Science.gov

Sample records for failure modes analysis

  1. Failure mode analysis to predict product reliability.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zemanick, P. P.

    1972-01-01

    The failure mode analysis (FMA) is described as a design tool to predict and improve product reliability. The objectives of the failure mode analysis are presented as they influence component design, configuration selection, the product test program, the quality assurance plan, and engineering analysis priorities. The detailed mechanics of performing a failure mode analysis are discussed, including one suggested format. Some practical difficulties of implementation are indicated, drawn from experience with preparing FMAs on the nuclear rocket engine program.

  2. Failure Mode Identification Through Clustering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arunajadai, Srikesh G.; Stone, Robert B.; Tumer, Irem Y.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Research has shown that nearly 80% of the costs and problems are created in product development and that cost and quality are essentially designed into products in the conceptual stage. Currently, failure identification procedures (such as FMEA (Failure Modes and Effects Analysis), FMECA (Failure Modes, Effects and Criticality Analysis) and FTA (Fault Tree Analysis)) and design of experiments are being used for quality control and for the detection of potential failure modes during the detail design stage or post-product launch. Though all of these methods have their own advantages, they do not give information as to what are the predominant failures that a designer should focus on while designing a product. This work uses a functional approach to identify failure modes, which hypothesizes that similarities exist between different failure modes based on the functionality of the product/component. In this paper, a statistical clustering procedure is proposed to retrieve information on the set of predominant failures that a function experiences. The various stages of the methodology are illustrated using a hypothetical design example.

  3. Failure modes and effects analysis automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhieh, Cynthia H.; Cutts, Dannie E.; Purves, R. Byron

    1988-01-01

    A failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) assistant was implemented as a knowledge based system and will be used during design of the Space Station to aid engineers in performing the complex task of tracking failures throughout the entire design effort. The three major directions in which automation was pursued were the clerical components of the FMEA process, the knowledge acquisition aspects of FMEA, and the failure propagation/analysis portions of the FMEA task. The system is accessible to design, safety, and reliability engineers at single user workstations and, although not designed to replace conventional FMEA, it is expected to decrease by many man years the time required to perform the analysis.

  4. A streamlined failure mode and effects analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Eric C. Smith, Koren; Terezakis, Stephanie; Croog, Victoria; Gollamudi, Smitha; Gage, Irene; Keck, Jordie; DeWeese, Theodore; Sibley, Greg

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Explore the feasibility and impact of a streamlined failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) using a structured process that is designed to minimize staff effort. Methods: FMEA for the external beam process was conducted at an affiliate radiation oncology center that treats approximately 60 patients per day. A structured FMEA process was developed which included clearly defined roles and goals for each phase. A core group of seven people was identified and a facilitator was chosen to lead the effort. Failure modes were identified and scored according to the FMEA formalism. A risk priority number,RPN, was calculated and used to rank failure modes. Failure modes with RPN > 150 received safety improvement interventions. Staff effort was carefully tracked throughout the project. Results: Fifty-two failure modes were identified, 22 collected during meetings, and 30 from take-home worksheets. The four top-ranked failure modes were: delay in film check, missing pacemaker protocol/consent, critical structures not contoured, and pregnant patient simulated without the team's knowledge of the pregnancy. These four failure modes hadRPN > 150 and received safety interventions. The FMEA was completed in one month in four 1-h meetings. A total of 55 staff hours were required and, additionally, 20 h by the facilitator. Conclusions: Streamlined FMEA provides a means of accomplishing a relatively large-scale analysis with modest effort. One potential value of FMEA is that it potentially provides a means of measuring the impact of quality improvement efforts through a reduction in risk scores. Future study of this possibility is needed.

  5. Failure-Modes-And-Effects Analysis Of Software Logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Danny; Hartline, Thomas; Minor, Terry; Statum, David; Vice, David

    1996-01-01

    Rigorous analysis applied early in design effort. Method of identifying potential inadequacies and modes and effects of failures caused by inadequacies (failure-modes-and-effects analysis or "FMEA" for short) devised for application to software logic.

  6. Mod 1 wind turbine generator failure modes and effects analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) was directed primarily at identifying those critical failure modes that would be hazardous to life or would result in major damage to the system. Each subsystem was approached from the top down, and broken down to successive lower levels where it appeared that the criticality of the failure mode warranted more detail analysis. The results were reviewed by specialists from outside the Mod 1 program, and corrective action taken wherever recommended.

  7. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) Assistant Tool Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, Melissa; Malin, Jane T.

    2013-01-01

    An effort to determine the feasibility of a software tool to assist in Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) has been completed. This new and unique approach to FMEA uses model based systems engineering concepts to recommend failure modes, causes, and effects to the user after they have made several selections from pick lists about a component s functions and inputs/outputs. Recommendations are made based on a library using common failure modes identified over the course of several major human spaceflight programs. However, the tool could be adapted for use in a wide range of applications from NASA to the energy industry.

  8. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA): A Bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) is a bottom-up analytical process that identifies process hazards, which helps managers understand vulnerabilities of systems, as well as assess and mitigate risk. It is one of several engineering tools and techniques available to program and project managers aimed at increasing the likelihood of safe and successful NASA programs and missions. This bibliography references 465 documents in the NASA STI Database that contain the major concepts, failure modes or failure analysis, in either the basic index of the major subject terms.

  9. Failure Mode Effects Analysis for an Accelerator Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Steven M

    2009-01-01

    Failure mode effects analysis (FMEA) has been used in industry for design, manufacturing and assembly process quality control. It describes a formal approach for categorizing how a process may fail and for prioritizing failures based on their severity, frequency and likelihood of detection. Experience conducting a partial FMEA of an accelerator subsystem and its related control system will be reviewed. The applicability of the FMEA process to an operational accelerator control system will be discussed.

  10. Cycles till failure of silver-zinc cells with competing failure modes - Preliminary data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidik, S. M.; Leibecki, H. F.; Bozek, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    The data analysis of cycles to failure of silver-zinc electrochemical cells with competing failure modes is presented. The test ran 129 cells through charge-discharge cycles until failure; preliminary data analysis consisted of response surface estimate of life. Batteries fail through low voltage condition and an internal shorting condition; a competing failure modes analysis was made using maximum likelihood estimation for the extreme value life distribution. Extensive residual plotting and probability plotting were used to verify data quality and selection of model.

  11. Failure modes and effects analysis (RADL Item 2-23)

    SciTech Connect

    1980-04-01

    The Pilot Plant is a central receiver design concept. It is comprised of five major subsystems as shown schematically, plus a set of equipment (Plant Support Subsystem) used to support total plant operation. The failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) is a bottom-up analysis used to identify the failure characteristics of the system (total equipment used to produce electrical power), that is, the failure of a single component is assumed and the effect of that failure upon the system is determined. The FMEA is concerned with the plant from an operational standpoint (i.e., the production of electrical power). This analysis was performed to the component level. This was interpreted as a valve, computer, measurement sensor and its associated signal conditioning, an electronic black box, etc.

  12. Failure modes and effects analysis of fusion magnet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, M; Kazimi, M S; Siu, N O; Thome, R J

    1988-12-01

    A failure modes and consequence analysis of fusion magnet system is an important contributor towards enhancing the design by improving the reliability and reducing the risk associated with the operation of magnet systems. In the first part of this study, a failure mode analysis of a superconducting magnet system is performed. Building on the functional breakdown and the fault tree analysis of the Toroidal Field (TF) coils of the Next European Torus (NET), several subsystem levels are added and an overview of potential sources of failures in a magnet system is provided. The failure analysis is extended to the Poloidal Field (PF) magnet system. Furthermore, an extensive analysis of interactions within the fusion device caused by the operation of the PF magnets is presented in the form of an Interaction Matrix. A number of these interactions may have significant consequences for the TF magnet system particularly interactions triggered by electrical failures in the PF magnet system. In the second part of this study, two basic categories of electrical failures in the PF magnet system are examined: short circuits between the terminals of external PF coils, and faults with a constant voltage applied at external PF coil terminals. An electromagnetic model of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is used to examine the mechanical load conditions for the PF and the TF coils resulting from these fault scenarios. It is found that shorts do not pose large threats to the PF coils. Also, the type of plasma disruption has little impact on the net forces on the PF and the TF coils. 39 refs., 30 figs., 12 tabs.

  13. [Failure mode and effect analysis: application in chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ching-Hui; Chuang, Sheu-Wen

    2009-08-01

    Medical institutions are increasingly concerned about ensuring the safety of patients under their care. Failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) is a qualitative approach based on a proactive process. Strongly promoted by the Joint Commission Accredited of Health Organization (JCAHO) since 2002, FMEA has since been adopted and widely practiced in healthcare organizations to assess and analyze clinical error events. FMEA has proven to be an effective method of minimizing errors in both manufacturing and healthcare industries. It predicts failure points in systems and allows an organization to address proactively the causes of problems and prioritize improvement strategies. The application of FMEA in chemotherapy at our department identified three main failure points: (1) inappropriate chemotherapy standard operating procedures (SOPs), (2) communication barriers, and (3) insufficient training of nurses. The application of FMEA in chemotherapy is expected to enhance the sensitivity and proactive abilities of healthcare practitioners during potentially risky situations as well as to improve levels of patient care safety. PMID:19634100

  14. Cycles till failure of silver-zinc cells with completing failures modes: Preliminary data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidik, S. M.; Leibecki, H. F.; Bozek, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    One hundred and twenty nine cells were run through charge-discharge cycles until failure. The experiment design was a variant of a central composite factorial in five factors. Preliminary data analysis consisted of response surface estimation of life. Batteries fail under two basic modes; a low voltage condition and an internal shorting condition. A competing failure modes analysis using maximum likelihood estimation for the extreme value life distribution was performed. Extensive diagnostics such as residual plotting and probability plotting were employed to verify data quality and choice of model.

  15. Letter report seismic shutdown system failure mode and effect analysis

    SciTech Connect

    KECK, R.D.

    1999-09-01

    The Supply Ventilation System Seismic Shutdown ensures that the 234-52 building supply fans, the dry air process fans and vertical development calciner are shutdown following a seismic event. This evaluates the failure modes and determines the effects of the failure modes.

  16. Failure modes and effects analysis in clinical engineering.

    PubMed

    Willis, G

    1992-01-01

    Failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) is a proactive quality assurance procedure that has been commonly used to address potential design flaws and product misuses during the design stage of a product's life. FMEA is becoming commonplace among manufacturing companies but is relatively unknown outside of manufacturing circles. One potential new application of FMEA is by medical device end-users who could address design or functional concerns specific to their situation. The continued increase in the amount and complexity of medical instrumentation necessitates an aggressive stance towards safety in each hospital, such as is recommended in this paper. PMID:10117004

  17. Failure mode and effects analysis: too little for too much?

    PubMed

    Dean Franklin, Bryony; Shebl, Nada Atef; Barber, Nick

    2012-07-01

    Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is a structured prospective risk assessment method that is widely used within healthcare. FMEA involves a multidisciplinary team mapping out a high-risk process of care, identifying the failures that can occur, and then characterising each of these in terms of probability of occurrence, severity of effects and detectability, to give a risk priority number used to identify failures most in need of attention. One might assume that such a widely used tool would have an established evidence base. This paper considers whether or not this is the case, examining the evidence for the reliability and validity of its outputs, the mathematical principles behind the calculation of a risk prioirty number, and variation in how it is used in practice. We also consider the likely advantages of this approach, together with the disadvantages in terms of the healthcare professionals' time involved. We conclude that although FMEA is popular and many published studies have reported its use within healthcare, there is little evidence to support its use for the quantitative prioritisation of process failures. It lacks both reliability and validity, and is very time consuming. We would not recommend its use as a quantitative technique to prioritise, promote or study patient safety interventions. However, the stage of FMEA involving multidisciplinary mapping process seems valuable and work is now needed to identify the best way of converting this into plans for action. PMID:22447819

  18. The Worker Exposure Failure Modes and Effects Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    2005-05-15

    The Worker Exposure Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (WE-FMEA) is a new approach to quantitatively evaluate worker risks from possible failures of co-located equipment in the complex environment of a magnetic or inertial fusion experiment. For next-step experiments such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) or the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the systems and equipment will be larger, handle more throughput or power, and will, in general, be more robust than past experiments. These systems and equipment are necessary to operate the machine, but the rooms are congested with equipment, piping, and cables, which poses a new level of hazard for workers who will perform hands-on maintenance. The WE-FMEA systematically analyzes the nearby equipment and the work environment for equipment failure or inherent hazards, and then develops exposure scenarios. Once identified, the exposure scenarios are evaluated for the worker hazards and quantitative worker risk is calculated. Then risk scenarios are quantitatively compared to existing statistical data on worker injuries; high-risk scenarios can be identified and addressed in more detail to determine the proper means to reduce, mitigate, or protect against the hazard. The WE-FMEA approach is described and a cooling system maintenance example is given.

  19. Radiology failure mode and effect analysis: what is it?

    PubMed

    Abujudeh, Hani H; Kaewlai, Rathachai

    2009-08-01

    Proactive prevention of medical errors is critical in medical practice. Root cause analysis (RCA) is a conventional method used to deal with errors that result in an adverse event. However, RCA has several limitations. An analytic method for health care risk management, health care failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA), has been introduced relatively recently. Health care FMEA combines several existing analytic approaches into one simple tool with which to analyze a particular health care process, determine the risks associated with it, and develop corrective actions and outcome measures. The authors provide a brief history of health care FMEA, describe its validation process, and relate their experience with its use in a radiology department. PMID:19703888

  20. Failure mode and effects analysis outputs: are they valid?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a prospective risk assessment tool that has been widely used within the aerospace and automotive industries and has been utilised within healthcare since the early 1990s. The aim of this study was to explore the validity of FMEA outputs within a hospital setting in the United Kingdom. Methods Two multidisciplinary teams each conducted an FMEA for the use of vancomycin and gentamicin. Four different validity tests were conducted: · Face validity: by comparing the FMEA participants’ mapped processes with observational work. · Content validity: by presenting the FMEA findings to other healthcare professionals. · Criterion validity: by comparing the FMEA findings with data reported on the trust’s incident report database. · Construct validity: by exploring the relevant mathematical theories involved in calculating the FMEA risk priority number. Results Face validity was positive as the researcher documented the same processes of care as mapped by the FMEA participants. However, other healthcare professionals identified potential failures missed by the FMEA teams. Furthermore, the FMEA groups failed to include failures related to omitted doses; yet these were the failures most commonly reported in the trust’s incident database. Calculating the RPN by multiplying severity, probability and detectability scores was deemed invalid because it is based on calculations that breach the mathematical properties of the scales used. Conclusion There are significant methodological challenges in validating FMEA. It is a useful tool to aid multidisciplinary groups in mapping and understanding a process of care; however, the results of our study cast doubt on its validity. FMEA teams are likely to need different sources of information, besides their personal experience and knowledge, to identify potential failures. As for FMEA’s methodology for scoring failures, there were discrepancies between the teams’ estimates

  1. Failure mode and effects analysis application to critical care medicine.

    PubMed

    Duwe, Beau; Fuchs, Barry D; Hansen-Flaschen, John

    2005-01-01

    In July 2001, the United States Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health care Organizations adopted a new leadership standard that requires department heads in health care organizations to perform at least one Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) every year. This proactive approach to error prevention has proven to be highly effective in other industries, notably aerospace, but remains untested in acute care hospitals. For several reasons, the intensive care unit (ICU) potentially is an attractive setting for early adoption of FMEA; however, successful implementation of FMEA in ICUs is likely to require strong, effective leadership and a sustained commitment to prevent errors that may have occurred rarely or never before in the local setting. This article describes FMEA in relation to critical care medicine and reviews some of the attractive features together with several potential pitfalls that are associated with this approach to error prevention in ICUs. PMID:15579350

  2. FMEA, the alternative process hazard method. [Failure Mode Effects Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, R.K. )

    1993-05-01

    Failure mode effects analysis (FMEA) is an old reliability/assurance tool finding its way into the HPI. Not popular yet, this hazard technique has some viable applications that can improve hazard assessment data. Notably, FMEA studies can identify possible areas for improvement that may have not been discovered using other methods. Also, FMEA is not as labor intensive and costly as other process hazard analysis (PHA) methods. PSHA 1910.119 set in place an informational structure whose main purpose is the reduction of potential accidents and minimizing risks in the event of an accident. Consequently, HPI operators must evaluate their process systems and identify potential major hazards, such as fires, explosions and accidental release of toxic/hazardous chemicals, and protect their facilities, employees, the public and the environment. But, which PHA method(s) apply to a particular plant or process still remains a difficult question. This paper describes what FMEA is; types of FMEA; how to conduct a FMEA study; comparison with HAZOP (hazard and operability study); computer software; applicability of FMEA; and examples of its use.

  3. Thermoplastic matrix composites - Finite-element analysis of mode I and mode II failure specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankert, Ray J.; Lambropoulos, Nicholas D.; Shephard, Mark S.; Sternstein, Sanford S.

    1989-01-01

    A finite-element analysis was conducted to evaluate the stress distributions within mode I and mode II failure specimens, assuming both isotropic and orthotropic elastic material properties. The effects of anisotropy on both the magnitude and the location of the highest stress concentration at the vicinity of the crack tip are significant. The results from modeling realistic blunt crack tip geometry and resin-rich zones imply that local variations in the microstructure strongly influence the stress state near the crack tip and therefore the measured fracture properties. In addition, the features of a viscoelastic model for thermoplastic matrices are described. This model will be used in future investigations of matrix-dominated failure phenomena.

  4. Failure Mode Analysis of V-Shaped Pyrotechnically Actuated Valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachdev, Jai S.; Hosangadi, A.; Chenoweth, James D.; Saulsberry, Regor L.; McDougle, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    Current V-shaped stainless steel pyrovalve initiators have rectified many of the deficiencies of the heritage Y-shaped aluminum design. However, a credible failure mode still exists for dual simultaneous initiator (NSI) firings in which low temperatures were detected at the booster cap and less consistent ignition was observed than when a single initiator was fired. In order to asses this issue, a numerical framework has been developed for predicting the flow through pyrotechnically actuated valves. This framework includes a fully coupled solution of the gas-phase equation with a non-equilibrium dispersed phase for solid particles as well as the capability to model conjugate gradient heat transfer to the booster cap. Through a hierarchy of increasingly complex simulations, a hypothesis for the failure mode of the nearly simultaneous dual NSI firings has been proven. The simulations indicate that the failure mode for simultaneous dual NSI firings may be caused by flow interactions between the flame channels. The shock waves from each initiator interact in the booster cavity resulting in a high pressure that prevents the gas and particulate velocity from rising in the booster cap region. This impedes the bulk of the particulate phase from impacting the booster cap and reduces the heat transfer to the booster cap since the particles do not impact it. Heat transfer calculations to the solid metal indicate that gas-phase convective heat transfer may not be adequate by itself and that energy transfer from the particulate phase may be crucial for the booster cap burn through.

  5. Constructing an effective prevention mechanism for MSW lifecycle using failure mode and effects analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Chu; Wu, Wen-Fang

    2015-12-01

    Municipal solid waste in Taiwan is a valuable source of renewable energy. Phases of municipal solid waste lifecycle (classification, disposal, storage, collection and transportation) before incineration or landfilled face various potential failures. Applying a proper technique to eliminate or decrease potential failures is desirable and needed. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis to municipal solid waste lifecycle was found in literature. This study utilized the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis as a convenient technique for determining, classifying and analyzing common failures in the municipal solid waste lifecycle. As a result, an appropriate risk scoring of severity, occurrence, and detection of failure modes and computing the Risk Priority Number for identifying the high potential failure modes were made. Nineteen failure modes were identified, and nine of them were ranked as the priority items for improvement. Recommended actions for all failure modes were suggested. Occurrences of failures were remarkably reduced after implementing the procedure for six months. The results of this study have minimized potential failures and brought continuous improvement, thus achieving a better protection of the environment. PMID:26372404

  6. A failure modes, mechanisms, and effects analysis (FMMEA) of lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, Christopher; Williard, Nick; Mathew, Sony; Pecht, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are popular energy storage devices for a wide variety of applications. As batteries have transitioned from being used in portable electronics to being used in longer lifetime and more safety-critical applications, such as electric vehicles (EVs) and aircraft, the cost of failure has become more significant both in terms of liability as well as the cost of replacement. Failure modes, mechanisms, and effects analysis (FMMEA) provides a rigorous framework to define the ways in which lithium-ion batteries can fail, how failures can be detected, what processes cause the failures, and how to model failures for failure prediction. This enables a physics-of-failure (PoF) approach to battery life prediction that takes into account life cycle conditions, multiple failure mechanisms, and their effects on battery health and safety. This paper presents an FMMEA of battery failure and describes how this process enables improved battery failure mitigation control strategies.

  7. Failure mode analysis using state variables derived from fault trees with application

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) is used extensively to assess both the qualitative and quantitative reliability of engineered nuclear power systems employing many subsystems and components. FTA is very useful, but the method is limited by its inability to account for failure mode rate-of-change interdependencies (coupling) of statistically independent failure modes. The state variable approach (using FTA-derived failure modes as states) overcomes these difficulties and is applied to the determination of the lifetime distribution function for a heat pipe-thermoelectric nuclear power subsystem. Analyses are made using both Monte Carlo and deterministic methods and compared with a Markov model of the same subsystem.

  8. The use of failure mode effect and criticality analysis in a medication error subcommittee.

    PubMed

    Williams, E; Talley, R

    1994-04-01

    Failure Mode Effect and Criticality Analysis (FMECA) is the systematic assessment of a process or product that enables one to determine the location and mechanism of potential failures. It has been used by engineers, particularly in the aerospace industry, to identify and prioritize potential failures during product development when there is a lack of data but an abundance of expertise. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices has recommended its use in analyzing the medication administration process in hospitals and in drug product development in the pharamceutical industry. A medication error subcommittee adopted and modified FMECA to identify and prioritize significant failure modes in its specific medication administration process. Based on this analysis, the subcommittee implemented solutions to four of the five highest ranked failure modes. FMECA provided a method for a multidisciplinary group to address the most important medication error concerns based upon the expertise of the group members. It also facilitated consensus building in a group with varied perceptions. PMID:10133462

  9. A Tool To Support Failure Mode And Effects Analysis Based On Causal Modelling And Reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, W. E.; Laib, S. L.

    1987-05-01

    A prototype knowledge-based system has been developed that supports Failure Mode & Effects Analysis (FMEA). The knowledge base consists of causal models of components and a representation for coupling these components into assemblies and systems. The causal models are qualitative models. They allow reasoning as to whether variables are increasing, decreasing or steady. The analysis strategies used by the prototype allow it to determine the effects of failure modes on the function of the part, the failure effect on the assembly the part is contained in, and the effect on the subsystem containing the assembly.

  10. Preliminary Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the US Massive Gas Injection Disruption Mitigation System Design

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2013-10-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of a candidate design for the ITER Disruption Mitigation System. This candidate is the Massive Gas Injection System that provides machine protection in a plasma disruption event. The FMEA was quantified with “generic” component failure rate data as well as some data calculated from operating facilities, and the failure events were ranked for their criticality to system operation.

  11. Preliminary Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the US DCLL Test Blanket Module

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2007-08-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of a small tritium-breeding test blanket module design for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The FMEA was quantified with “generic” component failure rate data, and the failure events are binned into postulated initiating event families and frequency categories for safety assessment. An appendix to this report contains repair time data to support an occupational radiation exposure assessment for test blanket module maintenance.

  12. Preliminary Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the US DCLL Test Blanket Module

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2010-06-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of a small tritium-breeding test blanket module design for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The FMEA was quantified with “generic” component failure rate data, and the failure events are binned into postulated initiating event families and frequency categories for safety assessment. An appendix to this report contains repair time data to support an occupational radiation exposure assessment for test blanket module maintenance.

  13. Failure modes and effects criticality analysis and accelerated life testing of LEDs for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, M.; Christou, A.

