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Sample records for factor-1 gene locus

  1. Hypermethylation of XIAP-associated factor 1, a putative tumor suppressor gene from the 17p13.2 locus, in human gastric adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Byun, Do-Sun; Cho, Kyucheol; Ryu, Byung-Kyu; Lee, Min-Goo; Kang, Min-Ju; Kim, Hak-Ryul; Chi, Sung-Gil

    2003-11-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) is the most potent member of the IAP family that exerts antiapoptotic effects by interfering with the activities of caspases. Recently, XIAP-associated factor 1 (XAF1) and two mitochondrial proteins, Smac/DIABLO and HtrA2, have been identified to negatively regulate the caspase-inhibiting activity of XIAP. To explore the candidacy of XAF1, Smac/DIABLO, and HtrA2 as a tumor suppressor in gastric tumorigenesis, we investigated the expression and mutation status of the genes in 123 gastric tissues and 15 cancer cell lines. Whereas Smac/DIABLO and HtrA2 transcripts were normally expressed in all cancer specimens we examined, XAF1 transcript was not expressed or present at extremely low levels in 40% (6 of 15) of cancer cell lines and in 23% (20 of 87) of primary carcinomas. Abnormal reduction of XAF1 expression showed a strong correlation with stage and grade of tumors, and a tumor-specific down-regulation of XAF1 was observed in 45% (9 of 20) of matched sets. Unlike XAF1, XIAP expression exhibited no detectable alteration in cancers. Whereas loss of heterozygosity within the XAF1 region or somatic mutations of the gene was not detected, expression of XAF1 transcript was reactivated in all nonexpressor cell lines after 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine treatment. The 5' upstream region of the XAF1 gene encompasses no gastric cell-rich region that rigorously satisfies the formal criteria for CpG islands. However, bisulfite DNA sequencing analysis for 34 CpG sites in the promoter region revealed a strong association between hypermethylation and gene silencing. Moreover, transcriptional silencing of XAF1 was tightly associated with hypermethylation of seven CpGs located in the 5' proximal region (nucleotides -23 to -234). Additionally, loss or abnormal reduction of XAF1 expression was found to inversely correlate with p53 mutations, suggesting that epigenetic inactivation of XAF1 and mutational alteration of p53 might be mutually exclusive

  2. Targeted genes and interacting proteins of hypoxia inducible factor-1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Shen, Shao-Ming; Zhao, Xu-Yun; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Heterodimeric transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) functions as a master regulator of oxygen homeostasis in almost all nucleated mammalian cells. The fundamental process adapted to cellular oxygen alteration largely depends on the refined regulation on its alpha subunit, HIF-1α. Recent studies have unraveled expanding and critical roles of HIF-1α, involving in a multitude of developmental, physiological, and pathophysiological processes. This review will focus on the current knowledge of HIF-1α-targeting genes and its interacting proteins, as well as the concomitant functional relationships between them. PMID:22773957

  3. Integration of the BALB/c ecotropic provirus into the colony-stimulating factor-1 growth factor locus in a myc retrovirus-induced murine monocyte tumor.

    PubMed

    Baumbach, W R; Colston, E M; Cole, M D

    1988-09-01

    The development of tumors is thought to be a multistage process that requires an unknown number of genetic or epigenetic changes in a single cell. We previously described a murine monocyte tumor which was induced by a helper-free c-myc retrovirus and which also contained a DNA rearrangement at the colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) locus. The CSF-1 gene rearrangement gave rise to high levels of growth factor production and autocrine growth, implicating this secondary event in tumorigenesis. This CSF-1 gene rearrangement was found to be the result of integration of the BALB/c ecotropic retrovirus. Restriction enzyme mapping and DNA sequence analysis demonstrated that the novel provirus is identical to the BALB/c endogenous ecotropic provirus, indicating that infection was probably not due to the creation of a recombinant virus in vivo. The proviral integration site was mapped 3 kilobases 5' of the CSF-1 promoter and in an opposite transcriptional orientation, indicating that activation of CSF-1 expression was the result of the presence of the retroviral enhancer element. PMID:3261346

  4. Receptor protein kinase gene encoded at the self-incompatibility locus

    DOEpatents

    Nasrallah, June B.; Nasrallah, Mikhail E.; Stein, Joshua

    1996-01-01

    Described herein is a S receptor kinase gene (SRK), derived from the S locus in Brassica oleracea, having a extracellular domain highly similar to the secreted product of the S-locus glycoprotein gene.

  5. CUBN Is a Gene Locus for Albuminuria

    PubMed Central

    Böger, Carsten A.; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Olden, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna; de Boer, Ian H.; Fuchsberger, Christian; O'Seaghdha, Conall M.; Pattaro, Cristian; Teumer, Alexander; Liu, Ching-Ti; Glazer, Nicole L.; Li, Man; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peralta, Carmen A.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, Jian'an; Zhao, Jing Hua; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Akylbekova, Ermeg; Kramer, Holly; van der Harst, Pim; Smith, Albert V.; Lohman, Kurt; de Andrade, Mariza; Hayward, Caroline; Kollerits, Barbara; Tönjes, Anke; Aspelund, Thor; Ingelsson, Erik; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Launer, Lenore J.; Harris, Tamara B.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Arking, Dan E.; Franceschini, Nora; Boerwinkle, Eric; Egan, Josephine; Hernandez, Dena; Reilly, Muredach; Townsend, Raymond R.; Lumley, Thomas; Siscovick, David S.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Kestenbaum, Bryan; Haritunians, Talin; Bergmann, Sven; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Mooser, Vincent; Waterworth, Dawn; Johnson, Andrew D.; Florez, Jose C.; Meigs, James B.; Lu, Xiaoning; Turner, Stephen T.; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Leak, Tennille S.; Aasarød, Knut; Skorpen, Frank; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Illig, Thomas; Baumert, Jens; Koenig, Wolfgang; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Devuyst, Olivier; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Minelli, Cosetta; Bakker, Stephan J.L.; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Paulweber, Bernhard; Coassin, Stefan; Endlich, Karlhans; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Biffar, Reiner; Stracke, Sylvia; Völzke, Henry; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Campbell, Harry; Vitart, Veronique; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Liu, Yongmei; Polasek, Ozren; Curhan, Gary; Kronenberg, Florian; Prokopenko, Inga; Rudan, Igor; Ärnlöv, Johan; Hallan, Stein; Navis, Gerjan; Parsa, Afshin; Ferrucci, Luigi; Coresh, Josef; Shlipak, Michael G.; Bull, Shelley B.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Yang, Qiong; Heid, Iris M.; Rettig, Rainer; Dreisbach, Albert W.; Bochud, Murielle

    2011-01-01

    Identification of genetic risk factors for albuminuria may alter strategies for early prevention of CKD progression, particularly among patients with diabetes. Little is known about the influence of common genetic variants on albuminuria in both general and diabetic populations. We performed a meta-analysis of data from 63,153 individuals of European ancestry with genotype information from genome-wide association studies (CKDGen Consortium) and from a large candidate gene study (CARe Consortium) to identify susceptibility loci for the quantitative trait urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) and the clinical diagnosis microalbuminuria. We identified an association between a missense variant (I2984V) in the CUBN gene, which encodes cubilin, and both UACR (P = 1.1 × 10−11) and microalbuminuria (P = 0.001). We observed similar associations among 6981 African Americans in the CARe Consortium. The associations between this variant and both UACR and microalbuminuria were significant in individuals of European ancestry regardless of diabetes status. Finally, this variant associated with a 41% increased risk for the development of persistent microalbuminuria during 20 years of follow-up among 1304 participants with type 1 diabetes in the prospective DCCT/EDIC Study. In summary, we identified a missense CUBN variant that associates with levels of albuminuria in both the general population and in individuals with diabetes. PMID:21355061

  6. Asynchronous DNA replication within the human. beta. -globin gene locus

    SciTech Connect

    Epner, E.; Forrester, W.C.; Groudine, M. )

    1988-11-01

    The timing of DNA replication of the human {beta}-globin gene locus has been studied by blot hybridization of newly synthesized BrdUrd-substituted DNA from cells in different stages of the S phase. Using probes that span >120 kilobases across the human {beta}-globin gene locus, the authors show that the majority of this domain replicates in early S phase in the human erythroleukemia cell line K562 and in middle-to-late S phase in the lymphoid cell line Manca. However, in K562 cells three small regions display a strikingly different replication pattern than adjacent sequences. These islands, located in the inter-{gamma}-globin gene region and approximately 20 kilobases 5' to the {epsilon}-globin gene and 20 kilobases 3' to the {beta}-globin gene, replicate later and throughout S phase. A similar area is also present in the {alpha}-globin gene region in K562 cells. They suggest that these regions may represent sites of termination of replication forks.

  7. Interchromosomal gene conversion at an endogenous human cell locus.

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, P J; Neuwirth, E A; Grosovsky, A J

    2001-01-01

    To examine the relationship between gene conversion and reciprocal exchange at an endogenous chromosomal locus, we developed a reversion assay in a thymidine kinase deficient mutant, TX545, derived from the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6. Selectable revertants of TX545 can be generated through interchromosomal gene conversion at the site of inactivating mutations on each tk allele or by reciprocal exchange that alters the linkage relationships of inactivating polymorphisms within the tk locus. Analysis of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at intragenic polymorphisms and flanking microsatellite markers was used to initially evaluate allelotypes in TK(+) revertants for patterns associated with either gene conversion or crossing over. The linkage pattern in a subset of convertants was then unambiguously established, even in the event of prereplicative recombinational exchanges, by haplotype analysis of flanking microsatellite loci in tk(-/-) LOH mutants collected from the tk(+/-) parental convertant. Some (7/38; 18%) revertants were attributable to easily discriminated nonrecombinational mechanisms, including suppressor mutations within the tk coding sequence. However, all revertants classified as a recombinational event (28/38; 74%) were attributed to localized gene conversion, representing a highly significant preference (P < 0.0001) over gene conversion with associated reciprocal exchange, which was never observed. PMID:11404339

  8. CHARACTERIZATION AND GENE EXPRESSION OF BABESIA BOVIS ELONGATION FACTOR-1ALPHA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1') is a constitutively expressed, abundant protein that is a key element in eukaryotic protein translation. Because of its high level of transcription, the EF-1''promoter has been utilized to drive exogenous gene expression in transfected cells. In this study, we ident...

  9. The discovery of the microphthalmia locus and its gene, Mitf

    PubMed Central

    Arnheiter, Heinz

    2010-01-01

    Summary The history of the discovery of the microphthalmia locus and its gene, now called Mitf, is a testament to the triumph of serendipity. Although the first microphthalmia mutation was discovered among the descendants of a mouse that was irradiated for the purpose of mutagenesis, the mutation most likely was not radiation-induced but occurred spontaneously in one of the parents of a later breeding. Although Mitf might eventually have been identified by other molecular genetic techniques, it was first cloned from a chance transgene insertion at the microphthalmia locus. And although Mitf was found to encode a member of a well-known transcription factor family, its analysis might still be in its infancy had Mitf not turned out to be of crucial importance for the physiology and pathology of many distinct organs, including eye, ear, immune system, bone, and skin, and in particular for melanoma. In fact, near seven decades of Mitf research have led to many insights about development, function, degeneration, and malignancies of a number of specific cell types, and it is hoped that these insights will one day lead to therapies benefitting those afflicted with diseases originating in these cell types. PMID:20807369

  10. TNXB locus may be a candidate gene predisposing to schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wei, J; Hemmings, G P

    2004-02-15

    We report here on the detection of nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near to the NOTCH4 locus in the search for schizophrenia susceptibility genes in the class III region of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We totally analyzed 122 family trios recruited in the UK. The TDT analysis demonstrated that of the nine SNPs, three were associated with schizophrenia, including rs1009382 (P = 0.00047), rs204887 (P = 0.007), and rs8283 (P = 0.015). Both rs1009382 and rs204887 are present in the TNXB locus. The rs1009382 is a non-synonymous SNP located in exon 23 of the gene and its A to G base change causes a Glu2578Gly substitution. The goodness-of-fit test showed that genotypic distribution of rs1009382 was deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium due to homozygote excess in the patient group (P = 0.01), suggesting that a double dose of a genetic risk may be involved. Possibly, rs1009382 is a candidate SNP predisposing to a schizophrenic illness. Moreover, the test for linkage disequilibrium (LD) between paired SNPs showed that the nine SNPs studied may be in the same LD block with an unexpected pattern as the strength of LD was not correlated with the distance between paired SNPs. The haplotype analysis suggested that there might be more than one disease-related allele located in the class III region of the MHC, and that these alleles possibly confer either susceptibility or resistance to schizophrenia. PMID:14755442

  11. Locus heterogeneity disease genes encode proteins with high interconnectivity in the human protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Benjamin P.; Robertson, David L.; Hentges, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in genes potentially lead to a number of genetic diseases with differing severity. These disease genes have been the focus of research in recent years showing that the disease gene population as a whole is not homogeneous, and can be categorized according to their interactions. Locus heterogeneity describes a single disorder caused by mutations in different genes each acting individually to cause the same disease. Using datasets of experimentally derived human disease genes and protein interactions, we created a protein interaction network to investigate the relationships between the products of genes associated with a disease displaying locus heterogeneity, and use network parameters to suggest properties that distinguish these disease genes from the overall disease gene population. Through the manual curation of known causative genes of 100 diseases displaying locus heterogeneity and 397 single-gene Mendelian disorders, we use network parameters to show that our locus heterogeneity network displays distinct properties from the global disease network and a Mendelian network. Using the global human proteome, through random simulation of the network we show that heterogeneous genes display significant interconnectivity. Further topological analysis of this network revealed clustering of locus heterogeneity genes that cause identical disorders, indicating that these disease genes are involved in similar biological processes. We then use this information to suggest additional genes that may contribute to diseases with locus heterogeneity. PMID:25538735

  12. Recombination between elongation factor 1α genes from distantly related archaeal lineages

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Yuji; Susko, Edward; Roger, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) and lateral gene transfer are major processes in genome evolution. The combination of the two processes, HR between genes in different species, has been documented but is thought to be restricted to very similar sequences in relatively closely related organisms. Here we report two cases of interspecific HR in the gene encoding the core translational protein translation elongation factor 1α (EF-1α) between distantly related archaeal groups. Maximum-likelihood sliding window analyses indicate that a fragment of the EF-1α gene from the archaeal lineage represented by Methanopyrus kandleri was recombined into the orthologous gene in a common ancestor of the Thermococcales. A second recombination event appears to have occurred between the EF-1α gene of the genus Methanothermobacter and its ortholog in a common ancestor of the Methanosarcinales, a distantly related euryarchaeal lineage. These findings suggest that HR occurs across a much larger evolutionary distance than generally accepted and affects highly conserved essential “informational” genes. Although difficult to detect by standard whole-gene phylogenetic analyses, interspecific HR in highly conserved genes may occur at an appreciable frequency, potentially confounding deep phylogenetic inference and hypothesis testing. PMID:16537397

  13. Quantitative trait locus mapping of soybean maturity gene E5

    PubMed Central

    Dissanayaka, Auchithya; Rodriguez, Tito O.; Di, Shaokang; Yan, Fan; Githiri, Stephen M.; Rodas, Felipe Rojas; Abe, Jun; Takahashi, Ryoji

    2016-01-01

    Time to flowering and maturity in soybean is controlled by loci E1 to E5, and E7 to E9. These loci were assigned to molecular linkage groups (MLGs) except for E5. This study was conducted to map the E5 locus using F2 populations expected to segregate for E5. F2 populations were subjected to quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis for days to flowering (DF) and maturity (DM). In Harosoy-E5 × Clark-e2 population, QTLs for DF and DM were found at a similar position with E2. In Harosoy × Clark-e2E5 population, QTLs for DF and DM were found in MLG D1a and B1, respectively. In Harosoy-E5Dt2 × Clark-e2 population, a QTL for DF was found in MLG B1. Thus, results from these populations were not fully consistent, and no candidate QTL for E5 was found. In Harosoy × PI 80837 population, from which E5 was originally identified, QTLs corresponding to E1 and E3 were found, but none for E5 existed. Harosoy and PI 80837 had the e2-ns allele whereas Harosoy-E5 had the E2-dl allele. The E2-dl allele of Harosoy-E5 may have been generated by outcrossing and may be responsible for the lateness of Harosoy-E5. We conclude that a unique E5 gene may not exist. PMID:27436951

  14. Quantitative Trait Locus and Genetical Genomics Analysis Identifies Putatively Causal Genes for Fecundity and Brooding in the Chicken.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Martin; Jonsson, Kenneth B; Andersson, Leif; Jensen, Per; Wright, Dominic

    2016-02-01

    Life history traits such as fecundity are important to evolution because they make up components of lifetime fitness. Due to their polygenic architectures, such traits are difficult to investigate with genetic mapping. Therefore, little is known about their molecular basis. One possible way toward finding the underlying genes is to map intermediary molecular phenotypes, such as gene expression traits. We set out to map candidate quantitative trait genes for egg fecundity in the chicken by combining quantitative trait locus mapping in an advanced intercross of wild by domestic chickens with expression quantitative trait locus mapping in the same birds. We measured individual egg fecundity in 232 intercross chickens in two consecutive trials, the second one aimed at measuring brooding. We found 12 loci for different aspects of egg fecundity. We then combined the genomic confidence intervals of these loci with expression quantitative trait loci from bone and hypothalamus in the same intercross. Overlaps between egg loci and expression loci, and trait-gene expression correlations identify 29 candidates from bone and five from hypothalamus. The candidate quantitative trait genes include fibroblast growth factor 1, and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins L42 and L32. In summary, we found putative quantitative trait genes for egg traits in the chicken that may have been affected by regulatory variants under chicken domestication. These represent, to the best of our knowledge, some of the first candidate genes identified by genome-wide mapping for life history traits in an avian species. PMID:26637433

  15. Quantitative Trait Locus and Genetical Genomics Analysis Identifies Putatively Causal Genes for Fecundity and Brooding in the Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Johnsson, Martin; Jonsson, Kenneth B.; Andersson, Leif; Jensen, Per; Wright, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Life history traits such as fecundity are important to evolution because they make up components of lifetime fitness. Due to their polygenic architectures, such traits are difficult to investigate with genetic mapping. Therefore, little is known about their molecular basis. One possible way toward finding the underlying genes is to map intermediary molecular phenotypes, such as gene expression traits. We set out to map candidate quantitative trait genes for egg fecundity in the chicken by combining quantitative trait locus mapping in an advanced intercross of wild by domestic chickens with expression quantitative trait locus mapping in the same birds. We measured individual egg fecundity in 232 intercross chickens in two consecutive trials, the second one aimed at measuring brooding. We found 12 loci for different aspects of egg fecundity. We then combined the genomic confidence intervals of these loci with expression quantitative trait loci from bone and hypothalamus in the same intercross. Overlaps between egg loci and expression loci, and trait–gene expression correlations identify 29 candidates from bone and five from hypothalamus. The candidate quantitative trait genes include fibroblast growth factor 1, and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins L42 and L32. In summary, we found putative quantitative trait genes for egg traits in the chicken that may have been affected by regulatory variants under chicken domestication. These represent, to the best of our knowledge, some of the first candidate genes identified by genome-wide mapping for life history traits in an avian species. PMID:26637433

  16. Structure of the Catfish IGH Locus: Analysis of the Region Including the Single Functional IGHM Gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The catfish IGH locus is large (~1Mb) and complex, having undergone multiple internal duplications and transpositions. To define the structure of the locus that contains the single expressed IGHM gene, two overlapping bacterial-artificial-chromosome (BAC) clones spanning the most 3’ end of the chann...

  17. Genes for the dimerization cofactor of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1[alpha] (DCOH) are on human and murine chromsomes 10

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovich, A.; Mendel, D.B.; Crabtree, G.R.; Francke, U. )

    1993-04-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1[alpha] (HNF-1[alpha]; gene symbol, TCF1) forms dimers with itself as well as with HNF-1[beta] and regulates the expression of several liver-specific genes. Recently, a dimerization cofactor of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1[alpha], called DCOH, has been identified. Here, the authors report the chromosomal localization of the genes for this cofactor to chromosomes 10 in both humans and mice by Southern blot analyses of somatic cell hybrids. 25 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. Two forms of loops generate the chromatin conformation of the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene locus

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Changying; Gerasimova, Tatiana; Hao, Haiping; Ivanova, Irina; Chakraborty, Tirtha; Selimyan, Roza; Oltz, Eugene M.; Sen, Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) gene locus undergoes radial re-positioning within the nucleus and locus contraction in preparation for gene recombination. We demonstrate that IgH locus conformation involves two levels of chromosomal compaction. At the first level the locus folds into several multi-looped domains. One such domain at the 3′ end of the locus requires an enhancer, Eμ; two other domains at the 5′ end are Eμ-independent. At the second level, these domains are brought into spatial proximity by Eμ-dependent interactions with specific sites within the VH region. Eμ is also required for radial re-positioning of IgH alleles indicating its essential role in large scale chromosomal movements in developing lymphocytes. Our observations provide a comprehensive view of the conformation of IgH alleles in pro-B cells and the mechanisms by which it is established. PMID:21982154

  19. A gene locus for targeted ectopic gene integration in Zymoseptoria tritici.

    PubMed

    Kilaru, S; Schuster, M; Latz, M; Das Gupta, S; Steinberg, N; Fones, H; Gurr, S J; Talbot, N J; Steinberg, G

    2015-06-01

    Understanding the cellular organization and biology of fungal pathogens requires accurate methods for genomic integration of mutant alleles or fluorescent fusion-protein constructs. In Zymoseptoria tritici, this can be achieved by integrating of plasmid DNA randomly into the genome of this wheat pathogen. However, untargeted ectopic integration carries the risk of unwanted side effects, such as altered gene expression, due to targeting regulatory elements, or gene disruption following integration into protein-coding regions of the genome. Here, we establish the succinate dehydrogenase (sdi1) locus as a single "soft-landing" site for targeted ectopic integration of genetic constructs by using a carboxin-resistant sdi1(R) allele, carrying the point-mutation H267L. We use various green and red fluorescent fusion constructs and show that 97% of all transformants integrate correctly into the sdi1 locus as single copies. We also demonstrate that such integration does not affect the pathogenicity of Z. tritici, and thus the sdi1 locus is a useful tool for virulence analysis in genetically modified Z. tritici strains. Furthermore, we have developed a vector which facilitates yeast recombination cloning and thus allows assembly of multiple overlapping DNA fragments in a single cloning step for high throughput vector and strain generation. PMID:26092798

  20. Transcriptional regulation of the human TR2 orphan receptor gene by nuclear factor 1-A

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.-L.; Wang, Y.-H.; Lee, H.-J. . E-mail: hjlee@mail.ndhu.edu.tw

    2006-11-17

    The human testicular receptor 2 (TR2), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, has no identified ligand yet. Previous evidence demonstrated that a 63 bp DNA fragment, named the promoter activating cis-element (PACE), has been identified as a positive regulatory region in the 5' promoter region of the human TR2 gene. In the present report, the human nuclear factor 1-A (NF1-A) was identified as a transcriptional activator to recognize the center of the PACE, called the PACE-C. NF1-A could bind to the 18 bp PACE-C region, and enhance about 13- to 17-fold of the luciferase reporter gene activity via the PACE-C in dose-dependent and orientation-independent manners. This transcriptional activation was further confirmed by real-time RT-PCR assay. In conclusion, our results indicated that NF1-A transcription factor plays an important role in the transcriptional activation of the TR2 gene expression via the PACE-C in the minimal promoter region.

  1. Activation of vascular endothelial growth factor gene transcription by hypoxia-inducible factor 1.

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, J A; Jiang, B H; Iyer, N V; Agani, F; Leung, S W; Koos, R D; Semenza, G L

    1996-01-01

    Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is induced in cells exposed to hypoxia or ischemia. Neovascularization stimulated by VEGF occurs in several important clinical contexts, including myocardial ischemia, retinal disease, and tumor growth. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a heterodimeric basic helix-loop-helix protein that activates transcription of the human erythropoietin gene in hypoxic cells. Here we demonstrate the involvement of HIF-1 in the activation of VEGF transcription. VEGF 5'-flanking sequences mediated transcriptional activation of reporter gene expression in hypoxic Hep3B cells. A 47-bp sequence located 985 to 939 bp 5' to the VEGF transcription initiation site mediated hypoxia-inducible reporter gene expression directed by a simian virus 40 promoter element that was otherwise minimally responsive to hypoxia. When reporters containing VEGF sequences, in the context of the native VEGF or heterologous simian virus 40 promoter, were cotransfected with expression vectors encoding HIF-1alpha and HIF-1beta (ARNT [aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator]), reporter gene transcription was much greater in both hypoxic and nonhypoxic cells than in cells transfected with the reporter alone. A HIF-1 binding site was demonstrated in the 47-bp hypoxia response element, and a 3-bp substitution eliminated the ability of the element to bind HIF-1 and to activate transcription in response to hypoxia and/or recombinant HIF-1. Cotransfection of cells with an expression vector encoding a dominant negative form of HIF-1alpha inhibited the activation of reporter transcription in hypoxic cells in a dose-dependent manner. VEGF mRNA was not induced by hypoxia in mutant cells that do not express the HIF-1beta (ARNT) subunit. These findings implicate HIF-1 in the activation of VEGF transcription in hypoxic cells. PMID:8756616

  2. Differentiation-inducing factor-1 suppresses gene expression of cyclin D1 in tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yasmin, Tania; Takahashi-Yanaga, Fumi . E-mail: yanaga@clipharm.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Mori, Jun; Miwa, Yoshikazu; Hirata, Masato; Watanabe, Yutaka; Morimoto, Sachio; Sasaguri, Toshiyuki

    2005-12-16

    To determine the mechanism by which differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), a morphogen of Dictyostelium discoideum, inhibits tumor cell proliferation, we examined the effect of DIF-1 on the gene expression of cyclin D1. DIF-1 strongly reduced the expression of cyclin D1 mRNA and correspondingly decreased the amount of {beta}-catenin in HeLa cells and squamous cell carcinoma cells. DIF-1 activated glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) and inhibition of GSK-3{beta} attenuated the DIF-1-induced {beta}-catenin degradation, indicating the involvement of GSK-3{beta} in this effect. Moreover, DIF-1 reduced the activities of T-cell factor (TCF)/lymphoid enhancer factor (LEF) reporter plasmid and a reporter gene driven by the human cyclin D1 promoter. Eliminating the TCF/LEF consensus site from the cyclin D1 promoter diminished the effect of DIF-1. These results suggest that DIF-1 inhibits Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling, resulting in the suppression of cyclin D1 promoter activity.

  3. Polymorphisms of Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Pathway Genes and Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Joy; Aronson, Kristan J.; Grundy, Anne; Kobayashi, Lindsay C.; Burstyn, Igor; Schuetz, Johanna M.; Lohrisch, Caroline A.; SenGupta, Sandip K.; Lai, Agnes S.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Spinelli, John J.; Richardson, Harriet

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variants of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) pathway genes have been shown to be associated with breast density and IGF1 levels and, therefore, may also influence breast cancer risk via pro-survival signaling cascades. The aim of this study was to investigate associations between IGF1 pathway single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and breast cancer risk among European and East Asian women, and potential interactions with menopausal status and breast tumor subtype. Stratified analyses of 1,037 cases and 1,050 controls from a population-based case–control study were conducted to assess associations with breast cancer for 22 SNPs across 5 IGF1 pathway genes in European and East Asian women. Odds ratios were calculated using logistic regression in additive genetic models. Polytomous logistic regression was used to assess heterogeneity by breast tumor subtype. Two SNPs of the IGF1 gene (rs1019731 and rs12821878) were associated with breast cancer risk among European women. Four highly linked IGF1 SNPs (rs2288378, rs17727841, rs7136446, and rs7956547) were modified by menopausal status among East Asian women only and associated with postmenopausal breast cancers. The association between rs2288378 and breast cancer risk was also modified by breast tumor subtype among East Asian women. Several IGF1 polymorphisms were found to be associated with breast cancer risk and some of these associations were modified by menopausal status or breast tumor subtype. Such interactions should be considered when assessing the role of these variants in breast cancer etiology. PMID:27376028

  4. Polymorphisms of Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Pathway Genes and Breast Cancer Risk.

    PubMed

    Shi, Joy; Aronson, Kristan J; Grundy, Anne; Kobayashi, Lindsay C; Burstyn, Igor; Schuetz, Johanna M; Lohrisch, Caroline A; SenGupta, Sandip K; Lai, Agnes S; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Spinelli, John J; Richardson, Harriet

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variants of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) pathway genes have been shown to be associated with breast density and IGF1 levels and, therefore, may also influence breast cancer risk via pro-survival signaling cascades. The aim of this study was to investigate associations between IGF1 pathway single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and breast cancer risk among European and East Asian women, and potential interactions with menopausal status and breast tumor subtype. Stratified analyses of 1,037 cases and 1,050 controls from a population-based case-control study were conducted to assess associations with breast cancer for 22 SNPs across 5 IGF1 pathway genes in European and East Asian women. Odds ratios were calculated using logistic regression in additive genetic models. Polytomous logistic regression was used to assess heterogeneity by breast tumor subtype. Two SNPs of the IGF1 gene (rs1019731 and rs12821878) were associated with breast cancer risk among European women. Four highly linked IGF1 SNPs (rs2288378, rs17727841, rs7136446, and rs7956547) were modified by menopausal status among East Asian women only and associated with postmenopausal breast cancers. The association between rs2288378 and breast cancer risk was also modified by breast tumor subtype among East Asian women. Several IGF1 polymorphisms were found to be associated with breast cancer risk and some of these associations were modified by menopausal status or breast tumor subtype. Such interactions should be considered when assessing the role of these variants in breast cancer etiology. PMID:27376028

  5. The insulin-like growth factor-1 gene is associated with cerebral infarction in Japanese subjects.

    PubMed

    Aoi, Noriko; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Soma, Masayoshi; Kosuge, Kotoko; Haketa, Akira; Sato, Mikano; Sato, Naoyuki; Hinohara, Shigeaki; Doba, Nobutakh; Asai, Satoshi

    2012-10-01

    Atherosclerosis leads to cerebral infarction (CI) and the insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) signaling pathway plays an important role in this process during adult life. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the human IGF1 gene and CI in the Japanese population via a case-control study that also included a separate analysis of the two gender groups. A total of 155 CI patients and 316 controls were genotyped for six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the human IGF1 gene (rs2162679, rs7956547, rs2288378, rs2072592, rs978458 and rs6218). All data were analyzed for three separate groups: the total subjects, men and women. The logistic regression analysis revealed that the GG + AG variant of rs2162679 (P = 0.047), the AA + GA variant of rs2072592 (P = 0.005) and the CC + TC variant of rs6218 (P = 0.015) exhibited a protective effect for CI in the total subject group. For the women and the total subjects groups, the overall distribution of the haplotype established by rs7956547-rs978458 was significantly different between the CI patients and the non-CI subjects. For the total subjects, the frequency of the T-G haplotype (rs7956547-rs978458) was also significantly higher (P = 0.034), whereas the frequency of the T-A haplotype (rs7956547-rs978458) was significantly lower (P = 0.008) in the CI patients versus the non-CI subjects. For women, the frequency of the T-A haplotype (rs7956547-rs978458) was significantly lower (P = 0.021) in the CI patients as compared with the non-CI subjects. The specific SNPs and haplotypes can be utilized as genetic markers for CI resistance or CI risk. PMID:23121326

  6. Different Foreign Genes Incidentally Integrated into the Same Locus of the Streptococcus suis Genome

    PubMed Central

    Sekizaki, Tsutomu; Takamatsu, Daisuke; Osaki, Makoto; Shimoji, Yoshihiro

    2005-01-01

    Some strains of Streptococcus suis possess a type II restriction-modification (RM) system, whose genes are thought to be inserted into the genome between purH and purD from a foreign source by illegitimate recombination. In this study, we characterized the purHD locus of the S. suis genomes of 28 serotype reference strains by DNA sequencing. Four strains contained the RM genes in the locus, as described before, whereas 11 strains possessed other genetic regions of seven classes. The genetic regions contained a single gene or multiple genes that were either unknown or similar to hypothetical genes of other bacteria. The mutually exclusive localization of the genetic regions with the atypical G+C contents indicated that these regions were also acquired from foreign sources. No transposable element or long-repeat sequence was found in the neighboring regions. An alignment of the nucleotide sequences, including the RM gene regions, suggested that the foreign regions were integrated by illegitimate recombination via short stretches of nucleotide identity. By using a thermosensitive suicide plasmid, the RM genes were experimentally introduced into an S. suis strain that did not contain any foreign genes in that locus. Integration of the plasmid into the S. suis genome did not occur in the purHD locus but occurred at various chromosomal loci, where there were 2 to 10 bp of nucleotide identity between the chromosome and the plasmid. These results suggest that various foreign genes described here were incidentally integrated into the same locus of the S. suis genome. PMID:15659665

  7. Mining locus tags in PubMed Central to improve microbial gene annotation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The scientific literature contains millions of microbial gene identifiers within the full text and tables, but these annotations rarely get incorporated into public sequence databases. We propose to utilize the Open Access (OA) subset of PubMed Central (PMC) as a gene annotation database and have developed an R package called pmcXML to automatically mine and extract locus tags from full text, tables and supplements. Results We mined locus tags from 1835 OA publications in ten microbial genomes and extracted tags mentioned in 30,891 sentences in main text and 20,489 rows in tables. We identified locus tag pairs marking the start and end of a region such as an operon or genomic island and expanded these ranges to add another 13,043 tags. We also searched for locus tags in supplementary tables and publications outside the OA subset in Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243 for comparison. There were 168 publications containing 48,470 locus tags and 83% of mentions were from supplementary materials and 9% from publications outside the OA subset. Conclusions B. pseudomallei locus tags within the full text and tables of OA publications represent only a small fraction of the total mentions in the literature. For microbial genomes with very few functionally characterized proteins, the locus tags mentioned in supplementary tables and within ranges like genomic islands contain the majority of locus tags. Significantly, the functions in the R package provide access to additional resources in the OA subset that are not currently indexed or returned by searching PMC. PMID:24499370

  8. Challenges and solutions for gene identification in the presence of familial locus heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Atteeq U; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Drummond, Meghan C; Shahzad, Mohsin; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Morell, Robert J; Ansar, Muhammad; Jan, Abid; Wang, Xin; Aziz, Abdul; Riazuddin, Saima; Smith, Joshua D; Wang, Gao T; Ahmed, Zubair M; Gul, Khitab; Shearer, A Eliot; Smith, Richard J H; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Hinnant, John; Khan, Shaheen N; Fisher, Rachel A; Ahmad, Wasim; Friderici, Karen H; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Friedman, Thomas B; Wilch, Ellen S; Leal, Suzanne M

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) of exomes and genomes has accelerated the identification of genes involved in Mendelian phenotypes. However, many NGS studies fall short of identifying causal variants, with estimates for success rates as low as 25% for uncovering the pathological variant underlying disease etiology. An important reason for such failures is familial locus heterogeneity, where within a single pedigree causal variants in two or more genes underlie Mendelian trait etiology. As examples of intra- and inter-sibship familial locus heterogeneity, we present 10 consanguineous Pakistani families segregating hearing impairment due to homozygous variants in two different hearing impairment genes and a European-American pedigree in which hearing impairment is caused by four variants in three different genes. We have identified 41 additional pedigrees with syndromic and nonsyndromic hearing impairment for which a single previously reported hearing impairment gene has been identified but only segregates with the phenotype in a subset of affected pedigree members. We estimate that locus heterogeneity occurs in 15.3% (95% confidence interval: 11.9%, 19.9%) of the families in our collection. We demonstrate novel approaches to apply linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping (for autosomal recessive consanguineous pedigrees), which can be used to detect locus heterogeneity using either NGS or SNP array data. Results from linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping can also be used to group sibships or individuals most likely to be segregating the same causal variants and thereby increase the success rate of gene identification. PMID:25491636

  9. Challenges and solutions for gene identification in the presence of familial locus heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Atteeq U; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Drummond, Meghan C; Shahzad, Mohsin; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Morell, Robert J; Ansar, Muhammad; Jan, Abid; Wang, Xin; Aziz, Abdul; Riazuddin, Saima; Smith, Joshua D; Wang, Gao T; Ahmed, Zubair M; Gul, Khitab; Shearer, A Eliot; Smith, Richard J H; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Hinnant, John; Khan, Shaheen N; Fisher, Rachel A; Ahmad, Wasim; Friderici, Karen H; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Friedman, Thomas B; Wilch, Ellen S; Leal, Suzanne M

    2015-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) of exomes and genomes has accelerated the identification of genes involved in Mendelian phenotypes. However, many NGS studies fall short of identifying causal variants, with estimates for success rates as low as 25% for uncovering the pathological variant underlying disease etiology. An important reason for such failures is familial locus heterogeneity, where within a single pedigree causal variants in two or more genes underlie Mendelian trait etiology. As examples of intra- and inter-sibship familial locus heterogeneity, we present 10 consanguineous Pakistani families segregating hearing impairment due to homozygous variants in two different hearing impairment genes and a European-American pedigree in which hearing impairment is caused by four variants in three different genes. We have identified 41 additional pedigrees with syndromic and nonsyndromic hearing impairment for which a single previously reported hearing impairment gene has been identified but only segregates with the phenotype in a subset of affected pedigree members. We estimate that locus heterogeneity occurs in 15.3% (95% confidence interval: 11.9%, 19.9%) of the families in our collection. We demonstrate novel approaches to apply linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping (for autosomal recessive consanguineous pedigrees), which can be used to detect locus heterogeneity using either NGS or SNP array data. Results from linkage analysis and homozygosity mapping can also be used to group sibships or individuals most likely to be segregating the same causal variants and thereby increase the success rate of gene identification. PMID:25491636

  10. THE EPENDYMAL ROUTE FOR INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR-1 GENE THERAPY IN THE BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Hereñú, Claudia B.; Sonntag, William E.; Morel, Gustavo R.; Portiansky, Enrique L.; Goya, Rodolfo G.

    2009-01-01

    Intracerebroventricular administration of the peptide insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) has been shown to be an effective neuroprotective strategy in the brain of different animal models, a major advantage being the achievement of high concentrations of IGF-1 in the brain without altering serum levels of the peptide. In order to exploit this therapeutic approach further, we used high performance recombinant adenoviral (RAd) vectors expressing their transgene under the control of the potent mouse cytomegalovirus immediate early (mCMV) promoter, to transduce brain ependymal cells with high efficiency and to achieve effective release of transgenic IGF-1 into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We constructed RAd vectors expressing either the chimeric protein (TK/GFP)fus (green fluorescent protein fused to HSV1 thymidine kinase) or the cDNA encoding rat IGF-1, both driven by the mCMV promoter. The vectors were injected into the lateral ventricles of young rats and chimeric GFP expression in brain sections was assessed by fluorescence microscopy. The ependymal cell marker vimentin was detected by immunofluorescence and nuclei were labeled with the DNA dye DAPI. Blood and CSF samples were drawn at different times post vector injection. In all cerebral ventricles, vimentin immunoreactive cells of the ependyma were predominantly transduced by RAd-(TK/GFP)fus, showing nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of the transgene. For tanycytes (TK/GFP)fus expression was evident in their cytoplasmic processes as they penetrated deep into the hypothalamic parenchyma. Intracerebroventricular injection of RAd-IGF-1 induced high levels of IGF-1 in the CSF but not in serum. We conclude that the ependymal route constitutes an effective approach for implementing experimental IGF-1 gene therapy in the brain. PMID:19531373

  11. Early B-cell factor 1 (EBF1) is critical for transcriptional control of SLAMF1 gene in human B cells.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Anton M; Putlyaeva, Lidia V; Covich, Milica; Klepikova, Anna V; Akulich, Kseniya A; Vorontsov, Ilya E; Korneev, Kirill V; Dmitriev, Sergey E; Polanovsky, Oleg L; Sidorenko, Svetlana P; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Kuprash, Dmitry V

    2016-10-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family member 1 (SLAMF1)/CD150 is a co-stimulatory receptor expressed on a variety of hematopoietic cells, in particular on mature lymphocytes activated by specific antigen, costimulation and cytokines. Changes in CD150 expression level have been reported in association with autoimmunity and with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. We characterized the core promoter for SLAMF1 gene in human B-cell lines and explored binding sites for a number of transcription factors involved in B cell differentiation and activation. Mutations of SP1, STAT6, IRF4, NF-kB, ELF1, TCF3, and SPI1/PU.1 sites resulted in significantly decreased promoter activity of varying magnitude, depending on the cell line tested. The most profound effect on the promoter strength was observed upon mutation of the binding site for Early B-cell factor 1 (EBF1). This mutation produced a 10-20 fold drop in promoter activity and pinpointed EBF1 as the master regulator of human SLAMF1 gene in B cells. We also identified three potent transcriptional enhancers in human SLAMF1 locus, each containing functional EBF1 binding sites. Thus, EBF1 interacts with specific binding sites located both in the promoter and in the enhancer regions of the SLAMF1 gene and is critical for its expression in human B cells. PMID:27424222

  12. EFFECTS OF HEAT AND BROMOCHLOROACETIC ACID ON MALE REPRODUCTION IN HEAT SHOCK FACTOR-1 GENE KNOCKOUT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of heat and bromochloroacetic acid on male reproduction in heat shock factor-1 gene knockout mice.
    Luft JC1, IJ Benjamin2, JB Garges1 and DJ Dix1. 1Reproductive Toxicology Division, USEPA, RTP, NC, 27711 and 2Dept of Internal Medicine, Univ.of Texas Southwestern Med C...

  13. Analysis of mammary specific gene locus regulation in differentiated cells derived by somatic cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Claire; Kolb, Andreas F.

    2009-02-01

    The transcriptional regulation of a gene is best analysed in the context of its normal chromatin surroundings. However, most somatic cells, in contrast to embryonic stem cells, are refractory to accurate modification by homologous recombination. We show here that it is possible to introduce precise genomic modifications in ES cells and to analyse the phenotypic consequences in differentiated cells by using a combination of gene targeting, site-specific recombination and somatic cell fusion. To provide a proof of principle, we have analysed the regulation of the casein gene locus in mammary gland cells derived from modified murine ES cells by somatic cell fusion. A {beta}-galactosidase reporter gene was inserted in place of the {beta}-casein gene and the modified ES cells, which do not express the reporter gene, were fused with the mouse mammary gland cell line HC11. The resulting cell clones expressed the {beta}-galactosidase gene to a similar extent and with similar hormone responsiveness as the endogenous gene. However, a reporter gene under the control of a minimal {beta}-casein promoter (encompassing the two consensus STAT5 binding sites which mediate the hormone response of the casein genes) was unable to replicate expression levels or hormone responsiveness of the endogenous gene when inserted into the same site of the casein locus. As expected, these results implicate sequences other than the STAT5 sites in the regulation of the {beta}-casein gene.

