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Sample records for facultative photosynthetic bacteria

  1. Photosynthetic reaction centers in bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, J.R. Univ. of Chicago, IL ); Schiffer, M. )

    1990-07-30

    The photochemistry of photosynthesis begins in complexes called reaction centers. These have become model systems to study the fundamental process by which plants and bacteria convert and store solar energy as chemical free energy. In green plants, photosynthesis occurs in two systems, each of which contains a different reaction center, working in series. In one, known as photosystem 1, oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP[sup +]) is reduced to NADPH for use in a series of dark reactions called the Calvin cycle, named for Nobel Laureate Melvin Calvin, by which carbon dioxide is converted into useful fuels such as carbohydrates and sugars. In the other half of the photosynthetic machinery of green plants, called photosystem 2, water is oxidized to produce molecular oxygen. A different form of photosynthesis occurs in photosynthetic bacteria, which typically live at the bottom of ponds and feed on organic debris. Two main types of photosynthetic bacteria exist: purple and green. Neither type liberates oxygen from water. Instead, the bacteria feed on organic media or inorganic materials, such as sulfides, which are easier to reduce or oxidize than carbon dioxide or water. Perhaps in consequence, their photosynthetic machinery is simpler than that of green, oxygen-evolving plants and their primary photochemistry is better understood.

  2. Phosphatase activity of aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pácová, Z; Kocur, M

    1978-10-01

    1115 strains of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria were tested for phosphatase activity by a conventional plate method and a microtest. The microtest was devised to allow results to be read after 4 h cultivation. Phosphatase activity was found in wide range of species and strains. Besides staphylococci, where the test for phosphatase is successfully used, it may be applied as one of the valuable tests for the differentiation of the following species: Bacillus cereus, B. licheniformis, Aeromonas spp., Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Actinobacillus spp., Pasteurella spp., Xanthomonas spp., Flavobacterium spp., Alteromonas putrefaciens, Pseudomonas maltophilia, Ps. cepacia, and some other species of Pseudomonas. The species which gave uniformly negative phosphatase reaction were as follows: Staph. saprophyticus, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Alcaligenes faecalis, and Bordetella bronchiseptica. PMID:216188

  3. Hydrogen metabolism of photosynthetic bacteria and algae

    SciTech Connect

    Kumazawa, S.; Mitsui, A.

    1982-01-01

    The metabolism, metabolic pathways and biochemistry of hydrogen in photosynthetic bacteria and algae are reviewed. Detailed information on the occurrence and measurement of hydrogenase activity is presented. Hydrogen production rates for different species of algae and bacteria are presented. 173 references, 1 figure, 7 tables.

  4. Recovery of anaerobic, facultative, and aerobic bacteria from clinical specimens in three anaerobic transport systems.

    PubMed Central

    Helstad, A G; Kimball, J L; Maki, D G

    1977-01-01

    With aspirated specimens from clinical infections, we evaluated the recovery of anaerobic, aerobic, and facultative bacteria in three widely used transport systems: (i) aspirated fluid in a gassed-out tube (FGT), (ii) swab in modified Cary and Blair transport medium (SCB), and (iii) swab in a gassed-out tube (SGT). Transport tubes were held at 25 degrees C and semiquantitatively sampled at 0, 2, 24, and 48 h. Twenty-five clinical specimens yielded 75 anaerobic strains and 43 isolates of facultative and 3 of aerobic bacteria. Only one anaerobic isolate was not recovered in the first 24 h, and then, only in the SGT. At 48 h, 73 anaerobic strains (97%) were recovered in the FGT, 69 (92%) in the SCB, and 64 (85%) in the SGT. Two problems hindered the recovery of anaerobes in the SCB and SGT systems: first die-off of organisms, as evidenced by a decrease in colony-forming units of 20 strains (27%) in the SCB and 25 strains (33%) in the SGT, as compared with 7 strains (9%) in the FGT, over 48 h; and second, overgrowth of facultative bacteria, more frequent with SCB and SGT. The FGT method was clearly superior at 48 h to the SCB and SGT systems in this study and is recommended as the preferred method for transporting specimens for anaerobic culture. PMID:328525

  5. Microbial oxidative stress response: Novel insights from environmental facultative anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huihui; Yuan, Jie; Gao, Haichun

    2015-10-15

    Facultative bacteria can grow under either oxic or anoxic conditions. While oxygen provides substantial advantages in energy yield by respiration, it can become life-threatening because of reactive oxygen species that derive from the molecule naturally. Thus, to survive and thrive in a given niche, these bacteria have to constantly regulate physiological processes to make maximum benefits from oxygen respiration while restraining oxidative stress. Molecular mechanisms and physiological consequences of oxidative stress have been under extensive investigation for decades, mostly on research model Escherichia coli, from which our understanding of bacterial oxidative stress response is largely derived. Nevertheless, given that bacteria live in enormously diverse environments, to cope with oxidative stress different strategies are conceivably developed. PMID:26319291

  6. D/H fractionation in lipids of facultative and obligate denitrifying and sulfate reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osburn, M. R.; Sessions, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition of lipids has been shown to vary broadly in both cultured bacteria and in environmental samples. Culturing studies have indicated that this variability may primarily reflect metabolism; however, the limited number of organisms studied thus far prevents application of these trends to interpretation of environmental samples. Here we report D/H fractionations in anaerobic bacteria, including both facultative and obligate anaerobic organisms with a range of electron donors, acceptors, and metabolic pathways. Experiments using the metabolically flexible alphaproteobacterium Paracoccus denitrificans probe particular central metabolic pathways using a range of terminal electron acceptors. While a large range of δD values has been observed during aerobic metabolism, denitrifying cultures produce a more limited range in δD values that are more similar to each other than the corresponding aerobic culture. Data from the sulfate reducing bacteria Desulfobacterium autotrophicum and Desulfobacter hydrogenophilus indicate that chemolithoautotrophy and anaerobic heterotrophy can produce similar δD values, and are similar between bacteria despite differing metabolic pathways. These results suggest that the fractionation of D/H depends both on the specific metabolic pathway and the electron acceptor. While this is not inconsistent with previous studies, it suggests the simple correspondence between δD and metabolism previously understood from aerobic bacteria is not universally applicable.

  7. Fuel from Bacteria: Bioconversion of Carbon Dioxide to Biofuels by Facultatively Autotrophic Hydrogen Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    Electrofuels Project: Ohio State is genetically modifying bacteria to efficiently convert carbon dioxide directly into butanol, an alcohol that can be used directly as a fuel blend or converted to a hydrocarbon, which closely resembles a gasoline. Bacteria are typically capable of producing a certain amount of butanol before it becomes too toxic for the bacteria to survive. Ohio State is engineering a new strain of the bacteria that could produce up to 50% more butanol before it becomes too toxic for the bacteria to survive. Finding a way to produce more butanol more efficiently would significantly cut down on biofuel production costs and help make butanol cost competitive with gasoline. Ohio State is also engineering large tanks, or bioreactors, to grow the biofuel-producing bacteria in, and they are developing ways to efficiently recover biofuel from the tanks.

  8. Nitrogen fixation by photosynthetic bacteria in lowland rice culture.

    PubMed

    Habte, M; Alexander, M

    1980-02-01

    Propanil (3',4'-dichloropropionanilide) was a potent inhibitor of the nitrogenase activity of blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) in flooded soil, but the herbicide at comparable concentrations was not toxic to rice, protozoa, and nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Ethanol-amended flooded soils treated with propanil exhibited higher rates of nitrogenase activity than those not treated with the herbicide. The enhanced nitrogenase activity in propanil-treated soils was associated with a rise in the population of purple sulfur bacteria, especially of cells resembling Chromatium and Thiospirillum. By employing propanil and a means of excluding light from the floodwater to prevent the development of phototrophs during rice growth under lowland conditions, the relative activities of blue-green algae, photosynthetic bacteria, and the rhizosphere microflora were determined. The results suggest that the potential contribution of photosynthetic bacteria may be quite high. PMID:16345507

  9. Nitrogen Fixation by Photosynthetic Bacteria in Lowland Rice Culture

    PubMed Central

    Habte, M.; Alexander, M.

    1980-01-01

    Propanil (3′,4′-dichloropropionanilide) was a potent inhibitor of the nitrogenase activity of blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) in flooded soil, but the herbicide at comparable concentrations was not toxic to rice, protozoa, and nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Ethanol-amended flooded soils treated with propanil exhibited higher rates of nitrogenase activity than those not treated with the herbicide. The enhanced nitrogenase activity in propanil-treated soils was associated with a rise in the population of purple sulfur bacteria, especially of cells resembling Chromatium and Thiospirillum. By employing propanil and a means of excluding light from the floodwater to prevent the development of phototrophs during rice growth under lowland conditions, the relative activities of blue-green algae, photosynthetic bacteria, and the rhizosphere microflora were determined. The results suggest that the potential contribution of photosynthetic bacteria may be quite high. PMID:16345507

  10. Culturing photosynthetic bacteria through surface plasmon resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Ooms, Matthew D.; Bajin, Lauren; Sinton, David

    2012-12-17

    In this work, cultivation of photosynthetic microbes in surface plasmon enhanced evanescent fields is demonstrated. Proliferation of Synechococcus elongatus was obtained on gold surfaces excited with surface plasmons. Excitation over three days resulted in 10 {mu}m thick biofilms with maximum cell volume density of 20% vol/vol (2% more total accumulation than control experiments with direct light). Collectively, these results indicate the ability to (1) excite surface-bound cells using plasmonic light fields, and (2) subsequently grow thick biofilms by coupling light from the surface. Plasmonic light delivery presents opportunities for high-density optofluidic photobioreactors for microalgal analysis and solar fuel production.

  11. Characterization of the biochemical-pathway of uranium (VI) reduction in facultative anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mtimunye, Phalazane J; Chirwa, Evans M N

    2014-10-01

    Cultures of U(VI) reducing bacteria sourced from abandoned uranium mine tailing dam were evaluated for their ability to reduce U(VI) to U(IV). The species in the cultures reduced U(VI) in solutions with initial U(VI) concentration up to 400mgL(-)(1) under a near neutral pH of 6.5. The electron flow pathway and fate of reduced species was also analysed in the individual species in order to evaluate the potential for control and optimisation of the reduction potential at the biochemical level. The results showed that U(VI) reduction in live cells was completely blocked by the NADH-dehydrogenase inhibitor, rotenone (C23H22O6), and thioredoxin inhibitor, cadmium chloride (CdCl2), showing that U(VI) reduction involves the electron flow through NADH-dehydrogenase, a primary electron donor to the electron transport respiratory (ETR) system. Mass balance analysis of uranium species aided by visual and electron microscopy suggest that most U(VI) reduction occurred on the cell surface of the isolated species. This finding indicates the possibility of easy uranium recovery for beneficial use through biological remediation. Should the U(VI) be reduced inside the cell, recovery would require complete disruption of the cells and therefore would be difficult. The study contributes new knowledge on the underlying mechanisms in the U(VI) reduction in facultative anaerobes. PMID:25065785

  12. Nutrient conversions by photosynthetic bacteria in a concentrated animal feeding operation lagoon system.

    PubMed

    Sund, J L; Evenson, C J; Strevett, K A; Nairn, R W; Athay, D; Trawinski, E

    2001-01-01

    A diurnal examination was conducted to determine the effect of photosynthetic bacteria on nutrient conversions in a two-stage concentrated animal feeding operation (CAFO) lagoon system in west-central Oklahoma. Changes in nutrients, microbial populations, and physical parameters were examined at three depths (0, 1.5, and 3.0 m) every 3 h over a 36-h period. The south lagoon (SL) was anaerobic (dissolved oxygen [DO] = 0.09 +/- 0.12 mg/L) while the north lagoon (NL) was facultative (DO ranged from 4.0-0.1 mg/L over 36-h period). Negative sulfide-sulfate (-0.85) and bacteriochlorophyll a (bchl a)-sulfate (-0.83) correlations, as well as positive bchl a-sulfide (0.87) and light intensity (I)-bchl a (0.89) correlations revealed that the SL was dominated by sulfur conversions driven by the photosynthetic purple sulfur bacteria (PSB). The correlation data was supported by diurnal trends for sulfate, sulfide, and bchl a. Both nitrogen and sulfur conversions played a role in the NL; however, nitrogen conversions appeared to dominate this system because of the activity of cyanobacteria. This was shown by positive chlorophyll a (chl a)-I (0.91) and chl a-nitrate (0.98) correlations and the negative correlation between ammonium and nitrite (-0.88). Correlation data was further supported by diurnal trends observed for chl a, DO, and ammonium. For both lagoons, the dominant photosynthetic microbial species determined which nutrient conversion processes were most important. PMID:11285928

  13. Engineering aspects of hydrogen production from photosynthetic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Herlevich, A.; Karpuk, M.

    1982-02-01

    Certain photosynthetic bacteria (PSB), for example, Rhodopseudomonas capsulata, evolve hydrogen when placed in an anaerobic environment with light and a suitable organic substrate. An engineering effort to use such bacteria for large-scale hydrogen production from sunlight is described. A system to produce 28,000 m/sup 3//day (1 x 10/sup 6/ ft/sup 3//day) of hydrogen has been designed on a conceptual level and includes hydrogen cleanup, substrate storage, and waste disposal. The most critical component in the design is the solar bacterial reactor. Several designs were developed and analyzed. A large covered pond concept appears most attractive. Cost estimates for the designs show favorable economics.

  14. Purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacteria monitor environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    Kis, Mariann; Sipka, Gábor; Asztalos, Emese; Rázga, Zsolt; Maróti, Péter

    2015-10-01

    Heavy metal ion pollution and oxygen deficiency are major environmental risks for microorganisms in aqueous habitat. The potential of purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacteria for biomonitoring and bioremediation was assessed by investigating the photosynthetic capacity in heavy metal contaminated environments. Cultures of bacterial strains Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Rhodospirillum rubrum and Rubrivivax gelatinosus were treated with heavy metal ions in micromolar (Hg(2+)), submillimolar (Cr(6+)) and millimolar (Pb(2+)) concentration ranges. Functional assays (flash-induced absorption changes and bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence induction) and electron micrographs were taken to specify the harmful effects of pollution and to correlate to morphological changes of the membrane. The bacterial strains and functional tests showed differentiated responses to environmental stresses, revealing that diverse mechanisms of tolerance and/or resistance are involved. The microorganisms were vulnerable to the prompt effect of Pb(2+), showed weak tolerance to Hg(2+) and proved to be tolerant to Cr(6+). The reaction center controlled electron transfer in Rvx. gelatinosus demonstrated the highest degree of resistance against heavy metal exposure. PMID:26232748

  15. Massilia eurypsychrophila sp. nov. a facultatively psychrophilic bacteria isolated from ice core.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liang; Liu, Yongqin; Gu, Zhengquan; Xu, Baiqing; Wang, Ninglian; Jiao, Nianzhi; Liu, Hongcan; Zhou, Yuguang

    2015-07-01

    Strain B528-3(T), a Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, aerobic, facultatively psychrophilic bacterium with polar flagella, was isolated from an ice core drilled from Muztagh Glacier, Xinjiang, China. The novel isolate was classified into the genus Massilia. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of the novel isolate shares a pairwise similarity of less than 97% with those of all the type strains of the genus Massilia. The major fatty acids of strain B528-3(T) were summed feature 3 (C16:1ω7c and/or iso-C15:0 2-OH) (57.31%), C16:0 (11.46%) and C18:1ω7c (14.72%). The predominant isoprenoid quinone was Q-8. The DNA G + C content was 62.2 mol% (Tm). The major polar lipids of this bacterium were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol. From the genotypic and phenotypic data, it is evident that strain B528-3(T) represents a novel species of the genus Massilia, for which the name Massilia eurypsychrophila sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is B528-3(T) ( = JCM 30074(T) = CGMCC 1.12828(T)). PMID:25851590

  16. Isolation of halotolerant, thermotolerant, facultative polymer-producing bacteria and characterization of the exopolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Pfiffner, S.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Jenneman, G.E.; Knapp, R.M.

    1986-06-01

    Over 200 bacterial strains were selected for anaerobic growth at 50/sup 0/C and extracellular polysaccharide production in a sucrose-mineral salts medium with NaNO/sub 3/ and up to 10% NaCl. The predominant cell type was an encapsulated gram-positive, motile, facultative spore-forming rod similar to Bacillus species. Strain SP018 grew and produced the polysaccharide on a variety of substrates at salinities up to 12% NaCl. Good polymer production only occurred anaerobically and was optimal between 4 and 10% NaCl. The ethanol-precipitated SP018 polymer was a charged heteropolysaccharide that contained glucose, mannose, arabinose, ribose, and low levels of allose and glucosamine. The SP018 polymer showed pseudoplastic behavior, was resistant to shearing, and had a higher viscosity at dilute concentrations and at elevated temperatures than xanthan gum. High-ionic-strength solutions reversibly decreased the viscosity of SP018 polymer solutions. The bacterium and the associated polymer have many properties that make them potentially useful for in situ microbially enhanced oil recovery processes.

  17. Isolation of Halotolerant, Thermotolerant, Facultative Polymer-Producing Bacteria and Characterization of the Exopolymer

    PubMed Central

    Pfiffner, S. M.; McInerney, Michael J.; Jenneman, Gary E.; Knapp, Roy M.

    1986-01-01

    Over 200 bacterial strains were selected for anaerobic growth at 50°C and extracellular polysaccharide production in a sucrose-mineral salts medium with NaNO3 and up to 10% NaCl. The predominant cell type was an encapsulated gram-positive, motile, facultative sporeforming rod similar to Bacillus species. Strain SP018 grew and produced the polysaccharide on a variety of substrates at salinities up to 12% NaCl. Good polymer production only occurred anaerobically and was optimal between 4 and 10% NaCl. The ethanol-precipitated SP018 polymer was a charged heteropolysaccharide that contained glucose, mannose, arabinose, ribose, and low levels of allose and glucosamine. The SP018 polymer showed pseudoplastic behavior, was resistant to shearing, and had a higher viscosity at dilute concentrations and at elevated temperatures than xanthan gum. High-ionic-strength solutions reversibly decreased the viscosity of SP018 polymer solutions. The bacterium and the associated polymer have many properties that make them potentially useful for in situ microbially enhanced oil recovery processes. PMID:16347080

  18. Evaluation of pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophic bacteria for phosphate solubilization.

    PubMed

    Jayashree, Shanmugam; Vadivukkarasi, Ponnusamy; Anand, Kirupanithi; Kato, Yuko; Seshadri, Sundaram

    2011-08-01

    Thirteen pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophic (PPFM) strains isolated from Adyar and Cooum rivers in Chennai and forest soil samples in Tamil Nadu, India, along with Methylobacterium extorquens, M. organophilum, M. gregans, and M. komagatae were screened for phosphate solubilization in plates. P-solubilization index of the PPFMs grown on NBRIP-BPB plates for 7 days ranged from 1.1 to 2.7. The growth of PPFMs in tricalcium phosphate amended media was found directly proportional to the glucose concentration. Higher phosphate solubilization was observed in four strains MSF 32 (415 mg l(-l)), MDW 80 (301 mg l(-l)), M. komagatae (279 mg l(-l)), and MSF 34 (202 mg l(-l)), after 7 days of incubation. A drop in the media pH from 6.6 to 3.4 was associated with an increase in titratable acidity. Acid phosphatase activity was more pronounced in the culture filtrate than alkaline phosphatase activity. Adherence of phosphate to densely grown bacterial surface was observed under scanning electron microscope after 7-day-old cultures. Biochemical characterization and screening for methanol dehydrogenase gene (mxaF) confirmed the strains as methylotrophs. The mxaF gene sequence from MSF 32 clustered towards M. lusitanum sp. with 99% similarity. This study forms the first detailed report on phosphate solubilization by the PPFMs. PMID:21445558

  19. Synthesis of High-Molecular-Weight Polyhydroxyalkanoates by Marine Photosynthetic Purple Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi-Takeuchi, Mieko; Morisaki, Kumiko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Numata, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) is a biopolyester/bioplastic that is produced by a variety of microorganisms to store carbon and increase reducing redox potential. Photosynthetic bacteria convert carbon dioxide into organic compounds using light energy and are known to accumulate PHA. We analyzed PHAs synthesized by 3 purple sulfur bacteria and 9 purple non-sulfur bacteria strains. These 12 purple bacteria were cultured in nitrogen-limited medium containing acetate and/or sodium bicarbonate as carbon sources. PHA production in the purple sulfur bacteria was induced by nitrogen-limited conditions. Purple non-sulfur bacteria accumulated PHA even under normal growth conditions, and PHA production in 3 strains was enhanced by nitrogen-limited conditions. Gel permeation chromatography analysis revealed that 5 photosynthetic purple bacteria synthesized high-molecular-weight PHAs, which are useful for industrial applications. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that mRNA levels of phaC and PhaZ genes were low under nitrogen-limited conditions, resulting in production of high-molecular-weight PHAs. We conclude that all 12 tested strains are able to synthesize PHA to some degree, and we identify 5 photosynthetic purple bacteria that accumulate high-molecular-weight PHA molecules. Furthermore, the photosynthetic purple bacteria synthesized PHA when they were cultured in seawater supplemented with acetate. The photosynthetic purple bacteria strains characterized in this study should be useful as host microorganisms for large-scale PHA production utilizing abundant marine resources and carbon dioxide. PMID:27513570

  20. Synthesis of High-Molecular-Weight Polyhydroxyalkanoates by Marine Photosynthetic Purple Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Higuchi-Takeuchi, Mieko; Morisaki, Kumiko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Numata, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) is a biopolyester/bioplastic that is produced by a variety of microorganisms to store carbon and increase reducing redox potential. Photosynthetic bacteria convert carbon dioxide into organic compounds using light energy and are known to accumulate PHA. We analyzed PHAs synthesized by 3 purple sulfur bacteria and 9 purple non-sulfur bacteria strains. These 12 purple bacteria were cultured in nitrogen-limited medium containing acetate and/or sodium bicarbonate as carbon sources. PHA production in the purple sulfur bacteria was induced by nitrogen-limited conditions. Purple non-sulfur bacteria accumulated PHA even under normal growth conditions, and PHA production in 3 strains was enhanced by nitrogen-limited conditions. Gel permeation chromatography analysis revealed that 5 photosynthetic purple bacteria synthesized high-molecular-weight PHAs, which are useful for industrial applications. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that mRNA levels of phaC and PhaZ genes were low under nitrogen-limited conditions, resulting in production of high-molecular-weight PHAs. We conclude that all 12 tested strains are able to synthesize PHA to some degree, and we identify 5 photosynthetic purple bacteria that accumulate high-molecular-weight PHA molecules. Furthermore, the photosynthetic purple bacteria synthesized PHA when they were cultured in seawater supplemented with acetate. The photosynthetic purple bacteria strains characterized in this study should be useful as host microorganisms for large-scale PHA production utilizing abundant marine resources and carbon dioxide. PMID:27513570

  1. Photosynthetic formation of inorganic pyrophosphate in phototrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nore, B F; Nyrén, P; Salih, G F; Strid, A

    1990-04-01

    In this paper we report studies on photosynthetic formation of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) in three phototrophic bacteria. Formation of PPi was found in chromatophores from Rhodopseudomonas viridis but not in chromatophores from Rhodopseudomonas blastica and Rhodobacter capsulatus. The maximal rate of PPi synthesis in Rps. viridis was 0.15 μmol PPi formed/(min*μmol Bacteriochlorophyll) at 23°C. The synthesis of PPi was inhibited by electron transport inhibitors, uncouplers and fluoride, but was insensitive to oligomycin and venturicidin. The steady state rate of PPi synthesis under continuous illumination was about 15% of the steady-state rate of ATP synthesis. The synthesis of PPi after short light flashes was also studied. The yield of PPi after a single 1 ms flash was equivalent to approximately 1 μmol PPi/500 μmol Bacteriochlorophyll. In Rps. viridis chromatophores, PPi was also found to induce a membrane potential, which was sensitive to carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone and NaF. PMID:24419767

  2. Diverse Gene Cassettes in Class 1 Integrons of Facultative Oligotrophic Bacteria of River Mahananda, West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Ranadhir; Kumar, Arvind; Bhowal, Suparna Saha; Mandal, Amit Kumar; Tiwary, Bipransh Kumar; Mukherjee, Shriparna

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study a large random collection (n = 2188) of facultative oligotrophic bacteria, from 90 water samples gathered in three consecutive years (2007–2009) from three different sampling sites of River Mahananda in Siliguri, West Bengal, India, were investigated for the presence of class 1 integrons and sequences of the amplification products. Methodology/Principal Findings Replica plating method was employed for determining the antibiotic resistance profile of the randomly assorted facultative oligotrophic isolates. Genomic DNA from each isolate was analyzed by PCR for the presence of class 1 integron. Amplicons were cloned and sequenced. Numerical taxonomy and 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses were done to ascertain putative genera of the class 1 integron bearing isolates. Out of 2188 isolates, 1667 (76.19%) were antibiotic-resistant comprising of both single-antibiotic resistance (SAR) and multiple-antibiotic resistant (MAR), and 521 (23.81%) were sensitive to all twelve different antibiotics used in this study. Ninety out of 2188 isolates produced amplicon(s) of varying sizes from 0.15 to 3.45 KB. Chi-square (χ2) test revealed that the possession of class 1 integron in sensitive, SAR and MAR is not equally probable at the 1% level of significance. Diverse antibiotic-resistance gene cassettes, aadA1, aadA2, aadA4, aadA5, dfrA1, dfrA5, dfrA7, dfrA12, dfrA16, dfrA17, dfrA28, dfrA30, dfr-IIe, blaIMP-9, aacA4, Ac-6′-Ib, oxa1, oxa10 and arr2 were detected in 64 isolates. The novel cassettes encoding proteins unrelated to any known antibiotic resistance gene function were identified in 26 isolates. Antibiotic-sensitive isolates have a greater propensity to carry gene cassettes unrelated to known antibiotic-resistance genes. The integron-positive isolates under the class Betaproteobacteria comprised of only two genera, Comamonas and Acidovorax of family Comamonadaceae, while isolates under class Gammaproteobacteria fell under the families

  3. Photosynthetic reaction center of green sulfur bacteria studied by EPR

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, W.; Rutherford, A.W. ); Fieler, U. )

    1990-04-24

    Membrane preparations of two species of the green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium have been studied be EPR. Three signals were detected which were attributed to iron-sulfur centers acting as electron acceptors in the photosynthetic reaction center. (1) A signal from a center designated F{sub B}, was photoinduced at 4K. (2) A similar signal, F{sub A}, was photoinduced in addition to the F{sub B} signal upon a short period of illumination at 200 K. (3) Further illumination at 200 K resulted in the appearance of a broad feature at g=1.78. This is attributed to the g{sub x} component of an iron-sulfur center designated F{sub X}. The designations of these signals as F{sub B}, F{sub A}, and F{sub X} are based on their spectroscopic similarities to signals in photosystem I (PS I). The orientation dependence of these EPR signals in ordered Chlorobium membrane multilayers is remarkably similar to that of their PS I homologues. A magnetic interaction between the reduced forms of F{sub B} and F{sub A} occurs, which is also very similar to that seen in PS I. The triplet state of P{sub 840}, the primary electron donor, could be photoinduced at 4 K in samples which had been preincubated with sodium dithionite and methyl viologen and then preilluminated at 200 K. The preillumination reduces the iron-sulfur centers while the preincubation is thought to result in the inactivation of an earlier electron acceptor. Orientation studies of the triplet signal in ordered multilayers indicate that the bacteriochlorophylls which act as the primary electron donor in Chlorobium are arranged with a structural geometry almost identical with that of the special pair in purple bacteria. The Chlorobium reaction center appears to be similar in some respects to both PS I and to the purple bacterial reaction center. This is discussed with regard to the evolution of the different types of reaction centers from a common ancestor.

  4. Photosynthetic bacteria production from food processing wastewater in sequencing batch and membrane photo-bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Chitapornpan, S; Chiemchaisri, C; Chiemchaisri, W; Honda, R; Yamamoto, K

    2012-01-01

    Application of photosynthetic process could be highly efficient and surpass anaerobic treatment in releasing less greenhouse gas and odor while the biomass produced can be utilized. The combination of photosynthetic process with membrane separation is possibly effective for water reclamation and biomass production. In this study, cultivation of mixed culture photosynthetic bacteria from food processing wastewater was investigated in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and a membrane bioreactor (MBR) supplied with infrared light. Both photo-bioreactors were operated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 10 days. Higher MLSS concentration achieved in the MBR through complete retention of biomass resulted in a slightly improved performance. When the system was operated with MLSS controlled by occasional sludge withdrawal, total biomass production of MBR and SBR photo-bioreactor was almost equal. However, 64.5% of total biomass production was washed out with the effluent in SBR system. Consequently, the higher biomass could be recovered for utilization in MBR. PMID:22258682

  5. Forster energy transfer in chlorosomes of green photosynthetic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Causgrove, T. P.; Brune, D. C.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Energy transfer properties of whole cells and chlorosome antenna complexes isolated from the green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium limicola (containing bacteriochlorophyll c), Chlorobium vibrioforme (containing bacteriochlorophyll d) and Pelodictyon phaeoclathratiforme (containing bacteriochlorophyll e) were measured. The spectral overlap of the major chlorosome pigment (bacteriochlorophyll c, d or, e) with the bacteriochlorophyll a B795 chlorosome baseplate pigment is greatest for bacteriochlorophyll c and smallest for bacteriochlorophyll e. The absorbance and fluorescence spectra of isolated chlorosomes were measured, fitted to gaussian curves and the overlap factors with B795 calculated. Energy transfer times from the bacteriochlorophyll c, d or e to B795 were measured in whole cells and the results interpreted in terms of the Forster theory of energy transfer.

  6. Rapid redox signal transmission by "Cable Bacteria" beneath a photosynthetic biofilm.

    PubMed

    Malkin, S Y; Meysman, F J R

    2015-02-01

    Recently, long filamentous bacteria, belonging to the family Desulfobulbaceae, were shown to induce electrical currents over long distances in the surface layer of marine sediments. These "cable bacteria" are capable of harvesting electrons from free sulfide in deeper sediment horizons and transferring these electrons along their longitudinal axes to oxygen present near the sediment-water interface. In the present work, we investigated the relationship between cable bacteria and a photosynthetic algal biofilm. In a first experiment, we investigated sediment that hosted both cable bacteria and a photosynthetic biofilm and tested the effect of an imposed diel light-dark cycle by continuously monitoring sulfide at depth. Changes in photosynthesis at the sediment surface had an immediate and repeatable effect on sulfide concentrations at depth, indicating that cable bacteria can rapidly transmit a geochemical effect to centimeters of depth in response to changing conditions at the sediment surface. We also observed a secondary response of the free sulfide at depth manifest on the time scale of hours, suggesting that cable bacteria adjust to a moving oxygen front with a regulatory or a behavioral response, such as motility. Finally, we show that on the time scale of days, the presence of an oxygenic biofilm results in a deeper and more acidic suboxic zone, indicating that a greater oxygen supply can enable cable bacteria to harvest a greater quantity of electrons from marine sediments. Rapid acclimation strategies and highly efficient electron harvesting are likely key advantages of cable bacteria, enabling their success in high sulfide generating coastal sediments. PMID:25416774

  7. Structure, Function and Reconstitution of Antenna Complexes of Green Photosynthetic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, Robert E.

    2005-06-10

    Most chlorophyll-type pigments in a photosynthetic organism function as an antenna, absorbing light and transferring excitations to a photochemical reaction center where energy storage takes place by a series of chemical reactions. The green photosynthetic bacteria are characterized by large antenna complexes known as chlorosomes, in which pigment-pigment interactions are of dominant importance. The overall objective of this project is to determine the mechanisms of excitation transfer and regulation of this unique antenna system, including how it is integrated into the rest of the photosynthetic energy transduction apparatus. Techniques that are being used in this research include biochemical analysis, spectroscopy, microscopy, X-ray structural studies, and reconstitution from purified components. Our recent results indicate that the chlorosome baseplate structure, which is the membrane attachment site for the chlorosome to the membrane, is a unique pigment-protein that contains large amounts of carotenoids and small amounts of bacteriochlorophyll a. Reconstitution of directed energy transfer in chlorosomes will be carried out using purified baseplates and oligomeric pigments. The integral membrane B808-866 antenna complex from Chloroflexus aurantiacus and the Fenna-Matthews-Olson protein-reaction center complex from green sulfur bacteria will be characterized by spectroscopic and structural techniques.

  8. Structure, Function, and Regulation of Antenna Complexes of Green Photosynthetic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Robert E. Blankenship

    2001-04-27

    This project is concerned with the structure and function of the chlorosome antennas found in green photosynthetic bacteria. Chlorosomes are ellipsoidal structures attached to the cytoplasmic side of the inner cell membrane. These antenna complexes provide a very large absorption cross section for light capture. Evidence is overwhelming that the chlorosome represents a very different type of antenna from that found in any other photosynthetic system yet studied. It is now clear that chlorosomes do not contain traditional pigment-proteins, in which the pigments bind to specific sites on proteins. Instead, the chlorosome pigments are organized in vivo into pigment oligomers in which direct pigment-pigment interactions are of dominant importance. Our group has used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate this unique system, including model systems, ultrafast spectroscopy, molecular biology, protein chemistry and X-ray crystallography.

  9. Removal of micropollutants, facultative pathogenic and antibiotic resistant bacteria in a full-scale retention soil filter receiving combined sewer overflow.

    PubMed

    Scheurer, Marco; Heß, Stefanie; Lüddeke, Frauke; Sacher, Frank; Güde, Hans; Löffler, Herbert; Gallert, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Combined sewer systems collect surface runoff as well as wastewater of industrial and domestic origin. During periods of heavy rainfall the capacity of the sewer system is exceeded and the overflow is discharged into receiving waters without any treatment. Consequently, combined sewer overflow (CSO) is considered as a major source of water pollution. This study investigates the effectiveness of a retention soil filter (RSF) for the removal of micropollutants as well as facultative pathogenic and antibiotic resistant bacteria from CSO. The removal of organic group parameters like total organic carbon was excellent and the removal efficiency for micropollutants of the RSF and the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), which treats wastewater of the same origin during dry and normal weather conditions, was comparable. Compounds of high environmental concern like estrogens or certain pharmaceuticals, e.g. diclofenac, were completely eliminated or removed to a high degree during RSF passage. RSF treatment also reduced the number of E. coli, enterococci and staphylococci by 2.7, 2.2 and 2.4 log-units (median values), respectively. Obviously, some Staphylococcus species can better adapt to the conditions of the RSF than others as a shift of the abundance of the different species was observed when comparing the diversity of staphylococci obtained from the RSF influent and effluent. RSF treatment also decreased the absolute number of antibiotic resistant bacteria. The percentage of antibiotic resistant E. coli and staphylococci isolates also decreased during passage of the RSF, whereas the percentage of resistant enterococci did not change. For E. coli ampicillin and for enterococci and staphylococci erythromycin determined the antibiotic resistance level. The results demonstrate that RSFs can be considered as an adequate treatment option for CSO. The performance for the removal of micropollutants is comparable with a medium sized WWTP with conventional activated sludge

  10. Molecular Regulation of Photosynthetic Carbon Dioxide Fixation in Nonsulfur Purple Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Tabita, Fred Robert

    2015-12-01

    The overall objective of this project is to determine the mechanism by which a transcriptional activator protein affects CO2 fixation (cbb) gene expression in nonsulfur purple photosynthetic bacteria, with special emphasis to Rhodobacter sphaeroides and with comparison to Rhodopseudomonas palustris. These studies culminated in several publications which indicated that additional regulators interact with the master regulator CbbR in both R. sphaeroides and R. palustris. In addition, the interactive control of the carbon and nitrogen assimilatory pathways was studied and unique regulatory signals were discovered.

  11. Diverse Arrangement of Photosynthetic Gene Clusters in Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qiang; Zhang, Rui; Koblížek, Michal; Boldareva, Ekaterina N.; Yurkov, Vladimir; Yan, Shi; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2011-01-01

    Background Aerobic anoxygenic photototrophic (AAP) bacteria represent an important group of marine microorganisms inhabiting the euphotic zone of the ocean. They harvest light using bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a and are thought to be important players in carbon cycling in the ocean. Methodology/Principal Findings Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria represent an important part of marine microbial communities. Their photosynthetic apparatus is encoded by a number of genes organized in a so-called photosynthetic gene cluster (PGC). In this study, the organization of PGCs was analyzed in ten AAP species belonging to the orders Rhodobacterales, Sphingomonadales and the NOR5/OM60 clade. Sphingomonadales contained comparatively smaller PGCs with an approximately size of 39 kb whereas the average size of PGCs in Rhodobacterales and NOR5/OM60 clade was about 45 kb. The distribution of four arrangements, based on the permutation and combination of the two conserved regions bchFNBHLM-LhaA-puhABC and crtF-bchCXYZ, does not correspond to the phylogenetic affiliation of individual AAP bacterial species. While PGCs of all analyzed species contained the same set of genes for bacteriochlorophyll synthesis and assembly of photosynthetic centers, they differed largely in the carotenoid biosynthetic genes. Spheroidenone, spirilloxanthin, and zeaxanthin biosynthetic pathways were found in each clade respectively. All of the carotenoid biosynthetic genes were found in the PGCs of Rhodobacterales, however Sphingomonadales and NOR5/OM60 strains contained some of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway genes outside of the PGC. Conclusions/Significance Our investigations shed light on the evolution and functional implications in PGCs of marine aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs, and support the notion that AAP are a heterogenous physiological group phylogenetically scattered among Proteobacteria. PMID:21949847

  12. Metabolic Engineering and Modeling of Metabolic Pathways to Improve Hydrogen Production by Photosynthetic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Y.; Navid, A.

    2014-12-19

    Rising energy demands and the imperative to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are driving research on biofuels development. Hydrogen gas (H2) is one of the most promising biofuels and is seen as a future energy carrier by virtue of the fact that 1) it is renewable, 2) does not evolve the “greenhouse gas” CO2 in combustion, 3) liberates large amounts of energy per unit weight in combustion (having about 3 times the energy content of gasoline), and 4) is easily converted to electricity by fuel cells. Among the various bioenergy strategies, environmental groups and others say that the concept of the direct manufacture of alternative fuels, such as H2, by photosynthetic organisms is the only biofuel alternative without significant negative criticism [1]. Biological H2 production by photosynthetic microorganisms requires the use of a simple solar reactor such as a transparent closed box, with low energy requirements, and is considered as an attractive system to develop as a biocatalyst for H2 production [2]. Various purple bacteria including Rhodopseudomonas palustris, can utilize organic substrates as electron donors to produce H2 at the expense of solar energy. Because of the elimination of energy cost used for H2O oxidation and the prevention of the production of O2 that inhibits the H2-producing enzymes, the efficiency of light energy conversion to H2 by anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria is in principle much higher than that by green algae or cyanobacteria, and is regarded as one of the most promising cultures for biological H2 production [3]. Here implemented a simple and relatively straightforward strategy for hydrogen production by photosynthetic microorganisms using sunlight, sulfur- or iron-based inorganic substrates, and CO2 as the feedstock. Carefully selected microorganisms with bioengineered beneficial

  13. Lamellar Organization of Pigments in Chlorosomes, the Light Harvesting Complexes of Green Photosynthetic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pšenčík, J.; Ikonen, T. P.; Laurinmäki, P.; Merckel, M. C.; Butcher, S. J.; Serimaa, R. E.; Tuma, R.

    2004-01-01

    Chlorosomes of green photosynthetic bacteria constitute the most efficient light harvesting complexes found in nature. In addition, the chlorosome is the only known photosynthetic system where the majority of pigments (BChl) is not organized in pigment-protein complexes but instead is assembled into aggregates. Because of the unusual organization, the chlorosome structure has not been resolved and only models, in which BChl pigments were organized into large rods, were proposed on the basis of freeze-fracture electron microscopy and spectroscopic constraints. We have obtained the first high-resolution images of chlorosomes from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum by cryoelectron microscopy. Cryoelectron microscopy images revealed dense striations ∼20 Å apart. X-ray scattering from chlorosomes exhibited a feature with the same ∼20 Å spacing. No evidence for the rod models was obtained. The observed spacing and tilt-series cryoelectron microscopy projections are compatible with a lamellar model, in which BChl molecules aggregate into semicrystalline lateral arrays. The diffraction data further indicate that arrays are built from BChl dimers. The arrays form undulating lamellae, which, in turn, are held together by interdigitated esterifying alcohol tails, carotenoids, and lipids. The lamellar model is consistent with earlier spectroscopic data and provides insight into chlorosome self-assembly. PMID:15298919

  14. Lamellar organization of pigments in chlorosomes, the light harvesting complexes of green photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Psencík, J; Ikonen, T P; Laurinmäki, P; Merckel, M C; Butcher, S J; Serimaa, R E; Tuma, R

    2004-08-01

    Chlorosomes of green photosynthetic bacteria constitute the most efficient light harvesting complexes found in nature. In addition, the chlorosome is the only known photosynthetic system where the majority of pigments (BChl) is not organized in pigment-protein complexes but instead is assembled into aggregates. Because of the unusual organization, the chlorosome structure has not been resolved and only models, in which BChl pigments were organized into large rods, were proposed on the basis of freeze-fracture electron microscopy and spectroscopic constraints. We have obtained the first high-resolution images of chlorosomes from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum by cryoelectron microscopy. Cryoelectron microscopy images revealed dense striations approximately 20 A apart. X-ray scattering from chlorosomes exhibited a feature with the same approximately 20 A spacing. No evidence for the rod models was obtained. The observed spacing and tilt-series cryoelectron microscopy projections are compatible with a lamellar model, in which BChl molecules aggregate into semicrystalline lateral arrays. The diffraction data further indicate that arrays are built from BChl dimers. The arrays form undulating lamellae, which, in turn, are held together by interdigitated esterifying alcohol tails, carotenoids, and lipids. The lamellar model is consistent with earlier spectroscopic data and provides insight into chlorosome self-assembly. PMID:15298919

  15. Photosynthetic aeration in biological wastewater treatment using immobilized microalgae-bacteria symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Praveen, Prashant; Loh, Kai-Chee

    2015-12-01

    Chlorella vulgaris encapsulated in alginate beads were added into a bioreactor treating synthetic wastewater using Pseudomonas putida. A symbiotic CO2/O2 gas exchange was established between the two microorganisms for photosynthetic aeration of wastewater. During batch operation, glucose removal efficiency in the bioreactor improved from 50% in 12 h without aeration to 100% in 6 h, when the bioreactor was aerated photosynthetically. During continuous operation, the bioreactor was operated at a low hydraulic retention time of 3.3 h at feed concentrations of 250 and 500 mg/L glucose. The removal efficiency at 500 mg/L increased from 73% without aeration to 100% in the presence of immobilized microalgae. The initial microalgae concentration was critical to achieve adequate aeration, and the removal rate increased with increasing microalgae concentration. The highest removal rate of 142 mg/L-h glucose was achieved at an initial microalgae concentration of 190 mg/L. Quantification of microalgae growth in the alginate beads indicated an exponential growth during symbiosis, indicating that the bioreactor performance was limited by oxygen production rates. Under symbiotic conditions, the chlorophyll content of the immobilized microalgae increased by more than 30%. These results indicate that immobilized microalgae in symbiosis with heterotrophic bacteria are promising in wastewater aeration. PMID:26266755

  16. Structure, Function and Reconstitution of Antenna Complexes from Green Photosynthetic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Robert E. Blankenship

    2005-08-10

    This project is concerned with the structure and function of the chlorosome antennas found in green photosynthetic bacteria. Chlorosomes are ellipsoidal structures attached to the cytoplasmic side of the inner cell membrane. These antenna complexes provide a very large absorption cross section for light capture. Evidence is overwhelming that the chlorosome represents a very different type of antenna from that found in any other photosynthetic system yet studied. It is now clear that chlorosomes do not contain traditional pigment-proteins, in which the pigments bind to specific sites on proteins. Instead, the chlorosome pigments are organized in vivo into pigment oligomers in which direct pigment-pigment interactions are of dominant importance. Our group has used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate this unique system, as well as the complexes that they directly interact with. Our work has included using model systems, numerous types of both steady-state and ultrafast spectroscopy, molecular biology, protein chemistry and X-ray crystallography. Details of our recent results using these approaches are given below and in the references. Numbers cited in the sections refer to DOE-sponsored publications that are listed below. Only publications dated 2001-2004 or later are included in this report. In addition to the primary literature reports, a comprehensive review of this area of research has been written as well as a commentary.

  17. Biomass and carotenoid production in photosynthetic bacteria wastewater treatment: effects of light intensity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qin; Zhang, Panyue; Zhang, Guangming

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) to produce biomass and carotenoid while treating wastewater. The effects of light intensity on the biomass, carotenoid and bacteriochlorophyll accumulation in together with pollutant removal were studied. Results showed that it was feasible to use PSB to treat wastewater as well as to produce biomass or carotenoid. 2000 lux was an optimal intensity for biomass production and COD removal, and the corresponding values were 2645 mg/L and 94.7%. 8000 lux was an optimal light intensity for carotenoid production (1.455 mg/L). Mechanism analysis displayed that the greater the bacteriochlorophyll and carotenoid were secreted, the lower the light conversion efficiency turned out to be. The highest light conversion efficiency was achieved at 500 lux; the ATP production, biomass production, and COD removal were the highest at 2000 lux, but the bacteriochlorophyll and carotenoid content were the lowest at 2000 lux. PMID:25218205

  18. Biomass and pigments production in photosynthetic bacteria wastewater treatment: Effects of photoperiod.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qin; Zhang, Panyue; Zhang, Guangming; Peng, Meng

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed at enhancing the bacterial biomass and pigments production in together with pollution removal in photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) wastewater treatment via using different photoperiods. Different light/dark cycles and light/dark cycle frequencies were examined. Results showed that PSB had the highest biomass production, COD removal and biomass yield, and light energy efficiency with light/dark cycle of 2h/1h. The corresponding biomass, COD removal and biomass yield reached 2068mg/L, 90.3%, and 0.38mg-biomass/mg-COD-removal, respectively. PSB showed higher biomass production and biomass yield with higher light/dark cycle frequency. Mechanism analysis showed within a light/dark cycle from 1h/2h to 2h/1h, the carotenoid and bacteriochlorophyll production increased with an increase in light/dark cycle. Moreover, the pigment contents were much higher with lower frequency of 2-4 times/d. PMID:25958142

  19. Effects of light sources on growth and carotenoid content of photosynthetic bacteria Rhodopseudomonas palustris.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Fu-Shiu; Chien, Yew-Hu; Chen, Chang-Jiang

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of eight light sources on photosynthetic bacteria (Rhodopseudomonas palustris) growth and carotenoid content (CD), cultured for 144 h. Light sources were incandescent lamp (IL), halogen lamp (HL), fluorescence lamp (FL), and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) of white (LW), yellow (LY), red (LR), blue (LB), and green (LG). Dark condition served as the control. Under around 2000 lux, light sources ranked greatest to least bacterial growth effect were (LB=IL) > FL > LW ≥ HL ≥ LR ≥ (LG=LY=DK). Ranking effect on CD content was LB > IL ≥ LY ≥ (HL=LR=LG) ≥ LW ≥ DK ≥ FL. Energy efficiency for bacterial growth was LB > LW > LY > IL > LG > HL > FL > LR. CD productivity ranking was LB > LY > LW > LG > IL > HL > LR > FL. Results revealed that LB saved 75% energy and increased CD productivity by 348% compared with IL. PMID:22330604

  20. Chemosensory and photosensory perception in purple photosynthetic bacteria utilize common signal transduction components.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Z Y; Gest, H; Bauer, C E

    1997-01-01

    The chemotaxis gene cluster from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum centenum contains five open reading frames (ORFs) that have significant sequence homology to chemotaxis genes from other bacteria. To elucidate the functions of each ORF, we have made various mutations in the gene cluster and analyzed their phenotypic defects. Deletion of the entire che operon (delta che), as well as nonpolar disruptions of cheAY, cheW, and cheR, resulted in a smooth-swimming phenotype, whereas disruption of cheB resulted in a locked tumbly phenotype. Each of these mutants was defective in chemotactic response. Interestingly, disruption of cheY resulted in a slight increase in the frequency of tumbling/reversal with no obvious defects in chemotactic response. In contrast to observations with Escherichia coli and several other bacteria, we found that all of the che mutant cells were capable of differentiating into hyperflagellated swarmer cells when plated on a solid agar surface. When viewed microscopically, the smooth-swimming che mutants exhibited active surface motility but were unable to respond to a step-down in light intensity. Both positive and negative phototactic responses were abolished in all che mutants, including the cheY mutant. These results indicate that eubacterial photosensory perception is mediated by light-generated signals that are transmitted through the chemotaxis signal transduction cascade. PMID:9294427

  1. Physicochemical studies of demetalation of light-harvesting bacteriochlorophyll isomers purified from green sulfur photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Yuki; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Kashimura, Shigenori; Saga, Yoshitaka

    2009-01-01

    Demetalation kinetics of bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) c, d and e from green sulfur photosynthetic bacteria were studied under weakly acidic conditions. Demetalation rate constants of BChl e possessing a formyl group at the 7-position were significantly smaller than those of BChls c and d, which had a methyl group at this position. The activation energy of demetalation of 3(1)R-8,12-diethyl([E,E])-BChl e was 1.5-times larger than that of 3(1)R-[E,E]-BChl c. 15N-labeled 3(1)R-[E,E]-BChls c and e were purified from cells of green sulfur bacteria grown in a medium containing 15NH4Cl, and their 15N NMR spectra were measured. The chemical shifts of N21, N22 and N23 atoms of 3(1)R-[E,E]-BChl e were lower-field shifted than those of 3(1)R-[E,E]-BChl c, respectively, and especially the difference in chemical shifts of N22 was significantly large. These results suggest that the electron-withdrawing formyl group at the 7-position of BChl e affected an electronic state of the chlorin macrocycle and caused BChl e to be more tolerant for removal of the central magnesium compared with BChls c and d. PMID:19558420

  2. Functional Relationship Between Phytoplankton and Aerobic Anoxygenic Photosynthetic Bacteria: Modes of Coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolber, Z. S.; Haffa, A.; Klimov, D.

    2006-12-01

    Aerobic Anoxygenic Photosynthetic Bacteria (AAPs) are ubiquitously distributed in the upper ocean. Although they contain bacteriochlorophyll a (BChla), the main absorption bands in the near UV (370 nm) and infrared (800-850 nm) make this pigment impractical in light harvesting below the first few meters of the water column. Instead, they utilize carotenoids as major light harvesting pigments. Since these carotenoids absorb in the 430-550 nm range, phytoplankton and AAPs utilize a similar portion of the available light spectrum. As AAPs cannot utilize water as the electron donor, they transfer electrons between a range of organic/inorganic electron donors and electron acceptors, thus significantly participating in the redox cycle in the upper ocean. We have measured the vertical distribution and photosynthetic properties of both phytoplankton and AAPs in a highly oligotrophic region 800 km SW of Monterey Bay (34N, 129W), and we have consistently observed the presence of a BChla maximum about 30 to 40 meters above the chlorophyll maximum, indicating that phytoplankton and AAPs occupy different ecological niches in the water column. However, the abundance of AAPs generally displayed a maximum at dawn and a minimum at the dusk, indicating a high level of mortality. This diel cycle was observed in 5 micron and 3 micron size fractions, indicating active grazing by small protists. Incubation experiments with natural, mixed population of AAPs and phytoplankton results in an unusually high accumulation of AAPs in DCMU-treated samples, indicating that pigmented protists do contribute significantly to AAP grazing in a tightly-controlled microbial loop. On the other hand, AAP incubations in pure cultures indicate that they biomineralize sulfur, thus affecting the sulfur cycle. All of these observations indicate that the role of AAPs in the upper ocean ecology is defined by their relationship with phototrophic and heterotrophic communities, rather than by their relative

  3. Studies on Hydrogen Production by Photosynthetic Bacteria after Anaerobic Fermentation of Starch by a Hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugitate, Toshihiro; Fukatsu, Makoto; Ishimi, Katsuhiro; Kohno, Hideki; Wakayama, Tatsuki; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Miyake, Jun; Asada, Yasuo

    In order to establish the sequential hydrogen production from waste starch using a hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus, and a photosynthetic bacterium, basic studies were done. P. furiosus produced hydrogen and acetate by anaerobic fermentation at 90°C. A photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV, was able to produce hydrogen from acetate under anaerobic and light conditions at 30°C. However, Rb. sphaeroides RV was not able to produce hydrogen from acetate in the presence of sodium chloride that was essential for the growth and hydrogen production of P. furiosus although it produced hydrogen from lactate at a reduced rate with 1% sodium chloride. A newly isolated strain, CST-8, from natural environment was, however, able to produce hydrogen from acetate, especially with 3 mM L-alanine and in the presence of 1% sodium chloride. The sequential hydrogen production with P. furiosus and salt-tolerant photosynthetic bacteria could be probable at least in the laboratory experiment scale.

  4. Asymmetrically acting lycopene beta-cyclases (CrtLm) from non-photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tao, L; Picataggio, S; Rouvière, P E; Cheng, Q

    2004-03-01

    Carotenoids have important functions in photosynthesis, nutrition, and protection against oxidative damage. Some natural carotenoids are asymmetrical molecules that are difficult to produce chemically. Biological production of carotenoids using specific enzymes is a potential alternative to extraction from natural sources. Here we report the isolation of lycopene beta-cyclases that selectively cyclize only one end of lycopene or neurosporene. The crtLm genes encoding the asymmetrically acting lycopene beta-cyclases were isolated from non-photosynthetic bacteria that produced monocyclic carotenoids. Co-expression of these crtLm genes with the crtEIB genes from Pantoea stewartii (responsible for lycopene synthesis) resulted in the production of monocyclic gamma-carotene in Escherichia coli. The asymmetric cyclization activity of CrtLm could be inhibited by the lycopene beta-cyclase inhibitor 2-(4-chlorophenylthio)-triethylamine (CPTA). Phylogenetic analysis suggested that bacterial CrtL-type lycopene beta-cyclases might represent an evolutionary link between the common bacterial CrtY-type of lycopene beta-cyclases and plant lycopene beta- and epsilon-cyclases. These lycopene beta-cyclases may be used for efficient production of high-value asymmetrically cyclized carotenoids. PMID:14740205

  5. Biomass and pigments production in photosynthetic bacteria wastewater treatment: effects of light sources.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qin; Zhang, Panyue; Zhang, Guangming

    2015-03-01

    This study is aimed at enhancing biomass and pigments production together with pollution removal in photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) wastewater treatment via different light sources. Red, yellow, blue, white LED and incandescent lamp were used. Results showed different light sources had great effects on the PSB. PSB had the highest biomass production, COD removal and biomass yield with red LED. The corresponding biomass, COD removal and biomass yield reached 2580 mg/L, 88.6% and 0.49 mg-biomass/mg-COD-removal, respectively. The hydraulic retention time of wastewater treatment could be shortened to 72 h with red LED. Mechanism analysis showed higher ATP was produced with red LED than others. Light sources could significantly affect the pigments production. The pigments productions were greatly higher with LED than incandescent lamp. Yellow LED had the highest pigments production while red LED produced the highest carotenoid/bacteriochlorophyll ratio. Considering both efficiency and energy cost, red LED was the optimal light source. PMID:25575211

  6. Exciton dynamics in circular aggregates: application to antenna of photosynthetic purple bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Novoderezhkin, V I; Razjivin, A P

    1995-01-01

    A theoretical model of exciton dynamics in circular molecular aggregates of light-harvesting bacteriochlorophyll of photosynthetic bacteria is proposed. The spectra and anisotropy of photoinduced absorption changes in the femto- and picosecond time domain are under its scope. The excited state of aggregate was treated due to the standard exciton theory, taking into account a pigment inhomogeneity. Dephasing processes via the exciton-phonon interactions were described by means of the Haken-Strobl equation. It was shown that only two exciton levels are dipole-allowed in the case of homogeneous circular aggregate. The pigment inhomogeneity results in the appearance of several weak transitions to higher exciton levels. It was proposed that the minor band (B896) in an absorption spectrum of the B875 complex as well as the similar minor band in spectra of B800-850 complex correspond to electron transition from the ground to the lowest exciton level, whereas the major band corresponds to transition to the higher exciton level. The proposed model shows the subpicosecond decay of anisotropy at the short-wavelength side of absorption band and a high degree of anisotropy at the long-wavelength side, even at high temperatures. PMID:7756528

  7. Effect of Azospirillum brasilense and Burkholderia unamae Bacteria on Maize Photosynthetic Activity Evaluated Using the Photoacoustic Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo-Delgado, F.; Marín, E.; Calderón, A.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the photosynthetic process of maize plants ( Zea mays), which were grown using seeds inoculated with plant growth promoting bacteria Azospirillum brasilense and Burkholderia unamae, was monitored. Photothermal and photobaric signals obtained by a time-resolved photoacoustic measurement configuration were used for measuring the oxygen evolution rate in situ. A frequency-resolved configuration of the method was utilized to determine the oxygen diffusion coefficient and the thermal diffusivity of the maize leaves. The latter parameters, which can be used as indicators of the photosynthetic activity of maize, are found to vary according to the plant-microbe interaction. Treatment with plant growth promoting bacteria induced a decrease in the oxygen diffusion coefficient of about 20 %.

  8. Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yurkov, Vladimir V.; Beatty, J. Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are a relatively recently discovered bacterial group. Although taxonomically and phylogenetically heterogeneous, these bacteria share the following distinguishing features: the presence of bacteriochlorophyll a incorporated into reaction center and light-harvesting complexes, low levels of the photosynthetic unit in cells, an abundance of carotenoids, a strong inhibition by light of bacteriochlorophyll synthesis, and the inability to grow photosynthetically under anaerobic conditions. Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are classified in two marine (Erythrobacter and Roseobacter) and six freshwater (Acidiphilium, Erythromicrobium, Erythromonas, Porphyrobacter, Roseococcus, and Sandaracinobacter) genera, which phylogenetically belong to the α-1, α-3, and α-4 subclasses of the class Proteobacteria. Despite this phylogenetic information, the evolution and ancestry of their photosynthetic properties are unclear. We discuss several current proposals for the evolutionary origin of aerobic phototrophic bacteria. The closest phylogenetic relatives of aerobic phototrophic bacteria include facultatively anaerobic purple nonsulfur phototrophic bacteria. Since these two bacterial groups share many properties, yet have significant differences, we compare and contrast their physiology, with an emphasis on morphology and photosynthetic and other metabolic processes. PMID:9729607

  9. Development and dynamics of the photosynthetic apparatus in purple phototrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Niederman, Robert A

    2016-03-01

    The purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides provides a useful model system for studies of the assembly and dynamics of bacterial photosynthetic membranes. For the nascent developing membrane, proteomic analyses showed an ~2-fold enrichment in general membrane assembly factors, compared to chromatophores. When the protonophore carbonyl-cyanide m-chlorophenyl-hydrazone (CCCP) was added to an ICM inducing culture, an ~2-fold elevation in spectral counts vs. the control was seen for the SecA translocation ATPase, the preprotein translocase SecY, SecD and SecF insertion components, and chaperonins DnaJ and DnaK, which act early in the assembly process. It is suggested that these factors accumulated with their nascent polypeptides, as putative assembly intermediates in a functionally arrested state. Since in Synechocystis PCC 6803, a link has been established between Chl delivery involving the high-light HilD protein and the SecY/YidC-requiring cotranslational insertion of nascent polypeptides, such a connection between BChl biosynthesis and insertion and folding of nascent Rba. sphaeroides BChl binding proteins is likely to also occur. AFM imaging studies of the formation of the reaction center (RC)-light harvesting 1 (LH1) complex suggested a cooperative assembly mechanism in which, following the association between the RC template and the initial LH1 unit, addition of successive LH1 units to the RC drives the assembly process to completion. Alterations in membrane dynamics as the developing membrane becomes filled with LH2-rings were assessed by fluorescence induction/relaxation kinetics, which showed a slowing in RC electron transfer rate thought to mainly reflect alterations in donor side electron transfer. This was attributed to an increased distance for electron flow in cytochrome c2 between the RC and cytochrome bc1 complexes, as suggested in the current structural models. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic

  10. In vitro assessment of gastrointestinal viability of two photosynthetic bacteria, Rhodopseudomonas palustris and Rhodobacter sphaeroides *

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xu-xia; Pan, Yuan-jiang; Wang, Yan-bo; Li, Wei-fen

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the potential of two photosynthetic bacteria (PSB), Rhodopseudomonas palustris HZ0301 and Rhodobacter sphaeroides HZ0302, as probiotics in aquaculture. The viability of HZ0301 and HZ0302 in simulated gastric transit conditions (pH 2.0, pH 3.0 and pH 4.0 gastric juices) and in simulated small intestinal transit conditions (pH 8.0, with or without 0.3% bile salts) was tested. The effects of HZ0301 and HZ0302 on the viability and permeability of intestinal epithelial cell in primary culture of tilapias, Oreochromis nilotica, were also detected. All the treatments were determined with three replicates. The simulated gastric transit tolerance of HZ0301 and HZ0302 strains was pH-dependent and correspondingly showed lower viability at pH 2.0 after 180 min compared with pH 3.0 and pH 4.0. Both HZ0301 and HZ0302 were tolerant to simulated small intestine transit with or without bile salts in our research. Moreover, there was no significant difference (P>0.05) among three treatments including the control and the groups treated with HZ0301 or HZ0302 both in intestinal epithelial cell viability and membrane permeability, showing no cell damage. In summary, this study demonstrated that HZ0301 and HZ0302 had high capacity of upper gastrointestinal transit tolerance and were relatively safe for intestinal epithelial cells of tilapias. PMID:17726751

  11. Organic carbon recovery and photosynthetic bacteria population in an anaerobic membrane photo-bioreactor treating food processing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chitapornpan, S; Chiemchaisri, C; Chiemchaisri, W; Honda, R; Yamamoto, K

    2013-08-01

    Purple non-sulfur bacteria (PNSB) were cultivated by food industry wastewater in the anaerobic membrane photo-bioreactor. Organic removal and biomass production and characteristics were accomplished via an explicit examination of the long term performance of the photo-bioreactor fed with real wastewater. With the support of infra-red light transmitting filter, PNSB could survive and maintain in the system even under the continual fluctuations of influent wastewater characteristics. The average BOD and COD removal efficiencies were found at the moderate range of 51% and 58%, respectively. Observed photosynthetic biomass yield was 0.6g dried solid/g BOD with crude protein content of 0.41 g/g dried solid. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoretic analysis (DGGE) and 16S rDNA sequencing revealed the presence of Rhodopseudomonas palustris and significant changes in the photosynthetic bacterial community within the system. PMID:23489563

  12. Communication: Coherences observed in vivo in photosynthetic bacteria using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, Peter D.; Norris, Graham J.; Wang, Cheng; Viswanathan, Subha; Singh, Ved P.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Energy transfer through large disordered antenna networks in photosynthetic organisms can occur with a quantum efficiency of nearly 100%. This energy transfer is facilitated by the electronic structure of the photosynthetic antennae as well as interactions between electronic states and the surrounding environment. Coherences in time-domain spectroscopy provide a fine probe of how a system interacts with its surroundings. In two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, coherences can appear on both the ground and excited state surfaces revealing detailed information regarding electronic structure, system-bath coupling, energy transfer, and energetic coupling in complex chemical systems. Numerous studies have revealed coherences in isolated photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, but these coherences have not been observed in vivo due to the small amplitude of these signals and the intense scatter from whole cells. Here, we present data acquired using ultrafast video-acquisition gradient-assisted photon echo spectroscopy to observe quantum beating signals from coherences in vivo. Experiments were conducted on isolated light harvesting complex II (LH2) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, whole cells of R. sphaeroides, and whole cells of R. sphaeroides grown in 30% deuterated media. A vibronic coherence was observed following laser excitation at ambient temperature between the B850 and the B850∗ states of LH2 in each of the 3 samples with a lifetime of ∼40-60 fs. PMID:26373989

  13. Communication: Coherences observed in vivo in photosynthetic bacteria using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlberg, Peter D.; Norris, Graham J.; Wang, Cheng; Viswanathan, Subha; Singh, Ved P.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2015-09-01

    Energy transfer through large disordered antenna networks in photosynthetic organisms can occur with a quantum efficiency of nearly 100%. This energy transfer is facilitated by the electronic structure of the photosynthetic antennae as well as interactions between electronic states and the surrounding environment. Coherences in time-domain spectroscopy provide a fine probe of how a system interacts with its surroundings. In two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, coherences can appear on both the ground and excited state surfaces revealing detailed information regarding electronic structure, system-bath coupling, energy transfer, and energetic coupling in complex chemical systems. Numerous studies have revealed coherences in isolated photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, but these coherences have not been observed in vivo due to the small amplitude of these signals and the intense scatter from whole cells. Here, we present data acquired using ultrafast video-acquisition gradient-assisted photon echo spectroscopy to observe quantum beating signals from coherences in vivo. Experiments were conducted on isolated light harvesting complex II (LH2) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, whole cells of R. sphaeroides, and whole cells of R. sphaeroides grown in 30% deuterated media. A vibronic coherence was observed following laser excitation at ambient temperature between the B850 and the B850∗ states of LH2 in each of the 3 samples with a lifetime of ˜40-60 fs.

  14. Communication: Coherences observed in vivo in photosynthetic bacteria using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlberg, Peter D.; Norris, Graham J.; Wang, Cheng; Viswanathan, Subha; Singh, Ved P.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2015-09-14

    Energy transfer through large disordered antenna networks in photosynthetic organisms can occur with a quantum efficiency of nearly 100%. This energy transfer is facilitated by the electronic structure of the photosynthetic antennae as well as interactions between electronic states and the surrounding environment. Coherences in time-domain spectroscopy provide a fine probe of how a system interacts with its surroundings. In two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, coherences can appear on both the ground and excited state surfaces revealing detailed information regarding electronic structure, system-bath coupling, energy transfer, and energetic coupling in complex chemical systems. Numerous studies have revealed coherences in isolated photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, but these coherences have not been observed in vivo due to the small amplitude of these signals and the intense scatter from whole cells. Here, we present data acquired using ultrafast video-acquisition gradient-assisted photon echo spectroscopy to observe quantum beating signals from coherences in vivo. Experiments were conducted on isolated light harvesting complex II (LH2) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, whole cells of R. sphaeroides, and whole cells of R. sphaeroides grown in 30% deuterated media. A vibronic coherence was observed following laser excitation at ambient temperature between the B850 and the B850{sup ∗} states of LH2 in each of the 3 samples with a lifetime of ∼40-60 fs.

  15. Kinetic development and evaluation of membrane sequencing batch reactor (MSBR) with mixed cultures photosynthetic bacteria for dairy wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Kaewsuk, Jutamas; Thorasampan, Worachat; Thanuttamavong, Monthon; Seo, Gyu Tae

    2010-05-01

    This experimental study was conducted to evaluate a membrane sequencing batch reactor (MSBR) with mixed culture photosynthetic bacteria for dairy wastewater treatment. The study was undertaken in two steps: laboratory and pilot scale experiments. In the first step, kinetics analysis of the MSBR was carried out in a laboratory scale experiment with influent COD concentration of 2500 mg/L. The pilot scale experiment was conducted to investigate the performance of the MSBR and checked the suitability of the kinetics for an engineering design. The kinetic coefficients K(s), k, k(d), Y and mu(m) were found to be 174-mg-COD/L, 7.42/d, 0.1383/d, 0.2281/d and 1.69/d, respectively. There were some deviations of COD removal efficiency between the design value and the actual value. From the kinetics estimation, COD effluent from the design was 27 mg/L while the average actual COD effluent from the experiment was 149 mg/L. Due to the different light source condition, the factors relating to light energy (i.e. L(f) and IR(%)) must be incorporated into engineering design and performance prediction with these kinetic coefficients of the photosynthetic MSBR. PMID:20149520

  16. Lasers-an effective artificial source of radiation for the cultivation of anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bertling, K; Hurse, T J; Kappler, U; Rakić, A D

    2006-06-01

    The laser diode (LD) is a unique light source that can efficiently produce all radiant energy within the narrow wavelength range used most effectively by a photosynthetic microorganism. We have investigated the use of a single type of LD for the cultivation of the well-studied anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter capsulatus (Rb. capsulatus). An array of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) was driven with a current of 25 mA, and delivered radiation at 860 nm with 0.4 nm linewidth. The emitted light was found to be a suitable source of radiant energy for the cultivation of Rb. capsulatus. The dependence of growth rate on incident irradiance was quantified. Despite the unusual nearly monochromatic light source used in these experiments, no significant changes in the pigment composition and in the distribution of bacteriochlorophyll between LHII and LHI-RC were detected in bacterial cells transferred from incandescent light to laser light. We were also able to show that to achieve a given growth rate in a light-limited culture, the VCSEL required only 30% of the electricity needed by an incandescent bulb, which is of great significance for the potential use of laser-devices in biotechnological applications and photobioreactor construction. PMID:16514675

  17. Separation of bacteriochlorophyll homologues from green photosynthetic sulfur bacteria by reversed-phase HPLC.

    PubMed

    Borrego, C M; Garcia-Gil, L J

    1994-07-01

    A reversed-phase High Performance Liquid Cromatography (HPLC) method has been developed to accurately separate bacteriochlorophyllsc, d ande homologues in a reasonably short run time of 60 minutes. By using this method, two well-defined groups of bacteriochlorophyll homologue peaks can be discriminated. The first one consists of 4 peaks (min 24 to 30), which corresponds to the four main farnesyl homologues. The second peak subset is formed by a cluster of up to 10 minor peaks (min 33 to 40). These peaks can be related with series of several alcohol esters of the different chlorosome chlorophylls. The number of homologues was, however, quite variable depending on both, the bacteriochlorophyll and the bacterial species. The method hereby described, also provides a good separation of other photosynthetic pigments, either bacterial (Bacteriochlorophylla, chlorobactene, isorenieratene and okenone) or algal ones (Chlorophylla, Pheophytina and β-carotene). A preliminary screening of the homologue composition of several green photosynthetic bacterial species and isolates, has revealed different relative quantitative patterns. These differences seem to be related to physiological aspects rather than to taxonomic ones. The application of the method to the study of natural populations avoids the typical drawbacks on the pigment identification of overlapping eukaryotic and prokaryotic phototrophic microorganisms, giving further information about their physiological status. PMID:24310022

  18. Isolation of Aerobic Anoxygenic Photosynthetic Bacteria from Black Smoker Plume Waters of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Yurkov, Vladimir; Beatty, J. Thomas

    1998-01-01

    A strain of the aerobic anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria was isolated from a deep-ocean hydrothermal vent plume environment. The in vivo absorption spectra of cells indicate the presence of bacteriochlorophyll a incorporated into light-harvesting complex I and a reaction center. The general morphological and physiological characteristics of this new isolate are described. PMID:16349490

  19. Inter-and intraspecific variation in excited-state triplet energy transfer rates in reaction centers of photosynthetic bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Laible, P. D.; Morris, Z. S.; Thurnauer, M. C.; Schiffer, M.; Hanson, D. K.

    2003-08-01

    In protein-cofactor reaction center (RC) complexes of purple photosynthetic bacteria, the major role of the bound carotenoid (C) is to quench the triplet state formed on the primary electron donor (P) before its sensitization of the excited singlet state of molecular oxygen from its ground triplet state. This triplet energy is transferred from P to C via the bacteriochlorophyll monomer B{sub B}. Using time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (TREPR), we have examined the temperature dependence of the rates of this triplet energy transfer reaction in the RC of three wild-type species of purple nonsulfur bacteria. Species-specific differences in the rate of transfer were observed. Wild-type Rhodobacter capsulatus RCs were less efficient at the triplet transfer reaction than Rhodobacter sphaeroides RCs, but were more efficient than Rhodospirillum rubrum RCs. In addition, RCs from three mutant strains of R. capsulatus carrying substitutions of amino acids near P and B{sub B} were examined. Two of the mutant RCs showed decreased triplet transfer rates compared with wild-type RCs, whereas one of the mutant RCs demonstrated a slight increase in triplet transfer rate at low temperatures. The results show that site-specific changes within the RC of R. capsulatus can mimic interspecies differences in the rates of triplet energy transfer. This application of TREPR was instrumental in defining critical energetic and coupling factors that dictate the efficiency of this photoprotective process.

  20. Simple and Versatile Turbidimetric Monitoring of Bacterial Growth in Liquid Cultures Using a Customized 3D Printed Culture Tube Holder and a Miniaturized Spectrophotometer: Application to Facultative and Strictly Anaerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Margarida R. G.; Marques, Sara; Cabrita, Ana R. J.; Wallace, R. John; Thompson, Gertrude; Fonseca, António J. M.; Oliveira, Hugo M.