    2012-12-01

    While use of LEDs in Fiber Optics and lighting applications is common, their use in medical diagnostic applications is not very extensive. Since the precise value of light intensity will be used to interpret patient results, understanding failure modes [1-4] is very important. We used the Failure Modes and Effects Criticality Analysis (FMECA) tool to identify the critical failure modes of the LEDs. FMECA involves identification of various failure modes, their effects on the system (LED optical output in this context), their frequency of occurrence, severity and the criticality of the failure modes. The competing failure modes/mechanisms were degradation of: active layer (where electron-hole recombination occurs to emit light), electrodes (provides electrical contact to the semiconductor chip), Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) surface layer (used to improve current spreading and light extraction), plastic encapsulation (protective polymer layer) and packaging failures (bond wires, heat sink separation). A FMECA table is constructed and the criticality is calculated by estimating the failure effect probability (β), failure mode ratio (α), failure rate (λ) and the operating time. Once the critical failure modes were identified, the next steps were generation of prior time to failure distribution and comparing with our accelerated life test data. To generate the prior distributions, data and results from previous investigations were utilized [5-33] where reliability test results of similar LEDs were reported. From the graphs or tabular data, we extracted the time required for the optical power output to reach 80% of its initial value. This is our failure criterion for the medical diagnostic application. Analysis of published data for different LED materials (AlGaInP, GaN, AlGaAs), the Semiconductor Structures (DH, MQW) and the mode of testing (DC, Pulsed) was carried out. The data was categorized according to the materials system and LED structure such as AlGaInP-DH-DC, Al

  14. Evaluation of Safety in a Radiation Oncology Setting Using Failure Mode and Effects Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Eric C. Gaudette, Ray; Myers, Lee; Vanderver, Bruce; Engineer, Lilly; Zellars, Richard; Song, Danny Y.; Wong, John; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is a widely used tool for prospectively evaluating safety and reliability. We report our experiences in applying FMEA in the setting of radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: We performed an FMEA analysis for our external beam radiation therapy service, which consisted of the following tasks: (1) create a visual map of the process, (2) identify possible failure modes; assign risk probability numbers (RPN) to each failure mode based on tabulated scores for the severity, frequency of occurrence, and detectability, each on a scale of 1 to 10; and (3) identify improvements that are both feasible and effective. The RPN scores can span a range of 1 to 1000, with higher scores indicating the relative importance of a given failure mode. Results: Our process map consisted of 269 different nodes. We identified 127 possible failure modes with RPN scores ranging from 2 to 160. Fifteen of the top-ranked failure modes were considered for process improvements, representing RPN scores of 75 and more. These specific improvement suggestions were incorporated into our practice with a review and implementation by each department team responsible for the process. Conclusions: The FMEA technique provides a systematic method for finding vulnerabilities in a process before they result in an error. The FMEA framework can naturally incorporate further quantification and monitoring. A general-use system for incident and near miss reporting would be useful in this regard.

  15. Application of failure mode and effect analysis in an assisted reproduction technology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Intra, Giulia; Alteri, Alessandra; Corti, Laura; Rabellotti, Elisa; Papaleo, Enrico; Restelli, Liliana; Biondo, Stefania; Garancini, Maria Paola; Candiani, Massimo; Viganò, Paola

    2016-08-01

    Assisted reproduction technology laboratories have a very high degree of complexity. Mismatches of gametes or embryos can occur, with catastrophic consequences for patients. To minimize the risk of error, a multi-institutional working group applied failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) to each critical activity/step as a method of risk assessment. This analysis led to the identification of the potential failure modes, together with their causes and effects, using the risk priority number (RPN) scoring system. In total, 11 individual steps and 68 different potential failure modes were identified. The highest ranked failure modes, with an RPN score of 25, encompassed 17 failures and pertained to "patient mismatch" and "biological sample mismatch". The maximum reduction in risk, with RPN reduced from 25 to 5, was mostly related to the introduction of witnessing. The critical failure modes in sample processing were improved by 50% in the RPN by focusing on staff training. Three indicators of FMEA success, based on technical skill, competence and traceability, have been evaluated after FMEA implementation. Witnessing by a second human operator should be introduced in the laboratory to avoid sample mix-ups. These findings confirm that FMEA can effectively reduce errors in assisted reproduction technology laboratories. PMID:27282213

  16. Failure mode analysis of a post-tension anchored dam using linear finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corn, Aimee

    There are currently over 84,000 dams in the United States, and the average age of those dams is 52 years. Concrete gravity dams are the second most common dam type, with more than 3,000 in the United States. Current engineering technology and technical understanding of hydrologic and seismic events has resulted in significant increases to the required design loads for most dams; therefore, many older dams do not have adequate safety for extreme loading events. Concrete gravity dams designed and constructed in the early 20th century did not consider uplift pressures beneath the dam, which reduces the effective weight of the structure. One method that has been used to enhance the stability of older concrete gravity dams includes the post-tension anchor (PTA) system. Post-tensioning infers modifying cured concrete and using self-equilibrating elements to increase the weight of the section, which provides added stability. There is a lack of historical evidence regarding the potential failure mechanisms for PTA concrete gravity dams. Of particular interest, is how these systems behave during large seismic events. The objective of this thesis is to develop a method by which the potential failure modes during a seismic event for a PTA dam can be evaluated using the linear elastic finite element method of analysis. The most likely potential failure modes (PFM) for PTA designs are due to tensile failure and shear failure. A numerical model of a hypothetical project was developed to simulate PTAs in the dam. The model was subjected to acceleration time-history motions that simulated the seismic loads. The results were used to evaluate the likelihood of tendon failure due to both tension and shear. The results from the analysis indicated that the PTA load increased during the seismic event; however, the peak load in the tendons was less than the gross ultimate tensile strength (GUTS) and would not be expected to result in tensile failure at the assumed project. The analysis

  17. Model-OA wind turbine generator - Failure modes and effects analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, William E.; Lali, Vincent R.

    1990-01-01

    The results failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) conducted for wind-turbine generators are presented. The FMEA was performed for the functional modes of each system, subsystem, or component. The single-point failures were eliminated for most of the systems. The blade system was the only exception. The qualitative probability of a blade separating was estimated at level D-remote. Many changes were made to the hardware as a result of this analysis. The most significant change was the addition of the safety system. Operational experience and need to improve machine availability have resulted in subsequent changes to the various systems, which are also reflected in this FMEA.

  18. An improved method for risk evaluation in failure modes and effects analysis of CNC lathe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachieru, N.; Belu, N.; Anghel, D. C.

    2015-11-01

    Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is one of the most popular reliability analysis tools for identifying, assessing and eliminating potential failure modes in a wide range of industries. In general, failure modes in FMEA are evaluated and ranked through the risk priority number (RPN), which is obtained by the multiplication of crisp values of the risk factors, such as the occurrence (O), severity (S), and detection (D) of each failure mode. However, the crisp RPN method has been criticized to have several deficiencies. In this paper, linguistic variables, expressed in Gaussian, trapezoidal or triangular fuzzy numbers, are used to assess the ratings and weights for the risk factors S, O and D. A new risk assessment system based on the fuzzy set theory and fuzzy rule base theory is to be applied to assess and rank risks associated to failure modes that could appear in the functioning of Turn 55 Lathe CNC. Two case studies have been shown to demonstrate the methodology thus developed. It is illustrated a parallel between the results obtained by the traditional method and fuzzy logic for determining the RPNs. The results show that the proposed approach can reduce duplicated RPN numbers and get a more accurate, reasonable risk assessment. As a result, the stability of product and process can be assured.

  19. Damage mechanics - failure modes

    SciTech Connect

    Krajcinovic, D.; Vujosevic, M.

    1996-12-31

    The present study summarizes the results of the DOE sponsored research program focused on the brittle failure of solids with disordered microstructure. The failure is related to the stochastic processes on the microstructural scale; namely, the nucleation and growth of microcracks. The intrinsic failure modes, such as the percolation, localization and creep rupture, are studied by emphasizing the effect of the micro-structural disorder. A rich spectrum of physical phenomena and new concepts that emerges from this research demonstrates the reasons behind the limitations of traditional, deterministic, and local continuum models.

  20. Failure mode and effect analysis-based quality assurance for dynamic MLC tracking systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sawant, Amit; Dieterich, Sonja; Svatos, Michelle; Keall, Paul

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: To develop and implement a failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA)-based commissioning and quality assurance framework for dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tumor tracking systems. Methods: A systematic failure mode and effect analysis was performed for a prototype real-time tumor tracking system that uses implanted electromagnetic transponders for tumor position monitoring and a DMLC for real-time beam adaptation. A detailed process tree of DMLC tracking delivery was created and potential tracking-specific failure modes were identified. For each failure mode, a risk probability number (RPN) was calculated from the product of the probability of occurrence, the severity of effect, and the detectibility of the failure. Based on the insights obtained from the FMEA, commissioning and QA procedures were developed to check (i) the accuracy of coordinate system transformation, (ii) system latency, (iii) spatial and dosimetric delivery accuracy, (iv) delivery efficiency, and (v) accuracy and consistency of system response to error conditions. The frequency of testing for each failure mode was determined from the RPN value. Results: Failures modes with RPN{>=}125 were recommended to be tested monthly. Failure modes with RPN<125 were assigned to be tested during comprehensive evaluations, e.g., during commissioning, annual quality assurance, and after major software/hardware upgrades. System latency was determined to be {approx}193 ms. The system showed consistent and accurate response to erroneous conditions. Tracking accuracy was within 3%-3 mm gamma (100% pass rate) for sinusoidal as well as a wide variety of patient-derived respiratory motions. The total time taken for monthly QA was {approx}35 min, while that taken for comprehensive testing was {approx}3.5 h. Conclusions: FMEA proved to be a powerful and flexible tool to develop and implement a quality management (QM) framework for DMLC tracking. The authors conclude that the use of FMEA-based QM ensures

  1. Operations analysis (study 2.1). Contingency analysis. [of failure modes anticipated during space shuttle upper stage planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Future operational concepts for the space transportation system were studied in terms of space shuttle upper stage failure contingencies possible during deployment, retrieval, or space servicing of automated satellite programs. Problems anticipated during mission planning were isolated using a modified 'fault tree' technique, normally used in safety analyses. A comprehensive space servicing hazard analysis is presented which classifies possible failure modes under the catagories of catastrophic collision, failure to rendezvous and dock, servicing failure, and failure to undock. The failure contingencies defined are to be taken into account during design of the upper stage.

  2. Ship operation and failure mode analysis using a maneuver simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrerizo-Morales, Miguel Angel; Molina, Rafael; de los Santos, Francisco; Camarero, Alberto

    2013-04-01

    In a ship or floating structure operation the agents that contribute to the systems behaviour are not only those derived from fluid-structure interaction, but also the ones linked to mooring-control line set-up evolution and human interaction. Therefore, the analysis of such systems is affected by boundary conditions that change during a complete operation. Frequently, monitoring techniques in laboratory (model) and field (prototype) are based in different instrumental techniques adding difficulty to data comparison and, in some cases, inducing precision and repeatability errors. For this reason, the main aim of this study is to develop the methods and tools to achieve a deep knowledge of those floating systems and obtain capabilities to optimize their operationally thresholds. This abstract presents a methodology and an instrumental system applicable both in field and laboratory: SRECMOCOS Project (Small scale REal-time Caisson MOnitoring and COntrol System). SRECMOCOS compiles three modules. For the monitoring and control of the structure it has been developed a synchronized open and modular microcontroller-based electronic system that comprises sensors, to monitor agents and reactions, and actuators to perform pertinent actions after processing the sensors' data. A secondary objective has been to design and implement a global scaled simulator (1:22), at the 3D basin of The Harbour Research Lab at Technical University of Madrid, in which climatic agents and those derived from the rig/maneuvering setup and the structural design were included. The particular case of Campamento's drydock, in Algeciras Bay (Spain), has been used to apply and validate the methodology. SRECMOCOS Project conjugates control, monitoring and wireless communication systems in a real time basis, offering the possibility to register and simulate all the parameters involved in port operations. This approach offers a step forward into a monitoring strategy to be included in monitoring

  3. Performance improvement through proactive risk assessment: Using failure modes and effects analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Abadi, Tahereh Naseri Boori; Tofighi, Shahram; Esfahani, Sekine Saghaeiannejad

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cognizance of any error-prone professional activities has a great impact on the continuity of professional organizations in the competitive atmosphere, particularly in health care industry where every second has critical value in patients’ life saving. Considering invaluable functions of medical record department — as legal document and continuity of health care — “failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA)” utilized to identify the ways a process can fail, and how it can be made safer. Materials and Methods: The structured approach involved assembling a team of experts, employing a trained facilitator, introducing the rating scales and process during team orientation and collectively scoring failure modes. The probability of the failure-effect combination was related to the frequency of occurrence, potential severity, and likelihood of detection before causing any harm to the staff or patients. Frequency, severity and detectability were each given a score from 1 to 10. Risk priority numbers were calculated. Results: In total 56 failure modes were identified and in subsets of Medical Record Department including admission unit dividing emergency, outpatient and inpatient classes, statististic, health data organizing and data processing and Medical Coding units. Although most failure modes were classified as a high risk group, limited resources were, as an impediment to implement recommended actions at the same time. Conclusion: Proactive risk assessment methods, such as FMEA enable health care administrators to identify where and what safeguards are needed to protect against a bad outcome even when an error does occur. PMID:25013821

  4. Failure mode and effects analysis of witnessing protocols for ensuring traceability during IVF.

    PubMed

    Rienzi, Laura; Bariani, Fiorenza; Dalla Zorza, Michela; Romano, Stefania; Scarica, Catello; Maggiulli, Roberta; Nanni Costa, Alessandro; Ubaldi, Filippo Maria

    2015-10-01

    Traceability of cells during IVF is a fundamental aspect of treatment, and involves witnessing protocols. Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is a method of identifying real or potential breakdowns in processes, and allows strategies to mitigate risks to be developed. To examine the risks associated with witnessing protocols, an FMEA was carried out in a busy IVF centre, before and after implementation of an electronic witnessing system (EWS). A multidisciplinary team was formed and moderated by human factors specialists. Possible causes of failures, and their potential effects, were identified and risk priority number (RPN) for each failure calculated. A second FMEA analysis was carried out after implementation of an EWS. The IVF team identified seven main process phases, 19 associated process steps and 32 possible failure modes. The highest RPN was 30, confirming the relatively low risk that mismatches may occur in IVF when a manual witnessing system is used. The introduction of the EWS allowed a reduction in the moderate-risk failure mode by two-thirds (highest RPN = 10). In our experience, FMEA is effective in supporting multidisciplinary IVF groups to understand the witnessing process, identifying critical steps and planning changes in practice to enable safety to be enhanced. PMID:26292780

  5. Failure modes and effects analysis of a coal-slurry preheater

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, H.A.; Parsly, L.F.; Smith, A.N.

    1981-09-01

    The Fossil Energy performance assurance program is concerned with the application of reliability, safety, and quality assurance techniques in the design and operation of the pilot plants and demonstration plants that exist or are being planned as part of the US Department of Energy fossil energy conversion programs. This report involves the application of one technique, failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), on the safety and reliability analysis of the coal slurry preheater, a critical component in a typical coal direct liquefaction plant. The analysis identifies 55 potential failure modes. Fourteen of these events, if they should occur, would result in losses of sufficient magnitude to require special consideration in the design or operating phase to assure control of risk at an acceptable level. The report concludes that the FMEA could be a valuable tool in the identification of critical components for coal conversion systems. For maximum effect, FMEA needs to be used during the initial design phase. Its principal value is to determine high-risk failure modes, which could have unacceptable impacts on system safety and reliability/availability. The usefulness of FMEA will be improved if it is supplemented by the development of a failure data base; this data base could also be of value in selected cases as input to a more detaled technique such as fault-tree analysis.

  6. Application of failure mode and effect analysis in a radiology department.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Eavan; Brook, Olga R; Mendiratta-Lala, Mishal; Hallett, Donna T; Kruskal, Jonathan B

    2011-01-01

    With increasing deployment, complexity, and sophistication of equipment and related processes within the clinical imaging environment, system failures are more likely to occur. These failures may have varying effects on the patient, ranging from no harm to devastating harm. Failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) is a tool that permits the proactive identification of possible failures in complex processes and provides a basis for continuous improvement. This overview of the basic principles and methodology of FMEA provides an explanation of how FMEA can be applied to clinical operations in a radiology department to reduce, predict, or prevent errors. The six sequential steps in the FMEA process are explained, and clinical magnetic resonance imaging services are used as an example for which FMEA is particularly applicable. A modified version of traditional FMEA called Healthcare Failure Mode and Effect Analysis, which was introduced by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs National Center for Patient Safety, is briefly reviewed. In conclusion, FMEA is an effective and reliable method to proactively examine complex processes in the radiology department. FMEA can be used to highlight the high-risk subprocesses and allows these to be targeted to minimize the future occurrence of failures, thus improving patient safety and streamlining the efficiency of the radiology department. PMID:20980666

  7. Failure mode analysis of silicon-based intracortical microelectrode arrays in non-human primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrese, James C.; Rao, Naveen; Paroo, Kaivon; Triebwasser, Corey; Vargas-Irwin, Carlos; Franquemont, Lachlan; Donoghue, John P.

    2013-12-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) using chronically implanted intracortical microelectrode arrays (MEAs) have the potential to restore lost function to people with disabilities if they work reliably for years. Current sensors fail to provide reliably useful signals over extended periods of time for reasons that are not clear. This study reports a comprehensive retrospective analysis from a large set of implants of a single type of intracortical MEA in a single species, with a common set of measures in order to evaluate failure modes. Approach. Since 1996, 78 silicon MEAs were implanted in 27 monkeys (Macaca mulatta). We used two approaches to find reasons for sensor failure. First, we classified the time course leading up to complete recording failure as acute (abrupt) or chronic (progressive). Second, we evaluated the quality of electrode recordings over time based on signal features and electrode impedance. Failure modes were divided into four categories: biological, material, mechanical, and unknown. Main results. Recording duration ranged from 0 to 2104 days (5.75 years), with a mean of 387 days and a median of 182 days (n = 78). Sixty-two arrays failed completely with a mean time to failure of 332 days (median = 133 days) while nine array experiments were electively terminated for experimental reasons (mean = 486 days). Seven remained active at the close of this study (mean = 753 days). Most failures (56%) occurred within a year of implantation, with acute mechanical failures the most common class (48%), largely because of connector issues (83%). Among grossly observable biological failures (24%), a progressive meningeal reaction that separated the array from the parenchyma was most prevalent (14.5%). In the absence of acute interruptions, electrode recordings showed a slow progressive decline in spike amplitude, noise amplitude, and number of viable channels that predicts complete signal loss by about eight years. Impedance measurements showed

  8. Some failure modes and analysis techniques for terrestrial solar cell modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumka, A.; Stern, K. H.

    1978-01-01

    Analysis data are presented on failed/defective silicon solar cell modules of various types and produced by different manufacturers. The failure mode (e.g., internal short and open circuits, output power degradation, isolation resistance degradation, etc.) are discussed in detail and in many cases related to the type of technology used in the manufacture of the modules; wherever applicable, appropriate corrective actions are recommended. Consideration is also given to some failure analysis techniques that are applicable to such modules, including X-ray radiography, capacitance measurement, cell shunt resistance measurement by the shadowing technique, steady-state illumination test station for module performance illumination, laser scanning techniques, and the SEM.

  9. Application of Failure Mode and Effects Analysis to Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Using Mobile Electron Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ciocca, Mario; Cantone, Marie-Claire; Veronese, Ivan; Cattani, Federica; Pedroli, Guido; Molinelli, Silvia; Vitolo, Viviana; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) represents a prospective approach for risk assessment. A multidisciplinary working group of the Italian Association for Medical Physics applied FMEA to electron beam intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) delivered using mobile linear accelerators, aiming at preventing accidental exposures to the patient. Methods and Materials: FMEA was applied to the IORT process, for the stages of the treatment delivery and verification, and consisted of three steps: 1) identification of the involved subprocesses; 2) identification and ranking of the potential failure modes, together with their causes and effects, using the risk probability number (RPN) scoring system, based on the product of three parameters (severity, frequency of occurrence and detectability, each ranging from 1 to 10); 3) identification of additional safety measures to be proposed for process quality and safety improvement. RPN upper threshold for little concern of risk was set at 125. Results: Twenty-four subprocesses were identified. Ten potential failure modes were found and scored, in terms of RPN, in the range of 42-216. The most critical failure modes consisted of internal shield misalignment, wrong Monitor Unit calculation and incorrect data entry at treatment console. Potential causes of failure included shield displacement, human errors, such as underestimation of CTV extension, mainly because of lack of adequate training and time pressures, failure in the communication between operators, and machine malfunctioning. The main effects of failure were represented by CTV underdose, wrong dose distribution and/or delivery, unintended normal tissue irradiation. As additional safety measures, the utilization of a dedicated staff for IORT, double-checking of MU calculation and data entry and finally implementation of in vivo dosimetry were suggested. Conclusions: FMEA appeared as a useful tool for prospective evaluation of patient safety in radiotherapy. The

  10. Risk assessment of the emergency processes: Healthcare failure mode and effect analysis

    PubMed Central

    Taleghani, Yasamin Molavi; Rezaei, Fatemeh; Sheikhbardsiri, Hojat

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ensuring about the patient’s safety is the first vital step in improving the quality of care and the emergency ward is known as a high-risk area in treatment health care. The present study was conducted to evaluate the selected risk processes of emergency surgery department of a treatment-educational Qaem center in Mashhad by using analysis method of the conditions and failure effects in health care. METHODS: In this study, in combination (qualitative action research and quantitative cross-sectional), failure modes and effects of 5 high-risk procedures of the emergency surgery department were identified and analyzed according to Healthcare Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HFMEA). To classify the failure modes from the “nursing errors in clinical management model (NECM)”, the classification of the effective causes of error from “Eindhoven model” and determination of the strategies to improve from the “theory of solving problem by an inventive method” were used. To analyze the quantitative data of descriptive statistics (total points) and to analyze the qualitative data, content analysis and agreement of comments of the members were used. RESULTS: In 5 selected processes by “voting method using rating”, 23 steps, 61 sub-processes and 217 potential failure modes were identified by HFMEA. 25 (11.5%) failure modes as the high risk errors were detected and transferred to the decision tree. The most and the least failure modes were placed in the categories of care errors (54.7%) and knowledge and skill (9.5%), respectively. Also, 29.4% of preventive measures were in the category of human resource management strategy. CONCLUSION: “Revision and re-engineering of processes”, “continuous monitoring of the works”, “preparation and revision of operating procedures and policies”, “developing the criteria for evaluating the performance of the personnel”, “designing a suitable educational content for needs of employee”,

  11. Failure mode and effects analysis using intuitionistic fuzzy hybrid weighted Euclidean distance operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hu-Chen; Liu, Long; Li, Ping

    2014-10-01

    Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) has shown its effectiveness in examining potential failures in products, process, designs or services and has been extensively used for safety and reliability analysis in a wide range of industries. However, its approach to prioritise failure modes through a crisp risk priority number (RPN) has been criticised as having several shortcomings. The aim of this paper is to develop an efficient and comprehensive risk assessment methodology using intuitionistic fuzzy hybrid weighted Euclidean distance (IFHWED) operator to overcome the limitations and improve the effectiveness of the traditional FMEA. The diversified and uncertain assessments given by FMEA team members are treated as linguistic terms expressed in intuitionistic fuzzy numbers (IFNs). Intuitionistic fuzzy weighted averaging (IFWA) operator is used to aggregate the FMEA team members' individual assessments into a group assessment. IFHWED operator is applied thereafter to the prioritisation and selection of failure modes. Particularly, both subjective and objective weights of risk factors are considered during the risk evaluation process. A numerical example for risk assessment is given to illustrate the proposed method finally.

