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Sample records for factors mouse sos1

  1. Human Sos1: A guanine nucleotide exchange factor for ras that binds to GRB2

    SciTech Connect

    Chardin, P. ); Camonis, J.; Gale, N.W.; Aelst, L. Van; Wigler, M.H.; Bar-Sagi, D. ); Schlessinger, J. )

    1993-05-28

    A human complementary DNA was isolated that encodes a widely expressed protein, hSos1, that is closely related to Sos, the product of the Drosophila son of sevenless gene. The hSos1 protein contains a region of significant sequence similarity to CDC25, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras from yeast. A fragment of hSos1 encoding the CDC25-related domain complemented loss of CDC25 function in yeast. This hSos1 domain specifically stimulated guanine nucleotide exchange on mammalian Ras proteins in vitro. Mammalian cells overexpressing full-length hSos1 had increased guanine nucleotide exchange activity. Thus hSos1 is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ras. The hSos1 interacted with growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2) in vivo and in vitro. This interaction was mediated by the carboxyl-terminal domain of hSos1 and the Src homology 3 (SH3) domains of GRB2. These results suggest that the coupling of receptor tyrosine kinases to Ras signaling is mediated by a molecular complex consisting of GRB2 and hSos1. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Functional Redundancy of Sos1 and Sos2 for Lymphopoiesis and Organismal Homeostasis and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Baltanás, Fernando C.; Pérez-Andrés, Martín; Ginel-Picardo, Alicia; Diaz, David; Jimeno, David; Liceras-Boillos, Pilar; Kortum, Robert L.; Samelson, Lawrence E.; Orfao, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Sos1 and Sos2 are ubiquitously expressed, universal Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors (Ras-GEFs) acting in multiple signal transduction pathways activated by upstream cellular kinases. The embryonic lethality of Sos1 null mutants has hampered ascertaining the specific in vivo contributions of Sos1 and Sos2 to processes controlling adult organism survival or development of hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic organs, tissues, and cell lineages. Here, we generated a tamoxifen-inducible Sos1-null mouse strain allowing analysis of the combined disruption of Sos1 and Sos2 (Sos1/2) during adulthood. Sos1/2 double-knockout (DKO) animals died precipitously, whereas individual Sos1 and Sos2 knockout (KO) mice were perfectly viable. A reduced percentage of total bone marrow precursors occurred in single-KO animals, but a dramatic depletion of B-cell progenitors was specifically detected in Sos1/2 DKO mice. We also confirmed a dominant role of Sos1 over Sos2 in early thymocyte maturation, with almost complete thymus disappearance and dramatically higher reduction of absolute thymocyte counts in Sos1/2 DKO animals. Absolute counts of mature B and T cells in spleen and peripheral blood were unchanged in single-KO mutants, while significantly reduced in Sos1/2 DKO mice. Our data demonstrate functional redundancy between Sos1 and Sos2 for homeostasis and survival of the full organism and for development and maturation of T and B lymphocytes. PMID:24043312

  3. Rational design of small molecule inhibitors targeting the Ras GEF, SOS1

    PubMed Central

    Evelyn, Chris R.; Duan, Xin; Biesiada, Jacek; Seibel, William L.; Meller, Jaroslaw; Zheng, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ras GTPases regulate intracellular signaling involved in cell proliferation. Elevated Ras signaling activity has been associated with human cancers. Ras activation is catalyzed by guanine-nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), of which SOS1 is a major member that transduces receptor tyrosine kinase signaling to Ras. We have developed a rational approach coupling virtual screening with experimental screening in identifying small-molecule inhibitors targeting the catalytic site of SOS1 and SOS1-regulated Ras activity. A lead inhibitor, NSC-658497, is found to bind to SOS1, competitively suppresses SOS1-Ras interaction, and dose-dependently inhibits SOS1 GEF activity. Mutagenesis and structure-activity relationship studies map the NSC-658497 site of action to the SOS1 catalytic site, and define the chemical moieties in the inhibitor essential for the activity. NSC-658497 showed dose-dependent efficacy in inhibiting Ras, downstream signaling activities, and associated cell proliferation. These studies establish a proof of principle for rational design of small-molecule inhibitors targeting Ras GEF enzymatic activity. PMID:25455859

  4. Gain-of-function SOS1 mutations cause a distinctive form of noonansyndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Tartaglia, Marco; Pennacchio, Len A.; Zhao, Chen; Yadav, KamleshK.; Fodale, Valentina; Sarkozy, Anna; Pandit, Bhaswati; Oishi, Kimihiko; Martinelli, Simone; Schackwitz, Wendy; Ustaszewska, Anna; Martin, Joes; Bristow, James; Carta, Claudio; Lepri, Francesca; Neri, Cinzia; Vasta,Isabella; Gibson, Kate; Curry, Cynthia J.; Lopez Siguero, Juan Pedro; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Zampino, Giuseppe; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Gelb, Brude D.

    2006-09-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is a developmental disordercharacterized by short stature, facial dysmorphia, congenital heartdefects and skeletal anomalies1. Increased RAS-mitogenactivated proteinkinase (MAPK) signaling due to PTPN11 and KRAS mutations cause 50 percentof NS2-6. Here, we report that 22 of 129 NS patients without PTPN11 orKRAS mutation (17 percent) have missense mutations in SOS1, which encodesa RAS-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). SOS1 mutationscluster at residues implicated in the maintenance of SOS1 in itsautoinhibited form and ectopic expression of two NS-associated mutantsinduced enhanced RAS activation. The phenotype associated with SOS1defects is distinctive, although within NS spectrum, with a highprevalence of ectodermal abnormalities but generally normal developmentand linear growth. Our findings implicate for the first timegain-of-function mutations in a RAS GEF in inherited disease and define anew mechanism by which upregulation of the RAS pathway can profoundlychange human development.

  5. Quantifying intramolecular binding in multivalent interactions: a structure-based synergistic study on Grb2-Sos1 complex.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Anurag; Goldstein, Byron; Gnanakaran, S

    2011-10-01

    Numerous signaling proteins use multivalent binding to increase the specificity and affinity of their interactions within the cell. Enhancement arises because the effective binding constant for multivalent binding is larger than the binding constants for each individual interaction. We seek to gain both qualitative and quantitative understanding of the multivalent interactions of an adaptor protein, growth factor receptor bound protein-2 (Grb2), containing two SH3 domains interacting with the nucleotide exchange factor son-of-sevenless 1 (Sos1) containing multiple polyproline motifs separated by flexible unstructured regions. Grb2 mediates the recruitment of Sos1 from the cytosol to the plasma membrane where it activates Ras by inducing the exchange of GDP for GTP. First, using a combination of evolutionary information and binding energy calculations, we predict an additional polyproline motif in Sos1 that binds to the SH3 domains of Grb2. This gives rise to a total of five polyproline motifs in Sos1 that are capable of binding to the two SH3 domains of Grb2. Then, using a hybrid method combining molecular dynamics simulations and polymer models, we estimate the enhancement in local concentration of a polyproline motif on Sos1 near an unbound SH3 domain of Grb2 when its other SH3 domain is bound to a different polyproline motif on Sos1. We show that the local concentration of the Sos1 motifs that a Grb2 SH3 domain experiences is approximately 1000 times greater than the cellular concentration of Sos1. Finally, we calculate the intramolecular equilibrium constants for the crosslinking of Grb2 on Sos1 and use thermodynamic modeling to calculate the stoichiometry. With these equilibrium constants, we are able to predict the distribution of complexes that form at physiological concentrations. We believe this is the first systematic analysis that combines sequence, structure, and thermodynamic analyses to determine the stoichiometry of the complexes that are dominant in

  6. SpAHA1 and SpSOS1 Coordinate in Transgenic Yeast to Improve Salt Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Yin, Xiaochang; Duan, Ruijun; Hao, Gangping; Guo, Jianchun; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-01-01

    In plant cells, the plasma membrane Na+/H+ antiporter SOS1 (salt overly sensitive 1) mediates Na+ extrusion using the proton gradient generated by plasma membrane H+-ATPases, and these two proteins are key plant halotolerance factors. In the present study, two genes from Sesuvium portulacastrum, encoding plasma membrane Na+/H+ antiporter (SpSOS1) and H+-ATPase (SpAHA1), were cloned. Localization of each protein was studied in tobacco cells, and their functions were analyzed in yeast cells. Both SpSOS1 and SpAHA1 are plasma membrane-bound proteins. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses showed that SpSOS1 and SpAHA1 were induced by salinity, and their expression patterns in roots under salinity were similar. Compared with untransformed yeast cells, SpSOS1 increased the salt tolerance of transgenic yeast by decreasing the Na+ content. The Na+/H+ exchange activity at plasma membrane vesicles was higher in SpSOS1-transgenic yeast than in the untransformed strain. No change was observed in the salt tolerance of yeast cells expressing SpAHA1 alone; however, in yeast transformed with both SpSOS1 and SpAHA1, SpAHA1 generated an increased proton gradient that stimulated the Na+/H+ exchange activity of SpSOS1. In this scenario, more Na+ ions were transported out of cells, and the yeast cells co-expressing SpSOS1 and SpAHA1 grew better than the cells transformed with only SpSOS1 or SpAHA1. These findings demonstrate that the plasma membrane Na+/H+ antiporter SpSOS1 and H+-ATPase SpAHA1 can function in coordination. These results provide a reference for developing more salt-tolerant crops via co-transformation with the plasma membrane Na+/H+ antiporter and H+-ATPase. PMID:26340746

  7. SpAHA1 and SpSOS1 Coordinate in Transgenic Yeast to Improve Salt Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Ruijun; Hao, Gangping; Guo, Jianchun; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-01-01

    In plant cells, the plasma membrane Na+/H+ antiporter SOS1 (salt overly sensitive 1) mediates Na+ extrusion using the proton gradient generated by plasma membrane H+-ATPases, and these two proteins are key plant halotolerance factors. In the present study, two genes from Sesuvium portulacastrum, encoding plasma membrane Na+/H+ antiporter (SpSOS1) and H+-ATPase (SpAHA1), were cloned. Localization of each protein was studied in tobacco cells, and their functions were analyzed in yeast cells. Both SpSOS1 and SpAHA1 are plasma membrane-bound proteins. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses showed that SpSOS1 and SpAHA1 were induced by salinity, and their expression patterns in roots under salinity were similar. Compared with untransformed yeast cells, SpSOS1 increased the salt tolerance of transgenic yeast by decreasing the Na+ content. The Na+/H+ exchange activity at plasma membrane vesicles was higher in SpSOS1-transgenic yeast than in the untransformed strain. No change was observed in the salt tolerance of yeast cells expressing SpAHA1 alone; however, in yeast transformed with both SpSOS1 and SpAHA1, SpAHA1 generated an increased proton gradient that stimulated the Na+/H+ exchange activity of SpSOS1. In this scenario, more Na+ ions were transported out of cells, and the yeast cells co-expressing SpSOS1 and SpAHA1 grew better than the cells transformed with only SpSOS1 or SpAHA1. These findings demonstrate that the plasma membrane Na+/H+ antiporter SpSOS1 and H+-ATPase SpAHA1 can function in coordination. These results provide a reference for developing more salt-tolerant crops via co-transformation with the plasma membrane Na+/H+ antiporter and H+-ATPase. PMID:26340746

  8. A putative soybean GmsSOS1 confers enhanced salt tolerance to transgenic Arabidopsis sos1-1 mutant.

    PubMed

    Nie, Wang-Xing; Xu, Lin; Yu, Bing-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The cDNA of GmsSOS1, a putative plasma membrane Na(+)/H(+) antiporter gene isolated from Glycine max, Glycine soja, and their hybrid, was constructed into plant expression vector pCAMBIA 1300 and then transformed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens under the control of CaMV 35S promoter to Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type (WT) and mutant (atsos1-1) plants. By hygromycin resistance detection and PCR analysis, transgenic plants (WT35S:GmsSOS1 and atsos1-1 35S:GmsSOS1) were obtained. Seed germination, seedling growth, and Na(+) contents in roots and shoots were analytically compared among WT, atsos1-1 mutant, and their transgenic lines under salt stress. The results showed that when GmsSOS1 was integrated into the genome of A. thaliana, the inhibitions of salt stress on seed germination and seedling growth were all significantly improved, and enhanced salt tolerance was displayed, which may be attributed to the decrease of Na(+) absorption in roots and transportation in shoots of the transgenic lines, especially for that of atsos1-1 mutant. PMID:24934653

  9. Expression and characterization of the SOS1 Arabidopsis salt tolerance protein.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Asad; Dutta, Debajyoti; Fliegel, Larry

    2016-04-01

    SOS1 is the plasma membrane Na(+)/H(+) antiporter of Arabidopsis thaliana. It is responsible for the removal of intracellular sodium in exchange for an extracellular proton. SOS1 is composed of 1146 amino acids. Approximately 450 make the membrane domain, while the protein contains and a very large regulatory cytosolic domain of about 696 amino acids. Schizosaccharomyces pombe contains the salt tolerance Na(+)/H(+) antiporter proteins sod2. We examined the ability of SOS1 to rescue salt tolerance in S. pombe with a knockout of the sod2 gene (sod2::ura4). In addition, we characterized the importance of the regulatory tail of SOS1, in expression of the protein in S. pombe. We expressed full-length SOS1 and SOS1 shortened at the C-terminus and ending at amino acids 766 (medium) and 481 (short). The short version of SOS1 conveyed salt tolerance to sod2::ura4 yeast and Western blotting revealed that the protein was present. The protein was also targeted to the plasma membrane. The medium and full-length SOS1 protein were partially degraded and were not as well expressed as the short version of SOS1. The SOS1 short protein was also able to reduce Na(+) content in S. pombe. The full-length SOS1 dimerized and depended on the presence of the cytosolic tail. An analysis of SOS1 predicted a topology of 13 transmembrane segments, distinct from E. coli NhaA but similar to the Na(+)/H(+) exchangers Methanocaldococcus jannaschii NhaP1 and Thermus thermophile NapA. PMID:26992907

  10. SOS1, a Genetic Locus Essential for Salt Tolerance and Potassium Acquisition.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, S. J.; Ding, L.; Zhu, J. K.

    1996-01-01

    To begin to determine which genes are essential for salt tolerance in higher plants, we identified four salt-hypersensitive mutants of Arabidopsis by using a root-bending assay on NaCl-containing agar plates. These mutants (sos1-1, sos1-2, sos1-3, and sos1-4) are allelic to each other and were caused by single recessive nuclear mutations. The SOS1 gene was mapped to chromosome 2 at 29.5 [plusmn] 6.1 centimorgans. The mutants showed no phenotypic changes except that their growth was >20 times more sensitive to inhibition by NaCl. Salt hypersensitivity is a basic cellular trait exhibited by the mutants at all developmental stages. The sos1 mutants are specifically hypersensitive to Na+ and Li+. The mutants were unable to grow on media containing low levels (below ~1 mM) of potassium. Uptake experiments using 86Rb showed that sos1 mutants are defective in high-affinity potassium uptake. sos1 plants became deficient in potassium when treated with NaCl. The results demonstrate that potassium acquisition is a critical process for salt tolerance in glycophytic plants. PMID:12239394

  11. RasGRP1 opposes proliferative EGFR–SOS1–Ras signals and restricts intestinal epithelial cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Depeille, Philippe; Henricks, Linda M.; van de Ven, Robert A. H.; Lemmens, Ed; Wang, Chih-Yang; Matli, Mary; Werb, Zena; Haigis, Kevin M.; Donner, David; Warren, Robert; Roose, Jeroen P.

    2015-01-01

    The character of EGFR signals can influence cell fate but mechanistic insights into intestinal EGFR-Ras signalling are limited. Here we show that two distinct Ras nucleotide exchange factors, RasGRP1 and SOS1, lie downstream of EGFR but act in functional opposition. RasGRP1 is expressed in intestinal crypts where it restricts epithelial growth. High RasGRP1 expression in colorectal cancer (CRC) patient samples correlates with a better clinical outcome. Biochemically, we find that RasGRP1 creates a negative feedback loop that limits proliferative EGFR–SOS1–Ras signals in CRC cells. Genetic Rasgrp1 depletion from mice with either an activating mutation in KRas or with aberrant Wnt signalling due to a mutation in Apc resulted in both cases in exacerbated Ras–ERK signalling and cell proliferation. The unexpected opposing cell biological effects of EGFR–RasGRP1 and EGFR–SOS1 signals in the same cell shed light on the intricacy of EGFR-Ras signalling in normal epithelium and carcinoma. PMID:26005835

  12. Reduced Na+ uptake in the NaCl-hypersensitive sos1 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Ding, L; Zhu, J K

    1997-01-01

    Sos1 is an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant with > 20 times higher sensitivity toward Na+ inhibition due to a defective high-affinity potassium-uptake system. We report here that sos1 accumulates less Na+ than the wild type in response to NaCl stress. The Na+ contents in sos1 seedlings exposed to 25 mM NaCl for 2 or more d are about 43% lower than those in the wild type. When assayed at 20 mM external NaCl, sos1 seedlings pretreated with low potassium have 32% lower Na+ uptake than the wild type. However, little difference in Na+ uptake could be measured when the seedlings were not pretreated with low potassium. Low-potassium treatment was shown to induce high-affinity potassium-uptake activity in Arabidopsis seedlings. No substantial difference in Na+ efflux between sos1 and the wild type was detected. The results show that the reduced Na+ accumulation in sos1 is due to a lower Na+ influx rate. Therefore, the sos1 mutation appears to disrupt low-affinity Na+ uptake in addition to its impairment of high-affinity K+ uptake. PMID:9085573

  13. Direct inhibition of oncogenic KRAS by hydrocarbon-stapled SOS1 helices

    PubMed Central

    Leshchiner, Elizaveta S.; Parkhitko, Andrey; Bird, Gregory H.; Luccarelli, James; Bellairs, Joseph A.; Escudero, Silvia; Opoku-Nsiah, Kwadwo; Godes, Marina; Perrimon, Norbert; Walensky, Loren D.

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations in the Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) underlie the pathogenesis and chemoresistance of ∼30% of all human tumors, yet the development of high-affinity inhibitors that target the broad range of KRAS mutants remains a formidable challenge. Here, we report the development and validation of stabilized alpha helices of son of sevenless 1 (SAH-SOS1) as prototype therapeutics that directly inhibit wild-type and mutant forms of KRAS. SAH-SOS1 peptides bound in a sequence-specific manner to KRAS and its mutants, and dose-responsively blocked nucleotide association. Importantly, this functional binding activity correlated with SAH-SOS1 cytotoxicity in cancer cells expressing wild-type or mutant forms of KRAS. The mechanism of action of SAH-SOS1 peptides was demonstrated by sequence-specific down-regulation of the ERK-MAP kinase phosphosignaling cascade in KRAS-driven cancer cells and in a Drosophila melanogaster model of Ras85DV12 activation. These studies provide evidence for the potential utility of SAH-SOS1 peptides in neutralizing oncogenic KRAS in human cancer. PMID:25624485

  14. Sequence analysis of the Ras-MAPK pathway genes SOS1, EGFR & GRB2 in silver foxes (Vulpes vulpes): candidate genes for hereditary hyperplastic gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jo-Anna B J; Tully, Sara J; Dawn Marshall, H

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary hyperplastic gingivitis (HHG) is an autosomal recessive disease that presents with progressive gingival proliferation in farmed silver foxes. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is an analogous condition in humans that is genetically heterogeneous with several known autosomal dominant loci. For one locus the causative mutation is in the Son of sevenless homologue 1 (SOS1) gene. For the remaining loci, the molecular mechanisms are unknown but Ras pathway involvement is suspected. Here we compare sequences for the SOS1 gene, and two adjacent genes in the Ras pathway, growth receptor bound protein 2 (GRB2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), between HHG-affected and unaffected foxes. We conclude that the known HGF causative mutation does not cause HHG in foxes, nor do the coding regions or intron-exon boundaries of these three genes contain any candidate mutations for fox gum disease. Patterns of molecular evolution among foxes and other mammals reflect high conservation and strong functional constraints for SOS1 and GRB2 but reveal a lineage-specific pattern of variability in EGFR consistent with mutational rate differences, relaxed functional constraints, and possibly positive selection. PMID:25377643

  15. Nax loci affect SOS1-like Na+/H+ exchanger expression and activity in wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Shabala, Lana; Cuin, Tracey A; Huang, Xin; Zhou, Meixue; Munns, Rana; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-02-01

    Salinity stress tolerance in durum wheat is strongly associated with a plant's ability to control Na(+) delivery to the shoot. Two loci, termed Nax1 and Nax2, were recently identified as being critical for this process and the sodium transporters HKT1;4 and HKT1;5 were identified as the respective candidate genes. These transporters retrieve Na(+) from the xylem, thus limiting the rates of Na(+) transport from the root to the shoot. In this work, we show that the Nax loci also affect activity and expression levels of the SOS1-like Na(+)/H(+) exchanger in both root cortical and stelar tissues. Net Na(+) efflux measured in isolated steles from salt-treated plants, using the non-invasive ion flux measuring MIFE technique, decreased in the sequence: Tamaroi (parental line)>Nax1=Nax2>Nax1:Nax2 lines. This efflux was sensitive to amiloride (a known inhibitor of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger) and was mirrored by net H(+) flux changes. TdSOS1 relative transcript levels were 6-10-fold lower in Nax lines compared with Tamaroi. Thus, it appears that Nax loci confer two highly complementary mechanisms, both of which contribute towards reducing the xylem Na(+) content. One enhances the retrieval of Na(+) back into the root stele via HKT1;4 or HKT1;5, whilst the other reduces the rate of Na(+) loading into the xylem via SOS1. It is suggested that such duality plays an important adaptive role with greater versatility for responding to a changing environment and controlling Na(+) delivery to the shoot. PMID:26585227

  16. Nax loci affect SOS1-like Na+/H+ exchanger expression and activity in wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Min; Shabala, Lana; Cuin, Tracey A; Huang, Xin; Zhou, Meixue; Munns, Rana; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Salinity stress tolerance in durum wheat is strongly associated with a plant’s ability to control Na+ delivery to the shoot. Two loci, termed Nax1 and Nax2, were recently identified as being critical for this process and the sodium transporters HKT1;4 and HKT1;5 were identified as the respective candidate genes. These transporters retrieve Na+ from the xylem, thus limiting the rates of Na+ transport from the root to the shoot. In this work, we show that the Nax loci also affect activity and expression levels of the SOS1-like Na+/H+ exchanger in both root cortical and stelar tissues. Net Na+ efflux measured in isolated steles from salt-treated plants, using the non-invasive ion flux measuring MIFE technique, decreased in the sequence: Tamaroi (parental line)>Nax1=Nax2>Nax1:Nax2 lines. This efflux was sensitive to amiloride (a known inhibitor of the Na+/H+ exchanger) and was mirrored by net H+ flux changes. TdSOS1 relative transcript levels were 6–10-fold lower in Nax lines compared with Tamaroi. Thus, it appears that Nax loci confer two highly complementary mechanisms, both of which contribute towards reducing the xylem Na+ content. One enhances the retrieval of Na+ back into the root stele via HKT1;4 or HKT1;5, whilst the other reduces the rate of Na+ loading into the xylem via SOS1. It is suggested that such duality plays an important adaptive role with greater versatility for responding to a changing environment and controlling Na+ delivery to the shoot. PMID:26585227

  17. SOS1 Mutations in Noonan Syndrome: Molecular Spectrum, Structural Insights on Pathogenic Effects, and Genotype–Phenotype Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Lepri, Francesca; De Luca, Alessandro; Stella, Lorenzo; Rossi, Cesare; Baldassarre, Giuseppina; Pantaleoni, Francesca; Cordeddu, Viviana; Williams, Bradley J; Dentici, Maria L; Caputo, Viviana; Venanzi, Serenella; Bonaguro, Michela; Kavamura, Ines; Faienza, Maria F; Pilotta, Alba; Stanzial, Franco; Faravelli, Francesca; Gabrielli, Orazio; Marino, Bruno; Neri, Giovanni; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Ferrero, Giovanni B; Torrrente, Isabella; Selicorni, Angelo; Mazzanti, Laura; Digilio, Maria C; Zampino, Giuseppe; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Gelb, Bruce D; Tartaglia, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is among the most common nonchromosomal disorders affecting development and growth. NS is caused by aberrant RAS-MAPK signaling and is genetically heterogeneous, which explains, in part, the marked clinical variability documented for this Mendelian trait. Recently, we and others identified SOS1 as a major gene underlying NS. Here, we explored further the spectrum of SOS1 mutations and their associated phenotypic features. Mutation scanning of the entire SOS1 coding sequence allowed the identification of 33 different variants deemed to be of pathological significance, including 16 novel missense changes and in-frame indels. Various mutation clusters destabilizing or altering orientation of regions of the protein predicted to contribute structurally to the maintenance of autoinhibition were identified. Two previously unappreciated clusters predicted to enhance SOS1's recruitment to the plasma membrane, thus promoting a spatial reorientation of domains contributing to inhibition, were also recognized. Genotype–phenotype analysis confirmed our previous observations, establishing a high frequency of ectodermal anomalies and a low prevalence of cognitive impairment and reduced growth. Finally, mutation analysis performed on cohorts of individuals with nonsyndromic pulmonic stenosis, atrial septal defects, and ventricular septal defects excluded a major contribution of germline SOS1 lesions to the isolated occurrence of these cardiac anomalies. Hum Mutat 32:760–772, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21387466

  18. Coronary artery ectasia in Noonan syndrome: Report of an individual with SOS1 mutation and literature review.

    PubMed

    Calcagni, Giulio; Baban, Anwar; De Luca, Enrica; Leonardi, Benedetta; Pongiglione, Giacomo; Digilio, Maria Cristina

    2016-03-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is the second most frequent hereditary syndrome with cardiac involvement. Pulmonary valve stenosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are the most prevalent cardiovascular abnormalities. We report on a 14-year-old girl with NS due to SOS1 mutation with pulmonary stenosis and idiopathic coronary ectasia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing coronary ectasia in a patient with NS secondary to a SOS1 mutation. We include a literature review of this rare association. PMID:26686981

  19. E3B1, a human homologue of the mouse gene product Abi-1, sensitizes activation of Rap1 in response to epidermal growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Jenei, Veronika; Andersson, Tommy; Jakus, Judit; Dib, Karim . E-mail: k.dib@qub.ac.uk

    2005-11-01

    E3B1, a human homologue of the mouse gene product Abi-1, has been implicated in growth-factor-mediated regulation of the small GTPases p21{sup Ras} and Rac. E3b1 is a regulator of Rac because it can form a complex with Sos-1 and eps8, and such a Sos-1-e3B1-eps8 complex serves as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac. In the present study, we found that overexpression of e3B1 in NIH3T3/EGFR cells sensitized EGF-induced activation of Rac1, whereas it had no impact on EGF-induced activation of p21{sup Ras}. Remarkably, we found that EGF-induced activation of the p21{sup Ras}-related GTPase Rap1 was also sensitized in NIH3T3/EGFR-e3B1 cells. Thus, in NIH3T3/EGFR-e3B1 cells, maximal EGF-induced activation of Rap1 occurs with a dose of EGF much lower than in NIH3T3/EGFR cells. We also report that overexpression of e3B1 in NIH3T3/EGFR cells renders EGF-induced activation of Rap1 completely dependent on Src tyrosine kinases but not on c-Abl. However, EGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the Rap GEF C3G occurred regardless of whether e3B1 was overexpressed or not, and this did not involve Src tyrosine kinases. Accordingly, we propose that overexpression of e3B1 in NIH3T3/EGFR cells leads to mobilization of Src tyrosine kinases that participate in EGF-induced activation of Rap1 and inhibition of cell proliferation.

  20. Mouse models for core binding factor leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chin, D W L; Watanabe-Okochi, N; Wang, C Q; Tergaonkar, V; Osato, M

    2015-10-01

    RUNX1 and CBFB are among the most frequently mutated genes in human leukemias. Genetic alterations such as chromosomal translocations, copy number variations and point mutations have been widely reported to result in the malfunction of RUNX transcription factors. Leukemias arising from such alterations in RUNX family genes are collectively termed core binding factor (CBF) leukemias. Although adult CBF leukemias generally are considered a favorable risk group as compared with other forms of acute myeloid leukemia, the 5-year survival rate remains low. An improved understanding of the molecular mechanism for CBF leukemia is imperative to uncover novel treatment options. Over the years, retroviral transduction-transplantation assays and transgenic, knockin and knockout mouse models alone or in combination with mutagenesis have been used to study the roles of RUNX alterations in leukemogenesis. Although successful in inducing leukemia, the existing assays and models possess many inherent limitations. A CBF leukemia model which induces leukemia with complete penetrance and short latency would be ideal as a platform for drug discovery. Here, we summarize the currently available mouse models which have been utilized to study CBF leukemias, discuss the advantages and limitations of individual experimental systems, and propose suggestions for improvements of mouse models. PMID:26165235

  1. SOS1 and PTPN11 mutations in five cases of Noonan syndrome with multiple giant cell lesions

    PubMed Central

    Beneteau, Claire; Cavé, Hélène; Moncla, Anne; Dorison, Nathalie; Munnich, Arnold; Verloes, Alain; Leheup, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    We report five cases of multiple giant cell lesions in patients with typical Noonan syndrome. Such association has frequently been referred to as Noonan-like/multiple giant cell (NL/MGCL) syndrome before the molecular definition of Noonan syndrome. Two patients show mutations in PTPN11 (p.Tyr62Asp and p.Asn308Asp) and three in SOS1 (p.Arg552Ser and p.Arg552Thr). The latter are the first SOS1 mutations reported outside PTPN11 in NL/MGCL syndrome. MGCL lesions were observed in jaws (‘cherubism') and joints (‘pigmented villonodular synovitis'). We show through those patients that both types of MGCL are not PTPN11-specific, but rather represent a low penetrant (or perhaps overlooked) complication of the dysregulated RAS/MAPK signaling pathway. We recommend discarding NL/MGCL syndrome from the nosology, as this presentation is neither gene-nor allele-specific of Noonan syndrome; these patients should be described as Noonan syndrome with MGCL (of the mandible, the long bone…). The term cherubism should be used only when multiple giant cell lesions occur without any other clinical and molecular evidence of Noonan syndrome, with or without mutations of the SH3BP2 gene. PMID:19352411

  2. TFCat: the curated catalog of mouse and human transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Debra L; Sundararajan, Saravanan; Badis, Gwenael; Hughes, Timothy R; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Roach, Jared C; Sladek, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Unravelling regulatory programs governed by transcription factors (TFs) is fundamental to understanding biological systems. TFCat is a catalog of mouse and human TFs based on a reliable core collection of annotations obtained by expert review of the scientific literature. The collection, including proven and homology-based candidate TFs, is annotated within a function-based taxonomy and DNA-binding proteins are organized within a classification system. All data and user-feedback mechanisms are available at the TFCat portal . PMID:19284633

  3. Mouse Incisor Stem Cell Niche and Myb Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Svandova, E; Vesela, B; Smarda, J; Hampl, A; Radlanski, R J; Matalova, E

    2015-10-01

    Dental hard tissues are formed particularly by odontoblasts (dentin) and ameloblasts (enamel). Whereas the reparation of dentin is often observed, enamel does not regenerate in most species. However, in mouse incisor, a population of somatic stem cells in the cervical loop is responsible for the incisor regeneration. Understanding of the specificities of these cells is therefore of an interest in basic research as well as regenerative therapies. The Myb transcription factors are involved in essential cellular processes. B-Myb is often linked to the stem cell phenotype, and c-Myb expression marks undifferentiated and proliferating cells such as the stem cells. In the presented study, temporo-spatial expression of B-Myb and c-Myb proteins was correlated with localisation of putative somatic stem cells in the mouse incisor cervical loop by immunohistochemistry. B-Myb expression was localised mostly in the zone of transit-amplifying cells, and c-Myb was found in the inner enamel epithelium, the surrounding mesenchyme and in differentiated cells. Taken together, neither B-Myb nor c-Myb was exclusively present or abundant in the area of the incisor stem cell niche. Their distribution, however, supports recently reported novel functions of c-Myb in differentiation of hard tissue cells. PMID:25182175

  4. Constitutive expression of ciliary neurotrophic factor in mouse hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Severi, Ilenia; Carradori, Maria Rita; Lorenzi, Teresa; Amici, Adolfo; Cinti, Saverio; Giordano, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a potent survival molecule for a large number of neuronal and glial cells in culture; its expression in glial cells is strongly upregulated after a variety of nerve tissue injuries. Exogenously administered CNTF produces an anorectic effect via activation of hypothalamic neurons and stimulates neurogenesis in mouse hypothalamus. To determine whether CNTF is produced endogenously in the hypothalamus, we sought cellular sources and examined their distribution in adult mouse hypothalamus by immunohistochemistry. CNTF immunoreactivity (IR) was predominantly detected in the ependymal layer throughout the rostrocaudal extension of the third ventricle, where numerous ependymocytes and tanycytes exhibited specific staining. Some astrocytes in the grey matter of the anterior hypothalamus and in the median eminence of the hypothalamic tuberal region were also positive. Stimulation of cells bearing CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα) induces specific activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signalling system. Treatment with recombinant CNTF and detection of the nuclear expression of phospho-STAT3 (P-STAT3) showed that CNTF-producing ependymal cells and tanycytes were intermingled with, or very close to, P-STAT3-positive, CNTFRα-bearing cells. A fraction of CNTF-producing ependymal cells and tanycytes and some median eminence astrocytes also exhibited P-STAT3 IR. Thus, in normal adult mice the ependyma of the third ventricle is both a source of and a target for CNTF, which may play hitherto unknown roles in hypothalamic function in physiological conditions. PMID:22458546

  5. Mouse nerve growth factor gene: structure and expression.

    PubMed Central

    Selby, M J; Edwards, R; Sharp, F; Rutter, W J

    1987-01-01

    The organization and biologically significant sequences of the entire mouse nerve growth factor (NGF) gene have been determined. The gene spans 45 kilobases and contains several small 5' exons. Transcription of the gene results in four different mRNA species, which can be accounted for by alternative splicing and independent initiation from two promoters. These transcripts encode proteins which have divergent N termini and the NGF moiety at their C termini. The levels of the various NGF transcripts have been determined in different tissues and throughout postnatal development. We have also examined the expression of these transcripts in the brain in response to specific early sensory deprivation. The results suggest that the expression of NGF mRNA during postnatal development is regulated independently of the formation of complex neural networks. Images PMID:3670305

  6. Function of GATA Factors in the Adult Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Rena; Rebolledo-Jaramillo, Boris; Zong, Yiwei; Wang, Liqing; Russo, Pierre; Hancock, Wayne; Stanger, Ben Z.; Hardison, Ross C.; Blobel, Gerd A.

    2013-01-01

    GATA transcription factors and their Friend of Gata (FOG) cofactors control the development of diverse tissues. GATA4 and GATA6 are essential for the expansion of the embryonic liver bud, but their expression patterns and functions in the adult liver are unclear. We characterized the expression of GATA and FOG factors in whole mouse liver and purified hepatocytes. GATA4, GATA6, and FOG1 are the most prominently expressed family members in whole liver and hepatocytes. GATA4 chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) identified 4409 occupied sites, associated with genes enriched in ontologies related to liver function, including lipid and glucose metabolism. However, hepatocyte-specific excision of Gata4 had little impact on gross liver architecture and function, even under conditions of regenerative stress, and, despite the large number of GATA4 occupied genes, resulted in relatively few changes in gene expression. To address possible redundancy between GATA4 and GATA6, both factors were conditionally excised. Surprisingly, combined Gata4,6 loss did not exacerbate the phenotype resulting from Gata4 loss alone. This points to the presence of an unusually robust transcriptional network in adult hepatocytes that ensures the maintenance of liver function. PMID:24367609

  7. Tissue factor expression during human and mouse development.

    PubMed Central

    Luther, T.; Flössel, C.; Mackman, N.; Bierhaus, A.; Kasper, M.; Albrecht, S.; Sage, E. H.; Iruela-Arispe, L.; Grossmann, H.; Ströhlein, A.; Zhang, Y.; Nawroth, P. P.; Carmeliet, P.; Loskutoff, D. J.; Müller, M.

    1996-01-01

    In the adult organism the cellular distribution of tissue factor (TF) expression corresponds to biological boundary layers forming a hemostatic barrier ready to activate blood coagulation after tissue injury. Whether TF expression might also play a role in development is unknown. To determine the significance of TF in ontogenesis, we examined the pattern of TF expression in mouse development and compared it with the distribution of TF in human post-implantation embryos and fetuses of corresponding gestational age. At early embryonic periods of murine (6.5 and 7.5 pc) and human (stage 5) development, there was strong expression of TF in both ectodermal and entodermal cells. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that TF mRNA and protein were expressed widely in epithelial areas with high levels of morphogenic activity during organogenesis. Staining for TF was seen during ontogenetic development in tissues such as epidermis, myocardium, bronchial epithelium, and hepatocytes, which express TF in the adult organism. Surprisingly, during renal development and in adults, expression of TF differed between humans and mice. In humans, maturing stage glomeruli were stained for TF whereas in mice, TF was absent from glomeruli but was present in the epithelia of tubular segments. In neuroepithelial cells, there was a substantial expression of TF. Moreover, there was robust TF expression in tissues such as skeletal muscle and pancreas, which do not express it in the adult. In contrast, expression of the physiological ligand for TF, factor VII, was not detectable during early stages of human embryogenesis using immunohistochemistry. The temporal and spatial pattern of TF expression during murine and human development supports the contention that TF serves as an important morphogenic factor during embryogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8686734

  8. Leukemia inhibitory factor increases glucose uptake in mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Nina; O'Neill, Hayley M; Kleinert, Maximilian; Schjerling, Peter; Vernet, Erik; Steinberg, Gregory R; Richter, Erik A; Jørgensen, Sebastian B

    2015-07-15

    Members of the IL-6 family, IL-6 and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), have been shown to increase glucose uptake and fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle. However, the metabolic effects of another family member, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), are not well characterized. Effects of LIF on skeletal muscle glucose uptake and palmitate oxidation and signaling were investigated in ex vivo incubated mouse soleus and EDL muscles from muscle-specific AMPKα2 kinase-dead, muscle-specific SOCS3 knockout, and lean and high-fat-fed mice. Inhibitors were used to investigate involvement of specific signaling pathways. LIF increased muscle glucose uptake in dose (50-5,000 pM/l) and time-dependent manners with maximal effects at the 30-min time point. LIF increased Akt Ser(473) phosphorylation (P) in soleus and EDL, whereas AMPK Thr(172) P was unaffected. Incubation with parthenolide abolished LIF-induced glucose uptake and STAT3 Tyr(705) P, whereas incubation with LY-294002 and wortmannin suppressed both basal and LIF-induced glucose uptake and Akt Ser(473) P, indicating that JAK and PI 3-kinase signaling is required for LIF-stimulated glucose uptake. Incubation with rapamycin and AZD8055 indicated that mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC)2, but not mTORC1, also is required for LIF-stimulated glucose uptake. In contrast to CNTF, LIF stimulation did not alter palmitate oxidation. LIF-stimulated glucose uptake was maintained in EDL from obese insulin-resistant mice, whereas soleus developed LIF resistance. Lack of SOCS3 and AMPKα2 did not affect LIF-stimulated glucose uptake. In conclusion, LIF acutely increased muscle glucose uptake by a mechanism potentially involving the PI 3-kinase/mTORC2/Akt pathway and is not impaired in EDL muscle from obese insulin-resistant mice. PMID:25968579

  9. Mouse models of osteoarthritis: modelling risk factors and assessing outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hang; Beier, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent musculoskeletal disease that results in pain and low quality of life for patients, as well as enormous medical and socioeconomic burdens. The molecular mechanisms responsible for the initiation and progression of OA are still poorly understood. As such, mouse models of the disease are having increasingly important roles in OA research owing to the advancements of microsurgical techniques and the use of genetically modified mice, as well as the development of novel assessment tools. In this Review, we discuss available mouse models of OA and applicable assessment tools in studies of experimental OA. PMID:24662645

  10. Key factors in experimental mouse hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nevozhay, Dmitry; Opolski, Adam

    2006-01-01

    The first mouse model of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) was developed more than 50 years ago. HSCT is currently being widely used in a broad range of research areas, which include studies of the engraftment process, the pathogenesis of graft-versus-host disease and possible ways of its treatment and prophylaxis, attempts to use the graft-versus-leukemia/tumor effect in treating hematological and oncological malignancies, cancer vaccine development, induction of transplanted organ tolerance, and gene therapy. However, although this model is widely distributed, many laboratories use different protocols for the procedure. There are a number of papers discussing different HSCT protocols in clinical work, but no articles summarizing mouse laboratory models are available. This review attempts to bring together different details about HSCT in the mouse model, such as the types of transplantation, possible pretreatment regimens and their combinations, methods and sources of graft harvesting and preparation for the transplantation procedure, the influence of graft cell dose and content on the engraftment process, the transplantation method itself, possible complications, symptoms and techniques of their prophylaxis or treatment, as well as follow-up and engraftment assessment. We have also tried to reflect current knowledge of the biology of the engraftment. PMID:16868724

  11. Generation and gene expression profiling of 48 transcription-factor-inducible mouse embryonic stem cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yamamizu, Kohei; Sharov, Alexei A.; Piao, Yulan; Amano, Misa; Yu, Hong; Nishiyama, Akira; Dudekula, Dawood B.; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can differentiate into a wide range – and possibly all cell types in vitro, and thus provide an ideal platform to study systematically the action of transcription factors (TFs) in cell differentiation. Previously, we have generated and analyzed 137 TF-inducible mouse ESC lines. As an extension of this “NIA Mouse ESC Bank,” we generated and characterized 48 additional mouse ESC lines, in which single TFs in each line could be induced in a doxycycline-controllable manner. Together, with the previous ESC lines, the bank now comprises 185 TF-manipulable ESC lines (>10% of all mouse TFs). Global gene expression (transcriptome) profiling revealed that the induction of individual TFs in mouse ESCs for 48 hours shifts their transcriptomes toward specific differentiation fates (e.g., neural lineages by Myt1 Isl1, and St18; mesodermal lineages by Pitx1, Pitx2, Barhl2, and Lmx1a; white blood cells by Myb, Etv2, and Tbx6, and ovary by Pitx1, Pitx2, and Dmrtc2). These data also provide and lists of inferred target genes of each TF and possible functions of these TFs. The results demonstrate the utility of mouse ESC lines and their transcriptome data for understanding the mechanism of cell differentiation and the function of TFs. PMID:27150017

  12. Mechanical factors direct mouse aortic remodelling during early maturation.

    PubMed

    Le, Victoria P; Cheng, Jeffrey K; Kim, Jungsil; Staiculescu, Marius C; Ficker, Shawn W; Sheth, Saahil C; Bhayani, Siddharth A; Mecham, Robert P; Yanagisawa, Hiromi; Wagenseil, Jessica E

    2015-03-01

    Numerous diseases have been linked to genetic mutations that lead to reduced amounts or disorganization of arterial elastic fibres. Previous work has shown that mice with reduced amounts of elastin (Eln+/-) are able to live a normal lifespan through cardiovascular adaptations, including changes in haemodynamic stresses, arterial geometry and arterial wall mechanics. It is not known if the timeline and presence of these adaptations are consistent in other mouse models of elastic fibre disease, such as those caused by the absence of fibulin-5 expression (Fbln5-/-). Adult Fbln5-/- mice have disorganized elastic fibres, decreased arterial compliance and high blood pressure. We examined mechanical behaviour of the aorta in Fbln5-/- mice through early maturation when the elastic fibres are being assembled. We found that the physiologic circumferential stretch, stress and modulus of Fbln5-/- aorta are maintained near wild-type levels. Constitutive modelling suggests that elastin contributions to the total stress are decreased, whereas collagen contributions are increased. Understanding how collagen fibre structure and mechanics compensate for defective elastic fibres to meet the mechanical requirements of the maturing aorta may help to better understand arterial remodelling in human elastinopathies. PMID:25652465

  13. Transcriptional regulation of mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor/IL-3 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, C.S.; Vadas, M.A.; Cockerill, P.N.

    1995-07-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage (GM)-CSF and IL-3 are hemopoietic growth factors whose genes are closely linked in both humans and mice. In humans, the GM-CSF and IL-3 genes are regulated by a cyclosporin A-inhibitable enhancer located 3 kb upstream of the GM-CSF gene that is inducible by signals that mimic TCR activation. To search for a murine homologue of this enhancer we probed mouse genomic DNA and located a 400-bp element 2 kb upstream of the mouse GM-CSF gene that was 76% homologous with the human GM-CSF enhancer. Like the human GM-CSF enhancer, this element formed a cyclosporin A-inhibitable DNase I-hypersensitive site in the murine T cell line EL4 upon activation with phorbol ester and calcium ionophore. Transient transfection assays showed that this homologue of the human enhancer acted as an inducible enhancer of the thymidine kinase promoter, the mouse IL-3 promoter, and the human GM-CSF promoter. We observed, however, that the mouse GM-CSF promoter was significantly more active than the human GM-CSF promoter and found that it supported a level of activity equivalent to the combination of the human GM-CSF promoter and the human GM-CSF enhancer. Consequently, the activity of mouse GM-CSF promoter was not significantly elevated in the presence of the mouse GM-CSF enhancer. Because the mouse GM-CSF enhancer is considerably less active than its human homologue we suggest that the mouse GM-CSF gene has evolved with less dependence upon the upstream enhancer for its activation. 53 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Construction of a mouse model of factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, L.; Lawler, A.; Gearhart, J.