  14. Genomic analysis reveals extensive gene duplication within the bovine TRB locus

    PubMed Central

    Connelley, Timothy; Aerts, Jan; Law, Andy; Morrison, W Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Background Diverse TR and IG repertoires are generated by V(D)J somatic recombination. Genomic studies have been pivotal in cataloguing the V, D, J and C genes present in the various TR/IG loci and describing how duplication events have expanded the number of these genes. Such studies have also provided insights into the evolution of these loci and the complex mechanisms that regulate TR/IG expression. In this study we analyze the sequence of the third bovine genome assembly to characterize the germline repertoire of bovine TRB genes and compare the organization, evolution and regulatory structure of the bovine TRB locus with that of humans and mice. Results The TRB locus in the third bovine genome assembly is distributed over 5 scaffolds, extending to ~730 Kb. The available sequence contains 134 TRBV genes, assigned to 24 subgroups, and 3 clusters of DJC genes, each comprising a single TRBD gene, 5–7 TRBJ genes and a single TRBC gene. Seventy-nine of the TRBV genes are predicted to be functional. Comparison with the human and murine TRB loci shows that the gene order, as well as the sequences of non-coding elements that regulate TRB expression, are highly conserved in the bovine. Dot-plot analyses demonstrate that expansion of the genomic TRBV repertoire has occurred via a complex and extensive series of duplications, predominantly involving DNA blocks containing multiple genes. These duplication events have resulted in massive expansion of several TRBV subgroups, most notably TRBV6, 9 and 21 which contain 40, 35 and 16 members respectively. Similarly, duplication has lead to the generation of a third DJC cluster. Analyses of cDNA data confirms the diversity of the TRBV genes and, in addition, identifies a substantial number of TRBV genes, predominantly from the larger subgroups, which are still absent from the genome assembly. The observed gene duplication within the bovine TRB locus has created a repertoire of phylogenetically diverse functional TRBV genes

  15. Gene arrangement at the Rhesus blood group locus of chimpanzees detected by fiber-FISH.

    PubMed

    Suto, Y; Ishikawa, Y; Hyodo, H; Ishida, T; Kasai, F; Tanoue, T; Hayasaka, I; Uchikawa, M; Juji, T; Hirai, M

    2003-01-01

    The Rhesus (Rh) blood group system in humans is encoded by two genes with high sequence homology. These two genes, namely, RHCE and RHD, have been implied to be duplicated during evolution. However, the genomic organization of Rh genes in chimpanzees and other nonhuman primates has not been precisely studied. We analyzed the arrangement of the Rh genes of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) by two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization on chromatin DNA fibers (fiber-FISH) using two genomic DNA probes that respectively contain introns 3 and 7 of human RH genes. Among the five chimpanzees studied, three were found to be homozygous for the two-Rh-gene type, in an arrangement of Rh (5'-->3') - Rh (3'<--5'). Although a similar gene arrangement can be detected in the RH gene locus of typical Rh-positive humans, the distance between the two genes in chimpanzees was about 50 kb longer than that in humans. The remaining two chimpanzees were homozygous for a four-Rh-gene type, in an arrangement of Rh (5'-->3') - Rh (3'<--5') - Rh (3'<--5') - Rh (3'<--5') within a region spanning about 300 kb. This four-Rh-gene type has not been detected in humans. Further analysis of other great apes showed different gene arrangements: a bonobo was homozygous for the three-Rh-gene type; a gorilla was heterozygous for the one-Rh- and two-Rh-gene types; an orangutan was homozygous for the one-Rh-gene type. Our findings on the intra- and interspecific genomic variations in the Rh gene locus in Hominoids would shed further light on reconstructing the genomic pathways of Rh gene duplication during evolution. PMID:14610358

  16. Structure and evolution of the mouse pregnancy-specific glycoprotein (Psg) gene locus

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Andrew S; Fischer, Beate; Dveksler, Gabriela; Hori, Tomomi; Wynne, Freda; Ball, Melanie; Okumura, Katsuzumi; Moore, Tom; Zimmermann, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Background The pregnancy-specific glycoprotein (Psg) genes encode proteins of unknown function, and are members of the carcinoembryonic antigen (Cea) gene family, which is a member of the immunoglobulin gene (Ig) superfamily. In rodents and primates, but not in artiodactyls (even-toed ungulates / hoofed mammals), there have been independent expansions of the Psg gene family, with all members expressed exclusively in placental trophoblast cells. For the mouse Psg genes, we sought to determine the genomic organisation of the locus, the expression profiles of the various family members, and the evolution of exon structure, to attempt to reconstruct the evolutionary history of this locus, and to determine whether expansion of the gene family has been driven by selection for increased gene dosage, or diversification of function. Results We collated the mouse Psg gene sequences currently in the public genome and expressed-sequence tag (EST) databases and used systematic BLAST searches to generate complete sequences for all known mouse Psg genes. We identified a novel family member, Psg31, which is similar to Psg30 but, uniquely amongst mouse Psg genes, has a duplicated N1 domain. We also identified a novel splice variant of Psg16 (bCEA). We show that Psg24 and Psg30 / Psg31 have independently undergone expansion of N-domain number. By mapping BAC, YAC and cosmid clones we described two clusters of Psg genes, which we linked and oriented using fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH). Comparison of our Psg locus map with the public mouse genome database indicates good agreement in overall structure and further elucidates gene order. Expression levels of Psg genes in placentas of different developmental stages revealed dramatic differences in the developmental expression profile of individual family members. Conclusion We have combined existing information, and provide new information concerning the evolution of mouse Psg exon organization, the mouse Psg genomic locus

  17. Locus of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin A gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hanne, L F; Howe, T R; Iglewski, B H

    1983-01-01

    The gene for Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin A has been mapped in the late region of the chromosome of strain PAO. Strain PAO-PR1, which produces parental levels of toxin A antigen that is enzymatically inactive and nontoxic, was used as the donor for R68.45 plasmid-mediated genetic exchange. Strain PAO-PR1 (toxA1) was mated with toxin A-producing strains, and exconjugates for selected prototrophic markers were tested for the transfer of toxA1. The toxA1 gene was located between cnu-9001 and pur-67 at approximately 85 min on the PAO chromosome. PMID:6403508

  18. Mining Disease-Resistance Genes in Roses: Functional and Molecular Characterization of the Rdr1 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Terefe-Ayana, Diro; Yasmin, Aneela; Le, Thanh Loan; Kaufmann, Helgard; Biber, Anja; Kühr, Astrid; Linde, Marcus; Debener, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of roses with the leaf spot pathogen Diplocarpon rosae (the cause of black spot on roses) is an interesting pathosystem because it involves a long-lived woody perennial, with life history traits very different from most model plants, and a hemibiotrophic pathogen with moderate levels of gene flow. Here we present data on the molecular structure of the first monogenic dominant resistance gene from roses, Rdr1, directed against one isolate of D. rosae. Complete sequencing of the locus carrying the Rdr1 gene resulted in a sequence of 265,477 bp with a cluster of nine highly related TIR–NBS–LRR (TNL) candidate genes. After sequencing revealed candidate genes for Rdr1, we implemented a gene expression analysis and selected five genes out of the nine TNLs. We then silenced the whole TNL gene family using RNAi (Rdr1–RNAi) constructed from the most conserved sequence region and demonstrated a loss of resistance in the normally resistant genotype. To identify the functional TNL gene, we further screened the five TNL candidate genes with a transient leaf infiltration assay. The transient expression assay indicated a single TNL gene (muRdr1H), partially restoring resistance in the susceptible genotype. Rdr1 was found to localize within the muRdr1 gene family; the genes within this locus contain characteristic motifs of active TNL genes and belong to a young cluster of R genes. The transient leaf assay can be used to further analyze the rose black spot interaction and its evolution, extending the analyses to additional R genes and to additional pathogenic types of the pathogen. PMID:22639591

  19. Direct visualization of the highly polymorphic RNU2 locus in proximity to the BRCA1 gene.

    PubMed

    Tessereau, Chloé; Buisson, Monique; Monnet, Nastasia; Imbert, Marine; Barjhoux, Laure; Schluth-Bolard, Caroline; Sanlaville, Damien; Conseiller, Emmanuel; Ceppi, Maurizio; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Mazoyer, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Although the breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 is one of the most extensively characterized genetic loci, much less is known about its upstream variable number tandem repeat element, the RNU2 locus. RNU2 encodes the U2 small nuclear RNA, an essential splicing element, but this locus is missing from the human genome assembly due to the inherent difficulty in the assembly of repetitive sequences. To fill the gap between RNU2 and BRCA1, we have reconstructed the physical map of this region by re-examining genomic clone sequences of public databases, which allowed us to precisely localize the RNU2 array 124 kb telomeric to BRCA1. We measured by performing FISH analyses on combed DNA for the first time the exact number of repeats carried by each of the two alleles in 41 individuals and found a range of 6-82 copies and a level of heterozygosity of 98%. The precise localisation of the RNU2 locus in the genome reference assembly and the implementation of a new technical tool to study it will make the detailed exploration of this locus possible. This recently neglected macrosatellite could be valuable for evaluating the potential role of structural variations in disease due to its location next to a major cancer susceptibility gene. PMID:24146815

  20. The cauliflower Orange gene enhances petiole elongation by suppressing expression of eukaryotic release factor 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cauliflower Or gene affects plant growth and development in addition to conferring beta-carotene accumulation. This study was undertaken to investigate the molecular basis of the Or gene mutation in controlling plant growth. The OR protein was found to interact with cauliflower and Arabidopsis e...

  1. Non-Locus-Specific Polygenes Giving Responses to Selection for Gene Conversion Frequencies in Ascobolus Immersus

    PubMed Central

    Zwolinski, S. A.; Lamb, B. C.

    1995-01-01

    Selection for higher and lower meiotic conversion frequencies was investigated in the fungus Ascobolus immersus. Strains carrying the same known gene conversion control factors, which have major effects on conversion frequencies at their specific target locus, sometimes gave significant differences in conversion frequency. Selection for high or low conversion frequencies at the w1-78 site was practiced for five generations, giving significant responses in both directions. These responses were due to polygenes, or genes of minor effect, not to new conversion control factors of major effect. Crosses of selected strains to strains with other mutations showed that the genes' effects were not specific to w1-78, but could affect conversion frequencies of another mutation, w1-3C1, at that locus and of two other loci, w-BHj and w9, which are unlinked to w1 or to each other. The proportional changes in gene conversion frequency due to selection varied according to the locus and site involved and according to the conversion control factor alleles present. There were differences of >/=277% in conversion frequency between ``high'' and ``low'' strains. Selection for conversion frequency had little effect on other features of conversion, such as the frequency of postmeiotic segregation or the relative frequencies of conversion to mutant or wild type. PMID:7498769

  2. The nuclear elongation factor-1α gene: a promising marker for phylogenetic studies of Triatominae (Hemiptera: Reduviidae).

    PubMed

    Díaz, Sebastián; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Gómez-Palacio, Andrés

    2016-09-01

    Molecular systematics is a remarkable approach for understanding the taxonomic traits and allows the exploration of the inter-population dynamics of several species in the Triatominae subfamily that are involved in Trypanosoma cruzi transmission. Compared to other relevant species that transmit vector-borne diseases, such as some species of the Diptera, there are relatively few nuclear genetic markers available for systematic studies in the Triatominae subfamily. Molecular systematic studies performed on Triatominae are based on mitochondrial gene fragments and, less frequently, on nuclear ribosomal genes or spacers. Due to the fact that these markers can occasionally present problems such as nuclear mitochondrial genes (NUMTs) or intra-genomic variation for high gene copy numbers, it is necessary to use additional nuclear markers to more reliably address the molecular evolution of Triatominae. In this study, we performed phylogenetic analysis using the nuclear elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1α) gene in individuals from 12 species belonging to the Triatomini and Rhodniini tribes. Genetic diversities and phylogenetic topologies were compared with those obtained for the mitochondrial 16S rRNA and Cytochrome b (cyt b) genes, as well as for the D2 variable region of the ribosomal 28S rRNA gene. These results indicate that the EF-1α marker exhibits an intermediate level of diversity compared to mitochondrial and nuclear ribosomal genes, and that phylogenetic analysis based on EF-1α is highly informative for resolving deep phylogenetic relationships in Triatominae, such as tribe or genera. PMID:27268149

  3. The MAT Locus Genes Play Different Roles in Sexual Reproduction and Pathogenesis in Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Juanyu; Zhang; Ma, Jiwen; Wu, Zhongshou; Wang, Guanghui; Wang, Chenfang; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Sexual reproduction plays a critical role in the infection cycle of Fusarium graminearum because ascospores are the primary inoculum. As a homothallic ascomycete, F. graminearum contains both the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2-1 loci in the genome. To better understand their functions and regulations in sexual reproduction and pathogenesis, in this study we assayed the expression, interactions, and mutant phenotypes of individual MAT locus genes. Whereas the expression of MAT1-1-1 and MAT12-1 rapidly increased after perithecial induction and began to decline after 1 day post-perithecial induction (dpi), the expression of MAT1-1-2 and MAT1-1-3 peaked at 4 dpi. MAT1-1-2 and MAT1-1-3 had a similar expression profile and likely are controlled by a bidirectional promoter. Although none of the MAT locus genes were essential for perithecium formation, all of them were required for ascosporogenesis in self-crosses. In outcrosses, the mat11-1-2 and mat11-1-3 mutants were fertile but the mat1-1-1 and mat1-2-1 mutants displayed male- and female-specific defects, respectively. The mat1-2-1 mutant was reduced in FgSO expression and hyphal fusion. Mat1-1-2 interacted with all other MAT locus transcription factors, suggesting that they may form a protein complex during sexual reproduction. Mat1-1-1 also interacted with FgMcm1, which may play a role in controlling cell identity and sexual development. Interestingly, the mat1-1-1 and mat1-2-1 mutants were reduced in virulence in corn stalk rot assays although none of the MAT locus genes was important for wheat infection. The MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 genes may play a host-specific role in colonization of corn stalks. PMID:23826182

  4. The MAT locus genes play different roles in sexual reproduction and pathogenesis in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qian; Hou, Rui; Juanyu; Zhang; Ma, Jiwen; Wu, Zhongshou; Wang, Guanghui; Wang, Chenfang; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Sexual reproduction plays a critical role in the infection cycle of Fusarium graminearum because ascospores are the primary inoculum. As a homothallic ascomycete, F. graminearum contains both the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2-1 loci in the genome. To better understand their functions and regulations in sexual reproduction and pathogenesis, in this study we assayed the expression, interactions, and mutant phenotypes of individual MAT locus genes. Whereas the expression of MAT1-1-1 and MAT12-1 rapidly increased after perithecial induction and began to decline after 1 day post-perithecial induction (dpi), the expression of MAT1-1-2 and MAT1-1-3 peaked at 4 dpi. MAT1-1-2 and MAT1-1-3 had a similar expression profile and likely are controlled by a bidirectional promoter. Although none of the MAT locus genes were essential for perithecium formation, all of them were required for ascosporogenesis in self-crosses. In outcrosses, the mat11-1-2 and mat11-1-3 mutants were fertile but the mat1-1-1 and mat1-2-1 mutants displayed male- and female-specific defects, respectively. The mat1-2-1 mutant was reduced in FgSO expression and hyphal fusion. Mat1-1-2 interacted with all other MAT locus transcription factors, suggesting that they may form a protein complex during sexual reproduction. Mat1-1-1 also interacted with FgMcm1, which may play a role in controlling cell identity and sexual development. Interestingly, the mat1-1-1 and mat1-2-1 mutants were reduced in virulence in corn stalk rot assays although none of the MAT locus genes was important for wheat infection. The MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1 genes may play a host-specific role in colonization of corn stalks. PMID:23826182

  5. Schizophrenia susceptibility gene locus at Xp22.3.

    PubMed

    Milunsky, J; Huang, X L; Wyandt, H E; Milunsky, A

    1999-06-01

    Multiple genetic loci have been implicated in the search for schizophrenia susceptibility genes, none having been proven as causal. Genetic heterogeneity is probable in the polygenic etiology of schizophrenia. We report on two unrelated Caucasian women with paranoid schizophrenia (meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM IV) criteria) who have an Xp22.3 overlapping deletion characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Patient 1 was previously reported by us (Wyandt HE, Bugeau-Michaud L, Skare JC, Milunsky A. Partial duplication of Xp: a case report and review of previously reported cases. Amer J Med Genet 1991: 40: 280-283) to have a de novo partial duplication of Xp. At that time, she was a 24-year-old woman with short stature, irregular menses, other abnormalities suggestive of Turner syndrome, and paranoid schizophrenia. Recently, FISH analysis demonstrated that she has an inverted duplication (X)(p22.1p11.2) and a microscopic deletion (X)(p22.2p22.3) between DXS1233 and DXS7108 spanning approximately 16-18 cM. Patient 2 is a 14-year-old girl with short stature, learning disabilities, and paranoid schizophrenia. High-resolution chromosome analysis revealed a de novo deletion involving Xp22. FISH analysis showed that the deletion (X)(p22.2p22.3) spanned 10-12 cM between AFMB290XG5 and DXS1060. Given that deletions of Xp22 are not common events, the occurrence of two unrelated schizophrenia patients with an overlapping deletion of this region would be extraordinarily rare. Hence, the deletion within Xp22.3 almost certainly contains a gene involved in the pathogenesis of paranoid schizophrenia. PMID:10450863

  6. The mouse lysosomal membrane protein 1 gene as a candidate for the motorneuron degeneration (mnd) locus

    SciTech Connect

    Bermingham, N.A.; Martin, J.E.; Fisher, E.M.C.

    1996-03-01

    The motorneuron degeneration (mnd) mutation causes one of the few late-onset progressive neurodegenerations in mice; therefore, the mnd mouse is a valuable paradigm for studying neurodegenerative biology. The mnd mutation may also model human neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) or Batten disease. Mnd maps to the centromeric region of mouse chromosome 8, which likely corresponds to portions of human chromosomes 13,8, or 19; we note that the chromosome 13 portion maps close to a region thought to contain the human Type V NCL locus. We have identified candidate genes for the mnd locus from human chromosomes 13, 8, and 19, and we are mapping these genes in the mouse to determine their proximity to the mutated locus and to refine the comparative human-mouse map in this area. A candidate gene from human chromosome 13 is LAMP1, which encodes lysosomal membrane protein 1. We found that Lamp1 in the mouse lies within the region of the mnd mutation. Therefore, we sequenced Lamp1 cDNAs from homozygous mnd mice and unrelated wildtype C57BL/6 mice. We find no differences between the two cDNA species in the regions examined, and expression analysis shows a similar LAMP1 protein distribution in wildtype and mutant mice, suggesting that an abnormal accumulation of material within normal lysosome structures is unlikely to be the pathogenetic mechanism in the mnd mouse. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Abiotic and biotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis overexpressing the multiprotein bridging factor 1a (MBF1a) transcriptional coactivator gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Jung; Lim, Gah-Hyun; Kim, Eun-Seon; Ko, Chang-Beom; Yang, Kwang-Yeol; Jeong, Jin-An; Lee, Myung-Chul; Kim, Cheol Soo

    2007-03-01

    We conducted a genetic yeast screen to identify salt tolerance (SAT) genes in a maize kernel cDNA library. During the screening, we identified a maize clone (SAT41) that seemed to confer elevated salt tolerance in comparison to control cells. SAT41 cDNA encodes a 16-kDa protein which is 82.4% identical to the Arabidopsis Multiprotein bridging factor 1a (MBF1a) transcriptional coactivator gene. To further examine salinity tolerance in Arabidopsis, we functionally characterized the MBF1a gene and found that dehydration as well as heightened glucose (Glc) induced MBF1a expression. Constitutive expression of MBF1a in Arabidopsis led to elevated salt tolerance in transgenic lines. Interestingly, plants overexpressing MBF1a exhibited insensitivity to Glc and resistance to fungal disease. Our results suggest that MBF1a is involved in stress tolerance as well as in ethylene and Glc signaling in Arabidopsis. PMID:17234157

  8. SimPhy: Phylogenomic Simulation of Gene, Locus, and Species Trees

    PubMed Central

    Mallo, Diego; De Oliveira Martins, Leonardo; Posada, David

    2016-01-01

    We present a fast and flexible software package—SimPhy—for the simulation of multiple gene families evolving under incomplete lineage sorting, gene duplication and loss, horizontal gene transfer—all three potentially leading to species tree/gene tree discordance—and gene conversion. SimPhy implements a hierarchical phylogenetic model in which the evolution of species, locus, and gene trees is governed by global and local parameters (e.g., genome-wide, species-specific, locus-specific), that can be fixed or be sampled from a priori statistical distributions. SimPhy also incorporates comprehensive models of substitution rate variation among lineages (uncorrelated relaxed clocks) and the capability of simulating partitioned nucleotide, codon, and protein multilocus sequence alignments under a plethora of substitution models using the program INDELible. We validate SimPhy's output using theoretical expectations and other programs, and show that it scales extremely well with complex models and/or large trees, being an order of magnitude faster than the most similar program (DLCoal-Sim). In addition, we demonstrate how SimPhy can be useful to understand interactions among different evolutionary processes, conducting a simulation study to characterize the systematic overestimation of the duplication time when using standard reconciliation methods. SimPhy is available at https://github.com/adamallo/SimPhy, where users can find the source code, precompiled executables, a detailed manual and example cases. PMID:26526427

  9. SimPhy: Phylogenomic Simulation of Gene, Locus, and Species Trees.

    PubMed

    Mallo, Diego; De Oliveira Martins, Leonardo; Posada, David

    2016-03-01

    We present a fast and flexible software package--SimPhy--for the simulation of multiple gene families evolving under incomplete lineage sorting, gene duplication and loss, horizontal gene transfer--all three potentially leading to species tree/gene tree discordance--and gene conversion. SimPhy implements a hierarchical phylogenetic model in which the evolution of species, locus, and gene trees is governed by global and local parameters (e.g., genome-wide, species-specific, locus-specific), that can be fixed or be sampled from a priori statistical distributions. SimPhy also incorporates comprehensive models of substitution rate variation among lineages (uncorrelated relaxed clocks) and the capability of simulating partitioned nucleotide, codon, and protein multilocus sequence alignments under a plethora of substitution models using the program INDELible. We validate SimPhy's output using theoretical expectations and other programs, and show that it scales extremely well with complex models and/or large trees, being an order of magnitude faster than the most similar program (DLCoal-Sim). In addition, we demonstrate how SimPhy can be useful to understand interactions among different evolutionary processes, conducting a simulation study to characterize the systematic overestimation of the duplication time when using standard reconciliation methods. SimPhy is available at https://github.com/adamallo/SimPhy, where users can find the source code, precompiled executables, a detailed manual and example cases. PMID:26526427

  10. Associations Between Newly Discovered Polymorphisms of the CEBPD GENE LOCUS and Body Parameters in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Trukhachev, Vladimir; Skripkin, Valentin; Kvochko, Andrey; Kulichenko, Alexander; Kovalev, Dmitry; Pisarenko, Sergey; Volynkina, Anna; Selionova, Marina; Aybazov, Magomet; Golovanova, Natalia; Yatsyk, Olesya; Krivoruchko, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    An understanding of what effects particular genes can have on body parameters in productive animals is particularly significant for the process of marker-assisted selection. The gene of transcriptional factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta (CEBPD gene) is involved in the process of growth in animals and is known to be a promising candidate for use as a genomic marker. The structure of the CEBPD gene locus was determined using NimbleGen sequencing technology (Roche, USA). The effect of polymorphisms, which were identified using the aforementioned technology, was investigated in 30 rams of the Manych Merino sheep breed. Twenty-two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were detected in the CEBPD gene locus. Significantly, two SNPs, namely, g.315T>G and g.327C>T, have been identified for the first time. It was demonstrated that the complex of linked SNPs, consisting of g.301A>T, g.426T>C, and g.1226T>C, had a negligible effect on body parameters in Manych Merino sheep. Animals with the heterozygous type of SNP g.1142C>T exhibited changes solely in the chest and croup width. The newly discovered SNP g.327C>T was proven to have a negative effect on live weight and body size (p < 0.05) in Manych Merino sheep. Sheep with the heterozygous type of g.562G>A and g.3112C>G SNP complex showed an increase in live weight and dimensions (p < 0.05) compared with those of wild homozygous type. Consequently, SNPs g.327C>T, g.562G>A, and g.3112C>G in the CEBPD gene locus can be successfully used as markers in sheep breeding. Future research will evaluate the influence of the aforementioned SNPs on slaughter indicators for sheep meat production. PMID:27565864

  11. The human growth hormone gene is regulated by a multicomponent locus control region

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Cooke, N.E.; Liebhaber, S.A.; Monks, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    This article describes research involving the five-member human growth hormone (hGH)/chorionic somatomammotropin (hCS) gene cluster and its expression in the placenta. The results indicate that interactions among multiple elements are required to restrict hGH transcription to the pituitary and generate appropriate levels of expression in the mouse genome. In addition, the results suggest a role for shared and unique regulatory sequences in locus control region-mediated expression of the hGH/hCS gene cluster in the pituitary and possibly the placenta. 67 refs., 9 figs.

  12. The Evx1/Evx1as gene locus regulates anterior-posterior patterning during gastrulation

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Charles C.; Amaral, Paulo P.; Kalsbeek, Anton; Magor, Graham W.; Gillinder, Kevin R.; Tangermann, Pierre; di Lisio, Lorena; Cheetham, Seth W.; Gruhl, Franziska; Frith, Jessica; Tallack, Michael R.; Ru, Ke-Lin; Crawford, Joanna; Mattick, John S.; Dinger, Marcel E.; Perkins, Andrew C.

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of sense-antisense mRNA-lncRNA gene pairs occur in the mammalian genome. While there is usually little doubt about the function of the coding transcript, the function of the lncRNA partner is mostly untested. Here we examine the function of the homeotic Evx1-Evx1as gene locus. Expression is tightly co-regulated in posterior mesoderm of mouse embryos and in embryoid bodies. Expression of both genes is enhanced by BMP4 and WNT3A, and reduced by Activin. We generated a suite of deletions in the locus by CRISPR-Cas9 editing. We show EVX1 is a critical downstream effector of BMP4 and WNT3A with respect to patterning of posterior mesoderm. The lncRNA, Evx1as arises from alternative promoters and is difficult to fully abrogate by gene editing or siRNA approaches. Nevertheless, we were able to generate a large 2.6 kb deletion encompassing the shared promoter with Evx1 and multiple additional exons of Evx1as. This led to an identical dorsal-ventral patterning defect to that generated by micro-deletion in the DNA-binding domain of EVX1. Thus, Evx1as has no function independent of EVX1, and is therefore unlikely to act in trans. We predict many antisense lncRNAs have no specific trans function, possibly only regulating the linked coding genes in cis. PMID:27226347

  13. The Evx1/Evx1as gene locus regulates anterior-posterior patterning during gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Bell, Charles C; Amaral, Paulo P; Kalsbeek, Anton; Magor, Graham W; Gillinder, Kevin R; Tangermann, Pierre; di Lisio, Lorena; Cheetham, Seth W; Gruhl, Franziska; Frith, Jessica; Tallack, Michael R; Ru, Ke-Lin; Crawford, Joanna; Mattick, John S; Dinger, Marcel E; Perkins, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of sense-antisense mRNA-lncRNA gene pairs occur in the mammalian genome. While there is usually little doubt about the function of the coding transcript, the function of the lncRNA partner is mostly untested. Here we examine the function of the homeotic Evx1-Evx1as gene locus. Expression is tightly co-regulated in posterior mesoderm of mouse embryos and in embryoid bodies. Expression of both genes is enhanced by BMP4 and WNT3A, and reduced by Activin. We generated a suite of deletions in the locus by CRISPR-Cas9 editing. We show EVX1 is a critical downstream effector of BMP4 and WNT3A with respect to patterning of posterior mesoderm. The lncRNA, Evx1as arises from alternative promoters and is difficult to fully abrogate by gene editing or siRNA approaches. Nevertheless, we were able to generate a large 2.6 kb deletion encompassing the shared promoter with Evx1 and multiple additional exons of Evx1as. This led to an identical dorsal-ventral patterning defect to that generated by micro-deletion in the DNA-binding domain of EVX1. Thus, Evx1as has no function independent of EVX1, and is therefore unlikely to act in trans. We predict many antisense lncRNAs have no specific trans function, possibly only regulating the linked coding genes in cis. PMID:27226347

  14. Association between polymorphism in the melanocortin 1 receptor gene and E locus plumage color phenotype.

    PubMed

    Dávila, S G; Gil, M G; Resino-Talaván, P; Campo, J L

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene on plumage color in chickens. The gene was sequenced in 77 males and 77 females from 13 Spanish breeds, carrying 6 different alleles in the E locus (E*E, E*R, E*WH, E*N, E*B, E*BC), a recessive wheaten (yellowish-white) tester line (E*Y), and a White Leghorn population (heterozygous E*E). A total of 11 significant SNP were detected. Nine of them were nonsynonymous (T212C, G274A, G376A, T398AC, G409A, A427G, C637T, A644C, and G646A, corresponding to amino acid changes Met72Thr, Glu92Lys, Val126Ile, Leu133GlnPro, Ala137Thr, Thr143Ala, Arg213Cys, His215Pro, and Val216Ile), and 2 were synonymous (C69T and C834T). With respect to the significant SNP, 7 had an allelic frequency of 0.5 or greater for some of the alleles at the E locus. These results indicated a significant correlation between MC1R polymorphism and the presence of different alleles at the E locus. All the populations carrying the E*E or E*R alleles, except the Birchen Leonesa, had the G274A polymorphism. Eleven haplotypes were made with 7 of the significant SNP. The distribution of these haplotypes in the different alleles of the E locus showed that each haplotype was predominantly associated to one allele. The number of haplotypes was greatest for the Black Menorca, Birchen Leonesa, and Blue Andaluza breeds, whereas the Quail Castellana and Red-barred Vasca breeds were monomorphic. Our results suggested that the Glu92Lys mutation may be responsible of the activation of the receptor for eumelanin production, being necessary but not sufficient to express the extended black phenotype. They also suggested that the Arg213Cys mutation may be the cause of the loss or the decrease of function of the receptor to produce eumelanin, and the Ala137Thr mutation may be a candidate to attenuate the Glu92Lys effect. The observed co-segregation of the E locus alleles and polymorphisms in MC1R confirms that the E locus is

  15. Actin-dependent intranuclear repositioning of an active gene locus in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dundr, Miroslav; Ospina, Jason K.; Sung, Myong-Hee; John, Sam; Upender, Madhvi; Ried, Thomas; Hager, Gordon L.; Matera, A. Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Although bulk chromatin is thought to have limited mobility within the interphase eukaryotic nucleus, directed long-distance chromosome movements are not unknown. Cajal bodies (CBs) are nuclear suborganelles that nonrandomly associate with small nuclear RNA (snRNA) and histone gene loci in human cells during interphase. However, the mechanism responsible for this association is uncertain. In this study, we present an experimental system to probe the dynamic interplay of CBs with a U2 snRNA target gene locus during transcriptional activation in living cells. Simultaneous four-dimensional tracking of CBs and U2 genes reveals that target loci are recruited toward relatively stably positioned CBs by long-range chromosomal motion. In the presence of a dominant-negative mutant of β-actin, the repositioning of activated U2 genes is markedly inhibited. This supports a model in which nuclear actin is required for these rapid, long-range chromosomal movements. PMID:18070915

  16. Locus for a human hereditary cataract is closely linked to the. gamma. -crystallin gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Lubsen, N.H.; Renwick, J.H.; Tsui, L.C.; Breitman, M.L.; Schoenmakers, J.G.G.

    1987-01-01

    Within the human ..gamma..-crystallin gene cluster polymorphic Taq I sites are present. These give rise to three sets of allelic fragments from the ..gamma..-crystallin genes. Together these restriction fragment length polymorphisms define eight possible haplotypes, three of which (Q, R, and S) were found in the Dutch and English population. A fourth haplotype (P) was detected within a family in which a hereditary Coppock-like cataract of the embryonic lens nucleus occurs in heterozygotes. Haplotype P was found only in family members who suffered from cataract, and all family members who suffered from cataract had haplotype P. The absolute correlation between the presence of haplotype P and cataract within this family shows that the ..gamma..-crystallin gene cluster and the locus for the Coppock-like cataract are closely linked. This linkage provides genetic evidence that the primary cause of a cataract in humans could possibly be a lesion in a crystallin gene.

  17. Eye-Specific Gene Expression following Embryonic Ethanol Exposure in Zebrafish: Roles for Heat Shock Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Bhavani; Pegorsch, Laurel; Frey, Ruth A.; Sun, Chi; Shelden, Eric A.; Stenkamp, Deborah L.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms through which ethanol exposure results in developmental defects remain unclear. We used the zebrafish model to elucidate eye-specific mechanisms that underlie ethanol-mediated microphthalmia (reduced eye size), through time-series microarray analysis of gene expression within eyes of embryos exposed to 1.5% ethanol. 62 genes were differentially expressed (DE) in ethanol-treated as compared to control eyes sampled during retinal neurogenesis (24-48 hours post-fertilization). The EDGE (extraction of differential gene expression) algorithm identified >3000 genes DE over developmental time in ethanol-exposed eyes as compared to controls. The DE lists included several genes indicating a mis-regulated cellular stress response due to ethanol exposure. Combined treatment with sub-threshold levels of ethanol and a morpholino targeting heat shock factor 1 mRNA resulted in microphthalmia, suggesting convergent molecular pathways. Thermal preconditioning partially prevented ethanol-mediated microphthalmia while maintaining Hsf-1 expression. These data suggest roles for reduced Hsf-1 in mediating microphthalmic effects of embryonic ethanol exposure. PMID:24355176

  18. Identification of novel steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1)-target genes and components of the SF-1 nuclear complex.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Tetsuya; Kawabe, Shinya; Ishikane, Shin; Imamichi, Yoshitaka; Umezawa, Akihiro; Miyamoto, Kaoru

    2015-06-15

    Steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) is a master regulator of adrenal and reproductive development and function. Although SF-1 was identified as a transcriptional regulator for steroid metabolic enzymes, it has been shown that SF-1 also regulates other genes that are involved in various cellular processes. Previously, we showed that introduction of SF-1 into mesenchymal stem cells resulted in the differentiation of these cells to the steroidogenic lineage. By using this method of differentiation, we performed comprehensive analyses to identify the novel SF-1-target genes and components of the SF-1 nuclear complex. Genome-wide analyses with promoter tiling array and DNA microarray identified 10 genes as novel SF-1-target genes including glutathione S-transferase A family, 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase 1 and ferredoxin reductase. Using SF-1 immuno-affinity chromatography of nuclear proteins followed by MS/MS analysis, we identified 24 proteins including CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β as components of SF-1 nuclear complex. In this review, we will describe novel roles of the newly identified genes for steroidogenesis. PMID:25463758

  19. Mice devoid of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) show normal expression of type I interferon genes.

    PubMed Central

    Reis, L F; Ruffner, H; Stark, G; Aguet, M; Weissmann, C

    1994-01-01

    The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) binds tightly to the interferon (IFN)-beta promoter and has been implicated in the induction of type I IFNs. We generated mice devoid of functional IRF-1 by targeted gene disruption. As reported by others, IRF-1-deficient mice showed a discrete phenotype: the CD4/CD8 ratio was increased and IFN-gamma-induced levels of macrophage iNO synthase mRNA were strongly diminished. However, type I IFN induction in vivo by virus or double-stranded RNA was unimpaired, as evidenced by serum IFN titers and IFN mRNA levels in spleen, liver and lung. There was also no impairment in the response of type I IFN-inducible genes. Therefore, IRF-1 is not essential for these processes in vivo. Images PMID:7957048

  20. Chenodeoxycholic Acid Reduces Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α Protein and Its Target Genes.

    PubMed

    Moon, Yunwon; Choi, Su Mi; Chang, Soojeong; Park, Bongju; Lee, Seongyeol; Lee, Mi-Ock; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Park, Hyunsung

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated HIF-1α inhibitors under different hypoxic conditions, physiological hypoxia (5% O2) and severe hypoxia (0.1% O2). We found that chenodeoxy cholic acid (CDCA) reduced the amount of HIF-1α protein only under physiological hypoxia but not under severe hypoxia without decreasing its mRNA level. By using a proteasome inhibitor MG132 and a translation inhibitor cyclohexamide, we showed that CDCA reduced HIF-1α protein by decreasing its translation but not by enhancing its degradation. The following findings indicated that farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a CDCA receptor and its target gene, Small heterodimer partner (SHP) are not involved in this effect of CDCA. Distinctly from CDCA, MG132 prevented SHP and an exogenous FXR agonist, GW4064 from reducing HIF-1α protein. Furthermore a FXR antagonist, guggulsterone failed to prevent CDCA from decreasing HIF-1α protein. Furthermore, guggulsterone by itself reduced HIF-1α protein even in the presence of MG132. These findings suggested that CDCA and guggulsterone reduced the translation of HIF-1α in a mechanism which FXR and SHP are not involved. This study reveals novel therapeutic functions of traditional nontoxic drugs, CDCA and guggulsterone, as inhibitors of HIF-1α protein. PMID:26098428

  1. Organization of the V gene segments in mouse T-cell antigen receptor [alpha]/[delta] locus

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K.; Klotz, J.L.; Kiser, G.; Bristol, G.; Hays, E.; Lai, E.; Gese, E.; Kronenberg, M.; Hood, L. )

    1994-04-01

    The mouse T-cell receptor (TCR) [alpha]/[delta] was mapped using 17 V[alpha] and 4 V[delta] subfamily-specific probes. Four complementary methods were used: (1) an estimate of the V gene repertoire by Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA with subfamily-specific probes; (2) an analysis of V gene segments deleted by TCR gene rearrangements from a panel of T-cell tumors and hybridomas; (3) an analysis of overlapping clusters of cosmid clones; and (4) an analysis of large DNA fragments separated by field-inversion gel electrophoresis. The [alpha]/[delta] locus spans about 1 Mb. The distance between the 3[prime]-most V gene segments (V[delta]1) and the [delta] constant gene (C[delta]) is no more than 150 kb. Sixty-six V gene segments have been mapped physically on cosmids. The members of individual V[alpha] gene segments subfamilies are dispersed throughout the locus. In contrast, the V[delta] gene segments V[delta]1 to 5 are clustered at the 3[prime] end of the V gene segments cluster. At least two DNA segment duplications, 45 to 80 kb in length, are present in the locus. These data provide information on the evolution of the [alpha]/[delta] locus and on organizational features that might influence the expression of specific V gene segments in [gamma][delta] cells. 35 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Murine and human b locus pigmentation genes encode a glycoprotein (gp75) with catalase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Halaban, R.; Moellmann, G. )

    1990-06-01

    Melanogenesis is regulated in large part by tyrosinase, and defective tyrosinase leads to albinism. The mechanisms for other pigmentation determinants (e.g., those operative in tyrosinase-positive albinism and in murine coat-color mutants) are not yet known. One murine pigmentation gene, the brown (b) locus, when mutated leads to a brown (b/b) or hypopigmentated (B{sup lt}/B{sup lt}) coat versus the wild-type black (B/B). The authors show that the b locus codes for a glycoprotein with the activity of a catalase (catalase B). Only the c locus protein is a tyrosinase. Because peroxides may be by-products of melanogenic activity and hydrogen peroxide in particular is known to destroy melanin precursors and melanin, they conclude that pigmentation is controlled not only by tyrosinase but also by a hydroperoxidase. The studies indicate that catalase B is identical with gp75, a known human melanosomal glycoprotein; that the b mutation is in a heme-associated domain; and that the B{sup lt} mutation renders the protein susceptible to rapid proteolytic degradation.

  3. A genomewide screen for chronic rhinosinusitis genes identifies a locus on chromosome 7q

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Jayant M.; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Schneider, Daniel; Naclerio, Robert M.; Ober, Carole

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic rhinosinusitis is an important public health problem with substantial impact on patient quality of life and health care costs. We hypothesized that genetic variation may be one factor that affects this disease. Objective To identify genetic variation underlying susceptibility to chronic rhinosinusitis using a genome-wide approach. Methods We studied a religious isolate that practices a communal lifestyle and shares common environmental exposures. Using physical examination, medical interviews, and a review of medical records, we identified 8 individuals with chronic rhinosinusitis out of 291 screened. These 8 individuals were related to each other in a single 60 member, 9 generation pedigree. A genome-wide screen for loci influencing susceptibility to chronic rhinosinusitis using 1123 genome-wide markers was conducted. Results The largest linkage peak (P = 0.0023; 127.15 cM, equivalent to LOD=2.01) was on chromosome 7q31.1-7q32.1, 7q31 (127.15 cM; 1-LOD support region: 115cM to 135cM) and included the CFTR locus. Genotyping of 38 mutations in the CFTR gene did not reveal variation accounting for this linkage signal. Conclusion Understanding the genes involved in chronic rhinosinusitis may lead to improvements in its diagnosis and treatment. Our results represent the first genome-wide screen for chronic rhinosinusitis and suggest that a locus on 7q31.1-7q32.1 influences disease susceptibility. This may be the CFTR gene or another nearby locus. PMID:18622306

  4. Dictyostelium ribosomal protein genes and the elongation factor 1B gene show coordinate developmental regulation which is under post-transcriptional control.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A K; Blumberg, D D

    1999-06-01

    Starvation for amino acids initiates the developmental program in the cellular slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum [19, 20]. One of the earliest developmental events is the decline in ribosomal protein synthesis [2, 17, 29, 30]. The ribosomal protein mRNAs are excluded from polysomes with 20 min to 1 h following the removal of nutrients, and their mRNA levels decline sharply at about 9 h into the 24-h developmental cycle [28, 31, 35, 36]. It has been generally assumed that the decline in r-protein mRNA levels during late development reflected a decline in the transcription rate [12, 32, 43]. Here we demonstrate that this is not the case. The transcription rates of three ribosomal protein genes, rpL11, rpL23 and rpS9 as well as an elongation factor 1B gene have been determined during growth and development in Dictyostelium. Throughout growth and development the transcription rate of the ribosomal protein genes remains relatively constant at 0.2%-0.5% of the rate of rRNA transcription while the elongation factor 1B gene is transcribed at 0.4%-0.6% of the rRNA rate. This low but constant transcription rate is in contrast to a spore coat protein gene Psp D, which is transcribed at 6% of the rRNA rate in late developing cells. The elongation factor 1B gene appears to be co-regulated with the ribosomal protein genes both in terms of its transcription rate and mRNA accumulation. Dictyostelium has been a popular model for understanding signal transduction and the growth to differentiation transition, thus it is of significance that the regulation of ribosome biosynthesis in Dictyostelium resembles that of higher eukaryotes in being regulated largely at the post-transcriptional level in response to starvation as opposed to yeasts where the regulation is largely transcriptional [27]. PMID:10374261

  5. Nucleotide sequence of the regulatory locus controlling expression of bacterial genes for bioluminescence.

    PubMed Central

    Engebrecht, J; Silverman, M

    1987-01-01

    Production of light by the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri and by recombinant hosts containing cloned lux genes is controlled by the density of the culture. Density-dependent regulation of lux gene expression has been shown to require a locus consisting of the luxR and luxI genes and two closely linked divergent promoters. As part of a genetic analysis to understand the regulation of bioluminescence, we have sequenced the region of DNA containing this control circuit. Open reading frames corresponding to luxR and luxI were identified; transcription start sites were defined by S1 nuclease mapping and sequences resembling promoter elements were located. Images PMID:3697093

  6. A distal locus element mediates IFN-γ priming of LPS-stimulated TNF gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Nancy A.; Jasenosky, Luke D.; Goldfeld, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY IFN-γ priming sensitizes monocytes/macrophages to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, resulting in augmented expression of a set of genes including TNF. Here, we demonstrate that IFN-γ priming of LPS-stimulated TNF transcription requires a distal TNF/LT locus element 8 kb upstream of the TNF transcription start site (hHS-8). IFN-γ stimulation leads to increased DNase I accessibility of hHS-8 and its recruitment of IRF1, and subsequent LPS stimulation enhances H3K27 acetylation and induces enhancer RNA synthesis at hHS-8. Ablation of IRF1 or targeting the hHS-8 IRF1 binding site in vivo with Cas9 linked to the KRAB repressive domain abolishes IFN-γ priming while LPS induction of the gene is unaffected. Thus, IFN-γ poises a distal enhancer in the TNF/LT locus by chromatin remodeling and IRF1 recruitment, which then drives enhanced TNF gene expression in response to a secondary TLR stimulus. PMID:25482561

  7. Dopamine D3 receptor gene locus: Association with schizophrenia, as well age of onset

    SciTech Connect

    Nimgsonkar, V.L.; Zhang, X.R.; Brar, J.S.