  12. Model OA Wind Turbine Generator FEMA (Failure Modes and Effects Analysis)

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, W.E. . Plum Brook Station); Lalli, V.R. . Lewis Research Center)

    1989-10-01

    This report presents the results of Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) conducted for the Wind Turbine Generators. The FMEA was performed for the functional modes of each system, subsystem, or component. The single-point failures were eliminated for most of the systems. The blade system was the only exception. The qualitative probability of a blade separating was estimated at Level D-remote. Many changes were made to the hardware as a result of this analysis. The most significant change was the addition of the safety system. Operational experience and need to improve machine availability have resulted in subsequent changes to the various systems which are also reflected in this FMEA. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Using causal reasoning for automated failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Daniel; Cox, Lisa; Jackson, Steve; Schaefer, Phil

    The authors have developed a tool that automates the reasoning portion of a failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA). It is built around a flexible causal reasoning module that has been adapted to the FMEA procedure. The approach and software architecture have been proven. A prototype tool has been created and successfully passed a test and evaluation program. The authors are expanding the operational capability and adapting the tool to various CAD/CAE (computer-aided design and engineering) platforms.

  14. Using Failure Mode and Effects Analysis to design a comfortable automotive driver seat.

    PubMed

    Kolich, Mike

    2014-07-01

    Given enough time and use, all designs will fail. There are no fail-free designs. This is especially true when it comes to automotive seating comfort where the characteristics and preferences of individual customers are many and varied. To address this problem, individuals charged with automotive seating comfort development have, traditionally, relied on iterative and, as a result, expensive build-test cycles. Cost pressures being placed on today's vehicle manufacturers have necessitated the search for more efficient alternatives. This contribution aims to fill this need by proposing the application of an analytical technique common to engineering circles (but new to seating comfort development), namely Design Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (DFMEA). An example is offered to describe how development teams can use this systematic and disciplined approach to highlight potential seating comfort failure modes, reduce their risk, and bring capable designs to life. PMID:24529532

  15. Common Cause Failure Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Jon; Heimann, Timothy J.; Anderson, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    High technology industries with high failure costs commonly use redundancy as a means to reduce risk. Redundant systems, whether similar or dissimilar, are susceptible to Common Cause Failures (CCF). CCF is not always considered in the design effort and, therefore, can be a major threat to success. There are several aspects to CCF which must be understood to perform an analysis which will find hidden issues that may negate redundancy. This paper will provide definition, types, a list of possible causes and some examples of CCF. Requirements and designs from NASA projects will be used in the paper as examples.

  16. Application of failure mode and effects analysis to treatment planning in scanned proton beam radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A multidisciplinary and multi-institutional working group applied the Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) approach to the actively scanned proton beam radiotherapy process implemented at CNAO (Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica), aiming at preventing accidental exposures to the patient. Methods FMEA was applied to the treatment planning stage and consisted of three steps: i) identification of the involved sub-processes; ii) identification and ranking of the potential failure modes, together with their causes and effects, using the risk probability number (RPN) scoring system, iii) identification of additional safety measures to be proposed for process quality and safety improvement. RPN upper threshold for little concern of risk was set at 125. Results Thirty-four sub-processes were identified, twenty-two of them were judged to be potentially prone to one or more failure modes. A total of forty-four failure modes were recognized, 52% of them characterized by an RPN score equal to 80 or higher. The threshold of 125 for RPN was exceeded in five cases only. The most critical sub-process appeared related to the delineation and correction of artefacts in planning CT data. Failures associated to that sub-process were inaccurate delineation of the artefacts and incorrect proton stopping power assignment to body regions. Other significant failure modes consisted of an outdated representation of the patient anatomy, an improper selection of beam direction and of the physical beam model or dose calculation grid. The main effects of these failures were represented by wrong dose distribution (i.e. deviating from the planned one) delivered to the patient. Additional strategies for risk mitigation, easily and immediately applicable, consisted of a systematic information collection about any known implanted prosthesis directly from each patient and enforcing a short interval time between CT scan and treatment start. Moreover, (i) the investigation of

  17. Material wear and failure mode analysis of breakfast cereal extruder barrels and screw elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastio, Michael Joseph, Jr.

    2005-11-01

    Nearly seventy-five years ago, the single screw extruder was introduced as a means to produce metal products. Shortly after that, the extruder found its way into the plastics industry. Today much of the world's polymer industry utilizes extruders to produce items such as soda bottles, PVC piping, and toy figurines. Given the significant economical advantages of extruders over conventional batch flow systems, extruders have also migrated into the food industry. Food applications include the meat, pet food, and cereal industries to name just a few. Cereal manufacturers utilize extruders to produce various forms of Ready-to-Eat (RTE) cereals. These cereals are made from grains such as rice, oats, wheat, and corn. The food industry has been incorrectly viewed as an extruder application requiring only minimal energy control and performance capability. This misconception has resulted in very little research in the area of material wear and failure mode analysis of breakfast cereal extruders. Breakfast cereal extruder barrels and individual screw elements are subjected to the extreme pressures and temperatures required to shear and cook the cereal ingredients, resulting in excessive material wear and catastrophic failure of these components. Therefore, this project focuses on the material wear and failure mode analysis of breakfast cereal extruder barrels and screw elements, modeled as a Discrete Time Markov Chain (DTMC) process in which historical data is used to predict future failures. Such predictive analysis will yield cost savings opportunities by providing insight into extruder maintenance scheduling and interchangeability of screw elements. In this DTMC wear analysis, four states of wear are defined and a probability transition matrix is determined based upon 24,041 hours of operational data. This probability transition matrix is used to predict when an extruder component will move to the next state of wear and/or failure. This information can be used to determine

  18. Anticipating risk for human subjects participating in clinical research: application of Failure Mode and Effects Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cody, Robert J

    2006-03-01

    Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a method applied in various industries to anticipate and mitigate risk. This methodology can be more systematically applied to the protection of human subjects in research. The purpose of FMEA is simple: prevent problems before they occur. By applying FMEA process analysis to the elements of a specific research protocol, the failure severity, occurrence, and detection rates can be estimated for calculation of a "risk priority number" (RPN). Methods can then be identified to reduce the RPN to levels where the risk/benefit ratio favors human subject benefit, to a greater magnitude than existed in the pre-analysis risk profile. At the very least, the approach provides a checklist of issues that can be individualized for specific research protocols or human subject populations. PMID:16537191

  19. Failure Mode and Effect Analysis for Delivery of Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Perks, Julian R.; Stanic, Sinisa; Stern, Robin L.; Henk, Barbara; Nelson, Marsha S.; Harse, Rick D.; Mathai, Mathew; Purdy, James A.; Valicenti, Richard K.; Siefkin, Allan D.; Chen, Allen M.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To improve the quality and safety of our practice of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), we analyzed the process following the failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) method. Methods: The FMEA was performed by a multidisciplinary team. For each step in the SBRT delivery process, a potential failure occurrence was derived and three factors were assessed: the probability of each occurrence, the severity if the event occurs, and the probability of detection by the treatment team. A rank of 1 to 10 was assigned to each factor, and then the multiplied ranks yielded the relative risks (risk priority numbers). The failure modes with the highest risk priority numbers were then considered to implement process improvement measures. Results: A total of 28 occurrences were derived, of which nine events scored with significantly high risk priority numbers. The risk priority numbers of the highest ranked events ranged from 20 to 80. These included transcription errors of the stereotactic coordinates and machine failures. Conclusion: Several areas of our SBRT delivery were reconsidered in terms of process improvement, and safety measures, including treatment checklists and a surgical time-out, were added for our practice of gantry-based image-guided SBRT. This study serves as a guide for other users of SBRT to perform FMEA of their own practice.

  20. Application of failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) to pretreatment phases in tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Broggi, Sara; Cantone, Marie Claire; Chiara, Anna; Di Muzio, Nadia; Longobardi, Barbara; Mangili, Paola; Veronese, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper was the application of the failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) approach to assess the risks for patients undergoing radiotherapy treatments performed by means of a helical tomotherapy unit. FMEA was applied to the preplanning imaging, volume determination, and treatment planning stages of the tomotherapy process and consisted of three steps: 1) identification of the involved subprocesses; 2) identification and ranking of the potential failure modes, together with their causes and effects, using the risk probability number (RPN) scoring system; and 3) identification of additional safety measures to be proposed for process quality and safety improvement. RPN upper threshold for little concern of risk was set at 125. A total of 74 failure modes were identified: 38 in the stage of preplanning imaging and volume determination, and 36 in the stage of planning. The threshold of 125 for RPN was exceeded in four cases: one case only in the phase of preplanning imaging and volume determination, and three cases in the stage of planning. The most critical failures appeared related to (i) the wrong or missing definition and contouring of the overlapping regions, (ii) the wrong assignment of the overlap priority to each anatomical structure, (iii) the wrong choice of the computed tomography calibration curve for dose calculation, and (iv) the wrong (or not performed) choice of the number of fractions in the planning station. On the basis of these findings, in addition to the safety strategies already adopted in the clinical practice, novel solutions have been proposed for mitigating the risk of these failures and to increase patient safety. PMID:24036868

  1. Failure mode analysis of silicon-based intracortical microelectrode arrays in non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Barrese, James C; Rao, Naveen; Paroo, Kaivon; Triebwasser, Corey; Vargas-Irwin, Carlos; Franquemont, Lachlan; Donoghue, John P

    2016-01-01

    Objective Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) using chronically implanted intracortical microelectrode arrays (MEAs) have the potential to restore lost function to people with disabilities if they work reliably for years. Current sensors fail to provide reliably useful signals over extended periods of time for reasons that are not clear. This study reports a comprehensive retrospective analysis from a large set of implants of a single type of intracortical MEA in a single species, with a common set of measures in order to evaluate failure modes. Approach Since 1996, 78 silicon MEAs were implanted in 27 monkeys (Macaca mulatta). We used two approaches to find reasons for sensor failure. First, we classified the time course leading up to complete recording failure as acute (abrupt) or chronic (progressive). Second, we evaluated the quality of electrode recordings over time based on signal features and electrode impedance. Failure modes were divided into four categories: biological, material, mechanical, and unknown. Main results Recording duration ranged from 0 to 2104 days (5.75 years), with a mean of 387 days and a median of 182 days (n = 78). Sixty-two arrays failed completely with a mean time to failure of 332 days (median = 133 days) while nine array experiments were electively terminated for experimental reasons (mean = 486 days). Seven remained active at the close of this study (mean = 753 days). Most failures (56%) occurred within a year of implantation, with acute mechanical failures the most common class (48%), largely because of connector issues (83%). Among grossly observable biological failures (24%), a progressive meningeal reaction that separated the array from the parenchyma was most prevalent (14.5%). In the absence of acute interruptions, electrode recordings showed a slow progressive decline in spike amplitude, noise amplitude, and number of viable channels that predicts complete signal loss by about eight years. Impedance measurements showed

  2. Modular titanium alloy neck adapter failures in hip replacement - failure mode analysis and influence of implant material

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Modular neck adapters for hip arthroplasty stems allow the surgeon to modify CCD angle, offset and femoral anteversion intraoperatively. Fretting or crevice corrosion may lead to failure of such a modular device due to high loads or surface contamination inside the modular coupling. Unfortunately we have experienced such a failure of implants and now report our clinical experience with the failures in order to advance orthopaedic material research and joint replacement surgery. The failed neck adapters were implanted between August 2004 and November 2006 a total of about 5000 devices. After this period, the titanium neck adapters were replaced by adapters out of cobalt-chromium. Until the end of 2008 in total 1.4% (n = 68) of the implanted titanium alloy neck adapters failed with an average time of 2.0 years (0.7 to 4.0 years) postoperatively. All, but one, patients were male, their average age being 57.4 years (36 to 75 years) and the average weight 102.3 kg (75 to 130 kg). The failures of neck adapters were divided into 66% with small CCD of 130° and 60% with head lengths of L or larger. Assuming an average time to failure of 2.8 years, the cumulative failure rate was calculated with 2.4%. Methods A series of adapter failures of titanium alloy modular neck adapters in combination with a titanium alloy modular short hip stem was investigated. For patients having received this particular implant combination risk factors were identified which were associated with the occurence of implant failure. A Kaplan-Meier survival-failure-analysis was conducted. The retrieved implants were analysed using microscopic and chemical methods. Modes of failure were simulated in biomechanical tests. Comparative tests included modular neck adapters made of titanium alloy and cobalt chrome alloy material. Results Retrieval examinations and biomechanical simulation revealed that primary micromotions initiated fretting within the modular tapered neck connection. A continuous

  3. D-Zero Nitrogen Dewar Failure Mode and Effects Analysis and "What-If" Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rucisnki, R.A.; /Fermilab

    1990-12-05

    All components related to the nitrogen storage dewar were included. Pipe failures were excluded. Instrument air valves and components were excluded. See the 'What if' analysis for consequences from loss of instrument air.

  4. A Review of Healthcare Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HFMEA) in Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Giardina, M; Cantone, M C; Tomarchio, E; Veronese, I

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a review of risk analyses in radiotherapy (RT) processes carried out by using Healthcare Failure Mode Effect Analysis (HFMEA) methodology, a qualitative method that proactively identifies risks to patients and corrects medical errors before they occur. This literature review was performed to provide an overview of how to approach the development of HFMEA applications in modern RT procedures, comparing recently published research conducted to support proactive programs to identify risks. On the basis of the reviewed literature, the paper suggests HFMEA shortcomings that need to be addressed. PMID:27575344

  5. SU-E-T-627: Failure Modes and Effect Analysis for Monthly Quality Assurance of Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, J; Xiao, Y; Wang, J; Peng, J; Lu, S; Hu, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and implement a failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) on routine monthly Quality Assurance (QA) tests (physical tests part) of linear accelerator. Methods: A systematic failure mode and effect analysis method was performed for monthly QA procedures. A detailed process tree of monthly QA was created and potential failure modes were defined. Each failure mode may have many influencing factors. For each factor, a risk probability number (RPN) was calculated from the product of probability of occurrence (O), the severity of effect (S), and detectability of the failure (D). The RPN scores are in a range of 1 to 1000, with higher scores indicating stronger correlation to a given influencing factor of a failure mode. Five medical physicists in our institution were responsible to discuss and to define the O, S, D values. Results: 15 possible failure modes were identified and all RPN scores of all influencing factors of these 15 failue modes were from 8 to 150, and the checklist of FMEA in monthly QA was drawn. The system showed consistent and accurate response to erroneous conditions. Conclusion: The influencing factors of RPN greater than 50 were considered as highly-correlated factors of a certain out-oftolerance monthly QA test. FMEA is a fast and flexible tool to develop an implement a quality management (QM) frame work of monthly QA, which improved the QA efficiency of our QA team. The FMEA work may incorporate more quantification and monitoring fuctions in future.

  6. Cost Based Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) for Systems of Accelerator Magnets.

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Cherrill M

    2003-06-02

    The proposed Next Linear Collider (NLC) has a proposed 85% overall availability goal, the availability specifications for all its 7200 magnets and their 6167 power supplies are 97.5% each. Thus all of the electromagnets and their power supplies must be highly reliable or quickly repairable. Improved reliability or repairability comes at a higher cost. We have developed a set of analysis procedures for magnet designers to use as they decide how much effort to exert, i.e. how much money to spend, to improve the reliability of a particular style of magnet. We show these procedures being applied to a standard SLAC electromagnet design in order to make it reliable enough to meet the NLC availability specs. First, empirical data from SLAC's accelerator failure database plus design experience are used to calculate MTBF for failure modes identified through a FMEA. Availability for one particular magnet can be calculated. Next, labor and material costs to repair magnet failures are used in a Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the total cost of all failures over a 30-year lifetime. Opportunity costs are included. Engineers choose from amongst various designs by comparing lifecycle costs.

  7. Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) for the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D. L.; Blacklock, K.; Langhenry, M. T.

    1988-01-01

    The recertification of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) and Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) has included an extensive rewriting of the Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL). The evolution of the groundrules and methodology used in the analysis is discussed and compared to standard FMEA techniques. Especially highlighted are aspects of the FMEA/CIL which are unique to the analysis of an SRM. The criticality category definitions are presented and the rationale for assigning criticality is presented. The various data required by the CIL and contribution of this data to the retention rationale is also presented. As an example, the FMEA and CIL for the SRM nozzle assembly is discussed in detail. This highlights some of the difficulties associated with the analysis of a system with the unique mission requirements of the Space Shuttle.

  8. Practical Implementation of Failure Mode and Effects Analysis for Safety and Efficiency in Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Younge, Kelly Cooper; Wang, Yizhen; Thompson, John; Giovinazzo, Julia; Finlay, Marisa

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To improve the safety and efficiency of a new stereotactic radiosurgery program with the application of failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) performed by a multidisciplinary team of health care professionals. Methods and Materials: Representatives included physicists, therapists, dosimetrists, oncologists, and administrators. A detailed process tree was created from an initial high-level process tree to facilitate the identification of possible failure modes. Group members were asked to determine failure modes that they considered to be the highest risk before scoring failure modes. Risk priority numbers (RPNs) were determined by each group member individually and then averaged. Results: A total of 99 failure modes were identified. The 5 failure modes with an RPN above 150 were further analyzed to attempt to reduce these RPNs. Only 1 of the initial items that the group presumed to be high-risk (magnetic resonance imaging laterality reversed) was ranked in these top 5 items. New process controls were put in place to reduce the severity, occurrence, and detectability scores for all of the top 5 failure modes. Conclusions: FMEA is a valuable team activity that can assist in the creation or restructuring of a quality assurance program with the aim of improved safety, quality, and efficiency. Performing the FMEA helped group members to see how they fit into the bigger picture of the program, and it served to reduce biases and preconceived notions about which elements of the program were the riskiest.

  9. Risk management for outsourcing biomedical waste disposal – Using the failure mode and effects analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Ching-Jong; Ho, Chao Chung

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • This study is based on a real case in hospital in Taiwan. • We use Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) as the evaluation method. • We successfully identify the evaluation factors of bio-medical waste disposal risk. - Abstract: Using the failure mode and effects analysis, this study examined biomedical waste companies through risk assessment. Moreover, it evaluated the supervisors of biomedical waste units in hospitals, and factors relating to the outsourcing risk assessment of biomedical waste in hospitals by referring to waste disposal acts. An expert questionnaire survey was conducted on the personnel involved in waste disposal units in hospitals, in order to identify important factors relating to the outsourcing risk of biomedical waste in hospitals. This study calculated the risk priority number (RPN) and selected items with an RPN value higher than 80 for improvement. These items included “availability of freezing devices”, “availability of containers for sharp items”, “disposal frequency”, “disposal volume”, “disposal method”, “vehicles meeting the regulations”, and “declaration of three lists”. This study also aimed to identify important selection factors of biomedical waste disposal companies by hospitals in terms of risk. These findings can serve as references for hospitals in the selection of outsourcing companies for biomedical waste disposal.

  10. Failure mode and effects analysis of witnessing protocols for ensuring traceability during PGD/PGS cycles.

    PubMed

    Cimadomo, Danilo; Ubaldi, Filippo Maria; Capalbo, Antonio; Maggiulli, Roberta; Scarica, Catello; Romano, Stefania; Poggiana, Cristina; Zuccarello, Daniela; Giancani, Adriano; Vaiarelli, Alberto; Rienzi, Laura

    2016-09-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis and aneuploidy testing (PGD/PGS) use is constantly growing in IVF, and embryo/biopsy traceability during the additional laboratory procedures needed is pivotal. An electronic witnessing system (EWS), which showed a significant value in decreasing mismatch occurrence and increasing detection possibilities during standard care IVF, still does not guarantee the same level of efficiency during PGD/PGS cycles. Specifically, EWS cannot follow single embryos throughout the procedure. This is however critical when an unambiguous diagnosis corresponds to each embryo. Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a proactive method generally adopted to define tools ensuring safety along a procedure. Due to the implementation of a large quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based blastocyst stage PGD/PGS programme in our centre, and to evaluate the potential procedural risks, a FMEA was performed in September 2014. Forty-four failure modes were identified, among which six were given a moderate risk priority number (>15) (RPN; product of estimated occurrence, severity and detection). Specific corrective measures were then introduced and implemented, and a second evaluation performed six months later. The meticulous and careful application of such measures allowed the risks to be decreased along the whole protocol, by reducing their estimated occurrence and/or increasing detection possibilities. PMID:27372783

  11. Assessing Safety in Distillation Column Using Dynamic Simulation and Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Suhendra; Fred, Witt; Compart

    Safety assessment becomes an important activity in chemical industries since the need to comply with general legal requirements in addition to meet safer plant and profit. This paper reviews some most frequently causes of distillation column malfunction. First, analysis of case histories will be discussed for providing guidelines in identifying potential trouble spots in distillation column. A dynamic simulation for operational failure is simulated as the basis for assessing the consequences. A case study will be used from a side stream distillation column to show the implementation of the concept. A framework for assessing safety in the column is proposed using Fault Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA). Further, trouble-free operation in order to reduce the risk associated with column malfunction is described.

  12. A failure mode effect analysis on extracorporeal circuits for cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Wehrli-Veit, Michel; Riley, Jeffrey B; Austin, Jon W

    2004-12-01

    Although many refinements in perfusion methodology and devices have been made, extracorporeal circulation remains a contributor to neurological complications, bleeding coagulopathies, use of blood products, as well as systemic inflammatory response. With the exposure of these adverse effects of cardiopulmonary bypass, the necessity to re-examine the safety of extracorporeal circuits is vital. A failure mode effect analysis (FMEA) is a proven proactive technique developed to evaluate system effect or equipment failure. FMEA was used to evaluate the six different types of extracorporeal circuits based on feedback from five clinical experts. Cardiovascular device manufacturers, the Veteran's Administration National Center for Patient Safety, and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations recommend the use of FMEA to assess and manage risks in current and developing technologies and therapies. This analysis investigates the safety of six types of extracorporeal circuits used in coronary revascularization, including the newer miniaturized extracorporeal circuits. The FMEA lists and ranks the hazards associated with the use of each cardiopulmonary bypass extracorporeal circuit type. To increase the safety of extracorporeal circuits and minimize the effects associated with cardiopulmonary bypass, perfusionists must incorporate FMEA into their clinical practice. PMID:15679277

  13. Optimisation of shock absorber process parameters using failure mode and effect analysis and genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariajayaprakash, Arokiasamy; Senthilvelan, Thiyagarajan; Vivekananthan, Krishnapillai Ponnambal

    2013-07-01

    The various process parameters affecting the quality characteristics of the shock absorber during the process were identified using the Ishikawa diagram and by failure mode and effect analysis. The identified process parameters are welding process parameters (squeeze, heat control, wheel speed, and air pressure), damper sealing process parameters (load, hydraulic pressure, air pressure, and fixture height), washing process parameters (total alkalinity, temperature, pH value of rinsing water, and timing), and painting process parameters (flowability, coating thickness, pointage, and temperature). In this paper, the process parameters, namely, painting and washing process parameters, are optimized by Taguchi method. Though the defects are reasonably minimized by Taguchi method, in order to achieve zero defects during the processes, genetic algorithm technique is applied on the optimized parameters obtained by Taguchi method.

  14. Human factors process failure modes and effects analysis (HF PFMEA) software tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, Faith T. (Inventor); Valentino, William D. (Inventor); Philippart, Monica F. (Inventor); Relvini, Kristine M. (Inventor); Bessette, Colette I. (Inventor); Shedd, Nathaneal P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Methods, computer-readable media, and systems for automatically performing Human Factors Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis for a process are provided. At least one task involved in a process is identified, where the task includes at least one human activity. The human activity is described using at least one verb. A human error potentially resulting from the human activity is automatically identified, the human error is related to the verb used in describing the task. A likelihood of occurrence, detection, and correction of the human error is identified. The severity of the effect of the human error is identified. The likelihood of occurrence, and the severity of the risk of potential harm is identified. The risk of potential harm is compared with a risk threshold to identify the appropriateness of corrective measures.

  15. A blackboard model of an expert system for failure mode and effects analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russomanno, David J.; Bonnell, Ronald D.; Bowles, John B.