    1994-09-01

    To develop a small animal model of hemophilia A for gene therapy experiments, we set out to construct a mouse model for factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting. First, we screened a mouse liver cDNA library using a human FVIII cDNA probe. We cloned a 2.6 Kb partial mouse factor VIII cDNA which extends from 800 base pairs of the 3{prime} end of exon 14 to the 5{prime} end of exon 26. A mouse genomic library made from strain 129 was then screened to obtain genomic fragments covering the exons desired for homologous recombination. Two genomic clones were obtained, and one covering exon 15 through 22 was used for gene targeting. To make gene targeting constructs, a 5.8 Kb genomic DNA fragment covering exons 15 to 19 of the mouse FVIII gene was subcloned, and the neo expression cassette was inserted into exons 16 and 17 separately by different strategies. These two constructs were named MFVIIIC-16 and MFVIIIC-17. The constructs were linearized and transfected into strain 129 mouse ES cells by electroporation. Factor VIII gene-knockout ES cell lines were selected by G-418 and screened by genomic Southern blots. Eight exon 16 targeted cell lines and five exon 17 targeted cell lines were obtained. Three cell lines from each construct were injected into blastocysts and surgically transferred into foster mothers. Multiple chimeric mice with 70-90% hair color derived from the ES-cell genotype were seen with both constructs. Germ line transmission of the ES-cell genotype has been obtained for the MFVIIIC-16 construct, and multiple hemophilia A carrier females have been identified. Factor VIII-deficient males will be conceived soon.

  15. Polymorphism of normal factor IX detected by mouse monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Wallmark, A; Ljung, R; Nilsson, I M; Holmberg, L; Hedner, U; Lindvall, M; Sjögren, H O

    1985-01-01

    Hemophilia B is an X-chromosomal recessive disease due to deficiency of coagulation factor IX. Three monoclonal antibodies against factor IX were prepared and used to develop immunoradiometric assays (IRMAs) of factor IX antigen (IX-Ag). IX-Ag was measured in 65 normal individuals with one IRMA based on polyclonal anti-IX antibodies and two IRMAs based on three monoclonal anti-IX antibodies. One of the monoclonal antibodies differed in specificity since it neutralized less than 50% of the clotting activity of factor IX (IX-C), whereas the other two monoclonal antibodies neutralized 80-95%. When the former antibody was used as the solid phase in IRMA, two groups of normal individuals were distinguished: group A with measurable IX-Ag, and group B without demonstrable IX-Ag. There were no differences between the groups either in IX-C or in IX-Ag measured with polyclonal antibodies. A subgroup comprising only women could be distinguished in group A, in whom intermediate IX-Ag concentrations were found. Family studies showed the group B variant of normal factor IX to be transmitted according to the pattern of X-linked recessive inheritance. The allelic frequency of group A was 0.66, and that of group B was 0.34. PMID:3873655

  16. The ontogeny of epidermal growth factor receptors during mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, E.D.; Meek, J.

    1984-05-01

    In an attempt to understand the role(s) of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in vivo during murine development, we have examined the /sup 125/I-EGF binding characteristics of EGF-receptors in membrane preparations of tissues from the 12th day of gestation to parturition. Using autoradiography, the earliest time that we could detect EGF-receptors was on trophoblast cells cultured for 3 days as blastocyst outgrowths. Trophoblast eventually forms a large portion of the placenta, where EGF-receptors have long been recognized. We measured the number and affinity of EGF-receptors on tissues dissected from conceptuses from the 12th day of gestation in order to identify a stage when tissues may be most sensitive to EGF. Whereas the number of EGF receptors increases during gestation for all tissues examined, the affinity of the receptors declines for carcass and placenta and remains relatively unchanged for brain and liver. This suggests that EGF may function differently throughout development. Our hypothesis is that EGF (or its embryonic equivalent) initially stimulates proliferation in embryonic cells and then stimulates differentiation as the tissues mature. In the adult, its main role could be to stimulate tissue repair after damage.

  17. Reprogramming of mouse and human somatic cells by high-performance engineered factors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Chen, Jiekai; Hu, Jia-Lei; Wei, Xi-Xiao; Qin, Dajiang; Gao, Juan; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Jing; Li, Jin-Song; Liu, Jing; Lai, Ke-Yu; Kuang, Xia; Zhang, Jian; Pei, Duanqing; Xu, Guo-Liang

    2011-01-01

    Reprogramming somatic cells to become induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by using defined factors represents an important breakthrough in biology and medicine, yet remains inefficient and poorly understood. We therefore devised synthetic factors by fusing the VP16 transactivation domain to OCT4 (also known as Pou5f1), NANOG and SOX2, respectively. These synthetic factors could reprogramme both mouse and human fibroblasts with enhanced efficiency and accelerated kinetics. Remarkably, Oct4–VP16 alone could efficiently reprogramme mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) into germline-competent iPSCs. Furthermore, episomally delivered synthetic factors could reproducibly generate integration-free iPSCs from MEFs with enhanced efficiency. Our results not only demonstrate the feasibility of engineering more potent reprogramming factors, but also suggest that transcriptional reactivation of OCT4 target genes might be a rate-limiting step in the conversion of somatic cells to pluripotent cells. Synthetic factor-based reprogramming might lead to a paradigm shift in reprogramming research. PMID:21399616

  18. Factor in urinary extracts from pregnant women that inhibit mouse oocyte maturation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, R; Sakai, K; Sakurai, Y; Kohnoura, T; Ishiguro, M

    1993-01-01

    Mouse oocyte maturation inhibitory factors, on the basis of inhibitory activity of spontaneous germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) of denuded mouse oocytes in culture, were extracted and partially purified by reversed-phase resin adsorption and Sephadex G-100 and G-50 column chromatographies from the urine of pregnant women. Denuded oocytes obtained from ovaries of ICR mice underwent spontaneous GVBD by cultivation for 3 h in modified Krebs-Ringer's buffered solution, while this spontaneous GVBD was found to be inhibited by adding the final preparation (U-D-4) of urine. The inhibition was dose dependent, ranging from 0.6 to 10 micrograms protein/ml medium. Oocytes treated with U-D-4 and resuspended in control medium resumed GVBD. The molecular mass of U-D-4 was estimated to be less than 2,000 Da with gel filtration. Ether treatment failed to extract inhibitory factor(s) from U-D-4 and pepsin treatment inactivated U-D-4, indicating that inhibitory factor(s) in U-D-4 are peptide-like substances. The inhibitory effect of U-D-4 on spontaneous GVBD was partially reversed in the presence of naloxone, a potent opioid antagonist. U-D-4s obtained from urine samples of pregnant women, nonpregnant women, and men showed the inhibitory effect on spontaneous GVBD; however, the activity of U-D-4 obtained from pregnancy urine was significantly more potent than those of the other urine samples. PMID:8418810

  19. A functionally conserved Polycomb response element from mouse HoxD complex responds to heterochromatin factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasanthi, Dasari; Nagabhushan, A.; Matharu, Navneet Kaur; Mishra, Rakesh K.

    2013-10-01

    Anterior-posterior body axis in all bilaterians is determined by the Hox gene clusters that are activated in a spatio-temporal order. This expression pattern of Hox genes is established and maintained by regulatory mechanisms that involve higher order chromatin structure and Polycomb group (PcG) and trithorax group (trxG) proteins. We identified earlier a Polycomb response element (PRE) in the mouse HoxD complex that is functionally conserved in flies. We analyzed the molecular and genetic interactions of mouse PRE using Drosophila melanogaster and vertebrate cell culture as the model systems. We demonstrate that the repressive activity of this PRE depends on PcG/trxG genes as well as the heterochromatin components. Our findings indicate that a wide range of factors interact with the HoxD PRE that can contribute to establishing the expression pattern of homeotic genes in the complex early during development and maintain that pattern at subsequent stages.

  20. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) inhibits stimulated thyroid hormone secretion in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Ahren, B.

    1987-07-01

    It is known that epidermal growth factor (EGF) inhibits iodide uptake in the thyroid follicular cells and lowers plasma levels of thyroid hormones upon infusion into sheep and ewes. In this study, the effects of EGF on basal and stimulated thyroid hormone secretion were investigated in the mouse. Mice were pretreated with /sup 125/I and thyroxine; the subsequent release of /sup 125/I is an estimation of thyroid hormone secretion. It was found that basal radioiodine secretion was not altered by intravenous injection of EGF (5 micrograms/animal). However, the radioiodine secretion stimulated by both TSH (120 microU/animal) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP; 5 micrograms/animal) were inhibited by EGF (5 micrograms/animal). At a lower dose level (0.5 microgram/animal), EGF had no influence on stimulated radioiodine secretion. In conclusion, EGF inhibits stimulated thyroid hormone secretion in the mouse.

  1. p90Rsk is not involved in cytostatic factor arrest in mouse oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Julien; Umbhauer, Muriel; Rassinier, Pascale; Hanauer, André; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène

    2005-01-01

    Vertebrate oocytes arrest in metaphase of the second meiotic division (MII), where they maintain a high cdc2/cyclin B activity and a stable, bipolar spindle because of cytostatic factor (CSF) activity. The Mos–MAPK pathway is essential for establishing CSF. Indeed, oocytes from the mos−/− strain do not arrest in MII and activate without fertilization, as do Xenopus laevis oocytes injected with morpholino oligonucleotides directed against Mos. In Xenopus oocytes, p90Rsk (ribosomal S6 kinase), a MAPK substrate, is the main mediator of CSF activity. We show here that this is not the case in mouse oocytes. The injection of constitutively active mutant forms of Rsk1 and Rsk2 does not induce a cell cycle arrest in two-cell mouse embryos. Moreover, these two mutant forms do not restore MII arrest after their injection into mos−/− oocytes. Eventually, oocytes from the triple Rsk (1, 2, 3) knockout present a normal CSF arrest. We demonstrate that p90Rsk is not involved in the MII arrest of mouse oocytes. PMID:15837801

  2. Pluripotent State Induction in Mouse Embryonic Fibroblast Using mRNAs of Reprogramming Factors

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Ahmed Kamel; Zhang, Zhentao; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Zhiyong; Abbott, Louise C.; Zhang, Yani; Li, Bichun

    2014-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells has great potential to provide therapeutic treatments for a number of diseases as well as provide insight into mechanisms underlying early embryonic development. Improvement of induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) generation through mRNA-based methods is currently an area of intense research. This approach provides a number of advantages over previously used methods such as DNA integration and insertional mutagenesis. Using transfection of specifically synthesized mRNAs of various pluripotency factors, we generated iPSCs from mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells. The genetic, epigenetic and functional properties of the iPSCs were evaluated at different times during the reprogramming process. We successfully introduced synthesized mRNAs, which localized correctly inside the cells and exhibited efficient and stable translation into proteins. Our work demonstrated a robust up-regulation and a gradual promoter de-methylation of the pluripotency markers, including non-transfected factors such as Nanog, SSEA-1 (stage-specific embryonic antigen 1) and Rex-1 (ZFP-42, zinc finger protein 42). Using embryonic stem cells (ESCs) conditions to culture the iPS cells resulted in formation of ES-like colonies after approximately 12 days with only five daily repeated transfections. The colonies were positive for alkaline phosphatase and pluripotency-specific markers associated with ESCs. This study revealed the ability of pluripotency induction and generation of mouse mRNA induced pluripotent stem cells (mRNA iPSCs) using transfection of specifically synthesized mRNAs of various pluripotency factors into mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells. These generated iPSCs exhibited molecular and functional properties similar to ESCs, which indicate that this method is an efficient and viable alternative to ESCs and can be used for further biological, developmental and therapeutic investigations. PMID:25437916

  3. Structural characterization and chromosomal location of the mouse macrophage migration inhibitory factor gene and pseudogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Bozza, M.; Gerard, C.; Kolakowski, L.F. Jr.

    1995-06-10

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor, MIF, is a cytokine released by T-lymphocytes, macrophages, and the pituitary gland that serves to integrate peripheral and central inflammatory responses. Ubiquitous expression and developmental regulation suggest that MIF may have additional roles outside of the immune system. Here we report the structure and chromosomal location of the mouse Mif gene and the partial characterization of five Mif pseudogenes. The mouse Mif gene spans less than 0.7 kb of chromosomal DNA and is composed of three exons. A comparison between the mouse and the human genes shows a similar gene structure and common regulatory elements in both promoter regions. The mouse Mif gene maps to the middle region of chromosome 10, between Bcr and S100b, which have been mapped to human chromosomes 22q11 and 21q22.3, respectively. The entire sequence of two pseudogenes demonstrates the absence of introns, the presence of the 5{prime} untranslated region of the cDNA, a 3{prime} poly(A) tail, and the lack of sequence similarity with untranscribed regions of the gene. The five pseudogenes are highly homologous to the cDNA, but contain a variable number of mutations that would produce mutated or truncated MIF-like proteins. Phylogenetic analyses of MIF genes and pseudogenes indicate several independent genetic events that can account for multiple genomic integrations. Three of the Mif pseudogenes were also mapped by interspecific backcross to chromosomes 1, 9, and 17. These results suggest that Mif pseudogenes originated by retrotransposition. 46 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Molecular and functional analysis of mouse decay accelerating factor (CD55).

    PubMed Central

    Harris, C L; Rushmere, N K; Morgan, B P

    1999-01-01

    Molecular cloning of mouse decay accelerating factor (DAF; CD55) predicted two forms of the molecule, one transmembrane (TM) and the other glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored; these are encoded by separate genes termed Daf-GPI and Daf-TM. In the present study several additional isoforms of mouse DAF, generated by alternative splicing from these genes, are described. Northern-blot analysis of RNA and reverse transcriptase-PCR from various tissues indicated that spleen and testis expressed high levels of DAF, which comprised several species. These species were cloned and sequence analysis revealed various novel forms in addition to those previously reported. Two novel forms were derived from the Daf-TM gene but the transmembrane sequence defined previously was replaced by a unique GPI-anchor addition sequence; one clone also had part of the serine/threonine/proline (STP) region deleted. A third clone, encoding a transmembrane protein, was also derived from this gene but the entire STP region was deleted. A fourth clone, derived from the Daf-GPI gene, contained a novel C-terminal sequence, suggestive of a secreted form of the protein. Two DAF cDNAs (TM and GPI-anchored) were stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. When these cells were attacked with mouse or rat complement and analysed for C3b deposition, DAF-transfected cells had greatly reduced C3b deposition compared with controls. Transfection with DAF also conferred protection from complement in a cell-lysis assay, and a soluble, recombinant form of mouse DAF inhibited complement in a haemolytic assay. PMID:10417349

  5. Regulation of factor IXa in vitro in human and mouse plasma and in vivo in the mouse. Role of the endothelium and the plasma proteinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, H.E.; Trapp, H.G.; Griffith, M.J.; Roberts, H.R.; Pizzo, S.V.

    1984-06-01

    The regulation of human Factor IXa was studied in vitro in human and mouse plasma and in vivo in the mouse. In human plasma, approximately 60% of the /sup 125/I-Factor IXa was bound to antithrombin III (ATIII) by 2 h, with no binding to alpha 2-macroglobulin or alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor, as assessed by gel electrophoresis and IgG- antiproteinase inhibitor-Sepharose beads. In the presence of heparin, virtually 100% of the /sup 125/I-Factor IXa was bound to ATIII by 1 min. The distribution of /sup 125/I-Factor IXa in mouse plasma was similar. The clearance of /sup 125/I-Factor IXa was rapid (50% clearance in 2 min) and biphasic and was inhibited by large molar excesses of ATIII-thrombin and alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor-trypsin, but not alpha 2-macro-globulin-trypsin; it was also inhibited by large molar excesses of diisopropylphosphoryl - (DIP-) Factor Xa, DIP-thrombin, and Factor IX, but not by prothrombin or Factor X. The clearance of Factor IX was also rapid (50% clearance in 2.5 min) and was inhibited by a large molar excess of Factor IX, but not by large molar excesses of Factor X, prothrombin, DIP-Factor Xa, or DIP-thrombin. Electrophoresis and IgG- antiproteinase inhibitor-Sepharose bead studies confirmed that by 2 min after injection into the murine circulation, 60% of the /sup 125/I-Factor IXa was bound to ATIII. Organ distribution studies with /sup 125/I-Factor IXa demonstrated that most of the radioactivity was in the liver. These studies suggest that Factor IXa binds to at least two classes of binding sites on endothelial cells. One site apparently recognizes both Factors IX and IXa, but not Factor X, Factor Xa, prothrombin, or thrombin. The other site recognizes thrombin, Factor Xa, and Factor IXa, but not the zymogen forms of these clotting factors. After this binding, Factor IXa is bound to ATIII and the complex is cleared from the circulation by hepatocytes.

  6. Haem oxygenase modifies salinity tolerance in Arabidopsis by controlling K+ retention via regulation of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase and by altering SOS1 transcript levels in roots

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Jayakumar

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is a common denominator in a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses, including salinity. In recent years, haem oxygenase (HO; EC 1.14.99.3) has been described as an important component of the antioxidant defence system in both mammalian and plant systems. Moreover, a recent report on Arabidopsis demonstrated that HO overexpression resulted in an enhanced salinity tolerance in this species. However, physiological mechanisms and downstream targets responsible for the observed salinity tolerance in these HO mutants remain elusive. To address this gap, ion transport characteristics (K+ and H+ fluxes and membrane potentials) and gene expression profiles in the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana HO-overexpressing (35S:HY1-1/2/3/4) and loss-of-function (hy-100, ho2, ho3, and ho4) mutants were compared during salinity stress. Upon acute salt stress, HO-overexpressing mutants retained more K+ (less efflux), and exhibited better membrane potential regulation (maintained more negative potential) and higher H+ efflux activity in root epidermis, compared with loss-of-function mutants. Pharmacological experiments suggested that high activity of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase in HO overexpressor mutants provided the proton-motive force required for membrane potential maintenance and, hence, better K+ retention. The gene expression analysis after 12h and 24h of salt stress revealed high expression levels of H+-ATPases (AHA1/2/3) and Na+/H+ antiporter [salt overly sensitive1 (SOS1)] transcripts in the plasma membrane of HO overexpressors. It is concluded that HO modifies salinity tolerance in Arabidopsis by controlling K+ retention via regulation of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase and by altering SOS1 transcript levels in roots. PMID:23307916

  7. Blocking macrophage migration inhibitory factor activity alleviates mouse acute otitis media in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Xu, Min; Zheng, Qingyin; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Weijun; Zhang, Zhaoqiang

    2014-11-01

    This study was to investigate the role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in mouse acute otitis media (AOM), we hypothesize that blocking MIF activity will relieve mouse AOM. A mouse AOM model was constructed by injecting lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into the middle ear of C57BL/6 mice through the tympanic membrane (TM). MIF levels were measured by real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and ELISA after LPS application. Normal or AOM mice were given PBS or ISO-1 (MIF antagonist) every day for 10 days and the hearing levels were determined by measuring auditory brainstem response (ABR) threshold. After the ABR test finished, H&E staining was conducted and the inflammation was also measured by detecting interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels with RT-PCR and ELISA. TLR-4 expression was determined by western blotting and NF-κB activation was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Compared with the normal control, MIF levels in the middle ear of LPS-induced AOM mice were significant increased. The ABR results showed that mean ABR thresholds in ISO-1 treated AOM mice were significantly reduced compared with PBS treated AOM mice since day 7, indicating that ISO-1 treatment potentially improved the hearing levels of AOM mice. H&E staining showed that ISO-1 treatment could reduce the mucosal thickness of AOM mice. In ISO-1 treated mice, TLR-4 expression and levels of IL-1β, TNF-α and VEGF were significantly lower compared with PBS treated AOM mice. ISO-1 treatment also significantly inhibited NF-κB activation in AOM mice compared with PBS treated AOM mice. These results suggested that blocking the activity of MIF by ISO-1 could reduce the inflammation in AOM mice in which process TLR-4 and NF-κB were involved. The reduction in MIF activity is conducive to alleviate mouse AOM, which may serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of AOM. PMID:25108100

  8. Structural organization and chromosomal assignment of the mouse embryonic TEA domain-containing factor (ETF) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kazuo; Yasunami, Michio; Matsuda, Yoichi

    1996-09-01

    Embryonic TEA domain-containing factor (ETF) belongs to the family of proteins structurally related to transcriptional enhancer factor-1 (TEF-1) and is implicated in neural development. Isolation and characterization of the cosmid clones encoding the mouse ETF gene (Etdf) revealed that Etdf spans approximately 17.9 kb and consists of 12 exons. The exon-intron structure of Etdf closely resembles that of the Drosophila scalloped gene, indicating that these genes may have evolved from a common ancestor. Then multiple transcription initiation sites revealed by S1 protection and primer extension analyses are consistent with the absence of the canonical TATA and CAAT boxes in the 5{prime}-flanking region, which contains many potential regulatory sequences, such as the E-box, N-box, Sp1 element, GATA-1 element, TAATGARAT element, and B2 short interspersed element (SINE) as well as several direct and inverted repeat sequences. The Etdf locus was assigned to the proximal region of mouse chromosome 7 using fluorescence in situ hybridization and linkage mapping analyses. These results provide the molecular basis for studying the regulation, in vivo function, and evolution of Etdf. 29 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Influence of some methodological factors on the radiosensitivity of the mouse zygote

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquet, P.; Grinfeld, S. )

    1990-10-01

    The experiments reported here were undertaken to investigate the influence of some methodological factors on the radiosensitivity of the mouse zygote. The following factors were studied: (1) the use of natural or hormone-stimulated ovulation; (2) the procedure followed for fertilization:mating overnight, or only during a short period in the morning after all oocytes have been ovulated, in vitro fertilization; (3) the type of irradiation, i.e., in vivo or in vitro irradiation. The radiosensitivity of the zygotes was estimated under the different experimental conditions by measuring the ability of the irradiated embryos to cleave and to develop further to the blastocyst stage. Our results suggest that the protocols used for mating and fertilization probably have a greater influence on embryonic survival following irradiation than the use of gonadotropins to stimulate ovulation. The highest degree of synchrony in the development of the embryos is achieved by restricting mating to a short period or by using in vitro fertilization. The very low LD50s obtained under such synchronous conditions confirm the high radiosensitivity of the mouse zygote at the early pronuclear stage. Comparison between the effects of in vivo and in vitro irradiation does not indicate a greater radiosensitivity of the embryo irradiated in vitro in comparison to the embryo irradiated in vivo.

  10. Inhibition of neoplastic development in the liver by hepatocyte growth factor in a transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed Central

    Santoni-Rugiu, E; Preisegger, K H; Kiss, A; Audolfsson, T; Shiota, G; Schmidt, E V; Thorgeirsson, S S

    1996-01-01

    Overexpression of the c-myc oncogene is associated with a variety of both human and experimental tumors, and cooperation of other oncogenes and growth factors with the myc family are critical in the evolution of the malignant phenotype. The interaction of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) with c-myc during hepatocarcinogenesis in a transgenic mouse model has been analyzed. While sustained overexpression of c-myc in the liver leads to cancer, coexpression of HGF and c-myc in the liver delayed the appearance of preneoplastic lesions and prevented malignant conversion. Furthermore, tumor promotion by phenobarbital was completely inhibited in the c-myc/HGF double transgenic mice, whereas phenobarbital was an effective tumor promoter in the c-myc single transgenic mice. The results indicate that HGF may function as a tumor suppressor during early stages of liver carcinogenesis, and suggest the possibility of therapeutic application for this cytokine. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8790372

  11. Direct conversion of mouse and human fibroblasts to functional melanocytes by defined factors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruifeng; Zheng, Ying; Li, Ling; Liu, Shujing; Burrows, Michelle; Wei, Zhi; Nace, Arben; Herlyn, Meenhard; Cui, Rutao; Guo, Wei; Cotsarelis, George; Xu, Xiaowei

    2014-01-01

    Direct reprogramming provides a fundamentally new approach for the generation of patient-specific cells. Here, by screening a pool of candidate transcription factors, we identify that a combination of the three factors, MITF, SOX10 and PAX3, directly converts mouse and human fibroblasts to functional melanocytes. Induced melanocytes (iMels) activate melanocyte-specific networks, express components of pigment production and delivery system and produce melanosomes. Human iMels properly integrate into the dermal-epidermal junction and produce and deliver melanin pigment to surrounding keratinocytes in a 3D organotypic skin reconstruct. Human iMels generate pigmented epidermis and hair follicles in skin reconstitution assays in vivo. The generation of iMels has important implications for studies of melanocyte lineage commitment, pigmentation disorders and cell replacement therapies. PMID:25510211

  12. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor prevents dendritic retraction of adult mouse retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Binley, Kate E; Ng, Wai S; Barde, Yves-Alain; Song, Bing; Morgan, James E

    2016-08-01

    We used cultured adult mouse retinae as a model system to follow and quantify the retraction of dendrites using diolistic labelling of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) following explantation. Cell death was monitored in parallel by nuclear staining as 'labelling' with RGC and apoptotic markers was inconsistent and exceedingly difficult to quantify reliably. Nuclear staining allowed us to delineate a lengthy time window during which dendrite retraction can be monitored in the absence of RGC death. The addition of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) produced a marked reduction in dendritic degeneration, even when application was delayed for 3 days after retinal explantation. These results suggest that the delayed addition of trophic factors may be functionally beneficial before the loss of cell bodies in the course of conditions such as glaucoma. PMID:27285957

  13. Direct conversion of mouse and human fibroblasts to functional melanocytes by defined factors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruifeng; Zheng, Ying; Li, Ling; Liu, Shujing; Burrows, Michelle; Wei, Zhi; Nace, Arben; Herlyn, Meenhard; Cui, Rutao; Guo, Wei; Cotsarelis, George; Xu, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Direct reprogramming provides a fundamentally new approach for the generation of patient-specific cells. Here, by screening a pool of candidate transcription factors, we identify that a combination of three factors, MITF, SOX10 and PAX3, directly converts mouse and human fibroblasts to functional melanocytes. Induced melanocytes (iMels) activate melanocyte-specific networks, express components of pigment production and delivery system, and produce melanosomes. Human iMels properly integrate into the dermal-epidermal junction, and produce and deliver melanin pigment to surrounding keratinocytes in a 3D organotypic skin reconstruct. Human iMels generate pigmented epidermis and hair follicles in skin reconstitution assays in vivo. The generation of iMels has important implications for studies of melanocyte lineage commitment, pigmentation disorders and cell replacement therapies. PMID:25510211

  14. Recombinant insulin-like growth factor-1 activates satellite cells in the mouse urethral rhabdosphincter

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The goal of this study is to demonstrate the efficacy of a new method for the treatment of urinary incontinence by stimulation of urethral rhabdosphincter satellite cells. We show that satellite cells do exist in the sphincter muscle of retired male mice breeders by staining for c-Met, a satellite cell specific protein. Once activated by recombinant mouse Insulin-like Growth Factor-1(rIgf-1), the satellite cells develop into muscle cells within the rhabdosphincter thereby potentially strengthening it. Methods 20 μl (1 μg/μl) of rIgf-1 was surgically injected directly into the urethral wall of retired male mouse breeders. Mice injected with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were used as controls. 4 weeks later, urethras were harvested and serially-sectioned through the sphincter for routine hematoxylin-eosin staining as well as immunohistochemical staining with satellite cell specific anti-c-Met antibody and proliferation specific anti-Ki-67 antibody. Results Anti-c-Met antibody positive cells (c-Met+) were identified in the rhabdosphincter. c-Met+ cells increased by 161.8% relative to controls four weeks after rIGF-1 injection. Anti- Ki-67 antibody positive cells were identified and characterized as cells with centrally located nuclei in striated muscle bundles of rIGF-1 treated animals. Conclusions Satellite cells in the mouse rhabdosphincter can be activated by rIGF-1 treatment, which subsequently are incorporated into existing skeletal muscle bundles. Using this approach, the rhabdosphincter can be induced to regenerate and potentially strengthen via satellite cell activation and likely improve urinary continence. PMID:24279352

  15. Factors affecting computer mouse use for young children: implications for AAC.

    PubMed

    Costigan, F Aileen; Light, Janice C; Newell, Karl M

    2012-06-01

    More than 12% of preschoolers receiving special education services have complex communication needs, including increasing numbers of children who do not have significant motor impairments (e.g., children with autism spectrum disorders, Down syndrome, etc.). In order to meet their diverse communication needs (e.g., face-to-face, written, Internet, telecommunication), these children may use mainstream technologies accessed via the mouse, yet little is known about factors that affect the mouse performance of young children. This study used a mixed factorial design to investigate the effects of age, target size, and angle of approach on accuracy and time required for accurate target selection with a mouse for 20 3-year-old and 20 4-year-old children. The 4-year-olds were generally more accurate and faster than the 3-year-olds. Target size and angle mediated differences in performance within age groups. The 3-year-olds were more accurate and faster in selecting the medium and large targets relative to the small target, were faster in selecting the large relative to the medium target, and were faster in selecting targets along the vertical relative to the diagonal angle. The 4-year-olds were faster in selecting the medium and large targets relative to the small target. Implications for improving access to AAC include the preliminary suggestion of age-related threshold target sizes that support sufficient accuracy, the possibility of efficiency benefits when target size is increased up to an age-related threshold, and identification of the potential utility of the vertical angle as a context for training navigational input device use. PMID:22670726

  16. Pol β associated complex and base excision repair factors in mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajendra; Williams, Jason G; Hou, Esther W; Wilson, Samuel H

    2012-12-01

    During mammalian base excision repair (BER) of lesion-containing DNA, it is proposed that toxic strand-break intermediates generated throughout the pathway are sequestered and passed from one step to the next until repair is complete. This stepwise process is termed substrate channeling. A working model evaluated here is that a complex of BER factors may facilitate the BER process. FLAG-tagged DNA polymerase (pol) β was expressed in mouse fibroblasts carrying a deletion in the endogenous pol β gene, and the cell extract was subjected to an 'affinity-capture' procedure using anti-FLAG antibody. The pol β affinity-capture fraction (ACF) was found to contain several BER factors including polymerase-1, X-ray cross-complementing factor1-DNA ligase III and enzymes involved in processing 3'-blocked ends of BER intermediates, e.g. polynucleotide kinase and tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1. In contrast, DNA glycosylases, apurinic/aprymidinic endonuclease 1 and flap endonuclease 1 and several other factors involved in BER were not present. Some of the BER factors in the pol β ACF were in a multi-protein complex as observed by sucrose gradient centrifugation. The pol β ACF was capable of substrate channeling for steps in vitro BER and was proficient in in vitro repair of substrates mimicking a 3'-blocked topoisomerase I covalent intermediate or an oxidative stress-induced 3'-blocked intermediate. PMID:23042675

  17. Connective tissue growth factor/CCN2-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts retain intact transforming growth factor-{beta} responsiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Yasuji; Hinchcliff, Monique; Wu, Minghua; Warner-Blankenship, Matthew; Lyons, Karen M.

    2008-03-10

    Background: The matricellular protein connective tissue growth factor (CCN2) has been implicated in pathological fibrosis, but its physiologic role remains elusive. In vitro, transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) induces CCN2 expression in mesenchymal cells. Because CCN2 can enhance profibrotic responses elicited by TGF-{beta}, it has been proposed that CCN2 functions as an essential downstream signaling mediator for TGF-{beta}. To explore this notion, we characterized TGF-{beta}-induced activation of fibroblasts from CCN2-null (CCN2{sup -/-}) mouse embryos. Methods: The regulation of CCN2 expression was examined in vivo in a model of fibrosis induced by bleomycin. Cellular TGF-{beta} signal transduction and regulation of collagen gene expression were examined in CCN2{sup -/-} MEFs by immunohistochemistry, Northern, Western and RT-PCR analysis, immunocytochemistry and transient transfection assays. Results: Bleomycin-induced skin fibrosis in the mouse was associated with substantial CCN2 up-regulation in lesional fibroblasts. Whereas in vitro proliferation rate of CCN2{sup -/-} MEFs was markedly reduced compared to wild type MEFs, TGF-{beta}-induced activation of the Smad pathways, including Smad2 phosphorylation, Smad2/3 and Smad4 nuclear accumulation and Smad-dependent transcriptional responses, were unaffected by loss of CCN2. The stimulation of COL1A2 and fibronectin mRNA expression and promoter activity, and of corresponding protein levels, showed comparable time and dose-response in wild type and CCN2{sup -/-} MEFs, whereas stimulation of alpha smooth muscle actin and myofibroblast transdifferentiation showed subtle impairment in MEFs lacking CCN2. Conclusion: Whereas endogenous CCN2 plays a role in regulation of proliferation and TGF-{beta}-induced myofibroblast transdifferentiation, it appears to be dispensable for Smad-dependent stimulation of collagen and extracellular matrix synthesis in murine embryonic fibroblasts.

  18. Recombinant Human Epidermal Growth Factor Accelerates Recovery of Mouse Small Intestinal Mucosa After Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kang Kyoo; Jo, Hyang Jeong; Hong, Joon Pio; Lee, Sang-wook Sohn, Jung Sook; Moon, Soo Young; Yang, Sei Hoon; Shim, Hyeok; Lee, Sang Ho; Ryu, Seung-Hee; Moon, Sun Rock

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether systemically administered recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) accelerates the recovery of mouse small intestinal mucosa after irradiation. Methods and Materials: A mouse mucosal damage model was established by administering radiation to male BALB/c mice with a single dose of 15 Gy applied to the abdomen. After irradiation, rhEGF was administered subcutaneously at various doses (0.04, 0.2, 1.0, and 5.0 mg/kg/day) eight times at 2- to 3-day intervals. The evaluation methods included histologic changes of small intestinal mucosa, change in body weight, frequency of diarrhea, and survival rate. Results: The recovery of small intestinal mucosa after irradiation was significantly improved in the mice treated with a high dose of rhEGF. In the mice that underwent irradiation without rhEGF treatment, intestinal mucosal ulceration, mucosal layer damage, and severe inflammation occurred. The regeneration of villi was noticeable in mice treated with more than 0.2 mg/kg rhEGF, and the villi recovered fully in mice given more than 1 mg/kg rhEGF. The frequency of diarrhea persisting for more than 3 days was significantly greater in the radiation control group than in the rhEGF-treated groups. Conclusions: Systemic administration of rhEGF accelerates recovery from mucosal damage induced by irradiation. We suggest that rhEGF treatment shows promise for the reduction of small intestinal damage after irradiation.

  19. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF.

    PubMed

    Olleros, Maria L; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A; Drutskaya, Marina S; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Garcia, Irene

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF. PMID:26123801

  20. Transcription Factors Expressed in Mouse Cochlear Inner and Outer Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Liu, Huizhan; Barta, Cody L.; Judge, Paul D.; Zhao, Lidong; Zhang, Weiping J.; Gong, Shusheng; Beisel, Kirk W.; He, David Z. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression is essential to determining the functional complexity and morphological diversity seen among different cells. Transcriptional regulation is a crucial step in gene expression regulation because the genetic information is directly read from DNA by sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs). Although several mouse TF databases created from genome sequences and transcriptomes are available, a cell type-specific TF database from any normal cell populations is still lacking. We identify cell type-specific TF genes expressed in cochlear inner hair cells (IHCs) and outer hair cells (OHCs) using hair cell-specific transcriptomes from adult mice. IHCs and OHCs are the two types of sensory receptor cells in the mammalian cochlea. We show that 1,563 and 1,616 TF genes are respectively expressed in IHCs and OHCs among 2,230 putative mouse TF genes. While 1,536 are commonly expressed in both populations, 73 genes are differentially expressed (with at least a twofold difference) in IHCs and 13 are differentially expressed in OHCs. Our datasets represent the first cell type-specific TF databases for two populations of sensory receptor cells and are key informational resources for understanding the molecular mechanism underlying the biological properties and phenotypical differences of these cells. PMID:26974322

  1. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF

    PubMed Central

    Olleros, Maria L.; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L.; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A.; Drutskaya, Marina S.; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V.; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F. J.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF. PMID:26123801

  2. Hormonal regulation of epidermal growth factor and protease in the submandibular gland of the adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Gresik, E W; Schenkein, I; van der Noen, H; Barka, T

    1981-09-01

    The structure of the granular convoluted tubules of the mouse submandibular gland is influenced by androgens, adrenal steroids, and thyroid hormones. We wished to investigate the effects of variations in hormonal status on the quantitative and qualitative distribution of two secretory products of these tubules, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and protease. The effects of the thyroid and adrenal glands on EGF content and protease activity of the submandibular glands of adult female mice were studied by RIAs (EGF), enzyme assays (protease), and immunocytochemical methods. In animals rendered chronically hypothyroid by propylthiouracil (4 months) or in animals which were adrenalectomized and ovariectomized (3 weeks), protease activity and EGF levels were reduced by 81-97%. The administration of testosterone induced these polypeptides even in hypothyroid animals. Daily administration of L-T4 (T4; 1 micrograms/g BW) for 7 days increased EGF and protease activity 3.6-fold in intact mice and reversed the effect of hypothyroidism. EGF and protease were also induced by T4 in adrenalectomized and ovariectomized mice, although to a lesser degree than in intact animals. Immunocytochemical stainings of submandibular glands indicated that the number of granular convoluted tubule cells immunoreactive for EGF correlated with the levels of EGF determined by RIAs. With respect to immunostaining for protease, such a correlation was not observed. The data indicate multihormonal regulation of EGF and protease in the mouse submandibular gland. PMID:7021131

  3. Transcription Factors Expressed in Mouse Cochlear Inner and Outer Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Liu, Huizhan; Barta, Cody L; Judge, Paul D; Zhao, Lidong; Zhang, Weiping J; Gong, Shusheng; Beisel, Kirk W; He, David Z Z

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression is essential to determining the functional complexity and morphological diversity seen among different cells. Transcriptional regulation is a crucial step in gene expression regulation because the genetic information is directly read from DNA by sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs). Although several mouse TF databases created from genome sequences and transcriptomes are available, a cell type-specific TF database from any normal cell populations is still lacking. We identify cell type-specific TF genes expressed in cochlear inner hair cells (IHCs) and outer hair cells (OHCs) using hair cell-specific transcriptomes from adult mice. IHCs and OHCs are the two types of sensory receptor cells in the mammalian cochlea. We show that 1,563 and 1,616 TF genes are respectively expressed in IHCs and OHCs among 2,230 putative mouse TF genes. While 1,536 are commonly expressed in both populations, 73 genes are differentially expressed (with at least a twofold difference) in IHCs and 13 are differentially expressed in OHCs. Our datasets represent the first cell type-specific TF databases for two populations of sensory receptor cells and are key informational resources for understanding the molecular mechanism underlying the biological properties and phenotypical differences of these cells. PMID:26974322

  4. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Specific Nanoprobe Biodistribution in Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher L D; Fashir, Samia B; Castilho, Maiara L; Hupman, Michael A; Raniero, Leandro J; Alwayn, Ian; Hewitt, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology offers a targeted approach to both imaging and treatment of cancer, the leading cause of death worldwide. Previous studies have found that nanoparticles with a wide variety of coatings initiate an immune response leading to sequestration in the liver and spleen. In an effort to find a nanoparticle platform which does not elicit an immune response, we created 43 nm and 44 nm of gold and silver nanoparticles coated with biomolecules normally produced by the body, α-lipoic acid and the epidermal growth factor (EGF), and have used mass spectroscopy to determine their biodistribution in mouse models, 24 h after tail vein injection. Relative to controls, mouse EGF (mEGF)-coated silver and gold nanoprobes are found at background levels in all organs including the liver and spleen. The lack of sequestration of mEGF-coated nanoprobes in the liver and spleen and the corresponding uptake of control nanoprobes at elevated levels in these organs suggest that the former are not recognized by the immune system. Further studies of cytokine and interleukin levels in the blood are required to confirm avoidance of an immune response. PMID:26852838

  5. Hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor modulates surfactant protein B and C expression in mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Tong, Qiangsong; Zheng, Liduan; Dodd-o, Jeffrey; Langer, John; Wang, Danming; Li, Dechun

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a robust pulmonary expression of hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor (HIMF) during the perinatal period, when surfactant protein (SP) synthesis begins. We hypothesized that HIMF modulates SP expression and participates in lung development and maturation. The temporal-spatial expression of HIMF, SP-B, and SP-C in developing mouse lungs was examined by immunohistochemical staining, Western blot, and RT-PCR. The expression and localization of SP-B and SP-C were investigated in mouse lungs after intratracheal instillation of HIMF in adult mice. The effects of HIMF on SP-B and SP-C transcription activity, and on mRNA degradation, were investigated in mouse lung epithelial (MLE)-12 and C10 cells using the promoter-luciferase reporter assay and actinomycin D incubation. The activation of Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase was explored by Western blot. Intratracheal instillation of HIMF resulted in significant increases of SP-B and SP-C production, predominantly localized to alveolar type II cells. In MLE-12 and C10 cells, HIMF enhanced SP-B and SP-C mRNA levels in a dose-dependent manner. Meanwhile, HIMF increased transcription activity and prevented actinomycin D-facilitated SP-B and SP-C mRNA degradation in MLE-12 cells. Incubation of cells with LY294002, PD098059, or U0126 abolished HIMF-induced Akt and ERK1/2 phosphorylation and suppressed HIMF-induced SP-B and SP-C production, whereas SB203580 had no effect. These results indicate that HIMF induces SP-B and SP-C production in mouse lungs and alveolar type II-like cell lines via activations of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt and ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase, suggesting that HIMF plays critical roles in lung development and maturation. PMID:16166744

  6. Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) inhibits thyroid hormone secretion in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Ahren, B. )

    1990-01-01

    Recently, thyroid follicular cells were shown to exhibit atrial natriuretic factor (ANF)-like immunoreactivity and high affinity ANF receptors. In this study, we therefore examined the effects of synthetic rat ANF{sub 1-28} on basal and stimulated thyroid hormone secretion in the mouse, according to the McKenzie technique. Iodine deficient mice were pretreated with {sup 125}I and thyroxine. ANF (3 nmol/animal) was found to inhibit the increase in blood radioiodine levels that was induced by TSH or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). Furthermore, ANF and norepinephrine additively inhibited the TSH-induced increase in blood radioiodine levels. It is concluded that ANF inhibits thyroid hormone secretion, which, therefore, might be locally regulated by intrathyroidal ANF.