    2016-01-01

    Here we introduce a novel strategy for turbidimetric monitoring of bacterial growth in liquid culture. The instrumentation comprises a light source, a customized 3D printed culture tube holder and a miniaturized spectrophotometer, connected through optical cables. Due to its small footprint and the possibility to operate with external light, bacterial growth was directly monitored from culture tubes in a simple and versatile fashion. This new portable measurement technique was used to monitor the growth of facultative (Escherichia coli ATCC/25922, and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC/29213) and strictly (Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens JW11, Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus P18, and Propionibacterium acnes DSMZ 1897) anaerobic bacteria. For E. coli and S. aureus, the growth rates calculated from normalized optical density values were compared with those ones obtained using a benchtop spectrophotometer without significant differences (P = 0.256). For the strictly anaerobic species, a high precision (relative standard deviation < 3.5%) was observed between replicates up to 48 h. Regarding its potential for customization, this manifold could accommodate further developments for customized turbidimetric monitoring, such as the use of light-emitting diodes as a light source or flow cells.

  1. Biodesalination: a case study for applications of photosynthetic bacteria in water treatment.

    PubMed

    Amezaga, Jaime M; Amtmann, Anna; Biggs, Catherine A; Bond, Tom; Gandy, Catherine J; Honsbein, Annegret; Karunakaran, Esther; Lawton, Linda; Madsen, Mary Ann; Minas, Konstantinos; Templeton, Michael R

    2014-04-01

    Shortage of freshwater is a serious problem in many regions worldwide, and is expected to become even more urgent over the next decades as a result of increased demand for food production and adverse effects of climate change. Vast water resources in the oceans can only be tapped into if sustainable, energy-efficient technologies for desalination are developed. Energization of desalination by sunlight through photosynthetic organisms offers a potential opportunity to exploit biological processes for this purpose. Cyanobacterial cultures in particular can generate a large biomass in brackish and seawater, thereby forming a low-salt reservoir within the saline water. The latter could be used as an ion exchanger through manipulation of transport proteins in the cell membrane. In this article, we use the example of biodesalination as a vehicle to review the availability of tools and methods for the exploitation of cyanobacteria in water biotechnology. Issues discussed relate to strain selection, environmental factors, genetic manipulation, ion transport, cell-water separation, process design, safety, and public acceptance. PMID:24610748

  2. Biodesalination: A Case Study for Applications of Photosynthetic Bacteria in Water Treatment1[C

    PubMed Central

    Amezaga, Jaime M.; Amtmann, Anna; Biggs, Catherine A.; Bond, Tom; Gandy, Catherine J.; Honsbein, Annegret; Karunakaran, Esther; Lawton, Linda; Madsen, Mary Ann; Minas, Konstantinos; Templeton, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Shortage of freshwater is a serious problem in many regions worldwide, and is expected to become even more urgent over the next decades as a result of increased demand for food production and adverse effects of climate change. Vast water resources in the oceans can only be tapped into if sustainable, energy-efficient technologies for desalination are developed. Energization of desalination by sunlight through photosynthetic organisms offers a potential opportunity to exploit biological processes for this purpose. Cyanobacterial cultures in particular can generate a large biomass in brackish and seawater, thereby forming a low-salt reservoir within the saline water. The latter could be used as an ion exchanger through manipulation of transport proteins in the cell membrane. In this article, we use the example of biodesalination as a vehicle to review the availability of tools and methods for the exploitation of cyanobacteria in water biotechnology. Issues discussed relate to strain selection, environmental factors, genetic manipulation, ion transport, cell-water separation, process design, safety, and public acceptance. PMID:24610748

  3. Effects of oxidants and reductants on the efficiency of excitation transfer in green photosynthetic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.; Brune, D. C.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    The efficiency of energy transfer in chlorosome antennas in the green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium vibrioforme and Chlorobium limicola was found to be highly sensitive to the redox potential of the suspension. Energy transfer efficiencies were measured by comparing the absorption spectrum of the bacteriochlorophyll c or d pigments in the chlorosome to the excitation spectrum for fluorescence arising from the chlorosome baseplate and membrane-bound antenna complexes. The efficiency of energy transfer approaches 100% at low redox potentials induced by addition of sodium dithionite or other strong reductants, and is lowered to 10-20% under aerobic conditions or after addition of a variety of membrane-permeable oxidizing agents. The redox effect on energy transfer is observed in whole cells, isolated membranes and purified chlorosomes, indicating that the modulation of energy transfer efficiency arises within the antenna complexes and is not directly mediated by the redox state of the reaction center. It is proposed that chlorosomes contain a component that acts as a highly quenching center in its oxidized state, but is an inefficient quencher when reduced by endogenous or exogenous reductants. This effect may be a control mechanism that prevents cellular damage resulting from reaction of oxygen with reduced low-potential electron acceptors found in the green sulfur bacteria. The redox modulation effect is not observed in the green gliding bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus, which contains chlorosomes but does not contain low-potential electron acceptors.

  4. Effect of soil salinity and nutrient levels on the community structure of the root-associated bacteria of the facultative halophyte, Tamarix ramosissima, in southwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Takeshi; Imada, Shogo; Acharya, Kumud; Iwanaga, Fumiko; Yamanaka, Norikazu

    2015-01-01

    Tamarix ramosissima is a tree species that is highly resistant to salt and drought. The Tamarix species survives in a broad range of environmental salt levels, and invades major river systems in southwestern United States. It may affect root-associated bacteria (RB) by increasing soil salts and nutrients. The effects of RB on host plants may vary even under saline conditions, and the relationship may be important for T. ramosissima. However, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no reports relating to T. ramosissima RB and its association with salinity and nutrient levels. In this study, we have examined this association and the effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization of T. ramosissima on RB because a previous study has reported that colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi affected the rhizobacterial community (Marschner et al., 2001). T. ramosissima roots were collected from five locations with varying soil salinity and nutrient levels. RB community structures were examined by terminal restriction fragment (T-RF) length polymorphism, cloning, and sequencing analyses. The results suggest that RB richness, or the diversity of T. ramosissima, have significant negative relationships with electrical conductivity (EC), sodium concentration (Na), and the colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, but have a significant positive relationship with phosphorus in the soil. However, at each T-RF level, positive correlations between the emergence of some T-RFs and EC or Na were observed. These results indicate that high salinity decreased the total number of RB species, but some saline-tolerant RB species multiplied with increasing salinity levels. The ordination scores of nonmetric multidimensional scale analysis of RB community composition show significant relationships with water content, calcium concentration, available phosphorus, and total nitrogen. These results indicate that the RB diversity and community composition of T. ramosissima are affected

  5. Redox regulation of energy transfer efficiency in antennas of green photosynthetic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, R. E.; Cheng, P.; Causgrove, T. P.; Brune, D. C.; Wang, J.

    1993-01-01

    The efficiency of energy transfer from the peripheral chlorosome antenna structure to the membrane-bound antenna in green sulfur bacteria depends strongly on the redox potential of the medium. The fluorescence spectra and lifetimes indicate that efficient quenching pathways are induced in the chlorosome at high redox potential. The midpoint redox potential for the induction of this effect in isolated chlorosomes from Chlorobium vibrioforme is -146 mV at pH 7 (vs the normal hydrogen electrode), and the observed midpoint potential (n = 1) decreases by 60 mV per pH unit over the pH range 7-10. Extraction of isolated chlorosomes with hexane has little effect on the redox-induced quenching, indicating that the component(s) responsible for this effect are bound and not readily extractable. We have purified and partially characterized the trimeric water-soluble bacteriochlorophyll a-containing protein from the thermophilic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum. This protein is located between the chlorosome and the membrane. Fluorescence spectra of the purified protein indicate that it also contains groups that quench excitations at high redox potential. The results indicate that the energy transfer pathway in green sulfur bacteria is regulated by redox potential. This regulation appears to operate in at least two distinct places in the energy transfer pathway, the oligomeric pigments in the interior of the chlorosome and in the bacteriochlorophyll a protein. The regulatory effect may serve to protect the cell against superoxide-induced damage when oxygen is present. By quenching excitations before they reach the reaction center, reduction and subsequent autooxidation of the low potential electron acceptors found in these organisms is avoided.

  6. The two last overviews by Colin Allen Wraight (1945-2014) on energy conversion in photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Maróti, Péter; Govindjee

    2016-02-01

    Colin Allen Wraight (1945-2014) was a well-known biophysicist and biochemist of our times-formerly Professor of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Plant Biology, and Head of the Department of Biochemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA. (See a detailed Tribute to him by Govindjee et al., Photosynth Res, 2015.) During the latter part of his life, Colin had (1) given an excellent lecture in 2008 on the overall topic of the molecular mechanisms in biological energy conversion, focusing on how an ubiquinone is reduced to ubiquinol at the so-called "two electron gate", and (2) presented a review poster on the design features of long distance proton transport in biological systems, with focus on photosynthetic bacteria (a pdf file of the original is available from one of us, Govindjee). We present here for historical purpose, a complete transcript of his 2008 lecture and his 2013 poster, which have been annotated and expanded by the authors of this paper. The major theme is: electron and proton transfer in biological systems, with emphasis on bacterial reaction centers. The figures, some of which were prepared by us, are presented in sequence for both the lecture and the poster. A common bibliography is provided at the end of the paper, which is divided into two parts: (I) The Lecture; and (II) The Poster. PMID:26216496

  7. Growth of Facultatively Heterofermentative Lactobacilli on Starter Cell Suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Rapposch, S.; Eliskases-Lechner, F.; Ginzinger, W.

    1999-01-01

    The growth of facultatively heterofermentative lactobacilli (FHL) on cell suspensions of the homofermentative Lactobacillus helveticus was investigated. Osmotic lysis of L. helveticus led to a significant increase of ribose. It decreased steadily in parallel with the growth of FHL, strongly suggesting that the bacteria used ribose as a growth substrate. PMID:10584024

  8. Chirality-Based Signatures of Local Protein Environments in Two-Dimensional Optical Spectroscopy of Two Species Photosynthetic Complexes of Green Sulfur Bacteria: Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Voronine, Dmitri V.; Abramavicius, Darius; Mukamel, Shaul

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional electronic chirality-induced signals of excitons in the photosynthetic Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex from two species of green sulfur bacteria (Chlorobium tepidum and Prosthecochloris aestuarii) are compared. The spectra are predicted to provide sensitive probes of local protein environment of the constituent bacteriochlorophyll a chromophores and reflect electronic structure variations (site energies and couplings) of the two complexes. Pulse polarization configurations are designed that can separate the coherent and incoherent exciton dynamics contributions to the two-dimensional spectra. PMID:18676650

  9. Facultative crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants: powerful tools for unravelling the functional elements of CAM photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Winter, Klaus; Holtum, Joseph A M

    2014-07-01

    Facultative crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) describes the optional use of CAM photosynthesis, typically under conditions of drought stress, in plants that otherwise employ C3 or C4 photosynthesis. In its cleanest form, the upregulation of CAM is fully reversible upon removal of stress. Reversibility distinguishes facultative CAM from ontogenetically programmed unidirectional C3-to-CAM shifts inherent in constitutive CAM plants. Using mainly measurements of 24h CO2 exchange, defining features of facultative CAM are highlighted in five terrestrial species, Clusia pratensis, Calandrinia polyandra, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, Portulaca oleracea and Talinum triangulare. For these, we provide detailed chronologies of the shifts between photosynthetic modes and comment on their usefulness as experimental systems. Photosynthetic flexibility is also reviewed in an aquatic CAM plant, Isoetes howellii. Through comparisons of C3 and CAM states in facultative CAM species, many fundamental biochemical principles of the CAM pathway have been uncovered. Facultative CAM species will be of even greater relevance now that new sequencing technologies facilitate the mapping of genomes and tracking of the expression patterns of multiple genes. These technologies and facultative CAM systems, when joined, are expected to contribute in a major way towards our goal of understanding the essence of CAM. PMID:24642847

  10. Structure and Excitation Transfer Pathways in the Chlorophyll-Carotenoid Aggregate of the Photosynthetic Unit of Purple Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulten, Klaus

    1998-03-01

    The absorption of light by light harvesting complexes and transfer of electronic excitation to the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) has been investigated on the basis of an atomic level model of the so-called photosynthetic unit of the photosynthetic bacterium Rb. sphaeroides. The photosynthetic unit combines in the intracytoplasmic membrane a nanometric (20-100 nm) assembly of three protein complexes: (i) the photosynthetic reaction center, (ii) a ring-shaped light harvesting complex LH-I, and (iii) multiple copies of a similar complex, LH-II. The unit has been modeled using the known structure of LH-II of Rs. molischianum. The lecture describes in detail the organization of chromophores involved in primary light absorption and excitation transfer: a hierarchy of ring-shaped chlorophyl aggregates with attached carotenoids. A quantum-mechanical description of the entire light harvesting process is developed employing electron structure calculations of individual and aggregated chlorophylls and carotenoids and associated effective Hamiltonian descriptions. The transfer times calculated, ranging between 100 fs and 100 ps for various processes, are found in close agreement with measured transfer rates. The results suggest that excitons are the key carriers of the excitation transfered. The photoprotection of chlorophylls by chlorophylls through triplet excitation transfer is also described.

  11. Self-assembly of natural light-harvesting bacteriochlorophylls of green sulfur photosynthetic bacteria in silicate capsules as stable models of chlorosomes.

    PubMed

    Saga, Yoshitaka; Akai, Sho; Miyatake, Tomohiro; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2006-01-01

    Naturally occurring bacteriochlorophyll(BChl)s-c, -d, and -e from green sulfur photosynthetic bacteria were self-assembled in an aqueous solution in the presence of octadecyltriethoxysilane and tetraethoxysilane, followed by polycondensation of the alkoxysilanes by incubation for 50 h at 25 degrees C. The resulting BChl self-assemblies in silicate capsules exhibited visible absorption and circular dichroism spectra similar to the corresponding natural light-harvesting systems (chlorosomes) of green sulfur bacteria. Dynamic light scattering measurements indicated that the silicate capsules had an average hydrodynamic diameter of several hundred nanometers. BChl self-aggregates in silicate capsules were significantly stable to a nonionic surfactant Triton X-100, which was apt to decompose the BChl aggregates to their monomeric form, compared with conventional micelle systems. BChls in silicate capsules were more tolerant to demetalation of the central magnesium under acidic conditions than the natural systems. PMID:16848406

  12. Effects of mass transfer and light intensity on substrate biological degradation by immobilized photosynthetic bacteria within an annular fiber-illuminating biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Huan; Zhang, Zhiping; Jiao, Youzhou; Zhang, Quanguo

    2014-02-01

    In this work, effects of mass transfer and light intensity on performance of substrate biodegradation by cell-immobilized photosynthetic bacteria were investigated within an annular fiber-illuminating bioreactor (AFIBR). In AFIBR, stable biofilm of photosynthetic bacteria was generated on the surface of side-glowing optical fiber to provide sufficient light supply and uniform light distribution in cell-immobilized zone for continuous substrate biodegradation during hydrogen production process. To optimize operation parameters for substrate degradation, a two-dimensional mass transfer model based on experimental data to describe coupled processes of substrate transfer and biodegradation in biofilm with substrate diffusion and convection in bulk flow region was proposed. Investigations on influences of substrate concentration, flow rate and light intensity were carried out. It was showed that the optimum operational parameters for the substrate degradation in the AFIBR are: 10g/l substrate concentration, 100ml/h flow rate and 3.1W/m(2) light intensity. PMID:24531266

  13. Oxygen dynamics in photosynthetic membranes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savikhin, Sergei; Kihara, Shigeharu

    2008-03-01

    Production of oxygen by oxygenic photosynthetic organisms is expected to raise oxygen concentration within their photosynthetic membranes above normal aerobic values. These raised levels of oxygen may affect function of many proteins within photosynthetic cells. However, experiments on proteins in vitro are usually performed in aerobic (or anaerobic) conditions since the oxygen content of a membrane is not known. Using theory of diffusion and measured oxygen production rates we estimated the excess levels of oxygen in functioning photosynthetic cells. We show that for an individual photosynthetic cell suspended in water oxygen level is essentially the same as that for a non-photosynthetic sell. These data suggest that oxygen protection mechanisms may have evolved after the development of oxygenic photosynthesis in primitive bacteria and was driven by the overall rise of oxygen concentration in the atmosphere. Substantially higher levels of oxygen are estimated to occur in closely packed colonies of photosynthetic bacteria and in green leafs.

  14. Bio-nanocomposite Photoelectrode Composed of the Bacteria Photosynthetic Reaction Center Entrapped on a Nanocrystalline TiO2 Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yidong; Liu, Yuan; Xu, Jingjing; Xu, Chunhe; Liu, Baohong; Kong, Jilie

    2005-01-01

    A new kind of bio-nanocomposite photoelectrode was fabricated through direct immobilization of the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center (RC) proteins on a nanocrystalline TiO2 matrix prepared by anodic electrodeposition. The near-infrared (NIR)-visible absorption and fluorescence emission spectra displayed that structure and activity of the RC remained unaltered on the nano-TiO2 film surface. High efficient light-harvesting of the NIR light energy by RC contributed to the distinct enhancement of the photoelectric conversion on such nanoporous matrix, which would provide a new strategy to develop versatile biomimic energy convertors or photoelectric sensors.

  15. B800-B850 coherence correlates with energy transfer rates in the LH2 complex of photosynthetic purple bacteria.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Cathal; Oblinsky, Daniel G; Scholes, Gregory D

    2015-12-14

    Until recently, no analytical measure of many-body delocalization in open systems had been developed, yet such a measure enables characterization of how molecular excitons delocalize in photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes, and in turn helps us understand quantum coherent aspects of electronic energy transfer. In this paper we apply these measures to a model peripheral light-harvesting complex, LH2 from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila. We find how many chromophores collectively contribute to the "delocalization length" of an excitation within LH2 and how the coherent delocalization is distributed spatially. We also investigate to what extent this delocalization length is effective, by examining the impact of bipartite and multipartite entanglement in inter-ring energy transfer in LH2. PMID:25797525

  16. The human gut and groundwater harbor non-photosynthetic bacteria belonging to a new candidate phylum sibling to Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Di Rienzi, Sara C; Sharon, Itai; Wrighton, Kelly C; Koren, Omry; Hug, Laura A; Thomas, Brian C; Goodrich, Julia K; Bell, Jordana T; Spector, Timothy D; Banfield, Jillian F; Ley, Ruth E

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria were responsible for the oxygenation of the ancient atmosphere; however, the evolution of this phylum is enigmatic, as relatives have not been characterized. Here we use whole genome reconstruction of human fecal and subsurface aquifer metagenomic samples to obtain complete genomes for members of a new candidate phylum sibling to Cyanobacteria, for which we propose the designation ‘Melainabacteria’. Metabolic analysis suggests that the ancestors to both lineages were non-photosynthetic, anaerobic, motile, and obligately fermentative. Cyanobacterial light sensing may have been facilitated by regulators present in the ancestor of these lineages. The subsurface organism has the capacity for nitrogen fixation using a nitrogenase distinct from that in Cyanobacteria, suggesting nitrogen fixation evolved separately in the two lineages. We hypothesize that Cyanobacteria split from Melainabacteria prior or due to the acquisition of oxygenic photosynthesis. Melainabacteria remained in anoxic zones and differentiated by niche adaptation, including for symbiosis in the mammalian gut. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01102.001 PMID:24137540

  17. Genomic Analysis of Melioribacter roseus, Facultatively Anaerobic Organotrophic Bacterium Representing a Novel Deep Lineage within Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi Group

    PubMed Central

    Kadnikov, Vitaly V.; Mardanov, Andrey V.; Podosokorskaya, Olga A.; Gavrilov, Sergey N.; Kublanov, Ilya V.; Beletsky, Alexey V.; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A.; Ravin, Nikolai V.

    2013-01-01

    Melioribacter roseus is a moderately thermophilic facultatively anaerobic organotrophic bacterium representing a novel deep branch within Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group. To better understand the metabolic capabilities and possible ecological functions of M. roseus and get insights into the evolutionary history of this bacterial lineage, we sequenced the genome of the type strain P3M-2T. A total of 2838 open reading frames was predicted from its 3.30 Mb genome. The whole proteome analysis supported phylum-level classification of M. roseus since most of the predicted proteins had closest matches in Bacteriodetes, Proteobacteria, Chlorobi, Firmicutes and deeply-branching bacterium Caldithrix abyssi, rather than in one particular phylum. Consistent with the ability of the bacterium to grow on complex carbohydrates, the genome analysis revealed more than one hundred glycoside hydrolases, glycoside transferases, polysaccharide lyases and carbohydrate esterases. The reconstructed central metabolism revealed pathways enabling the fermentation of complex organic substrates, as well as their complete oxidation through aerobic and anaerobic respiration. Genes encoding the photosynthetic and nitrogen-fixation machinery of green sulfur bacteria, as well as key enzymes of autotrophic carbon fixation pathways, were not identified. The M. roseus genome supports its affiliation to a novel phylum Ignavibateriae, representing the first step on the evolutionary pathway from heterotrophic ancestors of Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group towards anaerobic photoautotrophic Chlorobi. PMID:23301019

  18. Facultative cheating supports the coexistence of diverse quorum-sensing alleles

    PubMed Central

    Pollak, Shaul; Omer-Bendori, Shira; Even-Tov, Eran; Lipsman, Valeria; Bareia, Tasneem; Ben-Zion, Ishay; Eldar, Avigdor

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing enables bacteria to cooperate in a density-dependent manner via the group-wide secretion and detection of specific autoinducer molecules. Many bacterial species show high intraspecific diversity of autoinducer–receptor alleles, called pherotypes. The autoinducer produced by one pherotype activates its coencoded receptor, but not the receptor of another pherotype. It is unclear what selection forces drive the maintenance of pherotype diversity. Here, we use the ComQXPA system of Bacillus subtilis as a model system, to show that pherotype diversity can be maintained by facultative cheating—a minority pherotype exploits the majority, but resumes cooperation when its frequency increases. We find that the maintenance of multiple pherotypes by facultative cheating can persist under kin-selection conditions that select against “obligate cheaters” quorum-sensing response null mutants. Our results therefore support a role for facultative cheating and kin selection in the evolution of quorum-sensing diversity. PMID:26787913

  19. Crassulacean acid metabolism and fitness under water deficit stress: if not for carbon gain, what is facultative CAM good for?

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Ana

    2009-01-01

    Background In obligate Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), up to 99 % of CO2 assimilation occurs during the night, therefore supporting the hypothesis that CAM is adaptive because it allows CO2 fixation during the part of the day with lower evaporative demand, making life in water-limited environments possible. By comparison, in facultative CAM (inducible CAM, C3-CAM) and CAM-cycling plants drought-induced dark CO2 fixation may only be, with few exceptions, a small proportion of C3 CO2 assimilation in watered plants and occur during a few days. From the viewpoint of survival the adaptive advantages, i.e. increased fitness, of facultative CAM and CAM-cycling are not obvious. Therefore, it is hypothesized that, if it is to increase fitness, CAM must aid in reproduction. Scope An examination of published reports of 23 facultative CAM and CAM-cycling species finds that, in 19 species, drought-induced dark CO2 fixation represents on average 11 % of C3 CO2 assimilation of watered plants. Evidence is discussed on the impact of the operation of CAM in facultative and CAM-cycling plants on their survival – carbon balance, water conservation, water absorption, photo-protection of the photosynthetic apparatus – and reproductive effort. It is concluded that in some species, but not all, facultative and cycling CAM contribute, rather than to increase carbon balance, to increase water-use efficiency, water absorption, prevention of photoinhibition and reproductive output. PMID:18708641

  20. 46 CFR 308.544 - Facultative binder, Form MA-315.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Facultative binder, Form MA-315. 308.544 Section 308.544 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Facultative War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.544 Facultative binder, Form...

  1. 46 CFR 308.544 - Facultative binder, Form MA-315.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Facultative binder, Form MA-315. 308.544 Section 308.544 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Iii-Facultative War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.544 Facultative binder, Form...

  2. 46 CFR 308.544 - Facultative binder, Form MA-315.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Facultative binder, Form MA-315. 308.544 Section 308.544 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Iii-Facultative War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.544 Facultative binder, Form...

  3. 46 CFR 308.544 - Facultative binder, Form MA-315.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Facultative binder, Form MA-315. 308.544 Section 308.544 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Iii-Facultative War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.544 Facultative binder, Form...

  4. 46 CFR 308.544 - Facultative binder, Form MA-315.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Facultative binder, Form MA-315. 308.544 Section 308.544 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Cargo Insurance Iii-Facultative War Risk Cargo Insurance § 308.544 Facultative binder, Form...

  5. Protein structure, electron transfer and evolution of prokaryotic photosynthetic reaction centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers from a variety of organisms have been isolated and characterized. The groups of prokaryotic photosynthetic organisms include the purple bacteria, the filamentous green bacteria, the green sulfur bacteria and the heliobacteria as anoxygenic representatives as well as the cyanobacteria and prochlorophytes as oxygenic representatives. This review focuses on structural and functional comparisons of the various groups of photosynthetic reaction centers and considers possible evolutionary scenarios to explain the diversity of existing photosynthetic organisms.

  6. Hydrogen production by photosynthetic microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Akano, T.; Fukatsu, K.; Miyasaka, H. |

    1996-12-31

    Hydrogen is a clean energy alternative to the fossil fuels, the main source of greenhouse gas emissions. We developed a stable system for the conversion of solar energy into hydrogen using photosynthetic microorganisms. Our system consists of the following three stages: (1) Photosynthetic starch accumulation in green microalgae (400 L x2); (2) Dark anaerobic fermentation of the algal starch biomass to produce hydrogen and organic compounds (155 L x2); and (3) Further conversion of the organic compounds to produce hydrogen using photosynthetic bacteria (three types of reactors, parallel plate, raceway, and tubular). We constructed a test plant of this process at Nankoh power plant of Kansai Electric Power Company in Osaka, Japan, and carried out a series of tests using CO{sub 2} obtained from a chemical absorption pilot-plant. The photobiological hydrogen production process used a combination of a marine alga, Chlamydomonas sp. MGA 161 and marine photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodopseudomonas sp. W-1S. The dark anaerobic fermentation of algal starch biomass was also investigated. Sustained and stable starch accumulation, starch degradation in the algal cell, and hydrogen production from algal fermentation and photosynthetic bacteria in the light were demonstrated during several experiments. 3 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Iron, Sulfur, Arsenic and Water: Geochemical Implications of Facultative Anoxygenic Photosynthesis in Cyanobacteria and the Slow Rise of Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe-Simon, F.; Johnston, D. T.; Girguis, P. R.; Pearson, A.; Knoll, A. H.

    2008-12-01

    Over geologic time, the global rise in atmospheric oxygen (O2) is attributed to the evolution and wide spread proliferation of oxygenic photosynthesis in cyanobacteria. However, cyanobacteria maintain a metabolic flexibility that may not always result in O2 release. Specifically, cyanobacteria can use a variety of alternative electron donors, rather than water, that are also readily oxidized. These may include sulfur, iron, and arsenic. Cyanobacteria are thus not uniquely constrained towards O2 production. Changes in the bioavailability of these key elements may have had dramatic consequences for and resulted in the slow accumulation of O2 in the atmosphere. In particular, by using facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis the cells maintain advantageous anaerobic conditions for N2-fixation. Although other types of bacteria are capable of N2-fixation, cyanobacteria singularly possess the dynamic capability of generating and surviving O2. These two processes "pull" the cells in opposite directions, metabolically speaking, around an aerobic-anaerobic continuum. Such a strategy also confers a distinct competitive advantage for cyanobacteria over photosynthetic eukaryotes, as they can endure widespread euxinia and maintain their cellular N quota. In an anoxic and/or sulfidic ocean, cyanobacteria would be expected to dominate over eukaryotic algae. Here we present Bayesian constructed phylogenetic distribution of specific genes and the metabolic role of key enzymes that form the basis of this hypothesis. We further suggest that the consequences of this proposed ecosystem structure altered the redox balance of the fluid Earth (atmosphere and oceans) and can help explain the observed long-term geochemical stasis and slow rates of eukaryotic diversification. We suggest that the underlying control for global oxygenation was a synergistic interplay between the evolution and elastic physiology of cyanobacteria as they impacted the redox state of early Earth.

  8. High Efficiency Light Harvesting by Carotenoids in the LH2 Complex from Photosynthetic Bacteria: Unique Adaptation to Growth under Low-Light Conditions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopin, rhodopinal, and their glucoside derivatives are carotenoids that accumulate in different amounts in the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodoblastus (Rbl.) acidophilus strain 7050, depending on the intensity of the light under which the organism is grown. The different growth conditions also have a profound effect on the spectra of the bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) pigments that assemble in the major LH2 light-harvesting pigment–protein complex. Under high-light conditions the well-characterized B800-850 LH2 complex is formed and accumulates rhodopin and rhodopin glucoside as the primary carotenoids. Under low-light conditions, a variant LH2, denoted B800-820, is formed, and rhodopinal and rhodopinal glucoside are the most abundant carotenoids. The present investigation compares and contrasts the spectral properties and dynamics of the excited states of rhodopin and rhodopinal in solution. In addition, the systematic differences in pigment composition and structure of the chromophores in the LH2 complexes provide an opportunity to explore the effect of these factors on the rate and efficiency of carotenoid-to-BChl energy transfer. It is found that the enzymatic conversion of rhodopin to rhodopinal by Rbl. acidophilus 7050 grown under low-light conditions results in nearly 100% carotenoid-to-BChl energy transfer efficiency in the LH2 complex. This comparative analysis provides insight into how photosynthetic systems are able to adapt and survive under challenging environmental conditions. PMID:25171303

  9. On the biphoton excitation of the fluorescence of the bacteriochlorophyll molecules of purple photosynthetic bacteria by powerful near IR femto-picosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, A. Yu.

    2011-11-01

    The authors of a number of experimental works detected nonresonance biphoton excitation of bacteriochlorophyll molecules, which represent the main pigment in the light-absorbing natural "antenna" complexes of photosynthesizing purple bacteria, by femtosecond IR pulses (1250-1500 nm). They believe that IR quanta excite hypothetic forbidden levels of the pigments of these bacteria in the double frequency range 625-750 nm. We propose and ground an alternative triplet mechanism to describe this phenomenon. According to our hypothesis, the mechanism of biphoton excitation of molecules by IR quanta can manifest itself specifically, through high triplet levels of molecules in the high fields induced by femtosecond-picosecond laser pulses.

  10. On the biphoton excitation of the fluorescence of the bacteriochlorophyll molecules of purple photosynthetic bacteria by powerful near IR femto-picosecond pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, A. Yu.

    2011-11-15

    The authors of a number of experimental works detected nonresonance biphoton excitation of bacteriochlorophyll molecules, which represent the main pigment in the light-absorbing natural 'antenna' complexes of photosynthesizing purple bacteria, by femtosecond IR pulses (1250-1500 nm). They believe that IR quanta excite hypothetic forbidden levels of the pigments of these bacteria in the double frequency range 625-750 nm. We propose and ground an alternative triplet mechanism to describe this phenomenon. According to our hypothesis, the mechanism of biphoton excitation of molecules by IR quanta can manifest itself specifically, through high triplet levels of molecules in the high fields induced by femtosecond-picosecond laser pulses.

  11. Worldwide populations of APHIS CRACCIVORA have diverse facultative bacterial symbionts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Facultative bacterial endosymbionts can play an important role in the evolutionary trajectory of their hosts. Aphids are infected with a wide variety of facultative endosymbionts that can confer ecologically relevant traits, which in turn may drive microevolution in a dynamic selective environment....

  12. Endozoicomonas Are Specific, Facultative Symbionts of Sea Squirts

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Lars; Kjeldsen, Kasper U.; Funch, Peter; Jensen, Jeppe; Obst, Matthias; López-Legentil, Susanna; Schramm, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Ascidians are marine filter feeders and harbor diverse microbiota that can exhibit a high degree of host-specificity. Pharyngeal samples of Scandinavian and Mediterranean ascidians were screened for consistently associated bacteria by culture-dependent and -independent approaches. Representatives of the Endozoicomonas (Gammaproteobacteria, Hahellaceae) clade were detected in the ascidian species Ascidiella aspersa, Ascidiella scabra, Botryllus schlosseri, Ciona intestinalis, Styela clava, and multiple Ascidia/Ascidiella spp. In total, Endozoicomonas was detected in more than half of all specimens screened, and in 25–100% of the specimens for each species. The retrieved Endozoicomonas 16S rRNA gene sequences formed an ascidian-specific subclade, whose members were detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as extracellular microcolonies in the pharynx. Two strains of the ascidian-specific Endozoicomonas subclade were isolated in pure culture and characterized. Both strains are chemoorganoheterotrophs and grow on mucin (a mucus glycoprotein). The strains tested negative for cytotoxic or antibacterial activity. Based on these observations, we propose ascidian-associated Endozoicomonas to be commensals, living off the mucus continuously secreted into the pharynx. Members of the ascidian-specific Endozoicomonas subclade were also detected in seawater from the Scandinavian sampling site, which suggests acquisition of the symbionts by horizontal transmission. The combined results indicate a host-specific, yet facultative symbiosis between ascidians and Endozoicomonas. PMID:27462299

  13. Endozoicomonas Are Specific, Facultative Symbionts of Sea Squirts.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Lars; Kjeldsen, Kasper U; Funch, Peter; Jensen, Jeppe; Obst, Matthias; López-Legentil, Susanna; Schramm, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Ascidians are marine filter feeders and harbor diverse microbiota that can exhibit a high degree of host-specificity. Pharyngeal samples of Scandinavian and Mediterranean ascidians were screened for consistently associated bacteria by culture-dependent and -independent approaches. Representatives of the Endozoicomonas (Gammaproteobacteria, Hahellaceae) clade were detected in the ascidian species Ascidiella aspersa, Ascidiella scabra, Botryllus schlosseri, Ciona intestinalis, Styela clava, and multiple Ascidia/Ascidiella spp. In total, Endozoicomonas was detected in more than half of all specimens screened, and in 25-100% of the specimens for each species. The retrieved Endozoicomonas 16S rRNA gene sequences formed an ascidian-specific subclade, whose members were detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as extracellular microcolonies in the pharynx. Two strains of the ascidian-specific Endozoicomonas subclade were isolated in pure culture and characterized. Both strains are chemoorganoheterotrophs and grow on mucin (a mucus glycoprotein). The strains tested negative for cytotoxic or antibacterial activity. Based on these observations, we propose ascidian-associated Endozoicomonas to be commensals, living off the mucus continuously secreted into the pharynx. Members of the ascidian-specific Endozoicomonas subclade were also detected in seawater from the Scandinavian sampling site, which suggests acquisition of the symbionts by horizontal transmission. The combined results indicate a host-specific, yet facultative symbiosis between ascidians and Endozoicomonas. PMID:27462299

  14. Evolution and Diversity of Facultative Symbionts from the Aphid Subfamily Lachninae▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Gaelen R.; Normark, Benjamin B.; Favret, Colin; Moran, Nancy A.

    2009-01-01

    Many aphids harbor a variety of endosymbiotic bacteria. The functions of these symbionts can range from an obligate nutritional role to a facultative role in protecting their hosts against environmental stresses. One such symbiont is “Candidatus Serratia symbiotica,” which is involved in defense against heat and potentially also in aphid nutrition. Lachnid aphids have been the focus of several recent studies investigating the transition of this symbiont from a facultative symbiont to an obligate symbiont. In a phylogenetic analysis of Serratia symbionts from 51 lachnid hosts, we found that diversity in symbiont morphology, distribution, and function is due to multiple independent origins of symbiosis from ancestors belonging to Serratia and possibly also to evolution within distinct symbiont clades. Our results do not support cocladogenesis of “Ca. Serratia symbiotica” with Cinara subgenus Cinara species and weigh against an obligate nutritional role. Finally, we show that species belonging to the subfamily Lachninae have a high incidence of facultative symbiont infection. PMID:19542349

  15. Genome characteristics of facultatively symbiotic Frankia sp. strains reflect host range and host plant biogeography.

    PubMed

    Normand, Philippe; Lapierre, Pascal; Tisa, Louis S; Gogarten, Johann Peter; Alloisio, Nicole; Bagnarol, Emilie; Bassi, Carla A; Berry, Alison M; Bickhart, Derek M; Choisne, Nathalie; Couloux, Arnaud; Cournoyer, Benoit; Cruveiller, Stephane; Daubin, Vincent; Demange, Nadia; Francino, Maria Pilar; Goltsman, Eugene; Huang, Ying; Kopp, Olga R; Labarre, Laurent; Lapidus, Alla; Lavire, Celine; Marechal, Joelle; Martinez, Michele; Mastronunzio, Juliana E; Mullin, Beth C; Niemann, James; Pujic, Pierre; Rawnsley, Tania; Rouy, Zoe; Schenowitz, Chantal; Sellstedt, Anita; Tavares, Fernando; Tomkins, Jeffrey P; Vallenet, David; Valverde, Claudio; Wall, Luis G; Wang, Ying; Medigue, Claudine; Benson, David R

    2007-01-01

    Soil bacteria that also form mutualistic symbioses in plants encounter two major levels of selection. One occurs during adaptation to and survival in soil, and the other occurs in concert with host plant speciation and adaptation. Actinobacteria from the genus Frankia are facultative symbionts that form N(2)-fixing root nodules on diverse and globally distributed angiosperms in the "actinorhizal" symbioses. Three closely related clades of Frankia sp. strains are recognized; members of each clade infect a subset of plants from among eight angiosperm families. We sequenced the genomes from three strains; their sizes varied from 5.43 Mbp for a narrow host range strain (Frankia sp. strain HFPCcI3) to 7.50 Mbp for a medium host range strain (Frankia alni strain ACN14a) to 9.04 Mbp for a broad host range strain (Frankia sp. strain EAN1pec.) This size divergence is the largest yet reported for such closely related soil bacteria (97.8%-98.9% identity of 16S rRNA genes). The extent of gene deletion, duplication, and acquisition is in concert with the biogeographic history of the symbioses and host plant speciation. Host plant isolation favored genome contraction, whereas host plant diversification favored genome expansion. The results support the idea that major genome expansions as well as reductions can occur in facultative symbiotic soil bacteria as they respond to new environments in the context of their symbioses. PMID:17151343

  16. Facultative parthenogenesis discovered in wild vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Warren; Smith, Charles F.; Eskridge, Pamela H.; Hoss, Shannon K.; Mendelson, Joseph R.; Schuett, Gordon W.

    2012-01-01

    Facultative parthenogenesis (FP)—asexual reproduction by bisexual species—has been documented in a variety of multi-cellular organisms but only recently in snakes, varanid lizards, birds and sharks. Unlike the approximately 80 taxa of unisexual reptiles, amphibians and fishes that exist in nature, FP has yet to be documented in the wild. Based on captive documentation, it appears that FP is widespread in squamate reptiles (snakes, lizards and amphisbaenians), and its occurrence in nature seems inevitable, yet the task of detecting FP in wild individuals has been deemed formidable. Here we show, using microsatellite DNA genotyping and litter characteristics, the first cases of FP in wild-collected pregnant females and their offspring of two closely related species of North American pitviper snakes—the copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) and cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus). Our findings support the view that non-hybrid origins of parthenogenesis, such as FP, are more common in squamates than previously thought. With this confirmation, FP can no longer be viewed as a rare curiosity outside the mainstream of vertebrate evolution. Future research on FP in squamate reptiles related to proximate control of induction, reproductive competence of parthenogens and population genetics modelling is warranted. PMID:22977071

  17. A method for estimation of permittivity in photosynthetic membranes and the effect of permittivity on the photosynthetic quantum yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, A. Yu.

    2013-02-01

    A new method for estimation of the internal permittivity of photosynthetic membranes is based on joint analysis of the optical data with high spectral resolution and precise X-ray data. The permittivity of the bacteriochlorophyll-containing membranes of purple bacteria ranges from 1.62 to 1.75. The relatively low permittivity of photosynthetic organisms provides a significant increase in the efficiency of energy migration from multiple antenna chlorophylls to reaction centers and photosynthetic efficiency in general.

  18. Photosynthetic reaction center complexes from heliobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trost, J. T.; Vermaas, W. F. J.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers are pigment-protein complexes that are responsible for the transduction of light energy into chemical energy. Considerable evidence indicates that photosynthetic organisms were present very early in the evolution of life on Earth. The goal of this project is to understand the early evolutionary development of photosynthesis by examining the properties of reaction centers isolated from certain contemporary organisms that appear to contain the simplest photosynthetic reaction centers. The major focus is on the family of newly discovered strictly anaerobic photosynthetic organisms that are grouped with the gram-positive phylum of bacteria. The properties of these reactions centers suggest that they may be the descendants of an ancestor that also gave rise to Photosystem 1 found in oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms. Photoactive reaction center-core antenna complexes were isolated from the photosynthetic bacteria, Heliobacillus mobilis and Heliobacterium gestii, by extraction of membranes with Deriphat 160C followed by differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Other aspects of this investigation are briefly discussed.

  19. Antibacterial susceptibility of plaque bacteria.

    PubMed

    Newman, M G; Hulem, C; Colgate, J; Anselmo, C

    1979-07-01

    Selected anaerobic, capnophilic and facultative bacteria isolated from patients with various forms of periodontal health and disease were tested for their susceptibility to antibiotics and antimicrobial agents. Specific bactericidal and minimum inhibitory concentrations were compared to disc zone diameters, thereby generating new standards for the potential selection of antimicrobial agents. PMID:286720

  20. A Rapid Method for the Extraction and Analysis of Carotenoids and Other Hydrophobic Substances Suitable for Systems Biology Studies with Photosynthetic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bóna-Lovász, Judit; Bóna, Aron; Ederer, Michael; Sawodny, Oliver; Ghosh, Robin

    2013-01-01

    A simple, rapid, and inexpensive extraction method for carotenoids and other non-polar compounds present in phototrophic bacteria has been developed. The method, which has been extensively tested on the phototrophic purple non-sulphur bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum, is suitable for extracting large numbers of samples, which is common in systems biology studies, and yields material suitable for subsequent analysis using HPLC and mass spectroscopy. The procedure is particularly suitable for carotenoids and other terpenoids, including quinones, bacteriochlorophyll a and bacteriopheophytin a, and is also useful for the analysis of polar phospholipids. The extraction procedure requires only a single step extraction with a hexane/methanol/water mixture, followed by HPLC using a Spherisorb C18 column, with a mobile phase consisting of acetone-water and a non-linear gradient of 50%–100% acetone. The method was employed for examining the carotenoid composition observed during microaerophilic growth of R. rubrum strains, and was able to determine 18 carotenoids, 4 isoprenoid-quinones, bacteriochlorophyll a and bacteriopheophytin a as well as four different phosphatidylglycerol species of different acyl chain compositions. The analytical procedure was used to examine the dynamics of carotenoid biosynthesis in the major and minor pathways operating simultaneously in a carotenoid biosynthesis mutant of R. rubrum. PMID:24958257

  1. Compartmental model for organic matter digestion in facultative ponds.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, E; Garzón, A

    2002-01-01

    A model has been developed for the digestion of organic matter in facultative ponds in tropical regions. Complete mixing has been assumed for the aerobic and anaerobic compartments. Settling, aerobic layer oxidation, and anaerobic layer methanogenesis are the main processes for organic matter removal in the water column. Exchange processes between layers are dispersive or soluble exchange, solubilization and transport of organic matter from sediments to water column are also taken into account. Degradation of organic matter in the sediments produces gaseous emissions to the water column. The exchange between bubbles ascending and the water column was measured. The model was calibrated with data obtained from a pilot facultative pond built in Muña Reservoir in Bogotá. The pond was sampled during 4 months to compare data between its water hyacinth covered section and uncovered section. The results clearly show the relative importance of different BOD removal processes in facultative ponds and suggest modifications to further improve performance. The results from the model suggest that internal loadings to facultative ponds due to solubilization and return of organic matter from the sediments to the aerobic layer greatly influence the soluble BOD effluent concentration. Aerobic degradation activity in the facultative pond does not affect significantly the effluent concentration. Anaerobic degradation activity in the facultative pond can more easily achieve increases in the removal efficiencies of BOD. PMID:11833730

  2. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Enteric Gram Negative Facultative Anaerobe Bacilli in Aerobic versus Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Amachawadi, Raghavendra G.; Renter, David G.; Volkova, Victoriya V.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial treatments result in the host’s enteric bacteria being exposed to the antimicrobials. Pharmacodynamic models can describe how this exposure affects the enteric bacteria and their antimicrobial resistance. The models utilize measurements of bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility traditionally obtained in vitro in aerobic conditions. However, in vivo enteric bacteria are exposed to antimicrobials in anaerobic conditions of the lower intestine. Some of enteric bacteria of food animals are potential foodborne pathogens, e.g., Gram-negative bacilli Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. These are facultative anaerobes; their physiology and growth rates change in anaerobic conditions. We hypothesized that their antimicrobial susceptibility also changes, and evaluated differences in the susceptibility in aerobic vs. anaerobic conditions of generic E. coli and Salmonella enterica of diverse serovars isolated from cattle feces. Susceptibility of an isolate was evaluated as its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measured by E-Test® following 24 hours of adaptation to the conditions on Mueller-Hinton agar, and on a more complex tryptic soy agar with 5% sheep blood (BAP) media. We considered all major antimicrobial drug classes used in the U.S. to treat cattle: β-lactams (specifically, ampicillin and ceftriaxone E-Test®), aminoglycosides (gentamicin and kanamycin), fluoroquinolones (enrofloxacin), classical macrolides (erythromycin), azalides (azithromycin), sulfanomides (sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim), and tetracyclines (tetracycline). Statistical analyses were conducted for the isolates (n≥30) interpreted as susceptible to the antimicrobials based on the clinical breakpoint interpretation for human infection. Bacterial susceptibility to every antimicrobial tested was statistically significantly different in anaerobic vs. aerobic conditions on both media, except for no difference in susceptibility to ceftriaxone on BAP agar. A satellite experiment

  3. Conditional Reduction of Predation Risk Associated with a Facultative Symbiont in an Insect

    PubMed Central

    Polin, Sarah; Le Gallic, Jean-François; Simon, Jean-Christophe; Tsuchida, Tsutomu; Outreman, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    Symbionts are widespread among eukaryotes and their impacts on the ecology and evolution of their hosts are meaningful. Most insects harbour obligate and facultative symbiotic bacteria that can influence their phenotype. In the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, an astounding symbiotic-mediated phenotype has been recently observed: when infected with the symbiotic bacteria Rickettsiella viridis, young red aphid larvae become greener at adulthood and even darker green when co-infected with Rickettsiella viridis and Hamiltonella defensa. As body colour affects the susceptibility towards natural enemies in aphids, the influence of the colour change due to these facultative symbionts on the host survival in presence of predators was tested. Our results suggested that the Rickettsiella viridis infection may impact positively host survival by reducing predation risk. Due to results from uninfected aphids (i.e., more green ones attacked), the main assumption is that this symbiotic infection would deter the predatory ladybird feeding by reducing the profitability of their hosts rather than decreasing host detection through body colour change. Aphids co-infected with Rickettsiella viridis and Hamiltonella defensa were, however, more exposed to predation suggesting an ecological cost associated with multiple infections. The underlying mechanisms and ecological consequences of these symbiotic effects are discussed. PMID:26618776

  4. Conditional Reduction of Predation Risk Associated with a Facultative Symbiont in an Insect.

    PubMed

    Polin, Sarah; Le Gallic, Jean-François; Simon, Jean-Christophe; Tsuchida, Tsutomu; Outreman, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    Symbionts are widespread among eukaryotes and their impacts on the ecology and evolution of their hosts are meaningful. Most insects harbour obligate and facultative symbiotic bacteria that can influence their phenotype. In the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, an astounding symbiotic-mediated phenotype has been recently observed: when infected with the symbiotic bacteria Rickettsiella viridis, young red aphid larvae become greener at adulthood and even darker green when co-infected with Rickettsiella viridis and Hamiltonella defensa. As body colour affects the susceptibility towards natural enemies in aphids, the influence of the colour change due to these facultative symbionts on the host survival in presence of predators was tested. Our results suggested that the Rickettsiella viridis infection may impact positively host survival by reducing predation risk. Due to results from uninfected aphids (i.e., more green ones attacked), the main assumption is that this symbiotic infection would deter the predatory ladybird feeding by reducing the profitability of their hosts rather than decreasing host detection through body colour change. Aphids co-infected with Rickettsiella viridis and Hamiltonella defensa were, however, more exposed to predation suggesting an ecological cost associated with multiple infections. The underlying mechanisms and ecological consequences of these symbiotic effects are discussed. PMID:26618776

  5. Diapause and maintenance of facultative sexual reproductive strategies.

    PubMed

    Stelzer, Claus-Peter; Lehtonen, Jussi

    2016-10-19

    Facultative sex combines sexual and asexual reproduction in the same individual (or clone) and allows for a large diversity of life-history patterns regarding the timing, frequency and intensity of sexual episodes. In addition, other life-history traits such as a diapause stage may become linked to sex. Here, we develop a matrix modelling framework for addressing the cost of sex in facultative sexuals, in constant, periodic and stochastically fluctuating environments. The model is parametrized using life-history data from Brachionus calyciflorus, a facultative sexual rotifer in which sex and diapause are linked. Sexual propensity was an important driver of costs in constant environments, in which high costs (always > onefold, and sometimes > twofold) indicated that asexuals should outcompete facultative sexuals. By contrast, stochastic environments with high temporal autocorrelation favoured facultative sex over obligate asex, in particular, if the penalty to fecundity in 'bad' environments was large. In such environments, obligate asexuals were constrained by their life cycle length (i.e. time from birth to last reproductive adult age class), which determined an upper limit to the number of consecutive bad periods they could tolerate. Nevertheless, when facultative asexuals with different sexual propensities competed simultaneously against each other and asex, the lowest sex propensity was the most successful in stochastic environments with positive autocorrelation. Our results suggest that a highly specific mechanism (i.e. diapause linked to sex) can alone stabilize facultative sex in these animals, and protect it from invasion of both asexual and pure sexual strategies.This article is part of the themed issue 'Weird sex: the underappreciated diversity of sexual reproduction'. PMID:27619700

  6. Sulfate-reducing bacteria and their activities in cyanobacterial mats of solar lake (Sinai, Egypt).

    PubMed

    Teske, A; Ramsing, N B; Habicht, K; Fukui, M; Küver, J; Jørgensen, B B; Cohen, Y

    1998-08-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacteria within the surface layer of the hypersaline cyanobacterial mat of Solar Lake (Sinai, Egypt) were investigated with combined microbiological, molecular, and biogeochemical approaches. The diurnally oxic surface layer contained between 10(6) and 10(7) cultivable sulfate-reducing bacteria ml-1 and showed sulfate reduction rates between 1,000 and 2, 200 nmol ml-1 day-1, both in the same range as and sometimes higher than those in anaerobic deeper mat layers. In the oxic surface layer and in the mat layers below, filamentous sulfate-reducing Desulfonema bacteria were found in variable densities of 10(4) to 10(6) cells ml-1. A Desulfonema-related, diurnally migrating bacterium was detected with PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis within and below the oxic surface layer. Facultative aerobic respiration, filamentous morphology, motility, diurnal migration, and aggregate formation were the most conspicuous adaptations of Solar Lake sulfate-reducing bacteria to the mat matrix and to diurnal oxygen stress. A comparison of sulfate reduction rates within the mat and previously published photosynthesis rates showed that CO2 from sulfate reduction in the upper 5 mm accounted for 7 to 8% of the total photosynthetic CO2 demand of the mat. PMID:9687455

  7. Facultative thermogenesis during brooding is not the norm among pythons.

    PubMed

    Brashears, Jake; DeNardo, Dale F

    2015-08-01

    Facultative thermogenesis is often attributed to pythons in general despite limited comparative data available for the family. While all species within Pythonidae brood their eggs, only two species are known to produce heat to enhance embryonic thermal regulation. By contrast, a few python species have been reported to have insignificant thermogenic capabilities. To provide insight into potential phylogenetic, morphological, and ecological factors influencing thermogenic capability among pythons, we measured metabolic rates and clutch-environment temperature differentials at two environmental temperatures-python preferred brooding temperature (31.5 °C) and a sub-optimal temperature (25.5 °C)-in six species of pythons, including members of two major phylogenetic branches currently devoid of data on the subject. We found no evidence of facultative thermogenesis in five species: Aspidites melanocephalus, A. ramsayi, Morelia viridis, M. spilota cheynei, and Python regius. However, we found that Bothrochilus boa had a thermal metabolic sensitivity indicative of facultative thermogenesis (i.e., a higher metabolic rate at the lower temperature). However, its metabolic rate was quite low and technical challenges prevented us from measuring temperature differential to make conclusions about facultative endothermy in this species. Regardless, our data combined with existing literature demonstrate that facultative thermogenesis is not as widespread among pythons as previously thought. PMID:26113382

  8. Two host clades, two bacterial arsenals: evolution through gene losses in facultative endosymbionts.

    PubMed

    Rollat-Farnier, Pierre-Antoine; Santos-Garcia, Diego; Rao, Qiong; Sagot, Marie-France; Silva, Francisco J; Henri, Hélène; Zchori-Fein, Einat; Latorre, Amparo; Moya, Andrés; Barbe, Valérie; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Vavre, Fabrice; Mouton, Laurence

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial endosymbiosis is an important evolutionary process in insects, which can harbor both obligate and facultative symbionts. The evolution of these symbionts is driven by evolutionary convergence, and they exhibit among the tiniest genomes in prokaryotes. The large host spectrum of facultative symbionts and the high diversity of strategies they use to infect new hosts probably impact the evolution of their genome and explain why they undergo less severe genomic erosion than obligate symbionts. Candidatus Hamiltonella defensa is suitable for the investigation of the genomic evolution of facultative symbionts because the bacteria are engaged in specific relationships in two clades of insects. In aphids, H. defensa is found in several species with an intermediate prevalence and confers protection against parasitoids. In whiteflies, H. defensa is almost fixed in some species of Bemisia tabaci, which suggests an important role of and a transition toward obligate symbiosis. In this study, comparisons of the genome of H. defensa present in two B. tabaci species (Middle East Asia Minor 1 and Mediterranean) and in the aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum revealed that they belong to two distinct clades and underwent specific gene losses. In aphids, it contains highly virulent factors that could allow protection and horizontal transfers. In whiteflies, the genome lost these factors and seems to have a limited ability to acquire genes. However it contains genes that could be involved in the production of essential nutrients, which is consistent with a primordial role for this symbiont. In conclusion, although both lineages of H. defensa have mutualistic interactions with their hosts, their genomes follow distinct evolutionary trajectories that reflect their phenotype and could have important consequences on their evolvability. PMID:25714744

  9. Parotitis due to anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Matlow, A; Korentager, R; Keystone, E; Bohnen, J

    1988-01-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus remains the pathogen most commonly implicated in acute suppurative parotitis, the pathogenic role of gram-negative facultative anaerobic bacteria and strict anaerobic organisms in this disease is becoming increasingly recognized. This report describes a case of parotitis due to Bacteroides disiens in an elderly woman with Sjögren's syndrome. Literature reports on seven additional cases of suppurative parotitis due to anaerobic bacteria are reviewed. Initial therapy of acute suppurative parotitis should include coverage for S. aureus and, in a very ill patient, coverage of gram-negative facultative organisms with antibiotics such as cloxacillin and an aminoglycoside. A failure to respond clinically to such a regimen or isolation of anaerobic bacteria should lead to the consideration of the addition of clindamycin or penicillin. PMID:3287567

  10. (Carbon monoxide metabolism by photosynthetic bacteria)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Research continued on the metabolism of carbon monoxide by Rhodospirillum rubrum. This report discusses progress on the activity, induction, inhibition, and spectroscopic analysis of the enzyme Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase. (CBS)

  11. The Facultative Symbiont Rickettsia Protects an Invasive Whitefly against Entomopathogenic Pseudomonas syringae Strains

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Martha S.; Baltrus, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Facultative endosymbionts can benefit insect hosts in a variety of ways, including context-dependent roles, such as providing defense against pathogens. The role of some symbionts in defense may be overlooked, however, when pathogen infection is transient, sporadic, or asymptomatic. The facultative endosymbiont Rickettsia increases the fitness of the sweet potato whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) in some populations through mechanisms that are not yet understood. In this study, we investigated the role of Rickettsia in mediating the interaction between the sweet potato whitefly and Pseudomonas syringae, a common environmental bacterium, some strains of which are pathogenic to aphids. Our results show that P. syringae multiplies within whiteflies, leading to host death, and that whiteflies infected with Rickettsia show a decreased rate of death due to P. syringae. Experiments using plants coated with P. syringae confirmed that whiteflies can acquire the bacteria at a low rate while feeding, leading to increased mortality, particularly when the whiteflies are not infected with Rickettsia. These results suggest that P. syringae may affect whitefly populations in nature and that Rickettsia can ameliorate this effect. This study highlights the possible importance of interactions among opportunistic environmental pathogens and endosymbionts of insects. PMID:25217020

  12. Facultative Lagoons. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Lorri

    The textual material for a unit on facultative lagoons is presented in this student manual. Topic areas discussed include: (1) loading; (2) microbial theory; (3) structure and design; (4) process control; (5) lagoon start-up; (6) data handling and analysis; (7) lagoon maintenance (considering visual observations, pond structure, safety, odor,…

  13. Facultative Lagoons. Instructor's Guide. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Lorri

    This instructor's guide contains materials needed to teach a two-lesson unit on the structure and components of facultative lagoons, the biological theory of their operation, and factors affecting their operation. Control testing recommendations, maintenance guidelines, and troubleshooting hints are also provided. These materials include: (1) an…

  14. Photosynthetic water splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1981-01-01

    The photosynthetic unit of hydrogen evolution, the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production, and hydrogenic photosynthesis are discussed in the section on previous work. Recent results are given on simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen, kinetic studies, microscopic marine algae-seaweeds, and oxygen profiles.

  15. Oxygen concentration inside a functioning photosynthetic cell.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Shigeharu; Hartzler, Daniel A; Savikhin, Sergei

    2014-05-01

    The excess oxygen concentration in the photosynthetic membranes of functioning oxygenic photosynthetic cells was estimated using classical diffusion theory combined with experimental data on oxygen production rates of cyanobacterial cells. The excess oxygen concentration within the plesiomorphic cyanobacterium Gloeobactor violaceus is only 0.025 μM, or four orders of magnitude lower than the oxygen concentration in air-saturated water. Such a low concentration suggests that the first oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria in solitary form could have evolved ∼2.8 billion years ago without special mechanisms to protect them against reactive oxygen species. These mechanisms instead could have been developed during the following ∼500 million years while the oxygen level in the Earth's atmosphere was slowly rising. Excess oxygen concentrations within individual cells of the apomorphic cyanobacteria Synechocystis and Synechococcus are 0.064 and 0.25 μM, respectively. These numbers suggest that intramembrane and intracellular proteins in isolated oxygenic photosynthetic cells are not subjected to excessively high oxygen levels. The situation is different for closely packed colonies of photosynthetic cells. Calculations show that the excess concentration within colonies that are ∼40 μm or larger in diameter can be comparable to the oxygen concentration in air-saturated water, suggesting that species forming colonies require protection against reactive oxygen species even in the absence of oxygen in the surrounding atmosphere. PMID:24806920

  16. Culturable Aerobic and Facultative Anaerobic Intestinal Bacterial Flora of Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) in Southern Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Junaid; Sagheer, Mehwish; Tabassum, Nazneen; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Using morphological analysis and biochemical testing, here for the first time, we determined the culturable gut bacterial flora (aerobes and facultative anaerobes) in the venomous Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) from South Asia. The findings revealed that these snakes inhabit potentially pathogenic bacteria including Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shewanella putrefaciens, Aeromonas hydrophila, Salmonella sp., Moraxella sp., Bacillus sp., Ochrobactrum anthropi, and Providencia rettgeri. These findings are of concern, as injury from snake bite can result in wound infections and tissue necrosis leading to sepsis/necrotizing fasciitis and/or expose consumers of snake meat/medicine in the community to infections. PMID:25002979

  17. Culturable Aerobic and Facultative Anaerobic Intestinal Bacterial Flora of Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) in Southern Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Junaid; Sagheer, Mehwish; Tabassum, Nazneen; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Using morphological analysis and biochemical testing, here for the first time, we determined the culturable gut bacterial flora (aerobes and facultative anaerobes) in the venomous Black Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis) from South Asia. The findings revealed that these snakes inhabit potentially pathogenic bacteria including Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shewanella putrefaciens, Aeromonas hydrophila, Salmonella sp., Moraxella sp., Bacillus sp., Ochrobactrum anthropi, and Providencia rettgeri. These findings are of concern, as injury from snake bite can result in wound infections and tissue necrosis leading to sepsis/necrotizing fasciitis and/or expose consumers of snake meat/medicine in the community to infections. PMID:25002979

  18. Diverse Bacteria Inhabit Living Hyphae of Phylogenetically Diverse Fungal Endophytes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Michele T.; Arnold, A. Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Both the establishment and outcomes of plant-fungus symbioses can be influenced by abiotic factors, the interplay of fungal and plant genotypes, and additional microbes associated with fungal mycelia. Recently bacterial endosymbionts were documented in soilborne Glomeromycota and Mucoromycotina and in at least one species each of mycorrhizal Basidiomycota and Ascomycota. Here we show for the first time that phylogenetically diverse endohyphal bacteria occur in living hyphae of diverse foliar endophytes, including representatives of four classes of Ascomycota. We examined 414 isolates of endophytic fungi, isolated from photosynthetic tissues of six species of cupressaceous trees in five biogeographic provinces, for endohyphal bacteria using microscopy and molecular techniques. Viable bacteria were observed within living hyphae of endophytic Pezizomycetes, Dothideomycetes, Eurotiomycetes, and Sordariomycetes from all tree species and biotic regions surveyed. A focus on 29 fungus/bacterium associations revealed that bacterial and fungal phylogenies were incongruent with each other and with taxonomic relationships of host plants. Overall, eight families and 15 distinct genotypes of endohyphal bacteria were recovered; most were members of the Proteobacteria, but a small number of Bacillaceae also were found, including one that appears to occur as an endophyte of plants. Frequent loss of bacteria following subculturing suggests a facultative association. Our study recovered distinct lineages of endohyphal bacteria relative to previous studies, is the first to document their occurrence in foliar endophytes representing four of the most species-rich classes of fungi, and highlights for the first time their diversity and phylogenetic relationships with regard both to the endophytes they inhabit and the plants in which these endophyte-bacterium symbiota occur. PMID:20435775

  19. Production of Value-added Products by Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are a group of facultative anaerobic, catalase negative, nonmotile and nonsporeforming–Gram positive bacteria. Most LAB utilize high energy C sources including monomer sugars to produce energy to maintain cellular structure and function. This anaerobic fermentation proce...

  20. Facultative to strict anaerobes ratio in the preterm infant microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Arboleya, Silvia; Solís, Gonzalo; Fernández, Nuria; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    During recent years there has been an increasing interest on the development of strategies for modulating the process of microbiota establishment in preterm infants. For successfully developing of such strategies, a detailed knowledge of the microbiota establishment process in these infants is needed. In a previous study we evidenced clear alterations in the process of microbiota establishment in preterm newborns when compared with a control group of full-term breast-fed infants. Here we have analyzed these data more in depth, corroborating a reduced proportion of strict anaerobes with respect to facultatives in the fecal microbiota of preterm infants. The potential benefits, as well as the side effects, of strategies aimed at counterbalancing this alteration in the facultative to strict anaerobes ratio are discussed in this addendum. PMID:22922559

  1. Parasitoids as vectors of facultative bacterial endosymbionts in aphids.

    PubMed

    Gehrer, Lukas; Vorburger, Christoph

    2012-08-23

    Heritable bacterial endosymbionts play an important role in aphid ecology. Sequence-based evidence suggests that facultative symbionts such as Hamiltonella defensa or Regiella insecticola also undergo horizontal transmission. Other than through male-to-female transfer during the sexual generation in autumn, the routes by which this occurs remain largely unknown. Here, we tested if parasitoids or ectoparasitic mites can act as vectors for horizontal transfer of facultative symbionts. Using symbiont-specific primers for diagnostic PCR, we demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that parasitoids can indeed transfer H. defensa and R. insecticola by sequentially stabbing infected and uninfected individuals of their host, Aphis fabae, establishing new, heritable infections. Thus, a natural route of horizontal symbiont transmission is also available during the many clonal generations of the aphid life cycle. No transmissions by ectoparasitic mites were observed, nor did parasitoids that emerged from symbiont-infected aphids transfer any symbionts in our experiments. PMID:22417790

  2. Evolutionary genetic consequences of facultative sex and outcrossing.

    PubMed

    Hartfield, M

    2016-01-01

    Explaining the selective forces that underlie different reproductive modes forms a major part of evolution research. Many organisms are facultative sexuals, with the ability to reproduce both sexually and asexually. Reduced sequencing costs means it is now possible to start investigating genome sequences of a wider number of these organisms in depth, but teasing apart the genetic forces underlying the maintenance of facultative sexual reproduction remains a challenge. An analogous problem exists when determining the genetic consequences of a degree of outcrossing (and recombination) in otherwise self-fertilizing organisms. Here, I provide an overview of existing research on the evolutionary basis behind different reproductive modes, with a focus on explaining the population genetic effects favouring low outcrossing rates in either partially selfing or asexual species. I review the outcomes that both self-fertilization and asexuality have on either purging deleterious mutations or fixing beneficial alleles, and what empirical data exist to support these theories. In particular, a greater application of mathematical models to genomic data has provided insight into the numerous effects that transitions to self-fertilization from outcrossing have on genetic architecture. Similar modelling approaches could be used to determine the forces shaping genetic diversity of facultative sexual species. Hence, a further unification of mathematical models with next-generation sequence data will prove important in exploring the genetic influences on reproductive system evolution. PMID:26431643

  3. Enhanced start-up of anaerobic facultatively autotrophic biocathodes in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Zaybak, Zehra; Pisciotta, John M; Tokash, Justin C; Logan, Bruce E

    2013-12-01

    Biocathodes in bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) can be used to convert CO2 into diverse organic compounds through a process called microbial electrosynthesis. Unfortunately, start-up of anaerobic biocathodes in BESs is a difficult and time consuming process. Here, a pre-enrichment method was developed to improve start-up of anaerobic facultatively autotrophic biocathodes capable of using cathodes as the electron donor (electrotrophs) and CO2 as the electron acceptor. Anaerobic enrichment of bacteria from freshwater bog sediment samples was first performed in batch cultures fed with glucose and then used to inoculate BES cathode chambers set at -0.4V (versus a standard hydrogen electrode; SHE). After two weeks of heterotrophic operation of BESs, CO2 was provided as the sole electron acceptor and carbon source. Consumption of electrons from cathodes increased gradually and was sustained for about two months in concert with a significant decrease in cathode chamber headspace CO2. The maximum current density consumed was -34 ± 4 mA/m(2). Biosynthesis resulted in organic compounds that included butanol, ethanol, acetate, propionate, butyrate, and hydrogen gas. Bacterial community analyses based on 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed Trichococcus palustris DSM 9172 (99% sequence identity) as the prevailing species in biocathode communities, followed by Oscillibacter sp. and Clostridium sp. Isolates from autotrophic cultivation were most closely related to Clostridium propionicum (99% sequence identity; ZZ16), Clostridium celerecrescens (98-99%; ZZ22, ZZ23), Desulfotomaculum sp. (97%; ZZ21), and Tissierella sp. (98%; ZZ25). This pre-enrichment procedure enables simplified start-up of anaerobic biocathodes for applications such as electrofuel production by facultatively autotrophic electrotrophs. PMID:24126154

  4. Rapid isolation of a facultative anaerobic electrochemically active bacterium capable of oxidizing acetate for electrogenesis and azo dyes reduction.

    PubMed

    Shen, Nan; Yuan, Shi-Jie; Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Song, Xiang-Ning; Li, Wen-Wei; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-05-01

    In this study, 27 strains of electrochemically active bacteria (EAB) were rapidly isolated and their capabilities of extracellular electron transfer were identified using a photometric method based on WO3 nanoclusters. These strains caused color change of WO3 from white to blue in a 24-well agar plate within 40 h. Most of the isolated EAB strains belonged to the genera of Aeromonas and Shewanella. One isolate, Pantoea agglomerans S5-44, was identified as an EAB that can utilize acetate as the carbon source to produce electricity and reduce azo dyes under anaerobic conditions. The results confirmed the capability of P. agglomerans S5-44 for extracellular electron transfer. The isolation of this acetate-utilizing, facultative EBA reveals the metabolic diversity of environmental bacteria. Such strains have great potential for environmental applications, especially at interfaces of aerobic and anaerobic environments, where acetate is the main available carbon source. PMID:24648142

  5. [ENTRY OF FACULTATIVE PATHOGEN SERRATIA GRIMESII INTO HELA CELLS. ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC ANALYSIS].

    PubMed

    Bozhokina, E S; Kever, L V; Komissarchik, Ya Yu; Khaitlina, S Yu; Efremova, T N

    2015-01-01

    Facultative pathogens Serratia grimesii are able to invade eukaryotic cells where they have been found in vacuoles and free in the cytoplasm (Efremova et al., 2001; Bozhokina et al., 2011). However, efficiency of this invasion is low, and the mechanisms of the invasion related to the initial steps of the process are not known. In the present study, we have increased the invasion efficiency by incubation of HeLa cells with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) preceding the infection. In the NAC-pretreated cells, two modes of S. grimesii to enter HeLa cells were observed. In the most cases, the penetration of S. grimesii into the cell was consistent with the "zipper mechanism", involving specific interaction of bacterial invasin with a host cell surface receptor. However, in some cases, bacteria were trapped by membrane ruffling probably produced by injected bacterial proteins that trigger the bacterial uptake process, as described in the "trigger mechanism". Further elucidation of bacterial and cellular factors involved in the bacteria-host cell interaction should clarify whether two different mechanisms or a predominant one operate during S. grimesii invasion. PMID:26863770

  6. Genomes of three facultatively symbiotic Frankia sp. strainsreflect host plant biogeography

    SciTech Connect

    Normand, Philippe; Lapierre, Pascal; Tisa, Louis S.; Gogarten, J.Peter; Alloisio, Nicole; Bagnarol, Emilie; Bassi, Carla A.; Berry,Alison; Bickhart, Derek M.; Choisne, Nathalie; Couloux, Arnaud; Cournoyer, Benoit; Cruveiller, Stephane; Daubin, Vincent; Demange, Nadia; Francino, M. Pilar; Ggoltsman, Eugene; Huang, Ying; Kopp, Olga; Labarre,Laurent; Lapidus, Alla; Lavire, Celine; Marechal, Joelle; Martinez,Michele; Mastronunzio, Juliana E.; Mullin, Beth; Niemann, James; Pujic,Pierre; Rawnsley, Tania; Rouy, Zoe; Schenowitz, Chantal; Sellstedt,Anita; Tavares, Fernando; Tomkins, Jeffrey P.; Vallenet, David; Valverde,Claudio; Wall, Luis; Wang, Ying; Medigue, Claudine; Benson, David R.

    2006-02-01

    Filamentous actinobacteria from the genus Frankia anddiverse woody trees and shrubs together form N2-fixing actinorhizal rootnodule symbioses that are a major source of new soil nitrogen in widelydiverse biomes 1. Three major clades of Frankia sp. strains are defined;each clade is associated with a defined subset of plants from among theeight actinorhizal plant families 2,3. The evolution arytrajectoriesfollowed by the ancestors of both symbionts leading to current patternsof symbiont compatibility are unknown. Here we show that the competingprocesses of genome expansion and contraction have operated in differentgroups of Frankia strains in a manner that can be related to thespeciation of the plant hosts and their geographic distribution. Wesequenced and compared the genomes from three Frankia sp. strains havingdifferent host plant specificities. The sizes of their genomes variedfrom 5.38 Mbp for a narrow host range strain (HFPCcI3) to 7.50Mbp for amedium host range strain (ACN14a) to 9.08 Mbp for a broad host rangestrain (EAN1pec.) This size divergence is the largest yet reported forsuch closely related bacteria. Since the order of divergence of thestrains is known, the extent of gene deletion, duplication andacquisition could be estimated and was found to be inconcert with thebiogeographic history of the symbioses. Host plant isolation favoredgenome contraction, whereas host plant diversification favored genomeexpansion. The results support the idea that major genome reductions aswell as expansions can occur in facultatively symbiotic soil bacteria asthey respond to new environments in the context of theirsymbioses.

