Science.gov

Sample records for failure investigation 1983-2009

  1. Genesis Failure Investigation Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, John

    2004-01-01

    The-Genesis mission to collect solar-wind samples and return them to Earth for detailed analysis proceeded successfully for 3.5 years. During reentry on September 8, 2004, a failure in the entry, descent and landing sequence resulted in a crash landing of the Genesis sample return capsule. This document describes the findings of the avionics sub-team that supported the accident investigation of the JPL Failure Review Board.

  2. Tape recorder failure investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, M. D.; Loewenthal, S. H.; Carnahan, C. C.; Snyder, G. L.

    1996-01-01

    Two end-item tape recorders lost 4:1 mode data recording mode capability at less than half of their 1 6,000-cycle, 4-year operating life. Subsequent life tests on two spare recorders also experienced 4:1 mode data loss at 8,000 and 11,700 cycles. Tear down inspection after completion of the life tests showed that the tape had worn through the alfesil record and reproduce heads. An investigation was initiated to understand the cause of excessive tape head wear and the reasons why the 4:1 mode data rate, low-speed mode is more damaging than the 1:1 mode data rate, high-speed recording mode. The objective was to establish how operating conditions (tape speed, humidity, temperature, stop/start cycles) affects head life with the goal of extending head life on the remaining in-service tape recorders. Another interest was to explain why an earlier vendor life test showed capability beyond 16,000 cycles.

  3. Failure investigation of eddystone main steam piping

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, J.F.; Bynum, J.E.; Daikoku, T.; Ellis, F.V.; Haneda, H.; Rafiee, M.H.; Siddall, W.F.

    1985-10-01

    In March 1983, personnel at Philadelphia Electric's Eddystone No. 1 power plant discovered a through wall leak in the main steam outlet piping. This pipe was designed to carry steam at a pressure of 5300 psi (36,538 kPa) and a temperature of 1210F(654C). The pipe was made of 316 stainless steel and had been operated approximately 130,000 hours at the time that failure was discovered. Subsequent inspection revealed that many OD cracks existed in this piping system. This paper details the investigation into the cause of the failure. The following elements are highlighted: the in-place metallography which successfully used the plastic replica technique; the elasticplastic stress analysis and life prediction techniques carried out to assess probable failure modes and loadings; and the experimental stress analysis which was conducted to confirm analytical hypotheses.

  4. Analytical investigation of solid rocket nozzle failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, K. E.; Hester, J.

    1985-01-01

    On April 5, 1983, an Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) spacecraft experienced loss of control during the burn of the second of two solid rocket motors. The anomaly investigation showed the cause to be a malfunction of the solid rocket motor. This paper presents a description of the IUS system, a failure analysis summary, an account of the thermal testing and computer modeling done at Marshall Space Flight Center, a comparison of analysis results with thermal data obtained from motor static tests, and describes some of the design enhancement incorporated to prevent recurrence of the anomaly.

  5. Everyday Attention Failures: An Individual Differences Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unsworth, Nash; McMillan, Brittany D.; Brewer, Gene A.; Spillers, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined individual differences in everyday attention failures. Undergraduate students completed various cognitive ability measures in the laboratory and recorded everyday attention failures in a diary over the course of a week. The majority of attention failures were failures of distraction or mind wandering in educational…

  6. Materials investigation of STS-3 parachute failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Main parachute, No. 2 of SRB A-12 on STS-3, sustained damage during deployment or initial inflation that resulted in its collapse and failure to sustain load. During an investigation of the materials from this parachute, optical and scanning electron microscope analyses were conducted. This examination identified stains and abrasions on vent lines that appear to have been a result of friction contact with its flotation bag lanyard. Mechanical testing of the vent band indicated a reduction in strength of 37 percent obviously due to structural overload, heat, and ocean water exposure. It is concluded from this and other available data that entanglement of parachutes No. 1 and No. 2 during deployment caused adequate structural damage to main parachute No. 2 to render it unable to carry load.

  7. Cumberland last stage blade failure investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Puri, A.; Lam, T.

    1995-12-31

    TVA`s Cumberland plant has two sister units which are rated 1,300 MW each, and have been in service since 1973. Five other units in the United States share the identical design and configuration as the Cumberland machines, and have a similar operating history. Relying on a cross compound design, these machines have an HP turbine and two LP turbines in line A, an IP turbine and two LP turbines in line B. The four double flow LP turbines are identical in design. The L-0 stage is comprised of 71 free standing blades, each of which measures 30 inches from hub to tip. On December 3, 1993, Unit 1 experienced an in-service catastrophic failure. Subsequent inspection revealed that blade {number_sign}35 in the L-0 stage, LP1 turbine end of A line had failed in the airfoil near the platform. The separation of blade {number_sign}35 caused a revere rotor unbalance which resulted in extensive consequential damage to all the components in the A line rotor train. To manage the forced outage and minimize the unit downtime the plant needed to establish (a) a list of immediate actions to restore the damaged unit and return it back into service and (b) the long term actions which should be taken to ensure the reliability of both the damaged machine and its sister unit. A key issue included within this decision making process was to identify the root cause of failure of blade {number_sign}35. By relying on the EPRI BLADE{trademark} program, TVA was able to initiate a technical investigation in parallel with the repair efforts being performed with the cooperation of the Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM). Based on the technical detail generated in part with BLADE, and supplemented with a series of additional tests and studies, TVA was able to bring Unit 1 back into service and reduce the downtime by 58 days, and thereby save an estimated $25.55 million towards the purchase of replacement power.

  8. Human Brucellosis Trends: Re-emergence and Prospects for Control Using a One Health Approach in Azerbaijan (1983-2009).

    PubMed

    Kracalik, I T; Abdullayev, R; Asadov, K; Ismayilova, R; Baghirova, M; Ustun, N; Shikhiyev, M; Talibzade, A; Blackburn, J K

    2016-06-01

    Brucellosis is one of the most common and widely spread zoonotic diseases in the world. Control of the disease in humans is dependent upon limiting the infection in animals through surveillance and vaccination. Given the dramatic economic and political changes that have taken place in the former Soviet Union, which have limited control, evaluating the status of human brucellosis in former Soviet states is crucial. We assessed annual spatial and temporal trends in the epidemiology of human brucellosis in Azerbaijan, 1983-2009, in conjunction with data from a livestock surveillance and control programme (2002-2009). To analyse trends, we used a combination of segmented regression and spatial analysis. From 1983 to 2009, a total of 11 233 cases of human brucellosis were reported. Up to the mid-1990s, the incidence of human brucellosis showed a pattern of re-emergence, increasing by 25% annually, on average. Following Soviet governance, the incidence rates peaked, increasing by 1.8% annually, on average, and subsequently decreasing by 5% annually, on average, during the period 2002-2009. Despite recent national declines in human incidence, we identified geographic changes in the case distribution characterized by a geographic expansion and an increasing incidence among districts clustered in the south-east, compared to a decrease of elsewhere in the country. Males were consistently, disproportionately afflicted (71%) and incidence was highest in the 15 to 19 age group (18.1 cases/100 000). During the period 2002-2009, >10 million small ruminants were vaccinated with Rev1. Our findings highlight the improving prospects for human brucellosis control following livestock vaccination; however, the disease appears to be re-emerging in south-eastern Azerbaijan. Sustained one health measures are needed to address changing patterns of brucellosis in Azerbaijan and elsewhere in the former Soviet Union. PMID:26403990

  9. 49 CFR 193.2515 - Investigations of failures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Investigations of failures. 193.2515 Section 193.2515 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Operations § 193.2515 Investigations of failures. (a)...

  10. 49 CFR 193.2515 - Investigations of failures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Investigations of failures. 193.2515 Section 193.2515 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Operations § 193.2515 Investigations of failures. (a)...

  11. 49 CFR 193.2515 - Investigations of failures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Investigations of failures. 193.2515 Section 193.2515 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Operations § 193.2515 Investigations of failures. (a)...

  12. 49 CFR 193.2515 - Investigations of failures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Investigations of failures. 193.2515 Section 193.2515 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Operations § 193.2515 Investigations of failures. (a)...

  13. Status of the NASA continuing investigation of catastrophic balloon failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needleman, H. C.

    1987-01-01

    The findings and status of the continuing NASA investigation of catastrophic balloon failures, conducted following the adoption in 1984 of a new material specification, are reported on. Current efforts include a microstructual analysis, balloon stress studies, and seal investigations. Attention is given to the Recovery Plan, a program to demonstrate the use of the existing film and to develop an improved film is discussed. No specific cause for the increased occurrence of catastrophic failures has been identified.

  14. Investigating embryo deaths and hatching failure.

    PubMed

    Rideout, Bruce A

    2012-05-01

    Investigation of all embryo and neonatal mortalities is essential for optimizing productivity in artificial incubation and hand rearing programs. Because artificial incubation is a complex process with many variables, thorough and systematic evaluations are necessary to identify potential problems. Every step of the process from egg lay through incubation and hatching should be evaluated in conjunction with comprehensive data on management of the breeding population. The most common sources of significant problems include nutrition and management of the breeding population, insufficient parental incubation prior to artificial incubation, abnormal egg weight loss during incubation, and infections of the yolk sac or umbilicus. PMID:22640533

  15. Experimental aspects of an investigation of macroscopic ductile failure criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Soo Hoo, M.S.; Benzley, S.E.; Priddy, T.G.

    1981-03-01

    Experimental results for the ductile failure of 7075-T651 aluminum are presented. Four separate shapes were tested to investigate the importance that macroscopic effective shear stress, hydrostatic stress, and plastic strain play in describing ductile failure of materials. The specimens used were: thin wall torsion tubes to create a state of pure shear, uniform hollow tubes to create a state of uniaxial stress; hour-glass shaped hollow tubes to create a state of biaxial stress; and notched round bars to create a state of triaxial stress. Two proposed ductile failure criteria are discussed in conjunction with the experimental results presented.

  16. ISS Fiber Optic Failure Investigation Root Cause Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leidecker, Henning; Plante, Jeannette

    2000-01-01

    In August of 1999, Boeing Corporation (Boeing) engineers began investigating failures of optical fiber being used on International Space Station flight hardware. Catastrophic failures of the fiber were linked to a defect in the glass fiber. Following several meetings of Boeing and NASA engineers and managers, Boeing created and led an investigation team, which examined the reliability of the cable installed in the U.S. Lab. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Components Technologies and Radiation Effects Branch (GSFC) led a team investigating the root cause of the failures. Information was gathered from: regular telecons and other communications with the investigation team, investigative trips to the cable distributor's plant, the cable manufacturing plant and the fiber manufacturing plant (including a review of build records), destructive and non-destructive testing, and expertise supplied by scientists from Dupont, and Lucent-Bell Laboratories. Several theories were established early on which were not able to completely address the destructive physical analysis and experiential evidence. Lucent suggested hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching of the glass and successfully duplicated the "rocket engine" defect. Strength testing coupled with examination of the low strength break sites linked features in the polyimide coating with latent defect sites. The information provided below explains what was learned about the susceptibility of the pre-cabled fiber to failure when cabled as it was for Space Station and the nature of the latent defects.

  17. Investigation of valve failure problems in LWR power plants

    SciTech Connect

    1980-04-01

    An analysis of component failures from information in the computerized Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) data bank shows that for both PWR and BWR plants the component category most responsible for approximately 19.3% of light water reactor (LWR) power plant shutdowns. This investigation by Burns and Roe, Inc. shows that the greatest cause of shutdowns in LWRs due to valve failures is leakage from valve stem packing. Both BWR plants and PWR plants have stem leakage problems (BWRs, 21% and PWRs, 34%).

  18. Investigation of failure mode transition in ceramics under confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Ravichandran, G.; Chen, W.; Ortiz, M.

    1995-12-31

    A newly developed experimental technique is used to investigate the failure behavior of ceramics in multi-axial compression. The axial loading is provided by a split Kolsky (Hopkinson) compression bar and the radial confinement is provided by shrink fit sleeves on the cylindrical specimens. Confinement pressures on the order of 1 GPa have been achieved. As the confinement is increased on the specimen, the failure mode changes from axial splitting under no confinement to conical faulting under moderate confinement. Experimental data have been obtained for several engineering ceramics in the strain rate range of 10{sup -3} to 10{sup 3} s{sup -1}. The peak or failure strength increases with increasing confinement. The increase in strength over its unconfined strength for a given level of confinement remains independent of the strain rate. The data from multiaxial loading experiments suggest that the engineering ceramics follow the Drucker-Prager model for pressure sensitive dilatant materials. This model is used to predict the localization modes in axi-symmetric geometries. The predictions are compared with experimental results for the limit load and the geometry of the fault. The implications of the proposed constitutive and failure model for the performance of engineering ceramics under multi-axial loading are discussed.

  19. Investigation of nonwetting system failure and system integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Peter T.

    A droplet may be prevented from wetting a solid surface by the existence of a lubricating film of a different fluid, such as air, between the droplet and solid surfaces. In this research, thermocapillarity is exploited to induce free-surface motion on a droplet, dragging air with it. The noncontact nature and the load-carrying capability of a nonwetting droplet lead to potential engineering applications, e.g., low-friction bearings. The present research consists of two thrusts. The first is aimed at quantifying nonwetting-system failures (film and pinning) triggered by application of a mechanical load, gaining insights to failure mechanisms. Experimental results show that film failure occurs over a wide range of droplet volumes when the temperature difference DeltaT between the droplet and the plate, the driving potential of the free-surface motion, is small. Interferometric observations reveal flow-instability just prior to film failure, with the growth of a nonaxisymmetric disturbance on a free surface (m = 1). Pinning failure becomes more prevalent as DeltaT is increased, stabilizing the film flow. As part of the present investigation, a system was devised, allowing an oscillating free-surface to be reconstructed from a series of interferograms. The dynamic responses of the free surface reveal mode coupling, with harmonics of the input frequency excited through nonlinearity. The second thrust of the research succeeded in levitating and translating a droplet using the mechanism of permanent nonwetting. In this scheme, the droplet is heated by a CO2 laser and is placed above a cooled glass surface in order to drive the lubricating film that supports the weight of the drop. Furthermore, the position of the droplet can be controlled by moving the heating location, which leads to an asymmetry of the flow fields, driving air from the cooler-end of the droplet and propelling it towards the heat source. These demonstrations suggest the technique's potential use as a

  20. Experimental Investigations Of Failure Mechanisms Associated With Slow Slip Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Tamarkin, T.

    2010-12-01

    Slow slip events such as very low frequency earthquakes (VLFEs) are detected in the Nankai accretionary prism [Ito and Obara, 2006]. It is proposed that high pore fluid pressure weakens the out-of-sequence-thrusts and mega-splay faults by reducing effective normal stress on the fault plane and consequently generates slip instability producing low stress drop VLFEs. However, the frictional behaviors and failure mechanisms associated with reduction of effective normal stress are not well understood. In this study, we conducted frictional experiments on porous sedimentary rocks with a saw-cut. Sediments with different clay content from NantroSEIZE drilling project ODP Legs 315, 316, and 322 are used as fault gouge. A new triaxial loading configuration was designed to investigate the effect of high pore pressure on frictional instability and failure modes. During the deformation experiments, samples were subjected to constant axial stress and decreasing radial stresses. Distinguishing from the conventional loading configuration in which mean stress increases during deformation, with the alternative loading path, mean stress decreases during deformation. Under fully drained conditions where pore pressure remains constant, the effective stress decreases in these experiments, analoguous to increasing pore pressure. Our preliminary results indicate that: 1) frictional strength is comparable to that observed under conventional loading; 2) the rate of fracture energy release is considerably slower, which bears similar characteristics with observed slow slip events. Microstructural analyses on the deformed samples provide experimental constraints on deformation mechanisms associated with slow slip events.

  1. Variation in Cognitive Failures: An Individual Differences Investigation of Everyday Attention and Memory Failures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unsworth, Nash; Brewer, Gene A.; Spillers, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined individual differences in everyday cognitive failures assessed by diaries. A large sample of participants completed various cognitive ability measures in the laboratory. Furthermore, a subset of these participants also recorded everyday cognitive failures (attention, retrospective memory, and prospective memory failures)…

  2. 49 CFR 192.617 - Investigation of failures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS... operator shall establish procedures for analyzing accidents and failures, including the selection...

  3. 49 CFR 192.617 - Investigation of failures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS... operator shall establish procedures for analyzing accidents and failures, including the selection...

  4. 49 CFR 192.617 - Investigation of failures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS... operator shall establish procedures for analyzing accidents and failures, including the selection...

  5. 49 CFR 192.617 - Investigation of failures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS... operator shall establish procedures for analyzing accidents and failures, including the selection...

  6. 49 CFR 192.617 - Investigation of failures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS... operator shall establish procedures for analyzing accidents and failures, including the selection...

  7. Genesis failure investigation report : JPL Failure Review Board, Avionics Sub-Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, John; Manning, Rob; Barry, Ed; Donaldson, Jim; Rivellini, Tom; Battel, Steven; Savino, Joe; Lee, Wayne; Dalton, Jerry; Underwood, Mark; Surampudi, Rao; Accord, Arden; Perkins, Dave; Barrow, Kirk; Wilson, Bob

    2004-01-01

    On January 7, 2001, the Genesis spacecraft lifted off from Cape Canaveral. Its mission was to collect solar wind samples and return those samples to Earth for detailed analysis by scientists. The mission proceeded successfully for three-and-a-half years. On September 8, 2004, the spacecraft approached Earth, pointed the Sample Return Capsule (SRC) at its entry target, and then fired pyros that jettisoned the SRC. The SRC carried the valuable samples collected over the prior 29 months. The SRC also contained the requisite hardware (mechanisms, parachutes, and electronics) to manage the process of entry, descent, and landing (EDL). After entering Earthas atmosphere, the SRC was expected to open a drogue parachute. This should have been followed by a pyro event to release the drogue chute, and then by a pyro event to deploy the main parachute at an approximate elevation of 6.7 kilometers. As the SRC descended to the Utah landing site, helicopters were in position to capture the SRC before the capsule touched down. On September 8, 2004, observers of the SRCas triumphant return became concerned as the NASA announcer fell silent, and then became even more alarmed as they watched the spacecraft tumble as it streaked across the sky. Long-distance cameras clearly showed that the drogue parachute had not deployed properly. On September 9, 2004, General Eugene Tattini, Deputy Director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory formed a Failure Review Board (FRB). This board was charged with investigating the cause of the Genesis mishap in close concert with the NASA Mishap Investigation Board (MIB). The JPL-FRB was populated with experts from within and external to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The JPL-FRB participated with the NASA-MIB through all phases of the investigation, working jointly and concurrently as one team to discover the facts of the mishap.

  8. Investigation of Possible Wellbore Cement Failures During Hydraulic Fracturing Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jihoon; Moridis, George

    2014-11-01

    We model and assess the possibility of shear failure, using the Mohr-Coulomb model ? along the vertical well by employing a rigorous coupled flow-geomechanic analysis. To this end, we vary the values of cohesion between the well casing and the surrounding cement to representing different quality levels of the cementing operation (low cohesion corresponds to low-quality cement and/or incomplete cementing). The simulation results show that there is very little fracturing when the cement is of high quality.. Conversely, incomplete cementing and/or weak cement can causes significant shear failure and the evolution of long fractures/cracks along the vertical well. Specifically, low cohesion between the well and cemented areas can cause significant shear failure along the well, but the same cohesion as the cemented zone does not cause shear failure. When the hydraulic fracturing pressure is high, low cohesion of the cement can causes fast propagation of shear failure and of the resulting fracture/crack, but a high-quality cement with no weak zones exhibits limited shear failure that is concentrated near the bottom of the vertical part of the well. Thus, high-quality cement and complete cementing along the vertical well appears to be the strongest protection against shear failure of the wellbore cement and, consequently, against contamination hazards to drinking water aquifers during hydraulic fracturing operations.

  9. Investigation of Tantalum Wet Slug Capacitor Failures in the Apollo Telescope Mount Charger Battery Regulator Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. F.; Wiedeman, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    This investigation describes the capacitor failures and to identify the cause of the failure mechanism. Early failures were thought to have happened because of age and/or abuse since the failed capacitors were dated 1967. It is shown that all 1967 capacitors were replaced with 1972 capacitors.

  10. Morpheus 1.5A Lander Failure Investigation Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munday, Steve; Olansen, John

    2013-01-01

    On August 9th, 2012, the Morpheus 1.5 Vertical Testbed (VTB) crashed during Free Flight 2 (FF2) at KSC SLF, resulting in the loss of 1.5 VTB hardware. JSC/KSC Morpheus team immediately executed the pre-rehearsed Emergency Action Plan to protect personnel and property, so damage was limited to 1.5 VTB hardware. JSC/KSC Morpheus team secured data and mapped & recovered debris. Project had pre-declared loss of VTB to be a test failure, not a mishap.

  11. Investigation of failure to separate an Inconel 718 frangible nut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, William C., III; Hohmann, Carl

    1994-01-01

    The 2.5-inch frangible nut is used in two places to attach the Space Shuttle Orbiter to the External Tank. It must be capable of sustaining structural loads and must also separate into two pieces upon command. Structural load capability is verified by proof loading each flight nut, while ability to separate is verified on a sample of a production lot. Production lots of frangible nuts beginning in 1987 experienced an inability to reliably separate using one of two redundant explosive boosters. The problems were identified in lot acceptance tests, and the cause of failure has been attributed to differences in the response of the Inconel 718. Subsequent tests performed on the frangible nuts resulted in design modifications to the nuts along with redesign of the explosive booster to reliably separate the frangible nut. The problem history along with the design modifications to both the explosive booster and frangible nut are discussed in this paper. Implications of this failure experience impact any pyrotechnic separation system involving fracture of materials with respect to design margin control and lot acceptance testing.

  12. A near-miss management system architecture for the forensic investigation of software failures.

    PubMed

    Bella, M A Bihina; Eloff, J H P

    2016-02-01

    Digital forensics has been proposed as a methodology for doing root-cause analysis of major software failures for quite a while. Despite this, similar software failures still occur repeatedly. A reason for this is the difficulty of obtaining detailed evidence of software failures. Acquiring such evidence can be challenging, as the relevant data may be lost or corrupt following a software system's crash. This paper proposes the use of near-miss analysis to improve on the collection of evidence for software failures. Near-miss analysis is an incident investigation technique that detects and subsequently analyses indicators of failures. The results of a near-miss analysis investigation are then used to detect an upcoming failure before the failure unfolds. The detection of these indicators - known as near misses - therefore provides an opportunity to proactively collect relevant data that can be used as digital evidence, pertaining to software failures. A Near Miss Management System (NMS) architecture for the forensic investigation of software failures is proposed. The viability of the proposed architecture is demonstrated through a prototype. PMID:26727616

  13. Investigation of Interface States and Failure Mechanisms in Mnos Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hsing-Liang

    The objective of this dissertation is to conduct a quantitative study of the interface state characteristics at Si-SiO(,2) interface and the failure mechanisms in the silicon MNOS nonvolatile memory devices under different write/erase (W/E) cycling conditions. The main thrust of this research is to quantitatively characterize the interface states in MNOS devices and to correlate the results of the measurements to the failure mechanisms in the exercised MNOS devices for W/E cycles up to 1 x 10('11) cycles. The Constant-Capacitance Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (CC-DLTS) technique is employed for the first time to characterize the interface states in the MNOS device. The existing theory for the CC-DLTS technique is modified to analyze the interface state density and electron capture cross sections of the trap states at Si-SiO(,2) interface. An exact equivalent circuit model for the p('+)-gridded MNOS capacitors is developed to predict the high frequency C -V behavior in the exercised MNOS devices. The results show little change in the interface state density was observed for W/E cycles less than 1 x 10('7) and increased rapidly for W/E cycles greater than 1 x 10('7). For W/E cycles greater than 5 x 10('9), a gradual increase in interface state density with W/E cyclings was observed. The negative shift of threshold voltage in the exercised MNOS devices can be attributed to the creation of interface states for W/E cycles less than 10('9) and primarily due to the generation of interface states for W/E cycles exceeding 1 x 10('9). The increase in interface state densities and the degradation of the thin oxide layer after prolonged W/E cycling increase the back tunneling current which results in the increase of retention decay rate. Furthermore, mobility degradation in the inversion layer was observed in the MNOS transistors for W/E cycling exceeds 10('9). This is attributed to the generation of surface state densities. Improvement in retention and endurance of the

  14. Experimental and numerical investigation of failure of alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, J.; Wang, M.L.; Schreyer, H.L.

    1995-12-31

    Failure modes of polycrystalline alumina in compact-tension specimens were studied using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Microcrack propagation was monitored under large magnification. Starting with a pre-existing chevron notch, it was found that cracks propagated in a branching manner along the boundaries, i.e. intergranular fracture occurred. According to these experimental observations, a finite element method was developed based on continuum damage mechanics. The numerical model in two dimensions is established for a small specimen composed of a set of grains and grain boundaries. Grain boundaries are considered as thin regions of elastic damaging material; and each grain is isotropic elastic. A Voronoi diagram was used to generate realistic grain structure for alumina. Numerical analysis of a specimen under pure tension was conducted to show similar features of crack propagation. The effects of different damaging rates for the bulk and shear moduli on peak stress and softening are given. It is shown that the combination of reduced damage of the shear modulus and the restriction of tortuous cracking along grain boundaries results in a significant enhancement of strength in the composite ceramic over the material strength in the grain boundary. The numerical results also displayed the fundamental microfracture mechanisms of ceramics.

  15. Investigation of failure mechanisms in integrated vacuum circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosengreen, A.

    1972-01-01

    The fabrication techniques of integrated vacuum circuits are described in detail. Data obtained from a specially designed test circuit are presented. The data show that the emission observed in reverse biased devices is due to cross-talk between the devices and can be eliminated by electrostatic shielding. The lifetime of the cathodes has been improved by proper activation techniques. None of the cathodes on life test has shown any sign of failure after more than 3500 hours. Life tests of triodes show a decline of anode current by a factor of two to three after a few days. The current recovers when the large positive anode voltage (100 V) has been removed for a few hours. It is suggested that this is due to trapped charges in the sapphire substrate. Evidence of the presence of such charges is given, and a model of the charge distribution is presented consistent with the measurements. Solution of the problem associated with the decay of triode current may require proper treatment of the sapphire surface and/or changes in the deposition technique of the thin metal films.