  7. Effects of angiopoietin-1 on vascular endothelial growth factor-induced angiogenesis in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Shwe, Y; Du, R; Chen, Y; Shen, F X; Young, W L; Yang, G Y

    2006-01-01

    A better understanding of angiogenic factors and their effects on angiogenesis in brain is necessary to treat cerebral vascular disorders such as ischemic brain injury. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induces angiogenesis and increases blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in adult mouse brain. The effect of angiopoietin-1 on BBB leakage during the angiogenesis process is unclear. We sought to identify the effects of combining VEGF with angiopoietin-1 on cerebral angiogenesis and BBB. Adult male CD-1 mice underwent AdFc (adenoviral vector control), AdAng-1, VEGF protein, VEGF protein plus AdAng-1, or saline (negative control) injection. Brain microvessels were counted using lectin staining on tissue sections after 2 weeks of adenoviral gene transfer. The presence of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) was determined by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Microvessel count and augmented capillary diameter increased in mice treated with either VEGF protein or AdAng-1 plus VEGF protein compared to saline, AdFc, or AdAng-1 alone (p < 0.05). Double-labeled immunostaining demonstrated that ZO-1-positive staining was more complete on the microvessel wall in the AdAng-1 and AdAng-1 plus VEGF protein treated group compared to VEGF protein group. The results of ZO-1 expression from Western blot analysis paralleled that from immunohistochemistry (p < 0.05). We conclude that focal VEGF and angiopoietin-1 hyperstimulation in mouse brain increases microvessel density while maintaining ZO-1 protein expression, suggesting that angiopoietin-1 plays a role in synergistically inducing angiogenesis and BBB integrity. PMID:16671501

  8. Overexpression of gankyrin in mouse hepatocytes induces hemangioma by suppressing factor inhibiting hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (FIH-1) and activating hypoxia-inducible factor-1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Higashitsuji, Hiroaki; Higashitsuji, Hisako; Itoh, Katsuhiko; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Koike, Kazuhiko; Hirota, Kiichi; Fukumoto, Manabu; Fujita, Jun

    2013-03-01

    Gankyrin (also called p28 or PSMD10) is an oncoprotein commonly overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinomas. It consists of 7 ankyrin repeats and interacts with multiple proteins including Rb, Cdk4, MDM2 and NF-κB. To assess the oncogenic activity in vivo, we produced transgenic mice that overexpress gankyrin specifically in the hepatocytes. Unexpectedly, 5 of 7 F2 transgenic mice overexpressing hepatitis B virus X protein (HBX) promoter-driven gankyrin, and one of 3 founder mice overexpressing serum amyloid P component (SAP) promoter-driven gankyrin developed hepatic vascular neoplasms (hemangioma/hemangiosarcomas) whereas none of the wild-type mice did. Endothelial overgrowth was more frequent in the livers of diethylnitrosamine-treated transgenic mice than wild-type mice. Mouse hepatoma Hepa1-6 cells overexpressing gankyrin formed tumors with more vascularity than parental Hepa1-6 cells in the transplanted mouse skin. We found that gankyrin binds to and sequester factor inhibiting hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (FIH-1), which results in decreased interaction between FIH-1 and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and increased activity of HIF-1 to promote VEGF production. The effects of gankyrin were more prominent under 3% O2 than 1% or 20% O2 conditions. Thus, the present study clarified, at least partly, mechanisms of vascular tumorigenesis, and suggests that gankyrin might play a physiological role in hypoxic responses besides its roles as an oncoprotein. PMID:23376718

  9. Transcription Factor RFX2 Is a Key Regulator of Mouse Spermiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yujian; Hu, Xiangjing; Li, Zhen; Wang, Min; Li, Sisi; Wang, Xiuxia; Lin, Xiwen; Liao, Shangying; Zhang, Zhuqiang; Feng, Xue; Wang, Si; Cui, Xiuhong; Wang, Yanling; Gao, Fei; Hess, Rex A.; Han, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    The regulatory factor X (RFX) family of transcription factors is crucial for ciliogenesis throughout evolution. In mice, Rfx1-4 are highly expressed in the testis where flagellated sperm are produced, but the functions of these factors in spermatogenesis remain unknown. Here, we report the production and characterization of the Rfx2 knockout mice. The male knockout mice were sterile due to the arrest of spermatogenesis at an early round spermatid step. The Rfx2-null round spermatids detached from the seminiferous tubules, forming large multinucleated giant cells that underwent apoptosis. In the mutants, formation of the flagellum was inhibited at its earliest stage. RNA-seq analysis identified a large number of cilia-related genes and testis-specific genes that were regulated by RFX2. Many of these genes were direct targets of RFX2, as revealed by chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR assays. These findings indicate that RFX2 is a key regulator of the post-meiotic development of mouse spermatogenic cells. PMID:26853561

  10. Transcription Factor RFX2 Is a Key Regulator of Mouse Spermiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yujian; Hu, Xiangjing; Li, Zhen; Wang, Min; Li, Sisi; Wang, Xiuxia; Lin, Xiwen; Liao, Shangying; Zhang, Zhuqiang; Feng, Xue; Wang, Si; Cui, Xiuhong; Wang, Yanling; Gao, Fei; Hess, Rex A; Han, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    The regulatory factor X (RFX) family of transcription factors is crucial for ciliogenesis throughout evolution. In mice, Rfx1-4 are highly expressed in the testis where flagellated sperm are produced, but the functions of these factors in spermatogenesis remain unknown. Here, we report the production and characterization of the Rfx2 knockout mice. The male knockout mice were sterile due to the arrest of spermatogenesis at an early round spermatid step. The Rfx2-null round spermatids detached from the seminiferous tubules, forming large multinucleated giant cells that underwent apoptosis. In the mutants, formation of the flagellum was inhibited at its earliest stage. RNA-seq analysis identified a large number of cilia-related genes and testis-specific genes that were regulated by RFX2. Many of these genes were direct targets of RFX2, as revealed by chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR assays. These findings indicate that RFX2 is a key regulator of the post-meiotic development of mouse spermatogenic cells. PMID:26853561

  11. The effect of epidermal growth factor on neonatal incisor differentiation in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Topham, R T; Chiego, D J; Gattone, V H; Hinton, D A; Klein, R M

    1987-12-01

    The effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on cellular differentiation of the neonatal mouse mandibular incisor was examined autoradiographically using tritiated thymidine ([3H]TDR) and tritiated proline ([3H]PRO). On days 0 (day of birth), 1, and 2, EGF was administered (3 micrograms/g body wt) sc to neonates. Mice were killed on Days 1, 4, 7, 10, and 13 after birth and were injected with either [3H]TDR or [3H]PRO 1 hr before death. [3H]TDR was used to analyze cell proliferation in eight cell types in the developing mouse incisor including upper (lingual) and lower (buccal) pulpal fibroblasts, preodontoblasts, inner and outer enamel epithelial cells (IEE and OEE), stratum intermedium (SI), stellate reticulum (SR), and periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts. [3H]PRO was used to analyze protein synthesis in ameloblasts, and their secretion products (enamel and dentin), as well as PDL fibroblasts. The selected EGF injection scheme elicited acceleration of incisor eruption with minimal growth retardation. At Day 1, the upper and lower pulp, preodontoblasts, SI, and SR showed a significant decrease in labeling index (LI) 24 hr after a single EGF injection. After multiple injections (Days 0, 1, 2), two LI patterns were observed. In lower pulp, preodontoblasts, IEE, SI, SR, and OEE, a posteruptive change in LI was observed. In contrast, the upper pulp and PDL regions demonstrated a direct temporal relationship with eruption. Autoradiographic analysis with [3H]PRO indicated that EGF treatment caused significant increases in grain counts per unit area in ameloblast, odontoblast, and PDL regions studied. Significant differences were found in all four regions studied (ameloblasts, enamel, odontoblasts, dentin) at the 45-microns-tall ameloblast level as well as ameloblasts and odontoblasts at the 30-microns level at 13 days of age. The PDL demonstrated significant differences at all locations studied (base, 30 microns, 45 microns,) in 4-, 7-, and 13-day-old mice

  12. The epidermal growth factor receptor decreases Stathmin 1 and triggers catagen entry in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Bichsel, Kyle J; Hammiller, Brianna; Trempus, Carol S; Li, Yanhua; Hansen, Laura A

    2016-04-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is necessary for normal involution of hair follicles after the growth phase of anagen, although the mechanisms through which it acts are not well understood. In this report, we used transcriptional profiling of microdissected hair follicles from mice with skin-targeted deletion of Egfr to investigate how EGFR activation triggers catagen. Immunofluorescence for phospho-EGFR in mouse skin revealed increased activation of EGFR in follicular keratinocytes at catagen onset. Consistent with other models of EGFR deficiency, mice with skin-targeted deletion of Egfr (Krt14-Cre(+) /Egfr(fl/fl) ) exhibited a delayed and asynchronous catagen entry. Transcriptional profiling at the time of normal catagen onset at post-natal day (P) 17 revealed increased expression of the mitotic regulator Rcc2 in hair follicles lacking EGFR. Rcc2 protein was strongly immunopositive in the nuclei of control follicular keratinocytes at P16 then rapidly decreased until it was undetectable between P18 and 21. In contrast, Rcc2 expression continued in Egfr mutant follicles throughout this period. Proliferation, measured by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, was also significantly increased in Egfr mutant follicular keratinocytes compared to controls at P18-21. Similarly, Rcc2-regulated mitotic regulator Stathmin 1 was strikingly reduced in control but not Egfr mutant follicles between P17 and P19. Deletion of Stmn1, in turn, accelerated catagen entry associated with premature cessation of proliferation in the hair follicles. These data reveal EGFR suppression of mitotic regulators including Rcc2 and Stathmin 1 as a mechanism for catagen induction in mouse skin. PMID:26661905

  13. Regulatory module network of basic/helix-loop-helix transcription factors in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Liu, Zijing J; Pan, Yuchun C; Liu, Qi; Fu, Xing; Cooper, Nigel GF; Li, Yixue; Qiu, Mengsheng; Shi, Tieliu

    2007-01-01

    Background The basic/helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins are important components of the transcriptional regulatory network, controlling a variety of biological processes, especially the development of the central nervous system. Until now, reports describing the regulatory network of the bHLH transcription factor (TF) family have been scarce. In order to understand the regulatory mechanisms of bHLH TFs in mouse brain, we inferred their regulatory network from genome-wide gene expression profiles with the module networks method. Results A regulatory network comprising 15 important bHLH TFs and 153 target genes was constructed. The network was divided into 28 modules based on expression profiles. A regulatory-motif search shows the complexity and diversity of the network. In addition, 26 cooperative bHLH TF pairs were also detected in the network. This cooperation suggests possible physical interactions or genetic regulation between TFs. Interestingly, some TFs in the network regulate more than one module. A novel cross-repression between Neurod6 and Hey2 was identified, which may control various functions in different brain regions. The presence of TF binding sites (TFBSs) in the promoter regions of their target genes validates more than 70% of TF-target gene pairs of the network. Literature mining provides additional support for five modules. More importantly, the regulatory relationships among selected key components are all validated in mutant mice. Conclusion Our network is reliable and very informative for understanding the role of bHLH TFs in mouse brain development and function. It provides a framework for future experimental analyses. PMID:18021424

  14. Differential pathlength factor informs evoked stimulus response in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Alexander J; Ponticorvo, Adrien; Durkin, Anthony J; Venugopalan, Vasan; Choi, Bernard; Tromberg, Bruce J

    2015-10-01

    Baseline optical properties are typically assumed in calculating the differential pathlength factor (DPF) of mouse brains, a value used in the modified Beer-Lambert law to characterize an evoked stimulus response. We used spatial frequency domain imaging to measure in vivo baseline optical properties in 20-month-old control ([Formula: see text]) and triple transgenic APP/PS1/tau (3xTg-AD) ([Formula: see text]) mouse brains. Average [Formula: see text] for control and 3xTg-AD mice was [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively, at 460 nm; and [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively, at 530 nm. Average [Formula: see text] for control and 3xTg-AD mice was [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively, at 460 nm; and [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively, at 530 nm. The calculated DPF for control and 3xTg-AD mice was [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] OD mm, respectively, at 460 nm; and [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] OD mm, respectively, at 530 nm. In hindpaw stimulation experiments, the hemodynamic increase in brain tissue concentration of oxyhemoglobin was threefold larger and two times longer in the control mice compared to 3xTg-AD mice. Furthermore, the washout of deoxyhemoglobin from increased brain perfusion was seven times larger in controls compared to 3xTg-AD mice ([Formula: see text]). PMID:26835482

  15. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor attenuates inflammation in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) is protective in animal models of various neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated whether pegfilgrastim, GCSF with sustained action, is protective in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease with manifestations of upper and lower motoneuron death and muscle atrophy accompanied by inflammation in the CNS and periphery. Methods Human mutant G93A superoxide dismutase (SOD1) ALS mice were treated with pegfilgrastim starting at the presymptomatic stage and continued until the end stage. After long-term pegfilgrastim treatment, the inflammation status was defined in the spinal cord and peripheral tissues including hematopoietic organs and muscle. The effect of GCSF on spinal cord neuron survival and microglia, bone marrow and spleen monocyte activation was assessed in vitro. Results Long-term pegfilgrastim treatment prolonged mutant SOD1 mice survival and attenuated both astro- and microgliosis in the spinal cord. Pegfilgrastim in SOD1 mice modulated the inflammatory cell populations in the bone marrow and spleen and reduced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokine in monocytes and microglia. The mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells into the circulation was restored back to basal level after long-term pegfilgrastim treatment in SOD1 mice while the storage of Ly6C expressing monocytes in the bone marrow and spleen remained elevated. After pegfilgrastim treatment, an increased proportion of these cells in the degenerative muscle was detected at the end stage of ALS. Conclusions GCSF attenuated inflammation in the CNS and the periphery in a mouse model of ALS and thereby delayed the progression of the disease. This mechanism of action targeting inflammation provides a new perspective of the usage of GCSF in the treatment of ALS. PMID:21711557

  16. Methallothionein-3 contributes to vascular endothelial growth factor induction in a mouse model of choroidal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong A; Hwang, Jong-uk; Yoon, Young Hee; Koh, Jae-Young

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, we investigated possible roles of the zinc (Zn)-binding protein metallothionein-3 (MT3) and cellular Zn in a mouse model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) using wild-type (WT) and MT3-knockout (KO) mice. Quantitative RT-PCR was used for the detection of MT3 mRNA. CNV was induced in mice between 8 and 12 weeks of age by disrupting the Bruch's membrane using an argon laser. Fundus photography and fluorescein angiography (FA) were performed 2 weeks following laser photocoagulation. The possible connection between MT3 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression was explored by quantifying VEGF levels in WT and MT3-KO mouse retinas by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The role of Zn in VEGF expression was tested in WT and MT3-KO cells treated with pyrithione, with or without additional Zn, using immunoblotting and fluorescence photomicrography. Following laser-treatment, MT3-KO mice exhibited substantially smaller areas of CNV compared to WT mice. In addition, retinal angiograms revealed less severe fluorescein leakage in MT3-KO mice than in WT mice. On day 14 following the induction of CNV, VEGF expression was markedly increased in WT mice, but remained unchanged in MT3-KO mice. Consistent with the possible involvement of Zn released from MT3, raising intracellular Zn levels increased VEGF levels and activated its receptor, Flk-1, in both WT and MT3-KO retinal cells. Present results demonstrated that neural retinal cells express high levels of MT3, which might play a role in the process of CNV development. Moreover, Zn released from MT3 may contribute to VEGF induction. PMID:23962989

  17. Epidermal growth factor precursor in mouse lactating mammary gland alveolar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.F.; Teng, C.T.; Pentecost, B.T.; DiAugustine, R.P. )

    1989-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that high levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) occur in human and rodent milk and that oral administration of this polypeptide stimulates rodent gastrointestinal development. It is not known whether EGF in milk originates from cells of the lactating mammary gland or is sequestered from an extramammary source. In the present study, prepro-EGF mRNA (approximately 4.7 kilobases) was detected in the CD-1 mouse mammary gland throughout the period of lactation; by comparison, negligible levels of this EGF transcript were found in the gland during pregnancy. Low levels of EGF immunoreactivity (4-5 ng/g wet wt tissue) were extracted from lactating (day 18) mammary glands with dilute acetic acid. Immunolocalization was evident with antisera to either EGF or two other regions of the EGF precursor in essentially all alveolar cells of the lactating gland. The most prominent staining with antiserum to EGF was observed along the luminal borders of cells; this pattern of cellular staining required proteolytic pretreatment of tissue sections. Western blot analyses of cell membranes isolated from the day 16 lactating mammary gland revealed an EGF-immunoreactive band at about 145K, which was equivalent in size to the EGF precursor found in mouse kidney cell membranes. Despite these findings, labeling of lactating mammary gland mince with L-(35S)methionine and cysteine for up to 4 h did not reveal any specific bands in immunoprecipitates. These cumulative findings suggest that the precursor form of EGF occurs in alveolar cells of lactating mammary gland and that this protein is translocated to the cell membrane.

  18. Fibroblast growth factor-23 increases mouse PGE2 production in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Syal, Ashu; Schiavi, Susan; Chakravarty, Sumana; Dwarakanath, Vangipuram; Quigley, Raymond; Baum, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) has been implicated in the renal phosphate wasting in X-linked hypophosphatemia, tumor-induced osteomalacia, and autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets. Recently, we demonstrated that Hyp mice have greater urinary PGE2 levels compared with C57/B6 mice and that indomethacin administration in vivo and in vitro ameliorates the phosphate transport defect in Hyp mice. To determine further whether altered prostaglandin metabolism plays a role in the renal phosphate transport defect in Hyp mice, we incubated renal proximal tubules with arachidonic acid. We find that PGE2 production was higher in Hyp mice than in C57/B6 mice. Incubation of C57/B6 mouse renal proximal tubules with FGF-23R176Q, an active mutant form of FGR23, increased tubular PGE2 production, an effect that was inhibited by 50 μM PD-98059 and 10 μM SB-203580, inhibitors of the MAP kinase pathway. C57/B6 mice injected with FGF-23R176Q had a ~10-fold increase in PGE2 excretion 24 h after intraperitoneal injection of FGF-23R176Q compared with vehicle-treated controls. Finally, we show that PGE2 inhibited both phosphate and volume absorption in mouse proximal convoluted tubules perfused in vitro and reduced brush-border membrane vesicle NaPi-2a protein abundance from renal cortex incubated in vitro with PGE2. In conclusion, FGF-23 increases urinary and renal tubular PGE2 production via the MAP kinase pathway and PGE2 inhibits proximal tubule phosphate transport. PMID:16144964

  19. Fibroblast growth factor-23 increases mouse PGE2 production in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Syal, Ashu; Schiavi, Susan; Chakravarty, Sumana; Dwarakanath, Vangipuram; Quigley, Raymond; Baum, Michel

    2006-02-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) has been implicated in the renal phosphate wasting in X-linked hypophosphatemia, tumor-induced osteomalacia, and autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets. Recently, we demonstrated that Hyp mice have greater urinary PGE2 levels compared with C57/B6 mice and that indomethacin administration in vivo and in vitro ameliorates the phosphate transport defect in Hyp mice. To determine further whether altered prostaglandin metabolism plays a role in the renal phosphate transport defect in Hyp mice, we incubated renal proximal tubules with arachidonic acid. We find that PGE2 production was higher in Hyp mice than in C57/B6 mice. Incubation of C57/B6 mouse renal proximal tubules with FGF-23R176Q, an active mutant form of FGR23, increased tubular PGE2 production, an effect that was inhibited by 50 microM PD-98059 and 10 microM SB-203580, inhibitors of the MAP kinase pathway. C57/B6 mice injected with FGF-23R176Q had a approximately 10-fold increase in PGE2 excretion 24 h after intraperitoneal injection of FGF-23R176Q compared with vehicle-treated controls. Finally, we show that PGE2 inhibited both phosphate and volume absorption in mouse proximal convoluted tubules perfused in vitro and reduced brush-border membrane vesicle NaPi-2a protein abundance from renal cortex incubated in vitro with PGE2. In conclusion, FGF-23 increases urinary and renal tubular PGE2 production via the MAP kinase pathway and PGE2 inhibits proximal tubule phosphate transport. PMID:16144964

  20. Molecular cloning of the b subunit of mouse coagulation factor XIII and assignment of the gene to chromosome 1: Close evolutionary relationship to complement factor H

    SciTech Connect

    Nonaka, Mayumi; Nonaka, Masaru; Natsuume-Sakai, Shunnosuke ); Matsuda, Yoichi ); Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Moriwaki, Kazuo )

    1993-03-01

    The b subunit of human coagulation factor XIII (FXIII-b) is composed of 10 short consensus repeats (SCRs) characteristic of the regulatory proteins of complement activation system. A full-length cDNA clone of mouse FXIII-b was isolated and the entire sequence was determined. The predicted amino acid sequence showed 77.5% homology with human FXIII-b, although mouse FXIII-b contained seven extra amino acid residues at the carboxyl terminal. The strong reactivity of the translation product of this clone with rabbit anti-human FXIII-b antiserum confirmed that it encodes a mouse counterpart of the human FXIII-b. By in situ hybridization and mapping studies using 66 interspecific backcross mice, the mouse FXIII-b gene (designated F13b) was shown to be located on distal chromosome 1 closely linked to Cfh, extending a conserved linkage group between human and mouse chromosome 1. In addition, a significant structural similarity between FXIII-b and complement factor H is described. 29 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Effect of basic fibroblast growth factor in mouse embryonic stem cell culture and osteogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rose, Laura C; Fitzsimmons, Ross; Lee, Poh; Krawetz, Roman; Rancourt, Derrick E; Uludağ, Hasan

    2013-05-01

    Embryonic stem cells are actively explored as a cell source in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine involving bone repair. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) has been a valuable growth factor to support the culture of human stem cells as well as their osteogenic differentiation, but the influence of bFGF on mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells is not known. Towards this goal, D3 cells were treated with bFGF during maintenance conditions and during spontaneous and osteogenic differentiation. In feeder-free monolayers, up to 40 ng/ml of exogenous bFGF did not support self-renewal of mES without LIF during cell expansion. During spontaneous differentiation in high-density cultures, bFGF stimulated cell proliferation under certain conditions but did not influence differentiation, as judged by stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 expression. The addition of bFGF reduced the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity associated with osteoblast activity during differentiation induced by osteogenic supplements, although the extent of mineralization was unaffected by bFGF. The bFGF increased the mesenchymal stem cell marker Sca-1 in an mES cell population and led to an enhanced increase in osteocalcin and runx2 expression in combination with BMP-2. These results suggest that bFGF could be utilized to expand the cell population in high-density cultures in addition to enriching the BMP-2 responsiveness of mES cells. PMID:22674886

  2. Colony stimulating factor 1 is an extrinsic stimulator of mouse spermatogonial stem cell self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Oatley, Jon M.; Oatley, Melissa J.; Avarbock, Mary R.; Tobias, John W.; Brinster, Ralph L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Self-renewal and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) provide the foundation for testis homeostasis, yet mechanisms that control their functions in mammals are poorly defined. We used microarray transcript profiling to identify specific genes whose expressions are augmented in the SSC-enriched Thy1+ germ cell fraction of mouse pup testes. Comparisons of gene expression in the Thy1+ germ cell fraction with the Thy1-depleted testis cell population identified 202 genes that are expressed 10-fold or higher in Thy1+ cells. This database provided a mining tool to investigate specific characteristics of SSCs and identify novel mechanisms that potentially influence their functions. These analyses revealed that colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (Csf1r) gene expression is enriched in Thy1+ germ cells. Addition of recombinant colony stimulating factor 1 (Csf1), the specific ligand for Csf1r, to culture media significantly enhanced the self-renewal of SSCs in heterogeneous Thy1+ spermatogonial cultures over a 63-day period without affecting total germ cell expansion. In vivo, expression of Csf1 in both pre-pubertal and adult testes was localized to clusters of Leydig cells and select peritubular myoid cells. Collectively, these results identify Csf1 as an extrinsic stimulator of SSC self-renewal and implicate Leydig and myoid cells as contributors of the testicular stem cell niche in mammals. PMID:19270176

  3. Genomic organization of the mouse fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (Fgfr3) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Castro, A.V.; Wilson, J.; Altherr, M.R.

    1995-11-20

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (Fgfr3) protein is a tyrosine kinase receptor involved in the signal transduction of various fibroblast growth factors. Recent studies suggest its important role in normal development. In humans, mutation in Fgfr3 is responsible for growth disorders such as achondroplasia, hypoachondroplasia, and thanatophoric dysplasia. Here, we report the complete genomic organization of the mouse Fgfr3 gene. The murine gene spans approximately 15 kb and consists of 19 exons and 18 introns. One major and one minor transcription initiation site were identified. Position +1 is located 614 nucleotides upstream from the ATG initiation codon. The translation initiation and termination sites are located in exons 2 and 19, respectively. Five Sp1 sites, two AP2 sites, one Zeste site, and one Krox 24 site were observed in the 5{prime}-flanking region. The Fgfr3 promoter appears to be contained within a CpG island and, as is common in genes having multiple Sp1-binding sites, lacks a TATA box. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Transcription factors binding to the mouse HTF9 housekeeping promoter differ between cell types.

    PubMed Central

    Somma, M P; Gambino, I; Lavia, P

    1991-01-01

    The mouse CpG island HTF9 harbours a bidirectional promoter shared by two housekeeping genes that are arranged head-to-head. We have previously identified several protein binding-elements across the CpG island, yet a short region around the initiation region was found to be capable of bidirectional transcription in transient expression assays, suggesting that the multiple elements of the HTF9 promoter are functionally redundant. We have now compared the binding activities in nuclear extracts from different cell types. Two protein-binding elements of HTF9 interact with widely distributed factors. A potentially strong Sp1 binding site was also identified, however Sp1 appeared to bind efficiently to its target sequence with extracts prepared from proliferating cultured cells, but not from adult organs. On the other hand, the CCAAT box upstream of one gene (HTF9-A) interacted with a liver-enriched factor, whereas no binding was detected with cultured fibroblasts extracts. Consistently, deletion of the CCAAT box affected transient expression from the HTF9-A promoter in hepatocyte, but not in fibroblast, cultures. Our results suggest that ubiquitous expression of housekeeping promoters results from the activation of alternative elements in different cell types. Images PMID:1886769

  5. Homologs of Drosophila fushi-tarazu factor 1 map to mouse chromosome 2 and human chromosome 9q33

    SciTech Connect

    Taketo, Makoto; Parker, K.L.; Howard, T.A.

    1995-01-20

    SF-1, a nuclear receptor that regulates gene expression of the cytochrome P450 steroid hydroxylases, and ELP, an embryonal protein that suppresses expression of the Moloney murine leukemia virus LTR, are isoforms transcribed from the same gene by alternative promoter usage and splicing. This gene is the mammalian homolog of the Drosophila fushi-tarazu factor 1 (FTZ-Fl) gene. We have mapped the mouse gene Ftzf1 to the proximal quarter of Chr 2 by a linkage analysis using interspecific backcross mice, and its human homolog FTZ1 to Chr 9q33 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The mouse and human genes are located in the homologous regions of mouse Chr 2 and human Chr 9, respectively. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Effects of ciliary neurotrophic factor and leukemia inhibiting factor on oxytocin and vasopressin magnocellular neuron survival in rat and mouse hypothalamic organotypic cultures

    PubMed Central

    House, Shirley B.; Li, Congyu; Yue, Chunmei; Gainer, Harold

    2008-01-01

    Organotypic cultures of mouse and rat magnocellular neurons (MCNs) in the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system (HNS) have served as important experimental models for the molecular and physiological study of this neuronal phenotype. However, it has been difficult to maintain significant numbers of the MCNs, particularly vasopressin MCNs, in these cultures for long periods. In this paper, we describe the use of the neurotrophic factors, leukemia inhibiting factor (LIF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) to rescue rat vasopressin (Avp)- and oxytocin (Oxt) – MCNs from axotomy-induced, programmed cell death in vitro. Quantitative data are presented for the efficacy of the LIF family of neurotrophic factors on the survival of MCNs in three nuclei, the paraventricular (PVN), supraoptic (SON), and accessory (ACC) nuclei in the mouse and rat hypothalamus. PMID:19118574

  7. Hydrogen isotope ratios of mouse tissues are influenced by a variety of factors other than diet

    SciTech Connect

    DeNiro, M.J.; Epstein, S.

    1981-12-16

    Hydrogen isotopes are fractionated during biochemical reactions in a variety of organisms. A number of experiments have shown that the D/H ratios of animals and their tissues are not controlled solely by the D/H ratios of their food. The authors performed a simple experiment which indicated that the D/H ratios of a significant fraction of the organically bonded hydrogen in animal tissues must be determined by the isotopic composition of water that the samples encounter. Aliquots of dried mouse brain and liver and mouse food were exposed to water vapors of different D/H ratios prior to isotopic analysis. The results of the experiment showed that at least 16 percent of the hydrogen in mouse brain is exchangeable with the hydrogen of water; the corresponding values for mouse liver and mouse food were 25 to 29 percent. (JMT)

  8. The pluripotency factor Nanog regulates pericentromeric heterochromatin organization in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Novo, Clara Lopes; Tang, Calvin; Ahmed, Kashif; Djuric, Ugljesa; Fussner, Eden; Mullin, Nicholas P; Morgan, Natasha P; Hayre, Jasvinder; Sienerth, Arnold R; Elderkin, Sarah; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi; Chambers, Ian; Ellis, James; Bazett-Jones, David P; Rugg-Gunn, Peter J

    2016-05-01

    An open and decondensed chromatin organization is a defining property of pluripotency. Several epigenetic regulators have been implicated in maintaining an open chromatin organization, but how these processes are connected to the pluripotency network is unknown. Here, we identified a new role for the transcription factor NANOG as a key regulator connecting the pluripotency network with constitutive heterochromatin organization in mouse embryonic stem cells. Deletion of Nanog leads to chromatin compaction and the remodeling of heterochromatin domains. Forced expression of NANOG in epiblast stem cells is sufficient to decompact chromatin. NANOG associates with satellite repeats within heterochromatin domains, contributing to an architecture characterized by highly dispersed chromatin fibers, low levels of H3K9me3, and high major satellite transcription, and the strong transactivation domain of NANOG is required for this organization. The heterochromatin-associated protein SALL1 is a direct cofactor for NANOG, and loss of Sall1 recapitulates the Nanog-null phenotype, but the loss of Sall1 can be circumvented through direct recruitment of the NANOG transactivation domain to major satellites. These results establish a direct connection between the pluripotency network and chromatin organization and emphasize that maintaining an open heterochromatin architecture is a highly regulated process in embryonic stem cells. PMID:27125671

  9. Effect of perfluorooctane sulfonate on pluripotency and differentiation factors in mouse embryoid bodies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Ji, Xiaoli; Chen, Xiaojiao; Yao, Mengmeng; Han, Xiumei; Chen, Minjian; Tang, Wei; Xia, Yankai

    2015-02-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) poses potential risks to early development, but the molecular mechanisms how PFOS affects embryonic development are still unclear. Mouse embryoid bodies (mEBs) provide ideal models for testing safety or toxicity of chemicals in vitro. In this study, mEBs were exposed to PFOS up to 6 days and then their pluripotency and differentiation markers were evaluated. Our data showed that the mRNA and protein levels of pluripotency markers (Oct4, Sox2, Nanog) in mEBs were significantly increased following exposure to PFOS. Meanwhile, the expressions of miR-134, miR-145, miR-490-3p were decreased accordingly. PFOS reduced the mRNA levels of endodermal markers (Sox17, FOXA2), mesodermal markers (SMA, Brachyury) and ectodermal markers (Nestin, Fgf5) in mEBs. Meanwhile, PFOS increased the mRNA and protein levels of polycomb group (PcG) family members (Cbx4, Cbx7, Ezh2). Overall, our results showed that PFOS could increase the expression levels of pluripotency factors and decrease the differentiation markers. PMID:25510869

  10. The pluripotency factor Nanog regulates pericentromeric heterochromatin organization in mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Novo, Clara Lopes; Tang, Calvin; Ahmed, Kashif; Djuric, Ugljesa; Fussner, Eden; Mullin, Nicholas P.; Morgan, Natasha P.; Hayre, Jasvinder; Sienerth, Arnold R.; Elderkin, Sarah; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi; Chambers, Ian; Ellis, James; Bazett-Jones, David P.; Rugg-Gunn, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    An open and decondensed chromatin organization is a defining property of pluripotency. Several epigenetic regulators have been implicated in maintaining an open chromatin organization, but how these processes are connected to the pluripotency network is unknown. Here, we identified a new role for the transcription factor NANOG as a key regulator connecting the pluripotency network with constitutive heterochromatin organization in mouse embryonic stem cells. Deletion of Nanog leads to chromatin compaction and the remodeling of heterochromatin domains. Forced expression of NANOG in epiblast stem cells is sufficient to decompact chromatin. NANOG associates with satellite repeats within heterochromatin domains, contributing to an architecture characterized by highly dispersed chromatin fibers, low levels of H3K9me3, and high major satellite transcription, and the strong transactivation domain of NANOG is required for this organization. The heterochromatin-associated protein SALL1 is a direct cofactor for NANOG, and loss of Sall1 recapitulates the Nanog-null phenotype, but the loss of Sall1 can be circumvented through direct recruitment of the NANOG transactivation domain to major satellites. These results establish a direct connection between the pluripotency network and chromatin organization and emphasize that maintaining an open heterochromatin architecture is a highly regulated process in embryonic stem cells. PMID:27125671

  11. Structure, sequence, and chromosomal location of the gene for USF2 transcription factors in mouse.

    PubMed

    Henrion, A A; Martinez, A; Mattei, M G; Kahn, A; Raymondjean, M

    1995-01-01

    The ubiquitously expressed upstream stimulatory factor (USF) involved in the transcription of a wide variety of cellular genes is defined as dimers of c-myc-related proteins, composed of a basic helix-loop-helix/leucine zipper region. The USF family consists of different members that split into two groups: MLTF or USF1 and USF2 or FIP. We present here evidence that USF1 and USF2 are distinct closely related genes in human, rat, and mouse. Based on the recent cloning of rat and human new cDNAs, we have isolated genomic clones encompassing the murine USF2 gene, which consists of at least 10 exons spanning a minimum of 10 kb of genomic DNA. Unexpectedly, the organization of USF2 appears very split up by introns (0.08 to over 6 kb in size), compared to the myc gene structure. The entire gene (but the larger intron) and 1.6 kb of the 5' flanking region were sequenced. This 5' flanking region is GC-rich, contains several putative transcription binding sites, and has no apparent TATA box. Gene mapping of murine USF2 and USF1 has been determined by in situ hybridization, indicating the localization of USF2 on chromosome 7 and of USF1 on chromosomes 1 and 11. PMID:7774954

  12. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors Enhance the Permeability of the Mouse Blood-brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shize; Xia, Rui; Jiang, Yong; Wang, Lei; Gao, Fabao

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) impedes entry of many drugs into the brain, limiting clinical efficacy. A safe and efficient method for reversibly increasing BBB permeability would greatly facilitate central nervous system (CNS) drug delivery and expand the range of possible therapeutics to include water soluble compounds, proteins, nucleotides, and other large molecules. We examined the effect of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on BBB permeability in Kunming (KM) mice. Human VEGF165 was administered to treatment groups at two concentrations (1.6 or 3.0 µg/mouse), while controls received equal-volume saline. Changes in BBB permeability were measured by parenchymal accumulation of the contrast agent Gd-DTPA as assessed by 7 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Mice were then injected with Evans blue, sacrificed 0.5 h later, and perfused transcardially. Brains were removed, fixed, and sectioned for histological study. Both VEGF groups exhibited a significantly greater signal intensity from the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia than controls (P<0.001). Evans blue fluorescence intensity was higher in the parenchyma and lower in the cerebrovasculature of VEGF-treated animals compared to controls. No significant brain edema was observed by diffusion weighted MRI (DWI) or histological staining. Exogenous application of VEGF can increase the permeability of the BBB without causing brain edema. Pretreatment with VEGF may be a feasible method to facilitate drug delivery into the CNS. PMID:24551038

  13. Postnatal muscle modification by myogenic factors modulates neuropathology and survival in an ALS mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kevin H.J.; Franciosi, Sonia; Leavitt, Blair R.

    2016-01-01

    MyoD and myogenin are myogenic transcription factors preferentially expressed in adult fast and slow muscles, respectively. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disorder in which motor neuron loss is accompanied by muscle denervation and paralysis. Studies suggest that muscle phenotype may influence ALS disease progression. Here we demonstrate that myogenin gene transfer into muscle supports spinal cord motor neuron survival and muscle endplate innervation in the G93A SOD1 fALS mice. On the other hand, MyoD gene transfer decreases survival and enhances motor neuron degeneration and muscle denervation. Although an increase in motor neuron count is associated with increased succinic dehydrogenase staining in the muscle, muscle overexpression of PGC-1α does not improve survival or motor function. Our study suggests that postnatal muscle modification influences disease progression and demonstrates that the muscle expression of myogenic and metabolic regulators differentially impact neuropathology associated with disease progression in the G93A SOD1 fALS mouse model. PMID:24346342

  14. Mortality factor 4 like 1 protein mediates epithelial cell death in a mouse model of pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Zou, Chunbin; Li, Jin; Xiong, Sheng; Chen, Yan; Wu, Qin; Li, Xiuying; Weathington, Nathaniel M; Han, SeungHye; Snavely, Courtney; Chen, Bill B; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2015-10-28

    Unchecked epithelial cell death is fundamental to the pathogenesis of pneumonia. The recognition of unique signaling pathways that preserve epithelial cell viability may present new opportunities for interventional strategies. We describe that mortality factor 4 like 1 (Morf4l1), a protein involved in chromatin remodeling, is constitutively expressed at low levels in the lung because of its continuous degradation mediated by an orphan ubiquitin E3 ligase subunit, Fbxl18. Expression of Morf4l1 increases in humans with pneumonia and is up-regulated in lung epithelia after exposure to Pseudomonas aeruginosa or lipopolysaccharide. In a mouse model of pneumonia induced by P. aeruginosa, Morf4l1 is stabilized by acetylation that protects it from Fbxl18-mediated degradation. After P. aeruginosa infection of mice, overexpression of Morf4l1 resulted in lung epithelial cell death, whereas its depletion restored cell viability. Using in silico modeling and drug-target interaction studies, we identified that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved thrombin inhibitor argatroban is a Morf4l1 antagonist. Argatroban inhibited Morf4l1-dependent histone acetylation, reduced its cytotoxicity, and improved survival of mice with experimental lung injury at doses that had no anticoagulant activity. These studies uncover a previously unrecognized biological mechanism whereby pathogens subvert cell viability by extending the life span of a cytotoxic host protein. Morf4l1 may be a potential molecular target for non-antibiotic pharmacotherapy during severe pulmonary infection. PMID:26511508

  15. Mortality factor 4 like 1 protein mediates epithelial cell death in a mouse model of pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Chunbin; Li, Jin; Xiong, Sheng; Chen, Yan; Wu, Qin; Li, Xiuying; Weathington, Nathaniel M.; Han, Seung Hye; Snavely, Courtney; Chen, Bill B.; Mallampalli, Rama K.

    2016-01-01

    Unchecked epithelial cell death is fundamental to the pathogenesis of pneumonia. The recognition of unique signaling pathways that preserve epithelial cell viability may present new opportunities for interventional strategies. We describe that mortality factor 4 like 1 (Morf4l1), a protein involved in chromatin remodeling, is constitutively expressed at low levels in the lung because of its continuous degradation mediated by an orphan ubiquitin E3 ligase subunit, Fbxl18. Expression of Morf4l1 increases in humans with pneumonia and is up-regulated in lung epithelia after exposure to Pseudomonas aeruginosa or lipopolysaccharide. In a mouse model of pneumonia induced by P. aeruginosa, Morf4l1 is stabilized by acetylation that protects it from Fbxl18-mediated degradation. After P. aeruginosa infection of mice, overexpression of Morf4l1 resulted in lung epithelial cell death, whereas its depletion restored cell viability. Using in silico modeling and drug-target interaction studies, we identified that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved thrombin inhibitor argatroban is a Morf4l1 antagonist. Argatroban inhibited Morf4l1-dependent histone acetylation, reduced its cytotoxicity, and improved survival of mice with experimental lung injury at doses that had no anticoagulant activity. These studies uncover a previously unrecognized biological mechanism whereby pathogens subvert cell viability by extending the life span of a cytotoxic host protein. Morf4l1 may be a potential molecular target for non-antibiotic pharmacotherapy during severe pulmonary infection. PMID:26511508

  16. The mouse protein synthesis initiation factor 4A gene family includes two related functional genes which are differentially expressed.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, P J; Trachsel, H

    1988-01-01

    We have cloned and characterized a family of mouse genomic sequences hybridizing to mouse cDNA probes coding for eIF-4A, one of the protein synthesis initiation factors involved in the binding of mRNA to the ribosome. We estimate that there is a total of approximately 9-13 eIF-4A pseudogenes. We also found an eIF-4A intronless retroposon which, when compared to the cDNA, contains a single nucleotide difference. This possibly functional gene contains a mouse repetitive B1 element integrated in the promoter region. Furthermore, we have cloned two intron-containing eIF-4A genes (termed eIF-4AI and eIF-4AII). The eIF-4AII gene codes for a previously unknown form of eIF-4A. Northern blot hybridization with RNA from several mouse organs shows a variation in eIF-4AI expression within a factor of 7. In contrast, relative to liver, eIF-4AII expression is 20- to 30-times higher in brain and kidney, 10- to 17-fold higher in lung and heart, and is about equally abundant in liver, spleen and thymus. These data suggest that the relative efficiency of protein synthesis initiation for different mRNAs, as reflected by discrimination in messenger 5'-terminal cap recognition and binding to ribosomes, varies in different tissues. Images PMID:3046931

  17. Activation of transcription factors STAT1 and STAT5 in the mouse median eminence after systemic ciliary neurotrophic factor administration.

    PubMed

    Severi, Ilenia; Senzacqua, Martina; Mondini, Eleonora; Fazioli, Francesca; Cinti, Saverio; Giordano, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Exogenously administered ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) causes weight loss in obese rodents and humans through leptin-like activation of the Jak-STAT3 signaling pathway in hypothalamic arcuate neurons. Here we report for the first time that 40min after acute systemic treatment, rat recombinant CNTF (intraperitoneal injection of 0.3mg/kg of body weight) induced nuclear translocation of the tyrosine-phosphorylated forms of STAT1 and STAT5 in the mouse median eminence and other circumventricular organs, including the vascular organ of the lamina terminalis and the subfornical organ. In the tuberal hypothalamus of treated mice, specific nuclear immunostaining for phospo-STAT1 and phospho-STAT5 was detected in ependymal cells bordering the third ventricle floor and lateral recesses, and in median eminence cells. Co-localization studies documented STAT1 and STAT5 activation in median eminence β-tanycytes and underlying radial glia-like cells. A few astrocytes in the arcuate nucleus responded to CNTF by STAT5 activation. The vast majority of median eminence tanycytes and radial glia-like cells showing phospho-STAT1 and phospho-STAT5 immunoreactivity were also positive for phospho-STAT3. In contrast, STAT3 was the sole STAT isoform activated by CNTF in arcuate nucleus and median eminence neurons. Finally, immunohistochemical evaluation of STAT activation 20, 40, 80, and 120min from the injection demonstrated that cell activation was accompanied by c-Fos expression. Collectively, our findings show that CNTF activates STAT3, STAT1, and STAT5 in vivo. The distinctive activation pattern of these STAT isoforms in the median eminence may disclose novel targets and pathways through which CNTF regulates food intake. PMID:26133794

  18. Net, an Ets ternary complex transcription factor, is expressed in sites of vasculogenesis, angiogenesis, and chondrogenesis during mouse development.

    PubMed

    Ayadi, A; Suelves, M; Dollé, P; Wasylyk, B

    2001-04-01

    The Net gene encodes an Ets transcription factor belonging to the ternary complex factor subfamily. We studied Net expression during mouse development (E7.5-E18.5) by in situ hybridization. Net is expressed at E7.5-8.5 in developing vascular primordia, including the allantoic vessels, heart endocardium and dorsal aortae. Vascular endothelial cell expression persists throughout development. Additional sites of expression appear at E9.5-E10.5, especially in facial, branchial arch and distal limb-bud mesenchyme. Later, expression is most conspicuous in developing cartilage and becomes progressively restricted to perichondrium. Net expression during mouse development correlates with vasculogenesis, angiogenesis and cartilage ontogeny. PMID:11287193

  19. Evidence for the involvement of mouse heat shock factor 1 in the atypical expression of the HSP70.1 heat shock gene during mouse zygotic genome activation.

    PubMed Central

    Christians, E; Michel, E; Adenot, P; Mezger, V; Rallu, M; Morange, M; Renard, J P

    1997-01-01

    The mouse HSP70.1 gene, which codes for a heat shock protein (hsp70), is highly transcribed at the onset of zygotic genome activation (ZGA). This expression, which occurs in the absence of stress, is then repressed. It has been claimed that this gene does not exhibit a stress response until the blastocyst stage. The promoter of HSP70.1 contains four heat shock element (HSE) boxes which are the binding sites of heat shock transcription factors (HSF). We have been studying the presence and localization of the mouse HSFs, mHSF1 and mHSF2, at different stages of embryo development. We show that mHSF1 is already present at the one-cell stage and concentrated in the nucleus. Moreover, by mutagenizing HSE sequences and performing competition experiments (in transgenic embryos with the HSP70.1 promoter inserted before a reporter gene), we show that, in contrast with previous findings, HSE boxes are involved in this spontaneous activation. Therefore, we suggest that HSF1 and HSE are important in this transient expression at the two-cell stage and that the absence of typical inducibility at this early stage of development results mainly from the high level of spontaneous transcription of this gene during the ZGA. PMID:9001232

  20. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α is required for cell differentiation and homeostasis in the adult mouse gastric epithelium.