    The design of an expert system to assist in performing a failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is approached from a knowledge-use-level perspective to provide a thorough understanding of the problem and insight into the knowledge and expertise needed to automate the FMEA process. A blackboard model is a conceptual model that provides the organizational principles required for the design of an expert system without actually specifying its realization. In the blackboard model of an intelligent FMEA, the system is functionally decomposed into a set of knowledge sources, each containing the knowledge associated with a subfunction of the FMEA process. The conceptual model derived can be used to evaluate attempts to automate the FMEA process, and it can serve as the foundation for further research into automating the FMEA process. An example is presented illustrating the interaction among the knowledge sources in the blackboard model to construct a FMEA for a domestic hot water heater.

  16. Incident Learning and Failure-Mode-and-Effects-Analysis Guided Safety Initiatives in Radiation Medicine.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Ajay; Goode, Gina; Riehl, Catherine; Zuvic, Petrina; Joseph, Sherin; Adair, Nilda; Interrante, Michael; Bloom, Beatrice; Lee, Lucille; Sharma, Rajiv; Sharma, Anurag; Antone, Jeffrey; Riegel, Adam; Vijeh, Lili; Zhang, Honglai; Cao, Yijian; Morgenstern, Carol; Montchal, Elaine; Cox, Brett; Potters, Louis

    2013-01-01

    By combining incident learning and process failure-mode-and-effects-analysis (FMEA) in a structure-process-outcome framework we have created a risk profile for our radiation medicine practice and implemented evidence-based risk-mitigation initiatives focused on patient safety. Based on reactive reviews of incidents reported in our departmental incident-reporting system and proactive FMEA, high safety-risk procedures in our paperless radiation medicine process and latent risk factors were identified. Six initiatives aimed at the mitigation of associated severity, likelihood-of-occurrence, and detectability risks were implemented. These were the standardization of care pathways and toxicity grading, pre-treatment-planning peer review, a policy to thwart delay-rushed processes, an electronic whiteboard to enhance coordination, and the use of six sigma metrics to monitor operational efficiencies. The effectiveness of these initiatives over a 3-years period was assessed using process and outcome specific metrics within the framework of the department structure. There has been a 47% increase in incident-reporting, with no increase in adverse events. Care pathways have been used with greater than 97% clinical compliance rate. The implementation of peer review prior to treatment-planning and use of the whiteboard have provided opportunities for proactive detection and correction of errors. There has been a twofold drop in the occurrence of high-risk procedural delays. Patient treatment start delays are routinely enforced on cases that would have historically been rushed. Z-scores for high-risk procedures have steadily improved from 1.78 to 2.35. The initiatives resulted in sustained reductions of failure-mode risks as measured by a set of evidence-based metrics over a 3-years period. These augment or incorporate many of the published recommendations for patient safety in radiation medicine by translating them to clinical practice. PMID:24380074

  17. Incident Learning and Failure-Mode-and-Effects-Analysis Guided Safety Initiatives in Radiation Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Ajay; Goode, Gina; Riehl, Catherine; Zuvic, Petrina; Joseph, Sherin; Adair, Nilda; Interrante, Michael; Bloom, Beatrice; Lee, Lucille; Sharma, Rajiv; Sharma, Anurag; Antone, Jeffrey; Riegel, Adam; Vijeh, Lili; Zhang, Honglai; Cao, Yijian; Morgenstern, Carol; Montchal, Elaine; Cox, Brett; Potters, Louis

    2013-01-01

    By combining incident learning and process failure-mode-and-effects-analysis (FMEA) in a structure-process-outcome framework we have created a risk profile for our radiation medicine practice and implemented evidence-based risk-mitigation initiatives focused on patient safety. Based on reactive reviews of incidents reported in our departmental incident-reporting system and proactive FMEA, high safety-risk procedures in our paperless radiation medicine process and latent risk factors were identified. Six initiatives aimed at the mitigation of associated severity, likelihood-of-occurrence, and detectability risks were implemented. These were the standardization of care pathways and toxicity grading, pre-treatment-planning peer review, a policy to thwart delay-rushed processes, an electronic whiteboard to enhance coordination, and the use of six sigma metrics to monitor operational efficiencies. The effectiveness of these initiatives over a 3-years period was assessed using process and outcome specific metrics within the framework of the department structure. There has been a 47% increase in incident-reporting, with no increase in adverse events. Care pathways have been used with greater than 97% clinical compliance rate. The implementation of peer review prior to treatment-planning and use of the whiteboard have provided opportunities for proactive detection and correction of errors. There has been a twofold drop in the occurrence of high-risk procedural delays. Patient treatment start delays are routinely enforced on cases that would have historically been rushed. Z-scores for high-risk procedures have steadily improved from 1.78 to 2.35. The initiatives resulted in sustained reductions of failure-mode risks as measured by a set of evidence-based metrics over a 3-years period. These augment or incorporate many of the published recommendations for patient safety in radiation medicine by translating them to clinical practice. PMID:24380074

  18. Comparison Study of Electromagnet and Permanent Magnet Systems for an Accelerator Using Cost-Based Failure Modes and Effects Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, C

    2004-02-19

    The next generation of particle accelerators will be one-of-a-kind facilities, and to meet their luminosity goals they must have guaranteed availability over their several decade lifetimes. The Next Linear Collider (NLC) is one viable option for a 1 TeV electron-positron linear collider, it has an 85% overall availability goal. We previously showed how a traditional Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) of a SLAC electromagnet leads to reliability-enhancing design changes. Traditional FMEA identifies failure modes with high risk but does not consider the consequences in terms of cost, which could lead to unnecessarily expensive components. We have used a new methodology, ''Life Cost-Based FMEA'', which measures risk of failure in terms of cost, in order to evaluate and compare two different technologies that might be used for the 8653 NLC magnets: electromagnets or permanent magnets. The availabilities for the two different types of magnet systems have been estimated using empirical data from SLAC's accelerator failure database plus expert opinion on permanent magnet failure modes and industry standard failure data. Labor and material costs to repair magnet failures are predicted using a Monte Carlo simulation of all possible magnet failures over a 30-year lifetime. Our goal is to maximize up-time of the NLC through magnet design improvements and the optimal combination of electromagnets and permanent magnets, while reducing magnet system lifecycle costs.

  19. Risk Management in Magnetic Resonance: Failure Mode, Effects, and Criticality Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Granata, Vincenza; Filice, Salvatore; Raiano, Nicola; Amato, Daniela Maria; Zirpoli, Maria; di Finizio, Alessandro; Sansone, Mario; Russo, Anna; Covelli, Eugenio Maria; Pedicini, Tonino; Triassi, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to perform a risk management procedure in “Magnetic Resonance Examination” process in order to identify the critical phases and sources of radiological errors and to identify potential improvement projects including procedures, tests, and checks to reduce the error occurrence risk. In this study we used the proactive analysisFailure Mode Effects Criticality Analysis,” a qualitative and quantitative risk management procedure; has calculated Priority Risk Index (PRI) for each activity of the process; have identified, on the PRI basis, the most critical activities and, for them, have defined improvement projects; and have recalculated the PRI after implementation of improvement projects for each activity. Time stop and audits are performed in order to control the new procedures. The results showed that the most critical tasks of “Magnetic Resonance Examination” process were the reception of the patient, the patient schedule drafting, the closing examination, and the organization of activities. Four improvement projects have been defined and executed. PRI evaluation after improvement projects implementation has shown that the risk decreased significantly following the implementation of procedures and controls defined in improvement projects, resulting in a reduction of the PRI between 43% and 100%. PMID:24171173

  20. Using ISMP Canada's framework for failure mode and effects analysis: a tale of two FMEAs.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Tim; Jenkins, Margie; Greenall, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Patient safety concerns in healthcare are not new or unexpected, and one goal of all healthcare organizations is to provide the safest possible care for patients and their families. With that goal in mind, Annapolis Valley Health, a rural district health authority in Nova Scotia, identified the need to develop expertise in the use of failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) as a tool to promote quality processes within the organization. Staff members were aware of the value of this type of analysis but also recognized that real learning would best be achieved through completing an FMEA of an existing process or situation, rather than through a simulation or staff training. Annapolis Valley Health identified two high-risk situations requiring attention: transcription of medication orders for in-patients and overcrowding in the emergency department. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices Canada provided training and support to two staff teams and visited the organization eight months later for an update on progress. This article chronicles the journey of Annapolis Valley Health to improve patient safety through the application of FMEA to two high-risk processes for one of its hospital sites. PMID:18382160

  1. Risk management in magnetic resonance: failure mode, effects, and criticality analysis.

    PubMed

    Petrillo, Antonella; Fusco, Roberta; Granata, Vincenza; Filice, Salvatore; Raiano, Nicola; Amato, Daniela Maria; Zirpoli, Maria; di Finizio, Alessandro; Sansone, Mario; Russo, Anna; Covelli, Eugenio Maria; Pedicini, Tonino; Triassi, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to perform a risk management procedure in "Magnetic Resonance Examination" process in order to identify the critical phases and sources of radiological errors and to identify potential improvement projects including procedures, tests, and checks to reduce the error occurrence risk. In this study we used the proactive analysis "Failure Mode Effects Criticality Analysis," a qualitative and quantitative risk management procedure; has calculated Priority Risk Index (PRI) for each activity of the process; have identified, on the PRI basis, the most critical activities and, for them, have defined improvement projects; and have recalculated the PRI after implementation of improvement projects for each activity. Time stop and audits are performed in order to control the new procedures. The results showed that the most critical tasks of "Magnetic Resonance Examination" process were the reception of the patient, the patient schedule drafting, the closing examination, and the organization of activities. Four improvement projects have been defined and executed. PRI evaluation after improvement projects implementation has shown that the risk decreased significantly following the implementation of procedures and controls defined in improvement projects, resulting in a reduction of the PRI between 43% and 100%. PMID:24171173

  2. Effectiveness and cost of failure mode and effects analysis methodology to reduce neurosurgical site infections.

    PubMed

    Hover, Alexander R; Sistrunk, William W; Cavagnol, Robert M; Scarrow, Alan; Finley, Phillip J; Kroencke, Audrey D; Walker, Judith L

    2014-01-01

    Mercy Hospital Springfield is a tertiary care facility with 32 000 discharges and 15 000 inpatient surgeries in 2011. From June 2009 through January 2011, a stable inpatient elective neurosurgery infection rate of 2.15% was observed. The failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) methodology to reduce inpatient neurosurgery infections was utilized. Following FMEA implementation, overall elective neurosurgery infection rates were reduced to 1.51% and sustained through May 2012. Compared with baseline, the post-FMEA deep-space and organ infection rate was reduced by 41% (P = .052). Overall hospital inpatient clean surgery infection rates for the same time frame did not decrease to the same extent, suggesting a specific effect of the FMEA. The study team believes that the FMEA interventions resulted in 14 fewer expected infections, $270 270 in savings, a 168-day reduction in expected length of stay, and 22 fewer readmissions. Given the serious morbidity and cost of health care-associated infections, the study team concludes that FMEA implementation was clinically cost-effective. PMID:24101683

  3. Using Failure Mode Effects and Criticality Analysis for High-Risk Processes at Three Community Hospitals

    SciTech Connect

    Coles, Garill A.; Fuller, Becky; Nordquist, Kathleen; Kongslie, Anita

    2005-03-01

    The staff at three Washington State hospitals and Battelle Pacific Northwest Division have been collaborating to apply Failure Mode Effects and Criticality Analysis (FMECA) to assess several hospital processes. The staff from Kadlec Medical Center (KMC), located in Richland, Washington; Kennewick General Hospital (KGH), located in Kennewick, Washington; and Lourdes Medical Center (LMC), located in Pasco, Washington, along with staff from Battelle, which is located in Richland, Washington have been working together successfully for two and a half years. Tri-Cities Shared Services, a local organization which implements shared hospital services, has provided the forum for joint activity. This effort was initiated in response to the new JCAHO patient safety standards implemented in July 2001, and the hospitals’ desire to be more proactive in improving patient safety. As a result of performing FMECAs the weaknesses of six medical processes have been characterized and corresponding system improvements implemented. Based on this collective experience, insights about the benefits of applying FMECAs to healthcare processes have been identified.

  4. Risk management for outsourcing biomedical waste disposal - using the failure mode and effects analysis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ching-Jong; Ho, Chao Chung

    2014-07-01

    Using the failure mode and effects analysis, this study examined biomedical waste companies through risk assessment. Moreover, it evaluated the supervisors of biomedical waste units in hospitals, and factors relating to the outsourcing risk assessment of biomedical waste in hospitals by referring to waste disposal acts. An expert questionnaire survey was conducted on the personnel involved in waste disposal units in hospitals, in order to identify important factors relating to the outsourcing risk of biomedical waste in hospitals. This study calculated the risk priority number (RPN) and selected items with an RPN value higher than 80 for improvement. These items included "availability of freezing devices", "availability of containers for sharp items", "disposal frequency", "disposal volume", "disposal method", "vehicles meeting the regulations", and "declaration of three lists". This study also aimed to identify important selection factors of biomedical waste disposal companies by hospitals in terms of risk. These findings can serve as references for hospitals in the selection of outsourcing companies for biomedical waste disposal. PMID:24726188

  5. Application of ISO22000 and Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (fmea) for Industrial Processing of Poultry Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varzakas, Theodoros H.; Arvanitoyannis, Ioannis S.

    Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) model has been applied for the risk assessment of poultry slaughtering and manufacturing. In this work comparison of ISO22000 analysis with HACCP is carried out over poultry slaughtering, processing and packaging. Critical Control points and Prerequisite programs (PrPs) have been identified and implemented in the cause and effect diagram (also known as Ishikawa, tree diagram and fishbone diagram).

  6. Proactive Risk Assessment of Blood Transfusion Process, in Pediatric Emergency, Using the Health Care Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HFMEA)

    PubMed Central

    Dehnavieh, Reza; Ebrahimipour, Hossein; Molavi-Taleghani, Yasamin; Vafaee-Najar, Ali; Hekmat, Somayeh Noori; Esmailzdeh, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pediatric emergency has been considered as a high risk area, and blood transfusion is known as a unique clinical measure, therefore this study was conducted with the purpose of assessing the proactive risk assessment of blood transfusion process in Pediatric Emergency of Qaem education- treatment center in Mashhad, by the Healthcare Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HFMEA) methodology. Methodology: This cross-sectional study analyzed the failure mode and effects of blood transfusion process by a mixture of quantitative-qualitative method. The proactive HFMEA was used to identify and analyze the potential failures of the process. The information of the items in HFMEA forms was collected after obtaining a consensus of experts’ panel views via the interview and focus group discussion sessions. Results: The Number of 77 failure modes were identified for 24 sub-processes enlisted in 8 processes of blood transfusion. Totally 13 failure modes were identified as non-acceptable risk (a hazard score above 8) in the blood transfusion process and were transferred to the decision tree. Root causes of high risk modes were discussed in cause-effect meetings and were classified based on the UK national health system (NHS) approved classifications model. Action types were classified in the form of acceptance (11.6%), control (74.2%) and elimination (14.2%). Recommendations were placed in 7 categories using TRIZ (“Theory of Inventive Problem Solving.”) Conclusion: The re-engineering process for the required changes, standardizing and updating the blood transfusion procedure, root cause analysis of blood transfusion catastrophic events, patient identification bracelet, training classes and educational pamphlets for raising awareness of personnel, and monthly gathering of transfusion medicine committee have all been considered as executive strategies in work agenda in pediatric emergency. PMID:25560332

  7. Matrix Failure Modes and Effects Analysis as a Knowledge Base for a Real Time Automated Diagnosis Expert System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrin, Stephanie; Iverson, David; Spukovska, Lilly; Souza, Kenneth A. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Failure Modes and Effects Analysis contain a wealth of information that can be used to create the knowledge base required for building automated diagnostic Expert systems. A real time monitoring and diagnosis expert system based on an actual NASA project's matrix failure modes and effects analysis was developed. This Expert system Was developed at NASA Ames Research Center. This system was first used as a case study to monitor the Research Animal Holding Facility (RAHF), a Space Shuttle payload that is used to house and monitor animals in orbit so the effects of space flight and microgravity can be studied. The techniques developed for the RAHF monitoring and diagnosis Expert system are general enough to be used for monitoring and diagnosis of a variety of other systems that undergo a Matrix FMEA. This automated diagnosis system was successfully used on-line and validated on the Space Shuttle flight STS-58, mission SLS-2 in October 1993.

  8. Analysis of failure modes resulting in stress corrosion cracking of 304N tubing in a high pressure heater desuperheater

    SciTech Connect

    Karg, D.C.; Svensen, L.M.E.; Ford, A.W.; Catapano, M.C.

    1998-10-01

    Santee Cooper (South Carolina Public Service Authority) experienced twenty-three tube failures in a high pressure feedwater heater that was in service less than three years. The tube failures were located at baffles adjacent to both exists of the dual flow desuperheater. Metallurgical analysis of the failed tubes indicated that stress corrosion cracking of the 304N stainless steel was the primary failure mode (Rudin, 1994; Shifler, 1994). The investigation to determine the factors leading to the onset of stress corrosion cracking included analysis of heater acceptance tests, the heater manufacturer`s proposal and manufacturing procedures, operational data, eddy current reports, metallurgical reports, and a heater design review for vibration and wet wall potential (formation of condensation on the outside diameter (OD) of the tube prior to the desuperheater exit).

  9. Analysis of failure modes resulting in stress corrosion cracking of 304N tubing in a high pressure heater desuperheater

    SciTech Connect

    Karg, D.C.; Svensen, L.M.E. III; Ford, A.W. III; Catapano, M.C.

    1995-12-31

    Santee Cooper (South Carolina Public Service Authority) experienced twenty-three tube failures in a high pressure feedwater heater that was in service less than three years. The tube failures were located at baffles adjacent to both exits of the dual flow desuperheater. Metallurgical analysis of the failed tubes indicated that stress corrosion cracking of the 304N stainless steel was the primary failure mode. The investigation to determine the factors leading to the onset of stress corrosion cracking included analysis of heater acceptance tests, the heater manufacturer`s proposal and manufacturing procedures, operational data, eddy current reports, metallurgical reports, and a heater design review for vibration and wet wall potential (formation of condensation on the outside diameter (OD) of the tube prior to the desuperheater exit).

  10. Degradation analysis of anode-supported intermediate temperature-solid oxide fuel cells under various failure modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tae-Hee; Park, Ka-Young; Kim, Ji-Tae; Seo, Yongho; Kim, Ki Buem; Song, Sun-Ju; Park, Byoungnam; Park, Jun-Young

    2015-02-01

    This study focuses on mechanisms and symptoms of several simulated failure modes, which may have significant influences on the long-term durability and operational stability of intermediate temperature-solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs), including fuel/oxidation starvation by breakdown of fuel/air supply components and wet and dry cycling atmospheres. Anode-supported IT-SOFCs consisting of a Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ (BSCF)-Nd0.1Ce0.9O2-δ (NDC) composite cathode with an NDC electrolyte on a Ni-NDC anode substrate are fabricated via dry-pressings followed by the co-firing method. Comprehensive and systematic research based on the failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) of anode-supported IT-SOFCs is conducted using various electrochemical and physiochemical analysis techniques to extend our understanding of the major mechanisms of performance deterioration under SOFC operating conditions. The fuel-starvation condition in the fuel-pump failure mode causes irreversible mechanical degradation of the electrolyte and cathode interface by the dimensional expansion of the anode support due to the oxidation of Ni metal to NiO. In contrast, the BSCF cathode shows poor stability under wet and dry cycling modes of cathode air due to the strong electroactivity of SrO with H2O. On the other hand, the air-depletion phenomena under air-pump failure mode results in the recovery of cell performance during the long-term operation without the visible microstructural transformation through the reduction of anode overvoltage.

  11. Risk Assessment of Using Entonox for the Relief of Labor Pain: A Healthcare Failure Modes and Effects Analysis Approach

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Tahereh Fathi; Bahri, Narjes; Ebrahimipour, Hosein; Najar, Ali Vafaee; Taleghani, Yasamin Molavi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In order to prevent medical errors, it is important to know why they occur and to identify their causes. Healthcare failure modes and effects analysis (HFMEA) is a type of qualitative descriptive that is used to evaluate the risk. The aim of this study was to assess the risks of using Entonox for labor pain by HFMEA. Methods A mixed-methods design (qualitative action research and quantitative cross-sectional research) was used. The modes and effects of failures in the process of using Entonox were detected and analyzed during 2013–2014 at Hefdahe Shahrivar Hospital, Mashhad, Iran. Overall, 52 failure modes were identified, with 25 being recognized as high-risk modes. Results The results revealed that 48.5% of these errors fall into the care process type, 22.05% belong to the communicative type, 19.1% fall into the administrative type, and 10.2% are of the knowledge and skills type. Strategies were presented in the forms of acceptance (3.2%), control (90.3%), and elimination (6.4%). Conclusion The following actions are suggested for improving the process of using Entonox: Close supervision by the midwife, precise recording of all the stages of the process in the woman’s medical record, the necessity of the presence of the anesthesiologist at the woman’s bedside during labor, confirming the indications for use of Entonox, and close monitoring to ensure the safety of the gas cylinder guards. PMID:27123224

  12. Failure mode analysis of degraded InGaAs-AlGaAs strained quantum well multi-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sin, Yongkun; Lingley, Zachary; Brodie, Miles; Huang, Michael; Bushmaker, Adam; Theiss, Jesse; Presser, Nathan; Foran, Brendan; Moss, Steven C.

    2016-03-01

    Remarkable progress made in vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) emitting at 850 and 980 nm has led them to find an increasing number of applications in high speed data communications as well as in potential space satellite systems. However, little has been reported on reliability and failure modes of InGaAs VCSELs emitting at ~980 nm although it is crucial to understand failure modes and underlying degradation mechanisms in developing these VCSELs that exceed lifetime requirements for space missions. The active layer of commercial VCSELs that we studied consisted of two or three InGaAs quantum wells. The laser structures were fabricated into deep mesas followed by a steam oxidation process to form oxide-apertures for current and optical confinements. Our multi- mode VCSELs showed a laser threshold of ~ 0.5 mA at RT. Failures were generated via accelerated life-testing of VCSELs. For the present study, we report on failure mode analysis of degraded oxide-VCSELs using various techniques. We employed nondestructive techniques including electroluminescence (EL), optical beam induced current (OBIC), and electron beam induced current (EBIC) techniques as well as destructive techniques including focused ion beam (FIB) and high-resolution TEM techniques to study VCSELs that showed different degradation behaviors. Especially, we employed FIB systems to locally remove a portion of top-DBR mirrors of degraded VCSELs, which made it possible for our subsequent EBIC and OBIC techniques to locate damaged areas that were generated as a result of degradation processes and also for our HR-TEM technique to prepare TEM cross sections from damaged areas. Our nondestructive and destructive physical analysis results are reported including defect and structural analysis results from pre-aged VCSELs as well as from degraded VCSELs life-tested under different test conditions.

  13. Fracture - An Unforgiving Failure Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodin, James Ronald

    2006-01-01

    During the 2005 Conference for the Advancement for Space Safety, after a typical presentation of safety tools, a Russian in the audience simply asked, "How does that affect the hardware?" Having participated in several International System Safety Conferences, I recalled that most attention is dedicated to safety tools and little, if any, to hardware. The intent of this paper on the hazard of fracture and failure modes associated with fracture is my attempt to draw attention to the grass roots of system safety - improving hardware robustness and resilience.

  14. Comprehensive reliability allocation method for CNC lathes based on cubic transformed functions of failure mode and effects analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhou; Zhu, Yunpeng; Ren, Hongrui; Zhang, Yimin

    2015-03-01

    Reliability allocation of computerized numerical controlled(CNC) lathes is very important in industry. Traditional allocation methods only focus on high-failure rate components rather than moderate failure rate components, which is not applicable in some conditions. Aiming at solving the problem of CNC lathes reliability allocating, a comprehensive reliability allocation method based on cubic transformed functions of failure modes and effects analysis(FMEA) is presented. Firstly, conventional reliability allocation methods are introduced. Then the limitations of direct combination of comprehensive allocation method with the exponential transformed FMEA method are investigated. Subsequently, a cubic transformed function is established in order to overcome these limitations. Properties of the new transformed functions are discussed by considering the failure severity and the failure occurrence. Designers can choose appropriate transform amplitudes according to their requirements. Finally, a CNC lathe and a spindle system are used as an example to verify the new allocation method. Seven criteria are considered to compare the results of the new method with traditional methods. The allocation results indicate that the new method is more flexible than traditional methods. By employing the new cubic transformed function, the method covers a wider range of problems in CNC reliability allocation without losing the advantages of traditional methods.