  16. Failure Investigation of Radiant Platen Superheater Tube of Thermal Power Plant Boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, D.; Ray, S.; Mandal, A.; Roy, H.

    2015-04-01

    This paper highlights a case study of typical premature failure of a radiant platen superheater tube of 210 MW thermal power plant boiler. Visual examination, dimensional measurement and chemical analysis, are conducted as part of the investigations. Apart from these, metallographic analysis and fractography are also conducted to ascertain the probable cause of failure. Finally it has been concluded that the premature failure of the super heater tube can be attributed to localized creep at high temperature. The corrective actions has also been suggested to avoid this type of failure in near future.

  17. A simulator investigation of engine failure compensation for powered-lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieuwenhuijse, A. W.; Franklin, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    A piloted simulator investigation of various engine failure compensation concepts for powered-lift STOL aircraft was carried out at the Ames Research Center. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the influence of engine failure compensation on recovery from an engine failure during the landing approach and on the precision of the STOL landing. The various concepts include: (1) cockpit warning lights to cue the pilot of an engine failure, (2) programmed thrust and roll trim compensation, (3) thrust command and (4) flight-path stabilization. The aircraft simulated was a 150 passenger four-engine, externally blown flap civil STOL transport having a 90 psf wing loading and a .56 thrust to weight ratio. Results of the simulation indicate that the combination of thrust command and flight-path stabilization offered the best engine-out landing performance in turbulence and did so over the entire range of altitudes for which engine failures occurred.

  18. Investigation into Cause of High Temperature Failure of Boiler Superheater Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, D.; Ray, S.; Roy, H.; Shukla, A. K.

    2015-04-01

    The failure of the boiler tubes occur due to various reasons like creep, fatigue, corrosion and erosion. This paper highlights a case study of typical premature failure of a final superheater tube of 210 MW thermal power plant boiler. Visual examination, dimensional measurement, chemical analysis, oxide scale thickness measurement, microstructural examination are conducted as part of the investigations. Apart from these investigations, sulfur print, Energy Dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X ray diffraction analysis (XRD) are also conducted to ascertain the probable cause of failure of final super heater tube. Finally it has been concluded that the premature failure of the super heater tube can be attributed to the combination of localized high tube metal temperature and loss of metal from the outer surface due to high temperature corrosion. The corrective actions have also been suggested to avoid this type of failure in near future.

  19. 29 CFR 501.21 - Failure to cooperate with investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS ENFORCEMENT OF CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS FOR TEMPORARY ALIEN AGRICULTURAL WORKERS ADMITTED UNDER... agent or attorney) does not cooperate with an investigation concerning the employment of an H-2A worker, a worker in corresponding employment, or a U.S. worker who has been improperly rejected...

  20. 29 CFR 501.21 - Failure to cooperate with investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS ENFORCEMENT OF CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS FOR TEMPORARY ALIEN AGRICULTURAL WORKERS ADMITTED UNDER... agent or attorney) does not cooperate with an investigation concerning the employment of an H-2A worker, a worker in corresponding employment, or a U.S. worker who has been improperly rejected...

  1. When the biological indicator is positive: investigating autoclave failures.

    PubMed

    Bryce, E A; Roberts, F J; Clements, B; MacLean, S

    1997-09-01

    A series of positive biological indicators in steam autoclaves from different hospital departments within the same building were traced to blocked steam traps on building condensate lines. The steps taken during the investigation and a protocol for management of positive biological indicators are described. PMID:9309439

  2. Numerical investigations of rib fracture failure models in different dynamic loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Yang, Jikuang; Miller, Karol; Li, Guibing; Joldes, Grand R; Doyle, Barry; Wittek, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Rib fracture is one of the most common thoracic injuries in vehicle traffic accidents that can result in fatalities associated with seriously injured internal organs. A failure model is critical when modelling rib fracture to predict such injuries. Different rib failure models have been proposed in prediction of thorax injuries. However, the biofidelity of the fracture failure models when varying the loading conditions and the effects of a rib fracture failure model on prediction of thoracic injuries have been studied only to a limited extent. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effects of three rib failure models on prediction of thoracic injuries using a previously validated finite element model of the human thorax. The performance and biofidelity of each rib failure model were first evaluated by modelling rib responses to different loading conditions in two experimental configurations: (1) the three-point bending on the specimen taken from rib and (2) the anterior-posterior dynamic loading to an entire bony part of the rib. Furthermore, the simulation of the rib failure behaviour in the frontal impact to an entire thorax was conducted at varying velocities and the effects of the failure models were analysed with respect to the severity of rib cage damages. Simulation results demonstrated that the responses of the thorax model are similar to the general trends of the rib fracture responses reported in the experimental literature. However, they also indicated that the accuracy of the rib fracture prediction using a given failure model varies for different loading conditions. PMID:26214136

  3. Development Testing and Subsequent Failure Investigation of a Spring Strut Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dervan, Jared; Robertson, Brandan; Staab, Lucas; Culberson, Michael; Pellicciotti, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) and Lockheed Martin (LM) performed random vibration testing on a single spring strut development unit to assess its ability to withstand qualification level random vibration environments. Failure of the strut while exposed to random vibration resulted in a follow-on failure investigation, design changes, and additional development tests. This paper focuses on the results of the failure investigations referenced in detail in the NESC final report [1] including identified lessons learned to aid in future design iterations of the spring strut and to help other mechanism developers avoid similar pitfalls.

  4. Development Testing and Subsequent Failure Investigation of a Spring Strut Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dervan, Jared; Robertson, Brandon; Staab, Lucas; Culberson, Michael; Pellicciotti, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) and Lockheed Martin (LM) performed random vibration testing on a single spring strut development unit to assess its ability to withstand qualification level random vibration environments. Failure of the strut while exposed to random vibration resulted in a follow-on failure investigation, design changes, and additional development tests. This paper focuses on the results of the failure investigations referenced in detail in the NESC final report including identified lessons learned to aid in future design iterations of the spring strut and to help other mechanism developers avoid similar pitfalls.

  5. Mechanistic failure mode investigation and resolution of parvovirus retentive filters.

    PubMed

    LaCasse, Daniel; Lute, Scott; Fiadeiro, Marcus; Basha, Jonida; Stork, Matthew; Brorson, Kurt; Godavarti, Ranga; Gallo, Chris

    2016-07-01

    Virus retentive filters are a key product safety measure for biopharmaceuticals. A simplistic perception is that they function solely based on a size-based particle removal mechanism of mechanical sieving and retention of particles based on their hydrodynamic size. Recent observations have revealed a more nuanced picture, indicating that changes in viral particle retention can result from process pressure and/or flow interruptions. In this study, a mechanistic investigation was performed to help identify a potential mechanism leading to the reported reduced particle retention in small virus filters. Permeate flow rate or permeate driving force were varied and analyzed for their impact on particle retention in three commercially available small virus retentive filters. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:959-970, 2016. PMID:27160325

  6. Investigating Deformation and Failure Mechanisms in Nanoscale Multilayer Metallic Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zbib, Hussein M; Bahr, David F

    2014-10-22

    Over the history of materials science there are many examples of materials discoveries that have made superlative materials; the strongest, lightest, or toughest material is almost always a goal when we invent new materials. However, often these have been a result of enormous trial and error approaches. A new methodology, one in which researchers design, from the atoms up, new ultra-strong materials for use in energy applications, is taking hold within the science and engineering community. This project focused on one particular new classification of materials; nanolaminate metallic composites. These materials, where two metallic materials are intimately bonded and layered over and over to form sheets or coatings, have been shown over the past decade to reach strengths over 10 times that of their constituents. However, they are not yet widely used in part because while extremely strong (they don’t permanently bend), they are also not particularly tough (they break relatively easily when notched). Our program took a coupled approach to investigating new materials systems within the laminate field. We used computational materials science to explore ways to institute new deformation mechanisms that occurred when a tri-layer, rather than the more common bi-layer system was created. Our predictions suggested that copper-nickel or copper-niobium composites (two very common bi-layer systems) with layer thicknesses on the order of 20 nm and then layered 100’s of times, would be less tough than a copper-nickel-niobium metallic composite of similar thicknesses. In particular, a particular mode of permanent deformation, cross-slip, could be activated only in the tri-layer system; the crystal structure of the other bi-layers would prohibit this particular mode of deformation. We then experimentally validated this predication using a wide range of tools. We utilized a DOE user facility, the Center for Integrated Nanotechnology (CINT), to fabricate, for the first time, these

  7. Lessons Learned from Recent Failure and Incident Investigations of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, J. B.; Glaessgen, E. H.; Raju, L. S.; Knight, N. F., Jr.; Reeder, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    During the past few decades, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has supported several large-scale failure and incident investigations and numerous requests for engineering consultations. Although various extenuating circumstances contributed to each of these incidents, in all cases, the failure resulted from accumulation and/or propagation of damage that reduced the load carrying capability of the structure to a level below that which was needed to sustain structural loads. A brief overview of various failure and incident investigations supported by LaRC, including some of the computational and experimental methodologies that have been applied, is presented. An important outcome of many of these failure and incident investigations is the development of an improved understanding of not only the state-of-the-art in experimental and analytical methods but also the state-of-the-art in the design and manufacturing processes that may contribute to such failures. In order to provide insight into such large-scale investigations, a series of lessons learned were captured. Awareness of these lessons learned is highly beneficial to engineers involved in similar investigations. Therefore, it is prudent that the lessons learned are disseminated such that they can be built upon in other investigations and in ensuing research and development activities.

  8. 16 CFR 1605.11 - Remedies for failure to permit authorized investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Remedies for failure to permit authorized investigations. 1605.11 Section 1605.11 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS INVESTIGATIONS, INSPECTIONS AND INQUIRIES PURSUANT TO THE FLAMMABLE FABRICS...

  9. 16 CFR 1605.11 - Remedies for failure to permit authorized investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Remedies for failure to permit authorized investigations. 1605.11 Section 1605.11 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS INVESTIGATIONS, INSPECTIONS AND INQUIRIES PURSUANT TO THE FLAMMABLE FABRICS...

  10. 16 CFR 1605.11 - Remedies for failure to permit authorized investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Remedies for failure to permit authorized investigations. 1605.11 Section 1605.11 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS INVESTIGATIONS, INSPECTIONS AND INQUIRIES PURSUANT TO THE FLAMMABLE FABRICS...

  11. 16 CFR 1605.11 - Remedies for failure to permit authorized investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Remedies for failure to permit authorized investigations. 1605.11 Section 1605.11 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS INVESTIGATIONS, INSPECTIONS AND INQUIRIES PURSUANT TO THE FLAMMABLE FABRICS...

  12. 16 CFR 1605.11 - Remedies for failure to permit authorized investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Remedies for failure to permit authorized investigations. 1605.11 Section 1605.11 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS INVESTIGATIONS, INSPECTIONS AND INQUIRIES PURSUANT TO THE FLAMMABLE FABRICS...

  13. Investigation of a Modified 9Cr-1Mo (P91) Pipe Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, Ronald L; Shingledecker, John P

    2006-04-01

    A modified 9Cr-1Mo feedwater (condensate) line at an Eastman Chemical Company plant failed in January 2005. The line was in continuous service since start-up December 2001 until failure. The Plant Superintendent estimated there were three thermal cycles since start-up, although there may have been as many as 25 thermal cycles during commissioning. Normal operating temperature was 325 F (163 C) and pressure was 1762 psig. The line was steam traced with the tracing activated only when ambient outdoor temperature dropped to 40 F (5 C). A modified 9Cr-1Mo steel (P91) pipe failure in a feedwater line in a chemical plant was investigated. The failure occurred in the vicinity of an elbow produced with socket welds of the pipe to the elbow. Based on metallography and hardness measurements, it was concluded that failure occurred because of an improper post-weld heat treatment of the socket weldment.

  14. Failure detection and isolation investigation for strapdown skew redundant tetrad laser gyro inertial sensor arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberlein, A. J.; Lahm, T. G.

    1976-01-01

    The degree to which flight-critical failures in a strapdown laser gyro tetrad sensor assembly can be isolated in short-haul aircraft after a failure occurrence has been detected by the skewed sensor failure-detection voting logic is investigated along with the degree to which a failure in the tetrad computer can be detected and isolated at the computer level, assuming a dual-redundant computer configuration. The tetrad system was mechanized with two two-axis inertial navigation channels (INCs), each containing two gyro/accelerometer axes, computer, control circuitry, and input/output circuitry. Gyro/accelerometer data is crossfed between the two INCs to enable each computer to independently perform the navigation task. Computer calculations are synchronized between the computers so that calculated quantities are identical and may be compared. Fail-safe performance (identification of the first failure) is accomplished with a probability approaching 100 percent of the time, while fail-operational performance (identification and isolation of the first failure) is achieved 93 to 96 percent of the time.

  15. An investigation of gear mesh failure prediction techniques. M.S. Thesis - Cleveland State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, James J.

    1989-01-01

    A study was performed in which several gear failure prediction methods were investigated and applied to experimental data from a gear fatigue test apparatus. The primary objective was to provide a baseline understanding of the prediction methods and to evaluate their diagnostic capabilities. The methods investigated use the signal average in both the time and frequency domain to detect gear failure. Data from eleven gear fatigue tests were recorded at periodic time intervals as the gears were run from initiation to failure. Four major failure modes, consisting of heavy wear, tooth breakage, single pits, and distributed pitting were observed among the failed gears. Results show that the prediction methods were able to detect only those gear failures which involved heavy wear or distributed pitting. None of the methods could predict fatigue cracks, which resulted in tooth breakage, or single pits. It is suspected that the fatigue cracks were not detected because of limitations in data acquisition rather than in methodology. Additionally, the frequency response between the gear shaft and the transducer was found to significantly affect the vibration signal. The specific frequencies affected were filtered out of the signal average prior to application of the methods.

  16. Full-Field Strain Methods for Investigating Failure Mechanisms in Triaxial Braided Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advancements in braiding technology have led to commercially viable manufacturing approaches for making large structures with complex shape out of triaxial braided composite materials. In some cases, the static load capability of structures made using these materials has been higher than expected based on material strength properties measured using standard coupon tests. A more detailed investigation of deformation and failure processes in large-unit-cell-size triaxial braid composites is needed to evaluate the applicability of standard test methods for these materials and to develop alternative testing approaches. This report presents some new techniques that have been developed to investigate local deformation and failure using digital image correlation techniques. The methods were used to measure both local and global strains during standard straight-sided coupon tensile tests on composite materials made with 12- and 24-k yarns and a 0 /+60 /-60 triaxial braid architecture. Local deformation and failure within fiber bundles was observed and correlations were made between these local failures and global composite deformation and strength.

  17. Failure Investigation of a Cage Suspension Gear Chain used in Coal Mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Debashis; Dutta, Shamik; Shukla, Awdhesh Kumar; Roy, Himadri

    2015-09-01

    This investigation is primarily aimed to examine the probable causes of in-service failure of cage suspension gear chain used in coal mines. Preliminary visual examination, dimensional measurement, chemical analysis, magnetic particle inspection and estimation of mechanical properties are necessary supplement to this investigation. Optical microscopic analysis along with scanning electron microscopy examinations are carried out to understand the metallurgical reasons for failure. The visual examination and magnetic particle investigations reveal presence of fissure cracks at weld joint for both un-failed and failed end link chain. The average hardness value has been found to increase gradually with the distance from the weld interface. The macro and microstructural examinations of the samples prepared from both failed and un-failed specimens depict presence of continuous as well as aligned linear inclusions randomly distributed along with decarburized layer at weld interface/fusion zone. Fractographic examination shows flat fracture covering major portion of cross-section, which is surrounded by a narrow annular metallic fracture surface having a texture different from that of the remaining surface. Fracture mechanics principles have been used to study the fatigue crack growth rate in both weld region and base region of the un-failed gear chain material. Detailed stress analyses are also carried out to evaluate the stress generated along the chain periphery. Finally, it is concluded that presence of serious weld defect due to use of improper welding parameters/procedure caused failure of the end links of the investigated chain link.

  18. Bovine respiratory disease research (1983-2009).

    PubMed

    Fulton, Robert W

    2009-12-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) research has provided significant understanding of the disease over the past 26 years. Modern research tools that have been used include monoclonal antibodies, genomics, polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry (IHC), DNA vaccines and viral vectors coding for immunogens. Emerging/reemerging viruses and new antigenic strains of viruses and bacteria have been identified. Methods of detection and the role for cattle persistently infected bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) were identified; viral subunits, cellular components and bacterial products have been characterized. Product advances have included vaccines for bovine respiratory syncytial virus, Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida; the addition of BVDV2 to the existing vaccines and new antibiotics. The role of Mycoplasma spp., particularly Mycoplasma bovis in BRD, has been more extensively studied. Bovine immunology research has provided more specific information on immune responses, T cell subsets and cytokines. The molecular and genetic basis for viral-bacterial synergy in BRD has been described. Attempts have been made to document how prevention of BRD by proper vaccination and management prior to exposure to infectious agents can minimize disease and serve as economic incentives for certified health programs. PMID:20003649

  19. Impact failure of MHW fuel sphere MHFT 65: report on interagency task force investigation and SRL evaluation of failure, November 1979-February 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.H.

    1981-06-01

    Following a safety verification impact test failure of a Multi-Hundred Watt (MHW) fuel sphere made at Savannah River Plant, from which 2.1 g of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ escaped containment, the Department of Energy organized a task force to investigate the cause of the test failure and to assess the failure probability of MHW fuel made at SRP. The task force described a two-part failure mechanism: embrittlement of the iridium containment shell by phosphorus which may have been picked up from the fuel; and large shear strains in the iridium caused by shearing or push-through of large chunks of fuel. Because the likelihood of push-through in this failure model depends on preexisting cracks in the fuel and their orientation to the impact face, the probability of further impact failures could not be easily assessed. From independent analysis of the available data at the Savannah River Laboratory, we concluded that the impact failure was caused by phosphorus embrittlement of the iridium, and breaching during impact of the graphite impact shell surrounding and cushioning the iridium-clad fuel. Excessive strain in the iridium is caused by extrusion of the iridium into the breach. This model predicts that impact failure is essentially independent of pre-existing cracks in the fuel and that SRP fuel, upon impact, should have no more failures than previously used fuel made at Mound Facility. Impact data to date indicate that SRP fuel clad in DOP-26 iridium cladding actually has fewer impact failures than earlier fuel clad in undoped iridium at MF.

  20. A Numerical Investigation of CFRP-Steel Interfacial Failure with Material Point Method

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Luming; Faleh, Haydar; Al-Mahaidi, Riadh

    2010-05-21

    The success of retrofitting steel structures by using the Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) significantly depends on the performance and integrity of CFRP-steel joint and the effectiveness of the adhesive used. Many of the previous numerical studies focused on the design and structural performance of the CFRP-steel system and neglected the mechanical responses of adhesive layer, which results in the lack of understanding in how the adhesive layer between the CFRP and steel performs during the loading and failure stages. Based on the recent observation on the failure of CFRP-steel bond in the double lap shear tests, a numerical approach is proposed in this study to simulate the delamination process of CFRP sheet from steel plate using the Material Point Method (MPM). In the proposed approach, an elastoplasticity model with a linear hardening and softening law is used to model the epoxy layer. The MPM, which does not employ fixed mesh-connectivity, is employed as a robust spatial discretization method to accommodate the multi-scale discontinuities involved in the CFRP-steel bond failure process. To demonstrate the potential of the proposed approach, a parametric study is conducted to investigate the effects of bond length and loading rates on the capacity and failure modes of CFRP-steel system. The evolution of the CFRP-steel bond failure and the distribution of stress and strain along bond length direction will be presented. The simulation results not only well match the available experimental data but also provide a better understanding on the physics behind the CFRP sheet delamination process.

  1. Application of dynamic fracture mechanics to the investigation of catastrophic failure in aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Benjamin Bin

    A dynamic fracture mechanics approach to the estimation of the residual strength of aircraft structures is presented. The dependence of the dynamic crack initiation toughness of aluminum 2024-T3 on loading rate is first studied experimentally. Based on the experimental results and on established dynamic fracture mechanic concepts, a fracture mechanics based failure model is established and is used to estimate the residual strength of aircraft structures. A methodology to determine residual strength of dynamically loaded structures based on global structural analysis coupled with local finite element analysis is introduced. Local finite element calculations were performed for different loading rates to simulate the conditions encountered in an explosively loaded aircraft fuselage. The results from the analyses were then used in conjunction with the experimental results for the dynamic fracture toughness of a 2024-T3 aluminum alloy as a function of loading rate, KdIC vs. K˙d(t), to determine the time to failure, tf, for a given loading rate. A failure envelope, sf vs. ṡ , based on the failure model and finite element analysis, is presented for the different cases and the implications for the residual strength of aircraft structures is discussed. Mixed mode dynamic crack initiation in aluminum 2024-T3 alloy is investigated by combining experiments with numerical simulations. The optical technique of coherent gradient sensing (CGS) and a strain gage method are employed to study the evolution of the mixed mode stress intensity factors. The dynamic mixed mode failure envelope is obtained using the crack initiation data from the experiments at a nominal loading rate of 7 x 105 MPam/s . Numerical simulations of the experiments are conducted to both help in designing the experiments and to validate the results of the experiments. The numerical simulations show good correlation with the experimental results.

  2. A Numerical Investigation of CFRP-Steel Interfacial Failure with Material Point Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Luming; Faleh, Haydar; Al-Mahaidi, Riadh

    2010-05-01

    The success of retrofitting steel structures by using the Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) significantly depends on the performance and integrity of CFRP-steel joint and the effectiveness of the adhesive used. Many of the previous numerical studies focused on the design and structural performance of the CFRP-steel system and neglected the mechanical responses of adhesive layer, which results in the lack of understanding in how the adhesive layer between the CFRP and steel performs during the loading and failure stages. Based on the recent observation on the failure of CFRP-steel bond in the double lap shear tests [1], a numerical approach is proposed in this study to simulate the delamination process of CFRP sheet from steel plate using the Material Point Method (MPM). In the proposed approach, an elastoplasticity model with a linear hardening and softening law is used to model the epoxy layer. The MPM [2], which does not employ fixed mesh-connectivity, is employed as a robust spatial discretization method to accommodate the multi-scale discontinuities involved in the CFRP-steel bond failure process. To demonstrate the potential of the proposed approach, a parametric study is conducted to investigate the effects of bond length and loading rates on the capacity and failure modes of CFRP-steel system. The evolution of the CFRP-steel bond failure and the distribution of stress and strain along bond length direction will be presented. The simulation results not only well match the available experimental data but also provide a better understanding on the physics behind the CFRP sheet delamination process.

  3. Development Testing and Subsequent Failure Investigation of a Spring Strut Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dervan, Jared; Robertson, Brandon; Staab, Lucas; Culberson, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Commodities are transferred between the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) crew module (CM) and service module (SM) via an external umbilical that is driven apart with spring-loaded struts after the structural connection is severed. The spring struts must operate correctly for the modules to separate safely. There was no vibration testing of strut development units scoped in the MPCV Program Plan; therefore, any design problems discovered as a result of vibration testing would not have been found until the component qualification. The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) and Lockheed Martin (LM) performed random vibration testing on a single spring strut development unit to assess its ability to withstand qualification level random vibration environments. Failure of the strut while exposed to random vibration resulted in a follow-on failure investigation, design changes, and additional development tests. This paper focuses on the results of the failure investigations including identified lessons learned and best practices to aid in future design iterations of the spring strut and to help other mechanism developers avoid similar pitfalls.

  4. Results of investigations of failures of geothermal direct-use well pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Culver, G.

    1994-12-01

    Failures of 13 geothermal direct-use well pumps were investigated and information obtained about an additional 5 pumps that have been in service up to 23 years, but have not failed. Pumps with extra long lateral and variable-speed drives had the highest correlation with reduced time in service. There appears to be at least circumstantial evidence that recirculation may be a cause of reduced pump life. If recirculation is a cause of pump failures, pump specifiers will need to be more aware of minimum flow conditions as well as maximum flow conditions when specifying pumps. Over-sizing pumps and the tendency to specify pumps with high flow and low Net Positive Suction Head (NPSH) could lead to increased problems with recirculation.

  5. Project Morpheus: Morpheus 1.5A Lander Failure Investigation Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devolites, Jennifer L.; Olansen, Jon B.; Munday, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    On August 9, 2012 the Morpheus 1.5A vehicle crashed shortly after lift off from the Kennedy Space Center. The loss was limited to the vehicle itself which was pre-declared to be a test failure and not a mishap. The Morpheus project is demonstrating advanced technologies for in space and planetary surface vehicles including: autonomous flight control, landing site hazard identification and safe site selection, relative surface and hazard navigation, precision landing, modular reusable flight software, and high performance, non-toxic, cryogenic liquid Oxygen and liquid Methane integrated main engine and attitude control propulsion system. A comprehensive failure investigation isolated the fault to the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) data path to the flight computer. Several improvements have been identified and implemented for the 1.5B and 1.5C vehicles.

  6. On acoustic emission for failure investigation in CFRP: Pattern recognition and peak frequency analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutkin, R.; Green, C. J.; Vangrattanachai, S.; Pinho, S. T.; Robinson, P.; Curtis, P. T.

    2011-05-01

    This paper investigates failure in Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastics CFRP using Acoustic Emission (AE). Signals have been collected and post-processed for various test configurations: tension, Compact Tension (CT), Compact Compression (CC), Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) and four-point bend End Notched Flexure (4-ENF). The signals are analysed with three different pattern recognition algorithms: k-means, Self Organising Map (SOM) combined with k-means and Competitive Neural Network (CNN). The SOM combined with k-means appears as the most effective of the three algorithms. The results from the clustering analysis follow patterns found in the peak frequencies distribution. A detailed study of the frequency content of each test is then performed and the classification of several failure modes is achieved.