    PubMed

    Moore, Benjamin D; Khurana, Shradha S; Huh, Won Jae; Mills, Jason C

    2016-08-01

    We have previously shown that the sequential transcription factors Xbp1→Mist1 (Bhlha15) govern the ultrastructural maturation of the secretory apparatus in enzyme-secreting zymogenic chief cells (ZCs) in the gastric unit. Here we sought to identify transcriptional regulators upstream of X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) and MIST1. We used immunohistochemistry to characterize Hnf4α(flox/flox) adult mouse stomachs after tamoxifen-induced deletion of Hnf4α We used qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and chromatin immunoprecipitation to define the molecular interaction between hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) and Xbp1 in mouse stomach and human gastric cells. We show that HNF4α protein is expressed in pit (foveolar) cells, mucous neck cells, and zymogenic chief cells (ZCs) of the corpus gastric unit. Loss of HNF4α in adult mouse stomach led to reduced ZC size and ER content, phenocopying previously characterized effects of Xbp1 deletion. However, HNF4α(Δ/Δ) stomachs also exhibited additional phenotypes including increased proliferation in the isthmal stem cell zone and altered mucous neck cell migration, indicating a role of HNF4α in progenitor cells as well as in ZCs. HNF4α directly occupies the Xbp1 promoter locus in mouse stomach, and forced HNF4α expression increased abundance of XBP1 mRNA in human gastric cancer cells. Finally, as expected, loss of HNF4α caused decreased Xbp1 and Mist1 expression in mouse stomachs. We show that HNF4α regulates homeostatic proliferation in the gastric epithelium and is both necessary and sufficient for the upstream regulation of the Xbp1→Mist1 axis in maintenance of ZC secretory architecture. PMID:27340127

  1. Expression Pattern and Localization Dynamics of Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor RIC8 during Mouse Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tõnissoo, Tambet; Meier, Riho; Kask, Keiu; Ruisu, Katrin; Karis, Alar; Salumets, Andres; Pooga, Margus

    2015-01-01

    Targeting of G proteins to the cell cortex and their activation is one of the triggers of both asymmetric and symmetric cell division. Resistance to inhibitors of cholinesterase 8 (RIC8), a guanine nucleotide exchange factor, activates a certain subgroup of G protein α-subunits in a receptor independent manner. RIC8 controls the asymmetric cell division in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, and symmetric cell division in cultured mammalian cells, where it regulates the mitotic spindle orientation. Although intensely studied in mitosis, the function of RIC8 in mammalian meiosis has remained unknown. Here we demonstrate that the expression and subcellular localization of RIC8 changes profoundly during mouse oogenesis. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that RIC8 expression is dependent on oocyte growth and cell cycle phase. During oocyte growth, RIC8 is abundantly present in cytoplasm of oocytes at primordial, primary and secondary preantral follicle stages. Later, upon oocyte maturation RIC8 also populates the germinal vesicle, its localization becomes cell cycle dependent, and it associates with chromatin and the meiotic spindle. After fertilization, RIC8 protein converges to the pronuclei and is also detectable at high levels in the nucleolus precursor bodies of both maternal and paternal pronucleus. During first cleavage of zygote RIC8 localizes in the mitotic spindle and cell cortex of forming blastomeres. In addition, we demonstrate that RIC8 co-localizes with its interaction partners Gαi1/2:GDP and LGN in meiotic/mitotic spindle, cell cortex and polar bodies of maturing oocytes and zygotes. Downregulation of Ric8 by siRNA leads to interferred translocation of Gαi1/2 to cortical region of maturing oocytes and reduction of its levels. RIC8 is also expressed at high level in female reproductive organs e.g. oviduct. Therefore we suggest a regulatory function for RIC8 in mammalian gametogenesis and fertility. PMID:26062014

  2. Action of Administered Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor on the Mouse Dorsal Vagal Complex.

    PubMed

    Senzacqua, Martina; Severi, Ilenia; Perugini, Jessica; Acciarini, Samantha; Cinti, Saverio; Giordano, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) induces weight loss in obese rodents and humans through activation of the hypothalamic Jak-STAT (Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription) signaling pathway. Here, we tested the hypothesis that CNTF also affects the brainstem centers involved in feeding and energy balance regulation. To this end, wild-type and leptin-deficient (ob/ob and db/db) obese mice were acutely treated with intraperitoneal recombinant CNTF. Coronal brainstem sections were processed for immunohistochemical detection of STAT3, STAT1, STAT5 phosphorylation and c-Fos. In wild-type mice, CNTF treatment for 45 min induced STAT3, STAT1, and STAT5 phosphorylation in neurons as well as glial cells of the area postrema; here, the majority of CNTF-responsive cells activated multiple STAT isoforms, and a significant proportion of CNTF-responsive glial cells bore the immaturity and plasticity markers nestin and vimentin. After 120 min CNTF treatment, c-Fos expression was intense in glial cells and weak in neurons of the area postrema, it was intense in several neurons of the rostral and caudal solitary tract nucleus (NTS), and weak in some cholinergic neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. In the ob/ob and db/db mice, Jak-STAT activation and c-Fos expression were similar to those induced in wild-type mouse brainstem. Treatment with CNTF (120 min, to induce c-Fos expression) and leptin (25 min, to induce STAT3 phosphorylation) demonstrated the co-localization of the two transcription factors in a small neuron population in the caudal NTS portion. Finally, weak immunohistochemical CNTF staining, detected in funiculus separans, and meningeal glial cells, matched the modest amount of CNTF found by RT-qPCR in micropunched area postrema tissue, which in contrast exhibited a very high amount of CNTF receptor. Collectively, the present findings show that the area postrema and the NTS exhibit high, distinctive responsiveness to circulating

  3. Action of Administered Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor on the Mouse Dorsal Vagal Complex

    PubMed Central

    Senzacqua, Martina; Severi, Ilenia; Perugini, Jessica; Acciarini, Samantha; Cinti, Saverio; Giordano, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) induces weight loss in obese rodents and humans through activation of the hypothalamic Jak-STAT (Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription) signaling pathway. Here, we tested the hypothesis that CNTF also affects the brainstem centers involved in feeding and energy balance regulation. To this end, wild-type and leptin-deficient (ob/ob and db/db) obese mice were acutely treated with intraperitoneal recombinant CNTF. Coronal brainstem sections were processed for immunohistochemical detection of STAT3, STAT1, STAT5 phosphorylation and c-Fos. In wild-type mice, CNTF treatment for 45 min induced STAT3, STAT1, and STAT5 phosphorylation in neurons as well as glial cells of the area postrema; here, the majority of CNTF-responsive cells activated multiple STAT isoforms, and a significant proportion of CNTF-responsive glial cells bore the immaturity and plasticity markers nestin and vimentin. After 120 min CNTF treatment, c-Fos expression was intense in glial cells and weak in neurons of the area postrema, it was intense in several neurons of the rostral and caudal solitary tract nucleus (NTS), and weak in some cholinergic neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. In the ob/ob and db/db mice, Jak-STAT activation and c-Fos expression were similar to those induced in wild-type mouse brainstem. Treatment with CNTF (120 min, to induce c-Fos expression) and leptin (25 min, to induce STAT3 phosphorylation) demonstrated the co-localization of the two transcription factors in a small neuron population in the caudal NTS portion. Finally, weak immunohistochemical CNTF staining, detected in funiculus separans, and meningeal glial cells, matched the modest amount of CNTF found by RT-qPCR in micropunched area postrema tissue, which in contrast exhibited a very high amount of CNTF receptor. Collectively, the present findings show that the area postrema and the NTS exhibit high, distinctive responsiveness to circulating

  4. Mouse GATA-4: a retinoic acid-inducible GATA-binding transcription factor expressed in endodermally derived tissues and heart.

    PubMed Central

    Arceci, R J; King, A A; Simon, M C; Orkin, S H; Wilson, D B

    1993-01-01

    We report the cDNA cloning and characterization of mouse GATA-4, a new member of the family of zinc finger transcription factors that bind a core GATA motif. GATA-4 cDNA was identified by screening a 6.5-day mouse embryo library with oligonucleotide probes corresponding to a highly conserved region of the finger domains. Like other proteins of the family, GATA-4 is approximately 50 kDa in size and contains two zinc finger domains of the form C-X-N-C-(X17)-C-N-X-C. Cotransfection assays in heterologous cells demonstrate that GATA-4 trans activates reporter constructs containing GATA promoter elements. Northern (RNA) analysis and in situ hybridization show that GATA-4 mRNA is expressed in the heart, intestinal epithelium, primitive endoderm, and gonads. Retinoic acid-induced differentiation of mouse F9 cells into visceral or parietal endoderm is accompanied by increased expression of GATA-4 mRNA and protein. In vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells into embryoid bodies is also associated with increased GATA-4 expression. We conclude that GATA-4 is a tissue-specific, retinoic acid-inducible, and developmentally regulated transcription factor. On the basis of its tissue distribution, we speculate that GATA-4 plays a role in gene expression in the heart, intestinal epithelium, primitive endoderm, and gonads. Images PMID:8455608

  5. MicroRNA-127 Promotes Mesendoderm Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells by Targeting Left-Right Determination Factor 2.

    PubMed

    Ma, Haixia; Lin, Yu; Zhao, Zhen-Ao; Lu, Xukun; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Wang, Qiang; Li, Lei

    2016-06-01

    Specification of the three germ layers is a fundamental process and is essential for the establishment of organ rudiments. Multiple genetic and epigenetic factors regulate this dynamic process; however, the function of specific microRNAs in germ layer differentiation remains unknown. In this study, we established that microRNA-127 (miR-127) is related to germ layer specification via microRNA array analysis of isolated three germ layers of E7.5 mouse embryos and was verified through differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells. miR-127 is highly expressed in endoderm and primitive streak. Overexpression of miR-127 increases and inhibition of miR-127 decreases the expression of mesendoderm markers. We further show that miR-127 promotes mesendoderm differentiation through the nodal pathway, a determinative signaling pathway in early embryogenesis. Using luciferase reporter assay, left-right determination factor 2 (Lefty2), an antagonist of nodal, is identified to be a novel target of miR-127. Furthermore, the role of miR-127 in mesendoderm differentiation is attenuated by Lefty2 overexpression. Altogether, our results indicate that miR-127 accelerates mesendoderm differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells through nodal signaling by targeting Lefty2. PMID:27072135

  6. Integrating Factor Analysis and a Transgenic Mouse Model to Reveal a Peripheral Blood Predictor of Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Transgenic mouse tumor models have the advantage of facilitating controlled in vivo oncogenic perturbations in a common genetic background. This provides an idealized context for generating transcriptome-based diagnostic models while minimizing the inherent noisiness of high-throughput technologies. However, the question remains whether models developed in such a setting are suitable prototypes for useful human diagnostics. We show that latent factor modeling of the peripheral blood transcriptome in a mouse model of breast cancer provides the basis for using computational methods to link a mouse model to a prototype human diagnostic based on a common underlying biological response to the presence of a tumor. Methods We used gene expression data from mouse peripheral blood cell (PBC) samples to identify significantly differentially expressed genes using supervised classification and sparse ANOVA. We employed these transcriptome data as the starting point for developing a breast tumor predictor from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by using a factor modeling approach. Results The predictor distinguished breast cancer patients from healthy individuals in a cohort of patients independent from that used to build the factors and train the model with 89% sensitivity, 100% specificity and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.97 using Youden's J-statistic to objectively select the model's classification threshold. Both permutation testing of the model and evaluating the model strategy by swapping the training and validation sets highlight its stability. Conclusions We describe a human breast tumor predictor based on the gene expression of mouse PBCs. This strategy overcomes many of the limitations of earlier studies by using the model system to reduce noise and identify transcripts associated with the presence of a breast tumor over other potentially confounding factors. Our results serve as a proof-of-concept for using an animal model to develop a

  7. Chromosomal mapping of the human and mouse homologues of two new members of the AP-2 family of transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, J.A.; Sheer, D.; Bosher, J.M.

    1996-07-01

    The AP-2 transcription factor has been shown to play an important role in the development of tissues of ectodermal origin and has also been implicated in mammary oncogenesis. It has recently been found that AP-2 is encoded by a family of related genes, AP-2{alpha}, AP-2{beta}, and AP-2{gamma}. As a further step in understanding the role of each of these genes has in development, we have used fluorescence in situ hybridization to map the chromosomal locations of the mouse and human homologues of the newly isolated AP-2{beta} and AP-2{gamma} genes. Tcfap2b and Tcfap2c map to mouse chromosomes 1A2-4 and 2H3-4, respectively, while TFAP2B and TFAP2C map to human chromosomes 6p12 and 20q13.2, the later being a region that is frequently amplified in breast carcinoma. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. MITOCHONDRIAL DISEASES PART I: MOUSE MODELS OF OXPHOS DEFICIENCIES CAUSED BY DEFECTS ON RESPIRATORY COMPLEX SUBUNITS OR ASSEMBLY FACTORS

    PubMed Central

    Torraco, Alessandra; Peralta, Susana; Iommarini, Luisa; Diaz, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are the most common inborn errors of metabolism affecting the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS). Because the poor knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms, a cure for these disorders is still unavailable and all the treatments currently in use are supportive more than curative. Therefore, in the past decade a great variety of mouse models have been developed to assess the in vivo function of several mitochondrial proteins involved in human diseases. Due to the genetic and physiological similarity to humans, mice represent reliable models to study the pathogenic mechanisms of mitochondrial disorders and are precious to test new therapeutic approaches. Here we summarize the features of several mouse models of mitochondrial diseases directly related to defects in subunits of the OXPHOS complexes or in assembly factors. We discuss how these models recapitulate many human conditions and how they have contributed to the understanding of mitochondrial function in health and disease. PMID:25660179

  9. Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF) delays photoreceptor degeneration in explants of rd/rd mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, P; Caffé, A R; Holmqvist, I; Söderpalm, A K; Singh, D P; Shinohara, T; van Veen, T

    2001-09-17

    Lens epithelium derived growth factor (LEDGF) has been shown to rescue embryonic chick photoreceptor cells from serum starvation and heat stress, light damaged photoreceptor cells in Lewis rats, and photoreceptor cells in RCS rats. The aim of our study is to study the rescue effect of LEDGF on photoreceptor cells in the rd/rd mouse using our long-term serum free organ culture. At the end of this culture period of 21-26 days LEDGF treated rd mouse retina showed an increased photoreceptor survival compared to the untreated controls. LEDGF has no effect on expression and localization of opsin and arrestin in the rod photoreceptor cells when RPE is present. The protective potency of LEDGF on the retinal photoreceptor cells is similar to that of BDNF. LEDGF is known to activate heat shock proteins (Hsps) and the elevated Hsps are also reported to suppress apoptosis. PMID:11588609

  10. Effects of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor I on muscle in mouse models of human growth disorders.

    PubMed

    Clark, Ryan P; Schuenke, Mark; Keeton, Stephanie M; Staron, Robert S; Kopchick, John J

    2006-01-01

    The precise effects of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) on muscle development and physiology are relatively unknown. Furthermore, there have been conflicting reports on the effects of GH/IGF-I on muscle. Distinguishing the direct effects of GH versus those of IGF-I is problematic, but animal models with altered GH/IGF-I action could help to alleviate some of the conflicting results and help to determine the independent actions of GH and IGF-I. The phenotypes of several mouse models, namely the GH receptor-gene-disrupted (GHR -/-) mouse and a variety of IGF-I -/- mice, are summarized, which ultimately will aid our understanding of this complex area. PMID:17259718

  11. Transforming growth factor-beta1 upregulates myostatin expression in mouse C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Budasz-Rwiderska, M; Jank, M; Motyl, T

    2005-06-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) belong to the same TGF-beta superfamily of proteins. They are involved in regulation of skeletal muscle growth and development as well as muscle catabolism. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between MSTN and TGF-beta1 expression in proliferating and differentiating mouse C2C12 myoblasts cultured in normal and catabolic conditions and to evaluate the effect of exogenous TGF-beta1 as well as "knock down" of TGF-beta1 receptor type II on MSTN expression in proliferating and differentiating myogenic cells. The direct effect of TGF-beta1 on myostatin was also examined. Myostatin expression increased gradually with cell confluency in proliferating cultures, while the level of TGF-beta1, detected in the form of a 100 kDa small latent complex diminished. Myostatin expression was accompanied by a partial cell cycle arrest. Three forms of myostatin were found: a 52 kDa precursor, a 40 kDa latency associated propeptide, and a 26 kDa active peptide. A decrease in myostatin and TGF-beta1 levels was observed during the first three days of differentiation, which was subsequently followed by significant increase of their expression during next three to four days of differentiation. Catabolic state induced by dexamethasone significantly increased the level of all forms of myostatin as well as latent (100 kDa) and active (25 kDa) forms of TGF-beta1 in differentiating myoblasts in a dose dependent manner. Exogenous TGF-beta1 (2 ng/ml) significantly increased myostatin levels both in proliferating and differentiating C2C12 myoblasts, whereas silencing of the TGF-beta1 receptor II gene significantly lowered myostatin level in examined cells. The presented results indicate that TGF-beta1 may control myostatin-related regulation of myogenesis through up-regulation of myostatin, predominantly in the course of terminal differentiation and glucocorticoid-dependent catabolic stimulation. PMID

  12. MicroRNA-30 inhibits antiapoptotic factor Mcl-1 in mouse and human hematopoietic cells after radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang Hong; Ha, Cam T; Xiao, Mang

    2016-06-01

    We previously reported that microRNA-30 (miR-30) expression was initiated by radiation-induced proinflammatory factor IL-1β and NFkB activation in mouse and human hematopoietic cells. However, the downstream effectors of miR-30 and its specific role in radiation-induced cell death are not well understood. In the present study, we evaluated effects of radiation on miR-30 expression and activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathway Bcl-2 family factors in in vivo mouse and in vitro human hematopoietic cells. CD2F1 mice and human CD34+ cells were exposed to different doses of gamma-radiation. In addition to survival studies, mouse blood, bone marrow (BM) and spleen cells and human CD34+ cells were collected at 4 h, and 1, 3 and 4 days after irradiation to determine apoptotic and stress response signals. Our results showed that mouse serum miR-30, DNA damage marker γ-H2AX in BM, and Bim, Bax and Bak expression, cytochrome c release, and caspase-3 and -7 activation in BM and/or spleen cells were upregulated in a radiation dose-dependent manner. Antiapoptotic factor Mcl-1 was significantly downregulated, whereas Bcl-2 was less changed or unaltered in the irradiated mouse cells and human CD34+ cells. Furthermore, a putative miR-30 binding site was found in the 3' UTR of Mcl-1 mRNA. miR-30 directly inhibits the expression of Mcl-1 through binding to its target sequence, which was demonstrated by a luciferase reporter assay, and the finding that Mcl-1 was uninhibited by irradiation in miR-30 knockdown CD34+ cells. Bcl-2 expression was not affected by miR-30. Our data suggest miR-30 plays a key role in radiation-induced apoptosis through directly targeting Mcl-1in hematopoietic cells. PMID:27032651

  13. Effect of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor α gene silencing on mouse gastric cancer cell proliferation and migration

    PubMed Central

    SUN, ZHONGWEI; MENG, YAN; LIU, GUOQIN; JIANG, YONGSHENG; MENG, QINGHUA; HU, SANYUAN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) gene co-silencing in mouse gastric cancer (GC) cells. Respectively, three pairs of liposome-encapsulated IL-1β and TNFα small interfering RNA (siRNA) were transfected into the mouse GC cell line MFC. The most effective siRNA, as identified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, was used for co-suppression of IL-1β and TNFα genes. The activities of cell proliferation, colony formation and migration were determined by the Cell Counting Kit 8 method, colony formation assay and Transwell assay, respectively. Protein array analysis was performed to identify the differentially expressed factors. The possible signaling pathways of the various factors targeting the genes were identified by pathway enrichment analysis using KOBAS 2.0. siRNA1 and siRNAc were the most effective interference sequences for IL-1β and TNFα, respectively. Following co-transfection of siRNA1 and siRNAc, the expression of IL-1β and TNFα was inhibited at the mRNA and protein levels, and the cell proliferation, colony forming and migration abilities were reduced (P<0.05). The expression of inflammatory factors, including chemokine ligand 5, cyclooxygenase-2, IL-6, transforming growth factor β, IL-17A, matrix metallopeptidase 9 and stromal cell-derived factor 1α were also inhibited (P<0.05). These factors are mainly involved in the rheumatoid arthritis pathway, the intestinal immune network for IgA production, the TNF signaling pathway and the inflammatory bowel disease pathway. IL-1β and TNFα gene silencing inhibits the proliferation and migration of MFC. The mechanisms may involve multiple inflammatory factors that participate in the signaling pathways of tumor tissue inflammation, the immune network and TNF. PMID:27073517

  14. Mouse Meningiocytes Express Sox2 and Yield High Efficiency of Chimeras after Nuclear Reprogramming with Exogenous Factors*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Dajiang; Gan, Yi; Shao, Kaifeng; Wang, Hao; Li, Wen; Wang, Tao; He, Wenzhi; Xu, Jianyong; Zhang, Yu; Kou, Zhaohui; Zeng, Lingwen; Sheng, Guoqing; Esteban, Miguel A.; Gao, Shaorong; Pei, Duanqing

    2008-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell technology, also termed iPS, is an emerging approach to reprogram cells into an embryonic stem cell-like state by viral transduction with defined combinations of factors. iPS cells share most characteristics of embryonic stem cells, counting pluripotency and self-renewal, and have so far been obtained from mouse and humans, including patients with genetic diseases. Remarkably, autologous transplantation of cell lineages derived from iPS cells will eliminate the possibility of immunological rejection, as well as current ethical issues surrounding human embryonic stem cell research. However, before iPS can be used for clinical purposes, technical problems must be overcome. Among other considerations, full and homogeneous iPS reprogramming is an important prerequisite. However, despite the fact that cells from several mouse tissues can be successfully induced to iPS, the overall efficiency of chimera formation of these clones remains low even if selection for Oct4 or Nanog expression is applied. In this report, we demonstrate that cells from the mouse meningeal membranes express elevated levels of the embryonic master regulator Sox2 and are highly amenable to iPS. Meningeal iPS clones, generated without selection, are fully and homogeneously reprogrammed based on DNA methylation analysis and 100% chimera competent. Our results define a population of somatic cells that are ready to undergo iPS, thus highlighting a very attractive cell type for iPS research and application. PMID:18826945

  15. Mouse Y-Encoded Transcription Factor Zfy2 Is Essential for Sperm Head Remodelling and Sperm Tail Development

    PubMed Central

    Vernet, Nadege; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K.; Decarpentrie, Fanny; Longepied, Guy; de Rooij, Dirk G.; Burgoyne, Paul S.; Mitchell, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    A previous study indicated that genetic information encoded on the mouse Y chromosome short arm (Yp) is required for efficient completion of the second meiotic division (that generates haploid round spermatids), restructuring of the sperm head, and development of the sperm tail. Using mouse models lacking a Y chromosome but with varying Yp gene complements provided by Yp chromosomal derivatives or transgenes, we recently identified the Y-encoded zinc finger transcription factors Zfy1 and Zfy2 as the Yp genes promoting the second meiotic division. Using the same mouse models we here show that Zfy2 (but not Zfy1) contributes to the restructuring of the sperm head and is required for the development of the sperm tail. The preferential involvement of Zfy2 is consistent with the presence of an additional strong spermatid-specific promotor that has been acquired by this gene. This is further supported by the fact that promotion of sperm morphogenesis is also seen in one of the two markedly Yp gene deficient models in which a Yp deletion has created a Zfy2/1 fusion gene that is driven by the strong Zfy2 spermatid-specific promotor, but encodes a protein almost identical to that encoded by Zfy1. Our results point to there being further genetic information on Yp that also has a role in restructuring the sperm head. PMID:26765744

  16. Trefoil factor family peptides TFF1 and TFF3 in the nervous tissues of developing mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Belovari, Tatjana; Bijelić, Nikola; Tolušić Levak, Maja; Baus Lončar, Mirela

    2015-01-01

    Trefoil factor family peptides (TFF1, TFF2, and TFF3) are predominantly found in mucous epithelia of various organs. However, they have also been reported in the nervous tissue, particularly mouse, rat, porcine, and human brain. The aim of this research was to determine the presence of TFF1 and TFF3 in the nervous system of developing mouse embryo. Mouse embryos, at the stages E15 to E17 were isolated, fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde and embedded in paraffin blocks. Sagittal 6µm sections were made, processed for immunohistochemistry, and incubated with anti-TFF1 or anti-TFF3 primary polyclonal rabbit antibodies. Labeled streptavidin-biotin method was used for TFF detection. TFF1 and 3 were found in the cytoplasm of ganglion cell somata, while TFF3 staining was also visible in the cytoplasm of neurons in different areas and nuclei of brain and medulla oblongata. Neurons in the gray matter of spinal cord were also TFF1 and TFF3 positive, and signal for both peptides was found in the choroid plexus. TFF peptides might be involved in the complex processes of nervous system development and differentiation and brain plasticity. PMID:25725142

  17. A Mouse Strain Where Basal Connective Tissue Growth Factor Gene Expression Can Be Switched from Low to High

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Heather E.; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Hiller, Sylvia; Sulik, Kathleen K.; Maeda, Nobuyo

    2010-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a signaling molecule that primarily functions in extracellular matrix maintenance and repair. Increased Ctgf expression is associated with fibrosis in chronic organ injury. Studying the role of CTGF in fibrotic disease in vivo, however, has been hampered by perinatal lethality of the Ctgf null mice as well as the limited scope of previous mouse models of Ctgf overproduction. Here, we devised a new approach and engineered a single mutant mouse strain where the endogenous Ctgf-3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) was replaced with a cassette containing two 3′UTR sequences arranged in tandem. The modified Ctgf allele uses a 3′UTR from the mouse FBJ osteosarcoma oncogene (c-Fos) and produces an unstable mRNA, resulting in 60% of normal Ctgf expression (Lo allele). Upon Cre-expression, excision of the c-Fos-3′UTR creates a transcript utilizing the more stable bovine growth hormone (bGH) 3′UTR, resulting in increased Ctgf expression (Hi allele). Using the Ctgf Lo and Hi mutants, and crosses to a Ctgf knockout or Cre-expressing mice, we have generated a series of strains with a 30-fold range of Ctgf expression. Mice with the lowest Ctgf expression, 30% of normal, appear healthy, while a global nine-fold overexpression of Ctgf causes abnormalities, including developmental delay and craniofacial defects, and embryonic death at E10-12. Overexpression of Ctgf by tamoxifen-inducible Cre in the postnatal life, on the other hand, is compatible with life. The Ctgf Lo-Hi mutant mice should prove useful in further understanding the function of CTGF in fibrotic diseases. Additionally, this method can be used for the production of mouse lines with quantitative variations in other genes, particularly with genes that are broadly expressed, have distinct functions in different tissues, or where altered gene expression is not compatible with normal development. PMID:20877562

  18. Effects of transforming growth factor type beta on expression of cytoskeletal proteins in endosteal mouse osteoblastic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lomri, A.; Marie, P.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) has been shown to influence the growth and differentiation of many cell types in vitro. We have examined the effects of TGF beta on cell morphology and cytoskeletal organization in relation to parameters of cell proliferation and differentiation in endosteal osteoblastic cells isolated from mouse caudal vertebrae. Treatment of mouse osteoblastic cells cultured in serum free medium for 24 hours with TGF beta (1.5-30 ng/mL) slightly (-23%) inhibited alkaline phosphatase activity. In parallel, TGF beta (0.5-30 ng/mL, 24 hours) greatly increased cell replication as evaluated by (3H)-thymidine incorporation into DNA (157% to 325% of controls). At a median dose (1.5 ng/mL) that affected both alkaline phosphatase and DNA synthesis (235% of controls) TGF beta induced rapid (six hours) cell respreading of quiescent mouse osteoblastic cells. This effect was associated with increased polymerization of actin, alpha actinin, and tubulins, as evaluated by both biochemical and immunofluorescence methods. In addition, TGF beta (1.5 ng/mL) increased the de novo biosynthesis of actin, alpha actinin, vimentin, and tubulins, as determined by {sup 35}S methionine labeling and fractionation of cytoskeletal proteins using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. These effects were rapid and transient, as they occurred at six hours and were reversed after 24 hours of TGF beta exposure. The results indicate that the stimulatory effect of TGF beta on DNA synthesis in endosteal mouse osteoblastic cells is associated with a transient increase in cell spreading associated with enhanced polymerization and synthesis of cytoskeletal proteins.

  19. Fibroblast growth factor 10 alters the balance between goblet and Paneth cells in the adult mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Al Alam, Denise; Danopoulos, Soula; Schall, Kathy; Sala, Frederic G; Almohazey, Dana; Fernandez, G Esteban; Georgia, Senta; Frey, Mark R; Ford, Henri R; Grikscheit, Tracy; Bellusci, Saverio

    2015-04-15

    Intestinal epithelial cell renewal relies on the right balance of epithelial cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Intestinal epithelial cells consist of absorptive and secretory lineage. The latter is comprised of goblet, Paneth, and enteroendocrine cells. Fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) plays a central role in epithelial cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation in several organs. The expression pattern of FGF10 and its receptors in both human and mouse intestine and their role in small intestine have yet to be investigated. First, we analyzed the expression of FGF10, FGFR1, and FGFR2, in the human ileum and throughout the adult mouse small intestine. We found that FGF10, FGFR1b, and FGFR2b are expressed in the human ileum as well as in the mouse small intestine. We then used transgenic mouse models to overexpress Fgf10 and a soluble form of Fgfr2b, to study the impact of gain or loss of Fgf signaling in the adult small intestine. We demonstrated that overexpression of Fgf10 in vivo and in vitro induces goblet cell differentiation while decreasing Paneth cells. Moreover, FGF10 decreases stem cell markers such as Lgr5, Lrig1, Hopx, Ascl2, and Sox9. FGF10 inhibited Hes1 expression in vitro, suggesting that FGF10 induces goblet cell differentiation likely through the inhibition of Notch signaling. Interestingly, Fgf10 overexpression for 3 days in vivo and in vitro increased the number of Mmp7/Muc2 double-positive cells, suggesting that goblet cells replace Paneth cells. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanism by which Fgf10 alters cell differentiation in the small intestine. PMID:25721301

  20. What's wrong with my mouse cage? Methodological considerations for modeling lifestyle factors and gene-environment interactions in mice.

    PubMed

    Mo, Christina; Renoir, Thibault; Hannan, Anthony J

    2016-05-30

    The mechanistic understanding of lifestyle contributions to disease has been largely driven by work in laboratory rodent models using environmental interventions. These interventions show an array of methodologies and sometimes unclear collective conclusions, hampering clinical interpretations. Here we discuss environmental enrichment, exercise and stress interventions to illustrate how different protocols can affect the interpretations of environmental factors in disease. We use Huntington's disease (HD) as an example because its mouse models exhibit excellent validity and HD was the first genetic animal model in which environmental stimulation was found to be beneficial. We make a number of observations and recommendations. Firstly, environmental enrichment and voluntary exercise generally show benefits across laboratories and mouse models. However, the extent to which these environmental interventions have beneficial effects depends on parameters such as the structural complexity of the cage in the case of enrichment, the timing of the intervention and the nature of the control conditions. In particular, clinical interpretations should consider deprived control living conditions and the ethological relevance of the enrichment. Secondly, stress can have negative effects on the phenotype in mouse models of HD and other brain disorders. When modeling stress, the effects of more than one type of experimental stressor should be investigated due to the heterogeneity and complexity of stress responses. With stress in particular, but ideally in all studies, both sexes should be used and the randomized group sizes need to be sufficiently powered to detect any sex effects. Opportunities for clinical translation will be guided by the 'environmental construct validity' of the preclinical data, including the culmination of complementary protocols across multiple animal models. Environmental interventions in mouse models of HD provide illustrative examples of how valid

  1. Cell Signaling and Transcription Factors Regulating Cell Fate During Formation of the Mouse Blastocyst

    PubMed Central

    Frum, Tristan; Ralston, Amy

    2015-01-01

    The first cell fate decisions during mammalian development establish tissues essential for healthy pregnancy. The mouse has served as a valuable model for discovering pathways regulating the first cell fate decisions, because of the ease with which early embryos can be recovered and an arsenal of classical and emerging methods for manipulating gene expression. Here we summarize the major pathways that govern the first cell fate decisions in mouse development. This knowledge serves as a paradigm for exploring how emergent properties of a self-organizing system can dynamically regulate gene expression and cell fate plasticity. Moreover, it brings to light the processes that establish healthy pregnancy and embryonic stem (ES) cells. We also describe unsolved mysteries and new technologies that could help overcome experimental challenges in the field. PMID:25999217

  2. Inhibition of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A and Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α Maximizes the Effects of Radiation in Sarcoma Mouse Models Through Destruction of Tumor Vasculature

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hae-June; Yoon, Changhwan; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Yeo-Jung; Schmidt, Benjamin; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Tap, William D.; Eisinger-Mathason, T.S. Karin; Choy, Edwin; Kirsch, David G.; Simon, M. Celeste; and others

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To examine the addition of genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) to radiation therapy (RT) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) inhibition (ie trimodality therapy) for soft-tissue sarcoma. Methods and Materials: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α was inhibited using short hairpin RNA or low metronomic doses of doxorubicin, which blocks HIF-1α binding to DNA. Trimodality therapy was examined in a mouse xenograft model and a genetically engineered mouse model of sarcoma, as well as in vitro in tumor endothelial cells (ECs) and 4 sarcoma cell lines. Results: In both mouse models, any monotherapy or bimodality therapy resulted in tumor growth beyond 250 mm{sup 3} within the 12-day treatment period, but trimodality therapy with RT, VEGF-A inhibition, and HIF-1α inhibition kept tumors at <250 mm{sup 3} for up to 30 days. Trimodality therapy on tumors reduced HIF-1α activity as measured by expression of nuclear HIF-1α by 87% to 95% compared with RT alone, and cytoplasmic carbonic anhydrase 9 by 79% to 82%. Trimodality therapy also increased EC-specific apoptosis 2- to 4-fold more than RT alone and reduced microvessel density by 75% to 82%. When tumor ECs were treated in vitro with trimodality therapy under hypoxia, there were significant decreases in proliferation and colony formation and increases in DNA damage (as measured by Comet assay and γH2AX expression) and apoptosis (as measured by cleaved caspase 3 expression). Trimodality therapy had much less pronounced effects when 4 sarcoma cell lines were examined in these same assays. Conclusions: Inhibition of HIF-1α is highly effective when combined with RT and VEGF-A inhibition in blocking sarcoma growth by maximizing DNA damage and apoptosis in tumor ECs, leading to loss of tumor vasculature.

  3. Effect of Human Endothelial Progenitor Cell (EPC)- or Mouse Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Derived Vessel Formation on the Survival of Vitrified/Warmed Mouse Ovarian Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Soo Kyung; Shin, Dong Hyuk; Kim, Bo Yeun; Yoon, Sook-Young; Yoon, Tae Ki; Lee, Woo Sik

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of improving angiogenesis at graft sites on the survival of follicles in transplanted ovarian tissue. Matrigel containing 5 × 105 of cord blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) or 200 ng of mouse vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was injected subcutaneously into BALB/c-Nu mice. After 1 week, vitrified/warmed ovaries from female B6D2F1 mice were subcutaneously transplanted into the injection sites. After 1, 2, and 4 weeks posttransplantation, the ovaries were recovered and subjected to histological analysis. Oocytes were collected from the transplanted ovaries, and their fertilization, embryonic development, and delivery were also observed. Vitrified/warmed ovaries transplanted into EPC- or VEGF-treated sites developed more blood vessels and showed better follicle survival than those transplanted into sham-injected sites. Normal embryonic development and consequent live births were obtained using oocytes recovered from cryopreserved/transplanted ovaries. Treatment with EPCs or VEGF could prevent the ischemic damage during the early revascularization stage of ovarian transplantation. PMID:24401473

  4. Alteration of T cell maturation and proliferation in the mouse thymus induced by serum factors from patients with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, M; Aiso, S; Hibi, T; Watanabe, N; Iwao, Y; Yoshida, T; Asakura, H; Tsuru, S; Tsuchiya, M

    1987-01-01

    Recently it has been reported that patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) often have thymus abnormalities, although the precise mechanisms which induce those abnormalities remain unclear. We have examined the effect of serum fractions from patients with UC and other colonic diseases on mouse thymus to clarify the possible existence of factors which have thymus growth activity. These fractions were separated from sera of patients with UC by gel filtration and anion exchange high performance liquid chromatography. In mice given UC serum fractions; (i) remarkable increases in weight and total cell number of the thymus were observed from day 4 to day 9; (ii) a significant increase in the number of peanut agglutinin (PNA)+ thymus cells was demonstrated using flow cytometry on day 9; (iii) on quantitative analysis of surface antigens the percentage of Lyt-2+ thymus cells decreased and that of L3T4+ thymus cells increased remarkably on day 13; the number of bright Thy-1.2+ cells and of dull Lyt-1+ cells increased. In contrast, the serum fractions from patients with other colonic diseases and from normal persons caused little change in mouse thymus throughout the study. The results suggest that factors fractionated from the serum of patients with UC disturb intra-thymic T cell maturation and enhance the proliferation of thymus cells. PMID:3498579

  5. Identification of critical regions in mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor by scanning-deletion analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Shanafelt, A B; Kastelein, R A

    1989-01-01

    Structure-function relationships for mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor were examined by generating a series of small deletions scanning the entire length of the molecule. Deletions of three amino acids were introduced at intervals of five amino acids by site-directed mutagenesis of the mature mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene. The mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and assayed for biological activity. This procedure identified four regions critical to activity. These critical regions were further delineated by additional three-amino acid deletion mutants. Larger deletions at each terminus were also made, as well as changes of specific amino acid residues. The four critical regions span amino acid residues 18-22, 34-41, 52-61, and 94-115. The disulfide bridge between Cys-51 and Cys-93 was also shown to be essential for activity, whereas that between Cys-85 and Cys-118 could be removed without loss of activity. The possible structural and/or functional roles of the critical regions are discussed. Images PMID:2662186

  6. Paracrine signaling between tumor subclones of mouse SCLC: a critical role of ETS transcription factor Pea3 in facilitating metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min-chul; Proost, Natalie; Song, Ji-Ying; Sutherland, Kate D; Zevenhoven, John; Berns, Anton

    2015-08-01

    Tumor heterogeneity can create a unique symbiotic tumor microenvironment. Earlier, we showed that clonal evolution in mouse small cell lung cancer (SCLC) can result in subclones that, upon cografting, endow the neuroendocrine tumor cells with metastatic potential. We now show that paracrine signaling between SCLC subclones is a critical requirement in the early steps of the metastatic process, such as local invasion and intravasation. We further show evidence that paracrine signaling via fibroblast growth factor 2 (Fgf2) and Mapk between these diverged tumor subclones causes enhanced expression of the Pea3 (polyomavirus enhancer activator 3) transcription factor, resulting in metastatic dissemination of the neuroendocrine tumor subclones. Our data reveal for the first time paracrine signaling between tumor cell subclones in SCLC that results in metastatic spread of SCLC. PMID:26215568

  7. Total absence of colony-stimulating factor 1 in the macrophage-deficient osteopetrotic (op/op) mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, W; Bartocci, A; Ferrante, A W; Ahmed-Ansari, A; Sell, K W; Pollard, J W; Stanley, E R

    1990-01-01

    Osteopetrotic (op/op) mutant mice suffer from congenital osteopetrosis due to a severe deficiency of osteoclasts. Furthermore, the total number of mononuclear phagocytes is extremely low in affected mice. Serum, 11 tissues, and different cell and organ conditioned media from op/op mice were shown to be devoid of biologically active colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1), whereas all of these preparations from littermate control +/+ and +/op mice contained the growth factor. The deficiency was specific for CSF-1 in that serum or conditioned media from op/op mice possessed elevated levels of at least three other macrophage growth factors. Partial correction of the op/op defect was observed following intraperitoneal implantation of diffusion chambers containing L929 cells, which in culture produce CSF-1 as their sole macrophage growth factor. No rearrangement of the CSF-1 gene in op/op mice was detected by Southern analysis. However, in contrast to control lung fibroblasts, which contained 4.6- and 2.3-kilobase CSF-1 mRNAs, only the 4.6-kilobase species was detected in op/op cells. An alteration in the CSF-1 gene is strongly implicated as the primary defect in op/op mice because they do not contain detectable CSF-1, their defect is correctable by administration of CSF-1, the op locus and the CSF-1 gene map within the same region of mouse chromosome 3, their CSF-1 mRNA biosynthesis is altered, and the op/op phenotype is consistent with the phenotype expected in a CSF-1 deficient mouse. Images PMID:2191302

  8. Insulin-like growth factor-II is produced by, signals to and is an important survival factor for the mature podocyte in man and mouse.

    PubMed

    Hale, L J; Welsh, G I; Perks, C M; Hurcombe, J A; Moore, S; Hers, I; Saleem, M A; Mathieson, P W; Murphy, A J; Jeansson, M; Holly, J M; Hardouin, S N; Coward, R J

    2013-05-01

    Podocytes are crucial for preventing the passage of albumin into the urine and, when lost, are associated with the development of albuminuria, renal failure and cardiovascular disease. Podocytes have limited capacity to regenerate, therefore pro-survival mechanisms are critically important. Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) is a potent survival and growth factor; however, its major function is thought to be in prenatal development, when circulating levels are high. IGF-II has only previously been reported to continue to be expressed in discrete regions of the brain into adulthood in rodents, with systemic levels being undetectable. Using conditionally immortalized human and ex vivo adult mouse cells of the glomerulus, we demonstrated the podocyte to be the major glomerular source and target of IGF-II; it signals to this cell via the IGF-I receptor via the PI3 kinase and MAPK pathways. Functionally, a reduction in IGF signalling causes podocyte cell death in vitro and glomerular disease in vivo in an aged IGF-II transgenic mouse that produces approximately 60% of IGF-II due to a lack of the P2 promoter of this gene. Collectively, this work reveals the fundamental importance of IGF-II in the mature podocyte for glomerular health across mammalian species. PMID:23299523

  9. Direct activation of human and mouse Oct4 genes using engineered TALE and Cas9 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiabiao; Lei, Yong; Wong, Wing-Ki; Liu, Senquan; Lee, Kai-Chuen; He, Xiangjun; You, Wenxing; Zhou, Rui; Guo, Jun-Tao; Chen, Xiongfong; Peng, Xianlu; Sun, Hao; Huang, He; Zhao, Hui; Feng, Bo

    2014-04-01

    The newly developed transcription activator-like effector protein (TALE) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 transcription factors (TF) offered a powerful and precise approach for modulating gene expression. In this article, we systematically investigated the potential of these new tools in activating the stringently silenced pluripotency gene Oct4 (Pou5f1) in mouse and human somatic cells. First, with a number of TALEs and sgRNAs targeting various regions in the mouse and human Oct4 promoters, we found that the most efficient TALE-VP64s bound around -120 to -80 bp, while highly effective sgRNAs targeted from -147 to -89-bp upstream of the transcription start sites to induce high activity of luciferase reporters. In addition, we observed significant transcriptional synergy when multiple TFs were applied simultaneously. Although individual TFs exhibited marginal activity to up-regulate endogenous gene expression, optimized combinations of TALE-VP64s could enhance endogenous Oct4 transcription up to 30-fold in mouse NIH3T3 cells and 20-fold in human HEK293T cells. More importantly, the enhancement of OCT4 transcription ultimately generated OCT4 proteins. Furthermore, examination of different epigenetic modifiers showed that histone acetyltransferase p300 could enhance both TALE-VP64 and sgRNA/dCas9-VP64 induced transcription of endogenous OCT4. Taken together, our study suggested that engineered TALE-TF and dCas9-TF are useful tools for modulating gene expression in mammalian cells. PMID:24500196

  10. Low stress reactivity and neuroendocrine factors in the BTBR T+tf/J mouse model of autism.

    PubMed

    Silverman, J L; Yang, M; Turner, S M; Katz, A M; Bell, D B; Koenig, J I; Crawley, J N

    2010-12-29

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by abnormal reciprocal social interactions, communication deficits, and repetitive behaviors with restricted interests. BTBR T+tf/J (BTBR) is an inbred mouse strain that displays robust behavioral phenotypes with analogies to all three of the diagnostic symptoms of autism, including low social interactions, reduced vocalizations in social settings, and high levels of repetitive self-grooming. Autism-relevant phenotypes in BTBR offer translational tools to discover neurochemical mechanisms underlying unusual mouse behaviors relevant to symptoms of autism. Because repetitive self-grooming in mice may be a displacement behavior elevated by stressors, we investigated neuroendocrine markers of stress and behavioral reactivity to stressors in BTBR mice, as compared to C57BL/6J (B6), a standard inbred strain with high sociability. Radioimmunoassays replicated previous findings that circulating corticosterone is higher in BTBR than in B6. Higher basal glucocorticoid receptor mRNA and higher oxytocin peptide levels were detected in the brains of BTBR as compared to B6. No significant differences were detected in corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) peptide or CRF mRNA. In response to behavioral stressors, BTBR and B6 were generally similar on behavioral tasks including stress-induced hyperthermia, elevated plus-maze, light ↔ dark exploration, tail flick, acoustic startle and prepulse inhibition. BTBR displayed less reactivity than B6 to a noxious thermal stimulus in the hot plate, and less immobility than B6 in both the forced swim and tail suspension depression-related tasks. BTBR, therefore, exhibited lower depression-like scores than B6 on two standard tests sensitive to antidepressants, did not differ from B6 on two well-validated anxiety-like behaviors, and did not exhibit unusual stress reactivity to sensory stimuli. Our findings support the interpretation that autism-relevant social deficits, vocalizations, and

  11. Prediction of Pathway Activation by Xenobiotic-Responsive Transcription Factors in the Mouse Liver

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals activate xenobioticresponsive transcription factors (TF). Identification of target genes of these factors would be useful in predicting pathway activation in in vitro chemical screening. Starting with a large compendium of Affymet...