  7. Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} fixation and energy production - microalgae as a main subject

    SciTech Connect

    Asada, Yasuo

    1993-12-31

    Research activities for application of microalgal photosynthesis to CO{sub 2} fixation in Japan are overviewed. Presenter`s studies on energy (hydrogen gas) production by cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) and photosynthetic bacteria are also introduced.

  8. Facultative parthenogenesis in a critically endangered wild vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Fields, Andrew T; Feldheim, Kevin A; Poulakis, Gregg R; Chapman, Demian D

    2015-06-01

    Facultative parthenogenesis - the ability of sexually reproducing species to sometimes produce offspring asexually - is known from a wide range of ordinarily sexually reproducing vertebrates in captivity, including some birds, reptiles and sharks [1-3]. Despite this, free-living parthenogens have never been observed in any of these taxa in the wild, although two free-living snakes were recently discovered each gestating a single parthenogen - one copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) and one cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus) [1]. Vertebrate parthenogens are characterized as being of the homogametic sex (e.g., females in sharks, males in birds) and by having elevated homozygosity compared to their mother [1-3], which may reduce their viability [4]. Although it is unknown if either of the parthenogenetic snakes would have been carried to term or survived in the wild, facultative parthenogenesis might have adaptive significance [1]. If this is true, it is reasonable to hypothesize that parthenogenesis would be found most often at low population density, when females risk reproductive failure because finding mates is difficult [5]. Here, we document the first examples of viable parthenogens living in a normally sexually reproducing wild vertebrate, the smalltooth sawfish (Pristis pectinata). We also provide a simple approach to screen any microsatellite DNA database for parthenogens, which will enable hypothesis-driven research on the significance of vertebrate parthenogenesis in the wild. PMID:26035783

  9. Mafia behaviour and the evolution of facultative virulence.

    PubMed

    Soler, J J; Møller, A P; Soler, M

    1998-04-01

    Some organisms enforce "maladaptive" behaviours on others of the same or different species by imposing costs in the absence of compliance. Such enforcement is used by the enforcer to obtain benefits in the possession of the enforced individual. This mechanism is known as mafia behaviour in humans, but may be widespread in parasite-host relationships in nature, from the cellular level to societies. In this paper we describe the evolution of such mafia mechanisms, and we propose a fuzzy logic model where the mafia mechanism is based on enforcement of hosts by exponentially increasing the cost of resistance to the parasite. The benefits of host resistance can be counteracted by parasite virulence, or even a decrease in response to an increment in its resistance. This parasite response to the host defence increment can be used for the parasite to teach the host that it is better to pay part of its benefits than increase its extremely costly defence. This model differs from others because it takes into account the evolution of host defence related to the evolution of parasite virulence (host-parasite coevolution) and points out an optimum in host defence related to the facultative virulence of the parasite. We provide several potential examples of facultative virulence depending on the antiparasite responses of hosts, and we suggest that this kind of mafia behaviour may be a widespread mechanism in biological processes at a number of different levels. PMID:9631567

  10. 46 CFR 308.545 - Facultative cargo policy, Form MA-316.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Facultative cargo policy, Form MA-316. 308.545 Section 308.545 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK... policy, Form MA-316. The standard form of War Risk Facultative Cargo Policy, Form MA-316, may be...

  11. 46 CFR 308.545 - Facultative cargo policy, Form MA-316.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Facultative cargo policy, Form MA-316. 308.545 Section 308.545 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK..., Form MA-316. The standard form of War Risk Facultative Cargo Policy, Form MA-316, may be obtained...

  12. 46 CFR 308.545 - Facultative cargo policy, Form MA-316.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Facultative cargo policy, Form MA-316. 308.545 Section 308.545 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK... policy, Form MA-316. The standard form of War Risk Facultative Cargo Policy, Form MA-316, may be...

  13. 46 CFR 308.545 - Facultative cargo policy, Form MA-316.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Facultative cargo policy, Form MA-316. 308.545 Section 308.545 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK... policy, Form MA-316. The standard form of War Risk Facultative Cargo Policy, Form MA-316, may be...

  14. 46 CFR 308.545 - Facultative cargo policy, Form MA-316.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Facultative cargo policy, Form MA-316. 308.545 Section 308.545 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK... policy, Form MA-316. The standard form of War Risk Facultative Cargo Policy, Form MA-316, may be...

  15. Enhanced biohydrogen production from beverage industrial wastewater using external nitrogen sources and bioaugmentation with facultative anaerobic strains.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gopalakrishnan; Bakonyi, Péter; Sivagurunathan, Periyasamy; Kim, Sang-Hyoun; Nemestóthy, Nándor; Bélafi-Bakó, Katalin; Lin, Chiu-Yue

    2015-08-01

    In this work biohydrogen generation and its improvement possibilities from beverage industrial wastewater were sought. Firstly, mesophilic hydrogen fermentations were conducted in batch vials by applying heat-treated (80°C, 30 min) sludge and liquid (LB-grown) cultures of Escherichia coli XL1-Blue/Enterobacter cloacae DSM 16657 strains for bioaugmentation purposes. The results showed that there was a remarkable increase in hydrogen production capacities when facultative anaerobes were added in the form of inoculum. Furthermore, experiments were carried out in order to reveal whether the increment occurred either due to the efficient contribution of the facultative anaerobic microorganisms or the culture ingredients (in particular yeast extract and tryptone) supplied when the bacterial suspensions (LB media-based inocula) were mixed with the sludge. The outcome of these tests was that both the applied nitrogen sources and the bacteria (E. coli) could individually enhance hydrogen formation. Nevertheless, the highest increase took place when they were used together. Finally, the optimal initial wastewater concentration was determined as 5 g/L. PMID:25661265

  16. Occurrence of facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis among filamentous and unicellular cyanobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Garlick, S; Oren, A; Padan, E

    1977-01-01

    Eleven of 21 cyanobacteria strains examined are capable of facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis, as shown by their ability to photoassimilate CO2 in the presence of Na2S, 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and 703-nm light. These include different cyanobacterial types (filamentous and unicellular) of different growth histories (aerobic, anaerobic, and marine and freshwater). Oscillatoria limnetica, Aphanothece halophytica (7418), and Lyngbya (7104) have different optimal concentrations of Na2S permitting CO2 photoassimilation, above which the rate decreases: 3.5, 0.7, and 0.1 mM, respectively. In A. halophytica, for each CO2 molecule photoassimilated two sulfide molecules are oxidized to elemental sulfur, which is excreted from the cells.The ecological and evolutionary significance of anoxygenic photosynthesis in the cyanobacteria is discussed. PMID:402355

  17. Occurrence of facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis among filamentous and unicellular cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Garlick, S; Oren, A; Padan, E

    1977-02-01

    Eleven of 21 cyanobacteria strains examined are capable of facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis, as shown by their ability to photoassimilate CO2 in the presence of Na2S, 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and 703-nm light. These include different cyanobacterial types (filamentous and unicellular) of different growth histories (aerobic, anaerobic, and marine and freshwater). Oscillatoria limnetica, Aphanothece halophytica (7418), and Lyngbya (7104) have different optimal concentrations of Na2S permitting CO2 photoassimilation, above which the rate decreases: 3.5, 0.7, and 0.1 mM, respectively. In A. halophytica, for each CO2 molecule photoassimilated two sulfide molecules are oxidized to elemental sulfur, which is excreted from the cells. The ecological and evolutionary significance of anoxygenic photosynthesis in the cyanobacteria is discussed. PMID:402355

  18. Fermentation of polysaccharides by Klebsiella and other facultative bacilli

    SciTech Connect

    Ochuba, G.U.; Von Riesen, V.L.

    1980-05-01

    Fermentations of 10 polysaccharides by species of the family Enterobacteriaceae were examined. Algin, guar, karaya, xanthan, and xylan were not fermented by any of the strains tested. Most of the activity was found in the tribe Klebsielleae. Klebseilla oxytoca fermented amylopectin (97% of the strains studied), carrageenan (100%), inulin (68%), polypectate (100%), and tragacanth (100%). Klebsiella pneumoniae fermented amylopectin (91%), carrageenan (100%), and tragacanth (86%). Carraggeenan was also fermented by Enterobacter aerogenes (100%), Enterobacter agglomerans (63%), Enterobacter cloacae (95%), and pectobacterium (38%). pectobacterium shared polypectate fermentation (100%) with K. oxytoca. With one exception, Serratia strains were negative on all polysaccharides. These results, along with other evidence, indicate that (i) the genus Klebsiella is biochemically the most versatile genus of the tribe, (ii) because of its distinct characteristics, K. oxytoca warrants species designation separate from K. pneumoniae, and (iii) some food additives generally considered indigestible can be metabolized by a few species of facultative bacilli, whereas others appear to be resistant.

  19. Thiobacillus cuprinus sp. nov. , a novel facultatively organotrophic metal-mobilizing bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, H.; Stetter, K.O. )

    1990-02-01

    Five strains of mesophilic, facultatively organotrophic, ore-leaching eubacteria were isolated from solfatara fields in Iceland and a uranium mine in the Federal Republic of Germany. The new organisms are aerobic gram-negative rods. They can use sulfidic ores or elemental sulfur as sole energy source, indicating that they belong to the genus Thiobacillus. Alternatively, they grow on organic substrates such as yeast extract, peptone, and pyruvate. In contrast to the other leaching bacteria known so far, the new isolates are unable to oxidize ferrous iron. They consist of extreme and moderate acidophiles growing optimally at pH 3 and 4, respectively. The extreme acidophiles showed leaching characteristics similar to those shown by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, while the moderate acidophiles exhibited a pronounced preference for copper leaching on some chalcopyrite ores. The G+C content of the DNA is between 66 and 69 mol%, depending on the isolate. In DNA-DNA hybridization experiments, the new strains showed homologies among each other of >70%, indicating that they belong to the same species. No significant DNA homology to Thiobacillus reference strains was detectable. Therefore, the new isolates represent a new species of Thiobacillus, which the authors named Thiobacillus cuprinus. Isolate Hoe5 is designated as the type strain (DSM 5495).

  20. Characteristics of the draft genome of "Candidatus Arsenophonus nilaparvatae", a facultative endosymbiont of Nilaparvata lugens.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hai-Wei; Lu, Jia-Bao; Ye, Yu-Xuan; Yu, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Chuan-Xi

    2016-06-01

    There exists a kind of symbiotic bacterium named "Candidatus Arsenophonus nilaparvatae" in the brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens. After being filtered and assembled from the BPH genome sequencing project, the genome sequence of this bacterial symbiont was obtained. After initial analysis based on the genome, we have found its potential role to synthesize B vitamins for the host. In order to better understand the lifestyle and the genomic changes of this symbiotic bacterium after the symbiotic relationship was established, we further report the characteristics of this draft genome. Compared with several other related bacteria, "Candidatus Arsenophonus nilaparvatae" has proven to be a facultative endosymbiont at the genomic level. Concurrently, the presence of fimbriae and flagella formation related genes indicates this maternally transmitted endosymbiont is most likely to retain the capacity to invade new hosts. Through further analysis of annotated gene sets, we also find evidence of genome reduction in its secretion system and metabolic pathways. These findings reflect its evolutionary trend to be an obligate one and enable a deeper study of microbe-insect interactions. PMID:26792263

  1. [Recovery of facultatives and anaerobes from frozen specimens with a polymicrobial nature].

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Chizuko; Nakamura, Toshihiko; Kaimori, Mitsuomi; Watanabe, Kunitomo

    2003-01-01

    Microbiological examination of frozen specimens is sometimes carried out in clinical microbiology and the result is used as an aid of diagnosis and/or treatment of polymicrobial infections. The study was carried out to reevaluate the merit of freezing specimens in clinical microbiology. A total of 10 specimens with a polymicrobial nature were included in this study. Before and after freezing specimens, we isolated facultative and anaerobic bacteria using a set of primary isolation media, consisting of three aerobic agar plates (MacConkey agar, blood agar and chocolate agar) and four pre-reduced anaerobic agar plates (HK Blood agar, HK blood agar with paromomycin (PM) and vancomycin (VM), phenyl ethyl-alcohol (PEA) agar and Bacteroides bile esculin (BBE) agar). All the procedures were done in a properly controlled anaerobic chamber. The number of isolates before and after freezing was 79 and 70, respectively. Among the strains isolated before freezing, 33 strains were recovered on the same kin of media artery freezing, without a remarkable decrease in the quantity. But 26 strains were not recovered and 2 strains were recovered with a remarkable decrease. Among 26 strains, 15 strains could be successfully backed up on the different kind of media. In conclusion, an anaerobic technique with an anaerobic chamber and a set of isolatin plates including blood agar, chocolate agar, HK blood agar, PEA blood agar, HK blood agar with PM and VM enable us to estimate the bacteriology before freezing from frozen specimens. PMID:14984303

  2. Thiobacillus cuprinus sp. nov., a Novel Facultatively Organotrophic Metal-Mobilizing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Harald; Stetter, Karl O.

    1990-01-01

    Five strains of mesophilic, facultatively organotrophic, ore-leaching eubacteria were isolated from solfatara fields in Iceland and a uranium mine in the Federal Republic of Germany. The new organisms are aerobic gram-negative rods. They can use sulfidic ores or elemental sulfur as sole energy source, indicating that they belong to the genus Thiobacillus. Alternatively, they grow on organic substrates such as yeast extract, peptone, and pyruvate. In contrast to the other leaching bacteria known so far, the new isolates are unable to oxidize ferrous iron. They consist of extreme and moderate acidophiles growing optimally at pH 3 and 4, respectively. The extreme acidophiles showed leaching characteristics similar to those shown by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, while the moderate acidophiles exhibited a pronounced preference for copper leaching on some chalcopyrite ores. The G+C content of the DNA is between 66 and 69 mol%, depending on the isolate. In DNA-DNA hybridization experiments, the new strains showed homologies among each other of >70%, indicating that they belong to the same species. No significant DNA homology to Thiobacillus reference strains was detectable. Therefore, the new isolates represent a new species of Thiobacillus, which we name Thiobacillus cuprinus. Isolate Hö5 is designated as the type strain (DSM 5495). Images PMID:16348110

  3. Evolution of heliobacteria: implications for photosynthetic reaction center complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermaas, W. F.; Blankenship, R. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The evolutionary position of the heliobacteria, a group of green photosynthetic bacteria with a photosynthetic apparatus functionally resembling Photosystem I of plants and cyanobacteria, has been investigated with respect to the evolutionary relationship to Gram-positive bacteria and cyanobacteria. On the basis of 16S rRNA sequence analysis, the heliobacteria appear to be most closely related to Gram-positive bacteria, but also an evolutionary link to cyanobacteria is evident. Interestingly, a 46-residue domain including the putative sixth membrane-spanning region of the heliobacterial reaction center protein show rather strong similarity (33% identity and 72% similarity) to a region including the sixth membrane-spanning region of the CP47 protein, a chlorophyll-binding core antenna polypeptide of Photosystem II. The N-terminal half of the heliobacterial reaction center polypeptide shows a moderate sequence similarity (22% identity over 232 residues) with the CP47 protein, which is significantly more than the similarity with the Photosystem I core polypeptides in this region. An evolutionary model for photosynthetic reaction center complexes is discussed, in which an ancestral homodimeric reaction center protein (possibly resembling the heliobacterial reaction center protein) with 11 membrane-spanning regions per polypeptide has diverged to give rise to the core of Photosystem I, Photosystem II, and of the photosynthetic apparatus in green, purple, and heliobacteria.

  4. Aphid facultative symbionts reduce survival of the predatory lady beetle Hippodamia convergens

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-essential facultative endosymbionts can provide their hosts with protection from parasites, pathogens, and predators. For example, two facultative bacterial symbionts of the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum), Serratia symbiotica and Hamiltonella defensa, protect their hosts from parasitism by two species of parasitoid wasp. Previous studies have not explored whether facultative symbionts also play a defensive role against predation in this system. We tested whether feeding on aphids harboring different facultative symbionts affected the fitness of an aphid predator, the lady beetle Hippodamia convergens. Results While these aphid faculative symbionts did not deter lady beetle feeding, they did decrease survival of lady beetle larvae. Lady beetle larvae fed a diet of aphids with facultative symbionts had significantly reduced survival from egg hatching to pupation and therefore had reduced survival to adult emergence. Additionally, lady beetle adults fed aphids with facultative symbionts were significantly heavier than those fed facultative symbiont-free aphids, though development time was not significantly different. Conclusions Aphids reproduce clonally and are often found in large groups. Thus, aphid symbionts, by reducing the fitness of the aphid predator H. convergens, may indirectly defend their hosts’ clonal descendants against predation. These findings highlight the often far-reaching effects that symbionts can have in ecological systems. PMID:24555501

  5. Spin-lattice relaxation of coupled metal-radical spin-dimers in proteins: application to Fe(2+)-cofactor (Q(A)(-.), Q(B)(-.), phi(-.)) dimers in reaction centers from photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Rafael; Isaacson, Roger A; Abresch, Edward C; Okamura, Melvin Y; Feher, George

    2002-01-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1)) for the reduced quinone acceptors Q(A)(-.) and Q(B)(-.), and the intermediate pheophytin acceptor phi(-.), were measured in native photosynthetic reaction centers (RC) containing a high spin Fe(2+) (S = 2) and in RCs in which Fe(2+) was replaced by diamagnetic Zn(2+). From these data, the contribution of the Fe(2+) to the spin-lattice relaxation of the cofactors was determined. To relate the spin-lattice relaxation rate to the spin-spin interaction between the Fe(2+) and the cofactors, we developed a spin-dimer model that takes into account the zero field splitting and the rhombicity of the Fe(2+) ion. The relaxation mechanism of the spin-dimer involves a two-phonon process that couples the fast relaxing Fe(2+) spin to the cofactor spin. The process is analogous to the one proposed by R. Orbach (Proc. R. Soc. A. (Lond.). 264:458-484) for rare earth ions. The spin-spin interactions are, in general, composed of exchange and dipolar contributions. For the spin dimers studied in this work the exchange interaction, J(o), is predominant. The values of J(o) for Q(A)(-.)Fe(2+), Q(B)(-.)Fe(2+), and phi(-.)Fe(2+) were determined to be (in kelvin) -0.58, -0.92, and -1.3 x 10(-3), respectively. The |J(o)| of the various cofactors (obtained in this work and those of others) could be fitted with the relation exp(-beta(J)d), where d is the distance between cofactor spins and beta(J) had a value of (0.66-0.86) A(-1). The relation between J(o) and the matrix element |V(ij)|(2) involved in electron transfer rates is discussed. PMID:12414679

  6. Spin-lattice relaxation of coupled metal-radical spin-dimers in proteins: application to Fe(2+)-cofactor (Q(A)(-.), Q(B)(-.), phi(-.)) dimers in reaction centers from photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Rafael; Isaacson, Roger A; Abresch, Edward C; Okamura, Melvin Y; Feher, George

    2002-11-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1)) for the reduced quinone acceptors Q(A)(-.) and Q(B)(-.), and the intermediate pheophytin acceptor phi(-.), were measured in native photosynthetic reaction centers (RC) containing a high spin Fe(2+) (S = 2) and in RCs in which Fe(2+) was replaced by diamagnetic Zn(2+). From these data, the contribution of the Fe(2+) to the spin-lattice relaxation of the cofactors was determined. To relate the spin-lattice relaxation rate to the spin-spin interaction between the Fe(2+) and the cofactors, we developed a spin-dimer model that takes into account the zero field splitting and the rhombicity of the Fe(2+) ion. The relaxation mechanism of the spin-dimer involves a two-phonon process that couples the fast relaxing Fe(2+) spin to the cofactor spin. The process is analogous to the one proposed by R. Orbach (Proc. R. Soc. A. (Lond.). 264:458-484) for rare earth ions. The spin-spin interactions are, in general, composed of exchange and dipolar contributions. For the spin dimers studied in this work the exchange interaction, J(o), is predominant. The values of J(o) for Q(A)(-.)Fe(2+), Q(B)(-.)Fe(2+), and phi(-.)Fe(2+) were determined to be (in kelvin) -0.58, -0.92, and -1.3 x 10(-3), respectively. The |J(o)| of the various cofactors (obtained in this work and those of others) could be fitted with the relation exp(-beta(J)d), where d is the distance between cofactor spins and beta(J) had a value of (0.66-0.86) A(-1). The relation between J(o) and the matrix element |V(ij)|(2) involved in electron transfer rates is discussed. PMID:12414679

  7. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms.

    PubMed

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-09-01

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries. PMID:26389924

  8. The Photosynthetic Cycle

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Calvin, Melvin

    1955-03-21

    A cyclic sequence of transformations, including the carboxylation of RuDP (ribulose diphosphate) and its re-formation, has been deduced as the route for the creation of reduced carbon compounds in photosynthetic organisms. With the demonstration of RuDP as substrate for the carboxylation in a cell-free system, each of the reactions has now been carried out independently in vitro. Further purification of this last enzyme system has confirmed the deduction that the carboxylation of RuDP leads directly to the two molecules of PGA (phosphoglyceric acid) involving an internal dismutation and suggesting the name "carboxydismutase" for the enzyme. As a consequence of this knowledge of each of the steps in the photosynthetic CO{sub 2} reduction cycle, it is possible to define the reagent requirements to maintain it. The net requirement for the reduction of one molecule of CO{sub 2} is four equivalents of [H]and three molecules of ATP (adenine triphosphate). These must ultimately be supplied by the photochemical reaction. Some possible ways in which this may be accomplished are discussed.

  9. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries. PMID:26389924

  10. Facultative parthenogenesis in the Ryukyu drywood termite Neotermes koshunensis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazuya; Miyaguni, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Parthenogenesis is a relatively rare reproductive mode in nature compared to sex. In social insects, the evolution of parthenogenesis has a notable impact on their life histories. Some termites with parthenogenetic ability produce numerous non-dispersing supplementary queens asexually, whereas other castes are produced via sexual reproduction. This asexual queen succession (AQS) system is adaptive because hundreds of the asexual queens improve the reproductive potential of the colony and maintain the genetic diversity within the colony. However, the evolutionary process of the AQS system remains unclear because parthenogenetic species without this system are unknown. Here, we report facultative parthenogenesis in the drywood termite Neotermes koshunensis. Although the eggs produced by females isolated from males hatched, the hatching rate of those eggs was lower than that of the eggs produced by females kept with males. These parthenogenetic offspring inherited only the maternal alleles and showed high homozygosity, which indicates that the mechanism of ploidy restoration is terminal fusion. A previous study showed that most colonies of this species have a single queen or orphan; thus, the AQS system has not evolved despite their parthenogenetic ability. Further investigations of N. koshunensis will reveal how parthenogenesis evolved and its role in the insect societies. PMID:27464523

  11. Developmental Transcriptome for a Facultatively Eusocial Bee, Megalopta genalis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Beryl M.; Wcislo, William T.; Robinson, Gene E.

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptomes provide excellent foundational resources for mechanistic and evolutionary analyses of complex traits. We present a developmental transcriptome for the facultatively eusocial bee Megalopta genalis, which represents a potential transition point in the evolution of eusociality. A de novo transcriptome assembly of Megalopta genalis was generated using paired-end Illumina sequencing and the Trinity assembler. Males and females of all life stages were aligned to this transcriptome for analysis of gene expression profiles throughout development. Gene Ontology analysis indicates that stage-specific genes are involved in ion transport, cell–cell signaling, and metabolism. A number of distinct biological processes are upregulated in each life stage, and transitions between life stages involve shifts in dominant functional processes, including shifts from transcriptional regulation in embryos to metabolism in larvae, and increased lipid metabolism in adults. We expect that this transcriptome will provide a useful resource for future analyses to better understand the molecular basis of the evolution of eusociality and, more generally, phenotypic plasticity. PMID:26276382

  12. The Persistence of Facultative Parthenogenesis in Drosophila albomicans

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Ho; Fang, Shu; Chang, Hwei-yu

    2014-01-01

    Parthenogenesis has evolved independently in more than 10 Drosophila species. Most cases are tychoparthenogenesis, which is occasional or accidental parthenogenesis in normally bisexual species with a low hatching rate of eggs produced by virgin females; this form is presumed to be an early stage of parthenogenesis. To address how parthenogenesis and sexual reproduction coexist in Drosophila populations, we investigated several reproductive traits, including the fertility, parthenogenetic capability, diploidization mechanisms, and mating propensity of parthenogenetic D. albomicans. The fertility of mated parthenogenetic females was significantly higher than that of virgin females. The mated females could still produce parthenogenetic offspring but predominantly produced offspring by sexual reproduction. Both mated parthenogenetic females and their parthenogenetic-sexual descendants were capable of parthenogenesis. The alleles responsible for parthenogenesis can be propagated through both parthenogenesis and sexual reproduction. As diploidy is restored predominantly by gamete duplication, heterozygosity would be very low in parthenogenetic individuals. Hence, genetic variation in parthenogenetic genomes would result from sexual reproduction. The mating propensity of females after more than 20 years of isolation from males was decreased. If mutations reducing mating propensities could occur under male-limited conditions in natural populations, decreased mating propensity might accelerate tychoparthenogenesis through a positive feedback mechanism. This process provides an opportunity for the evolution of obligate parthenogenesis. Therefore, the persistence of facultative parthenogenesis may be an adaptive reproductive strategy in Drosophila when a few founders colonize a new niche or when small populations are distributed at the edge of a species' range, consistent with models of geographical parthenogenesis. PMID:25415200

  13. Silencing of DELLA induces facultative parthenocarpy in tomato fruits.

    PubMed

    Martí, Cristina; Orzáez, Diego; Ellul, Philippe; Moreno, Vicente; Carbonell, Juan; Granell, Antonio

    2007-12-01

    DELLA proteins are plant nuclear factors that restrain growth and proliferation in response to hormonal signals. The effects of the manipulation of the DELLA pathway in the making of a berry-like fruit were investigated. The expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana gain-of-function DELLA allele Atgai (del) in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) produced partially sterile dwarf plants and compacted influorescences, as expected for a constitutively activated growth repressor. In contrast, antisense silencing of the single endogenous tomato DELLA gene homologue (SlDELLA) produced slender-like plants with elongated flower trusses. Interestingly, the depletion of SlDELLA in tomato was sufficient to overcome the growth arrest normally imposed on the ovary at anthesis, resulting in parthenocarpic fruits in the absence of pollination. Antisense SlDELLA-engineered fruits were smaller in size and elongated in shape compared with wild type. Cell number estimations showed that fruit set, resulting from reduced SlDELLA expression, arose from activated cell elongation at the longitudinal and lateral axes of the fruit pericarp, bypassing phase-II (post-pollination) cell divisions. Parthenocarpy caused by SlDELLA depletion is facultative, as hand pollination restored wild-type fruit phenotype. This indicates that fertilization-associated SlDELLA-independent signals are operational in ovary-fruit transitions. SlDELLA was also found to restrain growth in other reproductive structures, affecting style elongation, stylar hair primordial growth and stigma development. PMID:17883372

  14. Facultative parthenogenesis in the Ryukyu drywood termite Neotermes koshunensis

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kazuya; Miyaguni, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Parthenogenesis is a relatively rare reproductive mode in nature compared to sex. In social insects, the evolution of parthenogenesis has a notable impact on their life histories. Some termites with parthenogenetic ability produce numerous non-dispersing supplementary queens asexually, whereas other castes are produced via sexual reproduction. This asexual queen succession (AQS) system is adaptive because hundreds of the asexual queens improve the reproductive potential of the colony and maintain the genetic diversity within the colony. However, the evolutionary process of the AQS system remains unclear because parthenogenetic species without this system are unknown. Here, we report facultative parthenogenesis in the drywood termite Neotermes koshunensis. Although the eggs produced by females isolated from males hatched, the hatching rate of those eggs was lower than that of the eggs produced by females kept with males. These parthenogenetic offspring inherited only the maternal alleles and showed high homozygosity, which indicates that the mechanism of ploidy restoration is terminal fusion. A previous study showed that most colonies of this species have a single queen or orphan; thus, the AQS system has not evolved despite their parthenogenetic ability. Further investigations of N. koshunensis will reveal how parthenogenesis evolved and its role in the insect societies. PMID:27464523

  15. Facultative methanotrophy: false leads, true results, and suggestions for future research.

    PubMed

    Semrau, Jeremy D; DiSpirito, Alan A; Vuilleumier, Stéphane

    2011-10-01

    Methanotrophs are a group of phylogenetically diverse microorganisms characterized by their ability to utilize methane as their sole source of carbon and energy. Early studies suggested that growth on methane could be stimulated with the addition of some small organic acids, but initial efforts to find facultative methanotrophs, i.e., methanotrophs able to utilize compounds with carbon-carbon bonds as sole growth substrates were inconclusive. Recently, however, facultative methanotrophs in the genera Methylocella, Methylocapsa, and Methylocystis have been reported that can grow on acetate, as well as on larger organic acids or ethanol for some species. All identified facultative methanotrophs group within the Alphaproteobacteria and utilize the serine cycle for carbon assimilation from formaldehyde. It is possible that facultative methanotrophs are able to convert acetate into intermediates of the serine cycle (e.g. malate and glyoxylate), because a variety of acetate assimilation pathways convert acetate into these compounds (e.g. the glyoxylate shunt of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the ethylmalonyl-CoA pathway, the citramalate cycle, and the methylaspartate cycle). In this review, we summarize the history of facultative methanotrophy, describe scenarios for the basis of facultative methanotrophy, and pose several topics for future research in this area. PMID:21599728

  16. Prebiotic photosynthetic reactions.

    PubMed

    Chittenden, G J; Schwartz, A W

    1981-01-01

    Historically, numerous attempts have been made to mimic - by means of inorganic model reactions - the photosynthetic fixation of CO2 by green plants. The literature in this field is strewn with claims and counter-claims. Two factors have led us to reexamine this subject: firstly; doubts concerning the highly reducing model for the atmosphere of the primitive Earth and secondly; recent results which demonstrate that photoreductive fixation is feasable on a suitable catalytic surface, for both CO2 and N2. The latter observation is of particular interest due to the well-known susceptibility of NH3 to photolytic destruction. Our review of the literature leads us to suggest that similar processes would have been plausible for the primitive Earth and could have been prebiotic precursors to an early development of CO2-fixing autotrophs. PMID:6791723

  17. Photoinduced Energy Transfer in Artificial Photosynthetic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imahori, H.; Umeyama, T.

    Artificial photosynthesis is a current topic of intensive investigations, both in order to understand the reactions that play a central role in natural photosynthesis as well as to develop highly efficient solar energy conversion systems and molecular optoelectronic devices [1-34]. Artificial photosynthesis is defined as a research field that attempts to mimic the natural process of photosynthesis. Therefore, the outline of natural photosynthesis is described briefly for the better understanding of artificial photosynthesis . Natural photosynthetic system is regarded as one of the most elaborate nanobiological machines [35,36]. It converts solar energy into electrochemical potential or chemical energy, which is prerequisite for the living organisms on the earth. The core function of photosynthesis is a cascade of photoinduced energy and electron transfer between donors and acceptors in the antenna complexes and the reaction center. For instance, in purple photosynthetic bacteria (Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and Rhodopseudomonas palustris) there are two different types of antenna complexes: a core light-harvesting antenna (LH1) and peripheral light-harvesting antenna (LH2) [37-39]. LH1 surrounds the reaction center where charge separation takes place.

  18. Formation of the light-harvesting complex I (B870) of anoxygenic phototrophic purple bacteria.

    PubMed

    Drews, G

    1996-09-01

    The light-harvesting (LH) complex I (B870) of anoxygenic photosynthetic purple bacteria is the oligomeric form of its subunit B820 consisting of the low-molecular-weight polypeptides alpha, beta, bacteriochlorophyll (BChl), and carotenoids in the stoichiometric ratio [alpha1 beta1 (BChl2) Crt1-2]n. LHI surrounds the photochemical reaction center (RC). The major absorption band of the LHI complex is species-specific and is found at 870-890 nm; those of the subunit and the monomeric BChl a (dissolved in methanol) absorb at 820 and 770 nm, respectively. The isolated LHI complex can be reversibly dissociated to the B820 subunit or to the polypeptides and pigments by addition of detergents. Reconstitution of the B820 or the functional B870 complex is still possible after partial truncation of the N- or C-terminal regions of the alpha- or beta-polypeptide or of the beta-polypeptide only. The minimal structural requirements for reconstitution of a spectrally wild-type form after truncation of the polypeptides and/or modifications of the BChl molecule are described. The insertion of the LHIalpha- and LHIbeta-polypeptides into the membrane and the in vivo assembly of LHI, studied in a cell-free system and in whole cells of Rhodobacter capsulatus, depend on the primary structures of both polypeptides, BChl, the chaperones DnaK and GroEL, membrane-bound proteins, and energized membranes. Exchanges, deletions, or insertions of amino acyl residues, especially in the conserved region of the N-terminus of the LHIalpha-polypeptide, prevent or reduce the efficiency and stability of the LHI assembly. Therefore, reconstitution of LHI in a detergent micelle does not exactly reproduce the formation of the LHI complex in the photosynthetic membrane in vivo. The N-terminal domains play a crucial role in the formation of the oligomeric protein scaffold and of the pigment array. Facultatively phototrophic bacteria such as Rhodospirillum (Rsp.) rubrum or Rhodobacter (Rba.) capsulatus can

  19. Nanoscale Optoelectronic Photosynthetic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenbaum, Elias; Lee, Ida; Guillorn, Michael; Lee, James W.; Simpson, Michael L.

    2001-03-01

    This presentation provides an overview and recent progress in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory research program in molecular electronics and green plant photosynthesis. The photosynthetic reaction center is a nanoscale molecular diode and photovoltaic device. The key thrust of our research program is the construction of molecular electronic devices from these nanoscale structures. Progress in this multidisciplinary research program has been demonstrated by direct electrical contact of emergent electrons with the Photosystem I (PS I) reaction center by nanoparticle precipitation. Demonstration of stable diode properties of isolated reaction centers combined with the ability to orient PS I by self-assembly on a planar surface, makes this structure a good building block for 2-D and potentially 3-D devices. Metallization of isolated PS I does not alter their fundamental photophysical properties and they can be bonded to metal surfaces. We report here the first measurement of photovoltage from single PS I reaction centers. Working at the Cornell University National Nanofabrication Facility, we have constructed sets of dissimilar metal electrodes separated by distances as small as 6 nm. We plan to use these structures to make electrical contact to both ends of oriented PSI reaction centers and thereby realize biomolecular logic circuits. Potential applications of PSI reaction centers for optoelectronic applications as well as molecular logic device construction will be discussed.

  20. Exploration for facultative endosymbionts of glassy-wingedsharpshooter (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Montllor-Curley, C.; Brodie, E.L.; Lechner, M.G.; Purcell, A.H.

    2006-07-01

    Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae),glassy-winged sharpshooter, was collected in California and severalstates in the southeastern United States in 2002 and 2003 and analyzedfor endosymbiotic bacteria. Hemolymph, eggs, and bacteriomes wereexamined for the presence of bacteria by polymerase chain reaction. Asubset of hemolymph and egg samples had their 16S rRNA gene ampliconscloned and sequenced or analyzed by restriction digest patterns ofsamples compared with known bacterial DNA. Baumannia cicadellinicola, oneof the primary symbionts of glassy-winged sharpshooter, was found in themajority of hemolymph samples, although it has been considered until nowto reside primarily inside the specialized host bacteriocytes. Wolbachiasp., a common secondary symbiont in many insect taxa investigated todate, was the second most frequently detected bacterium in hemolymphsamples. In addition, we detected bacteria that were most closely related(by 16S rRNA gene sequence) to Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, andAcinetobacter in hemolymph samples of one and/or two glassy-wingedsharpshooters, but their origin is uncertain.

  1. Anaerobic bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic bacteria are bacteria that do not live or grow when oxygen is present. In humans, these ... Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's ...

  2. [CURRENT IDEAS ON OBLIGATE AND FACULTATIVE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN MAN AND THE DIROFILARIASIS PATHOGEN DIROFILARIA (N.) REPENS].

    PubMed

    Supryaga, V G; Rakova, V M; Morozov, E N

    2016-01-01

    The ability of D. repens to complete its ontogenesis in man points to their obligate, rather than facultative rela- tionships. The fact that microfilariae are rarely found in human blood or are absent there may be associated with the removal of developing dirofilariae from humans in earlier than they achieve sexual maturity. Facultative ecological relationships to mosquitoes may be one of the reasons for limitation of human invasion cases. However, in long-standing microfilaremia in man (an obligate host), D.repens may take part in the epidemiological chain of dirofilariasis as a source of invasion. PMID:27405206

  3. Arsenic biomethylation by photosynthetic organisms

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jun; Rensing, Christopher; Rosen, Barry P.; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a ubiquitous element that is widespread in the environment and causes numerous health problems. Biomethylation of As has implications for its mobility and toxicity. Photosynthetic organisms may play a significant role in As geochemical cycling by methylating it to different As species, but little is known about the mechanisms of methylation. Methylated As species have been found in many photosynthetic organisms, and several arsenite S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) methyltransferases have been characterized in cyanobacteria and algae. However, higher plants may not have the ability to methylate As. Instead, methylated arsenicals in plants probably originate from microorganisms in soils and the rhizosphere. Here, we propose possible approaches for developing ‘smart’ photosynthetic organisms with an enhanced and sensitive biomethylation capacity for bioremediation and safer food. PMID:22257759

  4. Influence of thermal light correlations on photosynthetic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mendoza, Adriana; Manrique, Pedro; Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; Johnson, Neil F.; Rodríguez, Ferney J.; Quiroga, Luis

    2014-03-01

    The thermal light from the sun is characterized by both classical and quantum mechanical correlations. These correlations have left a fingerprint on the natural harvesting structures developed through five billion years of evolutionary pressure, specially in photosynthetic organisms. In this work, based upon previous extensive studies of spatio-temporal correlations of light fields, we hypothesize that structures involving photosensitive pigments like those present in purple bacteria vesicles emerge as an evolutionary response to the different properties of incident light. By using burstiness and memory as measures that quantify higher moments of the photon arrival statistics, we generate photon-time traces. They are used to simulate absorption on detectors spatially extended over regions comparable to these light fields coherence length. Finally, we provide some insights into the connection between these photo-statistical features with the photosynthetic membrane architecture and the lights' spatial correlation. Facultad de Ciencias Uniandes.

  5. Pigment oligomers as natural and artificial photosynthetic antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    Green photosynthetic bacteria contain antenna complexes known as chlorosomes. These complexes are appressed to the cytoplasmic side of the inner cell membrane and function to absorb light and transfer the energy to the photochemical reaction center, where photochemical energy storage takes place. Chlorosomes differ from all other known photosynthetic antenna complexes in that the geometrical arrangement of pigments is determined primarily by pigment-pigment interactions instead of pigment-protein interactions. The bacteriochlorophyll c, d or e pigments found in chlorosomes form large oligomers with characteristic spectral properties significantly perturbed from those exhibited by monomeric pigments. Because of their close spatial interaction, the pigments are thought to be strongly coupled electronically, and many of the optical properties result from exciton interactions. This presentation will summarize existing knowledge on the chemical composition and properties of chlorosomes, the evidence for the oligomeric nature of chlorosome pigment organization and proposed structures for the oligomers, and the kinetics and mechanisms of energy transfer in chlorosomes.

  6. PEP Carboxykinase Exchange Reaction in Photosynthetic Bacteria 1

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, T. G.; Benedict, C. R.

    1968-01-01

    This paper describes some new characteristics of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase CO2-oxaloacetate exchange reaction in purified preparations of Rhodospirillum rubrum. The enzymatic activity has been purified 169-fold. Nucleotide diphosphates substitute for nucleotide triphosphates in the exchange reaction. Nucleotide diphosphates will not support the synthesis of phosphoenolpyruvate from oxaloacetate. This reaction differs significantly from the CO2-oxaloacetate exchange reaction in higher plants and animals. PMID:5661493

  7. [Carbon monoxide metabolism by photosynthetic bacteria]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    Research continued on the metabolism of carbon monoxide by Rhodospirillum rubrum. This report discusses progress on the activity, induction, inhibition, and spectroscopic analysis of the enzyme Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase. (CBS)

  8. Photoproduction of hydrogen by membranes of green photosynthetic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, J D; Olson, J M

    1980-01-01

    Photoproduction of H/sub 2/ from ascorbate by unit-membrane vesicles from Chlorobium limicola f. thiosulfatophilum was achieved with a system containing gramicidin D, tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine, methyl viologen, dithioerythritol, Clostridium hydrogenase, and an oxygen-scavenging mixture of glucose, glucose oxidase, ethanol, and catalase. Maximum quantum yield was less than one percent. Half maximum rate of H/sub 2/ production occurred at a white-light intensity of approximately 0.15 cm/sup -2/. The reaction was inhibited completely by 0.3% sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate, 1% Triton X-100, or preheating the vesicles at 100/sup 0/C for 5 minutes. Low concentrations (0.01 and 0.05%) of Triton X-100 about doubled the reaction rate.

  9. Photobiological hydrogen production in green algae and photosynthetic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1986-01-01

    We have shown that, under appropriate physiological conditions, certain freshwater and marine green algae are capable of splitting water to molecular hydrogen and oxygen in a sustained steady-state reaction. In these algae, the gaseous-fuel-producing reaction can be driven by light throughout the visible portion of the solar emission spectrum, including the long wavelength (red) 700-nm region. No external energy sources are required.

  10. Taz1-Shelterin Promotes Facultative Heterochromatin Assembly at Chromosome-Internal Sites Containing Late Replication Origins.

    PubMed

    Zofall, Martin; Smith, Deborah R; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Dhakshnamoorthy, Jothy; Grewal, Shiv I S

    2016-06-16

    Facultative heterochromatin regulates gene expression, but its assembly is poorly understood. Previously, we identified facultative heterochromatin islands in the fission yeast genome and found that RNA elimination machinery promotes island assembly at meiotic genes. Here, we report that Taz1, a component of the telomere protection complex Shelterin, is required to assemble heterochromatin islands at regions corresponding to late replication origins that are sites of double-strand break formation during meiosis. The loss of Taz1 or other Shelterin subunits, including Ccq1 that interacts with Clr4/Suv39h, abolishes heterochromatin at late origins and causes derepression of associated genes. Moreover, the late-origin regulator Rif1 affects heterochromatin at Taz1-dependent islands and subtelomeric regions. We explore the connection between facultative heterochromatin and replication control and show that heterochromatin machinery affects replication timing. These analyses reveal the role of Shelterin in facultative heterochromatin assembly at late origins, which has important implications for genome stability and gene regulation. PMID:27264871

  11. Intraguild Interactions between Egg Parasitoids: Window of Opportunity and Fitness Costs for a Facultative Hyperparasitoid

    PubMed Central

    Cusumano, Antonino; Peri, Ezio; Amodeo, Valentina; McNeil, Jeremy N.; Colazza, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    We investigated intraguild interactions between two egg parasitoids of Nezara viridula (L.) (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae), Ooencyrtus telenomicida (Vassiliev) (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) and Trissolcus basalis (Wollaston) (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae), as the former has the potential to be a facultative hyperparasitoid of the latter. We assessed the suitability of N. viridula eggs for the development of O. telenomicida as a function of egg age when they were unparasitized, or had been attacked by T. basalis at different times prior to exposure to O. telenomicida females. Ooencyrtus telenomicida can exploit healthy N. viridula host eggs up to 5 days of age, just prior to the emergence of N. viridula. This window of opportunity can be extended for an additional 6–7 days through interspecific competition or facultative hyperparasitism. While there are minor fitness costs for O. telenomicida as the result of interspecific larval competition, those costs are greater with facultative hyperparasitism. In choice assays O. telenomicida females discriminated between different quality N. viridula eggs, avoiding those where their progeny would have to develop as facultative hyperparasitoids of T. basalis. Results are discussed with respect to the possible effects that the costs of intraguild parasitism might have on biological control programmes. PMID:23705009

  12. Methylation site within a facultatively persistent sequence in the macronucleus of Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed Central

    White, T C; McLaren, N C; Allen, S L

    1986-01-01

    DNA methylation occurs at the adenines in the somatic macronucleus of Tetrahymena thermophila. We report on a methylation site within a DNA segment showing facultative persistence in the macronucleus. When the site is present, methylation occurs on both strands, although only 50% of the DNA molecules are methylated. Images PMID:3796615

  13. Excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic protein-pigment complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Shu-Hao

    Quantum biology is a relatively new research area which investigates the rules that quantum mechanics plays in biology. One of the most intriguing systems in this field is the coherent excitation energy transport (EET) in photosynthesis. In this document I will discuss the theories that are suitable for describing the photosynthetic EET process and the corresponding numerical results on several photosynthetic protein-pigment complexes (PPCs). In some photosynthetic EET processes, because of the electronic coupling between the chromophores within the system is about the same order of magnitude as system-bath coupling (electron-phonon coupling), a non-perturbative method called hierarchy equation of motion (HEOM) is applied to study the EET dynamics. The first part of this thesis includes brief introduction and derivation to the HEOM approach. The second part of this thesis the HEOM method will be applied to investigate the EET process within the B850 ring of the light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from purple bacteria, Rhodopseudomonas acidophila. The dynamics of the exciton population and coherence will be analyzed under different initial excitation configurations and temperatures. Finally, how HEOM can be implemented to simulate the two-dimensional electronic spectra of photosynthetic PPCs will be discussed. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy is a crucial experimental technique to probe EET dynamics in multi-chromophoric systems. The system we are interested in is the 7-chromophore Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex from green sulfur bacteria, Prosthecochloris aestuarii. Recent crystallographic studies report the existence of an additional (eighth) chromophore in some of the FMO monomers. By applying HEOM we are able to calculate the two-dimensional electronic spectra of the 7-site and 8-site FMO complexes and investigate the functionality of the eighth chromophore.

  14. Spectral measurements of photosynthetic efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The photosynthetic efficiency of plants was examined for plants in two very different canopies, a USDA cornfield having an instrumented flux tower in Beltsville, MD, USA and a coniferous forest in British Columbia, Canada, included in the tower network of the Canadian Carbon Program. Basic field st...

  15. Classification and distribution of large intestinal bacteria in nonhibernating and hibernating leopard frogs (Rana pipiens).

    PubMed Central

    Banas, J A; Loesche, W J; Nace, G W

    1988-01-01

    The large intestinal flora of the leopard frog, Rana pipiens, was examined to determine whether differences existed between the nonhibernating and hibernating states of the animal and to determine the relative concentrations and proportions of potential frog pathogens. Hibernators had a logarithmic decrease of bacteria per milligram of intestine averaging one, and significantly greater proportions of facultative bacteria and psychrophiles relative to nonhibernators. The predominant anaerobic bacteria were gram-positive Clostridium species and gram-negative Bacteroides and Fusobacterium species. The predominant facultative bacteria were enterobacteria in nonhibernators but Pseudomonas species in hibernators. Many species of Pseudomonas are pathogenic for frogs, and thus the intestinal flora in hibernators may be a potential source of infectious disease. PMID:3263838

  16. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of a photosynthetic microbial mat and comparison with Archean cherts.

    PubMed

    Bourbin, M; Derenne, S; Gourier, D; Rouzaud, J-N; Gautret, P; Westall, F

    2012-12-01

    Organic radicals in artificially carbonized biomass dominated by oxygenic and non-oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria, Microcoleus chthonoplastes-like and Chloroflexus-like bacteria respectively, were studied by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The two bacteria species were sampled in mats from a hypersaline lake. They underwent accelerated ageing by cumulative thermal treatments to induce progressive carbonization of the biological material, mimicking the natural maturation of carbonaceous material of Archean age. For thermal treatments at temperatures higher than 620 °C, a drastic increase in the EPR linewidth is observed in the carbonaceous matter from oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria and not anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria. This selective EPR linewidth broadening reflects the presence of a catalytic element inducing formation of radical aggregates, without affecting the molecular structure or the microstructure of the organic matter, as shown by Raman spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy. For comparison, we carried out an EPR study of organic radicals in silicified carbonaceous rocks (cherts) from various localities, of different ages (0.42 to 3.5 Gyr) and having undergone various degrees of metamorphism, i.e. various degrees of natural carbonization. EPR linewidth dispersion for the most primitive samples was quite significant, pointing to a selective dipolar broadening similar to that observed for carbonized bacteria. This surprising result merits further evaluation in the light of its potential use as a marker of past bacterial metabolisms, in particular oxygenic photosynthesis, in Archean cherts. PMID:23254854

  17. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Study of a Photosynthetic Microbial Mat and Comparison with Archean Cherts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbin, M.; Derenne, S.; Gourier, D.; Rouzaud, J.-N.; Gautret, P.; Westall, F.

    2012-12-01

    Organic radicals in artificially carbonized biomass dominated by oxygenic and non-oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria, Microcoleus chthonoplastes-like and Chloroflexus-like bacteria respectively, were studied by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The two bacteria species were sampled in mats from a hypersaline lake. They underwent accelerated ageing by cumulative thermal treatments to induce progressive carbonization of the biological material, mimicking the natural maturation of carbonaceous material of Archean age. For thermal treatments at temperatures higher than 620 °C, a drastic increase in the EPR linewidth is observed in the carbonaceous matter from oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria and not anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria. This selective EPR linewidth broadening reflects the presence of a catalytic element inducing formation of radical aggregates, without affecting the molecular structure or the microstructure of the organic matter, as shown by Raman spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy. For comparison, we carried out an EPR study of organic radicals in silicified carbonaceous rocks (cherts) from various localities, of different ages (0.42 to 3.5 Gyr) and having undergone various degrees of metamorphism, i.e. various degrees of natural carbonization. EPR linewidth dispersion for the most primitive samples was quite significant, pointing to a selective dipolar broadening similar to that observed for carbonized bacteria. This surprising result merits further evaluation in the light of its potential use as a marker of past bacterial metabolisms, in particular oxygenic photosynthesis, in Archean cherts.

  18. Facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis in cyanobacteria driven by arsenite and sulfide with evidence for the support of nitrogen fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe-Simon, F.; Hoeft, S. E.; Baesman, S. M.; Oremland, R. S.

    2010-12-01

    The rise in atmospheric oxygen (O2) over geologic time is attributed to the evolution and widespread proliferation of oxygenic photosynthesis in cyanobacteria. However, cyanobacteria maintain a metabolic flexibility that may not always result in O2 release. In the environment, cyanobacteria may use a variety of alternative electron donors rather than water that are known to be used by other anoxygenic phototrophs (eg. purple sulfur bacteria) including reduced forms of sulfur, iron, nitrogen, and arsenic. Recent evidence suggests cyanobacteria actively take advantage of at least a few of these alternatives. We used a classical Winogradsky approach to enrich for cyanobacteria from the high salinity, elevated pH and arsenic-enriched waters of Mono Lake (CA). Experiments, optimized for cyanobacteria, revealed light-dependent, anaerobic arsenite-oxidation in sub-cultured sediment-free enrichments dominated by a filamentous cyanobacteria. We isolated and identified the dominant member of this enrichment to be a member of the Oscillatoriales by 16S rDNA. Addition of 1 mM arsenite induced facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis under continuous and circadian light. This isolate also oxidized sulfide under the same light-based conditions. Aerobic conditions elicited no arsenite oxidation in the light or dark and the isolate grew as a typical cyanobacterium using oxygenic photosynthesis. Under near-infrared light (700 nm) there was a direct correlation of enhanced growth with an increase in the rate arsenite or sulfide oxidation suggesting the use of photosystem I. Additionally, to test the wide-spread nature of this metabolism in the Oscillatoriales, we followed similar arsenite- and sulfide-driven facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis as well as nitrogen fixation (C2H2 reduction) in the axenic isolate Oscillatoria sp. CCMP 1731. Future characterization includes axenic isolation of the Mono Lake Oscillatoria sp. as well as the arsenite oxidase responsible for electron

  19. SANS Investigation of the Photosynthetic Machinery of Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Urban, Volker S.; Wen, Jianzhong; Xin, Yueyong; Blankenship, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    Green photosynthetic bacteria harvest light and perform photosynthesis in low-light environments, and contain specialized antenna complexes to adapt to this condition. We performed small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies to obtain structural information about the photosynthetic apparatus, including the peripheral light-harvesting chlorosome complex, the integral membrane light-harvesting B808-866 complex, and the reaction center (RC) in the thermophilic green phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. Using contrast variation in SANS measurements, we found that the B808-866 complex is wrapped around the RC in Cfx. aurantiacus, and the overall size and conformation of the B808-866 complex of Cfx. aurantiacus is roughly comparable to the LH1 antenna complex of the purple bacteria. A similar size of the isolated B808-866 complex was suggested by dynamic light scattering measurements, and a smaller size of the RC of Cfx. aurantiacus compared to the RC of the purple bacteria was observed. Further, our SANS measurements indicate that the chlorosome is a lipid body with a rod-like shape, and that the self-assembly of bacteriochlorophylls, the major component of the chlorosome, is lipid-like. Finally, two populations of chlorosome particles are suggested in our SANS measurements. PMID:20959079

  20. SANS Investigation of the Photosynthetic Machinery of Chloroflexus Aurantiacus

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Urban, Volker S; Jianzhong, Wen; Yueyong, Xin; Blankenship, Robert E

    2010-01-01

    Green photosynthetic bacteria harvest light and perform photosynthesis in low light environments, and contain specialized antenna complexes to adapt to this condition. In this report, we present studies using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to elucidate structural information about the photosynthetic apparatus, including the peripheral light harvesting chlorosome complex, the integral membrane light-harvesting B808-866 complex and the reaction center (RC) in the thermophilic green phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. Using contract variation in SANS measurments, our studies suggest that the B808-866 comples is wrapped around the RC in Cfx. aurantiacus, and the overall size and conformation for the B808-866 complex of Cfx. aurantiacus is roughly comparable to the LH1 antenna complex of the purple bacteria. A similar size for the isolated B808-866 complex is also suggested via dynamic light scattering measurements. Alos, a smaller size of the RC of Cfx. aurantiacus that the RC of the purple bacteria is observed. Further, our SANS measurements indicate that the chlorosome is a lipid body with rod-like shape, and that the self-assembly of bacteriochlorophylls, the major component of the chlorosome, is lipid-like. Finally, two populations of chlorosome particles are suggested in our SANS measurements.

  1. Structure-function studies of the photosynthetic reaction center using herbicides that compete for the quinone binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Bylina, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    Certain classes of herbicides act as competitive inhibitors of the photosynthetic reaction center. Genetic engineering techniques can be used to generate photosynthetic reaction centers which contain altered quinone binding sites. A genetic system for rapidly screening herbicides developed in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus has been used to examine the effect of different s-triazine herbicides on the growth of bacteria containing reaction centers with altered quinone binding sites. Structural insights into herbicide binding have been obtained by determining the level of resistance or sensitivity to structurally related herbicides in these modified reaction centers.

  2. Phytochromes in photosynthetically competent plants

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, L.H.

    1990-07-01

    Plants utilize light as a source of information in photomorphogenesis and of free energy in photosynthesis, two processes that are interrelated in that the former serves to increase the efficiency with which plants can perform the latter. Only one pigment involved in photomorphogenesis has been identified unequivocally, namely phytochrome. The thrust of this proposal is to investigate this pigment and its mode(s) of action in photosynthetically competent plants. Our long term objective is to characterize phytochrome and its functions in photosynthetically competent plants from molecular, biochemical and cellular perspectives. It is anticipated that others will continue to contribute indirectly to these efforts at the physiological level. The ultimate goal will be to develop this information from a comparative perspective in order to learn whether the different phytochromes have significantly different physicochemical properties, whether they fulfill independent functions and if so what these different functions are, and how each of the different phytochromes acts at primary molecular and cellular levels.

  3. Monitoring Ubiquitin-Coated Bacteria via Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lork, Marie; Delvaeye, Mieke; Gonçalves, Amanda; Van Hamme, Evelien; Beyaert, Rudi

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella is a gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen that is capable of infecting a variety of hosts. Inside host cells, most Salmonella bacteria reside and replicate within Salmonella-containing vacuoles. They use virulence proteins to manipulate the host cell machinery for their own benefit and hijack the host cytoskeleton to travel toward the perinuclear area. However, a fraction of bacteria escapes into the cytosol where they get decorated with a dense layer of polyubiquitin, which labels the bacteria for clearance by autophagy. More specifically, autophagy receptor proteins recognize the ubiquitinated bacteria and deliver them to autophagosomes, which subsequently fuse to lysosomes. Here, we describe methods used to infect HeLa cells with Salmonella bacteria and to detect their ubiquitination via immunofluorescence and laser scanning confocal microscopy. PMID:27613040

  4. Photosynthetic reaction center as a quantum heat engine.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, Konstantin E; Voronine, Dmitri V; Mukamel, Shaul; Scully, Marlan O

    2013-02-19

    Two seemingly unrelated effects attributed to quantum coherence have been reported recently in natural and artificial light-harvesting systems. First, an enhanced solar cell efficiency was predicted and second, population oscillations were measured in photosynthetic antennae excited by sequences of coherent ultrashort laser pulses. Because both systems operate as quantum heat engines (QHEs) that convert the solar photon energy to useful work (electric currents or chemical energy, respectively), the question arises whether coherence could also enhance the photosynthetic yield. Here, we show that both effects arise from the same population-coherence coupling term which is induced by noise, does not require coherent light, and will therefore work for incoherent excitation under natural conditions of solar excitation. Charge separation in light-harvesting complexes occurs in a pair of tightly coupled chlorophylls (the special pair) at the heart of photosynthetic reaction centers of both plants and bacteria. We show the analogy between the energy level schemes of the special pair and of the laser/photocell QHEs, and that both population oscillations and enhanced yield have a common origin and are expected to coexist for typical parameters. We predict an enhanced yield of 27% in a QHE motivated by the reaction center. This suggests nature-mimicking architectures for artificial solar energy devices. PMID:23365138

  5. Photocurrent of a single photosynthetic protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerster, Daniel; Reichert, Joachim; Bi, Hai; Barth, Johannes V.; Kaniber, Simone M.; Holleitner, Alexander W.; Visoly-Fisher, Iris; Sergani, Shlomi; Carmeli, Itai

    2012-10-01

    Photosynthesis is used by plants, algae and bacteria to convert solar energy into stable chemical energy. The initial stages of this process--where light is absorbed and energy and electrons are transferred--are mediated by reaction centres composed of chlorophyll and carotenoid complexes. It has been previously shown that single small molecules can be used as functional components in electric and optoelectronic circuits, but it has proved difficult to control and probe individual molecules for photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical applications. Here, we show that the photocurrent generated by a single photosynthetic protein--photosystem I--can be measured using a scanning near-field optical microscope set-up. One side of the protein is anchored to a gold surface that acts as an electrode, and the other is contacted by a gold-covered glass tip. The tip functions as both counter electrode and light source. A photocurrent of ~10 pA is recorded from the covalently bound single-protein junctions, which is in agreement with the internal electron transfer times of photosystem I.

  6. Metabolic network modeling of redox balancing and biohydrogen production in purple nonsulfur bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Purple nonsulfur bacteria (PNSB) are facultative photosynthetic bacteria and exhibit an extremely versatile metabolism. A central focus of research on PNSB dealt with the elucidation of mechanisms by which they manage to balance cellular redox under diverse conditions, in particular under photoheterotrophic growth. Results Given the complexity of the central metabolism of PNSB, metabolic modeling becomes crucial for an integrated analysis of the accumulated biological knowledge. We reconstructed a stoichiometric model capturing the central metabolism of three important representatives of PNSB (Rhodospirillum rubrum, Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodopseudomonas palustris). Using flux variability analysis, the model reveals key metabolic constraints related to redox homeostasis in these bacteria. With the help of the model we can (i) give quantitative explanations for non-intuitive, partially species-specific phenomena of photoheterotrophic growth of PNSB, (ii) reproduce various quantitative experimental data, and (iii) formulate several new hypotheses. For example, model analysis of photoheterotrophic growth reveals that - despite a large number of utilizable catabolic pathways - substrate-specific biomass and CO2 yields are fixed constraints, irrespective of the assumption of optimal growth. Furthermore, our model explains quantitatively why a CO2 fixing pathway such as the Calvin cycle is required by PNSB for many substrates (even if CO2 is released). We also analyze the role of other pathways potentially involved in redox metabolism and how they affect quantitatively the required capacity of the Calvin cycle. Our model also enables us to discriminate between different acetate assimilation pathways that were proposed recently for R. sphaeroides and R. rubrum, both lacking the isocitrate lyase. Finally, we demonstrate the value of the metabolic model also for potential biotechnological applications: we examine the theoretical capabilities of PNSB for

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of the Aerobic Facultative Methanotroph Methylocella silvestris BL2▿

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yin; Crombie, Andrew; Rahman, M. Tanvir; Dedysh, Svetlana N.; Liesack, Werner; Stott, Matthew B.; Alam, Maqsudul; Theisen, Andreas R.; Murrell, J. Colin; Dunfield, Peter F.

    2010-01-01

    Methylocella silvestris BL2 is an aerobic methanotroph originally isolated from an acidic forest soil in Germany. It is the first fully authenticated facultative methanotroph. It grows not only on methane and other one-carbon (C1) substrates, but also on some compounds containing carbon-carbon bonds, such as acetate, pyruvate, propane, and succinate. Here we report the full genome sequence of this bacterium. PMID:20472789

  8. Forster Energy Transfer Theory as Reflected in the Structures of Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sener, Melih; Strumpfer, Johan; Hsin, Jen; Chandler, Danielle; Scheuring, Simon; Hunter, C. Neil; Schulten, Klaus

    2011-02-22

    Förster's theory of resonant energy transfer underlies a fundamental process in nature, namely the harvesting of sunlight by photosynthetic life forms. The theoretical framework developed by Förster and others describes how electronic excitation migrates in the photosynthetic apparatus of plants, algae, and bacteria from light absorbing pigments to reaction centers where light energy is utilized for the eventual conversion into chemical energy. The demand for highest possible efficiency of light harvesting appears to have shaped the evolution of photosynthetic species from bacteria to plants which, despite a great variation in architecture, display common structural themes founded on the quantum physics of energy transfer as described first by Förster. Herein, Förster’s theory of excitation transfer is summarized, including recent extensions, and the relevance of the theory to photosynthetic systems as evolved in purple bacteria, cyanobacteria, and plants is demonstrated. Förster's energy transfer formula, as used widely today in many fields of science, is also derived.

  9. Substrate preference, uptake kinetics and bioenergetics in a facultatively autotrophic, thermoacidophilic crenarchaeote.

    PubMed

    Urschel, Matthew R; Hamilton, Trinity L; Roden, Eric E; Boyd, Eric S

    2016-05-01

    Facultative autotrophs are abundant components of communities inhabiting geothermal springs. However, the influence of uptake kinetics and energetics on preference for substrates is not well understood in this group of organisms. Here, we report the isolation of a facultatively autotrophic crenarchaeote, strain CP80, from Cinder Pool (CP, 88.7°C, pH 4.0), Yellowstone National Park. The 16S rRNA gene sequence from CP80 is 98.8% identical to that from Thermoproteus uzonensis and is identical to the most abundant sequence identified in CP sediments. Strain CP80 reduces elemental sulfur (S8°) and demonstrates hydrogen (H2)-dependent autotrophic growth. H2-dependent autotrophic activity is suppressed by amendment with formate at a concentration in the range of 20-40 μM, similar to the affinity constant determined for formate utilization. Synthesis of a cell during growth with low concentrations of formate required 0.5 μJ compared to 2.5 μJ during autotrophic growth with H2 These results, coupled to data indicating greater C assimilation efficiency when grown with formate as compared to carbon dioxide, are consistent with preferential use of formate for energetic reasons. Collectively, these results provide new insights into the kinetic and energetic factors that influence the physiology and ecology of facultative autotrophs in high-temperature acidic environments. PMID:27037359

  10. Seasonal variation of morph ratio in facultatively paedomorphic populations of the palmate newt Triturus helveticus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denoël, Mathieu

    2006-03-01

    Facultative paedomorphosis is a polyphenism in which individuals may express one of two alternative ontogenetic pathways (metamorphosis vs. paedomorphosis) depending on environmental cues. Previous laboratory experiments showed that drying can cause morph ratio change, suggesting that the maintenance of facultative paedomorphosis is highly dependent on environmental determinants. The aim of this study was to examine seasonal variation in morph ratios in eight ponds from Larzac (southern France) naturally inhabited by palmate newts and to relate it to pond drying. In some ponds, the relative proportion of paedomorphs (i.e. individuals retaining gills at the adult stage) increased after the breeding period, but it remained stable or decreased in other ponds. This seasonal variation in the abundance of the two morphs most probably reflects (1) the emigration of metamorphs leaving the pond to occupy terrestrial habitats and (2) metamorphosis of paedomorphic adults in response to drying of the ponds. This study shows that facultative paedomorphosis in palmate newts is a dynamic process that allows rapid change (i.e. within a single year) in morph ratio to fit environmental variation (i.e. risk of drying) within the aquatic habitats. Long-term studies are needed to model the evolution of the dimorphism according to environmental change.

  11. Compromised Lactobacillus helveticus starter activity in the presence of facultative heterofermentative Lactobacillus casei DPC6987 results in atypical eye formation in Swiss-type cheese.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Daniel J; McSweeney, Paul L H; Cotter, Paul D; Giblin, Linda; Sheehan, Jeremiah J

    2016-04-01

    Nonstarter lactic acid bacteria are commonly implicated in undesirable gas formation in several varieties, including Cheddar, Dutch-, and Swiss-type cheeses, primarily due to their ability to ferment a wide variety of substrates. This effect can be magnified due to factors that detrimentally affect the composition or activity of starter bacteria, resulting in the presence of greater than normal amounts of fermentable carbohydrates and citrate. The objective of this study was to determine the potential for a facultatively heterofermentative Lactobacillus (Lactobacillus casei DPC6987) isolated from a cheese plant environment to promote gas defects in the event of compromised starter activity. A Swiss-type cheese was manufactured, at pilot scale and in triplicate, containing a typical starter culture (Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus helveticus) together with propionic acid bacteria. Lactobacillus helveticus populations were omitted in certain vats to mimic starter failure. Lactobacillus casei DPC6987 was added to each experimental vat at 4 log cfu/g. Cheese compositional analysis and X-ray computed tomography revealed that the failure of starter bacteria, in this case L. helveticus, coupled with the presence of a faculatively heterofermentative Lactobacillus (L. casei) led to excessive eye formation during ripening. The availability of excess amounts of lactose, galactose, and citrate during the initial ripening stages likely provided the heterofermentative L. casei with sufficient substrates for gas formation. The accrual of these fermentable substrates was notable in cheeses lacking the L. helveticus starter population. The results of this study are commercially relevant, as they demonstrate the importance of viability of starter populations and the control of specific nonstarter lactic acid bacteria to ensure appropriate eye formation in Swiss-type cheese. PMID:26805985

  12. Photooxidative Damage in Photosynthetic Activities of Chromatium vinosum 1

    PubMed Central

    Asami, Sumio; Akazawa, Takashi

    1978-01-01

    The capacity of photosynthetic CO2 fixation in the anaerobic purple-sulfur bacterium, Chromatium vinosum is markedly impaired by strong illumination (9 × 104 lux) in the presence of 100% O2. In the absence of HCO3−, decline in activity occurred gradually, with about 40% of the initial activity remaining after a 1-hour incubation. The addition of 50 millimolar HCO3− to the incubation medium resulted in a measurable delay (about 30 minutes) of the inactivation process. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity and light-dependent O2 uptake (electron flow) or crude extracts prepared after pretreatment of the bacterial cells with O2 and light were not affected but the photophosphorylation capacity of either bacterial cells or chromatophores was drastically reduced. The inhibition of photophos-phorylation in the chromatophore preparations was significantly reduced by the addition of either an O2− scavenger, Tiron, or an 1O2 scavenger, α-tocopherol. These results suggest that the active O2 species, O2− or 1O2, might take part in the observed inactivation. The pretreatment of the bacteria with O2 and light inhibited CO2 assimilation through the Calvin-Benson cycle, while relatively stimulating the formation of aspartate and glutamate. It also inhibited the conversion of glycolate to glycine, resulting in a sustained extracellular excretion of glycolate. The inactivation of photosynthetic CO2 fixation by intact cells was enhanced by low temperature, KCN, or methylviologen addition during the pretreatment with O2 and light. The mechanism(s) of O2-dependent photoinactivation of photosynthetic activities in Chromatium are discussed in relation to the possible role of photorespiration as a means of producing CO2 in the photosynthetic system. PMID:16660651

  13. Quantum Life: How photosynthetic organisms use quantum coherence to enhance the efficiency of energy transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Seth

    2014-03-01

    Femtosecond spectroscopy reveals significant quantum coherence in excitonic transport in photosynthetic organisms. How and why are living systems using quantum mechanics? This talk presents a simple theory of how to optimize energy transport in quantum systems that possess noise and disorder. Too much quantum coherence leads to destructive interference and localization, while too little coherence prevents energy from moving at all, via the watchdog or quantum Zeno effect. With just the right amount of quantum coherence, however, energy can move through photosynthetic complexes with almost 100% efficiency. This talk explains how plants and photosynthetic bacteria attain such high efficiencies for energy transport, and discusses how human-made systems could be designed to attain similar efficiencies.

  14. The Photosynthetic Apparatus and Its Regulation in the Aerobic Gammaproteobacterium Congregibacter litoralis gen. nov., sp. nov

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Stefan; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Fuchs, Bernhard M.; Tindall, Brian J.

    2009-01-01

    Background There is accumulating evidence that in some marine environments aerobic bacteriochlorophyll a-producing bacteria represent a significant part of the microbial population. The interaction of photosynthesis and carbon metabolism in these interesting bacteria is still largely unknown and requires further investigation in order to estimate their contribution to the marine carbon cycle. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we analyzed the structure, composition and regulation of the photosynthetic apparatus in the obligately aerobic marine gammaproteobacterium KT71T. Photoheterotrophically grown cells were characterized by a poorly developed lamellar intracytoplasmic membrane system, a type 1 light-harvesting antenna complex and a photosynthetic reaction center associated with a tetraheme cytochrome c. The only photosynthetic pigments produced were bacteriochlorophyll a and spirilloxanthin. Under semiaerobic conditions KT71T cells expressing a photosynthetic apparatus showed a light-dependent increase of growth yield in the range of 1.3–2.5 fold. The expression level of the photosynthetic apparatus depended largely on the utilized substrate, the intermediary carbon metabolism and oxygen tension. In addition, pigment synthesis was strongly influenced by light, with blue light exerting the most significant effect, implicating that proteins containing a BLUF domain may be involved in regulation of the photosynthetic apparatus. Several phenotypic traits in KT71T could be identified that correlated with the assumed redox state of growing cells and thus could be used to monitor the cellular redox state under various incubation conditions. Conclusions/Significance In a hypothetical model that explains the regulation of the photosynthetic apparatus in strain KT71T we propose that the expression of photosynthesis genes depends on the cellular redox state and is maximal under conditions that allow a balanced membrane redox state. So far, bacteria capable of an

  15. Taxonomic composition and physiological and biochemical properties of bacteria in the digestive tracts of earthworms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byzov, B. A.; Tikhonov, V. V.; Nechitailo, T. Yu.; Demin, V. V.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.

    2015-03-01

    Several hundred bacterial strains belonging to different taxa were isolated and identified from the digestive tracts of soil and compost earthworms. Some physiological and biochemical properties of the bacteria were characterized. The majority of intestinal bacteria in the earthworms were found to be facultative anaerobes. The intestinal isolates as compared to the soil ones had elevated activity of proteases and dehydrogenases. In addition, bacteria associated with earthworms' intestines are capable of growth on humic acids as a sole carbon source. Humic acid stimulated the growth of the intestinal bacteria to a greater extent than those of the soil ones. In the digestive tracts, polyphenol oxidase activity was found. Along with the data on the taxonomic separation of the intestinal bacteria, the features described testified to the presence of a group of bacteria in the earthworms intestines that is functionally characteristic and is different from the soil bacteria.

  16. [Lysogeny and lysogenic conversion in methylotrophic bacteria. II. Lysogenic conversion in facultative methanol-assimilating Acetobacter strains].