  7. Full-field Strain Methods for Investigating Failure Mechanisms in Triaxial Braided Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2008-01-01

    Composite materials made with triaxial braid architecture and large tow size carbon fibers are beginning to be used in many applications, including composite aircraft and engine structures. Recent advancements in braiding technology have led to commercially viable manufacturing approaches for making large structures with complex shape. Although the large unit cell size of these materials is an advantage for manufacturing efficiency, the fiber architecture presents some challenges for materials characterization, design, and analysis. In some cases, the static load capability of structures made using these materials has been higher than expected based on material strength properties measured using standard coupon tests. A potential problem with using standard tests methods for these materials is that the unit cell size can be an unacceptably large fraction of the specimen dimensions. More detailed investigation of deformation and failure processes in large unit cell size triaxial braid composites is needed to evaluate the applicability of standard test methods for these materials and to develop alternative testing approaches. In recent years, commercial equipment has become available that enables digital image correlation to be used on a more routine basis for investigation of full field 3D deformation in materials and structures. In this paper, some new techniques that have been developed to investigate local deformation and failure using digital image correlation techniques are presented. The methods were used to measure both local and global strains during standard straight-sided coupon tensile tests on composite materials made with 12 and 24 k yarns and a 0/+60/-60 triaxial braid architecture. Local deformation and failure within fiber bundles was observed, and this local failure had a significant effect on global stiffness and strength. The matrix material had a large effect on local damage initiation for the two matrix materials used in this investigation

  8. Investigation of pump and pump switch failures in rainwater harvesting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moglia, Magnus; Gan, Kein; Delbridge, Nathan; Sharma, Ashok K.; Tjandraatmadja, Grace

    2016-07-01

    Rainwater harvesting is an important technology in cities that can contribute to a number of functions, such as sustainable water management in the face of demand growth and drought as well as the detention of rainwater to increase flood protection and reduce damage to waterways. The objective of this article is to investigate the integrity of residential rainwater harvesting systems, drawing on the results of the field inspection of 417 rainwater systems across Melbourne that was combined with a survey of householders' situation, maintenance behaviour and attitudes. Specifically, the study moves beyond the assumption that rainwater systems are always operational and functional and draws on the collected data to explore the various reasons and rates of failure associated with pumps and pump switches, leaving for later further exploration of the failure in other components such as the collection area, gutters, tank, and overflows. To the best of the authors' knowledge, there is no data like this in academic literature or in the water sector. Straightforward Bayesian Network models were constructed in order to analyse the factors contributing to various types of failures, including system age, type of use, the reason for installation, installer, and maintenance behaviour. Results show that a number of issues commonly exist, such as failure of pumps (5% of systems), automatic pump switches that mediate between the tank and reticulated water (9% of systems), and systems with inadequate setups (i.e. no pump) limiting their use. In conclusion, there appears to be a lack of enforcement or quality controls in both installation practices by sometimes unskilled contractors and lack of ongoing maintenance checks. Mechanisms for quality control and asset management are required, but difficult to promote or enforce. Further work is needed into how privately owned assets that have public benefits could be better managed.

  9. Triggers for the Collapse of Ice Shelves in Antarctica: Investigating Compressive Arch Failure with Numerical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huth, A.; Smith, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    Antarctic ice shelves restrain, or buttress, grounded ice from flowing freely into the ocean by redistributing the force of the ice flow to pinning points (ice rises) at the ice front and shear margins at adjacent bay walls. This buttressing process typically defines a 'compressive arch' in the strain rate-field of the ice shelf, where the smallest principal component transitions from compressive inland of the arch to extensive seaward of the arch. If the compressive arch is breached due to iceberg calving at the ice front or thinning at the shear margins, the ice shelf will retreat irreversibly to a new stable configuration or collapse entirely. This retreat can compromise ice shelf buttressing, resulting in sea-level rise and ocean freshening as grounded ice flows unrestricted into the ocean. Here, we investigate the dynamics of compressive arch failure using Larsen C ice shelf as a test case for a larger study that will include several other ice shelves and projections for sea-level rise. We use satellite observations to develop a steady state model of Larsen C in Elmer/ICE, a finite element ice sheet/ice flow software package. We run calving and thinning simulations to determine the conditions needed to trigger ice shelf retreat via compressive arch failure and discuss the likelihood of these scenarios occurring in relation to extrapolations of current melt profiles and calving trends.

  10. An accelerated failure time model for investigating pedestrian crossing behavior and waiting times at signalized intersections.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaobao; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Huan, Mei; Peng, Yichuan; Gao, Ziyou

    2015-09-01

    The waiting process is crucial to pedestrians in the street-crossing behavior. Once pedestrians terminate their waiting behavior during the red light period, they would cross against the red light and put themselves in danger. A joint hazard-based duration model is developed to investigate the effect of various covariates on pedestrian crossing behavior and to estimate pedestrian waiting times at signalized intersections. A total of 1181 pedestrians approaching the intersections during red light periods were observed in Beijing, China. Pedestrian crossing behaviors are classified into immediate crossing behavior and waiting behavior. The probability and effect of various covariates for pedestrians' immediate crossing behavior are identified by a logit model. Four accelerated failure time duration models based on the exponential, Weibull, lognormal and log-logistic distributions are proposed to examine the significant risk factors affecting duration times for pedestrians' waiting behavior. A joint duration model is developed to estimate pedestrian waiting times. Moreover, unobserved heterogeneity is considered in the proposed model. The results indicate that the Weibull AFT model with shared frailty is appropriate for modelling pedestrian waiting durations. Failure to account for heterogeneity would significantly underestimate the effects of covariates on waiting duration times. The proposed model provides a better understanding of pedestrian crossing behavior and more accurate estimation of pedestrian waiting times. It may be applicable in traffic system analysis in developing countries with high flow of mixed traffic. PMID:26072184

  11. An investigation of the causes of failure of flexible thermal protection materials in an aerodynamic environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, Charles F.

    1987-01-01

    Tests of small panels of advanced flexible reusable surface insulation (AFRSI) were conducted using a small wind tunnel that was designed to simulate Space Shuttle Orbiter entry mean-flow and pulsating aerodynamic loads. The wind tunnel, with a 3 inch wide by 1.75 inch high by 7.5 inch long test section, proved to be capable of continuous flow at dynamic pressures q near 580 psf with fluctuating pressures over 2 psi RMS at an excitation frequency f sub E of 200 Hz. For this investigation, however, the wind tunnel was used to test entry-temperature preconditioned and heat-cleaned AFRSI at q = 280 psf, Prms was nearly equal to 1.2 psi and f sub E = 200 Hz. The objective of these tests was to determine the mechanism of failure of AFRSI at Orbiter entry conditions. Details of the test apparatus and test results are presented.

  12. Development of a GIS-based failure investigation system for highway soil slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, Raghav; Aydilek, Ahmet H.; Tanyu, Burak F.

    2015-06-01

    A framework for preparation of an early warning system was developed for Maryland, using a GIS database and a collective overlay of maps that highlight highway slopes susceptible to soil slides or slope failures in advance through spatial and statistical analysis. Data for existing soil slope failures was collected from geotechnical reports and field visits. A total of 48 slope failures were recorded and analyzed. Six factors, including event precipitation, geological formation, land cover, slope history, slope angle, and elevation were considered to affect highway soil slope stability. The observed trends indicate that precipitation and poor surface or subsurface drainage conditions are principal factors causing slope failures. 96% of the failed slopes have an open drainage section. A majority of the failed slopes lie in regions with relatively high event precipitation ( P>200 mm). 90% of the existing failures are surficial erosion type failures, and only 1 out of the 42 slope failures is deep rotational type failure. More than half of the analyzed slope failures have occurred in regions having low density land cover. 46% of failures are on slopes with slope angles between 20° and 30°. Influx of more data relating to failed slopes should give rise to more trends, and thus the developed slope management system will aid the state highway engineers in prudential budget allocation and prioritizing different remediation projects based on the literature reviewed on the principles, concepts, techniques, and methodology for slope instability evaluation (Leshchinsky et al., 2015).

  13. Investigating compression failure mechanisms in composite laminates with a transparent fiberglass-epoxy birefringent materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, M. J.; Williams, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The response and failure of a + or - 45s class laminate was studied by transparent fiberglass epoxy composite birefringent material. The birefringency property allows the laminate stress distribution to be observed during the test and also after the test if permanent residual stresses occur. The location of initial laminate failure and of the subsequent failure propagation are observed through its transparency characteristics. Experimental results are presented.

  14. Comparison Between Corrosion Behavior of Copper and Stainless Steel 90° Elbow and Failure Investigation of 90° Copper Elbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouad, Mohamed Ahmed; Zewail, Taghreed Mohamed; Amine, Nieven Abbas; El-Tawail, Yehia Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    Frequently found in elbow, erosion failures may lead to the leakage of pipes and even damage the whole system. Erosion is a form of material degradation that involves electrochemical corrosion and mechanical wear processes encountered on the surface of metal pipes. Research on the erosion-corrosion mechanism indicates that the erosion mainly results from the interactions between the elbow surface and the fluid traveling along the surface. Corrosion behavior of 90° copper and stainless steel elbow was studied. Scanning electron microscopy was processed on the 90° copper elbow to show the surface morphology of the failed copper elbow. Failure investigation was carried out on 90° copper elbow to determine failure location and failure causes.

  15. Malfunction and failure analysis investigations of C26000 (Cu-30% Zn) brass cartridge cases

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, C.; Clark, S. . Metallic Materials Branch of the Armaments Technology Div.)

    1994-01-01

    The C26000 alloy, containing 70% Cu and 30% Zn, is predominantly used for cartridge case production and has an outstanding record of service. A multiple-step manufacturing process is employed to produce different microstructure in different sections of the cartridge case. The constant demands to increase performance have resulted in frequent revisions to the manufacturing process, and more stringent controls have been implemented in an attempt to produce a better product. Not surprisingly, however, failures and malfunctions are encountered in the tryout'' experiments. Studies indicate that failures in the head section can usually be traced to factors associated with gun design and propellant materials. Failures in the wall section are primarily stress-induced. Descriptions are given of the distinctive modes of failure in various sections of the cartridge case. The causes of failure and the remedies to prevent their recurrence are discussed.

  16. An Investigation of Emotion Recognition and Theory of Mind in People with Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Habota, Tina; McLennan, Skye N.; Cameron, Jan; Ski, Chantal F.; Thompson, David R.; Rendell, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Cognitive deficits are common in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF), but no study has investigated whether these deficits extend to social cognition. The present study provided the first empirical assessment of emotion recognition and theory of mind (ToM) in patients with CHF. In addition, it assessed whether each of these social cognitive constructs was associated with more general cognitive impairment. Methods A group comparison design was used, with 31 CHF patients compared to 38 demographically matched controls. The Ekman Faces test was used to assess emotion recognition, and the Mind in the Eyes test to measure ToM. Measures assessing global cognition, executive functions, and verbal memory were also administered. Results There were no differences between groups on emotion recognition or ToM. The CHF group’s performance was poorer on some executive measures, but memory was relatively preserved. In the CHF group, both emotion recognition performance and ToM ability correlated moderately with global cognition (r = .38, p = .034; r = .49, p = .005, respectively), but not with executive function or verbal memory. Conclusion CHF patients with lower cognitive ability were more likely to have difficulty recognizing emotions and inferring the mental states of others. Clinical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:26529409

  17. Numerical investigations of failure in EB-PVD thermal barrier coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glynn, Michael L.

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems are used in high temperature applications in turbine engines. TBCs are applied on superalloy substrates and are multilayered coatings comprised of a metallic bond coat, a thermally grown oxide (TGO) and a ceramic top coat. They provide thermal protection for the superalloy substrate and are considered to hold the greatest potential for increased operating temperatures. Failure of the TBC system most commonly occurs as a result of large scale buckling and spallation. The buckling is a consequence of many small-scale delaminations that arise in the top coat above local imperfections in the TGO, and durability of the TBC system is governed by a sequence of crack nucleation, propagation and coalescence. The numerical investigations that are employed in this dissertation are used to determine the stress development near the imperfections and are based on microstructural observations and measured material properties of TBC test buttons supplied by GE Aircraft Engines. The test buttons were subject to thermal cycling at GE and cycled to different percentages of TBC life. Numerical simulations of two different types of TBC tests are used to show that the top coat out-of-plane stress increases with a decrease of the substrate radius of curvature and a decrease in the heating rate. An inherent scaling parameter in the TBC system is identified and used to demonstrate that the stress developed in the top coat is governed by the evolution of an imperfection in the TGO. The effect of a martensitic phase transformation in the bond coat, related to a change in bond coat chemistry, is shown to significantly increase the top coat out-of-plane tensile stress. Finally, a subsurface crack is simulated in the top coat and used to determine the influence of the bond coat on failure of the TBC system. While the bond coat inelastic properties are the most important factors in determining the extent of the crack opening displacement, the bond coat

  18. Investigation of component failure rates for pulsed versus steady state tokamak operation

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1992-07-01

    This report presents component failure rate data sources applicable to magnetic fusion systems, and defines multiplicative factors to adjust these data for specific use on magnetic fusion experiment designs. The multipliers address both long pulse and steady state tokamak operation. Thermal fatigue and radiation damage are among the leading reasons for large multiplier values in pulsed operation applications. Field failure rate values for graphite protective tiles are presented, and beryllium tile failure rates in laboratory testing are also given. All of these data can be used for reliability studies, safety analyses, design tradeoff studies, and risk assessments.

  19. Comments on "How Child Protective Services Investigators Decide to Substantiate Mothers for Failure-to-Protect in Sexual Abuse Cases"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadoin, Amy L.; Carnes, Connie N.

    2006-01-01

    This commentary discusses the decisions of child protective service (CPS) investigators to substantiate mothers for failure-to-protect (FTP) in child sexual abuse cases. Four areas are identified in which the scientific literature remains inadequate to fully inform child maltreatment researchers, CPS practitioners and child welfare policymakers on…

  20. Investigation of extrusion failures of PTFE-based gaskets in chemical plant service

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, J.R.; Keywood, S.S.

    1996-12-01

    PTFE-based gaskets in chemical plant service typically fail in an extrusion mode, sometimes referred to as blowout. Test work previously published by Monsanto indicated that correctly installed PTFE-based gaskets have pressure performance far exceeding system pressure ratings. These results have since been confirmed by extensive testing at the Montreal based Ecole Polytechnique Tightness Testing and Research Laboratory (TTRL), funded by a consortium of gasket users and manufacturers. With the knowledge that properly installed gaskets can withstand system pressures in excess of 1,000 psig [6,894 kPa], failures at two chemical plants were re-examined. This analysis indicates that extrusion type failures can be caused by excessive internal pressures, associated with sections of pipe having an external source of heat coincident with a blocked flow condition. This results in high system pressures which explain the extrusion type failures observed. The paper discusses details of individual failures and examines methods to prevent them. Other causes for extrusion failures are reviewed, with a recommendation that stronger gasket materials not be utilized to correct problems until it is verified that excessive pressure build-up is not the problem. Also summarized are the requirements for proper installation to achieve the potential blowout resistance found in these gaskets.

  1. Elephant butte powerplant investigation of permanent magnet generator corrosion and bearing failures. Project notes 8450-97-07. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Price, P.; Atwater, P.

    1997-04-01

    This investigation and report were initiated in response to a request to determine causes for excessive corrosion and premature bearing failures on the Woodward Permanent Magnet Generator (PMG) on the three main generating units at Elephant Butte. All three main generating units were rewound using epoxy-type insulating materials between 1989 and 1991. Plant personnel reported that corrosion and failure rates seemed to accelerate after the new stator windings were installed. This report documents field testing conducted the week of March 10, 1997, to determine if stray electrical currents/voltages were causing the problems. Electrical field test results indicate that accelerated PMG bearing failure and corrosion were not caused by stray voltages or current. Tests were conducted on the main shaft in the turbine pit and on the PMG shaft and housing located atop the exciter shaft.

  2. Investigations of the Failure in Boilers Economizer Tubes Used in Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moakhar, Roozbeh Siavash; Mehdipour, Mehrad; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Mohebali, Milad; Koohbor, Behrad

    2013-09-01

    In this study, failure of a high pressure economizer tube of a boiler used in gas-Mazut combined cycle power plants was studied. Failure analysis of the tube was accomplished by taking into account visual inspection, thickness measurement, and hardness testing as well as microstructural observations using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Optical microscopy images indicate that there is no phase transformation during service, and ferrite-pearlite remained. The results of XRD also revealed Iron sulfate (FeSO4) and Iron hydroxide sulfate (FeOH(SO4)) phases formed on the steel surface. A considerable amount of Sulfur was also detected on the outer surface of the tube by EDS analysis. Dew-point corrosion was found to be the principal reason for the failure of the examined tube while it has been left out-of-service.

  3. Investigation of control law reconfigurations to accommodate a control element failure on a commercial airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, A. J.; Hueschen, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of a pilot to reconfigure the control surfaces on an airplane after a failure, allowing the airplane to recover to a safe condition, becomes more difficult with increasing airplane complexity. Techniques are needed to stabilize and control the airplane immediately after a failure, allowing the pilot more time to make longer range decisions. This paper presents a baseline design of a discrete multivariable control law using four controls for the longitudinal channel of a B-737. Non-reconfigured and reconfigured control laws are then evaluated, both analytically and by means of a digital airplane simulation, for three individual control element failures (stabilizer, elevator, spoilers). The simulation results are used to evaluate the effectiveness of the control reconfiguration on tracking ability during the approach and landing phase of flight with severe windshear and turbulence disturbing the airplane dynamics.

  4. Are Success and Failure Experiences Equally Motivational? An Investigation of Regulatory Focus and Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shu, Tse-Mei; Lam, Shui-fong

    2011-01-01

    The present study extended regulatory focus theory (Idson & Higgins, 2000) to an educational setting and attempted to identify individuals with high motivation after both success and failure feedback. College students in Hong Kong (N = 180) participated in an experiment with a 2 promotion focus (high vs. low) x 2 prevention focus (high vs. low) x…

  5. Investigation of a fatigue failure in a stainless steel femoral plate.

    PubMed

    Marcomini, J B; Baptista, C A R P; Pascon, J P; Teixeira, R L; Reis, F P

    2014-10-01

    Surgical implants are exposed to severe working conditions and therefore a wide range of failure mechanisms may occur, including fatigue, corrosion, wear, fretting and combinations of them. The mechanical failures of metallic implants may also be influenced by several other factors, including the design, material, manufacturing, installation, postoperative complications and misuse. An 83-year-old patient suffered an oblique femoral shaft fracture due to a fall at home. A stainless steel locking compression plate (LCP) employed in the fracture reduction failed after four months and was sent back to the producer. A second LCP of the same type was implanted and also failed after six months. A failure analysis of the second femoral LCP is performed in this paper. The results demonstrate that poor material quality was decisive to the failure. The chemical analysis revealed a high P content in the steel, which is not in accordance to the standards. A combination of factors lead to LCP fracture and these include: brittle crack initiation due to phosphorus, segregation at grain boundaries, crack propagation due to cyclic loading and final fast fracture favored by the loss of ductility due to cold work. PMID:25023519

  6. Predicting Success, Preventing Failure: An Investigation of the California High School Exit Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zau, Andrew C.; Betts, Julian R.

    2008-01-01

    Many educators, parents, and policymakers continue to call for reforms to the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE), citing concern about the 10 percent of California students who do not graduate because of their failure to pass the test. By law, current funding for tutoring those at risk of failing the CAHSEE is targeted at those in grade 12…

  7. Three-Dimensional Numerical Investigations of the Failure Mechanism of a Rock Disc with a Central or Eccentric Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. Y.; Sloan, S. W.; Tang, C. A.

    2014-11-01

    The diametrical compression of a circular disc (Brazilian test) or cylinder with a small eccentric hole is a simple but important test to determine the tensile strength of rocks. This paper studies the failure mechanism of circular disc with an eccentric hole by a 3D numerical model (RFPA3D). A feature of the code RFPA3D is that it can numerically simulate the evolution of cracks in three-dimensional space, as well as the heterogeneity of the rock mass. First, numerically simulated Brazilian tests are compared with experimental results. Special attention is given to the effect of the thickness to radius ratio on the failure modes and the peak stress of specimens. The effects of the compressive strength to tensile strength ratio ( C/T), the loading arc angle (2 α), and the homogeneity index ( m) are also studied in the numerical simulations. Secondly, the failure process of a rock disc with a central hole is studied. The effects of the ratio of the internal hole radius ( r) to the radius of the rock disc ( R) on the failure mode and the peak stress are investigated. Thirdly, the influence of the vertical and horizontal eccentricity of an internal hole on the initiation and propagation of cracks inside a specimen are simulated. The effect of the radius of the eccentric hole and the homogeneity index ( m) are also investigated.

  8. Investigation of accelerated stress factors and failure/degradation mechanisms in terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    Results of an ongoing research program into the reliability of terrestrial solar cells are presented. Laboratory accelerated testing procedures are used to identify failure/degradation modes which are then related to basic physical, chemical, and metallurgical phenomena. In the most recent tests, ten different types of production cells, both with and without encapsulation, from eight different manufacturers were subjected to a variety of accelerated tests. Results indicated the presence of a number of hitherto undetected failure mechanisms, including Schottky barrier formation at back contacts and loss of adhesion of grid metallization. The mechanism of Schottky barrier formation is explained by hydrogen, formed by the dissociation of water molecules at the contact surface, diffusing to the metal semiconductor interface. This same mechanism accounts for the surprising increase in sensitivity to accelerated stress conditions that was observed in some cells when encapsulated.

  9. Laboratory investigation of borehole breakouts and Multi-step failure model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Xiao-Ping; Mao, Ji-Zheng; Cui, Zhan-Tao

    1993-05-01

    Based on our experiment of borehole breakouts with a group of sandstone samples described in this paper, a multi-step failure model of borehole breakouts are proposed to quantitatively explain the relationship between the section shape of borehole breakouts and the state of crustal stress. In this model the borehole spalling is not only related to the state of stress at a single point but also the state of stress on its neighboring area. The comparison between the experimental results of borehole breakouts and the calculation results shows a good agreement.

  10. Reliability and failure mode investigation of high-power multimode InGaAs strained quantum well single emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sin, Yongkun; Foran, Brendan; Presser, Nathan; Mason, Maribeth; Moss, Steven C.

    2007-02-01

    In recent years record performance characteristics from multi-mode InGaAs strained quantum well single emitters at 920-980nm have been reported including a maximum CW optical output power of ~20W and a power conversion efficiency of ~75%. These excellent performance characteristics are only possible through combined optimization of laser structure design, chip fabrication processes, and packaging. Whereas broad area multi-mode single emitters likely have sufficient reliability for industrial uses, reliability of these lasers still remains a concern for communications applications including deployment in potential space satellite systems where high reliability is required. Most of previous reports on these lasers have been focused on their performance characteristics with very limited reports on failure mode analysis although understanding the physics of failure is crucial in developing a proper lifetime model for these lasers. We thus report on the reliability and failure mode analysis of high power multi-mode single emitters. The lasers studied were broad area strained InGaAs single QW lasers at 940-980nm with typical aperture widths of around 100μm. At an injection current of 7A typical CW output powers were over 6W at 25°C with a wall plug efficiency of ~60%. First, various lasing characteristics were measured including spatial and thermal characteristics that are critical to understanding performance and reliability of these devices. ACC burn-in tests with different stress conditions were performed on these devices until their failure. We report accelerated lifetest results with over 5000 accumulated test hours. Finally, we report failure mode investigation results of the degraded lasers.

  11. An overview of animal models for investigating the pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies in acute hepatic failure

    PubMed Central

    Tuñón, María Jesús; Alvarez, Marcelino; Culebras, Jesús M; González-Gallego, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Acute hepatic failure (AHF) is a severe liver injury accompanied by hepatic encephalopathy which causes multiorgan failure with an extremely high mortality rate, even if intensive care is provided. Management of severe AHF continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. Liver transplantation has been shown to be the most effective therapy, but the procedure is limited by shortage of donor organs. Although a number of clinical trials testing different liver assist devices are under way, these systems alone have no significant effect on patient survival and are only regarded as a useful approach to bridge patients with AHF to liver transplantation. As a result, reproducible experimental animal models resembling the clinical conditions are still needed. The three main approaches used to create an animal model for AHF are: surgical procedures, toxic liver injury and infective procedures. Most common models are based on surgical techniques (total/partial hepatectomy, complete/transient devascularization) or the use of hepatotoxic drugs (acetaminophen, galactosamine, thioacetamide, and others), and very few satisfactory viral models are available. We have recently developed a viral model of AHF by means of the inoculation of rabbits with the virus of rabbit hemorrhagic disease. This model displays biochemical and histological characteristics, and clinical features that resemble those in human AHF. In the present article an overview is given of the most widely used animal models of AHF, and their main advantages and disadvantages are reviewed. PMID:19575487

  12. What causes an icy fault to slip? Investigating strike-slip failure conditions on Ganymede at Dardanus and Tiamat Sulcus.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, M. E.; Smith-Konter, B. R.; Burkhard, L. M.; Collins, G. C.; Seifert, F.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    Ganymede exhibits two geologically distinct terrains known as dark and light (grooved) terrain. The mechanism for a transition from dark to light terrain remains unclear; however, inferences of strike-slip faulting and distributed shear zones suggest that strike-slip tectonism may be important to the structural development of Ganymede's surface and in this transition. Here we investigate the role of tidal stresses on Ganymede in the formation and evolution of strike-slip structures in both dark and grooved terrains. Using numerical code SatStress, we calculate both diurnal and non-synchronous rotation (NSR) tidal stresses at Ganymede's surface. Specifically, we investigate the role of fault friction and orbital eccentricity in the development of ~45 km of right-lateral offset at Dardanus Sulcus and a possible case of <10 km of right-lateral offset at Tiamat Sulcus. We compute Coulomb failure conditions for these target fractures and consider tidal stress scenarios for both present eccentricity (0.0013) and possible past high (~0.05) eccentricity of Ganymede. We find that while diurnal stresses are not large enough to support strike-slip failure at present or past eccentricities, models that include both diurnal and NSR stress readily generate shear and normal stress magnitudes that could give rise to shear failure. Results for a past high eccentricity assuming a low coefficient of friction (μf = 0.2) suggest shear failure is possible down to depths of 1-2 km along both Dardanus and Tiamat. For a high coefficient of friction (μf = 0.6), failure is limited to about 1 km depth at Dardanus and Tiamat, although confined to small episodic slip windows for the latter. Moreover, our models predict a right-lateral sense of slip, in agreement with inferred offset observed at both regions. Based on these results, we infer that past shear failure on Ganymede is possible when NSR is a driving stress mechanism. We complement this study with a detailed morphological mapping of

  13. Investigation of Mechanisms of Blade Failure of Forged Hastalloy B and Cast Stellite 21 Turbine Blades in Turbojet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaker, C; Robards, C F; Garrett, F B

    1951-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to study the mechanisms of blade failure of forged Hastelloy B and cast Stellite 21. The blades were mounted in a 16-25-6 alloy rotor and subjected to 20-minute cycles consisting of 15 minutes at rated speed and approximately 5 minutes at idle. The first failures of the Hastelloy B and Stellite 21 blades were probably the result of excessive vibratory stresses and occurred after 14.25 and 16.75 hours, respectively. After 28.75 hours of operation, all but 3 of the original 25 Hastelloy B blades had either failed or contained stress-rupture-type cracks and four of the original 27 Stellite 21 blades contained stress-rupture-type cracks.