  12. Fasting Induces Nuclear Factor E2-Related Factor 2 and ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters via Protein Kinase A and Sirtuin-1 in Mouse and Human

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Supriya R.; Donepudi, Ajay C.; Xu, Jialin; Wei, Wei; Cheng, Qiuqiong C.; Driscoll, Maureen V.; Johnson, Delinda A.; Johnson, Jeffrey A.; Li, Xiaoling

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The purpose of this study was to determine whether 3′-5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) and Sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) dependent mechanisms modulate ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) transport protein expression. ABC transport proteins (ABCC2–4) are essential for chemical elimination from hepatocytes and biliary excretion. Nuclear factor-E2 related-factor 2 (NRF2) is a transcription factor that mediates ABCC induction in response to chemical inducers and liver injury. However, a role for NRF2 in the regulation of transporter expression in nonchemical models of liver perturbation is largely undescribed. Results: Here we show that fasting increased NRF2 target gene expression through NRF2- and SIRT1–dependent mechanisms. In intact mouse liver, fasting induces NRF2 target gene expression by at least 1.5 to 5-fold. In mouse and human hepatocytes, treatment with 8-Bromoadenosine-cAMP, a cAMP analogue, increased NRF2 target gene expression and antioxidant response element activity, which was decreased by the PKA inhibitor, H-89. Moreover, fasting induced NRF2 target gene expression was decreased in liver and hepatocytes of SIRT1 liver-specific null mice and NRF2-null mice. Lastly, NRF2 and SIRT1 were recruited to MAREs and Antioxidant Response Elements (AREs) in the human ABCC2 promoter. Innovation: Oxidative stress mediated NRF2 activation is well described, yet the influence of basic metabolic processes on NRF2 activation is just emerging. Conclusion: The current data point toward a novel role of nutrient status in regulation of NRF2 activity and the antioxidant response, and indicates that cAMP/PKA and SIRT1 are upstream regulators for fasting-induced activation of the NRF2-ARE pathway. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 15–30. PMID:23725046

  13. The Effects of Imatinib Mesylate on Cellular Viability, Platelet Derived Growth Factor and Stem Cell Factor in Mouse Testicular Normal Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kheradmand, Fatemeh; Hashemnia, Seyyed Mohammad Reza; Valizadeh, Nasim; Roshan-Milani, Shiva

    2016-01-01

    Background: Growth factors play an essential role in the development of tumor and normal cells like testicular leydig cells. Treatment of cancer with anti-cancer agents like imatinib mesylate may interfere with normal leydig cell activity, growth and fertility through failure in growth factors’ production or their signaling pathways. The purpose of the study was to determine cellular viability and the levels of, platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and stem cell factor (SCF) in normal mouse leydig cells exposed to imatinib, and addressing the effect of imatinib on fertility potential. Methods: The mouse TM3 leydig cells were treated with 0 (control), 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 μM imatinib for 2, 4 and 6 days. Each experiment was repeated three times (15 experiments in each day).The cellular viability and growth factors levels were assessed by MTT and ELISA methods, respectively. For statistical analysis, one-way ANOVA with Tukey’s post hoc and Kruskal-Wallis test were performed. A p-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: With increasing drug concentration, cellular viability decreased significantly (p<0.05) and in contrast, PDGF levels increased (p<0.05). Different imatinib concentrations had no significant effect on SCF level. Increasing the duration of treatment from 2 to 6 days had no obvious effect on cellular viability, PDGF and SCF levels. Conclusion: Imatinib may reduce fertility potential especially at higher concentrations in patients treated with this drug by decreasing cellular viability. The effect of imatinib on leydig cells is associated with PDGF stimulation. Of course future studies can be helpful in exploring the long term effects of this drug. PMID:27141462

  14. Expression profiling and pathway analysis of Krüppel-like factor 4 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hagos, Engda G; Ghaleb, Amr M; Kumar, Amrita; Neish, Andrew S; Yang, Vincent W

    2011-01-01

    Background: Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is a zinc-finger transcription factor with diverse regulatory functions in proliferation, differentiation, and development. KLF4 also plays a role in inflammation, tumorigenesis, and reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which KLF4 regulates these processes, we conducted DNA microarray analyses to identify differentially expressed genes in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) wild type and null for Klf4. Methods: Expression profiles of fibroblasts isolated from mouse embryos wild type or null for the Klf4 alleles were examined by DNA microarrays. Differentially expressed genes were subjected to the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID). The microarray data were also interrogated with the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) for pathway identification. Results obtained from the microarray analysis were confirmed by Western blotting for select genes with biological relevance to determine the correlation between mRNA and protein levels. Results: One hundred and sixty three up-regulated and 88 down-regulated genes were identified that demonstrated a fold-change of at least 1.5 and a P-value < 0.05 in Klf4-null MEFs compared to wild type MEFs. Many of the up-regulated genes in Klf4-null MEFs encode proto-oncogenes, growth factors, extracellular matrix, and cell cycle activators. In contrast, genes encoding tumor suppressors and those involved in JAK-STAT signaling pathways are down-regulated in Klf4-null MEFs. IPA and GSEA also identified various pathways that are regulated by KLF4. Lastly, Western blotting of select target genes confirmed the changes revealed by microarray data. Conclusions: These data are not only consistent with previous functional studies of KLF4's role in tumor suppression and somatic cell reprogramming, but also revealed novel target genes that mediate KLF4's

  15. Characterization of specific high affinity receptors for human tumor necrosis factor on mouse fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, P.E.; Hotchkiss, A.; Mohler, M.; Aggarwal, B.B.

    1985-10-05

    Mouse L-929 fibroblasts, an established line of cells, are very sensitive to lysis by human lymphotoxin (hTNF-beta). Specific binding of a highly purified preparation of hTNF-beta to these cells was examined. Recombinant DNA-derived hTNF-beta was radiolabeled with (TH)propionyl succinimidate at the lysine residues of the molecule to a specific activity of 200 microCi/nmol of protein. (TH)hTNF-beta was purified by high performance gel permeation chromatography and the major fraction was found to be monomeric by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The labeled hTNF-beta was fully active in causing lysis of L-929 fibroblasts and bound specifically to high affinity binding sites on these cells. Scatchard analysis of the binding data revealed the presence of a single class of high affinity receptors with an apparent Kd of 6.7 X 10(-11) M and a capacity of 3200 binding sites/cell. Unlabeled recombinant DNA-derived hTNF-beta was found to be approximately 5-fold more effective competitive inhibitor of binding than the natural hTNF-beta. The binding of hTNF-beta to these mouse fibroblasts was also correlated with the ultimate cell lysis. Neutralizing polyclonal antibodies to hTNF-beta efficiently inhibited the binding of (TH)hTNF-beta to the cells. The authors conclude that the specific high affinity binding site is the receptor for hTNF-beta and may be involved in lysis of cells.

  16. Time Course of Behavioral Alteration and mRNA Levels of Neurotrophic Factor Following Stress Exposure in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Hashikawa, Naoya; Ogawa, Takumi; Sakamoto, Yusuke; Ogawa, Mami; Matsuo, Yumi; Zamami, Yoshito; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi

    2015-08-01

    Stress is known to affect neurotrophic factor expression, which induces depression-like behavior. However, whether there are time-dependent changes in neurotrophic factor mRNA expression following stress remains unclear. In the present study, we tested whether chronic stress exposure induces long-term changes in depression-related behavior, serum corticosterone, and hippocampal proliferation as well as neurotrophic factor family mRNA levels, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), in the mouse hippocampus. The mRNA level of neurotrophic factors (BDNF, NGF, NT-3, and CNTF) was measured using the real-time PCR. The serum corticosterone level was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and, for each subject, the hippocampal proliferation was examined by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine immunostaining. Mice exhibited depression-like behavior in the forced-swim test (FST) and decreased BDNF mRNA and hippocampal proliferation in the middle of the stress exposure. After 15 days of stress exposure, we observed increased immobility in the FST, serum corticosterone levels, and BDNF mRNA levels and degenerated hippocampal proliferation, maintained for at least 2 weeks. Anhedonia-like behavior in the sucrose preference test and NGF mRNA levels were decreased following 15 days of stress. NGF mRNA levels were significantly higher 1 week after stress exposure. The current data demonstrate that chronic stress exposure induces prolonged BDNF and NGF mRNA changes and increases corticosterone levels and depression-like behavior in the FST, but does not alter other neurotrophic factors or performance in the sucrose preference test. PMID:25820756

  17. Short-lived mammals (shrew, mouse) have a less robust metal-responsive transcription factor than humans and bats.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Katharina; Steiner, Kurt; Petrov, Boyan; Georgiev, Oleg; Schaffner, Walter

    2016-06-01

    Non-essential "heavy" metals such as cadmium tend to accumulate in an organism and thus are a particular threat for long-lived animals. Here we show that two unrelated, short-lived groups of mammals (rodents and shrews, separated by 100 Mio years of evolution) each have independently acquired mutations in their metal-responsive transcription factor (MTF-1) in a domain relevant for robust transcriptional induction by zinc and cadmium. While key amino acids are mutated in rodents, in shrews an entire exon is skipped. Rodents and especially shrews are unique regarding the alterations of this region. To investigate the biological relevance of these alterations, MTF-1s from the common shrew (Sorex araneus), the mouse, humans and a bat (Myotis blythii), were tested by cotransfection with a reporter gene into cells lacking MTF-1. Whereas shrews only live for 1.5-2.5 years, bats, although living on a very similar insect diet, have a lifespan of several decades. We find that bat MTF-1 is similarly metal-responsive as its human counterpart, while shrew MTF-1 is less responsive, similar to mouse MTF-1. We propose that in comparison to most other mammals, the short-lived shrews and rodents can afford a "lower-quality" system for heavy metal homeostasis and detoxification. PMID:27067444

  18. Establishment and evaluation of a transgenic mouse model of arthritis induced by overexpressing human tumor necrosis factor alpha

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ge; Wu, Yu'e; Jia, Huanhuan; Tang, Lu; Huang, Ren; Peng, Yucai; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Blockade of TNFα by monoclonal antibody has been widely used for the therapy of RA since the 1990s; however, its mechanism of efficacy, and potential safety concerns of the treatment are still not fully understood. This study sought to establish a transgenic arthritic mouse model by overexpressing human TNFα (hTNFα) and to apply this model as a means to evaluate therapeutic consequences of TNFα inhibitors. The transgenic mouse line (TgTC) with FVB background was generated by incorporating 3′-modified hTNFα gene sequences. A progressively erosive polyarthritis developed in the TgTC mice, with many characteristics observed in human rheumatoid arthritis, including polyarticular swelling, impairment of movement, synovial hyperplasia, and cartilage and bone erosion. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that hTNFα is not only expressed in hyperplastic synovial membrane, but also in tissues without lesions, including brain, lung and kidney. Treatment of the TgTC mice with anti-hTNFα monoclonal antibodies (mAb) significantly decreased the level of hTNFα in the diseased joint and effectively prevented development of arthritis in a dose-dependent response fashion. Our results indicated that the TgTC mice represent a genetic model which can be used to comprehensively investigate the pathogenesis and therapeutics of TNFα-related diseases. PMID:26977076

  19. Macrophage Migration Inhibitor Factor Upregulates MCP-1 Expression in an Autocrine Manner in Hepatocytes during Acute Mouse Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jieshi; Yang, Le; Tian, Lei; Li, Weiyang; Yang, Lin; Li, Liying

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitor factor (MIF), a multipotent innate immune mediator, is an upstream component of the inflammatory cascade in diseases such as liver disease. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a highly representative chemokine, is critical in liver disease pathogenesis. We investigated the role of MIF in regulating hepatocytic MCP-1 expression. MIF and MCP-1 expression were characterized by immunochemistry, RT-PCR, ELISA, and immunoblotting in CCl4-treated mouse liver and isolated hepatocytes. MIF was primarily distributed in hepatocytes, and its expression increased upon acute liver injury. Its expression was also increased in injured hepatocytes, induced by LPS or CCl4, which mimic liver injury in vitro. MIF was expressed earlier than MCP-1, strongly inducing hepatocytic MCP-1 expression. Moreover, the increase in MCP-1 expression induced by MIF was inhibited by CD74- or CD44-specific siRNAs and SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor. Further, CD74 or CD44 deficiency effectively inhibited MIF-induced p38 activation. MIF inhibitor ISO-1 reduced MCP-1 expression and p38 phosphorylation in CCl4-treated mouse liver. Our results showed that MIF regulates MCP-1 expression in hepatocytes of injured liver via CD74, CD44, and p38 MAPK in an autocrine manner, providing compelling information on the role of MIF in liver injury, and implying a new regulatory mechanism for liver inflammation. PMID:27273604

  20. Effect of atmospheric fine particles on epidermal growth factor receptor mRNA expression in mouse skin tissue.

    PubMed

    Han, X; Liang, W L; Zhang, Y; Sun, L D; Liang, W Y

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of atmospheric fine particles on epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr) mRNA expression in mouse skin tissue and explored the effect of atmospheric fine particles on skin aging. Forty female BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups (each comprising 10 mice) as follows: a saline control group and low-, medium-, and high-dose atmospheric fine particle groups (1.6, 8.0, and 40.0 mg/kg, respectively) (fine particles were defined as those with a diameter of £2.5 mm, i.e., PM2.5). Each dose group was exposed to intratracheal instillation for 3 days. Twenty-four hours after the last exposure, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the expression of Egfr mRNA in the skin tissue of each mouse. The expression levels of Egfr mRNA in the medium- and high-dose PM2.5 groups were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that in the control group, and were positively correlated with the dose. Medium and high concentrations of PM2.5 can induce the expression of Egfr mRNA and promote skin aging. PMID:27050971

  1. Whole Reproductive System Non-Negative Matrix Factorization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of an Early-Stage Ovarian Cancer Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Paine, Martin R L; Kim, Jaeyeon; Bennett, Rachel V; Parry, R Mitchell; Gaul, David A; Wang, May D; Matzuk, Martin M; Fernández, Facundo M

    2016-01-01

    High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is the most common and deadliest form of ovarian cancer. Yet it is largely asymptomatic in its initial stages. Studying the origin and early progression of this disease is thus critical in identifying markers for early detection and screening purposes. Tissue-based mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) can be employed as an unbiased way of examining localized metabolic changes between healthy and cancerous tissue directly, at the onset of disease. In this study, we describe MSI results from Dicer-Pten double-knockout (DKO) mice, a mouse model faithfully reproducing the clinical nature of human HGSC. By using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) for the unsupervised analysis of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) datasets, tissue regions are segregated based on spectral components in an unbiased manner, with alterations related to HGSC highlighted. Results obtained by combining NMF with DESI-MSI revealed several metabolic species elevated in the tumor tissue and/or surrounding blood-filled cyst including ceramides, sphingomyelins, bilirubin, cholesterol sulfate, and various lysophospholipids. Multiple metabolites identified within the imaging study were also detected at altered levels within serum in a previous metabolomic study of the same mouse model. As an example workflow, features identified in this study were used to build an oPLS-DA model capable of discriminating between DKO mice with early-stage tumors and controls with up to 88% accuracy. PMID:27159635

  2. Tissue Destruction Induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis Infection in a Mouse Chamber Model Is Associated with Host Tumor Necrosis Factor Generation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuh-Yih; Huang, Jan-Hung; Lai, Yo-Yin; Huang, Han-Ching; Hu, Suh-Woan

    2005-01-01

    Intrachamber challenge with Porphyromonas gingivalis strain 381 in a mouse subcutaneous chamber model results in a local infection that progresses to exfoliation of the chambers within 15 days. This study was designed to elucidate the contribution of host reactions to tissue destruction manifested by chamber exfoliation in animals infected with P. gingivalis. Chamber fluids showed increasing levels of prostaglandin E2 with infection, and the levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in chamber fluids peaked just before chamber exfoliation. Intraperitoneal injection of a TNF inhibitor, thalidomide (TH), reduced the number of exfoliated chambers, while indomethacin had no effect. Exogenous TNF in chambers without bacterial infection did not cause chamber exfoliation but induced neutrophil infiltration. In a dual-chamber model, two chambers were implanted in the same mouse. One chamber was infected with P. gingivalis, and 9 days later exogenous TNF was added to the other chamber. Altogether, 66.67% of uninfected chambers were exfoliated between day 11 and day 16, although no bacteria were recovered from uninfected chambers. TH treatment alleviated both infected and uninfected chamber exfoliation. In this study, tissue destruction caused by P. gingivalis 381 infection was due to the elevation of the TNF levels and not due to local bacterial activities. Our results further indicate that local infection by P. gingivalis 381, a nondisseminating strain, actually has systemic effects on the host pathological outcome. PMID:16299286

  3. Macrophage Migration Inhibitor Factor Upregulates MCP-1 Expression in an Autocrine Manner in Hepatocytes during Acute Mouse Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jieshi; Yang, Le; Tian, Lei; Li, Weiyang; Yang, Lin; Li, Liying

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitor factor (MIF), a multipotent innate immune mediator, is an upstream component of the inflammatory cascade in diseases such as liver disease. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a highly representative chemokine, is critical in liver disease pathogenesis. We investigated the role of MIF in regulating hepatocytic MCP-1 expression. MIF and MCP-1 expression were characterized by immunochemistry, RT-PCR, ELISA, and immunoblotting in CCl4-treated mouse liver and isolated hepatocytes. MIF was primarily distributed in hepatocytes, and its expression increased upon acute liver injury. Its expression was also increased in injured hepatocytes, induced by LPS or CCl4, which mimic liver injury in vitro. MIF was expressed earlier than MCP-1, strongly inducing hepatocytic MCP-1 expression. Moreover, the increase in MCP-1 expression induced by MIF was inhibited by CD74- or CD44-specific siRNAs and SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor. Further, CD74 or CD44 deficiency effectively inhibited MIF-induced p38 activation. MIF inhibitor ISO-1 reduced MCP-1 expression and p38 phosphorylation in CCl4-treated mouse liver. Our results showed that MIF regulates MCP-1 expression in hepatocytes of injured liver via CD74, CD44, and p38 MAPK in an autocrine manner, providing compelling information on the role of MIF in liver injury, and implying a new regulatory mechanism for liver inflammation. PMID:27273604

  4. Involvement of the T-box transcription factor Brachyury in early-stage embryonic mouse salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kouhei; Ikari, Tatsuya; Sugiyama, Goro; Sugiura, Tsuyoshi; Ohyama, Yukiko; Kumamaru, Wataru; Shirasuna, Kanemitsu; Mori, Yoshihide

    2016-09-01

    The mouse submandibular gland (SMG) is important organ for embryonic development, and branching morphogenesis is regulated by many molecules containing transcription factors. Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction revealed that the expression of Brachyury increased in the SMG and peaked between E12.5-E13.5, concomitant with the early stage of branching morphogenesis. The expression of Brachyury in SMG rudiments between E12.5-E13.5 was confirmed by western blotting. In addition, fibronectin and Btbd7 (regulated by fibronectin), which are both essential for cleft formation, were expressed strongly during the same period. The Sox2 and Wnt3a, which regulate cell growth, were also expressed strongly during E12.5-E13.5. On the other hand, cleft formation and branching morphogenesis was suppressed by knockdown of Brachyury gene, suggesting that Brachyury plays a central role in regulating cell growth and cleft formation in early-stage embryonic mouse salivary gland development. PMID:27369076

  5. Differential expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-A isoforms in the mouse uterus during early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Walter, Lisa M; Rogers, Peter A W; Girling, Jane E

    2010-12-01

    While vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A mediates endometrial vascular remodelling during early pregnancy in mice, individual VEGF-A isoforms have not been investigated, despite their different biological properties. Using mice as a model, the expression of VEGF-A isoforms and receptors in the mouse uterus during early pregnancy was quantified. It was postulated that selected isoform expression would increase concurrent with increased endometrial endothelial cell proliferation at this time. Uteri were collected on days 1-5 of pregnancy and mRNA expression was quantified by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, VEGF-A protein by Western blot and VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-2 by immunohistochemistry. The lowest expression of isomers Vegf(120) and Vegf(164) was observed on day 2 of pregnancy, increasing thereafter. Vegfr-2 mRNA expression was significantly higher on days 3-5 of pregnancy relative to days 1-2 (P<0.05). No significant changes were noted in Vegf(188), Nrp1 or Nrp2 mRNA. VEGF(188) protein expression was consistently higher than other isoforms. These data demonstrate differential regulation of VEGF-A isoforms in mouse uterus during early pregnancy. PMID:21050818

  6. Whole Reproductive System Non-Negative Matrix Factorization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of an Early-Stage Ovarian Cancer Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaeyeon; Bennett, Rachel V.; Parry, R. Mitchell; Gaul, David A.; Wang, May D.; Matzuk, Martin M.; Fernández, Facundo M.

    2016-01-01

    High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is the most common and deadliest form of ovarian cancer. Yet it is largely asymptomatic in its initial stages. Studying the origin and early progression of this disease is thus critical in identifying markers for early detection and screening purposes. Tissue-based mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) can be employed as an unbiased way of examining localized metabolic changes between healthy and cancerous tissue directly, at the onset of disease. In this study, we describe MSI results from Dicer-Pten double-knockout (DKO) mice, a mouse model faithfully reproducing the clinical nature of human HGSC. By using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) for the unsupervised analysis of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) datasets, tissue regions are segregated based on spectral components in an unbiased manner, with alterations related to HGSC highlighted. Results obtained by combining NMF with DESI-MSI revealed several metabolic species elevated in the tumor tissue and/or surrounding blood-filled cyst including ceramides, sphingomyelins, bilirubin, cholesterol sulfate, and various lysophospholipids. Multiple metabolites identified within the imaging study were also detected at altered levels within serum in a previous metabolomic study of the same mouse model. As an example workflow, features identified in this study were used to build an oPLS-DA model capable of discriminating between DKO mice with early-stage tumors and controls with up to 88% accuracy. PMID:27159635

  7. Host and Bacterial Factors Involved in the Innate Ability of Mouse Macrophages To Eliminate Internalized Unopsonized Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Hamrick, Terri S.; Havell, Edward A.; Horton, John R.; Orndorff, Paul E.

    2000-01-01

    In an effort to better understand genetic and cellular factors that influence innate immunity, we examined host and bacterial factors involved in the nonopsonic phagocytosis and killing of Escherichia coli K-12 by mouse macrophages. Unelicited (resident) peritoneal macrophages from five different mouse strains, BALB/c, C57BL/6, CD-1, C3H/HeJ, and C3H/HeN, were employed. Additional macrophage populations were obtained from CD-1 mice (bone marrow-derived macrophages). Also, for BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, peritoneal macrophages elicited with either thioglycolate or proteose peptone, bone marrow-derived macrophages, and macrophage-like cell lines derived from the two strains were employed. Two E. coli K-12 strains that differed specifically in their abilities to produce type 1 pili containing the adhesive protein FimH were examined. The parameters used to assess macrophage bacteriocidal activity were (i) the killing of internalized (gentamicin-protected) E. coli during the approximately 4-h assay and (ii) the initial rate at which internalized E. coli were eliminated. Data on these parameters allowed the following conclusions: (i) unelicited or proteose peptone-elicited peritoneal macrophages were significantly better at eliminating internalized bacteria than thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages, bone marrow-derived macrophages, or macrophage cell lines; (ii) the host genetic background had no significant effect upon the ability of unelicited peritoneal macrophages to kill E. coli (even though the mouse strains differ widely in their in vivo susceptibilities to bacterial infection); and (iii) the FimH phenotype had no significant effect upon E. coli survival once the bacterium was inside a macrophage. Additionally, there was no correlation between the bacteriocidal effectiveness of a macrophage population and the number of bacteria bound per macrophage. However, macrophage populations that were the least bacteriocidal tended to bind higher ratios of FimH+ to Fim

  8. Genotype is an important determinant factor of host susceptibility to periodontitis in the Collaborative Cross and inbred mouse populations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Periodontal infection (Periodontitis) is a chronic inflammatory disease, which results in the breakdown of the supporting tissues of the teeth. Previous epidemiological studies have suggested that resistance to chronic periodontitis is controlled to some extent by genetic factors of the host. The aim of this study was to determine the phenotypic response of inbred and Collaborative Cross (CC) mouse populations to periodontal bacterial challenge, using an experimental periodontitis model. In this model, mice are co-infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum, bacterial strains associated with human periodontal disease. Six weeks following the infection, the maxillary jaws were harvested and analyzed for alveolar bone loss relative to uninfected controls, using computerized microtomography (microCT). Initially, four commercial inbred mouse strains were examined to calibrate the procedure and test for gender effects. Subsequently, we applied the same protocol to 23 lines (at inbreeding generations 10–18) from the newly developed mouse genetic reference population, the Collaborative Cross (CC) to determine heritability and genetic variation of control bone volume prior to infection (CBV, naïve bone volume around the teeth of uninfected mice), and residual bone volume (RBV, bone volume after infection) and loss of bone volume (LBV, the difference between CBV and RBV) following infection. Results BALB/CJ mice were highly susceptible (P<0.05) whereas DBA/2J, C57BL/6J and A/J mice were resistant. Six lines of the tested CC population were susceptible, whereas the remaining lines were resistant to alveolar bone loss. Gender effects on bone volume were tested across the four inbred and 23 CC lines, and found not to be significant. Based on ANOVA analyses, broad-sense heritabilities were statistically significant and equal to 0.4 for CBV and 0.2 for LBV. Conclusions The moderate heritability values indicate that the variation in host

  9. Effect of epidermal growth factor/urogastrone on glycosaminoglycan synthesis and accumulation in vitro in the developing mouse palate.

    PubMed

    Turley, E A; Hollenberg, M D; Pratt, R M

    1985-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor/urogastrone (EGF-URO) has previously been implicated in murine secondary-palate formation. We report here that, in correlation with its effects on palate fusion, EGF-URO in physiological amounts (1.7 nmol/l) markedly affects glycosaminoglycan (GAG) production in organ cultures of mouse palate tissue; the effects of EGF-URO are dependent on the developmental stage of the palate. GAG production, particularly that of hyaluronic acid (HA), is stimulated two- to eight-fold by EGF-URO in cultures of palate tissue obtained between days 11-12 and 13-15 of development; by the time of birth, EGF-URO no longer stimulates GAG production in such cultures. EGF-URO increases the amount and alters the distribution of HA within the palate. The results suggest a role for EGF-URO and for HA in the process of normal palatal development. PMID:3888761

  10. Identification of negative transcriptional factor E4BP4-binding site in the mouse circadian-regulated gene Mdr2.

    PubMed

    Kotaka, Maki; Onishi, Yoshiaki; Ohno, Tomoya; Akaike, Toshihiro; Ishida, Norio

    2008-03-01

    The hepatic transporter Mdr2 is an ATP-binding cassette transporter which excretes phosphatidylcholine into the bile. We showed that the level of Mdr2 mRNA oscillated in circadian fashion in mouse liver whereas such oscillation was dampened in the liver of Clock mutants. To examine transcriptional regulation of the Mdr2 gene we performed luciferase reporter assays using plasmid constructs containing the 5'-flanking region of the Mdr2 gene. Reporter assays using deletion constructs demonstrated that E4BP4 represses the transcriptional activity of the promoter including the D1 and D2 sites within four putative E4BP4-binding sites. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and gel shift assays showed that E4BP4 binds to the D2 site, but not to the D1 site. These data suggested that E4BP4 is a negative transcription factor for circadian Mdr2 mRNA expression. PMID:18242748

  11. Characterization of factors involved in modulating persistence of transgene expression from recombinant adenovirus in the mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, J M; Armentano, D; Sparer, T E; Wynn, S G; Peterson, P A; Wadsworth, S C; Couture, K K; Pennington, S E; St George, J A; Gooding, L R; Smith, A E

    1997-01-01

    One potential limitation of adenovirus (Ad)-based vectors for the gene therapy of cystic fibrosis (CF) and other genetic diseases is the transience of expression observed in most in vivo systems. In this study, the influence of various factors on persistence of transgene expression in the lung was investigated. In the absence of immune pressure, such as in the nude mouse, the genomic structure of the vector was found to be predominant in determining the persistence of expression; Ad vector constructs with an E1-E3+E4ORF6+ backbone encoding beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal) or the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) produced declining levels of expression while an Ad/CMV beta Gal vector with an E1-E3+E4+ backbone gave rise to sustained, long-term reporter gene expression. The ability of the latter vector to persist was in turn limited in part by the presence of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Adoptive transfer experiments indicated that CTLs directed against either viral proteins or the beta-Gal reporter gene product were able to reduce expression in nude C57BL/6 mice stably expressing beta-Gal from the E4+ vector. Finally, the specificity and strength of the CTL response elicited by Ad vector was found to vary considerably depending on mouse strain haplotype. These results indicate that persistence of transgene expression in a given system is determined by the interplay between several factors including genomic structure of the vector, host background, and immune response. PMID:8989994

  12. Loss of Sigma Factor RpoN Increases Intestinal Colonization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in an Adult Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, W. Brian; Richards, Gary P.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of bacterial seafood-borne gastroenteritis worldwide, yet little is known about how this pathogen colonizes the human intestine. The alternative sigma factor RpoN/sigma-54 is a global regulator that controls flagellar synthesis, as well as a wide range of nonflagellar genes. We constructed an in-frame deletion mutation in rpoN (VP2670) in V. parahaemolyticus RIMD2210633, a clinical serogroup O3:K6 isolate, and examined the effects in vivo using a streptomycin-treated mouse model of colonization. We confirmed that deletion of rpoN rendered V. parahaemolyticus nonmotile, and it caused reduced biofilm formation and an apparent defect in glutamine synthetase production. In in vivo competition assays between the rpoN mutant and a wild-type RIMD2210633 strain marked with the β-galactosidase gene lacZ (WBWlacZ), the mutant colonized significantly more proficiently. Intestinal persistence competition assays also demonstrated that the rpoN mutant had enhanced fitness and outcompeted WBWlacZ. Mutants defective in the polar flagellum biosynthesis FliAP sigma factor also outcompeted WBWlacZ but not to the same level as the rpoN mutant, which suggested that lack of motility is not the sole cause of the fitness effect. In an in vitro growth competition assay in mouse intestinal mucus, the rpoN mutant also outcompeted the wild type and exhibited faster doubling times when grown in mucus and on individual components of mucus. Genes in the pathways for the catabolism of mucus sugars also had significantly higher expression levels in a ΔrpoN mutant than in the wild type. These data suggest that in V. parahaemolyticus, RpoN plays an important role in carbon utilization regulation, which may significantly affect host colonization. PMID:24478070

  13. Modulation of Leishmania (L.) amazonensis Growth in Cultured Mouse Macrophages by Prostaglandins and Platelet Activating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Lonardoni, M. V. C.; Barbieri, C. L.; Russo, M.

    1994-01-01

    The role of endogenously synthesized PAF and prostaglandins on the infection of mouse macrophages by Letsbmanta (L.) amazonensis was investigated, as well as the possible correlation between the effects of these inflammatory mediators with nitric oxide production. It was found that pretreatment of macrophages with 10−5 M of the PAF antagonists, BN-52021 or WEB-2086, increased macrophage infection by 17 and 59%, respectively. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin (10 μg/ml), induced a significant inhibition which was reversed by addition of PGE (10-3 M) to the culture medium. These results suggested that the infection of macrophages by leisbmanla is inhibited by PAF and enhanced by prostaglandins and that these mediators are produced by macrophages during this infection. This was confirmed by addition of these mediators to the culture medium before infection; PAF (10−6, 10−9 and 10−12M) reduced significantly the infection whereas PGE2 (10−5 M) induced a marked enhancement. This effect of exogenous PAF on macrophage infection was reversed by the two PAF antagonists used in this study as well as by the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis, L-arginine methyl ester (100 mM). Taken together the data suggest that endogenous production of PAF and PGE2 exert opposing effects on Lesbmana–macrophage interaction and that nitric oxide may be involved in the augmented destruction of parasites induced by PAF. PMID:18472932

  14. Effect of ascorbate on fibrinolytic factors in septic mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Swarbreck, Scott; Secor, Dan; Li, Fuyan; Gross, Peter L; Ellis, Christopher G; Sharpe, Michael D; Wilson, John X; Tyml, Karel

    2014-10-01

    Plugging of the capillary bed in tissues correlates with organ failure during sepsis. In septic mouse skeletal muscle, we showed that blood in capillaries becomes hypercoagulable and that ascorbate injection inhibits capillary plugging. In the present study, we hypothesized that ascorbate promotes fibrinolysis, reversing this plugging. Sepsis in mice was induced by fecal injection into peritoneum. Mice were injected intravenously with a bolus of streptokinase (fibrinolytic agent) or ascorbate at 5-6 h. Both agents reversed capillary plugging in muscle at 7 h. Sepsis increased mRNA expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (u-PA) (profibrinolytic) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) (antifibrinolytic) in muscle and liver homogenates at 7 h. Ascorbate did not affect u-PA mRNA in either tissue, but it inhibited PAI-1 mRNA in muscle, suggesting enhanced fibrinolysis in this tissue. However, ascorbate did not affect increased PAI-1 mRNA in the liver (dominant source of soluble PAI-1 in systemic blood). Consistently, ascorbate affected neither elevated PAI-1 protein/enzymatic activity in septic liver nor lowered plasmin antiplasmin level in septic blood. Furthermore, hypocoagulability of septic blood revealed by thrombelastography and thrombin-induced PAI-1 release from isolated platelets (ex-vivo model of sepsis) were not affected by ascorbate. Based on the PAI-1 protein data, the present study does not support the hypothesis that ascorbate promotes fibrinolysis in sepsis. PMID:24824492

  15. Astrocyte-Secreted Factors Selectively Alter Neural Stem and Progenitor Cell Proliferation in the Fragile X Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sourial, Mary; Doering, Laurie C.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that astrocytes contribute to the governance and fine tuning of stem and progenitor cell production during brain development. The effect of astrocyte function in cell production in neurodevelopmental disorders is unknown. We used the Neural Colony Forming Cell assay to determine the effect of astrocyte conditioned media (ACM) on the generation of neurospheres originating from either progenitor cells or functional stem cells in the knock out (KO) Fragile X mouse model. ACM from both normal and Fmr1-KO mice generated higher percentages of smaller neurospheres indicative of restricted proliferation of the progenitor cell population in Fmr1-KO brains. Wild type (WT) neurospheres, but not KO neurospheres, showed enhanced responses to ACM from the Fmr1-KO mice. In particular, Fmr1-KO ACM increased the percentage of large neurospheres generated, representative of spheres produced from neural stem cells. We also used 2D DIGE to initiate identification of the astrocyte-secreted proteins with differential expression between Fmr1-KO and WT cortices and hippocampi. The results further support the critical role of astrocytes in governing neural cell production in brain development and point to significant alterations in neural cell proliferation due to astrocyte secreted factors from the Fragile X brain. Highlights: • We studied the proliferation of neural stem and progenitor cells in Fragile X. • We examined the role of astrocyte-secreted factors in neural precursor cell biology. • Astrocyte-secreted factors with differential expression in Fragile X identified. PMID:27242437

  16. Adenoviral modification of mouse brain derived endothelial cells, bEnd3, to induce apoptosis by vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Mitsuuchi, Y; Powell, D R; Gallo, J M

    2006-02-01

    A second generation genetically-engineered cell-based drug delivery system, referred to as apoptotic-induced drug delivery (AIDD), was developed using endothelial cells (ECs) that undergo apoptosis upon binding of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to a Flk-1:Fas fusion protein (FF). This new AIDD was redesigned using mouse brain derived ECs, bEnd3 cells, and an adenovirus vector in order to enhance and control the expression of FF. The FF was tagged with a HA epitope (FFHA) and designed to be coexpressed with green fluorescence protein (GFP) by the regulation of cytomegalovirus promoters in the adenovirus vector. bEnd3 cells showed favorable coexpression of FFHA and GFP consistent with the multiplicity of infection of the adenovirus. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that FFHA was localized at the plasma membrane, whereas GFP was predominantly located in the cytoplasm of ECs. Cell death was induced by VEGF, but not by platelet derived growth factor or fibroblast growth factor in a dose-dependent manner (range 2-20 ng/ml), and revealed caspase-dependent apoptotic profiles. The FFHA expressing bEnd3 cells underwent apoptosis when cocultured with a glioma cell (SF188V+) line able to overexpress VEGF. The combined data indicated that the FFHA adenovirus system can induce apoptotic signaling in ECs in response to VEGF, and thus, is an instrumental modification to the development of AIDD. PMID:16247462

  17. Molecular cloning of the mouse grb2 gene: differential interaction of the Grb2 adaptor protein with epidermal growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Suen, K L; Bustelo, X R; Pawson, T; Barbacid, M

    1993-01-01

    We report the isolation and molecular characterization of the mouse grb2 gene. The product of this gene, the Grb2 protein, is highly related to the Caenorhabditis elegans sem-5 gene product and the human GRB2 protein and displays the same SH3-SH2-SH3 structural motifs. In situ hybridization studies revealed that the mouse grb2 gene is widely expressed throughout embryonic development (E9.5 to P0). However, grb2 transcripts are not uniformly distributed, and in certain tissues (e.g., thymus) they appear to be regulated during development. Recent genetic and biochemical evidence has implicated the Grb2 protein in the signaling pathways that link cell surface tyrosine kinase receptors with Ras. We have investigated the association of the Grb2 protein with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells. EGF treatment of PC12 cells results in the rapid association of Grb2 with the activated EGF receptors, an interaction mediated by the Grb2 SH2 domain. However, Grb2 does not bind to NGF-activated Trk receptors. Mitogenic signaling of NGF in NIH 3T3 cells ectopically expressing Trk receptors also takes place without detectable association between Grb2 and Trk. These results suggest that whereas EGF and NGF can activate the Ras signaling pathway in PC12 cells, only the EGF receptor is likely to do so through a direct interaction with Grb2. Finally, binding studies with glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins indicate that Grb2 binds two distinct subsets of proteins which are individually recognized by its SH2 and SH3 domains. These observations add further support to the concept that Grb2 is a modular adaptor protein. Images PMID:7689150

  18. ROLES OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR (EGF) AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-ALPHA (TGF-A) IN MEDIATION OF DIOXIN (TCDD)-INDUCED DELAYS IN DEVELOPMENT OF THE MOUSE MAMMARY GLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Roles of Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) and Transforming Growth Factor-alpha (TGF-a) in Mediation of Dioxin (TCDD)-Induced Delays in Development of the Mouse Mammary Gland.
    Suzanne E. Fenton, Barbara Abbott, Lamont Bryant, and Angela Buckalew. U.S. EPA, NHEERL, Reproductive Tox...

  19. Lysophosphatidic Acid Alters the Expression Profiles of Angiogenic Factors, Cytokines, and Chemokines in Mouse Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chia-Hung; Lai, Shou-Lun; Ho, Cheng-Maw; Lin, Wen-Hsi; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Lee, Po-Huang; Peng, Fu-Chuo; Kuo, Sung-Hsin; Wu, Szu-Yuan; Lai, Hong-Shiee

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a multi-function glycerophospholipid. LPA affects the proliferation of hepatocytes and stellate cells in vitro, and in a partial hepatectomy induced liver regeneration model, the circulating LPA levels and LPA receptor (LPAR) expression levels in liver tissue are significantly changed. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (Lsecs) play an important role during liver regeneration. However, the effects of LPA on Lsecs are not well known. Thus, we investigated the effects of LPA on the expression profiles of angiogenic factors, cytokines, and chemokines in Lsecs. Methods Mouse Lsecs were isolated using CD31-coated magnetic beads. The mRNA expression levels of LPAR’s and other target genes were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. The protein levels of angiogenesis factors, cytokines, and chemokines were determined using protein arrays and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Critical LPAR related signal transduction was verified by using an appropriate chemical inhibitor. Results LPAR1 and LPAR3 mRNA’s were expressed in mouse LPA-treated Lsecs. Treating Lsecs with a physiological level of LPA significantly enhanced the protein levels of angiogenesis related proteins (cyr61 and TIMP-1), cytokines (C5/C5a, M-CSF, and SDF-1), and chemokines (MCP-5, gp130, CCL28, and CXCL16). The LPAR1 and LPAR3 antagonist ki16425 significantly inhibited the LPA-enhanced expression of cyr61, TIMP-1, SDF-1, MCP-5, gp130, CCL28, and CXCL16, but not that of C5/C5a or M-CSF. LPA-induced C5/C5a and M-CSF expression may have been through an indirect regulation mechanism. Conclusion LPA regulated the expression profiles of angiogenic factors, cytokines, and chemokines in Lsecs that was mediated via LPAR1 and LPAR3 signaling. Most of the factors that were enhanced by LPA have been found to play critical roles during liver regeneration. Thus, these results may prove useful for manipulating LPA effects on liver regeneration. PMID:25822713

  20. Narrowing the critical regions for mouse t complex transmission ratio distortion factors by use of deletions.

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, M F; Schimenti, J C; Evans, E P

    2000-01-01

    Previously a deletion in mouse chromosome 17, T(22H), was shown to behave like a t allele of the t complex distorter gene Tcd1, and this was attributed to deletion of this locus. Seven further deletions are studied here, with the aim of narrowing the critical region in which Tcd1 must lie. One deletion, T(30H), together with three others, T(31H), T(33H), and T(36H), which extended more proximally, caused male sterility when heterozygous with a complete t haplotype and also enhanced transmission ratio of the partial t haplotype t(6), and this was attributed to deletion of the Tcd1 locus. The deletions T(29H), T(32H), and T(34H) that extended less proximally than T(30H) permitted male fertility when opposite a complete t haplotype. These results enabled narrowing of the critical interval for Tcd1 to between the markers D17Mit164 and D17Leh48. In addition, T(29H) and T(32H) enhanced the transmission ratio of t(6), but significantly less so than T(30H). T(34H) had no effect on transmission ratio. These results could be explained by a new distorter located between the breakpoints of T(29H) and T(34H) (between T and D17Leh66E). It is suggested that the original distorter Tcd1 in fact consists of two loci: Tcd1a, lying between D17Mit164 and D17Leh48, and Tcd1b, lying between T and D17Leh66E. PMID:10835400

  1. IFN Regulatory Factors 4 and 8 Expression in the NOD Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Besin, Gilles; Gaudreau, Simon; Dumont-Blanchette, Émilie; Ménard, Michael; Guindi, Chantal; Dupuis, Gilles; Amrani, Abdelaziz

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) contribute to islet inflammation and its progression to diabetes in NOD mouse model and human. DCs play a crucial role in the presentation of autoantigen and activation of diabetogenic T cells, and IRF4 and IRF8 are crucial genes involved in the development of DCs. We have therefore investigated the expression of these genes in splenic DCs during diabetes progression in NOD mice. We found that IRF4 expression was upregulated in splenocytes and in splenic CD11c+ DCs of NOD mice as compared to BALB/c mice. In contrast, IRF8 gene expression was higher in splenocytes of NOD mice whereas its expression was similar in splenic CD11c+ DCs of NOD and BALB/c mice. Importantly, levels of IRF4 and IRF8 expression were lower in tolerogenic bone marrow derived DCs (BMDCs) generated with GM-CSF as compared to immunogenic BMDCs generated with GM-CSF and IL-4. Analysis of splenic DCs subsets indicated that high expression of IRF4 was associated with increased levels of CD4+CD8α−IRF4+CD11c+ DCs but not CD4−CD8α+IRF8+CD11c+ DCs in NOD mice. Our results showed that IRF4 expression was up-regulated in NOD mice and correlated with the increased levels of CD4+CD8α− DCs, suggesting that IRF4 may be involved in abnormal DC functions in type 1 diabetes in NOD mice. PMID:21647406

  2. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor promotes behavioral recovery in a mouse model of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Song, Shijie; Kong, Xiaoyuan; Acosta, Sandra; Sava, Vasyl; Borlongan, Cesar; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan

    2016-05-01

    Hematopoietic growth factors such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) represent a novel approach for treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI). After mild controlled cortical impact (CCI), mice were treated with G-CSF (100 μg/kg) for 3 consecutive days. The primary behavioral endpoint was performance on the radial arm water maze (RAWM), assessed 7 and 14 days after CCI. Secondary endpoints included 1) motor performance on a rotating cylinder (rotarod), 2) measurement of microglial and astroglial response, 3) hippocampal neurogenesis, and 4) measures of neurotrophic factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF] and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor [GDNF]) and cytokines in brain homogenates. G-CSF-treated animals performed significantly better than vehicle-treated mice in the RAWM at 1 and 2 weeks but not on the rotarod. Cellular changes found in the G-CSF group included increased hippocampal neurogenesis as well as astrocytosis and microgliosis in both the striatum and the hippocampus. Neurotrophic factors GDNF and BDNF, elaborated by activated microglia and astrocytes, were increased in G-CSF-treated mice. These factors along with G-CSF itself are known to promote hippocampal neurogenesis and inhibit apoptosis and likely contributed to improvement in the hippocampal-dependent learning task. Six cytokines that were modulated by G-CSF treatment following CCI were elevated on day 3, but only one of them remained altered by day 7, and all of them were no different from vehicle controls by day 14. The pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines modulated by G-CSF administration interact in a complex and incompletely understood network involving both damage and recovery processes, underscoring the dual role of inflammation after TBI. PMID:26822127

  3. Role of Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Factors in Inducing Inflammation and Vascular Permeability in a Mouse Model of Bacterial Endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus is a common causative agent of bacterial endophthalmitis, a vision threatening complication of eye surgeries. The relative contribution of S. aureus virulence factors in the pathogenesis of endophthalmitis remains unclear. Here, we comprehensively analyzed the development of intraocular inflammation, vascular permeability, and the loss of retinal function in C57BL/6 mouse eyes, challenged with live S. aureus, heat-killed S. aureus (HKSA), peptidoglycan (PGN), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), staphylococcal protein A (SPA), α-toxin, and Toxic-shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST1). Our data showed a dose-dependent (range 0.01 μg/eye to 1.0 μg/eye) increase in the levels of inflammatory mediators by all virulence factors. The cell wall components, particularly PGN and LTA, seem to induce higher levels of TNF-α, IL-6, KC, and MIP2, whereas the toxins induced IL-1β. Similarly, among the virulence factors, PGN induced higher PMN infiltration. The vascular permeability assay revealed significant leakage in eyes challenged with live SA (12-fold) and HKSA (7.3-fold), in comparison to other virulence factors (~2-fold) and controls. These changes coincided with retinal tissue damage, as evidenced by histological analysis. The electroretinogram (ERG) analysis revealed a significant decline in retinal function in eyes inoculated with live SA, followed by HKSA, SPA, and α-toxin. Together, these findings demonstrate the differential innate responses of the retina to S. aureus virulence factors, which contribute to intraocular inflammation and retinal function loss in endophthalmitis. PMID:26053426

  4. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Mist1, induces maturation of mouse fetal hepatoblasts.