  15. The use of failure mode and effects analysis to construct an effective disposal and prevention mechanism for infectious hospital waste

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Chao Chung; Liao, Ching-Jong

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: > This study is based on a real case in a regional teaching hospital in Taiwan. > We use Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) as the evaluation method. > We successfully identify the risk factors of infectious waste disposal. > We propose plans for the detection of exceptional cases of infectious waste. - Abstract: In recent times, the quality of medical care has been continuously improving in medical institutions wherein patient-centred care has been emphasized. Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) has also been promoted as a method of basic risk management and as part of total quality management (TQM) for improving the quality of medical care and preventing mistakes. Therefore, a study was conducted using FMEA to evaluate the potential risk causes in the process of infectious medical waste disposal, devise standard procedures concerning the waste, and propose feasible plans for facilitating the detection of exceptional cases of infectious waste. The analysis revealed the following results regarding medical institutions: (a) FMEA can be used to identify the risk factors of infectious waste disposal. (b) During the infectious waste disposal process, six items were scored over 100 in the assessment of uncontrolled risks: erroneous discarding of infectious waste by patients and their families, erroneous discarding by nursing staff, erroneous discarding by medical staff, cleaning drivers pierced by sharp articles, cleaning staff pierced by sharp articles, and unmarked output units. Therefore, the study concluded that it was necessary to (1) provide education and training about waste classification to the medical staff, patients and their families, nursing staff, and cleaning staff; (2) clarify the signs of caution; and (3) evaluate the failure mode and strengthen the effects.

  16. Defense against common mode failures in protection system design

    SciTech Connect

    Wyman, R.H.; Johnson, G.L.

    1997-08-27

    The introduction of digital instrumentation and control into reactor safety systems creates a heightened concern about common-mode failure. This paper discusses the concern and methods to cope with the concern. Common-mode failures have been a ``fact-of-life`` in existing systems. The informal introduction of defense-in-depth and diversity (D-in-D&D)-coupled with the fact that hardware common-mode failures are often distributed in time-has allowed systems to deal with past common-mode failures. However, identical software operating in identical redundant systems presents the potential for simultaneous failure. Consequently, the use of digital systems raises the concern about common-mode failure to a new level. A more methodical approach to mitigating common-mode failure is needed to address these concerns. Purposeful introduction of D-in-D&D has been used as a defense against common-mode failure in reactor protection systems. At least two diverse systems are provided to mitigate any potential initiating event. Additionally, diverse displays and controls are provided to allow the operator to monitor plant status and manually initiate engineered safety features. A special form of conimon-mode failure analysis called ``defense-in-depth and diversity analysis`` has been developed to identify possible conimon-mode failure vulnerabilities in digital systems. An overview of this analysis technique is provided.

  17. Meteorological Satellites (METSAT) and Earth Observing System (EOS) Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) instruments that are being designed and manufactured for the Meteorological Satellites Project (METSAT) and the Earth Observing System (EOS) integrated programs. The FMEA analyzes the design of the METSAT and EOS instruments as they currently exist. This FMEA is intended to identify METSAT and EOS failure modes and their effect on spacecraft-instrument and instrument-component interfaces. The prime objective of this FMEA is to identify potential catastrophic and critical failures so that susceptibility to the failures and their effects can be eliminated from the METSAT/EOS instruments.

  18. The use of failure mode and effects analysis to construct an effective disposal and prevention mechanism for infectious hospital waste.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chao Chung; Liao, Ching-Jong

    2011-12-01

    In recent times, the quality of medical care has been continuously improving in medical institutions wherein patient-centred care has been emphasized. Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) has also been promoted as a method of basic risk management and as part of total quality management (TQM) for improving the quality of medical care and preventing mistakes. Therefore, a study was conducted using FMEA to evaluate the potential risk causes in the process of infectious medical waste disposal, devise standard procedures concerning the waste, and propose feasible plans for facilitating the detection of exceptional cases of infectious waste. The analysis revealed the following results regarding medical institutions: (a) FMEA can be used to identify the risk factors of infectious waste disposal. (b) During the infectious waste disposal process, six items were scored over 100 in the assessment of uncontrolled risks: erroneous discarding of infectious waste by patients and their families, erroneous discarding by nursing staff, erroneous discarding by medical staff, cleaning drivers pierced by sharp articles, cleaning staff pierced by sharp articles, and unmarked output units. Therefore, the study concluded that it was necessary to (1) provide education and training about waste classification to the medical staff, patients and their families, nursing staff, and cleaning staff; (2) clarify the signs of caution; and (3) evaluate the failure mode and strengthen the effects. PMID:21807493

  19. Failure mode and effects analysis of the universal anaesthesia machine in two tertiary care hospitals in Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, M. A.; Sampson, J. B.; Jackson, E. V.; Koka, R.; Chima, A. M.; Ogbuagu, O. U.; Marx, M. K.; Koroma, M.; Lee, B. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Anaesthesia care in developed countries involves sophisticated technology and experienced providers. However, advanced machines may be inoperable or fail frequently when placed into the austere medical environment of a developing country. Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is a method for engaging local staff in identifying real or potential breakdowns in processes or work systems and to develop strategies to mitigate risks. Methods Nurse anaesthetists from the two tertiary care hospitals in Freetown, Sierra Leone, participated in three sessions moderated by a human factors specialist and an anaesthesiologist. Sessions were audio recorded, and group discussion graphically mapped by the session facilitator for analysis and commentary. These sessions sought to identify potential barriers to implementing an anaesthesia machine designed for austere medical environments—the universal anaesthesia machine (UAM)—and also engaging local nurse anaesthetists in identifying potential solutions to these barriers. Results Participating Sierra Leonean clinicians identified five main categories of failure modes (resource availability, environmental issues, staff knowledge and attitudes, and workload and staffing issues) and four categories of mitigation strategies (resource management plans, engaging and educating stakeholders, peer support for new machine use, and collectively advocating for needed resources). Conclusions We identified factors that may limit the impact of a UAM and devised likely effective strategies for mitigating those risks. PMID:24833727

  20. Preliminary analysis of perfusionists' strategies for managing routine and failure mode scenarios in cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Power, Gerald; Miller, Anne

    2007-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is a complex task requiring high levels of practitioner expertise. Although some education standards exist, few are based on an analysis of perfusionists' problem-solving needs. This study shows the efficacy of work domain analysis (WDA) as a framework for analyzing perfusionists' conceptualization and problem-solving strategies. A WDA model of a CPB circuit was developed. A high-fidelity CPB simulator (Manbit) was used to present routine and oxygenator failure scenarios to six proficient perfusionists. The video-cued recall technique was used to elicit perfusionists' conceptualization strategies. The resulting recall transcripts were coded using the WDA model and analyzed for associations between task completion times and patterns of conceptualization. The WDA model developed was successful in being able to account for and describe the thought process followed by each participant. It was also shown that, although there was no correlation between experience with CPB and ability to change an oxygenator, there was a link between the between specific thought patterns and the efficiency in undertaking this task. Simulators are widely used in many fields of human endeavor, and in this research, the attempt was made to use WDA to gain insights into the complexities of the human thought process when engaged in the complex task of conducting CPB. The assumption that experience equates with ability is challenged, and rather, it is shown that thought process is a more significant determinant of success when engaged in complex tasks. WDA analysis in combination with a CPB simulator may be used to elucidate successful strategies for completing complex tasks. PMID:17972450

  1. Application of ISO 22000 and Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) for industrial processing of salmon: a case study.

    PubMed

    Arvanitoyannis, Ioannis S; Varzakas, Theodoros H

    2008-05-01

    The Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) model was applied for risk assessment of salmon manufacturing. A tentative approach of FMEA application to the salmon industry was attempted in conjunction with ISO 22000. Preliminary Hazard Analysis was used to analyze and predict the occurring failure modes in a food chain system (salmon processing plant), based on the functions, characteristics, and/or interactions of the ingredients or the processes, upon which the system depends. Critical Control points were identified and implemented in the cause and effect diagram (also known as Ishikawa, tree diagram and fishbone diagram). In this work, a comparison of ISO 22000 analysis with HACCP is carried out over salmon processing and packaging. However, the main emphasis was put on the quantification of risk assessment by determining the RPN per identified processing hazard. Fish receiving, casing/marking, blood removal, evisceration, filet-making cooling/freezing, and distribution were the processes identified as the ones with the highest RPN (252, 240, 210, 210, 210, 210, 200 respectively) and corrective actions were undertaken. After the application of corrective actions, a second calculation of RPN values was carried out resulting in substantially lower values (below the upper acceptable limit of 130). It is noteworthy that the application of Ishikawa (Cause and Effect or Tree diagram) led to converging results thus corroborating the validity of conclusions derived from risk assessment and FMEA. Therefore, the incorporation of FMEA analysis within the ISO 22000 system of a salmon processing industry is anticipated to prove advantageous to industrialists, state food inspectors, and consumers. PMID:18464031

  2. The use of failure mode and effect analysis in a radiation oncology setting: the Cancer Treatment Centers of America experience.

    PubMed

    Denny, Diane S; Allen, Debra K; Worthington, Nicole; Gupta, Digant

    2014-01-01

    Delivering radiation therapy in an oncology setting is a high-risk process where system failures are more likely to occur because of increasing utilization, complexity, and sophistication of the equipment and related processes. Healthcare failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) is a method used to proactively detect risks to the patient in a particular healthcare process and correct potential errors before adverse events occur. FMEA is a systematic, multidisciplinary team-based approach to error prevention and enhancing patient safety. We describe our experience of using FMEA as a prospective risk-management technique in radiation oncology at a national network of oncology hospitals in the United States, capitalizing not only on the use of a team-based tool but also creating momentum across a network of collaborative facilities seeking to learn from and share best practices with each other. The major steps of our analysis across 4 sites and collectively were: choosing the process and subprocesses to be studied, assembling a multidisciplinary team at each site responsible for conducting the hazard analysis, and developing and implementing actions related to our findings. We identified 5 areas of performance improvement for which risk-reducing actions were successfully implemented across our enterprise. PMID:22364244

  3. Quality risk analysis in a cGMP environment: multiple models for comprehensive failure mode identification during the computer system lifecycle.

    PubMed

    Gervais, Brian; D'Arcy, Deirdre M

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceutical quality systems use various inputs to ensure product quality and prevent failures that might have patient consequences. These inputs are generally data from failures that have already occurred, for example process deviations or customer complaints. Risk analysis techniques are well-established in certain other industries and have become of interest to pharmaceutical manufacturers because they allow potential quality failures to be predicted and mitigating action taken in advance of their occurring. Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is one such technique, and in this study it was applied to implement a computerized manufacturing execution system in a pharmaceutical manufacturing environment. After introduction, the system was monitored to detect failures that did occur and these were analyzed to determine why the risk analysis method failed to predict them. Application of FMEA in other industries has identified weaknesses in predicting certain error types, specifically its dependence on other techniques to model risk situations and its poor analysis of non-hardware risks, such as human error, and this was confirmed in this study. Hierarchical holographic modeling (HHM), a technique for identifying risk scenarios in wide-scope analyses, was applied subsequently and identified additional potential failure modes. The technique for human error rate prediction (THERP) has previously been used for the quantitative analysis of human error risk and the event tree from this technique was adapted and identified further human error scenarios. These were input to the FMEA for prioritization and mitigation, thereby strengthening the risk analysis in terms of failure modes considered. PMID:23216278

  4. Application of Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA), cause and effect analysis, and Pareto diagram in conjunction with HACCP to a corn curl manufacturing plant.

    PubMed

    Varzakas, Theodoros H; Arvanitoyannis, Ioannis S

    2007-01-01

    The Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) model has been applied for the risk assessment of corn curl manufacturing. A tentative approach of FMEA application to the snacks industry was attempted in an effort to exclude the presence of GMOs in the final product. This is of crucial importance both from the ethics and the legislation (Regulations EC 1829/2003; EC 1830/2003; Directive EC 18/2001) point of view. The Preliminary Hazard Analysis and the Fault Tree Analysis were used to analyze and predict the occurring failure modes in a food chain system (corn curls processing plant), based on the functions, characteristics, and/or interactions of the ingredients or the processes, upon which the system depends. Critical Control points have been identified and implemented in the cause and effect diagram (also known as Ishikawa, tree diagram, and the fishbone diagram). Finally, Pareto diagrams were employed towards the optimization of GMOs detection potential of FMEA. PMID:17457722

  5. Fiber optics - Failure modes and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyle, Richard A., Jr.

    A study was conducted to investigate the frequency and cause of failures of fiber-optic transmitters, waveguides, receivers, connectors, and splices. To accomplish this, quantitative and qualitative data were collected and evaluated to determine why and when failures occurred and to identify design options which can be made to avoid these failure conditions. An understanding of fiber-optic device failure modes and mechanisms is critical to insuring unit reliability, improving the manufacturing process, and allowing design flexibility of the overall fiber-optic system. The author summarizes the specific failure modes uncovered for typical items such as transmitters, receivers, fiber, cable, connectors, and splices. He also discusses fiber-optic performance criteria, design considerations, failure rate data, and failure mode information.

  6. Failure modes in surface micromachined microelectromechanical actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.L.; Rodgers, M.S.; LaVigne, G.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Clews, P.; Tanner, D.M.; Peterson, K.A.

    1998-03-01

    In order for the rapidly emerging field of MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) to meet its extraordinary expectations regarding commercial impact, issues pertaining to how they fail must be understood. The authors identify failure modes common to a broad range of MEMS actuators, including adhesion (stiction) and friction induced failures caused by improper operational methods, mechanical instabilities, and electrical instabilities. Demonstrated methods to mitigate these failure modes include implementing optimized designs, model based operational methods, and chemical surface treatments.

  7. Risk assessment of component failure modes and human errors using a new FMECA approach: application in the safety analysis of HDR brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Giardina, M; Castiglia, F; Tomarchio, E

    2014-12-01

    Failure mode, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA) is a safety technique extensively used in many different industrial fields to identify and prevent potential failures. In the application of traditional FMECA, the risk priority number (RPN) is determined to rank the failure modes; however, the method has been criticised for having several weaknesses. Moreover, it is unable to adequately deal with human errors or negligence. In this paper, a new versatile fuzzy rule-based assessment model is proposed to evaluate the RPN index to rank both component failure and human error. The proposed methodology is applied to potential radiological over-exposure of patients during high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments. The critical analysis of the results can provide recommendations and suggestions regarding safety provisions for the equipment and procedures required to reduce the occurrence of accidental events. PMID:25379678

  8. Failure mode and effect analysis: a technique to prevent chemotherapy errors.

    PubMed

    Sheridan-Leos, Norma; Schulmeister, Lisa; Hartranft, Steve

    2006-06-01

    Complex, multidrug chemotherapy protocols commonly are administered to patients with cancer. At every step of the chemotherapy administration process, from the point that chemotherapy is ordered to the point that it is infused and beyond, potential for error exists. FMEA, a proactive process that promotes systematic thinking about the safety of patient care, is a risk analysis technique that can be used to evaluate the process of chemotherapy administration. Error prevention is an ongoing quality improvement process that requires institutional commitment and support, and nurses play a vital role in the process. PMID:16789584

  9. Use of failure modes and effects analysis in design of the tracker system for the HET wide-field upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Richard; Beets, Tim; Beno, Joseph; Booth, John; Cornell, Mark; Good, John; Heisler, James; Hill, Gary; Kriel, Herman; Penney, Charles; Rafal, Marc; Savage, Richard; Soukup, Ian; Worthington, Michael; Zierer, Joseph

    2012-09-01

    In support of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX), the Center for Electromechanics at The University of Texas at Austin was tasked with developing the new Tracker and control system to support the HETDEX Wide-Field Upgrade. The tracker carries the 3,100 kg Prime Focus Instrument Package and Wide Field Corrector approximately 13 m above the 10 m diameter primary mirror. Its safe and reliable operation by a sophisticated control system, over a 20 year life time is a paramount requirement for the project. To account for all potential failures and potential hazards, to both the equipment and personnel involved, an extensive Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) was completed early in the project. This task required participation of all the stakeholders over a multi-day meeting with numerous follow up exchanges. The event drove a number of significant design decisions and requirements that might not have been identified this early in the project without this process. The result is a system that has multiple layers of active and passive safety systems to protect the tens of millions of dollars of hardware involved and the people who operate it. This paper will describe the background of the FMEA process, how it was utilized on HETDEX, the critical outcomes, how the required safety systems were implemented, and how they have worked in operation. It should be of interest to engineers, designers, and managers engaging in complex multi-disciplinary and parallel engineering projects that involve automated hardware and control systems with potentially hazardous operating scenarios.

  10. Finite Element Analysis and Failure Mode Characterization of Pyramidal Fin Arrays Produced by Masked Cold Gas Dynamic Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, Yannick; Dupuis, Philippe; Jodoin, Bertrand; Ghaei, Abbas

    2015-12-01

    This work evaluates the shear strength of pyramidal fin arrays made from various feedstock materials (cylindrical aluminum, spherical nickel, and cylindrical stainless steel 304 powders) deposited on an Al6061-T6 substrate. Higher shear strength was measured for the nickel fin array followed by the stainless steel 304 and the aluminum arrays. Different failure modes were observed by inspecting the fracture surfaces under Scanning Electron Microscope. Deposition between the cold sprayed nickel and stainless fins was detected whereas dimples were noticed on the substrate between the fins when aluminum is used as the feedstock material. A numerical simulation of normal and angled impacts using the high strain rate Preston-Tonks-Wallace model was carried out in order to have a better understanding of the experimental results. The equivalent plastic strain (PEEQ) obtained from the finite element analysis at normal impact correlates with the different shear strengths measured experimentally. Furthermore, even if a higher PEEQ was observed for angled impacts compared to its normal collision counterpart, it is suggested that the particles may not bond because of the rotational restitution momentum caused by the tangential friction generated during angled impacts. This rotational restitution momentum was not detected for particle impacts normal to the substrate surface.

  11. Structural system reliability under multiple failure modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahadevan, S.; Chamis, C. C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a computational method for system reliability estimation of propulsion structures. The failure domain of the entire structural system is computed through the union of failure regions for various critical system failure modes. The effect of non-critical progressive damage is incorporated through structural reanalysis, resulting in the construction of several linear segments to approximately cover the system failure domain. An adaptive damage imposition scheme is outlined for the sake of computational efficiency. The proposed method is used to construct the system survival cdf (cumulative distribution function) of a two-rotor system.

  12. Application of Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) and cause and effect analysis in conjunction with ISO 22000 to a snails (Helix aspersa) processing plant; A case study.

    PubMed

    Arvanitoyannis, Ioannis S; Varzakas, Theodoros H

    2009-08-01

    Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) has been applied for the risk assessment of snails manufacturing. A tentative approach of FMEA application to the snails industry was attempted in conjunction with ISO 22000. Preliminary Hazard Analysis was used to analyze and predict the occurring failure modes in a food chain system (snails processing plant), based on the functions, characteristics, and/or interactions of the ingredients or the processes, upon which the system depends. Critical Control points have been identified and implemented in the cause and effect diagram (also known as Ishikawa, tree diagram, and fishbone diagram). In this work a comparison of ISO22000 analysis with HACCP is carried out over snails processing and packaging. However, the main emphasis was put on the quantification of risk assessment by determining the RPN per identified processing hazard. Sterilization of tins, bioaccumulation of heavy metals, packaging of shells and poisonous mushrooms, were the processes identified as the ones with the highest RPN (280, 240, 147, 144, respectively) and corrective actions were undertaken. Following the application of corrective actions, a second calculation of RPN values was carried out leading to considerably lower values (below the upper acceptable limit of 130). It is noteworthy that the application of Ishikawa (Cause and Effect or Tree diagram) led to converging results thus corroborating the validity of conclusions derived from risk assessment and FMEA. Therefore, the incorporation of FMEA analysis within the ISO22000 system of a snails processing industry is considered imperative. PMID:19582641

  13. Administrative risk quantification of subcutaneous and intravenous therapies in Italian centers utilizing the Failure Mode and Effects Analysis approach

    PubMed Central

    Ponzetti, Clemente; Canciani, Monica; Farina, Massimo; Era, Sara; Walzer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background In oncology, an important parameter of safety is the potential treatment error in hospitals. The analyzed hypothesis is that of subcutaneous therapies would provide a superior safety benefit over intravenous therapies through fixed-dose administrations, when analyzed with trastuzumab and rituximab. Methods For the calculation of risk levels, the Failure Mode and Effect Analysis approach was applied. Within this approach, the critical treatment path is followed and risk classification for each individual step is estimated. For oncology and hematology administration, 35 different risk steps were assessed. The study was executed in 17 hematology and 16 breast cancer centers in Italy. As intravenous and subcutaneous were the only injection routes in medical available for trastuzumab and rituximab in oncology at the time of the study, these two therapies were chosen. Results When the risk classes were calculated, eight high-risk areas were identified for the administration of an intravenous therapy in hematology or oncology; 13 areas would be defined as having a median-risk classification and 14 areas as having a low-risk classification (total risk areas: n=35). When the new subcutaneous formulation would be applied, 23 different risk levels could be completely eliminated (65% reduction). Important high-risk classes such as dose calculation, preparation and package labeling, preparation of the access to the vein, pump infusion preparation, and infusion monitoring were included in the eliminations. The overall risk level for the intravenous administration was estimated to be 756 (ex-ante) and could be reduced by 70% (ex-post). The potential harm compensation for errors related to pharmacy would be decreased from eight risk classes to only three risk classes. Conclusion The subcutaneous administration of trastuzumab (breast cancer) and rituximab (hematology) might lower the risk of administration and treatment errors for patients and could hence indirectly have

  14. A Framework for Creating a Function-based Design Tool for Failure Mode Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arunajadai, Srikesh G.; Stone, Robert B.; Tumer, Irem Y.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Knowledge of potential failure modes during design is critical for prevention of failures. Currently industries use procedures such as Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA), Fault Tree analysis, or Failure Modes, Effects and Criticality analysis (FMECA), as well as knowledge and experience, to determine potential failure modes. When new products are being developed there is often a lack of sufficient knowledge of potential failure mode and/or a lack of sufficient experience to identify all failure modes. This gives rise to a situation in which engineers are unable to extract maximum benefits from the above procedures. This work describes a function-based failure identification methodology, which would act as a storehouse of information and experience, providing useful information about the potential failure modes for the design under consideration, as well as enhancing the usefulness of procedures like FMEA. As an example, the method is applied to fifteen products and the benefits are illustrated.

  15. Fracture Analysis of Competing Failure Modes of Aluminum-CFRP Joints Using Three-Layer Titanium Laminates as Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woizeschke, P.; Vollertsen, F.

    2015-09-01

    The structural properties of lightweight constructions can be adapted to specific local requirements using multi-material designs. Aluminum alloys and carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP) are materials of great interest requiring suitable joining techniques in order to transfer the advantages of combining the materials to structural benefits. Thus, the research group "Schwarz-Silber" investigates novel concepts to enable frontal aluminum-CFRP joints using transition structures. In the foil concept titanium foils are used as transition elements. Specimens have been produced using three-layer titanium laminates. In tensile tests, three failure locations have been observed: (1) Al-Ti seam, (2) Ti-CFRP hybrid laminate, and (3) CFRP laminate. In this paper, the fracture mechanisms of these failure modes are investigated by analyzing metallographic micrographs and fracture surfaces as well as by correlating load-displacement curves to video imaging of tensile tests. The results show that the cracking of the CFRP layers can be traced back to an assembly error. The laminate character of the titanium part tends to reduce the Al-Ti seam strength. However, two sub-joint tests demonstrate that the Al-Ti seam can endure loads up to 9.5 kN. The ductile failure behavior of the Ti-CFRP hybrid laminates is caused by plastic deformations of the titanium laminate liners.