  14. Investigation of failure mechanisms in high-power microwave transmission windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosman, Herman L.

    Thermal runaway and window failure restrict the power output of high power (˜1 MW), long pulse length (˜10 sec) gyrotrons used for plasma heating in magnetic confinement fusion experiments. Chemical vapor deposition diamond is used as window material due to its low loss tangent and high thermal conductivity, but still suffers from occasional, unpredictable failure. With the use of a simple model, it is shown that a uniform thin film of contaminant on a microwave window may absorb up to 50 percent of the incident power, even if the film thickness is only a small fraction of its resistive skin depth. The fraction of power absorbed by thin films on diamond gyrotron windows is estimated by comparison with published data obtained via two different experimental routes. Typically about a fraction of one percent of the incident power is absorbed by the thin films. Discontinuous surface films, where the surface contaminants have a patchy or island structure, are modeled with an equivalent transmission line circuit. Patchy surface contaminants on diamond gyrotron windows do not contribute significantly to the overall power absorbed on the window surface. An unexpected result is that most of the power is absorbed on the 'clean' window surface. The uniform thin film model is therefore adequate to describe surface power losses for diamond windows. The discontinuous film model, applied to alumina windows with TIN coatings, shows power absorption values of approximately 0.1--0.3%. Graphitic contaminants embedded in the CVD diamond absorb RE power from both the RE electric and magnetic field components. The absorbed power is insufficient to cause significant heating or cause graphitization in the diamond. The power absorbed in a diamond gyrotron window causes thermal gradient stresses in the window, with the maximum tensile stress occurring close to the window edge. For power absorption values up to 2000 W, the tensile stresses alone are insufficient to cause mechanical failure

  15. Investigation of accelerated stress factors and failure/degradation mechanisms in terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Research on the reliability of terrestrial solar cells was performed to identify failure/degradation modes affecting solar cells and to relate these to basic physical, chemical, and metallurgical phenomena. Particular concerns addressed were the reliability attributes of individual single crystalline, polycrystalline, and amorphous thin film silicon cells. Results of subjecting different types of crystalline cells to the Clemson accelerated test schedule are given. Preliminary step stress results on one type of thin film amorphous silicon (a:Si) cell indicated that extraneous degradation modes were introduced above 140 C. Also described is development of measurement procedures which are applicable to the reliability testing of a:Si solar cells as well as an approach to achieving the necessary repeatability of fabricating a simulated a:Si reference cell from crystalline silicon photodiodes.

  16. Circuit breaker operation and potential failure modes during an earthquake: a preliminary investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, H.E.

    1984-04-09

    This study addresses the effect of a strong-motion earthquake on circuit breaker operation. It focuses on the loss of offsite power (LOSP) transient caused by a strong-motion earthquake at the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. This report also describes the operator action necessary to prevent core melt if the above circuit breaker failure modes occur simultaneously on three 4.16 KV buses. Numerous circuit breakers important to plant safety, such as circuit breakers to diesel generators and engineered safety systems, (ESS), must open and/or close during this transient while strong motion is occurring. Nearly 500 electrical drawings were examined to address the effects of earthquakes on circuit breaker operation. Due to the complexity of the problem, this study is not intended to be definitive but serves as a focusing tool for further work. 5 references, 9 figures, 3 tables.

  17. The role of ultrasound imaging in diagnosing and investigating early pregnancy failure.

    PubMed

    Jauniaux, E; Johns, J; Burton, G J

    2005-06-01

    The advent of high-resolution transvaginal ultrasound (TVS) has revolutionized our understanding of the pathophysiology and the management of early pregnancy failure. Knowledge of the ultrasound appearances of normal early pregnancy development and a good understanding of its pitfalls are essential for the diagnosis and management of early pregnancy failure. Ultrasound imaging has rapidly replaced all other techniques used to study normal human development in the first trimester, and ultrasound features of the early gestational sac have corroborated anatomical studies showing that the first structures to appear are the celomic cavity and the secondary yolk sac. No single ultrasound measurement of the different anatomical features in the first trimester has been shown to have a high predictive value for determining early pregnancy outcome. Similarly, Doppler studies have failed to demonstrate abnormal blood flow indices in the first-trimester uteroplacental circulation of pregnancies that subsequently end in miscarriage. Ultrasound parameters combined with maternal serum hormone levels, maternal age, smoking habits, obstetric history and the occurrence of vaginal bleeding have all been combined in multivariate analyses, with mixed results. Combined ultrasound and in-vitro experiments have demonstrated that the maternal circulation inside the placenta starts at the periphery at around 9 weeks of gestation and that this is associated with a physiological oxidative stress which could be the trigger for the formation of the placental membranes. Abnormal development of these membranes can result in subchorionic hemorrhage and threatened miscarriage with subsequent long-term consequences such as preterm rupture of the membranes and preterm labor, irrespective of the finding of a hematoma on ultrasound. In both euploid and aneuploid missed miscarriages there is clear ultrasound evidence for excessive entry of maternal blood at a very early stage inside the developing

  18. Centrifuge model tests of rainfall-induced slope failures for the investigation of the initiation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matziaris, Vasileios; Marshall, Alec; Yu, Hai-Sui

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall-induced landslides are very common natural disasters which cause damage to properties and infrastructure and may result in the loss of human lives. These phenomena often take place in unsaturated soil slopes and are triggered by the saturation of the soil profile, due to rain infiltration, which leads to a loss of shear strength. The aim of this study is to determine rainfall thresholds for the initiation of landslides under different initial conditions. Model tests of rainfall-induced landslides are conducted in the Nottingham Centre for Geomechanics 50g-T geotechnical centrifuge. Initially unsaturated plane-strain slope models made with fine silica sand are prepared at varying densities at 1g and accommodated within a climatic chamber which provides controlled environmental conditions. During the centrifuge flight at 60g, rainfall events of varying intensity and duration are applied to the slope models causing the initiation of slope failure. The impact of soil state properties and rainfall characteristics on the landslide initiation process are discussed. The variation of pore water pressures within the slope before, during and after simulated rainfall events is recorded using miniature pore pressure transducers buried in the soil model. Slope deformation is determined by using a high-speed camera and digital image analysis techniques.

  19. Economic Burden of Heart Failure: Investigating Outpatient and Inpatient Costs in Abeokuta, Southwest Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ogah, Okechukwu S.; Stewart, Simon; Onwujekwe, Obinna E.; Falase, Ayodele O.; Adebayo, Saheed O.; Olunuga, Taiwo; Sliwa, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Heart failure (HF) is a deadly, disabling and often costly syndrome world-wide. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of data describing its economic impact in sub Saharan Africa; a region in which the number of relatively younger cases will inevitably rise. Methods: Heath economic data were extracted from a prospective HF registry in a tertiary hospital situated in Abeokuta, southwest Nigeria. Outpatient and inpatient costs were computed from a representative cohort of 239 HF cases including personnel, diagnostic and treatment resources used for their management over a 12-month period. Indirect costs were also calculated. The annual cost per person was then calculated. Results: Mean age of the cohort was 58.0±15.1 years and 53.1% were men. The total computed cost of care of HF in Abeokuta was 76, 288,845 Nigerian Naira (US$508, 595) translating to 319,200 Naira (US$2,128 US Dollars) per patient per year. The total cost of in-patient care (46% of total health care expenditure) was estimated as 34,996,477 Naira (about 301,230 US dollars). This comprised of 17,899,977 Naira- 50.9% ($US114,600) and 17,806,500 naira −49.1%($US118,710) for direct and in-direct costs respectively. Out-patient cost was estimated as 41,292,368 Naira ($US 275,282). The relatively high cost of outpatient care was largely due to cost of transportation for monthly follow up visits. Payments were mostly made through out-of-pocket spending. Conclusion: The economic burden of HF in Nigeria is particularly high considering, the relatively young age of affected cases, a minimum wage of 18,000 Naira ($US120) per month and considerable component of out-of-pocket spending for those affected. Health reforms designed to mitigate the individual to societal burden imposed by the syndrome are required. PMID:25415310

  20. Development of KSC program for investigating and generating field failure rates. Volume 1: Summary and overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bean, E. E.; Bloomquist, C. E.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the KSC program for investigating the reliability aspects of the ground support activities is presented. An analysis of unsatisfactory condition reports (RC), and the generation of reliability assessment of components based on the URC are discussed along with the design considerations for attaining reliable real time hardware/software configurations.

  1. Quality Assurance in Software Development: An Exploratory Investigation in Software Project Failures and Business Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ichu, Emmanuel A.

    2010-01-01

    Software quality is perhaps one of the most sought-after attributes in product development, however; this goal is unattained. Problem factors in software development and how these have affected the maintainability of the delivered software systems requires a thorough investigation. It was, therefore, very important to understand software…

  2. Failure Investigation of an Intra-Manifold Explosion in a Horizontally-Mounted 870 lbf Reaction Control Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durning, Joseph G., III; Westover, Shayne C.; Cone, Darren M.

    2011-01-01

    In June 2010, an 870 lbf Space Shuttle Orbiter Reaction Control System Primary Thruster experienced an unintended shutdown during a test being performed at the NASA White Sands Test Facility. Subsequent removal and inspection of the thruster revealed permanent deformation and misalignment of the thruster valve mounting plate. Destructive evaluation determined that after three nominal firing sequences, the thruster had experienced an energetic event within the fuel (monomethylhydrazine) manifold at the start of the fourth firing sequence. The current understanding of the phenomenon of intra-manifold explosions in hypergolic bipropellant thrusters is documented in literature where it is colloquially referred to as a ZOT. The typical ZOT scenario involves operation of a thruster in a gravitational field with environmental pressures above the triple point pressure of the propellants. Post-firing, when the thruster valves are commanded closed, there remains a residual quantity of propellant in both the fuel and oxidizer (nitrogen tetroxide) injector manifolds known as the "dribble volume". In an ambient ground test configuration, these propellant volumes will drain from the injector manifolds but are impeded by the local atmospheric pressure. The evacuation of propellants from the thruster injector manifolds relies on the fluids vapor pressure to expel the liquid. The higher vapor pressure oxidizer will evacuate from the manifold before the lower vapor pressure fuel. The localized cooling resulting from the oxidizer boiling during manifold draining can result in fuel vapor migration and condensation in the oxidizer passage. The liquid fuel will then react with the oxidizer that enters the manifold during the next firing and may produce a localized high pressure reaction or explosion within the confines of the oxidizer injector manifold. The typical ZOT scenario was considered during this failure investigation, but was ultimately ruled out as a cause of the explosion

  3. Failure Investigation & Design Optimization of a Photo-Multiplier Tube Assembly Under Thermal Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahya, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    Analysis of GLAST ACD Photo-Multiplier Tube (PMT) assembly under thermal loading demonstrates that the glass tube experiences high stresses due to Coefficient of Thermal Expansion mismatch, as well as increased stress due to high stiffness and incompressibility of potting compound. Further investigation shows adverse loading effects due to the magnetic shield, a thin piece of steel wrapped around the PMT. This steel, Mu Metal, contained an overlap region that directly attributed to crack propagation in the outside surface of the tube. Sensitivities to different configurations were studied to reduce the stress and provide a more uniform loading throughout the PMT to ensure mission success. Studies indicate substituting a softer and more compressible potting compound and moving the Mu metal from the glass tube to the outside wall of the aluminum housing yields lower stress.

  4. Investigation of failure modes in fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Moschler, J.W.

    1988-12-01

    This experimental study was conducted to investigate the damage progression in fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites under tensile loading. As part of this study, the effect of the residual stresses at the fiber-matrix interface on damage progression was evaluated. Composite samples were fabricated from silicon carbide fibers and borosilicate glass matrices. Each glass had a different coefficient of thermal expansion than the fiber and through the variation of this mismatch, the residual stresses at the fiber-matrix interface were varied resulting in different bonding conditions at the fiber-matrix interface. The mechanical properties of the composites were measured using a servo-hydraulic mechanical testing machine. During these tests, transverse strain reversal was observed that is believed to be caused by axial matrix cracks and fiber-matrix debonding. Tensile tests were conducted on the composites using a constant-load straining device in which damage progression was observed using an optical microscope.

  5. Failure of the Ingard-Myers boundary condition for a lined duct: an experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Renou, Ygaäl; Aurégan, Yves

    2011-07-01

    This paper deals with experimental investigation of the lined wall boundary condition in flow duct applications such as aircraft engine systems or automobile mufflers. A first experiment, based on a microphone array located in the liner test section, is carried out in order to extract the axial wavenumbers with the help of an "high-accurate" singular value decomposition Prony-like algorithm. The experimental axial wavenumbers are then used to provide the lined wall impedance for both downstream and upstream acoustic propagation by means of a straightforward impedance education method involving the classical Ingard-Myers boundary condition. The results show that the Ingard-Myers boundary condition fails to predict with accuracy the acoustic behavior in a lined duct with flow. An effective lined wall impedance, valid whatever the direction of acoustic propagation, can be suitably found from experimental axial wavenumbers and a modified version of the Ingard-Myers condition with the form inspired from a previous theoretical study [Aurégan et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109, 59-64 (2001)]. In a second experiment, the scattering matrix of the liner test section is measured and is then compared to the predicted scattering matrix using the multimodal approach and the lined wall impedances previously deduced. A large discrepancy is observed between the measured and the predicted scattering coefficients that confirms the poor accuracy provided from the Ingard-Myers boundary condition widely used in lined duct applications. PMID:21786877

  6. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Heart Failure What is Heart Failure? In heart failure, the heart cannot pump enough ... failure often experience tiredness and shortness of breath. Heart Failure is Serious Heart failure is a serious and ...

  7. Simulation and Mechanistic Investigation of the Arrhythmogenic Role of the Late Sodium Current in Human Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Trenor, Beatriz; Cardona, Karen; Gomez, Juan F.; Rajamani, Sridharan; Ferrero, Jose M.; Belardinelli, Luiz; Saiz, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure constitutes a major public health problem worldwide. The electrophysiological remodeling of failing hearts sets the stage for malignant arrhythmias, in which the role of the late Na+ current (INaL) is relevant and is currently under investigation. In this study we examined the role of INaL in the electrophysiological phenotype of ventricular myocytes, and its proarrhythmic effects in the failing heart. A model for cellular heart failure was proposed using a modified version of Grandi et al. model for human ventricular action potential that incorporates the formulation of INaL. A sensitivity analysis of the model was performed and simulations of the pathological electrical activity of the cell were conducted. The proposed model for the human INaL and the electrophysiological remodeling of myocytes from failing hearts accurately reproduce experimental observations. The sensitivity analysis of the modulation of electrophysiological parameters of myocytes from failing hearts due to ion channels remodeling, revealed a role for INaL in the prolongation of action potential duration (APD), triangulation of the shape of the AP, and changes in Ca2+ transient. A mechanistic investigation of intracellular Na+ accumulation and APD shortening with increasing frequency of stimulation of failing myocytes revealed a role for the Na+/K+ pump, the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and INaL. The results of the simulations also showed that in failing myocytes, the enhancement of INaL increased the reverse rate-dependent APD prolongation and the probability of initiating early afterdepolarizations. The electrophysiological remodeling of failing hearts and especially the enhancement of the INaL prolong APD and alter Ca2+ transient facilitating the development of early afterdepolarizations. An enhanced INaL appears to be an important contributor to the electrophysiological phenotype and to the dysregulation of [Ca2+]i homeostasis of failing myocytes. PMID:22427860

  8. What causes an icy fault to slip? Investigating the depth and frictional conditions for tidally driven Coulomb failure along major strike-slip faults of Europa and Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Marissa E.; Smith-Konter, Bridget R.; Pappalardo, Robert T.

    2014-11-01

    The surfaces of Europa and Ganymede display strike-slip fractures, presumably arising from a combination of global and local stress sources. To better understand the role of tidal stress sources and implications for strike-slip faulting on these icy bodies, we investigate the relationship between shear and normal stresses at several major fault zones: Agenor Linea, Rhadamanthys Linea, Agave/Asterius Lineae, and Astypalaea Linea (on Europa), and Dardanus Sulcus (on Ganymede). Assuming tidal diurnal and non-synchronous rotation (NSR) stresses as plausible mechanisms for strike-slip tectonism, here we investigate the mechanics of Coulomb shear failure. We consider a range of friction coefficients (µf = 0.2 - 0.6) and fault depths (0 - 6 km) to evaluate how failure predictions vary between the satellites and as a function of depth, ice friction, geographic location, and fault geometry. Assuming present-day orbital eccentricities, our results indicate that the conditions for failure at depth are not met for any of the fault systems if subject to diurnal stresses only. Alternatively, models that include both diurnal and NSR stresses readily generate stress magnitudes that could permit shear failure. On Europa, shear failure is easily activated and failure extends to depths ranging from 3 - 6 km when a low coefficient of friction (µf = 0.2) is assumed. On Ganymede, failure is limited to even shallower depths (< 2 km). A high coefficient of friction (µf = 0.6) limits failure depths to < 3 km on Europa faults and discourages strike-slip faulting completely on Ganymede. Based on these results, we infer that the conditions for shear failure are potentially met along at least these five studied systems, and possibly others in the outer solar system, if NSR is adopted as a driving stress mechanism and the coefficient of friction is low.

  9. Vibrational and thermal characterisation of a new chiral drug under investigation for the therapy of congestive heart failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddei, Paola; Torreggiani, Armida; Fini, Giancarlo

    2002-12-01

    Racemic (5,6-bis 2-methyl propanoic acid-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-naphtalen-2-yl)-methylammonium chloride, CHF-1035, under clinical investigation for the treatment of congestive heart failure, was here characterised by Raman and IR spectroscopies coupled with thermal analysis (thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry). These techniques proved suitable for investigating the presence of different polymorphic forms, their relative stability and interconversion tendency in relation to industrial manufacturing processes undergone by the drug (i.e. grinding, compression, heating). Crystallisation experiments were carried out and two different CHF-1035 polymorphic forms were identified. Both grinding and heating revealed to cause a polymorphic transformation of the drug crystal form. It was hypothesised that a change in molecular packing occurs in the drug by effect of both treatments. The possible sources of polymorphism were identified in the -OCOCH(CH 3) groups and in the saturated ring. The non-ground sample showed two endothermic transitions; since they are reversible and not due to desolvation processes the system is probably enantiotropic.

  10. Investigation of stainless steel clad fuel rod failures and fuel performance in the Connecticut Yankee Reactor. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pasupathi, V.; Klingensmith, R. W.

    1981-11-01

    Significant levels of fuel rod failures were observed in the batch 8 fuel assemblies of the Connecticut Yankee reactor. Failure of 304 stainless steel cladding in a PWR environment was not expected. Therefore a detailed poolside and hot cell examination program was conducted to determine the cause of failure and identify differences between batch 8 fuel and previous batches which had operated without failures. Hot cell work conducted consisted of detailed nondestructive and destructive examination of fuel rods from batches 7 and 8. The results indicate that the batch 8 failure mechanism was stress corrosion cracking initiating on the clad outer surface. The sources of cladding stresses are believed to be (a) fuel pellet chips wedged in the cladding gap, (b) swelling of highly nondensifying batch 8 fuel and (c) potentially harmful effects of a power change event that occurred near the end of the second cycle of irradiation for batch 8.

  11. Investigation of drilling failure of Well A1, E-Field, onshore Niger Delta, Nigeria, using 3-D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinmosin, A.; Oladele, S.; Oriade, O. F.

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed at investigating reasons for failure of Well A1 that is surrounded by hydrocarbon discoveries in onshore Niger delta with a view to propose optimal location for a new well through interpretation of new 3-D seismic data. Sands encountered by Well A1 were delineated and tied to seismic. Structural closure was mapped and reservoirs at various depths were stacked and sectioned. Porosity, Net to Gross, and Gross Rock Volume of the reservoirs were computed. Well A1 was correlated to a nearby Well K4 and a good correlation was observed. A fault assisted multi reservoirs Prospect-E with south-westerly shift with depth was delineated on the hanging wall of structure building E-Fault whose closing contours is expected to trap hydrocarbon. Petrophysical properties of the reservoirs range from fair to good. Well A1 either perforated prospect-E beneath the oil water contact, completely missed prospect-E or punctured the wet foot wall of E-fault. Consequently, Well A1 could not impact the objective sands and only able to produce water. Well A1 failed because of wrong surface positioning which unsuccessfully targeted the shifting reservoirs. A successful exploratory well in E-Field would be a gently south-westerly deviated well whose vertical section would encounter the shallower sands and deviated section targeting the deeper sands with surface location at about 1 km southeast of Well A1.

  12. In-Situ AFM Investigation of Solid Electrolyte Interphase Formation and Failure Mechanisms in Lithium -Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Thomas; Kumar, Ravi; Tokranov, Anton; Huang, Teddy; Li, Chunzeng; Xiao, Xingcheng; Sheldon, Brian

    The formation and evolution of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) is critical for lifetime and performance of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), particularly for LIBs with high energy density materials such as silicon. Si has almost ten time theoretical specific capacity vs graphite, but its volume changes during cycling (up to 400%) put enormous strains on the SEI layer, resulting in continuous capacity loss. In this study we report in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigation on the formation and failure mechanisms of SEI layer using patterned Si island structures. Due to the shear lag effect, patterned Si islands go through lateral expansion and Contraction, putting the SEI layer in tension and compression during lithiation and delithiation, respectively. Experimentally, we performed the studies in a glovebox with <1 ppm O2 and H2O, using PeakForce Tapping to image the extremely fragile SEI layer. We show for the first time the in operando cracking of SEI layer. To understand the mechanics of the SEI layer, the critical strain for cracking was derived from a progression of the AFM images. Our studies provide new insight into SEI formation, evolution and its mechanical response, and offer guidance to tailor passivation layers for optimal performance.

  13. Investigating internal architecture effect in plastic deformation and failure for TPMS-based scaffolds using simulation methods and experimental procedure.

    PubMed

    Kadkhodapour, J; Montazerian, H; Raeisi, S

    2014-10-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) has been a promising technique for producing tissue engineering scaffolds which mimic the behavior of host tissue as properly as possible. Biodegradability, agreeable feasibility of cell growth, and migration parallel to mechanical properties, such as strength and energy absorption, have to be considered in design procedure. In order to study the effect of internal architecture on the plastic deformation and failure pattern, the architecture of triply periodic minimal surfaces which have been observed in nature were used. P and D surfaces at 30% and 60% of volume fractions were modeled with 3∗3∗ 3 unit cells and imported to Objet EDEN 260 3-D printer. Models were printed by VeroBlue FullCure 840 photopolymer resin. Mechanical compression test was performed to investigate the compressive behavior of scaffolds. Deformation procedure and stress-strain curves were simulated by FEA and exhibited good agreement with the experimental observation. Current approaches for predicting dominant deformation mode under compression containing Maxwell's criteria and scaling laws were also investigated to achieve an understanding of the relationships between deformation pattern and mechanical properties of porous structures. It was observed that effect of stress concentration in TPMS-based scaffolds resultant by heterogeneous mass distribution, particularly at lower volume fractions, led to a different behavior from that of typical cellular materials. As a result, although more parameters are considered for determining dominant deformation in scaling laws, two mentioned approaches could not exclusively be used to compare the mechanical response of cellular materials at the same volume fraction. PMID:25175253

  14. Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference guidelines on heart failure – 2008 update: Best practices for the transition of care of heart failure patients, and the recognition, investigation and treatment of cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, J Malcolm O; Howlett, Jonathan G; Ducharme, Anique; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Gardner, Martin J; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Heckman, George A; Isaac, Debra; Jong, Philip; Liu, Peter; Mann, Elizabeth; McKelvie, Robert S; Moe, Gordon W; Svendsen, Anna M; Tsuyuki, Ross T; O’Halloran, Kelly; Ross, Heather J; Sequeira, Errol J; White, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Heart failure is a clinical syndrome that normally requires health care to be provided by both specialists and nonspecialists. This is advantageous because patients benefit from complementary skill sets and experience, but can present challenges in the development of a common, shared treatment plan. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society published a comprehensive set of recommendations on the diagnosis and management of heart failure in January 2006, and on the prevention, management during intercurrent illness or acute decompensation, and use of biomarkers in January 2007. The present update builds on those core recommendations. Based on feedback obtained through a national program of heart failure workshops during 2006 and 2007, several topics were identified as priorities because of the challenges they pose to health care professionals. New evidence-based recommendations were developed using the structured approach for the review and assessment of evidence that was adopted and previously described by the Society. Specific recommendations and practical tips were written for best practices during the transition of care of heart failure patients, and the recognition, investigation and treatment of some specific cardiomyopathies. Specific clinical questions that are addressed include: What information should a referring physician provide for a specialist consultation? What instructions should a consultant provide to the referring physician? What processes should be in place to ensure that the expectations and needs of each physician are met? When a cardiomyopathy is suspected, how can it be recognized, how should it be investigated and diagnosed, how should it be treated, when should the patient be referred, and what special tests are available to assist in the diagnosis and treatment? The goals of the present update are to translate best evidence into practice, apply clinical wisdom where evidence for specific strategies is weaker, and aid physicians and other health

  15. Development of KSC program for investigating and generating field failure rates. Reliability handbook for ground support equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomquist, C. E.; Kallmeyer, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Field failure rates and confidence factors are presented for 88 identifiable components of the ground support equipment at the John F. Kennedy Space Center. For most of these, supplementary information regarding failure mode and cause is tabulated. Complete reliability assessments are included for three systems, eight subsystems, and nine generic piece-part classifications. Procedures for updating or augmenting the reliability results are also included.