    1994-09-01

    Genetic factors are clearly involved in the etiology of schizophrenia, but their specific nature is unknown. If the genetic etiology is multifactorial or polygenic, the role of specific genes as susceptibility factors can be directly evaluated by examining allelic variation at these loci among cases in comparison with controls. Two studies have independently demonstrated an association of schizophrenia with homozygosity at the dopamine D3 receptor gene (D3RG) locus, using a biallelic polymorphism in the first exon of D3RG. These results are important because D3RG is a favored candidate gene. Three other studies have identified associations among sub-groups of patients, but the majority were negative. The present study involved patients with schizophrenia (DSM-III-R criteria) of Caucasian or African-American ethnicity (n=130). Two groups of controls, matched for ethnicity, were used: adults screened for schizophrenia (n=128) and unselected neonates (n=160). Multivariate analysis revealed an association between allele no. 1 homozygosity and schizophrenia in comparison with adult, but not neonatal controls. The association was most marked among Caucasian patients with a family history of schizophrenia (odds ratio 13.7, C.I. 1.8, 104.3). An association of the D3RG locus with age of onset (AOO) was also noted. The discrepancies in earlier studies may due to variations in control groups, differencies in mean AOO among different cohorts, or ethnic variations in susceptibility attributable to D3RG.

  8. Variant forms of the binary toxin CDT locus and tcdC gene in Clostridium difficile strains.

    PubMed

    Stare, Barbara Geric; Delmée, Michel; Rupnik, Maja

    2007-03-01

    Variability in the genes for toxin A, toxin B and other pathogenicity locus regions is well known and is the basis for the distribution of Clostridium difficile strains into variant toxinotypes. Previous data have indicated that some C. difficile strains have a non-functional truncated form of the binary toxin (CDT) locus. This study analysed variability in the CDT locus and the presence of deleted tcdC genes in C. difficile strains. A total of 146 strains were screened, including known variant toxinotypes and non-variant A+B+ (toxinotype 0) and A-B- C. difficile strains. In all of the strains studied, only two forms of the CDT locus were found: a full-length 4.3 kb fragment encoding the functional binary toxin or a truncated 2.3 kb fragment. Whilst the full-length CDT locus was found almost exclusively in variant toxinotypes, the truncated form was detected in 79% of toxinotype 0 strains. Non-toxinogenic A-B- strains with a truncated version were not found and only rarely possessed the full-length CDT locus (A-B-CDT+ strains). Four different forms of the tcdC gene were found; three represented deleted versions and typically were found in toxinotypes III-VII, XI, XIV-XVI and XXIV. PMID:17314362

  9. Retina-derived POU domain factor 1 coordinates expression of genes relevant to renal and neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Fiorino, Antonio; Manenti, Giacomo; Gamba, Beatrice; Bucci, Gabriele; De Cecco, Loris; Sardella, Michele; Buscemi, Giacomo; Ciceri, Sara; Radice, Maria T; Radice, Paolo; Perotti, Daniela

    2016-09-01

    Retina-derived POU domain Factor 1 (RPF-1), a member of POU transcription factor family, is encoded by POU6F2 gene, addressed by interstitial deletions at chromosome 7p14 in Wilms tumor (WT). Its expression has been detected in developing kidney and nervous system, suggesting an early role for this gene in regulating development of these organs. To investigate into its functions and determine its role in transcriptional regulation, we generated an inducible stable transfectant from HEK293 cells. RPF-1 showed nuclear localization, elevated stability, and transactivation of promoters featuring POU consensus sites, and led to reduced cell proliferation and in vivo tumor growth. By addressing the whole transcriptome regulated by its induction, we could detect a gross alteration of gene expression that is consistent with promoter occupancy predicted by genome-wide Chip-chip analysis. Comparison of bound regulatory regions with differentially expressed genes allowed identification of 217 candidate targets. Enrichment of divergent octamers in predicted regulatory regions revealed promiscuous binding to bipartite POUS and POUH consensus half-sites with intervening spacers. Gel-shift competition assay confirmed the specificity of RPF-1 binding to consensus motifs, and demonstrated that the Ser-rich region upstream of the POU domain is indispensable to achieve DNA-binding. Promoter-reporter activity addressing a few target genes indicated a dependence by RPF-1 on transcriptional response. In agreement with its expression in developing kidney and nervous system, the induced transcriptome appears to indicate a function for this protein in early renal differentiation and neuronal cell fate, providing a resource for understanding its role in the processes thereby regulated. PMID:27425396

  10. THE WHEAT D-GENOME HMW-GLUTENIN LOCUS:BAC SEQUENCING, GENE DISTRIBUTION, AND RETROTRANSPOSON CLUSTERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A bacterial-artificial-chromosome (BAC) clone from the genome of Triticum tauschii, the D-genome ancestor of hexaploid bread wheat, was sequenced and the presence of the two paralogous x- and y- type high-molecular-weight (HMW) glutenin genes of the Glu-D1 locus was confirmed. These two genes occur...

  11. GSP-1 genes are linked to the grain hardness locus (Ha) on wheat chromosome 5D.

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, C J; Glenn, G M; Rahman, S

    1996-01-01

    An important determinant of wheat grain quality is the hardness of the grain. The trait is controlled by a major locus, Ha, on the short arm of chromosome 5D. Purified starch granules from soft-grained wheats have associated with them 15-kDa polypeptides called grain softness proteins (GSPs) or "friabilins." Genes that encode one family of closely related GSP polypeptides - GSP-1 genes - were mapped using chromosome substitution lines to the group 5 chromosomes. An F2 population segregating for hard and soft alleles at the Ha locus on a near-isogenic background was used in a single-seed study of the inheritance of grain softness and of GSP-1 alleles. Grain softness versus grain hardness was inherited in a 3:1 ratio. The presence versus absence of GSPs in single seed starch preparations was coinherited with grain softness versus hardness. This showed that grain softness is primarily determined by seed, and not by maternal, genotype. In addition, no recombination was detected in 44 F2 plants between GSP-1 restriction fragment length polymorphisms and Ha alleles. Differences between hard and soft wheat grains in membrane structure and lipid extractability have been described and, of the three characterized proteins that are part of the mixture of 15-kDa polypeptides called GSPs, at least two, and probably all three, are proteins that bind polar lipids. The data are interpreted to suggest that the Ha locus may encode one or more members of a large family of lipid-binding proteins. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:8637887

  12. Amplification of the murine mdr2 gene and a reconsideration of the structure of the murine mdr gene locus.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, L S

    1995-01-01

    A common feature of cells selected in vitro for the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype is the amplification and concomitant overexpression of the mdr genes. In murine macrophage-like J774.2-derived MDR cell lines, there is a good correlation between levels of amplification and expression for the mdr1b gene, but not for the other two gene family members, mdr1a and mdr2. To understand this phenomenon better, a study of the amplification and expression of the mdr2 gene was undertaken. Southern blotting of genomic DNAs from a series of six MDR cell lines revealed that five of these lines had 5'-end amplification of mdr2, whereas only three contained 3'-end amplification. The analysis also suggested the involvement of a recombination hot-spot in this phenomenon. Despite the observation that the ratio between the number of copies of the 5' and 3' ends of the gene differs among cell lines, the ratio of 5' to 3' end transcription of mdr2 was approximately 1 in all cell lines. An analysis of promoter methylation in MDR cell lines demonstrated that this mechanism may play a role in regulating the transcription of mdr2, but not of mdr1b. Long-range mapping of the mdr locus in parental and amplified cell lines suggested that the three mdr genes are oriented in the same direction, and also revealed the presence of a number of rearrangement events. Models for the murine mdr gene locus in wild-type cells and in a cell line containing a rearrangement are presented. PMID:7832992

  13. Locus Characterization and Gene Expression of Bovine FNDC5: Is the Myokine Irisin Relevant in Cattle?

    PubMed Central

    Komolka, Katrin; Albrecht, Elke; Schering, Lisa; Brenmoehl, Julia; Hoeflich, Andreas; Maak, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    The transmembrane protein FNDC5 was recently characterized as precursor of an exercise induced myokine named irisin. Previous studies found a relationship between circulating irisin levels and muscle mass in humans. Consequently, we tested the hypothesis whether FNDC5/irisin is involved in the modulation of body composition in cattle. Since information on the bovine FNDC5 locus was scarce, we characterized the gene experimentally as prerequisite for these investigations. We provide here a revised and extended gene model for bovine FNDC5. Although similarly organized like the human and murine loci, a higher variability was observed at transcript level in the bovine locus. FNDC5 mRNA was abundant in bovine skeletal muscle and was detected at lower levels in adipose tissue and liver. There were no expression differences between two groups of bulls highly different in muscularity and adiposity. Full-length FNDC5 protein (25 kDa) was present in bovine skeletal muscle independent of muscularity. Neither FNDC5 nor its putatively secreted peptide irisin were found in circulation of bulls. In contrast, we demonstrated that FNDC5 (25 kDa) and irisin (12 kDa) were present in murine skeletal muscle and that irisin was circulating in murine serum. This indicates fundamental differences in the regulation of FNDC5 and irisin between rodents and cattle. PMID:24498244

  14. Directed gene copy number amplification in Pichia pastoris by vector integration into the ribosomal DNA locus.

    PubMed

    Marx, Hans; Mecklenbräuker, Astrid; Gasser, Brigitte; Sauer, Michael; Mattanovich, Diethard

    2009-12-01

    The yeast Pichia pastoris is a widely used host organism for heterologous protein production. One of the basic steps for strain improvement is to ensure a sufficient level of transcription of the heterologous gene, based on promoter strength and gene copy number. To date, high-copy-number integrants of P. pastoris are achievable only by screening of random events or by cloning of gene concatemers. Methods for rapid and reliable multicopy integration of the expression cassette are therefore desirable. Here we present such a method based on vector integration into the rDNA locus and post-transformational vector amplification by repeated selection on increased antibiotic concentrations. Data are presented for two exemplary products: human serum albumin, which is secreted into the supernatant, and human superoxide dismutase, which is accumulated in the cytoplasm of the cells. The striking picture evolving is that intracellular protein production is tightly correlated with gene copy number, while use of the secretory pathway introduces a high clonal variability and the correlation with gene copy number is valid only for low gene copy numbers. PMID:19799640

  15. Prostaglandin E2 Via Steroidogenic Factor-1 Coordinately Regulates Transcription of Steroidogenic Genes Necessary for Estrogen Synthesis in Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Attar, Erkut; Tokunaga, Hideki; Imir, Gonca; Yilmaz, M. Bertan; Redwine, David; Putman, Michael; Gurates, Bilgin; Attar, Rukset; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Hales, Dale B.; Bulun, Serdar E.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Products of at least five specific steroidogenic genes, including steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), which facilitates the entry of cytosolic cholesterol into the mitochondrion, side chain cleavage P450 enzyme, 3β-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase-2, 17-hydroxylase/17-20-lyase, and aromatase, which catalyzes the final step, are necessary for the conversion of cholesterol to estrogen. Expression and biological activity of StAR and aromatase were previously demonstrated in endometriosis but not in normal endometrium. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) induces aromatase expression via the transcriptional factor steroidogenic factor-1 (SF1) in endometriosis, which is opposed by chicken-ovalbumin upstream-transcription factor (COUP-TF) and Wilms’ tumor-1 (WT1) in endometrium. Objective: The aim of the study was to demonstrate a complete steroidogenic pathway leading to estrogen biosynthesis in endometriotic cells and the transcriptional mechanisms that regulate basal and PGE2-stimulated estrogen production in endometriotic cells and endometrium. Results: Compared with normal endometrial tissues, mRNA levels of StAR, side chain cleavage P450, 3β-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase-2, 17-hydroxylase/17-20-lyase, aromatase, and SF1 were significantly higher in endometriotic tissues. PGE2 induced the expression of all steroidogenic genes; production of progesterone, estrone, and estradiol; and StAR promoter activity in endometriotic cells. Overexpression of SF1 induced, whereas COUP-TFII or WT1 suppressed, StAR promoter activity. PGE2 induced coordinate binding of SF1 to StAR and aromatase promoters but decreased COUP-TFII binding in endometriotic cells. COUP-TFII or WT1 binding to both promoters was significantly higher in endometrial compared with endometriotic cells. Conclusion: Endometriotic cells contain the full complement of steroidogenic genes for de novo synthesis of estradiol from cholesterol, which is stimulated by PGE2 via enhanced binding of SF1 to promoters

  16. An anther-specific gene encoded by an S locus haplotype of Brassica produces complementary and differentially regulated transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Boyes, D C; Nasrallah, J B

    1995-01-01

    The self-incompatibility locus of Brassica consists of a coadapted gene complex that contains at least two genes required for the recognition and inhibition of pollen by the stigma when self-pollinated. Here, we report the identification of a third S locus-linked gene from the S2 haplotype of Brassica oleracea. This gene, which we designated SLA (for S Locus Anther), is a novel gene with an unusual structure. SLA is transcribed from two promoters to produce two complementary anther-specific transcripts, one spliced and the other unspliced, that accumulate in an antiparallel manner in developing microspores and anthers. The sequence of the spliced transcript showed the presence of two open reading frames that predict proteins of 10 and 7.5 kD. Neither transcript was produced in a self-compatible B. napus strain carrying an S2-like haplotype, indicating that the SLA gene in this strain is nonfunctional. Interestingly, sequences related to SLA were not detected in DNA or RNA from plants carrying S haplotypes other than S2. The haplotype specificity of SLA, its anther-specific expression, and its physical linkage to the S locus are properties expected for a gene that encodes a determinant of S2 specificity in pollen. PMID:7549484

  17. [BLG gene knockout and hLF gene knock-in at BLG locus in goat by TALENs].

    PubMed

    Song, Shaozheng; Zhu, Mengmin; Yuan, Yuguo; Rong, Yao; Xu, Sheng; Chen, Si; Mei, Junyan; Cheng, Yong

    2016-03-01

    To knock out β-lactoglobulin (BLG) gene and insert human lactoferrin (hLF) coding sequence at BLG locus of goat, the transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) mediated recombination was used to edit the BLG gene of goat fetal fibroblast, then as donor cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer. We designed a pair of specific plasmid TALEN-3-L/R for goat BLG exon III recognition sites, and BLC14-TK vector containing a negative selection gene HSV-TK, was used for the knock in of hLF gene. TALENs plasmids were transfected into the goat fetal fibroblast cells, and the cells were screened three days by 2 μg/mL puromycin. DNA cleavage activities of cells were verified by PCR amplification and DNA production sequencing. Then, targeting vector BLC14-TK and plasmids TALEN-3-L/R were co-transfected into goat fetal fibroblasts, both 700 μg/mL G418 and 2 μg/mL GCV were simultaneously used to screen G418-resistant cells. Detections of integration and recombination were implemented to obtain cells with hLF gene site-specific integration. We chose targeting cells as donor cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer. The mutagenicity of TALEN-3-L/R was between 25% and 30%. A total of 335 reconstructed embryos with 6 BLG-/hLF+ targeting cell lines were transferred into 16 recipient goats. There were 9 pregnancies confirmed by ultrasound on day 30 to 35 (pregnancy rate of 39.1%), and one of 50-day-old fetus with BLG-/hLF+ was achieved. These results provide the basis for hLF gene knock-in at BLG locus of goat and cultivating transgenic goat of low allergens and rich hLF in the milk. PMID:27349115

  18. Towards cloning the WAS-gene locus: YAC-contigs and PFGE analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Meindi, A.; Schindelhauer, D.; Hellebrand, H.

    1994-09-01

    Patients with X-linked recessive Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) manifest eczema, thrombocytopenia and severe immunodeficiency. Mapping studies place the WAS gene locus between the markers TIMP and DXS255 which both have been shown to be recombinant with the disease locus. Linkage analysis in eight families including a large Swiss family showed tight linkage of the disease to the loci DXS255 and DXS1126 and exclusion of TIMP as well as polymorphic loci adjacent to the OATL1 pseudogene cluster (e.g., DXS6616). Physical mapping with established YAC contigs and a radiation hybrid encompassing the Xp11.22-11.3 region revealed the loci order TIMP-PFC-elk1-DXS1367-DXS6616-OATL1-(DXS11260DXS226)-C5-3-TGE-3, SYP and (DXS255-DXS146). The markers TIMP and C5-3 are contained on the same 1.6 Mb MluI-fragment. A novel expressed sequence (R1) could be placed between elk-1 and the PFC gene while the STS C5-3 could be localized adjacent to DXS1126. The gene cluster around DXS1126 could be connected with the TFE-3 and synaptophysin genes which map on the same 400 kb MluI fragment and two overlapping YACs. The minimum distance between SYP and DXS255 is 1.2 Mb; the maximum distance is 2.2 Mb. Expressed sequences which are obtained from a cosmid contig around DXS1126 and C5-3 are being used for mutation screening in WAS patients.

  19. Physical linkage of a GABAA receptor subunit gene to the DXS374 locus in human Xq28.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, M V; Bloomfield, J; McKinley, M; Patterson, M N; Darlison, M G; Barnard, E A; Davies, K E

    1989-01-01

    We report the physical linkage of the gene encoding one of the subunits of the GABAA receptor (GABRA3) to the polymorphic locus DXS374 on the human X chromosome at Xq28. X-linked manic depression and other psychiatric disorders have been mapped to this region, and thus GABRA3 is a potential candidate gene for these disorders. DXS374--and therefore GABRA3--lies distal to the fragile X locus at a recombination fraction of approximately .15. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2574000

  20. Identification and Functional Analysis of Pheromone and Receptor Genes in the B3 Mating Locus of Pleurotus eryngii

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung-Hee; Kang, Young Min; Im, Chak Han; Ali, Asjad; Kim, Sun Young; Je, Hee-Jeong; Kim, Min-Keun; Rho, Hyun Su; Lee, Hyun Sook; Kong, Won-Sik; Ryu, Jae-San

    2014-01-01

    Pleurotus eryngii has recently become a major cultivated mushroom; it uses tetrapolar heterothallism as a part of its reproductive process. Sexual development progresses only when the A and B mating types are compatible. Such mating incompatibility occasionally limits the efficiency of breeding programs in which crossing within loci-shared strains or backcrossing strategies are employed. Therefore, understanding the mating system in edible mushroom fungi will help provide a short cut in the development of new strains. We isolated and identified pheromone and receptor genes in the B3 locus of P. eryngii and performed a functional analysis of the genes in the mating process by transformation. A genomic DNA library was constructed to map the entire mating-type locus. The B3 locus was found to contain four pheromone precursor genes and four receptor genes. Remarkably, receptor PESTE3.3.1 has just 34 amino acid residues in its C-terminal cytoplasmic region; therefore, it seems likely to be a receptor-like gene. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR (real-time qRT-PCR) revealed that most pheromone and receptor genes showed significantly higher expression in monokaryotic cells than dikaryotic cells. The pheromone genes PEphb3.1 and PEphb3.3 and the receptor gene PESTE3.3.1 were transformed into P5 (A3B4). The transformants were mated with a tester strain (A4B4), and the progeny showed clamp connections and a normal fruiting body, which indicates the proposed role of these genes in mating and fruiting processes. This result also confirms that PESTE3.3.1 is a receptor gene. In this study, we identified pheromone and receptor genes in the B3 locus of P. eryngii and found that some of those genes appear to play a role in the mating and fruiting processes. These results might help elucidate the mechanism of fruiting differentiation and improve breeding efficiency. PMID:25133513

  1. HOS1, a genetic locus involved in cold-responsive gene expression in arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Ishitani, M; Xiong, L; Lee, H; Stevenson, B; Zhu, J K

    1998-01-01

    Low-temperature stress induces the expression of a variety of genes in plants. However, the signal transduction pathway(s) that activates gene expression under cold stress is poorly understood. Mutants defective in cold signaling should facilitate molecular analysis of plant responses to low temperature and eventually lead to the identification and cloning of a cold stress receptor(s) and intracellular signaling components. In this study, we characterize a plant mutant affected in its response to low temperatures. The Arabidopsis hos1-1 mutation identified by luciferase imaging causes superinduction of cold-responsive genes, such as RD29A, COR47, COR15A, KIN1, and ADH. Although these genes are also induced by abscisic acid, high salt, or polyethylene glycol in addition to cold, the hos1-1 mutation only enhances their expression under cold stress. Genetic analysis revealed that hos1-1 is a single recessive mutation in a nuclear gene. Our studies using the firefly luciferase reporter gene under the control of the cold-responsive RD29A promoter have indicated that cold-responsive genes can be induced by temperatures as high as 19 degrees C in hos1-1 plants. In contrast, wild-type plants do not express the luciferase reporter at 10 degrees C or higher. Compared with the wild type, hos1-1 plants are l ess cold hardy. Nonetheless, after 2 days of cold acclimation, hos1-1 plants acquired the same degree of freezing tolerance as did the wild type. The hos1-1 plants flowered earlier than did the wild-type plants and appeared constitutively vernalized. Taken together, our findings show that the HOS1 locus is an important negative regulator of cold signal transduction in plant cells and that it plays critical roles in controlling gene expression under cold stress, freezing tolerance, and flowering time. PMID:9668134

  2. Generation of Antigenic Variants via Gene Conversion: Evidence for Recombination Fitness Selection at the Locus Level in Anaplasma marginale▿

    PubMed Central

    Futse, James E.; Brayton, Kelly A.; Nydam, Seth D.; Palmer, Guy H.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple bacterial and protozoal pathogens utilize gene conversion to generate antigenically variant surface proteins to evade immune clearance and establish persistent infection. Both the donor alleles that encode the variants following recombination into an expression site and the donor loci themselves are under evolutionary selection: the alleles that encode variants that are sufficiently antigenically unique yet retain growth fitness and the loci that allow efficient recombination. We examined allelic usage in generating Anaplasma marginale variants during in vivo infection in the mammalian reservoir host and identified preferential usage of specific alleles in the absence of immune selective pressure, consistent with certain individual alleles having a fitness advantage for in vivo growth. In contrast, the loci themselves appear to have been essentially equally selected for donor function in gene conversion with no significant effect of locus position relative to the expression site or origin of replication. This pattern of preferential allelic usage but lack of locus effect was observed independently for Msp2 and Msp3 variants, both generated by gene conversion. Furthermore, there was no locus effect observed when a single locus contained both msp2 and msp3 alleles in a tail-to-tail orientation flanked by a repeat. These experimental results support the hypothesis that predominance of specific variants reflects in vivo fitness as determined by the encoding allele, independent of locus structure and chromosomal position. Identification of highly fit variants provides targets for vaccines that will prevent the high-level bacteremia associated with acute disease. PMID:19487473

  3. Rpv10: a new locus from the Asian Vitis gene pool for pyramiding downy mildew resistance loci in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Schwander, Florian; Eibach, Rudolf; Fechter, Iris; Hausmann, Ludger; Zyprian, Eva; Töpfer, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    A population derived from a cross between grapevine breeding strain Gf.Ga-52-42 and cultivar 'Solaris' consisting of 265 F1-individuals was genetically mapped using SSR markers and screened for downy mildew resistance. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis revealed two strong QTLs on linkage groups (LGs) 18 and 09. The locus on LG 18 was found to be identical with the previously described locus Rpv3 and is transmitted by Gf.Ga-52-42. 'Solaris' transmitted the resistance-related locus on LG 09 explaining up to 50% of the phenotypic variation in the population. This downy mildew resistance locus is named Rpv10 for resistance to Plasmopara viticola. Rpv10 was initially introgressed from Vitis amurensis, a wild species of the Asian Vitis gene pool. The one-LOD supported confidence interval of the QTL spans a section of 2.1 centi Morgan (cM) corresponding to 314 kb in the reference genome PN40024 (12x). Eight resistance gene analogues (RGAs) of the NBS-LRR type and additional resistance-linked genes are located in this region of PN40024. The F1 sub-population which contains the Rpv3 as well as the Rpv10 locus showed a significantly higher degree of resistance, indicating additive effects by pyramiding of resistance loci. Possibilities for using the resistance locus Rpv10 in a grapevine breeding programme are discussed. Furthermore, the marker data revealed 'Severnyi' × 'Muscat Ottonel' as the true parentage for the male parent of 'Solaris'. PMID:21935694

  4. Accessory Gene Regulator-1 Locus Is Essential for Virulence and Pathogenesis of Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Odo, Chioma; DuPont, Herbert L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is responsible for most of the definable cases of antibiotic- and hospital-associated diarrhea worldwide and is a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in older patients. C. difficile, a multidrug-resistant anaerobic pathogen, causes disease by producing toxins A and B, which are controlled by an accessory gene regulator (Agr) quorum signaling system. Some C. difficile strains encode two Agr loci in their genomes, designated agr1 and agr2. The agr1 locus is present in all of the C. difficile strains sequenced to date, whereas the agr2 locus is present in a few strains. The functional roles of agr1 and agr2 in C. difficile toxin regulation and pathogenesis were unknown until now. Using allelic exchange, we deleted components of both agr loci and examined the mutants for toxin production and virulence. The results showed that the agr1 mutant cannot produce toxins A and B; toxin production can be restored by complementation with wild-type agr1. Furthermore, the agr1 mutant is able to colonize but unable to cause disease in a murine CDI model. These findings have profound implications for CDI treatment because we have uncovered a promising therapeutic target for the development of nonantibiotic drugs to treat this life-threatening emerging pathogen by targeting the toxins directly responsible for disease. PMID:27531912

  5. Genomic location of the major ribosomal protein gene locus determines Vibrio cholerae global growth and infectivity.

    PubMed

    Soler-Bistué, Alfonso; Mondotte, Juan A; Bland, Michael Jason; Val, Marie-Eve; Saleh, María-Carla; Mazel, Didier

    2015-04-01

    The effects on cell physiology of gene order within the bacterial chromosome are poorly understood. In silico approaches have shown that genes involved in transcription and translation processes, in particular ribosomal protein (RP) genes, localize near the replication origin (oriC) in fast-growing bacteria suggesting that such a positional bias is an evolutionarily conserved growth-optimization strategy. Such genomic localization could either provide a higher dosage of these genes during fast growth or facilitate the assembly of ribosomes and transcription foci by keeping physically close the many components of these macromolecular machines. To explore this, we used novel recombineering tools to create a set of Vibrio cholerae strains in which S10-spec-α (S10), a locus bearing half of the ribosomal protein genes, was systematically relocated to alternative genomic positions. We show that the relative distance of S10 to the origin of replication tightly correlated with a reduction of S10 dosage, mRNA abundance and growth rate within these otherwise isogenic strains. Furthermore, this was accompanied by a significant reduction in the host-invasion capacity in Drosophila melanogaster. Both phenotypes were rescued in strains bearing two S10 copies highly distal to oriC, demonstrating that replication-dependent gene dosage reduction is the main mechanism behind these alterations. Hence, S10 positioning connects genome structure to cell physiology in Vibrio cholerae. Our results show experimentally for the first time that genomic positioning of genes involved in the flux of genetic information conditions global growth control and hence bacterial physiology and potentially its evolution. PMID:25875621

  6. Characterization and localization of ORFF gene from the LD1 locus of Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Jain, Manju; Madhubala, Rentala

    2008-06-15

    The Leishmania genome project has identified new genes at a rapid rate. The 32.8-megabase haploid genome of Leishmania major (Friedlin strain) is published and the comparative analysis of genome sequences of two other species, Leishmania infantum and Leishmanai braziliensis has been done. The haploid genome of Leishmania major (Friedlin strain) has around 8272 protein-coding genes, of which only 36% can be ascribed a putative function. Out of these open reading frames around 910 Leishmania major genes have no orthologs in the other two Tritryp genomes. These "Leishmania -restricted" genes hold a potential as novel drug targets and potential vaccine candidates. Open reading frame, ORFF, is a single copy gene located on the chromosome 35 as a part of the multigene LD1 locus. Indirect immunofluorescence study and creation of ORFF-GFP fusion showed that ORFF is localized in the DNA containing compartments of Leishmania donovani, the nucleus and the kinetoplast. In order to characterize ORFF gene of L. donovani, we have created ORFF over-expressors and single allele deletion mutants by homologous replacement strategy. ORFF is likely to be an important gene for the parasite growth since results from over-expression studies and characterization of ORFF heterozygous knockout mutants reveal marked alterations in the cell cycle phenotype compared to the wild-type parasites. Flowcytometry based cell cycle analysis showed selective increase in the DNA synthetic phase of the ORFF over-expressors and a subversion of the same in heterozygous knockouts of ORFF suggesting its potential role in cell cycle progression. PMID:18423903

  7. Mapping of the recessive white locus and analysis of the tyrosinase gene in chickens.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Otake, T; Suzuki, C; Saburi, J; Kobayashi, E

    2007-10-01

    An F(2) chicken population of 265 individuals, obtained from an intercross between the Japanese Game (colored plumage) and the White Plymouth Rock (the recessive white) and genotyped for microsatellite markers, was used for determining the locus of the gene responsible for the recessive white plumage phenotype in chickens. Two hundred twenty-five markers were mapped in 28 linkage groups. Linkage analysis revealed that the recessive white gene was mapped to chromosome 1. Detailed analysis using additional markers uncovered a significant linkage between 2 new markers, mapped to the flanking region of the tyrosinase gene, which is associated with skin and plumage color. The sequence of the tyrosinase gene was investigated in recessive white chickens and colored chickens. There were no obvious differences in the tyrosinase gene exons between the recessive white chicken and the colored chicken. However, sequence analysis of tyrosinase intron 4 in the recessive white chicken revealed a presence of an insertion of an avian retroviral sequence. The White Plymouth Rock and the F(2) generation with white plumage were identified as homozygous carriers of the retroviral sequence. Expression of the normal transcript containing exon 5 was substantially decreased in the recessive white chicken compared with the colored chicken. Some abnormal tyrosinase gene transcripts were expressed in the skin of the White Plymouth Rock: reverse transcription PCR products amplified from exon 3 to intron 4 and from retroviral sequence 3' long terminal repeat to exon 5. Based on these results, it was confirmed that an avian retroviral sequence insertion in the tyrosinase gene was the cause of recessive white phenotype in chickens. PMID:17878441

  8. Molecular cloning of a putative receptor protein kinase gene encoded at the self-incompatibility locus of Brassica oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, J.C.; Howlett, B.; Boyes, D.C.; Nasrallah, M.E.; Nasrallah, J.B. )

    1991-10-01

    Self-recognition between pollen and stigma during pollination in Brassica oleracea is genetically controlled by the multiallelic self-incompatibility locus (S). The authors describe the S receptor kinase (SRK) gene, a previously uncharacterized gene that residues at the S locus. The nucleotide sequences of genomic DNA and of cDNAs corresponding to SRK predict a putative transmembrane receptor having serine/threonine-specific protein kinase activity. Its extracellular domain exhibits striking homology to the secreted product of the S-locus genotypes are highly polymorphic and have apparently evolved in unison with genetically linked alleles of SLG. SRK directs the synthesis of several alternative transcripts, which potentially encode different protein products, and these transcripts were detected exclusively in reproductive organs. The identification of SRK may provide new perspectives into the signal transduction mechanism underlying pollen recognition.

  9. Plasmid-based transient human stromal cell-derived factor-1 gene transfer improves cardiac function in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaman, S; Miller, T J; Pastore, J M; Kiedrowski, M; Aras, R; Penn, M S

    2011-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that transient stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1) improved cardiac function when delivered via cell therapy in ischemic cardiomyopathy at a time remote from acute myocardial infarction (MI) rats. We hypothesized that non-viral gene transfer of naked plasmid DNA-expressing hSDF-1 could similarly improve cardiac function. To optimize plasmid delivery, we tested SDF-1 and luciferase plasmids driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter with (pCMVe) or without (pCMV) translational enhancers or α myosin heavy chain (pMHC) promoter in a rodent model of heart failure. In vivo expression of pCMVe was 10-fold greater than pCMV and pMHC expression and continued over 30 days. We directly injected rat hearts with SDF-1 plasmid 1 month after MI and assessed heart function. At 4 weeks after plasmid injection, we observed a 35.97 and 32.65% decline in fractional shortening (FS) in control (saline) animals and pMHC-hSDF1 animals, respectively, which was sustained to 8 weeks. In contrast, we observed a significant 24.97% increase in animals injected with the pCMVe-hSDF1 vector. Immunohistochemistry of cardiac tissue revealed a significant increase in vessel density in the hSDF-1-treated animals compared with control animals. Increasing SDF-1 expression promoted angiogenesis and improved cardiac function in rats with ischemic heart failure along with evidence of scar remodeling with a trend toward decreased myocardial fibrosis. These data demonstrate that stand-alone non-viral hSDF-1 gene transfer is a strategy for improving cardiac function in ischemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:21472007

  10. Differentiation inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) induces gene and protein expression of the Dictyostelium nuclear calmodulin-binding protein nucleomorphin.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Poloz, Yekaterina; Myre, Michael A

    2009-02-01

    The nucleomorphin gene numA1 from Dictyostelium codes for a multi-domain, calmodulin binding protein that regulates nuclear number. To gain insight into the regulation of numA, we assessed the effects of the stalk cell differentiation inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), an extracellular signalling molecule, on the expression of numA1 RNA and protein. For comparison, the extracellular signalling molecules cAMP (mediates chemotaxis, prestalk and prespore differentiation) and ammonia (NH(3)/NH(4)(+); antagonizes DIF) were also studied. Starvation, which is a signal for multicellular development, results in a greater than 80% decrease in numA1 mRNA expression within 4 h. Treatment with ammonium chloride led to a greater than 90% inhibition of numA1 RNA expression within 2 h. In contrast, the addition of DIF-1 completely blocked the decrease in numA1 gene expression caused by starvation. Treatment of vegetative cells with cAMP led to decreases in numA1 RNA expression that were equivalent to those seen with starvation. Western blotting after various morphogen treatments showed that the maintenance of vegetative levels of numA1 RNA by DIF-1 in starved cells was reflected in significantly increased numA1 protein levels. Treatment with cAMP and/or ammonia led to decreased protein expression and each of these morphogens suppressed the stimulatory effects of DIF-1. Protein expression levels of CBP4a, a calcium-dependent binding partner of numA1, were regulated in the same manner as numA1 suggesting this potential co-regulation may be related to their functional relationship. NumA1 is the first calmodulin binding protein shown to be regulated by developmental morphogens in Dictyostelium being upregulated by DIF-1 and down-regulated by cAMP and ammonia. PMID:19000924

  11. Elongation Factor 1β′ Gene from Spodoptera exigua: Characterization and Function Identification through RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li-Na; Qin, Zi; Wei, Ping; Guo, Hong-Shuang; Dang, Xiang-Li; Wang, Shi-Gui; Tang, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Elongation factor (EF) is a key regulation factor for translation in many organisms, including plants, bacteria, fungi, animals and insects. To investigate the nature and function of elongation factor 1β′ from Spodoptera exigua (SeEF-1β′), its cDNA was cloned. This contained an open reading frame of 672 nucleotides encoding a protein of 223 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 24.04 kDa and pI of 4.53. Northern blotting revealed that SeEF-1β′ mRNA is expressed in brain, epidermis, fat body, midgut, Malpighian tubules, ovary and tracheae. RT-PCR revealed that SeEF-1β′ mRNA is expressed at different levels in fat body and whole body during different developmental stages. In RNAi experiments, the survival rate of insects injected with SeEF-1β′ dsRNA was 58.7% at 36 h after injection, which was significantly lower than three control groups. Other elongation factors and transcription factors were also influenced when EF-1β′ was suppressed. The results demonstrate that SeEF-1β′ is a key gene in transcription in S. exigua. PMID:22942694

  12. Kamebakaurin inhibits the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and its target genes to confer antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke Si; Ma, Juan; Mi, Chunliu; Li, Jing; Lee, Jung Joon; Jin, Xuejun

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), a heterodimeric transcription factor that mediates the adaptation of tumor cells and tissues to the hypoxic microenvironment, has attracted considerable interest as a potential therapeutic target. Kamebakaurin is a diterpenoid compound isolated from Isodon excia (Maxin.) Hara, which has been used for anti-inflammatory activities. However, its antitumor activity along with molecular mechanism has not been reported. Kamebakaurin showed potent inhibitory activity against HIF-1 activation induced by hypoxia or CoCl2 in various human cancer cell lines. This compound significantly decreased the hypoxia-induced accumulation of HIF-1α protein, whereas it did not affect the expression of topoisomerase-I (Topo-I). Further analysis revealed that kamebakaurin inhibited HIF-1α protein synthesis, without affecting the expression level of HIF-1α mRNA or degradation of HIF-1α protein. Furthermore, kamebakaurin prevented hypoxia-induced expression of HIF-1 target genes for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and erythropoietin (EPO). However, kamebakaurin caused cell growth inhibition via cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in tumor cells. In vivo studies, we further confirmed the inhibitory effect of kamebakaurin on the expression of HIF-1α proteins, leading to growth inhibition of HCT116 cells in a xenograft tumor model. These results show that kamebakaurin is an effective inhibitor of HIF-1 and provide new perspectives into its anticancer activity. PMID:26781327

  13. Gene Regulatory Network Inference of Immunoresponsive Gene 1 (IRG1) Identifies Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 (IRF1) as Its Transcriptional Regulator in Mammalian Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tallam, Aravind; Perumal, Thaneer M; Antony, Paul M; Jäger, Christian; Fritz, Joëlle V; Vallar, Laurent; Balling, Rudi; Del Sol, Antonio; Michelucci, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Immunoresponsive gene 1 (IRG1) is one of the highest induced genes in macrophages under pro-inflammatory conditions. Its function has been recently described: it codes for immune-responsive gene 1 protein/cis-aconitic acid decarboxylase (IRG1/CAD), an enzyme catalysing the production of itaconic acid from cis-aconitic acid, a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate. Itaconic acid possesses specific antimicrobial properties inhibiting isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt, an anaplerotic pathway that bypasses the TCA cycle and enables bacteria to survive on limited carbon conditions. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying itaconic acid production through IRG1 induction in macrophages, we examined the transcriptional regulation of IRG1. To this end, we studied IRG1 expression in human immune cells under different inflammatory stimuli, such as TNFα and IFNγ, in addition to lipopolysaccharides. Under these conditions, as previously shown in mouse macrophages, IRG1/CAD accumulates in mitochondria. Furthermore, using literature information and transcription factor prediction models, we re-constructed raw gene regulatory networks (GRNs) for IRG1 in mouse and human macrophages. We further implemented a contextualization algorithm that relies on genome-wide gene expression data to infer putative cell type-specific gene regulatory interactions in mouse and human macrophages, which allowed us to predict potential transcriptional regulators of IRG1. Among the computationally identified regulators, siRNA-mediated gene silencing of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) in macrophages significantly decreased the expression of IRG1/CAD at the gene and protein level, which correlated with a reduced production of itaconic acid. Using a synergistic approach of both computational and experimental methods, we here shed more light on the transcriptional machinery of IRG1 expression and could pave the way to therapeutic approaches targeting itaconic acid levels

  14. Gene Regulatory Network Inference of Immunoresponsive Gene 1 (IRG1) Identifies Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 (IRF1) as Its Transcriptional Regulator in Mammalian Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tallam, Aravind; Perumal, Thaneer M.; Antony, Paul M.; Jäger, Christian; Fritz, Joëlle V.; Vallar, Laurent; Balling, Rudi; del Sol, Antonio; Michelucci, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Immunoresponsive gene 1 (IRG1) is one of the highest induced genes in macrophages under pro-inflammatory conditions. Its function has been recently described: it codes for immune-responsive gene 1 protein/cis-aconitic acid decarboxylase (IRG1/CAD), an enzyme catalysing the production of itaconic acid from cis-aconitic acid, a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate. Itaconic acid possesses specific antimicrobial properties inhibiting isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt, an anaplerotic pathway that bypasses the TCA cycle and enables bacteria to survive on limited carbon conditions. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying itaconic acid production through IRG1 induction in macrophages, we examined the transcriptional regulation of IRG1. To this end, we studied IRG1 expression in human immune cells under different inflammatory stimuli, such as TNFα and IFNγ, in addition to lipopolysaccharides. Under these conditions, as previously shown in mouse macrophages, IRG1/CAD accumulates in mitochondria. Furthermore, using literature information and transcription factor prediction models, we re-constructed raw gene regulatory networks (GRNs) for IRG1 in mouse and human macrophages. We further implemented a contextualization algorithm that relies on genome-wide gene expression data to infer putative cell type-specific gene regulatory interactions in mouse and human macrophages, which allowed us to predict potential transcriptional regulators of IRG1. Among the computationally identified regulators, siRNA-mediated gene silencing of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) in macrophages significantly decreased the expression of IRG1/CAD at the gene and protein level, which correlated with a reduced production of itaconic acid. Using a synergistic approach of both computational and experimental methods, we here shed more light on the transcriptional machinery of IRG1 expression and could pave the way to therapeutic approaches targeting itaconic acid levels

  15. Expression of the poplar Flowering Locus T1 (FT1) gene reduces the generation time in plum (Prunus domestica L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plums normally begin to flower and fruit three to seven years from seed. To shorten this generation time, early flowering plum genotypes were produced by transforming plum hypocotyls with the poplar (Populus trichocarpa) Flowering Locus T1 (PtFT1) gene. Ectopic expression of 35S::PtFT1 induced ear...

  16. An ALMT1 gene cluster controlling aluminium (aluminum) tolerance at the Alt4 locus of rye (Secale cereale L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aluminium toxicity is a major problem in agriculture worldwide. Among the cultivated triticeae, rye (Secale cereale L.) is one of the most Al-tolerant and represents an important potential source of Al-tolerance for improvement of wheat. The Alt4 Al-tolerance locus of rye contains a cluster of genes...

  17. The alcohol dehydrogenase gene is nested in the outspread locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    McNabb, S.; Greig, S.; Davis, T.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the structure and expression of the outspread (osp) gene of Drosophila melanogaster. Previous work showed that chromosomal breakpoints associated with mutations of the osp locus map to both sides of the alcohol dehydrogenase gene (Adh), suggesting that Adh and the adjacent gene Adh{sup r} are nested in osp. We extended a chromosomal walk and mapped additional osp mutations to define the maximum molecular limit of osp as 119 kb. We identified a 6-kb transcript that hybridizes to osp region DNA and is altered or absent in osp mutants. Accumulation of this RNA peaks during embryonic and pupal periods. The osp cDNAs comprise two distinct classes based on alternative splicing patterns. The 5{prime} end of the longest cDNA was extended by PCR amplification. When hybridized to the osp walk, the 5{prime} extension verifies that Adh and Adh{sup r} are nested in osp and shows that osp has a transcription unit of {ge}74 kb. In situ hybridization shows that osp is expressed both maternally and zygotically. In the ovary, osp is transcribed in nurse cells and localized in the oocyte. In embryos, expression is most abundant in the developing visceral and somatic musculature. 55 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  18. TALEN‐mediated gene editing of the thrombospondin‐1 locus in axolotl

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tzu‐Hsing; Kowalko, Johanna E.; DiTommaso, Tia; Nyambi, Mandi; Montoro, Daniel T.; Essner, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Loss‐of‐function genetics provides strong evidence for a gene's function in a wild‐type context. In many model systems, this approach has been invaluable for discovering the function of genes in diverse biological processes. Axolotls are urodele amphibians (salamanders) with astonishing regenerative abilities, capable of regenerating entire limbs, portions of the tail (including spinal cord), heart, and brain into adulthood. With their relatively short generation time among salamanders, they offer an outstanding opportunity to interrogate natural mechanisms for appendage and organ regeneration provided that the tools are developed to address these long‐standing questions. Here we demonstrate targeted modification of the thrombospondin‐1 (tsp‐1) locus using transcription‐activator‐like effector nucleases (TALENs) and identify a role of tsp‐1 in recruitment of myeloid cells during limb regeneration. We find that while tsp‐1‐edited mosaic animals still regenerate limbs, they exhibit a reduced subepidermal collagen layer in limbs and an increased number of myeloid cells within blastemas. This work presents a protocol for generating and genotyping mosaic axolotls with TALEN‐mediated gene edits.