    PubMed

    Wünsche, L; Kiesel, B; Fischer, H

    1983-01-01

    The lysogenic state of the methylotrophic strain Acetobacter MB 58/1 is completely demonstrated by curing and lysogenization experiments. During these investigations we found that some phenotypic characteristics are modified by the presence or loss of the prophage MO 1. It could be shown that changes of the serological behaviour, the adsorption of the phages and the sensitivity against oxytetracycline are caused by lysogenic conversion. The phenotypic alterations of the bacterial cells induced by the phage genome are the result of modifications of the lipopolysaccharide structures on the cell surface. In the case of oxytetracycline resistance, interactions between the modified lipopolysaccharide structures and specific transport proteins of the cell membranes must be assumed. PMID:6880251

  17. Calculation of the radiative properties of photosynthetic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauchet, Jérémi; Blanco, Stéphane; Cornet, Jean-François; Fournier, Richard

    2015-08-01

    photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria and eukaryotic microalgae. The obtained results are in very good agreement with the experimental measurements when the shape of the microorganisms is well described (in comparison to the standard volume-equivalent sphere approximation). As a main perspective, the consideration of the helical shape of Arthrospira platensis appears to be a key to an accurate estimation of its radiative properties. On the whole, the presented methodological chain also appears of great interest for other scientific communities such as atmospheric science, oceanography, astrophysics and engineering.

  18. The complete mitochondrial genome of the facultative entomopathogenic nematode Oscheius chongmingensis (Rhabditida: Rhabditidae).

    PubMed

    Jarošová, Andrea; Půža, Vladimír; Žurovcová, Martina

    2016-09-01

    We determined the complete mitochondrial genome of the facultative entomopathogenic nematode Oscheius chongmingensis. The mitogenome length was 15,413 bp and similar to other Rhabditids contains genes for 2 rRNAs, 22 tRNAs, and 12 proteins (ATPase subunit 8 is missing). Predicted tRNAs indicated the secondary structure typical for chromadorean nematodes. Gene order is similar to that observed in the genus Caenorhabditis. The control AT-rich region is considerably large (2061 bp, 84% of AT), positioned in between tRNA(Ala) and tRNA(Pro) and has several microsatellite-like (AT)n elements. PMID:25758048

  19. Development of a gene cloning system for the hydrogen-producing marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp.

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, T; Matsunaga, N; Tsubaki, K; Tanaka, T

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-six strains of marine photosynthetic bacteria were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis for plasmid DNA content. Among these strains, 12 carried two to four different plasmids with sizes ranging from 3.1 to 11.0 megadaltons. The marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106 had two plasmids, pRD06S and pRD06L. The smaller plasmid, pRD06S, had a molecular weight of 3.8 megadaltons and was cut at a single site by restriction endonucleases SalI, SmaI, PstI, XhoI, and BglII. Moreover, the marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106 containing plasmid pRD06 had a satisfactory growth rate (doubling time, 7.5 h), a hydrogen-producing rate of 0.96 mumol/mg (dry weight) of cells per h, and nitrogen fixation capability. Plasmid pRD06S, however, had neither drug resistance nor heavy-metal resistance, and its copy number was less than 10. Therefore, a recombinant plasmid consisting of pRD06S and Escherichia coli cloning vector pUC13 was constructed and cloned in E. coli. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106. As a result, Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106 developed ampicillin resistance. Thus, a shuttle vector for gene transfer was constructed for marine photosynthetic bacteria. PMID:3020006

  20. Role of an elliptical structure in photosynthetic energy transfer: Collaboration between quantum entanglement and thermal fluctuation

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Hisaki

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments have revealed that the light-harvesting complex 1 (LH1) in purple photosynthetic bacteria has an elliptical structure. Generally, symmetry lowering in a structure leads to a decrease in quantum effects (quantum coherence and entanglement), which have recently been considered to play a role in photosynthetic energy transfer, and hence, elliptical structure seems to work against efficient photosynthetic energy transfer. Here we analyse the effect of an elliptical structure on energy transfer in a purple photosynthetic bacterium and reveal that the elliptical distortion rather enhances energy transfer from peripheral LH2 to LH1 at room temperature. Numerical results show that quantum entanglement between LH1 and LH2 is formed over a wider range of high energy levels than would have been the case with circular LH1. Light energy absorbed by LH2 is thermally pumped via thermal fluctuation and is effectively transferred to LH1 through the entangled states at room temperature rather than at low temperature. This result indicates the possibility that photosynthetic systems adopt an elliptical structure to effectively utilise both quantum entanglement and thermal fluctuation at physiological temperature. PMID:27173144

  1. Role of an elliptical structure in photosynthetic energy transfer: Collaboration between quantum entanglement and thermal fluctuation.

    PubMed

    Oka, Hisaki

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments have revealed that the light-harvesting complex 1 (LH1) in purple photosynthetic bacteria has an elliptical structure. Generally, symmetry lowering in a structure leads to a decrease in quantum effects (quantum coherence and entanglement), which have recently been considered to play a role in photosynthetic energy transfer, and hence, elliptical structure seems to work against efficient photosynthetic energy transfer. Here we analyse the effect of an elliptical structure on energy transfer in a purple photosynthetic bacterium and reveal that the elliptical distortion rather enhances energy transfer from peripheral LH2 to LH1 at room temperature. Numerical results show that quantum entanglement between LH1 and LH2 is formed over a wider range of high energy levels than would have been the case with circular LH1. Light energy absorbed by LH2 is thermally pumped via thermal fluctuation and is effectively transferred to LH1 through the entangled states at room temperature rather than at low temperature. This result indicates the possibility that photosynthetic systems adopt an elliptical structure to effectively utilise both quantum entanglement and thermal fluctuation at physiological temperature. PMID:27173144

  2. Role of an elliptical structure in photosynthetic energy transfer: Collaboration between quantum entanglement and thermal fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Hisaki

    2016-05-01

    Recent experiments have revealed that the light-harvesting complex 1 (LH1) in purple photosynthetic bacteria has an elliptical structure. Generally, symmetry lowering in a structure leads to a decrease in quantum effects (quantum coherence and entanglement), which have recently been considered to play a role in photosynthetic energy transfer, and hence, elliptical structure seems to work against efficient photosynthetic energy transfer. Here we analyse the effect of an elliptical structure on energy transfer in a purple photosynthetic bacterium and reveal that the elliptical distortion rather enhances energy transfer from peripheral LH2 to LH1 at room temperature. Numerical results show that quantum entanglement between LH1 and LH2 is formed over a wider range of high energy levels than would have been the case with circular LH1. Light energy absorbed by LH2 is thermally pumped via thermal fluctuation and is effectively transferred to LH1 through the entangled states at room temperature rather than at low temperature. This result indicates the possibility that photosynthetic systems adopt an elliptical structure to effectively utilise both quantum entanglement and thermal fluctuation at physiological temperature.

  3. Bacteria Provide Cleanup of Oil Spills, Wastewater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Marshall Space Flight Center, Micro-Bac International Inc., of Round Rock, Texas, developed a phototrophic cell for water purification in space. Inside the cell: millions of photosynthetic bacteria. Micro-Bac proceeded to commercialize the bacterial formulation it developed for the SBIR project. The formulation is now used for the remediation of wastewater systems and waste from livestock farms and food manufacturers. Strains of the SBIR-derived bacteria also feature in microbial solutions that treat environmentally damaging oil spills, such as that resulting from the catastrophic 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico.

  4. Magnetic Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    1992-01-01

    Describes the history of Richard Blakemore's discovery of magnetotaxic organisms. Discusses possible reasons why the magnetic response in bacteria developed. Proposes research experiments integrating biology and physics in which students investigate problems using cultures of magnetotaxic organisms. (MDH)

  5. Anaerobic bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    Brook I, Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 297. Stedman's Online ...

  6. Fluorescence enhancement of photosynthetic complexes separated from nanoparticles by a reduced graphene oxide layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twardowska, Magdalena; Kamińska, Izabela; Wiwatowski, Kamil; Ashraf, Khuram U.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Mackowski, Sebastian; Niedziółka-Jönsson, Joanna

    2014-03-01

    We observe that introducing a layer of reduced graphene oxide between electrochemically deposited gold nanoparticles and natural photosynthetic Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex from green sulfur bacteria, results in an increase of the fluorescence emission of the FMO. This increase is not accompanied with any substantial change of the fluorescence dynamics. Our findings indicate that incorporating graphene-based materials in hybrid assemblies yields better performance of such structures, thus holds promise for designing biosensing and optoelectronic devices.

  7. No facultative worker policing in the honey bee ( Apis mellifera L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loope, Kevin J.; Seeley, Thomas D.; Mattila, Heather R.

    2013-05-01

    Kin selection theory predicts that in colonies of social Hymenoptera with multiply mated queens, workers should mutually inhibit ("police") worker reproduction, but that in colonies with singly mated queens, workers should favor rearing workers' sons instead of queens' sons. In line with these predictions, Mattila et al. (Curr Biol 22:2027-2031, 2012) documented increased ovary development among workers in colonies of honey bees with singly mated queens, suggesting that workers can detect and respond adaptively to queen mating frequency and raising the possibility that they facultative police. In a follow-up experiment, we test and reject the hypothesis that workers in single-patriline colonies prefer worker-derived males and are able to reproduce directly; we show that their eggs are policed as strongly as those of workers in colonies with multiply mated queens. Evidently, workers do not respond facultatively to a kin structure that favors relaxed policing and increased direct reproduction. These workers may instead be responding to a poor queen or preparing for possible queen loss.

  8. Physiological variation as a mechanism for developmental caste-biasing in a facultatively eusocial sweat bee

    PubMed Central

    Kapheim, Karen M.; Smith, Adam R.; Ihle, Kate E.; Amdam, Gro V.; Nonacs, Peter; Wcislo, William T.

    2012-01-01

    Social castes of eusocial insects may have arisen through an evolutionary modification of an ancestral reproductive ground plan, such that some adults emerge from development physiologically primed to specialize on reproduction (queens) and others on maternal care expressed as allo-maternal behaviour (workers). This hypothesis predicts that variation in reproductive physiology should emerge from ontogeny and underlie division of labour. To test these predictions, we identified physiological links to division of labour in a facultatively eusocial sweat bee, Megalopta genalis. Queens are larger, have larger ovaries and have higher vitellogenin titres than workers. We then compared queens and workers with their solitary counterparts—solitary reproductive females and dispersing nest foundresses—to investigate physiological variation as a factor in caste evolution. Within dyads, body size and ovary development were the best predictors of behavioural class. Queens and dispersers are larger, with larger ovaries than their solitary counterparts. Finally, we raised bees in social isolation to investigate the influence of ontogeny on physiological variation. Body size and ovary development among isolated females were highly variable, and linked to differences in vitellogenin titres. As these are key physiological predictors of social caste, our results provide evidence for developmental caste-biasing in a facultatively eusocial bee. PMID:22048951

  9. The vocal repertoire in a solitary foraging carnivore, Cynictis penicillata, may reflect facultative sociality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, Aliza; Cherry, Michael I.; Manser, Marta B.

    2009-05-01

    We describe the vocal repertoire of a facultatively social carnivore, the yellow mongoose, Cynictis penicillata. Using a combination of close-range observations, recordings and experiments with simulated predators, we were able to obtain clear descriptions of call structure and function for a wide range of calls used by this herpestid. The vocal repertoire of the yellow mongooses comprised ten call types, half of which were used in appeasing or fearful contexts and half in aggressive interactions. Data from this study suggest that the yellow mongoose uses an urgency-based alarm calling system, indicating high and low urgency through two distinct call types. Compared to solitary mongooses, the yellow mongoose has a large proportion of ‘friendly’ vocalisations that enhance group cohesion, but its vocal repertoire is smaller and less context-specific than those of obligate social species. This study of the vocal repertoire of the yellow mongoose is, to our knowledge, the most complete to have been conducted on a facultatively social species in its natural habitat.

  10. Serratia symbiotica from the aphid Cinara cedri: a missing link from facultative to obligate insect endosymbiont.

    PubMed

    Lamelas, Araceli; Gosalbes, María José; Manzano-Marín, Alejandro; Peretó, Juli; Moya, Andrés; Latorre, Amparo

    2011-11-01

    The genome sequencing of Buchnera aphidicola BCc from the aphid Cinara cedri, which is the smallest known Buchnera genome, revealed that this bacterium had lost its symbiotic role, as it was not able to synthesize tryptophan and riboflavin. Moreover, the biosynthesis of tryptophan is shared with the endosymbiont Serratia symbiotica SCc, which coexists with B. aphidicola in this aphid. The whole-genome sequencing of S. symbiotica SCc reveals an endosymbiont in a stage of genome reduction that is closer to an obligate endosymbiont, such as B. aphidicola from Acyrthosiphon pisum, than to another S. symbiotica, which is a facultative endosymbiont in this aphid, and presents much less gene decay. The comparison between both S. symbiotica enables us to propose an evolutionary scenario of the transition from facultative to obligate endosymbiont. Metabolic inferences of B. aphidicola BCc and S. symbiotica SCc reveal that most of the functions carried out by B. aphidicola in A. pisum are now either conserved in B. aphidicola BCc or taken over by S. symbiotica. In addition, there are several cases of metabolic complementation giving functional stability to the whole consortium and evolutionary preservation of the actors involved. PMID:22102823

  11. Oxygen Effect on the Low Temperature Tolerance of Facultative Anaerobes from Antarctica, Alaska, and Patagonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    Psychrotolerance as an adaptation to survival in extreme environments is widespread among many of the mesophilic microorganisms. Red-ox potential, pH and salinity could significantly alter the features of ecosystems by providing liquid water at subzero temperatures. Furthermore, organisms can respond to temperature changes by several known mechanisms, including changing the conformation capacities of constitutional proteins or by the synthesis of mucopolysaccharides around the cell wall and membrane. Such protective mechanisms make it possible for cells to not only passively survive low-temperature in a state of anabiosis, but also to be capable of actively metabolizing substrates and reproducing normally. The physiological and biochemical characteristics of species as well as genetics could be remarkably changed due to -on and surviving m extreme environments. The cold shock genes for some of the studied strains of psychrotolerant facultative anaerobes already were published In this paper we present experimental data for psychrotolerant facultative anaerobes isolated from geographically different cold regions of our planet. We show the growth response on the changing of anaerobic conditions to aerobic with cultivation at subzero temperatures.

  12. Growth of the Facultative Anaerobes from Antarctica, Alaska, and Patagonia at Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    Psychotolerance, as an adaptation for surviving in extreme environments, is widespread among mesophilic microorganisms. Physico-chemical factors such as pressure, red-ox potential, pH and salinity could significantly alter the features of ecosystems by providing liquid water at subzero temperatures. Furthermore, organisms can respond to temperature changes by several known mechanisms, including changing the conformation capacities of constitutional proteins or by the synthesis of mucopolysaccharides around the cell wall and membrane. Such protective mechanisms make it possible for cells to not only passively survive low temperatures in a state of anabiosis, but also to be capable of actively metabolizing substrates and reproducing normally. The physiological and biochemical characteristics of the species, as well as genetics, could be remarkably changed due to adaptation and surviving in extreme environments. The cold shock genes of some of the studied strains of psychotolerant facultative anaerobes were reported previously. In this paper we present experimental data for psychotolerant, non spore-forming, facultative anaerobes isolated from geographically different cold regions of our planet. We show the growth response on changing from anaerobic conditions to aerobic with cultivation at low temperatures.

  13. SUSCEPTIBILITY OF STRICT AND FACULTATIVE ANAEROBES ISOLATED FROM ENDODONTIC INFECTIONS TO METRONIDAZOLE AND β-LACTAMS

    PubMed Central

    Gaetti-Jardim, Elerson; Landucci, Luís Fernando; Lins, Samira Âmbar; Vieira, Evanice Menezes Marçal; de Oliveira, Sérgio Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    Endodontic infections are mixed aerobic-anaerobic infections and several microbial groups associated to these pathologies are also involved in orofacial infections. The goal of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility of microorganisms isolated from endodontic infections to β-lactams and metronidazole and verify the production of β-lactamases. Clinical specimens were collected from 58 endodontic infections of 52 patients. The microorganisms were isolated in selective and non-selective culture media, under anaerobiosis and aerobiosis, and identified using biochemical methods. In the susceptibility tests, it was used an agar dilution method, and Wilkins-Chalgren agar enriched with blood, hemin and menadione for the anaerobes, while Mueller- Hinton agar was employed for the facultative anaerobes. The production of β-lactamases was evaluated through the biological and chromogenic cephalosporin methods. All tested isolates were sensitive to imipenem and 99.3% to amoxicillin/clavulanate association, while 16.1% showed resistance to amoxicillin and penicillin G, and 4.89% to cefoxitin. Resistance to metronidazole was just found in facultative anaerobes. Production of β-lactamases was detected in 18.2% of the isolates and presented a correlation with resistance to β-lactams. PMID:19089195

  14. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of competitive exclusion bacteria applied to newly hatched chickens.

    PubMed

    Wagner, R Doug; Cerniglia, Carl E

    2005-07-25

    Competitive exclusion (CE) products are mixtures of obligate and facultative anaerobic bacteria applied to poultry hatchlings for prevention of Salmonella colonization. These mixtures have the potential to introduce bacteria with undesirable antimicrobial drug resistance traits into the human food supply. Antimicrobial drug susceptibilities of 27 obligate and facultative anaerobes isolated from a commercial CE product were evaluated with a microdilution minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay. Bacteroides distasonis and Bacteroides fragilis isolates were resistant to tetracycline and other antimicrobial drugs. An Escherichia coli isolate was resistant to four antimicrobial drugs: erythromycin, penicillin, vancomycin, and tylosin. Erythromycin-resistant enterococci and vancomycin-resistant Lactococcus lactis isolates in the CE product were detected. These findings suggest that more work needs to be done to assess the potential effects of CE product use in poultry on the food supply. PMID:16014302

  15. On the Quenching of the Fluorescence Yield in Photosynthetic Systems 12

    PubMed Central

    van Grondelle, Rienk; Duysens, Louis N.

    1980-01-01

    A modified matrix model describing transfer of excitation energy in the photosynthetic pigment system is discussed. In addition to the antenna pigments and reaction centers of the simple matrix model, a coupling complex is postulated mediating energy transfer between antenna and reaction centers. The values of the parameters describing the transfer properties of the coupling complex can be chosen in such a way that a number of recent unexplained measurements of fluorescence properties of various purple bacteria can be described. If such coupling complexes are present in oxygen evolving organisms, some of their properties must be different from those of purple bacteria. PMID:16661272

  16. Primary Photosynthetic Energy Conversion in Bacterial Reaction Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinth, Wolfgang; Wachtveitl, J.

    The development of human societies is strongly influenced by the available energetic resources. In a period where the limitations of conventional fossil energy carriers become as evident as the often uncontrollable dangers of nuclear energy, one has to reconsider regenerative energy resources. Here photovoltaic or photochemical use of solar energy is an important approach. Since the early days of evolution some two billion years ago, the dominant energetic input into the life system on earth occurs via the conversion of solar energy performed in photosynthetic organisms. The fossil energy carriers that we use and waste today have been produced by photosynthesis over millions of years. In the race for an extended and versatile use of solar energy, semiconductorbased photovoltaic devices have been developed. However, even after decades of intense engineering they cannot serve as a competitive alternative to fossil energy. Under these circumstances new alternatives are required. One line of scientific development may use the operational principles of photosynthesis since photosynthesis is still our main energy source. In this respect, we will present results on the basic concepts of energy conversion in photosynthetic bacteria, which could be used as a guideline to alternative light energy conversion systems.

  17. Synergistic Two-Photon Absorption Enhancement in Photosynthetic Light Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuo-Mei; Chen, Yu-Wei; Gao, Ting-Fong

    2012-06-01

    The grand scale fixation of solar energies into chemical substances by photosynthetic reactions of light-harvesting organisms provides Earth's other life forms a thriving environment. Scientific explorations in the past decades have unraveled the fundamental photophysical and photochemical processes in photosynthesis. Higher plants, green algae, and light-harvesting bacteria utilize organized pigment-protein complexes to harvest solar power efficiently and the resultant electronic excitations are funneled into a reaction center, where the first charge separation process takes place. Here we show experimental evidences that green algae (Chlorella vulgaris) in vivo display a synergistic two-photon absorption enhancement in their photosynthetic light harvesting. Their absorption coefficients at various wavelengths display dramatic dependence on the photon flux. This newly found phenomenon is attributed to a coherence-electronic-energy-transfer-mediated (CEETRAM) photon absorption process of light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes of green algae. Under the ambient light level, algae and higher plants can utilize this quantum mechanical mechanism to create two entangled electronic excitations adjacently in their light-harvesting networks. Concerted multiple electron transfer reactions in the reaction centers and oxygen evolving complexes can be implemented efficiently by the coherent motion of two entangled excitons from antennae to the charge separation reaction sites. To fabricate nanostructured, synthetic light-harvesting apparatus, the paramount role of the CEETRAM photon absorption mechanism should be seriously considered in the strategic guidelines.

  18. The antimicrobial activity of essential oils and essential oil components towards oral bacteria.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, S; Meier, A; Guggenheim, B

    1994-08-01

    A method for reproducibly determining minimal inhibitory concentrations and minimal bactericidal concentrations of plant extracts towards fastidiously and facultatively anaerobic oral bacteria, predicated upon measurements of optical densities in microtitre plate wells, was devised. The antimicrobial properties of some botanical oils were surveyed; of these, Australian tea tree oil, peppermint oil, and sage oil proved to be the most potent essential oils, whereas thymol and eugenol were potent essential oil components. PMID:7478759

  19. Regulation of Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Photosynthetic Organs.

    PubMed

    Llorente, Briardo

    2016-01-01

    A substantial proportion of the dazzling diversity of colors displayed by living organisms throughout the tree of life is determined by the presence of carotenoids, which most often provide distinctive yellow, orange and red hues. These metabolites play fundamental roles in nature that extend far beyond their importance as pigments. In photosynthetic lineages, carotenoids are essential to sustain life, since they have been exploited to maximize light harvesting and protect the photosynthetic machinery from photooxidative stress. Consequently, photosynthetic organisms have evolved several mechanisms that adjust the carotenoid metabolism to efficiently cope with constantly fluctuating light environments. This chapter will focus on the current knowledge concerning the regulation of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in leaves, which are the primary photosynthetic organs of most land plants. PMID:27485221

  20. Hybrid system of semiconductor and photosynthetic protein.

    PubMed

    Kim, Younghye; Shin, Seon Ae; Lee, Jaehun; Yang, Ki Dong; Nam, Ki Tae

    2014-08-29

    Photosynthetic protein has the potential to be a new attractive material for solar energy absorption and conversion. The development of semiconductor/photosynthetic protein hybrids is an example of recent progress toward efficient, clean and nanostructured photoelectric systems. In the review, two biohybrid systems interacting through different communicating methods are addressed: (1) a photosynthetic protein immobilized semiconductor electrode operating via electron transfer and (2) a hybrid of semiconductor quantum dots and photosynthetic protein operating via energy transfer. The proper selection of materials and functional and structural modification of the components and optimal conjugation between them are the main issues discussed in the review. In conclusion, we propose the direction of future biohybrid systems for solar energy conversion systems, optical biosensors and photoelectric devices. PMID:25091409

  1. Genetics of Bacteria That Oxidize On-Carbon Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Richard S.

    2001-01-01

    Facultative methanol oxidizing bacteria contain large amounts of methanol dehydrogenase which is expressed only in the presence of methanol. This technical report describes two-two component regulatory systems encoding histidine kinases and response regulators and another response regulator all of which are required for the expression of mxaF, the open reading frame encoding methanol dehydrogenase. The response regulators bind to sequences upstream of the mxaF when phosphoryled in a reaction catalyzed by the histidine kinases. The binding of the response regulators is required for the transcription of mxaF.

  2. Implications of salivary protein binding to commensal and pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Seok-Mo; Ruhl, Stefan; Scannapieco, Frank A.

    2013-01-01

    An important function of salivary proteins is to interact with microorganisms that enter the oral cavity. For some microbes, these interactions promote microbial colonization. For others, these interactions are deleterious and result in the elimination of the microbe from the mouth, This paper reviews recent studies of the interaction of salivary proteins with two model bacteria; the commensal species Streptococcus gordonii, and the facultative pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. These organisms selectively interact with a variety of salivary proteins to influence important functions such as bacterial adhesion to surfaces, evasion of host defense, bacterial nutrition and metabolism and gene expression. PMID:24707190

  3. Parameters of photosynthetic energy partitioning.

    PubMed

    Lazár, Dušan

    2015-03-01

    Almost every laboratory dealing with plant physiology, photosynthesis research, remote sensing, and plant phenotyping possesses a fluorometer to measure a kind of chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence induction (FLI). When the slow Chl FLI is measured with addition of saturating pulses and far-red illumination, the so-called quenching analysis followed by the so-called relaxation analysis in darkness can be realized. These measurements then serve for evaluation of the so-called energy partitioning, that is, calculation of quantum yields of photochemical and of different types of non-photochemical processes. Several theories have been suggested for photosynthetic energy partitioning. The current work aims to summarize all the existing theories, namely their equations for the quantum yields, their meaning and their assumptions. In the framework of these theories it is also found here that the well-known NPQ parameter ( [Formula: see text] ; Bilger and Björkman, 1990) equals the ratio of the quantum yield of regulatory light-induced non-photochemical quenching to the quantum yield of constitutive non-regulatory non-photochemical quenching (ΦNPQ/Φf,D). A similar relationship is also found here for the PQ parameter (ΦP/Φf,D). PMID:25569797

  4. Process for photosynthetically splitting water

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1982-01-28

    In one form of the invention, hydrogen is produced by providing a reactor containing a body of water. The water contains photolytic material, i.e., photoactive material containing a hydrogen-catalyst. The interior of the reactor is isolated from atmosphere and includes a volume for receiving gases evolved from the body of water. The photolytic material is exposed to light to effect photosynthetic splitting of the water into gaseous hydrogen and oxygen. The gas-receiving volume is continuously evacuated by pumping to promote evolution of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen into that volume and to withdraw them therefrom. In another form of the invention, separation of the hydrogen and oxygen is effected by selectively diffusing the hydrogen through a heated semipermeable membrane in a separation zone while maintaining across the zone a magnetic field gradient biasing the oxygen away from the membrane. In a third form of the invention, the withdrawn gas is contacted with a membrane blocking flow of water vapor to the region for effecting recovery of the hydrogen. In a fourth embodiment, the invention comprises a process for selectively recovering hydrogen from a gas mixture comprising hydrogen and oxygen. The process is conducted in a separation zone and comprises contacting the mixture with a semipermeable membrane effecting selective diffusion of hydrogen while maintaining across the zone a magnetic field gradient effecting movement of oxygen in a direction away from the membrane.

  5. Methanotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, R S; Hanson, T E

    1996-01-01

    Methane-utilizing bacteria (methanotrophs) are a diverse group of gram-negative bacteria that are related to other members of the Proteobacteria. These bacteria are classified into three groups based on the pathways used for assimilation of formaldehyde, the major source of cell carbon, and other physiological and morphological features. The type I and type X methanotrophs are found within the gamma subdivision of the Proteobacteria and employ the ribulose monophosphate pathway for formaldehyde assimilation, whereas type II methanotrophs, which employ the serine pathway for formaldehyde assimilation, form a coherent cluster within the beta subdivision of the Proteobacteria. Methanotrophic bacteria are ubiquitous. The growth of type II bacteria appears to be favored in environments that contain relatively high levels of methane, low levels of dissolved oxygen, and limiting concentrations of combined nitrogen and/or copper. Type I methanotrophs appear to be dominant in environments in which methane is limiting and combined nitrogen and copper levels are relatively high. These bacteria serve as biofilters for the oxidation of methane produced in anaerobic environments, and when oxygen is present in soils, atmospheric methane is oxidized. Their activities in nature are greatly influenced by agricultural practices and other human activities. Recent evidence indicates that naturally occurring, uncultured methanotrophs represent new genera. Methanotrophs that are capable of oxidizing methane at atmospheric levels exhibit methane oxidation kinetics different from those of methanotrophs available in pure cultures. A limited number of methanotrophs have the genetic capacity to synthesize a soluble methane monooxygenase which catalyzes the rapid oxidation of environmental pollutants including trichloroethylene. PMID:8801441

  6. The sulfolipid sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol is not required for photosynthetic electron transport in Rhodobacter sphaeroides but enhances growth under phosphate limitation

    SciTech Connect

    Benning, C.; Somerville, C.R. ); Beatty, J.T. ); Prince, R.C. )

    1993-02-15

    All photosynthetic organisms, with the exception of several species of photosynthetic bacteria, are thought to contain the sulfolipid 6-sulfo-[alpha]-D-quinovosyldiacylglycerol. The association of this lipid with photosynthetic membranes has led to the assumption that it plays some role in photosynthesis. Stable null mutants of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides completely lacking sulfolipid were obtained by disruption of the sqdB gene. The ratios of the various components of the photosynthetic electron transport chain, as well as the electron transfer rates during cyclic electron transport, were not altered in the mutants, when grown under optimal conditions. Growth rates of wild type and mutants were identical under a variety of growth conditions, with the exception of phosphate limitation, which resulted in reduced growth of the mutants. Phosphate limitation of the wild type a used a significant reduction in the amount of all phospholipids and an increased amount of sulfolipid. By contrast, the sulfolipid-deficient mutant had reduced levels of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine but maintained a normal level of phosphatidylglycerol. In addition, two unidentified lipids lacking phosphorus accumulated in the membranes of both wild-type and mutant strains under phosphate limitation. We conclude that sulfolipid plays no significant unique role in photoheterotrophic growth or photosynthetic electron transport in R. sphaeroides but may function as a surrogate for phospholipids, particularly phosphatidylglycerol, under phosphate-limiting conditions. 34 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. First report on facultative parthenogenetic activation of eggs in sterlet sturgeon, Acipenser ruthenus.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Mohammad Abdul Momin; Butts, Ian Anthony Ernest; Cosson, Jacky; Linhart, Otomar

    2016-05-01

    This study reported facultative parthenogenetic cleavage development of sterlet sturgeon Acipenser ruthenus eggs and quantified the percentage of parthenogenetically developed eggs in relation to the fertilization ability of different females. When eggs were activated in freshwater, 5.1-13.7% of eggs developed parthenogenetically, while among those activated eggs 3.6-9.4% developed to 2 cells, 0.4-4.5% developed to 4 cells, and 0-0.8% developed to 8 cells. The mean percentage of fertilized and parthenogenetically activated eggs among the females was negatively correlated (R(2)=0.71, p=0.036), which indicates that parthenogenetic activation rate of sterlet eggs depends on the quality of eggs in terms of fertilization rate. PMID:26952761

  8. Tank bromeliads as natural microcosms: a facultative association with ants influences the aquatic invertebrate community structure.

    PubMed

    Talaga, Stanislas; Dézerald, Olivier; Carteron, Alexis; Petitclerc, Frédéric; Leroy, Céline; Céréghino, Régis; Dejean, Alain

    2015-10-01

    Many tank bromeliads have facultative relationships with ants as is the case in French Guiana between Aechmea aquilega (Salib.) Griseb. and the trap-jaw ant, Odontomachus haematodus Linnaeus. Using a redundancy analysis, we determined that the presence of O. haematodus colonies is accompanied by a greater quantity of fine particulate organic matter in the water likely due to their wastes. This increase in nutrient availability is significantly correlated with an increase in the abundance of some detritivorous taxa, suggesting a positive bottom-up influence on the aquatic macroinvertebrate communities living in the A. aquilega wells. On the other hand, the abundance of top predators is negatively affected by a lower number of available wells due to ant constructions for nesting, releasing a top-down pressure that could also favor lower trophic levels. PMID:26302833

  9. Uncultivated Methylocystis Species in Paddy Soil Include Facultative Methanotrophs that Utilize Acetate.

    PubMed

    Leng, Lingqin; Chang, Jiali; Geng, Kan; Lu, Yahai; Ma, Ke

    2015-07-01

    Methanotrophs are crucial in regulating methane emission from rice field systems. Type II methanotrophs in particular are often observed in high abundance in paddy soil. Some cultivated species of Methylocystis are able to grow on acetate in the absence of methane. We hypothesize that the dominant type II methanotrophs in paddy soil might facultatively utilize acetate for growth, which we evaluate in the present study. The measurement of methane oxidation rates showed that the methanotrophic activity in paddy soil was inhibited by the addition of acetate compared to the continuous supplementation of methane, but the paddy soil maintained the methane oxidation capacity and recovered following methane supplementation. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (T-RFLP) combined with cloning and sequencing of pmoA genes showed that Methylocystis was enriched after incubation with added acetate, while the type I methanotrophs Methylocaldum/Methylococcus and Methylobacter were enriched by methane supplementation. A comparison of pmoA sequences obtained in this study with those in the public database indicated that they were globally widespread in paddy soils or in associated with rice roots. Furthermore, we performed stable isotope probing (SIP) of pmoA messenger RNA (mRNA) to investigate the assimilation of (13)C-acetate by paddy soil methanotrophs. RNA-SIP revealed that Methylocystis-related methanotrophs which shared the same genotype of the above enriched species were significantly labelled. It indicates that these methanotrophs actively assimilated the labelled acetate in paddy soil. Altogether, these results suggested that uncultivated Methylocystis species are facultative methanotrophs utilizing acetate as a secondary carbon source in paddy soil. PMID:25475784

  10. Photoperiod Extension Enhances Sexual Megaspore Formation and Triggers Metabolic Reprogramming in Facultative Apomictic Ranunculus auricomus

    PubMed Central

    Klatt, Simone; Hadacek, Franz; Hodač, Ladislav; Brinkmann, Gina; Eilerts, Marius; Hojsgaard, Diego; Hörandl, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis, the key step of sexual reproduction, persists in facultative apomictic plants functional to some extent. However, it still remains unclear how and why proportions of reproductive pathways vary under different environmental stress conditions. We hypothesized that oxidative stress mediates alterations of developmental pathways. In apomictic plants we expected that megasporogenesis, the stage directly after meiosis, would be more affected than later stages of seed development. To simulate moderate stress conditions we subjected clone-mates of facultative apomictic Ranunculus auricomus to 10 h photoperiods, reflecting natural conditions, and extended ones (16.5 h). Reproduction mode was screened directly after megasporogenesis (microscope) and at seed stage (flow cytometric seed screening). Targeted metabolite profiles were performed with HPLC–DAD to explore if and which metabolic reprogramming was caused by the extended photoperiod. Prolonged photoperiods resulted in increased frequencies of sexual vs. aposporous initials directly after meiosis, but did not affect frequencies of sexual vs. asexual seed formation. Changes in secondary metabolite profiles under extended photoperiods affected all classes of compounds, and c. 20% of these changes separated the two treatments. Unexpectedly, the renowned antioxidant phenylpropanoids and flavonoids added more to clone-mate variation than to treatment differentiation. Among others, chlorophyll degradation products, non-assigned phenolic compounds and more lipophilic metabolites also contributed to the dissimilarity of the metabolic profiles of plants that had been exposed to the two different photoperiods. The hypothesis of moderate light stress effects was supported by increased proportions of sexual megaspore development at the expense of aposporous initial formation. The lack of effects at the seed stage confirms the basic assumption that only meiosis and sporogenesis would be sensitive to light stress. The

  11. Photoperiod Extension Enhances Sexual Megaspore Formation and Triggers Metabolic Reprogramming in Facultative Apomictic Ranunculus auricomus.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Simone; Hadacek, Franz; Hodač, Ladislav; Brinkmann, Gina; Eilerts, Marius; Hojsgaard, Diego; Hörandl, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis, the key step of sexual reproduction, persists in facultative apomictic plants functional to some extent. However, it still remains unclear how and why proportions of reproductive pathways vary under different environmental stress conditions. We hypothesized that oxidative stress mediates alterations of developmental pathways. In apomictic plants we expected that megasporogenesis, the stage directly after meiosis, would be more affected than later stages of seed development. To simulate moderate stress conditions we subjected clone-mates of facultative apomictic Ranunculus auricomus to 10 h photoperiods, reflecting natural conditions, and extended ones (16.5 h). Reproduction mode was screened directly after megasporogenesis (microscope) and at seed stage (flow cytometric seed screening). Targeted metabolite profiles were performed with HPLC-DAD to explore if and which metabolic reprogramming was caused by the extended photoperiod. Prolonged photoperiods resulted in increased frequencies of sexual vs. aposporous initials directly after meiosis, but did not affect frequencies of sexual vs. asexual seed formation. Changes in secondary metabolite profiles under extended photoperiods affected all classes of compounds, and c. 20% of these changes separated the two treatments. Unexpectedly, the renowned antioxidant phenylpropanoids and flavonoids added more to clone-mate variation than to treatment differentiation. Among others, chlorophyll degradation products, non-assigned phenolic compounds and more lipophilic metabolites also contributed to the dissimilarity of the metabolic profiles of plants that had been exposed to the two different photoperiods. The hypothesis of moderate light stress effects was supported by increased proportions of sexual megaspore development at the expense of aposporous initial formation. The lack of effects at the seed stage confirms the basic assumption that only meiosis and sporogenesis would be sensitive to light stress. The

  12. Coalescent Times and Patterns of Genetic Diversity in Species with Facultative Sex: Effects of Gene Conversion, Population Structure, and Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Hartfield, Matthew; Wright, Stephen I; Agrawal, Aneil F

    2016-01-01

    Many diploid organisms undergo facultative sexual reproduction. However, little is currently known concerning the distribution of neutral genetic variation among facultative sexual organisms except in very simple cases. Understanding this distribution is important when making inferences about rates of sexual reproduction, effective population size, and demographic history. Here we extend coalescent theory in diploids with facultative sex to consider gene conversion, selfing, population subdivision, and temporal and spatial heterogeneity in rates of sex. In addition to analytical results for two-sample coalescent times, we outline a coalescent algorithm that accommodates the complexities arising from partial sex; this algorithm can be used to generate multisample coalescent distributions. A key result is that when sex is rare, gene conversion becomes a significant force in reducing diversity within individuals. This can reduce genomic signatures of infrequent sex (i.e., elevated within-individual allelic sequence divergence) or entirely reverse the predicted patterns. These models offer improved methods for assessing null patterns of molecular variation in facultative sexual organisms. PMID:26584902

  13. Performance evaluation and spatial sludge distribution at facultative and maturation ponds treating wastewater from an international airport.

    PubMed

    Passos, Ricardo Gomes; von Sperling, Marcos; Ribeiro, Thiago Bressani

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a performance evaluation of facultative and maturation ponds in series treating wastewater from a large and intensively used international airport in Brazil, based on 16 years of regular monitoring. The wastewater from the airport showed similar or slightly lower concentrations compared to typical domestic sewage for most of the quality parameters. The contribution of effluents with possible industrial features (aircraft toilets and hangar effluent) did not seem to have adversely affected the characteristics of the influent in terms of aptitude to biological treatment. Overall, the ponds operated under very underloaded conditions (mean loading rate of 44 kg biochemical oxygen demand/ha.d in the facultative pond) and presented a satisfactory quality in terms of effluent concentrations for most parameters. A bathymetric survey of the ponds was done manually by a low-cost measurer constructed specifically for this purpose. After 27 years of operation, only 25% and 18% of the volumes of the facultative and maturation ponds were occupied by sludge. Specific sludge accumulation rates were 0.0071 m³/passenger.year for the facultative pond and 0.00017 m³/passenger.year for the maturation pond. PMID:25051468

  14. The Abundance of Pink-Pigmented Facultative Methylotrophs in the Root Zone of Plant Species in Invaded Coastal Sage Scrub Habitat

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Irina C.; Brigham, Christy A.; Suding, Katharine N.; Martiny, Jennifer B. H.

    2012-01-01

    Pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophic bacteria (PPFMs) are associated with the roots, leaves and seeds of most terrestrial plants and utilize volatile C1 compounds such as methanol generated by growing plants during cell division. PPFMs have been well studied in agricultural systems due to their importance in crop seed germination, yield, pathogen resistance and drought stress tolerance. In contrast, little is known about the PPFM abundance and diversity in natural ecosystems, let alone their interactions with non-crop species. Here we surveyed PPFM abundance in the root zone soil of 5 native and 5 invasive plant species along ten invasion gradients in Southern California coastal sage scrub habitat. PPFMs were present in every soil sample and ranged in abundance from 102 to 105 CFU/g dry soil. This abundance varied significantly among plant species. PPFM abundance was 50% higher in the root zones of annual or biennial species (many invasives) than perennial species (all natives). Further, PPFM abundance appears to be influenced by the plant community beyond the root zone; pure stands of either native or invasive species had 50% more PPFMs than mixed species stands. In sum, PPFM abundance in the root zone of coastal sage scrub plants is influenced by both the immediate and surrounding plant communities. The results also suggest that PPFMs are a good target for future work on plant-microorganism feedbacks in natural ecosystems. PMID:22383990

  15. PS2013 Satellite Workshop on Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Niederman, Robert A.; Blankenship, Robert E.; Frank, Harry A.

    2015-02-07

    represented a diverse international and multidisciplinary group, with over 160 individuals attending from a total of 17 different countries. Attendees came from a wide range of fields assuring that the widest possible interdisciplinary exchanges. They included prominent biochemists, biophysicists, plant physiologists, chemical physicists, as well as theoretical and computational physical chemists, who presented their research findings or to hear the latest advances in this very dynamic field. In the choice of speakers, a balance was created between established scientists and young, emerging researchers, given this opportunity to showcase their results. Sessions were held on electronic and vibrational coherence including coherent sharing of excitations among donor and acceptor molecules during excitation energy transfer, nonphotochemical quenching, acclimation to light environments, evolution, adaptation and biodiversity of light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes, their structure and membrane organization, spectroscopy and dynamics, as well as artificial antenna systems. A joint session was also held with the participants from the Cyanobacterial Satellite Conference. A special issue of Photosynthesis Research devoted to light harvesting (Volume 121, Issue No. 1, July 2014) has recently appeared which contains peer-reviewed original research contributions arising from talks and posters presented at the PS2013 Satellite Workshop on Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Systems. Edited by the Organizers of the Workshop, Robert E. Blankenship, Harry A. Frank and Robert A. Niederman, it includes topics ranging from the isolation of new bacteriochlorophyll species from green bacteria, temperature effects on the excited states of the newly discovered chlorophyll (Chl) ƒ, new architectures for enhancing energy capture by biohybrid light-harvesting complexes, forces governing the formation of light-harvesting rings, spectroscopy of carotenoids of algae and diatoms and the supramolecular

  16. Toward understanding as photosynthetic biosignatures: light harvesting and energy transfer calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Y.; Umemura, M.; Shoji, M.; Shiraishi, K.; Kayanuma, M.; Yabana, K.

    2014-03-01

    Among several proposed biosignatures, red edge is a direct evidence of photosynthetic life if it is detected (Kiang et al 2007). Red edge is a sharp change in reflectance spectra of vegetation in NIR region (about 700-750 nm). The sign of red edge is observed by Earthshine or remote sensing (Wolstencroft & Raven 2002, Woolf et al 2002). But, why around 700-750 nm? The photosynthetic organisms on Earth have evolved to optimize the sunlight condition. However, if we consider about photosynthetic organism on extrasolar planets, they should have developed to utilize the spectra of its principal star. Thus, it is not strange even if it shows different vegetation spectra. In this study, we focused on the light absorption mechanism of photosynthetic organisms on Earth and investigated the fundamental properties of the light harvesting mechanisms, which is the first stage for the light absorption. Light harvesting complexes contain photosynthetic pigments like chlorophylls. Effective light absorption and the energy transfer are accomplished by the electronic excitations of collective photosynthetic pigments. In order to investigate this mechanism, we constructed an energy transfer model by using a dipole-dipole approximation for the interactions between electronic excitations. Transition moments and transition energies of each pigment are calculated at the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) level (Marques & Gross 2004). Quantum dynamics simulation for the excitation energy transfer was calculated by the Liouvelle's equation. We adopted the model to purple bacteria, which has been studied experimentally and known to absorb lower energy. It is meaningful to focus on the mechanism of this bacteria, since in the future mission, M planets will become a important target. We calculated the oscillator strengths in one light harvesting complex and confirmed the validity by comparing to the experimental data. This complex is made of an inner and an outer ring. The

  17. Two Cyanobacterial Photoreceptors Regulate Photosynthetic Light Harvesting by Sensing Teal, Green, Yellow, and Red Light

    PubMed Central

    Wiltbank, Lisa B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genomes of many photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic bacteria encode numerous phytochrome superfamily photoreceptors whose functions and interactions are largely unknown. Cyanobacterial genomes encode particularly large numbers of phytochrome superfamily members called cyanobacteriochromes. These have diverse light color-sensing abilities, and their functions and interactions are just beginning to be understood. One of the best characterized of these functions is the regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting antenna composition in the cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon by the cyanobacteriochrome RcaE in response to red and green light, a process known as chromatic acclimation. We have identified a new cyanobacteriochrome named DpxA that maximally senses teal (absorption maximum, 494 nm) and yellow (absorption maximum, 568 nm) light and represses the accumulation of a key light-harvesting protein called phycoerythrin, which is also regulated by RcaE during chromatic acclimation. Like RcaE, DpxA is a two-component system kinase, although these two photoreceptors can influence phycoerythrin expression through different signaling pathways. The peak responsiveness of DpxA to teal and yellow light provides highly refined color discrimination in the green spectral region, which provides important wavelengths for photosynthetic light harvesting in cyanobacteria. These results redefine chromatic acclimation in cyanobacteria and demonstrate that cyanobacteriochromes can coordinately impart sophisticated light color sensing across the visible spectrum to regulate important photosynthetic acclimation processes. PMID:26861023

  18. Regulation of Photosynthetic Electron Transport and Photoinhibition

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Thomas; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja Krieger

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms and isolated photosystems are of interest for technical applications. In nature, photosynthetic electron transport has to work efficiently in contrasting environments such as shade and full sunlight at noon. Photosynthetic electron transport is regulated on many levels, starting with the energy transfer processes in antenna and ending with how reducing power is ultimately partitioned. This review starts by explaining how light energy can be dissipated or distributed by the various mechanisms of non-photochemical quenching, including thermal dissipation and state transitions, and how these processes influence photoinhibition of photosystem II (PSII). Furthermore, we will highlight the importance of the various alternative electron transport pathways, including the use of oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor and cyclic flow around photosystem I (PSI), the latter which seem particularly relevant to preventing photoinhibition of photosystem I. The control of excitation pressure in combination with the partitioning of reducing power influences the light-dependent formation of reactive oxygen species in PSII and in PSI, which may be a very important consideration to any artificial photosynthetic system or technical device using photosynthetic organisms. PMID:24678670

  19. Feasibility of a photosynthetic artificial lung.

    PubMed

    Basu-Dutt, S; Fandino, M R; Salley, S O; Thompson, I M; Whittlesey, G C; Klein, M D

    1997-01-01

    The success of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for the treatment of acute respiratory failure has led to consideration of the development of a more portable, and perhaps even implantable, artificial lung. The authors suggest a bioregenerative life support system that includes a photo-synthetic organism that can remove CO2 and produce O2 in the presence of an energy source. To build a model of such a photosynthetic artificial lung, the photosynthetic capability of a high temperature strain of the algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa was maximized at a cell density of 25 million cells/ml to serve as the O2 producer and CO2 remover. The "patient" in this model was comprised of 1 L of medium or 350 ml of blood, interfaced with the photosynthetic system across a gas transfer membrane. The experiments demonstrated the ability of the plant cells to supply O2 and remove CO2 from the "patient" with a maximum rate of 0.55 mmoles/L/hr under the most favorable measured operating conditions. The projected rate of 1.0 mmoles/L/hr required for physiologic applications is not totally ab absurd idea, with a slightly modified set-up. Modifications may be in the form of regulating the photosynthetic pathway or genetically engineering a hybrid strain with enhanced O2 producing and suppressed photoinhibition capacity. PMID:9242940

  20. Rapid Redox Signal Transmission by “Cable Bacteria” beneath a Photosynthetic Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Meysman, F. J. R.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, long filamentous bacteria, belonging to the family Desulfobulbaceae, were shown to induce electrical currents over long distances in the surface layer of marine sediments. These “cable bacteria” are capable of harvesting electrons from free sulfide in deeper sediment horizons and transferring these electrons along their longitudinal axes to oxygen present near the sediment-water interface. In the present work, we investigated the relationship between cable bacteria and a photosynthetic algal biofilm. In a first experiment, we investigated sediment that hosted both cable bacteria and a photosynthetic biofilm and tested the effect of an imposed diel light-dark cycle by continuously monitoring sulfide at depth. Changes in photosynthesis at the sediment surface had an immediate and repeatable effect on sulfide concentrations at depth, indicating that cable bacteria can rapidly transmit a geochemical effect to centimeters of depth in response to changing conditions at the sediment surface. We also observed a secondary response of the free sulfide at depth manifest on the time scale of hours, suggesting that cable bacteria adjust to a moving oxygen front with a regulatory or a behavioral response, such as motility. Finally, we show that on the time scale of days, the presence of an oxygenic biofilm results in a deeper and more acidic suboxic zone, indicating that a greater oxygen supply can enable cable bacteria to harvest a greater quantity of electrons from marine sediments. Rapid acclimation strategies and highly efficient electron harvesting are likely key advantages of cable bacteria, enabling their success in high sulfide generating coastal sediments. PMID:25416774

  1. [Microbial synthesis of deuterium labelled L-phenylalanine with different levels of isotopic enrichment by facultative methylotrophic bacterium Brevibacterium methylicum with RMP assimilation of carbon].

    PubMed

    Mosin, O V; Shvets, V I; Skladnev, D A; Ignatov, I

    2014-01-01

    The preparative microbial synthesis of amino acids labelled with stable isotopes, including deuterium ( 2 H), suitable for biomedical applications by methylotrophic bacteria was studied using L-phenylalanine as example. This amino acid is secreted by Gram-negative aerobic facultative methylotrophic bacteria Brevibacterium methylicum, assimilating methanol via ribulose-5-monophosphate (RMP) cycle of assimilation of carbon, The data on adaptation of L-phenylalanine secreted by methylotrophic bacterium В. methylicum to the maximal concentration of deuterium in the growth medium with 98% 2 Н 2 O and 2% [ 2 Н]methanol, and biosynthesis of deuterium labelled L-phenylalanine With different levels of enrichment are presented. The strain was adapted by means of plating initial cells on firm (2% agarose) minimal growth media with an increasing gradient of 2 Н 2 O concentration from 0; 24.5; 49.0; 73.5 up to 98% 2 Н 2 O followed by subsequent selection of separate colonies stable to the action of 2 Н 2 O. These colonies were capable to produce L-phenylalanine. L-phenylalanine was extracted from growth medium by extraction with isopropanol with the subsequent crystallization in ethanol (output 0.65 g/l). The developed method of microbial synthesis allows to obtain deuterium labelled L-phenylalanine with different levels of isotopic enrichment, depending on concentration of 2 Н 2 O in growth media, from 17% (on growth medium with 24,5% 2 Н 2 O) up to 75% (on growth medium with 98% 2 Н 2 O) of deuterium in the molecule that is confirmed with the data of the electron impact (EI) mass- spectrometry analysis of methyl ethers of N-dimethylamino(naphthalene)-5-sulfochloride (dansyl) phenylalanine in these experimental conditions. PMID:25249528

  2. Bacteria Counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Science Applications, Inc.'s ATP Photometer makes a rapid and accurate count of the bacteria in a body fluid sample. Instrument provides information on the presence and quantity of bacteria by measuring the amount of light emitted by the reaction between two substances. Substances are ATP adenosine triphosphate and luciferase. The reactants are applied to a human body sample and the ATP Photometer observes the intensity of the light emitted displaying its findings in a numerical output. Total time lapse is usually less than 10 minutes, which represents a significant time savings in comparison of other techniques. Other applications are measuring organisms in fresh and ocean waters, determining bacterial contamination of foodstuffs, biological process control in the beverage industry, and in assay of activated sewage sludge.

  3. Quorum sensing influences growth and photosynthetic membrane production in high-cell-density cultivations of Rhodospirillum rubrum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The facultative anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum exhibits versatile metabolic activity allowing the adaptation to rapidly changing growth conditions in its natural habitat, the microaerobic and anoxic zones of stagnant waters. The microaerobic growth mode is of special interest as it allows the high-level expression of photosynthetic membranes when grown on succinate and fructose in the dark, which could significantly simplify the industrial production of compounds associated with PM formation. However, recently we showed that PM synthesis is no longer inducible when R. rubrum cultures are grown to high cell densities under aerobic conditions. In addition a reduction of the growth rate and the continued accumulation of precursor molecules for bacteriochlorophyll synthesis were observed under high cell densities conditions. Results In the present work, we demonstrate that the cell density-dependent effects are reversible if the culture supernatant is replaced by fresh medium. We identified six N-acylhomoserine lactones and show that four of them are produced in varying amounts according to the growth phase and the applied growth conditions. Further, we demonstrate that N-acylhomoserine lactones and tetrapyrrole compounds released into the growth medium affect the growth rate and PM expression in high cell density cultures. Conclusions In summary, we provide evidence that R. rubrum possesses a Lux-type quorum sensing system which influences the biosynthesis of PM and the growth rate and is thus likely to be involved in the phenotypes of high cell density cultures and the rapid adaptation to changing environmental conditions. PMID:23927486

  4. The Genome Sequences of Cellulomonas fimi and “Cellvibrio gilvus” Reveal the Cellulolytic Strategies of Two Facultative Anaerobes, Transfer of “Cellvibrio gilvus” to the Genus Cellulomonas, and Proposal of Cellulomonas gilvus sp. nov

    PubMed Central

    Bramhacharya, Shanti; Jewell, Kelsea A.; Aylward, Frank O.; Mead, David; Brumm, Phillip J.

    2013-01-01

    Actinobacteria in the genus Cellulomonas are the only known and reported cellulolytic facultative anaerobes. To better understand the cellulolytic strategy employed by these bacteria, we sequenced the genome of the Cellulomonas fimi ATCC 484T. For comparative purposes, we also sequenced the genome of the aerobic cellulolytic “Cellvibrio gilvus” ATCC 13127T. An initial analysis of these genomes using phylogenetic and whole-genome comparison revealed that “Cellvibrio gilvus” belongs to the genus Cellulomonas. We thus propose to assign “Cellvibrio gilvus” to the genus Cellulomonas. A comparative genomics analysis between these two Cellulomonas genome sequences and the recently completed genome for Cellulomonas flavigena ATCC 482T showed that these cellulomonads do not encode cellulosomes but appear to degrade cellulose by secreting multi-domain glycoside hydrolases. Despite the minimal number of carbohydrate-active enzymes encoded by these genomes, as compared to other known cellulolytic organisms, these bacteria were found to be proficient at degrading and utilizing a diverse set of carbohydrates, including crystalline cellulose. Moreover, they also encode for proteins required for the fermentation of hexose and xylose sugars into products such as ethanol. Finally, we found relatively few significant differences between the predicted carbohydrate-active enzymes encoded by these Cellulomonas genomes, in contrast to previous studies reporting differences in physiological approaches for carbohydrate degradation. Our sequencing and analysis of these genomes sheds light onto the mechanism through which these facultative anaerobes degrade cellulose, suggesting that the sequenced cellulomonads use secreted, multidomain enzymes to degrade cellulose in a way that is distinct from known anaerobic cellulolytic strategies. PMID:23342046

  5. THE C2 OXIDATIVE PHOTOSYNTHETIC CARBON CYCLE.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, N. E.

    1997-06-01

    The C2 oxidative photosynthetic carbon cycle plus the C3 reductive photosynthetic carbon cycle coexist. Both are initiated by Rubisco, use about equal amounts of energy, must regenerate RuBP, and result in exchanges of CO2 and O2 to establish rates of net photosynthesis, CO2 and O2 compensation points, and the ratio of CO2 and O2 in the atmosphere. These concepts evolved from research on O2 inhibition, glycolate metabolism, leaf peroxisomes, photorespiration, 18O2/16O2 exchange, CO2 concentrating processes, and a requirement for the oxygenase activity of Rubisco. Nearly 80 years of research on these topics are unified under the one process of photosynthetic carbon metabolism and its self-regulation. PMID:15012254

  6. BOREAS TE-10 Photosynthetic Response Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor); Middleton, Elizabeth; Sullivan, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) TE-10 (Terrestrial Ecology) team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the gas exchange, reflectance, transmittance, chlorophyll content, carbon content, hydrogen content, nitrogen content, and photosynthetic response of boreal vegetation. This data set contains measurements of quantitative parameters and leaf photosynthetic response to increases in light conducted in the SSA during the growing seasons of 1994 and 1996 using an oxygen electrode system. Leaf photosynthetic responses were not collected in 1996. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  7. Productivity, absorbed photosynthetically active radiation, and light use efficiency in crops: implications for remote sensing of crop primary production.

    PubMed

    Gitelson, Anatoly A; Peng, Yi; Arkebauer, Timothy J; Suyker, Andrew E

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation productivity metrics such as gross primary production (GPP) at the canopy scale are greatly affected by the efficiency of using absorbed radiation for photosynthesis, or light use efficiency (LUE). Thus, close investigation of the relationships between canopy GPP and photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by vegetation is the basis for quantification of LUE. We used multiyear observations over irrigated and rainfed contrasting C3 (soybean) and C4 (maize) crops having different physiology, leaf structure, and canopy architecture to establish the relationships between canopy GPP and radiation absorbed by vegetation and quantify LUE. Although multiple LUE definitions are reported in the literature, we used a definition of efficiency of light use by photosynthetically active "green" vegetation (LUE(green)) based on radiation absorbed by "green" photosynthetically active vegetation on a daily basis. We quantified, irreversible slowly changing seasonal (constitutive) and rapidly day-to-day changing (facultative) LUE(green), as well as sensitivity of LUE(green) to the magnitude of incident radiation and drought events. Large (2-3-fold) variation of daily LUE(green) over the course of a growing season that is governed by crop physiological and phenological status was observed. The day-to-day variations of LUE(green) oscillated with magnitude 10-15% around the seasonal LUE(green) trend and appeared to be closely related to day-to-day variations of magnitude and composition of incident radiation. Our results show the high variability of LUE(green) between C3 and C4 crop species (1.43 g C/MJ vs. 2.24 g C/MJ, respectively), as well as within single crop species (i.e., maize or soybean). This implies that assuming LUE(green) as a constant value in GPP models is not warranted for the crops studied, and brings unpredictable uncertainties of remote GPP estimation, which should be accounted for in LUE models. The uncertainty of GPP estimation due to facultative and

  8. Photosynthetic complex stoichiometry dynamics in higher plants: environmental acclimation and photosynthetic flux control

    PubMed Central

    Schöttler, Mark A.; Tóth, Szilvia Z.

    2014-01-01

    The composition of the photosynthetic apparatus of higher plants is dynamically adjusted to long-term changes in environmental conditions such as growth light intensity and light quality, and to changing metabolic demands for ATP and NADPH imposed by stresses and leaf aging. By changing photosynthetic complex stoichiometry, a long-term imbalance between the photosynthetic production of ATP and NADPH and their metabolic consumption is avoided, and cytotoxic side reactions are minimized. Otherwise, an excess capacity of the light reactions, relative to the demands of primary metabolism, could result in a disturbance of cellular redox homeostasis and an increased production of reactive oxygen species, leading to the destruction of the photosynthetic apparatus and the initiation of cell death programs. In this review, changes of the abundances of the different constituents of the photosynthetic apparatus in response to environmental conditions and during leaf ontogenesis are summarized. The contributions of the different photosynthetic complexes to photosynthetic flux control and the regulation of electron transport are discussed. PMID:24860580

  9. Design criteria for optimal photosynthetic energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fingerhut, Benjamin P.; Zinth, Wolfgang; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2008-12-01

    Photochemical solar energy conversion is considered as an alternative of clean energy. For future light converting nano-machines photosynthetic reaction centers are used as prototypes optimized during evolution. We introduce a reaction scheme for global optimization and simulate the ultrafast charge separation in photochemical energy conversion. Multiple molecular charge carriers are involved in this process and are linked by Marcus-type electron transfer. In combination with evolutionary algorithms, we unravel the biological strategies for high quantum efficiency in photosynthetic reaction centers and extend these concepts to the design of artificial photochemical devices for energy conversion.

  10. Enhanced practical photosynthetic CO2 mitigation

    DOEpatents

    Bayless, David J.; Vis-Chiasson, Morgan L.; Kremer, Gregory G.

    2003-12-23

    This process is unique in photosynthetic carbon sequestration. An on-site biological sequestration system directly decreases the concentration of carbon-containing compounds in the emissions of fossil generation units. In this process, photosynthetic microbes are attached to a growth surface arranged in a containment chamber that is lit by solar photons. A harvesting system ensures maximum organism growth and rate of CO.sub.2 uptake. Soluble carbon and nitrogen concentrations delivered to the cyanobacteria are enhanced, further increasing growth rate and carbon utilization.

  11. Spectroscopic Studies of Photosynthetic Systems and Their Application in Photovoltaic Devices - Equipment Only: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-175

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, M.

    2014-09-01

    Spectral hole-burning (SHB) and single photosynthetic complex spectroscopy (SPCS) will be used to study the excitonic structure and excitation energy transfer (EET) processes of several photosynthetic protein complexes at low temperatures. The combination of SHB on bulk samples and SPCS is a powerful frequency domain approach for obtaining data that will address a number of issues that are key to understanding excitonic structure and energy transfer dynamics. The long-term goal is to reach a better understanding of the ultrafast solar energy driven primary events of photosynthesis as they occur in higher plants, cyanobacteria, purple bacteria, and green algae. A better understanding of the EET and charge separation (CS) processes taking place in photosynthetic complexes is of great interest, since photosynthetic complexes might offer attractive architectures for a future generation of circuitry in which proteins are crystallized.

  12. Atomic Detail Visualization of Photosynthetic Membranes with GPU-Accelerated Ray Tracing

    PubMed Central

    Vandivort, Kirby L.; Barragan, Angela; Singharoy, Abhishek; Teo, Ivan; Ribeiro, João V.; Isralewitz, Barry; Liu, Bo; Goh, Boon Chong; Phillips, James C.; MacGregor-Chatwin, Craig; Johnson, Matthew P.; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Hunter, C. Neil

    2016-01-01

    The cellular process responsible for providing energy for most life on Earth, namely photosynthetic light-harvesting, requires the cooperation of hundreds of proteins across an organelle, involving length and time scales spanning several orders of magnitude over quantum and classical regimes. Simulation and visualization of this fundamental energy conversion process pose many unique methodological and computational challenges. We present, in two accompanying movies, light-harvesting in the photosynthetic apparatus found in purple bacteria, the so-called chromatophore. The movies are the culmination of three decades of modeling efforts, featuring the collaboration of theoretical, experimental, and computational scientists. We describe the techniques that were used to build, simulate, analyze, and visualize the structures shown in the movies, and we highlight cases where scientific needs spurred the development of new parallel algorithms that efficiently harness GPU accelerators and petascale computers. PMID:27274603

  13. In situ mapping of the energy flow through the entire photosynthetic apparatus.

    PubMed

    Dostál, Jakub; Pšenčík, Jakub; Zigmantas, Donatas

    2016-07-01

    Absorption of sunlight is the first step in photosynthesis, which provides energy for the vast majority of organisms on Earth. The primary processes of photosynthesis have been studied extensively in isolated light-harvesting complexes and reaction centres, however, to understand fully the way in which organisms capture light it is crucial to also reveal the functional relationships between the individual complexes. Here we report the use of two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy to track directly the excitation-energy flow through the entire photosynthetic system of green sulfur bacteria. We unravel the functional organization of individual complexes in the photosynthetic unit and show that, whereas energy is transferred within subunits on a timescale of subpicoseconds to a few picoseconds, across the complexes the energy flows at a timescale of tens of picoseconds. Thus, we demonstrate that the bottleneck of energy transfer is between the constituents. PMID:27325098

  14. Growth, photosynthetic acclimation and yield quality in legumes under climate change simulations: an updated survey.

    PubMed

    Irigoyen, J J; Goicoechea, N; Antolín, M C; Pascual, I; Sánchez-Díaz, M; Aguirreolea, J; Morales, F

    2014-09-01

    Continued emissions of CO2, derived from human activities, increase atmospheric CO2 concentration. The CO2 rise stimulates plant growth and affects yield quality. Effects of elevated CO2 on legume quality depend on interactions with N2-fixing bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi. Growth at elevated CO2 increases photosynthesis under short-term exposures in C3 species. Under long-term exposures, however, plants generally acclimate to elevated CO2 decreasing their photosynthetic capacity. An updated survey of the literature indicates that a key factor, perhaps the most important, that characteristically influences this phenomenon, its occurrence and extent, is the plant source-sink balance. In legumes, the ability of exchanging C for N at nodule level with the N2-fixing symbionts creates an extra C sink that avoids the occurrence of photosynthetic acclimation. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi colonizing roots may also result in increased C sink, preventing photosynthetic acclimation. Defoliation (Anthyllis vulneraria, simulated grazing) or shoot cutting (alfalfa, usual management as forage) largely increases root/shoot ratio. During re-growth at elevated CO2, new shoots growth and nodule respiration function as strong C sinks that counteracts photosynthetic acclimation. In the presence of some limiting factor, the legumes response to elevated CO2 is weakened showing photosynthetic acclimation. This survey has identified limiting factors that include an insufficient N supply from bacterial strains, nutrient-poor soils, low P supply, excess temperature affecting photosynthesis and/or nodule activity, a genetically determined low nodulation capacity, an inability of species or varieties to increase growth (and therefore C sink) at elevated CO2 and a plant phenological state or season when plant growth is stopped. PMID:25113447

  15. Enrichments for phototrophic bacteria and characterization by morphology and pigment analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, D.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine several sulfide containing environments for the presence of phototrophic bacteria and to obtain enriched cultures of some of the bacteria present. The field sites were Alum Rock State Park, the Palo Alto salt marsh, the bay area salt ponds, and Big Soda Lake (near Fallon, Nevada). Bacteria from these sites were characterized by microscopic examination, measurement of in vitro absorption spectra, and analysis of carotenoid pigments. Field observations at one of the bay area salt ponds, in which the salt concentration was saturating (about 30 percent NaCl) and the sediments along the shore of the pond covered with a gypsum crust, revealed a layer of purple photosynthetic bacteria under a green layer in the gypsum crust. Samples of this gypsum crust were taken to the laboratory to measure light transmission through the crust and to try to identify the purple photosynthetic bacteria present in this extremely saline environment.

  16. Longitudinal photosynthetic gradient in crust lichens' thalli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Zhang, Gaoke; Lan, Shubin; Zhang, Delu; Hu, Chunxiang

    2014-05-01

    In order to evaluate the self-shading protection for inner photobionts, the photosynthetic activities of three crust lichens were detected using Microscope-Imaging-PAM. The false color images showed that longitudinal photosynthetic gradient was found in both the green algal lichen Placidium sp. and the cyanolichen Peltula sp. In longitudinal direction, all the four chlorophyll fluorescence parameters Fv/Fm, Yield, qP, and rETR gradually decreased with depth in the thalli of both of these two lichens. In Placidium sp., qN values decreased with depth, whereas an opposite trend was found in Peltula sp. However, no such photosynthetic heterogeneity was found in the thalli of Collema sp. in longitudinal direction. Microscope observation showed that photobiont cells are compactly arranged in Placidium sp. and Peltula sp. while loosely distributed in Collema sp. It was considered that the longitudinal photosynthetic heterogeneity was ascribed to the result of gradual decrease of incidence caused by the compact arrangement of photobiont cells in the thalli. The results indicate a good protection from the self-shading for the inner photobionts against high radiation in crust lichens. PMID:24477924

  17. Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

    2004-07-15

    This report highlights significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation Project for the period ending 06/30/2004. The major accomplishment was the modification of the header and harvesting work, with a system designed to distribute algae at startup, sustain operations and harvest in one unit.

  18. Three stage cultivation process of facultative strain of Chlorella sorokiniana for treating dairy farm effluent and lipid enhancement.

    PubMed

    Hena, S; Fatihah, N; Tabassum, S; Ismail, N

    2015-09-01

    Reserve lipids of microalgae are promising for biodiesel production. However, economically feasible and sustainable energy production from microalgae requires optimization of cultivation conditions for both biomass yield and lipid production of microalgae. Biomass yield and lipid production in microalgae are a contradictory problem because required conditions for both targets are different. Simultaneously, the mass cultivation of microalgae for biofuel production also depends extremely on the performance of the microalgae strains used. In this study a green unicellular microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana (DS6) isolated from the holding tanks of farm wastewater treatment plant using multi-step screening and acclimation procedures was found high-lipid producing facultative heterotrophic microalgae strain capable of growing on dairy farm effluent (DFE) for biodiesel feedstock and wastewater treatment. Morphological features and the phylogenetic analysis for the 18S rRNA identified the isolated strains. A novel three stage cultivation process of facultative strain of C. sorokiniana was examined for lipid production. PMID:26043271

  19. Genome of the facultative scuticociliatosis pathogen Pseudocohnilembus persalinus provides insight into its virulence through horizontal gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jie; Wang, Guangying; Cheng, Jun; Tian, Miao; Pan, Xuming; Warren, Alan; Jiang, Chuanqi; Yuan, Dongxia; Miao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Certain ciliates of the subclass Scuticociliatia (scuticociliates) are facultative parasites of fishes in which they cause a suite of diseases collectively termed scuticociliatosis. Hitherto, comparatively little was known about genetics and genomics of scuticociliates or the mechanism of scuticociliatosis. In this study, a laboratory culture of the facultatively pathogenic scuticociliate Pseudocohnilembus persalinus was established and its genome sequenced, giving the first genome of a marine ciliate. Genome-wide horizontal gene transfer (HGT) analysis showed P. persalinus has acquired many unique prokaryote-derived genes that potentially contribute to the virulence of this organism, including cell adhesion, hemolysis and heme utilization genes. These findings give new insights into our understanding of the pathology of scuticociliates. PMID:26486372

  20. Abnormal methylation pattern in constitutive and facultative heterochromatin of ICF patients

    SciTech Connect

    Miniou, P.; Blanquet, V.; Viegas-Pequignot, E.

    1994-09-01

    ICF syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disease, characterized by variable immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial abnormalities. Stretchings and frequent associations of centromeric or juxtacentromeric heterochromatin of chromosome 1 and 16 principally, and to a lesser degree, chromosome 9 mimic chromosome features of normal PHA-stimulated lymphocytes treated with 5-azacytidine, an inducer of demethylation. In fact, in these patients we have detected by DNA digestion with methyl-sensitive enzymes a hypomethylation of classical satellites 2 and 3, located in heterochromatin. To assess the role of other satellite DNA in the heterochromatin modifications and chromosome rearrangements, in situ fluorescent method using 5-methylcytosine (5-MeC) monoclonal antibody on chromosomes and nuclei were performed in parallel with Southern blot analysis of other satellite sequences located in heterochromatin. 5-MeC reveals that constitutive and facultative heterochromatin (X inactive chromosome) are hypomethylated. Alpha satellite sequences corresponding to centromeric heterochromatin of chromosomes 1, 3, 6, 9, 16, 18 and X are mostly methylated in patients G and R, and are undermethylated in patient S. Both molecular and cytogenetic analysis are in agreement. By in situ hybridization, breakpoints of rearranged chromosomes were located in stretched and hypomethylated classical satellites. In euchromatin, 5-MeC antibodies reveal an R-like banding pattern indicating an unequal distribution of DNA methylation, disclosing another aspect of chromosome organization. The underlying hypomethylation, associated with an abnormal chromatin structure, may predispose to chromosome instability.