  16. An Experimental Investigation into Failure and Localization Phenomena in the Extension to Shear Fracture Transition in Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choens, R. C., II; Chester, F. M.; Bauer, S. J.; Flint, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid-pressure assisted fracturing can produce mesh and other large, interconnected and complex networks consisting of both extension and shear fractures in various metamorphic, magmatic and tectonic systems. Presently, rock failure criteria for tensile and low-mean compressive stress conditions is poorly defined, although there is accumulating evidence that the transition from extension to shear fracture with increasing mean stress is continuous. We report on the results of experiments designed to document failure criteria, fracture mode, and localization phenomena for several rock types (sandstone, limestone, chalk and marble). Experiments were conducted in triaxial extension using a necked (dogbone) geometry to achieve mixed tension and compression stress states with local component-strain measurements in the failure region. The failure envelope for all rock types is similar, but are poorly described using Griffith or modified Griffith (Coulomb or other) failure criteria. Notably, the mode of fracture changes systematically from pure extension to shear with increase in compressive mean stress and display a continuous change in fracture orientation with respect to principal stress axes. Differential stress and inelastic strain show a systematic increase with increasing mean stress, whereas the axial stress decreases before increasing with increasing mean stress. The stress and strain data are used to analyze elastic and plastic strains leading to failure and compare the experimental results to predictions for localization using constitutive models incorporating on bifurcation theory. Although models are able to describe the stability behavior and onset of localization qualitatively, the models are unable to predict fracture type or orientation. Constitutive models using single or multiple yield surfaces are unable to predict the experimental results, reflecting the difficulty in capturing the changing micromechanisms from extension to shear failure. Sandia

  17. Wind-Turbine Gear-Box Roller-Bearing Premature-Failure Caused by Grain-Boundary Hydrogen Embrittlement: A Multi-physics Computational Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Chenna, V.; Galgalikar, R.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.; Yavari, R.

    2014-11-01

    To help overcome the problem of horizontal-axis wind-turbine (HAWT) gear-box roller-bearing premature-failure, the root causes of this failure are currently being investigated using mainly laboratory and field-test experimental approaches. In the present work, an attempt is made to develop complementary computational methods and tools which can provide additional insight into the problem at hand (and do so with a substantially shorter turn-around time). Toward that end, a multi-physics computational framework has been developed which combines: (a) quantum-mechanical calculations of the grain-boundary hydrogen-embrittlement phenomenon and hydrogen bulk/grain-boundary diffusion (the two phenomena currently believed to be the main contributors to the roller-bearing premature-failure); (b) atomic-scale kinetic Monte Carlo-based calculations of the hydrogen-induced embrittling effect ahead of the advancing crack-tip; and (c) a finite-element analysis of the damage progression in, and the final failure of a prototypical HAWT gear-box roller-bearing inner raceway. Within this approach, the key quantities which must be calculated using each computational methodology are identified, as well as the quantities which must be exchanged between different computational analyses. The work demonstrates that the application of the present multi-physics computational framework enables prediction of the expected life of the most failure-prone HAWT gear-box bearing elements.

  18. Multi-spectral investigation of bulk and facet failures in high-power single emitters at 980 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanson, Dan; Levy, Moshe; Shamay, Moshe; Cohen, Shalom; Shkedy, Lior; Berk, Yuri; Tessler, Renana; Klumel, Genadi; Rappaport, Noam; Karni, Yoram

    2013-03-01

    Reliable single emitters delivering >10W in the 9xx nm spectral range, are common building blocks for fiber laser pumps. As facet passivation techniques can suppress or delay catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD) extending emitter reliability into hundreds of thousands of hours, other, less dominant, failure modes such as intra-chip catastrophic optical bulk damage (COBD) become apparent. Based on our failure statistics in high current operation, only ~52% of all failures can be attributed to COMD. Imaging through a window opened in the metallization on the substrate (n) side of a p-side down mounted emitter provides valuable insight into both COMD and COBD failure mechanisms. We developed a laser ablation process to define a window on the n-side of an InGaAs/AlGaAs 980nm single emitter that is overlaid on the pumped 90μm stripe on the p-side. The ablation process is compatible with the chip wire-bonding, enabling the device to be operated at high currents with high injection uniformity. We analyzed both COMD and COBD failed emitters in the electroluminescence and mid-IR domains supported by FIB/SEM observation. The ablated devices revealed branching dark line patterns, with a line origin either at the facet center (COMD case) or near the stripe edge away from the facet (COBD case). In both cases, the branching direction is always toward the rear facet (against the photon density gradient), with SEM images revealing a disordered active layer structure. Absorption levels between 0.22eV - 0.55eV were observed in disordered regions by FT-IR spectroscopy. Temperature mapping of a single emitter in the MWIR domain was performed using an InSb detector. We also report an electroluminescence study of a single emitter just before and after failure.

  19. Failure analysis of sandwich-type ceramic-on-ceramic hip joints: A spectroscopic investigation into the role of the polyethylene shell component.

    PubMed

    Okita, Shinya; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Takahashi, Yasuhito; Puppulin, Leonardo; Sudo, Akihiro; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    The mechanisms leading to systematic failure in modular acetabular components with a sandwich insertion (alumina/polyethylene/titanium) have been reconsidered in light of the newly collected Raman spectroscopic results. Raman assessments were conducted on the polyethylene shells, which belonged to a series of six failed sandwich implants with in vivo lifetimes ranging between 2 and 9yr. With only one exception, all implants commonly showed dislodgment of the polyethylene shell during radiographic analyses prior to revision surgery. The polyethylene shell slipped out of the backing titanium shell, while always remaining integer to the ceramic liner. Four implants fractured at the ceramic liners, but their fractures occurred according to distinctly different patterns, which could be rationalized and classified. The insertion of the polyethylene layer, originally conceived to reduce the rigidity of the ceramic-on-ceramic bearing and to prevent impingement between the ceramic liner rim and the femoral neck, played a role in implant failure with its initial (asymmetric) thickness reduction due to creep deformation (eventually followed by cup rotation and backside wear). The results of the present spectroscopic investigation suggest that a simplistic failure classification of the sandwich-type implant as a "ceramic fracture failure" could be misleading and might represent a confounding factor in judging about the reliability of modern ceramic implants. PMID:23466283

  20. Kidney Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... if You Have Kidney Disease Kidney Failure Expand Dialysis Kidney Transplant Preparing for Kidney Failure Treatment Choosing Not to Treat with Dialysis or Transplant Paying for Kidney Failure Treatment Contact ...

  1. Developmental problems and their solution for the Space Shuttle main engine alternate liquid oxygen high-pressure turbopump: Anomaly or failure investigation the key

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, R.; Gross, L. A.

    1995-05-01

    The Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) alternate high-pressure liquid oxygen pump experienced synchronous vibration and ball bearing life problems that were program threatening. The success of the program hinged on the ability to solve these development problems. The design and solutions to these problems are engirded in the lessons learned and experiences from prior programs, technology programs, and the ability to properly conduct failure or anomaly investigations. The failure investigation determines the problem cause and is the basis for recommending design solutions. For a complex problem, a comprehensive solution requires that formal investigation procedures be used, including fault trees, resolution logic, and action items worked through a concurrent engineering-multidiscipline team. The normal tendency to use an intuitive, cut-and-try approach will usually prove to be costly, both in money and time and will reach a less than optimum, poorly understood answer. The SSME alternate high-pressure oxidizer turbopump development has had two complex problems critical to program success: (1) high synchronous vibrations and (2) excessive ball bearing wear. This paper will use these two problems as examples of this formal failure investigation approach. The results of the team's investigation provides insight into the complexity of the turbomachinery technical discipline interacting/sensitivities and the fine balance of competing investigations required to solve problems and guarantee program success. It is very important to the solution process that maximum use be made of the resources that both the contractor and Government can bring to the problem in a supporting and noncompeting way. There is no place for the not-invented-here attitude. The resources include, but are not limited to: (1) specially skilled professionals; (2) supporting technologies; (3) computational codes and capabilities; and (4) test and manufacturing facilities.

  2. Developmental problems and their solution for the Space Shuttle main engine alternate liquid oxygen high-pressure turbopump: Anomaly or failure investigation the key

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R.; Gross, L. A.

    1995-01-01

    The Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) alternate high-pressure liquid oxygen pump experienced synchronous vibration and ball bearing life problems that were program threatening. The success of the program hinged on the ability to solve these development problems. The design and solutions to these problems are engirded in the lessons learned and experiences from prior programs, technology programs, and the ability to properly conduct failure or anomaly investigations. The failure investigation determines the problem cause and is the basis for recommending design solutions. For a complex problem, a comprehensive solution requires that formal investigation procedures be used, including fault trees, resolution logic, and action items worked through a concurrent engineering-multidiscipline team. The normal tendency to use an intuitive, cut-and-try approach will usually prove to be costly, both in money and time and will reach a less than optimum, poorly understood answer. The SSME alternate high-pressure oxidizer turbopump development has had two complex problems critical to program success: (1) high synchronous vibrations and (2) excessive ball bearing wear. This paper will use these two problems as examples of this formal failure investigation approach. The results of the team's investigation provides insight into the complexity of the turbomachinery technical discipline interacting/sensitivities and the fine balance of competing investigations required to solve problems and guarantee program success. It is very important to the solution process that maximum use be made of the resources that both the contractor and Government can bring to the problem in a supporting and noncompeting way. There is no place for the not-invented-here attitude. The resources include, but are not limited to: (1) specially skilled professionals; (2) supporting technologies; (3) computational codes and capabilities; and (4) test and manufacturing facilities.

  3. Investigations into the tensile failure of doubly-convex cylindrical tablets under diametral loading using finite element methodology.

    PubMed

    Podczeck, Fridrun; Drake, Kevin R; Newton, J Michael

    2013-09-15

    In the literature various solutions exist for the calculation of the diametral compression tensile strength of doubly-convex tablets and each approach is based on experimental data obtained from single materials (gypsum, microcrystalline cellulose) only. The solutions are represented by complex equations and further differ for elastic and elasto-plastic behaviour of the compacts. The aim of this work was to develop a general equation that is applicable independently of deformation behaviour and which is based on simple tablet dimensions such as diameter and total tablet thickness only. With the help of 3D-FEM analysis the tensile failure stress of doubly-convex tables with central cylinder to total tablet thickness ratios W/D between 0.06 and 0.50 and face-curvature ratios D/R between 0.25 and 1.85 were evaluated. Both elastic and elasto-plastic deformation behaviour were considered. The results of 80 individual simulations were combined and showed that the tensile failure stress σt of doubly-convex tablets can be calculated from σt=(2P/πDW)(W/T)=2P/πDT with P being the failure load, D the diameter, W the central cylinder thickness, and T the total thickness of the tablet. This equation converts into the standard Brazilian equation (σt=2P/πDW) when W equals T, i.e. is equally valid for flat cylindrical tablets. In practice, the use of this new equation removes the need for complex measurements of tablet dimensions, because it only requires values for diameter and total tablet thickness. It also allows setting of standards for the mechanical strength of doubly-convex tablets. The new equation holds both for elastic and elasto-plastic deformation behaviour of the tablets under load. It is valid for all combinations of W/D-ratios between 0.06 and 0.50 with D/R-ratios between 0.00 and 1.85 except for W/D=0.50 in combination with D/R-ratios of 1.85 and 1.43 and for W/D-ratios of 0.40 and 0.30 in combination with D/R=1.85. FEM-analysis indicated a tendency to

  4. Investigation of heat transfer in zirconium potassium perchlorate at low temperature: A study of the failure mechanism of the NASA standard initiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varghese, Philip L.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the reasons for the failure of pyrotechnic initiators at very low temperatures (10 to 100 K). A two-dimensional model of the NASA standard initiator was constructed to model heat transfer from the electrically heated stainless steel bridgewire to the zirconium potassium perchlorate explosive charge and the alumina charge cup. Temperature dependent properties were used in the model to simulate initiator performance over a wide range of initial temperatures (10 to 500 K). A search of the thermophysical property data base showed that pure alumina has a very high thermal conductivity at low temperatures. It had been assumed to act as a thermal insulator in all previous analyses. Rapid heat transfer from the bridgewire to the alumina at low initial temperatures was shown to cause failure of the initiators if the wire did not also make good contact with the zirconium potassium perchlorate charge. The mode is able to reproduce the results of the tests that had been conducted to investigate the cause for failure. It also provides an explanation for previously puzzling results and suggests simple design changes that will increase reliability at very low initial temperatures.

  5. Investigation of Macroscopic Brittle Creep Failure Caused by Microcrack Growth Under Step Loading and Unloading in Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhao; Shao, Zhushan

    2016-07-01

    The growth of subcritical cracks plays an important role in the creep of brittle rock. The stress path has a great influence on creep properties. A micromechanics-based model is presented to study the effect of the stress path on creep properties. The microcrack model of Ashby and Sammis, Charles' Law, and a new micro-macro relation are employed in our model. This new micro-macro relation is proposed by using the correlation between the micromechanical and macroscopic definition of damage. A stress path function is also introduced by the relationship between stress and time. Theoretical expressions of the stress-strain relationship and creep behavior are derived. The effects of confining pressure on the stress-strain relationship are studied. Crack initiation stress and peak stress are achieved under different confining pressures. The applied constant stress that could cause creep behavior is predicted. Creep properties are studied under the step loading of axial stress or the unloading of confining pressure. Rationality of the micromechanics-based model is verified by the experimental results of Jinping marble. Furthermore, the effects of model parameters and the unloading rate of confining pressure on creep behavior are analyzed. The coupling effect of step axial stress and confining pressure on creep failure is also discussed. The results provide implications on the deformation behavior and time-delayed rockburst mechanism caused by microcrack growth on surrounding rocks during deep underground excavations.

  6. The Path from Childhood Behavioural Disorders to Felony Offending: Investigating the Role of Adolescent Drinking, Peer Marginalization, and School Failure

    PubMed Central

    Savolainen, Jukka; Mason, W. Alex; Bolen, Jonathan D.; Chmelka, Mary B.; Hurtig, Tuula; Ebeling, Hanna; Nordström, Tanja; Taanila, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Background Although a pathway from childhood behavioural disorders to criminal offending is well-established, the aetiological processes remain poorly understood. Also, it is not clear if attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is predictive of crime in the absence of comorbid disruptive behaviour disorder (DBD). Hypothesis We examined two research questions: (1) Does ADHD have a unique effect on the risk of criminal offending, independently of DBD? (2) Is the effect of childhood behavioural disorders on criminal offending direct or mediated by adolescent processes related to school experience, substance misuse, and peers? Method Structural equation modelling, with latent variables, was applied to longitudinally collected data on 4,644 males from the 1986 Northern Finland Birth Cohort Study. Results Both ADHD and DBD separately predicted felony conviction risk. Most of these effects were mediated by adolescent alcohol use and low academic performance. The effect of DBD was stronger and included a direct pathway to criminal offending. Conclusion Findings were more consistent with the life course mediation hypothesis of pathways into crime, in that the effects of each disorder category were mediated by heavy drinking and educational failure. Preventing these adolescent risk outcomes may be an effective approach to closing pathways to criminal behaviour among behaviourally disordered children. However, as there was some evidence of a direct pathway from DBD, effective treatments targeting this disorder are also expected to reduce criminal offending. PMID:25250918

  7. Exploratory Investigation of Failure Mechanisms in Transition Regions between Solid Laminates and X-cor(registered tm) Truss Sandwich

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Paris, Isabelle L.

    2004-01-01

    Small sub-component specimens consisting of solid laminates at the ends that transition to X-cor(R) truss sandwich in the center, were tested in a combination of three point bending, uni-axial tension, and combined tension and bending. The failure process in the transition region was documented for each loading using digital video and high-resolution cameras. For the 3-point bending tests, most of the deformation occurred in the solid laminate regions on either end of the specimen. Some pin debonding from the skin of the X-cor(R) truss sandwich was observed in the transition region and was accompanied by audible "pings" throughout the loading. Tension loaded specimens failed in the sandwich skin in the middle of the gage length, accompanied by separation of the sandwich core from the back skin and by delamination between the top skin and bottom skin at the transition region. The pinging associated with pin debonding occurred as the load was increased. However, the frequency of the pinging exceeded any visual observations of pin debonding in the video of the transition region. For specimens tested in combined tension and bending, the greatest amount of pinging occurred during initial application of the axial load. High-resolution images in the transition region indicated that the pinging corresponded to pins debonding and buckling due to the through-thickness Poisson contraction of the specimen. This buckling continued to a much smaller extent as the transverse load was applied.

  8. A poroplastic model of mature fault cores with biphasic pore fluids to investigate the role of gas on the onset of fault failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maury, V.; Fitzenz, D. D.; Piau, J.

    2011-12-01

    A poroplastic model of mature fault cores with biphasic pore fluids to investigate the role of gas on the onset of fault failure The effects of a rapid access of a fault to a source of overpressured fluids on effective stress and failure criterion have been recognized for a long time (Quattrocchi 1999), resulting in a decrease of the effective stress. We concentrate here on the case of the appearance/disappearance of gas in the pore fluid, and its effects on the loading path (Maury et al., 2011). Indeed, gas can appear continuously in a fault zone through dilatant deformation of the zones adjacent to the core fault (Kuo, 2006 ), due to fluid depressurization and degassing. Other source of gas e.g., mantle degasing (Miller et al, 2004), devolitization of coal or other organic matter during frictional sliding (O'Hara et al, 2006), may be remote, and diffuse through a fracture network, or local. Gas in a fault core reduces the Skempton's coefficient to almost 0, the total stress increase during tectonic loading induces a larger increase in effective stress than when pore fluid is fully liquid saturated, thus changing dramatically the loading path for that fault. Not only is failure delayed, but the shear stress at failure increases significantly. Before gas disappearance, the fault might not be critically stressed. However, a subsequent disappearance of gas may lead to failure for small increments of normal and shear stress: apparently strong faults can fail in response to small stress changes. Dilatant failure envelopes are often assumed for localized faults, whereas end-cap envelopes are usually used in association with compaction bands. Here we investigate a poroplastic model for mature fault cores acknowledging that these can be dilatant/contractant according to the state of stress at the plasticity criterion contact. We therefore use a Cam-Clay model as a first approximation. This model enables us to monitor the stability behavior and compute the jumps in stress

  9. Investigating the reasons for the failure of palaeointensity experiments: a study on historical lava flows from Mt. Etna (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Manuel; Prévot, Michel; Perrin, Mireille; Riisager, Janna

    2002-04-01

    A refined palaeointensity experiment, accompanied by rock-magnetic studies, has been carried out on six lava flows from 1910 and 1928 from Mt. Etna. The purpose of the study was to try to understand why these very young basaltic flows are generally unable to provide a correct estimate of the magnitude of the ambient magnetic field during flow cooling. Susceptibility versus temperature curves and ore microscopic studies show that 3 types of magnetic minerals (phases `h ', `m ' and `l') are present in these flows, some samples containing a single largely dominant magnetic phase while others contain a mixture of several phases. Phase `h ' is a thermally stable, near magnetite phase resulting from titanomagnetite oxyexsolution. Phase `l' is a thermally stable titanomagnetite with a Curie temperature of approximately 200°C. Phase `m ' is a titanomagnetite phase of Curie temperature between 450-490°C which is unstable at temperatures above 400°C. In addition to the usual reliability checks of the Thellier method (NRM-TRM linearity, pTRM checks), our palaeointensity experiments included additional heating allowing determination of the MD or PSD-SD character of each pTRM and determination of CRM or transdomain remanences possibly acquired during heating. From the 28 samples studied 20 provide a linear NRM-TRM plot over about 1/4 or more of total NRM. However, only six of them, all containing near-magnetite as a single phase, display positive pTRM checks. Nevertheless, these six samples yield a mean palaeointensity of about 52 μT, which exceeds the real field palaeomagnitude (42 μT) by some 25 per cent. The reasons for this almost-total failure of palaeointensity experiments are diverse. For samples with a dominant `l' phase, pTRMs present a behaviour typical of large MD grains, with as much as 1/3 of remanence with unblocking temperatures exceeding the blocking range. No CRM is acquired. Yet a remanence does develop during heating in a field (followed by cooling in

  10. Experimental Investigation of Secondary Flow Structures Downstream of a Model Type IV Stent Failure in a 180° Curved Artery Test Section.

    PubMed

    Bulusu, Kartik V; Plesniak, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    The arterial network in the human vasculature comprises of ubiquitously present blood vessels with complex geometries (branches, curvatures and tortuosity). Secondary flow structures are vortical flow patterns that occur in curved arteries due to the combined action of centrifugal forces, adverse pressure gradients and inflow characteristics. Such flow morphologies are greatly affected by pulsatility and multiple harmonics of physiological inflow conditions and vary greatly in size-strength-shape characteristics compared to non-physiological (steady and oscillatory) flows (1 - 7). Secondary flow structures may ultimately influence the wall shear stress and exposure time of blood-borne particles toward progression of atherosclerosis, restenosis, sensitization of platelets and thrombosis (4 - 6, 8 - 13). Therefore, the ability to detect and characterize these structures under laboratory-controlled conditions is precursor to further clinical investigations. A common surgical treatment to atherosclerosis is stent implantation, to open up stenosed arteries for unobstructed blood flow. But the concomitant flow perturbations due to stent installations result in multi-scale secondary flow morphologies (4 - 6). Progressively higher order complexities such as asymmetry and loss in coherence can be induced by ensuing stent failures vis-à-vis those under unperturbed flows (5). These stent failures have been classified as "Types I-to-IV" based on failure considerations and clinical severity (14). This study presents a protocol for the experimental investigation of the complex secondary flow structures due to complete transverse stent fracture and linear displacement of fractured parts ("Type IV") in a curved artery model. The experimental method involves the implementation of particle image velocimetry (2C-2D PIV) techniques with an archetypal carotid artery inflow waveform, a refractive index matched blood-analog working fluid for phase-averaged measurements (15 - 18

  11. Kidney Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... enough red blood cells. This is called kidney failure. If your kidneys fail, you need treatment to ... providers, family, and friends, most people with kidney failure can lead full and active lives. NIH: National ...

  12. Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, such ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can't ...

  13. Novel experimental methods for investigating high speed friction of titanium-aluminum-vanadium/tool steel interface and dynamic failure of extrinsically toughened DRA composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfan, Mohammad Abdulaziz

    Dynamic deformation, flow, and failure are integral parts of all dynamic processes in materials. Invariably, dynamic failure also involves the relative sliding of one component of the material over the other. Advances in elucidation of these failure mechanisms under high loading rates has been of great interest to scientists working in this area. The need to develop new dynamic mechanical property tests for materials under well characterized and controllable loading conditions has always been a challenge to experimentalists. The current study focuses on the development of two experimental methods to study some aspects of dynamic material response. The first part focuses on the development of a single stage gas gun facility for investigating high-speed metal to metal interfacial friction with applications to high speed machining. During the course of this investigation a gas gun was designed and built capable of accelerating projectiles upto velocities of 1 km/s. Using this gas gun pressure-shear plate impact friction experiments were conducted to simulate conditions similar to high speed machining at the tool-workpiece interface. The impacting plates were fabricated from materials representing the tribo-pair of interest. Accurate measurements of the interfacial tractions, i.e. the normal pressure and the frictional stress at the tribo-pair interface, and the interfacial slip velocity could be made by employing laser interferometry. Normal pressures of the order of 1-2 MPa were generated and slipping velocities of the order of 50 m/s were obtained. In order to illustrate the structure of the constitutive law governing friction, the study included experimental investigation of frictional response to step changes in normal pressure and interfacial shear stress. The results of these experiments indicate that sliding resistance for Ti6Al4V/CH steel interface is much lower than measured under quasi-static sliding conditions. Also the temperature at the interface strongly

  14. Divergent consequences of success and failure in japan and north america: an investigation of self-improving motivations and malleable selves.

    PubMed

    Heine, S J; Lehman, D R; Ide, E; Leung, C; Kitayama, S; Takata, T; Matsumoto, H

    2001-10-01

    Self-enhancing and self-improving motivations were investigated across cultures. Replicating past research, North Americans who failed on a task persisted less on a follow-up task than those who succeeded. In contrast, Japanese who failed persisted more than those who succeeded. The Japanese pattern is evidence for a self-improving orientation: Failures highlight where corrective efforts are needed. Japanese who failed also enhanced the importance and the diagnosticity of the task compared with those who succeeded, whereas North Americans did the opposite. Study 2 revealed that self-improving motivations are specific to the tasks on which one receives feedback. Study 3 unpackaged the cultural differences by demonstrating that they are due, at least in part, to divergent lay theories regarding the utility of effort. Study 4 addressed the problem of comparing cultures on subjective Likert scales and replicated the findings with a different measure. PMID:11642348

  15. A Coupled Field Multiphysics Modeling Approach to Investigate RF MEMS Switch Failure Modes under Various Operational Conditions.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Khaled; Lueke, Jonathan; Moussa, Walied

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the reliability of capacitive shunt RF MEMS switches have been investigated using three dimensional (3D) coupled multiphysics finite element (FE) analysis. The coupled field analysis involved three consecutive multiphysics interactions. The first interaction is characterized as a two-way sequential electromagnetic (EM)-thermal field coupling. The second interaction represented a one-way sequential thermal-structural field coupling. The third interaction portrayed a two-way sequential structural-electrostatic field coupling. An automated substructuring algorithm was utilized to reduce the computational cost of the complicated coupled multiphysics FE analysis. The results of the substructured FE model with coupled field analysis is shown to be in good agreement with the outcome of previously published experimental and numerical studies. The current numerical results indicate that the pull-in voltage and the buckling temperature of the RF switch are functions of the microfabrication residual stress state, the switch operational frequency and the surrounding packaging temperature. Furthermore, the current results point out that by introducing proper mechanical approaches such as corrugated switches and through-holes in the switch membrane, it is possible to achieve reliable pull-in voltages, at various operating temperatures. The performed analysis also shows that by controlling the mean and gradient residual stresses, generated during microfabrication, in conjunction with the proposed mechanical approaches, the power handling capability of RF MEMS switches can be increased, at a wide range of operational frequencies. These design features of RF MEMS switches are of particular importance in applications where a high RF power (frequencies above 10 GHz) and large temperature variations are expected, such as in satellites and airplane condition monitoring. PMID:22408490

  16. Articular cartilage surface failure: an investigation of the rupture rate and morphology in relation to tissue health and hydration.