  16. Utilization of Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) Method in Increasing the Revenue of Emergency Department; a Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Shahrami, Ali; Rahmati, Farhad; Kariman, Hamid; Hashemi, Behrooz; Rahmati, Majid; Baratloo, Alireza; Forouzanfar, Mohammad Mehdi; Safari, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The balance between revenue and cost of an organization/system is essential to maintain its survival and quality of services. Emergency departments (ED) are one of the most important parts of health care delivery system. Financial discipline of EDs, by increasing the efficiency and profitability, can directly affect the quality of care and subsequently patient satisfaction. Accordingly, the present study attempts to investigate failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) method in identifying the problems leading to the loss of ED revenue and offer solutions to help fix these problems. Methods: This prospective cohort study investigated the financial records of ED patients and evaluated the effective errors in reducing the revenue in ED of Imam Hossein hospital, Tehran, Iran, from October 2007 to November 2009. The whole department was divided into one main system and six subsystems, based on FMEA. The study was divided into two phases. In the first phase, the problems leading to the loss of revenue in each subsystem were identified and weighted into four groups using risk priority number (RPN), and the solutions for fixing them were planned. Then, in the second phase, discovered defects in the first phase were fixed according to their priority. Finally, the impact of each solution was compared before and after intervention using the repeated measure ANOVA test. Results: 100 financial records of ED patients were evaluated during the first phase of the study. The average of ED revenue in the six months of the first phase was 73.1±3.65 thousand US dollars/month. 12 types of errors were detected in the predefined subsystems. ED revenue rose from 73.1 to 153.1, 207.06, 240, and 320 thousand US dollars/month after solving first, second, third, and fourth priority problems, respectively (337.75% increase in two years) (p<0.001). 111.0% increase in the ED revenue after solving of first priority problems revealed that they were extremely indispensable in

  17. Flashlamp failure modes and lifetime estimation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Ryand J. F.; Cochran, Nicholas; Morelli, Gregg L.

    2013-03-01

    Solid state pulsed laser systems are of interest for industrial applications. Flashlamps are an effective method for pumping solid state pulsed laser systems. Flashlamp lifetime is hard to quantify past the specification provided by the manufacture and is of concern for applications that are not used or tested on a frequent basis. The flashlamp lifetime can be shortened by three main failure modes: manufacturing quality escapes, shipping and handling damage, and shelf life. Manufacturing and shipping failure modes will be the focus of this research. Manufacturing and shipping failure modes are hard to detect, beyond the obvious non-functioning flashlamp, without testing to failure, which is not a feasible option. A method is being proposed that can estimate the lifetime of flashlamps as well as other key characteristics of the flashlamp while a relatively low number of shots are taken with the flashlamp. Fill pressure and fill gas will be determined by monitoring the input voltage, current, and output spectrum with comparison to the arc length, bore diameter, wall thickness and electrode configuration. Flashlamp lifetime estimations will be determined by monitoring the current, wavelength shift, and output intensity. Experimental results will be discussed focusing on the characteristics and lifetime estimations of flashlamps.

  18. Metal matrix composites: Testing, analysis, and failure modes; Proceedings of the Symposium, Sparks, NV, Apr. 25, 26, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The present conference discusses the tension and compression testing of MMCs, the measurement of advanced composites' thermal expansion, plasticity theory for fiber-reinforced composites, a deformation analysis of boron/aluminum specimens by moire interferometry, strength prediction methods for MMCs, and the analysis of notched MMCs under tensile loading. Also discussed are techniques for the mechanical and thermal testing of Ti3Al/SCS-6 MMCs, damage initiation and growth in fiber-reinforced MMCs, the shear testing of MMCs, the crack growth and fracture of continuous fiber-reinforced MMCs in view of analytical and experimental results, and MMC fiber-matrix interface failures.

  19. Analysis of possibilities for carbon removal from porous anode of solid oxide fuel cells after different failure modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subotić, Vanja; Schluckner, Christoph; Schroettner, Hartmuth; Hochenauer, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the investigation of possibilities for carbon removal from the fuel electrode of anode supported solid oxide fuel cells (ASC-SOFCs) after different degradation modes. To design the conditions which generally lead the cell in the range of carbon depositions the performed thermodynamic calculations show that the SOFC operating temperature range seems to be appropriate for formation of elemental carbon in various types. Concerning this the loaded large planar single SOFCs are fed with synthetic diesel reformate thus simulating realistic operating conditions and enabling the formation and deposition of carbon on the anode side. A mixture of hydrogen/water vapor/nitrogen is used to remove the detected carbon depositions in a cell-protecting manner. For the purpose of this investigation several failure modes are induced after which determination the already defined regeneration strategy is applied. The cathode degradation is first induced and secondly the fuel supply is interrupted to induce re-oxidation of nickel (Ni) on the anode side. The undertaken investigations determine that carbon can be fully removed from the anode surface after nickel oxidation, while cathode degradation disables the complete cell regeneration.

  20. Failure Modes during Low-Voltage Electrowetting.

    PubMed

    Mibus, Marcel; Hu, Xiaoyu; Knospe, Carl; Reed, Michael L; Zangari, Giovanni

    2016-06-22

    Low-voltage electrowetting devices allow significant contact angle changes below a 50 V bias; however, operation under prolonged cycling and failure modes have not yet been sufficiently elucidated. In this work, the failure modes and performance degradation of Cytop (23-210 nm)/aluminum oxide (15-44 nm) bilayers have been investigated. Contact angle and leakage current were measured during stepped voltage measurements up to failure, showing three electrowetting response regimes: ideal Young-Lippmann behavior, contact angle saturation, and dielectric breakdown. The onset of ionic conduction in aluminum oxide and the resulting breakdown control when the layer would ultimately fail, but the thickness of the Cytop layer determined the achievable contact angle versus voltage characteristics. Cyclic electrowetting measurements studied the repeatability of contact angle change using an applied voltage above or below the voltage drop needed for polymer breakdown (VT). Results show repeatable electrowetting below VT and a rapidly diminishing contact angle response above VT. The leakage current and injected charge cannot be used to comprehensively assess the stability of the system during operation. The contact potential difference measured with a Kelvin probe provides an alternative means of assessing the extent of the damage. PMID:27253515

  1. Fracture-An Unforgiving Failure Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodin, James Ronald

    2010-09-01

    During the 2005 Conference for the Advancement for Space Safety, after a typical presentation of safety tools, a Russian in the audience simply asked, “How does that affect the hardware?” Most of the papers in the International Association for Space Safety Conferences are dedicated to safety tools and few, if any, to hardware. The intent of this paper on the hazard of fracture and failure modes associated with fracture is to draw attention to the grass roots of system safety - improving hardware robustness and resilience. This paper outlines the causes of fracture, test techniques to identify cracks, and design techniques to reduce the probability of system failure due to fracture.

  2. Failure modes and conditions of Itokawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Masatoshi; Scheeres, Daniel J.

    2015-11-01

    The YORP effect has been found to play a crucial role in the rotational evolution of small bodies. Recent studies have argued that the YORP effect is very sensitive to the shape of an asteroid (Statler, 2015, Icarus 202, 502) and, as the shape deforms, can possibly change (McMahon, 2015, DDA meeting #301.04). Such sensitivity has been considered to affect the orbital evolution of an asteroid (Bottke et al., 2015, Icarus 247, 191). As a result, this mysterious effect could make fast and slow rotators (personal communication with Bill Bottke, 2015). In addition, possible candidates of rotational disruption have also been discovered in the last decades (e.g., Jewitt et al., 2014, ApJ 784, L8). These studies gave rise to the following question: how does the shape of an asteroid change when subject to rotational variations from the YORP effect? Better understandings of asteroid deformation and failure at different spin periods will help us find clues of it. To do this we are surveying the failure modes and conditions of available shape models with detailed mass information. The main technique used is a plastic finite element model by Hirabayashi and Scheeres (2015, ApJ 798, L8). We have analyzed asteroid Itokawa, which is currently spinning at a spin period of 12.1 hours. Itokawa’s failure conditions at different spin periods can be described by using the minimum cohesive strength that ensures stability of the structure. The results show that this minimum cohesive strength increases as the spin period becomes shorter. If the spin period is longer than 4.5 hours, a failure mode caused by a combination of compression and tension occurs at cohesive strength less than 6 Pa. At shorter spin periods, however, tension spreads out across the neck, causing the body to fail even at cohesive strength higher than it. Since Hill’s stability condition is 5.2 hours, once the body fails at spin periods shorter than 4.5 hours, it breaks into two components that eventually escape

  3. Metal Whiskers: Failure Modes and Mitigation Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brusse, Jay A.; Leidecker, Henning

    2007-01-01

    Metal coatings especially tin, zinc and cadmium are unpredictably susceptible to the formation of electrically conductive, crystalline filaments referred to as metal whiskers. The use of such coatings in and around electrical systems presents a risk of electrical shorting. Examples of metal whisker formation are shown with emphasis on optical inspection techniques to improve probability of detection. The failure modes (i.e., electrical shorting behavior) associated with metal whiskers are described. Based on an almost 9- year long study, the benefits of polyurethane conformal coat (namely, Arathane 5750) to protect electrical conductors from whisker-induced short circuit anomalies is discussed.

  4. Life Cost Based FMEA Manual: A Step by Step Guide to Carrying Out a Cost-based Failure Modes and Effects Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, Seung; Spencer, Cherrill; /Stanford U. /SLAC

    2009-01-23

    Failure occurs when one or more of the intended functions of a product are no longer fulfilled to the customer's satisfaction. The most critical product failures are those that escape design reviews and in-house quality inspection and are found by the customer. The product may work for a while until its performance degrades to an unacceptable level or it may have not worked even before customer took possession of the product. The end results of failures which may lead to unsafe conditions or major losses of the main function are rated high in severity. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a tool widely used in the automotive, aerospace, and electronics industries to identify, prioritize, and eliminate known potential failures, problems, and errors from systems under design, before the product is released (Stamatis, 1997). Several industrial FMEA standards such as those published by the Society of Automotive Engineers, US Department of Defense, and the Automotive Industry Action Group employ the Risk Priority Number (RPN) to measure risk and severity of failures. The Risk Priority Number (RPN) is a product of 3 indices: Occurrence (O), Severity (S), and Detection (D). In a traditional FMEA process design engineers typically analyze the 'root cause' and 'end-effects' of potential failures in a sub-system or component and assign penalty points through the O, S, D values to each failure. The analysis is organized around categories called failure modes, which link the causes and effects of failures. A few actions are taken upon completing the FMEA worksheet. The RPN column generally will identify the high-risk areas. The idea of performing FMEA is to eliminate or reduce known and potential failures before they reach the customers. Thus, a plan of action must be in place for the next task. Not all failures can be resolved during the product development cycle, thus prioritization of actions must be made within the design group. One definition of detection

  5. Tools for developing a quality management program: proactive tools (process mapping, value stream mapping, fault tree analysis, and failure mode and effects analysis).

    PubMed

    Rath, Frank

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the concepts of quality management (QM) and quality assurance (QA), as well as the current state of QM and QA practices in radiotherapy. A systematic approach incorporating a series of industrial engineering-based tools is proposed, which can be applied in health care organizations proactively to improve process outcomes, reduce risk and/or improve patient safety, improve through-put, and reduce cost. This tool set includes process mapping and process flowcharting, failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), value stream mapping, and fault tree analysis (FTA). Many health care organizations do not have experience in applying these tools and therefore do not understand how and when to use them. As a result there are many misconceptions about how to use these tools, and they are often incorrectly applied. This article describes these industrial engineering-based tools and also how to use them, when they should be used (and not used), and the intended purposes for their use. In addition the strengths and weaknesses of each of these tools are described, and examples are given to demonstrate the application of these tools in health care settings. PMID:18406925

  6. Tools for Developing a Quality Management Program: Proactive Tools (Process Mapping, Value Stream Mapping, Fault Tree Analysis, and Failure Mode and Effects Analysis)

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, Frank

    2008-05-01

    This article examines the concepts of quality management (QM) and quality assurance (QA), as well as the current state of QM and QA practices in radiotherapy. A systematic approach incorporating a series of industrial engineering-based tools is proposed, which can be applied in health care organizations proactively to improve process outcomes, reduce risk and/or improve patient safety, improve through-put, and reduce cost. This tool set includes process mapping and process flowcharting, failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), value stream mapping, and fault tree analysis (FTA). Many health care organizations do not have experience in applying these tools and therefore do not understand how and when to use them. As a result there are many misconceptions about how to use these tools, and they are often incorrectly applied. This article describes these industrial engineering-based tools and also how to use them, when they should be used (and not used), and the intended purposes for their use. In addition the strengths and weaknesses of each of these tools are described, and examples are given to demonstrate the application of these tools in health care settings.

  7. Study Of The Risks Arising From Natural Disasters And Hazards On Urban And Intercity Motorways By Using Failure Mode Effect Analysis (FMEA) Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DELİCE, Yavuz

    2015-04-01

    Highways, Located in the city and intercity locations are generally prone to many kind of natural disaster risks. Natural hazards and disasters that may occur firstly from highway project making to construction and operation stages and later during the implementation of highway maintenance and repair stages have to be taken into consideration. And assessment of risks that may occur against adverse situations is very important in terms of project design, construction, operation maintenance and repair costs. Making hazard and natural disaster risk analysis is largely depending on the definition of the likelihood of the probable hazards on the highways. However, assets at risk , and the impacts of the events must be examined and to be rated in their own. With the realization of these activities, intended improvements against natural hazards and disasters will be made with the utilization of Failure Mode Effects Analysis (FMEA) method and their effects will be analyzed with further works. FMEA, is a useful method to identify the failure mode and effects depending on the type of failure rate effects priorities and finding the most optimum economic and effective solution. Although relevant measures being taken for the identified risks by this analysis method , it may also provide some information for some public institutions about the nature of these risks when required. Thus, the necessary measures will have been taken in advance in the city and intercity highways. Many hazards and natural disasters are taken into account in risk assessments. The most important of these dangers can be listed as follows; • Natural disasters 1. Meteorological based natural disasters (floods, severe storms, tropical storms, winter storms, avalanches, etc.). 2. Geological based natural disasters (earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, subsidence, sinkholes, etc) • Human originated disasters 1. Transport accidents (traffic accidents), originating from the road surface defects (icing

  8. Equipment Failure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-01-01

    Tennessee Eastman uses NASTRAN to minimize lost production by pinpointing the causes of equipment failures and preventing recurrences. An example of the program's utility involves a large centrifugal fan which developed cracks during start-ups and shutdowns. This information prompted redesign of the fan. Tennessee Eastman has made extensive use of NASTRAN, both as failure analysis tool and as an aid in redesigning production hardware.

  9. An evaluation of mixed-mode delamination failure criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Many different failure criteria have been suggested for mixed mode delamination toughness, but few sets of mixed mode data exist that are consistent over the full mode I opening to mode II shear load range. The mixed mode bending (MMB) test was used to measure the delamination toughness of a brittle epoxy composite, a state of the art toughened epoxy composite, and a tough thermoplastic composite over the full mixed mode range. To gain insight into the different failure responses of the different materials, the delamination fracture surfaces were also examined. An evaluation of several failure criteria which have been reported in the literature was performed, and the range of responses modeled by each criterion was analyzed. A new bilinear failure criterion was analyzed. A new bilinear failure criterion was developed based on a change in the failure mechanism observed from the delamination surfaces. The different criteria were compared to the failure criterion. The failure response of the tough thermoplastic composite could be modeled well with the bilinear criterion but could also be modeled with the more simple linear failure criterion. Since the materials differed in their mixed mode failure response, mixed mode delamination testing will be needed to characterize a composite material. A critical evaluation is provided of the mixed mode failure criteria and should provide general guidance for selecting an appropriate criterion for other materials.

  10. Failure modes of lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culpin, B.; Rand, D. A. J.

    , have been afforded little discussion. Progressive life-limiting factors encountered with flooded-electrolyte batteries are discussed in detail. These are mainly associated with degradation of the positive plate, the negative plate and the separator. The technology of valve-regulated (i.e., immobilized-electrolyte) batteries is still at an early stage compared with that of flooded designs and, consequently, published information on failure modes is very limited. Nevertheless, based on the reports that are available and the authors' own knowledge, it is possible to make estimates of the major and minor causes of failure (note, these will also occur in flooded systems, but with shifted emphasis). Grid corrosion and growth are generally considered to be of major importance. Both negative-plate sulphation and water loss are also of concern, particularly in cycling applications. By contrast, the traditional problems associated mossing and dendritic growth of the active material should be reduced in valve-regulated batteries.

  11. BWR reactor vessel bottom head failure modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Boiling water reactors (BWRs) incorporate many unique structural features that make their expected response under severe accident conditions very different from that predicted in the case of pressurized water reactor accident sequences. The effect of the BWR procedural and structural differences upon the progression of a severe accident sequence during the period preceding movement of core debris into the reactor vessel lower plenum has been discussed previously. It is the purpose of this paper to briefly address the events occurring after debris relocation past the core plate and to describe the subsequent expected modes of bottom head pressure boundary failure. As an example, the calculated timing of events for the unmitigated short-term station blackout severe accident sequence at the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station is also presented. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Global Failure Modes in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauss, W. G.; Gonzalez, Luis

    2001-01-01

    Composite materials provide well-known advantages for space and aeronautical applications in terms of strength and rigidity to weight ratios and other mechanical properties. As a consequence, their use has experienced a constant increase in the past decades and it is anticipated that this trend will be maintained in the near future. At the same time, being these materials relatively new compared to metals, and having failure characteristics completely different from them, their damage growth and their failure mechanisms are not as well understood in a predictive sense. For example, while in metals fracture produces "clean" cracks with their well defined analytically stress fields at the crack tip, composite fracture is a more complex phenomenon. Instead of a crack, we confront a "damage zone" that may include fiber breakage, fiber microbuckling, fiber pullout, matrix cracking, delamination, debonding or any combination of all these different mechanisms. These phenomena are prevalent in any failure process through an aircraft structure, whether one addresses a global failure such as the ripping of a fuselage or wing section, or whether one is concerned with the failure initiation near a thickness change at stringers or other reinforcement. Thus the topic that has been under consideration has wide application in any real structure and is considered an essential contribution to the predictive failure analysis capability for aircraft containing composite components. The heterogeneity and the anisotropy of composites are not only advantageous but essential characteristics, yet these same features provide complex stress fields, especially in the presence of geometrical discontinuities such as notches, holes or cutouts or structural elements such as stiffeners, stringers, etc. To properly address the interaction between a damage/crack front and a hole with a stringer it is imperative that the stress and deformation fields of the former be (sufficiently well) characterized

  13. Application of ISO22000, failure mode, and effect analysis (FMEA) cause and effect diagrams and pareto in conjunction with HACCP and risk assessment for processing of pastry products.

    PubMed

    Varzakas, Theodoros H

    2011-09-01

    The Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) model has been applied for the risk assessment of pastry processing. A tentative approach of FMEA application to the pastry industry was attempted in conjunction with ISO22000. Preliminary Hazard Analysis was used to analyze and predict the occurring failure modes in a food chain system (pastry processing plant), based on the functions, characteristics, and/or interactions of the ingredients or the processes, upon which the system depends. Critical Control points have been identified and implemented in the cause and effect diagram (also known as Ishikawa, tree diagram, and fishbone diagram). In this work a comparison of ISO22000 analysis with HACCP is carried out over pastry processing and packaging. However, the main emphasis was put on the quantification of risk assessment by determining the Risk Priority Number (RPN) per identified processing hazard. Storage of raw materials and storage of final products at -18°C followed by freezing were the processes identified as the ones with the highest RPN (225, 225, and 144 respectively) and corrective actions were undertaken. Following the application of corrective actions, a second calculation of RPN values was carried out leading to considerably lower values (below the upper acceptable limit of 130). It is noteworthy that the application of Ishikawa (Cause and Effect or Tree diagram) led to converging results thus corroborating the validity of conclusions derived from risk assessment and FMEA. Therefore, the incorporation of FMEA analysis within the ISO22000 system of a pastry processing industry is considered imperative. PMID:21838557

  14. Gearbox Typical Failure Modes, Detection, and Mitigation Methods (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, S.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation was given at the AWEA Operations & Maintenance and Safety Seminar and focused on what the typical gearbox failure modes are, how to detect them using detection techniques, and strategies that help mitigate these failures.

  15. Failure modes of Y-TZP abutments with external hex implant-abutment connection determined by fractographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Basílio, Mariana de Almeida; Delben, Juliana Aparecida; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Rizkalla, Amin Sami; Santos Junior, Gildo Coelho; Arioli Filho, João Neudenir

    2016-07-01

    Yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP) was introduced as ceramic implant abutments due to its excellent mechanical properties. However, the damage patterns for Y-TZP abutments are limited in the literature. Fractographic analyses can provide insights as to the failure origin and related mechanisms. The purpose of this study was to analyze fractured Y-TZP abutments to establish fractographic patterns and then possible reasons for failure. Thirty two prefabricated Y-TZP abutments on external hex implants were retrieved from a single-load-to failure test according to the ISO 14801. Fractographic analyses were conducted under polarized-light estereo and scanning electro microscopy. The predominant fracture pattern was abutment fracture at the connecting region. Classic fractographic features such as arrest lines, hackle, and twist hackle established that failure started where Y-TZP abutments were in contact with the retention screw edges. The abutment screw design and the loading point were the reasons for localized stress concentration and fracture patterns. PMID:26807772

  16. Applicability of NASA contract quality management and failure mode effect analysis procedures to the USGS Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas lease management program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, M. K.; Little, D. G.; Hoard, E. G.; Taylor, A. C.; Campbell, R.

    1972-01-01

    An approach that might be used for determining the applicability of NASA management techniques to benefit almost any type of down-to-earth enterprise is presented. A study was made to determine the following: (1) the practicality of adopting NASA contractual quality management techniques to the U.S. Geological Survey Outer Continental Shelf lease management function; (2) the applicability of failure mode effects analysis to the drilling, production, and delivery systems in use offshore; (3) the impact on industrial offshore operations and onshore management operations required to apply recommended NASA techniques; and (4) the probable changes required in laws or regulations in order to implement recommendations. Several management activities that have been applied to space programs are identified, and their institution for improved management of offshore and onshore oil and gas operations is recommended.

  17. Integration of Value Stream Map and Healthcare Failure Mode and Effect Analysis into Six Sigma Methodology to Improve Process of Surgical Specimen Handling.

    PubMed

    Hung, Sheng-Hui; Wang, Pa-Chun; Lin, Hung-Chun; Chen, Hung-Ying; Su, Chao-Ton

    2015-01-01

    Specimen handling is a critical patient safety issue. Problematic handling process, such as misidentification (of patients, surgical site, and specimen counts), specimen loss, or improper specimen preparation can lead to serious patient harms and lawsuits. Value stream map (VSM) is a tool used to find out non-value-added works, enhance the quality, and reduce the cost of the studied process. On the other hand, healthcare failure mode and effect analysis (HFMEA) is now frequently employed to avoid possible medication errors in healthcare process. Both of them have a goal similar to Six Sigma methodology for process improvement. This study proposes a model that integrates VSM and HFMEA into the framework, which mainly consists of define, measure, analyze, improve, and control (DMAIC), of Six Sigma. A Six Sigma project for improving the process of surgical specimen handling in a hospital was conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed model. PMID:26753440

  18. Probability of pipe fracture in the primary coolant loop of a PWR plant. Volume 6: failure mode analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Streit, R.D.