  19. Dentin phosphoprotein gene locus is not associated with dentinogenesis imperfecta types II and III

    SciTech Connect

    MacDougall, M.; Zeichner-David, M.; Davis, A.; Slavkin, H. ); Murray, J. ); Crall, M. )

    1992-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) is an autosomal dominant inherited dental disease which affects dentin production and mineralization. Genetic linkage studies have been performed on several multigeneration informative kindreds. These studies determined linkage between DGI types II and III and group-specific component (vitamin D-binding protein). This gene locus has been localized to the long arm of human chromosome 4 in the region 4q11-q21. Although this disease has been mapped to chromosome 4, the defective gene product is yet to be determined. Biochemical studies have suggested abnormal levels of dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) associated with DGI type II. This highly acidic protein is the major noncollagenous component of dentin, being solely expressed by the ectomesenchymal derived odontoblast cells of the tooth. The purpose of the present study was to establish whether DPP is associated with DGI types II and III, by using molecular biology techniques. The results indicated that DPP is not localized to any region of human chromosome 4, thus suggesting that the DPP gene is not directly associated with DGI type II or DGI type III. The data do not exclude the possibility that other proteins associated with DPP posttranslational modifications might be responsible for this genetic disease.

  20. Surf5: A gene in the tightly clustered mouse surfeit locus is highly conserved and transcribed divergently from the rpL7A (Surf3) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Garson, K.; Duhig, T.; Armes, N.; Colombo, P.; Fried, M.

    1995-11-20

    The four previously characterized genes (Surf1 to 4) of the mouse Surfeit locus do not share any sequence homology, and the transcription of each gene alternates with respect to its neighbors. Adjacent Surfeit genes are separated by very small distances, and two of the genes overlap at their 3{prime} ends. In this work we have further defined the Surfeit gene cluster by the isolation of Surf5, a fifth gene of the locus, and determination of its relationship to the other Surfeit genes. Surf5 does not share any sequence homology with the four cloned Surfeit genes. The transcription of Surf5 is divergent with respect to its neighbor the Surf3 gene, and the 5{prime} ends of Surf5 and Surf3 are separated by only 159 bp, suggesting the presence of a second bidirectional promoter in the locus. The 3{prime} end of Surf5 maps only 68 bp away from the processed 3{prime} end of a pseudogene. The human and partial chicken Surf5 coding regions show greater than 95% identity, and a Caenorhabditis elegans homologue shows 38% identity and 56% similarity with the mouse Surf5 amino acid sequence. The 3.5-kb transcript of Surf5 encodes a small hydrophilic protein of 140 amino acid residues, which differs from the ribosomal protein L7a encoded by the Surf3 gene or the integral membrane protein encoded by the Surf4 gene. Subcellular fractionation located the Surf5 protein to the soluble fraction of the cytoplasm. The Surfeit locus appears to represent a novel type of gene cluster in which the genes are unrelated by sequence or function; however, their organization may play a role in their gene expression. 44 refs., 5 figs.

  1. [Gene polymorphism at apoB locus and the serum lipids profile in children].

    PubMed

    Zhu, W; Feng, N; Wang, Y; Ye, G

    2001-09-01

    The relations of gene polymorphism at the apolipoprotein B locus and serum lipid profile in children was studied in 308 normal 7-11 year-old children, including 151 boys and 157 girls. Blood samples were collected for all subjects, and then the serum and blood clot were separated. Serum lipids, including TC, TG, LDL-C, HDL-C, apoB, apoA I and Lp(a) were detected. Genome DNA was extracted from blood clot, then apoB-Xba I gene polymorphism were tested by PCR-RFLP method. The results showed that the distribution of apoB-Xba I genotype in 308 children accorded with Hardy-Weiberg inheritance equilibrium law. The frequency of heterozygote(+/-) was 13.3%, allele(+) was 0.067. The frequency of allele(+) was closed to the internal and Japanese reports (0.033 and 0.04), but much less than the Caucasians (0.50). This showed a ethnic and population difference in the inheritance variation. The average LDL-C levels of the heterozygotes(+/-) were 2.17 mmol/L, no difference compared with homozygotes(-/-) (2.21 mmol/L, P > 0.05). There was also no difference for the genotype distribution between the hyperlipidemia group and control group, which may be the results of no enough sample size and the sample selection, and so on. On the other hand, in normal children, serum lipids controlled by many genes, the effect of a single gene might be small. More studies and analysis on the relationship between serum lipids and multiple genes in multisites should be the next step. PMID:12561593

  2. Identification of the minus-dominance gene ortholog in the mating-type locus of Gonium pectorale.

    PubMed

    Hamaji, Takashi; Ferris, Patrick J; Coleman, Annette W; Waffenschmidt, Sabine; Takahashi, Fumio; Nishii, Ichiro; Nozaki, Hisayoshi

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of anisogamy/oogamy in the colonial Volvocales might have occurred in an ancestral isogamous colonial organism like Gonium pectorale. The unicellular, close relative Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has a mating-type (MT) locus harboring several mating-type-specific genes, including one involved in mating-type determination and another involved in the function of the tubular mating structure in only one of the two isogametes. In this study, as the first step in identifying the G. pectorale MT locus, we isolated from G. pectorale the ortholog of the C. reinhardtii mating-type-determining minus-dominance (CrMID) gene, which is localized only in the MT- locus. 3'- and 5'-RACE RT-PCR using degenerate primers identified a CrMID-orthologous 164-amino-acid coding gene (GpMID) containing a leucine-zipper RWP-RK domain near the C-terminal, as is the case with CrMID. Genomic Southern blot analysis showed that GpMID was coded only in the minus strain of G. pectorale. RT-PCR revealed that GpMID expression increased during nitrogen starvation. Analysis of F1 progeny suggested that GpMID and isopropylmalate dehydratase LEU1S are tightly linked, suggesting that they are harbored in a chromosomal region under recombinational suppression that is comparable to the C. reinhardtii MT locus. However, two other genes present in the C. reinhardtii MT locus are not linked to the G. pectorale LEU1S/MID, suggesting that the gene content of the volvocalean MT loci is not static over time. Inheritance of chloroplast and mitochondria genomes in G. pectorale is uniparental from the plus and minus parents, respectively, as is also the case in C. reinhardtii. PMID:18202374

  3. The mutated human gene encoding hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β inhibits kidney formation in developing Xenopus embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Wiltrud; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke; Nastos, Aristotelis; Senkel, Sabine; Lingott-Frieg, Anja; Bulman, Michael; Bingham, Coralie; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Ryffel, Gerhart U.

    2000-01-01

    The transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β (HNF1β) is a tissue-specific regulator that also plays an essential role in early development of vertebrates. In humans, four heterozygous mutations in the HNF1β gene have been identified that lead to early onset of diabetes and severe primary renal defects. The degree and type of renal defects seem to depend on the specific mutation. We show that the frameshift mutant P328L329fsdelCCTCT associated with nephron agenesis retains its DNA-binding properties and acts as a gain-of-function mutation with increased transactivation potential in transfection experiments. Expression of this mutated factor in the Xenopus embryo leads to defective development and agenesis of the pronephros, the first kidney form of amphibians. Very similar defects are generated by overexpressing in Xenopus the wild-type HNF1β, which is consistent with the gain-of-function property of the mutant. In contrast, introduction of the human HNF1β mutant R137-K161del, which is associated with a reduced number of nephrons with hypertrophy of the remaining ones and which has an impaired DNA binding, shows only a minor effect on pronephros development in Xenopus. Thus, the overexpression of both human mutants has a different effect on renal development in Xenopus, reflecting the variation in renal phenotype seen with these mutations. We conclude that mutations in human HNF1β can be functionally characterized in Xenopus. Our findings imply that HNF1β not only is an early marker of kidney development but also is functionally involved in morphogenetic events, and these processes can be investigated in lower vertebrates. PMID:10758154

  4. Polymorphisms in the kinesin-like factor 1 B gene and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in Eastern Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ting-Yan; Jiang, Zhi; Jiang, Rong; Yin, Sheng; Wang, Meng-Yun; Yu, Ke-Da; Shao, Zhi-Ming; Sun, Meng-Hong; Zang, Rongyu; Wei, Qingyi

    2015-09-01

    The kinesin-like factor 1 B (KIF1B) gene plays an important role in the process of apoptosis and the transformation and progression of malignant cells. Genetic variations in KIF1B may contribute to risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). In this study of 1,324 EOC patients and 1,386 cancer-free female controls, we investigated associations between two potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms in KIF1B and EOC risk by the conditional logistic regression analysis. General linear regression model was used to evaluate the correlation between the number of variant alleles and KIF1B mRNA expression levels. We found that the rs17401966 variant AG/GG genotypes were significantly associated with a decreased risk of EOC (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.81, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 0.68-0.97), compared with the AA genotype, but no associations were observed for rs1002076. Women who carried both rs17401966 AG/GG and rs1002076 AG/AA genotypes of KIF1B had a 0.82-fold decreased risk (adjusted 95 % CI = 0.69-0.97), compared with others. Additionally, there was no evidence of possible interactions between about-mentioned co-variants. Further genotype-phenotype correlation analysis indicated that the number of rs17401966 variant G allele was significantly associated with KIF1B mRNA expression levels (P for GLM = 0.003 and 0.001 in all and Chinese subjects, respectively), with GG carriers having the lowest level of KIF1B mRNA expression. Taken together, the rs17401966 polymorphism likely regulates KIF1B mRNA expression and thus may be associated with EOC risk in Eastern Chinese women. Larger, independent studies are warranted to validate our findings. PMID:25854172

  5. Internal Duplications of DH, JH, and C Region Genes Create an Unusual IgH Gene Locus in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Qin, Tong; Chu, Dan; Cheng, Xueqian; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xifeng; Wang, Peng; Han, Haitang; Ren, Liming; Aitken, Robert; Hammarström, Lennart; Li, Ning; Zhao, Yaofeng

    2016-05-15

    It has been suspected for many years that cattle possess two functional IgH gene loci, located on Bos taurus autosome (BTA) 21 and BTA11, respectively. In this study, based on fluorescence in situ hybridization and additional experiments, we showed that all functional bovine IgH genes were located on BTA21, and only a truncated μCH2 exon was present on BTA11. By sequencing of seven bacterial artificial chromosome clones screened from a Hostein cow bacterial artificial chromosome library, we generated a 678-kb continuous genomic sequence covering the bovine IGHV, IGHD, IGHJ, and IGHC genes, which are organized as IGHVn-IGHDn-IGHJn-IGHM1-(IGHDP-IGHV3-IGHDn)3-IGHJn-IGHM2-IGHD-IGHG3-IGHG1-IGHG2-IGHE-IGHA. Although both of two functional IGHM genes, IGHM1 and IGHM2, can be expressed via independent VDJ recombinations, the IGHM2 can also be expressed through class switch recombination. Likely because more IGHD segments can be involved in the expression of IGHM2, the IGHM2 gene was shown to be dominantly expressed in most tissues throughout different developmental stages. Based on the length and identity of the coding sequence, the 23 IGHD segments identified in the locus could be divided into nine subgroups (termed IGHD1 to IGHD9). Except two members of IGHD9 (14 nt in size), all other functional IGHD segments are longer than 30 nt, with the IGHD8 gene (149 bp) to be the longest. These remarkably long germline IGHD segments play a pivotal role in generating the exceptionally great H chain CDR 3 length variability in cattle. PMID:27053761

  6. Phenotype selection for detecting variable genes: a survey of cardiovascular quantitative traits and TNF locus polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Hong, Mun-Gwan; Bennet, Anna M; de Faire, Ulf; Prince, Jonathan A

    2007-06-01

    The practice of using discrete clinical diagnoses in genetic association studies has seldom led to a replicable genetic model. If, as the literature suggests, weak genotype-phenotype relationships are detected when clinical diagnoses are used, power might be increased by exploring more fundamental biological traits. Emerging solutions to this include directly modeling levels of the protein product of a gene (usually in plasma) and sequence variation specifically in/around that gene, as well as exploring multiple quantitative traits related to a disease of interest. Here, we attempt a strategy based upon these premises examining sequence variants near the TNF locus, a region widely studied in cardiovascular disease. Multilocus genotype models were used to perform a systematic screen of 18 metabolic and anthropometric traits for genetic association. While there was no evidence for an effect of TNF polymorphism on plasma TNF levels, a relatively strong effect on plasma PAI-1 levels did emerge (P=0.000019), but this was only evident in post-myocardial infarction patients. Modeled jointly with the common 4G/5G insertion/deletion polymorphism of SERPINE1 (formerly PAI), this effect appears large (10% of variance explained versus 2% for SERPINE1 4G/5G). We exhibit this finding cautiously, and use it to illustrate how transitioning the study of disease risk to quantitative traits might empower the identification of functionally variable genes. Further, a case is highlighted where association between sequence variation in a gene and its product is not readily apparent even in large samples, but where association with a down-stream pathway may be. PMID:17356550

  7. A new risk locus in the ZEB2 gene for schizophrenia in the Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Khan, Raja Amjad Waheed; Chen, Jianhua; Wang, Meng; Li, Zhiqiang; Shen, Jiawei; Wen, Zujia; Song, Zhijian; Li, Wenjin; Xu, Yifeng; Wang, Lishan; Shi, Yongyong

    2016-04-01

    The ZEB2 gene encodes the Zinc Finger E-box binding protein. As a key regulator of epithelial mesenchymal differentiation, ZEB2 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cancer, and its high level expression has been observed in glioma patients. Different mutations in this gene have been identified in patients with Mowat-Wilson syndrome. A previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) of schizophrenia conducted in Caucasians has shown a significant association of rs12991836, located near the ZEB2 gene, with schizophrenia. Thus, we conducted a case control study to further investigate whether this genomic region is also a susceptibility locus for schizophrenia in the Han Chinese population. In total, 1248 schizophrenia (SCZ) cases (mean age±S.D., 36.44±9.0years), 1344 bipolar disorder (BPD) cases (mean age±S.D., 34.84±11.44years), 1056 major depressive disorder (MDD) cases (mean age±S.D., 34.41±12.09years) and 1248 healthy control samples (mean age±S.D., 30.62±11.35years) were recruited. We genotyped 12 SNPs using the Sequenom MassARRAY platform in this study. We found that rs6755392 showed a significant association with SCZ (rs6755392: adjusted Pallele=0.016; adjusted Pgenotype=0.052; OR (95% CI)=1.201 (1.073~1.344)). Additionally, two haplotypes (TCTG, TCTA) were also significantly associated with SCZ. This is the first study claiming the association of the genetic risks of rs6755392 in the ZEB2 gene with schizophrenia. PMID:26654950

  8. The HLA DQB1 gene locus: Further evidence for an association with schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.R.; Rudert, W.A.; Nimgaonkar, L.

    1994-09-01

    A genetic predisposition to schizophrenia is well-established. Immunological abnormalities suggestive of an auto-immune disorder have also been noted. However, no consistent associations with HLA have been detected. A negative association between schizophrenia and HLA DQB1*0602 among African-Americans, but not among Caucasian individuals, was reported recently. The association is plausible, because (i) an association of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) with the HLA DQB1 gene locus is known, and (ii) an inverse relationship between the prevalence of schizophrenia and IDDM has been suggested. In view of the ethnic differences in the above association, a cohort of Chinese ethnicity from Singapore was examined in the present study. Consenting male inpatients with schizophrenia (n=102, ICD-9 criteria) participated. The controls were male adults undergoing pre-employment checkup (n=111). HLA DQB1 gene polymorphisms were analyzed using a PCR-based reverse dot-blot assay. In case of ambiguity, samples were checked using PCR amplification with sequence-specific primers. In support of the earlier report, a negative association with HLA DQB1*0602 was noted (odds ratio 0.22, C.I. 0.18, 0.83; {chi}{sup 2}=8.0, p<0.005; both analyses uncorrected for multiple comparisons).

  9. The SLC2A14 gene: genomic locus, tissue expression, splice variants, and subcellular localization of the protein.

    PubMed

    Amir Shaghaghi, Mandana; Murphy, Brent; Eck, Peter

    2016-08-01

    The SLC2A14 gene encodes for GLUT14, an orphan member of the facilitated membrane glucose transporter family, which was originally described to be exclusively expressed in human testis. However, genetic variations in SLC2A14 are associated with chronic diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Inflammatory Bowel Disease, which cannot be explained by a strictly testicular expression. Therefore we analyzed available information on the SLC2A14 gene to update knowledge of the locus and its encoded products. This report presents an expanded SLC2A14 gene locus and a more diverse tissue expression, concurring with the existing evidence for disease associations. The exon utilization is tissue specific, with major expression in testis. When the 2 major testicular protein isoforms were expressed in mammalian cells, they located to the plasmalemma membrane, providing early evidence that GLUT14 could function as a membrane transporter. PMID:27460888

  10. Quantitative trait locus gene mapping: a new method for locating alcohol response genes.

    PubMed

    Crabbe, J C

    1996-01-01

    Alcoholism is a multigenic trait with important non-genetic determinants. Studies with genetic animal models of susceptibility to several of alcohol's effects suggest that several genes contributing modest effects on susceptibility (Quantitative Trait Loci, or QTLs) are important. A new technique of QTL gene mapping has allowed the identification of the location in mouse genome of several such QTLs. The method is described, and the locations of QTLs affecting the acute alcohol withdrawal reaction are described as an example of the method. Verification of these QTLs in ancillary studies is described and the strengths, limitations, and future directions to be pursued are discussed. QTL mapping is a promising method for identifying genes in rodents with the hope of directly extrapolating the results to the human genome. This review is based on a paper presented at the First International Congress of the Latin American Society for Biomedical Research on Alcoholism, Santiago, Chile, November 1994. PMID:12893462

  11. Imprinting defects at human 14q32 locus alters gene expression and is associated with the pathobiology of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jingmin; Li, Lihua; Sarver, Anne E; Pope, Emily A; Varshney, Jyotika; Thayanithy, Venugopal; Spector, Logan; Largaespada, David A; Steer, Clifford J; Subramanian, Subbaya

    2016-04-19

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone malignancy affecting children and adolescents. Although several genetic predisposing conditions have been associated with osteosarcoma, our understanding of its pathobiology is rather limited. Here we show that, first, an imprinting defect at human 14q32-locus is highly prevalent (87%) and specifically associated with osteosarcoma patients < 30 years of age. Second, the average demethylation at differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in the 14q32-locus varied significantly compared to genome-wide demethylation. Third, the 14q32-locus was enriched in both H3K4-me3 and H3K27-me3 histone modifications that affected expression of all imprinted genes and miRNAs in this region. Fourth, imprinting defects at 14q32 - DMRs are present in triad DNA samples from affected children and their biological parents. Finally, imprinting defects at 14q32-DMRs were also observed at higher frequencies in an Rb1/Trp53 mutation-induced osteosarcoma mouse model. Further analysis of normal and tumor tissues from a Sleeping Beauty mouse model of spontaneous osteosarcoma supported the notion that these imprinting defects may be a key factor in osteosarcoma pathobiology. In conclusion, we demonstrate that imprinting defects at the 14q32 locus significantly alter gene expression, may contribute to the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma, and could be predictive of survival outcomes. PMID:26802029

  12. Imprinting defects at human 14q32 locus alters gene expression and is associated with the pathobiology of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Jingmin; Li, Lihua; Sarver, Anne E.; Pope, Emily A.; Varshney, Jyotika; Thayanithy, Venugopal; Spector, Logan; Largaespada, David A.; Steer, Clifford J.; Subramanian, Subbaya

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone malignancy affecting children and adolescents. Although several genetic predisposing conditions have been associated with osteosarcoma, our understanding of its pathobiology is rather limited. Here we show that, first, an imprinting defect at human 14q32-locus is highly prevalent (87%) and specifically associated with osteosarcoma patients < 30 years of age. Second, the average demethylation at differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in the 14q32-locus varied significantly compared to genome-wide demethylation. Third, the 14q32-locus was enriched in both H3K4-me3 and H3K27-me3 histone modifications that affected expression of all imprinted genes and miRNAs in this region. Fourth, imprinting defects at 14q32 - DMRs are present in triad DNA samples from affected children and their biological parents. Finally, imprinting defects at 14q32-DMRs were also observed at higher frequencies in an Rb1/Trp53 mutation-induced osteosarcoma mouse model. Further analysis of normal and tumor tissues from a Sleeping Beauty mouse model of spontaneous osteosarcoma supported the notion that these imprinting defects may be a key factor in osteosarcoma pathobiology. In conclusion, we demonstrate that imprinting defects at the 14q32 locus significantly alter gene expression, may contribute to the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma, and could be predictive of survival outcomes. PMID:26802029

  13. Regulatory elements necessary for termination of transcription within the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene locus

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.B.

    1992-01-01

    Previous experimentation demonstrated that regulation of the IgM only phenotype in both pre-B and immature B cells was primarily at the transcriptional level. Expression of IgD mRNA involves transcription of the entire 29 kilobase rearranged [mu]-[delta] locus. Mature B cells transcribe the [beta] exons at approximately half the level that they transcribe the [delta] gene. Early B cells however, transcribe the [mu] gene with approximately 90% more efficiency than they do the [delta] gene. Specifically, early B cells show a transcription termination event occurring within a 1 kilobase region of the [mu]-[delta] intron. This dissertation analyzes the sequence elements necessary to encode the transcription termination event within the [mu]-[delta] intron. This work shows that the termination motif consists of specific sequences within the [mu]m poly(A) site as well as a region of the [mu]-[delta] intron contained within a 1200 base pair fragment. The 1200 base pair fragment extends from the Pst I site within the intron and ends just prior to the C[delta]1 exon. This fragment contains a 162 base pair unique sequence inverted repeat (USIR). Furthermore, the [mu]m site is specifically required because the [mu]s site was unable to substitute, despite extensive usage. In addition, the USIR-containing intron functions in an orientation-dependent manner. Analysis of this termination motif in a variety of lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells suggests that this motif is an intrinsic polymerase II termination motif. This implies that transcription termination in early B cells is by a default model and that active regulation of this motif involves an anti-termination event in mature B cells.

  14. Search for the Function of NWC, Third Gene Within RAG Locus: Generation and Characterization of NWC-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Kasztura, Monika; Sniezewski, Lukasz; Laszkiewicz, Agnieszka; Majkowski, Michal; Kobak, Kamil; Peczek, Karolina; Janik, Sylwia; Kapusniak, Violetta; Miazek, Arkadiusz; Cebrat, Malgorzata; Kisielow, Pawel

    2016-08-01

    NWC is a third gene within recombination activating gene (RAG) locus, which unlike RAG genes is ubiquitously expressed and encodes a unique protein containing three strongly evolutionarily conserved domains not found in any other known protein. To get insight into its function we identified several proteins co-immunoprecipitating with NWC protein and generated new NWC-deficient mice. Here, we present evidence that unlike many other ubiquitously expressed evolutionarily conserved proteins, functional inactivation of NWC does not cause any gross developmental, physiological or reproductive abnormalities and that under physiological conditions NWC may be involved in assembling and functioning of cilia, cell surface organelles found on nearly every eukaryotic cell. PMID:26703212

  15. A transcription map of the regions surrounding the CSF1R locus on human chromosome 5q31: Candidate genes for diastrophic dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Clines, G.; Lovett, M.

    1994-09-01

    Diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of unknown pathogenesis that is characterized by abnormal skeletal and cartilage growth. Phenotypic characteristics of the disorder include short stature, scoliosis, and deformation of the first metacarpal. The diastrophic dysplasia gene has been localized to chromosome 5q31-33, within {approximately}60 kb of the colony stimulating factor 1 receptor gene (CSF1R). We have used direct cDNA selection to build a transcription map across {approximately}250 kb surrounding and including the CSF1R locus. cDNA pools from human placenta, activated T cells, cerebellum, Hela cells, fetal brain, chondrocytes, chondrosarcomas and osteosarcomas were multiplexed in these selections. After two rounds of selection, an analysis revealed that {approximately}70% of the selected cDNAs were contained within the contig. DNA sequencing and cosmid mapping data from a collection of 310 clones revealed the presence of three new genes in this region that show no appreciable homologies on sequence database searches, as well as cDNA clones from the CSF1R and the PDGFRB loci (another of the known genes in the region). An additional cDNA was found with 100% homology to the gene encoding human ribosomal protein L7 (RPL7). This cDNA comprised {approximately}25% of all selected clones. However, further analysis of the genomic contig revealed the presence of an RPL7 processed pseudogene in very close proximity to the CSF1R and PDGFRB genes. The selection of processed pseudogenes is one previously anticipated artifact of selection metholodolgies, but has not been previously observed. Mutational analysis of the three new genes is underway in diastrophic dysplasia families, as is derivation of full length cDNA clones and the expansion of this detailed transcription map into a larger genomic contig.

  16. Fine mapping and identification of a candidate gene for a major locus controlling maturity date in peach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Maturity date (MD) is a crucial factor for marketing of fresh fruit, especially those with limited shelf-life such as peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch): selection of several cultivars with differing MD would be advantageous to cover and extend the marketing season. Aims of this work were the fine mapping and identification of candidate genes for the major maturity date locus previously identified on peach linkage group 4. To improve genetic resolution of the target locus two F2 populations derived from the crosses Contender x Ambra (CxA, 306 individuals) and PI91459 (NJ Weeping) x Bounty (WxBy, 103 individuals) were genotyped with the Sequenom and 9K Illumina Peach Chip SNP platforms, respectively. Results Recombinant individuals from the WxBy F2 population allowed the localisation of maturity date locus to a 220 kb region of the peach genome. Among the 25 annotated genes within this interval, functional classification identified ppa007577m and ppa008301m as the most likely candidates, both encoding transcription factors of the NAC (NAM/ATAF1, 2/CUC2) family. Re-sequencing of the four parents and comparison with the reference genome sequence uncovered a deletion of 232 bp in the upstream region of ppa007577m that is homozygous in NJ Weeping and heterozygous in Ambra, Bounty and the WxBy F1 parent. However, this variation did not segregate in the CxA F2 population being the CxA F1 parent homozygous for the reference allele. The second gene was thus examined as a candidate for maturity date. Re-sequencing of ppa008301m, showed an in-frame insertion of 9 bp in the last exon that co-segregated with the maturity date locus in both CxA and WxBy F2 populations. Conclusions Using two different segregating populations, the map position of the maturity date locus was refined from 3.56 Mb to 220 kb. A sequence variant in the NAC gene ppa008301m was shown to co-segregate with the maturity date locus, suggesting this gene as a candidate controlling ripening time in

  17. Transcription Factors Oct-1 and GATA-3 Cooperatively Regulate Th2 Cytokine Gene Expression via the RHS5 within the Th2 Locus Control Region

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kiwan; Kim, Najung; Lee, Gap Ryol

    2016-01-01

    The T helper type 2 (Th2) locus control region (LCR) regulates Th2 cell differentiation. Several transcription factors bind to the LCR to modulate the expression of Th2 cytokine genes, but the molecular mechanisms behind Th2 cytokine gene regulation are incompletely understood. Here, we used database analysis and an oligonucleotide competition/electrophoretic mobility shift assays to search for transcription factors binding to RHS5, a DNase I hypersensitive site (DHS) within the Th2 LCR. Consequently, we demonstrated that GATA-binding protein-3 (GATA-3), E26 transformation-specific protein 1 (Ets-1), octamer transcription factor-1 (Oct-1), and Oct-2 selectively associate with RHS5. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase reporter assays showed that Oct-1 and Oct-2 bound within the Il4 promoter region and the Th2 LCR, and that Oct-1 and GATA-3 or Oct-2 synergistically triggered the transactivational activity of the Il4 promoter through RHS5. These results suggest that Oct-1 and GATA-3/Oct-2 direct Th2 cytokine gene expression in a cooperative manner. PMID:26840450

  18. Knockin of Cre Gene at Ins2 Locus Reveals No Cre Activity in Mouse Hypothalamic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling; Gao, Lin; Wang, Kejia; Ma, Xianhua; Chang, Xusheng; Shi, Jian-Hui; Zhang, Ye; Yin, Kai; Liu, Zhimin; Shi, Yuguang; Xie, Zhifang; Zhang, Weiping J.

    2016-01-01

    The recombination efficiency and cell specificity of Cre driver lines are critical for exploring pancreatic β cell biology with the Cre/LoxP approach. Some commonly used Cre lines are based on the short Ins2 promoter fragment and show recombination activity in hypothalamic neurons; however, whether this stems from endogenous Ins2 promoter activity remains controversial. In this study, we generated Ins2-Cre knockin mice with a targeted insertion of IRES-Cre at the Ins2 locus and demonstrated with a cell lineage tracing study that the Ins2 gene is not transcriptionally active in the hypothalamus. The Ins2-Cre driver line displayed robust Cre expression and activity in pancreatic β cells without significant alterations in insulin expression. In the brain, Cre activity was mainly restricted to the choroid plexus, without significant recombination detected in the hippocampus or hypothalamus by the LacZ or fluorescent tdTomato reporters. Furthermore, Ins2-Cre mice exhibited normal glucose tolerance and insulin secretion upon glucose stimulation in vivo. In conclusion, this Ins2-Cre driver line allowed high-fidelity detection of endogenous Ins2 promoter activity in vivo, and the negative activity in the hypothalamus demonstrated that this system is a promising alternative tool for studying β cell biology. PMID:26830324

  19. gadA gene locus in Lactobacillus brevis NCL912 and its expression during fed-batch fermentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixing; Li, Wenming; Liu, Xiaohua; Cao, Yusheng

    2013-12-01

    Normally, Lactobacillus brevis has two glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) genes; gadA and gadB. Using PCR, we cloned the gadA gene from L. brevis strain NCL912, a high yield strain for the production of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). However, despite using 61 different primer pairs, including degenerate primers from conserved regions, we were unable to use PCR to clone gadB from the NCL912 strain. Furthermore, we could not clone it by genomic walking over 3000 bp downstream of the aldo-keto reductase gene, a single-copy gene that is located 1003 bp upstream of gadB in L. brevis ATCC367. Altogether, the data suggest that L. brevis NCL912 does not contain a gadB gene. By genomic walking, we cloned regions upstream and downstream of the gadA gene to obtain a 4615 bp DNA fragment that included the complete gadA locus. The locus contained the GAD gene (gadA) and the glutamate:GABA antiporter gene (gadC), which appear to be transcribed in an operon (gadCA), and a transcriptional regulator (gadR) of gadCA. During whole fed-batch fermentation, the expression of gadR, gadC and gadA was synchronized and correlated well with GABA production. The gadA locus we cloned from NCL912 has reduced homology compared with gadA loci of other L. brevis strains, and these differences might explain the ability of NCL912 to produce higher levels of GABA in culture. PMID:24164637

  20. Gene Structure of the 10q26 Locus: A Clue to Cracking the ARMS2/HTRA1 Riddle?

    PubMed

    Kortvely, Elod; Ueffing, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a sight-threatening disorder of the central retina. Being the leading cause of visual impairment in senior citizens, it represents a major public health issue in developed countries. Genetic studies of AMD identified two major susceptibility loci on chromosomes 1 and 10. The high-risk allele of the 10q26 locus encompasses three genes, PLEKHA1, ARMS2, and HTRA1 with high linkage disequilibrium and the individual contribution of the encoded proteins to disease etiology remains controversial. While PLEKHA1 and HTRA1 are highly conserved proteins, ARMS2 is only present in primates and can be detected by using RT-PCR. On the other hand, there is no unequivocal evidence for the existence of the encoded protein. However, it has been reported that risk haplotypes only affect the expression of ARMS2 (but not of HTRA1), making ARMS2 the best candidate for being the genuine AMD gene within this locus. Yet, homozygous carriers of a common haplotype carry a premature stop codon in the ARMS2 gene (R38X) and therefore lack ARMS2, but this variant is not associated with AMD. In this work we aimed at characterizing the diversity of transcripts originating from this locus, in order to find new hints on how to resolve this perplexing paradox. We found chimeric transcripts originating from the PLEKHA1 gene but ending in ARMS2. This finding may give a new explanation as to how variants in this locus contribute to AMD. PMID:26427389

  1. A bacterial artificial chromosome contig spanning the major domestication locus Q in wheat and identification of a candidate gene.

    PubMed Central

    Faris, Justin D; Fellers, John P; Brooks, Steven A; Gill, Bikram S

    2003-01-01

    The Q locus played a major role in the domestication of wheat because it confers the free-threshing character and influences many other agronomically important traits. We constructed a physical contig spanning the Q locus using a Triticum monococcum BAC library. Three chromosome walking steps were performed by complete sequencing of BACs and identification of low-copy markers through similarity searches of database sequences. The BAC contig spans a physical distance of approximately 300 kb corresponding to a genetic distance of 0.9 cM. The physical map of T. monococcum had perfect colinearity with the genetic map of wheat chromosome arm 5AL. Recombination data in conjunction with analysis of fast neutron deletions confirmed that the contig spanned the Q locus. The Q gene was narrowed to a 100-kb segment, which contains an APETALA2 (AP2)-like gene that cosegregates with Q. AP2 is known to play a major role in controlling floral homeotic gene expression and thus is an excellent candidate for Q. PMID:12750342

  2. Familial migraine: Exclusion of the susceptibility gene from the reported locus of familial hemiplegic migraine on 19p

    SciTech Connect

    Hovatta, I.; Peltonen, L.; Kallela, M.; Faerkkilae, M.

    1994-10-01

    Genetic isolates are highly useful in analyses of the molecular background of complex diseases since the enrichment of a limited number of predisposing genes can be predicted in representative families or in specific geographical regions. It has been suggested that the pathophysiology and etiology of familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) and typical migraine with aura are most probably the same. Recent assignment of FHM locus to chromosome 19p in two French families makes it now possible to test this hypothesis. We report here linkage data on four families with multiple cases of migraine disorder originating from the genetically isolated population of Finland. We were interested to discover whether the migraine in these families would also show linkage to the markers on 19p. We could exclude a region of 50 cM, flanking the reported FHM locus, as a site of migraine locus in our four families. It seems evident that locus heterogeneity exists between different diagnostic classes of migraine spectrum of diseases and also between different ethnic groups. 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Characteristics of polymorphism at a VNTR locus 3' to the apolipoprotein B gene in five human populations.

    PubMed Central

    Deka, R; Chakraborty, R; DeCroo, S; Rothhammer, F; Barton, S A; Ferrell, R E

    1992-01-01

    We have analyzed the allele frequency distribution at the hypervariable locus 3' to the apolipoprotein B gene (ApoB 3' VNTR) in five well-defined human populations (Kacharis of northeast India, New Guinea Highlanders of Papua New Guinea, Dogrib Indians of Canada, Pehuenche Indians of Chile, and a relatively homogeneous Caucasian population of northern German extraction) by using the PCR technique. A total of 12 segregating alleles were detected in the pooled sample of 319 individuals. A fairly consistent bimodal pattern of allele frequency distribution, apparent in most of these geographically and genetically diverse populations, suggests that the ApoB 3' VNTR polymorphism predates the geographic dispersal of ancestral human populations. In spite of the observed high degree of polymorphism at this locus (expected heterozygosity levels 55%-78%), the genotype distributions in all populations (irrespective of their tribal or cosmopolitan nature) conform to their respective Hardy-Weinberg predictions. Furthermore, analysis of the congruence between expected heterozygosity and the observed number of alleles reveals that, in general, the allele frequency distributions at this locus are in agreement with the predictions of the classical mutation-drift models. The data also show that alleles that are shared by all populations have the highest average frequency within populations. These findings demonstrate the potential utility of highly informative hypervariable loci such as the ApoB 3' VNTR locus in population genetic research, as well as in forensic medicine and determination of biological relatedness of individuals. Images Figure 1 PMID:1463014

  4. Vascular endothelial growth factor and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α gene polymorphisms and coronary collateral formation in patients with coronary chronic total occlusions

    PubMed Central

    Amoah, Vincent; Wrigley, Benjamin; Holroyd, Eric; Smallwood, Andrew; Armesilla, Angel L; Nevill, Alan; Cotton, James

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We evaluated the association between two single nucleotide polymorphisms of the vascular endothelial growth factor gene and one of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α gene and the degree of coronary collateral formation in patients with a coronary chronic total occlusion. Methods: Totally, 98 patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease and a chronic total occlusion observed during coronary angiography were recruited. Genotyping of two vascular endothelial growth factor promoter single nucleotide polymorphisms (−152G>A and −165C>T) and the C1772T single nucleotide polymorphism of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α were performed using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The presence and extent of collateral vessel filling was scored by blinded observers using the Rentrop grade. Results: We found no association between the vascular endothelial growth factor −152G>A, −165C>T and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α −1772C>T with the presence and filling of coronary collateral vessels. A history of percutaneous coronary intervention and transient ischaemic attack/cerebrovascular accident were associated with the presence of enhanced collateral vessel formation following binary logistic regression analysis. Conclusion: The study findings suggest that coronary collateral formation is not associated with the tested polymorphic variants of vascular endothelial growth factor and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease and the presence of a chronic total occlusion. PMID:27621802

  5. Charactering the ZFAND3 gene mapped in the sex-determining locus in hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Keyi; Liao, Minghui; Liu, Feng; Ye, Baoqing; Sun, Fei; Yue, Gen Hua

    2016-01-01

    Zinc finger AN1-type domain 3 (ZFAND3) is essential for spermatogenesis in mice. However, its function in teleosts remains unclear. In this study, we characterized the ZFAND3 gene (termed as OsZFAND3) in an important food fish, tilapia. The OsZFAND3 cDNA sequence is 1,050 bp in length, containing an ORF of 615 bp, which encodes a putative peptide of 204 amino acid residues. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that the OsZFAND3 transcripts were exclusively expressed in the testis and ovary. In situ hybridization showed that the high expression of OsZFAND3 transcripts was predominantly localized in the spermatocyte and spermatid. These results suggest that OsZFAND3 is involved in male germ cell maturation. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected in the introns of OsZFAND3. The OsZFAND3 gene was mapped in the sex-determining locus on linkage group 1 (LG1). The three SNPs in the OsZFAND3 gene were strictly associated with sex phenotype, suggesting that the OsZFAND3 gene is tightly linked to the sex-determining locus. Our study provides new insights into the functions of the OsZFAND3 gene in tilapia and a foundation for further detailed analysis of the OsZFAND3 gene in sex determination and differentiation. PMID:27137111

  6. Charactering the ZFAND3 gene mapped in the sex-determining locus in hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis spp.).

    PubMed

    Ma, Keyi; Liao, Minghui; Liu, Feng; Ye, Baoqing; Sun, Fei; Yue, Gen Hua

    2016-01-01

    Zinc finger AN1-type domain 3 (ZFAND3) is essential for spermatogenesis in mice. However, its function in teleosts remains unclear. In this study, we characterized the ZFAND3 gene (termed as OsZFAND3) in an important food fish, tilapia. The OsZFAND3 cDNA sequence is 1,050 bp in length, containing an ORF of 615 bp, which encodes a putative peptide of 204 amino acid residues. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that the OsZFAND3 transcripts were exclusively expressed in the testis and ovary. In situ hybridization showed that the high expression of OsZFAND3 transcripts was predominantly localized in the spermatocyte and spermatid. These results suggest that OsZFAND3 is involved in male germ cell maturation. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected in the introns of OsZFAND3. The OsZFAND3 gene was mapped in the sex-determining locus on linkage group 1 (LG1). The three SNPs in the OsZFAND3 gene were strictly associated with sex phenotype, suggesting that the OsZFAND3 gene is tightly linked to the sex-determining locus. Our study provides new insights into the functions of the OsZFAND3 gene in tilapia and a foundation for further detailed analysis of the OsZFAND3 gene in sex determination and differentiation. PMID:27137111

  7. Targeting exogenous GDNF gene to the bovine somatic cell beta-casein locus for the production of transgenic bovine animals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X M; Luo, F H; Ding, H M; Li, B; Zhang, J J; Wu, Y J

    2015-01-01

    Considerable attention is currently being directed toward methods for producing recombinant human proteins in the mammary glands of genetically modified transgenic livestock. However, the expression of inserted genes in transgenic animals is variable and often very low because of the randomness of the site of transgene integration. One possible strategy to avoid the expression problem associated with random integration is to use site-specific integration by targeting integration to a high expression locus and, thereby, to improve expression of the transferred gene. In the present study, we focused on glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), a novel type of neurotrophic factor first cloned in 1993. Research has shown that GDNF may have potential applications in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and other diseases of the central nervous system since it acts as a protective factor for central dopaminergic neurons. Here, we constructed a gene targeting vector to knock-in the human GDNF gene at the bovine beta-casein gene locus as a first step to producing transgenic animals with a high level of expression of human GDNF protein in their mammary glands. Bovine fetal fibroblast cells were transfected with linearized pNRTCNbG by electroporation. Three cell clones were identified with successful targeting to the beta-casein locus; and were confirmed using both polymerase chain reaction analysis and sequencing. Gene-targeted cells were used as nuclear donors; a total of 161 embryos were reconstructed, 23 of which developed to the blastocyst stage. These blastocysts were transferred to 8 recipient cows, but no offspring were obtained. PMID:26634460

  8. Stress-induced expression of NICOTINE2-locus genes and their homologs encoding Ethylene Response Factor transcription factors in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Tsubasa; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    Plants have evolved diverse defense metabolites as adaptations to biotic and abiotic stresses. The defense alkaloid nicotine is produced in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) and its biosynthesis is elicited by jasmonates in the roots. At least seven jasmonate-responsive genes that encode transcription factors of the Ethylene Response Factor (ERF) family are clustered at the nicotine-regulatory locus NICOTINE2 (NIC2) in the tobacco genome. A subset of the NIC2-locus ERFs and their homologs, including ERF189 and ERF199, have been shown to be most effective in controlling nicotine biosynthetic pathway genes. Herein reported is that the ERF genes of this group, other than ERF189 and ERF199, were strongly induced by NaCl in tobacco hairy roots, although salt stress had no effect on expression of nicotine biosynthesis genes. Abscisic acid and osmotic stress also increased expression of a subset of these NaCl-inducible ERF genes. Promoter expression analysis in transgenic tobacco hairy roots confirmed that while methyl jasmonate (MJ) activated the promoters of ERF29, ERF210 and ERF199, salt stress up-regulated the promoters of only ERF29 and ERF210, but not ERF199. The protein biosynthesis inhibitor cycloheximide induced expression of the ERFs, and simultaneous addition of MJ and cycloheximide showed synergistic effects. These results indicate that, after several gene duplication events, the NIC2-locus ERFs and possibly their homologs appear to have diverged in their responses to jasmonates and various environmental inputs, including salt stress, and may have evolved to regulate distinct metabolic processes and cellular responses. PMID:24947337

  9. Characterization of FLOWERING LOCUS T1 (FT1) Gene in Brachypodium and Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiuli; Wang, Shuyun; Ni, Fei; Li, Kun; Pearce, Stephen; Wu, Jiajie; Dubcovsky, Jorge; Fu, Daolin

    2014-01-01

    The phase transition from vegetative to reproductive growth is a critical event in the life cycle of flowering plants. FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) plays a central role in the regulation of this transition by integrating signals from multiple flowering pathways in the leaves and transmitting them to the shoot apical meristem. In this study, we characterized FT homologs in the temperate grasses Brachypodium distachyon and polyploid wheat using transgenic and mutant approaches. Downregulation of FT1 by RNAi was associated with a significant downregulation of the FT-like genes FT2 and FT4 in Brachypodium and FT2 and FT5 in wheat. In a transgenic wheat line carrying a highly-expressed FT1 allele, FT2 and FT3 were upregulated under both long and short days. Overexpression of FT1 caused extremely early flowering during shoot regeneration in both Brachypodium and hexaploid wheat, and resulted in insufficient vegetative tissue to support the production of viable seeds. Downregulation of FT1 transcripts by RNA interference (RNAi) resulted in non-flowering Brachypodium plants and late flowering plants (2–4 weeks delay) in wheat. A similar delay in heading time was observed in tetraploid wheat plants carrying mutations for both FT-A1 and FT-B1. Plants homozygous only for mutations in FT-B1 flowered later than plants homozygous only for mutations in FT-A1, which corresponded with higher transcript levels of FT-B1 relative to FT-A1 in the early stages of development. Taken together, our data indicate that FT1 plays a critical role in the regulation of flowering in Brachypodium and wheat, and that this role is associated with the simultaneous regulation of other FT-like genes. The differential effects of mutations in FT-A1 and FT-B1 on wheat heading time suggest that different allelic combinations of FT1 homoeologs could be used to adjust wheat heading time to improve adaptation to changing environments. PMID:24718312

  10. Methylation impact analysis of erythropoietin (EPO) Gene to hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) activity.