  1. Characterization of a Facultatively Psychrophilic Bacterium, Vibrio rumoiensis sp. nov., That Exhibits High Catalase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yumoto, Isao; Iwata, Hideaki; Sawabe, Tomoo; Ueno, Keisuke; Ichise, Nobutoshi; Matsuyama, Hidetoshi; Okuyama, Hidetoshi; Kawasaki, Kosei

    1999-01-01

    A novel facultatively psychrophilic bacterium, strain S-1, which exhibits extraordinarily high catalase activity was isolated from the drain pool of a fish product processing plant that uses H2O2 as a bleaching and microbicidal agent. The catalase activity of the isolate was 1 or 2 orders of magnitude higher than those of Corynebacterium glutamicum, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and five other species tested in this study. The strain seemed to possess only one kind of catalase, according to the results of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the cell extract. The optimum temperature for catalase activity was about 30°C, which was about 20°C lower than that for bovine catalase activity. Electron microscopic observation revealed that the surface of the microorganism was covered by blebs. Although the isolate was nonflagellated, its taxonomic position on the basis of physiological and biochemical characteristics and analysis of 16S rRNA sequence and DNA-DNA relatedness data indicated that strain S-1 is a new species belonging to the genus Vibrio. Accordingly, we propose the name Vibrio rumoiensis. The type strain is S-1 (FERM P-14531). PMID:9872761

  2. Genetic draft and quasi-neutrality in large facultatively sexual populations.

    PubMed

    Neher, R A; Shraiman, B I

    2011-08-01

    Large populations may contain numerous simultaneously segregating polymorphisms subject to natural selection. Since selection acts on individuals whose fitness depends on many loci, different loci affect each other's dynamics. This leads to stochastic fluctuations of allele frequencies above and beyond genetic drift-an effect known as genetic draft. Since recombination disrupts associations between alleles, draft is strong when recombination is rare. Here, we study a facultatively outcrossing population in a regime where the frequency of outcrossing and recombination, r, is small compared to the characteristic scale of fitness differences σ. In this regime, fit genotypes expand clonally, leading to large fluctuations in the number of recombinant offspring genotypes. The power law tail in the distribution of the latter makes it impossible to capture the dynamics of draft by an effective neutral model. Instead, we find that the fixation time of a neutral allele increases only slowly with the population size but depends sensitively on the ratio r/σ. The efficacy of selection is reduced dramatically and alleles behave "quasi-neutrally" even for Ns≫1, provided that |s| < s(c), where s(c) depends strongly on r/σ, but only weakly on population size N. In addition, the anomalous fluctuations due to draft change the spectrum of (quasi)-neutral alleles from f(ν) ∼ ν(-1), corresponding to drift, to ∼ ν(-2). Finally, draft accelerates the rate of two-step adaptations through deleterious intermediates. PMID:21625002

  3. Requirement of carbon dioxide for initial growth of facultative methylotroph, Acidomonas methanolica MB58.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Ryoji; Katayama, Hiroko; Tanaka, Mitsuo

    2015-07-01

    The facultative methylotrophic bacterium Acidomonas methanolica MB58 can utilize C1 compounds via the ribulose monophosphate pathway. A large gene cluster comprising three components related to C1 metabolism was found in the genome. From upstream, the first was an mxa cluster encoding proteins for oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde; the second was the rmp cluster encoding enzymes for formaldehyde fixation; and the third was the cbb gene cluster encoding proteins for carbon dioxide (CO2) fixation. Examination of CO2 requirements for growth of A. methanolica MB58 cells demonstrated that it did not grow on any carbon source under CO2-free conditions. Measurement of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity and RT-PCR analysis demonstrated enzymatic activity was detected in A. methanolica MB58 at growth phase, regardless of carbon sources. However, methanol dehydrogenase and 3-hexlose-6-phosphate synthase expression was regulated by methanol or formaldehyde; it were detected during growth and apparently differed from ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase expression. These results suggested that A. methanolica MB58 may be initially dependent on autotrophic growth and that carbon assimilation was subsequently coupled with the ribulose monophosphate pathway at early- to mid-log phases during methylotrophic growth. PMID:25511787

  4. High gene flow between alternative morphs and the evolutionary persistence of facultative paedomorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Oromi, Neus; Michaux, Johan; Denoël, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Paedomorphosis and metamorphosis are two major developmental processes that characterize the evolution of complex life cycles in many lineages. Whereas these processes were fixed in some taxa, they remained facultative in others, with alternative phenotypes expressed in the same populations. From a genetic perspective, it is still unknown whether such phenotypes form a single population or whether they show some patterns of isolation in syntopy. This has deep implications for understanding the evolution of the phenotypes, i.e. towards their persistence or their fixation and speciation. Newts and salamanders are excellent models to test this hypothesis because they exhibit both developmental processes in their populations: the aquatic paedomorphs retain gills, whereas the metamorphs are able to colonize land. Using microsatellite data of coexisting paedomorphic and metamorphic palmate newts (Lissotriton helveticus), we found that they formed a panmictic population, which evidences sexual compatibility between the two phenotypes. The high gene flow could be understood as an adaptation to unstable habitats in which phenotypic plasticity is favored over the fixation of developmental alternatives. This makes then possible the persistence of a polyphenism: only metamorphosis could be maintained in case of occasional drying whereas paedomorphosis could offer specific advantages in organisms remaining in water. PMID:27534370

  5. Stable isotopes reveal habitat-related diet shifts in facultative deposit-feeders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Francesca; Baeta, Alexandra; Marques, João C.

    2015-01-01

    Seagrass patches interspersed in a sediment matrix may vary environmental conditions and affect feeding habits of consumers and food-web structure. This paper investigates diet shifts between bare sediments and a Zostera noltei (Hornemann, 1832) meadow for three facultative deposit-feeding macrofaunal consumers, notably the bivalve Scrobicularia plana (da Costa, 1778), the polychaete Hediste diversicolor (O.T. Müller, 1776), and the gastropod Hydrobia ulvae (Pennant, 1778). In July 2008, one eelgrass meadow and two bare sediment locations were chosen in the Mondego estuary (40° 08″ N, 8° 50‧ W, Portugal) and sampled for stable isotope signatures (δ13C and δ15N) of macrofauna consumers and some of their potential basal food sources, such as sedimentary organic matter (SOM), microphytobenthos (MPB), seagrass shoots, leaves and seaweeds laying on the surface sediment. The δ15N of H. diversicolor was 3‰ higher in the eelgrass meadow than in bare sediment, indicating a change of trophic position, whereas the Bayesian stable-isotope mixing model showed that S. plana assimilated more macroalgal detritus than microphytobenthos in the eelgrass bed. Such habitat-related diet shifts have the potential to change structure and spatial dynamics of benthic food webs.

  6. Phylogeography of Cambarus tenebrosus: a Facultative Cave-Dwelling Freshwater Crayfish Species.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, J.; Buhay, J. E.; Crandall, K. A.

    2005-05-01

    Cambarus tenebrosus is a unique freshwater crayfish species, inhabiting both subterranean and surface habitats in southeastern United States. This facultative cave-dweller is found in all aquatic karst areas within its range, including deep pits, massive underground rivers, springs, and surface streams, which makes this species ideal for a phylogeographic study. The objectives of our research are to: 1.) determine if C. tenebrosus is a single lineage or represents multiple cryptic species using phylogenetic methods, 2.) evaluate the evolutionary history and current gene flow patterns of C. tenebrosus using Nested Clade Analysis, and 3.) assess genetic diversity and conservation status of the species. We have gathered molecular genetic data from over 300 individuals from cave and surface environments across the entire range, with focus on the Cumberland Plateau from Kentucky to Alabama. Preliminary findings suggest that there are several clades of C. tenebrosus, but these clades geographically overlap in many areas. There is also no association between genetics and habitat (surface vs. subsurface), suggesting that there is gene flow between the two environment types. The origin of the species appears to be around Western Kentucky and Indiana, which then expanded southward down the Cumberland Plateau.

  7. Methylobrevis pamukkalensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a halotolerant restricted facultative methylotroph isolated from saline water.

    PubMed

    Poroshina, Maria N; Trotsenko, Yuri A; Doronina, Nina V

    2015-04-01

    An aerobic halotolerant restricted facultatively methylotrophic bacterium was isolated from a saline hot spring in Pamukkale, Turkey, and designated strain PK2(T). The cells of this strain were Gram-stain-negative, asporogenous, motile short rods multiplying by binary fission. They utilized methanol, methylamine and mannitol as carbon and energy sources. The organism grew optimally at 30 °C in media containing 85 mM NaCl and at pH 7.5-8.0. C1 compounds were assimilated via the isocitrate-lyase-positive variant of the serine pathway. Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate and the compatible solute ectoine were found in the cells. The dominant phospholipids were phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine. The major cellular fatty acids of methanol-grown cells were C(18 : 1)ω7 and C(16 : 1)ω7c. The main ubiquinone was Q-10. The DNA G+C content was 67.9 mol% (T(m)). The 16S rRNA gene sequence suggests that strain PK2(T) is affiliated with the order Rhizobiales within the class Alphaproteobacteria , being most closely related to Mesorhizobium gobiense CCBAU 83330(T) (94% similarity). A novel genus and species, Methylobrevis pamukkalensis gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed on the basis of phenotypic and genotypic data, with PK2(T) (VKM B-2849(T) = JCM 30229(T)) as the type strain. PMID:25667389

  8. Arsenite oxidation by a facultative chemolithoautotrophic Sinorhizobium sp. KGO-5 isolated from arsenic-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Dong, Dan; Ohtsuka, Toshihiko; Dong, Dian Tao; Amachi, Seigo

    2014-01-01

    A chemolithoautotrophic arsenite-oxidizing bacterium, designated strain KGO-5, was isolated from arsenic-contaminated industrial soil. Strain KGO-5 was phylogenetically closely related with Sinorhizobium meliloti with 16S rRNA gene similarity of more than 99%, and oxidized 5 mM arsenite under autotrophic condition within 60 h with a doubling time of 3.0 h. Additions of 0.01-0.1% yeast extract enhanced the growth significantly, and the strain still oxidized arsenite efficiently with much lower doubling times of approximately 1.0 h. Arsenite-oxidizing capacities (11.2-54.1 μmol h(-1) mg dry cells(-1)) as well as arsenite oxidase (Aio) activities (1.76-10.0 mU mg protein(-1)) were found in the cells grown with arsenite, but neither could be detected in the cells grown without arsenite. Strain KGO-5 possessed putative aioA gene, which is closely related with AioA of Ensifer adhaerens. These results suggest that strain KGO-5 is a facultative chemolithoautotrophic arsenite oxidizer, and its Aio is induced by arsenic. PMID:25051896

  9. Sexual size dimorphism in the evolutionary context of facultative paedomorphosis: insights from European newts

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Sexual size dimorphism (SSD) is a key evolutionary feature that has been studied in many organisms. In a wide range of species, this pattern is more complex because of polymorphism within each sex. However, it is not known whether the magnitude and direction of SSD could be affected by alternative developmental trajectories within sexes. Our aim was to test whether an intrasexual polymorphism, facultative paedomorphosis (a process in which the development of somatic and gonadal tissues differs in alternative morphs), could affect SSD variation patterns in European newts. Results We report here the first evidence that SSD varies depending on the paedomorphic or metamorphic ontogenetic pathway. In species with a consistent female-biased SSD, paedomorphosis decreased the SSD level, but did not affect its direction. In species with moderate female-biased SSD or variable SSD patterns, paedomorphosis changed the magnitude, or both the magnitude and the direction, of SSD. Conclusion Our study highlights the importance of developmental processes for shaping SSD patterns in populations in which contrasting life-history pathways evolved. European newts express different SSD patterns depending on their developmental pathway (i.e., metamorphosis versus paedomorphosis), as well as their species and population. These findings emphasize the importance of studying alternative morphotypes, which are found in a wide range of animal groups, to understand the evolution of SSD. PMID:19954520

  10. Interactions between marine facultative epiphyte Chlamydomonas sp. (Chlamydomonadales, Chlorophyta) and ceramiaceaen algae (Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Klochkova, Tatyana A; Cho, Ga Youn; Boo, Sung Min; Chung, Ki Wha; Kim, Song Ja; Kim, Gwang Hoon

    2008-07-01

    Previously unrecorded marine Chlamydomonas that grew epiphytic on ceramiaceaen algae was collected from the western coast of Korea and isolated into a unialgal culture. The isolate was subjected to 18S rDNA phylogenetic analysis as well as ultrastructure and life cycle studies. It had an affinity with the marine Chlamydomonas species and was less related to freshwater/terrestrial representatives of this genus. It had flagella shorter than the cell body two-layered cell wall with striated outer surface and abundant mucilaginous material beneath the innermost layer and no contractile vacuoles. This alga grew faster in mixed cultures with ceramiaceaen algae rather than in any tested unialgal culture condition; the cells looked healthier and zoosporangia and motile flagellated vegetative cells appeared more often. These results suggested that this Chlamydomonas might be a facultative epiphyte benefiting from its hosts. Several ceramiaceaen algae were tested as host plants. Meanwhile, cell deformation or collapse of the whole thallus was caused to Aglaothamnion byssoides, and preliminary study suggested that a substance released from Chlamydomonas caused the response. This is first report on harmful epiphytic interactions between Chlamydomonas species and red ceramiaceaen algae. PMID:19195375

  11. Seroepidemiologic Survey of Potential Pathogens in Obligate and Facultative Scavenging Avian Species in California.

    PubMed

    Straub, Mary H; Kelly, Terra R; Rideout, Bruce A; Eng, Curtis; Wynne, Janna; Braun, Josephine; Johnson, Christine K

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the world, populations of scavenger birds are declining rapidly with some populations already on the brink of extinction. Much of the current research into the factors contributing to these declines has focused on exposure to drug residues, lead, and other toxins. Despite increased monitoring of these declining populations, little is known about infectious diseases affecting scavenger bird species. To assess potential infectious disease risks to both obligate and facultative scavenger bird species, we performed a serosurvey for eleven potential pathogens in three species of scavenging birds in California: the California condor (Gymnogyps californianus), turkey vulture (Cathartes aura) and golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos). California condors were seropositive for avian adenovirus, infectious bronchitis virus, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, avian paramyxovirus-2, West Nile virus (WNV) and Toxoplasma gondii. Golden eagles were seropositive for avian adenovirus, Chlamydophila psittaci and Toxoplasma gondii, and turkey vultures were seropositive for avian adenovirus, Chlamydophila psittaci, avian paramyxovirus-1, Toxoplasma gondii and WNV. Risk factor analyses indicated that rearing site and original release location were significantly associated with a positive serologic titer to WNV among free-flying condors. This study provides preliminary baseline data on infectious disease exposure in these populations for aiding in early disease detection and provides potentially critical information for conservation of the endangered California condor as it continues to expand its range and encounter new infectious disease threats. PMID:26606755

  12. Facultative apomixis and development of fruit in a deciduous shrub with medicinal and nutritional uses.

    PubMed

    Mangla, Yash; Chaudhary, Manju; Gupta, Himshikha; Thakur, Rakesh; Goel, Shailendra; Raina, S N; Tandon, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of reproductive biology of plants is crucial to understand their natural mode of propagation, which may aid in conservation and crop improvement. The reproductive details are also crucial for beginning the cultivation of a potential crop on a commercial scale. Fruits of sea buckthorn, Hippophae rhamnoides, are used in a variety of medicinal and nutritional products. So far, fruits are collected from the female plants in the wild. It is known that the species fruits profusely and also propagates by forming root suckers, but the details of sexual reproduction are not available. We investigated the mode of reproduction and development of fruits from natural populations of sea buckthorn. Megasporogenesis and megagametogenesis were studied through resin-embedded sectioning and ovule-clearing methods, and fruit development through histochemistry. The study of mitosis and male meiosis showed that the plants at the site were diploid (2n = 2x = 24). The embryo sac may develop either through the monosporic pathway and differentiates into 'Polygonum type' or aposporously into 'Panicum type'. The embryo may develop by sexual and adventitious pathways. Thus, sea buckthorn is a facultative apomict. The occurrence of diverse reproductive pathways assures the possibility of generation of novel genotypes through sexuality, while apomictic reproduction maintains adaptive genotypes and ensures reproduction in the absence of pollination. Anatomical details suggest that the fruit of sea buckthorn may be appropriately described as a pseudo-drupe. PMID:26286224

  13. Facultative apomixis and development of fruit in a deciduous shrub with medicinal and nutritional uses

    PubMed Central

    Mangla, Yash; Chaudhary, Manju; Gupta, Himshikha; Thakur, Rakesh; Goel, Shailendra; Raina, S. N.; Tandon, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of reproductive biology of plants is crucial to understand their natural mode of propagation, which may aid in conservation and crop improvement. The reproductive details are also crucial for beginning the cultivation of a potential crop on a commercial scale. Fruits of sea buckthorn, Hippophae rhamnoides, are used in a variety of medicinal and nutritional products. So far, fruits are collected from the female plants in the wild. It is known that the species fruits profusely and also propagates by forming root suckers, but the details of sexual reproduction are not available. We investigated the mode of reproduction and development of fruits from natural populations of sea buckthorn. Megasporogenesis and megagametogenesis were studied through resin-embedded sectioning and ovule-clearing methods, and fruit development through histochemistry. The study of mitosis and male meiosis showed that the plants at the site were diploid (2n = 2x = 24). The embryo sac may develop either through the monosporic pathway and differentiates into ‘Polygonum type’ or aposporously into ‘Panicum type’. The embryo may develop by sexual and adventitious pathways. Thus, sea buckthorn is a facultative apomict. The occurrence of diverse reproductive pathways assures the possibility of generation of novel genotypes through sexuality, while apomictic reproduction maintains adaptive genotypes and ensures reproduction in the absence of pollination. Anatomical details suggest that the fruit of sea buckthorn may be appropriately described as a pseudo-drupe. PMID:26286224

  14. Involvement of facultative apomixis in inheritance of EPSPS gene amplification in glyphosate-resistant Amaranthus palmeri.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Daniela N; Pan, Zhiqiang; Duke, Stephen O; Nandula, Vijay K; Baldwin, Brian S; Shaw, David R; Dayan, Franck E

    2014-01-01

    The inheritance of glyphosate resistance in two Amaranthus palmeri populations (R1 and R2) was examined in reciprocal crosses (RC) and second reciprocal crosses (2RC) between glyphosate-resistant (R) and -susceptible (S) parents of this dioecious species. R populations and Female-R × Male-S crosses contain higher 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene copy numbers than the S population. EPSPS expression, EPSPS enzyme activity, EPSPS protein quantity, and level of resistance to glyphosate correlated positively with genomic EPSPS relative copy number. Transfer of resistance was more influenced by the female than the male parent in spite of the fact that the multiple copies of EPSPS are amplified in the nuclear genome. This led us to hypothesize that this perplexing pattern of inheritance may result from apomictic seed production in A. palmeri. We confirmed that reproductively isolated R and S female plants produced seeds, indicating that A. palmeri can produce seeds both sexually and apomictically (facultative apomixis). This apomictic trait accounts for the low copy number inheritance in the Female-S × Male-R offsprings. Apomixis may also enhance the stability of the glyphosate resistance trait in the R populations in the absence of reproductive partners. PMID:24142112

  15. A test of the facultative calibration/reactive heritability model of extraversion

    PubMed Central

    Haysom, Hannah J.; Mitchem, Dorian G.; Lee, Anthony J.; Wright, Margaret J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Keller, Matthew C.; Zietsch, Brendan P.

    2015-01-01

    A model proposed by Lukaszewski and Roney (2011) suggests that each individual’s level of extraversion is calibrated to other traits that predict the success of an extraverted behavioural strategy. Under ‘facultative calibration’, extraversion is not directly heritable, but rather exhibits heritability through its calibration to directly heritable traits (“reactive heritability”). The current study uses biometrical modelling of 1659 identical and non-identical twins and their siblings to assess whether the genetic variation in extraversion is calibrated to variation in facial attractiveness, intelligence, height in men and body mass index (BMI) in women. Extraversion was significantly positively correlated with facial attractiveness in both males (r=.11) and females (r=.18), but correlations between extraversion and the other variables were not consistent with predictions. Further, twin modelling revealed that the genetic variation in facial attractiveness did not account for a substantial proportion of the variation in extraversion in either males (2.4%) or females (0.5%). PMID:26880866

  16. Low interbasin connectivity in a facultatively diadromous fish: evidence from genetics and otolith chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jane M; Schmidt, Daniel J; Macdonald, Jed I; Huey, Joel A; Crook, David A

    2014-03-01

    Southern smelts (Retropinna spp.) in coastal rivers of Australia are facultatively diadromous, with populations potentially containing individuals with diadromous or wholly freshwater life histories. The presence of diadromous individuals is expected to reduce genetic structuring between river basins due to larval dispersal via the sea. We use otolith chemistry to distinguish between diadromous and nondiadromous life histories and population genetics to examine interbasin connectivity resulting from diadromy. Otolith strontium isotope ((87) Sr:(86) Sr) transects identified three main life history patterns: amphidromy, freshwater residency and estuarine/marine residency. Despite the potential for interbasin connectivity via larval mixing in the marine environment, we found unprecedented levels of genetic structure for an amphidromous species. Strong hierarchical structure along putative taxonomic boundaries was detected, along with highly structured populations within groups using microsatellites (FST  = 0.046-0.181), and mtDNA (ΦST  = 0.498-0.816). The presence of strong genetic subdivision, despite the fact that many individuals reside in saline water during their early life history, appears incongruous. However, analysis of multielemental signatures in the otolith cores of diadromous fish revealed strong discrimination between river basins, suggesting that diadromous fish spend their early lives within chemically distinct estuaries rather than the more homogenous marine environment, thus avoiding dispersal and maintaining genetic structure. PMID:24410817

  17. Bacillus haikouensis sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic halotolerant bacterium isolated from a paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Li, Jibing; Yang, Guiqin; Lu, Qin; Zhao, Yong; Zhou, Shungui

    2014-10-01

    A Gram-stain positive, rod-shaped, endospore-forming and facultatively anaerobic halotolerant bacterium, designated as C-89(T), was isolated from a paddy field soil in Haikou, Hainan Province, People's Republic of China. Optimal growth was observed at 37 °C and pH 7.0 in the presence of 4% NaCl (w/v). The predominant menaquinone was identified as MK-7, the major cellular fatty acids were identified as anteiso-C(15:0) and iso-C(15:0), and the major cellular polar lipids were identified as phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and two unknown phospholipids. The peptidoglycan type was determined to be based on meso-DAP. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, the closest phylogenetic relatives were identified as Bacillus vietnamensis JCM 11124(T) (98.8% sequence similarity), Bacillus aquimaris JCM 11545(T) (98.6%) and Bacillus marisflavi JCM 11544(T) (98.5%). The DNA G+C content of strain C-89(T) was determined to be 45.4 mol%. The DNA-DNA relatedness values of strain C-89(T) with its closest relatives were below 18%. Therefore, on the basis of phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic, and phenotypic results, strain C-89(T) can be considered to represent a novel species within the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus haikouensis sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is C-89(T) (=KCTC 33545(T) = CCTCC AB 2014076(T)). PMID:25100188

  18. Self-powered wastewater treatment for the enhanced operation of a facultative lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, Timothy; Babauta, Jerome T.; Atci, Erhan; Tang, Nghia; Orellana, Josue; Heo, Deukhyoun; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this study was to harness the redox gradients in facultative lagoons using a lagoon microbial fuel cell (LMFC) to enhance autonomously the delivery of oxygen to the lagoon through aeration and mixing by operating an air pump. To enhance the usability of the low power generated by the LMFC, a power management system (PMS) was used to harvest power continually while only operating the air pump intermittently. Here we demonstrate the LMFC as an alternative energy source for self-powered wastewater treatment systems by treating both artificial wastewater and dairy wastewater in large laboratory-scale simulated lagoons. For comparison, we also used a lagoon treatment system without self-aeration. We show that the integrated LMFC and PMS system was able to improve chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal time by 21% for artificial wastewater and by 54% for dairy wastewater. The LMFC-PMS wastewater treatment system operated for over a year and proved to be robust and provide a measure of sustainability. The LMFC-PMS combination offers an innovative and low-tech approach to increasing the capacity of lagoons for rural communities. We believe that the technology developed in this research is the first step towards providing sustainable self-powered wastewater treatment systems.

  19. Seroepidemiologic Survey of Potential Pathogens in Obligate and Facultative Scavenging Avian Species in California

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Mary H.; Kelly, Terra R.; Rideout, Bruce A.; Eng, Curtis; Wynne, Janna; Braun, Josephine; Johnson, Christine K.

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the world, populations of scavenger birds are declining rapidly with some populations already on the brink of extinction. Much of the current research into the factors contributing to these declines has focused on exposure to drug residues, lead, and other toxins. Despite increased monitoring of these declining populations, little is known about infectious diseases affecting scavenger bird species. To assess potential infectious disease risks to both obligate and facultative scavenger bird species, we performed a serosurvey for eleven potential pathogens in three species of scavenging birds in California: the California condor (Gymnogyps californianus), turkey vulture (Cathartes aura) and golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos). California condors were seropositive for avian adenovirus, infectious bronchitis virus, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, avian paramyxovirus-2, West Nile virus (WNV) and Toxoplasma gondii. Golden eagles were seropositive for avian adenovirus, Chlamydophila psittaci and Toxoplasma gondii, and turkey vultures were seropositive for avian adenovirus, Chlamydophila psittaci, avian paramyxovirus-1, Toxoplasma gondii and WNV. Risk factor analyses indicated that rearing site and original release location were significantly associated with a positive serologic titer to WNV among free-flying condors. This study provides preliminary baseline data on infectious disease exposure in these populations for aiding in early disease detection and provides potentially critical information for conservation of the endangered California condor as it continues to expand its range and encounter new infectious disease threats. PMID:26606755

  20. High gene flow between alternative morphs and the evolutionary persistence of facultative paedomorphosis.

    PubMed

    Oromi, Neus; Michaux, Johan; Denoël, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Paedomorphosis and metamorphosis are two major developmental processes that characterize the evolution of complex life cycles in many lineages. Whereas these processes were fixed in some taxa, they remained facultative in others, with alternative phenotypes expressed in the same populations. From a genetic perspective, it is still unknown whether such phenotypes form a single population or whether they show some patterns of isolation in syntopy. This has deep implications for understanding the evolution of the phenotypes, i.e. towards their persistence or their fixation and speciation. Newts and salamanders are excellent models to test this hypothesis because they exhibit both developmental processes in their populations: the aquatic paedomorphs retain gills, whereas the metamorphs are able to colonize land. Using microsatellite data of coexisting paedomorphic and metamorphic palmate newts (Lissotriton helveticus), we found that they formed a panmictic population, which evidences sexual compatibility between the two phenotypes. The high gene flow could be understood as an adaptation to unstable habitats in which phenotypic plasticity is favored over the fixation of developmental alternatives. This makes then possible the persistence of a polyphenism: only metamorphosis could be maintained in case of occasional drying whereas paedomorphosis could offer specific advantages in organisms remaining in water. PMID:27534370

  1. Notes on facultative predation in Prosimulium larvae (Diptera: Simuliidae) in alpine and subalpine streams in Colorado.

    PubMed

    Al-Shaer, Layla; Pierce, Allison K; Larson, David; Hancock, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Although it is widely accepted that black fly larvae employ filter feeding as their primary mode of nutrient intake, other forms of food acquisition, such as predation, may be more prevalent than previously realized. It has been suggested that environments where particulate matter is low, such as high-elevation seasonal streams, may drive predatory behavior in black fly larvae. Relatively little is known about the frequency at which larvae prey on other organisms or if predation may be obligate in some species. In order to supplement the idea that larval black fly predation may be a common method of feeding under certain conditions, a preliminary survey of predation by Prosimulium larvae was conducted in order to assess predation frequency at high-elevation sites (> 3,200 m) in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. Larvae were sampled from alpine and subalpine locations, and their gut content analysis revealed evidence of facultative predation and possible cannibalism. Evidence of predation was observed in all but 1 Prosimulium species collected. Predation frequency was highest in the North Fork Snake River headwater location, a small tributary stream of the Snake River in central Colorado. This survey suggests that further inquiry into predatory behavior of black fly larvae should be conducted to determine the mechanisms, behavior, and ecological impact of this understudied feeding strategy. PMID:25843187

  2. Fungi Treated with Small Chemicals Exhibit Increased Antimicrobial Activity against Facultative Bacterial and Yeast Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Zutz, Christoph; Bandian, Dragana; Neumayer, Bernhard; Speringer, Franz; Wagner, Martin; Strauss, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    For decades, fungi have been the main source for the discovery of novel antimicrobial drugs. Recent sequencing efforts revealed a still high number of so far unknown “cryptic” secondary metabolites. The production of these metabolites is presumably epigenetically silenced under standard laboratory conditions. In this study, we investigated the effect of six small mass chemicals, of which some are known to act as epigenetic modulators, on the production of antimicrobial compounds in 54 spore forming fungi. The antimicrobial effect of fungal samples was tested against clinically facultative pathogens and multiresistant clinical isolates. In total, 30 samples of treated fungi belonging to six different genera reduced significantly growth of different test organisms compared to the untreated fungal sample (growth log reduction 0.3–4.3). For instance, the pellet of Penicillium restrictum grown in the presence of butyrate revealed significant higher antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus (S.) aureus and multiresistant S. aureus strains and displayed no cytotoxicity against human cells, thus making it an ideal candidate for antimicrobial compound discovery. Our study shows that every presumable fungus, even well described fungi, has the potential to produce novel antimicrobial compounds and that our approach is capable of rapidly filling the pipeline for yet undiscovered antimicrobial substances. PMID:25121102

  3. A selection mosaic in the facultative mutualism between ants and wild cotton.

    PubMed

    Rudgers, Jennifer A; Strauss, Sharon Y

    2004-12-01

    In protection mutualisms, one mutualist defends its partner against a natural enemy in exchange for a reward, usually food or shelter. For both partners, the costs and benefits of these interactions often vary considerably in space because the outcome (positive, negative or neutral) depends on the local abundance of at least three species: the protector, the beneficiary of protection and the beneficiary's natural enemy. In Gossypium thurberi (wild cotton), ants benefit nutritionally from the plant's extrafloral nectaries and guard plants from herbivores. Experimentally altering the availability of both ants and extrafloral nectar in three populations demonstrated that the mutualism is facultative, depending, in part, on the abundance of ants and the level of herbivore damage. The species composition of ants and a parasitic alga that clogs extrafloral nectaries were also implicated in altering the outcome of plant-ant interactions. Furthermore, experimental treatments that excluded ants (the putative selective agents) in combination with phenotypic selection analyses revealed that selection on extrafloral nectary traits was mediated by ants and, importantly, varied across populations. This work is some of the first to manipulate interactions experimentally across multiple sites and thereby document that geographically variable selection, mediated by a mutualist, can shape the evolution of plant traits. PMID:15590599

  4. Methyloversatilis thermotolerans sp. nov., a novel thermotolerant facultative methylotroph isolated from a hot spring.

    PubMed

    Doronina, Nina V; Kaparullina, Elena N; Trotsenko, Yuri A

    2014-01-01

    A newly isolated facultatively methylotrophic bacterium (strain 3t(T)) was investigated. Cells of the isolate were Gram-stain-negative, asporogenous, non-motile rods that multiplied by binary fission. The strain utilized methanol, methylamine and a variety of multicarbon compounds as carbon and energy sources. Growth occurred at pH 6.5-8.5 (optimally at 7.0-7.5) and at 10-45 °C (optimally at 30-37 °C). The major fatty acids of methanol-grown cells were C16 : 1ω7c and C16 : 0. The predominant phospholipids were phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol. The major ubiquinone was Q-8. Strain 3t(T) possessed pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-linked methanol dehydrogenase and assimilated C1 units at the level of formaldehyde and CO2 via the serine cycle. The DNA G+C content of the strain was 63.6 mol% (Tm). On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (98.1 %) and rather low DNA-DNA relatedness (30 %) with the type strain of the type species of the genus Methyloversatilis (Methyloversatilis universalis FAM5(T)), and physiological and biochemical characteristics, the isolate was classified as a representative of a new species of the genus and named Methyloversatilis thermotolerans 3t(T) ( = VKM B-2692(T) = CCUG 61694(T) = DSM 25156(T)). PMID:24048869

  5. Differential effects of lesion mimic mutants in barley on disease development by facultative pathogens

    PubMed Central

    McGrann, Graham R. D.; Steed, , Andrew; Burt, Christopher; Nicholson, Paul; Brown, James K. M.

    2015-01-01

    Lesion mimic mutants display spontaneous necrotic spots and chlorotic leaves as a result of mis-regulated cell death programmes. Typically these mutants have increased resistance to biotrophic pathogens but their response to facultative fungi that cause necrotrophic diseases is less well studied. The effect of altered cell death regulation on the development of disease caused by Ramularia collo-cygni, Fusarium culmorum and Oculimacula yallundae was explored using a collection of barley necrotic (nec) lesion mimic mutants. nec8 mutants displayed lower levels of all three diseases compared to nec9 mutants, which had increased R. collo-cygni but decreased F. culmorum disease symptoms. nec1 mutants reduced disease development caused by both R. collo-cygni and F. culmorum. The severity of the nec1-induced lesion mimic phenotype and F. culmorum symptom development was reduced by mutation of the negative cell death regulator MLO. The significant reduction in R. collo-cygni symptoms caused by nec1 was completely abolished in the presence of the mlo-5 allele and both symptoms and fungal biomass were greater than in the wild-type. These results indicate that physiological pathways involved in regulation of cell death interact with one another in their effects on different fungal pathogens. PMID:25873675

  6. A successful crayfish invader is capable of facultative parthenogenesis: a novel reproductive mode in decapod crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Buřič, Miloš; Hulák, Martin; Kouba, Antonín; Petrusek, Adam; Kozák, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Biological invasions are impacting biota worldwide, and explaining why some taxa tend to become invasive is of major scientific interest. North American crayfish species, particularly of the family Cambaridae, are prominent invaders in freshwaters, defying the "tens rule" which states that only a minority of species introduced to new regions become established, and only a minority of those become invasive and pests. So far, success of cambarid invaders has largely been attributed to rapid maturation, high reproductive output, aggressiveness, and tolerance to pollution. We provide experimental evidence that females of one cambarid species particularly widespread in Europe, the spiny-cheek crayfish Orconectes limosus, are capable of facultative parthenogenesis. Such reproductive mode has never before been recognized in decapods, the most diverse crustacean order. As shown by analysis of seven microsatellite loci, crayfish females kept physically separated from males produced genetically homogeneous offspring identical with maternal individuals; this suggests they reproduced by apomixis, unlike those females which mated with males and had a diverse offspring. Further research is needed to clarify what environmental conditions are necessary for a switch to parthenogenesis in O. limosus, and what role it plays in natural crayfish populations. However, if such reproductive plasticity is present in other cambarid crayfish species, it may contribute to the overwhelming invasive success of this group. PMID:21655282

  7. Direct Fitness Correlates and Thermal Consequences of Facultative Aggregation in a Desert Lizard

    PubMed Central

    Rabosky, Alison R. Davis; Corl, Ammon; Liwanag, Heather E. M.; Surget-Groba, Yann; Sinervo, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Social aggregation is a common behavioral phenomenon thought to evolve through adaptive benefits to group living. Comparing fitness differences between aggregated and solitary individuals in nature – necessary to infer an evolutionary benefit to living in groups – has proven difficult because communally-living species tend to be obligately social and behaviorally complex. However, these differences and the mechanisms driving them are critical to understanding how solitary individuals transition to group living, as well as how and why nascent social systems change over time. Here we demonstrate that facultative aggregation in a reptile (the Desert Night Lizard, Xantusia vigilis) confers direct reproductive success and survival advantages and that thermal benefits of winter huddling disproportionately benefit small juveniles, which can favor delayed dispersal of offspring and the formation of kin groups. Using climate projection models, however, we estimate that future aggregation in night lizards could decline more than 50% due to warmer temperatures. Our results support the theory that transitions to group living arise from direct benefits to social individuals and offer a clear mechanism for the origin of kin groups through juvenile philopatry. The temperature dependence of aggregation in this and other taxa suggests that environmental variation may be a powerful but underappreciated force in the rapid transition between social and solitary behavior. PMID:22844413

  8. Attack on Lignified Grass Cell Walls by a Facultatively Anaerobic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Danny E.

    1980-01-01

    A filamentous, facultatively anaerobic microorganism that attacked lignified tissue in forage grasses was isolated from rumen fluid with a Bermuda grass-containing anaerobic medium in roll tubes. The microbe, designated 7-1, demonstrated various colony and cellular morphologies under different growth conditions. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that 7-1 attacked lignified cell walls in aerobic and anaerobic culture. 7-1 predominately degraded tissues reacting positively for lignin with the chlorine-sulfite stain (i.e., sclerenchyma in leaf blades and parenchyma in stems) rather than the more resistant acid phloroglucinol-positive tissues (i.e., lignified vascular tissue and sclerenchyma ring in stems), although the latter tissues were occasionally attacked. Turbidimetric tests showed that 7-1 in anaerobic culture grew optimally at 39°C at a pH of 7.4 to 8.0. Tests for growth on plant cell wall carbohydrates showed that 7-1 grew on xylan and pectin slowly in aerobic cultures but not with pectin and only slightly with xylan in anaerobic culture. 7-1 was noncellulolytic as shown by filter paper tests. The microbe used the phenolic acids sinapic, ferulic, and p-coumaric acids as substrates for growth; the more highly methoxylated acids were used more effectively. Images PMID:16345651

  9. Genetic Draft and Quasi-Neutrality in Large Facultatively Sexual Populations

    PubMed Central

    Neher, R. A.; Shraiman, B. I.

    2011-01-01

    Large populations may contain numerous simultaneously segregating polymorphisms subject to natural selection. Since selection acts on individuals whose fitness depends on many loci, different loci affect each other’s dynamics. This leads to stochastic fluctuations of allele frequencies above and beyond genetic drift—an effect known as genetic draft. Since recombination disrupts associations between alleles, draft is strong when recombination is rare. Here, we study a facultatively outcrossing population in a regime where the frequency of outcrossing and recombination, r, is small compared to the characteristic scale of fitness differences σ. In this regime, fit genotypes expand clonally, leading to large fluctuations in the number of recombinant offspring genotypes. The power law tail in the distribution of the latter makes it impossible to capture the dynamics of draft by an effective neutral model. Instead, we find that the fixation time of a neutral allele increases only slowly with the population size but depends sensitively on the ratio r/σ. The efficacy of selection is reduced dramatically and alleles behave “quasi-neutrally” even for Ns≫1, provided that |s| < sc, where sc depends strongly on r/σ, but only weakly on population size N. In addition, the anomalous fluctuations due to draft change the spectrum of (quasi)-neutral alleles from f(ν) ∼ ν−1, corresponding to drift, to ∼ ν−2. Finally, draft accelerates the rate of two-step adaptations through deleterious intermediates. PMID:21625002

  10. Inbreeding depression varies with investment in sex in a facultative parthenogen.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, Carla E; Hartway, Cynthia; Paczolt, Kimberly A

    2009-09-01

    The reproductive mode of facultative parthenogens allows recessive mutations that accumulate during the asexual phase to be unmasked following sexual reproduction. Longer periods of asexual reproduction should increase the accumulation of deleterious mutations within individuals, reduce population-level genetic diversity via competition and increase the probability of mating among close relatives. Having documented that the investment in sexual reproduction differs among populations and clones of Daphnia pulicaria, we ask if this variation is predictive of the level of inbreeding depression across populations. In four lake populations that vary in sex investment, we raised multiple families (mother, field-produced daughter, laboratory-produced daughter) on high food and estimated the fitness reduction in both sexually produced offspring relative to the maternal genotype. Inbred individuals had lower fitness than their field-produced siblings. The magnitude of fitness reduction in inbred offspring increased as population-level investment in sex decreased. However, there was less of a fitness reduction following sex in the field-produced daughters, suggesting that many field-collected mothers were involved in outcross mating. PMID:19473400

  11. Induction of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism in the Facultative Halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum by Abscisic Acid 1

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chun; Dai, Ziyu; Ku, Maurice S. B.; Edwards, Gerald E.

    1990-01-01

    The facultative halophyte, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, shifts its mode of carbon assimilation from the C3 pathway to Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) in response to water stress. In this study, exogenously applied abscisic acid (ABA), at micromolar concentrations, could partially substitute for water stress in induction of CAM in this species. ABA at concentrations of 5 to 10 micromolar, when applied to leaves or to the roots in hydroponic culture or in soil, induced the expression of CAM within days (as indicated by the nocturnal accumulation of total titratable acidity and malate). After applying ABA there was also an increase in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and NADP-malic enzyme activities. The degree and time course of induction by ABA were comparable to those induced by salt and water stress. Electrophoretic analyses of leaf soluble protein indicate that the increases in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity during the induction by ABA, salt, and water stress are due to an increase in the quantity of the enzyme protein. ABA may be a factor in the stress-induced expression of CAM in M. crystallinum, serving as a functional link between stress and biochemical adaptation. Images Figure 9 PMID:16667587

  12. Roseimarinus sediminis gen. nov., sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic bacterium isolated from coastal sediment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Jie; Liu, Qian-Qian; Chen, Guan-Jun; Du, Zong-Jun

    2015-07-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, non-motile and pink-pigmented bacterium, designated strain HF08(T), was isolated from marine sediment of the coast of Weihai, China. Cells were rod-shaped, and oxidase- and catalase-positive. The isolate grew optimally at 33 °C, at pH 7.5-8.0 and with 2-3% (w/v) NaCl. The dominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C15 : 0 and iso-C14 : 0. Menaquinone 7 (MK-7) was the major respiratory quinone and the DNA G+C content was 44.8 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the isolate was a member of the class Bacteroidia, and shared 88-90% sequence similarity with the closest genera Sunxiuqinia, Prolixibacter, Draconibacterium, Mariniphaga and Meniscus. Based on the phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence presented, a novel species in a new genus of the family Prolixibacteraceae is proposed, with the name Roseimarinus sediminis gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of Roseimarinus sediminis is HF08(T) ( = KCTC 42261(T) = CICC 10901(T)). PMID:25866024

  13. A Successful Crayfish Invader Is Capable of Facultative Parthenogenesis: A Novel Reproductive Mode in Decapod Crustaceans

    PubMed Central

    Buřič, Miloš; Hulák, Martin; Kouba, Antonín

    2011-01-01

    Biological invasions are impacting biota worldwide, and explaining why some taxa tend to become invasive is of major scientific interest. North American crayfish species, particularly of the family Cambaridae, are prominent invaders in freshwaters, defying the “tens rule” which states that only a minority of species introduced to new regions become established, and only a minority of those become invasive and pests. So far, success of cambarid invaders has largely been attributed to rapid maturation, high reproductive output, aggressiveness, and tolerance to pollution. We provide experimental evidence that females of one cambarid species particularly widespread in Europe, the spiny-cheek crayfish Orconectes limosus, are capable of facultative parthenogenesis. Such reproductive mode has never before been recognized in decapods, the most diverse crustacean order. As shown by analysis of seven microsatellite loci, crayfish females kept physically separated from males produced genetically homogeneous offspring identical with maternal individuals; this suggests they reproduced by apomixis, unlike those females which mated with males and had a diverse offspring. Further research is needed to clarify what environmental conditions are necessary for a switch to parthenogenesis in O. limosus, and what role it plays in natural crayfish populations. However, if such reproductive plasticity is present in other cambarid crayfish species, it may contribute to the overwhelming invasive success of this group. PMID:21655282

  14. Higher clonal integration in the facultative epiphytic fern Selliguea griffithiana growing in the forest canopy compared with the forest understorey

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hua-Zheng; Liu, Wen-Yao; Yu, Fei-Hai; Song, Liang; Xu, Xing-Liang; Wu, Chuan-Sheng; Zheng, Yu-Long; Li, Yang-Ping; Gong, He-De; Chen, Ke; Li, Su; Chen, Xi; Qi, Jin-Hua; Lu, Shu-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The advantage of clonal integration (resource sharing between connected ramets of clonal plants) varies and a higher degree of integration is expected in more stressful and/or more heterogeneous habitats. Clonal facultative epiphytes occur in both forest canopies (epiphytic habitats) and forest understories (terrestrial habitats). Because environmental conditions, especially water and nutrients, are more stressful and heterogeneous in the canopy than in the understorey, this study hypothesizes that clonal integration is more important for facultative epiphytes in epiphytic habitats than in terrestrial habitats. Methods In a field experiment, an examination was made of the effects of rhizome connection (connected vs. disconnected, i.e. with vs. without clonal integration) on survival and growth of single ramets, both young and old, of the facultative epiphytic rhizomatous fern Selliguea griffithiana (Polypodiaceae) in both epiphytic and terrestrial habitats. In another field experiment, the effects of rhizome connection on performance of ramets were tested in small (10 × 10 cm2) and large (20 × 20 cm2) plots in both epiphytic and terrestrial habitats. Key Results Rhizome disconnection significantly decreased survival and growth of S. griffithiana in both experiments. The effects of rhizome disconnection on survival of single ramets and on ramet number and growth in plots were greater in epiphytic habitats than in terrestrial habitats. Conclusions Clonal integration contributes greatly to performance of facultative epiphytic ferns, and the effects were more important in forest canopies than in forest understories. The results therefore support the hypothesis that natural selection favours genotypes with a higher degree of integration in more stressful and heterogeneous environments. PMID:26050068

  15. Comparative analysis of plastid genomes of non-photosynthetic Ericaceae and their photosynthetic relatives

    PubMed Central

    Logacheva, Maria D.; Schelkunov, Mikhail I.; Shtratnikova, Victoria Y.; Matveeva, Maria V.; Penin, Aleksey A.

    2016-01-01

    Although plastid genomes of flowering plants are typically highly conserved regarding their size, gene content and order, there are some exceptions. Ericaceae, a large and diverse family of flowering plants, warrants special attention within the context of plastid genome evolution because it includes both non-photosynthetic and photosynthetic species with rearranged plastomes and putative losses of “essential” genes. We characterized plastid genomes of three species of Ericaceae, non-photosynthetic Monotropa uniflora and Hypopitys monotropa and photosynthetic Pyrola rotundifolia, using high-throughput sequencing. As expected for non-photosynthetic plants, M. uniflora and H. monotropa have small plastid genomes (46 kb and 35 kb, respectively) lacking genes related to photosynthesis, whereas P. rotundifolia has a larger genome (169 kb) with a gene set similar to other photosynthetic plants. The examined genomes contain an unusually high number of repeats and translocations. Comparative analysis of the expanded set of Ericaceae plastomes suggests that the genes clpP and accD that are present in the plastid genomes of almost all plants have not been lost in this family (as was previously thought) but rather persist in these genomes in unusual forms. Also we found a new gene in P. rotundifolia that emerged as a result of duplication of rps4 gene. PMID:27452401

  16. Arsenic biotransformation and release by bacteria indigenous to arsenic contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Paul, Dhiraj; Kazy, Sufia K; Banerjee, Tirtha Das; Gupta, Ashok K; Pal, Taraknath; Sar, Pinaki

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) biotransformation and release by indigenous bacteria from As rich groundwater was investigated. Metabolic landscape of 173 bacterial isolates indicated broad catabolic repertoire including abundance of As(5+) reductase activity and abilities in utilizing wide ranges of organic and inorganic respiratory substrates. Abundance of As homeostasis genes and utilization of hydrocarbon as carbon/electron donor and As(5+) as electron acceptor were noted within the isolates. Sediment microcosm study (for 300 days) showed a pivotal role of metal reducing facultative anaerobic bacteria in toxic As(3+) release in aqueous phase. Inhabitant bacteria catalyze As transformation and facilitate its release through a cascade of reactions including mineral bioweathering and As(5+) and/or Fe(3+) reduction activities. Compared to anaerobic incubation with As(5+) reducing strains, oxic state and/or incubation with As(3+) oxidizing bacteria resulted in reduced As release, thus indicating a strong role of such condition or biocatalytic mechanism in controlling in situ As contamination. PMID:25782634

  17. Macrophage defense mechanisms against intracellular bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Günter; Schaible, Ulrich E

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages and neutrophils play a decisive role in host responses to intracellular bacteria including the agent of tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis as they represent the forefront of innate immune defense against bacterial invaders. At the same time, these phagocytes are also primary targets of intracellular bacteria to be abused as host cells. Their efficacy to contain and eliminate intracellular M. tuberculosis decides whether a patient initially becomes infected or not. However, when the infection becomes chronic or even latent (as in the case of TB) despite development of specific immune activation, phagocytes have also important effector functions. Macrophages have evolved a myriad of defense strategies to combat infection with intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. These include induction of toxic anti-microbial effectors such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen intermediates, the stimulation of microbe intoxication mechanisms via acidification or metal accumulation in the phagolysosome, the restriction of the microbe's access to essential nutrients such as iron, fatty acids, or amino acids, the production of anti-microbial peptides and cytokines, along with induction of autophagy and efferocytosis to eliminate the pathogen. On the other hand, M. tuberculosis, as a prime example of a well-adapted facultative intracellular bacterium, has learned during evolution to counter-balance the host's immune defense strategies to secure survival or multiplication within this otherwise hostile environment. This review provides an overview of innate immune defense of macrophages directed against intracellular bacteria with a focus on M. tuberculosis. Gaining more insights and knowledge into this complex network of host-pathogen interaction will identify novel target sites of intervention to successfully clear infection at a time of rapidly emerging multi-resistance of M. tuberculosis against conventional antibiotics. PMID:25703560

  18. Identification, isolation, and sequence of the reaction center protein genes of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas capsulata

    SciTech Connect

    Hearst, J.E.

    1984-07-01

    Reaction centers in photosynthetic membranes are the centers to which electronic excitation due to light absorption is transferred. This excitation brings about a charge separation between a bacteriochlorophyll molecule and two quinone molecules which ultimately leads to the formation of a hydroquinone. The reduced hydroquinone is then utilized to produce a proton gradient across the membrane and ultimately to produce ATP. We have focused our interest on the structure of the reaction center in the photosynthetic purple bacterium, Rhodopseudomonas capsulata, with the intention of establishing a detailed understanding of these first chemical steps in the natural fixation of sunlight. The methods used to identify and isolate the genes for the three reaction center subunits, L, M, and H, in Rps. capsulata are outlined. These genes have then been sequenced, and the sequences analyzed in detail for their similarity with sequences of comparable proteins from more advanced photosynthetic bacteria such as Anabena, from algae such as Euglena and Chlamydomonas, and from higher plants such as amaranthus, soybean, tobacco and spinach. Homology was found which has been tentatively interpreted to be in the region of quinone binding in all of these reaction centers. There is growing optimism that there will be substantial structural similarity between the reaction centers of the purple bacteria and those of photosystem II in higher plants. This conclusion is important because the x-ray crystal structures of several of the purple bacteria reaction center complexes are presently being worked on and will ultimately be solved.

  19. [Biological activity of lipids and photosynthetic pigments of Sargassum pallidum C. Agardh].

    PubMed

    Gerasimenko, N I; Martyias, E A; Logvinov, S V; Busarova, N G

    2014-01-01

    The biological activity of lipids and photosynthetic pigments of the kelp Sargassum pallidum (Turner) C. Agardh has been studied. Free fatty acids and their esters demonstrated considerable antimicrobial activity against bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus[ital] and Escherichia coli), yeast-like fungi (Candida albicans), and opportunistic pathogenic (Aspergilius niger) and phytopathogenic (Fusarium oxysporum, and Septoria glycines) fungi. Glyceroglycolipids and neutral lipids demonstrated moderate activity. Fucoxanthin and chlorophylls weakly suppressed the growth of microorganisms. None of the studied substances demonstrated activity against Ehrlich's carcinoma. It was shown that the season of weed harvesting affected both antimicrobial and hemolytic activities of different lipids due to changes in their fatty acid composition. PMID:25272757

  20. Up-converted fluorescence from photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes linearly dependent on excitation intensity.

    PubMed

    Leiger, Kristjan; Freiberg, Arvi

    2016-01-01

    Weak up-converted fluorescence related to bacteriochlorophyll a was recorded from various detergent-isolated and membrane-embedded light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes as well as from the functional membranes of photosynthetic purple bacteria under continuous-wave infrared laser excitation at 1064 nm, far outside the optically allowed singlet absorption bands of the chromophore. The fluorescence increases linearly with the excitation power, distinguishing it from the previously observed two-photon excited fluorescence upon femtosecond pulse excitation. Possible mechanisms of this excitation are discussed. PMID:25764015

  1. A New Comparative-Genomics Approach for Defining Phenotype-Specific Indicators Reveals Specific Genetic Markers in Predatory Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Zohar; Ben Sasson, Tom; Cohen, Yossi; Segev, Elad; Jurkevitch, Edouard

    2015-01-01

    Predatory bacteria seek and consume other live bacteria. Although belonging to taxonomically diverse groups, relatively few bacterial predator species are known. Consequently, it is difficult to assess the impact of predation within the bacterial realm. As no genetic signatures distinguishing them from non-predatory bacteria are known, genomic resources cannot be exploited to uncover novel predators. In order to identify genes specific to predatory bacteria, we developed a bioinformatic tool called DiffGene. This tool automatically identifies marker genes that are specific to phenotypic or taxonomic groups, by mapping the complete gene content of all available fully-sequenced genomes for the presence/absence of each gene in each genome. A putative ‘predator region’ of ~60 amino acids in the tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) protein was found to probably be a predator-specific marker. This region is found in all known obligate predator and a few facultative predator genomes, and is absent from most facultative predators and all non-predatory bacteria. We designed PCR primers that uniquely amplify a ~180bp-long sequence within the predators’ TDO gene, and validated them in monocultures as well as in metagenetic analysis of environmental wastewater samples. This marker, in addition to its usage in predator identification and phylogenetics, may finally permit reliable enumeration and cataloguing of predatory bacteria from environmental samples, as well as uncovering novel predators. PMID:26569499

  2. Oxidation of methyl halides by the facultative methylotroph strain IMB-1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaefer, J.K.; Oremland, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    Washed cell suspensions of the facultative methylotroph strain IMB-1 grown on methyl bromide (MeBr) were able to consume methyl chloride (MeCl) and methyl iodide (MeI) as well as MeBr. Consumption of >100 ??M MeBr by cells grown on glucose, acetate, or monomethylamine required induction. Induction was inhibited by chloramphenicol. However, cells had a constitutive ability to consume low concentrations (<20 nM) of MeBr. Glucose-grown cells were able to readily oxidize [14C]formaldehyde to 14CO2 but had only a small capacity for oxidation of [14C]methanol. Preincubation of cells with MeBr did not affect either activity, but MeBr-induced cells had a greater capacity for [14C]MeBr oxidation than did cells without preincubation. Consumption of MeBr was inhibited by MeI, and MeCl consumption was inhibited by MeBr. No inhibition of MeBr consumption occurred with methyl fluoride, propyl iodide, dibromomethane, dichloromethane, or difluoromethane, and in addition cells did not oxidize any of these compounds. Cells displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics for the various methyl halides, with apparent K(s) values of 190, 280, and 6,100 nM for MeBr, MeI, and MeCl, respectively. These results suggest the presence of a single oxidation enzyme system specific for methyl halides (other than methyl fluoride) which runs through formaldehyde to CO2. The ease of induction of methyl halide oxidation in strain IMB-1 should facilitate its mass culture for the purpose of reducing MeBr emissions to the atmosphere from fumigated soils.

  3. Shewanella amazonensis sp. nov., a novel metal-reducing facultative anaerobe from Amazonian shelf muds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, K.; Dollhopf, M. E.; Aller, R.; Stackebrandt, E.; Nealson, K. H.

    1998-01-01

    A new bacterial species belonging to the genus Shewanella is described on the basis of phenotypic characterization and sequence analysis of its 16S rRNA-encoding and gyrase B (gyrB) genes. This organism, isolated from shallow-water marine sediments derived from the Amazon River delta, is a Gram-negative, motile, polarly flagellated, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped eubacterium and has a G&C content of 51.7 mol%. Strain SB2BT is exceptionally active in the anaerobic reduction of iron, manganese and sulfur compounds. SB2BT grows optimally at 35 degrees C, with 1-3% NaCl and over a pH range of 7-8. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence revealed a clear affiliation between strain SB2BT and members of the gamma subclass of the class Proteobacteria. High similarity values were found with certain members of the genus Shewanella, especially with Shewanella putrefaciens, and this was supported by cellular fatty acid profiles and phenotypic characterization. DNA-DNA hybridization between strain SB2BT and its phylogenetically closest relatives revealed low similarity values (24.6-42.7%) which indicated species status for strain SB2BT. That SB2BT represents a distinct bacterial species within the genus Shewanella is also supported by gyrB sequence analysis. Considering the source of the isolate, the name Shewanella amazonensis sp. nov. is proposed and strain SB2BT (= ATCC 700329T) is designated as the type strain.

  4. Pseudomonas toyotomiensis sp. nov., a psychrotolerant facultative alkaliphile that utilizes hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Kikue; Yamahira, Keiko; Nakajima, Kenji; Nodasaka, Yoshinobu; Okuyama, Hidetoshi; Yumoto, Isao

    2011-08-01

    A psychrotolerant, facultatively alkaliphilic strain, HT-3(T), was isolated from a sample of soil immersed in hot-spring water containing hydrocarbons in Toyotomi, Hokkaido, Japan. 16S rRNA gene sequence-based phylogeny suggested that strain HT-3(T) is a member of the genus Pseudomonas and belongs to the Pseudomonas oleovorans group. Cells of the isolate were Gram-negative, aerobic, straight rods, motile by a single polar flagellum. The strain grew at 4-42 °C, with optimum growth at 35 °C at pH 7, and at pH 6-10. It hydrolysed Tweens 20, 40, 60 and 80, but not casein, gelatin, starch or DNA. Its major isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone-9 (Q-9) and the DNA G+C content was 65.1 mol%. The whole-cell fatty acid profile consisted mainly of C(16 : 0), C(16 : 1)ω9c and C(18 : 1)ω9c. Phylogenetic analyses based on gyrB, rpoB and rpoD sequences revealed that the isolate could be discriminated from Pseudomonas species that exhibited more than 97 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity and phylogenetic neighbours belonging to the P. oleovorans group including the closest relative of the isolate, Pseudomonas alcaliphila. DNA-DNA hybridization with P. alcaliphila AL15-21(T) revealed 51 ± 5 % relatedness. Owing to differences in phenotypic properties and phylogenetic analyses based on multilocus gene sequence analysis and DNA-DNA relatedness data, the isolate merits classification in a novel species, for which the name Pseudomonas toyotomiensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is HT-3(T) ( = JCM 15604(T)  = NCIMB 14511(T)). PMID:20817837

  5. Stress-induced changes in abundance differ among obligate and facultative endosymbionts of the soybean aphid.

    PubMed

    Enders, Laramy S; Miller, Nicholas J

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial endosymbionts can drive evolutionary novelty by conferring adaptive benefits under adverse environmental conditions. Among aphid species there is growing evidence that symbionts influence tolerance to various forms of stress. However, the extent to which stress inflicted on the aphid host has cascading effects on symbiont community dynamics remains poorly understood. Here we simultaneously quantified the effect of host-plant induced and xenobiotic stress on soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) fitness and relative abundance of its three bacterial symbionts. Exposure to soybean defensive stress (Rag1 gene) and a neurotoxic insecticide (thiamethoxam) substantially reduced aphid composite fitness (survival × reproduction) by 74 ± 10% and 92 ± 2%, respectively, which in turn induced distinctive changes in the endosymbiont microbiota. When challenged by host-plant defenses a 1.4-fold reduction in abundance of the obligate symbiont Buchnera was observed across four aphid clonal lines. Among facultative symbionts of Rag1-stressed aphids, Wolbachia abundance increased twofold and Arsenophonus decreased 1.5-fold. A similar pattern was observed under xenobiotic stress, with Buchnera and Arsenophonus titers decreasing (1.3-fold) and Wolbachia increasing (1.5-fold). Furthermore, variation in aphid virulence to Rag1 was positively correlated with changes in Arsenophonus titers, but not Wolbachia or Buchnera. A single Arsenophonus multi-locus genotype was found among aphid clonal lines, indicating strain diversity is not primarily responsible for correlated host-symbiont stress levels. Overall, our results demonstrate the nature of aphid symbioses can significantly affect the outcome of interactions under stress and suggests general changes in the microbiome can occur across multiple stress types. PMID:26865969

  6. Methylobacterium pseudosasae sp. nov., a pink-pigmented, facultatively methylotrophic bacterium isolated from the bamboo phyllosphere.

    PubMed

    Madhaiyan, Munusamy; Poonguzhali, Selvaraj

    2014-02-01

    A pink-pigmented, Gram negative, aerobic, facultatively methylotrophic bacterium, strain BL44(T), was isolated from bamboo leaves and identified as a member of the genus Methylobacterium. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed similarity values of 98.7-97.0 % with closely related type strains and showed highest similarity to Methylobacterium zatmanii DSM 5688(T) (98.7 %) and Methylobacterium thiocyanatum DSM 11490(T) (98.7 %). Methylotrophic metabolism in this strain was confirmed by PCR amplification and sequencing of the mxaF gene coding for the α-subunit of methanol dehydrogenase. Strain BL44(T) produced three known quorum sensing signal molecules with similar retention time to C8, C10 and C12-HSLs when characterized by GC-MS. The fatty acid profiles contained major amounts of C18:1 ω7c, iso-3OH C17:0 and summed feature 3 (C16:1 ω7c and/or iso-C15:0 2-OH), which supported the grouping of the isolate in the genus Methylobacterium. The DNA G+C content was 66.9 mol%. DNA relatedness of the strain BL44(T) to its most closely related strains ranged from 12-43.3 %. On the basis of the phenotypic, phylogenetic and DNA-DNA hybridization data, strain BL44(T) is assigned to a novel species of the genus Methylobacterium for which the name Methylobacterium pseudosasae sp. nov. is proposed (type strain BL44(T) = NBRC 105205(T) = ICMP 17622(T)). PMID:24297603

  7. Degradation of 1,2-dichloroethane by Ancylobacter aquaticus and other facultative methylotrophs

    SciTech Connect

    Van Den Wijngaard, A.J.; Van Der Kamp, K.W.H.J.; Van Der Ploeg, J.; Pries, F.; Kazemier, B.; Janssen, D.B. )

    1992-03-01

    Cultures of the newly isolated bacterial strains AD20, AD25, and AD27, identified as strains of Ancylobacter aquaticus, were capable of growth on 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) as the sole carbon and energy source. These strains, as well as two other new DCE utilizers, were facultative methylotrophs and were also able to row on 2-chloroethanol, chloroacetate, and 2-chloropropionate. In all strains tested, DCE was degraded by initial hydrolytic dehalogenation to 2-chloroethanol, followed by oxidation by a phenazine methosulfate-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase and an NAD-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenase. The resulting chloroacetic acid was converted to glycolate by chloroacetate dehalogenase. The alcohol dehydrogenase was induced during growth on methanol or DCE in strain AD20, but no activity was found during growth on glucose. However, in strain AD25 the enzyme was synthesized to a higher level during growth on glucose than on methanol, and it reached levels of around 2 U/mg of protein in late-exponential-phase cultures growing on glucose. The haloalkane dehalogenase was constitutively produced in all strains tested, but strain AD25 synthesized the enzyme at a level of 30 to 40% of the total cellular protein, which is much higher than that found in other DCE degraders. The nucleotide sequences of the haloalkane dehalogenase (dhlA) genes of strains AD20 and AD25 were the same as the sequence of dhlA from Xanthobacter autotrophicus GJ10 and GJ11. Hybridization experiments showed that the dhlA genes of six different DCE utilizers were all locate on an 8.3-kb EcoRI restriction fragment, indicating that the organisms may have obtained the dhlA gene by horizontal gene transmission.

  8. Oxidation of methyl halides by the facultative methylotroph strain IMB-1

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, J.K.; Oremland, R.S.

    1999-11-01

    Washed cell suspensions of the facultative methylotroph strain IMB-1 grown on methyl bromide (MeBr) were able to consume methyl chloride (MeCl) and methyl iodide (MeI) as well as MeBr. Consumption of {gt}100 {mu}M MeBr by cells grown on glucose, acetate, or monomethylamine required induction. Induction was inhibited by chloramphenicol. However, cells had a constitutive ability to consume low concentrations of MeBr. Glucose-grown cells were able to readily oxidize [{sup 14}C]formaldehyde to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} but had only a small capacity for oxidation of [{sup 14}C]methanol. Preincubation of cells with MeBr did not affect either activity, but MeBr-induced cells had a greater capacity for [{sup 14}C] MeBr oxidation than did cells without preincubation. Consumption of MeBr was inhibited by MeI, and MeCl consumption was inhibited by MeBr. No inhibition of MeBr consumption occurred with methyl fluoride, propyl iodide, dibromomethane, dichloromethane, or difluoromethane, and in addition cells did not oxidize any of these compounds. Cells displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics for the various methyl halides, with apparent K{sub s} values of 190, 280, and 6,100 Mn for MeBr, MeI, and McCl, respectively. These results suggest the presence of a single oxidation enzyme system specific for methyl halides (other than methyl fluoride) which runs through formaldehyde to CO{sub 2}. The ease of induction of methyl halide oxidation in strain IMB-1 should facilitate its mass culture for the purpose of reducing MeBr emissions to the atmosphere from fumigated soils.

  9. Facultative Control of Matrix Production Optimizes Competitive Fitness in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 Biofilm Models

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Jonas S.; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Squyres, Georgia R.; Price-Whelan, Alexa; de Santiago Torio, Ana; Song, Angela; Cornell, William C.; Sørensen, Søren J.

    2015-01-01

    As biofilms grow, resident cells inevitably face the challenge of resource limitation. In the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, electron acceptor availability affects matrix production and, as a result, biofilm morphogenesis. The secreted matrix polysaccharide Pel is required for pellicle formation and for colony wrinkling, two activities that promote access to O2. We examined the exploitability and evolvability of Pel production at the air-liquid interface (during pellicle formation) and on solid surfaces (during colony formation). Although Pel contributes to the developmental response to electron acceptor limitation in both biofilm formation regimes, we found variation in the exploitability of its production and necessity for competitive fitness between the two systems. The wild type showed a competitive advantage against a non-Pel-producing mutant in pellicles but no advantage in colonies. Adaptation to the pellicle environment selected for mutants with a competitive advantage against the wild type in pellicles but also caused a severe disadvantage in colonies, even in wrinkled colony centers. Evolution in the colony center produced divergent phenotypes, while adaptation to the colony edge produced mutants with clear competitive advantages against the wild type in this O2-replete niche. In general, the structurally heterogeneous colony environment promoted more diversification than the more homogeneous pellicle. These results suggest that the role of Pel in community structure formation in response to electron acceptor limitation is unique to specific biofilm models and that the facultative control of Pel production is required for PA14 to maintain optimum benefit in different types of communities. PMID:26431965

  10. Amphibacillus jilinensis sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic, alkaliphilic bacillus from a soda lake.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Yue; Zheng, Gang; Zhang, Wen-Wu; Xu, Xue-Wei; Wu, Min; Zhu, Xu-Fen

    2010-11-01

    A facultatively anaerobic, alkaliphilic, spore-forming, Gram-positive-staining rod, designated Y1(T), was isolated under strictly anaerobic conditions from sediment of a soda lake in Jilin province, China. The strain was not dependent on Na(+) but was highly halotolerant and grew optimally in medium JY with 0.5 M Na(+) (0.06 M NaHCO(3) and 0.44 M NaCl). The optimum pH for growth was 9.0, with a range of pH 7.5-10.5. No growth occurred at pH 7.0 or 11.0. The strain was mesophilic, with a temperature range of 15-45 °C and optimum growth at 32 °C. Strain Y1(T) was able to use certain mono- and oligosaccharides. Soluble starch and casein were hydrolysed. The methyl red test, Voges-Proskauer test and tests for catalase and oxidase activities were negative. The predominant fatty acids were anteiso-C(15 : 0) and iso-C(15 : 0). Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed 93.4-96.8 % sequence similarity to members of the genus Amphibacillus. The DNA G+C content was 37.7 mol% (T(m) method). The DNA-DNA relatedness of strain Y1(T) with respect to Amphibacillus tropicus DSM 13870(T) and Amphibacillus sediminis DSM 21624(T) was 48 and 37 %, respectively. On the basis of its phylogenetic position and the DNA-DNA relatedness data as well as its physiological and biochemical properties, strain Y1(T) represents a novel species of the genus Amphibacillus, for which the name Amphibacillus jilinensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Y1(T) (=CGMCC 1.5123(T) =JCM 16149(T)). PMID:19965990

  11. BOREAS TE-9 NSA Photosynthetic Response Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G.; Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Dang, Qinglai; Margolis, Hank; Coyea, Marie

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) TE-9 (Terrestrial Ecology) team collected several data sets related to chemical and photosynthetic properties of leaves. This data set describes: (1) the response of leaf and shoot-level photosynthesis to ambient and intercellular CO2 concentration, temperature, and incident photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) for black spruce, jack pine, and aspen during the three intensive field campaigns (IFCs) in 1994 in the Northern Study Area (NSA); (2) the response of stomatal conductance to vapor pressure difference throughout the growing season of 1994; and (3) a range of shoot water potentials (controlled in the laboratory) for black spruce and jack pine. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  12. Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

    2004-10-13

    This report highlights significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation Project for the period ending 09/30/2004. The primary effort of this quarter was focused on mass transfer of carbon dioxide into the water film to study the potential effects on the photosynthetic organisms that depend on the carbon. Testing of the carbon dioxide scrubbing capability (mass transfer capability) of flowing water film appears to be relatively high and largely unaffected by transport of the gas through the bioreactor. The implications are that the transfer of carbon dioxide into the film is nearly at maximum and that it is sufficient to sustain photosynthesis at whatever rate the organisms can sustain. This finding is key to assuming that the process is an energy (photon) limited reaction and not a nutrient limited reaction.

  13. Photosynthetic hydrogen and oxygen production - Kinetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenbaum, E.

    1982-01-01

    The simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen was measured in a study of the steady-state turnover times of two biological systems, by driving them into the steady state with repetitive, single-turnover flash illumination. The systems were: (1) in vitro, isolated chloroplasts, ferredoxin and hydrogenase; and (2) the anaerobically-adapted green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. It is found that the turnover times for production of both oxygen and hydrogen in photosynthetic water splitting are in milliseconds, and either equal to, or less than, the turnover time for carbon dioxide reduction in intact algal cells. There is therefore mutual compatibility between hydrogen and oxygen turnover times, and partial compatibility with the excitation rate of the photosynthetic reaction centers under solar irradiation conditions.

  14. Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

    2005-01-13

    This report highlights significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation Project during the ending 12/31/2004. Specific results and accomplishments for the program include review of pilot scale testing and design of a new bioreactor. Testing confirmed that algae can be grown in a sustainable fashion in the pilot bioreactor, even with intermittent availability of sunlight. The pilot-scale tests indicated that algal growth rate followed photon delivery during productivity testing.

  15. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2003-04-15

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 1/2/2003 through 4/01/2003. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we are progressing with long-term model scale bioreactor tests and are completing final preparations for pilot scale bioreactor testing. Specific results and accomplishments for the first quarter of 2003 are included.

  16. Coral bleaching independent of photosynthetic activity.

    PubMed

    Tolleter, Dimitri; Seneca, François O; DeNofrio, Jan C; Krediet, Cory J; Palumbi, Stephen R; Pringle, John R; Grossman, Arthur R

    2013-09-23

    The global decline of reef-building corals is due in part to the loss of algal symbionts, or "bleaching," during the increasingly frequent periods of high seawater temperatures. During bleaching, endosymbiotic dinoflagellate algae (Symbiodinium spp.) either are lost from the animal tissue or lose their photosynthetic pigments, resulting in host mortality if the Symbiodinium populations fail to recover. The >1,000 studies of the causes of heat-induced bleaching have focused overwhelmingly on the consequences of damage to algal photosynthetic processes, and the prevailing model for bleaching invokes a light-dependent generation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) by heat-damaged chloroplasts as the primary trigger. However, the precise mechanisms of bleaching remain unknown, and there is evidence for involvement of multiple cellular processes. In this study, we asked the simple question of whether bleaching can be triggered by heat in the dark, in the absence of photosynthetically derived ROS. We used both the sea anemone model system Aiptasia and several species of reef-building corals to demonstrate that symbiont loss can occur rapidly during heat stress in complete darkness. Furthermore, we observed damage to the photosynthetic apparatus under these conditions in both Aiptasia endosymbionts and cultured Symbiodinium. These results do not directly contradict the view that light-stimulated ROS production is important in bleaching, but they do show that there must be another pathway leading to bleaching. Elucidation of this pathway should help to clarify bleaching mechanisms under the more usual conditions of heat stress in the light. PMID:24012312

  17. Organ preservation using a photosynthetic solution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Organs harvested from a body lapsing into circulatory deficit are exposed to low O2/high CO2, and reach a critical point where original functionality after transplantation is unlikely. The present study evaluates the effect of respiratory assistance using Chlorella photosynthesis on preservation of the rat pancreas from the viewpoint of donation after cardiac death (DCD). Methods Gas was exchanged through the peritoneum of rats under controlled ventilation with or without Chlorella photosynthetic respiratory assistance. A gas permeable pouch containing Chlorella in solution was placed in the peritoneum and then the space between the pouch and the peritoneum was filled with an emulsified perfluorocarbon gas carrier. Rat DCD pancreases procured 3 h after cardiac arrest were preserved for 30 min in a cold or mildly hypothermic environment or in a mildly hypothermic environment with photosynthetic respiratory support. The pancreases were then heterotopically transplanted into rats with STZ-induced diabetes. Results Levels of blood oxygen (PaO2) and carbon dioxide (PaCO2) increased and significantly decreased, respectively, in rats with mechanically reduced ventilation and rats given intraperitoneal photosynthetic respiratory support when compared with those without such support. Transplantation with DCD pancreases that had been stored under photosynthetic respiratory support resulted in the survival of all rats, which is impossible to achieve using pancreases that have been maintained statically in cold storage. Conclusion Respiratory assistance using photosynthesis helps to improve not only blood gas status in the event of respiratory insufficiency, but also graft recovery after pancreas transplantation with a DCD pancreas that has been damaged by prolonged warm ischemia. PMID:23369195

  18. Topology and energy transport in networks of interacting photosynthetic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegra, Michele; Giorda, Paolo

    2012-05-01

    We address the role of topology in the energy transport process that occurs in networks of photosynthetic complexes. We take inspiration from light-harvesting networks present in purple bacteria and simulate an incoherent dissipative energy transport process on more general and abstract networks, considering both regular structures (Cayley trees and hyperbranched fractals) and randomly generated ones. We focus on the the two primary light-harvesting complexes of purple bacteria, i.e., the LH1 and LH2, and we use network-theoretical centrality measures in order to select different LH1 arrangements. We show that different choices cause significant differences in the transport efficiencies, and that for regular networks, centrality measures allow us to identify arrangements that ensure transport efficiencies which are better than those obtained with a random disposition of the complexes. The optimal arrangements strongly depend on the dissipative nature of the dynamics and on the topological properties of the networks considered, and depending on the latter, they are achieved by using global versus local centrality measures. For randomly generated networks, a random arrangement of the complexes already provides efficient transport, and this suggests the process is strong with respect to limited amount of control in the structure design and to the disorder inherent in the construction of randomly assembled structures. Finally, we compare the networks considered with the real biological networks and find that the latter have in general better performances, due to their higher connectivity, but the former with optimal arrangements can mimic the real networks' behavior for a specific range of transport parameters. These results show that the use of network-theoretical concepts can be crucial for the characterization and design of efficient artificial energy transport networks.