    PubMed

    Chikada, Hiromi; Ito, Keiichi; Yanagida, Ayaka; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Kamiya, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stem/progenitor cells, hepatoblasts, have a high proliferative ability and can differentiate into mature hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Therefore, these cells are considered to be useful for regenerative medicine and drug screening for liver diseases. However, it is problem that in vitro maturation of hepatoblasts is insufficient in the present culture system. In this study, a novel regulator to induce hepatic differentiation was identified and the molecular function of this factor was examined in embryonic day 13 hepatoblast culture with maturation factor, oncostatin M and extracellular matrices. Overexpression of the basic helix-loop-helix type transcription factor, Mist1, induced expression of mature hepatocytic markers such as carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase1 and several cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes in this culture system. In contrast, Mist1 suppressed expression of cholangiocytic markers such as Sox9, Sox17, Ck19, and Grhl2. CYP3A metabolic activity was significantly induced by Mist1 in this hepatoblast culture. In addition, Mist1 induced liver-enriched transcription factors, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α and Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α, which are known to be involved in liver functions. These results suggest that Mist1 partially induces mature hepatocytic expression and function accompanied by the down-regulation of cholangiocytic markers. PMID:26456005

  5. Dynamic expression of transcription factor Brn3b during mouse cranial nerve development.

    PubMed

    Sajgo, Szilard; Ali, Seid; Popescu, Octavian; Badea, Tudor Constantin

    2016-04-01

    During development, transcription factor combinatorial codes define a large variety of morphologically and physiologically distinct neurons. Such a combinatorial code has been proposed for the differentiation of projection neurons of the somatic and visceral components of cranial nerves. It is possible that individual neuronal cell types are not specified by unique transcription factors but rather emerge through the intersection of their expression domains. Brn3a, Brn3b, and Brn3c, in combination with each other and/or transcription factors of other families, can define subgroups of retinal ganglion cells (RGC), spiral and vestibular ganglia, inner ear and vestibular hair cell neurons in the vestibuloacoustic system, and groups of somatosensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia. The present study investigates the expression and potential role of the Brn3b transcription factor in cranial nerves and associated nuclei of the brainstem. We report the dynamic expression of Brn3b in the somatosensory component of cranial nerves II, V, VII, and VIII and visceromotor nuclei of nerves VII, IX, and X as well as other brainstem nuclei during different stages of development into adult stage. We find that genetically identified Brn3b(KO) RGC axons show correct but delayed pathfinding during the early stages of embryonic development. However, loss of Brn3b does not affect the anatomy of the other cranial nerves normally expressing this transcription factor. PMID:26356988

  6. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Mist1, induces maturation of mouse fetal hepatoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chikada, Hiromi; Ito, Keiichi; Yanagida, Ayaka; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Kamiya, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stem/progenitor cells, hepatoblasts, have a high proliferative ability and can differentiate into mature hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Therefore, these cells are considered to be useful for regenerative medicine and drug screening for liver diseases. However, it is problem that in vitro maturation of hepatoblasts is insufficient in the present culture system. In this study, a novel regulator to induce hepatic differentiation was identified and the molecular function of this factor was examined in embryonic day 13 hepatoblast culture with maturation factor, oncostatin M and extracellular matrices. Overexpression of the basic helix-loop-helix type transcription factor, Mist1, induced expression of mature hepatocytic markers such as carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase1 and several cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes in this culture system. In contrast, Mist1 suppressed expression of cholangiocytic markers such as Sox9, Sox17, Ck19, and Grhl2. CYP3A metabolic activity was significantly induced by Mist1 in this hepatoblast culture. In addition, Mist1 induced liver-enriched transcription factors, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α and Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α, which are known to be involved in liver functions. These results suggest that Mist1 partially induces mature hepatocytic expression and function accompanied by the down-regulation of cholangiocytic markers. PMID:26456005

  7. RE1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencing factor regulates expansion of adult mouse subventricular zone-derived neural stem/progenitor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Soldati, Chiara; Caramanica, Pasquale; Burney, Matthew J; Toselli, Camilla; Bithell, Angela; Augusti-Tocco, Gabriella; Stanton, Lawrence W; Biagioni, Stefano; Buckley, Noel J; Cacci, Emanuele

    2015-08-01

    Adult neural stem cell (aNSC) activity is tuned by external stimuli through the recruitment of transcription factors. This study examines the RE1 silencing transcription factor (REST) in neural stem/progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone of adult mouse brain and provides the first extensive characterization of REST-mediated control of the cellular and molecular properties. This study shows that REST knockdown affects the capacity of progenitor cells to generate neurospheres, reduces cell proliferation, and triggers cell differentiation despite the presence of growth factors. Genome- and transcriptome-wide analyses show that REST binding sites are significantly enriched in genes associated with synaptic transmission and nervous system development and function. Seeking candidate regulators of aNSC function, this study identifies a member of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family, BMP6, the mRNA and protein of which increased after REST knockdown. The results of this study extend previous findings, demonstrating a reciprocal control of REST expression by BMPs. Administration of exogenous BMP6 inhibits aNSC proliferation and induces the expression of the astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein, highlighting its antimitogenic and prodifferentiative effects. This study suggests that BMP6 produced in a REST-regulated manner together with other signals can contribute to regulation of NSC maintenance and fate. PMID:25691247

  8. Protease Omi facilitates neurite outgrowth in mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells by cleaving transcription factor E2F1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qi; Hu, Qing-song; Xu, Ran-jie; Zhen, Xue-chu; Wang, Guang-hui

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Omi is an ATP-independent serine protease that is necessary for neuronal function and survival. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of protease Omi in regulating differentiation of mouse neuroblastoma cells and to identify the substrate of Omi involved in this process. Methods: Mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells and Omi protease-deficient mnd2 mice were used in this study. To modulate Omi and E2F1 expression, N2a cells were transfected with expression plasmids, shRNA plasmids or siRNA. Protein levels were detected using immunoblot assays. The interaction between Omi and E2F1 was studied using immunoprecipitation, GST pulldown and in vitro cleavage assays. N2a cells were treated with 20 μmol/L retinoic acid (RA) and 1% fetal bovine serum to induce neurite outgrowth, which was measured using Image J software. Results: E2F1 was significantly increased in Omi knockdown cells and in brain lysates of mnd2 mice, and was decreased in cells overexpressing wild-type Omi, but not inactive Omi S276C. In brain lysates of mnd2 mice, endogenous E2F1 was co-immunoprecipitated with endogenous Omi. In vitro cleavage assay demonstrated that Omi directly cleaved E2F1. Treatment of N2a cells with RA induced marked differentiation and neurite outgrowth accompanied by significantly increased Omi and decreased E2F1 levels, which were suppressed by pretreatment with the specific Omi inhibitor UCF-101. Knockdown of Omi in N2a cells suppressed RA-induced neurite outgrowth, which was partially restored by knockdown of E2F1. Conclusion: Protease Omi facilitates neurite outgrowth by cleaving the transcription factor E2F1 in differentiated neuroblastoma cells; E2F1 is a substrate of Omi. PMID:26238290

  9. Epidermal growth factor does not act as a primary cue for inducing developmental changes in suckling mouse jejunum.

    PubMed

    Ménard, D; Arsenault, P; Gallo-Payet, N

    1986-01-01

    The direct influence of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the differentiation and proliferation of small intestine was studied in organ culture. Eight-day-old mouse small intestine was cultured during 2 days in serum-free Leibovitz L-15 medium alone or supplemented with EGF (50, 100, and 500 ng/ml) either at room temperature or at 37 degrees C. Brush border membrane hydrolytic activities, namely, sucrase, lactase, glucoamylase, trehalase, maltase, and alkaline phosphatase, were assayed in the intestinal tissue as well as in the culture medium. None of the brush border enzymic activities was affected by the addition of EGF to the culture medium. This lack of effect is not temperature dependent since it occurred both at room temperature and at 37 degrees C. The addition of hydrocortisone (10(-6) M) to the culture medium induced the appearance of sucrase activity and increased the activity of the other brush border enzymes. The simultaneous addition of EGF with hydrocortisone did not influence the response of the intestinal explants to hydrocortisone. The deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) content was determined while DNA synthesis was evaluated by the incorporation of (3H)-thymidine. The addition of EGF did not affect DNA content or (3H)-thymidine incorporation into DNA either at room temperature or at 37 degrees C. The EGF binding to epithelial cells did not significantly vary throughout the culture period and a down-regulation process occurred in presence of EGF. These observations strongly suggest that EGF does not act as a primary cue for inducing developmental changes in suckling mouse small intestine. It is proposed that EGF induces a systemic reaction in vivo that then influences the neonatal small intestine. PMID:3491891

  10. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-5 inhibits growth and induces differentiation of mouse osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Schneider, M R; Zhou, R; Hoeflich, A; Krebs, O; Schmidt, J; Mohan, S; Wolf, E; Lahm, H

    2001-10-26

    The precise role of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) in regulating the growth of tumor cells, especially of bone-derived malignant cells, is not well understood. We have investigated the biological activity of IGFBP-5 by transfecting OS/50-K8 mouse osteosarcoma cells with an expression vector containing the osteocalcin promoter and the complete mouse IGFBP-5 cDNA (OC-IGFBP-5). Overexpression of IGFBP-5 mRNA and secretion of increased amounts of bioactive protein in conditioned media were demonstrated in different clones. For the analysis of cell proliferation, three clones exhibiting high levels of IGFBP-5 expression were selected and compared to a mock clone and to nontransfected parental cells. IGFBP-5-secreting clones displayed reduced proliferation under both anchorage-dependent and -independent conditions (P < 0.05). The increase in proliferation observed in IGFBP-5-secreting clones after addition of exogenous IGF was significantly lower than that observed in mock-transfected or parental cells. A similar result was obtained with long[R3]IGF-I which has a low affinity for all IGFBPs, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of IGFBP-5 is only partially IGF-dependent. OC-IGFBP-5-transfected clones expressed significantly higher amounts of osteocalcin mRNA (P < 0.05) and secreted more osteocalcin protein than a mock clone or parental OS-50/K8 cells. Thus, part of the growth-inhibiting effect of IGFBP-5 may be due to an induction of differentiation in these cells. PMID:11606061

  11. Cortical Granule Exocytosis Is Mediated by Alpha-SNAP and N-Ethilmaleimide Sensitive Factor in Mouse Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    de Paola, Matilde; Bello, Oscar Daniel; Michaut, Marcela Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Cortical granule exocytosis (CGE), also known as cortical reaction, is a calcium- regulated secretion that represents a membrane fusion process during meiotic cell division of oocytes. The molecular mechanism of membrane fusion during CGE is still poorly understood and is thought to be mediated by the SNARE pathway; nevertheless, it is unkown if SNAP (acronym for soluble NSF attachment protein) and NSF (acronym for N-ethilmaleimide sensitive factor), two key proteins in the SNARE pathway, mediate CGE in any oocyte model. In this paper, we documented the gene expression of α-SNAP, γ-SNAP and NSF in mouse oocytes. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of these proteins maintains a similar level during oocyte maturation and early activation. Their localization was mainly observed at the cortical region of metaphase II oocytes, which is enriched in cortical granules. To evaluate the function of these proteins in CGE we set up a functional assay based on the quantification of cortical granules metaphase II oocytes activated parthenogenetically with strontium. Endogenous α-SNAP and NSF proteins were perturbed by microinjection of recombinant proteins or antibodies prior to CGE activation. The microinjection of wild type α-SNAP and the negative mutant of α-SNAP L294A in metaphase II oocytes inhibited CGE stimulated by strontium. NEM, an irreversibly inhibitor of NSF, and the microinjection of the negative mutant NSF D1EQ inhibited cortical reaction. The microinjection of anti-α-SNAP and anti-NSF antibodies was able to abolish CGE in activated metaphase II oocytes. The microinjection of anti-γ SNAP antibody had no effect on CGE. Our findings indicate, for the first time in any oocyte model, that α-SNAP, γ-SNAP, and NSF are expressed in mouse oocytes. We demonstrate that α-SNAP and NSF have an active role in CGE and propose a working model. PMID:26267363

  12. A Novel mouse model of enhanced proteostasis: Full-length human heat shock factor 1 transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Anson; Wei, Rochelle; Halade, Dipti; Yoo, Si-Eun; Ran, Qitao; Richardson, Arlan

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Development of mouse overexpressing native human HSF1 in all tissues including CNS. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances heat shock response at whole-animal and cellular level. {yields} HSF1 overexpression protects from polyglutamine toxicity and favors aggresomes. {yields} HSF1 overexpression enhances proteostasis at the whole-animal and cellular level. -- Abstract: The heat shock response (HSR) is controlled by the master transcriptional regulator heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). HSF1 maintains proteostasis and resistance to stress through production of heat shock proteins (HSPs). No transgenic model exists that overexpresses HSF1 in tissues of the central nervous system (CNS). We generated a transgenic mouse overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 and observed a 2-4-fold increase in HSF1 mRNA and protein expression in all tissues studied of HSF1 transgenic (HSF1{sup +/0}) mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates, including several regions of the CNS. Basal expression of HSP70 and 90 showed only mild tissue-specific changes; however, in response to forced exercise, the skeletal muscle HSR was more elevated in HSF1{sup +/0} mice compared to WT littermates and in fibroblasts following heat shock, as indicated by levels of inducible HSP70 mRNA and protein. HSF1{sup +/0} cells elicited a significantly more robust HSR in response to expression of the 82 repeat polyglutamine-YFP fusion construct (Q82YFP) and maintained proteasome-dependent processing of Q82YFP compared to WT fibroblasts. Overexpression of HSF1 was associated with fewer, but larger Q82YFP aggregates resembling aggresomes in HSF1{sup +/0} cells, and increased viability. Therefore, our data demonstrate that tissues and cells from mice overexpressing full-length non-mutant HSF1 exhibit enhanced proteostasis.

  13. Cortical Granule Exocytosis Is Mediated by Alpha-SNAP and N-Ethilmaleimide Sensitive Factor in Mouse Oocytes.

    PubMed

    de Paola, Matilde; Bello, Oscar Daniel; Michaut, Marcela Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Cortical granule exocytosis (CGE), also known as cortical reaction, is a calcium- regulated secretion that represents a membrane fusion process during meiotic cell division of oocytes. The molecular mechanism of membrane fusion during CGE is still poorly understood and is thought to be mediated by the SNARE pathway; nevertheless, it is unkown if SNAP (acronym for soluble NSF attachment protein) and NSF (acronym for N-ethilmaleimide sensitive factor), two key proteins in the SNARE pathway, mediate CGE in any oocyte model. In this paper, we documented the gene expression of α-SNAP, γ-SNAP and NSF in mouse oocytes. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of these proteins maintains a similar level during oocyte maturation and early activation. Their localization was mainly observed at the cortical region of metaphase II oocytes, which is enriched in cortical granules. To evaluate the function of these proteins in CGE we set up a functional assay based on the quantification of cortical granules metaphase II oocytes activated parthenogenetically with strontium. Endogenous α-SNAP and NSF proteins were perturbed by microinjection of recombinant proteins or antibodies prior to CGE activation. The microinjection of wild type α-SNAP and the negative mutant of α-SNAP L294A in metaphase II oocytes inhibited CGE stimulated by strontium. NEM, an irreversibly inhibitor of NSF, and the microinjection of the negative mutant NSF D1EQ inhibited cortical reaction. The microinjection of anti-α-SNAP and anti-NSF antibodies was able to abolish CGE in activated metaphase II oocytes. The microinjection of anti-γ SNAP antibody had no effect on CGE. Our findings indicate, for the first time in any oocyte model, that α-SNAP, γ-SNAP, and NSF are expressed in mouse oocytes. We demonstrate that α-SNAP and NSF have an active role in CGE and propose a working model. PMID:26267363

  14. Factors affecting the survival, fertilization, and embryonic development of mouse oocytes after vitrification using glass capillaries.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiuwen; Song, Enliang; Liu, Xiaomu; You, Wei; Wan, Fachun

    2009-09-01

    Cryopreservation of mammalian oocytes is an important way to provide a steady source of materials for research and practice of parthenogenetic activation, in vitro fertilization, and nuclear transfer. However, oocytes cryopreservation has not been common used, as there still are some problems waiting to be solved on the repeatability, safety, and validity. Then, it is necessary to investigate the damage occurred from vitrification and find a way to avoid or repair it. In this study, mouse mature oocytes were firstly pretreated in different equilibrium media, such as 5% ethylene glycol (EG) + 5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), 10% EG + 10% DMSO, and 15% EG + 15% DMSO in TCM199 supplemented with 20% fetal calf serum (FCS), for 1, 3, and 5 min, respectively, and then oocytes were transferred into vitrification solution (20% EG, 20% DMSO, 0.3 M sucrose, and 20% FCS in TCM199, M2, Dulbecco's phosphate buffered saline, and 0.9% saline medium, respectively) and immediately loaded into glass capillaries to be plunged into liquid nitrogen. After storage from 1 h to 1 wk, they were diluted in stepwise sucrose solutions. The surviving oocytes were stained for cortical granule, meiotic spindles, and chromosomes. Oocytes without treatments were used as controls. The results showed that oocytes pretreated in 5% EG +5% DMSO group for 3-5 min or in 10% EG + 10% DMSO group for 1-3 min were better than other treatments. Oocytes vitrified in TCM199 as basic medium showed higher survival and better subsequent embryonic development than other groups. When the concentration of FCS in vitrification solution reduced below 15%, the rates of survival, fertilization, and developing to blastocyst declined dramatically. The inner diameter (0.6 mm) of glass capillaries and amount of vitrification solution (1-3 microl) achieved more rapid cooling and warming and so reduce the injury to oocytes. Cropreservation led to the exocytosis of cortical granule of oocytes (about 10%) and serious disturbance of

  15. Core Binding Factor-β Knockdown Alters Ovarian Gene Expression and Function in the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kalin; Park, Jiyeon; Curry, Thomas E; Mishra, Birendra; Gossen, Jan; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Jo, Misung

    2016-07-01

    Core binding factor (CBF) is a heterodimeric transcription factor complex composed of a DNA-binding subunit, one of three runt-related transcription factor (RUNX) factors, and a non-DNA binding subunit, CBFβ. CBFβ is critical for DNA binding and stability of the CBF transcription factor complex. In the ovary, the LH surge increases the expression of Runx1 and Runx2 in periovulatory follicles, implicating a role for CBFs in the periovulatory process. The present study investigated the functional significance of CBFs (RUNX1/CBFβ and RUNX2/CBFβ) in the ovary by examining the ovarian phenotype of granulosa cell-specific CBFβ knockdown mice; CBFβ f/f * Cyp19 cre. The mutant female mice exhibited significant reductions in fertility, with smaller litter sizes, decreased progesterone during gestation, and fewer cumulus oocyte complexes collected after an induced superovulation. RNA sequencing and transcriptome assembly revealed altered expression of more than 200 mRNA transcripts in the granulosa cells of Cbfb knockdown mice after human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation in vitro. Among the affected transcripts are known regulators of ovulation and luteinization including Sfrp4, Sgk1, Lhcgr, Prlr, Wnt4, and Edn2 as well as many genes not yet characterized in the ovary. Cbfβ knockdown mice also exhibited decreased expression of key genes within the corpora lutea and morphological changes in the ovarian structure, including the presence of large antral follicles well into the luteal phase. Overall, these data suggest a role for CBFs as significant regulators of gene expression, ovulatory processes, and luteal development in the ovary. PMID:27176614

  16. The Candida albicans Pho4 Transcription Factor Mediates Susceptibility to Stress and Influences Fitness in a Mouse Commensalism Model

    PubMed Central

    Urrialde, Verónica; Prieto, Daniel; Pla, Jesús; Alonso-Monge, Rebeca

    2016-01-01

    The Pho4 transcription factor is required for growth under low environmental phosphate concentrations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A characterization of Candida albicans pho4 mutants revealed that these cells are more susceptible to both osmotic and oxidative stress and that this effect is diminished in the presence of 5% CO2 or anaerobiosis, reflecting the relevance of oxygen metabolism in the Pho4-mediated response. A pho4 mutant was as virulent as wild type strain when assayed in the Galleria mellonella infection model and was even more resistant to murine macrophages in ex vivo killing assays. The lack of Pho4 neither impairs the ability to colonize the murine gut nor alters the localization in the gastrointestinal tract. However, we found that Pho4 influenced the colonization of C. albicans in the mouse gut in competition assays; pho4 mutants were unable to attain high colonization levels when inoculated simultaneously with an isogenic wild type strain. Moreover, pho4 mutants displayed a reduced adherence to the intestinal mucosa in a competitive ex vivo assays with wild type cells. In vitro competitive assays also revealed defects in fitness for this mutant compared to the wild type strain. Thus, Pho4, a transcription factor involved in phosphate metabolism, is required for adaptation to stress and fitness in C. albicans. PMID:27458452

  17. Regulation by vascular endothelial growth factor of human colon cancer tumorigenesis in a mouse model of experimental liver metastasis.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, R S; Yuan, H; Matli, M R; Gillett, N A; Ferrara, N

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between angiogenesis and hepatic tumorigenesis, we examined the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in 8 human colon carcinoma cell lines and in 30 human colorectal cancer liver metastases. Abundant message for VEGF was found in all tumors, localized to the malignant cells within each neoplasm. Two receptors for VEGF, KDR and flt1, were also demonstrated in most of the tumors examined. KDR and flt1 mRNA were limited to tumor endothelial cells and were more strongly expressed in the hepatic metastases than in the sinusoidal endothelium of the surrounding liver parenchyma. VEGF monoclonal antibody administration in tumor-bearing athymic mice led to a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of growth of subcutaneous xenografts and to a marked reduction in the number and size of experimental liver metastases. In hepatic metastases of VEGF antibody-treated mice, neither blood vessels nor expression of the mouse KDR homologue flk-1 could be demonstrated. These data indicate that VEGF is a commonly expressed angiogenic factor in human colorectal cancer metastases, that VEGF receptors are up-regulated as a concomitant of hepatic tumorigenesis, and that modulation of VEGF gene expression or activity may represent a potentially effective antineoplastic therapy in colorectal cancer. Images PMID:7535799

  18. Genes expressed in mouse cortical progenitors are enriched in Pax, Lhx, and Sox transcription factor putative binding sites.

    PubMed

    Bery, Amandine; Mérot, Yohann; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2016-02-15

    Considerable progress has been made in the understanding of molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling the development of the mammalian cortex. The proliferative and neurogenic properties of cortical progenitors located in the ventricular germinal zone start being understood. Little is known however on the cis-regulatory control that finely tunes gene expression in these progenitors. Here, we undertook an in silico-based approach to address this question, followed by some functional validation. Using the Eurexpress database, we established a list of 30 genes specifically expressed in the cortical germinal zone, we selected mouse/human conserved non-coding elements (CNEs) around these genes and we performed motif-enrichment search in these CNEs. We found an over-representation of motifs corresponding to binding sites for Pax, Sox, and Lhx transcription factors, often found as pairs and located within 100bp windows. A small subset of CNEs (n=7) was tested for enhancer activity, by ex-vivo and in utero electroporation assays. Two showed strong enhancer activity in the germinal zone progenitors. Mutagenesis experiments on a selected CNE showed the functional importance of the Pax, Sox, and Lhx TFBS for conferring enhancer activity to the CNE. Overall, from a cis-regulatory viewpoint, our data suggest an input from Pax, Sox and Lhx transcription factors to orchestrate corticogenesis. These results are discussed with regards to the known functional roles of Pax6, Sox2 and Lhx2 in cortical development. PMID:26721689

  19. Hind Limb Unloading Model Alters Nuclear Factor kappa B and Activator Protein-1 Signaling in Mouse Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Govindarajan; Vani, Vani; Renard, Renard; Vera, Vera; Wilosn, Wilosn; Ramesh, Govindarajan

    Microgravity induces inflammatory response and also modulates immune functions, which may increase oxidative stress. Exposure to the microgravity environment induces adverse neurological effects. However, there is little research exploring the etiology of neurological effects of exposure to this environment. To explore this area we evaluated changes in Nuclear Factor kappa B, Activator Protein 1, MAPP kinase and N terminal c-Jun kinase in mouse brain exposed to a simulated microgravity environment using the hindlimb unloading model. BALB/c male mice were randomly assigned to hindlimb unloading group (n=12) and control group (n=12) to simulate a microgravity environment, for 7 days. Changes observed in NF-κB, AP- 1 DNA binding, MAPKK and N terminal c-Jun kinase were measured using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and western blot analysis and compared to unexposed brain regions. Hindlimb unloading exposed mice showed significant increases in generated NF-κB, AP-1, MAPKK and Kinase in all regions of the brain exposed to hindlimb unloading as compared to the control brain regions. Results suggest that exposure to simulated microgravity can induce expression of certain transcription factors and protein kinases. This work was supported by funding from NASA NCC 9-165. 504b030414000600080000002100828abc13fa0000001c020000130000005b436f6e74656e745f54797065735d2e78

  20. Protein Delivery of an Artificial Transcription Factor Restores Widespread Ube3a Expression in an Angelman Syndrome Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Bailus, Barbara J; Pyles, Benjamin; McAlister, Michelle M; O'Geen, Henriette; Lockwood, Sarah H; Adams, Alexa N; Nguyen, Jennifer Trang T; Yu, Abigail; Berman, Robert F; Segal, David J

    2016-03-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurological genetic disorder caused by loss of expression of the maternal copy of UBE3A in the brain. Due to brain-specific genetic imprinting at this locus, the paternal UBE3A is silenced by a long antisense transcript. Inhibition of the antisense transcript could lead to unsilencing of paternal UBE3A, thus providing a therapeutic approach for AS. However, widespread delivery of gene regulators to the brain remains challenging. Here, we report an engineered zinc finger-based artificial transcription factor (ATF) that, when injected i.p. or s.c., crossed the blood-brain barrier and increased Ube3a expression in the brain of an adult mouse model of AS. The factor displayed widespread distribution throughout the brain. Immunohistochemistry of both the hippocampus and cerebellum revealed an increase in Ube3a upon treatment. An ATF containing an alternative DNA-binding domain did not activate Ube3a. We believe this to be the first report of an injectable engineered zinc finger protein that can cause widespread activation of an endogenous gene in the brain. These observations have important implications for the study and treatment of AS and other neurological disorders. PMID:26727042

  1. Protein Delivery of an Artificial Transcription Factor Restores Widespread Ube3a Expression in an Angelman Syndrome Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bailus, Barbara J; Pyles, Benjamin; McAlister, Michelle M; O'Geen, Henriette; Lockwood, Sarah H; Adams, Alexa N; Nguyen, Jennifer Trang T; Yu, Abigail; Berman, Robert F; Segal, David J

    2016-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurological genetic disorder caused by loss of expression of the maternal copy of UBE3A in the brain. Due to brain-specific genetic imprinting at this locus, the paternal UBE3A is silenced by a long antisense transcript. Inhibition of the antisense transcript could lead to unsilencing of paternal UBE3A, thus providing a therapeutic approach for AS. However, widespread delivery of gene regulators to the brain remains challenging. Here, we report an engineered zinc finger-based artificial transcription factor (ATF) that, when injected i.p. or s.c., crossed the blood–brain barrier and increased Ube3a expression in the brain of an adult mouse model of AS. The factor displayed widespread distribution throughout the brain. Immunohistochemistry of both the hippocampus and cerebellum revealed an increase in Ube3a upon treatment. An ATF containing an alternative DNA-binding domain did not activate Ube3a. We believe this to be the first report of an injectable engineered zinc finger protein that can cause widespread activation of an endogenous gene in the brain. These observations have important implications for the study and treatment of AS and other neurological disorders. PMID:26727042

  2. Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 Alpha Is a Key Factor Related to Depression and Physiological Homeostasis in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Yamanishi, Kyosuke; Doe, Nobutaka; Sumida, Miho; Watanabe, Yuko; Yoshida, Momoko; Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Xu, Yunfeng; Li, Wen; Yamanishi, Hiromichi; Okamura, Haruki; Matsunaga, Hisato

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common psychiatric disorder that involves marked disabilities in global functioning, anorexia, and severe medical comorbidities. MDD is associated with not only psychological and sociocultural problems, but also pervasive physical dysfunctions such as metabolic, neurobiological and immunological abnormalities. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying the interactions between these factors have yet to be determined in detail. The aim of the present study was to identify the molecular mechanisms responsible for the interactions between MDD and dysregulation of physiological homeostasis, including immunological function as well as lipid metabolism, coagulation, and hormonal activity in the brain. We generated depression-like behavior in mice using chronic mild stress (CMS) as a model of depression. We compared the gene expression profiles in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of CMS and control mice using microarrays. We subsequently categorized genes using two web-based bioinformatics applications: Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and The Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery. We then confirmed significant group-differences by analyzing mRNA and protein expression levels not only in the PFC, but also in the thalamus and hippocampus. These web tools revealed that hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (Hnf4a) may exert direct effects on various genes specifically associated with amine synthesis, such as genes involved in serotonin metabolism and related immunological functions. Moreover, these genes may influence lipid metabolism, coagulation, and hormonal activity. We also confirmed the significant effects of Hnf4a on both mRNA and protein expression levels in the brain. These results suggest that Hnf4a may have a critical influence on physiological homeostasis under depressive states, and may be associated with the mechanisms responsible for the interactions between MDD and the dysregulation of physiological homeostasis

  3. Thyroid hormone regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor levels in mouse mammary glands

    SciTech Connect

    Vonderhaar, B.K.; Tang, E.; Lyster, R.R.; Nascimento, M.C.

    1986-08-01

    The specific binding of iodinated epidermal growth factor ((/sup 125/I)iodo-EGF) to membranes prepared from the mammary glands and spontaneous breast tumors of euthyroid and hypothyroid mice was measured in order to determine whether thyroid hormones regulate the EGF receptor levels in vivo. Membranes from hypothyroid mammary glands of mice at various developmental ages bound 50-65% less EGF than those of age-matched euthyroid controls. Treatment of hypothyroid mice with L-T4 before killing restored binding to the euthyroid control level. Spontaneous breast tumors arising in hypothyroid mice also bound 30-40% less EGF than tumors from euthyroid animals even after in vitro desaturation of the membranes of endogenous growth factors with 3 M MgCl2 treatment. The decrease in binding in hypothyroid membranes was due to a decrease in the number of binding sites, not to a change in affinity of the growth factor for its receptor, as determined by Scatchard analysis of the binding data. Both euthyroid and hypothyroid membranes bound EGF primarily to a single class of high affinity sites (dissociation constant (Kd) = 0.7-1.8 nM). Euthyroid membranes bound 28.4 +/- (SE) 0.6 fmol/mg protein, whereas hypothyroid membranes bound 15.5 +/- 1.0 fmol/mg protein. These data indicate that EGF receptor levels in normal mammary glands and spontaneous breast tumors in mice are subject to regulation by thyroid status.

  4. Edaravone Enhances Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Production in the Ischemic Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Okuyama, Satoshi; Morita, Mayu; Sawamoto, Atsushi; Terugo, Tsukasa; Nakajima, Mitsunari; Furukawa, Yoshiko

    2015-01-01

    Edaravone, a clinical drug used to treat strokes, protects against neuronal cell death and memory loss in the ischemic brains of animal models through its antioxidant activity. In the present study, we subcutaneously administrated edaravone to mice (3 mg/kg/day) for three days immediately after bilateral common carotid artery occlusion, and revealed through an immunohistochemical analysis that edaravone (1) accelerated increases in the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus; (2) increased the number of doublecortin-positive neuronal precursor cells in the dentate gyrus subgranular zone; and (3) suppressed the ischemia-induced inactivation of calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the hippocampus. We also revealed through a Western blotting analysis that edaravone (4) induced the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding (CREB), a transcription factor that regulates BDNF gene expression; and (5) induced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2, an upstream signal factor of CREB. These results suggest that the neuroprotective effects of edaravone following brain ischemia were mediated not only by the elimination of oxidative stress, but also by the induction of BDNF production. PMID:25850013

  5. Proteomic Analysis of Mouse Oocytes Identifies PRMT7 as a Reprogramming Factor that Replaces SOX2 in the Induction of Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bingyuan; Pfeiffer, Martin J; Drexler, Hannes C A; Fuellen, Georg; Boiani, Michele

    2016-08-01

    The reprogramming process that leads to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may benefit from adding oocyte factors to Yamanaka's reprogramming cocktail (OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, with or without MYC; OSK(M)). We previously searched for such facilitators of reprogramming (the reprogrammome) by applying label-free LC-MS/MS analysis to mouse oocytes, producing a catalog of 28 candidates that are (i) able to robustly access the cell nucleus and (ii) shared between mature mouse oocytes and pluripotent embryonic stem cells. In the present study, we hypothesized that our 28 reprogrammome candidates would also be (iii) abundant in mature oocytes, (iv) depleted after the oocyte-to-embryo transition, and (v) able to potentiate or replace the OSKM factors. Using LC-MS/MS and isotopic labeling methods, we found that the abundance profiles of the 28 proteins were below those of known oocyte-specific and housekeeping proteins. Of the 28 proteins, only arginine methyltransferase 7 (PRMT7) changed substantially during mouse embryogenesis and promoted the conversion of mouse fibroblasts into iPSCs. Specifically, PRMT7 replaced SOX2 in a factor-substitution assay, yielding iPSCs. These findings exemplify how proteomics can be used to prioritize the functional analysis of reprogrammome candidates. The LC-MS/MS data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003093. PMID:27225728

  6. Vitrification and Subsequent In Vitro Maturation of Mouse Preantral Follicles in Presence of Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Oryan Abkenar, Zahra; Ganji, Roya; Eghbal Khajehrahimi, Amir; Bahadori, Mohammad Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cryopreservation of ovarian tissue or follicles has been proposed as an alternative method for fertility preservation. Although successful vitrification of follicles has been reported in several mammalian species, the survival rate is generally low. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) on in vitro preantral follicle development after vitrification. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, preantral follicles with diameter of 150-180 µm were mechanically isolated from ovaries of 18-21 days old NMRI mice. Follicles were vitrified and warmed, then cultured in a-minimal essential medium (α-MEM) without growth factor supplementation as control group (group I), while supplemented with 20 ng/ml FGF (group II), 20 ng/ml EGF (group III), and 20 ng/ml FGF +20 ng/ml EGF (group IV). After 12 days, human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG)/EGF was added to culture medium, and after 18-20 hours, the presence of cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) and oocyte maturation were assessed. The chi-square (Χ2) test was used to analyze survival and ovulation rates of the follicles. Results Our results showed that the rate of metaphase II (MII) oocytes in FGF group increased in comparison with control and other treatment groups (p<0.027), but there was no difference between control with EGF and EGF+FGF groups in oocyte maturation rate (p>0.05). There was a significant decrease in survival rate of follicles in EGF+FGE group in comparison with other groups (p<0.008). After in vitro ovulation induction, the follicles in EGF group showed a higher ovulation rate (p<0.008) than those cultured in other groups. Conclusion FGF has beneficial effect on oocyte maturation, and EGF increases COCs number in vitro. Combination of EGF and FGE decreases the number of survived follicles. PMID:24611145

  7. Defects in subventricular zone pigmented epithelium-derived factor niche signaling in the senescence-accelerated mouse prone-8.

    PubMed

    Castro-Garcia, Paola; Díaz-Moreno, María; Gil-Gas, Carmen; Fernández-Gómez, Francisco J; Honrubia-Gómez, Paloma; Álvarez-Simón, Carmen Belén; Sánchez-Sánchez, Francisco; Cano, Juan Carlos Castillo; Almeida, Francisco; Blanco, Vicente; Jordán, Joaquín; Mira, Helena; Ramírez-Castillejo, Carmen

    2015-04-01

    We studied potential changes in the subventricular zone (SVZ) stem cell niche of the senescence-accelerated mouse prone-8 (SAM-P8) aging model. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) assays with longtime survival revealed a lower number of label-retaining stem cells in the SAM-P8 SVZ compared with the SAM-Resistant 1 (SAM-R1) control strain. We also found that in SAM-P8 niche signaling is attenuated and the stem cell pool is less responsive to the self-renewal niche factor pigmented epithelium-derived factor (PEDF). Protein analysis demonstrated stable amounts of the PEDF ligand in the SAM-P8 SVZ niche; however, SAM-P8 stem cells present a significant expression decrease of patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 2, a receptor for PEDF (PNPLA2-PEDF) receptor, but not of laminin receptor (LR), a receptor for PEDF (LR-PEDF) receptor. We observed changes in self-renewal related genes (hairy and enhancer of split 1 (Hes1), hairy and enhancer of split 1 (Hes5), Sox2] and report that although these genes are down-regulated in SAM-P8, differentiation genes (Pax6) are up-regulated and neurogenesis is increased. Finally, sheltering mammalian telomere complexes might be also involved given a down-regulation of telomeric repeat binding factor 1 (Terf1) expression was observed in SAM-P8 at young age periods. Differences between these 2 models, SAM-P8 and SAM-R1 controls, have been previously detected at more advanced ages. We now describe alterations in the PEDF signaling pathway and stem cell self-renewal at a very young age, which could be involved in the premature senescence observed in the SAM-P8 model. PMID:25636741

  8. Gene Expression in Mouse Thyrotrope Adenoma: Transcription Elongation Factor Stimulates Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Gergics, Peter; Christian, Helen C; Choo, Monica S; Ajmal, Adnan; Camper, Sally A

    2016-09-01

    Thyrotrope hyperplasia and hypertrophy are common responses to primary hypothyroidism. To understand the genetic regulation of these processes, we studied gene expression changes in the pituitaries of Cga(-/-) mice, which are deficient in the common α-subunit of TSH, LH, and FSH. These mice have thyrotrope hypertrophy and hyperplasia and develop thyrotrope adenoma. We report that cell proliferation is increased, but the expression of most stem cell markers is unchanged. The α-subunit is required for secretion of the glycoprotein hormone β-subunits, and mutants exhibit elevated expression of many genes involved in the unfolded protein response, consistent with dilation and stress of the endoplasmic reticulum. Mutants have elevated expression of transcription factors that are important in thyrotrope function, such as Gata2 and Islet 1, and those that stimulate proliferation, including Nupr1, E2f1, and Etv5. We characterized the expression and function of a novel, overexpressed gene, transcription elongation factor A (SII)-like 5 (Tceal5). Stable expression of Tceal5 in a pituitary progenitor cell line is sufficient to increase cell proliferation. Thus, Tceal5 may act as a proto-oncogene. This study provides a rich resource for comparing pituitary transcriptomes and an analysis of gene expression networks. PMID:27580811

  9. Deep Proteomics of Mouse Skeletal Muscle Enables Quantitation of Protein Isoforms, Metabolic Pathways, and Transcription Factors*

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Atul S.; Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Treebak, Jonas T.; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle constitutes 40% of individual body mass and plays vital roles in locomotion and whole-body metabolism. Proteomics of skeletal muscle is challenging because of highly abundant contractile proteins that interfere with detection of regulatory proteins. Using a state-of-the art MS workflow and a strategy to map identifications from the C2C12 cell line model to tissues, we identified a total of 10,218 proteins, including skeletal muscle specific transcription factors like myod1 and myogenin and circadian clock proteins. We obtain absolute abundances for proteins expressed in a muscle cell line and skeletal muscle, which should serve as a valuable resource. Quantitation of protein isoforms of glucose uptake signaling pathways and in glucose and lipid metabolic pathways provides a detailed metabolic map of the cell line compared with tissue. This revealed unexpectedly complex regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin signaling in muscle tissue at the level of enzyme isoforms. PMID:25616865

  10. Pluripotency and Epigenetic Factors in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Fate Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Morey, Lluis; Santanach, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are characterized by their ability to self-renew and to differentiate into all cell types of a given organism. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that govern the ESC state is of great interest not only for basic research—for instance, ESCs represent a perfect system to study cellular differentiation in vitro—but also for their potential implications in human health, as these mechanisms are likewise involved in cancer progression and could be exploited in regenerative medicine. In this minireview, we focus on the latest insights into the molecular mechanisms mediated by the pluripotency factors as well as their roles during differentiation. We also discuss recent advances in understanding the function of the epigenetic regulators, Polycomb and MLL complexes, in ESC biology. PMID:26031336

  11. Role of large MAF transcription factors in the mouse endocrine pancreas

    PubMed Central

    ABDELLATIF, Ahmed M.; OGATA, Kiyohito; KUDO, Takashi; XIAFUKAITI, Gulibaikelamu; CHANG, Yu-Hsin; KATOH, Megumi C.; EL-MORSY, Salah E.; OISHI, Hisashi; TAKAHASHI, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    The members of the MAF family of transcription factors are homologs of v-Maf –the oncogenic component of the avian retrovirus AS42. The MAF family is subdivided into 2 groups, small and large MAFs. To elucidate the role of the large MAF transcription factors in the endocrine pancreas, we analyzed large MAF gene knockout mice. It has been shown that Mafa−/− mice develop phenotypes including abnormal islet structure soon after birth. This study revealed that Ins1 and Ins2 transcripts and the protein contents were significantly reduced in Mafa−/− mice at embryonic day 18.5. In addition, Mafa−/−;Mafb−/− mice contained less than 10% of the insulin transcript and protein of those of wild-type mice, suggesting that Mafa and Mafb cooperate to maintain insulin levels at the embryonic stage. On the other hand, the number of insulin-positive cells in Mafa−/− mice was comparable to that of wild-type mice, and even under a Mafb-deficient background the number of insulin-positive cells was not decreased, suggesting that Mafb plays a dominant role in embryonic β-cell development. We also found that at 20 weeks of age Mafa−/−;Mafb+/− mice showed a higher fasting blood glucose level than single Mafa−/− mice. In summary, our results indicate that Mafa is necessary for the maintenance of normal insulin levels even in embryos and that Mafb is important for the maintenance of fasting blood glucose levels in the Mafa-deficient background in adults. PMID:25912440

  12. Age, Strain, and Gender as Factors for Increased Sensitivity of the Mouse Lung to Inhaled Ozone

    PubMed Central

    Vancza, Elizabeth M.; Galdanes, Karen; Gunnison, Al; Hatch, Gary; Gordon, Terry

    2009-01-01

    Ozone (O3) is a respiratory irritant that leads to airway inflammation and pulmonary dysfunction. Animal studies show that neonates are more sensitive to O3 inhalation than adults, and children represent a potentially susceptible population. This latter notion is not well established, and biological mechanisms underlying a predisposition to pollution-induced pulmonary effects are unknown. We examined age and strain as interactive factors affecting differential pulmonary responses to inhaled O3. Male and female adult mice (15 weeks old) and neonates (15–16 days old) from eight genetically diverse inbred strains were exposed to 0.8 ppm O3 for 5 h. Pulmonary injury and lung inflammation were quantified as total protein concentration and total polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) number in lavage fluid recovered 24-h postexposure. Dose-response and time-course curves were generated using SJL/J pups, and 18O lung burden dose was assessed in additional mice. Interstrain differences in response to O3 were seen in neonatal mice: Balb/cJ and SJL/J being most sensitive and A/J and 129x1/SvJ most resistant. The PMN response to O3 was greater in neonates than in adults, specifically for SJL/J and C3H/HeJ strains, independent of dose. Small gender differences were also observed in adult mice. Variation in protein concentrations and PMN counts between adults and pups were strain dependent, suggesting that genetic determinants do play a role in age-related sensitivity to O3. Further research will help to determine what genetic factors contribute to these heightened responses, and to quantify the relative contribution of genes vs. environment in O3-induced health effects. PMID:19066396

  13. Transcriptional activation of mouse mast cell Protease-7 by activin and transforming growth factor-beta is inhibited by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Funaba, Masayuki; Ikeda, Teruo; Murakami, Masaru; Ogawa, Kenji; Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Sugino, Hiromu; Abe, Matanobu

    2003-12-26

    Previous studies have revealed that activin A and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) induced migration and morphological changes toward differentiation in bone marrow-derived cultured mast cell progenitors (BMCMCs). Here we show up-regulation of mouse mast cell protease-7 (mMCP-7), which is expressed in differentiated mast cells, by activin A and TGF-beta1 in BMCMCs, and the molecular mechanism of the gene induction of mmcp-7. Smad3, a signal mediator of the activin/TGF-beta pathway, transcriptionally activated mmcp-7. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), a tissue-specific transcription factor predominantly expressed in mast cells, melanocytes, and heart and skeletal muscle, inhibited Smad3-mediated mmcp-7 transcription. MITF associated with Smad3, and the C terminus of MITF and the MH1 and linker region of Smad3 were required for this association. Complex formation between Smad3 and MITF was neither necessary nor sufficient for the inhibition of Smad3 signaling by MITF. MITF inhibited the transcriptional activation induced by the MH2 domain of Smad3. In addition, MITF-truncated N-terminal amino acids could associate with Smad3 but did not inhibit Smad3-mediated transcription. The level of Smad3 was decreased by co-expression of MITF but not of dominant-negative MITF, which resulted from proteasomal protein degradation. The changes in the level of Smad3 protein were paralleled by those in Smad3-mediated signaling activity. These findings suggest that MITF negatively regulates Smad-dependent activin/TGF-beta signaling in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:14527958

  14. Generation of Potent Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Neutralizing Antibodies from Mouse Phage Display Library for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yan-Da; Wu, Yen-Yu; Tsai, Yi-Jiue; Tsai, Yi-San; Lin, Yu-Ying; Lai, Szu-Liang; Huang, Chao-Yang; Lok, Ying-Yung; Hu, Chih-Yung; Lai, Jiann-Shiun

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important stimulator for angiogenesis in solid tumors. Blocking VEGF activity is an effective therapeutic strategy to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. Avastin, a humanized monoclonal antibody recognizes VEGF, has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. To generate potential VEGF-recognizing antibodies with better tumor regression ability than that of Avastin, we have designed a systematic antibody selection plan. From mice immunized with recombinant human VEGF, we generated three phage display libraries, scFv-M13KO7, Fab-M13KO7, and scFv-Hyperphage, in single-chain Fv (scFv) or Fab format, displayed using either M13KO7 helper phage or Hyperphage. Solid-phase and solution-phase selection strategies were then applied to each library, generating six panning combinations. A total of sixty-four antibodies recognizing VEGF were obtained. Based on the results of epitope mapping, binding affinity, and biological functions in tumor inhibition, eight antibodies were chosen to examine their abilities in tumor regression in a mouse xenograft model using human COLO 205 cancer cells. Three of them showed improvement in the inhibition of tumor growth (328%-347% tumor growth ratio (% of Day 0 tumor volume) on Day 21 vs. 435% with Avastin). This finding suggests a potential use of these three antibodies for VEGF-targeted therapy. PMID:26861297

  15. Dissecting mechanisms of mouse embryonic stem cells heterogeneity through a model-based analysis of transcription factor dynamics.