    PubMed

    Fick, James M; Espino, Daniel M

    2012-05-01

    This study investigates the rupture rate and morphology of articular cartilage by altering the bathing environments of healthy and degenerate bovine cartilage. Soaking tissues in either distilled water or 1.5 M NaCI saline was performed in order to render the tissues into a swollen or dehydrated state, respectively. Creep compression was applied using an 8 mm flat-ended polished indenter that contained a central pore of 450 microm in diameter, providing a consistent region for rupture to occur across all 105 tested specimens. Rupture rates were determined by varying the nominal compressive stress and the loading time. Similar rupture rates were observed with the swollen healthy and degenerate specimens, loaded with either 6 or 7MPa of nominal compressive stress over 11 and 13 min. The observed rupture rates for the dehydrated specimens loaded with 7 MPa over 60 and 90s were 20% versus 40% and 20% versus 60% for healthy and degenerate tissues, respectively. At 8 MPa of nominal compressive stress over 60 and 90s the observed rupture rates were 20% versus 60% and 40% versus 80% for healthy and degenerate tissues, respectively; with all dehydrated degenerate tissues exhibiting a greater tendency to rupture (Barnard's exact test, p < 0.05). Rupture morphologies were only different in the swollen degenerate tissues (p < 0.05). The mechanisms by which dehydration and swelling induce initial surface rupture of mildly degenerate articular cartilage differ. Dehydration increases the likelihood that the surface will rupture, however, swelling alters the observed rupture morphology. PMID:22720392

  17. A Coupled Field Multiphysics Modeling Approach to Investigate RF MEMS Switch Failure Modes under Various Operational Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sadek, Khaled; Lueke, Jonathan; Moussa, Walied

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the reliability of capacitive shunt RF MEMS switches have been investigated using three dimensional (3D) coupled multiphysics finite element (FE) analysis. The coupled field analysis involved three consecutive multiphysics interactions. The first interaction is characterized as a two-way sequential electromagnetic (EM)-thermal field coupling. The second interaction represented a one-way sequential thermal-structural field coupling. The third interaction portrayed a two-way sequential structural-electrostatic field coupling. An automated substructuring algorithm was utilized to reduce the computational cost of the complicated coupled multiphysics FE analysis. The results of the substructured FE model with coupled field analysis is shown to be in good agreement with the outcome of previously published experimental and numerical studies. The current numerical results indicate that the pull-in voltage and the buckling temperature of the RF switch are functions of the microfabrication residual stress state, the switch operational frequency and the surrounding packaging temperature. Furthermore, the current results point out that by introducing proper mechanical approaches such as corrugated switches and through-holes in the switch membrane, it is possible to achieve reliable pull-in voltages, at various operating temperatures. The performed analysis also shows that by controlling the mean and gradient residual stresses, generated during microfabrication, in conjunction with the proposed mechanical approaches, the power handling capability of RF MEMS switches can be increased, at a wide range of operational frequencies. These design features of RF MEMS switches are of particular importance in applications where a high RF power (frequencies above 10 GHz) and large temperature variations are expected, such as in satellites and airplane condition monitoring. PMID:22408490

  18. Numerical Investigation of Seismically Induced Rock Mass Fatigue as a Mechanism Contributing to the Progressive Failure of Deep-Seated Landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gischig, Valentin; Preisig, Giona; Eberhardt, Erik

    2016-06-01

    The importance of earthquakes in triggering catastrophic failure of deep-seated landslides has long been recognized and is well documented in the literature. However, seismic waves do not only act as a trigger mechanism. They also contribute to the progressive failure of large rock slopes as a fatigue process that is highly efficient in deforming and damaging rock slopes. Given the typically long recurrence time and unpredictability of earthquakes, field-based investigations of co-seismic rock slope deformations are difficult. We present here a conceptual numerical study that demonstrates how repeated earthquake activity over time can destabilize a relatively strong rock slope by creating and propagating new fractures until the rock mass is sufficiently weakened to initiate catastrophic failure. Our results further show that the damage and displacement induced by a certain earthquake strongly depends on pre-existing damage. In fact, the damage history of the slope influences the earthquake-induced displacement as much as earthquake ground motion characteristics such as the peak ground acceleration. Because seismically induced fatigue is: (1) characterized by low repeat frequency, (2) represents a large amplitude damage event, and (3) weakens the entire rock mass, it differs from other fatigue processes. Hydro-mechanical cycles, for instance, occur at higher repeat frequencies (i.e., annual cycles), lower amplitude, and only affect limited parts of the rock mass. Thus, we also compare seismically induced fatigue to seasonal hydro-mechanical fatigue. While earthquakes can progressively weaken even a strong, competent rock mass, hydro-mechanical fatigue requires a higher degree of pre-existing damage to be effective. We conclude that displacement rates induced by hydro-mechanical cycling are indicative of the degree of pre-existing damage in the rock mass. Another indicator of pre-existing damage is the seismic amplification pattern of a slope; frequency

  19. Productive Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapur, Manu

    2008-01-01

    This study demonstrates an existence proof for "productive failure": engaging students in solving complex, ill-structured problems without the provision of support structures can be a productive exercise in failure. In a computer-supported collaborative learning setting, eleventh-grade science students were randomly assigned to one of two…

  20. Investigation of the cross-ship comparison monitoring method of failure detection in the HIMAT RPRV. [digital control techniques using airborne microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The Highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HIMAT) remotely piloted research vehicle (RPRV) uses cross-ship comparison monitoring of the actuator RAM positions to detect a failure in the aileron, canard, and elevator control surface servosystems. Some possible sources of nuisance trips for this failure detection technique are analyzed. A FORTRAN model of the simplex servosystems and the failure detection technique were utilized to provide a convenient means of changing parameters and introducing system noise. The sensitivity of the technique to differences between servosystems and operating conditions was determined. The cross-ship comparison monitoring method presently appears to be marginal in its capability to detect an actual failure and to withstand nuisance trips.

  1. The histological investigation of gingiva from patients with chronic renal failure, renal transplants, and periodontitis: a light and electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Yamalik, N; Delilbasi, L; Gülay, H; Cağlayan, F; Haberal, M; Cağlayan, G

    1991-12-01

    The clinical and histological appearance of gingiva was evaluated in renal transplant recipients (RTR) receiving immunosuppressive drugs, in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) undergoing hemodialysis, and systemically healthy individuals with periodontitis. Although the amount of bacterial plaque accumulation was similar among the groups (P greater than 0.05), the gingival inflammation was significantly less in RTR when compared to the other 2 groups (P less than 0.05). In light microscopic investigation the overall appearance of the connective tissue was similar in all of the groups. A mononuclear cell infiltration was present in all of the specimens; however, the number of inflammatory cells in patients with periodontitis was significantly higher than the other 2 groups (P less than 0.05). Prominent epithelial changes in the superficial layers of the oral epithelium; i.e., areas showing desquamation-like appearance, were noticed in patients with CRF. In electron microscopic investigation, fibroblasts and plasma cells with well-developed granular endoplasmic reticulum were found in connective tissue in RTR patients. In patients with CRF, epithelial cells presented swollen granular endoplasmic reticulum cisternae resembling vacuoles, indicating the presence of degeneration. It was suggested that with the use of immunosuppressive drugs the response to bacterial plaque did not diminish completely. PMID:1765936

  2. A Study to Compare the Failure Rates of Current Space Shuttle Ground Support Equipment with the New Pathfinder Equipment and Investigate the Effect that the Proposed GSE Infrastructure Upgrade Might Have to Reduce GSE Infrastructure Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Barbara J.

    2004-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to compare the current Space Shuttle Ground Support Equipment (GSE) infrastructure with the proposed GSE infrastructure upgrade modification. The methodology will include analyzing the first prototype installation equipment at Launch PAD B called the "Pathfinder". This study will begin by comparing the failure rate of the current components associated with the "Hardware interface module (HIM)" at the Kennedy Space Center to the failure rate of the neW Pathfinder components. Quantitative data will be gathered specifically on HIM components and the PAD B Hypergolic Fuel facility and Hypergolic Oxidizer facility areas which has the upgraded pathfinder equipment installed. The proposed upgrades include utilizing industrial controlled modules, software, and a fiber optic network. The results of this study provide evidence that there is a significant difference in the failure rates of the two studied infrastructure equipment components. There is also evidence that the support staff for each infrastructure system is not equal. A recommendation to continue with future upgrades is based on a significant reduction of failures in the new' installed ground system components.

  3. Testicular failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood tests may show a low level of testosterone and high levels of prolactin, FSH , and LH . ... testes will be ordered. Testicular failure and low testosterone level may be hard to diagnose in older ...

  4. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... together. About Rise Above HF Rise Above Heart Failure seeks to increase the dialogue about HF and improve the lives of people affected by the condition through awareness, education and support. Through the initiative, AHA strives to ...

  5. Preliminary results: Root cause investigation of orbital anomalies and failures in NASA standard 50 ampere-hour nickel-cadmium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toft, Mark R.

    1993-01-01

    Two lots of NASA standard 50 A.H. Ni-Cd battery cells, manufactured by Gates Aerospace Batteries and built into batteries by McDonnell Douglas, have experienced significant performance problems. The two lots were used on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory and the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. Both of these satellites are Low Earth Orbital (LEO) satellites containing batteries on a parallel bus charged to NASA standard V/T curves using a NASA standard power regulator. The following preliminary conclusions were reached: (1) several plate and cell parameters have migrated within their spec limits over the years (in some cases, from one extreme to the other); (2) several parametric relationships, not generally monitored and therefore not under specification control, have also migrated over the years; (3) many of these changes appear to have taken place as a natural consequence of changes in GE/GAB materials and processes; (4) several of these factors may be 'conspiring' to aggravate known cell failure mechanisms (factors such as heavier plate, less teflon and/or less-uniform teflon, and less electrolyte) but all are still in spec (where specs exist); (5) the weight of the evidence collected to characterize the anomalies and to characterize the negative electrode itself, strongly suggests that alterations to the structure, composition, uniformity, and efficiency of the negative electrode are at the heart of the battery performance problems currently being experienced; and (6) further investigation at all levels (plate, cell, battery, and system) continues to be warranted.

  6. Development of KSC program for investigating and generating field failure rates. Volume 2: Recommended format for reliability handbook for ground support equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomquist, C. E.; Kallmeyer, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Field failure rates and confidence factors are presented for 88 identifiable components of the ground support equipment at the John F. Kennedy Space Center. For most of these, supplementary information regarding failure mode and cause is tabulated. Complete reliability assessments are included for three systems, eight subsystems, and nine generic piece-part classifications. Procedures for updating or augmenting the reliability results presented in this handbook are also included.

  7. Identification, separation and characterization of process-related impurities of bifendate derivative (DB-6), an investigational agent combating acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Ye, Weiwei; Yang, Yinghong; Wang, Guangcheng; Luo, Youfu; Chen, Lijuan

    2015-01-01

    DB-6, with an IUPAC name of (Z)-5-(2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-((2,4-dioxothiazolidin-5-ylidene)methyl)phenyl)-5'-methyl-7,7'-dimethoxy-[4,4'-bibenzo[d][1,3]dioxole]-5,5'-dicarboxylate, is an investigational agent for acute liver failure. The focus of this study is the identification and characterization of major unknown impurities in DB-6 bulk drug samples. Four major impurities of DB-6 were detected by a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method and designated as IMP-I, IMP-II, IMP-III and IMP-IV. Accurate masses of these impurities were determined by using a Q-TOF mass spectrometer. Based on chromatographic, spectrometric data and plausible chemical transformation mechanism, the structures of IMP-I, IMP-II, IMP-III and IMP-IV were identified, respectively, as bifendate, (E)-5-(2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-((2,4-dioxothiazolidin-5-ylidene)methyl)phenyl)-5'-methyl-7,7'-dimethoxy-[4,4'-bibenzo[d][1,3]dioxole]-5,5'-dicarboxylate, (Z)-5-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzylidene) thiazolidine-2,4-dione and bis(2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-((Z)-(2,4-dioxothiazolidin-5-ylidene)methyl)phenyl)-7,7'-dimethoxy-[4,4'-bibenzo[d][1,3]dioxole]-5,5'-icarboxylate. The impurities were isolated by preparative-HPLC or preparative high-speed counter-current chromatography and their structures were confirmed by NMR spectroscopy. PMID:25238768

  8. Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... from inhaling smoke or harmful fumes Treatment for respiratory failure depends on whether the condition is acute (short-term) or chronic (ongoing) and how severe it is. It also depends on the underlying cause. You may receive oxygen therapy and other treatment to help you breathe. NIH: ...

  9. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tiredness and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. It is more common in people who are 65 years old or older, African Americans, people who are overweight, and people who have ...

  10. Geochemical evidence of multistage retrogressive failure during the 160,000ka Icod landslide from turbidite facies analysis: multidisciplinary investigative approaches using destructive and non-destructive methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, James; Wynn, Russell; Masson, Doug; Croudace, Ian

    2010-05-01

    The study of modern deep-sea systems through targeted piston coring has enabled detailed investigations into the process mechanics of turbidity currents. In complex systems such as the Moroccan Turbidite System the derivation of provenance is of vital importance, since flows from different sources in this system have been found to behave differently. Early provenance studies in the Madeira Abyssal Plain found that bulk sand-fraction geochemical analysis through ICP-AES could enable successful attribution of provenance to specific turbidites alongside electron microprobe analysis (de Lange, Jarvis & Kuijpers, 1987; Pearce & Jarvis, 1992). These sources including the Moroccan siliclastic shelf, Tenerife, Las Palma, El Hierro and Madeira. ICP-AES, MC-ICP-MS and XRF have been utilised here, however these present destructive methodologies, using 0.1-5g of material >63µm. Deep-sea piston cores are also expensive to collect, and often there is not enough material to remove for analysis without compromising the core. Furthermore, routine sampling, preparation and analysis using the destructive methods stated above are undertaken at considerable cost and analytical time. The successful use of non-destructive instruments to yield quantitative geochemical has become paramount at the NOC. This presentation serves to show the successful application of the TM-1000 tabletop SEM EDS analyser, ITRAX micro-XRF analyser and the GEOTEK XYZ logger, in coincidence with traditional destructive methods. These instruments can only supply semi-quantitative data, unless correct calibration can be achieved, and will be shown here. The 160,000ka Icod landslide from Tenerife generated a 150km3 debris avalanche with a runout of 105km and a >180km3 turbidity, which will form the case study for application of these instruments. The vertically stacked subunit facies of the Icod turbidite has been attributed to generation from a multistage retrogressive failure (Wynn & Masson, 2003). Here there

  11. Investigating Clinical Failure of Bone Grafting through a Window at the Femoral Head Neck Junction Surgery for the Treatment of Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Zhao, Dingyan; Gao, Fuqiang; Su, Yangming; Li, Zirong

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study aimed to analyze the clinical factors related to the failure of bone grafting through a window at the femoral head-neck junction. Methods In total, 119 patients (158 hips) underwent bone grafting for treatment of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. The patients were classified by their ARCO staging and CJFH classification. All patients were clinically and radiographically followed up every three months during the first year and every six months in the following year. The clinical follow-up comprised determination of pre- and postoperative Harris hip scores, while serial AP, frog lateral radiographs, and CT scan were used for the radiographic follow-up. Results The clinical failure of bone grafting was observed in 40 patients. The clinical failure rates in patients belonging to ARCO stage II period, IIIa, and III (b + c) were 25.9%, 16.2%, and 61.5%, respectively, while those in patients belonging to (C + M + L1) type and L2, L3 type disease groups were 1.7%, 38.9%, and 39%, respectively. The clinical failure rates in patients aged below 40 and those aged 40 and over were 20.5% and 39.0%, respectively (all P < 0.05). Conclusion Disease type, disease stage, and patient age are risk factors for failure of bone graft surgery. Patients belonging to ARCO stage II and IIIa showed a good overall response rate, while patients belonging to ARCO stage IIIb and IIIc and those with necrotic lesions involving the lateral pillar (L2 and L3 type) showed high surgical failure rates. PMID:27285821

  12. Metallization failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, R.

    1971-01-01

    Metallization-related failure mechanisms were shown to be a major cause of integrated circuit failures under accelerated stress conditions, as well as in actual use under field operation. The integrated circuit industry is aware of the problem and is attempting to solve it in one of two ways: (1) better understanding of the aluminum system, which is the most widely used metallization material for silicon integrated circuits both as a single level and multilevel metallization, or (2) evaluating alternative metal systems. Aluminum metallization offers many advantages, but also has limitations particularly at elevated temperatures and high current densities. As an alternative, multilayer systems of the general form, silicon device-metal-inorganic insulator-metal, are being considered to produce large scale integrated arrays. The merits and restrictions of metallization systems in current usage and systems under development are defined.

  13. A recent investigation of gas hydrate as a factor in northern Cascadia accretionary margin frontal ridge slope failures and cold seep biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haacke, R.; Riedel, M.; Pohlman, J.; Rose, K.; Lapham, L.; Hamilton, T. S.; Enkin, R.; Spence, G.; Hyndman, R.

    2008-12-01

    In August 2008, a research expedition was conducted on the n. Cascadia margin by the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) as part of the Earth Science Sector, Natural Gas Hydrate Program, Natural Resources Canada (NRCan). This collaboration included researchers from several universities as well as Canadian and U.S. government agencies. The primary objective was to determine the impact of gas hydrate on slope stability along the frontal ridges of the N. Cascadia accretionary wedge. Multibeam bathymetry data indicate numerous slope collapse features along the frontal ridges. To constrain the cause and timing of the collapse features, sedimentological, physical property and geochemical studies were conducted at several slump areas. Four cores were collected from within the headwall, apron and sole of the slumped material of 'Lopez Slide', a failure area detected prior to IODP Expedition 311. Directly south of Lopez Slide at a slump feature named 'Slipstream Slide', a 5-core transect extended from the headwall scarp to the toe of the slide deposits. Slipstream Slide is a series of en echelon box-like slump blocks bounded by transverse faults that cross-cut that frontal ridge. One additional core from a slump-feature further south (Chunk Slide) was also recovered. Onboard analyses suggest that the slump occurrences are not related to the last mega-thrust earthquake that occurred at the N. Cascadia subduction zone in January 1700. However, the slumps could have been triggered by earlier such earthquakes. Further analyses and age determinations are underway to confirm the linkages between slumps and the mega-thrust earthquake cycle and other possible trigger mechanisms such as eustatic sea level changes. The secondary objective of the expedition was a multidisciplinary program that included microbiological, geochemical, geophysical and sedimentological studies designed to advance our understanding of the environmental factors that control methane fluxes and oxidation at cold

  14. Computer-Based Reading Programs: A Preliminary Investigation of Two Parent Implemented Programs with Students At-Risk for Reading Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pindiprolu, Sekhar S.; Forbush, David

    2009-01-01

    In 2000, National Reading Panelists (NRP) reported that computer delivered reading instruction has potential for promoting the reading skills of students at-risk for reading failure. However, panelists also noted a scarcity of data present in the literature on the effects of computer-based reading instruction. This preliminary investigation…

  15. A stability analysis of semi-cohesive streambanks with CONCEPTS: Coupling field and laboratory investigations to quantify the onset of fluvial erosion and mass failure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The overarching goal of this study is to perform a comprehensive bank stability analysis that is phenomenologically sound by considering both mass failure and fluvial erosion. The nature of this study is twofold. First, field and experimental analysis is conducted to generate data for channel cross-...

  16. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFS are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused by: system environments; manufacturing; transportation; storage; maintenance; and assembly, as examples. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, the effects can be reduced, but they are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and CCF (dependent) failure and data is limited, especially for launch vehicles. The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of NASA's Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC) is using generic data from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's database of common cause failures at nuclear power plants to estimate CCF due to the lack of a more appropriate data source. There remains uncertainty in the actual magnitude of the common cause risk estimates for different systems at this stage of the design. Given the limited data about launch vehicle CCF and that launch vehicles are a highly redundant system by design, it is important to make design decisions to account for a range of values for independent and CCFs. When investigating the design of the one-out-of-two component redundant system for launch vehicles, a response surface was constructed to represent the impact of the independent failure rate versus a common cause beta factor effect on a system's failure probability. This presentation will define a CCF and review estimation calculations. It gives a summary of reduction methodologies and a review of examples of historical CCFs. Finally, it presents the response surface and discusses the results of the different CCFs on the reliability of a one-out-of-two system.

  17. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFS are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused by: system environments; manufacturing; transportation; storage; maintenance; and assembly, as examples. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, the effects can be reduced, but they are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and CCF (dependent) failure and data is limited, especially for launch vehicles. The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of NASA's Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate at Marshal Space Flight Center (MFSC) is using generic data from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's database of common cause failures at nuclear power plants to estimate CCF due to the lack of a more appropriate data source. There remains uncertainty in the actual magnitude of the common cause risk estimates for different systems at this stage of the design. Given the limited data about launch vehicle CCF and that launch vehicles are a highly redundant system by design, it is important to make design decisions to account for a range of values for independent and CCFs. When investigating the design of the one-out-of-two component redundant system for launch vehicles, a response surface was constructed to represent the impact of the independent failure rate versus a common cause beta factor effect on a system's failure probability. This presentation will define a CCF and review estimation calculations. It gives a summary of reduction methodologies and a review of examples of historical CCFs. Finally, it presents the response surface and discusses the results of the different CCFs on the reliability of a one-out-of-two system.

  18. Message for Heart Failure Patients: Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159059.html Message for Heart Failure Patients: Exercise You'll feel better and maybe even live ... with heart failure should not be scared of exercise damaging them or killing them," said principal investigator ...

  19. Investigation of the design and static behavior of cylindrical tubular composite adhesive joints utilizing the finite element method and stress-based failure theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Michael D.

    2011-12-01

    The stress and strength behavior of cylindrical tubular adhesive joints composed of dissimilar materials was explored. This was accomplished with the finite element method (FEM) and stress-based failure theories. Also, it was shown how a design of experiments (DOE) based method can be used to objectively organize the process of optimizing joint strength by using stress-based failure criteria. The finite element program used in this work was written in-house from scratch to implement the FEM for the purpose of solving both axisymmetric and three-dimensional linear elastic governing equations of static equilibrium. The formulation of the three-dimensional model is presented, and the required operations to arrive to the axisymmetric model are also presented. The axisymmetric model is two dimensional, capable of using four and eight node quadrilateral elements. However, only four node elements are used because a mesh of eight node elements requires more memory and increased mesh refinement. The three-dimensional model is capable of using eight and twenty node brick elements, but only eight node brick elements are used for the same reason. Both of the axisymmetric and three-dimensional models calculate the nodal displacements, strains, stress values for each material, and strength values for each material. The external static loads can be individually applied, or coupled together. The outputs seem to be most useful for interpretation when plotted through-the-thickness (TTT) and along-the-length (ATL) of the joint or tube. Outputs are valid only for materials that behave linearly elastic up to (or near) failure, and the stress-based failure criteria are used to define that limit. A small laboratory-sized joint was modeled to look at the theoretical stress and strength distributions plotted along-the-length of the joint at different radial locations. These stress and strength distributions can be correlated to the type of load being applied because of unique or prominent

  20. Failure-proof estimation under conditions of lack of information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vul, Alexander

    1993-02-01

    This paper deals with some aspects of failure detection and isolation (FDI) theory and its implementation. Namely, the problems of failure distinction and compensation are investigated. The problem of failure-proof estimation under the criterion of fastest treatment of the occurred failure is solved. Some concrete algorithms of failure distinction and compensation are developed and results of their investigation by numerical simulations are shown. These algorithms can be useful in designing a failure-proof system.

  1. Vamistor resistor investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Results are presented of the failure investigation conducted on resistors produced by the Vamistor Divison, Wagner Electric Corporation. This failure investigation included; failure analyses, chemical and metallurgical analyses, failure mechanism studies, seal leak analyses, and nondestructive stress tests. The data, information, conclusions, and recommendation can be helpful in assessing current usage of these resistors.

  2. Experimental Autoimmune Breast Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kesaraju, Pavani; Jaini, Ritika; Johnson, Justin M.; Altuntas, Cengiz Z.; Gruden, Jessica J.; Sakalar, Cagri; Tuohy, Vincent K.

    2013-01-01

    Mastitis is a substantial clinical problem in lactating women that may result in severe pain and abrupt termination of breastfeeding, thereby predisposing infants to long-term health risks. Many cases of mastitis involve no known infectious agent and may fundamentally be due to autoimmune-mediated inflammation of the breast. Herein, we develop a murine model of autoimmune mastitis and provide a detailed characterization of its resulting phenotype of breast failure and lactation insufficiency. To generate breast-specific autoimmunity, we immunized SWXJ mice with recombinant mouse α-lactalbumin, a lactation-dependent, breast-specific differentiation protein critical for production of lactose. Mice immunized with α-lactalbumin showed extensive T-cell–mediated inflammation in lactating normal breast parenchyma but none in nonlactating normal breast parenchyma. This targeted autoimmune attack resulted in breast failure characterized by lactation insufficiency and decreased ability to nurture offspring. Although immunization with α-lactalbumin had no effect on fertility and birth numbers, pups nursed by α-lactalbumin–immunized mice showed significantly disrupted growth often accompanied by kwashiorkor-like nutritional abnormalities, including alopecia, liver toxicity, and runting. This experimental model of autoimmune breast failure has useful applications for prophylactic breast cancer vaccination and for addressing inflammatory complications during breastfeeding. In addition, this model is suited for investigating nutritionally based “failure-to-thrive” issues, particularly regarding the long-term implications of postnatal nutritional deprivation. PMID:22901749

  3. What Is Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Heart Failure? Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can' ... force. Some people have both problems. The term "heart failure" doesn't mean that your heart has stopped ...

  4. Acute kidney failure

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute ... There are many possible causes of kidney damage. They include: ... cholesterol (cholesterol emboli) Decreased blood flow due to very ...