  19. Spectral broadening of interacting pigments: polarized absorption by photosynthetic proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Somsen, O J; van Grondelle, R; van Amerongen, H

    1996-01-01

    Excitonic interaction between pigment molecules is largely responsible for the static and dynamic spectroscopic properties of photosynthetic pigment-proteins. This paper provides a new description of its effect on polarized absorption spectroscopy, in particular on circular dichroism (CD). We investigate excitonic spectra of finite width and use "spectral moments" to compare 1) inhomogeneously broadened excitonic spectra, 2) spectra that are (homogeneously broadened by vibrations or electron-phonon interaction, and 3) spectra that are simulated by applying convolution after the interaction has been evaluated. Two cases are distinguished. If the excitonic splitting is smaller than the width of the interacting absorption bands, the broadening of the excitonic spectrum can be approximated by a convolution approach, although a correction is necessary for CD spectra. If the excitonic splitting exceeds the bandwidth, the well-known exchange narrowing occurs. We demonstrate that this is accompanied by redistribution of dipole strength and spectral shifts. The magnitude of a CD spectrum is conveniently expressed by its first spectral moment. As will be shown, this is independent of spectral broadening as well as dispersive shifts induced by pigment-protein interactions. Consequently, it provides a simple tool to relate the experimental CD spectrum of a pigment complex to the excitonic interactions from which it originates. To illustrate the potential of the presented framework, the spectroscopy of the LH2 pigment-protein complex from purple bacteria is analyzed and compared for dimer-like and ring-like structures. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the variability of the CD of chlorosomes from green bacteria can be explained by small changes in the structure of their cylindrical bacteriochlorophyll c subunits. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:8889168

  20. Energy transfer and clustering of photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes in reconstituted lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewa, Takehisa; Sumino, Ayumi; Watanabe, Natsuko; Noji, Tomoyasu; Nango, Mamoru

    2013-06-01

    In purple photosynthetic bacteria, light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) and light harvesting/reaction centre core complex (LH1-RC) play the key roles of capturing and transferring light energy and subsequent charge separation. These photosynthetic apparatuses form a supramolecular assembly; however, how the assembly influences the efficiency of energy conversion is not yet clear. We addressed this issue by evaluating the energy transfer in reconstituted photosynthetic protein complexes LH2 and LH1-RC and studying the structures and the membrane environment of the LH2/LH1-RC assemblies, which had been embedded into various lipid bilayers. Thus, LH2 and LH1-RC from Rhodopseudomonas palustris 2.1.6 were reconstituted in phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylcholine (PC), and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)/PG/cardiolipin (CL). Efficient energy transfer from LH2 to LH1-RC was observed in the PC and PE/PG/CL membranes. Atomic force microscopy revealed that LH2 and LH1-RC were heterogeneously distributed to form clusters in the PC and PE/PG/CL membranes. The results indicated that the phospholipid species influenced the cluster formation of LH2 and LH1-RC as well as the energy transfer efficiency.

  1. A multi-pathway model for photosynthetic reaction center.

    PubMed

    Qin, M; Shen, H Z; Yi, X X

    2016-03-28

    Charge separation occurs in a pair of tightly coupled chlorophylls at the heart of photosynthetic reaction centers of both plants and bacteria. Recently it has been shown that quantum coherence can, in principle, enhance the efficiency of a solar cell, working like a quantum heat engine. Here, we propose a biological quantum heat engine (BQHE) motivated by Photosystem II reaction center (PSII RC) to describe the charge separation. Our model mainly considers two charge-separation pathways which is more than that typically considered in the published literature. We explore how these cross-couplings increase the current and power of the charge separation and discuss the effects of multiple pathways in terms of current and power. The robustness of the BQHE against the charge recombination in natural PSII RC and dephasing induced by environments is also explored, and extension from two pathways to multiple pathways is made. These results suggest that noise-induced quantum coherence helps to suppress the influence of acceptor-to-donor charge recombination, and besides, nature-mimicking architectures with engineered multiple pathways for charge separations might be better for artificial solar energy devices considering the influence of environments. PMID:27036480

  2. Thermal Quantum Correlations in Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdian, M.; Kouhestani, H.

    2015-08-01

    Photosynthesis is one of the ancient biological processes, playing crucial role converting solar energy to cellular usable currency. Environmental factors and external perturbations has forced nature to choose systems with the highest efficiency and performance. Recent theoretical and experimental studies have proved the presence of quantum properties in biological systems. Energy transfer systems like Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex shows quantum entanglement between sites of Bacteriophylla molecules in protein environment and presence of decoherence. Complex biological systems implement more truthful mechanisms beside chemical-quantum correlations to assure system's efficiency. In this study we investigate thermal quantum correlations in FMO protein of the photosynthetic apparatus of green sulfur bacteria by quantum discord measure. The results confirmed existence of remarkable quantum correlations of of BChla pigments in room temperature. This results approve involvement of quantum correlation mechanisms for information storage and retention in living organisms that could be useful for further evolutionary studies. Inspired idea of this study is potentially interesting to practice by the same procedure in genetic data transfer mechanisms.

  3. A multi-pathway model for photosynthetic reaction center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, M.; Shen, H. Z.; Yi, X. X.

    2016-03-01

    Charge separation occurs in a pair of tightly coupled chlorophylls at the heart of photosynthetic reaction centers of both plants and bacteria. Recently it has been shown that quantum coherence can, in principle, enhance the efficiency of a solar cell, working like a quantum heat engine. Here, we propose a biological quantum heat engine (BQHE) motivated by Photosystem II reaction center (PSII RC) to describe the charge separation. Our model mainly considers two charge-separation pathways which is more than that typically considered in the published literature. We explore how these cross-couplings increase the current and power of the charge separation and discuss the effects of multiple pathways in terms of current and power. The robustness of the BQHE against the charge recombination in natural PSII RC and dephasing induced by environments is also explored, and extension from two pathways to multiple pathways is made. These results suggest that noise-induced quantum coherence helps to suppress the influence of acceptor-to-donor charge recombination, and besides, nature-mimicking architectures with engineered multiple pathways for charge separations might be better for artificial solar energy devices considering the influence of environments.

  4. Structure-function investigations of bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Leonova, M M; Fufina, T Yu; Vasilieva, L G; Shuvalov, V A

    2011-12-01

    During photosynthesis light energy is converted into energy of chemical bonds through a series of electron and proton transfer reactions. Over the first ultrafast steps of photosynthesis that take place in the reaction center (RC) the quantum efficiency of the light energy transduction is nearly 100%. Compared to the plant and cyanobacterial photosystems, bacterial RCs are well studied and have relatively simple structure. Therefore they represent a useful model system both for manipulating of the electron transfer parameters to study detailed mechanisms of its separate steps as well as to investigate the common principles of the photosynthetic RC structure, function, and evolution. This review is focused on the research papers devoted to chemical and genetic modifications of the RCs of purple bacteria in order to study principles and mechanisms of their functioning. Investigations of the last two decades show that the maximal rates of the electron transfer reactions in the RC depend on a number of parameters. Chemical structure of the cofactors, distances between them, their relative orientation, and interactions to each other are of great importance for this process. By means of genetic and spectral methods, it was demonstrated that RC protein is also an essential factor affecting the efficiency of the photochemical charge separation. Finally, some of conservative water molecules found in RC not only contribute to stability of the protein structure, but are directly involved in the functioning of the complex. PMID:22339599

  5. Tectonics and the photosynthetic habitable zone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, N. H.

    2009-12-01

    The traditional habitable zone lies between an inner stellar radius where the surface of the planet becomes too hot for liquid water carbon-based life and on outer radius, where the surface freezes. It is effectively the zone where photosynthesis is feasible. The concept extends to putative life on objects with liquid methane at the surface, like Titan. As a practical matter, photosynthesis leaves detectable biosignatures in the geological record; black shale on the Earth indicates that sulfide and probably FeO based photosynthesis existed by 3.8 Ga. The hard crustal rocks and the mantle sequester numerous photosynthetic biosignatures. Photosynthesis can produce detectable free oxygen with ozone in the atmosphere of extrasolar planets. In contrast, there is no outer limit for subsurface life in large silicate objects. Pre-photosynthetic niches are dependable but meager and not very detectable at great antiquity or great distance, with global productivity less than 1e-3 of the photosynthetic ones. Photosynthetic organisms have bountiful energy that modifies their surface environment and even tectonics. For example, metamorphic rocks formed at the expense of thick black shale are highly radioactive and hence self-fluxing. Active tectonics with volcanism and metamorphism prevents volatiles from being sequestered in the subsurface as on Mars. A heat-pipe object, like a larger Io, differs from the Earth in that the volatiles return to the deep interior distributed within massive volcanic deposits rather than concentrated in the shallow oceanic crust. One the Earth, the return of water to the surface by arc volcanoes controls its mantle abundance at the transition between behaving as a trace element and behaving as a major element that affects melting. The ocean accumulates the water that the mantle and crust do not take. The Earth has the “right” amount of water that erosion/deposition and tectonics both tend to maintain near sea level surfaces. The mantle contains

  6. A compendium of temperature responses of Rubisco kinetic traits: variability among and within photosynthetic groups and impacts on photosynthesis modeling

    PubMed Central

    Galmés, Jeroni; Hermida-Carrera, Carmen; Laanisto, Lauri; Niinemets, Ülo

    2016-01-01

    The present study provides a synthesis of the in vitro and in vivo temperature responses of Rubisco Michaelis–Menten constants for CO2 (Kc) and O2 (Ko), specificity factor (Sc,o) and maximum carboxylase turnover rate (kcatc) for 49 species from all the main photosynthetic kingdoms of life. Novel correction routines were developed for in vitro data to remove the effects of study-to-study differences in Rubisco assays. The compilation revealed differences in the energy of activation (∆Ha) of Rubisco kinetics between higher plants and other photosynthetic groups, although photosynthetic bacteria and algae were under-represented and very few species have been investigated so far. Within plants, the variation in Rubisco temperature responses was related to species’ climate and photosynthetic mechanism, with differences in ∆Ha for kcatc among C3 plants from cool and warm environments, and in ∆Ha for kcatc and Kc among C3 and C4 plants. A negative correlation was observed among ∆Ha for Sc/o and species’ growth temperature for all data pooled, supporting the convergent adjustment of the temperature sensitivity of Rubisco kinetics to species’ thermal history. Simulations of the influence of varying temperature dependences of Rubisco kinetics on Rubisco-limited photosynthesis suggested improved photosynthetic performance of C3 plants from cool habitats at lower temperatures, and C3 plants from warm habitats at higher temperatures, especially at higher CO2 concentration. Thus, variation in Rubisco kinetics for different groups of photosynthetic organisms might need consideration to improve prediction of photosynthesis in future climates. Comparisons between in vitro and in vivo data revealed common trends, but also highlighted a large variability among both types of Rubisco kinetics currently used to simulate photosynthesis, emphasizing the need for more experimental work to fill in the gaps in Rubisco datasets and improve scaling from enzyme kinetics to

  7. A compendium of temperature responses of Rubisco kinetic traits: variability among and within photosynthetic groups and impacts on photosynthesis modeling.

    PubMed

    Galmés, Jeroni; Hermida-Carrera, Carmen; Laanisto, Lauri; Niinemets, Ülo

    2016-09-01

    The present study provides a synthesis of the in vitro and in vivo temperature responses of Rubisco Michaelis-Menten constants for CO2 (Kc) and O2 (Ko), specificity factor (Sc,o) and maximum carboxylase turnover rate (kcatc) for 49 species from all the main photosynthetic kingdoms of life. Novel correction routines were developed for in vitro data to remove the effects of study-to-study differences in Rubisco assays. The compilation revealed differences in the energy of activation (∆Ha) of Rubisco kinetics between higher plants and other photosynthetic groups, although photosynthetic bacteria and algae were under-represented and very few species have been investigated so far. Within plants, the variation in Rubisco temperature responses was related to species' climate and photosynthetic mechanism, with differences in ∆Ha for kcatc among C3 plants from cool and warm environments, and in ∆Ha for kcatc and Kc among C3 and C4 plants. A negative correlation was observed among ∆Ha for Sc/o and species' growth temperature for all data pooled, supporting the convergent adjustment of the temperature sensitivity of Rubisco kinetics to species' thermal history. Simulations of the influence of varying temperature dependences of Rubisco kinetics on Rubisco-limited photosynthesis suggested improved photosynthetic performance of C3 plants from cool habitats at lower temperatures, and C3 plants from warm habitats at higher temperatures, especially at higher CO2 concentration. Thus, variation in Rubisco kinetics for different groups of photosynthetic organisms might need consideration to improve prediction of photosynthesis in future climates. Comparisons between in vitro and in vivo data revealed common trends, but also highlighted a large variability among both types of Rubisco kinetics currently used to simulate photosynthesis, emphasizing the need for more experimental work to fill in the gaps in Rubisco datasets and improve scaling from enzyme kinetics to realized

  8. Back To Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1997-01-01

    Explores new research about bacteria. Discusses bacterial genomes, archaea, unusual environments, evolution, pathogens, bacterial movement, biofilms, bacteria in the body, and a bacterial obsession. Contains 29 references. (JRH)

  9. Magnetic bacteria against MIC

    SciTech Connect

    Javaherdashti, R.

    1997-12-01

    In this article, it is suggested to use the sensitivity of magnetotactic bacteria to changes of magnetic field direction and the natural ability of this bacteria in rapid growth during relatively short time intervals against corrosion-enhancing bacteria and especially sulfate-reducing bacteria. If colonies of sulfate-reducing bacteria could be packed among magnetotactic bacteria, then, by applying sufficiently powerful magnetic field (about 0.5 gauss), all of these bacteria (magnetic and non-magnetic) will be oriented towards an Anti-bacteria agent (oxygen or biocide). So, Microbiologically-Influenced Corrosion in the system would be controlled to a large extent.

  10. Characterisation of antioxidants in photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic leaf tissues of variegated Pelargonium zonale plants.

    PubMed

    Vidović, M; Morina, F; Milić-Komić, S; Vuleta, A; Zechmann, B; Prokić, Lj; Veljović Jovanović, S

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important signalling molecule, involved in regulation of numerous metabolic processes in plants. The most important sources of H2 O2 in photosynthetically active cells are chloroplasts and peroxisomes. Here we employed variegated Pelargonium zonale to characterise and compare enzymatic and non-enzymatic components of the antioxidative system in autotrophic and heterotrophic leaf tissues at (sub)cellular level under optimal growth conditions. The results revealed that both leaf tissues had specific strategies to regulate H2 O2 levels. In photosynthetic cells, the redox regulatory system was based on ascorbate, and on the activities of thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase (tAPX) and catalase. In this leaf tissue, ascorbate was predominantly localised in the nucleus, peroxisomes, plastids and mitochondria. On the other hand, non-photosynthetic cells contained higher glutathione content, mostly located in mitochondria. The enzymatic antioxidative system in non-photosynthetic cells relied on the ascorbate-glutathione cycle and both Mn and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase. Interestingly, higher content of ascorbate and glutathione, and higher activities of APX in the cytosol of non-photosynthetic leaf cells compared to the photosynthetic ones, suggest the importance of this compartment in H2 O2 regulation. Together, these results imply different regulation of processes linked with H2 O2 signalling at subcellular level. Thus, we propose green-white variegated leaves as an excellent system for examination of redox signal transduction and redox communication between two cell types, autotrophic and heterotrophic, within the same organ. PMID:26712503

  11. CsmA Protein is Associated with BChl a in the Baseplate Subantenna of Chlorosomes of the Photosynthetic Green Filamentous Bacterium Oscillochloris trichoides belonging to the Family Oscillochloridaceae

    PubMed Central

    Zobova, Anastasiya; Taisova, Alexandra; Lukashev, Eugeny; Fedorova, Nataliya; Baratova, Ludmila; Fetisova, Zoya

    2011-01-01

    The baseplate subantenna in chlorosomes of green anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria, belonging to the families Chloroflexaceae and Chlorobiaceae, is known to represent a complex of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a with the ~6 kDa CsmA proteins. Earlier, we showed the existence of a similar BChl a subantenna in chlorosomes of the photosynthetic green bacterium Oscillochloris trichoides, member of Oscillochloridaceae, the third family of green photosynthetic bacteria. However, this BChl a subantenna was not visually identified in absorption spectra of isolated Osc. trichoides chlorosomes in contrast to those of Chloroflexaceae and Chlorobiaceae. In this work, using room and low-temperature absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of alkaline-treated and untreated chlorosomes of Osc. trichoides, we showed that the baseplate BChl a subantenna does exist in Oscillochloridaceae chlorosomes as a complex of BChl a with the 5.7 kDa CsmA protein. The present results support the idea that the baseplate subantenna, representing a complex of BChl a with a ~6 kDa CsmA protein, is a universal interface between the BChl c subantenna of chlorosomes and the nearest light-harvesting BChl a subantenna in all three known families of green anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria. PMID:21941538

  12. The contribution of bacteria to algal growth by carbon cycling.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue; Lant, Paul; Pratt, Steven

    2015-04-01

    Algal mass production in open systems is often limited by the availability of inorganic carbon substrate. In this paper, we evaluate how bacterial driven carbon cycling mitigates carbon limitation in open algal culture systems. The contribution of bacteria to carbon cycling was determined by quantifying algae growth with and without supplementation of bacteria. It was found that adding heterotrophic bacteria to an open algal culture dramatically enhanced algae productivity. Increases in algal productivity due to supplementation of bacteria of 4.8 and 3.4 times were observed in two batch tests operating at two different pH values over 7 days. A kinetic model is proposed which describes carbon limited algal growth, and how the limitation could be overcome by bacterial activity to re-mineralize photosynthetic end products. PMID:25312046

  13. Electrostatics of photosynthetic reaction centers in membranes.

    PubMed

    Pennisi, Cristian P; Greenbaum, Elias; Yoshida, Ken

    2006-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers are integral membrane complexes. They have potential application as molecular photovoltaic structures and have been used in diverse technological applications. A three-dimensional electrostatic model of the photosystem I reaction center (PSI) embedded in a lipid membrane is presented. The potential is obtained by solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation with the finite element method (FEM). Simulations showing the potential distribution in a vesicle containing PSI reaction centers under different conditions are presented. The results of the simulations are compared with previous findings and a possible application of PSI to provide light activation of voltage-gated ion channels is discussed. PMID:17946611

  14. Temperature response of Antarctic cryptoendolithic photosynthetic microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ocampo-Friedmann, R.; Meyer, M. A.; Chen, M.; Friedmann, E. I.

    1988-01-01

    Growth responses to temperatures between 12.5 [degrees] C and 25 degrees C were determined for five photosynthetic microorganisms isolated from the Ross Desert cryptoendolithic community. Among eukaryotic algae, two strains of Trebouxia sp. have an upper temperature limit of 20 degrees C, and two strains of Hemichloris antarctica of 25 degrees C. The cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis sp., in contrast, grows at temperatures above 25 degrees C. These and earlier studies suggest that the eukaryotic algae of the Antarctic cryptoendolithic community have an upper temperature limit near 25 degrees C.

  15. Isolation and Presumptive Identification of Adherent Epithelial Bacteria (“Epimural” Bacteria) from the Ovine Rumen Wall

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Lorna J.; Jones, G. A.

    1981-01-01

    One hundred sixty-one strains of adherent bacteria were isolated under anaerobic conditions from four sites on the rumen epithelial surface of sheep fed hay or a hay-grain ration. Before isolation of bacteria, rumen tissue was washed six times in an anaerobic dilution solution, and viable bacteria suspended in the washings were counted. Calculation indicated that unattached bacteria would have been removed from the tissue by this procedure, but a slow and progressive release of attached bacteria also occurred. Nevertheless, a wide range of characteristic morphological types remained associated with the epithelium as demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy. Most of these types were represented among the isolates. Characterization and presumptive identification of the isolates showed that 95.0% belonged to previously described genera of functionally significant rumen bacteria, including Butyrivibrio sp. (31.1%), Bacteroides sp. (22.4%), Selenomonas ruminantium (9.9%), Succinivibrio dextrinosolvens (8.7%), Streptococcus bovis (8.1%), Propionibacterium sp. (4.3%), Treponema sp. (3.1%), and Eubacterium sp., Lachnospira multiparus, and Ruminococcus flavefaciens (2.5% each). Eight isolates (5.0%) were not identified. L. multiparus was recovered only from hay-fed animals; all other genera were obtained from animals fed either ration. All S. bovis strains and two strains each of Bacteroides sp. and Butyrivibrio sp. were aerotolerant; all other strains were strictly anaerobic. Bacteria representing the gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic flora associated with rumen wall tissue (R. J. Wallace, K.-J. Cheng, D. Dinsdale, and E. R. Ørskov, Nature (London) 279:424-426, 1979) were therefore not recovered by the techniques used; instead a different fraction of the adherent population was isolated. The term “epimural” is proposed to describe the flora associated with the rumen epithelium. Images PMID:7195191

  16. Discordant coral-symbiont structuring: factors shaping geographical variation of Symbiodinium communities in a facultative zooxanthellate coral genus, Oculina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leydet, Karine Posbic; Hellberg, Michael E.

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the factors that help shape the association between corals and their algal symbionts, zooxanthellae ( Symbiodinium), is necessary to better understand the functional diversity and acclimatization potential of the coral host. However, most studies focus on tropical zooxanthellate corals and their obligate algal symbionts, thus limiting our full comprehension of coral-algal symbiont associations. Here, we examine algal associations in a facultative zooxanthellate coral. We survey the Symbiodinium communities associated with Oculina corals in the western North Atlantic and the Mediterranean using one clade-level marker ( psbA coding region) and three fine-scale markers ( cp23S- rDNA, b7sym15 flanking region, and b2sym17). We ask whether Oculina spp. harbor geographically different Symbiodinium communities across their geographic range and, if so, whether the host's genetics or habitat differences are correlated with this geographical variation. We found that Oculina corals harbor different Symbiodinium communities across their geographical range. Of the habitat differences (including chlorophyll a concentration and depth), sea surface temperature is better correlated with this geographical variation than the host's genetics, a pattern most evident in the Mediterranean. Our results suggest that although facultative zooxanthellate corals may be less dependent on their algal partners compared to obligate zooxanthellate corals, the Symbiodinium communities that they harbor may nevertheless reflect acclimatization to environmental variation among habitats.

  17. Canopy CO2 exchange of two neotropical tree species exhibiting constitutive and facultative CAM photosynthesis, Clusia rosea and Clusia cylindrica

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Klaus; Garcia, Milton; Holtum, Joseph A. M.

    2009-01-01

    Photon flux density (PFD) and water availability, the daily and seasonal factors that vary most in tropical environments, were examined to see how they influenced expression of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) in 3-year-old Clusia shrubs native to Panama. Instead of the commonly used single-leaf approach, diel CO2 exchange was measured for whole individual canopies of plants in large soil containers inside a naturally illuminated 8.8 m3 chamber. In well-watered C. rosea, a mainly constitutive CAM species, nocturnally fixed CO2 contributed about 50% to 24 h carbon gain on sunny days but the contribution decreased to zero following overcast days. Nonetheless, CO2 fixation in the light responded in such a way that 24 h carbon gain was largely conserved across the range of daily PFDs. The response of C. rosea to drought was similarly buffered. A facultative component of CAM expression led to reversible increases in nocturnal carbon gain that offset drought-induced reductions of CO2 fixation in the light. Clusia cylindrica was a C3 plant when well-watered but exhibited CAM when subjected to water stress. The induction of CAM was fully reversible upon rewatering. C. cylindrica joins C. pratensis as the most unambiguous facultative CAM species reported in the genus Clusia. PMID:19487388

  18. Short-term benefits, but transgenerational costs of maternal loss in an insect with facultative maternal care.

    PubMed

    Thesing, Julia; Kramer, Jos; Koch, Lisa K; Meunier, Joël

    2015-10-22

    A lack of parental care is generally assumed to entail substantial fitness costs for offspring that ultimately select for the maintenance of family life across generations. However, it is unknown whether these costs arise when parental care is facultative, thus questioning their fundamental importance in the early evolution of family life. Here, we investigated the short-term, long-term and transgenerational effects of maternal loss in the European earwig Forficula auricularia, an insect with facultative post-hatching maternal care. We showed that maternal loss did not influence the developmental time and survival rate of juveniles, but surprisingly yielded adults of larger body and forceps size, two traits associated with fitness benefits. In a cross-breeding/cross-fostering experiment, we then demonstrated that maternal loss impaired the expression of maternal care in adult offspring. Interestingly, the resulting transgenerational costs were not only mediated by the early-life experience of tending mothers, but also by inherited, parent-of-origin-specific effects expressed in juveniles. Orphaned females abandoned their juveniles for longer and fed them less than maternally-tended females, while foster mothers defended juveniles of orphaned females less well than juveniles of maternally-tended females. Overall, these findings reveal the key importance of transgenerational effects in the early evolution of family life. PMID:26490790

  19. Distribution and dietary regulation of an associated facultative Rhizobiales-related bacterium in the omnivorous giant tropical ant, Paraponera clavata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Hannah K.; Goffredi, Shana K.; Parra, Erica L.; Vargas, Orlando; Pinto-Tomas, Adrián A.; McGlynn, Terrence P.

    2014-05-01

    We document a facultative Bartonella-like Rhizobiales bacterium in the giant tropical ant, Paraponera clavata. In a lowland tropical rainforest in Costa Rica, 59 colonies were assayed for the prevalence of the Bartonella-like bacterium (BLB), 14 of which were positive. We addressed three questions: First, how does the prevalence of BLB within colonies vary with environmental conditions? Second, how does diet affect the prevalence of BLB in P. clavata? Third, how does the distribution of BLB among colonies reflect ambient differences in food resources and foraging habits? A variety of environmental variables that may be predictive of the presence of BLB were measured, and diet manipulations were conducted to test whether the prevalence of BLB responded to supplemental carbohydrate or prey. The ambient frequency of BLB is much higher in young secondary forests, but is nearly absent from older secondary forests. The prevalence of BLB inside field colonies increased over the duration of a 2-week carbohydrate supplementation; however, water and prey supplementation did not alter the prevalence of BLB. The diets of the colonies located in young secondary forest, compared to other habitats, have a diet richer in carbohydrates and lower in prey. The abundance of carbohydrate, or the relative lack of N, in a colony's diet influences the occurrence of the BLB microbe in P. clavata. As experimental diet manipulations can affect the facultative presence of an N-cycling microbe, a consistent diet shift in diet may facilitate the emergence of tighter symbioses.

  20. Determination of mercury and organomercurial resistance in obligate anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rudrik, J T; Bawdon, R E; Guss, S P

    1985-03-01

    A methodology for determining the minimum inhibitory concentration of inorganic and organomercurial compounds for obligate anaerobic bacteria is described. A wide variation in the susceptibility of anaerobic clinical and sewage isolates was observed. Isolates of Bacteroides ruminicola and Clostridium perfringens resistant to mercury were examined for their plasmid content and ability to demonstrate inducible resistance. None of the resistant anaerobes contained any plasmids, while resistant facultative isolates from the same source contained several plasmids. In 24 h, resistant strains of clostridia and Bacteroides volatilized 20 and 43% of the 203Hg2+ added to cultures, while Escherichia coli R100 and a sewage isolate of Enterobacter cloacae volatilized 63 and 27%, respectively, of the added 203Hg2+. Attempts to induce mercury resistance in the aerobic isolates were successful, but no induction was seen in the anaerobes. Thus, mercury resistance in these anaerobic isolates was neither inducible nor plasmid mediated. PMID:4005712

  1. Immune control of phagosomal bacteria by p47 GTPases.

    PubMed

    MacMicking, John D

    2005-02-01

    Sequestered from the action of complement, antibody and lytic peptides, phagosomal pathogens pose a unique problem for the innate immune system both in terms of detection and disposal. An immunologically induced 47-kDa (p47) GTPase family recruited to nascent phagosomes (PGs) has provided new insights into how vertebrates deal with facultative bacteria occupying a vacuolar niche. Research over the past 2 years in particular has identified several molecular determinants that underlie the membrane trafficking functions of LRG-47 and other p47 GTPases as part of a PG remodeling program. When coupled to signals issuing from pathogen-specific Toll-like receptors, the p47 proteins may constitute a novel sensory system enlisted by mammals, birds and fish to decode the language of immune recognition against this particular class of infectious agents. PMID:15694860

  2. Non-photosynthetic pigments as potential biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwieterman, E. W.; Cockell, C. S.; Meadows, V. S.

    2014-03-01

    Photosynthetic organisms on Earth produce potentially detectable surface reflectance biosignatures due in part to the spectral location and strength of pigment absorption. However, life on Earth uses pigments for a multitude of purposes other than photosynthesis, including coping with extreme environments. Macroscopic environments exist on Earth where the surface reflectance is significantly altered by a nonphotosynthetic pigment, such as the case of hypersaline lakes and ponds (Oren et al. 1992). Here we explore the nature and potential detectability of non-photosynthetic pigments in disk-averaged planetary observations using a combination of laboratory measurements and archival reflectance spectra, along with simulated broadband photometry and spectra. The in vivo visible reflectance spectra of a cross section of pigmented microorganisms are presented to illustrate the spectral diversity of biologically produced pigments. Synthetic broadband colors are generated to show a significant spread in color space. A 1D radiative transfer model (Meadows & Crisp 1996; Crisp 1997) is used to approximate the spectra of scenarios where pigmented organisms are widespread on planets with Earth-like atmospheres. Broadband colors are revisited to show that colors due to surface reflectivity are not robust to the addition of scattering and absorption effects from the atmosphere. We consider a èbest case' plausible scenario for the detection of nonphotosynthetic pigments by using the Virtual Planetary Laboratory's 3D spectral Earth model (Robinson et al. 2011) to explore the detectability of the surface biosignature produced by pigmented halophiles that are widespread on an Earth-analog planet.

  3. Respiratory processes in non-photosynthetic plastids

    PubMed Central

    Renato, Marta; Boronat, Albert; Azcón-Bieto, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    Chlororespiration is a respiratory process located in chloroplast thylakoids which consists in an electron transport chain from NAD(P)H to oxygen. This respiratory chain involves the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase complex, the plastoquinone pool and the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX), and it probably acts as a safety valve to prevent the over-reduction of the photosynthetic machinery in stress conditions. The existence of a similar respiratory activity in non-photosynthetic plastids has been less studied. Recently, it has been reported that tomato fruit chromoplasts present an oxygen consumption activity linked to ATP synthesis. Etioplasts and amyloplasts contain several electron carriers and some subunits of the ATP synthase, so they could harbor a similar respiratory process. This review provides an update on the study about respiratory processes in chromoplasts, identifying the major gaps that need to be addressed in future research. It also reviews the proteomic data of etioplasts and amyloplasts, which suggest the presence of a respiratory electron transport chain in these plastids. PMID:26236317

  4. The making of a photosynthetic animal

    PubMed Central

    Rumpho, Mary E.; Pelletreau, Karen N.; Moustafa, Ahmed; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2011-01-01

    Symbiotic animals containing green photobionts challenge the common perception that only plants are capable of capturing the sun's rays and converting them into biological energy through photoautotrophic CO2 fixation (photosynthesis). ‘Solar-powered’ sacoglossan molluscs, or sea slugs, have taken this type of symbiotic association one step further by solely harboring the photosynthetic organelle, the plastid (=chloroplast). One such sea slug, Elysia chlorotica, lives as a ‘plant’ when provided with only light and air as a result of acquiring plastids during feeding on its algal prey Vaucheria litorea. The captured plastids (kleptoplasts) are retained intracellularly in cells lining the digestive diverticula of the sea slug, a phenomenon sometimes referred to as kleptoplasty. Photosynthesis by the plastids provides E. chlorotica with energy and fixed carbon for its entire lifespan of ∼10 months. The plastids are not transmitted vertically (i.e. are absent in eggs) and do not undergo division in the sea slug. However, de novo protein synthesis continues, including plastid- and nuclear-encoded plastid-targeted proteins, despite the apparent absence of algal nuclei. Here we discuss current data and provide hypotheses to explain how long-term photosynthetic activity is maintained by the kleptoplasts. This fascinating ‘green animal’ provides a unique model to study the evolution of photosynthesis in a multicellular heterotrophic organism. PMID:21177950

  5. Micromachined microbial and photosynthetic fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiao, Mu; Lam, Kien B.; Lin, Liwei

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents two types of fuel cells: a miniature microbial fuel cell (µMFC) and a miniature photosynthetic electrochemical cell (µPEC). A bulk micromachining process is used to fabricate the fuel cells, and the prototype has an active proton exchange membrane area of 1 cm2. Two different micro-organisms are used as biocatalysts in the anode: (1) Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) is used to catalyze glucose and (2) Phylum Cyanophyta (blue-green algae) is used to produce electrons by a photosynthetic reaction under light. In the dark, the µPEC continues to generate power using the glucose produced under light. In the cathode, potassium ferricyanide is used to accept electrons and electric power is produced by the overall redox reactions. The bio-electrical responses of µMFCs and µPECs are characterized with the open-circuit potential measured at an average value of 300-500 mV. Under a 10 ohm load, the power density is measured as 2.3 nW cm-2 and 0.04 nW cm-2 for µMFCs and µPECs, respectively.

  6. Photosynthetic water splitting: 1987 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1988-01-01

    This document is an annual report of photosynthetic water splitting for the production of hydrogen and oxygen. Unicellular green algae are capable of evolving molecular hydrogen in the presence of carbon dioxide. Controlling factors that determine hydrogen evolution are either temperature or light intensity. Also, mutants of the green alga Chlamydomonas are capable of evolving hydrogen in the presence of carbon dioxide. The significance of these discoveries is that the presence of carbon dioxide (or bicarbonate) is a key factor in determining the activity of the Photosystem II water splitting complex. Second, a new advance in oxygen sensor technology has been made that, for the first time, allows the absolute measurement of photosynthetically evolved oxygen from a single colony of microalgae growing on a solidified agar medium. The key aspect of this electrochemical sensor is the utilization of ultra-pure potassium hydroxide as the electrolyte and a recognition of the role that electrolyte impurities play in contributing to base line noise. 9 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Phosphofructokinase Activities in Photosynthetic Organisms 1

    PubMed Central

    Carnal, Nancy Wieland; Black, Clanton C.

    1983-01-01

    A pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofructokinase (PPi-PFK) activity is detectable in extracts of a wide variety of primitive and advanced plants, the Charalean algae, and in the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodospirillum rubrum. Angiosperms with extractable PPi-PFK activities 4- to 70-fold higher than the respective ATP-PFK activities tend to be succulent and to exhibit CAM. Even though PPi-PFK activity is not detected in crude extracts of some well known CAM plants, e.g. plants in the Crassulaceae, gel filtration of the extract and/or inclusion of the PPi-PFK activator, fructose 2,6-bisphosphate, in the assay reveals that a PPi-PFK activity is present in these species. Fructose 2,6-bisphosphate likewise activates PPi-PFK activities in extracts of C3 and C4 plants. C3 and C4 plant PPi-PFK activities are roughly equivalent to ATP-PFK activities in the same species. PPi-PFK activity is also detected in some bryophytes, lower vascular plants, ferns, and gymnosperms. The Charophytes, advanced algae presumed to be similar to species ancestral to vascular plants, exhibit at least 4-fold higher PPi-PFK than ATP-PFK activities. R. rubrum also exhibits a much higher PPi-PFK activity than ATP-PFK activity. These data indicate that PPi-PFK may serve as an alternate enzyme to ATP-PFK in glycolysis in a wide range of photosynthetic organisms. PMID:16662776

  8. Redox regulation of photosynthetic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Queval, Guillaume; Foyer, Christine H.

    2012-01-01

    Redox chemistry and redox regulation are central to the operation of photosynthesis and respiration. However, the roles of different oxidants and antioxidants in the regulation of photosynthetic or respiratory gene expression remain poorly understood. Leaf transcriptome profiles of a range of Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes that are deficient in either hydrogen peroxide processing enzymes or in low molecular weight antioxidant were therefore compared to determine how different antioxidant systems that process hydrogen peroxide influence transcripts encoding proteins targeted to the chloroplasts or mitochondria. Less than 10 per cent overlap was observed in the transcriptome patterns of leaves that are deficient in either photorespiratory (catalase (cat)2) or chloroplastic (thylakoid ascorbate peroxidase (tapx)) hydrogen peroxide processing. Transcripts encoding photosystem II (PSII) repair cycle components were lower in glutathione-deficient leaves, as were the thylakoid NAD(P)H (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate)) dehydrogenases (NDH) mRNAs. Some thylakoid NDH mRNAs were also less abundant in tAPX-deficient and ascorbate-deficient leaves. Transcripts encoding the external and internal respiratory NDHs were increased by low glutathione and low ascorbate. Regulation of transcripts encoding specific components of the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains by hydrogen peroxide, ascorbate and glutathione may serve to balance non-cyclic and cyclic electron flow pathways in relation to oxidant production and reductant availability. PMID:23148274

  9. Thermal responses of Symbiodinium photosynthetic carbon assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakley, Clinton A.; Schmidt, Gregory W.; Hopkinson, Brian M.

    2014-06-01

    The symbiosis between hermatypic corals and their dinoflagellate endosymbionts, genus Symbiodinium, is based on carbon exchange. This symbiosis is disrupted by thermally induced coral bleaching, a stress response in which the coral host expels its algal symbionts as they become physiologically impaired. The disruption of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) supply or the thermal inactivation of Rubisco have been proposed as sites of initial thermal damage that leads to the bleaching response. Symbiodinium possesses a highly unusual Form II ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), which exhibits a lower CO2:O2 specificity and may be more thermally unstable than the Form I Rubiscos of other algae and land plants. Components of the CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM), which supplies inorganic carbon for photosynthesis, may also be temperature sensitive. Here, we examine the ability of four cultured Symbiodinium strains to acquire and fix DIC across a temperature gradient. Surprisingly, the half-saturation constant of photosynthesis with respect to DIC concentration ( K P), an index of CCM function, declined with increasing temperature in three of the four strains, indicating a greater potential for photosynthetic carbon acquisition at elevated temperatures. In the fourth strain, there was no effect of temperature on K P. Finding no evidence for thermal inhibition of the CCM, we conclude that CCM components are not likely to be the primary sites of thermal damage. Reduced photosynthetic quantum yields, a hallmark of thermal bleaching, were observed at low DIC concentrations, leaving open the possibility that reduced inorganic carbon availability is involved in bleaching.

  10. A Carbon-Neutral Photosynthetic Microbial Fuel Cell Powered by Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ma, Meirong; Cao, Limin; Chen, Li; Ying, Xiaofang; Deng, Zongwu

    2015-07-01

    A photosynthetic microbial fuel cell (m-PMFC) is developed for generating electricity by harnessing solar energy using Microcystis aeruginosa. In this m-PMFC, commensal bacteria can consume the nutrients that Microcystis aeruginosa produces to generate electricity so that no net CO₂production occurs. A b-MFC is constructed to confirm the role of commensal bacteria in electric generation. An s-PMFC is constructed to confirm the contribution of Microcystis aeruginosa as substrates. The power outputs of m-PMFCs exhibit no significant difference in terms of different inoculation amount of Microcystis aeruginosa or light/dark cycles. The power density of m-PMFC exhibits similar response to bubbling of N₂and O₂as that of b-MFC, as confirmed by cyclic voltammetry analysis of m-PMFC and b-MFC. Scanning electron microscope images demonstrate that the biofilm of m-PMFC consists mainly of commensal bacteria. These results suggest that commensal bacteria act as the main biocatalysts and Microcystis aeruginosa as the anode substrates in the m-PMFC. PMID:26163500

  11. Nitrifying Bacteria in Wastewater Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Abeliovich, Aharon

    1987-01-01

    Deep wastewater reservoirs are used throughout Israel to store domestic wastewater effluents for summer irrigation. These effluents contain high concentrations of ammonia (≤5 mM) that are frequently toxic to photosynthetic microorganisms and that lead to development of anoxic conditions. Population dynamics of nitrifying bacteria and rates of nitrification were studied in two wastewater reservoirs that differed in organic load and degree of oxygenation and in the laboratory under controlled conditions, both by serial dilutions in mineral medium and microscopically with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated antibodies prepared against local isolates. The difference in counts by the two methods was within 1 order of magnitude. In the laboratory, an O2 concentration of 0.2 mg liter−1 was close to optimal with respect to growth of NH3 oxidizers on domestic wastewater, while O2 concentrations of 0.05 mg liter−1 supported significant rates of nitrification. It was found that even hypertrophic anaerobic environments such as the anaerobic hypolimnion of the wastewater reservoir or the anaerobic settling ponds are capable of sustaining a viable, although not actively nitrifying, population of Nitrosomonas spp. and Nitrobacter spp., in contrast to their rapid decline when maintained anaerobically in mineral medium in the laboratory. Nitrification rates of NH3 in effluents during storage in the reservoirs were slower by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude compared with corresponding rates in water samples brought to the laboratory. The factors causing this inhibition were not identified. PMID:16347319

  12. Determination of photosynthetic parameters in two seawater-tolerant vegetables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Nianwei; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Qian; Zhao, Wenqian

    2016-03-01

    It is difficult to determine the photosynthetic parameters of non-flat leaves/green stems using photosynthetic instruments, due to the unusual morphology of both organs, especially for Suaeda salsa and Salicornia bigelovii as two seawater-tolerant vegetables. To solve the problem, we developed a simple, practical, and effective method to measure and calculate the photosynthetic parameters (such as P N, g s, E) based on unit fresh mass, instead of leaf area. The light/CO2/temperature response curves of the plants can also be measured by this method. This new method is more effective, stable, and reliable than conventional methods for plants with non-flat leaves. In addition, the relative notes on measurements and calculation of photosynthetic parameters were discussed in this paper. This method solves technical difficulties in photosynthetic parameter determination of the two seawater-tolerant vegetables and similar plants.

  13. Isotope effects associated with the anaerobic oxidation of sulfite and thiosulfate by the photosynthetic bacterium, Chromatium vinosum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, B.; Gest, H.; Hayes, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The purple photosynthetic bacterium Chromatium vinosum, strain D, catalyzes several oxidations of reduced sulfur compounds under anaerobic conditions in the light: e.g., sulfide --> sulfur --> sulfate, sulfite --> sulfate, and thiosulfate --> sulfur + sulfate. Here it is shown that no sulfur isotope effect is associated with the last of these processes; isotopic compositions of the sulfur and sulfate produced can differ, however, if the sulfane and sulfonate positions within the thiosulfate have different isotopic compositions. In the second process, an observed change from an inverse to a normal isotope effect during oxidation of sulfite may indicate the operation of 2 enzymatic pathways. In contrast to heterotrophic anaerobic reduction of oxidized sulfur compounds, anaerobic oxidations of inorganic sulfur compounds by photosynthetic bacteria are characterized by relatively small isotope effects.

  14. Complete genome sequence of the facultatively anaerobic, appendaged bacterium Muricauda ruestringensis type strain (B1T)

    PubMed Central

    Huntemann, Marcel; Teshima, Hazuki; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Pan, Chongle; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Muricauda ruestringensis Bruns et al. 2001 is the type species of the genus Muricauda, which belongs to the family Flavobacteriaceae in the phylum Bacteroidetes. The species is of interest because of its isolated position in the genomically unexplored genus Muricauda, which is located in a part of the tree of life containing not many organisms with sequenced genomes. The genome, which consists of a circular chromosome of 3,842,422 bp length with a total of 3,478 protein-coding and 47 RNA genes, is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:22768362

  15. Complete genome sequence of the facultatively anaerobic, appendaged bacterium Muricauda ruestringensis type strain (B1T)

    SciTech Connect

    Huntemann, Marcel; Teshima, Hazuki; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Pan, Chongle; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Muricauda ruestringensis Bruns et al. 2001 is the type species of the genus Muricauda, which belongs to the family Flavobacteriaceae in the phylum Bacteroidetes. The species is of interest because of its isolated position in the genomically unexplored genus Muricauda, which is located in a part of the tree of life containing not many organisms with sequenced genomes. The genome, which consists of a circular chromosome of 3,842,422 bp length with a total of 3,478 protein-coding and 47 RNA genes, is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  16. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1995-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  17. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1995-05-30

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  18. Elementary Energy Transfer Pathways in Allochromatium vinosum Photosynthetic Membranes.

    PubMed

    Lüer, Larry; Carey, Anne-Marie; Henry, Sarah; Maiuri, Margherita; Hacking, Kirsty; Polli, Dario; Cerullo, Giulio; Cogdell, Richard J

    2015-11-01

    Allochromatium vinosum (formerly Chromatium vinosum) purple bacteria are known to adapt their light-harvesting strategy during growth according to environmental factors such as temperature and average light intensity. Under low light illumination or low ambient temperature conditions, most of the LH2 complexes in the photosynthetic membranes form a B820 exciton with reduced spectral overlap with LH1. To elucidate the reason for this light and temperature adaptation of the LH2 electronic structure, we performed broadband femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy as a function of excitation wavelength in A. vinosum membranes. A target analysis of the acquired data yielded individual rate constants for all relevant elementary energy transfer (ET) processes. We found that the ET dynamics in high-light-grown membranes was well described by a homogeneous model, with forward and backward rate constants independent of the pump wavelength. Thus, the overall B800→B850→B890→ Reaction Center ET cascade is well described by simple triexponential kinetics. In the low-light-grown membranes, we found that the elementary backward transfer rate constant from B890 to B820 was strongly reduced compared with the corresponding constant from B890 to B850 in high-light-grown samples. The ET dynamics of low-light-grown membranes was strongly dependent on the pump wavelength, clearly showing that the excitation memory is not lost throughout the exciton lifetime. The observed pump energy dependence of the forward and backward ET rate constants suggests exciton diffusion via B850→ B850 transfer steps, making the overall ET dynamics nonexponential. Our results show that disorder plays a crucial role in our understanding of low-light adaptation in A. vinosum. PMID:26536265

  19. Increased photosynthetic acclimation in alfalfa associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and cultivated in greenhouse under elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Goicoechea, Nieves; Baslam, Marouane; Erice, Gorka; Irigoyen, Juan José

    2014-11-15

    Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) can exhibit photosynthetic down-regulation when grown in greenhouse conditions under elevated atmospheric CO2. This forage legume can establish a double symbiosis with nitrogen fixing bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), which may increase the carbon sink effect of roots. Our aim was to assess whether the association of alfalfa with AMF can avoid, diminish or delay the photosynthetic acclimation observed in previous studies performed with nodulated plants. The results, however, showed that mycorrhizal (M) alfalfa at the end of their vegetative period had lower carbon (C) discrimination than non-mycorrhizal (NM) controls, indicating photosynthetic acclimation under ECO2 in plants associated with AMF. Decreased C discrimination was due to the acclimation of conductance, since the amount of Rubisco and the expression of genes codifying both large and small subunits of Rubisco were similar or slightly higher in M than in NM plants. Moreover, M alfalfa accumulated a greater amount of soluble sugars in leaves than NM plants, thus favoring a down-regulation effect on photosynthetic rates. The enhanced contents of sugars in leaves coincided with a reduced percentage of arbuscules in roots, suggesting decreased sink of carbohydrates from shoots to roots in M plants. The shorter life cycle of alfalfa associated with AMF in comparison with the NM controls may also be related to the accelerated photosynthetic acclimation in M plants. Further research is needed to clarify to what extent this behavior could be extrapolated to alfalfa cultivated in the field and subjected to periodic cutting of shoots under climatic change scenarios. PMID:25240322

  20. Is salt stress tolerance in Casuarina glauca Sieb. ex Spreng. associated with its nitrogen-fixing root-nodule symbiosis? An analysis at the photosynthetic level.

    PubMed

    Batista-Santos, Paula; Duro, Nuno; Rodrigues, Ana P; Semedo, José N; Alves, Paula; da Costa, Mário; Graça, Inês; Pais, Isabel P; Scotti-Campos, Paula; Lidon, Fernando C; Leitão, António E; Pawlowski, Katharina; Ribeiro-Barros, Ana I; Ramalho, José C

    2015-11-01

    Casuarina glauca is an actinorhizal tree which establishes root-nodule symbiosis with N2-fixing Frankia bacteria. This plant is commonly found in saline zones and is widely used to remediate marginal soils and prevent desertification. The nature of its ability to survive in extreme environments and the extent of Frankia contribution to stress tolerance remain unknown. Thus, we evaluated the ability of C. glauca to cope with salt stress and the influence of the symbiosis on this trait. To this end, we analysed the impact of salt on plant growth, mineral contents, water relations, photosynthetic-related parameters and non-structural sugars in nodulated vs. non-nodulated plants. Although the effects on photosynthesis and stomatal conductance started to become measurable in the presence of 200 mM NaCl, photochemical (e.g., photosynthetic electron flow) and biochemical (e.g., activity of photosynthetic enzymes) parameters were only strongly impaired when NaCl levels reached 600 mM. These results indicate the maintenance of high tissue hydration under salt stress, probably associated with enhanced osmotic potential. Furthermore, the maintenance of photosynthetic assimilation potential (A(max)), together with the increase in the quantum yield of down-regulated energy dissipation of PSII (Y(NPQ)), suggested a down-regulation of photosynthesis instead of photo-damaging effects. A comparison of the impact of increasing NaCl levels on the activities of photosynthetic (RubisCO and ribulose-5 phosphate kinase) and respiratory (pyruvate kinase and NADH-dependent malate dehydrogenase) enzymes vs. photosynthetic electron flow and fluorescence parameters, revealed that biochemical impairments are more limiting than photochemical damage. Altogether, these results indicate that, under controlled conditions, C. glauca tolerates high NaCl levels and that this capacity is linked to photosynthetic adjustments. PMID:26245981

  1. Evidence for only minor contributions from bacteria to sedimentary organic carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartgers, W. A.; Sinninghe Damste, J. S.; Requejo, A. G.; Allan, J.; Hayes, J. M.; de Leeuw, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    Because their molecular signatures are often prominent in extracts of sediments, bacteria are thought to be important contributors to petroleum source beds. It has been shown recently, however, that abundances of biomarkers do not always reflect relative contributions to sedimentary organic carbon (Corg). The contribution of photosynthetic green sulphur bacteria to sediments can be assessed effectively because the diagenetic products of distinctive carotenoids from these organisms occur widely and their biomass is isotopically labelled, being enriched in 13C. We show here that, although sediments and oils from the Western Canada and Williston basins contain prominent biomarkers of photosynthetic bacteria, the absence of 13C enrichment in the total Corg requires that the bacterial contribution is in fact minimal. Although the importance of bacterial reworking of sedimentary debris cannot be doubted, we argue that our findings, when considered in conjunction with those from other settings, suggest that bacterial biomass may commonly represent only a minor component of total Corg in carbonaceous rocks.

  2. Mapping the spectral variability in photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic vegetation, soils, and shade using AVIRIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Dar A.; Smith, Milton O.; Sabol, Donald E.; Adams, John B.; Ustin, Susan L.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of this research was to map as many spectrally distinct types of green vegetation (GV), non-photosynthetic vegetation (NPV), shade, and soil (endmembers) in an Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) scene as is warranted by the spectral variability of the data. Once determined, a secondary objective was to interpret these endmembers and their abundances spatially and spectrally in an ecological context.

  3. Bacteria Inactivation During Lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Sol Quintero, María; Mora, Ulises; Gutiérrez, Jorge; Mues, Enrique; Castaño, Eduardo; Fernández, Francisco; Loske, Achim M.

    2006-09-01

    The influence of extracorporeal and intracorporeal lithotripsy on the viability of bacteria contained inside artificial kidney stones was investigated in vitro. Two different bacteria were exposed to the action of one extracorporeal shock wave generator and four intracorporeal lithotripters.

  4. Photosynthetic Machineries in Nano-Systems

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, László; Magyar, Melinda; Szabó, Tibor; Hajdu, Kata; Giotta, Livia; Dorogi, Márta; Milano, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centres are membrane-spanning proteins, found in several classes of autotroph organisms, where a photoinduced charge separation and stabilization takes place with a quantum efficiency close to unity. The protein remains stable and fully functional also when extracted and purified in detergents thereby biotechnological applications are possible, for example, assembling it in nano-structures or in optoelectronic systems. Several types of bionanocomposite materials have been assembled by using reaction centres and different carrier matrices for different purposes in the field of light energy conversion (e.g., photovoltaics) or biosensing (e.g., for specific detection of pesticides). In this review we will summarize the current status of knowledge, the kinds of applications available and the difficulties to be overcome in the different applications. We will also show possible research directions for the close future in this specific field. PMID:24678673

  5. Structural basis of photosynthetic water-splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Jian-Ren; Kawakami, Keisuke; Kamiya, Nobuo

    2013-12-10

    Photosynthetic water-splitting takes place in photosystem II (PSII), a membrane protein complex consisting of 20 subunits with an overall molecular mass of 350 kDa. The light-induced water-splitting reaction catalyzed by PSII not only converts light energy into biologically useful chemical energy, but also provides us with oxygen indispensible for sustaining oxygenic life on the earth. We have solved the structure of PSII at a 1.9 Å resolution, from which, the detailed structure of the Mn{sub 4}CaO{sub 5}-cluster, the catalytic center for water-splitting, became clear. Based on the structure of PSII at the atomic resolution, possible mechanism of light-induced water-splitting was discussed.

  6. Predatory prokaryotes: predation and primary consumption evolved in bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerrero, R.; Pedros-Alio, C.; Esteve, I.; Mas, J.; Chase, D.; Margulis, L.

    1986-01-01

    Two kinds of predatory bacteria have been observed and characterized by light and electron microscopy in samples from freshwater sulfurous lakes in northeastern Spain. The first bacterium, named Vampirococcus, is Gram-negative and ovoidal (0.6 micrometer wide). An anaerobic epibiont, it adheres to the surface of phototrophic bacteria (Chromatium spp.) by specific attachment structures and, as it grows and divides by fission, destroys its prey. An important in situ predatory role can be inferred for Vampirococcus from direct counts in natural samples. The second bacterium, named Daptobacter, is a Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic straight rod (0.5 x 1.5 micrometers) with a single polar flagellum, which collides, penetrates, and grows inside the cytoplasm of its prey (several genera of Chromatiaceae). Considering also the well-known case of Bdellovibrio, a Gram-negative, aerobic curved rod that penetrates and divides in the periplasmic space of many chemotrophic Gram-negative bacteria, there are three types of predatory prokaryotes presently known (epibiotic, cytoplasmic, and periplasmic). Thus, we conclude that antagonistic relationships such as primary consumption, predation, and scavenging had already evolved in microbial ecosystems prior to the appearance of eukaryotes. Furthermore, because they represent methods by which prokaryotes can penetrate other prokaryotes in the absence of phagocytosis, these associations can be considered preadaptation for the origin of intracellular organelles.

  7. CHAPTER IV-2 BACTERIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomopathogenic bacteria provide an alternative to chemical pesticides used in insect control programs. Today, the principal microbial insecticides utilize spore forming bacteria or toxins produced by these bacteria as their active ingredients, either in formulations or by incorporation of toxin g...

  8. Facultative Anaerobe Caldibacillus debilis GB1: Characterization and Use in a Designed Aerotolerant, Cellulose-Degrading Coculture with Clostridium thermocellum

    PubMed Central

    Wushke, Scott; Levin, David B.; Cicek, Nazim

    2015-01-01

    Development of a designed coculture that can achieve aerotolerant ethanogenic biofuel production from cellulose can reduce the costs of maintaining anaerobic conditions during industrial consolidated bioprocessing (CBP). To this end, a strain of Caldibacillus debilis isolated from an air-tolerant cellulolytic consortium which included a Clostridium thermocellum strain was characterized and compared with the C. debilis type strain. Characterization of isolate C. debilis GB1 and comparisons with the type strain of C. debilis revealed significant physiological differences, including (i) the absence of anaerobic metabolism in the type strain and (ii) different end product synthesis profiles under the experimental conditions used. The designed cocultures displayed unique responses to oxidative conditions, including an increase in lactate production. We show here that when the two species were cultured together, the noncellulolytic facultative anaerobe C. debilis GB1 provided respiratory protection for C. thermocellum, allowing the synergistic utilization of cellulose even under an aerobic atmosphere. PMID:26048931

  9. Prediction of social structure and genetic relatedness in colonies of the facultative polygynous stingless bee Melipona bicolor (Hymenoptera, Apidae)

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Evelyze Pinheiro; de Oliveira Campos, Lucio Antonio; Tavares, Mara Garcia

    2011-01-01

    Stingless bee colonies typically consist of one single-mated mother queen and her worker offspring. The stingless bee Melipona bicolor (Hymenoptera: Apidae) shows facultative polygyny, which makes this species particularly suitable for testing theoretical expectations concerning social behavior. In this study, we investigated the social structure and genetic relatedness among workers from eight natural and six manipulated colonies of M. bicolor over a period of one year. The populations of M. bicolor contained monogynous and polygynous colonies. The estimated genetic relatedness among workers from monogynous and polygynous colonies was 0.75 ± 0.12 and 0.53 ± 0.16 (mean ± SEM), respectively. Although the parental genotypes had significant effects on genetic relatedness in monogynous and polygynous colonies, polygyny markedly decreased the relatedness among nestmate workers. Our findings also demonstrate that polygyny in M. bicolor may arise from the adoption of related or unrelated queens. PMID:21734839

  10. First record of second-generation facultative parthenogenesis in a vertebrate species, the whitespotted bambooshark Chiloscyllium plagiosum.

    PubMed

    Straube, N; Lampert, K P; Geiger, M F; Weiß, J D; Kirchhauser, J X

    2016-02-01

    In this study, two parthenogenetic events within a family of the whitespotted bambooshark Chiloscyllium plagiosum are reported. A captive female produced multiple parthenogens. Unexpectedly, a single specimen of a total of nine parthenogens displayed external claspers characterizing the male sex in chondrichthyans. Upon dissection, internal sexual organs of this specimen were malformed or absent; however, the presence of claspers in this study challenges the as yet assumed sex determination system in this shark species. Even more remarkable was that one of the female parthenogens reproduced asexually again producing viable offspring. As far as is known, this is the first genetically confirmed evidence for second-generation facultative parthenogenesis in vertebrates. These results support the evolutionary significance of parthenogenesis as an alternative to sexual reproduction. PMID:26727105

  11. Blue-light-regulated transcription factor, Aureochrome, in photosynthetic stramenopiles.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Fumio

    2016-03-01

    During the course of evolution through various endosymbiotic processes, diverse photosynthetic eukaryotes acquired blue light (BL) responses that do not use photosynthetic pathways. Photosynthetic stramenopiles, which have red algae-derived chloroplasts through secondary symbiosis, are principal primary producers in aquatic environments, and play important roles in ecosystems and aquaculture. Through secondary symbiosis, these taxa acquired BL responses, such as phototropism, chloroplast photo-relocation movement, and photomorphogenesis similar to those which green plants acquired through primary symbiosis. Photosynthetic stramenopile BL receptors were undefined until the discovery in 2007, of a new type of BL receptor, the aureochrome (AUREO), from the photosynthetic stramenopile alga, Vaucheria. AUREO has a bZIP domain and a LOV domain, and thus BL-responsive transcription factor. AUREO orthologs are only conserved in photosynthetic stramenopiles, such as brown algae, diatoms, and red tide algae. Here, a brief review is presented of the role of AUREOs as photoreceptors for these diverse BL responses and their biochemical properties in photosynthetic stramenopiles. PMID:26781435

  12. Adaptation to quantum flux by the emerson photosynthetic unit.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, R P

    1972-09-01

    The size of the Emerson photosynthetic unit was measured in Chlorella pyrenoidosa strain no. 252 grown at light intensities between 50 and 1000 foot candles. The Emerson photosynthetic unit changed from a minimum size of 1970 molecules chlorophyll a + b/O(2) per flash in cells grown at 1000 foot candles to a maximum size of 3150 molecules chlorophyll a + b/O(2) per flash for cells grown at 50 foot candles. The size changes were interpreted as a partial adaptation where the trapping center antenna responded to changes in incident light intensity. Light-induced changes in chlorophyll content and size of the Emerson photosynthetic unit were directly related.Two strains of Chlorella pyrenoidosa adapted by growth to 500 foot candles were then illuminated at the reduced light intensity of 50 foot candles. Emerson photosynthetic unit size (Emerson strain) increased from 2110 molecules Chlorophyll a + b/O(2) per flash at time zero to a maximum size of 3160 after 65 hours at 50 foot candles. The Emerson photosynthetic unit size for strain 252 transferred from 500 to 50 foot candles was 2260 at zero hours and 3650 after 50 hours at 50 foot candles. Emerson photosynthetic unit sizes for similar cultures which remained at 500 foot candles were almost constant in size. Oxygen yield per flash per cell was nearly constant whereas Emerson photosynthetic unit size increased in cells moved to the reduced incident light intensity. PMID:16658173

  13. Adaptation to Quantum Flux by the Emerson Photosynthetic Unit 1

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, R. P.

    1972-01-01

    The size of the Emerson photosynthetic unit was measured in Chlorella pyrenoidosa strain no. 252 grown at light intensities between 50 and 1000 foot candles. The Emerson photosynthetic unit changed from a minimum size of 1970 molecules chlorophyll a + b/O2 per flash in cells grown at 1000 foot candles to a maximum size of 3150 molecules chlorophyll a + b/O2 per flash for cells grown at 50 foot candles. The size changes were interpreted as a partial adaptation where the trapping center antenna responded to changes in incident light intensity. Light-induced changes in chlorophyll content and size of the Emerson photosynthetic unit were directly related. Two strains of Chlorella pyrenoidosa adapted by growth to 500 foot candles were then illuminated at the reduced light intensity of 50 foot candles. Emerson photosynthetic unit size (Emerson strain) increased from 2110 molecules Chlorophyll a + b/O2 per flash at time zero to a maximum size of 3160 after 65 hours at 50 foot candles. The Emerson photosynthetic unit size for strain 252 transferred from 500 to 50 foot candles was 2260 at zero hours and 3650 after 50 hours at 50 foot candles. Emerson photosynthetic unit sizes for similar cultures which remained at 500 foot candles were almost constant in size. Oxygen yield per flash per cell was nearly constant whereas Emerson photosynthetic unit size increased in cells moved to the reduced incident light intensity. PMID:16658173

  14. Molecular evidence of facultative intraguild predation by Monochamus titillator larvae (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) on members of the southern pine beetle guild

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeller, Erich N.; Husseneder, Claudia; Allison, Jeremy D.

    2012-11-01

    The southern pine bark beetle guild (SPBG) is arguably the most destructive group of forest insects in the southeastern USA. This guild contains five species of bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae): Dendroctonus frontalis, Dendroctonus terebrans, Ips avulsus, Ips calligraphus, and Ips grandicollis. A diverse community of illicit receivers is attracted to pheromones emitted by the SPBG, including the woodborers Monochamus carolinensis and Monochamus titillator (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). These woodborers have been traditionally classified as resource competitors; however, laboratory assays suggest that larval M. carolinensis may be facultative intraguild predators of SPBG larvae. This study used polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based molecular gut content analyses to characterize subcortical interactions between M. titillator and members of the SPBG. The half-lives of SPBG DNA were estimated in the laboratory prior to examining these interactions in the field. A total of 271 field-collected M. titillator larvae were analyzed and 26 (9.6 %) tested positive for DNA of members of the SPBG. Of these larvae, 25 (96.2 %) tested positive for I. grandicollis and one (3.8 %) for I. calligraphus. Failure to detect D. terebrans and D. frontalis was likely due to their absence in the field. I. avulsus was present, but primers developed using adult tissues failed to amplify larval tissue. Results from this study support the hypothesis that larval Monochamus spp. are facultative intraguild predators of bark beetle larvae. Additionally, this study demonstrates the capabilities of PCR in elucidating the interactions of cryptic forest insects and provides a tool to better understand mechanisms driving southern pine beetle guild population fluctuations.

  15. Best linear unbiased prediction of host range of the facultative parasite Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. salsolae, a potential biological control agent of Russian thistle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tumbleweed or Russian thistle (Salsola tragus L.) is an introduced invasive weed in N. America. It is widely distributed in the U.S. and is a target of biological control efforts. The facultative parasitic fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (Penz.) Penz. & Sacc. in Penz. f. sp. salsolae is a po...

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus Strain P1XP2, a Polysaccharide-Degrading, Thermophilic, Facultative Anaerobic Bacterium Isolated from a Commercial Bioreactor Degrading Food Waste

    PubMed Central

    Adelskov, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the ~5.8-Mb draft genome sequence of a moderately thermophilic, heterotrophic, facultative anaerobic bacterium, Paenibacillus strain P1XP2, identified genes for enzymes with the potential for degrading complex food wastes, a property consistent with the ecological habitat of the isolate. PMID:25635015

  17. Field assessment, in Greece and Russia, of the facultative saprophytic fungus, Colletotrichum salsolae, for biological control of Russian thistle (Salsola tragus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Russian thistle (Salsola tragus, tumbleweed, RT) is a problematic invasive weed in the United States (U.S.) and is a target of biological control efforts. The facultative saprophytic fungus Colletotrichum salsolae (CS) kills RT plants in greenhouse tests and is specific to Salsola spp., which are no...

  18. Carbon Gain and Photosynthetic Response of Chrysanthemum to Photosynthetic Photon Flux Density Cycles 1

    PubMed Central

    Stoop, Johan M. H.; Willits, Dan H.; Peet, Mary M.; Nelson, Paul V.

    1991-01-01

    Most models of carbon gain as a function of photosynthetic irradiance assume an instantaneous response to increases and decreases in irradiance. High- and low-light-grown plants differ, however, in the time required to adjust to increases and decreases in irradiance. In this study the response to a series of increases and decreases in irradiance was observed in Chrysanthemum × morifolium Ramat. “Fiesta” and compared with calculated values assuming an instantaneous response. There were significant differences between high- and low-light-grown plants in their photosynthetic response to four sequential photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) cycles consisting of 5-minute exposures to 200 and 400 micromoles per square meter per second (μmol m−2s−1). The CO2 assimilation rate of high-light-grown plants at the cycle peak increased throughout the PPFD sequence, but the rate of increase was similar to the increase in CO2 assimilation rate observed under continuous high-light conditions. Low-light leaves showed more variability in their response to light cycles with no significant increase in CO2 assimilation rate at the cycle peak during sequential cycles. Carbon gain and deviations from actual values (percentage carbon gain over- or underestimation) based on assumptions of instantaneous response were compared under continuous and cyclic light conditions. The percentage carbon gain overestimation depended on the PPFD step size and growth light level of the leaf. When leaves were exposed to a large PPFD increase, the carbon gain was overestimated by 16 to 26%. The photosynthetic response to 100 μmol m−2 s−1 PPFD increases and decreases was rapid, and the small overestimation of the predicted carbon gain, observed during photosynthetic induction, was almost entirely negated by the carbon gain underestimation observed after a decrease. If the PPFD cycle was 200 or 400 μmol m−2 s−1, high- and low-light leaves showed a carbon gain overestimation of 25

  19. Unique role for translation initiation factor 3 in the light color regulation of photosynthetic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gutu, Andrian; Nesbit, April D; Alverson, Andrew J; Palmer, Jeffrey D; Kehoe, David M

    2013-10-01

    Light-harvesting antennae are critical for collecting energy from sunlight and providing it to photosynthetic reaction centers. Their abundance and composition are tightly regulated to maintain efficient photosynthesis in changing light conditions. Many cyanobacteria alter their light-harvesting antennae in response to changes in ambient light-color conditions through the process of chromatic acclimation. The control of green light induction (Cgi) pathway is a light-color-sensing system that controls the expression of photosynthetic genes during chromatic acclimation, and while some evidence suggests that it operates via transcription attenuation, the components of this pathway have not been identified. We provide evidence that translation initiation factor 3 (IF3), an essential component of the prokaryotic translation initiation machinery that binds the 30S subunit and blocks premature association with the 50S subunit, is part of the control of green light induction pathway. Light regulation of gene expression has not been previously described for any translation initiation factor. Surprisingly, deletion of the IF3-encoding gene infCa was not lethal in the filamentous cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon, and its genome was found to contain a second, redundant, highly divergent infC gene which, when deleted, had no effect on photosynthetic gene expression. Either gene could complement an Escherichia coli infC mutant and thus both encode bona fide IF3s. Analysis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genome databases established that multiple infC genes are present in the genomes of diverse groups of bacteria and land plants, most of which do not undergo chromatic acclimation. This suggests that IF3 may have repeatedly evolved important roles in the regulation of gene expression in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. PMID:24048028

  20. Kinetic model of primary energy transfer and trapping in photosynthetic membranes

    PubMed Central

    Pullerits, Tõnu; Freiberg, Arvi

    1992-01-01

    The picosecond time-domain incoherent singlet excitation transfer and trapping kinetics in core antenna of photosynthetic bacteria are studied in case of low excitation intensities by numerical integration of the appropriate master equation in a wide temperature range of 4-300 K. The essential features of our two-dimensional-lattice model are as follows: Förster excitation transfer theory, spectral heterogeneity of both the light-harvesting antenna and the reaction center, treatment of temperature effects through temperature dependence of spectral bands, inclusion of inner structure of the trap, and transition dipole moment orientation. The fluorescence kinetics is analyzed in terms of distributions of various kinetic components, and the influence of different inhomogeneities (orientational, spectral) is studied. A reasonably good agreement between theoretical and experimental fluorescence decay kinetics for purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum is achieved at high temperatures by assuming relatively large antenna spectral inhomogeneity: 20 nm at the whole bandwidth of 40 nm. The mean residence time in the antenna lattice site (it is assumed to be the aggregate of four bacteriochlorophyll a molecules bound to proteins) is estimated to be ∼12 ps. At 4 K only qualitative agreement between model and experiment is gained. The failure of quantitative fitting is perhaps due to the lack of knowledge about the real structure of antenna or local heating and cooling effects not taken into account. PMID:19431849

  1. Cloning and analysis of the C4 photosynthetic NAD-dependent malic enzyme of amaranth mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Long, J J; Wang, J L; Berry, J O

    1994-01-28

    In some C4 plant species, a mitochondrial NAD-dependent malic enzyme (EC 1.1.1.39) (NAD-ME) catalyzes the decarboxylation of 4 carbon malate in the bundle sheath cells, releasing CO2 for the Calvin cycle of photosynthesis. In amaranth, a dicotyledonous NAD-ME-type C4 plant, the photosynthetic NAD-ME purified as two subunits of 65 and 60 kDa, designated alpha and beta, respectively. Antiserum raised against the alpha subunit reacted only with the 65-kDa protein in immunoblot analysis. Immunogold electron microscopy using the alpha subunit antiserum demonstrated that this protein was localized specifically to the mitochondrial matrix of bundle sheath cells. The complete nucleotide sequence of a 2300-base pair alpha subunit cDNA clone showed that this gene encodes a protein that contains all of the motifs required for a complete and functional malic enzyme. The alpha subunit has significant similarity along its entire length to other known NAD- and NADP-dependent malic enzymes from plants, animals, and bacteria. The findings presented here provide new insights about the C4 photosynthetic NAD-ME and its evolutionary relationship to other forms of malic enzyme present in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. PMID:8300616

  2. Optimal fold symmetry of LH2 rings on a photosynthetic membrane

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Liam; Chen, Hang; Chuang, Chern; Silbey, Robert J.; Cao, Jianshu

    2013-01-01

    An intriguing observation of photosynthetic light-harvesting systems is the N-fold symmetry of light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of purple bacteria. We calculate the optimal rotational configuration of N-fold rings on a hexagonal lattice and establish two related mechanisms for the promotion of maximum excitation energy transfer (EET). (i) For certain fold numbers, there exist optimal basis cells with rotational symmetry, extendable to the entire lattice for the global optimization of the EET network. (ii) The type of basis cell can reduce or remove the frustration of EET rates across the photosynthetic network. We find that the existence of a basis cell and its type are directly related to the number of matching points S between the fold symmetry and the hexagonal lattice. The two complementary mechanisms provide selection criteria for the fold number and identify groups of consecutive numbers. Remarkably, one such group consists of the naturally occurring 8-, 9-, and 10-fold rings. By considering the inter-ring distance and EET rate, we demonstrate that this group can achieve minimal rotational sensitivity in addition to an optimal packing density, achieving robust and efficient EET. This corroborates our findings i and ii and, through their direct relation to S, suggests the design principle of matching the internal symmetry with the lattice order. PMID:23650366

  3. Spiral tubular bioreactors for hydrogen production by photosynthetic microorganisms. Design and operation

    SciTech Connect

    Markov, S.A.; Weaver, P.F.; Seibert, M.