    PubMed

    Herberg, Maria; Glauche, Ingmar; Zerjatke, Thomas; Winzi, Maria; Buchholz, Frank; Roeder, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) show heterogeneous expression levels of transcription factors (TFs) involved in pluripotency regulation, among them Nanog and Rex1. The expression of both TFs can change dynamically between states of high and low activity, correlating with the cells' capacity for self-renewal. Stochastic fluctuations as well as sustained oscillations in gene expression are possible mechanisms to explain this behaviour, but the lack of suitable data hampered their clear distinction. Here, we present a systems biology approach in which novel experimental data on TF heterogeneity is complemented by an agent-based model of mESC self-renewal. Because the model accounts for intracellular interactions, cell divisions and heredity structures, it allows for evaluating the consistency of the proposed mechanisms with data on population growth and on TF dynamics after cell sorting. Our model-based analysis revealed that a bistable, noise-driven network model fulfils the minimal requirements to consistently explain Nanog and Rex1 expression dynamics in heterogeneous and sorted mESC populations. Moreover, we studied the impact of TF-related proliferation capacities on the frequency of state transitions and demonstrate that cellular genealogies can provide insights into the heredity structures of mESCs. PMID:27097654

  16. Generation of Potent Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Neutralizing Antibodies from Mouse Phage Display Library for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yan-Da; Wu, Yen-Yu; Tsai, Yi-Jiue; Tsai, Yi-San; Lin, Yu-Ying; Lai, Szu-Liang; Huang, Chao-Yang; Lok, Ying-Yung; Hu, Chih-Yung; Lai, Jiann-Shiun

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important stimulator for angiogenesis in solid tumors. Blocking VEGF activity is an effective therapeutic strategy to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. Avastin, a humanized monoclonal antibody recognizes VEGF, has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. To generate potential VEGF-recognizing antibodies with better tumor regression ability than that of Avastin, we have designed a systematic antibody selection plan. From mice immunized with recombinant human VEGF, we generated three phage display libraries, scFv-M13KO7, Fab-M13KO7, and scFv-Hyperphage, in single-chain Fv (scFv) or Fab format, displayed using either M13KO7 helper phage or Hyperphage. Solid-phase and solution-phase selection strategies were then applied to each library, generating six panning combinations. A total of sixty-four antibodies recognizing VEGF were obtained. Based on the results of epitope mapping, binding affinity, and biological functions in tumor inhibition, eight antibodies were chosen to examine their abilities in tumor regression in a mouse xenograft model using human COLO 205 cancer cells. Three of them showed improvement in the inhibition of tumor growth (328%–347% tumor growth ratio (% of Day 0 tumor volume) on Day 21 vs. 435% with Avastin). This finding suggests a potential use of these three antibodies for VEGF-targeted therapy. PMID:26861297

  17. Peripheral orthopaedic surgery down-regulates hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor and impairs remote memory in mouse.

    PubMed

    Fidalgo, A R; Cibelli, M; White, J P M; Nagy, I; Noormohamed, F; Benzonana, L; Maze, M; Ma, D

    2011-09-01

    Peripheral orthopaedic surgery induces a profound inflammatory response. This includes a substantial increase in cytokines and, especially, in the level of interleukin (IL)-1β in the hippocampus, which has been shown to impair hippocampal-dependent memory in mice. We have employed two tests of contextual remote memory to demonstrate that the inflammatory response to surgical insult in mice also results in impairment of remote memory associated with prefrontal cortex (PFC). We have also found that, under the conditions presented in the social interaction test, peripheral orthopaedic surgery does not increase anxiety-like behaviour in our animal model. Although such surgery induces an increase in the level of IL-1β in the hippocampus, it fails to do so in the PFC. Peripheral orthopaedic surgery also results in a reduction in the level of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and this may contribute, in part, to the memory impairment found after such surgery. Our data suggest that a reduction in the level of hippocampal BDNF and an increase in the level of hippocampal IL-1β following surgery may affect the transference of fear memory in the mouse brain. PMID:21699962

  18. Insulinlike Growth Factor (IGF)-1 Administration Ameliorates Disease Manifestations in a Mouse Model of Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Carlo; Bott, Laura C; Chen, Ke-lian; Harmison, George G; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen; Pennuto, Maria; Fischbeck, Kenneth H

    2012-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an X-linked motor neuron disease caused by polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor. Patients develop slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness, muscle atrophy and fasciculations. Affected individuals often show gynecomastia, testicular atrophy and reduced fertility as a result of mild androgen insensitivity. No effective disease-modifying therapy is currently available for this disease. Our recent studies have demonstrated that insulinlike growth factor (IGF)-1 reduces the mutant androgen receptor toxicity through activation of Akt in vitro, and spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy transgenic mice that also overexpress a noncirculating muscle isoform of IGF-1 have a less severe phenotype. Here we sought to establish the efficacy of daily intraperitoneal injections of mecasermin rinfabate, recombinant human IGF-1 and IGF-1 binding protein 3, in a transgenic mouse model expressing the mutant androgen receptor with an expanded 97 glutamine tract. The study was done in a controlled, randomized, blinded fashion, and, to reflect the clinical settings, the injections were started after the onset of disease manifestations. The treatment resulted in increased Akt phosphorylation and reduced mutant androgen receptor aggregation in muscle. In comparison to vehicle-treated controls, IGF-1–treated transgenic mice showed improved motor performance, attenuated weight loss and increased survival. Our results suggest that peripheral tissue can be targeted to improve the spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy phenotype and indicate that IGF-1 warrants further investigation in clinical trials as a potential treatment for this disease. PMID:22952056

  19. A gene transfer comparative study of HSA-conjugated antiangiogenic factors in a transgenic mouse model of metastatic ocular cancer.

    PubMed

    Frau, E; Magnon, C; Opolon, P; Connault, E; Opolon, D; Beermann, F; Beerman, F; Abitbol, M; Perricaudet, M; Bouquet, C

    2007-03-01

    Different antiangiogenic and antimetastatic recombinant adenoviruses were tested in a transgenic mouse model of metastatic ocular cancer (TRP1/SV40 Tag transgenic mice), which is a highly aggressive tumor, developed from the pigmented epithelium of the retina. These vectors, encoding amino-terminal fragments of urokinase plasminogen activator (ATF), angiostatin Kringles (K1-3), endostatin (ES) and canstatin (Can) coupled to human serum albumin (HSA) were injected to assess their metastatic and antiangiogenic activities in our model. Compared to AdCO1 control group, AdATF-HSA did not significantly reduce metastatic growth. In contrast, mice treated with AdK1-3-HSA, AdES-HSA and AdCan-HSA displayed significantly smaller metastases (1.19+/-1.19, 0.87+/-1.5, 0.43+/-0.56 vs controls 4.04+/-5.12 mm3). Moreover, a stronger inhibition of metastatic growth was obtained with AdCan-HSA than with AdK1-3-HSA (P=0.04). Median survival was improved by 4 weeks. A close correlation was observed between the effects of these viruses on metastatic growth and their capacity to inhibit tumor angiogenesis. Our study indicates that systemic antiangiogenic factors production by recombinant adenoviruses, particularly Can, might represent an effective way of delaying metastatic growth via inhibition of angiogenesis. PMID:17082795

  20. Heterozygosity for Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1α decreases the incidence of thymic lymphomas in a p53 mutant mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bertout, Jessica A.; Patel, Shetal A.; Fryer, Benjamin H.; Durham, Amy C.; Covello, Kelly L.; Olive, Kenneth P.; Goldschmidt, Michael H.; Simon, M. Celeste

    2009-01-01

    Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs) are critical mediators of the cellular response to decreased oxygen tension and are overexpressed in a number of tumors. While HIF1α and HIF2α share a high degree of sequence homology, recent work has shown that the two α subunits can have contrasting and tissue-specific effects on tumor growth. To directly compare the role of each HIFα subunit in spontaneous tumorigenesis, we bred a mouse model of expanded HIF2α expression and Hif1α+/− mice to homozygotes for the R270H mutation in p53. Here we report that p53R270H/R270H mice, which have not been previously described, develop a unique tumor spectrum relative to p53R270H/− mice, including a high incidence of thymic lymphomas. Heterozygosity for Hif1α significantly reduced the incidence of thymic lymphomas observed in this model. Moreover, reduced Hif1α levels correlated with decreased stabilization of activated Notch1 and expression of the Notch target genes, Dtx1 and Nrarp. These observations uncover a novel role for HIF1α in Notch pathway activation during T-cell lymphomagenesis. PMID:19293180

  1. Activation of the factor XII-driven contact system in Alzheimer’s disease patient and mouse model plasma

    PubMed Central

    Zamolodchikov, Daria; Chen, Zu-Lin; Conti, Brooke A.; Renné, Thomas; Strickland, Sidney

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by accumulation of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ), which likely contributes to disease via multiple mechanisms. Increasing evidence implicates inflammation in AD, the origins of which are not completely understood. We investigated whether circulating Aβ could initiate inflammation in AD via the plasma contact activation system. This proteolytic cascade is triggered by the activation of the plasma protein factor XII (FXII) and leads to kallikrein-mediated cleavage of high molecular-weight kininogen (HK) and release of proinflammatory bradykinin. Aβ has been shown to promote FXII-dependent cleavage of HK in vitro. In addition, increased cleavage of HK has been found in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with AD. Here, we show increased activation of FXII, kallikrein activity, and HK cleavage in AD patient plasma. Increased contact system activation is also observed in AD mouse model plasma and in plasma from wild-type mice i.v. injected with Aβ42. Our results demonstrate that Aβ42-mediated contact system activation can occur in the AD circulation and suggest new pathogenic mechanisms, diagnostic tests, and therapies for AD. PMID:25775543

  2. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated somatic correction of a novel coagulator factor IX gene mutation ameliorates hemophilia in mouse.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yuting; Ma, Yanlin; Li, Qi; Sun, Zhenliang; Ma, Lie; Wu, Lijuan; Wang, Liren; Zeng, Li; Shao, Yanjiao; Chen, Yuting; Ma, Ning; Lu, Wenqing; Hu, Kewen; Han, Honghui; Yu, Yanhong; Huang, Yuanhua; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2016-01-01

    The X-linked genetic bleeding disorder caused by deficiency of coagulator factor IX, hemophilia B, is a disease ideally suited for gene therapy with genome editing technology. Here, we identify a family with hemophilia B carrying a novel mutation, Y371D, in the human F9 gene. The CRISPR/Cas9 system was used to generate distinct genetically modified mouse models and confirmed that the novel Y371D mutation resulted in a more severe hemophilia B phenotype than the previously identified Y371S mutation. To develop therapeutic strategies targeting this mutation, we subsequently compared naked DNA constructs versus adenoviral vectors to deliver Cas9 components targeting the F9 Y371D mutation in adult mice. After treatment, hemophilia B mice receiving naked DNA constructs exhibited correction of over 0.56% of F9 alleles in hepatocytes, which was sufficient to restore hemostasis. In contrast, the adenoviral delivery system resulted in a higher corrective efficiency but no therapeutic effects due to severe hepatic toxicity. Our studies suggest that CRISPR/Cas-mediated in situ genome editing could be a feasible therapeutic strategy for human hereditary diseases, although an efficient and clinically relevant delivery system is required for further clinical studies. PMID:26964564

  3. Activation of the factor XII-driven contact system in Alzheimer's disease patient and mouse model plasma.

    PubMed

    Zamolodchikov, Daria; Chen, Zu-Lin; Conti, Brooke A; Renné, Thomas; Strickland, Sidney

    2015-03-31

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by accumulation of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ), which likely contributes to disease via multiple mechanisms. Increasing evidence implicates inflammation in AD, the origins of which are not completely understood. We investigated whether circulating Aβ could initiate inflammation in AD via the plasma contact activation system. This proteolytic cascade is triggered by the activation of the plasma protein factor XII (FXII) and leads to kallikrein-mediated cleavage of high molecular-weight kininogen (HK) and release of proinflammatory bradykinin. Aβ has been shown to promote FXII-dependent cleavage of HK in vitro. In addition, increased cleavage of HK has been found in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with AD. Here, we show increased activation of FXII, kallikrein activity, and HK cleavage in AD patient plasma. Increased contact system activation is also observed in AD mouse model plasma and in plasma from wild-type mice i.v. injected with Aβ42. Our results demonstrate that Aβ42-mediated contact system activation can occur in the AD circulation and suggest new pathogenic mechanisms, diagnostic tests, and therapies for AD. PMID:25775543

  4. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor protects against abdominal aortic aneurysm in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Obama, Takashi; Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Tomonori; Fukuda, Yamato; Takayanagi, Takehiko; Taro, Yoshinori; Kawai, Tatsuo; Forrester, Steven J; Elliott, Katherine J; Choi, Eric; Daugherty, Alan; Rizzo, Victor; Eguchi, Satoru

    2015-05-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) has been implicated in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), Ang II activates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mediating growth promotion. We hypothesized that inhibition of EGFR prevents Ang II-dependent AAA. C57BL/6 mice were co-treated with Ang II and β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) to induce AAA with or without treatment with EGFR inhibitor, erlotinib. Without erlotinib, 64.3% of mice were dead due to aortic rupture. All surviving mice had AAA associated with EGFR activation. Erlotinib-treated mice did not die and developed far fewer AAA. The maximum diameters of abdominal aortas were significantly shorter with erlotinib treatment. In contrast, both erlotinib-treated and non-treated mice developed hypertension. The erlotinib treatment of abdominal aorta was associated with lack of EGFR activation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress, interleukin-6 induction and matrix deposition. EGFR activation in AAA was also observed in humans. In conclusion, EGFR inhibition appears to protect mice from AAA formation induced by Ang II plus BAPN. The mechanism seems to involve suppression of vascular EGFR and ER stress. PMID:25531554

  5. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Induced Ototoxicity in Mouse Cochlear Organotypic Culture

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qian; Wang, Guo-Peng; Xie, Jing; Guo, Jing-Ying; Gong, Shu-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is a cytokine involved in acute inflammatory phase reactions, and is the primary upstream mediator in the cochlear inflammatory response. Treatment of the organ of Corti with TNF-α can induce hair cell damage. However, the resulting morphological changes have not been systematically examined. In the present study, cochlear organotypic cultures from neonatal mice were treated with various concentrations and durations of TNF-α to induce inflammatory responses. Confocal microscopy was used to evaluate the condition of hair cells and supporting cells following immunohistochemical staining. In addition, the ultrastructure of the stereocilia bundle, hair cells, and supporting cells were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. TNF-α treatment resulted in a fusion and loss of stereocilia bundles in hair cells, swelling of mitochondria, and vacuolation and degranulation of the endoplasmic reticulum. Disruption of tight junctions between hair cells and supporting cells was also observed at high concentrations. Hair cell loss was preceded by apoptosis of Deiters’ and pillar cells. Taken together, these findings detail the morphological changes in the organ of Corti after TNF-α treatment, and provide an in vitro model of inflammatory-induced ototoxicity. PMID:26000970

  6. Optimization of transcription factor binding map accuracy utilizing knockout-mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Susanne V.; Goren, Alon; De Nardo, Dominic; Labzin, Larisa; Bovier, Anton; Ulas, Thomas; Theis, Heidi; Kraut, Michael; Latz, Eicke; Beyer, Marc; Schultze, Joachim L.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide assessment of protein–DNA interaction by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq) is a key technology for studying transcription factor (TF) localization and regulation of gene expression. Signal-to-noise-ratio and signal specificity in ChIP-seq studies depend on many variables, including antibody affinity and specificity. Thus far, efforts to improve antibody reagents for ChIP-seq experiments have focused mainly on generating higher quality antibodies. Here we introduce KOIN (knockout implemented normalization) as a novel strategy to increase signal specificity and reduce noise by using TF knockout mice as a critical control for ChIP-seq data experiments. Additionally, KOIN can identify ‘hyper ChIPable regions’ as another source of false-positive signals. As the use of the KOIN algorithm reduces false-positive results and thereby prevents misinterpretation of ChIP-seq data, it should be considered as the gold standard for future ChIP-seq analyses, particularly when developing ChIP-assays with novel antibody reagents. PMID:25378309

  7. Protective and detrimental effects of neuroectodermal cell–derived tissue factor in mouse models of stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaobin; Reeves, Brandi; Sparkenbaugh, Erica M.; Russell, Janice; Soltys, Zbigniew; Zhang, Hua; Faber, James E.; Key, Nigel S.; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Granger, D. Neil; Mackman, Nigel; Pawlinski, Rafal

    2016-01-01

    Within the CNS, a dysregulated hemostatic response contributes to both hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes. Tissue factor (TF), the primary initiator of the extrinsic coagulation cascade, plays an essential role in hemostasis and also contributes to thrombosis. Using both genetic and pharmacologic approaches, we characterized the contribution of neuroectodermal (NE) cell TF to the pathophysiology of stroke. We used mice with various levels of TF expression and found that astrocyte TF activity reduced to ~5% of WT levels was still sufficient to maintain hemostasis after hemorrhagic stroke but was also low enough to attenuate inflammation, reduce damage to the blood-brain barrier, and improve outcomes following ischemic stroke. Pharmacologic inhibition of TF during the reperfusion phase of ischemic stroke attenuated neuronal damage, improved behavioral deficit, and prevented mortality of mice. Our data demonstrate that NE cell TF limits bleeding complications associated with the transition from ischemic to hemorrhagic stroke and also contributes to the reperfusion injury after ischemic stroke. The high level of TF expression in the CNS is likely the result of selective pressure to limit intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) after traumatic brain injury but, in the modern era, poses the additional risk of increased ischemia-reperfusion injury after ischemic stroke. PMID:27489885

  8. Mouse models for studying genetic influences on factors determining smoking cessation success in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hall, F. Scott; Markou, Athina; Levin, Edward D.; Uhl, George R.

    2014-01-01

    Humans differ in their ability to quit using addictive substances, including nicotine, the major psychoactive ingredient in tobacco. For tobacco smoking, a substantial body of evidence, largely derived from twin studies, indicates that approximately half of these individual differences in ability to quit are heritable [1, 2], genetic influences that likely overlap with those for other addictive substances [3]. Both twin and molecular genetic studies support overlapping influences on nicotine addiction vulnerability and smoking cessation success, although there is little formal analysis of the twin data that supports this important point [2, 3]. None of the current datasets provides clear data concerning which heritable factors might provide robust dimensions around which individuals differ in ability to quit smoking. One approach to this problem is to test mice with genetic variations in genes that contain human variants that alter quit-success. This review considers which features of quit success should be included in a comprehensive approach to elucidating the genetics of quit success, and how those features may be modeled in mice. PMID:22304675

  9. The mouse Foxi3 transcription factor is necessary for the development of posterior placodes.

    PubMed

    Birol, Onur; Ohyama, Takahiro; Edlund, Renée K; Drakou, Katerina; Georgiades, Pantelis; Groves, Andrew K

    2016-01-01

    The inner ear develops from the otic placode, one of the cranial placodes that arise from a region of ectoderm adjacent to the anterior neural plate called the pre-placodal domain. We have identified a Forkhead family transcription factor, Foxi3, that is expressed in the pre-placodal domain and down-regulated when the otic placode is induced. We now show that Foxi3 mutant mice do not form otic placodes as evidenced by expression changes in early molecular markers and the lack of thickened placodal ectoderm, an otic cup or otocyst. Some preplacodal genes downstream of Foxi3-Gata3, Six1 and Eya1-are not expressed in the ectoderm of Foxi3 mutant mice, and the ectoderm exhibits signs of increased apoptosis. We also show that Fgf signals from the hindbrain and cranial mesoderm, which are necessary for otic placode induction, are received by pre-placodal ectoderm in Foxi3 mutants, but do not initiate otic induction. Finally, we show that the epibranchial placodes that develop in close proximity to the otic placode and the mandibular division of the trigeminal ganglion are missing in Foxi3 mutants. Our data suggest that Foxi3 is necessary to prime pre-placodal ectoderm for the correct interpretation of inductive signals for the otic and epibranchial placodes. PMID:26550799

  10. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Underlies Loss of Cortical Dendritic Spine Density in a Mouse Model of Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, Anja; Visanji, Naomi P; Momen, M Abdul; Feng, Rui; Francis, Beverly M; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian; Hazrati, Lili-Naz

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) is a progressive disorder characterized by reduced cardiac output and increased peripheral resistance, ultimately leading to tissue perfusion deficits and devastating consequences for several organs including the brain. We previously described a tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)–dependent enhancement of posterior cerebral artery tone and concomitant reduced cerebral blood flow in a mouse model of early HF in which blood pressure remains minimally affected. HF is often associated with cognitive impairments such as memory deficits, even before any overt changes in brain structure and function occur. The pathophysiology underlying the development of cognitive impairments in HF is unknown, and appropriate treatment strategies are lacking. Methods and Results We used a well-established mouse model in which HF was induced by experimental myocardial infarction produced by permanent surgical ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery (infarct size ≈25% of the left ventricular wall). Ligated mice developed enlarged hearts, congested lungs, and reduced cardiac output and blood pressure, with elevated peripheral resistance within 6 to 8 weeks after ligation. In this study, we demonstrated the significance of the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α during HF-mediated neuroinflammation and associated impaired hippocampus-independent nonspatial episodic memory function. Augmented cerebral TNF-α expression and microglial activation in HF mice, indicative of brain inflammation, were accompanied by morphological changes and significant reduction of cortical dendritic spines (61.39±8.61% for basal and 61.04±9.18% for apical spines [P<0.001]). The significance of TNF-α signaling during the observed HF-mediated neurodegenerative processes is supported by evidence showing that sequestration or genetic deletion of TNF-α ameliorates the observed reduction of cortical dendritic spines (33.51±7.63% for basal and 30.13±6.98% for apical

  11. Molecular therapy targeting Sonic hedgehog and hepatocyte growth factor signaling in a mouse model of medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Coon, Valerie; Laukert, Tamara; Pedone, Carolyn A; Laterra, John; Kim, K Jin; Fults, Daniel W

    2010-09-01

    The use of genetically engineered mice has provided insights into the molecular pathogenesis of the pediatric brain tumor medulloblastoma and revealed promising therapeutic targets. Ectopic expression of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) in cerebellar neural progenitor cells induces medulloblastomas in mice, and coexpression of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) enhances Shh-induced tumor formation. To determine whether Shh + HGF-driven medulloblastomas were responsive to Shh signaling blockade and whether treatment response could be enhanced by combination therapy targeting both HGF and Shh signaling pathways, we carried out a survival study in mice. We induced medulloblastomas by retrovirus-mediated expression of Shh and HGF, after which we treated the mice systemically with (a) HGF-neutralizing monoclonal antibody L2G7, (b) Shh signaling inhibitor cyclopamine, (c) Shh-neutralizing monoclonal antibody 5E1, (d) L2G7 + cyclopamine, or (e) L2G7 + 5E1. We report that monotherapy targeting either HGF signaling or Shh signaling prolonged survival and that anti-HGF therapy had a more durable response than Shh-targeted therapy. The effect of L2G7 + 5E1 combination therapy on cumulative survival was equivalent to that of L2G7 monotherapy and that of L2G7 + cyclopamine therapy was worse. The principal mechanism by which Shh- and HGF-targeted therapies inhibited tumor growth was a potent apoptotic death response in tumor cells, supplemented by a weaker suppressive effect on proliferation. Our observation that combination therapy either failed to improve or even reduced survival in mice bearing Shh + HGF-induced medulloblastomas compared with monotherapy underscores the importance of preclinical testing of molecular-targeted therapies in animal models of tumors in which the targeted pathways are known to be active. PMID:20807782

  12. Molecular Therapy Targeting Sonic Hedgehog and Hepatocyte Growth Factor Signaling in a Mouse Model of Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Coon, Valerie; Laukert, Tamara; Pedone, Carolyn A.; Laterra, John; Kim, K. Jin; Fults, Daniel W.

    2010-01-01

    The use of genetically engineered mice has provided insights into the molecular pathogenesis of the pediatric brain tumor medulloblastoma and revealed promising therapeutic targets. Ectopic expression of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) in cerebellar neural progenitor cells induces medulloblastomas in mice, and coexpression of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) enhances Shh-induced tumor formation. To determine whether Shh+HGF–driven medulloblastomas were responsive to Shh signaling blockade and whether treatment response could be enhanced by combination therapy targeting both HGF and Shh signaling pathways, we carried out a survival study in mice. We induced medulloblastomas by retrovirus-mediated expression of Shh and HGF, after which we treated the mice systemically with (a) HGF-neutralizing monoclonal antibody L2G7, (b) Shh signaling inhibitor cyclopamine, (c) Shh-neutralizing monoclonal antibody 5E1, (d) L2G7+cyclopamine, or (e) L2G7+5E1. We report that monotherapy targeting either HGF signaling or Shh signaling prolonged survival and that anti-HGF therapy had a more durable response than Shh-targeted therapy. The effect of L2G7+5E1 combination therapy on cumulative survival was equivalent to that of L2G7 monotherapy and that of L2G7+cyclopamine therapy was worse. The principal mechanism by which Shh- and HGF-targeted therapies inhibited tumor growth was a potent apoptotic death response in tumor cells, supplemented by a weaker suppressive effect on proliferation. Our observation that combination therapy either failed to improve or even reduced survival in mice bearing Shh+HGF induced medulloblastomas compared with monotherapy underscores the importance of preclinical testing of molecular-targeted therapies in animal models of tumors in which the targeted pathways are known to be active. PMID:20807782

  13. Examining the virulence of Candida albicans transcription factor mutants using Galleria mellonella and mouse infection models

    PubMed Central

    Amorim-Vaz, Sara; Delarze, Eric; Ischer, Françoise; Sanglard, Dominique; Coste, Alix T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify Candida albicans transcription factors (TFs) involved in virulence. Although mice are considered the gold-standard model to study fungal virulence, mini-host infection models have been increasingly used. Here, barcoded TF mutants were first screened in mice by pools of strains and fungal burdens (FBs) quantified in kidneys. Mutants of unannotated genes which generated a kidney FB significantly different from that of wild-type were selected and individually examined in Galleria mellonella. In addition, mutants that could not be detected in mice were also tested in G. mellonella. Only 25% of these mutants displayed matching phenotypes in both hosts, highlighting a significant discrepancy between the two models. To address the basis of this difference (pool or host effects), a set of 19 mutants tested in G. mellonella were also injected individually into mice. Matching FB phenotypes were observed in 50% of the cases, highlighting the bias due to host effects. In contrast, 33.4% concordance was observed between pool and single strain infections in mice, thereby highlighting the bias introduced by the “pool effect.” After filtering the results obtained from the two infection models, mutants for MBF1 and ZCF6 were selected. Independent marker-free mutants were subsequently tested in both hosts to validate previous results. The MBF1 mutant showed impaired infection in both models, while the ZCF6 mutant was only significant in mice infections. The two mutants showed no obvious in vitro phenotypes compared with the wild-type, indicating that these genes might be specifically involved in in vivo adapt PMID:25999923

  14. MyD88 Deficiency Alters Expression of Antimicrobial Factors in Mouse Salivary Glands

    PubMed Central

    Into, Takeshi; Takigawa, Toshiya; Niida, Shumpei; Shibata, Ken-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    The surfaces of oral mucosa are protected from infections by antimicrobial proteins and natural immunoglobulins that are constantly secreted in saliva, serving as principal innate immune defense in the oral cavity. MyD88 is an important adaptor protein for signal transduction downstream of Toll-like receptors and TACI, receptors for regulation of innate immunity and B cell responses, respectively. Although MyD88-mediated signaling has a regulatory role in the intestinal mucosal immunity, its specific role in the oral cavity has remained elusive. In the present study, we assessed the influence of MyD88 deficiency on the oral innate defense, particularly the expression of antimicrobial proteins in salivary glands and production of salivary basal immunoglobulins, in mice. Microarray analysis of the whole tissues of submandibular glands revealed that the expression of several genes encoding salivary antimicrobial proteins, such as secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor (SLPI), S100A8, and lactotransferrin, was reduced due to MyD88 deficiency. Histologically, SLPI-expressing acinar cells were evidently decreased in the glands from MyD88 deficient mice compared to wild-type mice. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that B cell populations, including B-1 cells and IgA+ plasma cells, residing in submandibular glands were increased by MyD88 deficiency. The level of salivary anti-phosphorylcholine IgA was elevated in MyD88 deficient mice compared to wild-type mice. Thus, this study provides a detailed description of the effect of MyD88 deficiency on expression of several salivary antimicrobial factors in mice, illustrating the role for MyD88-mediated signaling in the innate immune defense in the oral cavity. PMID:25415419

  15. Early alterations in extracellular matrix and transforming growth factor [beta] gene expression in mouse lung indicative of late radiation fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, J.N.; Johnston, C.J.; Baggs, R.; Rubin, P. )

    1994-02-01

    Fibrosis, characterized by the accumulation of collagen, is a late result of thoracic irradiation. The expression of late radiation injury can be found immediately after irradiation by measuring messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance. To determine if extracellular matrix mRNA and transforming growth factor beta abundance was affected acutely after irradiation, the authors measured mRNA levels of collagen I (CI), collagen III (CIII), collagen IV (CIV), fibronectin (FN), and transforming growth factor [beta] (TGF[beta][sub 1,2 3]) in mouse lungs on day 1 and day 14 after graded doses of radiation. C57BL/6 female mice were irradiated with a single dose to the thorax of 5 or 12.5 Gy. Total lung RNA was prepared and immobilized by Northern and slot blotting and hybridized with radiolabelled cDNA probes for CI, CIII, CIV, FN, TGF[beta][sub 1,2 3] and a control probe encoding for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Autoradiographic data were quantified by video densitometry and results normalized to GAPDH. Changes in the expression of CI, CIII, CIV, FN and TGF[beta][sub 1,2 3] were observed as early as 1 day after exposure. Through 14 days, changes in mRNA up to 5-fold were seen for any one dose. Dose related changes as high as 10-fold were also evident. The CI:CIII ratio increased gradually for the 5 Gy dose at 14 days postirradiation while the CI:CII ratio for the 12.5 Gy dose decreased by approximately 4-fold as compared to the control. These studies suggest that alterations in expression of extracellular matrix and TGF[beta] mRNA occur very early after radiation injury even at low doses and may play a role in the development of chronic fibrosis. 37 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Role of the Helicobacter pylori virulence factors vacuolating cytotoxin, CagA, and urease in a mouse model of disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ghiara, P; Marchetti, M; Blaser, M J; Tummuru, M K; Cover, T L; Segal, E D; Tompkins, L S; Rappuoli, R

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenic role of Helicobacter pylori virulence factors has been studied with a mouse model of gastric disease. BALB/c mice were treated orally with different amounts of sonic extracts of cytotoxic H. pylori strains (NCTC 11637, 60190, 84-183, and 87A300 [CagA+/Tox+]). The pathological effects on histological sections of gastric mucosae were assessed and were compared with the effects of treatments with extracts from noncytotoxic strains (G21 and G50 [CagA-/Tox-]) and from strains that express either CagA alone (D931 [CagA+/Tox-]) or the cytotoxin alone (G104 [CagA-/Tox+]). The treatment with extracts from cytotoxic strains induced various epithelial lesions (vacuolation, erosions, and ulcerations), recruitment of inflammatory cells in the lamina propria, and a marked reduction of the mucin layer. Extracts of noncytotoxic strains induced mucin depletion but no other significant pathology. Crude extracts of strain D931, expressing CagA alone, caused only mild infiltration of inflammatory cells, whereas extracts of strain G104, expressing cytotoxin alone, induced extensive epithelial damage but little inflammatory reaction. Loss of the mucin layer was not associated with a cytotoxic phenotype, since this loss was observed in mice treated with crude extracts of all strains. The pathogenic roles of CagA, cytotoxin, and urease were further assessed by using extracts of mutant strains of H. pylori defective in the expression of each of these virulence factors. The results obtained suggest that (i) urease activity does not play a significant role in inducing the observed gastric damage, (ii) cytotoxin has an important role in the induction of gastric epithelial cell lesions but not in eliciting inflammation, and (iii) other components present in strains which carry the cagA gene, but distinct from CagA itself, are involved in eliciting the inflammatory response. PMID:7558333

  17. SOXC Transcription Factors Induce Cartilage Growth Plate Formation in Mouse Embryos by Promoting Noncanonical WNT Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kenji; Bhattaram, Pallavi; Penzo-Méndez, Alfredo; Gadi, Abhilash; Lefebvre, Véronique

    2015-09-01

    Growth plates are specialized cartilage structures that ensure the elongation of most skeletal primordia during vertebrate development. They are made by chondrocytes that proliferate in longitudinal columns and then progress in a staggered manner towards prehypertrophic, hypertrophic and terminal maturation. Complex molecular networks control the formation and activity of growth plates, but remain incompletely understood. We investigated here the importance of the SoxC genes, which encode the SOX4, SOX11 and SOX12 transcription factors, in growth plates. We show that the three genes are expressed robustly in perichondrocytes and weakly in growth plate chondrocytes. SoxC(Prx1Cre) mice, which deleted SoxC genes in limb bud skeletogenic mesenchyme, were born with tiny appendicular cartilage primordia because of failure to form growth plates. In contrast, SoxC(Col2Cre) and SoxC(ATC) mice, which deleted SoxC genes primarily in chondrocytes, were born with mild dwarfism and fair growth plates. Chondrocytes in the latter mutants matured normally, but formed irregular columns, proliferated slowly and died ectopically. Asymmetric distribution of VANGL2 was defective in both SoxC(Prx1Cre) and SoxC(ATC) chondrocytes, indicating impairment of planar cell polarity, a noncanonical WNT signaling pathway that controls growth plate chondrocyte alignment, proliferation and survival. Accordingly, SoxC genes were necessary in perichondrocytes for expression of Wnt5a, which encodes a noncanonical WNT ligand required for growth plate formation, and in chondrocytes and perichondrocytes for expression of Fzd3 and Csnk1e, which encode a WNT receptor and casein kinase-1 subunit mediating planar cell polarity, respectively. Reflecting the differential strengths of the SOXC protein transactivation domains, SOX11 was more powerful than SOX4, and SOX12 interfered with the activity of SOX4 and SOX11. Altogether, these findings provide novel insights into the molecular regulation of skeletal

  18. Changes in Dietary Fat Content Rapidly Alters the Mouse Plasma Coagulation Profile without Affecting Relative Transcript Levels of Coagulation Factors

    PubMed Central

    van Diepen, Janna A.; Verhoef, Daniël; Voshol, Peter J.; Reitsma, Pieter H.; van Vlijmen, Bart J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with a hypercoagulable state and increased risk for thrombotic cardiovascular events. Objective Establish the onset and reversibility of the hypercoagulable state during the development and regression of nutritionally-induced obesity in mice, and its relation to transcriptional changes and clearance rates of coagulation factors as well as its relation to changes in metabolic and inflammatory parameters. Methods Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a low fat (10% kcal as fat; LFD) or high fat diet (45% kcal as fat; HFD) for 2, 4, 8 or 16 weeks. To study the effects of weight loss, mice were fed the HFD for 16 weeks and switched to the LFD for 1, 2 or 4 weeks. For each time point analyses of plasma and hepatic mRNA levels of coagulation factors were performed after overnight fasting, as well as measurements of circulating metabolic and inflammatory parameters. Furthermore, in vivo clearance rates of human factor (F) VII, FVIII and FIX proteins were determined after 2 weeks of HFD-feeding. Results HFD feeding gradually increased the body and liver weight, which was accompanied by a significant increase in plasma glucose levels from 8 weeks onwards, while insulin levels were affected after 16 weeks. Besides a transient rise in cytokine levels at 2 weeks after starting the HFD, no significant effect on inflammation markers was present. Increased plasma levels of fibrinogen, FII, FVII, FVIII, FIX, FXI and FXII were observed in mice on a HFD for 2 weeks, which in general persisted throughout the 16 weeks of HFD-feeding. Interestingly, with the exception of FXI the effects on plasma coagulation levels were not paralleled by changes in relative transcript levels in the liver, nor by decreased clearance rates. Switching from HFD to LFD reversed the HFD-induced procoagulant shift in plasma, again not coinciding with transcriptional modulation. Conclusions Changes in dietary fat content rapidly alter the mouse plasma coagulation profile, thereby

  19. MITOCHONDRIAL DISEASES PART II: MOUSE MODELS OF OXPHOS DEFICIENCIES CAUSED BY DEFECTS IN REGULATORY FACTORS AND OTHER COMPONENTS REQUIRED FOR MITOCHONDRIAL FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Iommarini, Luisa; Peralta, Susana; Torraco, Alessandra; Diaz, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are defined as defects that affect the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS). They are characterized by a heterogeneous array of clinical presentations due in part to a wide variety of factors required for proper function of the components of the OXPHOS system. There is no cure for these disorders owing our poor knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms of disease. To understand the mechanisms of human disease numerous mouse models have been developed in recent years. Here we summarize the features of several mouse models of mitochondrial diseases directly related to those factors affecting mtDNA maintenance, replication, transcription, translation as well to other proteins that are involved in mitochondrial dynamics and quality control which affect mitochondrial OXPHOS function without been intrinsic components of the system. We discuss how these models have contributed to our understanding of mitochondrial diseases and their pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:25640959

  20. An Extract from Wax Apple (Syzygium samarangense (Blume) Merrill and Perry) Effects Glycogenesis and Glycolysis Pathways in Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Treated FL83B Mouse Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Szu-Chuan; Chang, Wen-Chang; Chang, Chiao-Li

    2013-01-01

    FL83B mouse hepatocytes were treated with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) to induce insulin resistance to investigate the effect of a wax apple aqueous extract (WAE) in insulin-resistant mouse hepatocytes. The uptake of 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxyglucose (2 NBDG), a fluorescent D-glucose derivative, was performed, and the metabolism of carbohydrates was evaluated by examining the expression of glycogenesis or glycolysis-related proteins in insulin-resistant hepatocytes. The results show that WAE significantly improves the uptake of glucose and enhances glycogen content in insulin-resistant FL83B mouse hepatocytes. The results from Western blot analysis also reveal that WAE increases the expression of glycogen synthase (GS), hexokinase (HXK), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), phosphofructokinase (PFK) and aldolase in TNF-α treated cells, indicating that WAE may ameliorate glucose metabolism by promoting glycogen synthesis and the glycolysis pathways in insulin-resistant FL83B mouse hepatocytes. PMID:23389304

  1. Crystal structure of the N-terminal SH3 domain of mouse {beta}PIX, p21-activated kinase-interacting exchange factor

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiaofeng; Liu Xueqi; Sun Fei; Gao Jia; Zhou Hongwei; Gao, George F.; Bartlam, Mark; Rao Zihe . E-mail: raozh@xtal.tsinghua.edu.cn

    2006-01-06

    The mouse {beta}PIX-SH3 domain, residues 8-63 of P21-activated kinase interacting exchange factor, has been characterized by X-ray diffraction. Crystals belonging to space group P3{sub 2}21 diffracted to 2.0 A and the structure was phased by the single-wavelength anomalous diffraction method. The domain is a compact {beta}-barrel with an overall conformation similar to the general SH3 structure. The X-ray structure shows mouse {beta}PIX-SH3 domain binding the way in which the {beta}PIX characteristic amino acids do so for an unconventional ligand binding surface. This arrangement provides a rationale for the unusual ligand recognition motif exhibited by mouse {beta}PIX-SH3 domain. Comparison with another SH3/peptide complex shows that the recognition mode of the mouse {beta}PIX-SH3 domain should be very similar to the RXXK ligand binding mode. The unique large and planar hydrophobic pocket may contribute to the promiscuity of {beta}PIX-SH3 domain resulting in its multiple biological functions.

  2. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Genetically Engineered to Overexpress Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Improve Outcomes in Huntington's Disease Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Kari; Dahlenburg, Heather; Nelson, Haley; Fink, Kyle D; Cary, Whitney; Hendrix, Kyle; Annett, Geralyn; Torrest, Audrey; Deng, Peter; Gutierrez, Joshua; Nacey, Catherine; Pepper, Karen; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; D Anderson, Johnathon; McGee, Jeannine; Gruenloh, William; Fury, Brian; Bauer, Gerhard; Duffy, Alexandria; Tempkin, Theresa; Wheelock, Vicki; Nolta, Jan A

    2016-05-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal degenerative autosomal dominant neuropsychiatric disease that causes neuronal death and is characterized by progressive striatal and then widespread brain atrophy. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a lead candidate for the treatment of HD, as it has been shown to prevent cell death and to stimulate the growth and migration of new neurons in the brain in transgenic mouse models. BDNF levels are reduced in HD postmortem human brain. Previous studies have shown efficacy of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC)/BDNF using murine MSCs, and the present study used human MSCs to advance the therapeutic potential of the MSC/BDNF platform for clinical application. Double-blinded studies were performed to examine the effects of intrastriatally transplanted human MSC/BDNF on disease progression in two strains of immune-suppressed HD transgenic mice: YAC128 and R6/2. MSC/BDNF treatment decreased striatal atrophy in YAC128 mice. MSC/BDNF treatment also significantly reduced anxiety as measured in the open-field assay. Both MSC and MSC/BDNF treatments induced a significant increase in neurogenesis-like activity in R6/2 mice. MSC/BDNF treatment also increased the mean lifespan of the R6/2 mice. Our genetically modified MSC/BDNF cells set a precedent for stem cell-based neurotherapeutics and could potentially be modified for other neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and some forms of Parkinson's disease. These cells provide a platform delivery system for future studies involving corrective gene-editing strategies. PMID:26765769

  3. Substituting mouse transcription factor Pou4f2 with a sea urchin orthologue restores retinal ganglion cell development

    PubMed Central

    Mocko-Strand, Julie A.; Wang, Jing; Ullrich-Lüter, Esther; Pan, Ping; Wang, Steven W.; Arnone, Maria Ina; Frishman, Laura J.; Klein, William H.