  5. Heart failure - medicines

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken ...

  6. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases. PMID:27547136

  7. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A.; Zugck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases. PMID:27547136

  8. Failure processes unidirectional composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaresan, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    Failure processes in unidirectional composite materials subjected to quasi-static tensile load along the fiber direction are investigated. The emphasis in this investigation is to identify the physical processes taking place during the evolution of failure in these materials. An extensive literature review is conducted and the information relevant to the present topic is summarized. The nature of damage growth in five different commercially available composite systems are studied. In-situ scanning electron microscopy is employed for identifying the failure events taking place at the microscopic level. Acoustic emission monitoring is used for estimating the rate of damage growth on a global scale and determining the size of individual failure events. Results show the important roles of the matrix material and the interphase in determining the tensile strength of unidirectional composite materials. Several failure modes occurring at the microscopic scale are revealed for the first time. Further, the results indicate that dynamic fracture participates to a significant extent in determining the failure process in these materials. Based on the results the influence of various parameters in determining the composite strength is described.

  9. Some Investigations of the General Instability of Stiffened Metal Cylinders IX : Criterions for the Design of Stiffened Metal Cylinders Subject to General Instability Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Louis G

    1947-01-01

    Results are presented of an experimental investigation of the general instability of reinforced thin-walled metal cylinders subjected to pure bending and pure torsion over a range of geometrical quantities and structural sectional characteristics. Based on the experimental results and an existing theory of unstiffened metal cylinders, parameters were evolved which make possible an estimate of the stress at which general instability will occur for any given stiffened metal structure of circular cross section. (author)

  10. Respiratory failure in diabetic ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinov, Nikifor K; Rohrscheib, Mark; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Dorin, Richard I; Murata, Glen H; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory failure complicating the course of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a source of increased morbidity and mortality. Detection of respiratory failure in DKA requires focused clinical monitoring, careful interpretation of arterial blood gases, and investigation for conditions that can affect adversely the respiration. Conditions that compromise respiratory function caused by DKA can be detected at presentation but are usually more prevalent during treatment. These conditions include deficits of potassium, magnesium and phosphate and hydrostatic or non-hydrostatic pulmonary edema. Conditions not caused by DKA that can worsen respiratory function under the added stress of DKA include infections of the respiratory system, pre-existing respiratory or neuromuscular disease and miscellaneous other conditions. Prompt recognition and management of the conditions that can lead to respiratory failure in DKA may prevent respiratory failure and improve mortality from DKA. PMID:26240698

  11. Respiratory failure in diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Konstantinov, Nikifor K; Rohrscheib, Mark; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Dorin, Richard I; Murata, Glen H; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2015-07-25

    Respiratory failure complicating the course of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a source of increased morbidity and mortality. Detection of respiratory failure in DKA requires focused clinical monitoring, careful interpretation of arterial blood gases, and investigation for conditions that can affect adversely the respiration. Conditions that compromise respiratory function caused by DKA can be detected at presentation but are usually more prevalent during treatment. These conditions include deficits of potassium, magnesium and phosphate and hydrostatic or non-hydrostatic pulmonary edema. Conditions not caused by DKA that can worsen respiratory function under the added stress of DKA include infections of the respiratory system, pre-existing respiratory or neuromuscular disease and miscellaneous other conditions. Prompt recognition and management of the conditions that can lead to respiratory failure in DKA may prevent respiratory failure and improve mortality from DKA. PMID:26240698

  12. Advanced Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Advanced Heart Failure Updated:Oct 8,2015 When heart failure (HF) ... content was last reviewed on 04/06/2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  13. Investigation of failure mechanisms in silicon based half cells during the first cycle by micro X-ray tomography and radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fu; Markötter, Henning; Dong, Kang; Manke, Ingo; Hilger, Andre; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Banhart, John

    2016-07-01

    Two proof-of-concept batteries were designed and prepared for X-ray microtomography and radiography characterizations to investigate the degradation mechanisms of silicon (Si) based half cells during the first cycle. It is highlighted here for the first time that, apart from the significant volume expansion-induced pulverization, the electrochemical "deactivation" mechanism contributes significantly to the capacity loss during the first charge process. In addition, the unexpected electrochemically inactive Si particles are also believed to substantially decrease the energy density due to the inefficient utilization of loaded active material. These unexpected findings, which cannot be deduced from macroscopic electrochemical characterizations, expand the inherent explanations for performance deterioration of Si-anode material based lithium ion batteries (LIBs) and emphasize the vital value of microscopic techniques in revealing the correlation between macroscopic electrode structure and the overall electrochemical performance.

  14. Failure Analysis at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Victoria L.; Wright, Clara

    2010-01-01

    History has shown that failures occur in every engineering endeavor, and what we learn from those failures contributes to the knowledge base to safely complete future missions. The necessity of failure analysis is at its apex at the end of one aged program (i.e. Shuttle) and at the beginning of a new and untested program (i.e. Constellation). The information that we gain through failure analysis corrects the deficiencies in the current vehicle to make the next generation of vehicles more efficient and safe. The Failure Analysis and Materials Evaluation section in the Materials Science Division at the Kennedy Space Center performs metallurgical, mechanical, electrical, and non-metallic failure analysis and accident investigations on both flight hardware and ground support equipment (GSE) for the Shuttle, International Space Station, Constellation, and Launch Services Programs. This presentation will explore a variety of failure case studies at KSC and the lessons learned that can be applied in future programs.

  15. Failure Analysis at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Victoria L.; Wright, M. Clara

    2010-01-01

    History has shown that failures occur in every engineering endeavor, and what we learn from those failures contributes to the knowledge base to safely complete future missions. The necessity of failure analysis is at its apex at the end of one aged program and at the beginning of a new and untested program. The information that we gain through failure analysis corrects the deficiencies in the current vehicle to make the next generation of vehicles more efficient and safe. The Failure Analysis and Materials Evaluation Branch in the Materials Science Division at the Kennedy Space Center performs metallurgical, mechanical, electrical, and non-metallic materials failure analyses and accident investigations on both flight hardware and ground support equipment for the Space Shuttle, International Space Station, Constellation, and Launch Services Programs. This paper will explore a variety of failure case studies at the Kennedy Space Center and the lessons learned that can be applied in future programs.

  16. Fiber optics - Failure modes and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyle, Richard A., Jr.

    A study was conducted to investigate the frequency and cause of failures of fiber-optic transmitters, waveguides, receivers, connectors, and splices. To accomplish this, quantitative and qualitative data were collected and evaluated to determine why and when failures occurred and to identify design options which can be made to avoid these failure conditions. An understanding of fiber-optic device failure modes and mechanisms is critical to insuring unit reliability, improving the manufacturing process, and allowing design flexibility of the overall fiber-optic system. The author summarizes the specific failure modes uncovered for typical items such as transmitters, receivers, fiber, cable, connectors, and splices. He also discusses fiber-optic performance criteria, design considerations, failure rate data, and failure mode information.

  17. An investigation of dynamic failure events in steels using full field high-speed infrared thermography and high-speed photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guduru, Pradeep R.

    An infrared (IR) imaging system has been developed for measuring the temperature increase during the dynamic deformation of materials. The system consists of an 8 x 8 HgCdTe focal plane array, each with its own preamplifier. Outputs from all 64 signals are simultaneously acquired and held using a bank of track and hold amplifiers. An array of eight 8:1 multiplexers then routes the signals to eight 10MHz digitizers, acquiring data from each row of detectors in parallel. The maximum rate is one million frames per second. Crack tip temperature rise during dynamic deformation is known to alter the fracture mechanisms and consequently the fracture toughness of a material. However, no direct experimental measurements have ever been made to determine the same because of limited diagnostic tools. By transcending the existing experimental limitations, this investigation presents detailed, real time evolution of the transient crack tip temperature fields in two different steels (C300 and HY100 steels), using the 2-D high speed IR camera. The crack tip temperature rise at initiation in C300 steel was found to be about 55K. In case of HY100, which is a highly ductile steel, the crack tip temperature rise was above 200K and was seen to be a strong function of loading rate. HRR elastic-plastic singular field has been used to extract J integral evolution from the measured temperature field. An experimental investigation has been conducted to study the initiation and propagation characteristics of dynamic shear bands in C300 maraging steel. Pre-fatigued single edge notched specimens were impacted on the edge under the notch to produce shear dominated mixed mode stress fields. The optical technique of coherent gradient sensing (CGS) was employed to study the evolution of the mixed mode stress intensity factors. Simultaneously, a newly developed high speed IR camera was employed to obtain the temperature field evolution during the initiation and propagation of the shear bands. The

  18. Stress-related increases in risk taking and attentional failures predict earlier relapse to smoking in young adults: A pilot investigation.

    PubMed

    Schepis, Ty S; Tapscott, Brian E; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra

    2016-04-01

    Substantial evidence links greater impulsivity and stress exposure to poorer smoking cessation outcomes. Results from adolescents also indicate that stress-related change in risk taking can impede cessation attempts. We investigated the effects of stress-related change in impulsivity, risk taking, attention and nicotine withdrawal, and craving in young adult smokers on time to smoking relapse in a relapse analogue paradigm. Twenty-six young adult smokers (50% women; mean age: 20.9 ± 1.8) were exposed to a stress imagery session followed by a contingency management-based relapse analogue paradigm. Participants smoked at least 5 cigarettes daily, with a mean baseline carbon monoxide (CO) level of 13.7 (±5.1) ppm. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and paired t tests examined stress induction validity and Cox regressions of proportional hazards examined the effects of stress-related changes in nicotine withdrawal, nicotine craving, attention, impulsivity, and risk taking on time to relapse. While stress-related change in impulsivity, nicotine craving and withdrawal did not predict time to relapse (all ps > .10), greater stress-related increases in reaction time (RT) variability (p = .02) were predictive of shorter time to relapse, with trend-level findings for inattention and risk taking. Furthermore, changes in stress-related risk taking affected outcome in women more than in men, with a significant relationship between stress-related change in risk taking only in women (p = .026). Smoking cessation attempts in young adults may be adversely impacted by stress-related increases in risk taking and attentional disruption. Clinicians working with young adults attempting cessation may need to target these stress-related impairments by fostering more adaptive coping and resilience. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26901590

  19. Heart failure - home monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000113.htm Heart failure - home monitoring To use the sharing features on ... body and the symptoms that tell you your heart failure is getting worse will help you stay healthier ...

  20. Failures in psychodynamic psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gold, Jerry; Stricker, George

    2011-11-01

    This article addresses the issue of failures in psychodynamic psychotherapy. Drawing on the clinical and research literatures, and utilizing our clinical experiences, we first describe and define criteria for success and failure in treatment. We then review five factors that can lead to failure: client factors, therapist factors, technical factors, relationship factors, and environmental factors. We illustrate our presentation with a case example, and conclude by discussing ways in which the likelihood of failures in psychodynamic treatment can be lowered. PMID:21935934

  1. In Support of Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Allison

    2013-01-01

    In this essay, I propose a concerted effort to begin devising a theory and pedagogy of failure. I review the discourse of failure in Western culture as well as in composition pedagogy, ultimately suggesting that failure is not simply a judgement or indication of rank but is a relational, affect-bearing concept with tremendous relevance to…

  2. Sensor-Failure Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.; Delaat, John C.; Merrill, Walter C.; Oberle, Lawrence G.; Sadler, Gerald G.

    1988-01-01

    Outputs of defective sensors simulated for studies of reliability of control systems. Real-time sensor-failure simulator (SFS) designed and built for use with Advance Detection, Isolation, and Accommodation (ADIA) program. Equipment consists of IBM PC/XT computer and associated analog circuitry. User defines failure scenarios to determine which sensor signals fail and method(s) used to simulate failure.

  3. Ammonia tank failure

    SciTech Connect

    Sweat, M.E.

    1983-04-01

    An ammonia tank failure at Hawkeye Chemical of Clinton, Iowa is discussed. The tank was a double-wall, 27,000 metric-ton tank built in 1968 and commissioned in December 1969. The paper presented covers the cause of the failure, repair, and procedural changes made to prevent recurrence of the failure. (JMT)

  4. Heart failure - palliative care

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic heart failure very often gets worse over time. Many people who have heart failure die of ... failure to take in enough calories and nutrients. Wasting of muscles and weight loss are part of the natural disease process. It can help to eat several small ...

  5. X ray computed tomography for failure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossi, Richard H.; Crews, Alan R.; Georgeson, Gary E.

    1992-08-01

    Under a preliminary testing task assignment of the Advanced Development of X-Ray Computed Tomography Application program, computed tomography (CT) has been studied for its potential as a tool to assist in failure analysis investigations. CT provides three-dimensional spatial distribution of material that can be used to assess internal configurations and material conditions nondestructively. This capability has been used in failure analysis studies to determine the position of internal components and their operation. CT is particularly advantageous on complex systems, composite failure studies, and testing under operational or environmental conditions. CT plays an important role in reducing the time and effort of a failure analysis investigation. Aircraft manufacturing or logistical facilities perform failure analysis operations routinely and could be expected to reduce schedules, reduce costs and/or improve evaluation on about 10 to 30 percent of the problems they investigate by using CT.

  6. Failure models for textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brian

    1995-01-01

    The goals of this investigation were to: (1) identify mechanisms of failure and determine how the architecture of reinforcing fibers in 3D woven composites controlled stiffness, strength, strain to failure, work of fracture, notch sensitivity, and fatigue life; and (2) to model composite stiffness, strength, and fatigue life. A total of 11 different angle and orthogonal interlock woven composites were examined. Composite properties depended on the weave architecture, the tow size, and the spatial distributions and strength of geometrical flaws. Simple models were developed for elastic properties, strength, and fatigue life. A more complicated stochastic model, called the 'Binary Model,' was developed for damage tolerance and ultimate failure. These 3D woven composites possessed an extraordinary combination of strength, damage tolerance, and notch insensitivity.

  7. Light water reactor lower head failure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L.

    1993-10-01

    This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response.

  8. Failure analyses of composite bolted joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. W.; Gillespie, J. W.; York, J. L.; Pipes, R. B.

    1980-01-01

    The complex failure behavior exhibited by bolted joints of graphite epoxy (Hercules AS/3501) was investigated for the net tension, bearing and shearout failure modes using combined analytical and experimental techniques. Plane stress, linear elastic, finite element methods were employed to determine the two dimensional state of stress resulting from a loaded hole in a finite width, semiinfinite strip. The stresses predicted by the finite element method were verified by experiment to lend credence to the analysis. The influence of joint geometric parameters on the state of stress and resultant strength of the joint was also studied. The resulting functional relationships found to exist between bolted joint strength and the geometric parameters, were applied in the formulation of semiempirical strength models for the basic failure modes. A point stress failure criterion was successfully applied as the failure criterion for the net tension and shearout failure modes.

  9. Failure of Non-Circular Composite Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a progressive failure analysis is used to investigate leakage in internally pressurized non-circular composite cylinders. This type of approach accounts for the localized loss of stiffness when material failure occurs at some location in a structure by degrading the local material elastic properties by a certain factor. The manner in which this degradation of material properties takes place depends on the failure modes, which are determined by the application of a failure criterion. The finite-element code STAGS, which has the capability to perform progressive failure analysis using different degradation schemes and failure criteria, is utilized to analyze laboratory scale, graphite-epoxy, elliptical cylinders with quasi-isotropic, circumferentially-stiff, and axially-stiff material orthotropies. The results are divided into two parts. The first part shows that leakage, which is assumed to develop if there is material failure in every layer at some axial and circumferential location within the cylinder, does not occur without failure of fibers. Moreover before fibers begin to fail, only matrix tensile failures, or matrix cracking, takes place, and at least one layer in all three cylinders studied remain uncracked, preventing the formation of a leakage path. That determination is corroborated by the use of different degradation schemes and various failure criteria. Among the degradation schemes investigated are the degradation of different engineering properties, the use of various degradation factors, the recursive or non-recursive degradation of the engineering properties, and the degradation of material properties using different computational approaches. The failure criteria used in the analysis include the noninteractive maximum stress criterion and the interactive Hashin and Tsai-Wu criteria. The second part of the results shows that leakage occurs due to a combination of matrix tensile and compressive, fiber tensile and compressive, and inplane

  10. Role of failure-mechanism identification in accelerated testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, J. M.; Barker, D.; Dasgupta, A.; Arora, A.

    1993-01-01

    Accelerated life testing techniques provide a short-cut method to investigate the reliability of electronic devices with respect to certain dominant failure mechanisms that occur under normal operating conditions. However, accelerated tests have often been conducted without knowledge of the failure mechanisms and without ensuring that the test accelerated the same mechanism as that observed under normal operating conditions. This paper summarizes common failure mechanisms in electronic devices and packages and investigates possible failure mechanism shifting during accelerated testing.

  11. ATM CMG bearing failure analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The cause or causes for the failure of ATM CMG S/N 5 (Skylab 1) and the anomalies associated with ATM CMG S/N 6 (Skylab 2) were investigated. Skylab telemetry data were reviewed and presented in the form of parameter distributions. The theory that the problems were caused by marginal bearing lubrication was studied along with the effects of orbital conditions on lubricants. Bearing tests were performed to investigate the effect of lubricant or lack of lubricant in the ATM CMG bearings and the dispersion and migration of the lubricant. The vacuum and weightless conditions of space were simulated in the bearing tests. Analysis of the results of the tests conducted points to inadequate lubrication as the predominant factor causing the failure of ATM CMG S/N 5 (Skylab 1) and the anomalies associated with ATM CMG S/N 6 (Skylab 2).

  12. Management of acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Fry, A C; Farrington, K

    2006-01-01

    Acute renal failure is a common condition, frequently encountered in both community practice and hospital inpatients. While it remains a heterologous condition, following basic principles makes investigation straightforward, and initial management follows a standard pathway in most patients. This article shows this, advises on therapeutic strategies, including those in special situations, and should help the clinician in deciding when to refer to a nephrologist, and when to consider renal replacement therapy. PMID:16461473

  13. Effects of Constituent Properties on Compression Failure Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.

    1984-01-01

    Compression failure mechanisms were investigated through the analysis of matrix-embedded fiber bundles. The use of fiber bundle specimens can provide much needed information on compression failure mechanisms because failure of the bundle is well contained and can be monitored during testing. The method can clearly distinguish between buckling-induced failure and shear-induced failure. The results indicate that WY and T300 graphite fibers and E-glass fiber fail in buckling while the high-modulus P75S graphite fiber fails in shear. Buckling-induced failure becomes more evident with low-modulus fiber in softer epoxy.

  14. Telemonitoring in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Ayesha; Paul, Vince

    2011-06-01

    Clinical management of refractory heart failure remains challenging, with a high rate of rehospitalizations despite advances in medical and device therapy. Care can be provided in person, via telehomecare (by telephone), or telemonitoring, which involves wireless technology for remote follow-up. Telemonitoring wirelessly transmits parameters such as weight, heart rate, or blood pressure for review by health-care professionals. Cardiac implantable devices (defibrillators and cardiac resynchronization therapy) also transmit continually interrogated physiological data, such as heart rate variability or intrathoracic impedance, which may be of value to predict patients at greater risk of hospitalization for heart failure. The use of remote monitoring techniques facilitates a rapid and regular review of such data by health-care workers as part of a heart failure management programme. Current evidence supports the feasibility of such an approach but routinely assessed parameters have been shown not to impact patient outcomes. Devices that directly assess cardiac haemodynamic status through invasive measurement of pressures are currently under investigation and could potentially increase the sensitivity and specificity of predicting heart failure events. The current evidence for telemonitoring and remote monitoring, including implantable haemodynamic devices, will be reviewed. PMID:21289040

  15. Ampoule Failure System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watring, Dale A. (Inventor); Johnson, Martin L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An ampoule failure system for use in material processing furnaces comprising a containment cartridge and an ampoule failure sensor. The containment cartridge contains an ampoule of toxic material therein and is positioned within a furnace for processing. An ampoule failure probe is positioned in the containment cartridge adjacent the ampoule for detecting a potential harmful release of toxic material therefrom during processing. The failure probe is spaced a predetermined distance from the ampoule and is chemically chosen so as to undergo a timely chemical reaction with the toxic material upon the harmful release thereof. The ampoule failure system further comprises a data acquisition system which is positioned externally of the furnace and is electrically connected to the ampoule failure probe so as to form a communicating electrical circuit. The data acquisition system includes an automatic shutdown device for shutting down the furnace upon the harmful release of toxic material. It also includes a resistance measuring device for measuring the resistance of the failure probe during processing. The chemical reaction causes a step increase in resistance of the failure probe whereupon the automatic shutdown device will responsively shut down the furnace.

  16. Birth control failure.

    PubMed

    Sophocles, A M

    1986-10-01

    Birth control failure usually results from the incorrect or inconsistent use of contraceptives. By providing anticipatory counseling, based on an understanding of the reasons for birth control failure, family physicians can help curtail the current epidemic of unwanted pregnancies. PMID:3766356

  17. Failure combination method

    SciTech Connect

    Hedin, F.; Le Coguiec, A.; Le Floch, C.; Llory, M.; Villemeur, A.

    1981-01-01

    The method described in this paper is an inductive method for combining failures (called the Failure Combination Method (FCM)). It is based on a preliminary analysis of the systems performed with an FMEA. As a study has been undertaken to test the method, the organization of the study as well as its first results from a methodological point of view are stressed. 8 refs.

  18. A failure recovery planning prototype for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammen, David G.; Kelly, Christine M.

    1991-01-01

    NASA is investigating the use of advanced automation to enhance crew productivity for Space Station Freedom in numerous areas, including failure management. A prototype is described that uses various advanced automation techniques to generate courses of action whose intents are to recover from a diagnosed failure, and to do so within the constraints levied by the failure and by Freedom's configuration and operating conditions.

  19. Generalized energy failure criterion

    PubMed Central

    Qu, R. T.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, P.; Liu, Z. Q.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2016-01-01

    Discovering a generalized criterion that can predict the mechanical failure of various different structural materials is one of ultimate goals for scientists in both material and mechanics communities. Since the first study on the failure criterion of materials by Galileo, about three centuries have passed. Now we eventually find the “generalized energy criterion”, as presented here, which appears to be one universal law for various different kinds of materials. The validity of the energy criterion for quantitatively predicting the failure is experimentally confirmed using a metallic glass. The generalized energy criterion reveals the competition and interaction between shear and cleavage, the two fundamental inherent failure mechanisms, and thus provides new physical insights into the failure prediction of materials and structural components. PMID:26996781

  20. Generalized energy failure criterion.

    PubMed

    Qu, R T; Zhang, Z J; Zhang, P; Liu, Z Q; Zhang, Z F

    2016-01-01

    Discovering a generalized criterion that can predict the mechanical failure of various different structural materials is one of ultimate goals for scientists in both material and mechanics communities. Since the first study on the failure criterion of materials by Galileo, about three centuries have passed. Now we eventually find the "generalized energy criterion", as presented here, which appears to be one universal law for various different kinds of materials. The validity of the energy criterion for quantitatively predicting the failure is experimentally confirmed using a metallic glass. The generalized energy criterion reveals the competition and interaction between shear and cleavage, the two fundamental inherent failure mechanisms, and thus provides new physical insights into the failure prediction of materials and structural components. PMID:26996781

  1. Generalized energy failure criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, R. T.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, P.; Liu, Z. Q.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2016-03-01

    Discovering a generalized criterion that can predict the mechanical failure of various different structural materials is one of ultimate goals for scientists in both material and mechanics communities. Since the first study on the failure criterion of materials by Galileo, about three centuries have passed. Now we eventually find the “generalized energy criterion”, as presented here, which appears to be one universal law for various different kinds of materials. The validity of the energy criterion for quantitatively predicting the failure is experimentally confirmed using a metallic glass. The generalized energy criterion reveals the competition and interaction between shear and cleavage, the two fundamental inherent failure mechanisms, and thus provides new physical insights into the failure prediction of materials and structural components.

  2. Common Cause Failure Modeling: Aerospace Versus Nuclear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stott, James E.; Britton, Paul; Ring, Robert W.; Hark, Frank; Hatfield, G. Spencer

    2010-01-01

    Aggregate nuclear plant failure data is used to produce generic common-cause factors that are specifically for use in the common-cause failure models of NUREG/CR-5485. Furthermore, the models presented in NUREG/CR-5485 are specifically designed to incorporate two significantly distinct assumptions about the methods of surveillance testing from whence this aggregate failure data came. What are the implications of using these NUREG generic factors to model the common-cause failures of aerospace systems? Herein, the implications of using the NUREG generic factors in the modeling of aerospace systems are investigated in detail and strong recommendations for modeling the common-cause failures of aerospace systems are given.

  3. Acute Lung Failure

    PubMed Central

    Mac Sweeney, Rob; McAuley, Daniel F.; Matthay, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Lung failure is the most common organ failure seen in the intensive care unit. The pathogenesis of acute respiratory failure (ARF) can be classified as (1) neuromuscular in origin, (2) secondary to acute and chronic obstructive airway diseases, (3) alveolar processes such as cardiogenic and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema and pneumonia, and (4) vascular diseases such as acute or chronic pulmonary embolism. This article reviews the more common causes of ARF from each group, including the pathological mechanisms and the principles of critical care management, focusing on the supportive, specific, and adjunctive therapies for each condition. PMID:21989697

  4. Failure of Viral Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, William S.; Bruinsma, Robijn F.; Michel, Jean-Philippe; Knobler, Charles M.; Ivanovska, Irena L.; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.

    2006-12-01

    We report a combined theoretical and experimental study of the structural failure of viral shells under mechanical stress. We find that discontinuities in the force-indentation curve associated with failure should appear when the so-called Föppl von Kármán (FvK) number exceeds a critical value. A nanoindentation study of a viral shell subject to a soft-mode instability, where the stiffness of the shell decreases with increasing pH, confirms the predicted onset of failure as a function of the FvK number.

  5. Damage mechanics - failure modes

    SciTech Connect

    Krajcinovic, D.; Vujosevic, M.

    1996-12-31

    The present study summarizes the results of the DOE sponsored research program focused on the brittle failure of solids with disordered microstructure. The failure is related to the stochastic processes on the microstructural scale; namely, the nucleation and growth of microcracks. The intrinsic failure modes, such as the percolation, localization and creep rupture, are studied by emphasizing the effect of the micro-structural disorder. A rich spectrum of physical phenomena and new concepts that emerges from this research demonstrates the reasons behind the limitations of traditional, deterministic, and local continuum models.