    1997-12-31

    Spiral tubular bioreactors were constructed out of transparent PVC tubing for H{sub 2} production applications. Both a cyanobacterial Anabaena variabilis mutant that lacks uptake hydrogenase activity and the photo-synthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sp. CBS were tested in the bioreactors. Continuous H{sub 2} photoproduction at an average rate of 19 mL {center_dot} min{sup -2} {center_dot} h{sup -1} was observed using the A. variabilis mutant under an air atmosphere (without argon sparging or application of a partial vacuum). The cyanobacterial photobioreactor was run continuously for over one month with an average efficiency of light energy conversion to H{sub 2} of 1.4%. Another H{sub 2}-producing approach employed a unique type of activity found in a strain of photosynthetic bacteria that shifts CO (and H{sub 2}O) into H{sub 2} (and CO{sub 2}) in darkness. Continuous dark H{sub 2} production by Rhodobacter sp. CBS from CO (in anticipation of using synthesis gas as the future substrate) at rates up to 140 mL {center_dot} g cdw{sup -1} {center_dot} h{sup -1} was observed in a bubble-train bioreactor for more than 10 d. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Physiological ecology of heterotrophic bacteria in two Indiana lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Lovell, C.R.

    1984-01-01

    Rates of bacterial production of particulate organic carbon in two hardwater Indiana lakes were studied. Primary production rates were calculated from rates of photosynthetic H/sup 14/CO/sub 3//sup -/ incorporation and bacterial (secondary) production from rates of /sup 3/H-(methyl)-thymidine incorporation by natural samples. The relationship of thymidine incorporation to rates of bacterial growth in diluted natural samples was used to calculate the conversion factor 2.2 x 10/sup 18/ cells produced (mole thymidine incorporated)/sup -1/. Bacteria in Little Crooked Lake were found to be growing at suboptimal temperatures throughout most of the water column, even during the summer months. Even rapidly growing metalimnetic populations displayed no noticable adaptation to low environmental temperatures. This indicates that temperature could have limited the growth of bacteria in this lake throughout the period of thermal stratification. The extracellular release of photosynthetically fixed organic carbon by healthy phytoplankton was not found to be an important carbon source for planktonic bacteria. Slow carbon release mechanisms, such as algal decomposition, seem to have been more important.

  5. Low-Temperature Fluorescence from Single Chlorosomes, Photosynthetic Antenna Complexes of Green Filamentous and Sulfur Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Yutaka; Saga, Yoshitaka; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Itoh, Shigeru

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescence spectra of single chlorosomes isolated from a green filamentous bacterium (Chloroflexus (Cfl.) aurantiacus) and a green sulfur bacterium (Chlorobium (Cb.) tepidum) were measured by using a confocal laser microscope at 13 K. Chlorosomes were frozen either in a liquid solution (floating chlorosome) or on a quartz plate after being adsorbed (adsorbed chlorosome). Fluorescence peak wavelengths were shorter for the adsorbed single chlorosomes than for the floating ones. Single floating Cfl. chlorosomes showed a distribution of fluorescence peak positions having a center at 759.0 nm with a full width at half maximum of 6.3 nm. Single floating Cb. chlorosomes showed a 782.7 nm center with a full width at half-maximum of 3.4 nm. The distribution shifted to the blue and became wider with increasing temperature, especially in Cb. chlorosomes, suggesting a large excitonic density of states just above the lowest level. Energy transfer from BChl-c aggregates to BChl-a molecules in the baseplate proteins was observed in the floating chlorosomes but not in the adsorbed ones. A positive correlation was found between the peak wavelength of BChl-c fluorescence and the intensity of BChl-a fluorescence in single Cfl. chlorosomes. The results suggest that the BChl-c aggregates with longer wavelengths of the fluorescence peaks have a more efficient Förster-type energy transfer to the baseplate BChl-a. PMID:16950839

  6. Nonphotochemical Hole-Burning Studies of Energy Transfer Dynamics in Antenna Complexes of Photosynthetic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Satoshi Matsuzaki

    2002-08-01

    This thesis contains the candidate's original work on excitonic structure and energy transfer dynamics of two bacterial antenna complexes as studied using spectral hole-burning spectroscopy. The general introduction is divided into two chapters (1 and 2). Chapter 1 provides background material on photosynthesis and bacterial antenna complexes with emphasis on the two bacterial antenna systems related to the thesis research. Chapter 2 reviews the underlying principles and mechanism of persistent nonphotochemical hole-burning (NPHB) spectroscopy. Relevant energy transfer theories are also discussed. Chapters 3 and 4 are papers by the candidate that have been published. Chapter 3 describes the application of NPHB spectroscopy to the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex from the green sulfur bacterium Prosthecochloris aestuarii; emphasis is on determination of the low energy vibrational structure that is important for understanding the energy transfer process associated within three lowest energy Qy-states of the complex. The results are compared with those obtained earlier on the FMO complex from Chlorobium tepidum. In Chapter 4, the energy transfer dynamics of the B800 molecules of intact LH2 and B800-deficient LH2 complexes of the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila are compared. New insights on the additional decay channel of the B800 ring of bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) molecules are provided. General conclusions are given in Chapter 5.

  7. Terminal steps of bacteriochlorophyll a phytol formation in purple photosynthetic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Shioi, Y.; Sasa, T.

    1984-04-01

    Four chemically different bacteriochlorophylls (Bchls) a esterified with geranylgeraniol, dihydrogeranyl-geraniol, tetrahydrogeraniol, and phytol have been detected by high-pressure liquid chromatography in cell extracts from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides and Chromatium vinosum. Bchl a containing phytol is the principal component, and the other three Bchls a comprise about 4% of the total Bchls a in stationary-phase cells of R. sphaeroides and C. vinosum. The high levels of the minor pigments occur in the beginning of Bchl a phytol formation, indicating that they are not degradation products, but intermediates of Bchl a phytol formation.

  8. Nonphotochemical Hole-Burning Studies of Energy Transfer Dynamics in Antenna Complexes of Photosynthetic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Satoshi Matsuzaki

    2002-06-27

    This thesis contains the candidate's original work on excitonic structure and energy transfer dynamics of two bacterial antenna complexes as studied using spectral hole-burning spectroscopy. The general introduction is divided into two chapters (1 and 2). Chapter 1 provides background material on photosynthesis and bacterial antenna complexes with emphasis on the two bacterial antenna systems related to the thesis research. Chapter 2 reviews the underlying principles and mechanism of persistent nonphotochemical hole-burning (NPHB) spectroscopy. Relevant energy transfer theories are also discussed. Chapters 3 and 4 are papers by the candidate that have been published. Chapter 3 describes the application of NPHB spectroscopy to the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex from the green sulfur bacterium Prosthecochloris aestuarii; emphasis is on determination of the low energy vibrational structure that is important for understanding the energy transfer process associated within three lowest energy Q{sub y}-states of the complex. The results are compared with those obtained earlier on the FMO complex from Chlorobium tepidum. In Chapter 4, the energy transfer dynamics of the B800 molecules of intact LH2 and B800-deficient LH2 complexes of the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila are compared. New insights on the additional decay channel of the B800 ring of bacteriochlorophyll{sub a} (BChl{sub a}) molecules are provided. General conclusions are given in Chapter 5. A version of the hole spectrum simulation program written by the candidate for the FMO complex study (Chapter 3) is included as an appendix. The references for each chapter are given at the end of each chapter.

  9. Export or recombination of charges in reaction centers in intact cells of photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Asztalos, Emese; Maróti, Péter

    2009-12-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of forward and reverse electron transfer around the reaction center of purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides were studied in vivo by flash-excited delayed fluorescence, prompt fluorescence (induction) and kinetic difference absorption. By protection of the photomultiplier from intense bacteriochlorophyll prompt fluorescence evoked by laser excitation, the time resolution of the fluorometer was reduced typically 10 micros. Two precursor states of the delayed fluorescence were identified: P(+)Q(A)(-) and cyt c(2)(3+)Q(A)(-) whose enthalpy levels were 340 meV and 1020 meV below A, respectively. The free energy of the P(+)Q(A)(-) state relative to A* was -870 meV in whole cells. Similar values were obtained earlier for isolated reaction center and chromatophore. The free energies of cyt c(2)(3+)Q(A)(-) and P(+)Q(A)(-) states showed no or very weak (-6 meV/pH unit) pH-dependence, respectively, supporting the concept of pH-independent redox midpoint potential of Q(A)/Q(A)(-) in intact cells. In accordance with the multiphasic kinetics of delayed fluorescence, the kinetics of re-opening of the closed reaction center is also complex (it extends up to 1 s) as a consequence of acceptor and donor-side reactions. The control of charge export from the reaction center by light regime, redox agents and inhibitors is investigated. The complex kinetics may arise from the distribution of quinones in different redox states on the acceptor side (Q(B) binding site and pool) and from organization of electron transfer components in supercomplexes. PMID:19555655

  10. Variable photosynthetic units, energy transfer and light-induced evolution of hydrogen in algae and bacteria.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffron, H.

    1971-01-01

    The present state of knowledge regarding the truly photochemical reactions in photosynthesis is considered. Nine-tenths of the available knowledge is of a biochemical nature. Questions regarding the activities of the chlorophyll system are examined. The simplest photochemical response observed in living hydrogen-adapted algal cells is the release of molecular hydrogen, which continues even after all other known natural reactions have been eliminated either by heating or the action of poisons.

  11. Photosynthetic carbon metabolism of a marine grass.

    PubMed

    Benedict, C R; Scott, J R

    1976-06-01

    The delta(13)C value of a tropical marine grass Thalassia testudinum is -9.04 per thousand. This value is similar to the delta(13)C value of terrestrial tropical grasses. The delta(13)C values of the organic acid fraction, the amino acid fraction, the sugar fraction, malic acid, and glucose are: -11.2 per thousand, -13.1 per thousand, -10.1 per thousand, -11.1 per thousand, and -11.5 per thousand, respectively. The delta(13)C values of malic acid and glucose of Thalassia are similar to the delta(13)C values of these intermediates in sorghum leaves and attest to the presence of the photosynthetic C(4)-dicarboxylic acid pathway in this marine grass. The inorganic HCO(3) (-) for the growth of the grass fluctuates between -6.7 to -2.7 per thousand during the day. If CO(2) fixation in Thalassia is catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (which would result in a -3 per thousand fractionation between HCO(3) (-) and malic acid), the predicted delta(13)C value for Thalassia would be -9.7 to -5.7 per thousand. This range is close to the observed range of -12.6 to -7.8 per thousand for Thalassia and agree with the operation of the C(4)-dicarboxylic acid pathway in this plant. The early products of the fixation of HCO(3) (-) in the leaf sections are malic acid and aspartic acid which are similar to the early products of CO(2) fixation in C(4) terrestrial plants.Electron microscopy of the leaves of Thalassia reveal thick walled epidermal cells exceedingly rich in mitochondria and C(3)-type chloroplasts. The mesophyll cells have many different shapes and surround air lacunae which contain O(2) and CO(2). The mesophyll cells are highly vacuolated and the parietal cytoplasm contains an occasional chloroplast. This chloroplast contains grana but the lamellar system is not as developed as the system in epidermal chloroplasts. Extensive phloem tissue is present but the xylem elements are reduced in this aquatic grass. The vascular tissue is not surrounded by bundle sheath cells

  12. Hydrogen Biogeochemistry in Anaerobic and Photosynthetic Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    culture studies. Our recent work has extended the study of hydrogen to cyanobacterial mat communities. The large amounts of reducing power generated during photosynthetic activity carry the potential to contribute a swamping term to the H2 economy of the anaerobic microbial populations within the mat - and thereby to alter the population structure and biogeochemical function of the mat as a whole. In hypersaline microbial mats, we observe a distinct diel cycle in H2 production and a substantial corresponding flux. On an early Earth dominated by microbial mats, this transmission of photosynthetic reducing power may have carried important implications for both biospheric and atmospheric evolution.

  13. Physiological and microbial adjustments to diet quality permit facultative herbivory in an omnivorous lizard.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Kevin D; Brun, Antonio; Magallanes, Melisa; Brinkerhoff, Joshua; Laspiur, Alejandro; Acosta, Juan Carlos; Bordenstein, Seth R; Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique

    2016-06-15

    While herbivory is a common feeding strategy in a number of vertebrate classes, less than 4% of squamate reptiles feed primarily on plant material. It has been hypothesized that physiological or microbial limitations may constrain the evolution of herbivory in lizards. Herbivorous lizards exhibit adaptations in digestive morphology and function that allow them to better assimilate plant material. However, it is unknown whether these traits are fixed or perhaps phenotypically flexible as a result of diet. Here, we maintained a naturally omnivorous lizard, Liolaemus ruibali, on a mixed diet of 50% insects and 50% plant material, or a plant-rich diet of 90% plant material. We compared parameters of digestive performance, gut morphology and function, and gut microbial community structure between the two groups. We found that lizards fed the plant-rich diet maintained nitrogen balance and exhibited low minimum nitrogen requirements. Additionally, lizards fed the plant-rich diet exhibited significantly longer small intestines and larger hindguts, demonstrating that gut morphology is phenotypically flexible. Lizards fed the plant-rich diet harbored small intestinal communities that were more diverse and enriched in Melainabacteria and Oscillospira compared with mixed diet-fed lizards. Additionally, the relative abundance of sulfate-reducing bacteria in the small intestine significantly correlated with whole-animal fiber digestibility. Thus, we suggest that physiological and microbial limitations do not sensu stricto constrain the evolution of herbivory in lizards. Rather, ecological context and fitness consequences may be more important in driving the evolution of this feeding strategy. PMID:27307545

  14. Towards autotrophic tissue engineering: Photosynthetic gene therapy for regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chávez, Myra Noemi; Schenck, Thilo Ludwig; Hopfner, Ursula; Centeno-Cerdas, Carolina; Somlai-Schweiger, Ian; Schwarz, Christian; Machens, Hans-Günther; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Bono, María Rosa; Allende, Miguel L; Nickelsen, Jörg; Egaña, José Tomás

    2016-01-01

    The use of artificial tissues in regenerative medicine is limited due to hypoxia. As a strategy to overcome this drawback, we have shown that photosynthetic biomaterials can produce and provide oxygen independently of blood perfusion by generating chimeric animal-plant tissues during dermal regeneration. In this work, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of photosynthetic biomaterials in vivo after engraftment in a fully immunocompetent mouse skin defect model. Further, we show that it is also possible to genetically engineer such photosynthetic scaffolds to deliver other key molecules in addition to oxygen. As a proof-of-concept, biomaterials were loaded with gene modified microalgae expressing the angiogenic recombinant protein VEGF. Survival of the algae, growth factor delivery and regenerative potential were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. This work proposes the use of photosynthetic gene therapy in regenerative medicine and provides scientific evidence for the use of engineered microalgae as an alternative to deliver recombinant molecules for gene therapy. PMID:26474040

  15. Cultivar variation in cotton photosynthetic performance under different temperature regimes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) yields are impacted by overall photosynthetic production. Factors that influence crop photosynthesis are the plants genetic makeup and the environmental conditions. This study investigated cultivar variation in photosynthesis when plants were grown in the field under...

  16. Energy transfer in real and artificial photosynthetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.E.; Katz, J.J.; Hindman, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    A comparative study of the fluorescence emitted by three photosynthetic organisms (chlorella, tribonema, and anacystis) and the fluorescence of some model systems selected for study by criteria described below are reported. Light emission has been studied as a function of excitation wavelength and of temperature. Low temperature fluorescence studies on photosynthetic organisms and chloroplast preparations provide the chief experimental support for the existence of a PSII in green plants, and fluorescence at low temperatures has been used as the principal source of information on energy flow between the photosynthetic pigments. The nature and functional aspects of PSII and the course of energy transfer in the photosynthetic apparatus are highly pertinent to the oxygen evolution in green plant photosynthesis.

  17. Non-Markov dissipative dynamics of electron transfer in a photosynthetic reaction center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddubnyy, V. V.; Glebov, I. O.; Eremin, V. V.

    2014-02-01

    We consider the dissipative dynamics of electron transfer in the photosynthetic reaction center of purple bacteria and propose a model where the transition between electron states arises only due to the interaction between a chromophore system and the protein environment and is not accompanied by the motion of nuclei of the reaction subsystem. We establish applicability conditions for the Markov approximation in the framework of this model and show that these conditions are not necessarily satisfied in the protein medium. We represent the spectral function of the "system+heat bath" interaction in the form of one or several Gaussian functions to study specific characteristics of non-Markov dynamics of the final state population, the presence of an induction period and vibrations. The consistency of the computational results obtained for non-Markov dynamics with experimental data confirms the correctness of the proposed approach.

  18. Distinguishing the roles of energy funnelling and delocalization in photosynthetic light harvesting.

    PubMed

    Baghbanzadeh, Sima; Kassal, Ivan

    2016-03-14

    Photosynthetic complexes improve the transfer of excitation energy from peripheral antennas to reaction centers in several ways. In particular, a downward energy funnel can direct excitons in the right direction, while coherent excitonic delocalization can enhance transfer rates through the cooperative phenomenon of supertransfer. However, isolating the role of purely coherent effects is difficult because any change to the delocalization also changes the energy landscape. Here, we show that the relative importance of the two processes can be determined by comparing the natural light-harvesting apparatus with counterfactual models in which the delocalization and the energy landscape are altered. Applied to the example of purple bacteria, our approach shows that although supertransfer does enhance the rates somewhat, the energetic funnelling plays the decisive role. Because delocalization has a minor role (and is sometimes detrimental), it is most likely not adaptive, being a side-effect of the dense chlorophyll packing that evolved to increase light absorption per reaction center. PMID:26899714

  19. Light-enhanced bioaccumulation of molybdenum by nitrogen-deprived recombinant anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris.

    PubMed

    Naito, Taki; Sachuronggui; Ueki, Masayoshi; Maeda, Isamu

    2016-01-01

    As molybdenum (Mo) is an indispensable metal for plant nitrogen metabolisms, accumulation of dissolved Mo into bacterial cells may connect to the development of bacterial fertilizers that promote plant growth. In order to enhance Mo bioaccumulation, nitrogen removal and light illumination were examined in anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (APB) because APB possess Mo nitrogenase whose synthesis is strictly regulated by ammonium ion concentration. In addition, an APB, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, transformed with a gene encoding Mo-responsive transcriptional regulator ModE was constructed. Mo content was most markedly enhanced by the removal of ammonium ion from medium and light illumination while their effects on other metal contents were limited. Increases in contents of trace metals including Mo by the genetic modification were observed. Thus, these results demonstrated an effective way to enrich Mo in the bacterial cells by the culture conditions and genetic modification. PMID:26376718

  20. Native FMO-reaction center supercomplex in green sulfur bacteria: an electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Bína, David; Gardian, Zdenko; Vácha, František; Litvín, Radek

    2016-04-01

    Chlorobaculum tepidum is a representative of green sulfur bacteria, a group of anoxygenic photoautotrophs that employ chlorosomes as the main light-harvesting structures. Chlorosomes are coupled to a ferredoxin-reducing reaction center by means of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein. While the biochemical properties and physical functioning of all the individual components of this photosynthetic machinery are quite well understood, the native architecture of the photosynthetic supercomplexes is not. Here we report observations of membrane-bound FMO and the analysis of the respective FMO-reaction center complex. We propose the existence of a supercomplex formed by two reaction centers and four FMO trimers based on the single-particle analysis of the complexes attached to native membrane. Moreover, the structure of the photosynthetic unit comprising the chlorosome with the associated pool of RC-FMO supercomplexes is proposed. PMID:26589322

  1. Photosynthetic light harvesting: excitons and coherence

    PubMed Central

    Fassioli, Francesca; Dinshaw, Rayomond; Arpin, Paul C.; Scholes, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis begins with light harvesting, where specialized pigment–protein complexes transform sunlight into electronic excitations delivered to reaction centres to initiate charge separation. There is evidence that quantum coherence between electronic excited states plays a role in energy transfer. In this review, we discuss how quantum coherence manifests in photosynthetic light harvesting and its implications. We begin by examining the concept of an exciton, an excited electronic state delocalized over several spatially separated molecules, which is the most widely available signature of quantum coherence in light harvesting. We then discuss recent results concerning the possibility that quantum coherence between electronically excited states of donors and acceptors may give rise to a quantum coherent evolution of excitations, modifying the traditional incoherent picture of energy transfer. Key to this (partially) coherent energy transfer appears to be the structure of the environment, in particular the participation of non-equilibrium vibrational modes. We discuss the open questions and controversies regarding quantum coherent energy transfer and how these can be addressed using new experimental techniques. PMID:24352671

  2. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2001-01-16

    This is the first quarterly report of the project Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation. The official project start date, 10/02/2000, was delayed until 10/31/2000 due to an intellectual property dispute that was resolved. However, the delay forced a subsequent delay in subcontracting with Montana State University, which then delayed obtaining a sampling permit from Yellowstone National Park. However, even with these delays, the project moved forward with some success. Accomplishments for this quarter include: Culturing of thermophilic organisms from Yellowstone; Testing of mesophilic organisms in extreme CO{sub 2} conditions; Construction of a second test bed for additional testing; Purchase of a total carbon analyzer dedicated to the project; Construction of a lighting container for Oak Ridge National Laboratory optical fiber testing; Modified lighting of existing test box to provide more uniform distribution; Testing of growth surface adhesion and properties; Experimentation on water-jet harvesting techniques; and Literature review underway regarding uses of biomass after harvesting. Plans for next quarter's work and an update on the project's web page are included in the conclusions.

  3. Photosynthetically active sunlight at high southern latitudes.

    PubMed

    Frederick, John E; Liao, Yixiang

    2005-01-01

    A network of scanning spectroradiometers has acquired a multiyear database of visible solar irradiance, covering wavelengths from 400 to 600 nm, at four sites in the high-latitude Southern Hemisphere, from 55 degrees S to 90 degrees S. Monthly irradiations computed from the hourly measurements reveal the character of the seasonal cycle and illustrate the role of cloudiness as functions of latitude. Near summer solstice, the combined influences of solar elevation and the duration of daylight would produce a monthly irradiation with little latitude dependence under clear skies. However, the attenuation associated with local cloudiness varies geographically, with the greatest effect at the most northern locations, Ushuaia, Argentina and Palmer Station on the Antarctic Peninsula. Near summer solstice, the South Pole experiences the largest monthly irradiation of the sites studied, where relatively clear skies contribute to this result. Scaling factors derived from radiative-transfer calculations combined with the measured 400-600 nm irradiances allow estimating irradiances integrated over the wavelength band 400-700 nm. This produces a climatology of photosynthetically active radiation for each month of the year at each site. PMID:15689179

  4. Renewable hydrogen production by photosynthetic water splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.

    1998-06-01

    This mission-oriented research project is focused on the production of renewable hydrogen. The authors have demonstrated that certain unicellular green algae are capable of sustained simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen by light-activated photosynthetic water splitting. It is the goal of this project to develop a practical chemical engineering system for the development of an economic process that can be used to produce renewable hydrogen. There are several fundamental problems that need to be solved before the application of this scientific knowledge can be applied to the development a practical process: (I) maximizing net thermodynamic conversion efficiency of light energy into hydrogen energy, (2) development of oxygen-sensitive hydrogenase-containing mutants, and (3) development of bioreactors that can be used in a real-world chemical engineering process. The authors are addressing each of these problems here at ORNL and in collaboration with their research colleagues at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Hawaii. This year the authors have focused on item 1 above. In particular, they have focused on the question of how many light reactions are required to split water to molecular hydrogen and oxygen.

  5. Dynamic Environmental Photosynthetic Imaging Reveals Emergent Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Jeffrey A; Savage, Linda J; Zegarac, Robert; Hall, Christopher C; Satoh-Cruz, Mio; Davis, Geoffry A; Kovac, William Kent; Chen, Jin; Kramer, David M

    2016-06-22

    Understanding and improving the productivity and robustness of plant photosynthesis requires high-throughput phenotyping under environmental conditions that are relevant to the field. Here we demonstrate the dynamic environmental photosynthesis imager (DEPI), an experimental platform for integrated, continuous, and high-throughput measurements of photosynthetic parameters during plant growth under reproducible yet dynamic environmental conditions. Using parallel imagers obviates the need to move plants or sensors, reducing artifacts and allowing simultaneous measurement on large numbers of plants. As a result, DEPI can reveal phenotypes that are not evident under standard laboratory conditions but emerge under progressively more dynamic illumination. We show examples in mutants of Arabidopsis of such "emergent phenotypes" that are highly transient and heterogeneous, appearing in different leaves under different conditions and depending in complex ways on both environmental conditions and plant developmental age. These emergent phenotypes appear to be caused by a range of phenomena, suggesting that such previously unseen processes are critical for plant responses to dynamic environments. PMID:27336966

  6. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2001-07-25

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 4/03/2001 through 7/02/2001. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives. Note that this version of the quarterly technical report is a revision to add the reports from subcontractors Montana State and Oak Ridge National Laboratories The significant accomplishments for this quarter include: Development of an experimental plan and initiation of experiments to create a calibration curve that correlates algal chlorophyll levels with carbon levels (to simplify future experimental procedures); Completion of debugging of the slug flow reactor system, and development of a plan for testing the pressure drop of the slug flow reactor; Design and development of a new bioreactor screen design which integrates the nutrient delivery drip system and the harvesting system; Development of an experimental setup for testing the new integrated drip system/harvesting system; Completion of model-scale bioreactor tests examining the effects of CO{sub 2} concentration levels and lighting levels on Nostoc 86-3 growth rates; Completion of the construction of a larger model-scale bioreactor to improve and expand testing capabilities and initiation of tests; Substantial progress on construction of a pilot-scale bioreactor; and Preliminary economic analysis of photobioreactor deployment. Plans for next quarter's work are included in the conclusions. A preliminary economic analysis is included as an appendix.

  7. Supramolecular structures modeling photosynthetic reaction center function

    SciTech Connect

    Wasielewski, M.R.; Gaines, G.L. III; Gosztola, D.; Niemczyk, M.P.; Svec, W.A.

    1992-08-20

    Work in our laboratory has focused on the influence of solvent motion on the rates and energetics of photochemical charge separation in glassy solids. The efficiencies of many nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions involving photochemical electron donors with relatively low excited state energies, such as porphyrins and chlorophylls, are poor in the solid state. Recent work has shown that placing a porphyrin-acceptor system in a glassy solid at low temperature significantly raises the energy of ks ion-pair state. This destabilization can be as much as 0.8 eV relative to the ion pair state energy in a polar liquid. This contrasts sharply with photosynthetic reaction centers, which maintain medium-independent electron transfer rates with relatively small free energies of charge separation. Using this information we have set out to design photochemical systems that produce long-lived radical ion pairs in glassy solids with high quantum efficiency. These systems maintain their efficiency when placed in other glassy matrices, such as polymers. An important consequence of this effort is the design of molecules that minimize the electronic interaction between the oxidized donor and reduced acceptor. This minimization can be attained by careful design of the spacer groups linking the donor and acceptor and by using more than a single electron transfer step to increase the distance between the separated charges as is done in natural photosynthesis.

  8. Multiantenna artificial photosynthetic reaction center complex.

    PubMed

    Terazono, Yuichi; Kodis, Gerdenis; Liddell, Paul A; Garg, Vikas; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L; Gust, Devens

    2009-05-21

    In order to ensure efficient utilization of the solar spectrum, photosynthetic organisms use a variety of antenna chromophores to absorb light and transfer excitation to a reaction center, where photoinduced charge separation occurs. Reported here is a synthetic molecular heptad that features two bis(phenylethynyl)anthracene and two borondipyrromethene antennas linked to a hexaphenylbenzene core that also bears two zinc porphyrins. A fullerene electron acceptor self-assembles to both porhyrins via dative bonds. Excitation energy is transferred very efficiently from all four antennas to the porphyrins. Singlet-singlet energy transfer occurs both directly and by a stepwise funnel-like pathway wherein excitation moves down a thermodynamic gradient. The porphyrin excited states donate an electron to the fullerene with a time constant of 3 ps to generate a charge-separated state with a lifetime of 230 ps. The overall quantum yield is close to unity. In the absence of the fullerene, the porphyrin excited singlet state donates an electron to a borondipyrromethene on a slower time scale. This molecule demonstrates that by incorporating antennas, it is possible for a molecular system to harvest efficiently light throughout the visible from ultraviolet wavelengths out to approximately 650 nm. PMID:19438278

  9. Regulation of the photosynthetic apparatus under fluctuating growth light.

    PubMed

    Tikkanen, Mikko; Grieco, Michele; Nurmi, Markus; Rantala, Marjaana; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2012-12-19

    Safe and efficient conversion of solar energy to metabolic energy by plants is based on tightly inter-regulated transfer of excitation energy, electrons and protons in the photosynthetic machinery according to the availability of light energy, as well as the needs and restrictions of metabolism itself. Plants have mechanisms to enhance the capture of energy when light is limited for growth and development. Also, when energy is in excess, the photosynthetic machinery slows down the electron transfer reactions in order to prevent the production of reactive oxygen species and the consequent damage of the photosynthetic machinery. In this opinion paper, we present a partially hypothetical scheme describing how the photosynthetic machinery controls the flow of energy and electrons in order to enable the maintenance of photosynthetic activity in nature under continual fluctuations in white light intensity. We discuss the roles of light-harvesting II protein phosphorylation, thermal dissipation of excess energy and the control of electron transfer by cytochrome b(6)f, and the role of dynamically regulated turnover of photosystem II in the maintenance of the photosynthetic machinery. We present a new hypothesis suggesting that most of the regulation in the thylakoid membrane occurs in order to prevent oxidative damage of photosystem I. PMID:23148275

  10. Rice Photosynthetic Productivity and PSII Photochemistry under Nonflooded Irrigation

    PubMed Central

    He, Haibing; Yang, Ru; Jia, Biao; Chen, Lin; Fan, Hua; Cui, Jing; Yang, Dong; Li, Menglong; Ma, Fu-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Nonflooded irrigation is an important water-saving rice cultivation technology, but little is known on its photosynthetic mechanism. The aims of this work were to investigate photosynthetic characteristics of rice during grain filling stage under three nonflooded irrigation treatments: furrow irrigation with plastic mulching (FIM), furrow irrigation with nonmulching (FIN), and drip irrigation with plastic mulching (DI). Compared with the conventional flooding (CF) treatment, those grown in the nonflooded irrigation treatments showed lower net photosynthetic rate (PN), lower maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm), and lower effective quantum yield of PSII photochemistry (ΦPSII). And the poor photosynthetic characteristics in the nonflooded irrigation treatments were mainly attributed to the low total nitrogen content (TNC). Under non-flooded irrigation, the PN, Fv/Fm, and ΦPSII significantly decreased with a reduction in the soil water potential, but these parameters were rapidly recovered in the DI and FIM treatments when supplementary irrigation was applied. Moreover, The DI treatment always had higher photosynthetic productivity than the FIM and FIN treatments. Grain yield, matter translocation, and dry matter post-anthesis (DMPA) were the highest in the CF treatment, followed by the DI, FIM, and FIN treatments in turn. In conclusion, increasing nitrogen content in leaf of rice plants could be a key factor to improve photosynthetic capacity in nonflooded irrigation. PMID:24741364

  11. Electrochemical and optical studies of model photosynthetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-15

    The objective of this research is to obtain a better understanding of the relationship between the structural organization of photosynthetic pigments and their spectroscopic and electrochemical properties. Defined model systems were studied first. These included the least ordered (solutions) through the most highly ordered (Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers and self-assembled monolayers) systems containing BChl, BPheo, and UQ. Molecules other than the photosynthetic pigments and quinones were also examined, including chromophores (i.e. surface active cyanine dyes and phtahlocyanines) an redox active compounds (methyl viologen (MV) and surfactant ferrocenes), in order to develop the techniques needed to study the photosynthetic components. Because the chlorophylls are photosensitive and labile, it was easier first to develop procedures using stable species. Three different techniques were used to characterize these model systems. These included electrochemical techniques for determining the standard oxidation and reduction potentials of the photosynthetic components as well as methods for determining the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants for BChl and BPheo at metal electrodes (Pt and Au). Resonance Raman (RR) and surface enhanced resonance Raman (SERR) spectroscopy were used to determine the spectra of the photosynthetic pigments and model compounds. SERRS was also used to study several types of photosynthetic preparations.

  12. Regulation of the photosynthetic apparatus under fluctuating growth light

    PubMed Central

    Tikkanen, Mikko; Grieco, Michele; Nurmi, Markus; Rantala, Marjaana; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2012-01-01

    Safe and efficient conversion of solar energy to metabolic energy by plants is based on tightly inter-regulated transfer of excitation energy, electrons and protons in the photosynthetic machinery according to the availability of light energy, as well as the needs and restrictions of metabolism itself. Plants have mechanisms to enhance the capture of energy when light is limited for growth and development. Also, when energy is in excess, the photosynthetic machinery slows down the electron transfer reactions in order to prevent the production of reactive oxygen species and the consequent damage of the photosynthetic machinery. In this opinion paper, we present a partially hypothetical scheme describing how the photosynthetic machinery controls the flow of energy and electrons in order to enable the maintenance of photosynthetic activity in nature under continual fluctuations in white light intensity. We discuss the roles of light-harvesting II protein phosphorylation, thermal dissipation of excess energy and the control of electron transfer by cytochrome b6f, and the role of dynamically regulated turnover of photosystem II in the maintenance of the photosynthetic machinery. We present a new hypothesis suggesting that most of the regulation in the thylakoid membrane occurs in order to prevent oxidative damage of photosystem I. PMID:23148275

  13. Hydraulic basis for the evolution of photosynthetic productivity.

    PubMed

    Scoffoni, Christine; Chatelet, David S; Pasquet-Kok, Jessica; Rawls, Michael; Donoghue, Michael J; Edwards, Erika J; Sack, Lawren

    2016-01-01

    Clarifying the evolution and mechanisms for photosynthetic productivity is a key to both improving crops and understanding plant evolution and habitat distributions. Current theory recognizes a role for the hydraulics of water transport as a potential determinant of photosynthetic productivity based on comparative data across disparate species. However, there has never been rigorous support for the maintenance of this relationship during an evolutionary radiation. We tested this theory for 30 species of Viburnum, diverse in leaf shape and photosynthetic anatomy, grown in a common garden. We found strong support for a fundamental requirement for leaf hydraulic capacity (Kleaf) in determining photosynthetic capacity (Amax), as these traits diversified across this lineage in tight coordination, with their proportionality modulated by the climate experienced in the species' range. Variation in Kleaf arose from differences in venation architecture that influenced xylem and especially outside-xylem flow pathways. These findings substantiate an evolutionary basis for the coordination of hydraulic and photosynthetic physiology across species, and their co-dependence on climate, establishing a fundamental role for water transport in the evolution of the photosynthetic rate. PMID:27255836

  14. R-body-producing bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Pond, F R; Gibson, I; Lalucat, J; Quackenbush, R L

    1989-01-01

    Until 10 years ago, R bodies were known only as diagnostic features by which endosymbionts of paramecia were identified as kappa particles. They were thought to be limited to the cytoplasm of two species in the Paramecium aurelia species complex. Now, R bodies have been found in free-living bacteria and other Paramecium species. The organisms now known to form R bodies include the cytoplasmic kappa endosymbionts of P. biaurelia and P. tetraurelia, the macronuclear kappa endosymbionts of P. caudatum, Pseudomonas avenae (a free-living plant pathogen), Pseudomonas taeniospiralis (a hydrogen-oxidizing soil microorganism), Rhodospirillum centenum (a photosynthetic bacterium), and a soil bacterium, EPS-5028, which is probably a pseudomonad. R bodies themselves fall into five distinct groups, distinguished by size, the morphology of the R-body ribbons, and the unrolling behavior of wound R bodies. In recent years, the inherent difficulties in studying the organization and assembly of R bodies by the obligate endosymbiont kappa, have been alleviated by cloning and expressing genetic determinants for these R bodies (type 51) in Escherichia coli. Type 51 R-body synthesis requires three low-molecular-mass polypeptides. One of these is modified posttranslationally, giving rise to 12 polypeptide species, which are the major structural subunits of the R body. R bodies are encoded in kappa species by extrachromosomal elements. Type 51 R bodies, produced in Caedibacter taeniospiralis, are encoded by a plasmid, whereas bacteriophage genomes probably control R-body synthesis in other kappa species. However, there is no evidence that either bacteriophages or plasmids are present in P. avenae or P. taeniospiralis. No sequence homology was detected between type 51 R-body-encoding DNA and DNA from any R-body-producing species, except C. varicaedens 1038. The evolutionary relatedness of different types of R bodies remains unknown. Images PMID:2651865

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Bacteria That Grow on Methane and Organic Compounds as Sole Sources of Carbon and Energy

    PubMed Central

    Patt, Tom E.; Cole, Gloria C.; Bland, Judith; Hanson, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    Bacteria capable of growth on methane and a variety of complex organic substrates as sole sources of carbon and energy have been isolated. Conditions used to rigorously establish the purity of the cultures are described. One facultative methylotroph has been studied in detail. This organism has peripherally arranged pairs of intracytoplasmic membranes characteristic of obligate methylotrophs. This isolate apparently utilizes the serine pathway of formaldehyde fixation. The location of methane oxidizers in a dimictic lake indicates that these organisms prefer less than saturating levels of dissolved oxygen. Laboratory experiments confirmed the preference of these organisms for atmospheres containing less oxygen than air. Images PMID:4142033

  16. Genomics of Probiotic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Flaherty, Sarah; Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    Probiotic bacteria from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species belong to the Firmicutes and the Actinobacteria phylum, respectively. Lactobacilli are members of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) group, a broadly defined family of microorganisms that ferment various hexoses into primarily lactic acid. Lactobacilli are typically low G + C gram-positive species which are phylogenetically diverse, with over 100 species documented to date. Bifidobacteria are heterofermentative, high G + C content bacteria with about 30 species of bifidobacteria described to date.

  17. Honey bee colonies act as reservoirs for two Spiroplasma facultative symbionts and incur complex multiyear infection dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Approximately 30 years ago, two species of mollicute bacteria in the genus Spiroplasma were isolated and described from adult Western honey bees (Apis mellifera). Denominated for their host as Spiroplasma apis and Spiroplasma melliferum, these bacteria were uniquely isolated during springtime and h...

  18. Regulation of Photosynthetic Carbon Metabolism in Cucumber by Light Intensity and Photosynthetic Period 1

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, N. Suzanne; Pharr, David M.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of photosynthetic periods and light intensity on cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) carbon exchange rates and photoassimilate partitioning were determined in relation to the activities of galactinol synthase and sucrose-phosphate synthase. Carbon assimilation and partitioning appeared to be controlled by different mechanisms. Carbon exchange rates were influenced by total photon flux density, but were nearly constant over the entire photoperiod for given photoperiod lengths. Length of the photosynthetic periods did influence photoassimilate partitioning. Assimilate export rate was decreased by more than 60% during the latter part of the short photoperiod treatment. This decrease in export rate was associated with a sharp increase in leaf starch acccumulation rate. Results were consistent with the hypothesis that starch accumulation occurs at the expense of export under short photoperiods. Galactinol synthase activities did not appear to influence the partitioning of photoassimilates between starch and transport carbohydrates. Sucrose phosphate synthase activities correlated highly with sugar formation rates (sucrose, raffinose, stachyose + assimilate export rate, r = 0.93, α = 0.007). Cucumber leaf sucrose phosphate synthase fluctuated diurnally in a similar pattern to that observed in vegetative soybean plants. PMID:16665742

  19. Differential Allocation to Photosynthetic and Non-Photosynthetic Nitrogen Fractions among Native and Invasive Species

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Jennifer L.; Glenwinkel, Lori A.; Sack, Lawren

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species are expected to cluster on the “high-return” end of the leaf economic spectrum, displaying leaf traits consistent with higher carbon assimilation relative to native species. Intra-leaf nitrogen (N) allocation should support these physiological differences; however, N biochemistry has not been examined in more than a few invasive species. We measured 34 leaf traits including seven leaf N pools for five native and five invasive species from Hawaii under low irradiance to mimic the forest understory environment. We found several trait differences between native and invasive species. In particular, invasive species showed preferential N allocation to metabolism (amino acids) rather than photosynthetic light reactions (membrane-bound protein) by comparison with native species. The soluble protein concentration did not vary between groups. Under these low irradiance conditions, native species had higher light-saturated photosynthetic rates, possibly as a consequence of a greater investment in membrane-bound protein. Invasive species may succeed by employing a wide range of N allocation mechanisms, including higher amino acid production for fast growth under high irradiance or storage of N in leaves as soluble protein or amino acids. PMID:23700483

  20. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2002-10-15

    This report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/2/2001 through 10/01/2002. This report marks the end of year 2 of a three-year project as well as the milestone date for completion of Phase I activities. This report includes our current status and defines the steps being taken to ensure that we meet the project goals by the end of year 3. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below our current efforts are focused on evaluating candidate organisms and growth surfaces, preparing to conduct long-term tests in the bench-scale bioreactor test systems, and scaling-up the test facilities from bench scale to pilot scale. Specific results and accomplishments for the third quarter of 2002 include: Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (1) Test results continue to indicate that thermophilic cyanobacteria have significant advantages as agents for practical photosynthetic CO{sub 2} mitigation before mesophilic forms. (2) Additional thermal features with developed cyanobacterial mats, which might be calcium resistant, were found in YNP. (3) Back to back tests show that there is no detectable difference in the growth of isolate 1.2 s.c. (2) in standard and Ca-modified BG-11 medium. The doubling time for both cases was about 12 hours. (4) The cultivation of cyanobacteria in Ca-BG medium should proceed in the pH range between 7 and 7.4, but this suggestion requires additional experiments. (5) Cyanobacteria can be grown in media where sodium is present at trace levels. (6) Ca{sup 2+} enriched medium can be used as a sink for CO{sub 2} under alkaline conditions. (7) Cyanobacteria are able to generate cones of filaments on travertine surfaces. [Travertine is a mixture of CaCO{sub 3} and CaSO{sub 4}]. We hypothesize that SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} stimulates the generation of such cones, because they are not almost generated on CaCO3 surface. On the other hand, we know that plant gas contains elevated

  1. Carbon Metabolic Pathways in Phototrophic Bacteria and Their Broader Evolutionary Implications

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Tang, Yinjie J.; Blankenship, Robert Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Photosynthesis is the biological process that converts solar energy to biomass, bio-products, and biofuel. It is the only major natural solar energy storage mechanism on Earth. To satisfy the increased demand for sustainable energy sources and identify the mechanism of photosynthetic carbon assimilation, which is one of the bottlenecks in photosynthesis, it is essential to understand the process of solar energy storage and associated carbon metabolism in photosynthetic organisms. Researchers have employed physiological studies, microbiological chemistry, enzyme assays, genome sequencing, transcriptomics, and 13C-based metabolomics/fluxomics to investigate central carbon metabolism and enzymes that operate in phototrophs. In this report, we review diverse CO2 assimilation pathways, acetate assimilation, carbohydrate catabolism, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and some key, and/or unconventional enzymes in central carbon metabolism of phototrophic microorganisms. We also discuss the reducing equivalent flow during photoautotrophic and photoheterotrophic growth, evolutionary links in the central carbon metabolic network, and correlations between photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic organisms. Considering the metabolic versatility in these fascinating and diverse photosynthetic bacteria, many essential questions in their central carbon metabolism still remain to be addressed. PMID:21866228

  2. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2001-04-16

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 1/03/2001 through 4/02/2001. Many of the activities and accomplishments are continuations of work initiated and reported in last quarter's status report. Major activities and accomplishments for this quarter include: Three sites in Yellowstone National Park have been identified that may contain suitable organisms for use in a bioreactor; Full-scale culturing of one thermophilic organism from Yellowstone has progressed to the point that there is a sufficient quantity to test this organism in the model-scale bioreactor; The effects of the additive monoethanolamine on the growth of one thermophilic organism from Yellowstone has been tested; Testing of growth surface adhesion and properties is continuing; Construction of a larger model-scale bioreactor to improve and expand testing capabilities is completed and the facility is undergoing proof tests; Model-scale bioreactor tests examining the effects of CO{sub 2} concentration levels and lighting levels on organism growth rates are continuing; Alternative fiber optic based deep-penetration light delivery systems for use in the pilot-scale bioreactor have been designed, constructed and tested; An existing slug flow reactor system has been modified for use in this project, and a proof-of-concept test plan has been developed for the slug flow reactor; Research and testing of water-jet harvesting techniques is continuing, and a harvesting system has been designed for use in the model-scale bioreactor; and The investigation of comparative digital image analysis as a means for determining the ''density'' of algae on a growth surface is continuing Plans for next quarter's work and an update on the project's web page are included in the conclusions.

  3. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

    2004-01-30

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/2/2003 through 1/1/2004. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we have seen very encouraging results from the model scale tests in terms of organism growth rates and we have begun the final tests necessary to meet our project goals. Specific results and accomplishments for the fourth quarter of 2003 include: (1) Bioreactor support systems and test facilities--(A) The solar collector is working well and has survived the winter weather. (B) The improved high-flow CRF-2 test system has been used successfully to run several long-term growth tests with periodic harvesting events. The high flow harvesting system performed well. The mass measurement results after a 4-week test show 275% growth over the initial mass loading. This figure would have been higher had there been no leakage and handling losses. Carbon dating of biomass from this test is planned for carbon uptake estimation. The next test will include direct measurement of carbon uptake in addition to organism mass measurements. (C) Qualitative organism growth testing has begun in the pilot scale bioreactor. Some issues with uniformity of organism loading, fluid leakage and evaporation have surfaced and are currently being addressed, and quantitative testing will begin as soon as these problems are resolved. (2) Organisms and Growth Surfaces--(A) Montana State University (Subcontracted to do organism studies) submitted their final (3-year) project report. An abstract of the report in included in this quarterly report.

  4. Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

    2003-10-15

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 7/2/2003 through 10/01/2003. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we are preparing for the final tests necessary to meet our project goals. Specific results and accomplishments for the third quarter of 2003 include: (1) Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (A) The solar collector used in the light delivery system showed signs of degradation and hence had to be replaced by ORNL. A set of light readings were taken after the new solar collector was installed. The readings showed an acceptable light profile. (B) The CRF-2 test system has undergone major improvements to produce the high flow rates needed for harvesting (as determined by previous experiments). The main changes to the system are new stainless steel header/frame units with increased flow capacity and a modified pipe end sealing method to improve flow uniformity, and installation and plumbing for a new high flow harvesting pump. The improvements have been completed and the system is ready for testing. (C) The pilot scale bioreactor is ready for testing pending some information from the CRF-2 tests. (2) Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (A) The shape of the Chlorogloeopsis sp. cells (cyanobacteria) was found to be affected by environmental pH, which may be useful in culture quality control. Besides, the further investigation of this phenomenon suggested that the rate of cell adhesion to glass surface decreases upon medium alkalinization. Thus, harvesting effectiveness may be improved by increasing medium pH up to 9 before harvesting of cyanobacteria from a substratum.

  5. Phylogenetic and metabolic diversity of bacteria associated with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Guss, Adam M; Roeselers, Guus; Newton, Irene L G; Young, C Robert; Klepac-Ceraj, Vanja; Lory, Stephen; Cavanaugh, Colleen M

    2011-01-01

    In patients afflicted with cystic fibrosis (CF), morbidity and mortality are primarily associated with the adverse consequences of chronic microbial bronchial infections, which are thought to be caused by a few opportunistic pathogens. However, recent evidence suggests the presence of other microorganisms, which may significantly affect the course and outcome of the infection. Using a combination of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, bacterial culturing and pyrosequencing of barcoded 16S rRNA amplicons, the microbial communities present in CF patient sputum samples were examined. In addition to previously recognized CF pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, >60 phylogenetically diverse bacterial genera that are not typically associated with CF pathogenesis were also detected. A surprisingly large number of fermenting facultative and obligate anaerobes from multiple bacterial phyla was present in each sample. Many of the bacteria and sequences found were normal residents of the oropharyngeal microflora and with many containing opportunistic pathogens. Our data suggest that these undersampled organisms within the CF lung are part of a much more complex microbial ecosystem than is normally presumed. Characterization of these communities is the first step in elucidating potential roles of diverse bacteria in disease progression and to ultimately facilitate advances in CF therapy. PMID:20631810

  6. Novel methylotrophic bacteria isolated from the River Thames (London, UK).

    PubMed

    Boden, Rich; Thomas, Elizabeth; Savani, Parita; Kelly, Donovan P; Wood, Ann P

    2008-12-01

    Enrichment and elective culture for methylotrophs from sediment of the River Thames in central London yielded a diversity of pure cultures representing several genera of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, which were mainly of organisms not generally regarded as typically methylotrophic. Substrates leading to successful isolations included methanol, monomethylamine, dimethylamine, trimethylamine, methanesulfonate and dimethylsulfone. Several isolates were studied in detail and shown by their biochemical and morphological properties and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to be Sphingomonas melonis strain ET35, Mycobacterium fluoranthenivorans strain DSQ3, Rhodococcus erythropolis strain DSQ4, Brevibacterium casei strain MSQ5, Klebsiella oxytoca strains MMA/F and MMA/1, Pseudomonas mendocina strain TSQ4, and Flavobacterium sp. strains MSA/1 and MMA/2. The results show that facultative methylotrophy is present across a wide range of Bacteria, suggesting that turnover of diverse C(1)-compounds is of much greater microbiological and environmental significance than is generally thought. The origins of the genes encoding the enzymes of methylotrophy in diverse heterotrophs need further study, and could further our understanding of the phylogeny and antiquity of methylotrophic systems. PMID:18681896

  7. Effect of sulfide on growth of marine bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mirzoyan, Natella; Schreier, Harold J

    2014-04-01

    Severe hypoxia leads to excess production of hydrogen sulfide in marine environments. In this study, we examined the effect of sulfide on growth of four facultative anaerobic marine bacteria in minimal media under anaerobic conditions. The Gram-negative chemolithoautotrophic Marinobacter sp. tolerated sulfide concentrations up to 0.60 mM, with doubling and lag times increasing as a function of increasing sulfide concentration but with no change in maximum culture yields; growth did not occur at 1.2 mM sulfide. Similar results were obtained for the metabolically diverse Gram-negative denitrifying Pseudomonas stutzeri, except that growth occurred at 1.2 mM and culture yields at 0.60 and 1.2 mM sulfide were approximately 10-fold lower than at sulfide concentrations between 0 and 0.30 mM. Increases in doubling and lag times accompanied by an overall 10-fold decrease in maximum culture yields were found for the Gram-negative chemoheterotrophic Vibrio sp. at all sulfide concentrations tested. In contrast, growth of a Gram-positive chemoheterotrophic Bacillus sp. was resistant to all sulfide concentrations tested (0.15-1.2 mM). Our results highlight the variable responses of marine bacteria to sulfide and provide some insight into shifts that may occur in microbial community structure and diversity as a consequence of changes in sulfide levels that are the result of hypoxia. PMID:24609188

  8. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inside Life Science > Bleach vs. Bacteria Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds ... For Proteins, Form Shapes Function This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  9. Bacteria turn tiny gears

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Swarms of bacteria turn two 380-micron long gears, opening the possibility of building hybrid biological machines at the microscopic scale. Read more at Wired: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/12/bacterial-micro-machine/#more-15684 or Scientific American: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=brownian-motion-bacteria

  10. Translocations of Chromosome End-Segments and Facultative Heterochromatin Promote Meiotic Ring Formation in Evening Primroses[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Golczyk, Hieronim; Massouh, Amid; Greiner, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Due to reciprocal chromosomal translocations, many species of Oenothera (evening primrose) form permanent multichromosomal meiotic rings. However, regular bivalent pairing is also observed. Chiasmata are restricted to chromosomal ends, which makes homologous recombination virtually undetectable. Genetic diversity is achieved by changing linkage relations of chromosomes in rings and bivalents via hybridization and reciprocal translocations. Although the structural prerequisite for this system is enigmatic, whole-arm translocations are widely assumed to be the mechanistic driving force. We demonstrate that this prerequisite is genome compartmentation into two epigenetically defined chromatin fractions. The first one facultatively condenses in cycling cells into chromocenters negative both for histone H3 dimethylated at lysine 4 and for C-banding, and forms huge condensed middle chromosome regions on prophase chromosomes. Remarkably, it decondenses in differentiating cells. The second fraction is euchromatin confined to distal chromosome segments, positive for histone H3 lysine 4 dimethylation and for histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation. The end-segments are deprived of canonical telomeres but capped with constitutive heterochromatin. This genomic organization promotes translocation breakpoints between the two chromatin fractions, thus facilitating exchanges of end-segments. We challenge the whole-arm translocation hypothesis by demonstrating why reciprocal translocations of chromosomal end-segments should strongly promote meiotic rings and evolution toward permanent translocation heterozygosity. Reshuffled end-segments, each possessing a major crossover hot spot, can furthermore explain meiotic compatibility between genomes with different translocation histories. PMID:24681616

  11. Benthic nutrient fluxes and sediment oxygen consumption in a full-scale facultative pond in Patagonia, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Faleschini, M; Esteves, J L

    2013-01-01

    The study of benthic metabolism is an interesting tool to understand the process that occurs in bottom water at wastewater stabilization ponds. Here, rates of benthic oxygen consumption and nutrient exchange across the water-sludge interface were measured in situ using a benthic chamber. The research was carried out during autumn, winter, and summer at a municipal facultative stabilization pond working in a temperate region (Puerto Madryn city, Argentina). Both a site near the raw wastewater inlet (Inlet station) and a site near the outlet (Outlet station) were sampled. Important seasonal and spatial patterns were identified as being related to benthic fluxes. Ammonium release ranged from undetectable (autumn/summer - Inlet station) to +30.7 kg-NH4(+) ha(-1) d(-1) (autumn - Outlet station), denitrification ranged from undetectable (winter - in both sites) to -4.0 kg-NO3(-) ha(-1) d(-1) (autumn - Outlet station), and oxygen consumption ranged from 0.07 kg-O2ha(-1) d(-1) (autumn/summer - Outlet station) to 0.84 kg-O2ha(-1) d(-1) (autumn - Inlet station). During the warmer months, the mineralization of organic matter from the bottom pond acts as a source of nutrients, which seem to support the important development of phytoplankton and nitrification activity recorded in the surface water. Bottom processes could be related to the advanced degree and efficiency of the treatment, the temperature, and probably the strong and frequent wind present in the region. PMID:24185059

  12. Dormancy release and flowering time in Ziziphus jujuba Mill., a "direct flowering" fruit tree, has a facultative requirement for chilling.

    PubMed

    Meir, Michal; Ransbotyn, Vanessa; Raveh, Eran; Barak, Simon; Tel-Zur, Noemi; Zaccai, Michele

    2016-03-15

    In deciduous fruit trees, the effect of chilling on flowering has mostly been investigated in the "indirect flowering" group, characterized by a period of rest between flower bud formation and blooming. In the present study, we explored the effects of chilling and chilling deprivation on the flowering of Ziziphus jujuba, a temperate deciduous fruit tree belonging to the "direct flowering" group, in which flower bud differentiation, blooming and fruit development occur after dormancy release, during a single growing season. Dormancy release, vegetative growth and flowering time in Z. jujuba cv. Ben-Li were assessed following several treatments of chilling. Chilling treatments quantitatively decreased the timing of vegetative bud dormancy release, thereby accelerating flowering, but had no effect on the time from dormancy release to flowering. Trees grown at a constant temperature of 25°C, without chilling, broke dormancy and flowered, indicating the facultative character of chilling in this species. We measured the expression of Z. jujuba LFY and AP1 homologues (ZjLFY and ZjAP1). Chilling decreased ZjLFY expression in dormant vegetative buds but had no effect on ZjAP1expression, which reached peak expression before dormancy release and at anthesis. In conclusion, chilling is not obligatory for dormancy release of Z. jujuba cv. Ben-Li vegetative buds. However, the exposure to chilling during dormancy does accelerate vegetative bud dormancy release and flowering. PMID:26949231

  13. Haustorial Hairs Are Specialized Root Hairs That Support Parasitism in the Facultative Parasitic Plant Phtheirospermum japonicum1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Kei; Toyooka, Kiminori

    2016-01-01

    A haustorium is the unique organ that invades host tissues and establishes vascular connections. Haustorium formation is a key event in parasitism, but its underlying molecular basis is largely unknown. Here, we use Phtheirospermum japonicum, a facultative root parasite in the Orobanchaceae, as a model parasitic plant. We performed a forward genetic screen to identify mutants with altered haustorial morphologies. The development of the haustorium in P. japonicum is induced by host-derived compounds such as 2,6-dimethoxy-p-benzoquinone. After receiving the signal, the parasite root starts to swell to develop a haustorium, and haustorial hairs proliferate to densely cover the haustorium surface. We isolated mutants that show defects in haustorial hair formation and named them haustorial hair defective (hhd) mutants. The hhd mutants are also defective in root hair formation, indicating that haustorial hair formation is controlled by the root hair development program. The internal structures of the haustoria in the hhd mutants are similar to those of the wild type, indicating that the haustorial hairs are not essential for host invasion. However, all the hhd mutants form fewer haustoria than the wild type upon infection of the host roots. The number of haustoria is restored when the host and parasite roots are forced to grow closely together, suggesting that the haustorial hairs play a role in stabilizing the host-parasite association. Thus, our study provides genetic evidence for the regulation and function of haustorial hairs in the parasitic plant. PMID:26712864

  14. Intraspecific variability of the facultative meiotic parthenogenetic root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne graminicola) from rice fields in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Bellafiore, Stéphane; Jougla, Claire; Chapuis, Élodie; Besnard, Guillaume; Suong, Malyna; Vu, Phong Nguyen; De Waele, Dirk; Gantet, Pascal; Thi, Xuyen Ngo

    2015-07-01

    Twenty years ago, the facultative meiotic parthenogenetic root-knot nematode (RKN), Meloidogyne graminicola, was recognised as an important rice pathogen in South Vietnam. Although this country is one of the most important rice exporters worldwide, a comprehensive picture of the occurrence of M. graminicola in Vietnamese rice fields is still not available. Therefore a nematode survey was carried out with the aim of better understanding the geographical distribution, and the pathogenic and genetic variability of the RKN in Vietnam. From the fields surveyed in a range of ecosystems, 21 RKN populations were recovered from infected rice roots. A diagnostic SCAR marker was developed showing that all Vietnamese populations belong to M. graminicola. Furthermore, sequencing of the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) of the rDNA genes confirmed this identification. These populations were then characterised using morphometrics and pathogenicity tests (host plant range diversity, reproduction and virulence diversity) revealing intraspecific variability. We showed that morphometric traits are mainly genetically heritable characters with significant differences among the studied populations. Finally, a distinctive trait signature was found for the populations isolated from the upland rice cultures. All together, our study reveals the prevalence of M. graminicola populations in Vietnamese rice. Further investigations need to be developed to explore the population dynamics and evolutionary history of this species in South East Asia. PMID:26026576

  15. Anaerobic oxidation of arsenite in Mono Lake water and by a facultative, arsenite-oxidizing chemoautotroph, strain MLHE-1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Hoeft, S.E.; Santini, J.M.; Bano, N.; Hollibaugh, R.A.; Hollibaugh, J.T.

    2002-01-01

    Arsenite [As(III)]-enriched anoxic bottom water from Mono Lake, California, produced arsenate [As(V)] during incubation with either nitrate or nitrite. No such oxidation occurred in killed controls or in live samples incubated without added nitrate or nitrite. A small amount of biological As(III) oxidation was observed in samples amended with Fe(III) chelated with nitrolotriacetic acid, although some chemical oxidation was also evident in killed controls. A pure culture, strain MLHE-1, that was capable of growth with As(III) as its electron donor and nitrate as its electron acceptor was isolated in a defined mineral salts medium. Cells were also able to grow in nitrate-mineral salts medium by using H2 or sulfide as their electron donor in lieu of As(III). Arsenite-grown cells demonstrated dark 14CO2 fixation, and PCR was used to indicate the presence of a gene encoding ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Strain MLHE-1 is a facultative chemoautotroph, able to grow with these inorganic electron donors and nitrate as its electron acceptor, but heterotrophic growth on acetate was also observed under both aerobic and anaerobic (nitrate) conditions. Phylogenetic analysis of its 16S ribosomal DNA sequence placed strain MLHE-1 within the haloalkaliphilic Ectothiorhodospira of the ??-Proteobacteria. Arsenite oxidation has never been reported for any members of this subgroup of the Proteobacteria.

  16. Exploring species level taxonomy and species delimitation methods in the facultatively self-fertilizing land snail genus Rumina (gastropoda: pulmonata).

    PubMed

    Prévot, Vanya; Jordaens, Kurt; Sonet, Gontran; Backeljau, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Delimiting species in facultatively selfing taxa is a challenging problem of which the terrestrial pulmonate snail genus Rumina is a good example. These snails have a mixed breeding system and show a high degree of shell and color variation. Three nominal species (R. decollata, R. saharica and R. paivae) and two color morphs within R. decollata (dark and light) are currently recognized. The present study aims at evaluating to what extent these entities reflect evolutionary diverging taxonomic units, rather than fixed polymorphisms due to sustained selfing. Therefore, a phylogenetic analysis of nuclear (ITS1, ITS2) and mitochondrial DNA (COI, CytB, 12S rDNA, 16S rDNA) sequences was performed. Putative species in Rumina, inferred from the mitochondrial DNA phylogeny, were compared with those proposed on the basis of the COI gene by (1) DNA barcoding gap analysis, (2) Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery, (3) the species delimitation plug-in of the Geneious software, (4) the Genealogical Sorting Index, and (5) the General Mixed Yule Coalescent model. It is shown that these methods produce a variety of different species hypotheses and as such one may wonder to what extent species delimitation methods are really useful. With respect to Rumina, the data suggest at least seven species, one corresponding to R. saharica and six that are currently grouped under the name R. decollata. The species-level status of R. paivae is rejected. PMID:23577154

  17. Use of Enzyme Tests in Characterization and Identification of Aerobic and Facultatively Anaerobic Gram-Positive Cocci

    PubMed Central

    Bascomb, Shoshana; Manafi, Mammad

    1998-01-01

    The contribution of enzyme tests to the accurate and rapid routine identification of gram-positive cocci is introduced. The current taxonomy of the genera of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic cocci based on genotypic and phenotypic characterization is reviewed. The clinical and economic importance of members of these taxa is briefly summarized. Tables summarizing test schemes and kits available for the identification of staphylococci, enterococci, and streptococci on the basis of general requirements, number of tests, number of taxa, test classes, and completion times are discussed. Enzyme tests included in each scheme are compared on the basis of their synthetic moiety. The current understanding of the activity of enzymes important for classification and identification of the major groups, methods of testing, and relevance to the ease and speed of identification are reviewed. Publications describing the use of different identification kits are listed, and overall identification successes and problems are discussed. The relationships between the results of conventional biochemical and rapid enzyme tests are described and considered. The use of synthetic substrates for the detection of glycosidases and peptidases is reviewed, and the advantages of fluorogenic synthetic moieties are discussed. The relevance of enzyme tests to accurate and meaningful rapid routine identification is discussed. PMID:9564566

  18. Suigetsumonas clinomigrationis gen. et sp. nov., a Novel Facultative Anaerobic Nanoflagellate Isolated from the Meromictic Lake Suigetsu, Japan.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Takahiko; Kondo, Ryuji

    2015-09-01

    A novel facultative anaerobic bacterivorous nanoflagellate was isolated from the water just below the permanent oxic-anoxic interface of the meromictic Lake Suigetsu, Japan. We characterized the isolate using light and transmission electron microscopy and molecular phylogenetic analyses inferred from 18S rDNA sequences. The phylogenetic analyses showed that the isolate belonged to class Placididea (stramenopiles). The isolate showed key ultrastructural features of the Placididea, such as flagellar hairs with two unequal terminal filaments, microtubular root 2 changing in shape from an arced to an acute-angled shape, and a lack of an x-fiber in root 2. However, the isolate had a single helix in the flagellar transition region, which is a double helix in the two known placidid nanoflagellates Placidia cafeteriopsis and Wobblia lunata. Moreover, the isolate had different intracellular features compared with these two genera, such as the arrangement of basal bodies, the components of the flagellar apparatus, the number of mitochondria, and the absence (or presence) of paranuclear bodies. The 18S rDNA sequence was also phylogenetically distant from the clades of the known Placididae W. lunata and P. cafeteriopsis. Consequently, the newly isolated nanoflagellate was described as Suigetsumonas clinomigrationis gen. et sp. nov. PMID:26202992

  19. Reduction of Cr(VI) under acidic conditions by the facultative Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Acidiphilium cryptum

    SciTech Connect

    David E. Cummings; Scott Fendorf; Rajesh K. Sani; Brent M. Peyton; Timothy S. Magnuson

    2007-01-01

    The potential for biological reduction of Cr(VI) under acidic conditions was evaluated with the acidophilic, facultatively metal-reducing bacterium Acidiphilium cryptum strain JF-5 to explore the role of acidophilic microorganisms in the Cr cycle in low-pH environments. An anaerobic suspension of washed A. cryptum cells rapidly reduced 50 M Cr(VI) at pH 3.2; biological reduction was detected from pH 1.7-4.7. The reduction product, confirmed by XANES analysis, was entirely Cr(III) that was associated predominantly with the cell biomass (70-80%) with the residual residing in the aqueous phase. Reduction of Cr(VI) showed a pH optimum similar to that for growth and was inhibited by 5 mM HgCl2, suggesting that the reaction was enzyme-mediated. Introduction of O2 into the reaction medium slowed the reduction rate only slightly, whereas soluble Fe(III) (as ferric sulfate) increased the rate dramatically, presumably by the shuttling of electrons from bioreduced Fe(II) to Cr(VI) in a coupled biotic-abiotic cycle. Starved cells could not reduce Cr(VI) when provided as sole electron acceptor, indicating that Cr(VI) reduction is not an energy-conserving process in A. cryptum. We speculate, rather, that Cr(VI) reduction is used here as a detoxification mechanism.

  20. Carnobacterium pleistocenium sp. nov., a novel psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe isolated from permafrost of the Fox Tunnel in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Bej, Asim; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Hoover, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    A novel, psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe, strain FTRl, was isolated from Pleistocene ice from the permafrost tunnel in Fox, Alaska. Gram-positive, motile, rod-shaped cells were observed with sizes 0(raised dot)6-0(raised dot)7 x 0(raised dot)9-1(raised dot)5 microns. Growth occurred within the pH range 6(raised dot)5-9(raised dot)5 with optimum growth at pH 7(raised dot)3-7(raised dot)5. The temperature range for growth of the novel isolate was 0-28 C and optimum growth occurred at 24 C. The novel isolate does not require NaCl; growth was observed between 0 and 5% NaCl with optimum growth at 0(raised dot)5% (w/v). The novel isolate was a catalase-negative chemoorganoheterotroph that used as substrates sugars and some products of proteolysis. The metabolic end products were acetate, ethanol and CO2. Strain FTRl was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, kanamycin and gentamicin. 16s rRNA gene sequence analysis showed 99(raised dot)8% similarity between strain FTR1 and Carnobacterium alterfunditum, but DNA-DNA hybridization between them demonstrated 39 plus or minus 1(raised dot)5% relatedness. On the basis of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, it is proposed that strain FTRl (= ATCC BAA-754T= JCM 12174T=CIP 108033) be assigned to the novel species Carnobacterium pleistocenium sp. nov.

  1. Complete genome sequence of the facultatively chemolithoautotrophic and methylotrophic alpha Proteobacterium Starkeya novella type strain (ATCC 8093T)

    SciTech Connect

    Kappler, Ulrike; Davenport, Karen W.; Beatson, Scott; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Berry, Kerrie W.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Hammon, Nancy; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Richardson, P M; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Detter, J. Chris; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Goker, Markus; Ivanova, N; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Starkeya novella (Starkey 1934) Kelly et al. 2000 is a member of the family Xanthobacteraceae in the order Rhizobiales , which is thus far poorly characterized at the genome level. Cultures from this spe- cies are most interesting due to their facultatively chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle, which allows them to both consume carbon dioxide and to produce it. This feature makes S. novella an interesting model or- ganism for studying the genomic basis of regulatory networks required for the switch between con- sumption and production of carbon dioxide, a key component of the global carbon cycle. In addition, S. novella is of interest for its ability to grow on various inorganic sulfur compounds and several C1- compounds such as methanol. Besides Azorhizobium caulinodans, S. novella is only the second spe- cies in the family Xanthobacteraceae with a completely sequenced genome of a type strain. The cur- rent taxonomic classification of this group is in significant conflict with the 16S rRNA data. The ge- nomic data indicate that the physiological capabilities of the organism might have been underestimat- ed. The 4,765,023 bp long chromosome with its 4,511 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes was se- quenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2008.