    1981-09-01

    Material properties and failure criteria were evaluated to assess the requirements for double-ended guillotine break in the primary coolant loop of the Zion Unit 1 pressurized water reactor. The properties of the 316 stainless steel piping materials were obtained from the literature. Statistical distributions of both the tensile and fracture properties at room and operating temperatures were developed. Yield and ultimate strength tensile properties were combined to estimate the material flow strength. The flow strength and fracture properties were used in the various failure models analyzed. Linear-elastic, elastic-plastic, and fully plastic fracture models were compared, and the governing fracture criterion was determined. For the particular case studied, the fully plastic flow requirement was found to be the controlling fracture criterion leading to a double-ended guillotine pipe break.

  19. Failure Analysis for Improved Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sood, Bhanu

    2016-01-01

    Outline: Section 1 - What is reliability and root cause? Section 2 - Overview of failure mechanisms. Section 3 - Failure analysis techniques (1. Non destructive analysis techniques, 2. Destructive Analysis, 3. Materials Characterization). Section 4 - Summary and Closure

  20. CSM RCS Design Considerations and Failure Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Objectives include: a) Define major Command and Service Module (CSM) design considerations; b) List Command Module (CM) RCS failures and lessons learned; and c) List Service Module (SM) RCS failures and lessons learned.

  1. Decomposition-Based Failure Mode Identification Method for Risk-Free Design of Large Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Irem Y.; Stone, Robert B.; Roberts, Rory A.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    When designing products, it is crucial to assure failure and risk-free operation in the intended operating environment. Failures are typically studied and eliminated as much as possible during the early stages of design. The few failures that go undetected result in unacceptable damage and losses in high-risk applications where public safety is of concern. Published NASA and NTSB accident reports point to a variety of components identified as sources of failures in the reported cases. In previous work, data from these reports were processed and placed in matrix form for all the system components and failure modes encountered, and then manipulated using matrix methods to determine similarities between the different components and failure modes. In this paper, these matrices are represented in the form of a linear combination of failures modes, mathematically formed using Principal Components Analysis (PCA) decomposition. The PCA decomposition results in a low-dimensionality representation of all failure modes and components of interest, represented in a transformed coordinate system. Such a representation opens the way for efficient pattern analysis and prediction of failure modes with highest potential risks on the final product, rather than making decisions based on the large space of component and failure mode data. The mathematics of the proposed method are explained first using a simple example problem. The method is then applied to component failure data gathered from helicopter, accident reports to demonstrate its potential.

  2. SU-C-BRD-02: A Team Focused Clinical Implementation and Failure Mode and Effects Analysis of HDR Skin Brachytherapy Using Valencia and Leipzig Surface Applicators

    SciTech Connect

    Sayler, E; Harrison, A; Eldredge-Hindy, H; Dinome, J; Munro, S; Anne, R; Comber, E; Lockamy, V

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: and Leipzig applicators (VLAs) are single-channel brachytherapy surface applicators used to treat skin lesions up to 2cm diameter. Source dwell times can be calculated and entered manually after clinical set-up or ultrasound. This procedure differs dramatically from CT-based planning; the novelty and unfamiliarity could lead to severe errors. To build layers of safety and ensure quality, a multidisciplinary team created a protocol and applied Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) to the clinical procedure for HDR VLA skin treatments. Methods: team including physicists, physicians, nurses, therapists, residents, and administration developed a clinical procedure for VLA treatment. The procedure was evaluated using FMEA. Failure modes were identified and scored by severity, occurrence, and detection. The clinical procedure was revised to address high-scoring process nodes. Results: Several key components were added to the clinical procedure to minimize risk probability numbers (RPN): -Treatments are reviewed at weekly QA rounds, where physicians discuss diagnosis, prescription, applicator selection, and set-up. Peer review reduces the likelihood of an inappropriate treatment regime. -A template for HDR skin treatments was established in the clinical EMR system to standardize treatment instructions. This reduces the chances of miscommunication between the physician and planning physicist, and increases the detectability of an error during the physics second check. -A screen check was implemented during the second check to increase detectability of an error. -To reduce error probability, the treatment plan worksheet was designed to display plan parameters in a format visually similar to the treatment console display. This facilitates data entry and verification. -VLAs are color-coded and labeled to match the EMR prescriptions, which simplifies in-room selection and verification. Conclusion: Multidisciplinary planning and FMEA increased delectability and

  3. Failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of the ICS/NNI electric power distribution circuitry at the Oconee 1 Nuclear Plant. [Integrated control system/nonnuclear instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, A.F.; Mayo, C.W.; Battle, R.E.

    1985-10-01

    The effects of nonnuclear instrumentation (NNI) and integrated control system (ICS) electric power supply failures have been analyzed for the Oconee Unit 1 nuclear plant. The instrument and control system power distribution circuits were analyzed to define a comprehensive set of 19 single-point failure modes. For each power supply failure, the failed and operating control system signal inputs were propagated through the partially energized control system circuits as well as the energized and deenergized output control devices to evaluate the initial plant response. In addition, the effects of the power supply failures on the principal control room parameter displays were combined with the initial plant response to the automatic control circuits to evaluate possible control room operator response. Plant responses to the defined power supply failures are described in detail.

  4. Light water reactor lower head failure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L.

    1993-10-01

    This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response.

  5. Wind Turbine Gearbox Failure Modes - A Brief (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, S.; McDade, M.; Errichello, R.

    2011-10-01

    Wind turbine gearboxes are not always meeting 20-year design life. Premature failure of gearboxes increases cost of energy, turbine downtime, unplanned maintenance, gearbox replacement and rebuild, and increased warranty reserves. The problem is widespread, affects most Original Equipment Manufacturers, and is not caused by manufacturing practices. There is a need to improve gearbox reliability and reduce turbine downtime. The topics of this presentation are: GRC (Gearbox Reliability Collaborative) technical approach; Gearbox failure database; Recorded incidents summary; Top failure modes for bearings; Top failure modes for gears; GRC test gearbox; Bearing nomenclature; Test history; Real damage; Gear sets; Bearings; Observations; and Summary. 5 refs.

  6. Weighted Fuzzy Risk Priority Number Evaluation of Turbine and Compressor Blades Considering Failure Mode Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Luping; Li, Yan-Feng; Zhu, Shun-Peng; Yang, Yuan-Jian; Huang, Hong-Zhong

    2014-06-01

    Failure mode, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA) and Fault tree analysis (FTA) are powerful tools to evaluate reliability of systems. Although single failure mode issue can be efficiently addressed by traditional FMECA, multiple failure modes and component correlations in complex systems cannot be effectively evaluated. In addition, correlated variables and parameters are often assumed to be precisely known in quantitative analysis. In fact, due to the lack of information, epistemic uncertainty commonly exists in engineering design. To solve these problems, the advantages of FMECA, FTA, fuzzy theory, and Copula theory are integrated into a unified hybrid method called fuzzy probability weighted geometric mean (FPWGM) risk priority number (RPN) method. The epistemic uncertainty of risk variables and parameters are characterized by fuzzy number to obtain fuzzy weighted geometric mean (FWGM) RPN for single failure mode. Multiple failure modes are connected using minimum cut sets (MCS), and Boolean logic is used to combine fuzzy risk priority number (FRPN) of each MCS. Moreover, Copula theory is applied to analyze the correlation of multiple failure modes in order to derive the failure probabilities of each MCS. Compared to the case where dependency among multiple failure modes is not considered, the Copula modeling approach eliminates the error of reliability analysis. Furthermore, for purpose of quantitative analysis, probabilities importance weight from failure probabilities are assigned to FWGM RPN to reassess the risk priority, which generalize the definition of probability weight and FRPN, resulting in a more accurate estimation than that of the traditional models. Finally, a basic fatigue analysis case drawn from turbine and compressor blades in aeroengine is used to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the presented method. The result provides some important insights on fatigue reliability analysis and risk priority assessment of structural

  7. An efficient scan diagnosis methodology according to scan failure mode for yield enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Tae; Seo, Nam-Sik; Oh, Ghil-Geun; Kim, Dae-Gue; Lee, Kyu-Taek; Choi, Chi-Young; Kim, InSoo; Min, Hyoung Bok

    2008-12-01

    Yield has always been a driving consideration during fabrication of modern semiconductor industry. Statistically, the largest portion of wafer yield loss is defective scan failure. This paper presents efficient failure analysis methods for initial yield ramp up and ongoing product with scan diagnosis. Result of our analysis shows that more than 60% of the scan failure dies fall into the category of shift mode in the very deep submicron (VDSM) devices. However, localization of scan shift mode failure is very difficult in comparison to capture mode failure because it is caused by the malfunction of scan chain. Addressing the biggest challenge, we propose the most suitable analysis method according to scan failure mode (capture / shift) for yield enhancement. In the event of capture failure mode, this paper describes the method that integrates scan diagnosis flow and backside probing technology to obtain more accurate candidates. We also describe several unique techniques, such as bulk back-grinding solution, efficient backside probing and signal analysis method. Lastly, we introduce blocked chain analysis algorithm for efficient analysis of shift failure mode. In this paper, we contribute to enhancement of the yield as a result of the combination of two methods. We confirm the failure candidates with physical failure analysis (PFA) method. The direct feedback of the defective visualization is useful to mass-produce devices in a shorter time. The experimental data on mass products show that our method produces average reduction by 13.7% in defective SCAN & SRAM-BIST failure rates and by 18.2% in wafer yield rates.

  8. Safety Management of a Clinical Process Using Failure Mode and Effect Analysis: Continuous Renal Replacement Therapies in Intensive Care Unit Patients.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Izquierdo-Riera, Jose Angel; Molano-Alvarez, Esteban; Saez-de la Fuente, Ignacio; Maynar-Moliner, Javier; Marín-Mateos, Helena; Chacón-Alves, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) may improve the safety of the continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT) in the intensive care unit. We use this tool in three phases: 1) Retrospective observational study. 2) A process FMEA, with implementation of the improvement measures identified. 3) Cohort study after FMEA. We included 54 patients in the pre-FMEA group and 72 patients in the post-FMEA group. Comparing the risks frequencies per patient in both groups, we got less cases of under 24 hours of filter survival time in the post-FMEA group (31 patients 57.4% vs. 21 patients 29.6%; p < 0.05); less patients suffered circuit coagulation with inability to return the blood to the patient (25 patients [46.3%] vs. 16 patients [22.2%]; p < 0.05); 54 patients (100%) versus 5 (6.94%) did not get phosphorus levels monitoring (p < 0.05); in 14 patients (25.9%) versus 0 (0%), the CRRT prescription did not appear on medical orders. As a measure of improvement, we adopt a dynamic dosage management. After the process FMEA, there were several improvements in the management of intensive care unit patients receiving CRRT, and we consider it a useful tool for improving the safety of critically ill patients. PMID:26418206

  9. Failure analysis of surface-micromachined microengines

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.A.; Tangyunyong, P.; Pimentel, A.A.

    1998-11-01

    Microelectronic failure analysis (FA) has been an integral part of the development of state-of-the-art integrated circuits. FA of MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) is moving from its infancy stage to assume an important role in the successful design, fabrication, performance and reliability analysis for this new technology. In previous work, the authors focused on the application of several techniques developed for integrated circuit analysis to an earlier version of a surface micromachined microengine fabricated at Sandia. Recently, they have identified important new failure modes in binary counters that incorporate a newer design of the microengine, using a subset of integrated circuit failure analysis techniques including optical microscopy, focused ion beam (FIB) techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The primary failure mode they have identified is directly related to visible wear on bearing surfaces. In this paper, they describe in detail the characteristics of the failure modes in binary counters. They also compare the failure characteristics with those of an earlier version of the microengine.

  10. Failure Modes Experienced on Spacecraft Nicd Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, S.

    1985-01-01

    A review was made of failures and irregularities experienced on nickel cadmium batteries for 31 spacecraft. Only rarely did batteries fail completely. In many cases, poorly performing batteries were compensated for by a reduction in loads or by continuing to operate in spite of out-of-voltage conditions. Low discharge voltage was the most common problem observed in flight spacecraft (42%). Spacecraft batteries are often designed to protect against cell shorts, but cell shorts accounted for only 16% of the failures. Other causes of problems were high charge voltage (16%), battery problems caused by other elements of the spacecraft (10%), and open circuit failures (6%). Problems of miscellaneous or unknown causes occurred in 10% of the cases.

  11. Microstructural modeling of heterogeneous failure modes in martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatem, Tarek Moustafa

    A three-dimensional multiple-slip dislocation-density-based crystalline formulation, specialized finite-element formulations, predictive failure models, and infinity-power integrable function based Voronoi tessellations adapted to martensitic orientations, were used to investigate large strain inelastic deformation, dislocation-density evolution in martensitic transformation, and heterogeneous failure modes in martensitic microstructures. The formulation is based on accounting for variant morphologies and orientations, secondary phases, such as retained austenite and inclusions, and initial dislocations-densities that are uniquely inherent to martensitic microstructures. The computational framework and the constitutive formulation were validated with experimental results for 10% Ni high-strength steel alloy. Furthermore, the formulation was used to investigate microstructures mapped directly from SEM/EBSD images of martensitic steel alloys. The interrelated effects of microstructural characteristics, such as parent austenite orientation, variants distribution and arrangement, retained austenite, inclusions, initial dislocation-density, and defects, such as microcracks, and microvoids, were investigated for different failure modes such as rupture, transgranular and intergranular fracture, and shear localization over a broad spectrum of loading conditions that range from quasi-static to high strain-rate conditions. The computational predictions, consistent with experimental observations, indicated that variant morphology and orientations have a direct consequence on how shear-strain accumulation and failure evolves in martensitic microstructures subjected to quasi-static and high strain-rate loading conditions. The analysis shows that shear-strain localization occurs due to slip-system compatibilities corresponding to low-angle blocks boundaries, the loading direction and the long direction of laths, which result in shear-pipes. At specific triple junctions, rotation

  12. Circuit breaker operation and potential failure modes during an earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, H.E.; Budnitz, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    This study addresses the effect of a strong-motion earthquake on circuit breaker operation. It focuses on the loss of offsite power (LOSP) transient caused by a strong-motion earthquake at the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. This paper also describes the operator action necessary to prevent core melt if the above circuit breaker failure modes occur simultaneously on three 4.16 KV buses. Numerous circuit breakers important to plant safety, such as circuit breakers to diesel generators and engineered safety systems (ESS), must open and/or close during this transient while strong motion is occurring. Potential seismically-induced circuit-breaker failures modes were uncovered while the study was conducted. These failure modes include: circuit breaker fails to close; circuit breaker trips inadvertently; circuit breaker fails to reclose after trip. The causes of these failure modes include: Relay chatter causes the circuit breaker to trip; Relay chatter causes anti-pumping relays to seal-in which prevents automatic closure of circuit breakers; Load sequencer failures. The incorporation of these failure modes as well as other instrumentation and control failures into a limited scope seismic probabilistic risk assessment is also discussed in this paper.

  13. Failure analysis of aluminum alloy components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johari, O.; Corvin, I.; Staschke, J.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of six service failures in aluminum alloy components which failed in aerospace applications is reported. Identification of fracture surface features from fatigue and overload modes was straightforward, though the specimens were not always in a clean, smear-free condition most suitable for failure analysis. The presence of corrosion products and of chemically attacked or mechanically rubbed areas here hindered precise determination of the cause of crack initiation, which was then indirectly inferred from the scanning electron fractography results. In five failures the crack propagation was by fatigue, though in each case the fatigue crack initiated from a different cause. Some of these causes could be eliminated in future components by better process control. In one failure, the cause was determined to be impact during a crash; the features of impact fracture were distinguished from overload fractures by direct comparisons of the received specimens with laboratory-generated failures.

  14. Failure modes for pipelines in landslide areas

    SciTech Connect

    Bruschi, R.; Spinazze, M.; Tomassini, D.; Cuscuna, S.; Venzi, S.

    1995-12-31

    In recent years a number of incidences of pipelines affected by slow soil movements have been reported in the relevant literature. Further related issues such as soil-pipe interaction have been studied both theoretically and through experimental surveys, along with the environmental conditions which are responsible for hazard to the pipeline integrity. A suitable design criteria under these circumstances has been discussed by several authors, in particular in relation to a limit state approach and hence a strain based criteria. The scope of this paper is to describe the failure mechanisms which may affect the pipeline in the presence of slow soil movements impacting on the pipeline, both in the longitudinal and transverse direction. Particular attention is paid to environmental, geometric and structural parameters which steer the process towards one or other failure mechanism. Criteria for deciding upon remedial measures required to guarantee the structural integrity of the pipeline, both in the short and in the long term, are discussed.

  15. Ignition Failure Mode Radiochemical Diagnostics Initial Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Fortner, R; Bernstein, L; Cerjan, C; Haan, S W; Harding, R; Hatchett, S; Hoffman, R; Koch, J; Moody, K; Schneider, D; Stoyer, M; Werner, C; Zimmerman, G

    2007-04-20

    Radiochemical diagnostic signatures are well known to be effective indicators of nuclear ignition and burn reaction conditions. Nuclear activation is already a reliable technique to measure yield. More comprehensively, though, important quantities such as fuel areal density and ion temperature might be separately and more precisely monitored by a judicious choice of select nuclear reactions. This report details an initial assessment of this approach to diagnosing ignition failures on point-design cryogenic National Ignition Campaign targets. Using newly generated nuclear reaction cross section data for Scandium and Iridium, modest uniform doping of the innermost ablator region provides clearly observable reaction product differences between robust burn and failure for either element. Both equatorial and polar tracer loading yield observable, but indistinguishable, signatures for either choice of element for the preliminary cases studied.

  16. Predicting Modes and Displacements of Seismic Rock Slope Failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, M. D.; Wartman, J.; Keefer, D. K.; Maclaughlin, M.; Arnold, L.; Applegate, K. N.; Smith, S.; Adams, S.

    2013-12-01

    Seismically induced rock slope failures have resulted in billions of dollars of economic damage and enormous loss of life throughout the world. Accurate prediction of the triggering and run out of these failures is elusive for a variety of reasons, including knowledge of the physical modes of failure. Our research explores the potential failure modes of an idealized rigid rock block and expands the modes typically considered to include not only sliding but also toppling (pure forward rotation) and slumping (combined backward rotation and translation). The yield acceleration (or minimum inertial acceleration to cause block movement) for slumping, similar to toppling, is found to be lower than for pure translational sliding. These yield accelerations indicate the initial modes of rock block failure; however, they do not always predict the ultimate failure mode. To predict the final failure modes, the results of discrete element numerical analyses were compared to pseudo static yield acceleration to develop a seismic failure mode decision-making chart based on block geometry and interface friction. With regard to seismic displacement predictions, current simplified models predicting ultimate displacement of a mass under seismic conditions are limited to purely translating, sliding blocks (i.e. Newmark's sliding block method). Our modeling introduces additional simplified analyses to predict ultimate displacement in toppling and slumping modes as well. Important findings from these new methods are that the magnitude of seismically-induced displacement is dependent on the size of the block (or failure mass) and that as the yield acceleration decreases the seismically induced displacements increase. We plan to map these tools into analyses that evaluate rock slope systems with complex geology and geotechnical characteristics. It is envisioned that the decision chart, which predicts the initial and ultimate modes of failure based on block geometry and interface friction

  17. Brittle failure mode plots for compressional and extensional tectonic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, Richard H.

    1998-05-01

    Equations governing different macroscopic modes of brittle rock failure (extensional fracturing, extensional-shear fracturing, compressional shear failure and reshear of existing faults) can be represented on plots of differential stress vs effective vertical stress for a set of material properties. Such plots can be constructed for different tectonic regimes and correlated to depth for particular fluid pressure conditions, allowing easy evaluation of the physical controls on brittle rock failure, and ready comparison of the fields occupied by the three failure modes in different tectonic settings. They emphasize the relative ease, in terms of differential stress and fluid-pressure levels, of deforming a rock mass by brittle fracturing and faulting in extensional regimes compared with compressional. Aside from their relevance to general structural mechanics, these generic failure plots have wide-ranging application to understanding the initial development and progressive evolution of fault-fracture systems, both in sedimentary basins and as hosting structures for hydrothermal mineralization in different tectonic settings.

  18. Failure Environment Analysis Tool (FEAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawler, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form on the Failure Environment Analysis Tool (FEAT), a tool designed to demonstrate advanced modeling and analysis techniques to better understand and capture the flow of failures within and between elements of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) and other large complex systems. Topics covered include objectives, development background, the technical approach, SSF baseline integration, and FEAT growth and evolution.

  19. Failure modes and materials design for biomechanical layer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yan

    Ceramic materials are finding increasing usage in the area of biomechanical replacements---dental crowns, hip and bone implants, etc.---where strength, wear resistance, biocompatibility, chemical durability and even aesthetics are critical issues. Aesthetic ceramic crowns have been widely used in dentistry to replace damaged or missing teeth. However, the failure rates of ceramic crowns, especially all-ceramic crowns, can be 1%˜6% per year, which is not satisfactory to patients. The materials limitations and underlying fracture mechanisms of these prostheses are not well understood. In this thesis, fundamental fracture and damage mechanisms in model dental bilayer and trilayer structures are studied. Principle failure modes are identified from in situ experimentation and confirmed by fracture mechanics analysis. In bilayer structures of ceramic/polycarbonate (representative of ceramic crown/dentin structure), three major damage sources are identified: (i) top-surface cone cracks or (ii) quasiplasticity, dominating in thick ceramic bilayers; (iii) bottom-surface radial cracks, dominating in thin ceramic bilayers. Critical load P for each damage mode are measured in six dental ceramics: Y-TZP zirconia, glass-infiltrated zirconia and alumina (InCeram), glass-ceramic (Empress II), Porcelain (Mark II and Empress) bonded to polymer substrates, as a function of ceramic thickness d in the range of 100 mum to 10 mm. P is found independent of d for mode (i) and (ii), but has a d 2 relations for mode (iii)---bottom surface radial cracking. In trilayer structures of glass/core-ceramic/polycarbonate (representing veneer porcelain/core/dentin structures), three inner fracture origins are identified: radial cracks from the bottom surface in the (i) first and (ii) second layers; and (iii) quasiplasticity in core-ceramic layer. The role of relative veneer/core thickness, d1/d 2 and materials properties is investigated for three core materials with different modulus (114--270GPa

  20. Influence of crosshead speed on failure load and failure mode of restored maxillary premolars.

    PubMed

    Naves, Lucas Zago; Silva, Gisele Rodrigues da; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Costa, Ana Rosa; Valdivia, Andréa Dolores Correia Miranda; Soares, Carlos José

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the effect of the crosshead speed of an applied load on failure load and failure mode of restored human premolars. Fifty intact, noncarious human premolars were selected. Class II mesio-occlusodistal preparations were made with a water-cooled high-speed preparation machine, and the teeth were restored with composite resin. The specimens were divided into five groups (n = 10 each) and tested individually in a mechanical testing machine, in which a 6.0-mm-diameter steel cylinder was mounted to vary the crosshead speed: v0.5: 0.5 mm/min; v1: 1.0 mm/min; v2.5: 2.5 mm/min; v5: 5.0 mm/min; and v10: 10.0 mm/min. The cylinder contacted the facial and lingual ridges beyond the margins of the restorations. Peak load to fracture was measured for each specimen (N). The means were calculated and analyzed with one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test (a = 0.05). The mean load at failure values were (N) as follows: v0.5, 769.4 ± 174.8; v1, 645.2 ± 115.7; v5, 614.3 ± 126.0; v2.5, 609.2 ± 208.1; and v10, 432.5 ± 136.9. The fracture modes were recorded on the basis of the degree of the tooth structural and restorative damage: (I) fracture of the restoration involving a small portion of the tooth; (II) fractures involving the coronal portion of the tooth with cohesive failure of the composite resin; (III) oblique tooth and restoration fracture with periodontal involvement; and (IV) vertical root and coronal fracture. Varying crosshead speeds of 0.5-5.0 mm/min did not influence the failure load of restored maxillary premolars; however, increasing the crosshead speed to 10 mm/min decreased the failure load values and the degree of tooth structural damage. PMID:26676190

  1. Automated failure mode effects and criticality analyses for reliability prediction of multibody mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Alex Chih-Chien

    Reliability is important to ensure both serviceability and safety of a mechanical system. A method for simulation-based Failure Mode Effects and Criticality Analysis (FMECA) for reliability prediction of mechanical systems is presented. This approach integrates recursive formulation for dynamic analysis, failure criteria for failure determination, graphics techniques for collision detection, and new techniques for modifying dynamics model during the simulation. The automated FMECA method developed consists of three libraries and a graphics collision detection technique. First, a library of mechanical failure modes is created using cause-effect relationships for mechanical failure modes. Second, a library of component failure criteria is constructed by collecting different material test data. Third, a library of simulation algorithms and supporting techniques is built by developing simulation technologies to perform FMECA for mechanical failure modes. In addition, the automated FMECA method uses the developed graphics software VDS for collision detection. Finally, this approach is used to investigate the consequences of four failure modes of a vehicle system. The difficulty in formulating mathematical expressions for a damaged mechanical system is resolved by manipulating the number of cut joint constraints and generalized coordinates to implicitly update the original system topology. Formulations for virtual joints are derived, as well as other new techniques to permit multiple failures during a dynamic simulation. A near-minimum set of generalized coordinates is thus retained throughout the dynamic simulation. Four general-purpose dynamics codes are implemented and effects of four mechanical failure modes of a mechanical system are investigated; suspension failure, joint degradation and breakage, joint stiction, and component yielding and breakage. Failure histories as well as Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF) and Mean Time To Failure (MTTF) are obtained. The

  2. BIOASSAY VESSEL FAILURE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Vormelker, P

    2008-09-22

    Two high-pressure bioassay vessels failed at the Savannah River Site during a microwave heating process for biosample testing. Improper installation of the thermal shield in the first failure caused the vessel to burst during microwave heating. The second vessel failure is attributed to overpressurization during a test run. Vessel failure appeared to initiate in the mold parting line, the thinnest cross-section of the octagonal vessel. No material flaws were found in the vessel that would impair its structural performance. Content weight should be minimized to reduce operating temperature and pressure. Outer vessel life is dependent on actual temperature exposure. Since thermal aging of the vessels can be detrimental to their performance, it was recommended that the vessels be used for a limited number of cycles to be determined by additional testing.