    2016-01-01

    Pou domain transcription factor Pou4f2 is essential for the development of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the vertebrate retina. A distant orthologue of Pou4f2 exists in the genome of the sea urchin (class Echinoidea) Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (SpPou4f1/2), yet the photosensory structure of sea urchins is strikingly different from that of the mammalian retina. Sea urchins have no obvious eyes, but have photoreceptors clustered around their tube feet disc. The mechanisms that are associated with the development and function of photoreception in sea urchins are largely unexplored. As an initial approach to better understand the sea urchin photosensory structure and relate it to the mammalian retina, we asked whether SpPou4f1/2 could support RGC development in the absence of Pou4f2. To answer this question, we replaced genomic Pou4f2 with an SpPou4f1/2 cDNA. In Pou4f2-null mice, retinas expressing SpPou4f1/2 were outwardly identical to those of wild-type mice. SpPou4f1/2 retinas exhibited dark-adapted electroretinogram scotopic threshold responses, indicating functionally active RGCs. During retinal development, SpPou4f1/2 activated RGC-specific genes and in S. purpuratus, SpPou4f2 was expressed in photoreceptor cells of tube feet in a pattern distinct from Opsin4 and Pax6. Our results suggest that SpPou4f1/2 and Pou4f2 share conserved components of a gene network for photosensory development and they maintain their conserved intrinsic functions despite vast morphological differences in mouse and sea urchin photosensory structures. PMID:26962139

  4. Contrasting effects of basic fibroblast growth factor and neurotrophin 3 on cell cycle kinetics of mouse cortical stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lukaszewicz, Agnès; Savatier, Pierre; Cortay, Véronique; Kennedy, Henry; Dehay, Colette

    2002-01-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) exerts a mitogenic effect on cortical neuroblasts, whereas neurotrophin 3 (NT3) promotes differentiation in these cells. Here we provide evidence that both the mitogenic effect of bFGF and the differentiation-promoting effect of NT3 are linked with modifications of cell cycle kinetics in mouse cortical precursor cells. We adapted an in vitro assay, which makes it possible to evaluate (1) the speed of progression of the cortical precursors through the cell cycle, (2) the duration of individual phases of the cell cycle, (3) the proportion of proliferative versus differentiative divisions, and (4) the influence on neuroglial differentiation. Contrary to what has been claimed previously, bFGF promotes proliferation via a change in cell cycle kinetics by simultaneously decreasing G1 duration and increasing the proportion of proliferative divisions. In contrast, NT3 lengthens G1 and promotes differentiative divisions. We investigated the molecular foundations of these effects and show that bFGF downregulates p27kip1 and upregulates cyclin D2 expression. This contrasts with NT3, which upregulates p27kip1 and downregulates cyclin D2 expression. Neither bFGF nor NT3 influences the proportion of glia or neurons in short to medium term cultures. The data point to links between the length of the G1 phase and the type of division of cortical precursors: differentiative divisions are correlated with long G1 durations, whereas proliferative divisions correlate with short G1 durations. The present results suggest that concerted mechanisms control the progressive increase in the cell cycle duration and proportion of differentiative divisions that is observed as corticogenesis proceeds. PMID:12151540

  5. Opposite effects of a high-fat diet and calorie restriction on ciliary neurotrophic factor signaling in the mouse hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Severi, Ilenia; Perugini, Jessica; Mondini, Eleonora; Smorlesi, Arianna; Frontini, Andrea; Cinti, Saverio; Giordano, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    In the mouse hypothalamus, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is mainly expressed by ependymal cells and tanycytes of the ependymal layer covering the third ventricle. Since exogenously administered CNTF causes reduced food intake and weight loss, we tested whether endogenous CNTF might be involved in energy balance regulation. We thus evaluated CNTF production and responsiveness in the hypothalamus of mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD), of ob/ob obese mice, and of mice fed a calorie restriction (CR) regimen. RT-PCR showed that CNTF mRNA increased significantly in HFD mice and decreased significantly in CR animals. Western blotting confirmed that CNTF expression was higher in HFD mice and reduced in CR mice, but high interindividual variability blunted the significance of these differences. By immunohistochemistry, hypothalamic tuberal and mammillary region tanycytes stained strongly for CNTF in HFD mice, whereas CR mice exhibited markedly reduced staining. RT-PCR and Western blotting disclosed that changes in CNTF expression were paralleled by changes in the expression of its specific receptor, CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα). Injection of recombinant CNTF and detection of phospho-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (P-STAT3) showed that CNTF responsiveness by the ependymal layer, mainly by tanycytes, was higher in HFD than CR mice. In addition, in HFD mice CNTF administration induced distinctive STAT3 signaling in a large neuron population located in the dorsomedial and ventromedial nuclei, perifornical area and mammillary body. The hypothalamic expression of CNTF and CNTFRα did not change in the hyperphagic, leptin-deficient ob/ob obese mice; accordingly, P-STAT3 immunoreactivity in CNTF-treated ob/ob mice was confined to ependymal layer and arcuate neurons. Collectively, these data suggest that hypothalamic CNTF is involved in controlling the energy balance and that CNTF signaling plays a role in HFD obese mice at specific sites. PMID:24409114

  6. Human HOXB cluster and the nerve growth factor receptor gene: Comparison with an orthologous chromosomal domain in mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, K.L.; Bradshaw, M.S.; Ruddle, F.H.

    1995-11-01

    The structural organization and nucleotide sequence similarity of mammalian Antennapedia-class homeobox genes support the view that the four homeobox clusters (HOXA, B,C, and D on human chromosomes 7, 17, 12 and 2, respectively) arose through a combination of gene duplication and divergence to form a cluster, followed by several cluster duplications. The duplication events that gave rise to the four clusters appear to have involved chromosomal domains extending well beyond the borders of the clusters in either direction. This evidence arises from the observation that many genes closely linked to the homeobox clusters on different chromosomes show sequence similarity. Here, we present a continuation of physical mapping studies to determine the extent and organization of the duplicated regions surrounding the four homeobox clusters in human. Southern blots prepared from pulsed-field gels of human DNA were probed with cloned segments of human HOXB genes and the nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR) gene on chromosome 17q21-q22. Restriction enzyme analysis revealed the close physical linkage of these genes within 100 kb. Two yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs), 220 and 380 kb in size, were isolated using oligonucleotide primers specific for NGFR. Both YACs contained the entire HOXB cluster. Restriction mapping of the clones indicated that the distance separating these loci could not be greater than 50 kb. This result confirms and extends previous information on the proximity of these genes as determined by genetic linkage analysis and closely parallels the orthologous loci in the mouse. 48 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Substituting mouse transcription factor Pou4f2 with a sea urchin orthologue restores retinal ganglion cell development.

    PubMed

    Mao, Chai-An; Agca, Cavit; Mocko-Strand, Julie A; Wang, Jing; Ullrich-Lüter, Esther; Pan, Ping; Wang, Steven W; Arnone, Maria Ina; Frishman, Laura J; Klein, William H

    2016-03-16

    Pou domain transcription factor Pou4f2 is essential for the development of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the vertebrate retina. A distant orthologue of Pou4f2 exists in the genome of the sea urchin (class Echinoidea) Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (SpPou4f1/2), yet the photosensory structure of sea urchins is strikingly different from that of the mammalian retina. Sea urchins have no obvious eyes, but have photoreceptors clustered around their tube feet disc. The mechanisms that are associated with the development and function of photoreception in sea urchins are largely unexplored. As an initial approach to better understand the sea urchin photosensory structure and relate it to the mammalian retina, we asked whether SpPou4f1/2 could support RGC development in the absence of Pou4f2. To answer this question, we replaced genomic Pou4f2 with an SpPou4f1/2 cDNA. In Pou4f2-null mice, retinas expressing SpPou4f1/2 were outwardly identical to those of wild-type mice. SpPou4f1/2 retinas exhibited dark-adapted electroretinogram scotopic threshold responses, indicating functionally active RGCs. During retinal development, SpPou4f1/2 activated RGC-specific genes and in S. purpuratus, SpPou4f2 was expressed in photoreceptor cells of tube feet in a pattern distinct from Opsin4 and Pax6. Our results suggest that SpPou4f1/2 and Pou4f2 share conserved components of a gene network for photosensory development and they maintain their conserved intrinsic functions despite vast morphological differences in mouse and sea urchin photosensory structures. PMID:26962139

  8. A Mouse Model for Chikungunya: Young Age and Inefficient Type-I Interferon Signaling Are Risk Factors for Severe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Disson, Olivier; Brigitte, Madly; Guivel-Benhassine, Florence; Touret, Yasmina; Barau, Georges; Cayet, Nadège; Schuffenecker, Isabelle; Desprès, Philippe; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Michault, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging arbovirus responsible for a massive outbreak currently afflicting the Indian Ocean region and India. Infection from CHIKV typically induces a mild disease in humans, characterized by fever, myalgia, arthralgia, and rash. Cases of severe CHIKV infection involving the central nervous system (CNS) have recently been described in neonates as well as in adults with underlying conditions. The pathophysiology of CHIKV infection and the basis for disease severity are unknown. To address these critical issues, we have developed an animal model of CHIKV infection. We show here that whereas wild type (WT) adult mice are resistant to CHIKV infection, WT mouse neonates are susceptible and neonatal disease severity is age-dependent. Adult mice with a partially (IFN-α/βR+/−) or totally (IFN-α/βR−/−) abrogated type-I IFN pathway develop a mild or severe infection, respectively. In mice with a mild infection, after a burst of viral replication in the liver, CHIKV primarily targets muscle, joint, and skin fibroblasts, a cell and tissue tropism similar to that observed in biopsy samples of CHIKV-infected humans. In case of severe infections, CHIKV also disseminates to other tissues including the CNS, where it specifically targets the choroid plexuses and the leptomeninges. Together, these data indicate that CHIKV-associated symptoms match viral tissue and cell tropisms, and demonstrate that the fibroblast is a predominant target cell of CHIKV. These data also identify the neonatal phase and inefficient type-I IFN signaling as risk factors for severe CHIKV-associated disease. The development of a permissive small animal model will expedite the testing of future vaccines and therapeutic candidates. PMID:18282093

  9. Corticotropin-releasing Factor Changes the Phenotype and Function of Dendritic Cells in Mouse Mesenteric Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Li; Lu, Zhang; Xiaoteng, Wang; Yue, Hu; Bin, Lu; Lina, Meng; Zhe, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Dendritic cells (DCs) are a significant contributor to the pathology of numerous chronic inflammatory autoimmune disorders; however, the effects of Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) on intestinal DCs are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of CRF in alterations of intestinal dendritic cell phenotype and function. Methods Mouse mesenteric lymph node dendritic cells (MLNDCs) were obtained using magnetic bead sorting. Surface expression of CRF receptor type 1 (CRF-R1) and CRF-R2 was determined by double-labeling immunofluorescence and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and MLNDCs were subsequently exposed to CRF in the presence or absence of CRF-R1 and CRF-R2 antagonists. Expression of surface molecules (MHC-I and MHC-II) and co-stimulatory molecules (CD80 and CD86) was determined by flow cytometric and western blot analyses, and the T cell stimulatory capacity of MLNDCs was evaluated by mixed lymphocyte reaction. Results Immunofluorescent staining and quatitative polymerase chain reaction indicated that both the CRF receptors (CRF-R1 and CRF-2) are expressed on the surface of MLNDCs. Exposure to CRF increased the expression of MHC-II on MLNDCs as well as their capacity to stimulate T cell proliferation. MLNDCs treated with CRF-R1 antagonist exhibited a phenotype characterized by a less activated state and reduced surface expression of MHC-II, and consequently showed reduced capacity to stimulate T cells. In contrast, treatment of MLNDCs with CRF-R2 antagonist yielded an opposite result. Conclusions CRF can alter the phenotype and function of intestinal DCs through direct action on CRF-R1 and CRF-R2, and activation of the CRF-R1 and CRF-R2 pathways yields opposing outcomes. PMID:26424042

  10. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Genetically Engineered to Overexpress Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Improve Outcomes in Huntington's Disease Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Kari; Dahlenburg, Heather; Nelson, Haley; Fink, Kyle D; Cary, Whitney; Hendrix, Kyle; Annett, Geralyn; Torrest, Audrey; Deng, Peter; Gutierrez, Joshua; Nacey, Catherine; Pepper, Karen; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; D Anderson, Johnathon; McGee, Jeannine; Gruenloh, William; Fury, Brian; Bauer, Gerhard; Duffy, Alexandria; Tempkin, Theresa; Wheelock, Vicki; Nolta, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal degenerative autosomal dominant neuropsychiatric disease that causes neuronal death and is characterized by progressive striatal and then widespread brain atrophy. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a lead candidate for the treatment of HD, as it has been shown to prevent cell death and to stimulate the growth and migration of new neurons in the brain in transgenic mouse models. BDNF levels are reduced in HD postmortem human brain. Previous studies have shown efficacy of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC)/BDNF using murine MSCs, and the present study used human MSCs to advance the therapeutic potential of the MSC/BDNF platform for clinical application. Double-blinded studies were performed to examine the effects of intrastriatally transplanted human MSC/BDNF on disease progression in two strains of immune-suppressed HD transgenic mice: YAC128 and R6/2. MSC/BDNF treatment decreased striatal atrophy in YAC128 mice. MSC/BDNF treatment also significantly reduced anxiety as measured in the open-field assay. Both MSC and MSC/BDNF treatments induced a significant increase in neurogenesis-like activity in R6/2 mice. MSC/BDNF treatment also increased the mean lifespan of the R6/2 mice. Our genetically modified MSC/BDNF cells set a precedent for stem cell-based neurotherapeutics and could potentially be modified for other neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and some forms of Parkinson's disease. These cells provide a platform delivery system for future studies involving corrective gene-editing strategies. PMID:26765769

  11. Transforming growth factor beta 1 and gamma interferon provide opposing signals to lipopolysaccharide-activated mouse macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Hausmann, E H; Hao, S Y; Pace, J L; Parmely, M J

    1994-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are potent inducers of macrophage activation, leading to the production of a number of proinflammatory mediators. Although several cytokines that prime macrophages for enhanced LPS-triggered responses have been identified, far less is known regarding the role that cytokines play in down-regulating macrophage responses to LPS. This study was designed to determine the effects of recombinant transforming growth factor beta 1 (rTGF-beta 1) on macrophage activation by LPS. Pretreatment of either mouse peritoneal macrophages or cells of the RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cell line with rTGF-beta 1 inhibited their ability to produce both tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and nitric oxide (NO) in response to LPS. These inhibitory effects were reversed by increasing the concentration of LPS or by priming cells with optimal concentrations of recombinant gamma interferon (rIFN-gamma). Pretreatment of cells with rTGF-beta 1 had only a modest inhibitory effect on the expression of TNF-alpha mRNA. By contrast, the expression of mRNA for the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which is responsible for NO production in activated macrophages, was significantly inhibited by rTGF-beta 1 pretreatment. Thus, rTGF-beta 1-dependent suppression of macrophage TNF-alpha biosynthesis was manifest at a posttranscriptional level, whereas the inhibition of NO production correlated with a direct effect on iNOS gene expression. Importantly, both of these suppressive effects of rTGF-beta 1 were reversed by exposing the cells to priming concentrations of rIFN-gamma. As with NO production, immunocytochemical analysis of iNOS expression in LPS-stimulated macrophages revealed that rIFN-gamma and rTGF-beta 1 had antagonistic effects, with the former increasing, and the latter reducing, the number of iNOS-expressing cells induced by LPS. These data suggest that a balance between the priming effects of IFN-gamma and the inhibitory effects of TGF-beta 1 can

  12. Transfer of three transcription factors via a lentiviral vector ameliorates spatial learning and memory impairment in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pin; Yan, Qing; Wang, Songtao; Wang, Cunzu; Zhao, Peng

    2016-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible and progressive neurodegenerative disorder with observable memory impairment. The present study was performed to evaluate the beneficial effects of lentiviral vector-mediated overexpression of a combination of three transcription regulators, ABN (Ascl1, Brn2 and Ngn2), on learning and memory loss in a mouse model of AD. The AD model was established by injecting Aβ1-42 bilaterally into the mouse hippocampus. Lentiviral ABN was delivered bilaterally into the hippocampus of mice. Animals injected with LV-ABN showed significantly improved spatial learning and memory in the water maze test. Additionally, antibody array analysis indicated that intrahippocampal LV-ABN delivery significantly altered the expression levels of some proteins that were identified as inflammatory factors or neuroprotective and growth factors. In conclusion, our data suggest that LV-ABN delivery can ameliorate spatial learning and memory impairment in an AD mouse model, and the beneficial effect of ABN gene treatment could be linked to inhibition of the neuroinflammatory response and enhancement of neuroprotection and neurogenesis. Thus, these findings indicate that lentiviral ABN gene delivery has potential therapeutic applications for AD. PMID:27102892

  13. Comprehensive Identification of Krüppel-Like Factor Family Members Contributing to the Self-Renewal of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells and Cellular Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyojung; Waku, Tsuyoshi; Azami, Takuya; Khoa, Le Tran Phuc; Yanagisawa, Jun; Takahashi, Satoru; Ema, Masatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotency is maintained in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and is induced from somatic cells by the activation of appropriate transcriptional regulatory networks. Krüppel-like factor gene family members, such as Klf2, Klf4 and Klf5, have important roles in maintaining the undifferentiated state of mouse ES cells as well as in cellular reprogramming, yet it is not known whether other Klf family members exert self-renewal and reprogramming functions when overexpressed. In this study, we examined whether overexpression of any representative Klf family member, such as Klf1-Klf10, would be sufficient for the self-renewal of mouse ES cells. We found that only Klf2, Klf4, and Klf5 produced leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)-independent self-renewal, although most KLF proteins, if not all, have the ability to occupy the regulatory regions of Nanog, a critical Klf target gene. We also examined whether overexpression of any of Klf1-Klf10 would be sufficient to convert epiblast stem cells into a naïve pluripotent state and found that Klf5 had such reprogramming ability, in addition to Klf2 and Klf4. We also delineated the functional domains of the Klf2 protein for LIF-independent self-renewal and reprogramming. Interestingly, we found that both the N-terminal transcriptional activation and C-terminal zinc finger domains were indispensable for this activity. Taken together, our comprehensive analysis provides new insight into the contribution of Klf family members to mouse ES self-renewal and cellular reprogramming. PMID:26943822

  14. The forkhead transcription factors, Foxp1 and Foxp2, identify different subpopulations of projection neurons in the mouse cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Hisaoka, T; Nakamura, Y; Senba, E; Morikawa, Y

    2010-03-17

    Foxp1 and Foxp2, which belong to the forkhead transcription factor family, are expressed in the developing and adult mouse brain, including the striatum, thalamus, and cerebral cortex. Recent reports suggest that FOXP1 and FOXP2 are involved in the development of speech and language in humans. Although both Foxp1 and Foxp2 are expressed in the neural circuits that mediate speech and language, including the corticostriatal circuit, the functions of Foxp1 and Foxp2 in the cerebral cortex remain unclear. To gain insight into the functions of Foxp1 and Foxp2 in the cerebral cortex, we characterized Foxp1- and Foxp2-expressing cells in postnatal and adult mice using immunohistochemistry. In adult mice, Foxp1 was expressed in neurons of layers III-VIa in the neocortex, whereas the expression of Foxp2 was restricted to dopamine and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate-regulated phosphoprotein, 32 kDa (DARPP-32)(+) neurons of layer VI. In addition, Foxp2 was weakly expressed in the neurons of layer V of the motor cortex and hindlimb and forelimb regions of the primary somatosensory cortex. Both Foxp1 and Foxp2 were expressed in the ionotropic glutamate receptor (GluR) 2/3(+) neurons, and colocalized with none of GluR1, gamma-aminobutyric acid, calbindin, and parvalbumin, indicating that expression of Foxp1 and Foxp2 is restricted to projection neurons. During the postnatal stages, Foxp1 was predominantly expressed in Satb2(+)/Ctip2(-) corticocortical projection neurons of layers III-V and in Tbr1(+) corticothalamic projection neurons of layer VIa. Although Foxp2 was also expressed in Tbr1(+) corticothalamic projection neurons of layer VI, no colocalization of Foxp1 with Foxp2 was observed from postnatal day (P) 0 to P7. These findings suggest that Foxp1 and Foxp2 may be involved in the development of different cortical projection neurons during the early postnatal stages in addition to the establishment and maintenance of different cortical circuits from the late postnatal

  15. Chronic alterations in growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I signaling lead to changes in mouse tendon structure.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, R H; Clausen, N M; Schjerling, P; Larsen, J O; Martinussen, T; List, E O; Kopchick, J J; Kjaer, M; Heinemeier, K M

    2014-02-01

    The growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I (GH/IGF-I) axis is an important stimulator of collagen synthesis in connective tissue, but the effect of chronically altered GH/IGF-I levels on connective tissue of the muscle-tendon unit is not known. We studied three groups of mice; 1) giant transgenic mice that expressed bovine GH (bGH) and had high circulating levels of GH and IGF-I, 2) dwarf mice with a disrupted GH receptor gene (GHR-/-) leading to GH resistance and low circulating IGF-I, and 3) a wild-type control group (CTRL). We measured the ultra-structure, collagen content and mRNA expression (targets: GAPDH, RPLP0, IGF-IEa, IGF-IR, COL1A1, COL3A1, TGF-β1, TGF-β2, TGF-β3, versican, scleraxis, tenascin C, fibronectin, fibromodulin, decorin) in the Achilles tendon, and the mRNA expression was also measured in calf muscle (same targets as tendon plus IGF-IEb, IGF-IEc). We found that GHR-/- mice had significantly lower collagen fibril volume fraction in Achilles tendon, as well as decreased mRNA expression of IGF-I isoforms and collagen types I and III in muscle compared to CTRL. In contrast, the mRNA expression of IGF-I isoforms and collagens in bGH mice was generally high in both tendon and muscle compared to CTRL. Mean collagen fibril diameter was significantly decreased with both high and low GH/IGF-I signaling, but the GHR-/- mouse tendons were most severely affected with a total loss of the normal bimodal diameter distribution. In conclusion, chronic manipulation of the GH/IGF-I axis influenced both morphology and mRNA levels of selected genes in the muscle-tendon unit of mice. Whereas only moderate structural changes were observed with up-regulation of GH/IGF-I axis, disruption of the GH receptor had pronounced effects upon tendon ultra-structure. PMID:24080228

  16. Age-Specific Regulation of Drug-Processing Genes in Mouse Liver by Ligands of Xenobiotic-Sensing Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Cindy Yanfei; Renaud, Helen J; Klaassen, Curtis D; Cui, Julia Yue

    2016-07-01

    The xenobiotic-sensing transcription factors (xeno-sensors) AhR, CAR, and PXR upregulate the expression of many drug-processing genes (DPGs) in liver. Previous studies have unveiled profound changes in the basal expression of DPGs during development; however, knowledge on the ontogeny of the inducibility of DPGs in response to pharmacological activation of xeno-sensors is still limited. The goal of this study was to investigate the age-specific regulation of DPGs by prototypical xeno-sensor ligands: 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD) for AhR; 1,4-bis [2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)] benzene (TCPOBOP) for CAR; and pregnane-16α-carbonitrile (PCN) for PXR during mouse liver development. The basal mRNAs of most DPGs were low during neonatal age, but gradually increased to adult levels, whereas some DPGs (Cyp1a2, Cyp2b10, Cyp3a11, Gstm2, Gstm3, Papss2, and Oatp1a4) exhibited an adolescent-predominant expression pattern. The inducibility of DPGs was age-specific: 1) during neonatal age, the highest fold increase in the mRNA expression was observed for Cyp1a2, Sult5a1, and Ugt1a9 by TCDD; Cyp3a11 and Mrp2 by TCPOBOP; as well as Gstm2 and Gstm3 by PCN; 2) during adolescent age, the highest fold increase in the mRNA expression was observed for Ugt1a6 and Mrp4 by TCDD, Cyp2b10, Ugt2b34, and Ugt2b35 by TCPOBOP, as well as Gsta1, Gsta4, Sult1e1, Ugt1a1, Mrp3, and Mrp4 by PCN; 3) in adults, the highest fold increase in the mRNA expression was observed for Aldh1a1, Aldh1a7, and Ugt2b36 by TCPOBOP, as well as Papss2 and Oatp1a4 by PCN. In conclusion, the inducibility of hepatic DPGs following the pharmacological activation of xeno-sensors is age specific. PMID:26577535

  17. The MyoD family of myogenic factors is regulated by electrical activity: isolation and characterization of a mouse Myf-5 cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Buonanno, A; Apone, L; Morasso, M I; Beers, R; Brenner, H R; Eftimie, R

    1992-01-01

    A full-length cDNA coding for a homolog of the human Myf-5 was isolated from a BC3H-1 mouse library and characterized. The clone codes for a protein of 255 amino acids that is 89%, 88% and 68% identical to the human, bovine and Xenopus myf-5, respectively. The mouse Myf-5 cDNA (mmyf-5), as well as sequences coding for MyoD, myogenin and Mrf-4, were used to probe Northern blots to analyze the effects of innervation on the expression of the MyoD family of myogenic factors. Mouse myf-5, MyoD and myogenin mRNAs levels were found to decline in hind limb muscles of mice between embryonic day 15 (E15) and the first postnatal week, a period that coincides with innervation. In contrast, Mrf-4 transcripts increase during this period and reach steady-state levels by 1-week after birth. To distinguish if the changes in myogenic factor expression are due to a developmental program or to innervation, mRNA levels were analyzed at different times after muscle denervation. Mmyf-5 transcripts begin to accumulate 2 days postdenervation; after 1 week levels are 7-fold higher than in innervated muscle. Mrf-4, MyoD and myogenin transcripts begin to accumulate as soon as 8h after denervation, and attain levels that are 8-, 15- and 40-fold higher than found in innervated skeletal muscle, respectively. The accumulation of these three mRNAs precedes the increase of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit transcripts, a gene that is transcriptionally regulated by MyoD-related factors in vitro. Using extracellular electrodes to directly stimulate in situ the soleus muscle of rats, we found that 'electrical activity' per se, in absence of the nerve, represses the increases of myogenic factor mRNAs associated with denervation. Images PMID:1741288

  18. A comparative analysis of the structural, functional and biological differences between Mouse and Human Nerve Growth Factor.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Francesca; Malerba, Francesca; Ercole, Bruno Bruni; Lamba, Doriano; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2015-03-01

    NGF is the prototype member of the neurotrophin family of proteins that promote the survival and growth of selected neurons in the central and peripheral nervous systems. As for all neurotrophins, NGF is translated as a pre-pro-protein. Over the years, NGF and proNGF of either human or mouse origin, given their high degree of homology, have been exploited for numerous applications in biomedical sciences. The mouse NGF has been considered the golden-standard for bioactivity. Indeed, due to evolutionary relatedness to human NGF and to its ready availability and by assuming identical properties to its human counterpart, the mouse NGF, isolated and purified from sub-maxillary glands, has been tested not only in laboratory practice and in preclinical models, but it has also been evaluated in several human clinical trials. Aiming to validate this assumption, widely believed, we performed a comparative study of the biochemical and biophysical properties of the mouse and human counterparts of NGF and proNGF. The mature and the precursor proteins of either species strikingly differ in their biophysical profiles and, when tested for ligand binding to their receptors, in their in vitro biological activities. We provide a structural rationale that accounts for their different functional behaviors. Despite being highly conserved during evolution, NGF and proNGF of mouse and human origins show distinct properties and therefore special care must be taken in performing experiments with cross-species systems in the laboratory practice, in developing immunoassays, in clinical trials and in pharmacological treatments. PMID:25496838

  19. The chromosome localization and the HCF repeats of the human host cell factor gene (HCFC1) are conserved in the mouse homologue

    SciTech Connect

    Frattini, A.; Faranda, S.; Sacco, M.G.; Villa, A.; Vezzoni, P.

    1996-03-01

    The gene encoding the human host cell factor (HCFC1) has recently been cloned and mapped to Xq28. HCFC1 codes for a family of related polypeptides that apparently arise from posttranslational processing. Six extremely conserved 19-amino-acid (aa)-long motifs, unique to HCFC1 and located in the middle of the protein, could play a role in this processing or could be instrumental to the physiological role of the protein. Alternatively, these repeats could have arisen from recent duplications and may not have any specific function. To resolve this issue, we cloned the homologous region from the mouse Hcfc1 gene and demonstrated that the 19-aa motifs are extremely conserved in sequence, number, and genomic organization, while the {open_quotes}linker{close_quotes} region between the third and fourth repeat is not. This suggests an important function for these repeats. In addition, by RT-PCR analysis of human RNA and comparison to the human genomic sequence, an alternative transcript including a 44-aa in-frame insertion, driving from the 3{prime} nd of intron 18, was found. The significance of this alternative transcript is unknown, since it was not detectable in the mouse. The mouse Hcfc1 gene maps to a region syntenic to Xq28, and, as in human, is in close proximity to the Renin-binding protein gene, in a 100-kb region also including the L1cam and Vasopressin receptor type 2 genes. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Chromosomal localization of mouse and human genes encoding the splicing factors ASF/SF2 (SFRS1) and SC-35 (SFRS2)

    SciTech Connect

    Bermingham, J.R. Jr.; Arden, K.C.; Viars, C.S.

    1995-09-01

    The mammalian SR-type splicing factors ASF/SF2 and SC-35 play crucial roles in pre-mRNA splicing and have been shown to shift splice site choice in vitro. We have mapped the ASF/SF2 gene in mice and humans and the SC-35 gene in mice. Somatic cell hybrid mapping of the human ASF/SF2 gene (SFRS1 locus) reveals that it resides on chromosome 17, and fluorescence in situ hybridization refines this localization to 17q21.3-q22. Recombinant inbred mapping of the mouse ASF/ SF2 gene (Sfrs1 locus) and the mouse SC-35 gene (Sfrs2 locus) demonstrates that both genes are located in a part of mouse chromosome 11 that is homologous to human chromosome 17. Mapping of Sfrs1 using F{sub 1} hybrid backcross mice between the strains C57BL/6 and DDK places Sfrs1 very near the marker D11Mit38 and indicates that the ASF/SF2 gene is closely linked to the Ovum mutant locus. 59 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. A cluster region of AP-1 responsive elements is required for transcriptional activity of mouse ODC gene by hepatocyte growth factor.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Laura; Tacchini, Lorenza; Matteucci, Emanuela; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2002-05-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity is regulated by a variety of mechanisms including transcription, translation, and RNA and protein half-life. Since in mouse B16-F1 melanoma cells an early and remarkable (about 6-fold) increase in steady state mRNA levels was observed after hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) treatment, we investigated the transcriptional regulation of mouse ODC promoter. Transient transfection of various ODC-luciferase promoter constructs into the B16-Fl cells in combination with electrophoretic mobility shift assays identified the HGF-responsive element as a cluster of three AP-1 binding sites (-1660 to -1572). Even if each site differs from the canonical TPA responsive element for one nucleotide, only the first two AP-1 consensus sequences seemed to be functional since allowed DNA-binding activity of nuclear proteins after HGF treatment. Comparison of the results of transfection assays with the pOD2.5-luc (2.5 kb gene fragment) and with the construct deprived of the AP-1 cluster pOD-B-luc showed that this 50 bp region was required for ODC transactivating activity in response to HGF. Since in B16-F1 cells HGF increased AP-1 activity and the mRNA expression of various AP-1 subunits, we may conclude that HGF-induced transcription of mouse ODC was largely due to triggering of AP-1 pathway. PMID:12054494

  2. A novel rabbit anti-hepatocyte growth factor monoclonal neutralizing antibody inhibits tumor growth in prostate cancer cells and mouse xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yanlan; Chen, Yicheng; Ding, Guoqing; Wang, Mingchao; Wu, Haiyang; Xu, Liwei; Rui, Xuefang; Zhang, Zhigen

    2015-08-14

    The hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor c-Met are correlated with castration-resistance in prostate cancer. Although HGF has been considered as an attractive target for therapeutic antibodies, the lack of cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with human/mouse HGFs is a major obstacle in preclinical developments. We generated a panel of anti-HGF RabMAbs either blocking HGF/c-Met interaction or inhibiting c-Met phosphorylation. We selected one RabMAb with mouse cross-reactivity and demonstrated that it blocked HGF-stimulated downstream activation in PC-3 and DU145 cells. Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibited not only the growth of PC-3 cells but also HGF-dependent proliferation in HUVECs. We further demonstrated the efficacy and potency of the anti-HGF RabMAb in tumor xenograft mice models. Through these in vitro and in vivo experiments, we explored a novel therapeutic antibody for advanced prostate cancer. - Highlights: • HGF is an attractive target for castration-refractory prostate cancer. • We generated and characterized a panel of anti-HGF rabbit monoclonal antibodies. • More than half of these anti-HGF RabMAbs was cross-reactive with mouse HGF. • Anti-HGF RabMAb blocks HGF-stimulated phosphorylation and cell growth in vitro. • Anti-HGF RabMAb inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft mice.

  3. Ginsenoside Rg3 up-regulates the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in human dermal papilla cells and mouse hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dae Hyun; Cha, Youn Jeong; Yang, Kyeong Eun; Jang, Ik-Soon; Son, Chang-Gue; Kim, Bo Hyeon; Kim, Jung Min

    2014-07-01

    Crude Panax ginseng has been documented to possess hair growth activity and is widely used to treat alopecia, but the effects of ginsenoside Rg3 on hair growth have not to our knowledge been determined. The aim of the current study was to identify the molecules through which Rg3 stimulates hair growth. The thymidine incorporation for measuring cell proliferation was determined. We used DNA microarray analysis to measure gene expression levels in dermal papilla (DP) cells upon treatment with Rg3. The mRNA and protein expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in human DP cells were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, respectively. We also used immunohistochemistry assays to detect in vivo changes in VEGF and 3-stemness marker expressions in mouse hair follicles. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed dose-dependent increases in VEGF mRNA levels on treatment with Rg3. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that expression of VEGF was significantly up-regulated by Rg3 in a dose-dependent manner in human DP cells and in mouse hair follicles. In addition, the CD8 and CD34 were also up-regulated by Rg3 in the mouse hair follicles. It may be concluded that Rg3 might increase hair growth through stimulation of hair follicle stem cells and it has the potential to be used in hair growth products. PMID:24375856

  4. The Testicular and Epididymal Expression Profile of PLCζ in Mouse and Human Does Not Support Its Role as a Sperm-Borne Oocyte Activating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Aarabi, Mahmoud; Yu, Yang; Xu, Wei; Tse, Man Y.; Pang, Stephen C.; Yi, Young-Joo; Sutovsky, Peter; Oko, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ) is a candidate sperm-borne oocyte activating factor (SOAF) which has recently received attention as a potential biomarker of human male infertility. However, important SOAF attributes of PLCζ, including its developmental expression in mammalian spermiogenesis, its compartmentalization in sperm head perinuclear theca (PT) and its release into the ooplasm during fertilization have not been established and are addressed in this investigation. Different detergent extractions of sperm and head/tail fractions were compared for the presence of PLCζ by immunoblotting. In both human and mouse, the active isoform of PLCζ was detected in sperm fractions other than PT, where SOAF is expected to reside. Developmentally, PLCζ was incorporated as part of the acrosome during the Golgi phase of human and mouse spermiogenesis while diminishing gradually in the acrosome of elongated spermatids. Immunofluorescence localized PLCζ over the surface of the postacrosomal region of mouse and bull and head region of human spermatozoa leading us to examine its secretion in the epididymis. While previously thought to have strictly a testicular expression, PLCζ was found to be expressed and secreted by the epididymal epithelial cells explaining its presence on the sperm head surface. In vitro fertilization (IVF) revealed that PLCζ is no longer detectable after the acrosome reaction occurs on the surface of the zona pellucida and thus is not incorporated into the oocyte cytoplasm for activation. In summary, we show for the first time that PLCζ is compartmentalized as part of the acrosome early in human and mouse spermiogenesis and is secreted during sperm maturation in the epididymis. Most importantly, no evidence was found that PLCζ is incorporated into the detergent-resistant perinuclear theca fraction where SOAF resides. PMID:22428063

  5. Regulation of p53, nuclear factor {kappa}B and cyclooxygenase-2 expression by bromelain through targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Kalra, Neetu; Bhui, Kulpreet; Roy, Preeti; Srivastava, Smita; George, Jasmine; Prasad, Sahdeo; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2008-01-01

    Bromelain is a pharmacologically active compound, present in stems and immature fruits of pineapples (Ananas cosmosus), which has been shown to have anti-edematous, anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic and anti-metastatic properties. In the present study, antitumorigenic activity of bromelain was recorded in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted 2-stage mouse skin model. Results showed that bromelain application delayed the onset of tumorigenesis and reduced the cumulative number of tumors, tumor volume and the average number of tumors/mouse. To establish a cause and effect relationship, we targeted the proteins involved in the cell death pathway. Bromelain treatment resulted in upregulation of p53 and Bax and subsequent activation of caspase 3 and caspase 9 with concomitant decrease in antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 in mouse skin. Since persistent induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) is frequently implicated in tumorigenesis and is regulated by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B), we also investigated the effect of bromelain on Cox-2 and NF-{kappa}B expression. Results showed that bromelain application significantly inhibited Cox-2 and inactivated NF-{kappa}B by blocking phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}. In addition, bromelain treatment attenuated DMBA-TPA-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt. Taken together, we conclude that bromelain induces apoptosis-related proteins along with inhibition of NF-{kappa}B-driven Cox-2 expression by blocking the MAPK and Akt/protein kinase B signaling in DMBA-TPA-induced mouse skin tumors, which may account for its anti-tumorigenic effects.

  6. Mouse Y-Encoded Transcription Factor Zfy2 Is Essential for Sperm Formation and Function in Assisted Fertilization.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Riel, Jonathan M; Ruthig, Victor; Ward, Monika A

    2015-12-01

    Spermatogenesis is a key developmental process allowing for a formation of a mature male gamete. During its final phase, spermiogenesis, haploid round spermatids undergo cellular differentiation into spermatozoa, which involves extensive restructuring of cell morphology, DNA, and epigenome. Using mouse models with abrogated Y chromosome gene complements and Y-derived transgene we identified Y chromosome encoded Zfy2 as the gene responsible for sperm formation and function. In the presence of a Zfy2 transgene, mice lacking the Y chromosome and transgenic for two other Y-derived genes, Sry driving sex determination and Eif2s3y initiating spermatogenesis, are capable of producing sperm which when injected into the oocytes yield live offspring. Therefore, only three Y chromosome genes, Sry, Eif2s3y and Zfy2, constitute the minimum Y chromosome complement compatible with successful intracytoplasmic sperm injection in the mouse. PMID:26719889

  7. Mouse Y-Encoded Transcription Factor Zfy2 Is Essential for Sperm Formation and Function in Assisted Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Riel, Jonathan M.; Ruthig, Victor; Ward, Monika A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spermatogenesis is a key developmental process allowing for a formation of a mature male gamete. During its final phase, spermiogenesis, haploid round spermatids undergo cellular differentiation into spermatozoa, which involves extensive restructuring of cell morphology, DNA, and epigenome. Using mouse models with abrogated Y chromosome gene complements and Y-derived transgene we identified Y chromosome encoded Zfy2 as the gene responsible for sperm formation and function. In the presence of a Zfy2 transgene, mice lacking the Y chromosome and transgenic for two other Y-derived genes, Sry driving sex determination and Eif2s3y initiating spermatogenesis, are capable of producing sperm which when injected into the oocytes yield live offspring. Therefore, only three Y chromosome genes, Sry, Eif2s3y and Zfy2, constitute the minimum Y chromosome complement compatible with successful intracytoplasmic sperm injection in the mouse. PMID:26719889

  8. Perinatal Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Blockade Prevents Peripheral Nerve Disruption in a Mouse Model Reminiscent of Benign World Health Organization Grade I Neurofibroma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianqiang; Crimmins, Jason T.; Monk, Kelly R.; Williams, Jon P.; Fitzgerald, Maureen E.; Tedesco, Susan; Ratner, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Benign peripheral nerve tumors called neurofibromas are a major source of morbidity for patients with neurofibromatosis type 1. Some neurofibroma Schwann cells aberrantly express the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In a mouse model in which the CNPase promoter drives expression of human EGFR in Schwann cells, nerves develop hypertrophy, mast cell accumulation, collagen deposition, disruption of axon-glial interactions, characteristics of neurofibroma and are hypoalgesic. Administration of the EGFR antagonist cetuximab (IMC-C225) for 2 weeks beginning at birth in CNPase-hEGFR mice normalized all pathologies at 3 months of age as evaluated by hotplate testing or histology and by electron microscopy. Mast cell chemoattractants brain-derived neurotrophic factor, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and transforming growth factor-β1, which may account for mast cell accumulation and fibrosis, were reduced by cetuximab. Later treatment was much less effective. A birth to 2-week pulse of cetuximab blocked hEGFR phosphorylation and Schwann cell proliferation in perinatal mutant nerve, so CNPase-hEGFR Schwann cell numbers correlate with the cetuximab effect. A >250-fold enlarged population of EGFR+/p75+ cells was detected in newborn Nf1+/− mouse nerves. These results suggest the existence of an EGFR+ cell enriched in the perinatal period capable of driving complex changes characteristic of neurofibroma formation. PMID:16651634

  9. Effect of Recombinant Human Keratinocyte Growth Factor (rHuKGF, Palifermin) on Radiation-Induced Mouse Urinary Bladder Dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Jaal, Jana Doerr, Wolfgang

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of Palifermin (rHuKGF) on acute and late radiation effects in mouse urinary bladder. Methods and Materials: Graded radiation doses were applied on day 0. Single subcutaneous injections of Palifermin (15 mg/kg) were given on day -2 or day +2. Changes in bladder function (i.e., a reduction in bladder volume by {>=}50% of the individual preirradiation value) were assessed by cystometry. Results: Early changes in mouse bladder after irradiation occur in two phases. In the first early phase, a single injection of Palifermin on day -2 increased the ED{sub 50} (dose associated with a positive bladder response in 50% of the mice) from 20.0 {+-} 3.3 Gy to 27.1 {+-} 6.9 Gy (p < .0051). Palifermin given on day +2 was not beneficial. No significant effects of Palifermin were seen in the second early phase. However, Palifermin administration before, but not after, irradiation, also modified late radiation effects, with an ED{sub 50} of 22.2 {+-} 4.8 Gy compared with 16.2 {+-} 4.9 Gy in control animals (p < .0187). Conclusions: Initial early functional changes in the mouse urinary bladder after irradiation as well as late effects can be significantly reduced by a single administration of Palifermin before irradiation.

  10. The transforming growth factor-beta 3 knock-out mouse: an animal model for cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Koo, S H; Cunningham, M C; Arabshahi, B; Gruss, J S; Grant, J H

    2001-09-15

    The recent report of a transforming growth factor-beta 3 (TGF-beta 3) knock-out mouse in which 100 percent of the homozygous pups have cleft palate raised the question as to the potential usefulness of these animals as a model for cleft palate research. The specific aim in this study was to carefully document the anatomy of the cleft palate in the TGF-beta 3 knock-out mice as compared with wild type controls. Special attention was paid to the levator veli palatini muscle, the tensor veli palatini muscle, and their respective innervation. Because the TGF-beta 3 knock-out is lethal in the early perinatal period and because the heterozygotes are phenotypically normal, polymerase chain reaction was required to genotype the animals before mating. Time-mated pregnancies between proven heterozygotes were then delivered by cesarean section at gestational day 18.5 to prevent maternal cannibalism of homozygote pups. All delivered pups were killed and their tails processed by polymerase chain reaction to verify genotype. The heads were then fixed and sectioned in axial, coronal, or sagittal planes. Sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin or processed for immunohistochemistry with nerve specific protein gene product 9.5 and calcitonin gene-related peptide antibodies. Sections were analyzed in a serial fashion. Nine wild type control animals were analyzed along with nine TGF-beta 3 knock-out homozygotes. Time matings between proven heterozygotes yielded wild type pups, heterozygote pups, and homozygote knock-out pups in the expected mendelian ratios (28 percent to 46 percent to 26 percent; n = 43). The results demonstrated 100 percent clefting in the homozygous TGF-beta 3 knock-out pups. Complete clefting of the secondary palate was seen in four of nine and incomplete clefting was seen in five of nine. The levator veli palatini and tensor veli palatini muscles were demonstrated coursing parallel to the cleft margin in all cleft mice. The orientation of these muscles