  6. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Robert; Novack, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Space Launch System (SLS) Agenda: Objective; Key Definitions; Calculating Common Cause; Examples; Defense against Common Cause; Impact of varied Common Cause Failure (CCF) and abortability; Response Surface for various CCF Beta; Takeaways.

  7. Types of Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be made. Here we delve into the importance of shared decision making. This content was last ... heart failure. Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Low Blood Pressure ...

  8. Classes of Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be made. Here we delve into the importance of shared decision making. HF Resources For Life ... heart failure. Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Low Blood Pressure ...

  9. Premature Ovarian Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is when a woman's ovaries stop working before she is 40. POF is different from ... There is no treatment that will restore normal ovarian function. However, many health care providers suggest taking ...

  10. What Causes Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart, leading to heart failure. High Blood Pressure Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing against the ... weaken your heart and lead to plaque buildup. Blood pressure is considered high if it stays at or ...

  11. Heart failure - tests

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... An echocardiogram (Echo) is a test that uses sound waves to create a moving picture of the heart. The picture is much more detailed than a plain ...

  12. Inverter ratio failure detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, A. P.; Ebersole, T. J.; Andrews, R. E. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A failure detector which detects the failure of a dc to ac inverter is disclosed. The inverter under failureless conditions is characterized by a known linear relationship of its input and output voltages and by a known linear relationship of its input and output currents. The detector includes circuitry which is responsive to the detector's input and output voltages and which provides a failure-indicating signal only when the monitored output voltage is less by a selected factor, than the expected output voltage for the monitored input voltage, based on the known voltages' relationship. Similarly, the detector includes circuitry which is responsive to the input and output currents and provides a failure-indicating signal only when the input current exceeds by a selected factor the expected input current for the monitored output current based on the known currents' relationship.

  13. Heart failure - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... any drugs you may be taking for Diabetes, high blood pressure, or other medical conditions you have. ... of the arteries Heart failure - overview Heart pacemaker High blood pressure Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator Smoking - tips on ...

  14. Failure to thrive

    MedlinePlus

    ... at puberty. Symptoms of failure to thrive include: Height, weight, and head circumference do not match standard ... or 20% below the ideal weight for their height Growth may have slowed or stopped The following ...

  15. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... renal function using ureteral stenting, nephrostomy, surgery or dialysis. What is kidney (renal) failure? How is kidney ... as a urinary stent or kidney stone removal. Dialysis , including hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis: These procedures remove ...

  16. Heart failure - overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your heart muscle is stiff and does not fill up with blood easily. This is called diastolic heart failure. As the heart's pumping becomes less effective, blood may back up in other areas of the body. Fluid ...

  17. What Causes Respiratory Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... easily move oxygen into your blood and remove carbon dioxide from your blood (gas exchange). This can cause a low oxygen level or high carbon dioxide level, or both, in your blood. Respiratory failure ...

  18. Equipment Failure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-01-01

    Tennessee Eastman uses NASTRAN to minimize lost production by pinpointing the causes of equipment failures and preventing recurrences. An example of the program's utility involves a large centrifugal fan which developed cracks during start-ups and shutdowns. This information prompted redesign of the fan. Tennessee Eastman has made extensive use of NASTRAN, both as failure analysis tool and as an aid in redesigning production hardware.

  19. Pathophysiology of Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Tanai, Edit; Frantz, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is considered an epidemic disease in the modern world affecting approximately 1% to 2% of adult population. It presents a multifactorial, systemic disease, in which--after cardiac injury--structural, neurohumoral, cellular, and molecular mechanisms are activated and act as a network to maintain physiological functioning. These coordinated, complex processes lead to excessive volume overload, increased sympathetic activity, circulation redistribution, and result in different, parallel developing clinical signs and symptoms. These signs and symptoms sum up to an unspecific clinical picture; thus invasive and noninvasive diagnostic tools are used to get an accurate diagnosis and to specify the underlying cause. The most important, outcome determining factor in heart failure is its constant progression. Constant optimizing of pharmatherapeutical regimes, novel targets, and fine regulation of these processes try to keep these compensatory mechanisms in a physiological range. Beside pharmacological therapy, interventional and surgical therapy options give new chances in the management of heart failure. For the optimization and establishment of these and novel therapeutical approaches, complete and comprehensive understanding of the underlying mechanisms is essentially needed. Besides diagnosis and treatment, efforts should be made for better prevention in heart failure by treatment of risk factors, or identifying and following risk groups. This summary of the pathophysiology of heart failure tries to give a compact overview of basic mechanisms and of the novel unfolding, progressive theory of heart failure to contribute to a more comprehensive knowledge of the disease. PMID:26756631

  20. Devices in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Munir, Shahzeb M.; Bogaev, Roberta C.; Sobash, Ed; Shankar, K. J.; Gondi, Sreedevi; Stupin, Igor V.; Robertson, Jillian; Brewer, M. Alan; Casscells, S. Ward; Delgado, Reynolds M.; Ahmed, Amany

    2008-01-01

    Congestive heart failure has long been one of the most serious medical conditions in the United States; in fact, in the United States alone, heart failure accounts for 6.5 million days of hospitalization each year. One important goal of heart-failure therapy is to inhibit the progression of congestive heart failure through pharmacologic and device-based therapies. Therefore, there have been efforts to develop device-based therapies aimed at improving cardiac reserve and optimizing pump function to meet metabolic requirements. The course of congestive heart failure is often worsened by other conditions, including new-onset arrhythmias, ischemia and infarction, valvulopathy, decompensation, end-organ damage, and therapeutic refractoriness, that have an impact on outcomes. The onset of such conditions is sometimes heralded by subtle pathophysiologic changes, and the timely identification of these changes may promote the use of preventive measures. Consequently, device-based methods could in the future have an important role in the timely identification of the subtle pathophysiologic changes associated with congestive heart failure. PMID:18612451

  1. Thyroid hormones and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Felipe

    2016-07-01

    Heart failure is a major health problem and its relationship to thyroid dysfunction has been increasingly investigated in recent years. Since it has been demonstrated that thyroid hormones (TH) and mainly T3 have cardioprotective effects, it is easy to understand that in the scenario of thyroid disorder, cardiac function may be damaged, and inversely in cardiac dysfunction thyroid dysregulation may be seen. The increase in plasma TH produces a clear neurohormonal activation which impacts negatively on cardiac function. In hypothyroidism, and in addition to extracardiac dysfunction, myocardial and vascular remodelling is altered and they contribute to cardiac failure. Abnormal low plasma TSH has also been shown to be a risk factor for developing HF in several recent studies, and they suggest that TSH is an independent predictor of clinical outcome including death and cardiac hospitalizations. Therefore, physicians should consider all these concepts when managing a patient with heart failure, not only for a clear diagnosis, but also for better and accurate treatment. PMID:27098905

  2. Life Support with Failures and Variable Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry

    2010-01-01

    The life support system for long duration missions will recycle oxygen and water to reduce the material resupply mass from Earth. The impact of life support failures was investigated by dynamic simulation of a lunar outpost habitat life support model. The model was modified to simulate resupply delays, power failures, recycling system failures, and storage failures. Many failures impact the lunar outpost water supply directly or indirectly, depending on the water balance and water storage. Failure effects on the water supply are reduced if Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) water use is low and the water supply is ample. Additional oxygen can be supplied by scavenging unused propellant or by production from regolith, but the amounts obtained can vary significantly. The requirements for oxygen and water can also vary significantly, especially for EVA. Providing storage buffers can improve efficiency and reliability, and minimize the chance of supply failing to meet demand. Life support failures and supply variations can be survivable if effective solutions are provided by the system design

  3. Dependent failures of diesel generators

    SciTech Connect

    Mankamo, T.; Pulkkinen, U.

    1982-01-01

    This survey of dependent failures (common-cause failures) is based on the data of diesel generator failures in U. S. nuclear power plants as reported in Licensee Event Reports. Failures were classified into random and potentially dependent failures. All failures due to design errors, manufacturing or installation errors, maintenance errors, or deviations in the operational environment were classified as potentially dependent failures.The statistical dependence between failures was estimated from the relative portion of multiple failures. Results confirm the earlier view of the significance of statistical dependence, a strong dependence on the age of the diesel generator was found in each failure class excluding random failures and maintenance errors, which had a nearly constant frequency independent of diesel generator age.

  4. Technology integration box beam failure study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, Mark J.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Davis, D. D., Jr.; Davis, R. C.; Farley, G. L.; Lotts, C. G.; Wang, J. T.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe current results from an on-going study of the mechanisms that led to the failure of the TIBB. Experimental and analytical results are presented. Experimental results include load, strain, and deflection data for the TIBB (Technology Integration Box Beam). An analytical investigation was conducted to compliment the experimental investigation and to gain additional insight into the TIBB structural response. Analytical results include strain and deflection results from a global analysis of the TIBB. A local analysis of the failure region is being completed. These analytical results are validated through comparisons with the experimental results from the TIBB tests. The experimental and analytical results from the TIBB tests are used to determine a sequence of events that may have resulted in failure of the TIBB. A potential cause of failure is high stresses in a stiffener runout region. Typical analytical results are presented for a stiffener runout specimen that is being defined to simulate the TIBB failure mechanisms. The results of this study are anticipated to provide better understanding of potential failure mechanisms in composite aircraft structures, to lead to future design improvements, and to identify needed analytical tools for design and analysis.

  5. Analysis of failure in manufacturing machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaiman, S.; Abidin Ismail, N.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents information about how to interpret the machine failure in suitable ways. The concept in this paper focuses on the methodology and creates active thinking with positive attitude to solve the machine failure. It is also described few topic on elaborate the technique towards investigate and develop a better understanding of using this concept in manufacturing industry. Failure analysis (FA) in manufacturing has its own value for each characteristic and to communicate, it needs specific data. Two methods were discussed to perform FA i.e. Why-why analysis and PM analysis (is a philosophy which aims to clarify the mechanism behind the chronically defective phenomena by analyzing the phenomena in terms of physical principle). For Why-why analysis, it is mainly effective in preventing the recurrence of failures that occur at the initial period. Whereas PM analysis is mainly effective for resolving on a fundamental problem that occur in the accidental period.

  6. Apollo 15 main-parachute failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arabian, D. D.; Mechelay, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    In the investigation of the failure of one of the three main parachutes of the Apollo 15 spacecraft, which collapsed at approximately 1825 meters after operating properly from deployment at 3050 meters, three conditions considered to be possible causes of the failure were produced. The suspect conditions were the proximity of the forward heat shield that passed the spacecraft at approximately 1825 meters, the dumping of the reaction control system hypergolic propellants at approximately 1825 meters, and the failing of a riser link found on a recovered parachute. (The failed parachute was not recovered). The remaining two parachutes functioned as planned and averted a catastrophic failure. The conclusions concerning the cause of the failure are discussed.

  7. SAW Sensor for Fastener Failure Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. C.; Rogge, M. D.; Fisher, B.; Roller, M. J.; Malocha, D. M.

    2010-01-01

    The proof of concept for using surface acoustic wave (SAW) strain sensors in the detection of aircraft fastener failures is demonstrated. SAW sensors were investigated because they have the potential for the development of passive wireless systems. The SAW devices employed four orthogonal frequency coding (OFC) spread spectrum reflectors in two banks on a high temperature piezoelectric substrate. Three SAW devices were attached to a cantilever panel with removable side stiffeners. Damage in the form of fastener failure was simulated by removal of bolts from the side stiffeners. During testing, three different force conditions were used to simulate static aircraft structural response under loads. The design of the sensor, the panel arrangement and the panel testing results are reported. The results show that the sensors successfully detected single fastener failure at distances up to 54.6 cm from the failure site under loaded conditions.

  8. Weld failure detection

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.; Sutton, Jr., Harry G.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting failure in a welded connection, particrly applicable to not readily accessible welds such as those joining components within the reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor system. A preselected tag gas is sealed within a chamber which extends through selected portions of the base metal and weld deposit. In the event of a failure, such as development of a crack extending from the chamber to an outer surface, the tag gas is released. The environment about the welded area is directed to an analyzer which, in the event of presence of the tag gas, evidences the failure. A trigger gas can be included with the tag gas to actuate the analyzer.

  9. BIOASSAY VESSEL FAILURE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Vormelker, P

    2008-09-22

    Two high-pressure bioassay vessels failed at the Savannah River Site during a microwave heating process for biosample testing. Improper installation of the thermal shield in the first failure caused the vessel to burst during microwave heating. The second vessel failure is attributed to overpressurization during a test run. Vessel failure appeared to initiate in the mold parting line, the thinnest cross-section of the octagonal vessel. No material flaws were found in the vessel that would impair its structural performance. Content weight should be minimized to reduce operating temperature and pressure. Outer vessel life is dependent on actual temperature exposure. Since thermal aging of the vessels can be detrimental to their performance, it was recommended that the vessels be used for a limited number of cycles to be determined by additional testing.

  10. [Hypoxic lung failure].

    PubMed

    David, S; Wiesner, O

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxic lung failure is among the major indications for patients' referral to intensive care units either for surveillance or if necessary therapy. There are a vast number of pathophysiological causes of lung failure and the optimal treatment highly depends on the underlying pathology; therefore, no standard algorithm exists. So-called acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) represents a very severe manifestation of hypoxemic lung failure that is of particular relevance for intensivists and is therefore the focus of this review. In addition to fundamental pathophysiology of lung injury, the article also focuses on established and modern treatment strategies. Moreover, we will briefly highlight innovative concepts of ARDS treatment that might become relevant in the future. PMID:27084180

  11. Pure Autonomic Failure.

    PubMed

    Thaisetthawatkul, Pariwat

    2016-08-01

    Pure autonomic failure (PAF) is a rare sporadic neurodegenerative autonomic disorder characterized by slowly progressive pan autonomic failure without other features of neurologic dysfunctions. The main clinical symptoms result from neurogenic orthostatic hypotension and urinary and gastrointestinal autonomic dysfunctions. Autonomic failure in PAF is caused by neuronal degeneration of pre- and postganglionic sympathetic and parasympathetic neurons in the thoracic spinal cord and paravertebral autonomic ganglia. The presence of Lewy bodies and α-synuclein deposits in these neural structures suggests that PAF is one of Lewy body synucleinopathies, examples of which include multiple system atrophy, Parkinson disease, and Lewy body disease. There is currently no specific treatment to stop progression in PAF. Management of autonomic symptoms is the mainstay of treatment and includes management of orthostatic hypotension and supine hypertension. The prognosis for survival of PAF is better than for the other synucleinopathies. PMID:27338613

  12. Failure to thrive.

    PubMed

    Nangia, Sushma; Tiwari, Soumya

    2013-07-01

    Failure to thrive is poor physical growth that results when the nutritional demands of young children are not fulfilled. This diagnosis is made when, on serial growth monitoring, the child's anthropometric parameters such as weight for age and/or height are found to be significantly below the expected values. A detailed evaluation by the treating physician, taking into account physical and psychosocial factors affecting the child's health is essential for understanding the factors contributing to failure to thrive. The treatment of this entity requires a multidisciplinary approach, correcting the macro and micronutrient deficiency in the child as well as education of parents regarding age-appropriate feeding recommendation for children. In addition, parents need to be apprised of the possible implications of malnutrition on growth and neurodevelopment of the child. Early childhood being a crucial period for growth and development, an early diagnosis and treatment will result in better outcomes in children with failure to thrive. PMID:23604606

  13. Management of Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Singh Lamba, Tejpreet; Sharara, Rihab Saeed; Leap, Jennifer; Singh, Anil C

    2016-01-01

    The management of acute respiratory failure varies according to the etiology. A clear understanding of physiology of respiration and pathophysiological mechanisms of respiratory failure is mandatory for managing these patients. The extent of abnormality in arterial blood gas values is a result of the balance between the severity of disease and the degree of compensation by cardiopulmonary system. Normal blood gases do not mean that there is an absence of disease because the homeostatic system can compensate. However, an abnormal arterial blood gas value reflects uncompensated disease that might be life threatening. PMID:26919671

  14. Common Cause Failure Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Jon; Heimann, Timothy J.; Anderson, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    High technology industries with high failure costs commonly use redundancy as a means to reduce risk. Redundant systems, whether similar or dissimilar, are susceptible to Common Cause Failures (CCF). CCF is not always considered in the design effort and, therefore, can be a major threat to success. There are several aspects to CCF which must be understood to perform an analysis which will find hidden issues that may negate redundancy. This paper will provide definition, types, a list of possible causes and some examples of CCF. Requirements and designs from NASA projects will be used in the paper as examples.

  15. Failure detection and identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massoumnia, Mohammad-Ali; Verghese, George C.; Willsky, Alan S.

    1989-01-01

    Using the geometric concept of an unobservability subspace, a solution is given to the problem of detecting and identifying control system component failures in linear, time-invariant systems. Conditions are developed for the existence of a causal, linear, time-invariant processor that can detect and uniquely identify a component failure, first for the case where components can fail simultaneously, and then for the case where they fail only one at a time. Explicit design algorithms are provided when these conditions are satisfied. In addition to time-domain solvability conditions, frequency-domain interpretations of the results are given, and connections are drawn with results already available in the literature.

  16. Microseismic Signature of Magma Failure: Testing Failure Forecast in Heterogeneous Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, J.; Lavallee, Y.; Hess, K.; Wassermann, J. M.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    Volcanoes exhibit a range of seismic precursors prior to eruptions. This range of signals derive from different processes, which if quantified, may tell us when and how the volcano will erupt: effusively or explosively. This quantification can be performed in laboratory. Here we investigated the signals associated with the deformation and failure of single-phase silicate liquids compare to mutli-phase magmas containing pores and crystals as heterogeneities. For the past decades, magmas have been simplified as viscoelastic fluids with grossly predictable failure, following an analysis of the stress and strain rate conditions in volcanic conduits. Yet it is clear that the way magmas fail is not unique and evidences increasingly illustrate the role of heterogeneities in the process of magmatic fragmentation. In such multi-phase magmas, failure cannot be predicted using current rheological laws. Microseismicity, as detected in the laboratory by analogous Acoustic Emission (AE), can be used to monitor fracture initiation and propagation, and thus provides invaluable information to characterise the process of brittle failure underlying explosive eruptions. Tri-axial press experiments on different synthetised and natural glass samples have been performed to investigate the acoustic signature of failure. We observed that the failure of single-phase liquids occurs without much strain and is preceded by the constant nucleation, propagation and coalescence of cracks as demonstrated by the monitored AE. In contrast, the failure of multi-phase magmas depends on the applied stress and is strain dependent. The path dependence of magma failure is nonetheless accompanied by supra exponential acceleration in released AEs. Analysis of the released AEs following material Failure Forecast Method (FFM) suggests that the predicability of failure is enhanced by the presence of heterogeneities in magmas. We discuss our observations in terms of volcanic scenarios.

  17. Causal Attributions for Failure and the Effect of Gender among Moroccan EFL University Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zohri, Abdelaziz

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports a study that sought to investigate Moroccan university learners' perceptions of failure. 333 subjects studying English at university ranked their perceptions of failure in a Causal Attribution Scale of University Failure (CASUF). The results show that Moroccan learners attribute their failure to teachers' attitude, effort,…

  18. Explaining Jewish Student Failure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoem, David

    1982-01-01

    Ethnographic study of a suburban Jewish afternoon school suggests that students' failure to meet school behavior and learning standards occurred because they did not value or understand the rewards made available to them through the school and because their means of achieving status mobility had shifted away from the Jewish school. (Author/GC)

  19. Preventing Early Learning Failure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sornson, Bob, Ed.

    Noting that thousands of young children with the capacity to experience school success do not because they are unprepared for school learning activities, have experienced physical or emotional setbacks that cause them to be at risk for early learning failure, have never experienced limits on their behavior, or have mild sensory or motor deficits,…

  20. Failure in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Peter

    2009-01-01

    In this article, it is argued that Kurt Hahn felt that it was important for children to experience 'failure' at times and to learn how to cope with it. If this is no longer desirable in the classroom, it ought to be possible to encourage children to be adventurous and "take risks" in a wide range of Outward Bound activities.

  1. Failure Free Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This paper provides an overview of Failure Free Reading, a program with the primary goal of providing a basic understanding of the reading process to students in grades K-12 with pronounced reading difficulty and move them into traditional reading programs. The program is targeted to and most effective with at-risk and English as a Second Language…

  2. Designing for Productive Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapur, Manu; Bielaczyc, Katerine

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we describe the design principles undergirding "productive failure" (PF; M. Kapur, 2008). We then report findings from an ongoing program of research on PF in mathematical problem solving in 3 Singapore public schools with significantly different mathematical ability profiles, ranging from average to lower ability. In the 1st…

  3. Failure-Oriented Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickens, Diana; Lorenz, Paul

    This document consists of a number of figures and diagrams suitable for overhead transparencies that illustrate and elaborate on the prnciples of failure-oriented training (a model for improving the effectiveness of instructional analysis). By adding a few simple steps to analysis, the resulting training will be closer to the idealized tutor:…

  4. Living with Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... should be. This includes advice on daily activities, work, leisure time, sex, and exercise. Your level of activity will depend on the stage of your heart failure (how severe it is). Keep all of your ... to get tests and lab work. Your doctor needs the results of these tests ...

  5. Learning from Failures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saffran, Murray

    1991-01-01

    Describes mistakes made in trying to change the Nutrition and Digestion section of a medical biochemistry course. Author tried to make the section student taught and reports nine mistakes including the following: ignoring active opposition of colleagues, failure to assess the receptivity of the class to a new form of teaching, and overestimating…

  6. Large Rock Slope Failures Induced by Recent Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydan, Ö.

    2016-06-01

    Recent earthquakes caused many large-scale rock slope failures. The scale and impact of rock slope failures are very large, and the form of failure differs depending upon the geological structures of slopes. First, the author briefly describes some model experiments to investigate the effects of shaking or faulting due to earthquakes on rock slopes. Then, fundamental characteristics of the rock slope failures induced by the earthquakes are described and evaluated according to some empirical and theoretical models. Furthermore, the observations for slope failures in relation to earthquake magnitude and epicenter or hypocenter distance were compared with several empirical relations available in the literature. Some of major rock slope failures induced by earthquakes are selected, and the post-failure motions are simulated and compared with observations. In addition, the effects of tsunamis on rock slopes in view of observations in the reconnaissances of the recent mega-earthquakes are explained and are discussed.

  7. Buckling failures in insect exoskeletons.

    PubMed

    Parle, Eoin; Herbaj, Simona; Sheils, Fiona; Larmon, Hannah; Taylor, David

    2016-02-01

    Thin walled tubes are often used for load-bearing structures, in nature and in engineering, because they offer good resistance to bending and torsion at relatively low weight. However, when loaded in bending they are prone to failure by buckling. It is difficult to predict the loading conditions which cause buckling, especially for tubes whose cross sections are not simple shapes. Insights into buckling prevention might be gained by studying this phenomenon in the exoskeletons of insects and other arthropods. We investigated the leg segments (tibiae) of five different insects: the locust (Schistocerca gergaria), American cockroach (Periplaneta americana), death's head cockroach (Blaberus discoidalis), stick insect (Parapachymorpha zomproi) and bumblebee (Bombus terrestris audax). These were tested to failure in cantilever bending and modelled using finite element analysis (FEA). The tibiae of the locust and the cockroaches were found to be approximately circular in shape. Their buckling loads were well predicted by linear elastic FEA, and also by one of the analytical solutions available in the literature for elastic buckling. The legs of the stick insect are also circular in cross section but have several prominent longitudinal ridges. We hypothesised that these ridges might protect the legs against buckling but we found that this was not the case: the loads necessary for elastic buckling were not reached in practice because yield occurred in the material, causing plastic buckling. The legs of bees have a non-circular cross section due to a pollen-carrying feature (the corbicula). We found that this did not significantly affect their resistance to buckling. Our results imply that buckling is the dominant failure mode in the tibia of insects; it likely to be a significant consideration for other arthropods and any organisms with stiff exoskeletons. The interactions displayed here between material properties and cross sectional geometry may provide insights for the

  8. Carbon Fiber Strand Tensile Failure Dynamic Event Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kenneth L.; Reeder, James

    2016-01-01

    There are few if any clear, visual, and detailed images of carbon fiber strand failures under tension useful for determining mechanisms, sequences of events, different types of failure modes, etc. available to researchers. This makes discussion of physics of failure difficult. It was also desired to find out whether the test article-to-test rig interface (grip) played a part in some failures. These failures have nothing to do with stress rupture failure, thus representing a source of waste for the larger 13-00912 investigation into that specific failure type. Being able to identify or mitigate any competing failure modes would improve the value of the 13-00912 test data. The beginnings of the solution to these problems lay in obtaining images of strand failures useful for understanding physics of failure and the events leading up to failure. Necessary steps include identifying imaging techniques that result in useful data, using those techniques to home in on where in a strand and when in the sequence of events one should obtain imaging data.

  9. A New Rule-Based Strategy to Determine The Failure modes of Structural Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasnia, R.; Bagheri, M. M.

    2011-07-01

    Parameters affecting types of failure of reinforced concrete structural walls with arbitrary aspect ratios and cross section are investigated using data from numerous wall tests. Basically there are three known primary failure modes that covers prominent behavior of wall at the failure load. Shear failure is known by diagonal tension cracks and premature yielding of shear reinforcement that leads to abrupt none-ductile failure. To insure a ductile flexural failure, it is recommended that strength in shear be equal or grater than strength in flexure. Flexural-shear failure is another type of failure that needs to more details to identify explicitly and it is divided to two different cases namely web crushing or sliding shear failure. A new model is proposed to predict the failure modes of structural walls in terms of shear strength, nominal shear stress, shear force related to flexural capacity, the level of compression in concrete and control of sliding shear failure.

  10. Civil aircraft accident investigation.

    PubMed

    Haines, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This talk reviews some historic aircraft accidents and some more recent. It reflects on the division of accident causes, considering mechanical failures and aircrew failures, and on aircrew training. Investigation results may lead to improved aircraft design, and to appropriate crew training. PMID:24057309