    PubMed

    Dewi, Firli Rahmah Primula; Fatchiyah, Fatchiyah

    2013-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a glycoprotein hormone that play a role as key regulator in the production of red blood cells. The promoter region of EPO is methylated in normoxic (non-hypoxia) condition, but not in hypoxic condition. Methylation of the EPO enhancer region decline the transcription activity of EPO gene. The aim of this study is to investigate how different methylation percentage affected on the regulation and transcriptional activity of EPO gene. The DNA sequence of erythropoietin gene and protein sequence was retrieved from the sequence database of NCBI. DNA structure was constructed using 3D-DART web server and modeling structure of HIF1 predicted using SWISS-MODEL web server. Methylated DNA sequence of EPO gene using performed with YASARA View software and docking of EPO gene and transcription factor HIF1 analyzed by using HADDOCK webserver. Our result showed that binding energy in 46% methylated DNA was higher (-161,45 kcal/mol) than in unmethylated DNA (-194,16 kcal/mol) and 8% methylated DNA (-175,94 kcal/mol). So, we presume that a silencing mechanism of the Epo gene by methylation is correlated with the binding energy, which is required for interaction. A higher methylation percentage correlates with a higher binding energy which can cause an unstable interaction between DNA and transcription factor. In conclution, methylation of promoter and enhancer region of Epo gene leads to silencing. PMID:24023421

  11. AMPK activation represses the human gene promoter of the cardiac isoform of acetyl-CoA carboxylase: Role of nuclear respiratory factor-1

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, Tasneem; Opie, Lionel H.; Essop, M. Faadiel

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} AMPK inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta gene promoter activity. {yields} Nuclear respiratory factor-1 inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta promoter activity. {yields} AMPK regulates acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta at transcriptional level. -- Abstract: The cardiac-enriched isoform of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC{beta}) produces malonyl-CoA, a potent inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1. AMPK inhibits ACC{beta} activity, lowering malonyl-CoA levels and promoting mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation. Previously, AMPK increased promoter binding of nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), a pivotal transcriptional modulator controlling gene expression of mitochondrial proteins. We therefore hypothesized that NRF-1 inhibits myocardial ACC{beta} promoter activity via AMPK activation. A human ACC{beta} promoter-luciferase construct was transiently transfected into neonatal cardiomyocytes {+-} a NRF-1 expression construct. NRF-1 overexpression decreased ACC{beta} gene promoter activity by 71 {+-} 4.6% (p < 0.001 vs. control). Transfections with 5'-end serial promoter deletions revealed that NRF-1-mediated repression of ACC{beta} was abolished with a pPII{beta}-18/+65-Luc deletion construct. AMPK activation dose-dependently reduced ACC{beta} promoter activity, while NRF-1 addition did not further decrease it. We also investigated NRF-1 inhibition in the presence of upstream stimulatory factor 1 (USF1), a known transactivator of the human ACC{beta} gene promoter. Here NRF-1 blunted USF1-dependent induction of ACC{beta} promoter activity by 58 {+-} 7.5% (p < 0.001 vs. control), reversed with a dominant negative NRF-1 construct. NRF-1 also suppressed endogenous USF1 transcriptional activity by 55 {+-} 6.2% (p < 0.001 vs. control). This study demonstrates that NRF-1 is a novel transcriptional inhibitor of the human ACC{beta} gene promoter in the mammalian heart. Our data extends AMPK regulation of ACC{beta} to the transcriptional level.

  12. Gene I, a potential cell-to-cell movement locus of cauliflower mosaic virus, encodes an RNA-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Citovsky, V.; Knorr, D.; Zambryski, P. )

    1991-03-15

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) is a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) pararetrovirus capable of cell-to-cell movement presumably through intercellular connections, the plasmodesmata, of the infected plant. This movement is likely mediated by a specific viral protein encoded by the gene I locus. Here we report that the purified gene I protein binds RNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) but not dsDNA regardless of nucleotide sequence specificity. The binding is highly cooperative, and the affinity of the gene I protein for RNA is 10-fold higher than for ssDNA. CaMV replicates by reverse transcription of a 35S RNA that is homologous to the entire genome. The authors propose that the 35S RNA may be involved in cell-to-cell movement of CaMV as an intermediate that is transported through plasmodesmata as an RNA-gene I protein complex.

  13. Determination of the kappa anti-alpha(1,3) dextran immune response difference by A gene(s) in the VKappa-locus of mice

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Mice lacking the V(alpha(1,3) (h gamma1)-gene do not produce a gamma1 anti-alpha(1,3) dextran response. However, on hyperimmunization some strains mount a kappa-anti-alpha(1,3) dextran response, whereas other remain nonresponder. Responsiveness in dominant. The kappa-anti- alpha(1,3) response difference is linked to the Ly-3 locus on chromosone 6 and is likely the result of a structural Vkappa-gene(s). In conjunction with previous work, three Vkappa-allogroups can now be distinguished. At present, this is the only example of an immune responsiveness difference associated with the Vkappa-locus. PMID:109565

  14. Immotile cilia syndrome: A recombinant family at HLA-linked gene locus

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparini, P.; Grifa, A.; Oggiano, N.; Fabbrizzi, E.; Giorgi, P.L.

    1994-02-15

    The immotile-cilia syndrome (ICS) is an autosomal recessive trait of congenital dismobility or even complete immobility of cilia in the ciliated epithelia (MIM 244400). Recurrent upper respiratory infections in early childhood are the most common clinical findings. Recently a disease locus was mapped by sib pair analysis in two unrelated families on 6p tightly linked to HLA class II loci, such as DR and DQ. In order to confirm this assignment and to test the presence of possible heterogeneity, the authors analyzed several ICS families utilizing DNA makers of HLA class II region. Here they report the identification of a recombinant family at this locus. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Sequence homology requirements for transcriptional silencing of 35S transgenes and post-transcriptional silencing of nitrite reductase (trans)genes by the tobacco 271 locus.

    PubMed

    Thierry, D; Vaucheret, H

    1996-12-01

    The transgene locus of the tobacco plant 271 (271 locus) is located on a telomere and consists of multiple copies of a plasmid carrying an NptII marker gene driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 19S promoter and the leaf-specific nitrite reductase Nii1 cDNA cloned in the antisense orientation under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter. Previous analysis of gene expression in leaves has shown that this locus triggers both post-transcriptional silencing of the host leaf-specific Nii genes and transcriptional silencing of transgenes driven by the 19S or 35S promoter irrespective of their coding sequence and of their location in the genome. In this paper we show that silencing of transgenes carrying Nii1 sequences occurs irrespective of the promoter driving their expression and of their location within the genome. This phenomenon occurs in roots as well as in leaves although root Nii genes share only 84% identity with leaf-specific Nii1 sequences carried by the 271 locus. Conversely, transgenes carrying the bean Nii gene (which shares 76% identity with the tobacco Nii1 gene) escape silencing by the 271 locus. We also show that transgenes driven by the figwort mosaic virus 34S promoter (which shares 63% identity with the 35S promoter) also escape silencing by the 271 locus. Taken together, these results indicate that a high degree of sequence similarity is required between the sequences of the silencing locus and of the target (trans)genes for both transcriptional and post-transcriptional silencing. PMID:9002606

  16. SNAIL gene inhibited by hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengnan; Liu, Yanmei; Feng, Youji; Gao, Shujun

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between HIF-1α and SNAIL gene expression in the epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cell line. EOC cells were treated with hypoxia, hypoxia combined with rapamycin, and control. The expression of HIF-1α and E-cad were assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting. The gene expression of SNAIL was studied by RT-PCR and real-time PCR. RNA interference technology was used to determine the relationship between HIF-1α and SNAIL. The present study indicated that the HIF-1α protein was expressed and increased in EOC cell line. SNAIL mRNA was found to increase and E-cad expression decreased with the time of hypoxia prolonged. Hypoxia increased invasion abilities of EOC cell line, but compared with cells exposed to hypoxia, the change of invasive ability of cells with rapamycin had no effect. The expression of HIF-1α protein and SNAIL mRNA could be inhibited gradually by rapamycin. siRNA of HIF-1α could suppress the expression of SNAIL while siRNA of SNAIL had no influence on HIF-1α protein expression. HIF-1α may be the upstream of the SNAIL gene in EOC. Our data suggested that HIF-1α might be an upregulator of the SNAIL gene and HIF-1α-SNAIL-E-cad pathway may play an important role in EOC invasion and metastasis. PMID:27044634

  17. Insulin-like growth factor-1- and interleukin-6-related gene variation and risk of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Birmann, Brenda M.; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Giovannucci, Edward; Rosner, Bernard; Hunter, David J.; Kraft, Peter; Mitsiades, Constantine; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Colditz, Graham A.

    2009-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 and interleukin (IL)-6 promote the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells. Variation in genes related to IGF-1 and IL-6 signaling may influence susceptibility to multiple myeloma. To assess their etiologic role, we examined the association of 70 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in seven IGF-1 and three IL-6 pathway genes with multiple myeloma risk in two prospective cohorts, the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Among participants who provided DNA specimens, we identified 58 women and 24 men with multiple myeloma and matched two controls per case. We used multivariable logistic regression models to assess the association of the SNPs or tagged haplotypes with multiple myeloma risk. Several SNPs had suggestive associations with multiple myeloma based on large odds ratios (OR), although corresponding omnibus p-values were not more than nominally significant (i.e., at p<0.05). These SNPs included rs1801278 in the gene encoding insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1; C/T v. C/C genotypes; OR=4.3, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.5-12.1), and three IL-6 receptor SNPs: rs6684439 (T/T v. C/C: 2.9, 1.2-7.0), rs7529229 (C/C v. T/T; 2.5, 1.1-6.0), and rs8192284 (C/C v. A/A; 2.5, 1.1-6.0). Additional SNPs in genes encoding IGF-1, IGF binding protein-2, IRS2, and gp130 also demonstrated suggestive associations with multiple myeloma risk. We conducted a large number of statistical tests, and the findings may be due to chance. Nonetheless, the data are consistent with the hypothesis that IGF-1- and IL-6-related gene variation influences susceptibility to multiple myeloma and warrant confirmation in larger populations. PMID:19124510

  18. The Effects of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Gene Therapy and Cell Transplantation on Rat Acute Wound Model

    PubMed Central

    Talebpour Amiri, Fereshteh; Fadaei Fathabadi, Fatemeh; Mahmoudi Rad, Mahnaz; Piryae, Abbas; Ghasemi, Azar; Khalilian, Alireza; Yeganeh, Farshid; Mosaffa, Nariman

    2014-01-01

    Background: Wound healing is a complex process. Different types of skin cells, extracellular matrix and variety of growth factors are involved in wound healing. The use of recombinant growth factors in researches and production of skin substitutes are still a challenge. Objectives: Much research has been done on the effects of gene therapy and cell therapy on wound healing. In this experimental study, the effect of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) gene transfer in fibroblast cells was assessed on acute dermal wound healing. Materials and Methods: Fibroblasts were cultured and transfected with IGF-1. Lipofectamine 2000 was used as a reagent of transfection. Transgene expression levels were measured by the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To study in vivo, rats (weighing 170-200 g) were randomly divided into three groups (five/group) and full-thickness wounds were created on the dorsum region. Suspensions of transfected fibroblast cells were injected into the wound and were compared with wounds treated with native fibroblast cells and normal saline. For the microscopic examination, biopsy was performed on day seven. Results: In vitro, the maximum expression of IGF1 (96.95 pg/mL) in transfected fibroblast cells was 24 hours after gene transfer. In vivo, it was clear that IGF-1 gene therapy caused an increase in the number of keratinocyte cells during the wound healing process (mean of group A vs. group B with P value = 0.01, mean of group A vs. group C with P value = 0.000). Granulation of tissue formation in the transfected fibroblast group was more organized when compared with the normal saline group and native fibroblast cells. Conclusions: This study indicated that the optimization of gene transfer increases the expression of IGF-1. High concentrations of IGF-1, in combination with cell therapy, have a significant effect on wound healing. PMID:25558384

  19. Synovial expression of Th17-related and cancer-associated genes is regulated by the arthritis severity locus Cia10.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, E; Brenner, M; Laragione, T; Gulko, P S

    2012-04-01

    We have previously identified Cia10 as an arthritis severity and articular damage quantitative trait locus. In this study, we used Illumina RatRef-12 microarrays to analyze the expression of 21,922 genes in synovial tissues from arthritis-susceptible DA and arthritis-protected DA.ACI(Cia10) congenics with pristane-induced arthritis. 310 genes had significantly different expression. The genes upregulated in DA, and reciprocally downregulated in DA.ACI(Cia10) included IL-11, Ccl12 and Cxcl10, as well as genes implicated in Th17 responses such as IL-17A, IL-6, Ccr6, Cxcr3 and Stat4. Suppressors of immune responses Tgfb and Vdr, and inhibitors of oxidative stress were upregulated in congenics. There was an over-representation of genes implicated in cancer and cancer-related phenotypes such as tumor growth and invasion among the differentially expressed genes. Cancer-favoring genes like Ctsd, Ikbke, and Kras were expressed in increased levels in DA, whereas inhibitors of cancer phenotypes such as Timp2, Reck and Tgfbr3 were increased in DA.ACI(Cia10). These results suggest that Cia10 may control arthritis severity, synovial hyperplasia and joint damage via the regulation of the expression of cancer-related genes, inflammatory mediators and Th17-related markers. These new findings have the potential to generate new targets for therapies aimed at reducing arthritis severity and joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:22048456

  20. Steroid sulfotransferase 2A1 gene transcription is regulated by steroidogenic factor 1 and GATA-6 in the human adrenal.

    PubMed

    Saner, Karla J; Suzuki, Takashi; Sasano, Hironobu; Pizzey, John; Ho, Clement; Strauss, Jerome F; Carr, Bruce R; Rainey, William E

    2005-01-01

    Sulfonation is a phase II conjugation reaction responsible for the biotransformation of many compounds including steroids, bile acids, and drugs. Humans are presently known to express at least five cytosolic sulfotransferase (SULT) enzymes, of which only two are hydroxysteroid SULT, SULT2A1, commonly known as steroid sulfotransferase, and the cholesterol sulfotransferase SULT2B1. SULT2A1 is highly expressed in the adrenal where it is responsible for the sulfation of hydroxysteroids including conversion of dehydroepiandrosterone to dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and in the liver where it is responsible for sulfation of bile acids and circulating hydroxysteroids. Little is known concerning the transcriptional regulation of human SULT2A1 in adrenal. Herein we demonstrate the role of two transcription factors, steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1) and GATA-6, in the regulation of SULT2A1 transcription. These transcription factors were quantified by real-time RT-PCR in normal human adrenal tissue. Transient transfection assays with deleted and mutated SULT2A1 promoter constructs allowed for the determination of specific SF1 and GATA binding cis-regulatory elements necessary for transactivation of SULT2A1 promoter, and binding was confirmed by EMSA analysis. Both SF1 and GATA-6 were positive regulators of SULT2A1 promoter constructs. These data support the hypothesis that adrenal SULT2A1 expression is regulated by SF1 and GATA-6. PMID:15388788

  1. In depth analysis of the Sox4 gene locus that consists of sense and natural antisense transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Ling, King-Hwa; Brautigan, Peter J.; Moore, Sarah; Fraser, Rachel; Leong, Melody Pui-Yee; Leong, Jia-Wen; Zainal Abidin, Shahidee; Lee, Han-Chung; Cheah, Pike-See; Raison, Joy M.; Babic, Milena; Lee, Young Kyung; Daish, Tasman; Mattiske, Deidre M.; Mann, Jeffrey R.; Adelson, David L.; Thomas, Paul Q.; Hahn, Christopher N.; Scott, Hamish S.

    2016-01-01

    SRY (Sex Determining Region Y)-Box 4 or Sox4 is an important regulator of the pan-neuronal gene expression during post-mitotic cell differentiation within the mammalian brain. Sox4 gene locus has been previously characterized with multiple sense and overlapping natural antisense transcripts [1], [2]. Here we provide accompanying data on various analyses performed and described in Ling et al. [2]. The data include a detail description of various features found at Sox4 gene locus, additional experimental data derived from RNA-Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (RNA-FISH), Western blotting, strand-specific reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), gain-of-function and in situ hybridization (ISH) experiments. All the additional data provided here support the existence of an endogenous small interfering- or PIWI interacting-like small RNA known as Sox4_sir3, which origin was found within the overlapping region consisting of a sense and a natural antisense transcript known as Sox4ot1. PMID:26958646

  2. In depth analysis of the Sox4 gene locus that consists of sense and natural antisense transcripts.

    PubMed

    Ling, King-Hwa; Brautigan, Peter J; Moore, Sarah; Fraser, Rachel; Leong, Melody Pui-Yee; Leong, Jia-Wen; Zainal Abidin, Shahidee; Lee, Han-Chung; Cheah, Pike-See; Raison, Joy M; Babic, Milena; Lee, Young Kyung; Daish, Tasman; Mattiske, Deidre M; Mann, Jeffrey R; Adelson, David L; Thomas, Paul Q; Hahn, Christopher N; Scott, Hamish S

    2016-06-01

    SRY (Sex Determining Region Y)-Box 4 or Sox4 is an important regulator of the pan-neuronal gene expression during post-mitotic cell differentiation within the mammalian brain. Sox4 gene locus has been previously characterized with multiple sense and overlapping natural antisense transcripts [1], [2]. Here we provide accompanying data on various analyses performed and described in Ling et al. [2]. The data include a detail description of various features found at Sox4 gene locus, additional experimental data derived from RNA-Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (RNA-FISH), Western blotting, strand-specific reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), gain-of-function and in situ hybridization (ISH) experiments. All the additional data provided here support the existence of an endogenous small interfering- or PIWI interacting-like small RNA known as Sox4_sir3, which origin was found within the overlapping region consisting of a sense and a natural antisense transcript known as Sox4ot1. PMID:26958646

  3. Functional Characterization of Hevea brasiliensis CRT/DRE Binding Factor 1 Gene Revealed Regulation Potential in the CBF Pathway of Tropical Perennial Tree.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Han; Cai, Haibin; Fu, Haitian; An, Zewei; Fang, Jialin; Hu, Yanshi; Guo, Dianjing; Huang, Huasun

    2015-01-01

    Rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis) are susceptible to low temperature and therefore are only planted in the tropical regions. In the past few decades, although rubber trees have been successfully planted in the northern margin of tropical area in China, they suffered from cold injury during the winter. To understand the physiological response under cold stress, we isolated a C-repeat binding factor 1 (CBF1) gene from the rubber tree. This gene (HbCBF1) was found to respond to cold stress but not drought or ABA stress. The corresponding HbCBF1 protein showed CRT/DRE binding activity in gel shift experiment. To further characterize its molecular function, the HbCBF1 gene was overexpressed in Arabidopsis. The HbCBF1 over expression (OE) line showed enhanced cold resistance and relatively slow dehydration, and the expression of Arabidopsis CBF pathway downstream target genes, e.g. AtCOR15a and AtRD29a, were significantly activated under non-acclimation condition. These data suggest HbCBF1 gene is a functional member of the CBF gene family, and may play important regulation function in rubber tree. PMID:26361044

  4. Functional Characterization of Hevea brasiliensis CRT/DRE Binding Factor 1 Gene Revealed Regulation Potential in the CBF Pathway of Tropical Perennial Tree

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Han; Cai, Haibin; Fu, Haitian; An, Zewei; Fang, Jialin; Hu, Yanshi; Guo, Dianjing; Huang, Huasun

    2015-01-01

    Rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis) are susceptible to low temperature and therefore are only planted in the tropical regions. In the past few decades, although rubber trees have been successfully planted in the northern margin of tropical area in China, they suffered from cold injury during the winter. To understand the physiological response under cold stress, we isolated a C-repeat binding factor 1 (CBF1) gene from the rubber tree. This gene (HbCBF1) was found to respond to cold stress but not drought or ABA stress. The corresponding HbCBF1 protein showed CRT/DRE binding activity in gel shift experiment. To further characterize its molecular function, the HbCBF1 gene was overexpressed in Arabidopsis. The HbCBF1 over expression (OE) line showed enhanced cold resistance and relatively slow dehydration, and the expression of Arabidopsis CBF pathway downstream target genes, e.g. AtCOR15a and AtRD29a, were significantly activated under non-acclimation condition. These data suggest HbCBF1 gene is a functional member of the CBF gene family, and may play important regulation function in rubber tree. PMID:26361044

  5. Gene trapping uncovers sex-specific mechanisms for upstream stimulatory factors 1 and 2 in angiotensinogen expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Sungmi; Liu, Xuebo; Davis, Deborah R; Sigmund, Curt D

    2012-06-01

    A single-nucleotide polymorphism (C/A) located within an E-box at the -20 position of the human angiotensinogen (AGT) promoter may regulate transcriptional activation through differential recruitment of the transcription factors upstream stimulatory factor (USF) 1 and 2. To study the contribution of USF1 on AGT gene expression, mice carrying a (-20C) human AGT (hAGT) transgene were bred with mice harboring a USF1 gene trap allele designed to knock down USF1 expression. USF1 mRNA was reduced relative to controls in liver (9 ± 1%), perigenital adipose (16 ± 3%), kidney (17 ± 1%), and brain (34 ± 2%) in double-transgenic mice. This decrease was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses revealed a decrease in USF1, with retention of USF2 binding at the hAGT promoter in the liver of male mice. hAGT expression was reduced in the liver and other tissues of female but not male mice. The decrease in endogenous AGT expression was insufficient to alter systolic blood pressure at baseline but caused reduced systolic blood pressure in female USF1 gene trap mice fed a high-fat diet. Treatment of USF1 knockdown males with intravenous adenoviral short hairpin RNA targeting USF2 resulted in reduced expression of USF1, USF2, and hAGT protein. Our data from chromatin immunoprecipitation assays suggests that this decrease in hAGT is attributed to decreased USF2 binding to the hAGT promoter. In conclusion, both USF1 and USF2 are essential for AGT transcriptional regulation, and distinct sex-specific and tissue-specific mechanisms are involved in the activities of these transcription factors in vivo. PMID:22547438

  6. The effect of 9p21.3 coronary artery disease locus neighboring genes on atherosclerosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Juyong Brian; Deluna, Andres; Mungrue, Imran N.; Vu, Christine; Pouldar, Delila; Civelek, Mete; Orozco, Luz; Wu, Judy; Wang, Xuping; Charugundla, Sarada; Castellani, Lawrence W.; Rusek, Marta; Jakobowski, Hieronim; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The human 9p21.3 chromosome locus has been shown to be an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis in multiple large scale genome-wide association studies, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. We set out to investigate the potential role of the 9p21.3 locus neighboring genes, including Mtap, the two isoforms of Cdkn2a, p16Ink4a and p19Arf, and Cdkn2b in atherosclerosis using knockout mice models. Methods and Results Gene targeted mice for neighboring genes, including Mtap, Cdkn2a, p19Arf, and Cdkn2b, were each bred to mice carrying the human APO*E3 Leiden transgene which sensitizes the mice for atherosclerotic lesions through elevated plasma cholesterol. We found that the mice heterozygous for Mtap developed larger lesion compared to wild-type mice (49623±21650 vs. 18899±9604 μm2/section (Mean±SD); p=0.01), with similar morphology as wild type mice. The Mtap heterozygous mice demonstrated changes in metabolic and methylation profiles and CD4+ cell counts. The Cdkn2a knockout mice had smaller lesions compared to wild-type and heterozygous mice and there were no significant differences in lesion size in p19Arf and Cdkn2b mutants as compared to wild type. We observed extensive, tissue-specific compensatory regulation of the Cdkn2a and Cdkn2b genes among the various knockout mice, making the effects on atherosclerosis difficult to interpret. Conclusions Mtap plays a protective role against atherosclerosis, whereas Cdkn2a appears to be modestly proatherogenic. However, no relation was found between the 9p21 genotype and the transcription of 9p21 neighboring genes in primary human aortic vascular cells in vitro. There is extensive compensatory regulation in the highly conserved 9p21 orthologous region in mice. PMID:22952318

  7. The DYX2 locus and neurochemical signaling genes contribute to speech sound disorder and related neurocognitive domains.

    PubMed

    Eicher, J D; Stein, C M; Deng, F; Ciesla, A A; Powers, N R; Boada, R; Smith, S D; Pennington, B F; Iyengar, S K; Lewis, B A; Gruen, J R

    2015-04-01

    A major milestone of child development is the acquisition and use of speech and language. Communication disorders, including speech sound disorder (SSD), can impair a child's academic, social and behavioral development. Speech sound disorder is a complex, polygenic trait with a substantial genetic component. However, specific genes that contribute to SSD remain largely unknown. To identify associated genes, we assessed the association of the DYX2 dyslexia risk locus and markers in neurochemical signaling genes (e.g., nicotinic and dopaminergic) with SSD and related endophenotypes. We first performed separate primary associations in two independent samples - Cleveland SSD (210 affected and 257 unaffected individuals in 127 families) and Denver SSD (113 affected individuals and 106 unaffected individuals in 85 families) - and then combined results by meta-analysis. DYX2 markers, specifically those in the 3' untranslated region of DCDC2 (P = 1.43 × 10(-4) ), showed the strongest associations with phonological awareness. We also observed suggestive associations of dopaminergic-related genes ANKK1 (P = 1.02 × 10(-2) ) and DRD2 (P = 9.22 × 10(-3) ) and nicotinic-related genes CHRNA3 (P = 2.51 × 10(-3) ) and BDNF (P = 8.14 × 10(-3) ) with case-control status and articulation. Our results further implicate variation in putative regulatory regions in the DYX2 locus, particularly in DCDC2, influencing language and cognitive traits. The results also support previous studies implicating variation in dopaminergic and nicotinic neural signaling influencing human communication and cognitive development. Our findings expand the literature showing genetic factors (e.g., DYX2) contributing to multiple related, yet distinct neurocognitive domains (e.g., dyslexia, language impairment, and SSD). How these factors interactively yield different neurocognitive and language-related outcomes remains to be elucidated. PMID:25778907

  8. The DYX2 locus and neurochemical signaling genes contribute to speech sound disorder and related neurocognitive domains

    PubMed Central

    Eicher, J. D.; Stein, C. M.; Deng, F.; Ciesla, A. A.; Powers, N. R.; Boada, R.; Smith, S. D.; Pennington, B. F.; Iyengar, S. K.; Lewis, B. A.; Gruen, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    A major milestone of child development is the acquisition and use of speech and language. Communication disorders, including speech sound disorder (SSD), can impair a child's academic, social and behavioral development. Speech sound disorder is a complex, polygenic trait with a substantial genetic component. However, specific genes that contribute to SSD remain largely unknown. To identify associated genes, we assessed the association of the DYX2 dyslexia risk locus and markers in neurochemical signaling genes (e.g., nicotinic and dopaminergic) with SSD and related endophenotypes. We first performed separate primary associations in two independent samples – Cleveland SSD (210 affected and 257 unaffected individuals in 127 families) and Denver SSD (113 affected individuals and 106 unaffected individuals in 85 families) – and then combined results by meta-analysis. DYX2 markers, specifically those in the 3′ untranslated region of DCDC2 (P = 1.43 × 10–4), showed the strongest associations with phonological awareness. We also observed suggestive associations of dopaminergic-related genes ANKK1 (P = 1.02 × 10–2) and DRD2 (P = 9.22 × 10–3) and nicotinic-related genes CHRNA3 (P = 2.51 × 10–3) and BDNF (P = 8.14 × 10–3) with case–control status and articulation. Our results further implicate variation in putative regulatory regions in the DYX2 locus, particularly in DCDC2, influencing language and cognitive traits. The results also support previous studies implicating variation in dopaminergic and nicotinic neural signaling influencing human communication and cognitive development. Our findings expand the literature showing genetic factors (e.g., DYX2) contributing to multiple related, yet distinct neurocognitive domains (e.g., dyslexia, language impairment, and SSD). How these factors interactively yield different neurocognitive and language-related outcomes remains to be elucidated. PMID:25778907

  9. A novel function of interferon regulatory factor-1: inhibition of Th2 cells by down-regulating the Il4 gene during Listeria infection.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Saho; Kanoh, Makoto; Matsumoto, Akira; Kuwahara, Makoto; Yamashita, Masakatsu; Asano, Yoshihiro

    2015-03-01

    Infection with certain pathogens induces a shift of the Th subset balance to a Th1 dominant state. This, in turn, results in the suppression of Th2 responses. We focused on the involvement of interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) in the suppression of Th2 cells during Listeria infection. We found that the inhibition of IL-4 production by Th2 cells is mediated by a soluble factor (LmSN) produced by Listeria-infected antigen-presenting cells. The inhibition is not observed with T cells from Irf1 gene-targeted mice. IRF-1 suppresses transcription of the Il4 gene in Th2 cells. Under the influence of the LmSN, IRF-1 binds to the 3' untranslated region (UTR) region of the Il4 gene and down-regulates Il4 gene transcription. Finally, we identified IL-1α and IL-1β as the mediator of the LmSN activity. Signaling through IL-1R induces the stabilization and/or nuclear translocation of IRF-1. We propose that IRF-1 functions to induce the T-cell subset shift via a novel mechanism. Under the influence of IL-1, IRF-1 translocates into the nucleus and acts on the 3'UTR region of the Il4 gene, thus inhibiting its transcription in Th2 cells. As a result, the immune system shifts predominantly to a Th1 response during Listeria infection, resulting in effective protection of the host. PMID:25280793

  10. Identification of a Maize Locus That Modulates the Hypersensitive Defense Response, Using Mutant-Assisted Gene Identification and Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Chintamanani, Satya; Hulbert, Scot H.; Johal, Gurmukh S.; Balint-Kurti, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Potentially useful naturally occurring genetic variation is often difficult to identify as the effects of individual genes are subtle and difficult to observe. In this study, a novel genetic technique called Mutant-Assisted Gene Identification and Characterization is used to identify naturally occurring loci modulating the hypersensitive defense response (HR) in maize. Mutant-Assisted Gene Identification and Characterization facilitates the identification of naturally occurring alleles underlying phenotypic variation from diverse germplasm, using a mutant phenotype as a “reporter.” In this study the reporter phenotype was caused by a partially dominant autoactive disease resistance gene, Rp1-D21, which caused HR lesions to form spontaneously all over the plant. Here it is demonstrated that the Rp1-D21 phenotype is profoundly affected by genetic background. By crossing the Rp1-D21 gene into the IBM mapping population, it was possible to map and identify Hrml1 on chromosome 10, a locus responsible for modulating the HR phenotype conferred by Rp1-D21. Other loci with smaller effects were identified on chromosomes 1 and 9. These results demonstrate that Mutant-Assisted Gene Identification and Characterization is a viable approach for identifying naturally occurring useful genetic variation. PMID:20176981

  11. Sugar beet contains a large CONSTANS-LIKE gene family including a CO homologue that is independent of the early-bolting (B) gene locus

    PubMed Central

    Chia, T. Y. P.; Müller, A.; Jung, C.; Mutasa-Göttgens, E. S.

    2008-01-01

    Floral transition in the obligate long-day (LD) plant sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris) is tightly linked to the B gene, a dominant early-bolting quantitative trait locus, the expression of which is positively regulated by LD photoperiod. Thus, photoperiod regulators like CONSTANS (CO) and CONSTANS-LIKE (COL) genes identified in many LD and short-day (SD)-responsive plants have long been considered constituents and/or candidates for the B gene. Until now, the photoperiod response pathway of sugar beet (a Caryophyllid), diverged from the Rosids and Asterids has not been identified. Here, evidence supporting the existence of a COL gene family is provided and the presence of Group I, II, and III COL genes in sugar beet, as characterized by different zinc-finger (B-box) and CCT (CO, CO-like, TOC) domains is demonstrated. BvCOL1 is identified as a close-homologue of Group 1a (AtCO, AtCOL1, AtCOL2) COL genes, hence a good candidate for flowering time control and it is shown that it maps to chromosome II but distant from the B gene locus. The late-flowering phenotype of A. thaliana co-2 mutants was rescued by over-expression of BvCOL1 thereby suggesting functional equivalence with AtCO, and it is shown that BvCOL1 interacts appropriately with the endogenous downstream genes, AtFT and AtSOC1 in the transgenic plants. Curiously, BvCOL1 has a dawn-phased diurnal pattern of transcription, mimicking that of AtCOL1 and AtCOL2 while contrasting with AtCO. Taken together, these data suggest that BvCOL1 plays an important role in the photoperiod response of sugar beet. PMID:18495636

  12. Phylogenetic comparisons suggest that distance from the locus control region guides developmental expression of primate beta-type globin genes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert M; Prychitko, Tom; Gumucio, Deborah; Wildman, Derek E; Uddin, Monica; Goodman, Morris

    2006-02-28

    Phylogenetic inferences drawn from comparative data on mammalian beta-globin gene clusters indicate that the ancestral primate cluster contained a locus control region (LCR) and five paralogously related beta-type globin loci (5'-LCR-epsilon-gamma-psieta-delta-beta-3'), with epsilon and gamma expressed solely during embryonic life. A gamma locus tandem duplication (5'-gamma(1)-gamma(2)-3') triggered gamma's evolution toward fetal expression but by a different trajectory in platyrrhines (New World monkeys) than in catarrhines (Old World monkeys and apes, including humans). In platyrrhine (e.g., Cebus) fetuses, gamma(1) at the ancestral distance from epsilon is down-regulated, whereas gamma(2) at increased distance is up-regulated. Catarrhine gamma(1) and gamma(2) acquired longer distances from epsilon (14 and 19 kb, respectively), and both are up-regulated throughout fetal life with gamma(1)'s expression predominating over gamma(2)'s. On enlarging the platyrrhine expression data, we find Aotus gamma is embryonic, Alouatta gamma is inactive at term, and in Callithrix, gamma(1) is down-regulated fetally, whereas gamma(2) is up-regulated. Of eight mammalian taxa now represented per taxon by embryonic, fetal, and postnatal beta-type globin gene expression data, four taxa are primates, and data for three of these primates are from this laboratory. Our results support a model in which a short distance (<10 kb) between epsilon and the adjacent gamma is a plesiomorphic character that allows the LCR to drive embryonic expression of both genes, whereas a longer distance (>10 kb) impedes embryonic activation of the downstream gene. PMID:16488971

  13. ERBB3-rs2292239 as primary type 1 diabetes association locus among non-HLA genes in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chengjun; Wei, Haiyan; Chen, Xiuli; Zhao, Zhuhui; Du, Hongwei; Song, Wenhui; Yang, Yu; Zhang, Miaoying; Lu, Wei; Pei, Zhou; Xi, Li; Yan, Jian; Zhi, Dijing; Cheng, Ruoqian; Luo, Feihong

    2016-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that has strong contribution of genetic factors to its etiology. We aimed to assess the genetic association between non-HLA genes and T1D in a Chinese case-control cohort recruited from multiple centers consisting of 364 patients with T1D and 719 unrelated healthy children. We genotyped 55 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) markers located in 16 non-HLA genes (VTCN1, PTPN22, CTLA4, SUMO4, CD274, IL2RA, INS, DHCR7, ERBB3, VDR, CYP27B1, CD69, CD276, PTPN2, UBASH3A, and IL2RB) using SNaPshot multiple single-base extension methods. After multivariate analysis and correction for multiple comparisons, we identified the SNP rs2292239 in ERBB3 gene were significantly associated with T1D. The frequency of the major G allele was significantly decreased in patients with T1D (68.8% in T1D vs 77.3% in controls, OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.53-0.79, P = 0.02), and the minor allele T was associated with an increased risk of T1D (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.26-1.90, P = 0.02). Our haplotype analysis confirmed that rs2292239 was the primary T1D association locus in our current investigation. These results indicated that the ERBB3-rs2292239 was the primary T1D association locus among the investigated 55 SNPs in 16 non-HLA genes in Chinese Han population. PMID:27331016

  14. Candidate gene selection and detailed morphological evaluations of fs8.1, a quantitative trait locus controlling tomato fruit shape

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liang; Rodriguez, Gustavo R.; Clevenger, Josh P.; Illa-Berenguer, Eudald; Lin, Jinshan; Blakeslee, Joshua J.; Liu, Wenli; Fei, Zhangjun; Wijeratne, Asela; Meulia, Tea; van der Knaap, Esther

    2015-01-01

    fs8.1 is a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) that controls the elongated shape of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit. In this study, we fine-mapped the locus from a 47Mb to a 3.03Mb interval on the long arm of chromosome 8. Of the 122 annotated genes found in the fs8.1 region, 51 were expressed during floral development and six were differentially expressed in anthesis-stage ovaries in fs8.1 and wild-type (WT) lines. To identify possible nucleotide polymorphisms that may underlie the fruit shape phenotype, genome sequence analyses between tomato cultivars carrying the mutant and WT allele were conducted. This led to the identification of 158 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and five small indels in the fs8.1 interval, including 31 that could be associated with changes in gene expression or function. Morphological and histological analyses showed that the effects of fs8.1 were mainly on reproductive organ elongation by increasing cell number in the proximal–distal direction. Fruit weight was also increased in fs8.1 compared with WT, which was predominantly attributed to the increased fruit length. By combining the findings from the different analyses, we consider 12 likely candidate genes to underlie fs8.1, including Solyc08g062580 encoding a pentatricopeptide repeat protein, Solyc08g061560 encoding a putative orthologue of ERECTA, which is known to control fruit morphology and inflorescence architecture in Arabidopsis, Solyc08g061910 encoding a GTL2-like trihelix transcription factor, Solyc08g061930 encoding a protein that regulates cytokinin degradation, and two genes, Solyc08g062340 and Solyc08g062450, encoding 17.6kDa class II small heat-shock proteins. PMID:26175354

  15. Interferon-regulatory factor 1 is an immediate-early gene under transcriptional regulation by prolactin in Nb2 T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Lee, L Y; Hrachovy, J A; Stevens, A M; Schwarz, L A

    1990-01-01

    The pituitary peptide hormone prolactin (Prl) is a potent inducer of Nb2 T lymphoma cell proliferation. To analyze the early genetic response to the mitogenic signals of Prl, a cDNA library was constructed from Nb2 T cells stimulated for 4 h with Prl and the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Of 26 distinct clones isolated by differential screening, one clone, designated c25, exhibited extremely rapid but transient kinetics of induction by Prl and superinduction by Prl plus cycloheximide. Run-on transcription analysis indicated that c25 gene transcription was induced greater than 20-fold within 30 to 60 min of Prl stimulation. Surprisingly, DNA sequence analysis of c25 cDNA revealed that this Prl-inducible early-response gene is the rat homolog of the mouse transcription factor interferon-regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1), sharing 91% coding sequence similarity with mouse IRF-1. At the protein level, rat IRF-1 shares 97% and 92% homology with mouse IRF-1 and human IRF-1, respectively, suggesting that this molecule has been functionally conserved throughout evolution. Our studies show that the gene for IRF-1 is an immediate-early gene in Prl-stimulated T cells, which suggests that IRF-1 is a multifunctional molecule. In addition to its role in regulating growth-inhibitory interferon genes, IRF-1 may, therefore, also play a stimulatory role in cell proliferation. The gene for IRF-1 is one of the earliest genes known to be transcriptionally regulated by Prl. Images PMID:2342469

  16. Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1alpha is required for expression but dispensable for histone acetylation of the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase gene in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bosse, Tjalling; van Wering, Herbert M; Gielen, Marieke; Dowling, Lauren N; Fialkovich, John J; Piaseckyj, Christina M; Gonzalez, Frank J; Akiyama, Taro E; Montgomery, Robert K; Grand, Richard J; Krasinski, Stephen D

    2006-05-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1alpha (HNF-1alpha) is a modified homeodomain-containing transcription factor that has been implicated in the regulation of intestinal genes. To define the importance and underlying mechanism of HNF-1alpha for the regulation of intestinal gene expression in vivo, we analyzed the expression of the intestinal differentiation markers and putative HNF-1alpha targets lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH) and sucrase-isomaltase (SI) in hnf1alpha null mice. We found that in adult jejunum, LPH mRNA in hnf1alpha(-/-) mice was reduced 95% compared with wild-type controls (P < 0.01, n = 4), whereas SI mRNA was virtually identical to that in wild-type mice. Furthermore, SI mRNA abundance was unchanged in the absence of HNF-1alpha along the length of the adult mouse small intestine as well as in newborn jejunum. We found that HNF-1alpha occupies the promoters of both the LPH and SI genes in vivo. However, in contrast to liver and pancreas, where HNF-1alpha regulates target genes by recruitment of histone acetyl transferase activity to the promoter, the histone acetylation state of the LPH and SI promoters was not affected by the presence or absence of HNF-1alpha. Finally, we showed that a subset of hypothesized intestinal target genes is regulated by HNF-1alpha in vivo and that this regulation occurs in a defined tissue-specific and developmental context. These data indicate that HNF-1alpha is an activator of a subset of intestinal genes and induces these genes through an alternative mechanism in which it is dispensable for chromatin remodeling. PMID:16223943

  17. Three FLOWERING LOCUS T-like genes function as potential florigens and mediate photoperiod response in sorghum.

    PubMed

    Wolabu, Tezera W; Zhang, Fei; Niu, Lifang; Kalve, Shweta; Bhatnagar-Mathur, Pooja; Muszynski, Michael G; Tadege, Million

    2016-05-01

    Sorghum is a typical short-day (SD) plant and its use in grain or biomass production in temperate regions depends on its flowering time control, but the underlying molecular mechanism of floral transition in sorghum is poorly understood. Here we characterized sorghum FLOWERING LOCUS T (SbFT) genes to establish a molecular road map for mechanistic understanding. Out of 19 PEBP genes, SbFT1, SbFT8 and SbFT10 were identified as potential candidates for encoding florigens using multiple approaches. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that SbFT1 clusters with the rice Hd3a subclade, while SbFT8 and SbFT10 cluster with the maize ZCN8 subclade. These three genes are expressed in the leaf at the floral transition initiation stage, expressed early in grain sorghum genotypes but late in sweet and forage sorghum genotypes, induced by SD treatment in photoperiod-sensitive genotypes, cooperatively repressed by the classical sorghum maturity loci, interact with sorghum 14-3-3 proteins and activate flowering in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, suggesting florigenic potential in sorghum. SD induction of these three genes in sensitive genotypes is fully reversed by 1 wk of long-day treatment, and yet, some aspects of the SD treatment may still make a small contribution to flowering in long days, indicating a complex photoperiod response mediated by SbFT genes. PMID:26765652

  18. Intrachromosomal Amplification, Locus Deletion and Point Mutation in the Aquaglyceroporin AQP1 Gene in Antimony Resistant Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis

    PubMed Central

    Monte-Neto, Rubens; Laffitte, Marie-Claude N.; Leprohon, Philippe; Reis, Priscila; Frézard, Frédéric; Ouellette, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background Antimony resistance complicates the treatment of infections caused by the parasite Leishmania. Methodology/Principal Findings Using next generation sequencing, we sequenced the genome of four independent Leishmania guyanensis antimony-resistant (SbR) mutants and found different chromosomal alterations including aneuploidy, intrachromosomal gene amplification and gene deletion. A segment covering 30 genes on chromosome 19 was amplified intrachromosomally in three of the four mutants. The gene coding for the multidrug resistance associated protein A involved in antimony resistance was also amplified in the four mutants, most likely through chromosomal translocation. All mutants also displayed a reduced accumulation of antimony mainly due to genomic alterations at the level of the subtelomeric region of chromosome 31 harboring the gene coding for the aquaglyceroporin 1 (LgAQP1). Resistance involved the loss of LgAQP1 through subtelomeric deletions in three mutants. Interestingly, the fourth mutant harbored a single G133D point mutation in LgAQP1 whose role in resistance was functionality confirmed through drug sensitivity and antimony accumulation assays. In contrast to the Leishmania subspecies that resort to extrachromosomal amplification, the Viannia strains studied here used intrachromosomal amplification and locus deletion. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report of a naturally occurred point mutation in AQP1 in antimony resistant parasites. PMID:25679388

  19. Identification of the locus for human polymorphic cataract on chromosome 2 near gamma-crystallin gene cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Rogaev, E.I.; Rogaeva, E.A.; Keryanov, S.