  2. Exploring Species Level Taxonomy and Species Delimitation Methods in the Facultatively Self-Fertilizing Land Snail Genus Rumina (Gastropoda: Pulmonata)

    PubMed Central

    Prévot, Vanya; Jordaens, Kurt; Sonet, Gontran; Backeljau, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Delimiting species in facultatively selfing taxa is a challenging problem of which the terrestrial pulmonate snail genus Rumina is a good example. These snails have a mixed breeding system and show a high degree of shell and color variation. Three nominal species (R. decollata, R. saharica and R. paivae) and two color morphs within R. decollata (dark and light) are currently recognized. The present study aims at evaluating to what extent these entities reflect evolutionary diverging taxonomic units, rather than fixed polymorphisms due to sustained selfing. Therefore, a phylogenetic analysis of nuclear (ITS1, ITS2) and mitochondrial DNA (COI, CytB, 12S rDNA, 16S rDNA) sequences was performed. Putative species in Rumina, inferred from the mitochondrial DNA phylogeny, were compared with those proposed on the basis of the COI gene by (1) DNA barcoding gap analysis, (2) Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery, (3) the species delimitation plug-in of the Geneious software, (4) the Genealogical Sorting Index, and (5) the General Mixed Yule Coalescent model. It is shown that these methods produce a variety of different species hypotheses and as such one may wonder to what extent species delimitation methods are really useful. With respect to Rumina, the data suggest at least seven species, one corresponding to R. saharica and six that are currently grouped under the name R. decollata. The species-level status of R. paivae is rejected. PMID:23577154

  3. Intermediary Metabolism in Protists: a Sequence-based View of Facultative Anaerobic Metabolism in Evolutionarily Diverse Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Ginger, Michael L.; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K.; Fulton, Chandler; Cande, W. Zacheus; Dawson, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Protists account for the bulk of eukaryotic diversity. Through studies of gene and especially genome sequences the molecular basis for this diversity can be determined. Evident from genome sequencing are examples of versatile metabolism that go far beyond the canonical pathways described for eukaryotes in textbooks. In the last 2–3 years, genome sequencing and transcript profiling has unveiled several examples of heterotrophic and phototrophic protists that are unexpectedly well-equipped for ATP production using a facultative anaerobic metabolism, including some protists that can (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) or are predicted (Naegleria gruberi, Acanthamoeba castellanii, Amoebidium parasiticum) to produce H2 in their metabolism. It is possible that some enzymes of anaerobic metabolism were acquired and distributed among eukaryotes by lateral transfer, but it is also likely that the common ancestor of eukaryotes already had far more metabolic versatility than was widely thought a few years ago. The discussion of core energy metabolism in unicellular eukaryotes is the subject of this review. Since genomic sequencing has so far only touched the surface of protist diversity, it is anticipated that sequences of additional protists may reveal an even wider range of metabolic capabilities, while simultaneously enriching our understanding of the early evolution of eukaryotes. PMID:21036663

  4. Carnobacterium pleistocenium sp. nov., a novel psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe isolated from permafrost of the Fox Tunnel in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Bej, Asim; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Hoover, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    A novel, psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe, strain FTR1T, was isolated from Pleistocene ice from the permafrost tunnel in Fox, Alaska. Gram-positive, motile, rod-shaped cells were observed with sizes 0.6-0.7 x 0.9-1.5 microm. Growth occurred within the pH range 6.5-9.5 with optimum growth at pH 7.3-7.5. The temperature range for growth of the novel isolate was 0-28 degrees C and optimum growth occurred at 24 degrees C. The novel isolate does not require NaCl; growth was observed between 0 and 5 % NaCl with optimum growth at 0.5 % (w/v). The novel isolate was a catalase-negative chemoorganoheterotroph that used as substrates sugars and some products of proteolysis. The metabolic end products were acetate, ethanol and CO2. Strain FTR1T was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, kanamycin and gentamicin. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed 99.8 % similarity between strain FTR1T and Carnobacterium alterfunditum, but DNA-DNA hybridization between them demonstrated 39+/-1.5 % relatedness. On the basis of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, it is proposed that strain FTR1T (=ATCC BAA-754T=JCM 12174T=CIP 108033T) be assigned to the novel species Carnobacterium pleistocenium sp. nov.

  5. Carnobacterium Pleistocaenium sp. nov.: A Novel Psychrotolerant, Facultative Anaerobe Isolated from Permafrost of the Fox Tunnel in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Bej, Asim; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    A novel, psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe, strain FTRIT1(sup T), was isolated from Pleistocene ice from the permafrost tunnel in Fox, Alaska. Gram-positive, motile, rod-shaped cells with sizes 0.6-0.7 x 0.9-1.5 micrometers were observed. Growth occurred within the pH range 6.5-9.5 and optimum at pH 7.3-7.5. The temperature range of the new isolate was 0-28 C and optimum growth occurred at 24 C. The novel isolate requires NaCl (growth absent at 0 %) and growth was observed between 0 and 5% NaCl with optimum at 0.5% (w/v). The new isolate was a catalase-negative chemoorganoheterotroph that used as substrates sugars and some products of proteolysis. The metabolic end products were: acetate, ethanol and CO2. Strain FTRl was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampin, kanamycin, and gentamycin. The 16S rDNA sequence analysis showed 99.8% similarity of strain FTR1 with Carnobacterium alterfunditum, but the DNA-DNA hybridization between them demonstrated 39 plus or minus 5% homology. On the basis of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, it is proposed that the strain FTR1(sup T) (= ATCC BAA-754(sup T) = JSM 12174(sup T) is assigned to the new species of the genus Carnobacterium with proposed name Carnobacterium pleistocaenium sp. nov.

  6. Auracyanin A from the thermophilic green gliding photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus represents an unusual class of small blue copper proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Van Driessche, G.; Hu, W.; Van de Werken, G.; Selvaraj, F.; McManus, J. D.; Blankenship, R. E.; Van Beeumen, J. J.

    1999-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of the small copper protein auracyanin A isolated from the thermophilic photosynthetic green bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus has been determined to be a polypeptide of 139 residues. His58, Cys123, His128, and Met132 are spaced in a way to be expected if they are the evolutionary conserved metal ligands as in the known small copper proteins plastocyanin and azurin. Secondary structure prediction also indicates that auracyanin has a general beta-barrel structure similar to that of azurin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and plastocyanin from poplar leaves. However, auracyanin appears to have sequence characteristics of both small copper protein sequence classes. The overall similarity with a consensus sequence of azurin is roughly the same as that with a consensus sequence of plastocyanin, namely 30.5%. We suggest that auracyanin A, together with the B forms, is the first example of a new class of small copper proteins that may be descendants of an ancestral sequence to both the azurin proteins occurring in prokaryotic nonphotosynthetic bacteria and the plastocyanin proteins occurring in both prokaryotic cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae and plants. The N-terminal sequence region 1-18 of auracyanin is remarkably rich in glycine and hydroxy amino acids, and required mass spectrometric analysis to be determined. The nature of the blocking group X is not yet known, although its mass has been determined to be 220 Da. The auracyanins are the first small blue copper proteins found and studied in anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria and are likely to mediate electron transfer between the cytochrome bc1 complex and the photosynthetic reaction center. PMID:10338005

  7. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria Isolated From Surgical Site Infection of Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghotaslou, Reza; Beheshtirouy, Samad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Asghari, Babak; Alizadeh, Naser; Toloue Ostadgavahi, Ali; Sorayaei Somesaraei, Vida; Memar, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) are infections of incision or deep tissue at operation sites. These infections prolong hospitalization, delay wound healing, and increase the overall cost and morbidity. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate anaerobic and aerobic bacteria prevalence in surgical site infections and determinate antibiotic susceptibility pattern in these isolates. Materials and Methods: One hundred SSIs specimens were obtained by needle aspiration from purulent material in depth of infected site. These specimens were cultured and incubated in both aerobic and anaerobic condition. For detection of antibiotic susceptibility pattern in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, we used disk diffusion, agar dilution, and E-test methods. Results: A total of 194 bacterial strains were isolated from 100 samples of surgical sites. Predominant aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria isolated from these specimens were the members of Enterobacteriaceae family (66, 34.03%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26, 13.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (24, 12.37%), Acinetobacter spp. (18, 9.28%), Enterococcus spp. (16, 8.24%), coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. (14, 7.22%) and nonhemolytic streptococci (2, 1.03%). Bacteroides fragilis (26, 13.4%), and Clostridium perfringens (2, 1.03%) were isolated as anaerobic bacteria. The most resistant bacteria among anaerobic isolates were B. fragilis. All Gram-positive isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid while most of Enterobacteriaceae showed sensitivity to imipenem. Conclusions: Most SSIs specimens were polymicrobial and predominant anaerobic isolate was B. fragilis. Isolated aerobic and anaerobic strains showed high level of resistance to antibiotics. PMID:26421133

  8. Isotope Ratios of Cellulose from Plants Having Different Photosynthetic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, Leonel O.; Deniro, Michael J.; Johnson, Hyrum B.

    1984-01-01

    Hydrogen and carbon isotope ratios of cellulose nitrate and oxygen isotope ratios of cellulose from C3, C4, and Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants were determined for plants growing within a small area in Val Verde County, Texas. Plants having CAM had distinctly higher deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratios than plants having C3 and C4 metabolism. When hydrogen isotope ratios are plotted against carbon isotope ratios, each photosynthetic mode separates into a distinct cluster of points. C4 plants had many D/H ratios similar to those of C3 plants, so that hydrogen isotope ratios cannot be used to distinguish between these two photosynthetic modes. Portulaca mundula, which may have a modified photosynthetic mode between C4 and CAM, had a hydrogen isotope ratio between those of the C4 and CAM plants. When oxygen isotope ratios are plotted against carbon isotope ratios, no distinct clustering of the C4 and CAM plants occurs. Thus, oxygen isotope ratios are not useful in distinguishing between these metabolic modes. A plot of hydrogen isotope ratios versus oxygen isotope ratios for this sample set shows considerable overlap between oxygen isotope ratios of the different photosynthetic modes without a concomitant overlap in the hydrogen isotope ratios of CAM and the other two photosynthetic modes. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that higher D/H ratios in CAM plants relative to C3 and C4 plants are due to isotopic fractionations occurring during biochemical reactions. PMID:16663460

  9. Principles of light harvesting from single photosynthetic complexes

    PubMed Central

    Schlau-Cohen, G. S.

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic systems harness sunlight to power most life on Earth. In the initial steps of photosynthetic light harvesting, absorbed energy is converted to chemical energy with near-unity quantum efficiency. This is achieved by an efficient, directional and regulated flow of energy through a network of proteins. Here, we discuss the following three key principles of this flow and of photosynthetic light harvesting: thermal fluctuations of the protein structure; intrinsic conformational switches with defined functional consequences; and environmentally triggered conformational switches. Through these principles, photosynthetic systems balance two types of operational costs: metabolic costs, or the cost of maintaining and running the molecular machinery, and opportunity costs, or the cost of losing any operational time. Understanding how the molecular machinery and dynamics are designed to balance these costs may provide a blueprint for improved artificial light-harvesting devices. With a multi-disciplinary approach combining knowledge of biology, this blueprint could lead to low-cost and more effective solar energy conversion. Photosynthetic systems achieve widespread light harvesting across the Earth's surface; in the face of our growing energy needs, this is functionality we need to replicate, and perhaps emulate. PMID:26052423

  10. Principles of light harvesting from single photosynthetic complexes.

    PubMed

    Schlau-Cohen, G S

    2015-06-01

    Photosynthetic systems harness sunlight to power most life on Earth. In the initial steps of photosynthetic light harvesting, absorbed energy is converted to chemical energy with near-unity quantum efficiency. This is achieved by an efficient, directional and regulated flow of energy through a network of proteins. Here, we discuss the following three key principles of this flow and of photosynthetic light harvesting: thermal fluctuations of the protein structure; intrinsic conformational switches with defined functional consequences; and environmentally triggered conformational switches. Through these principles, photosynthetic systems balance two types of operational costs: metabolic costs, or the cost of maintaining and running the molecular machinery, and opportunity costs, or the cost of losing any operational time. Understanding how the molecular machinery and dynamics are designed to balance these costs may provide a blueprint for improved artificial light-harvesting devices. With a multi-disciplinary approach combining knowledge of biology, this blueprint could lead to low-cost and more effective solar energy conversion. Photosynthetic systems achieve widespread light harvesting across the Earth's surface; in the face of our growing energy needs, this is functionality we need to replicate, and perhaps emulate. PMID:26052423

  11. Photosynthetic terpene hydrocarbon production for fuels and chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X; Ort, DR; Yuan, JS

    2015-01-28

    Photosynthetic hydrocarbon production bypasses the traditional biomass hydrolysis process and represents the most direct conversion of sunlight energy into the next-generation biofuels. As a major class of biologically derived hydrocarbons with diverse structures, terpenes are also valuable in producing a variety of fungible bioproducts in addition to the advanced drop-in' biofuels. However, it is highly challenging to achieve the efficient redirection of photosynthetic carbon and reductant into terpene biosynthesis. In this review, we discuss four major scientific and technical barriers for photosynthetic terpene production and recent advances to address these constraints. Collectively, photosynthetic terpene production needs to be optimized in a systematic fashion, in which the photosynthesis improvement, the optimization of terpene biosynthesis pathway, the improvement of key enzymes and the enhancement of sink effect through terpene storage or secretion are all important. New advances in synthetic biology also offer a suite of potential tools to design and engineer photosynthetic terpene platforms. The systemic integration of these solutions may lead to disruptive' technologies to enable biofuels and bioproducts with high efficiency, yield and infrastructure compatibility.

  12. Photosynthetic biomaterials: a pathway towards autotrophic tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Schenck, Thilo Ludwig; Hopfner, Ursula; Chávez, Myra Noemi; Machens, Hans-Günther; Somlai-Schweiger, Ian; Giunta, Riccardo Enzo; Bohne, Alexandra Viola; Nickelsen, Jörg; Allende, Miguel L; Egaña, José Tomás

    2015-03-01

    Engineered tissues are highly limited by poor vascularization in vivo, leading to hypoxia. In order to overcome this challenge, we propose the use of photosynthetic biomaterials to provide oxygen. Since photosynthesis is the original source of oxygen for living organisms, we suggest that this could be a novel approach to provide a constant source of oxygen supply independently of blood perfusion. In this study we demonstrate that bioartificial scaffolds can be loaded with a solution containing the photosynthetic microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, showing high biocompatibility and photosynthetic activity in vitro. Furthermore, when photosynthetic biomaterials were engrafted in a mouse full skin defect, we observed that the presence of the microalgae did not trigger a native immune response in the host. Moreover, the analyses showed that the algae survived for at least 5 days in vivo, generating chimeric tissues comprised of algae and murine cells. The results of this study represent a crucial step towards the establishment of autotrophic tissue engineering approaches and suggest the use of photosynthetic cells to treat a broad spectrum of hypoxic conditions. PMID:25536030

  13. Growth and photosynthetic responses of wheat plants grown in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathy, B. C.; Brown, C. S.; Levine, H. G.; Krikorian, A. D.

    1996-01-01

    Growth and photosynthesis of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Super Dwarf) plants grown onboard the space shuttle Discovery for 10 d were examined. Compared to ground control plants, the shoot fresh weight of space-grown seedlings decreased by 25%. Postflight measurements of the O2 evolution/photosynthetic photon flux density response curves of leaf samples revealed that the CO2-saturated photosynthetic rate at saturating light intensities in space-grown plants declined 25% relative to the rate in ground control plants. The relative quantum yield of CO2-saturated photosynthetic O2 evolution measured at limiting light intensities was not significantly affected. In space-grown plants, the light compensation point of the leaves increased by 33%, which likely was due to an increase (27%) in leaf dark-respiration rates. Related experiments with thylakoids isolated from space-grown plants showed that the light-saturated photosynthetic electron transport rate from H2O through photosystems II and I was reduced by 28%. These results demonstrate that photosynthetic functions are affected by the microgravity environment.

  14. Biological optimization systems for enhancing photosynthetic efficiency and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Ryan W.; Chinnasamy, Senthil; Das, Keshav C.; de Mattos, Erico Rolim

    2012-11-06

    Biological optimization systems for enhancing photosynthetic efficiency and methods of use. Specifically, methods for enhancing photosynthetic efficiency including applying pulsed light to a photosynthetic organism, using a chlorophyll fluorescence feedback control system to determine one or more photosynthetic efficiency parameters, and adjusting one or more of the photosynthetic efficiency parameters to drive the photosynthesis by the delivery of an amount of light to optimize light absorption of the photosynthetic organism while providing enough dark time between light pulses to prevent oversaturation of the chlorophyll reaction centers are disclosed.

  15. Carotenoid Photoprotection in Artificial Photosynthetic Antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Kloz, Miroslav; Pillai, Smitha; Kodis, Gerdenis; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A.; Moore, Ana L.; van Grondelle, Rienk; Kennis, John T. M.

    2011-04-14

    . These synthetic systems are providing a deeper understanding of structural and environmental effects on the interactions between carotenoids and tetrapyrroles and thereby better defining their role in controlling natural photosynthetic systems.

  16. Inactivation of biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    LeChevallier, M W; Cawthon, C D; Lee, R G

    1988-01-01

    The current project was developed to examine inactivation of biofilm bacteria and to characterize the interaction of biocides with pipe surfaces. Unattached bacteria were quite susceptible to the variety of disinfectants tested. Viable bacterial counts were reduced 99% by exposure to 0.08 mg of hypochlorous acid (pH 7.0) per liter (1 to 2 degrees C) for 1 min. For monochloramine, 94 mg/liter was required to kill 99% of the bacteria within 1 min. These results were consistent with those found by other investigators. Biofilm bacteria grown on the surfaces of granular activated carbon particles, metal coupons, or glass microscope slides were 150 to more than 3,000 times more resistant to hypochlorous acid (free chlorine, pH 7.0) than were unattached cells. In contrast, resistance of biofilm bacteria to monochloramine disinfection ranged from 2- to 100-fold more than that of unattached cells. The results suggested that, relative to inactivation of unattached bacteria, monochloramine was better able to penetrate and kill biofilm bacteria than free chlorine. For free chlorine, the data indicated that transport of the disinfectant into the biofilm was a major rate-limiting factor. Because of this phenomenon, increasing the level of free chlorine did not increase disinfection efficiency. Experiments where equal weights of disinfectants were used suggested that the greater penetrating power of monochloramine compensated for its limited disinfection activity. These studies showed that monochloramine was as effective as free chlorine for inactivation of biofilm bacteria. The research provides important insights into strategies for control of biofilm bacteria. Images PMID:2849380

  17. Viable Bacteria Associated with Red Blood Cells and Plasma in Freshly Drawn Blood Donations

    PubMed Central

    Damgaard, Christian; Magnussen, Karin; Enevold, Christian; Nilsson, Martin; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Holmstrup, Palle; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Infection remains a leading cause of post-transfusion mortality and morbidity. Bacterial contamination is, however, detected in less than 0.1% of blood units tested. The aim of the study was to identify viable bacteria in standard blood-pack units, with particular focus on bacteria from the oral cavity, and to determine the distribution of bacteria revealed in plasma and in the red blood cell (RBC)-fraction. Design Cross-sectional study. Blood were separated into plasma and RBC-suspensions, which were incubated anaerobically or aerobically for 7 days on trypticase soy blood agar (TSA) or blue lactose plates. For identification colony PCR was performed using primers targeting 16S rDNA. Setting Blood donors attending Capital Region Blood Bank, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Hvidovre, Denmark, October 29th to December 10th 2013. Participants 60 donors (≥50 years old), self-reported medically healthy. Results Bacterial growth was observed on plates inoculated with plasma or RBCs from 62% of the blood donations. Growth was evident in 21 (35%) of 60 RBC-fractions and in 32 (53%) of 60 plasma-fractions versus 8 of 60 negative controls (p = 0.005 and p = 2.6x10-6, respectively). Propionibacterium acnes was found in 23% of the donations, and Staphylococcus epidermidis in 38%. The majority of bacteria identified in the present study were either facultative anaerobic (59.5%) or anaerobic (27.8%) species, which are not likely to be detected during current routine screening. Conclusions Viable bacteria are present in blood from donors self-reported as medically healthy, indicating that conventional test systems employed by blood banks insufficiently detect bacteria in plasma. Further investigation is needed to determine whether routine testing for anaerobic bacteria and testing of RBC-fractions for adherent bacteria should be recommended. PMID:25751254

  18. Toward extending photosynthetic biosignatures: quantum dynamics calculation of light harvesting complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Yu; Umemura, Masayuki; Shoji, Mitsuo; Kayanuma, Megumi; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Kenji

    For detecting life from reflectance spectra on extrasolar planets, several indicators called surface biosignatures have been proposed. One of them is the vegetation red edge (VRE) which derives from surface vegetation. VRE is observed in 700-750 nm on the Earth, but there is no guarantee that exovegetation show the red edge in this wavelength. Therefore it is necessary to check the validity of current standards of VRE as the signatures. In facts, M stars (cooler than Sun) will be the main targets in future missions, it is significantly important to know on the fundamental mechanisms in photosynthetic organism such as purple bacteria which absorb longer wavelength radiation. We investigated light absorptions and excitation energy transfers (EETs) in light harvesting complexes in purple bacteria (LH2s) by using quantum dynamics simulations. In LH2, effective EET is accomplished by corporative electronic excitation of the pigments. In our theoretical model, a dipole-dipole approximation was used for the electronic interactions between pigment excitations. Quantum dynamics simulations were performed according to Liouville equation to examine the EET process. The calculated oscillator strength and the transfer time between LH2 were good agreement with the experimental values. As the system size increases, the absorption bands shifted longer and the transfer velocities became larger. When two pigments in a LHC were exchanged to another pigments with lower excitation energy, faster and intensive light collection were observed.

  19. Interactions Between Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Strains Improve CO₂ Fixing Efficiency of Non-photosynthetic Microbial Communities.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiajun; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Shiping; Xi, Xuefei; Le, Yiquan; Fu, Xiaohua; Tsang, Yiufai; Gao, Mintian

    2015-07-01

    Five autotrophic strains isolated from non-photosynthetic microbial communities (NPMCs), which were screened from oceans with high CO2 fixing capability, were identified as Ochrobactrum sp. WH-2, Stenotrophomonas sp. WH-11, Ochrobactrum sp. WH-13, Castellaniella sp. WH-14, and Sinomicrobium oceani WH-15. The CO2 fixation pathways of all these strains were Calvin-Benson-Bassham pathway. These strains could metabolize multifarious organic compounds, which allowed switching them to autotrophic culture after enrichment in heterotrophic culture. The central composite response surface method indicated that these strains possessed many interactive effects, which increased the CO2 fixing efficiency of a combined community composed of these strains by 56 %, when compared with that of the single strain. Furthermore, another combined community composed of these autotrophic strains and NPMC had richer interactive relationships, with CO2 fixing efficiency being 894 % higher than that of the single strain and 148 % higher than the theoretical sum of the CO2 fixing efficiency of each of its microbial components. The interaction between strictly heterotrophic bacteria in NPMC and isolated autotrophic strains played a crucial role in improving the CO2 fixing efficiency, which not only eliminated self-restraint of organic compounds generated during the growth of autotrophic bacteria but also promoted its autotrophic pathway. PMID:25947620

  20. Timecourse analysis of photosynthetic microbial communities that degrade cellulose and fix nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, A.; van der Heyde, R.; Sheets, M.; Zhang, L.; Wang, Y.; Liu, X.; Slikas, B.; Amaral-Zettler, L. A.; Huang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Cellulose is an abundant polymer derived from plant matter and it is also a nitrogen poor resource. Nutrient cycling is carried out by microbial communities in nature, and bacteria that degrade cellulose must be able to obtain a source of fixed nitrogen for growth. We used light wavelength selection to enrich for a series of anoxygenic photosynthetic microbial communities from marine and freshwater environments that degrade cellulose and fix nitrogen. This research examines how the communities carry out these processes. We compare community composition and metabolite production measured using high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography over time of growth of the communities. A freshwater community grown at 590nm showed the highest metabolic rates. Acetate and propionate reached maximum concentration at around day 4 and hydrogen concentrations peaked at 5uM on day 6 at stationary phase. There was no methane production by this culture suggesting methanogens were not present or inactive. In contrast, methanogenesis was very active in another freshwater community grown at 760/940nm. This culture showed acetate and propionate accumulation and hydrogen gas concentrations that decreased over time as well suggesting that hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was occurring. A similar trend was observed in a marine community grown at 470nm. This work can enable determination of factors important for efficient community nutrient cycling and understanding of community dynamics. Future work will be done to determine the roles of the individual species of bacteria within the communities and to investigate the potential of these communities in biofuel production.

  1. Photosynthetic light reactions: integral to chloroplast retrograde signalling.

    PubMed

    Gollan, Peter J; Tikkanen, Mikko; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2015-10-01

    Chloroplast retrograde signalling is ultimately dependent on the function of the photosynthetic light reactions and not only guides the acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus to changing environmental and metabolic cues, but has a much wider influence on the growth and development of plants. New information generated during the past few years about regulation of photosynthetic light reactions and identification of the underlying regulatory proteins has paved the way towards better understanding of the signalling molecules produced in chloroplasts upon changes in the environment. Likewise, the availability of various mutants lacking regulatory functions has made it possible to address the role of excitation energy distribution and electron flow in the thylakoid membrane in inducing the retrograde signals from chloroplasts to the nucleus. Such signalling molecules also induce and interact with hormonal signalling cascades to provide comprehensive information from chloroplasts to the nucleus. PMID:26318477

  2. Superradiance Transition and Nonphotochemical Quenching in Photosynthetic Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Gennady Petrovich; Nesterov, Alexander; Lopez, Gustavo; Sayre, Richard Thomas

    2015-04-23

    Photosynthetic organisms have evolved protective strategies to allow them to survive in cases of intense sunlight fluctuation with the development of nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ). This process allows light harvesting complexes to transfer the excess sunlight energy to non-damaging quenching channels. This report compares the NPQ process with the superradiance transition (ST). We demonstrated that the maximum of the NPQ efficiency is caused by the ST to the sink associated with the CTS. However, experimental verifications are required in order to determine whether or not the NPQ regime is associated with the ST transition for real photosynthetic complexes. Indeed, it can happen that, in the photosynthetic apparatus, the NPQ regime occurs in the “non-optimal” region of parameters, and it could be independent of the ST.

  3. Tracking photosynthetic efficiency with narrow-band spectroradiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamon, John A.; Field, Christopher B.

    1992-01-01

    Narrow-waveband spectroradiometry presents the possibility of detecting subtle signals closely related to the current physiological state of vegetation. One such signal related to the epoxidation state of the xanthophyll cycle pigments, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin is discussed. Recent advances in plant ecophysiology demonstrated a close relationship between these pigments and the regulatory state of photosystem 2 in photosynthesis. Our recent field studies of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) and oak (Quercus agrifolia) demonstrated that a 'xanthophyll signal' can be isolated from the diurnal reflectance spectra of intact canopies. Furthermore, the xanthophyll signal can be used to derive a 'physiological reflectance index' (PRI) that closely correlates with the actual photosynthetic efficiency (defined as the photosynthetic rate divided by the incident PAR) in closed canopies. If these signals were detectable in Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometers (AVIRIS) images, they could lead to improved remote estimates of photosynthetic fluxes.

  4. Multidrug Resistance in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Large amounts of antibiotics used for human therapy, as well as for farm animals and even for fish in aquaculture, resulted in the selection of pathogenic bacteria resistant to multiple drugs. Multidrug resistance in bacteria may be generated by one of two mechanisms. First, these bacteria may accumulate multiple genes, each coding for resistance to a single drug, within a single cell. This accumulation occurs typically on resistance (R) plasmids. Second, multidrug resistance may also occur by the increased expression of genes that code for multidrug efflux pumps, extruding a wide range of drugs. This review discusses our current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms involved in both types of resistance. PMID:19231985

  5. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Korp, Juliane; Vela Gurovic, María S

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism. PMID:27340451

  6. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria.

    PubMed

    Korp, Juliane; Vela Gurovic, María S; Nett, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism. PMID:27340451

  7. Carbon flow of heliobacteria is related more to clostridia than to the green sulfur bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Feng, Xueyang; Zhuang, Wei-Qin; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa; Blankenship, Robert E; Tang, Yinjie J

    2010-11-01

    The recently discovered heliobacteria are the only Gram-positive photosynthetic bacteria that have been cultured. One of the unique features of heliobacteria is that they have properties of both the photosynthetic green sulfur bacteria (containing the type I reaction center) and Clostridia (forming heat-resistant endospores). Most of the previous studies of heliobacteria, which are strict anaerobes and have the simplest known photosynthetic apparatus, have focused on energy and electron transfer processes. It has been assumed that like green sulfur bacteria, the major carbon flow in heliobacteria is through the (incomplete) reductive (reverse) tricarboxylic acid cycle, whereas the lack of CO(2)-enhanced growth has not been understood. Here, we report studies to fill the knowledge gap of heliobacterial carbon metabolism. We confirm that the CO(2)-anaplerotic pathway is active during phototrophic growth and that isoleucine is mainly synthesized from the citramalate pathway. Furthermore, to our surprise, our results suggest that the oxidative (forward) TCA cycle is operative and more active than the previously reported reductive (reverse) tricarboxylic acid cycle. Both isotopomer analysis and activity assays suggest that citrate is produced by a putative (Re)-citrate synthase and then enters the oxidative (forward) TCA cycle. Moreover, in contrast to (Si)-citrate synthase, (Re)-citrate synthase produces a different isomer of 2-fluorocitrate that is not expected to inhibit the activity of aconitase. PMID:20807773

  8. Plutonium Oxidation State Distribution under Aerobic and Anaerobic Subsurface Conditions for Metal-Reducing Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, D. T.; Swanson, J.; Khaing, H.; Deo, R.; Rittmann, B.

    2009-12-01

    The fate and potential mobility of plutonium in the subsurface is receiving increased attention as the DOE looks to cleanup the many legacy nuclear waste sites and associated subsurface contamination. Plutonium is the near-surface contaminant of concern at several DOE sites and continues to be the contaminant of concern for the permanent disposal of nuclear waste. The mobility of plutonium is highly dependent on its redox distribution at its contamination source and along its potential migration pathways. This redox distribution is often controlled, especially in the near-surface where organic/inorganic contaminants often coexist, by the direct and indirect effects of microbial activity. The redox distribution of plutonium in the presence of facultative metal reducing bacteria (specifically Shewanella and Geobacter species) was established in a concurrent experimental and modeling study under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Pu(VI), although relatively soluble under oxidizing conditions at near-neutral pH, does not persist under a wide range of the oxic and anoxic conditions investigated in microbiologically active systems. Pu(V) complexes, which exhibit high chemical toxicity towards microorganisms, are relatively stable under oxic conditions but are reduced by metal reducing bacteria under anaerobic conditions. These facultative metal-reducing bacteria led to the rapid reduction of higher valent plutonium to form Pu(III/IV) species depending on nature of the starting plutonium species and chelating agents present in solution. Redox cycling of these lower oxidation states is likely a critical step in the formation of pseudo colloids that may lead to long-range subsurface transport. The CCBATCH biogeochemical model is used to explain the redox mechanisms and final speciation of the plutonium oxidation state distributions observed. These results for microbiologically active systems are interpreted in the context of their importance in defining the overall migration

  9. Loss of HP1 causes depletion of H3K27me3 from facultative heterochromatin and gain of H3K27me2 at constitutive heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Kirsty; Wiles, Elizabeth T; McNaught, Kevin J; Sidoli, Simone; Leggett, Neena; Shao, Yanchun; Garcia, Benjamin A; Selker, Eric U

    2016-01-01

    Methylated lysine 27 on histone H3 (H3K27me) marks repressed "facultative heterochromatin," including developmentally regulated genes in plants and animals. The mechanisms responsible for localization of H3K27me are largely unknown, perhaps in part because of the complexity of epigenetic regulatory networks. We used a relatively simple model organism bearing both facultative and constitutive heterochromatin, Neurospora crassa, to explore possible interactions between elements of heterochromatin. In higher eukaryotes, reductions of H3K9me3 and DNA methylation in constitutive heterochromatin have been variously reported to cause redistribution of H3K27me3. In Neurospora, we found that elimination of any member of the DCDC H3K9 methylation complex caused massive changes in the distribution of H3K27me; regions of facultative heterochromatin lost H3K27me3, while regions that are normally marked by H3K9me3 became methylated at H3K27. Elimination of DNA methylation had no obvious effect on the distribution of H3K27me. Elimination of HP1, which "reads" H3K9me3, also caused major changes in the distribution of H3K27me, indicating that HP1 is important for normal localization of facultative heterochromatin. Because loss of HP1 caused redistribution of H3K27me2/3, but not H3K9me3, these normally nonoverlapping marks became superimposed. Indeed, mass spectrometry revealed substantial cohabitation of H3K9me3 and H3K27me2 on H3 molecules from an hpo strain. Loss of H3K27me machinery (e.g., the methyltransferase SET-7) did not impact constitutive heterochromatin but partially rescued the slow growth of the DCDC mutants, suggesting that the poor growth of these mutants is partly attributable to ectopic H3K27me. Altogether, our findings with Neurospora clarify interactions of facultative and constitutive heterochromatin in eukaryotes. PMID:26537359

  10. Loss of HP1 causes depletion of H3K27me3 from facultative heterochromatin and gain of H3K27me2 at constitutive heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, Kirsty; Wiles, Elizabeth T.; McNaught, Kevin J.; Sidoli, Simone; Leggett, Neena; Shao, Yanchun; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Selker, Eric U.

    2016-01-01

    Methylated lysine 27 on histone H3 (H3K27me) marks repressed “facultative heterochromatin,” including developmentally regulated genes in plants and animals. The mechanisms responsible for localization of H3K27me are largely unknown, perhaps in part because of the complexity of epigenetic regulatory networks. We used a relatively simple model organism bearing both facultative and constitutive heterochromatin, Neurospora crassa, to explore possible interactions between elements of heterochromatin. In higher eukaryotes, reductions of H3K9me3 and DNA methylation in constitutive heterochromatin have been variously reported to cause redistribution of H3K27me3. In Neurospora, we found that elimination of any member of the DCDC H3K9 methylation complex caused massive changes in the distribution of H3K27me; regions of facultative heterochromatin lost H3K27me3, while regions that are normally marked by H3K9me3 became methylated at H3K27. Elimination of DNA methylation had no obvious effect on the distribution of H3K27me. Elimination of HP1, which “reads” H3K9me3, also caused major changes in the distribution of H3K27me, indicating that HP1 is important for normal localization of facultative heterochromatin. Because loss of HP1 caused redistribution of H3K27me2/3, but not H3K9me3, these normally nonoverlapping marks became superimposed. Indeed, mass spectrometry revealed substantial cohabitation of H3K9me3 and H3K27me2 on H3 molecules from an hpo strain. Loss of H3K27me machinery (e.g., the methyltransferase SET-7) did not impact constitutive heterochromatin but partially rescued the slow growth of the DCDC mutants, suggesting that the poor growth of these mutants is partly attributable to ectopic H3K27me. Altogether, our findings with Neurospora clarify interactions of facultative and constitutive heterochromatin in eukaryotes. PMID:26537359

  11. Global scale environmental control of plant photosynthetic capacity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ali, Ashehad; Xu, Chonggang; Rogers, Alistair; McDowell, Nathan G.; Medlyn, Belinda E.; Fisher, Rosie A.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Reich, Peter B.; Bauerle, William L.; Wilson, Cathy J.; et al

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthetic capacity, determined by light harvesting and carboxylation reactions, is a key plant trait that determines the rate of photosynthesis; however, in Earth System Models (ESMs) at a reference temperature, it is either a fixed value for a given plant functional type or derived from a linear function of leaf nitrogen content. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive analysis that considered correlations of environmental factors with photosynthetic capacity as determined by maximum carboxylation (Vc,m) rate scaled to 25°C (i.e., Vc,25; μmol CO2·m–2·s–1) and maximum electron transport rate (Jmax) scaled to 25°C (i.e., J25; μmol electron·m–2·s–1) at the global scale.more » Our results showed that the percentage of variation in observed Vc,25 and J25 explained jointly by the environmental factors (i.e., day length, radiation, temperature, and humidity) were 2–2.5 times and 6–9 times of that explained by area-based leaf nitrogen content, respectively. Environmental factors influenced photosynthetic capacity mainly through photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency, rather than through leaf nitrogen content. The combination of leaf nitrogen content and environmental factors was able to explain ~56% and ~66% of the variation in Vc,25 and J25 at the global scale, respectively. As a result, our analyses suggest that model projections of plant photosynthetic capacity and hence land–atmosphere exchange under changing climatic conditions could be substantially improved if environmental factors are incorporated into algorithms used to parameterize photosynthetic capacity in ESMs.« less

  12. Global-scale environmental control of plant photosynthetic capacity.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ashehad A; Xu, Chonggang; Rogers, Alistair; McDowell, Nathan G; Medlyn, Belinda E; Fisher, Rosie A; Wullschleger, Stan D; Reich, Peter B; Vrugt, Jasper A; Bauerle, William L; Santiago, Louis S; Wilson, Cathy J

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthetic capacity, determined by light harvesting and carboxylation reactions, is a key plant trait that determines the rate of photosynthesis; however, in Earth System Models (ESMs) at a reference temperature, it is either a fixed value for a given plant functional type or derived from a linear function of leaf nitrogen content. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive analysis that considered correlations of environmental factors with photosynthetic capacity as determined by maximum carboxylation (V(cm)) rate scaled to 25 degrees C (i.e., V(c),25; μmol CO2 x m(-2)x s(-1)) and maximum electron transport rate (J(max)) scaled to 25 degrees C (i.e., J25; μmol electron x m(-2) x s(-1)) at the global scale. Our results showed that the percentage of variation in observed V(c),25 and J25 explained jointly by the environmental factors (i.e., day length, radiation, temperature, and humidity) were 2-2.5 times and 6-9 times of that explained by area-based leaf nitrogen content, respectively. Environmental factors influenced photosynthetic capacity mainly through photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency, rather than through leaf nitrogen content. The combination of leaf nitrogen content and environmental factors was able to explain -56% and -66% of the variation in V(c),25 and J25 at the global scale, respectively. Our analyses suggest that model projections of plant photosynthetic capacity and hence land-atmosphere exchange under changing climatic conditions could be substantially improved if environmental factors are incorporated into algorithms used to parameterize photosynthetic capacity in ESMs. PMID:26910960

  13. Global scale environmental control of plant photosynthetic capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Ashehad; Xu, Chonggang; Rogers, Alistair; McDowell, Nathan G.; Medlyn, Belinda E.; Fisher, Rosie A.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Reich, Peter B.; Bauerle, William L.; Wilson, Cathy J.; Vrugt, Jasper A.; Santiago, Louis S.

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthetic capacity, determined by light harvesting and carboxylation reactions, is a key plant trait that determines the rate of photosynthesis; however, in Earth System Models (ESMs) at a reference temperature, it is either a fixed value for a given plant functional type or derived from a linear function of leaf nitrogen content. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive analysis that considered correlations of environmental factors with photosynthetic capacity as determined by maximum carboxylation (Vc,m) rate scaled to 25°C (i.e., Vc,25; μmol CO2·m–2·s–1) and maximum electron transport rate (Jmax) scaled to 25°C (i.e., J25; μmol electron·m–2·s–1) at the global scale. Our results showed that the percentage of variation in observed Vc,25 and J25 explained jointly by the environmental factors (i.e., day length, radiation, temperature, and humidity) were 2–2.5 times and 6–9 times of that explained by area-based leaf nitrogen content, respectively. Environmental factors influenced photosynthetic capacity mainly through photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency, rather than through leaf nitrogen content. The combination of leaf nitrogen content and environmental factors was able to explain ~56% and ~66% of the variation in Vc,25 and J25 at the global scale, respectively. As a result, our analyses suggest that model projections of plant photosynthetic capacity and hence land–atmosphere exchange under changing climatic conditions could be substantially improved if environmental factors are incorporated into algorithms used to parameterize photosynthetic capacity in ESMs.

  14. Photosynthetic production of itaconic acid in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Chin, Taejun; Sano, Mei; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Ohara, Hitomi; Aso, Yuji

    2015-02-10

    Here, we report the photosynthetic production of itaconic acid (IA), a promising building block, from carbon dioxide (CO₂) by Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. The engineered PCC6803 strain expressing cis-aconitate decarboxylase, the key enzyme in IA biosynthesis, produced 0.9 mg/L and 14.5 mg/L of IA at production rates of 42.8 μgL(-1)day(-1) and 919.0 μgL(-1)day(-1), under conditions of constant bubbling with air and 5% CO₂, respectively. This is the first report on the possibility of IA production from CO₂ via the photosynthetic process in cyanobacteria. PMID:25554635

  15. Energy transfer in real and artificial photosynthetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hindman, J.C.; Hunt, J.E.; Katz, J.J.

    1995-02-01

    Fluorescence emission from the photosynthetic organisms Tribonema aequale, Anacystis nidulau, and Chlorelia vulgais and from some chlorophyll model systems have been recorded as a function of excitation wavelength and temperature. Considerable similarity was observed in the effects of excitation wavelength and temperature on the fluorescence from intact photosynthetic organisms and the model systems. The parallelism in behavior suggest that self-assembly processes may occur in both the in vivo and in vitro systems that give rise to chlorophyll species at low temperature that may differ significantly from those present at ambient temperatures.

  16. Indicator For Pseudomonas Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margalit, Ruth

    1990-01-01

    Characteristic protein extracted and detected. Natural protein marker found in Pseudomonas bacteria. Azurin, protein containing copper readily extracted, purified, and used to prepare antibodies. Possible to develop simple, fast, and accurate test for marker carried out in doctor's office.

  17. Bacteria subsisting on antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Gautam; Sommer, Morten O A; Oluwasegun, Rantimi D; Church, George M

    2008-04-01

    Antibiotics are a crucial line of defense against bacterial infections. Nevertheless, several antibiotics are natural products of microorganisms that have as yet poorly appreciated ecological roles in the wider environment. We isolated hundreds of soil bacteria with the capacity to grow on antibiotics as a sole carbon source. Of 18 antibiotics tested, representing eight major classes of natural and synthetic origin, 13 to 17 supported the growth of clonal bacteria from each of 11 diverse soils. Bacteria subsisting on antibiotics are surprisingly phylogenetically diverse, and many are closely related to human pathogens. Furthermore, each antibiotic-consuming isolate was resistant to multiple antibiotics at clinically relevant concentrations. This phenomenon suggests that this unappreciated reservoir of antibiotic-resistance determinants can contribute to the increasing levels of multiple antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria. PMID:18388292

  18. What is the potential for dark CO2 fixation in the facultative crassulacean acid metabolism species Talinum triangulare?

    PubMed

    Herrera, Ana; Ballestrini, Caín; Montes, Enrique

    2015-02-01

    In obligate Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants, dark CO2 fixation is almost the sole route of CO2 fixation and, under drought, continues for long periods. In contrast, in plants of the facultative CAM species Talinum triangulare under experimental drought, dark CO2 fixation provides a small proportion of the daily assimilation observed in watered plants and occurs only for a few days, after which almost nil CO2 fixation is observed. Under field conditions, with a practically unlimited substrate volume, drought-induced CAM might operate for a longer period and make a higher contribution to daily CO2 fixation. Greenhouse-grown plants of T. triangulare were subjected to low and nearly constant soil water content; the operation of CAM was assessed through the measurement of nocturnal proton accumulation and dark CO2 fixation. Dark CO2 fixation appeared 19d after the onset of drought; its contribution during three months of experiment to daily CO2 assimilation ranged from 0.5 to 30.7% with a mean of 13.5%. Twenty days after the beginning of treatment, nocturnal proton accumulation increased six times and remained high for over three months. In spite of low soil water content, leaves did not engage in dark CO2 fixation all the time but dark CO2 fixation was large enough to produce an increase in relative (13)C composition of mature leaves compared to watered plants but not to the value in short-term drought experiments. Leaf anatomical characteristics may guarantee the achievement of higher rates of dark CO2 fixation but results evidence the occurrence of a limit to the expression of CAM that remains to be determined. PMID:25462967

  19. Trichococcus Patagoniensis sp. nov., a Facultative Anaerobe that grows at -5 C, Isolated from Penguin Guano in Chilean Patagonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Krader, Paul E.; Tang, Jane

    2006-01-01

    A novel, extremely psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe, strain PmagGl(sup T), was isolated from guano of Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) collected in Chilean Patagonia. Gram-variable, motile cocci with a diameter of 1.3-2.0 micrometers were observed singularly or in pairs, short chains and irregular conglomerates. Growth occurred within the pH range 6.0-10.0, with optimum growth at pH 8.5. The temperature range for growth of the novel isolate was from -5 to 35 C, with optimum growth at 28-30 C. Strain PmagG1(sup T) did not require NaCl, as growth was observed in the presence of 0-6.5% NaCl with optimum growth at 0.5% (w/v). Strain PmagGl(sup T) was a catalase-negative chemo-organoheterotroph that used sugars and some organic acids as substrates. The metabolic end products were lactate, formate, acetate, ethanol and Con. Strain PmagG1(sup T) was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, kanamycin and gentamicin. The G+C content of its genomic DNA was 45.8 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed 100 % similarity of strain PmagG1(sup T) with Trichococcus collinsii ATCC BAA-296(sup T), but DNA-DNA hybridization between them demonstrated relatedness values of less than 45 plus or minus 1%. Another phylogenetically closely related species, Trichococcus pasteurii, showed 99.85 % similarity by 16s rRNA sequencing and DNA-DNA hybridization showed relatedness values of 47 plus or minus 1.5%. Based on genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, the novel species Trichococcus patagoniensis sp. nov. is proposed, with strain PmagG1(sup T) (=ATCC BAA-756(sup T)=JCM 12176(sup T)=CIP 108035(sup T)) as the type strain.

  20. Genomic and Transcriptomic Analyses of the Facultative Methanotroph Methylocystis sp. Strain SB2 Grown on Methane or Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Vorobev, Alexey; Jagadevan, Sheeja; Jain, Sunit; Anantharaman, Karthik; Dick, Gregory J.; Vuilleumier, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    A minority of methanotrophs are able to utilize multicarbon compounds as growth substrates in addition to methane. The pathways utilized by these microorganisms for assimilation of multicarbon compounds, however, have not been explicitly examined. Here, we report the draft genome of the facultative methanotroph Methylocystis sp. strain SB2 and perform a detailed transcriptomic analysis of cultures grown with either methane or ethanol. Evidence for use of the canonical methane oxidation pathway and the serine cycle for carbon assimilation from methane was obtained, as well as for operation of the complete tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and the ethylmalonyl-coenzyme A (EMC) pathway. Experiments with Methylocystis sp. strain SB2 grown on methane revealed that genes responsible for the first step of methane oxidation, the conversion of methane to methanol, were expressed at a significantly higher level than those for downstream oxidative transformations, suggesting that this step may be rate limiting for growth of this strain with methane. Further, transcriptomic analyses of Methylocystis sp. strain SB2 grown with ethanol compared to methane revealed that on ethanol (i) expression of the pathway of methane oxidation and the serine cycle was significantly reduced, (ii) expression of the TCA cycle dramatically increased, and (iii) expression of the EMC pathway was similar. Based on these data, it appears that Methylocystis sp. strain SB2 converts ethanol to acetyl-coenzyme A, which is then funneled into the TCA cycle for energy generation or incorporated into biomass via the EMC pathway. This suggests that some methanotrophs have greater metabolic flexibility than previously thought and that operation of multiple pathways in these microorganisms is highly controlled and integrated. PMID:24610846

  1. Treatment of mice with human recombinant interleukin-2 augments resistance to the facultative intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Haak-Frendscho, M; Young, K M; Czuprynski, C J

    1989-01-01

    The effects of exogenously administered human recombinant IL-2 (hrIL-2) on resistance to Listeria monocytogenes infection were examined. Intravenous injection of hrIL-2 significantly enhanced antibacterial resistance in both BDF1 and C3H/HeJ mice. The beneficial effect of hrIL-2 was observed with as little as 0.6 micrograms per mouse, whereas optimum protection occurred at 6 micrograms per mouse, hrIL-2 was equally protective when administered concomitant with the listeriae or up to 24 h prior to infection; it had little effect if given after the bacterial challenge. Kinetic experiments indicated that both the peak bacterial burden and the time lag before L. monocytogenes began to be cleared from the spleen and liver were reduced in hrIL-2-treated mice as compared with control mice. Histopathological examination of spleens and livers confirmed that hrIL-2-treated Listeria-infected mice experienced considerably less damage to these organs than did control mice. Spleen cells from Listeria-infected mice exhibited depressed levels of mitogen-induced proliferation coincident with the peak bacterial burden in the spleen and liver and during the subsequent recovery from the infection. Administration of hrIL-2 to uninfected mice had no effect on spleen cell proliferation in response to mitogens in vitro, nor did hrIL-2 treatment restore normal levels of splenocyte proliferative responses to Listeria-infected mice. In addition, hrIL-2 treatment resulted in attenuated levels of serum colony-stimulating activity in infected mice as compared with control infected mice. Coadministration of both hrIL-2 and human recombinant interleukin-1 alpha at various dose and time combinations had no detectable additive or synergistic effect. Although these data do not suggest an obvious mechanism of action, they clearly demonstrate that hrIL-2 can augment host defense against the facultative intracellular pathogen L. monocytogenes. Images PMID:2789191

  2. Trichococcus patagoniensis sp. nov., a facultative anaerobe that grows at -5 degrees C, isolated from penguin guano in Chilean Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Pikuta, Elena V; Hoover, Richard B; Bej, Asim K; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B; Krader, Paul E; Tang, Jane

    2006-09-01

    A novel, extremely psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe, strain PmagG1(T), was isolated from guano of Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) collected in Chilean Patagonia. Gram-variable, motile cocci with a diameter of 1.3-2.0 mum were observed singularly or in pairs, short chains and irregular conglomerates. Growth occurred within the pH range 6.0-10.0, with optimum growth at pH 8.5. The temperature range for growth of the novel isolate was from -5 to 35 degrees C, with optimum growth at 28-30 degrees C. Strain PmagG1(T) did not require NaCl, as growth was observed in the presence of 0-6.5 % NaCl with optimum growth at 0.5 % (w/v). Strain PmagG1(T) was a catalase-negative chemo-organoheterotroph that used sugars and some organic acids as substrates. The metabolic end products were lactate, formate, acetate, ethanol and CO(2). Strain PmagG1(T) was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, kanamycin and gentamicin. The G+C content of its genomic DNA was 45.8 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed 100 % similarity of strain PmagG1(T) with Trichococcus collinsii ATCC BAA-296(T), but DNA-DNA hybridization between them demonstrated relatedness values of <45+/-1 %. Another phylogenetically closely related species, Trichococcus pasteurii, showed 99.85 % similarity by 16S rRNA sequencing and DNA-DNA hybridization showed relatedness values of 47+/-1.5 %. Based on genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, the novel species Trichococcus patagoniensis sp. nov. is proposed, with strain PmagG1(T) (=ATCC BAA-756(T)=JCM 12176(T)=CIP 108035(T)) as the type strain. PMID:16957099

  3. Methylobacterium jeotgali sp. nov., a non-pigmented, facultatively methylotrophic bacterium isolated from jeotgal, a traditional Korean fermented seafood.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Zubair; Lee, Chang Soo; Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Im, Wan-Taek; Ten, Leonid N; Lee, Sung-Taik

    2007-03-01

    A novel facultatively methylotrophic, Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain S2R03-9(T), was isolated from jeotgal, a traditional Korean fermented seafood. The organism was strictly aerobic, motile by means of a single polar flagellum, non-sporulating and catalase- and oxidase-positive. Strain S2R03-9(T) grew in the presence of 0-1 % (w/v) NaCl and at pH 6.0-10.0, with optimum growth in the absence of NaCl and at pH 7.0. It grew at temperatures in the range 20.0-30.0 degrees C, with optimum growth at 30 degrees C. Colonies grown on R2A medium were non-pigmented, opaque and creamy white. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that it was most closely related to Methylobacterium organophilum JCM 2833(T) (96.6 % similarity) and the phylogenetic similarities to all other Methylobacterium species with validly published names were less than 95.0 %. The DNA G+C content was 64.9 mol%. The phylogenetic analysis, the phenotypic assessment and the chemotaxonomic data (major ubiquinone, Q-10; major fatty acids, C(18 : 1) and C(18 : 0)) showed that S2R03-9(T) represents a novel species within the genus Methylobacterium in the class Alphaproteobacteria, for which the name Methylobacterium jeotgali sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is S2R03-9(T) (=KCTC 12671(T)=LMG 23639(T)). PMID:17329786

  4. Gut bacteria and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Erdman, Susan E.; Poutahidis, Theofilos

    2015-01-01

    Microbiota on the mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract greatly outnumber the cells in the human body. Effects of antibiotics indicate that GI tract bacteria may be determining the fate of distal cancers. Recent data implicate dysregulated host responses to enteric bacteria leading to cancers in extra-intestinal sites. Together these findings point to novel anti-cancer strategies aimed at promoting GI tract homeostasis. PMID:26050963

  5. RESPONSE OF THE PHOTOSYNTHETIC APPARATUS OF PHAEODACTYLYM TRICORNUTUM (BACILLARIOPHYCEAE) TO NITRATE, PHOSPHATE OR IRON STARVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of nitrate, phosphate, and iron starvation and resupply on photosynthetic pigments, selected photosynthetic proteins, and photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry were examined in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin (CCMP1327). lthough cell chlorophyll a (chl a) c...

  6. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2002-07-15

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 4/2/2001 through 7/01/2002. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives, and we are currently on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, the milestone date from the original project timeline. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below, our efforts are focused on improving the design of the bioreactor test system, evaluating candidate organisms and growth surfaces, and scaling-up the test facilities from bench scale to pilot scale. Specific results and accomplishments for the second quarter of 2002 include: Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (1) Our collection of cyanobacteria, isolated in YNP was increased to 15 unialgal cultures. (2) Illumination rate about 50 {micro}E/m{sup 2}/sec is not saturated for the growth of 1.2 s.c. (2) isolate. The decrease of illumination rate led to the decrease of doubling time of this isolate. (3) The positive effect of Ca{sup 2+} on the growth of isolate 1.2 s.c. (2) without Omnisil was revealed, though Ca{sup 2+} addition was indifferent for the growth of this isolate at the presence of Omnisil. (4) Calcium addition had a positive effect on the generation of cyanobacterial biofilm on Omnisil surface. (5) The survivability problems with the Tr9.4 organism on Omnisil screens in the CRF2 model-scale bioreactor have been solved. The problems were related to the method used to populate the growth surfaces. When pre-populated screens were placed in the bioreactor the microalgae died within 72 hours, but when the microalgae were cultured while in place in the bioreactor using a continuous-population method they grew well inside of the CRF2 test system and survived for the full 7-day test duration. CRF2 tests will continue as soon as the new combined drip system/harvesting system header pipe

  7. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2002-04-15

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 1/3/2001 through 4/02/2002. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives, and we are currently on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, the milestone date from the original project timeline. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below, we are continuing to evaluate candidate organisms and growth surfaces, and we are expanding the test facilities in preparation for scaled up system-level testing. Specific results and accomplishments for the first quarter of 2002 include: Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (1) Isolate 1.2 s.c. (2) has been selected for further investigations because of its favorable growth properties. (2) Research on optimal conditions for the growth of cyanobacterial isolates from YNP should be carried out using distilled water which has more stable chemical parameters, although tap water use may be permissible during full scale operations (at the cost of longer organism doubling times). (3) Tr. 9.4 WF is able to generate a biofilm on an Omnisil surface. Over the long term Omnisil does not inhibit the growth of TR 9.4 isolate, though it does elongate the lag phase of growth of this isolate. (4) Initial survivability tests for the TR 9.4 organism on Omnisil screens in the CRF2 modelscale bioreactor are underway. We have experienced problems keeping the organisms alive for more than three days, but we are currently investigating several possible causes for this unexpected result. (5) Accelerated materials testing have shown that Omnisil fabric has acceptable strength properties for use in a practical bioreactor system. Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (1) Several CO{sub 2} scrubbing experiments have been completed in the translating slug flow test system, however the error introduced by the

  8. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2002-01-15

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/3/2001 through 1/02/2002. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives. Our research team has made significant progress towards completion of our Phase I objectives, and our current efforts remain focused on fulfilling these research objectives in accordance with the project timeline. Overall, we believe that we are on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, which is the milestone date from the original project timeline. Specific results and accomplishments for the fourth quarter of 2001 include: (1) New procedures and protocols have been developed to increase the chances of successful implementation in the bioreactor of organisms that perform well in the lab. The new procedures include pre-screening of organisms for adhesion characteristics and a focus on identifying the organisms with maximum growth rate potential. (2) Preliminary results show an increase in adhesion to glass and a decrease in overall growth rates when using growth media prepared with tap water rather than distilled water. (3) Several of the organisms collected from Yellowstone National Park using the new procedures are currently being cultured in preparation for bioreactor tests. (4) One important result from a test of growth surface temperature distribution as a function of gas stream and drip-fluid temperatures showed a high dependence of membrane temperature on fluid temperature, with gas stream temperature having minimal effect. This result indicates that bioreactor growth surface temperatures can be controlled using fluid delivery temperature. The possible implications for implementation of the bioreactor concept are encouraging, since it may be possible to use the bioreactor with very high gas stream temperatures by controlling the temperature

  9. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2001-10-15

    This report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/03/2000 through 10/02/2001. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives. This is the fourth quarterly report for this project, so it also serves as a year-1 project review. We have made significant progress on our Phase I objectives, and our current efforts are focused on fulfilling these research objectives ''on time'' relative to the project timeline. Overall, we believe that we are on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, which is the milestone date from the original project timeline. Our results to date concerning the individual factors which have the most significant effect on CO{sub 2} uptake are inconclusive, but we have gathered useful information about the effects of lighting, temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration on one particular organism (Nostoc) and significant progress has been made in identifying other organisms that are more suitable for use in the bioreactor due to their better tolerance for the high temperatures likely to be encountered in the flue gas stream. Our current tests are focused on one such thermophilic organism (Cyanidium), and an enlarged bioreactor system (CRF-2) has been prepared for testing this organism. Tests on the enhanced mass transfer CO{sub 2} absorption technique are underway and useful information is currently being collected concerning pressure drop. The solar collectors for the deep-penetration hybrid solar lighting system have been designed and a single solar collector tracking unit is being prepared for installation in the pilot scale bioreactor system currently under construction. Much progress has been made in designing the fiber optic light delivery system, but final selection of the ''optimum'' delivery system design depends on many factors, most significantly the

  10. Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

    2003-07-22

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 4/2/2003 through 7/01/2003. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we have completed some long-term model scale bioreactor tests and are prepared to begin pilot scale bioreactor testing. Specific results and accomplishments for the second quarter of 2003 include: (1) Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (a) Qualitative long-term survivability tests for S.C.1.2(2) on Omnisil have been successfully completed and results demonstrate a growth rate that appears to be acceptable. (b) Quantitative tests of long-term growth productivity for S.C.1.2(2) on Omnisil have been completed and initial results are promising. Initial results show that the mass of organisms doubled (from 54.9 grams to 109.8 grams) in about 5 weeks. Full results will be available as soon as all membranes and filters are completely dried. The growth rate should increase significantly with the initiation of weekly harvesting during the long term tests. (c) The phase 1 construction of the pilot scale bioreactor has been completed, including the solar collector and light distribution system. We are now in the phase of system improvement as we wait for CRF-2 results in order to be able to finalize the design and construction of the pilot scale system. (d) A mass transfer experimental setup was constructed in order to measure the mass transfer rate from the gas to the liquid film flowing over a membrane and to study the hydrodynamics of the liquid film flowing over a membrane in the bioreactor. Results were reported for mass transfer coefficient, film thickness, and fluid velocity over an Omnisil membrane with a ''drilled hole'' header pipe design. (2) Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (a) A selectivity approach was used to obtain a cyanobacterial culture with elevated resistance to acid pH. Microlonies of ''3.2.2 S.C.1 Positive'' migrated

  11. Quantitative measurement of the growth rate of the PHA-producing photosynthetic bacterium Rhodocyclus gelatinous CBS-2[PolyHydroxyAlkanoate

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfrum, E.J.; Weaver, P.F.

    1999-07-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have been investigating the use of model photosynthetic microorganisms that use sunlight and two-carbon organic substrates (e.g., ethanol, acetate) to produce biodegradable polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) copolymers as carbon storage compounds. Use of these biological PHAs in single-use plastics applications, followed by their post-consumer composting or anaerobic digestion, could impact petroleum consumption as well as the overloading of landfills. The large-scale production of PHA polymers by photosynthetic bacteria will require large-scale reactor systems utilizing either sunlight or artificial illumination. The first step in the scale-up process is to quantify the microbial growth rates and the PHA production rates as a function of reaction conditions such as nutrient concentration, temperature, and light quality and intensity.

  12. Scytonemin and Photosynthetic Pigment Proxies for Late Pleistocene/Holocene Environmental Change in the Eastern Great Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, J. M.; Van Mooy, B. A. S.

    2015-12-01

    Sedimentary pigments are biomarkers of photosynthetic organisms, most commonly derived from aquatic bacteria and algae but also with potential terrigenous sources. We detected a diverse pigment assemblage with variable down-core distributions in Great Salt Lake (GSL) sediments deposited since ca. 280 ka (GLAD1-GSL00, core 4). The most abundant pigments included derivatives of chlorophyll a, most likely from algae or cyanobacteria, bacteriochlorophyll c from green sulfur bacteria, okenone from purple sulfur bacteria, and scytonemin from UV-exposed cyanobacteria. Scytonemin is a biomarker for colonial cyanobacteria exposed to UV-radiation. In GSL it has potential sources from bioherms on the shoreline or microbiotic soil crusts from the adjacent Great Basin Desert. Scytonemin concentration was highest in the Upper Salt and Sapropel (USS) unit, deposited between 11.5-10 ka in shallow water (ca. 10 m), following deep pluvial Lake Bonneville (30-18 cal ka), the Provo lake level (ca. 18-15 cal ka), and the Gilbert transgression (11.6 cal ka). Scytonemin concentration was very low in sediments deposited during the deep lake phases, even though bioherms were prominent shoreline features. The USS was deposited under hypersaline waters and contained remarkably low concentrations of photosynthetic pigment derivatives that would be expected in organic-matter-rich sediments deposited under productive surface waters or anoxic bottom waters. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic data point toward a desert soil crust source for scytonemin in the USS, similar to what we previously observed in the Holocene Black Sea sapropel. We propose that increased aridity supported the widespread occurrence and erosion of microbiotic soil crusts during deposition of the USS. This is consistent with interpretations of Great Salt Lake hydrology, pointing toward a broader regional aridity event. Holocene sediments above the USS also contain scytonemin at relatively high concentration, consistent with

  13. Genes, Genomes, and Assemblages of Modern Anoxygenic Photosynthetic Cyanobacteria as Proxies for Ancient Cyanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grim, S. L.; Dick, G.

    2015-12-01

    Oxygenic photosynthetic (OP) cyanobacteria were responsible for the production of O2 during the Proterozoic. However, the extent and degree of oxygenation of the atmosphere and oceans varied for over 2 Ga after OP cyanobacteria first appeared in the geologic record. Cyanobacteria capable of anoxygenic photosynthesis (AP) may have altered the trajectory of oxygenation, yet the scope of their role in the Proterozoic is not well known. Modern cyanobacterial populations from Middle Island Sinkhole (MIS), Michigan and a handful of cultured cyanobacterial strains, are capable of OP and AP. With their metabolic versatility, these microbes may approximate ancient cyanobacterial assemblages that mediated Earth's oxygenation. To better characterize the taxonomic and genetic signatures of these modern AP/OP cyanobacteria, we sequenced 16S rRNA genes and conducted 'omics analyses on cultured strains, lab mesocosms, and MIS cyanobacterial mat samples collected over multiple years from May to September. Diversity in the MIS cyanobacterial mat is low, with one member of Oscillatoriales dominating at all times. However, Planktothrix members are more abundant in the cyanobacterial community in late summer and fall. The shift in cyanobacterial community composition may be linked to seasonally changing light intensity. In lab mesocosms of MIS microbial mat, we observed a shift in dominant cyanobacterial groups as well as the emergence of Chlorobium, bacteria that specialize in AP. These shifts in microbial community composition and metabolism are likely in response to changing environmental parameters such as the availability of light and sulfide. Further research is needed to understand the impacts of the changing photosynthetic community on oxygen production and the entire microbial consortium. Our study connects genes and genomes of AP cyanobacteria to their environment, and improves understanding of cyanobacterial metabolic strategies that may have shaped Earth's redox evolution.

  14. Remote sensing of life: polarimetric signatures of photosynthetic pigments as sensitive biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyugina, Svetlana V.; Kuhn, Jeff R.; Harrington, David M.; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Messersmith, E. John

    2016-01-01

    We develop a polarimetry-based remote-sensing method for detecting and identifying life forms in distant worlds and distinguishing them from non-biological species. To achieve this we have designed and built a bio-polarimetric laboratory experiment BioPol for measuring optical polarized spectra of various biological and non-biological samples. Here we focus on biological pigments, which are common in plants and bacteria that employ them either for photosynthesis or for protection against reactive oxygen species. Photosynthesis, which provides organisms with the ability to use light as a source of energy, emerged early in the evolution of life on Earth. The ability to harvest such a significant energy resource could likely also develop on habited exoplanets. Thus, we investigate the detectability of biomolecules that can capture photons of particular wavelengths and contribute to storing their energy in chemical bonds. We have carried out laboratory spectropolarimetric measurements of a representative sample of plants containing various amounts of pigments such as chlorophyll, carotenoids and others. We have also measured a variety of non-biological samples (sands, rocks). Using our lab measurements, we have modelled intensity and polarized spectra of Earth-like planets having different surface coverage by photosynthetic organisms, deserted land and ocean, as well as clouds. Our results demonstrate that linearly polarized spectra provide very sensitive and rather unambiguous detection of photosynthetic pigments of various kinds. Our work paves the path towards analogous measurements of microorganisms and remote sensing of microbial ecology on the Earth and of extraterrestrial life on other planets and moons.

  15. Innovative Approaches Using Lichen Enriched Media to Improve Isolation and Culturability of Lichen Associated Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Biosca, Elena G.; Flores, Raquel; Santander, Ricardo D.; Díez-Gil, José Luis; Barreno, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Lichens, self-supporting mutualistic associations between a fungal partner and one or more photosynthetic partners, also harbor non-photosynthetic bacteria. The diversity and contribution of these bacteria to the functioning of lichen symbiosis have recently begun to be studied, often by culture-independent techniques due to difficulties in their isolation and culture. However, culturing as yet unculturable lichenic bacteria is critical to unravel their potential functional roles in lichen symbiogenesis, to explore and exploit their biotechnological potential and for the description of new taxa. Our objective was to improve the recovery of lichen associated bacteria by developing novel isolation and culture approaches, initially using the lichen Pseudevernia furfuracea. We evaluated the effect of newly developed media enriched with novel lichen extracts, as well as the influence of thalli washing time and different disinfection and processing protocols of thalli. The developed methodology included: i) the use of lichen enriched media to mimic lichen nutrients, supplemented with the fungicide natamycin; ii) an extended washing of thalli to increase the recovery of ectolichenic bacteria, thus allowing the disinfection of thalli to be discarded, hence enhancing endolichenic bacteria recovery; and iii) the use of an antioxidant buffer to prevent or reduce oxidative stress during thalli disruption. The optimized methodology allowed significant increases in the number and diversity of culturable bacteria associated with P. furfuracea, and it was also successfully applied to the lichens Ramalina farinacea and Parmotrema pseudotinctorum. Furthermore, we provide, for the first time, data on the abundance of culturable ecto- and endolichenic bacteria that naturally colonize P. furfuracea, R. farinacea and P. pseudotinctorum, some of which were only able to grow on lichen enriched media. This innovative methodology is also applicable to other microorganisms inhabiting these

  16. Innovative Approaches Using Lichen Enriched Media to Improve Isolation and Culturability of Lichen Associated Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Biosca, Elena G; Flores, Raquel; Santander, Ricardo D; Díez-Gil, José Luis; Barreno, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Lichens, self-supporting mutualistic associations between a fungal partner and one or more photosynthetic partners, also harbor non-photosynthetic bacteria. The diversity and contribution of these bacteria to the functioning of lichen symbiosis have recently begun to be studied, often by culture-independent techniques due to difficulties in their isolation and culture. However, culturing as yet unculturable lichenic bacteria is critical to unravel their potential functional roles in lichen symbiogenesis, to explore and exploit their biotechnological potential and for the description of new taxa. Our objective was to improve the recovery of lichen associated bacteria by developing novel isolation and culture approaches, initially using the lichen Pseudevernia furfuracea. We evaluated the effect of newly developed media enriched with novel lichen extracts, as well as the influence of thalli washing time and different disinfection and processing protocols of thalli. The developed methodology included: i) the use of lichen enriched media to mimic lichen nutrients, supplemented with the fungicide natamycin; ii) an extended washing of thalli to increase the recovery of ectolichenic bacteria, thus allowing the disinfection of thalli to be discarded, hence enhancing endolichenic bacteria recovery; and iii) the use of an antioxidant buffer to prevent or reduce oxidative stress during thalli disruption. The optimized methodology allowed significant increases in the number and diversity of culturable bacteria associated with P. furfuracea, and it was also successfully applied to the lichens Ramalina farinacea and Parmotrema pseudotinctorum. Furthermore, we provide, for the first time, data on the abundance of culturable ecto- and endolichenic bacteria that naturally colonize P. furfuracea, R. farinacea and P. pseudotinctorum, some of which were only able to grow on lichen enriched media. This innovative methodology is also applicable to other microorganisms inhabiting these

  17. Effects of Storage in an Anaerobic Transport System on Bacteria in Known Polymicrobial Mixtures and in Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Gale B.

    1978-01-01

    An anaerobic transport system (ATS) which provides for catalytic removal of oxygen was evaluated by using in vitro-prepared polymicrobial mixtures of logphase bacteria and clinical specimens. Inoculated swabs were stored at room temperature in (i) aerobic, (ii) anaerobic glove box, and (iii) ATS environments, and bacteria were quantitated after 2, 24, 48, and 72 h. Bacteria in a three-part mixture of Bacteroides fragilis, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, and Escherichia coli and in a five-part mixture of B. fragilis, P. anaerobius, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa survived 72 h of storage in the ATS and anaerobic glove box environments, but the anaerobic species were inactivated in the aerobic storage except for B. fragilis in pure culture or in the three-part mixture. Changes in relative proportions among the species in a mixture were least in the ATS and anaerobic glove box environments and greatest during the aerobic storage, particularly in the five-part mixture. Bacteria present in pure or mixed culture in clinical specimens generally survived 72 h of storage in the ATS. These data indicate that changes in relative proportions occur with prolonged storage even under anaerobic conditions, but that the ATS would be most effective for preserving anaerobic bacteria and preventing drastic concentration changes and overgrowth of facultative and aerobic bacteria. Images PMID:370142

  18. Distributions of Manganese, Iron, and Manganese-Oxidizing Bacteria In Lake Superior Sediments of Different Organic Carbon Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Laurie L.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    1989-01-01

    Profiles of oxygen, soluble and particulate manganese and iron, organic carbon and nitrogen were examined in Lake Superior sediment cores, along with the distribution and abundance of heterotrophic and manganese oxidizing bacteria. Analyses were performed using cores collected with the submersible Johnson Sea Link II. Three cores, exhibiting a range of organic carbon content, were collected from the deepest basin in Lake Superior and the north and south ends of the Caribou trough, and brought to the surface for immediate analysis. Minielectrode profiles of oxygen concentration of the three cores were carried out using a commercially available minielectrode apparatus. Oxygen depletion to less than 1% occurred within 4 cm of the surface for two of the cores, but not until approximately 15 cm for the core from the south basin of the Caribou trough. The three cores exhibited very different profiles of soluble, as well as leachable, manganese and iron, suggesting different degrees of remobilization of these metals in the sediments. Vertical profiles of viable bacteria and Mn oxidizing bacteria, determined by plating and counting, showed that aerobic (and facultatively aerobic) heterotrophic bacteria were present at the highest concentrations near the surface and decreased steadily with depth, while Mn oxidizing bacteria were concentrations primarily at and above the oxic/anoxic interface. Soluble manganese in the pore waters, along with abundant organic carbon, appeared to enhance the presence of manganese oxidizing bacteria, even below the oxic/anoxic interface. Profiles of solid-phase leachable manganese suggested a microbial role in manganese reprecipitation in these sediments.

  19. A simulation of global regimes of potential leaf net photosynthetic rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, Patricia A.

    1982-01-01

    Worldwide patterns of leaf net photosynthetic rates are produced by a parameterized model (PHOTO 1) in relation to plant climates. PHOTO 1 produces a continuum of photosynthetic plant leaf responses to climatic variables via its two submodels which characterize the phtosynthetic activity of generalized C4 and C3 plants. World maps depict seasonal net photosynthetic rates.

  20. [Comparative characteristics of free-living ultramicroscopical bacteria obtained from extremal biotopes].

    PubMed

    Suzina, N E; Esikova, T Z; Oleinikov, R R; Gafarov, B; Shorokhov, A P; Polivtseva, V N; Ross, D V; Abashina, T N; Duda, V I; Boronin, A M

    2015-01-01

    We isolated 50 strains of free-living ultrasmall bacteria with a cell volume that varies from 0.02 to 1.3 microm3 from a range of extremal natural biotopes, namely permafrost soils, oil slime, soils, lake silt, thermal swamp moss, and the skin integuments of the clawed frog, Xenopus laevis. Of them, 15 isolates, characterized by a cell size of less than 0.1 microm3 and a genome size from 1.5 to 2.4 Mb, were subsumed to ultramicrobacteria belonging to different philogenetic groups (Alphaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria) and genera (Kaistia, Chryseobacterium, Microbacterium, Leucobacter, Leifsonia, and Agrococcus) of the Bacteria domain. They are free-living mesophilic heterotrophic aerobic bacteria. The representatives of Kaistia and Chryseobacterium genera were capable of facultative parasitism on other species of chemo-organotrophic bacteria and cyanobacteria. The ultramicrobacteria differed in their morpholgy, cell ultrastructural organization, and physiological and biochemical features. According to the fine structure of their cell walls, the isolates were subdivided into two groups, namely Gram-positive and Gram-negative forms. PMID:26027350