    1994-09-01

    Cataract is the leading cause of blindness in human population. While positive linkage data have been obtained for some forms of inherited cataract, no evidence for mutations in any genes have been reported for human inherited cataract existing as an isolated abnormality. Previously, we have described the autosomal dominant polymorphic congenital cataract (PCC) which is characterized by partial opacity located between the fetal nucleus of the lens and the equator. The number, color and form of opacity is varied. We described pedigrees with 73 affected individuals, and used this in a linkage analysis with a set of polymorphic DNA markers randomly placed across the genome as well as with markers selected from some of the candidate genes or from nearby chromosomal regions. We have found evidence for segregation of a cataract locus with DNA markers from 2q36. The causative genetic defect has been mapped to a 20 cM interval which includes a cluster of gamma-crystallin genes. The gamma-crystallin proteins are abundant soluble low molecular weight proteins in the lens. We have used the trinucleotide repeat polymorphic markers from intron 2 of gamma-crystallin B gene and found the segregation of this marker with the disease with no evidence for recombination in the pedigree containing 62 affected individuals. These data suggest that the non-nuclear forms of human cataract may be caused by defects in gamma-crystallin genes.

  20. Identification of a New Locus, Ptr(t), Required for Rice Blast Resistance Gene Pi-ta-Mediated Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Yulin; Martin, Rodger Carl

    2008-01-01

    Resistance to the blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae is proposed to be initiated by physical binding of a putative cytoplasmic receptor encoded by a NBS type resistance gene Pi-ta to the processed elicitor encoded by the corresponding avirulence gene AVR-Pita. Here we report the identification of a new locus Ptr(t) that is required for Pi-ta-mediated signal recognition. A Pi-ta expressing susceptible mutant was identified using a genetic screen. Putative mutations at Ptr(t) does not alter recognition specificity to another resistance gene Pi-ks in the Pi-ta homozygote indicate that Ptr(t) is more likely specific to Pi-ta-mediated signal recognition. Genetic crosses of Pi-ta Ptr(t) and Pi-ta ptr(t) homozygotes suggest that Ptr(t) segregate at single dominant nuclear gene. A ratio of 1 resistant: 1 susceptible of a BC1 using Pi-ta Ptr(t) with pi-ta ptr(t) homozygotes indicates that Pi-ta and Ptr(t) are linked and co-segregated. Genotyping of mutants of pi-ta ptr(t) and Pi-ta Ptr(t) homozygotes using ten simple sequence repeat markers spanning 9 megabase of Pi-ta determines that Pi-ta and Ptr(t) are of indica origin. Identification of Ptr(t) is a significant advancement in studying Pi-ta-mediated signal recognition and transduction.

  1. Effects of ploidy and sex-locus genotype on gene expression patterns in the fire ant Solenopsis invicta

    PubMed Central

    Nipitwattanaphon, Mingkwan; Wang, John; Ross, Kenneth G.; Riba-Grognuz, Oksana; Wurm, Yannick; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Keller, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Males in many animal species differ greatly from females in morphology, physiology and behaviour. Ants, bees and wasps have a haplodiploid mechanism of sex determination whereby unfertilized eggs become males while fertilized eggs become females. However, many species also have a low frequency of diploid males, which are thought to develop from diploid eggs when individuals are homozygous at one or more sex determination loci. Diploid males are morphologically similar to haploids, though often larger and typically sterile. To determine how ploidy level and sex-locus genotype affect gene expression during development, we compared expression patterns between diploid males, haploid males and females (queens) at three developmental timepoints in Solenopsis invicta. In pupae, gene expression profiles of diploid males were very different from those of haploid males but nearly identical to those of queens. An unexpected shift in expression patterns emerged soon after adult eclosion, with diploid male patterns diverging from those of queens to resemble those of haploid males, a pattern retained in older adults. The finding that ploidy level effects on early gene expression override sex effects (including genes implicated in sperm production and pheromone production/perception) may explain diploid male sterility and lack of worker discrimination against them during development. PMID:25355475

  2. Identification of the genetic locus for the structural gene and a new regulatory gene for the synthesis of repressible alkaline phosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Y.; Toh-e, A.; Oshima, Y.

    1982-02-01

    Two lines of evidence showed that the PHO8 gene encodes the structure of repressible, nonspecific alkaline phosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: (I) the enzyme produced by a temperature-sensitive pho8 mutant at the permissive temperature (25/sup 0/C) was more thermolabile than that of the wild-type strain, and (II) the PHO8 gene showed a gene dosage effect on the enzyme activity. The pho8 locus has been mapped on chromosome IV, 8 centimorgans distal to rna3. A new mutant carrying the pho9 gene was isolated which lacks repressible alkaline phosphatase, but has the normal phenotype for the synthesis of repressible acid phosphatase. The pho9 gene segregated independently of all known pho-regulatory genes and did not show the gene dosage effect on repressible alkaline phosphatase activity. The pho9/pho9 diploid hardly sporulated and showed no commitment to intragenic recombination when it was inoculated on sporulation medium. Hence the pho9 mutant has a phenotype similar to the pep4 mutant, which was isolated as a pleiotropic mutant with reduced levels of proteinases A and B carboxypeptidase Y. An allelism test indicated that pho9 and pep4 are allelic.

  3. A 1.6-Mb contig of yeast artificial chromosomes around the human factor VIII gene reveals three regions homologous to probes for the DXS115 locus and two for the DXYS64 locus.

    PubMed Central

    Freije, D; Schlessinger, D

    1992-01-01

    Two yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) libraries were screened for probes in Xq28, around the gene for coagulation factor VIII (F8). A set of 30 YACs were recovered and assembled into a contig spanning at least 1.6 Mb from the DXYS64 locus to the glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (G6PD). Overlaps among the YACs were determined by several fingerprinting techniques and by additional probes generated from YAC inserts by using Alu-vector or ligation-mediated PCR. Analysis of more than 30 probes and sequence-tagged sites (STSs) made from the region revealed the presence of several homologous genomic segments. For example, a probe for the DXYS64 locus, which maps less than 500 kb 5' of F8, detects a similar but not identical locus between F8 and G6PD. Also, a probe for the DXS115 locus detects at least three identical copies in this region, one in intron 22 of F8 and at least two more, which are upstream of the 5' end of the gene. Comparisons of genomic and YAC DNA suggest that the multiple loci are not created artifactually during cloning but reflect the structure of uncloned human DNA. On the basis of these data, the most likely order for the loci analyzed is tel-DXYS61-DXYS64-(DXS115-3-DXS115-2)-5'F8-(D XS115-1)-3'F8-G6PD. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1609806

  4. Plasticity of tyrosine hydroxylase gene expression within BALB/C and C57Black/6 mouse locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Marcel, D; Raison, S; Bezin, L; Pujol, J F; Weissmann, D

    1998-02-13

    The plasticity of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) phenotype in the locus coeruleus (LC) of two pure inbred strains of mice, Balb/C (C) and C57Black/6 (B6), was investigated at the molecular level by radioactive in situ hybridization. The results demonstrated that in basal conditions, C mouse LC contains less TH-mRNA-expressing cells than B6. After RU 24722-treatment, which induces long lasting TH gene expression in the LC, we previously reported an increase in TH-expressing cell number in C mouse LC only, equalizing TH phenotype between the two strains. Here, we demonstrate that strain specific plasticity of TH phenotype detected in spatially organized cells is associated with the regulation of TH-mRNA expression above a detectable level. These results suggest that interstrain differences and pharmacologically-induced phenotypic plasticity in TH phenotype may occur at the transcriptional level. PMID:9533398

  5. Ectopic T Cell Receptor-α Locus Control Region Activity in B Cells Is Suppressed by Direct Linkage to Two Flanking Genes at Once

    PubMed Central

    Andino, Blanca E.; Harrow, Faith; Erhard, Karl F.; Kovalovsky, Damian; Sant'Angelo, Derek B.; Ortiz, Benjamin D.

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms regulating the activity of the TCRα gene are required for the production of the circulating T cell repertoire. Elements of the mouse TCRα locus control region (LCR) play a role in these processes. We previously reported that TCRα LCR DNA supports a gene expression pattern that mimics proper thymus-stage, TCRα gene-like developmental regulation. It also produces transcription of linked reporter genes in peripheral T cells. However, TCRα LCR-driven transgenes display ectopic transcription in B cells in multiple reporter gene systems. The reasons for this important deviation from the normal TCRα gene regulation pattern are unclear. In its natural locus, two genes flank the TCRα LCR, TCRα (upstream) and Dad1 (downstream). We investigated the significance of this gene arrangement to TCRα LCR activity by examining transgenic mice bearing a construct where the LCR was flanked by two separate reporter genes. Surprisingly, the presence of a second, distinct, reporter gene downstream of the LCR virtually eliminated the ectopic B cell expression of the upstream reporter observed in earlier studies. Downstream reporter gene activity was unaffected by the presence of a second gene upstream of the LCR. Our findings indicate that a gene arrangement in which the TCRα LCR is flanked by two distinct transcription units helps to restrict its activity, selectively, on its 5′-flanking gene, the natural TCRα gene position with respect to the LCR. Consistent with these findings, a TCRα/Dad1 locus bacterial artificial chromosome dual-reporter construct did not display the ectopic upstream (TCRα) reporter expression in B cells previously reported for single TCRα transgenes. PMID:21124935

  6. Single gene locus changes perturb complex microbial communities as much as apex predator loss.

    PubMed

    McClean, Deirdre; McNally, Luke; Salzberg, Letal I; Devine, Kevin M; Brown, Sam P; Donohue, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Many bacterial species are highly social, adaptively shaping their local environment through the production of secreted molecules. This can, in turn, alter interaction strengths among species and modify community composition. However, the relative importance of such behaviours in determining the structure of complex communities is unknown. Here we show that single-locus changes affecting biofilm formation phenotypes in Bacillus subtilis modify community structure to the same extent as loss of an apex predator and even to a greater extent than loss of B. subtilis itself. These results, from experimentally manipulated multitrophic microcosm assemblages, demonstrate that bacterial social traits are key modulators of the structure of their communities. Moreover, they show that intraspecific genetic variability can be as important as strong trophic interactions in determining community dynamics. Microevolution may therefore be as important as species extinctions in shaping the response of microbial communities to environmental change. PMID:26354365

  7. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) locus 12: is glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPX1) the relevant gene?

    PubMed

    Häuser, F; Rossmann, H; Laubert-Reh, D; Wild, P S; Zeller, T; Müller, C; Neuwirth, S; Blankenberg, S; Lackner, K J

    2015-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified and repeatedly confirmed the association of rs3197999 in MST1 with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the underlying pathophysiology remains unclear. rs3197999 is a non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism which modifies the function of macrophage stimulating protein-1 (MST1). We show by haplotyping that rs3197999 is in linkage disequilibrium with rs1050450 in GPX1, with almost complete cosegregation of the minor alleles. As shown by immunoassay, rs3197999 influences the MST-1 level in serum. But also rs1050450 causes an amino acid exchange in glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx-1) and reduced activity of this antioxidant enzyme. The association of GPx deficiency and IBD in mice was already shown. We propose that GPx-1 is a better candidate than MST1 for the pathophysiologic link between IBD locus 12 and IBD. PMID:26355565

  8. Mapping of the gene for cleidocranial dysplasia in the historical Cape Town (Arnold) kindred and evidence for locus homogeneity.

    PubMed Central

    Ramesar, R S; Greenberg, J; Martin, R; Goliath, R; Bardien, S; Mundlos, S; Beighton, P

    1996-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant disorder, features of which include a patient anterior fontanelle, a bulging calvarium, hypoplasia or aplasia of the clavicles, a wide public symphysis, dental anomalies, vertebral malformation, and short stature. The Cape Town kindred which is under our genetic management was originally described more than four decades ago and now consists of more than 1000 people. Following reports of rearrangements on chromosomes 6 and 8 in people with CCD, we have carried out linkage analyses between highly information microsatellite dinucleotide repeat markers in the rearranged regions and the disorder in a branch of this South African CCD kindred, consisting of 38 subjects, 18 of whom are affected. Maximum lod scores (at theta = 0.00) of 7.14 (for marker D6S459), 4.32 (TCTE), 4.99 (D6S452), 5.97 (D6S269), and 3.95 (D6S465) confirm linkage of the disorder to the short arm of chromosome 6. Our data indicate that the CCD gene is located within a minimal region of approximately 10 cM flanked by the marker D6S451 distally and D6S466 proximally. This information is vital towards isolating and characterising the gene for CCD, and is being used to construct a physical map of 6p21.1-6p21.3. More importantly, mapping of the locus in the South African kindred of mixed ancestry, in which the "founder" of the disorder was of Chinese origin, suggests that a single locus is responsible for classic CCD. Images PMID:8782054

  9. Role of the serotonin transporter gene locus in the response to SSRI treatment of major depressive disorder in late life.

    PubMed

    Seripa, Davide; Pilotto, Andrea; Paroni, Giulia; Fontana, Andrea; D'Onofrio, Grazia; Gravina, Carolina; Urbano, Maria; Cascavilla, Leandro; Paris, Francesco; Panza, Francesco; Padovani, Alessandro; Pilotto, Alberto

    2015-05-01

    It has been suggested that the serotonin or 5-hydroxytriptamine (5-HT) transporter (5-HTT) and its gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) response modulators in late-life depression (LLD), and particularly in late-life major depressive disorder (MDD). Previous studies differed in design and results. Our study aimed to investigate the solute carrier family 6 (neurotransmitter transporter and serotonin) member 4 (SLC6A4) gene locus, encoding 5-HTT and SSRI treatment response in late-life MDD. For a prospective cohort study, we enrolled 234 patients with late-life MDD to be treated with escitalopram, sertraline, paroxetine or citalopram for 6 months. The SLC6A4 polymorphisms rs4795541 (5-HTTLPR), rs140701 and rs3813034 genotypes spanning the SLC6A4 locus were investigated in blinded fashion. No placebo group was included. We assessed responder or non-responder phenotypes according to a reduction in the 21-item version of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-21) score of ⩾ 50%. At follow-up, 30% of the late-life MDD patients were non-responders to SSRI treatment. No time-course of symptoms and responses was made. A poor response was associated with a higher baseline HDRS-21 score. We observed a significant over-representation of the rs4795541-S allele in the responder patients (0.436 versus 0.321; p = 0.023). The single S-allele dose-additive effect had OR = 1.74 (95% CI 1.12-2.69) in the additive regression model. Our findings suggested a possible influence of 5-HTTLPR on the SSRI response in patients with late-life MDD, which is potentially useful in identifying the subgroups of LLD patients whom need a different pharmacological approach. PMID:25827644

  10. Mapping of the gene for cleidocranial dysplasia in the historical Cape Town (Arnold) kindred and evidence for locus homogeneity.

    PubMed

    Ramesar, R S; Greenberg, J; Martin, R; Goliath, R; Bardien, S; Mundlos, S; Beighton, P

    1996-06-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an autosomal dominant disorder, features of which include a patient anterior fontanelle, a bulging calvarium, hypoplasia or aplasia of the clavicles, a wide public symphysis, dental anomalies, vertebral malformation, and short stature. The Cape Town kindred which is under our genetic management was originally described more than four decades ago and now consists of more than 1000 people. Following reports of rearrangements on chromosomes 6 and 8 in people with CCD, we have carried out linkage analyses between highly information microsatellite dinucleotide repeat markers in the rearranged regions and the disorder in a branch of this South African CCD kindred, consisting of 38 subjects, 18 of whom are affected. Maximum lod scores (at theta = 0.00) of 7.14 (for marker D6S459), 4.32 (TCTE), 4.99 (D6S452), 5.97 (D6S269), and 3.95 (D6S465) confirm linkage of the disorder to the short arm of chromosome 6. Our data indicate that the CCD gene is located within a minimal region of approximately 10 cM flanked by the marker D6S451 distally and D6S466 proximally. This information is vital towards isolating and characterising the gene for CCD, and is being used to construct a physical map of 6p21.1-6p21.3. More importantly, mapping of the locus in the South African kindred of mixed ancestry, in which the "founder" of the disorder was of Chinese origin, suggests that a single locus is responsible for classic CCD. PMID:8782054

  11. Two Tightly Linked Genes at the hsa1 Locus Cause Both F1 and F2 Hybrid Sterility in Rice.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takahiko; Takashi, Tomonori; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Kurata, Nori

    2016-02-01

    Molecular mechanisms of hybrid breakdown associated with sterility (F2 sterility) are poorly understood as compared with those of F1 hybrid sterility. Previously, we characterized three unlinked epistatic loci, hybrid sterility-a1 (hsa1), hsa2, and hsa3, responsible for the F2 sterility in a cross between Oryza sativa ssp. indica and japonica. In this study, we identified that the hsa1 locus contains two interacting genes, HSA1a and HSA1b, within a 30-kb region. HSA1a-j (japonica allele) encodes a highly conserved plant-specific domain of unknown function protein (DUF1618), whereas the indica allele (HSA1a-i(s)) has two deletion mutations that cause disruption of domain structure. The second gene, HSA1b-i(s), encodes an uncharacterized protein with some similarity to a nucleotide-binding protein. Homozygous introgression of indica HSA1a-i(s)-HSA1b-i(s) alleles into japonica showed female gamete abortion at an early mitotic stage. The fact that the recombinant haplotype HSA1a-j-HSA1b-i(s) caused semi-sterility in the heterozygous state with the HSA1a-i(s)-HSA1b-i(s) haplotype suggests that variation in the hsa1 locus is a possible cause of the wide-spectrum sterility barriers seen in F1 hybrids and successive generations in rice. We propose a simple genetic model to explain how a single causal mechanism can drive both F1 and F2 hybrid sterility. PMID:26455463

  12. Rearrangements at the 11p15 locus and overexpression of insulin-like growth factor-II gene in sporadic adrenocortical tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Gicquel, C.; Schneid, H.; Le Bouc, Y.; Bertagna, X.; Francillard-Leblond, M.; Luton, J.P.; Girard, F.

    1994-06-01

    Little is known about the pathophysiology of sporadic adrenocortical tumors in adults. Because loss of heterozygosity at the 11p15 locus has been described in childhood tumors, particularly in adrenocortical tumors associated with the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, and because insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) is a crucial regulator of fetal adrenal growth, the authors looked for structural analysis at the 11p15 locus and IGF-II gene expression in 23 sporadic adrenocortical adult tumors: 6 carcinomas (5 with Cushing`s syndrome and 1 nonsecreting) and 17 benign adenomas (13 with Cushing`s syndrome, 1 pure androgen secreting, and 3 nonsecreting). Twenty-one patients were informative at the 11p15 locus, and six (four carcinomas and two adenomas) of them (28.5%) exhibited 11p15 structural abnormalities in tumor DNA (five, a uniparental disomy and one, a mosaicism). In a single case that could be further studied, a paternal isodisomy was observed. Very high IGF-II mRNA contents were detected in seven tumors (30%; 5 of the 6 carcinomas and 2 of the 17 adenomas). They were particularly found in tumors with uniparental disomy at the 11p15 locus. Overall, a strong correlation existed between IGF-II mRNA contents and DNA demethylation at the IGF-II locus. These data show that genetic alterations involving the 11p15 locus were highly frequent in malignant tumors, but found only in rare adenomas. These results in combination with evidence for overexpression of IGF-II from the 11p15.5 locus suggest that abnormalities in structure and/or expression of the IGF-II gene play a role as a late event of a multistep process of tumorigenesis. 58 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Quantifying the contribution of chromatin dynamics to stochastic gene expression reveals long, locus-dependent periods between transcriptional bursts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A number of studies have established that stochasticity in gene expression may play an important role in many biological phenomena. This therefore calls for further investigations to identify the molecular mechanisms at stake, in order to understand and manipulate cell-to-cell variability. In this work, we explored the role played by chromatin dynamics in the regulation of stochastic gene expression in higher eukaryotic cells. Results For this purpose, we generated isogenic chicken-cell populations expressing a fluorescent reporter integrated in one copy per clone. Although the clones differed only in the genetic locus at which the reporter was inserted, they showed markedly different fluorescence distributions, revealing different levels of stochastic gene expression. Use of chromatin-modifying agents showed that direct manipulation of chromatin dynamics had a marked effect on the extent of stochastic gene expression. To better understand the molecular mechanism involved in these phenomena, we fitted these data to a two-state model describing the opening/closing process of the chromatin. We found that the differences between clones seemed to be due mainly to the duration of the closed state, and that the agents we used mainly seem to act on the opening probability. Conclusions In this study, we report biological experiments combined with computational modeling, highlighting the importance of chromatin dynamics in stochastic gene expression. This work sheds a new light on the mechanisms of gene expression in higher eukaryotic cells, and argues in favor of relatively slow dynamics with long (hours to days) periods of quiet state. PMID:23442824

  14. Evidence that the penetrance of mutations at the RP11 locus causing dominant retinitis pigmentosa is influenced by a gene linked to the homologous RP11 allele.

    PubMed Central

    McGee, T L; Devoto, M; Ott, J; Berson, E L; Dryja, T P

    1997-01-01

    A subset of families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP) display reduced penetrance with some asymptomatic gene carriers showing no retinal abnormalities by ophthalmic examination or by electroretinography. Here we describe a study of three families with reduced-penetrance RP. In all three families the disease gene appears to be linked to chromosome 19q13.4, the region containing the RP11 locus, as defined by previously reported linkage studies based on five other reduced-penetrance families. Meiotic recombinants in one of the newly identified RP11 families and in two of the previously reported families serve to restrict the disease locus to a 6-cM region bounded by markers D19S572 and D19S926. We also compared the disease status of RP11 carriers with the segregation of microsatellite alleles within 19q13.4 from the noncarrier parents in the newly reported and the previously reported families. The results support the hypothesis that wild-type alleles at the RP11 locus or at a closely linked locus inherited from the noncarrier parents are a major factor influencing the penetrance of pathogenic alleles at this locus. PMID:9345108

  15. Chicken TAP genes differ from their human orthologues in locus organisation, size, sequence features and polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Walker, Brian A; van Hateren, Andrew; Milne, Sarah; Beck, Stephan; Kaufman, Jim

    2005-05-01

    We have previously shown that in the chicken major histocompatibility complex, the two transporters associated with antigen processing genes (TAP1 and TAP2) are located head to head between two classical class I genes. Here we show that the region between these two TAP genes has transcription factor-binding sites in common with class I gene promoters. The TAP genes are also up-regulated by interferon-gamma in a similar way to mammalian TAP genes and in a way that suggests they are both transcribed from a bi-directional promoter. The gene structures of TAP1 and TAP2 differ from that of human TAPs in that TAP1 has a truncated exon 1 and TAP2 has fused exons, resulting in a much smaller gene size. The truncation of TAP1 results in the loss of approximately 150 amino acids, which are thought to be involved in endoplasmic reticulum retention, heterodimer formation and tapasin binding, compared to human TAP1. Most of the protein sequence features involved in binding ATP are conserved, with two exceptions: chicken TAP1 has a glycine in the switch region where other TAPs have glutamine or histidine, and both chicken TAP genes have serines in the C motif where mammalian TAP2 has an alanine. Lastly, the chicken TAP genes are highly polymorphic, with at least as many TAP alleles as there are class I alleles, as seen by investigating nine inbred lines of chicken. The close proximity of the TAP genes to the class I genes and the high level of polymorphism may allow co-evolution of the genes, allowing TAP molecules to transport peptides specifically for the class I molecules of that haplotype. PMID:15900495

  16. Multi-locus molecular phylogeny and allelic variation in a transcription factor gene suggest the multiple independent origins of kabuli chickpea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To examine the patterns of molecular diversity in wild crop relatives and the cultivated gene pool of chickpea we genotyped a set of 98 wild annual and 224 cultivated accessions with a 768 feature assay that monitored SNPs in low-copy orthologous loci. Analyses of the resulting multi-locus genotypin...

  17. Further Characterization of the Odysseus Locus of Hybrid Sterility in Drosophila: One Gene Is Not Enough

    PubMed Central

    Perez, D. E.; Wu, C. I.

    1995-01-01

    Previously we mapped by genetical and molecular means a gene that contributes to hybrid-male sterility between Drosophila mauritiana and D. simulans to the cytological interval of 16D. In this report, we refine the mapping of this gene, Odysseus (Ods) and show that it can be delineated to a region the size of an average gene. We further demonstrate that, while Ods appears to be a discrete element, it requires other nearby gene(s) to be cointrogressed to confer full hybrid sterility effect. This observation is in agreement with the view that reproductive isolation between closely related species of Drosophila is usually caused by several genes of weak effect from the same species that interact strongly among themselves as well as with the foreign genetic background. PMID:7635285

  18. Integrating Colon Cancer Microarray Data: Associating Locus-Specific Methylation Groups to Gene Expression-Based Classifications

    PubMed Central

    Barat, Ana; Ruskin, Heather J.; Byrne, Annette T.; Prehn, Jochen H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, considerable attention has been paid to gene expression-based classifications of colorectal cancers (CRC) and their association with patient prognosis. In addition to changes in gene expression, abnormal DNA-methylation is known to play an important role in cancer onset and development, and colon cancer is no exception to this rule. Large-scale technologies, such as methylation microarray assays and specific sequencing of methylated DNA, have been used to determine whole genome profiles of CpG island methylation in tissue samples. In this article, publicly available microarray-based gene expression and methylation data sets are used to characterize expression subtypes with respect to locus-specific methylation. A major objective was to determine whether integration of these data types improves previously characterized subtypes, or provides evidence for additional subtypes. We used unsupervised clustering techniques to determine methylation-based subgroups, which are subsequently annotated with three published expression-based classifications, comprising from three to six subtypes. Our results showed that, while methylation profiles provide a further basis for segregation of certain (Inflammatory and Goblet-like) finer-grained expression-based subtypes, they also suggest that other finer-grained subtypes are not distinctive and can be considered as a single subtype.

  19. Gene amplification at a locus encoding a putative Na+/H+ antiporter confers sodium and lithium tolerance in fission yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Z P; McCullough, N; Martel, R; Hemmingsen, S; Young, P G

    1992-01-01

    We have identified a new locus, sodium 2 (sod2) based on selection for increased LiCl tolerance in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Tolerant strains have enhanced pH-dependent Na+ export capacity and sodium transport experiments suggest that the gene encodes an Na+/H+ antiport. The predicted sod2 gene product can be placed in the broad class of transporters which possess 12 hydrophobic transmembrane domains. The protein shows some sequence similarity to the human and bacterial Na+/H+ antiporters. Overexpression of sod2 increased Na+ export capacity and conferred sodium tolerance. Osmotolerance was not affected and sod2 cells were unaffected for growth in K+. In a sod2 disruption strain cells were incapable of exporting sodium. They were hypersensitive to Na+ or Li+ and could not grow under conditions that approximate pH7. The sod2 gene amplification could be selected stepwise and the degree of such amplification correlated with the level of Na+ or Li+ tolerance. Images PMID:1314171

  20. Clustered cadherin genes: a sequence-ready contig for the desmosomal cadherin locus on human chromosome 18.

    PubMed

    Hunt, D M; Sahota, V K; Taylor, K; Simrak, D; Hornigold, N; Arnemann, J; Wolfe, J; Buxton, R S

    1999-12-15

    We describe the assembly of a cosmid and PAC contig of approximately 700 kb on human chromosome 18q12 spanning the DSC and DSG genes coding for the desmocollins and desmogleins. These are members of the cadherin superfamily of calcium-dependent cell adhesion proteins present in the desmosome type of cell junction found especially in epithelial cells. They provide the strong cell-cell adhesion generated by this type of cell junction for which expression of both a desmocollin and a desmoglein is required. In the autoimmune skin diseases pemphigus foliaceous and pemphigus vulgaris (PV), where the autoantigens are, respectively, encoded by the DSG1 and DSG3 genes, severe areas of acantholysis (cell separation), potentially life-threatening in the case of PV, are evident. Dominant mutations in the DSG1 gene causing striate palmoplantar keratoderma result in hyperkeratosis of the skin on the parts of the body where pressure and abrasion are greatest, viz., on the palms and soles. These genes are also candidate tumor suppressor genes in squamous cell carcinomas and other epithelial cancers. We have screened two chromosome 18-specific cosmid libraries by hybridization with previously isolated YAC clones and DSC and DSG cDNAs, and a whole genome PAC library, both by hybridization with the YACs and by screening by PCR using cDNA sequences and YAC end sequence. The contigs were extended by further PCR screens using STSs generated by vectorette walking from the ends of the cosmids and PACs, together with sequence from PAC ends. Despite screening of two libraries, the cosmid contig still had four gaps. The PAC contig filled these gaps and in fact covered the whole locus. The positions of 45 STSs covering the whole of this region are presented. The desmocollin and desmoglein genes, which are about 30-35 kb in size, are quite well separated at approximately 20-30 kb apart and are arranged in two clusters, one DSC cluster and one DSG cluster, which are transcribed outward from the

  1. Suppression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha and its downstream genes reduces acute hyperglycemia-enhanced hemorrhagic transformation in a rat model of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunhua; Ostrowski, Robert P; Zhou, Changman; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2010-07-01

    We evaluated a role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) and its downstream genes in acute hyperglycemia-induced hemorrhagic transformation in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 280-300 g (n = 105) were divided into sham, 90 min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), MCAO plus HIF-1alpha inhibitors, 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2) or 3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl)-1-benzylindazole (YC-1), groups. Rats received an injection of 50% dextrose (6 ml/kg intraperitoneally) at 15 min before MCAO. HIF-1alpha inhibitors were administered at the onset of reperfusion. The animals were examined for neurological deficits and sacrificed at 6, 12, 24, and 72 hr following MCAO. The cerebral tissues were collected for histology, zymography, and Western blot analysis. The expression of HIF-1alpha was increased in ischemic brain tissues after MCAO and reduced by HIF-1alpha inhibitors. In addition, 2ME2 reduced the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the elevation of active matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (MMP-2/MMP-9) in the ipsilateral hemisphere. Both 2ME2 and YC-1 reduced infarct volume and ameliorated neurological deficits. However, only 2ME2 attenuated hemorrhagic transformation in the ischemic territory. In conclusion, the inhibition of HIF-1alpha and its downstream genes attenuates hemorrhagic conversion of cerebral infarction and ameliorates neurological deficits after focal cerebral ischemia. PMID:20155812

  2. Host Cell Factor-1 Recruitment to E2F-bound and Cell Cycle Control Genes is Mediated by THAP11 and ZNF143

    PubMed Central

    Parker, J. Brandon; Yin, Hanwei; Vinckevicius, Aurimas; Chakravarti, Debabrata

    2014-01-01

    Summary Host cell factor-1 (HCF-1) is a metazoan transcriptional co-regulator essential for cell cycle progression and cell proliferation. Current models suggest a mechanism whereby HCF-1 functions as a direct co-regulator of E2F proteins, facilitating the expression of genes necessary for cell proliferation. In this report, we show that HCF-1 recruitment to numerous E2F-bound promoters is mediated by the concerted action of zinc finger transcription factors THAP11 and ZNF143, rather than E2F proteins directly. THAP11, ZNF143, and HCF-1 form a mutually dependent complex on chromatin, which is independent of E2F occupancy. Disruption of the THAP11/ZNF143/HCF-1 complex results in altered expression of cell cycle control genes and leads to reduced cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and cell viability. These data establish a new model which suggests that a THAP11/ZNF143/HCF-1 complex is a critical component of the transcriptional regulatory network governing cell proliferation. PMID:25437553

  3. Host cell factor-1 recruitment to E2F-bound and cell-cycle-control genes is mediated by THAP11 and ZNF143.

    PubMed

    Parker, J Brandon; Yin, Hanwei; Vinckevicius, Aurimas; Chakravarti, Debabrata

    2014-11-01

    Host cell factor-1 (HCF-1) is a metazoan transcriptional coregulator essential for cell-cycle progression and cell proliferation. Current models suggest a mechanism whereby HCF-1 functions as a direct coregulator of E2F proteins, facilitating the expression of genes necessary for cell proliferation. In this report, we show that HCF-1 recruitment to numerous E2F-bound promoters is mediated by the concerted action of zinc finger transcription factors THAP11 and ZNF143, rather than E2F proteins directly. THAP11, ZNF143, and HCF-1 form a mutually dependent complex on chromatin, which is independent of E2F occupancy. Disruption of the THAP11/ZNF143/HCF-1 complex results in altered expression of cell-cycle control genes and leads to reduced cell proliferation, cell-cycle progression, and cell viability. These data establish a model in which a THAP11/ZNF143/HCF-1 complex is a critical component of the transcriptional regulatory network governing cell proliferation. PMID:25437553

  4. Detecting purely epistatic multi-locus interactions by an omnibus permutation test on ensembles of two-locus analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wongseree, Waranyu; Assawamakin, Anunchai; Piroonratana, Theera; Sinsomros, Saravudh; Limwongse, Chanin; Chaiyaratana, Nachol

    2009-01-01

    in PGM1 (phosphoglucomutase 1), two intronic SNPs in LMX1A (LIM homeobox transcription factor 1, alpha), two intronic SNPs in PARK2 (Parkinson disease (autosomal recessive, juvenile) 2, parkin) and three intronic SNPs in GYS2 (glycogen synthase 2 (liver)) are associated with the disease. The 2LOmb result suggests that there is no interaction between each pair of the identified genes that can be described by purely epistatic two-locus interaction models. Moreover, there are no interactions between these four genes that can be described by purely epistatic multi-locus interaction models with marginal two-locus effects. The findings provide an alternative explanation for the aetiology of T2D in a UK population. Conclusion An omnibus permutation test on ensembles of two-locus analyses can detect purely epistatic multi-locus interactions with marginal two-locus effects. The study also reveals that SNPs from large-scale or genome-wide case-control data which are discarded after single-locus analysis detects no association can still be useful for genetic epidemiology studies. PMID:19761607

  5. Molecular bases of genetic diversity and evolution of the immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region (IGHV) gene locus in leporids

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Ana; Lanning, Dennis; Alves, Paulo C.; Mage, Rose G.; Knight, Katherine L.; van der Loo, Wessel; Esteves, Pedro J.

    2012-01-01

    The rabbit has long been a model for studies of the immune system. Work using rabbits contributed both to the battle against infectious diseases such as rabies and syphilis, and to our knowledge of antibodies' structure, function, and regulated expression. With the description of rabbit Ig allotypes, the discovery of different gene segments encoding immunoglobulins became possible. This challenged the “one gene-one protein” dogma. The observation that rabbit allotypic specificities of the variable regions were present on IgM and IgG molecules also led to the hypothesis of Ig class switching. Rabbit allotypes contributed to the documentation of phenomena such as allelic exclusion and imbalance in production of allelic gene products. During the last 30 years, the rabbit Ig allotypes revealed a number of unique features, setting them apart from mice, humans and other mammals. Here, we review the most relevant findings concerning the rabbit IGHV. Among these are the preferential usage of one VH gene in VDJ rearrangements, the existence of trans-species polymorphism in the IGHV locus revealed by serology and confirmed by sequencing IGHV genes in Lepus, the unusually large genetic distances between allelic lineages and the fact that the antibody repertoire is diversified in this species only after birth. The Whole Genome Sequence of rabbit, plus re-sequencing of additional strains and related genera, will allow further evolutionary investigations of antibody variation. Continued research will help define the roles that genetic, allelic and population diversity at antibody loci may play in host-parasite interactions. PMID:21594770

  6. Analysis of a plant complex resistance gene locus underlying immune-related hybrid incompatibility and its occurrence in nature.

    PubMed

    Alcázar, Rubén; von Reth, Marcel; Bautor, Jaqueline; Chae, Eunyoung; Weigel, Detlef; Koornneef, Maarten; Parker, Jane E

    2014-12-01

    Mechanisms underlying speciation in plants include detrimental (incompatible) genetic interactions between parental alleles that incur a fitness cost in hybrids. We reported on recessive hybrid incompatibility between an Arabidopsis thaliana strain from Poland, Landsberg erecta (Ler), and many Central Asian A. thaliana strains. The incompatible interaction is determined by a polymorphic cluster of Toll/interleukin-1 receptor-nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat (TNL) RPP1 (Recognition of Peronospora parasitica1)-like genes in Ler and alleles of the receptor-like kinase Strubbelig Receptor Family 3 (SRF3) in Central Asian strains Kas-2 or Kond, causing temperature-dependent autoimmunity and loss of growth and reproductive fitness. Here, we genetically dissected the RPP1-like Ler locus to determine contributions of individual RPP1-like Ler (R1-R8) genes to the incompatibility. In a neutral background, expression of most RPP1-like Ler genes, except R3, has no effect on growth or pathogen resistance. Incompatibility involves increased R3 expression and engineered R3 overexpression in a neutral background induces dwarfism and sterility. However, no individual RPP1-like Ler gene is sufficient for incompatibility between Ler and Kas-2 or Kond, suggesting that co-action of at least two RPP1-like members underlies this epistatic interaction. We find that the RPP1-like Ler haplotype is frequent and occurs with other Ler RPP1-like alleles in a local population in Gorzów Wielkopolski (Poland). Only Gorzów individuals carrying the RPP1-like Ler haplotype are incompatible with Kas-2 and Kond, whereas other RPP1-like alleles in the population are compatible. Therefore, the RPP1-like Ler haplotype has been maintained in genetically different individuals at a single site, allowing exploration of forces shaping the evolution of RPP1-like genes at local and regional population scales. PMID:25503786

  7. New assignment of the adenosine deaminase gene locus to chromosome 20q13 X 11 by study of a patient with interstitial deletion 20q.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, M B; Tranebjaerg, L; Tommerup, N; Nygaard, P; Edwards, H

    1987-01-01

    A karyotype 46,XY,del(20)(q11 X 23q13 X 11) was found in a three year old boy with mental and growth retardation, low set ears, broad nasal bridge, and macrostomia. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity was reduced by about 50%, assigning the gene locus to the deleted segment. A review of the previously reported regional assignments suggests that the ADA gene is in the region of band 20q13 X 11. Images PMID:3560174

  8. A complement receptor locus: genes encoding C3b/C4b receptor and C3d/Epstein-Barr virus receptor map to 1q32.

    PubMed

    Weis, J H; Morton, C C; Bruns, G A; Weis, J J; Klickstein, L B; Wong, W W; Fearon, D T

    1987-01-01

    The alternative or classical pathways for complement system component C3 may be triggered by microorganisms and antigen-antibody complexes. In particular, an activated fragment of C3, C3b, covalently attaches to microorganisms or antigen-antibody complexes, which in turn bind to the C3b receptor, also known as complement receptor 1. The genes encoding the proteins that constitute the C3-activating enzymes have been cloned and mapped to a "complement activation" locus in the major histocompatibility complex, and we demonstrate in this study such a locus on the long arm of chromosome 1 at band 1q32. PMID:3782802

  9. Apparent gene conversions involving the SMN gene in the region of the spinal muscular atrophy locus on chromosome 5

    SciTech Connect

    Steege, G. van der; Grootscholten, P.M.; Cobben, J.M.; Scheffer, H.; Buys, C.H.C.M.

    1996-10-01

    The survival motor neuron (SMN) gene has been described as a determining gene for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). SMN has a closely flanking, nearly identical copy ({sup C}BCD541). Gene and copy gene can be discriminated by sequence differences in exons 7 and 8. The large majority of SMA patients show homozygous deletions of at least exons 7 and 8 of the SMN gene. A minority of patients show absence of SMN exon 7 but retention of exon 8. This is explained by results of our present analysis of 13 such patients providing evidence for apparent gene-conversion events between SMN and the centromeric copy gene. Instead of applying a separate analysis for absence or presence of SMN exons 7 and 8, we used a contiguous PCR from intron 6 to exon 8. In every case we found a chimeric gene with a fusion of exon 7 of the copy gene and exon 8 of SMN and absence of a normal SMN gene. Similar events, including the fusion counterpart, were observed in a group of controls, although in the presence of a normal SMN gene. Chimeric genes as the result of fusions of parts of SMN and {sup C}BCD541 apparently are far from rare and may partly explain the frequently observed SMN deletions in SMA patients. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Increased messenger RNA for allograft inflammatory factor-1, LERK-5, and a novel gene in 17.5-day relative to 15.5-day bovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Glover, Michelle D; Seidel, George E

    2003-09-01

    Considerable embryonic loss occurs between Gestation Days 15 and 18 in cattle when critical cellular and molecular events occur, including maternal recognition of pregnancy. To gain insight into these events, mRNA differential display analysis was used to identify eight unique cDNA fragments present in greater abundance in 17.5-day than in 15.5-day bovine embryos. Four cDNA fragments, confirmed to be upregulated in 17.5-day embryos using Northern analysis, were cloned and sequenced. Three cDNA fragments shared sequence identities with known homologs: human allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF-1), human LERK-5, and bovine interferon-tau. One novel cDNA fragment did not share sequence identity to previously reported genes, except for a similar DNA sequence in the human genome. AIF-1 mRNA was present in developing placenta through Gestation Day 36, and abundant levels were observed in adult bovine spleen and lung. The novel gene, which we have named periattachment factor (PAF), was not detected in adult tissues using Northern analysis or in conceptuses between Days 30 and 36 of pregnancy. Additional sequence information for bPAF was obtained from a cDNA library constructed from a 25-day bovine embryo. The protein corresponding to the open reading frame has four protein kinase C phosphorylation sites, two casein kinase II phosphorylation sites, a nuclear targeting sequence, but no obvious DNA or RNA binding motifs. Abundant expression of this gene during a narrow but critical window of embryonic development makes it worthy of further study. PMID:12773430

  11. Plant Translation Elongation Factor 1Bβ Facilitates Potato Virus X (PVX) Infection and Interacts with PVX Triple Gene Block Protein 1.

    PubMed

    Hwang, JeeNa; Lee, Seonhee; Lee, Joung-Ho; Kang, Won-Hee; Kang, Jin-Ho; Kang, Min-Young; Oh, Chang-Sik; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 (eEF1) has two components: the G-protein eEF1A and the nucleotide exchange factor eEF1B. In plants, eEF1B is itself composed of a structural protein (eEF1Bγ) and two nucleotide exchange subunits (eEF1Bα and eEF1Bβ). To test the effects of elongation factors on virus infection, we isolated eEF1A and eEF1B genes from pepper (Capsicum annuum) and suppressed their homologs in Nicotiana benthamiana using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). The accumulation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Potato virus X (PVX) was significantly reduced in the eEF1Bβ- or eEF1Bɣ-silenced plants as well as in eEF1A-silenced plants. Yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that eEF1Bα and eEF1Bβ interacted with eEF1A and that eEF1A and eEF1Bβ interacted with triple gene block protein 1 (TGBp1) of PVX. These results suggest that both eEF1A and eEF1Bβ play essential roles in the multiplication of PVX by physically interacting with TGBp1. Furthermore, using eEF1Bβ deletion constructs, we found that both N- (1-64 amino acids) and C-terminal (150-195 amino acids) domains of eEF1Bβ are important for the interaction with PVX TGBp1 and that the C-terminal domain of eEF1Bβ is involved in the interaction with eEF1A. These results suggest that eEF1Bβ could be a potential target for engineering virus-resistant plants. PMID:26020533

  12. Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor protein expression and gene copy number alterations in non-small cell lung carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Tsuta, Koji; Mimae, Takahiro; Nitta, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Akihiko; Maeshima, Akiko M; Asamura, Hisao; Grogan, Thomas M; Furuta, Koh; Tsuda, Hitoshi

    2013-06-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a tyrosine kinase receptor implicated in the pathogenesis of several malignancies and is potentially an attractive target for anticancer treatment. In this study, we included 379 patients who underwent surgical resection (179 diagnosed as having adenocarcinoma [ADC]; 150, squamous cell carcinoma [SCC]; 41, sarcomatoid carcinoma and 9, large cell carcinoma). IGF-1R expression and gene copy number were assessed by immunohistochemistry and bright-field in situ hybridization (BISH), respectively. IGF-1R expression in non-small cell lung carcinoma was observed in 41.4% of samples and was more prevalent in SCC (69.3%) than in ADC (25.1%), large cell carcinoma (33.3%), and sarcomatoid carcinoma (12.2%) (P < .001). Among ADCs, most mucinous ADCs (75%) showed strong membranous staining with the IGF-1R antibody. Compared with protein expression, IGF-1R gene alteration was rare (8.4%). A statistically significant correlation between IGF-1R expression and positive IGF-1R BISH was observed (γ = 0.762, P < .001). IGF-1R-positive tumors were more common in smokers (P = .004), and these tumors were larger (P = .006) than the IGF-1R-negative tumors. IGF-1R BISH positivity was not correlated with any clinicopathologic factor. IGF-1R expression and IGF-1R BISH positivity were not correlated with overall survival. IGF-1R is highly expressed in SCC and mucinous ADC, although copy number alterations in the IGF-1R gene were rare. These findings may have important implications for future anti-IGF-1R therapeutic approaches. PMID:23266446

  13. An ancient evolutionary origin of the Rag1/2 gene locus.

    PubMed

    Fugmann, Sebastian D; Messier, Cynthia; Novack, Laura A; Cameron, R Andrew; Rast, Jonathan P

    2006-03-01

    The diversity of antigen receptors in the adaptive immune system of jawed vertebrates is generated by a unique process of somatic gene rearrangement known as V(D)J recombination. The Rag1 and Rag2 proteins are the key mediators of this process. They are encoded by a compact gene cluster that has exclusively been identified in animal species displaying V(D)J-mediated immunity, and no homologous gene pair has been identified in other organisms. This distinctly restricted phylogenetic distribution has led to the hypothesis that one or both of the Rag genes were coopted after horizontal gene transfer and assembled into a Rag1/2 gene cluster in a common jawed vertebrate ancestor. Here, we identify and characterize a closely linked pair of genes, SpRag1L and SpRag2L, from an invertebrate, the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) with similarity in both sequence and genomic organization to the vertebrate Rag1 and Rag2 genes. They are coexpressed during development and in adult tissues, and recombinant versions of the proteins form a stable complex with each other as well as with Rag1 and Rag2 proteins from several vertebrate species. We thus conclude that SpRag1L and SpRag2L represent homologs of vertebrate Rag1 and Rag2. In combination with the apparent absence of V(D)J recombination in echinoderms, this finding strongly suggests that linked Rag1- and Rag2-like genes were already present and functioning in a different capacity in the common ancestor of living deuterostomes, and that their specific role in the adaptive immune system was acquired much later in an early jawed vertebrate. PMID:16505374

  14. A complex gene locus enables xyloglucan utilization in the model saprophyte Cellvibrio japonicus

    PubMed Central

    Larsbrink, Johan; Thompson, Andrew J; Lundqvist, Magnus; Gardner, Jeffrey G; Davies, Gideon J; Brumer, Harry

    2014-01-01

    The degradation of plant biomass by saprophytes is an ecologically important part of the global carbon cycle, which has also inspired a vast diversity of industrial enzyme applications. The xyloglucans (XyGs) constitute a family of ubiquitous and abundant plant cell wall polysaccharides, yet the enzymology of XyG saccharification is poorly studied. Here, we present the identification and molecular characterization of a complex genetic locus that is required for xyloglucan utilization by the model saprophyte Cellvibrio japonicus. In harness, transcriptomics, reverse genetics, enzyme kinetics, and structural biology indicate that the encoded cohort of an α-xylosidase, a β-galactosidase, and an α-l-fucosidase is specifically adapted for efficient, concerted saccharification of dicot (fucogalacto)xyloglucan oligosaccharides following import into the periplasm via an associated TonB-dependent receptor. The data support a biological model of xyloglucan degradation by C. japonicus with striking similarities – and notable differences – to the complex polysaccharide utilization loci of the Bacteroidetes. PMID:25171165

  15. The Interleukin 1 Gene Cluster Contains a Major Susceptibility Locus for Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Timms, Andrew E.; Crane, Alison M.; Sims, Anne-Marie; Cordell, Heather J.; Bradbury, Linda A.; Abbott, Aaron; Coyne, Mark R. E.; Beynon, Owen; Herzberg, Ibi; Duff, Gordon W.; Calin, Andrei; Cardon, Lon R.; Wordsworth, B. Paul; Brown, Matthew A.

    2004-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a common and highly heritable inflammatory arthropathy. Although the gene HLA-B27 is almost essential for the inheritance of the condition, it alone is not sufficient to explain the pattern of familial recurrence of the disease. We have previously demonstrated suggestive linkage of AS to chromosome 2q13, a region containing the interleukin 1 (IL-1) family gene cluster, which includes several strong candidates for involvement in the disease. In the current study, we describe strong association and transmission of IL-1 family gene cluster single-nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotypes with AS. PMID:15309690

  16. Identification of a 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase gene linked to the female (F) locus that enhances female sex expression in cucumber.

    PubMed Central

    Trebitsh, T; Staub, J E; O'Neill, S D

    1997-01-01

    Sex determination in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) is controlled largely by three genes: F, m, and a. The F and m loci interact to produce monoecious (M_f_) or gynoecious (M_f_) sex phenotypes. Ethylene and factors that induce ethylene biosynthesis, such as 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) and auxin, also enhance female sex expression. A genomic sequence (CS-ACS1) encoding ACC synthase was amplified from genomic DNA by a polymerase chain reaction using degenerate oligonucleotide primers. Expression of CS-ACS1 is induced by auxin, but not by ACC, in wounded and intact shoot apices. Southern blo hybridization analysis of near-isogenic gynoecious (MMFF) and monoecious (MMff) lines derived from divers genetic backgrounds revealed the existence of an additional ACC synthase (CS-ACS1G) genomic sequence in the gynoecious lines. Sex phenotype analysis of a segregating F2 population detected a 100% correlation between the CS-ACS1G marker and the presence of the F locus. The CS-ACS1G gene is located in linkage group B coincident with the F locus, and in the population tested there was no recombination between the CS-ACS1G gene and the F locus. Collectively, these data suggest that CS-ACS1G is closely linked to the F locus and may play a pivotal role in the determination of sex in cucumber flowers. PMID:9085580

  17. Voluntary exercise offers anxiolytic potential and amplifies galanin gene expression in the locus coeruleus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Sciolino, Natale R; Dishman, Rodney K; Holmes, Philip V

    2012-07-15

    Although exercise improves anxiety in humans, it is controversial whether exercise is anxiolytic in rodents. We tested the hypothesis that stress influences the effect of exercise on anxiety-like and defensive behaviors. To explore the neurobiological mechanisms of exercise, we also examined whether exercise alters gene expression for the stress-related peptide galanin. Rats were housed in the presence or absence of a running wheel for 21 d. A subset of these rats were (1) not injected or received a single high, dose of the β-carboline FG7142 (inverse agonist at the benzodiazepine receptor site) immediately prior to testing or (2) were injected repeatedly with vehicle or FG7142 during the last 10d of exercise. On day 22, anxiety-like and defensive behaviors were measured in the elevated plus maze, shock probe defensive burying, and defensive withdrawal tests. Locus coeruleus prepro-galanin mRNA was measured by in situ hybridization. Exercise and sedentary rats that were not injected exhibited similar behavior in all tests, whereas FG7142 injected immediately prior to the test battery produced intense avoidance and immobility consistent with an anxiety-like response. However, exercise produced anxiolytic-like and active defensive behaviors in the test battery relative to the sedentary condition in rats injected repeatedly with vehicle or FG7142. Exercise also increased prepro-galanin mRNA in the locus coeruleus relative to sedentary controls. These data suggest that the emergence of enhanced adaptive behavior after chronic voluntary exercise is influenced by stress. Our data support a role for galanin in the beneficial consequences of wheel running. PMID:22580167

  18. A Drosophila muscle-specific gene related to the mouse quaking locus.

    PubMed

    Fyrberg, C; Becker, J; Barthmaier, P; Mahaffey, J; Fyrberg, E

    1997-09-15

    We have characterized a novel muscle-specific gene of Drosophila melanogaster, defined by enhancer trap strain 24B of Brand and Perrimon (1993). We show that transcripts of the gene accumulate within presumptive mesoderm and persist within developing muscles, strongly suggesting that the encoded protein is involved in muscle cell determination and differentiation. cDNA sequences reveal that the Drosophila protein is similar to quaking (64% identity over 210 amino acids), a protein essential for mouse embryogenesis, and gld-1 (53% identity over 162 amino acids) a germ-line-specific tumor suppressing protein of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. We demonstrate that the Drosophila gene resides within the 93F chromosome subdivision, and describe its physical map. Finally, we have used the gene, which we have named quaking-related 93F (qkr93F), to identify a family of closely related KH domains. PMID:9332381

  19. Variation suggestive of horizontal gene transfer at a lipopolysaccharide (lps) biosynthetic locus in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the bacterial leaf blight pathogen of rice

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Prabhu B; Sonti, Ramesh V

    2004-01-01

    Background In animal pathogenic bacteria, horizontal gene transfer events (HGT) have been frequently observed in genomic regions that encode functions involved in biosynthesis of the outer membrane located lipopolysaccharide (LPS). As a result, different strains of the same pathogen can have substantially different lps biosynthetic gene clusters. Since LPS is highly antigenic, the variation at lps loci is attributed to be of advantage in evading the host immune system. Although LPS has been suggested as a potentiator of plant defense responses, interstrain variation at lps biosynthetic gene clusters has not been reported for any plant pathogenic bacterium. Results We report here the complete sequence of a 12.2 kb virulence locus of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) encoding six genes whose products are homologous to functions involved in LPS biosynthesis and transport. All six open reading frames (ORFs) have atypical G+C content and altered codon usage, which are the hallmarks of genomic islands that are acquired by horizontal gene transfer. The lps locus is flanked by highly conserved genes, metB and etfA, respectively encoding cystathionine gamma lyase and electron transport flavoprotein. Interestingly, two different sets of lps genes are present at this locus in the plant pathogens, Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) and Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac). The genomic island is present in a number of Xoo strains from India and other Asian countries but is not present in two strains, one from India (BXO8) and another from Nepal (Nepal624) as well as the closely related rice pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoor). TAIL-PCR analysis indicates that sequences related to Xac are present at the lps locus in both BXO8 and Nepal624. The Xoor strain has a hybrid lps gene cluster, with sequences at the metB and etfA ends, being most closely related to sequences from Xac and the tomato pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato respectively

  20. A gene fusion at a homeobox locus: alterations in leaf shape and implications for morphological evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J J; Janssen, B J; Williams, A; Sinha, N

    1997-01-01

    Compound leaves are seen in many angiosperm genera and are thought to be either fundamentally different from simple leaves or elaborations of simple leaves. The knotted1-like homeobox (knox) genes are known to regulate plant development. When overexpressed in homologous or heterologous species, this family of genes can cause changes in leaf morphology, including excessive leaf compounding in tomato. We describe here an instance of a spontaneously arisen fusion between a gene encoding a metabolic enzyme and a homeodomain protein. We show that the fusion results in overexpression of the homeodomain protein and a change in morphology that approximates the changes caused by overexpression of the same gene under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter in transgenic plants. Exon-shuffling events can account for the modularity of proteins. If the shuffled exons are associated with altered promoters, changes in gene expression patterns can result. Our results show that gene fusions of this nature can cause changes in expression patterns that lead to altered morphology. We suggest that such phenomena may have played a role in the evolution of form. PMID:9286107

  1. Alternative Transposition Generates New Chimeric Genes and Segmental Duplications at the Maize p1 Locus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dafang; Yu, Chuanhe; Zuo, Tao; Zhang, Jianbo; Weber, David F; Peterson, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The maize Ac/Ds transposon family was the first transposable element system identified and characterized by Barbara McClintock. Ac/Ds transposons belong to the hAT family of class II DNA transposons. We and others have shown that Ac/Ds elements can undergo a process of alternative transposition in which the Ac/Ds transposase acts on the termini of two separate, nearby transposons. Because these termini are present in different elements, alternative transposition can generate a variety of genome alterations such as inversions, duplications, deletions, and translocations. Moreover, Ac/Ds elements transpose preferentially into genic regions, suggesting that structural changes arising from alternative transposition may potentially generate chimeric genes at the rearrangement breakpoints. Here we identified and characterized 11 independent cases of gene fusion induced by Ac alternative transposition. In each case, a functional chimeric gene was created by fusion of two linked, paralogous genes; moreover, each event was associated with duplication of the ∼70-kb segment located between the two paralogs. An extant gene in the maize B73 genome that contains an internal duplication apparently generated by an alternative transposition event was also identified. Our study demonstrates that alternative transposition-induced duplications may be a source for spontaneous creation of diverse genome structures and novel genes in maize. PMID:26434719

  2. A locus on mouse Ch10 influences susceptibility to limbic seizure severity: fine mapping and in silico candidate gene analysis

    PubMed Central

    Winawer, Melodie R.; Klassen, Tara L.; Teed, Sarah; Shipman, Marissa; Leung, Emily H.; Palmer, Abraham A.

    2014-01-01

    Identification of genes contributing to mouse seizure susceptibility can reveal novel genes or pathways that provide insight into human epilepsy. Using mouse chromosome substitution strains and interval-specific congenic strains (ISCS), we previously identified an interval conferring pilocarpine-induced limbic seizure susceptibility on distal mouse Chromosome 10 (Ch10). We narrowed the region by generating subcongenics with smaller A/J Ch10 segments on a C57BL/6J (B6) background and tested them with pilocarpine. We also tested pilocarpine susceptible congenics for 6Hz ECT, another model of limbic seizure susceptibility, to determine whether the susceptibility locus might have a broad effect on neuronal hyperexcitability across more than one mode of limbic seizure induction. ISCS Line 1, which contained the distal 2.7 Mb segment from A/J (starting at rs29382217), was more susceptible to both pilocarpine and ECT. Line 2, which was a subcongenic of Line1 (starting at rs13480828), was not susceptible; thus defining a 1.0 Mb critical region that was unique to Line1. Bioinformatic approaches identified 52 human orthologues within the unique Line 1 susceptibility region, the majority syntenic to human Ch12. Applying an epilepsy network analysis of known and suspected excitability genes and examination of interstrain genomic and brain expression differences revealed novel candidates within the region. These include Stat2, which plays a role in hippocampal GABA receptor expression after status epilepticus, and novel candidates Pan2, Cdk2, Gls2, and Cs, which are involved in neural cell differentiation, cellular remodeling, and embryonic development. Our strategy may facilitate discovery of novel human epilepsy genes. PMID:24373497

  3. Identification of a new locus, Ptr(t), required for rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta-mediated resistance.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yulin; Martin, Rodger

    2008-04-01

    Resistance to the blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae is proposed to be initiated by physical binding of a putative cytoplasmic receptor encoded by a nucleotide binding site-type resistance gene, Pi-ta, to the processed elicitor encoded by the corresponding avirulence gene AVR-Pita. Here, we report the identification of a new locus, Ptr(t), that is required for Pi-ta-mediated signal recognition. A Pi-ta-expressing susceptible mutant was identified using a genetic screen. Putative mutations at Ptr(t) do not alter recognition specificity to another resistance gene, Pi-k(s), in the Pi-ta homozygote, indicating that Ptr(t) is more likely specific to Pi-ta-mediated signal recognition. Genetic crosses of Pi-ta Ptr(t) and Pi-ta ptr(t) homozygotes suggest that Ptr(t) segregates as a single dominant nuclear gene. A ratio of 1:1 (resistant/susceptible) of a population of BC1 of Pi-ta Ptr(t) with pi-ta ptr(t) homozygotes indicates that Pi-ta and Ptr(t) are linked and cosegregate. Genotyping of mutants of pi-ta ptr(t) and Pi-ta Ptr(t) homozygotes using ten simple sequence repeat markers at the Pi-ta region determined that Pi-ta and Ptr(t) are located within a 9-megabase region and are of indica origin. Identification of Ptr(t) is a significant advancement in studying Pi-ta-mediated signal recognition and transduction. PMID:18321185

  4. Regulation of Flowering in the Long-Day Grass Lolium temulentum by Gibberellins and the FLOWERING LOCUS T Gene

    PubMed Central

    King, Rod W.; Moritz, Thomas; Evans, Lloyd T.; Martin, Jerome; Andersen, Claus H.; Blundell, Cheryl; Kardailsky, Igor; Chandler, Peter M.

    2006-01-01

    Seasonal control of flowering often involves leaf sensing of daylength coupled to time measurement and generation and transport of florigenic signals to the shoot apex. We show that transmitted signals in the grass Lolium temulentum may include gibberellins (GAs) and the FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) gene. Within 2 h of starting a florally inductive long day (LD), expression of a 20-oxidase GA biosynthetic gene increases in the leaf; its product, GA20, then increases 5.7-fold versus short day; its substrate, GA19, decreases equivalently; and a bioactive product, GA5, increases 4-fold. A link between flowering, LD, GAs, and GA biosynthesis is shown in three ways: (1) applied GA19 became florigenic on exposure to LD; (2) expression of LtGA20ox1, an important GA biosynthetic gene, increased in a florally effective LD involving incandescent lamps, but not with noninductive fluorescent lamps; and (3) paclobutrazol, an inhibitor of an early step of GA biosynthesis, blocked flowering, but only if applied before the LD. Expression studies of a 2-oxidase catabolic gene showed no changes favoring a GA increase. Thus, the early LD increase in leaf GA5 biosynthesis, coupled with subsequent doubling in GA5 content at the shoot apex, provides a substantial trail of evidence for GA5 as a LD florigen. LD signaling may also involve transport of FT mRNA or protein because expression of LtFT and LtCONSTANS increased rapidly, substantially (>80-fold for FT), and independently of GA. However, because a LD from fluorescent lamps induced LtFT expression but not flowering, the nature of the light response of FT requires clarification. PMID:16581877

  5. A case of 9.7 Mb terminal Xp deletion including OA1 locus associated with contiguous gene syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eun-Hae; Kim, Sook-Young; Kim, Jin-Kyung

    2012-10-01

    Terminal or interstitial deletions of Xp (Xp22.2→Xpter) in males have been recognized as a cause of contiguous gene syndromes showing variable association of apparently unrelated clinical manifestations such as Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (SHOX), chondrodysplasia punctata (CDPX1), mental retardation (NLGN4), ichthyosis (STS), Kallmann syndrome (KAL1), and ocular albinism (GPR143). Here we present a case of a 13.5 yr old boy and sister with a same terminal deletion of Xp22.2 resulting in the absence of genes from the telomere of Xp to GPR143 of Xp22. The boy manifested the findings of all of the disorders mentioned above. We began a testosterone enanthate monthly replacement therapy. His sister, 11 yr old, manifested only Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis, and had engaged in growth hormone therapy for 3 yr. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a male with a 9.7 Mb terminal Xp deletion including the OA1 locus in Korea. PMID:23091330

  6. Targeting Human α-Lactalbumin Gene Insertion into the Goat β-Lactoglobulin Locus by TALEN-Mediated Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Chenchen; Song, Yujie; Ge, Hengtao; Hu, Linyong; Li, Qian; Jin, Yaping; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Special value of goat milk in human nutrition and well being is associated with medical problems of food allergies which are caused by milk proteins such as β-lactoglobulin (BLG). Here, we employed transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-assisted homologous recombination in goat fibroblasts to introduce human α-lactalbumin (hLA) genes into goat BLG locus. TALEN-mediated targeting enabled isolation of colonies with mono- and bi-allelic transgene integration in up to 10.1% and 1.1%, respectively, after selection. Specifically, BLG mRNA levels were gradually decreasing in both mo- and bi-allelic goat mammary epithelial cells (GMECs) while hLA demonstrated expression in GMECs in vitro. Gene-targeted fibroblast cells were efficiently used in somatic cell nuclear transfer, resulting in production of hLA knock-in goats directing down-regulated BLG expression and abundant hLA secretion in animal milk. Our findings provide valuable background for animal milk optimization and expedited development for agriculture and biomedicine. PMID:27258157

  7. Targeting Human α-Lactalbumin Gene Insertion into the Goat β-Lactoglobulin Locus by TALEN-Mediated Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongmei; Liu, Jun; Cui, Chenchen; Song, Yujie; Ge, Hengtao; Hu, Linyong; Li, Qian; Jin, Yaping; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Special value of goat milk in human nutrition and well being is associated with medical problems of food allergies which are caused by milk proteins such as β-lactoglobulin (BLG). Here, we employed transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-assisted homologous recombination in goat fibroblasts to introduce human α-lactalbumin (hLA) genes into goat BLG locus. TALEN-mediated targeting enabled isolation of colonies with mono- and bi-allelic transgene integration in up to 10.1% and 1.1%, respectively, after selection. Specifically, BLG mRNA levels were gradually decreasing in both mo- and bi-allelic goat mammary epithelial cells (GMECs) while hLA demonstrated expression in GMECs in vitro. Gene-targeted fibroblast cells were efficiently used in somatic cell nuclear transfer, resulting in production of hLA knock-in goats directing down-regulated BLG expression and abundant hLA secretion in animal milk. Our findings provide valuable background for animal milk optimization and expedited development for agriculture and biomedicine. PMID:27258157

  8. Truncating Mutations of MAGEL2, a Gene within the Prader-Willi Locus, Are Responsible for Severe Arthrogryposis.

    PubMed

    Mejlachowicz, Dan; Nolent, Flora; Maluenda, Jérome; Ranjatoelina-Randrianaivo, Hanitra; Giuliano, Fabienne; Gut, Ivo; Sternberg, Damien; Laquerrière, Annie; Melki, Judith

    2015-10-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is characterized by the presence of multiple joint contractures resulting from reduced or absent fetal movement. Here, we report two unrelated families affected by lethal AMC. By genetic mapping and whole-exome sequencing in a multiplex family, a heterozygous truncating MAGEL2 mutation leading to frameshift and a premature stop codon (c.1996delC, p.Gln666Serfs∗36) and inherited from the father was identified in the probands. In another family, a distinct heterozygous truncating mutation leading to frameshift (c.2118delT, p.Leu708Trpfs∗7) and occurring de novo on the paternal allele of MAGEL2 was identified in the affected individual. In both families, RNA analysis identified the mutated paternal MAGEL2 transcripts only in affected individuals. MAGEL2 is one of the paternally expressed genes within the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) locus. PWS is associated with, to varying extents, reduced fetal mobility, severe infantile hypotonia, childhood-onset obesity, hypogonadism, and intellectual disability. MAGEL2 mutations have been recently reported in affected individuals with features resembling PWS and called Schaaf-Yang syndrome. Here, we show that paternal MAGEL2 mutations are also responsible for lethal AMC, recapitulating the clinical spectrum of PWS and suggesting that MAGEL2 is a PWS-determining gene. PMID:26365340

  9. Discovery of functional non-coding conserved regions in the α-synuclein gene locus

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Lori; Walter, Michael; Ting, Dennis; Schüle, Birgitt

    2014-01-01

    Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the Rep-1 microsatellite marker of the α-synuclein ( SNCA) gene have consistently been shown to be associated with Parkinson’s disease, but the functional relevance is unclear. Based on these findings we hypothesized that conserved cis-regulatory elements in the SNCA genomic region regulate expression of SNCA, and that SNPs in these regions could be functionally modulating the expression of SNCA, thus contributing to neuronal demise and predisposing to Parkinson’s disease. In a pair-wise comparison of a 206kb genomic region encompassing the SNCA gene, we revealed 34 evolutionary conserved DNA sequences between human and mouse. All elements were cloned into reporter vectors and assessed for expression modulation in dual luciferase reporter assays.  We found that 12 out of 34 elements exhibited either an enhancement or reduction of the expression of the reporter gene. Three elements upstream of the SNCA gene displayed an approximately 1.5 fold (p<0.009) increase in expression. Of the intronic regions, three showed a 1.5 fold increase and two others indicated a 2 and 2.5 fold increase in expression (p<0.002). Three elements downstream of the SNCA gene showed 1.5 fold and 2.5 fold increase (p<0.0009). One element downstream of SNCA had a reduced expression of the reporter gene of 0.35 fold (p<0.0009) of normal activity. Our results demonstrate that the SNCA gene contains cis-regulatory regions that might regulate the transcription and expression of SNCA. Further studies in disease-relevant tissue types will be important to understand the functional impact of regulatory regions and specific Parkinson’s disease-associated SNPs and its function in the disease process. PMID:25566351

  10. Receptor-like genes in the major resistance locus of lettuce are subject to divergent selection.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, B C; Shen, K A; Rohani, P; Gaut, B S; Michelmore, R W

    1998-01-01

    Disease resistance genes in plants are often found in complex multigene families. The largest known cluster of disease resistance specificities in lettuce contains the RGC2 family of genes. We compared the sequences of nine full-length genomic copies of RGC2 representing the diversity in the cluster to determine the structure of genes within this family and to examine the evolution of its members. The transcribed regions range from at least 7.0 to 13.1 kb, and the cDNAs contain deduced open reading frames of approximately 5. 5 kb. The predicted RGC2 proteins contain a nucleotide binding site and irregular leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) that are characteristic of resistance genes cloned from other species. Unique features of the RGC2 gene products include a bipartite LRR region with >40 repeats. At least eight members of this family are transcribed. The level of sequence diversity between family members varied in different regions of the gene. The ratio of nonsynonymous (Ka) to synonymous (Ks) nucleotide substitutions was lowest in the region encoding the nucleotide binding site, which is the presumed effector domain of the protein. The LRR-encoding region showed an alternating pattern of conservation and hypervariability. This alternating pattern of variation was also found in all comparisons within families of resistance genes cloned from other species. The Ka /Ks ratios indicate that diversifying selection has resulted in increased variation at these codons. The patterns of variation support the predicted structure of LRR regions with solvent-exposed hypervariable residues that are potentially involved in binding pathogen-derived ligands. PMID:9811792

  11. Alteration of the retinoblastoma gene locus in radium-exposed individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Hardwick, J.P.; Schlenker, R.; Huberman, E.

    1991-01-01

    This study was performed to determine if the retinoblastoma suppressor gene was altered in individuals exposed to radium. We analyzed the Rb gene in 30 individuals, 17 of whom were exposed to radium either occupationally or iatrogenically. In the kidney DNA from four of nine radium-exposed individuals, the Rb gene was deleted. Three of these alterations in the Rb gene were internal deletions, which resulted in the absence of Rb mRNA accumulation. These results imply that the Rb gene is susceptible to radium-induced damage and confirm previous showing that radiation preferentially causes genomic deletions. The pronounced alterations in the non-tumorigenic femurs from radium-exposed individuals suggests that in the many years of exposure there was a selection of cells with alterations, presumably because of their growth advantage. Also it implies that deletions of one of the Rb alleles can be one of the events (perhaps an initial one) in the progression of radium-induced sarcomas. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  12. The association between hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α gene G1790A polymorphism and cancer risk: a meta-analysis of 28 case–control studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a key transcription factor that regulates the cellular adaptation to hypoxia. HIF-1α gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are implicated to be associated with cancer risks. However, results from the published studies remained inconclusive. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship of HIF-1α gene G1790A polymorphism with cancer using meta-analysis. Methods A comprehensive search in Pubmed, EMBASE and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) was conducted to identify all publications on the association between this polymorphism and cancer until December 13, 2013. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were used to evaluate the strength of this association. Association between lymph node metastasis and G1790A was also investigated. Results A total of 5985 cases and 6809 controls in 28 case–control studies were included in this meta-analysis. The A allele of HIF-1α gene G1790A polymorphism was found to be significantly associated with increased cancer risk in four genetic models: AA + AG vs. GG (dominant model OR = 1.85, 95% CI = 1.27-2.69), AA vs. AG + GG (recessive model OR = 5.69, 95% CI = 3.87-8.37), AA vs. GG (homozygote comparison OR = 6.63, 95% CI = 4.49-9.79), and AG vs. GG (heterozygote comparison OR = 2.39, 95% CI = 1.53-3.75). This variant was also significantly associated with higher risks of pancreatic cancer, head and neck cancer, lung cancer and renal cell carcinoma. However, the A allele of G1790A was not significantly associated with increased lymph node metastasis in the dominant model by overall meta-analysis. Conclusions Our meta-analysis suggests that the substitution of G with A of HIF-1α gene G1790A polymorphism is a risk factor of cancer, especially for pancreatic cancer, lung cancer, renal cell carcinoma and head and neck cancer. The association is significant in Asian, Caucasian population and public based

  13. The dopamine D sub 2 receptor locus as a modifying gene in neuropsychiatric disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Comings, D.E.; Comings, B.G.; Muhleman, D.; Dietz, G.; Shahbahrami, B.; Tast, D.; Knell, E.; Kocsis, P.; Baumgarten, R.; Kovacs, B.W.; Gysin, R.; Flanagan, S.D. ); Levy, D.L. ); Smith, M. ); Klein, D.N. ); MacMurray, J.; Tosk, J.M. ); Sverd, J. Cornell Univ. Medical College, Manhasset, NY ); Borison, R.L.; Evans, D.D. )

    1991-10-02

    The A1 allele of the Taq I polymorphism of the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor (DRD2) gene has been earlier reported to occur in 69% of alcoholics, compared with 20% of controls. Other research has reported no significant difference in the prevalence of the A1 allele in alcoholics vs controls and no evidence that the DRD2 gene was linked to alcoholism. The authors hypothesized that these seemingly conflicting results might be because increases in the prevalence of the A1 allele may not be specific to alcoholism. Thus, they examined other disorders frequently associated with alcoholism or those believed to involve defects in dopaminergic neurotransmission.

  14. Intragenic Locus in Human PIWIL2 Gene Shares Promoter and Enhancer Functions

    PubMed Central

    Zinovyeva, Marina V.; Nikolaev, Lev G.; Azhikina, Tatyana L.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, more evidence supporting common nature of promoters and enhancers has been accumulated. In this work, we present data on chromatin modifications and non-polyadenylated transcription characteristic for enhancers as well as results of in vitro luciferase reporter assays suggesting that PIWIL2 alternative promoter in exon 7 also functions as an enhancer for gene PHYHIP located 60Kb upstream. This finding of an intragenic enhancer serving as a promoter for a shorter protein isoform implies broader impact on understanding enhancer-promoter networks in regulation of gene expression. PMID:27248499

  15. Linkage disequilibrium between the beta frequency of the human EEG and a GABAA receptor gene locus

    PubMed Central

    Porjesz, Bernice; Almasy, Laura; Edenberg, Howard J.; Wang, Kongming; Chorlian, David B.; Foroud, Tatiana; Goate, Alison; Rice, John P.; O'Connor, Sean J.; Rohrbaugh, John; Kuperman, Samuel; Bauer, Lance O.; Crowe, Raymond R.; Schuckit, Marc A.; Hesselbrock, Victor; Conneally, P. Michael; Tischfield, Jay A.; Li, Ting-Kai; Reich, Theodore; Begleiter, Henri

    2002-01-01

    Human brain oscillations represent important features of information processing and are highly heritable. A common feature of beta oscillations (13–28 Hz) is the critical involvement of networks of inhibitory interneurons as pacemakers, gated by γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) action. Advances in molecular and statistical genetics permit examination of quantitative traits such as the beta frequency of the human electroencephalogram in conjunction with DNA markers. We report a significant linkage and linkage disequilibrium between beta frequency and a set of GABAA receptor genes. Uncovering the genes influencing brain oscillations provides a better understanding of the neural function involved in information processing. PMID:11891318

  16. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 regulates the expression of the organic cation transporter 1 via binding to an evolutionary conserved region in intron 1 of the OCT1 gene.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Valerie P; Bokelmann, Kristin; Ramírez, Jacqueline; Jobst, Karoline; Ratain, Mark J; Brockmöller, Jürgen; Tzvetkov, Mladen V

    2013-10-01

    The organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1), also known as solute carrier family 22 member 1, is strongly and specifically expressed in the human liver. Here we show that the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (HNF1) regulates OCT1 transcription and contributes to the strong, liver-specific expression of OCT1. Bioinformatic analyses revealed strong conservation of HNF1 binding motifs in an evolutionary conserved region (ECR) in intron 1 of the OCT1 gene. Electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed the specific binding of HNF1 to the intron 1 ECR. In reporter gene assays performed in HepG2 cells, the intron 1 ECR increased SV40 promoter activity by 22-fold and OCT1 promoter activity by 13-fold. The increase was reversed when the HNF1 binding sites in the intron 1 ECR were mutated or the endogenous HNF1α expression was downregulated with small interfering RNA. Following HNF1α overexpression in Huh7 cells, the intron 1 ECR increased SV40 promoter activity by 11-fold and OCT1 promoter activity by 6-fold. Without HNF1α overexpression, the increases were only 3- and 2-fold, respectively. Finally, in human liver samples, high HNF1 expression was significantly correlated with high OCT1 expression (r = 0.48, P = 0.002, n = 40). In conclusion, HNF1 is a strong regulator of OCT1 expression. It remains to be determined whether genetic variants, disease conditions, or drugs that affect HNF1 activity may affect the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of OCT1-transported drugs such as morphine, tropisetron, ondansetron, tramadol, and metformin. Beyond OCT1, this study demonstrates the validity and usefulness of interspecies comparisons in the discovery of functionally relevant genomic sequences. PMID:23922447

  17. Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1 Regulates the Expression of the Organic Cation Transporter 1 via Binding to an Evolutionary Conserved Region in Intron 1 of the OCT1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Valerie P.; Bokelmann, Kristin; Ramírez, Jacqueline; Jobst, Karoline; Ratain, Mark J.; Brockmöller, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    The organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1), also known as solute carrier family 22 member 1, is strongly and specifically expressed in the human liver. Here we show that the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (HNF1) regulates OCT1 transcription and contributes to the strong, liver-specific expression of OCT1. Bioinformatic analyses revealed strong conservation of HNF1 binding motifs in an evolutionary conserved region (ECR) in intron 1 of the OCT1 gene. Electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed the specific binding of HNF1 to the intron 1 ECR. In reporter gene assays performed in HepG2 cells, the intron 1 ECR increased SV40 promoter activity by 22-fold and OCT1 promoter activity by 13-fold. The increase was reversed when the HNF1 binding sites in the intron 1 ECR were mutated or the endogenous HNF1α expression was downregulated with small interfering RNA. Following HNF1α overexpression in Huh7 cells, the intron 1 ECR increased SV40 promoter activity by 11-fold and OCT1 promoter activity by 6-fold. Without HNF1α overexpression, the increases were only 3- and 2-fold, respectively. Finally, in human liver samples, high HNF1 expression was significantly correlated with high OCT1 expression (r = 0.48, P = 0.002, n = 40). In conclusion, HNF1 is a strong regulator of OCT1 expression. It remains to be determined whether genetic variants, disease conditions, or drugs that affect HNF1 activity may affect the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of OCT1-transported drugs such as morphine, tropisetron, ondansetron, tramadol, and metformin. Beyond OCT1, this study demonstrates the validity and usefulness of interspecies comparisons in the discovery of functionally relevant genomic sequences. PMID:23922447

  18. A polymorphism in the insulin-like growth factor 1 gene is associated with postpartum resumption of ovarian cyclicity in Holstein-Friesian cows under grazing conditions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) gene is considered as a promising candidate for the identification of polymorphisms affecting cattle performance. The objectives of the current study were to determine the association of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) IGF-1/SnaBI with fertility, milk production and body condition traits in Holstein-Friesian dairy cows under grazing conditions. Methods Seventy multiparous cows from a commercial herd were genotyped for the SNP IGF-1/SnaBI. Fertility measures evaluated were: interval to commencement of luteal activity (CLA), calving to first service (CFS) and calving to conception (CC) intervals. Milk production and body condition score were also evaluated. The study period extended from 3 wk before calving to the fourth month of lactation. Results and discussion Frequencies of the SNP IGF-1/SnaBI alleles A and B were 0.59 and 0.41, respectively. Genotype frequencies were 0.31, 0.54 and 0.14 for AA, AB and BB, respectively. Cows with the AA genotype presented an early CLA and were more likely to resume ovarian cyclicity in the early postpartum than AB and BB ones. No effect of the SNP IGF-1/SnaBI genotype was evidenced on body condition change over the experimental period, suggesting that energy balance is not responsible for the outcome of postpartum ovarian resumption in this study. Traditional fertility measures were not affected by the SNP IGF-1/SnaBI. Conclusion To our knowledge this is the first report describing an association of the SNP IGF-1/SnaBI with an endocrine fertility measure like CLA in cattle. Results herein remark the important role of the IGF-1gene in the fertility of dairy cows on early lactation and make the SNP IGF-1/SnaBI an interesting candidate marker for genetic improvement of fertility in dairy cattle. PMID:23409757

  19. Association between Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Gene rs12423791 or rs6214 Polymorphisms and High Myopia: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lan; Du, Xueying; Lu, Ciyong; Zhang, Wei-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of insulin-like growth factor 1 gene rs12423791 and rs6214 polymorphisms with high myopia. Methods An electronic search was conducted on PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library and the Chinese Biological Abstract Database for articles published prior to May 6, 2014. A meta-analysis was performed using Revman 5.1 and Stata 12.0, and the odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated in fixed or random effects models based on the results of the Q test. The subgroup analysis was conducted on the basis of the various regions, the sensitivity analysis was also performed to evaluate the stability of the results, and the publication bias was evaluated by a funnel plot and Egger’s linear regression analysis. Results This comprehensive meta-analysis included 2808 high myopia patients and 2778 controls from five unrelated studies. The results demonstrated that the significant association was not present in any genetic models between IGF-1 rs12423791 or rs6214 and high myopia. However, subgroup analysis indicated that rs12423791 polymorphism was associated with high myopia in the Chinese populations in the allelic contrast model (C vs. G: OR=1.24, 95% CI=1.04-1.48 in the fixed-effects model), the dominant model (CC+CG vs. GG: OR=1.40, 95% CI=1.16-1.69 in the fixed-effects model), and the codominant model (CG vs. GG: OR=1.37, 95% CI= 1.12-1.68 in the fixed-effects model). Additionally, none of the individual studies significantly affected the association between IGF-1 rs12423791 and high myopia, according to sensitivity analysis. Conclusion This meta-analysis shows that IGF-1 rs12423791 or rs6214 gene polymorphism is not associated with high myopia. PMID:26076017

  20. Molecular cloning, pathologically-correlated expression and functional characterization of the colonystimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) gene from a teleost, Plecoglossus altivelis

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, Qiang; LU, Xin-Jiang; LI, Ming-Yun; CHEN, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    Colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) is an important regulator of monocytes/macrophages (MO/MΦ). Although several CSF-1R genes have been identified in teleosts, the precise role of CSF- 1R in ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis) remains unclear. In this study, we characterized the CSF-1R homologue from P. altivelis, and named it PaCSF-1R. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree analysis showed that PaCSF-1R was most closely related to that of Japanese ricefish (Oryzias latipes). Tissue distribution and expression analysis showed that the PaCSF-1R transcript was mainly expressed in the head kidney-derived MO/MΦ, spleen, and head kidney, and its expression was significantly altered in various tissues upon Vibrio anguillarum infection. After PaCSF-1R neutralization for 48 h, the phagocytic activity of MO/MΦ was significantly decreased, suggesting that PaCSF-1R plays a role in regulating the phagocytic function of ayu MO/MΦ. PMID:27029867

  1. Comprehensive sequence analysis of the NR5A1 gene encoding steroidogenic factor 1 in a large group of infertile males

    PubMed Central

    Röpke, Albrecht; Tewes, Ann-Christin; Gromoll, Jörg; Kliesch, Sabine; Wieacker, Peter; Tüttelmann, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1) protein, encoded by the NR5A1 gene, plays a central role in gonadal development and steroidogenesis. Mutations in NR5A1 were first described in patients with primary adrenal insufficiency and 46,XY disorders of sexual development and later also in men with hypospadias, bilateral anorchia and micropenis and women with primary ovarian insufficiency. Recently, heterozygous missense mutations were found in 4% of infertile men with unexplained reduced sperm counts living in France, but all mutation carriers were of non-Caucasian ancestry. Therefore, we performed a comprehensive NR5A1 sequence analysis in 488 well-characterised predominantly Caucasian patients with azoo- or severe oligozoospermia. Two-hundred-thirty-seven men with normal semen parameters were sequenced as controls. In addition to several synonymous variants of unclear pathogenicity, three heterozygous missense mutations predicted to be damaging to SF1 protein function were identified. The andrological phenotype in infertile but otherwise healthy mutation carriers seems variable. In conclusion, mutations altering SF1 protein function and causing spermatogenic failure are also found in men of German origin, but the prevalence seems markedly lower than in other populations. PMID:23299922

  2. The wheat Sr50 gene reveals rich diversity at a cereal disease resistance locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We identify the wheat stem rust resistance gene Sr50 by physical mapping, mutation and complementation as homologous to barley Mla encoding a Coiled-Coil-Nucleotide-Binding-Leucine-Rich Repeat (CC-NB-LRR) protein. We show that Sr50 confers a unique resistance specificity, different from Sr31 and oth...

  3. Genomic analysis of the Tsn1 locus and the identification of candidate genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The wheat Tsn1 gene on wheat chromosome arm 5BL confers sensitivity to the host-selective proteinaceous toxins Ptr ToxA and SnToxA produced by the pathogenic fungi Pyrenophora tritici-repentis and Stagonospora nodorum, respectively. Compatible Tsn1-ToxA interactions lead to extensive cell death and...

  4. Common variants at the CHEK2 gene locus and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Lawrenson, Kate; Iversen, Edwin S; Tyrer, Jonathan; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Concannon, Patrick; Hazelett, Dennis J; Li, Qiyuan; Marks, Jeffrey R; Berchuck, Andrew; Lee, Janet M; Aben, Katja K H; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bandera, Elisa V; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chen, Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T; Edwards, Robert P; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B; Fasching, Peter A; Fridley, Brooke L; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L; Goodman, Marc T; Gronwald, Jacek; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Jakubowska, Anna; Paul, James; Jensen, Allan; Karlan, Beth Y; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Kelemen, Linda E; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krakstad, Camilla; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D; Lee, Alice W; Cannioto, Rikki; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R; Nevanlinna, Heli; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Narod, Steven A; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B; Noor Azmi, Mat Adenan; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Phelan, Catherine M; Pike, Malcolm C; Poole, Elizabeth M; Ramus, Susan J; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Salvesen, Helga B; Budzilowska, Agnieszka; Sellers, Thomas A; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Timorek, Agnieszka; Tworoger, Shelley S; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wicklund, Kristine G; Wilkens, Lynne R; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Freedman, Matthew L; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Pharoah, Paul D; Gayther, Simon A; Schildkraut, Joellen M

    2015-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 20 genomic regions associated with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but many additional risk variants may exist. Here, we evaluated associations between common genetic variants [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels] in DNA repair genes and EOC risk. We genotyped 2896 common variants at 143 gene loci in DNA samples from 15 397 patients with invasive EOC and controls. We found evidence of associations with EOC risk for variants at FANCA, EXO1, E2F4, E2F2, CREB5 and CHEK2 genes (P ≤ 0.001). The strongest risk association was for CHEK2 SNP rs17507066 with serous EOC (P = 4.74 x 10(-7)). Additional genotyping and imputation of genotypes from the 1000 genomes project identified a slightly more significant association for CHEK2 SNP rs6005807 (r (2) with rs17507066 = 0.84, odds ratio (OR) 1.17, 95% CI 1.11-1.24, P = 1.1×10(-7)). We identified 293 variants in the region with likelihood ratios of less than 1:100 for representing the causal variant. Functional annotation identified 25 candidate SNPs that alter transcription factor binding sites within regulatory elements active in EOC precursor tissues. In The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset, CHEK2 gene expression was significantly higher in primary EOCs compared to normal fallopian tube tissues (P = 3.72×10(-8)). We also identified an association between genotypes of the candidate causal SNP rs12166475 (r (2) = 0.99 with rs6005807) and CHEK2 expression (P = 2.70×10(-8)). These data suggest that common variants at 22q12.1 are associated with risk of serous EOC and CHEK2 as a plausible target susceptibility gene. PMID:26424751

  5. Regulation of cytochrome b5 gene transcription by Sp3, GATA-6, and steroidogenic factor 1 in human adrenal NCI-H295A cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ningwu; Dardis, Andrea; Miller, Walter L

    2005-08-01

    Sex steroid synthesis requires the 17,20 lyase activity of P450c17, which is enhanced by cytochrome b5, acting as an allosteric factor to promote association of P450c17 with its electron donor, P450 oxidoreductase. Cytochrome b5 is preferentially expressed in the fetal adrenal and postadrenarchal adrenal zona reticularis; the basis of this tissue-specific, developmentally regulated transcription of the b5 gene is unknown. We found b5 expression in all cell lines tested, including human adrenal NCI-H295A cells, where its mRNA is reduced by cAMP and phorbol ester. Multiple sites, between -83 and -122 bp upstream from the first ATG, initiate transcription. Deletional mutagenesis localized all detectable promoter activity within -327/+15, and deoxyribonuclease I footprinting identified protein binding at -72/-107 and -157/-197. DNA segments -65/-40, -114/-70 and -270/-245 fused to TK32/Luc yielded significant activity, and mutations in their Sp sites abolished that activity; electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) showed that Sp3, but not Sp1, binds to these Sp sites. Nuclear factor 1 (NF-1) and GATA-6, but not GATA-4 bind to the NF-1 and GATA sites in -157/-197. In Drosophila S2 cells, Sp3 increased -327/Luc activity 58-fold, but Sp1 and NF-1 isoforms were inactive. Mutating the three Sp sites ablated activity without or with cotransfection of Sp1/Sp3. In NCI-H295A cells, mutating the three Sp sites reduced activity to 39%; mutating the Sp, GATA, and NF-1 sites abolished activity. In JEG-3 cells, GATA-4 was inactive, GATA-6 augmented -327/Luc activity to 231% over the control, and steroidogenic factor 1 augmented activity to 655% over the control; these activities required the Sp and NF-1 sites. Transcription of cytochrome b5 shares many features with the regulation of P450c17, whose activity it enhances. PMID:15831526

  6. A 1,681-locus consensus genetic map of cultivated cucumber including 67 NB-LRR resistance gene homolog and ten gene loci

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cucumber is an important vegetable crop that is susceptible to many pathogens, but no disease resistance (R) genes have been cloned. The availability of whole genome sequences provides an excellent opportunity for systematic identification and characterization of the nucleotide binding and leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) type R gene homolog (RGH) sequences in the genome. Cucumber has a very narrow genetic base making it difficult to construct high-density genetic maps. Development of a consensus map by synthesizing information from multiple segregating populations is a method of choice to increase marker density. As such, the objectives of the present study were to identify and characterize NB-LRR type RGHs, and to develop a high-density, integrated cucumber genetic-physical map anchored with RGH loci. Results From the Gy14 draft genome, 70 NB-containing RGHs were identified and characterized. Most RGHs were in clusters with uneven distribution across seven chromosomes. In silico analysis indicated that all 70 RGHs had EST support for gene expression. Phylogenetic analysis classified 58 RGHs into two clades: CNL and TNL. Comparative analysis revealed high-degree sequence homology and synteny in chromosomal locations of these RGH members between the cucumber and melon genomes. Fifty-four molecular markers were developed to delimit 67 of the 70 RGHs, which were integrated into a genetic map through linkage analysis. A 1,681-locus cucumber consensus map including 10 gene loci and spanning 730.0 cM in seven linkage groups was developed by integrating three component maps with a bin-mapping strategy. Physically, 308 scaffolds with 193.2 Mbp total DNA sequences were anchored onto this consensus map that covered 52.6% of the 367 Mbp cucumber genome. Conclusions Cucumber contains relatively few NB-LRR RGHs that are clustered and unevenly distributed in the genome. All RGHs seem to be transcribed and shared significant sequence homology and synteny with the melon

  7. Assignment of the human GABA transporter gene (GABATHG) locus to chromosome 3p24-p25

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Fang; Fei, Jian; Guo, Li-He

    1995-09-01

    An essential regulatory process of synaptic transmission is the inactivation of released neurotransmitters by the transmitter-specific uptake mechanism, {gamma}-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory transmitter in the vertebrate central nervous system; its activity is terminated by a high-affinity Na{sup +} and Cl{sup -} -dependent specific GABA transporter (GAT), which carries the neurotransmitter to the presynaptic neuron and/or glial elements surrounding the synaptic cleft. Deficiency of the transporter may cause epilepsy and some other nervous diseases. The human GAT gene (GABATHG), approximately 25 kb in length, has been cloned and sequenced by our colleagues (7). Here the results of the in situ hybridization mapping with the gene are presented. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  8. The Staphylococcus aureus scdA gene: a novel locus that affects cell division and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, E W; de Jonge, B L; Bayles, K W

    1997-09-01

    A new Staphylococcus aureus gene termed scdA was found upstream of the autolysis regulatory genes, lytS and lytR, and was shown to potentially encode a hydrophilic 25 kDa protein. Analysis of scdA transcription revealed that it is transcribed as a monocistronic message and is lytSR-independent. A role in cell wall metabolism was indicated by examination of the scdA mutant S. aureus KB323, which had a grossly aberrant cellular morphology and formed large cell clusters when grown in liquid culture medium. Furthermore, KB323 exhibited a reduced rate of autolysis and had increased peptidoglycan cross-linking compared to the parental strain, NCTC 8325-4. These data suggest that scdA plays an important role in staphylococcal cell division. PMID:9308171

  9. Mutation-Selection Balance in Multi-Locus Systems. I. Duplicate Gene Action

    PubMed Central

    Pritchett-Ewing, Evelyn

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical model is presented that extends the case of selection against homozygous recessives counterbalanced by mutation to a system of n loci. This extension allows analysis of the role of gene duplication in the evolution of new function. The aspect of retention of function for sufficiently long periods of time to allow for divergence vs. silencing of nonfunctional loci is discussed in relation to examples in salmonid and catastomid fishes and in the globin-like clusters. PMID:17249091

  10. Gene Recruitment of the Activated INO1 Locus to the Nuclear Membrane

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The spatial arrangement of chromatin within the nucleus can affect reactions that occur on the DNA and is likely to be regulated. Here we show that activation of INO1 occurs at the nuclear membrane and requires the integral membrane protein Scs2. Scs2 antagonizes the action of the transcriptional repressor Opi1 under conditions that induce the unfolded protein response (UPR) and, in turn, activate INO1. Whereas repressed INO1 localizes throughout the nucleoplasm, the gene is recruited to the nuclear periphery upon transcriptional activation. Recruitment requires the transcriptional activator Hac1, which is produced upon induction of the UPR, and is constitutive in a strain lacking Opi1. Artificial recruitment of INO1 to the nuclear membrane permits activation in the absence of Scs2, indicating that the intranuclear localization of a gene can profoundly influence its mechanism of activation. Gene recruitment to the nuclear periphery, therefore, is a dynamic process and appears to play an important regulatory role. PMID:15455074

  11. Nucleotide Variation and Conservation at the Dpp Locus, a Gene Controlling Early Development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Richter, B.; Long, M.; Lewontin, R. C.; Nitasaka, E.

    1997-01-01

    A study of polymorphism and species divergence of the dpp gene of Drosophila has been made. Eighteen lines from a population of D. melanogaster were sequenced for 5200 bp of the Hin region of the gene, coding for the dpp polypeptide. A comparison was made with sequence from D. simulans. Ninety-six silent polymorphisms and three amino acid replacement polymorphisms were found. The overall silent polymorphism (0.0247) is low, but haplotype diversity (0.0066 for effectively silent sites and 0.0054 for all sites) is in the range found for enzyme loci. Amino acid variation is absent in the N-terminal signal peptide, the C-terminal TGF-β peptide and in the N-terminal half of the pro-protein region. At the nucleotide level there is strong conservation in the middle half of the large intron and in the 3' untranslated sequence of the last exon. The 3' untranslated conservation, which is perfect for 110 bp among all the divergent species, is unexplained. There is strong positive linkage disequilibrium among polymorphic sites, with stretches of apparent gene conversion among originally divergent sequences. The population apparently is a migration mixture of divergent clades. PMID:9071586

  12. Analysis of stage-specific transcripts of the Plasmodium falciparum serine repeat antigen (SERA) gene and transcription from the SERA locus.

    PubMed

    Fox, B A; Bzik, D J

    1994-11-01

    We evaluated the stage-specific transcription and processing of serine repeat antigen (SERA) messenger RNA to further examine mechanisms regulating gene expression in Plasmodium falciparum. SERA mRNA was expressed exclusively in trophozoite and schizont stages. Transcription from the SERA gene was first detected between 24 and 29 h following erythrocyte invasion. The transcript mapping data revealed heterogeneity of the SERA mRNA 5' and 3' ends. RNA sequencing revealed that SERA transcripts were not generated by a trans-splicing mechanism. A new SERA gene, SERA3, was identified 1.8 kb upstream of SERA. The direction of transcription of the SERA locus genes, SERA3, SERA, and SERA2, was mapped relative to the location of other chromosome 2 genetic markers. The SERA locus and the closely linked MSA2 locus were found to be transcriptionally regulated in a coordinate fashion. Collectively, the results of these experiments show that parallel and coordinately controlled transcription units reside on chromosome 2. These results implicate a novel mechanism of transcriptional control in Plasmodium. PMID:7891737

  13. A NOVEL ALZHEIMER DISEASE LOCUS LOCATED NEAR THE GENE ENCODING TAU PROTEIN

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Gyungah; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A.; Vronskaya, Maria; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Chung, Jaeyoon; Naj, Adam C.; Kunkle, Brian W.; Wang, Li-San; Bis, Joshua C.; Bellenguez, Céline; Harold, Denise; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Destefano, Anita L.; Grenier-Boley, Benjamin; Sims, Rebecca; Beecham, Gary W.; Smith, Albert V.; Chouraki, Vincent; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Fievet, Nathalie; Denning, Nicola; Martin, Eden R.; Schmidt, Helena; Kamatani, Yochiro; Dunstan, Melanie L; Valladares, Otto; Laza, Agustin Ruiz; Zelenika, Diana; Ramirez, Alfredo; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Choi, Seung-Hoan; Boland, Anne; Becker, Tim; Kukull, Walter A.; van der Lee, Sven J.; Pasquier, Florence; Cruchaga, Carlos; Beekly, Duane; Fitzpatrick, Annette L.; Hanon, Oliver; Gill, Michael; Barber, Robert; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Campion, Dominique; Love, Seth; Bennett, David A.; Amin, Najaf; Berr, Claudine; Tsolaki, Magda; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Deramecourt, Vincent; Fox, Nick C; Cantwell, Laura B.; Tárraga, Lluis; Dufouil, Carole; Hardy, John; Crane, Paul K.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Hannequin, Didier; Clarke, Robert; Evans, Denis; Mosley, Thomas H.; Letenneur, Luc; Brayne, Carol; Maier, Wolfgang; De Jager, Philip; Emilsson, Valur; Dartigues, Jean-François; Hampel, Harald; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; de Bruijn, Renee F.A.G.; Tzourio, Christophe; Pastor, Pau; Larson, Eric B.; Rotter, Jerome I.; O’Donovan, Michael C; Montine, Thomas J.; Nalls, Michael A.; Mead, Simon; Reiman, Eric M.; Jonsson, Palmi V.; Holmes, Clive; St George-Hyslop, Peter H.; Boada, Mercè; Passmore, Peter; Wendland, Jens R.; Schmidt, Reinhold; Morgan, Kevin; Winslow, Ashley R.; Powell, John F; Carasquillo, Minerva; Younkin, Steven G.; Jakobsdóttir, Jóhanna; Kauwe, John SK; Wilhelmsen, Kirk C.; Rujescu, Dan; Nöthen, Markus M; Hofman, Albert; Jones, Lesley; Haines, Jonathan L.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Holmans, Peter; Launer, Lenore J.; Mayeux, Richard; Lathrop, Mark; Goate, Alison M.; Escott-Price, Valentina; Seshadri, Sudha; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Amouyel, Philippe; Williams, Julie; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Farrer, Lindsay A.

    2015-01-01

    APOE ε4, the most significant genetic risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD), may mask effects of other loci. We re-analyzed genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from the International Genomics of Alzheimer’s Project (IGAP) Consortium in APOE ε4+ (10,352 cases and 9,207 controls) and APOE ε4− (7,184 cases and 26,968 controls) subgroups as well as in the total sample testing for interaction between a SNP and APOE ε4 status. Suggestive associations (P<1x10−4) in stage 1 were evaluated in an independent sample (stage 2) containing 4,203 subjects (APOE ε4+: 1,250 cases and 536 controls; APOE ε4-: 718 cases and 1,699 controls). Among APOE ε4− subjects, novel genome-wide significant (GWS) association was observed with 17 SNPs (all between KANSL1 and LRRC37A on chromosome 17 near MAPT) in a meta-analysis of the stage 1 and stage 2 datasets (best SNP, rs2732703, P=5·8x10−9). Conditional analysis revealed that rs2732703 accounted for association signals in the entire 100 kilobase region that includes MAPT. Except for previously identified AD loci showing stronger association in APOE ε4+ subjects (CR1 and CLU) or APOE ε4− subjects (MS4A6A/MS4A4A/ MS4A6E), no other SNPs were significantly associated with AD in a specific APOE genotype subgroup. In addition, the finding in the stage 1 sample that AD risk is significantly influenced by the interaction of APOE with rs1595014 in TMEM106B (P=1·6x10−7) is noteworthy because TMEM106B variants have previously been associated with risk of frontotemporal dementia. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis revealed that rs113986870, one of the GWS SNPs near rs2732703, is significantly associated with four KANSL1 probes that target transcription of the first translated exon and an untranslated exon in hippocampus (P≤1.3x10−8), frontal cortex (P≤1.3x10−9), and temporal cortex (P≤1.2x10−11). Rs113986870 is also strongly associated with a MAPT probe that targets transcription of alternatively

  14. A novel Alzheimer disease locus located near the gene encoding tau protein.

    PubMed

    Jun, G; Ibrahim-Verbaas, C A; Vronskaya, M; Lambert, J-C; Chung, J; Naj, A C; Kunkle, B W; Wang, L-S; Bis, J C; Bellenguez, C; Harold, D; Lunetta, K L; Destefano, A L; Grenier-Boley, B; Sims, R; Beecham, G W; Smith, A V; Chouraki, V; Hamilton-Nelson, K L; Ikram, M A; Fievet, N; Denning, N; Martin, E R; Schmidt, H; Kamatani, Y; Dunstan, M L; Valladares, O; Laza, A R; Zelenika, D; Ramirez, A; Foroud, T M; Choi, S-H; Boland, A; Becker, T; Kukull, W A; van der Lee, S J; Pasquier, F; Cruchaga, C; Beekly, D; Fitzpatrick, A L; Hanon, O; Gill, M; Barber, R; Gudnason, V; Campion, D; Love, S; Bennett, D A; Amin, N; Berr, C; Tsolaki, Magda; Buxbaum, J D; Lopez, O L; Deramecourt, V; Fox, N C; Cantwell, L B; Tárraga, L; Dufouil, C; Hardy, J; Crane, P K; Eiriksdottir, G; Hannequin, D; Clarke, R; Evans, D; Mosley, T H; Letenneur, L; Brayne, C; Maier, W; De Jager, P; Emilsson, V; Dartigues, J-F; Hampel, H; Kamboh, M I; de Bruijn, R F A G; Tzourio, C; Pastor, P; Larson, E B; Rotter, J I; O'Donovan, M C; Montine, T J; Nalls, M A; Mead, S; Reiman, E M; Jonsson, P V; Holmes, C; St George-Hyslop, P H; Boada, M; Passmore, P; Wendland, J R; Schmidt, R; Morgan, K; Winslow, A R; Powell, J F; Carasquillo, M; Younkin, S G; Jakobsdóttir, J; Kauwe, J S K; Wilhelmsen, K C; Rujescu, D; Nöthen, M M; Hofman, A; Jones, L; Haines, J L; Psaty, B M; Van Broeckhoven, C; Holmans, P; Launer, L J; Mayeux, R; Lathrop, M; Goate, A M; Escott-Price, V; Seshadri, S; Pericak-Vance, M A; Amouyel, P; Williams, J; van Duijn, C M; Schellenberg, G D; Farrer, L A

    2016-01-01

    APOE ɛ4, the most significant genetic risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD), may mask effects of other loci. We re-analyzed genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project (IGAP) Consortium in APOE ɛ4+ (10 352 cases and 9207 controls) and APOE ɛ4- (7184 cases and 26 968 controls) subgroups as well as in the total sample testing for interaction between a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and APOE ɛ4 status. Suggestive associations (P<1 × 10(-4)) in stage 1 were evaluated in an independent sample (stage 2) containing 4203 subjects (APOE ɛ4+: 1250 cases and 536 controls; APOE ɛ4-: 718 cases and 1699 controls). Among APOE ɛ4- subjects, novel genome-wide significant (GWS) association was observed with 17 SNPs (all between KANSL1 and LRRC37A on chromosome 17 near MAPT) in a meta-analysis of the stage 1 and stage 2 data sets (best SNP, rs2732703, P=5·8 × 10(-9)). Conditional analysis revealed that rs2732703 accounted for association signals in the entire 100-kilobase region that includes MAPT. Except for previously identified AD loci showing stronger association in APOE ɛ4+ subjects (CR1 and CLU) or APOE ɛ4- subjects (MS4A6A/MS4A4A/MS4A6E), no other SNPs were significantly associated with AD in a specific APOE genotype subgroup. In addition, the finding in the stage 1 sample that AD risk is significantly influenced by the interaction of APOE with rs1595014 in TMEM106B (P=1·6 × 10(-7)) is noteworthy, because TMEM106B variants have previously been associated with risk of frontotemporal dementia. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis revealed that rs113986870, one of the GWS SNPs near rs2732703, is significantly associated with four KANSL1 probes that target transcription of the first translated exon and an untranslated exon in hippocampus (P ⩽ 1.3 × 10(-8)), frontal cortex (P ⩽ 1.3 × 10(-9)) and temporal cortex (P⩽1.2 × 10(-11)). Rs113986870 is also strongly associated with a MAPT probe

  15. Dynamics of α-globin locus chromatin structure and gene expression during erythroid differentiation of human CD34+ cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Milind C; Karmakar, Subhradip; Krause, Diane; Weissman, Sherman M

    2009-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study has been to establish serum free culture conditions for the ex vivo expansion and differentiation of human CD34+ cells into erythroid lineage and to study the chromatin structure, gene expression and transcription factor recruitment at the α–globin locus in the developing erythron. Methods A basal IMDM cell culture medium with 1% bovine serum albumin as a serum replacement and a combination of cytokines and growth factors was used for the expansion and differentiation of the CD34+ cells. Expression patterns of the alpha and beta like genes at various stages of erythropoiesis was studied by Reverse transcriptase (RT)-qPCR analysis, profile of key erythroid transcription factors was investigated by western blotting, and the chromatin structure and transcription factor recruitment at the alpha globin locus was investigated by ChIP-qPCR analysis. Results Human CD34+ cells in the serum free medium undergo near synchronous erythroid differentiation to yield large amount of cells at different differentiation stages. We observe distinct patterns of the histone modifications and transcription factor binding at the α-globin locus during erythroid differentiation of CD34+ cells. NF-E2 was present at upstream activator sites even before addition of erythropoietin (Epo), while bound GATA-1 was only detectable after Epo treatment. After seven days of erythropoietin treatment, H3K4Me2 modification uniformly increases throughout the α–globin locus. Acetylation at H3K9 and binding of Pol II, NF-E2 and GATA-1 were restricted to certain HS sites of the enhancer and theta gene, and were conspicuously low at the α-like globin promoters. Rearrangement of the insulator binding factor CTCF took place at and around the α-globin locus as CD34+ cells differentiated into erythroid pathway. Conclusion Our results indicate that remodeling of the upstream elements may be the primary event in activation of α–globin gene expression. Activation of

  16. Layered genetic control of DNA methylation and gene expression: a locus of multiple sclerosis in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jean; Bourdon, Celine; Bernard, Manon; Wilson, Michael D; Reischl, Eva; Waldenberger, Melanie; Ruggeri, Barbara; Schumann, Gunter; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Leemans, Alexander; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Leonard, Gabriel; Richer, Louis; Bouchard, Luigi; Gaudet, Daniel; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka

    2015-10-15

    DNA methylation may contribute to the etiology of complex genetic disorders through its impact on genome integrity and gene expression; it is modulated by DNA-sequence variants, named methylation quantitative trait loci (meQTLs). Most meQTLs influence methylation of a few CpG dinucleotides within short genomic regions (<3 kb). Here, we identified a layered genetic control of DNA methylation at numerous CpGs across a long 300 kb genomic region. This control involved a single long-range meQTL and multiple local meQTLs. The long-range meQTL explained up to 75% of variance in methylation of CpGs located over extended areas of the 300 kb region. The meQTL was identified in four samples (P = 2.8 × 10(-17), 3.1 × 10(-31), 4.0 × 10(-71) and 5.2 × 10(-199)), comprising a total of 2796 individuals. The long-range meQTL was strongly associated not only with DNA methylation but also with mRNA expression of several genes within the 300 kb region (P = 7.1 × 10(-18)-1.0 × 10(-123)). The associations of the meQTL with gene expression became attenuated when adjusted for DNA methylation (causal inference test: P = 2.4 × 10(-13)-7.1 × 10(-20)), indicating coordinated regulation of DNA methylation and gene expression. Further, the long-range meQTL was found to be in linkage disequilibrium with the most replicated locus of multiple sclerosis, a disease affecting primarily the brain white matter. In middle-aged adults free of the disease, we observed that the risk allele was associated with subtle structural properties of the brain white matter found in multiple sclerosis (P = 0.02). In summary, we identified a long-range meQTL that controls methylation and expression of several genes and may be involved in increasing brain vulnerability to multiple sclerosis. PMID:26220975

  17. Analysis of Expression of a Phenazine Biosynthesis Locus of Pseudomonas aureofaciens PGS12 on Seeds with a Mutant Carrying a Phenazine Biosynthesis Locus-Ice Nucleation Reporter Gene Fusion.

    PubMed

    Georgakopoulos, D G; Hendson, M; Panopoulos, N J; Schroth, M N

    1994-12-01

    A derivative of Pseudomonas aureofaciens PGS12 expressing a promoterless ice nucleation gene under the control of a phenazine biosynthesis locus was used to study the expression of a phenazine antibiotic locus (Phz) during bacterial seed colonization. Seeds of various plants were inoculated with wild-type PGS12 and a PGS12 ice nucleation-active phz:inaZ marker exchange derivative and planted in soil, and the expression of the reporter gene was monitored at different intervals for 48 h during seed germination. phz gene expression was first detected 12 h after planting, and the expression increased during the next 36-h period. Significant differences in expression of bacterial populations on different seeds were measured at 48 h. The highest expression level was recorded for wheat seeds (one ice nucleus per 4,000 cells), and the lowest expression level was recorded for cotton seeds (one ice nucleus per 12,000,000 cells). These values indicate that a small proportion of bacteria in a seed population expressed phenazine biosynthesis. Reporter gene expression levels and populations on individual seeds in a sample were lognormally distributed. There was greater variability in reporter gene expression than in population size among individual seeds in a sample. Expression on sugar beet and radish seeds was not affected by different inoculum levels or soil matric potentials of -10 and -40 J/kg; only small differences in expression on wheat and sugar beet seeds were detected when the seeds were planted in various soils. It is suggested that the nutrient level in seed exudates is the primary reason for the differences observed among seeds. The lognormal distribution of phenazine expression on seeds and the timing and difference in expression of phenazine biosynthesis on seeds have implications for the potential efficacy of biocontrol microorganisms against plant pathogens. PMID:16349467

  18. Analysis of Expression of a Phenazine Biosynthesis Locus of Pseudomonas aureofaciens PGS12 on Seeds with a Mutant Carrying a Phenazine Biosynthesis Locus-Ice Nucleation Reporter Gene Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios G.; Hendson, Mavis; Panopoulos, Nickolas J.; Schroth, Milton N.

    1994-01-01

    A derivative of Pseudomonas aureofaciens PGS12 expressing a promoterless ice nucleation gene under the control of a phenazine biosynthesis locus was used to study the expression of a phenazine antibiotic locus (Phz) during bacterial seed colonization. Seeds of various plants were inoculated with wild-type PGS12 and a PGS12 ice nucleation-active phz:inaZ marker exchange derivative and planted in soil, and the expression of the reporter gene was monitored at different intervals for 48 h during seed germination. phz gene expression was first detected 12 h after planting, and the expression increased during the next 36-h period. Significant differences in expression of bacterial populations on different seeds were measured at 48 h. The highest expression level was recorded for wheat seeds (one ice nucleus per 4,000 cells), and the lowest expression level was recorded for cotton seeds (one ice nucleus per 12,000,000 cells). These values indicate that a small proportion of bacteria in a seed population expressed phenazine biosynthesis. Reporter gene expression levels and populations on individual seeds in a sample were lognormally distributed. There was greater variability in reporter gene expression than in population size among individual seeds in a sample. Expression on sugar beet and radish seeds was not affected by different inoculum levels or soil matric potentials of -10 and -40 J/kg; only small differences in expression on wheat and sugar beet seeds were detected when the seeds were planted in various soils. It is suggested that the nutrient level in seed exudates is the primary reason for the differences observed among seeds. The lognormal distribution of phenazine expression on seeds and the timing and difference in expression of phenazine biosynthesis on seeds have implications for the potential efficacy of biocontrol microorganisms against plant pathogens. PMID:16349467

  19. A novel antisense long noncoding RNA within the IGF1R gene locus is imprinted in hematopoietic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingnan; Li, Wei; Sun, Yunpeng; Yu, Dehai; Wen, Xue; Wang, Hong; Cui, Jiuwei; Wang, Guanjun; Hoffman, Andrew R; Hu, Ji-Fan

    2014-09-01

    Dysregulation of the insulin-like growth factor type I receptor (IGF1R) has been implicated in the progression and therapeutic resistance of malignancies. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, IGF1R is one of the most abundantly phosphorylated receptor tyrosine kinases, promoting cell growth through the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. However, little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying IGF1R gene dysregulation in cancer. We discovered a novel intragenic long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) within the IGF1R locus, named IRAIN, which is transcribed in an antisense direction from an intronic promoter. The IRAIN lncRNA was expressed exclusively from the paternal allele, with the maternal counterpart being silenced. Using both reverse transcription-associated trap and chromatin conformation capture assays, we demonstrate that this lncRNA interacts with chromatin DNA and is involved in the formation of an intrachromosomal enhancer/promoter loop. Knockdown of IRAIN lncRNA with shRNA abolishes this intrachromosomal interaction. In addition, IRAIN was downregulated both in leukemia cell lines and in blood obtained from high-risk AML patients. These data identify IRAIN as a new imprinted lncRNA that is involved in long-range DNA interactions. PMID:25092925

  20. Tumor necrosis factor alpha -308 gene locus promoter polymorphism: an analysis of association with health and disease.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Maqsood M; Asotra, Kamlesh; Matata, Bashir M; Mastana, Sarabjit S

    2009-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is a potent immunomediator and proinflammatory cytokine that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a large number of human diseases. The location of its gene within major histocompatibility complex and biological activities has raised the possibility that polymorphisms within this locus may contribute to the pathogenesis of wide range of autoimmune and infectious diseases. For example, a bi-allelic single nucleotide substitution of G (TNFA1 allele) with A (TNFA2 allele) polymorphism at -308 nucleotides upstream from the transcription initiation site in the TNF-alpha promoter is associated with elevated TNF-alpha levels and disease susceptibilities. However, it is still unclear whether TNF-alpha -308 polymorphism plays a part in the disease process, in particular whether it could affect transcription factor binding and in turn influence TNF-alpha transcription and synthesis. Several studies have suggested that TNFA2 allele is significantly linked with the high TNF-alpha-producing autoimmune MHC haplotype HLA-A1, B8, DR3, with elevated serum TNF-alpha levels and a more severe outcome in diseases. This review discusses the genetics of the TNF-alpha -308 polymorphism in selected major diseases and evaluates its common role in health and disease. PMID:19708125

  1. The symbiosis regulator RscS controls the syp gene locus, biofilm formation and symbiotic aggregation by Vibrio fischeri

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Emily S.; Geszvain, Kati; DeLoney-Marino, Cindy R.; Visick, Karen L.

    2006-01-01

    Summary Successful colonization of a eukaryotic host by a microbe involves complex microbe-microbe and microbe-host interactions. Previously, we identified in Vibrio fischeri a putative sensor kinase, RscS, required for initiating symbiotic colonization of its squid host Euprymna scolopes. Here, we analyzed the role of rscS by isolating an allele, rscS1, with increased activity. Multi-copy rscS1 activated transcription of genes within the recently identified symbiosis polysaccharide (syp) cluster. Wild-type cells carrying rscS1 induced aggregation phenotypes in culture, including the formation of pellicles and wrinkled colonies, in a syp-dependent manner. Colonies formed by rscS1-expressing cells produced a matrix not found in control colonies and largely lost in an rscS1-expressing sypN mutant. Finally, multi-copy rscS1 provided a colonization advantage over control cells and substantially enhanced the ability of wild-type cells to aggregate on the surface of the symbiotic organ of E. scolopes; this latter phenotype similarly depended upon an intact syp locus. These results suggest that transcription induced by RscS-mediated signal transduction plays a key role in colonization at the aggregation stage by modifying the cell surface and increasing the ability of the cells to adhere to one another and/or to squid-secreted mucus. PMID:17087775

  2. A novel deletion/insertion caused by a replication error in the β-globin gene locus control region.

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Lacan, Philippe; Garcia, Caroline; Meley, Roland; Pondarré, Corinne; Francina, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Deletions in the β-globin locus control region (β-LCR) lead to (εγδβ)(0)-thalassemia [(εγδβ)(0)-thal]. In patients suffering from these rare deletions, a normal hemoglobin (Hb), phenotype is found, contrasting with a hematological thalassemic phenotype. Multiplex-ligation probe amplification (MLPA) is an efficient tool to detect β-LCR deletions combined with long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing to pinpoint deletion breakpoints. We present here a novel 11,155 bp β-LCR deletion found in a French Caucasian patient which removes DNase I hypersensitive site 2 (HS2) to HS4 of the β-LCR. Interestingly, a 197 bp insertion of two inverted sequences issued from the HS2-HS3 inter-region is present and suggests a complex rearrangement during replication. Carriers of this type of thalassemia can be misdiagnosed as an α-thal trait. Consequently, a complete α- and β-globin gene cluster analysis is required to prevent a potentially damaging misdiagnosis in genetic counselling. PMID:21797698

  3. Cytochrome oxidase subunit V gene of Neurospora crassa: DNA sequences, chromosomal mapping, and evidence that the cya-4 locus specifies the structural gene for subunit V.

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, M S; Bertrand, H; Metzenberg, R L; RajBhandary, U L

    1989-01-01

    The sequences of cDNA and genomic DNA clones for Neurospora cytochrome oxidase subunit V show that the protein is synthesized as a 171-amino-acid precursor containing a 27-amino-acid N-terminal extension. The subunit V protein sequence is 34% identical to that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae subunit V; these proteins, as well as the corresponding bovine subunit, subunit IV, contain a single hydrophobic domain which most likely spans the inner mitochondrial membrane. The Neurospora crassa subunit V gene (cox5) contains two introns, 398 and 68 nucleotides long, which share the conserved intron boundaries 5'GTRNGT...CAG3' and the internal consensus sequence ACTRACA. Two short sequences, YGCCAG and YCCGTTY, are repeated four times each in the cox5 gene upstream of the mRNA 5' termini. The cox5 mRNA 5' ends are heterogeneous, with the major mRNA 5' end located 144 to 147 nucleotides upstream from the translational start site. The mRNA contains a 3'-untranslated region of 186 to 187 nucleotides. Using restriction-fragment-length polymorphism, we mapped the cox5 gene to linkage group IIR, close to the arg-5 locus. Since one of the mutations causing cytochrome oxidase deficiency in N. crassa, cya-4-23, also maps there, we transformed the cya-4-23 strain with the wild-type cox5 gene. In contrast to cya-4-23 cells, which grow slowly, cox5 transformants grew quickly, contained cytochrome oxidase, and had 8- to 11-fold-higher levels of subunit V in their mitochondria. These data suggest (i) that the cya-4 locus in N. crassa specifies structural information for cytochrome oxidase subunit V and (ii) that, in N. crassa, as in S. cerevisiae, deficiencies in the production of nuclearly encoded cytochrome oxidase subunits result in deficiency in cytochrome oxidase activity. Finally, we show that the lower levels of subunit V in cya-4-23 cells are most likely due to substantially reduced levels of translatable subunit V mRNA. Images PMID:2540423

  4. Novel locus for fibrinogen in 3' region of LEPR gene in island population of Vis (Croatia).

    PubMed

    Tomas, Željka; Petranović, Matea Zajc; Škarić-Jurić, Tatjana; Barešić, Ana; Salihović, Marijana Peričić; Narančić, Nina Smolej

    2014-11-01

    Leptin, a possible mediator between energy homeostasis, inflammation and cardiovascular disease (CVD), acts via leptin receptors. We investigated association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes of the leptin receptor gene (LEPR) with several CVD risk factors: body mass index, waist circumference (WC), serum lipids, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein levels. Thirty-one SNPs in and near LEPR gene were analyzed in 986 inhabitants of the island of Vis, Croatia and 29 SNPs in the inland sample (N=499). We assessed linkage disequilibrium (LD), SNP and haplotype associations with the selected phenotypes. rs4291477 significantly associated with fibrinogen (P=0.003) and rs7539471 marginally significantly with high-density lipoprotein (P=0.004), but only in the Vis sample, while rs10493384 marginally significantly associated with triglyceride levels (P=0.006) in the inland sample. SNPs were grouped into eight LD blocks in Vis and in seven blocks in the inland population. Haplotype A-C-A-A-G-A in block 5 in Vis (rs1782754, rs1171269, rs1022981, rs6673324, rs3790426, rs10493380) and haplotype A-A-A-A in block 4 in the inland data (rs1782754, rs1022981, rs6673324, rs1137100) were nominally associated with WC, P=7.085 × 10(-22) (adjusted P=0.0979) and P=5.496 × 10(-144) (adjusted P=0.1062), respectively. PMID:25296580

  5. Gene-disease association with human IFNL locus polymorphisms extends beyond hepatitis C virus infections.

    PubMed

    Chinnaswamy, S

    2016-07-01

    Interferon (IFN) lambda (IFN-λ or type III IFN) gene polymorphisms were discovered in the year 2009 to have a strong association with spontaneous and treatment-induced clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in human hosts. This landmark discovery also brought renewed interest in type III IFN biology. After more than half a decade since this discovery, we now have reports that show that genetic association of IFNL gene polymorphisms in humans is not limited only to HCV infections but extends beyond, to include varied diseases such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, allergy and several other viral diseases including that caused by the human immunodeficiency virus. Notably, all these conditions have strong involvement of host innate immune responses. After the discovery of a deletion polymorphism that leads to the expression of a functional IFN-λ4 as the prime 'functional' variant, the relevance of other polymorphisms regulating the expression of IFN-λ3 is in doubt. Herein, I seek to critically address these issues and review the current literature to provide a framework to help further understanding of IFN-λ biology. PMID:27278127

  6. The BAF60 subunit of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex directly controls the formation of a gene loop at FLOWERING LOCUS C in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jégu, Teddy; Latrasse, David; Delarue, Marianne; Hirt, Heribert; Domenichini, Séverine; Ariel, Federico; Crespi, Martin; Bergounioux, Catherine; Raynaud, Cécile; Benhamed, Moussa

    2014-02-01

    SWI/SNF complexes mediate ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling to regulate gene expression. Many components of these complexes are evolutionarily conserved, and several subunits of Arabidopsis thaliana SWI/SNF complexes are involved in the control of flowering, a process that depends on the floral repressor FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). BAF60 is a SWI/SNF subunit, and in this work, we show that BAF60, via a direct targeting of the floral repressor FLC, induces a change at the high-order chromatin level and represses the photoperiod flowering pathway in Arabidopsis. BAF60 accumulates in the nucleus and controls the formation of the FLC gene loop by modulation of histone density, composition, and posttranslational modification. Physiological analysis of BAF60 RNA interference mutant lines allowed us to propose that this chromatin-remodeling protein creates a repressive chromatin configuration at the FLC locus. PMID:24510722

  7. Novel exons in the tbx5 gene locus generate protein isoforms with distinct expression domains and function.

    PubMed

    Yamak, Abir; Georges, Romain O; Sheikh-Hassani, Massomeh; Morin, Martin; Komati, Hiba; Nemer, Mona

    2015-03-13

    TBX5 is the gene mutated in Holt-Oram syndrome, an autosomal dominant disorder with complex heart and limb deformities. Its protein product is a member of the T-box family of transcription factors and an evolutionarily conserved dosage-sensitive regulator of heart and limb development. Understanding TBX5 regulation is therefore of paramount importance. Here we uncover the existence of novel exons and provide evidence that TBX5 activity may be extensively regulated through alternative splicing to produce protein isoforms with differing N- and C-terminal domains. These isoforms are also present in human heart, indicative of an evolutionarily conserved regulatory mechanism. The newly identified isoforms have different transcriptional properties and can antagonize TBX5a target gene activation. Droplet Digital PCR as well as immunohistochemistry with isoform-specific antibodies reveal differential as well as overlapping expression domains. In particular, we find that the predominant isoform in skeletal myoblasts is Tbx5c, and we show that it is dramatically up-regulated in differentiating myotubes and is essential for myotube formation. Mechanistically, TBX5c antagonizes TBX5a activation of pro-proliferative signals such as IGF-1, FGF-10, and BMP4. The results provide new insight into Tbx5 regulation and function that will further our understanding of its role in health and disease. The finding of new exons in the Tbx5 locus may also be relevant to mutational screening especially in the 30% of Holt-Oram syndrome patients with no mutations in the known TBX5a exons. PMID:25623069

  8. PAX5-positive T-cell Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphomas Associated with Extra Copies of the PAX5 Gene Locus

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Andrew L; Law, Mark E; Inwards, David J; Dogan, Ahmet; McClure, Rebecca F; Macon, William R

    2010-01-01

    Cell lineage is the major criterion by which lymphomas are classified. Immunohistochemistry has greatly facilitated lymphoma diagnosis by detecting expression of lineage-associated antigens. However, loss or aberrant expression of these antigens may present diagnostic challenges. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a T-cell lymphoma that shows morphologic and phenotypic overlap with classical Hodgkin lymphoma, a tumor of B-cell derivation. Staining for the B-cell transcription factor, PAX5, has been suggested to be helpful in this differential, as it is positive in most classical Hodgkin lymphomas, but absent in anaplastic large cell lymphomas. Herein, we report four systemic T-cell anaplastic large cell lymphomas positive for PAX5 by immunohistochemistry, with weak staining intensity similar to that seen in classical Hodgkin lymphoma. All diagnoses were confirmed by a combination of morphologic, phenotypic, and molecular criteria. Three cases were ALK-negative and one was ALK-positive. PAX5 immunohistochemistry was negative in 198 additional peripheral T-cell lymphomas, including 66 anaplastic large cell lymphomas. Unexpectedly, though PAX5 translocations were absent, all evaluable PAX5-positive anaplastic large cell lymphomas showed extra copies of the PAX5 gene locus by fluorescence in situ hybridization. In contrast, only 4% of PAX5-negative peripheral T-cell lymphomas had extra copies of PAX5. We conclude that aberrant expression of PAX5 occurs rarely in T-cell anaplastic large cell lymphomas, and may be associated with extra copies of the PAX5 gene. PAX5-positive lymphomas with morphologic features overlapping different lymphoma types should be evaluated with an extensive immunohistochemical panel and/or molecular studies to avoid diagnostic errors that could lead to inappropriate treatment. Since PAX5 overexpression causes T-cell neoplasms in experimental models, PAX5 may have contributed to lymphomagenesis in our cases. PMID:20118907

  9. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1) Gene are Associated with Performance in Holstein-Friesian Dairy Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Michael Paul; Berry, Donagh P.; Howard, Dawn J.; Diskin, Michael G.; Lynch, Ciaran O.; Giblin, Linda; Kenny, David A.; Magee, David A.; Meade, Kieran G.; Waters, Sinead M.

    2011-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) has been shown to be associated with fertility, growth, and development in cattle. The aim of this study was to (1) identify novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the bovine IGF-1 gene and alongside previously identified SNPs (2) determine their association with traits of economic importance in Holstein-Friesian dairy cattle. Nine novel SNPs were identified across a panel of 22 beef and dairy cattle by sequence analysis of the 5′ promoter, intronic, and 3′ regulatory regions, encompassing ~5 kb of IGF-1. Genotyping and associations with daughter performance for milk production, fertility, survival, and measures of body size were undertaken on 848 Holstein-Friesian AI sires. Using multiple regression analysis nominal associations (P < 0.05) were identified between six SNPs (four novel and two previously identified) and milk composition, survival, body condition score, and body size. The C allele of AF017143 a previously published SNP (C-512T) in the promoter region of IGF-1 predicted to introduce binding sites for transcription factors HSF1 and ZNF217 was associated (P < 0.05) with increased cow carcass weight (i.e., an indicator of mature cow size). Novel SNPs were identified in the 3′ region of IGF-1 were associated (P < 0.05) with functional survival and chest width. The remaining four SNPs, all located within introns of IGF-1 were associated (P < 0.05) with milk protein yield, milk fat yield, milk fat concentration, somatic cell score, carcass conformation, and carcass fat. Results of this study further demonstrate the multifaceted influences of IGF-1 on milk production and growth related traits in cattle. PMID:22303302

  10. Cloning and gene expression of allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF-1) provide new insights into injury and bacteria response of the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka, 1867).

    PubMed

    Ji, Nanjing; Chang, Yaqing; Zhao, Chong; Pang, Zhengguo; He, Zhou

    2014-06-01

    Allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF-1) is an interferon (IFN)-γ-inducible Ca(2+)-binding cytokine that associates with the immune defense and inflammatory response. In this study, we reported AIF-1 gene in sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (AjAIF-1). The full-length cDNA of AjAIF-1 is 1541 bp with an open reading frame (ORF) of 477 bp encoding 158 amino acids. Two EF-hand Ca(2+)-binding motifs were found in the deduced AjAIF-1. AjAIF-1 was widely expressed in all tested tissues (body wall, intestine, respiratory tree, tube feet, coelomocytes and longitudinal muscle), with the highest expression in respiratory tree. After Vibrio splendidus challenge and physical injury, AjAIF-1 transcripts were significantly upregulated in coelomocytes. The mRNA expression level of AjAIF-1 in coelomocytes reached to the highest value at 4 h (3.38-folds vs. the PBS control, P < 0.05) post injection. After papilla injury, the mRNA level of AjAIF-1 in coelomocytes was upregulated, and its peak value was found at 4 h (3.88-folds vs. the control, P < 0.05). These results indicated that 1) AjAIF-1 sensitively responds to pathogen infection; 2) AjAIF-1 is involved in acute inflammatory response. Our findings gain general information about the role of AjAIF-1 in the innate immunity of A. japonicus. PMID:24704420