  3. Failure analysis of high performance ballistic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spatola, Jennifer S.

    High performance fibers have a high tensile strength and modulus, good wear resistance, and a low density, making them ideal for applications in ballistic impact resistance, such as body armor. However, the observed ballistic performance of these fibers is much lower than the predicted values. Since the predictions assume only tensile stress failure, it is safe to assume that the stress state is affecting fiber performance. The purpose of this research was to determine if there are failure mode changes in the fiber fracture when transversely loaded by indenters of different shapes. An experimental design mimicking transverse impact was used to determine any such effects. Three different indenters were used: round, FSP, and razor blade. The indenter height was changed to change the angle of failure tested. Five high performance fibers were examined: KevlarRTM KM2, SpectraRTM 130d, DyneemaRTM SK-62 and SK-76, and ZylonRTM 555. Failed fibers were analyzed using an SEM to determine failure mechanisms. The results show that the round and razor blade indenters produced a constant failure strain, as well as failure mechanisms independent of testing angle. The FSP indenter produced a decrease in failure strain as the angle increased. Fibrillation was the dominant failure mechanism at all angles for the round indenter, while through thickness shearing was the failure mechanism for the razor blade. The FSP indenter showed a transition from fibrillation at low angles to through thickness shearing at high angles, indicating that the round and razor blade indenters are extreme cases of the FSP indenter. The failure mechanisms observed with the FSP indenter at various angles correlated with the experimental strain data obtained during fiber testing. This indicates that geometry of the indenter tip in compression is a contributing factor in lowering the failure strain of the high performance fibers. TEM analysis of the fiber failure mechanisms was also attempted, though without

  4. Recent performance, lifetime, and failure modes of the 5045 klystron population at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, R.F.; Lee, T.G.; Pearson, C.; Vlieks, A.E.

    1992-08-01

    The 65 MW S-Band klystrons (5045) used to power SLC have been in service for over seven years. Currently, 244 of these tubes are in place on the accelerator, operating full power at 120 pulses per second. Enough tubes have now reached end of life, or experienced other failures to allow a good analysis of failure modes, and to project average lifetime for this type of tube. This paper describes the various modes of failure seen in klystrons rammed from SLC service, and provides data on expected lifetime from current production based on accumulated SLC operating experience.

  5. Effects of Failure Modes on Strength of Aluminum Resistance Spot Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Davies, Richard W.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Spinella, Donald J.

    2005-04-01

    This paper examines the effects of failure modes on the static strength and total energy absorption of aluminum spot-welded samples using experimental, statistical, and analytical approaches. The main failure modes for aluminum spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Two populations of aluminum spot welds were studied. Within each population, coupon configurations of lap shear, cross tension and coach peel were considered. Thirty replicate static strength tests were performed for each coupon configuration. The resulted peak load and energy absorption level associated with each failure mode was studied using statistical models. Next, an analytical model was developed to determine the failure mode of an aluminum resistance spot weld based on stress analysis. It is found that weld size, sheet thickness, and level of weld porosity and defects are the main factors determining the cross tension failure mode for an aluminum spot weld. The peak load and energy absorption levels for the cross tension and coach peel samples tested are found not to be very sensitive to the failure modes under static loading.

  6. Risk assessment of failure modes of gas diffuser liner of V94.2 siemens gas turbine by FMEA method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaei Rafsanjani, H.; Rezaei Nasab, A.

    2012-05-01

    Failure of welding connection of gas diffuser liner and exhaust casing is one of the failure modes of V94.2 gas turbines which are happened in some power plants. This defect is one of the uncertainties of customers when they want to accept the final commissioning of this product. According to this, the risk priority of this failure evaluated by failure modes and effect analysis (FMEA) method to find out whether this failure is catastrophic for turbine performance and is harmful for humans. By using history of 110 gas turbines of this model which are used in some power plants, the severity number, occurrence number and detection number of failure determined and consequently the Risk Priority Number (RPN) of failure determined. Finally, critically matrix of potential failures is created and illustrated that failure modes are located in safe zone.

  7. Microcircuit failure analysis using the SEM. [Scanning Electron Microscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolas, D. P.

    1974-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope adds a new dimension to the knowledge that can be obtained from a failed microcircuit. When used with conventional techniques, SEM assists and clarifies the analysis, but it does not replace light microscopy. The most advantageous features for microcircuit analysis are long working distances and great depth of field. Manufacturer related failure modes of microcircuits are metallization defects, poor bonding, surface and particle contamination, and design and fabrication faults. User related failure modes are caused by abuse, such as overstress. The Physics of Failure Procedure followed by the Astrionics Laboratory in failure analysis is described, which is designed to obtain maximum information available from each step.

  8. Transition among failure modes of the bending system with a stiff film on a soft substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Longchao; Huang, Yin; Chen, Hang; Feng, Xue; Fang, Daining

    2015-01-12

    Growing interest is being attracted by stretchable and flexible electronics recently due to their attractive characteristics, commercial potentials, and engineering challenges. In comparison with the system on a macroscopic scale, different failure modes are observed in a system with a thin film bonded on an elastomeric substrate. Furthermore, the experimental observations reveal that failure modes occur in turn with the increasing of thickness ratio of the film to substrate. In this paper, theoretical analysis is performed on the failure mechanism in this system with the focus on transitions among these failure modes based on the theory of fracture mechanics. The present theoretical predictions are coincident with related experiment results and can be used to guide the related structural design.

  9. Failure environment analysis tool applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, Ginger L.; Wadsworth, David B.

    1993-01-01

    Understanding risks and avoiding failure are daily concerns for the women and men of NASA. Although NASA's mission propels us to push the limits of technology, and though the risks are considerable, the NASA community has instilled within, the determination to preserve the integrity of the systems upon which our mission and, our employees lives and well-being depend. One of the ways this is being done is by expanding and improving the tools used to perform risk assessment. The Failure Environment Analysis Tool (FEAT) was developed to help engineers and analysts more thoroughly and reliably conduct risk assessment and failure analysis. FEAT accomplishes this by providing answers to questions regarding what might have caused a particular failure; or, conversely, what effect the occurrence of a failure might have on an entire system. Additionally, FEAT can determine what common causes could have resulted in other combinations of failures. FEAT will even help determine the vulnerability of a system to failures, in light of reduced capability. FEAT also is useful in training personnel who must develop an understanding of particular systems. FEAT facilitates training on system behavior, by providing an automated environment in which to conduct 'what-if' evaluation. These types of analyses make FEAT a valuable tool for engineers and operations personnel in the design, analysis, and operation of NASA space systems.

  10. Failure environment analysis tool applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, Ginger L.; Wadsworth, David B.

    1994-01-01

    Understanding risks and avoiding failure are daily concerns for the women and men of NASA. Although NASA's mission propels us to push the limits of technology, and though the risks are considerable, the NASA community has instilled within it, the determination to preserve the integrity of the systems upon which our mission and, our employees lives and well-being depend. One of the ways this is being done is by expanding and improving the tools used to perform risk assessment. The Failure Environment Analysis Tool (FEAT) was developed to help engineers and analysts more thoroughly and reliably conduct risk assessment and failure analysis. FEAT accomplishes this by providing answers to questions regarding what might have caused a particular failure; or, conversely, what effect the occurrence of a failure might have on an entire system. Additionally, FEAT can determine what common causes could have resulted in other combinations of failures. FEAT will even help determine the vulnerability of a system to failures, in light of reduced capability. FEAT also is useful in training personnel who must develop an understanding of particular systems. FEAT facilitates training on system behavior, by providing an automated environment in which to conduct 'what-if' evaluation. These types of analyses make FEAT a valuable tool for engineers and operations personnel in the design, analysis, and operation of NASA space systems.

  11. Asteroid failure modes due to YORP spin-up: A survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Masatoshi; Scheeres, D. J.

    2013-10-01

    We study the first failure mode of real asteroids driven to high spin-rates by the YORP effect. We focus on two failure modes: structural failure and surface shedding. The analysis only considers self-gravity and centrifugal forces. Also, we assume that the body spins in a principal axis mode, has a homogeneous density distribution, is cohesionless, and can be characterized by a friction angle between 30 and 45 degrees. We analyze surface shedding by tracking the dynamical equilibrium points. This mode causes a body to lose material from its extremities due to centrifugal accelerations overcoming gravitational accelerations. Shedding first occurs when one of the equilibrium points reaches the surface. We assume that the original shape is fixed, and thus the analysis provides a conservative condition. This condition does not consider temporary small-scale mass movement like saltation by landslides. We determine structural failure using the upper bound theorem of limit analysis. This failure mode causes a body to catastrophically deform or break into smaller components. The theorem by Holsapple (2008, INT J NONLINEAR MECH) guarantees that for any static surface traction and body force, the yield due to a smooth and convex yield envelope associated with the volume average is identical to the upper bound. We use this theorem with two volume averaging techniques: total volume (Holsapple, 2008, Icarus) and partial volume (Hirabayashi et al., 2013, Apj, submitted). This method is conservative as well. We investigate the failure modes for 21 shape models, including 1999KW4, Betulia, Geographos, Nereus, Itokawa, and 1996HW1. We can classify three shape morphologies in terms of their internal properties and failure modes: spheroidal, ellipsoidal, and bifurcated. Spheroidal bodies such as 1999KW4 and Betulia undergo structural failure first, not surface shedding. Ellipsoidal bodies such as Geographos and Nereus can experience either surface shedding or structural failure

  12. Investigation of failure mode transition in ceramics under confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Ravichandran, G.; Chen, W.; Ortiz, M.

    1995-12-31

    A newly developed experimental technique is used to investigate the failure behavior of ceramics in multi-axial compression. The axial loading is provided by a split Kolsky (Hopkinson) compression bar and the radial confinement is provided by shrink fit sleeves on the cylindrical specimens. Confinement pressures on the order of 1 GPa have been achieved. As the confinement is increased on the specimen, the failure mode changes from axial splitting under no confinement to conical faulting under moderate confinement. Experimental data have been obtained for several engineering ceramics in the strain rate range of 10{sup -3} to 10{sup 3} s{sup -1}. The peak or failure strength increases with increasing confinement. The increase in strength over its unconfined strength for a given level of confinement remains independent of the strain rate. The data from multiaxial loading experiments suggest that the engineering ceramics follow the Drucker-Prager model for pressure sensitive dilatant materials. This model is used to predict the localization modes in axi-symmetric geometries. The predictions are compared with experimental results for the limit load and the geometry of the fault. The implications of the proposed constitutive and failure model for the performance of engineering ceramics under multi-axial loading are discussed.

  13. New understandings of failure modes in SSL luminaires

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, Sarah D; Mills, Karmann C; Yaga, Robert; Johnson, Cortina; Davis, J Lynn

    2014-09-18

    As SSL products are being rapidly introduced into the market, there is a need to develop standard screening and testing protocols that can be performed quickly and provide data surrounding product lifetime and performance. These protocols, derived from standard industry tests, are known as ALTs (accelerated life tests) and can be performed in a timeframe of weeks to months instead of years. Accelerated testing utilizes a combination of elevated temperature and humidity conditions as well as electrical power cycling to control aging of the luminaires. In this study, we report on the findings of failure modes for two different luminaire products exposed to temperature-humidity ALTs. LEDs are typically considered the determining component for the rate of lumen depreciation. However, this study has shown that each luminaire component can independently or jointly influence system performance and reliability. Material choices, luminaire designs, and driver designs all have significant impacts on the system reliability of a product. From recent data, it is evident that the most common failure modes are not within the LED, but instead occur within resistors, capacitors, and other electrical components of the driver. Insights into failure modes and rates as a result of ALTs are reported with emphasis on component influence on overall system reliability.

  14. New understandings of failure modes in SSL luminaires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Sarah D.; Mills, Karmann C.; Yaga, Robert; Johnson, Cortina; Davis, J. Lynn

    2014-09-01

    As SSL products are being rapidly introduced into the market, there is a need to develop standard screening and testing protocols that can be performed quickly and provide data surrounding product lifetime and performance. These protocols, derived from standard industry tests, are known as ALTs (accelerated life tests) and can be performed in a timeframe of weeks to months instead of years. Accelerated testing utilizes a combination of elevated temperature and humidity conditions as well as electrical power cycling to control aging of the luminaires. In this study, we report on the findings of failure modes for two different luminaire products exposed to temperature-humidity ALTs. LEDs are typically considered the determining component for the rate of lumen depreciation. However, this study has shown that each luminaire component can independently or jointly influence system performance and reliability. Material choices, luminaire designs, and driver designs all have significant impacts on the system reliability of a product. From recent data, it is evident that the most common failure modes are not within the LED, but instead occur within resistors, capacitors, and other electrical components of the driver. Insights into failure modes and rates as a result of ALTs are reported with emphasis on component influence on overall system reliability.

  15. Characterization of mode I and mixed-mode failure of adhesive bonds between composite adherends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.

    1986-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical investigation of an adhesively bonded composite joint was conducted to characterize both the static and fatigue beyond growth mechanism under mode 1 and mixed-mode 1 and 2 loadings. Two bonded systems were studied: graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with EC 3445 and FM-300 adhesives. For each bonded system, two specimen types were tested: a double-cantilever-beam specimen for mode 1 loading and a cracked-lapshear specimen for mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading. In all specimens tested, failure occurred in the form of debond growth. Debonding always occurred in a cohesive manner with EC 3445 adhesive. The FM-300 adhesive debonded in a cohesive manner under mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading, but in a cohesive, adhesive, or combined cohesive and adhesive manner under mode 1 loading. Total strain-energy release rate appeared to be the driving parameter for debond growth under static and fatigue loadings.

  16. Characterization of mode 1 and mixed-mode failure of adhesive bonds between composite adherends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.

    1985-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical investigation of an adhesively bonded composite joint was conducted to characterize both the static and fatigue beyond growth mechanism under mode 1 and mixed-mode 1 and 2 loadings. Two bonded systems were studied: graphite/epoxy adherends bonded with EC 3445 and FM-300 adhesives. For each bonded system, two specimen types were tested: a double-cantilever-beam specimen for mode 1 loading and a cracked-lapshear specimen for mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading. In all specimens tested, failure occurred in the form of debond growth. Debonding always occurred in a cohesive manner with EC 3445 adhesive. The FM-300 adhesive debonded in a cohesive manner under mixed-mode 1 and 2 loading, but in a cohesive, adhesive, or combined cohesive and adhesive manner under mode 1 loading. Total strain-energy release rate appeared to be the driving parameter for debond growth under static and fatigue loadings.

  17. Structural integrity and potential failure modes of hanford high-level waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Han, F.C.

    1996-09-30

    Structural Integrity of the Hanford High-Level Waste Tanks were evaluated based on the existing Design and Analysis Documents. All tank structures were found adequate for the normal operating and seismic loads. Potential failure modes of the tanks were assessed by engineering interpretation and extrapolation of the existing engineering documents.

  18. Failure rate analysis using GLIMMIX

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, L.M.; Hemphill, G.M.; Martz, H.F.

    1998-12-01

    This paper illustrates use of a recently developed SAS macro, GLIMMIX, for implementing an analysis suggested by Wolfinger and O`Connell (1993) in modeling failure count data with random as well as fixed factor effects. Interest in this software tool arose from consideration of modernizing the Failure Rate Analysis Code (FRAC), developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the early 1980`s by Martz, Beckman and McInteer (1982). FRAC is a FORTRAN program developed to analyze Poisson distributed failure count data as a log-linear model, possibly with random as well as fixed effects. These statistical modeling assumptions are a special case of generalized linear mixed models, identified as GLMM in the current statistics literature. In the nearly 15 years since FRAC was developed, there have been considerable advances in computing capability, statistical methodology and available statistical software tools allowing worthwhile consideration of the tasks of modernizing FRAC. In this paper, the approaches to GLMM estimation implemented in GLIMMIX and in FRAC are described and a comparison of results for the two approaches is made with data on catastrophic time-dependent pump failures from a report by Martz and Whiteman (1984). Additionally, statistical and graphical model diagnostics are suggested and illustrated with the GLIMMIX analysis results.

  19. The effects of participatory mode and task workload on the detection of dynamic system failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickens, C. D.; Kessel, C.

    1977-01-01

    The ability of operators to detect step changes in the dynamics of control systems is investigated as a joint function of, (1) participatory mode: whether subjects are actively controlling those dynamics or are monitoring an autopilot controlling them, and (2) concurrent task workload. A theoretical analysis of detection in the two modes identifies factors that will favor detection in either mode. Three subjects detected system failures in either an autopilot or manual controlling mode, under single-task conditions and concurrently with a subcritical tracking task. Latency and accuracy of detection were assessed and related through a speed accuracy tradeoff representation. It was concluded that failure detection performance was better during manual control than during autopilot control, and that the extent of this superiority was enhanced as dual-task load increased. Ensemble averaging and multiple regression techniques were then employed to investigate the cues utilized by the subjects in making their detection decisions.

  20. MEMS Reliability: Infrastructure, Test Structures, Experiments, and Failure Modes

    SciTech Connect

    TANNER,DANELLE M.; SMITH,NORMAN F.; IRWIN,LLOYD W.; EATON,WILLIAM P.; HELGESEN,KAREN SUE; CLEMENT,J. JOSEPH; MILLER,WILLIAM M.; MILLER,SAMUEL L.; DUGGER,MICHAEL T.; WALRAVEN,JEREMY A.; PETERSON,KENNETH A.

    2000-01-01

    The burgeoning new technology of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) shows great promise in the weapons arena. We can now conceive of micro-gyros, micro-surety systems, and micro-navigators that are extremely small and inexpensive. Do we want to use this new technology in critical applications such as nuclear weapons? This question drove us to understand the reliability and failure mechanisms of silicon surface-micromachined MEMS. Development of a testing infrastructure was a crucial step to perform reliability experiments on MEMS devices and will be reported here. In addition, reliability test structures have been designed and characterized. Many experiments were performed to investigate failure modes and specifically those in different environments (humidity, temperature, shock, vibration, and storage). A predictive reliability model for wear of rubbing surfaces in microengines was developed. The root causes of failure for operating and non-operating MEMS are discussed. The major failure mechanism for operating MEMS was wear of the polysilicon rubbing surfaces. Reliability design rules for future MEMS devices are established.

  1. Maximum likelihood estimation for life distributions with competing failure modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidik, S. M.

    1979-01-01

    Systems which are placed on test at time zero, function for a period and die at some random time were studied. Failure may be due to one of several causes or modes. The parameters of the life distribution may depend upon the levels of various stress variables the item is subject to. Maximum likelihood estimation methods are discussed. Specific methods are reported for the smallest extreme-value distributions of life. Monte-Carlo results indicate the methods to be promising. Under appropriate conditions, the location parameters are nearly unbiased, the scale parameter is slight biased, and the asymptotic covariances are rapidly approached.

  2. The Sematech failure analysis roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Kudva, S.M.; Hasegawa, T.; Shreeve, R.

    1995-12-31

    A failure analysis (FA) technology roadmap that addresses a broad set of needs through the year 2007 is described. It is derived from the 1994 edition of the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) National Technology Roadmap For Semiconductors. The material for this paper has been generated as a result of the combined effort of all the Sematech member company failure analysis representatives, collectively known as the Sematech Product Analysis (PA) Forum. This document is intended as a roadmap of future challenges for those who are involved in performing failure analysis of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) ultra large scale integration (ULSI) circuits and its variants, the suppliers of equipment and services to the FA community, and the various strategic planning organizations in the semiconductor industry, e.g., design, test and process development groups. Incorporated in this publication are the relevant elements of the semiconductor technology roadmap, which serves as the primary driver of the FA capabilities, the resulting FA challenges, and the key capabilities that are needed to meet these FA challenges through the technology generations.

  3. The failure mode of natural silk epoxy triggered composite tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshkour, R. A.; Ariffin, A. K.; Zulkifli, R.; Sulong, A. B.; Azhari, C. H.

    2012-09-01

    In this study the quasi static compression test over natural silk epoxy triggered composite tubes has been carried out, the natural silk epoxy composite tubes consist of 24 layer of woven natural silk as reinforcement and thermoset epoxy resin as matrix which both of them i e natural silk and epoxy have excellent mechanical properties More over the natural silk have better moisture resistance in comparison with other natural reinforcements, the length of tubes are 50, 80 and 120 mm The natural silk epoxy composite tubes are associated with an external trigger which includes 4 steel pieces welded on downside flat plate fixture The hand lay up fabrication method has been used to make the natural silk epoxy composite tubes Instron universal testing machine with 250 KN load capacity has been employed to accomplish this investigation The failure modes of natural silk epoxy triggered composite tubes has been investigated by representative photographs which has been taken by a high resolution camera(12 2 Mp) during the quasi static compression test, from the photographs is observed the failure modes is progressive local buckling

  4. Deformation and failure of cartilage in the tensile mode

    PubMed Central

    Sasazaki, Yoshihiro; Shore, Roger; Seedhom, Bahaa B

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to visualize, at the ultrastructural level, the deformation and failure mechanism of cartilage matrix in the tensile mode. Full-thickness dumbbell-shaped specimens were prepared from adult bovines. There were two specimen groups; in the ‘parallel’ group the specimen axis was parallel to the split lines defining the preferential orientation of the collagen in the articular surface, and in the ‘perpendicular’ group the specimen axis was perpendicular to the split lines. Specimens were placed with the articular surface uppermost and subjected to a graded series of strain within individual mini-tension devices, while observed with stereomicroscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Thereafter, the changes in the ultrastructure were observed with both scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The mechanism of cartilage failure in the tensile mode comprised the following stages, whether the strain was applied parallel or perpendicular to the split line. (1) At 0% strain a fibrillar meshwork within the articular surface was predominantly orientated in the direction of the split line. (2) As strain increased, the fibrillar meshwork became more orientated in the parallel group and reorientated in the perpendicular group in the direction of the applied strain. (3) After complete reorientation of the fibrillar meshwork in the direction of the applied strain, the initial sign of failure was rupture of the fibrillar meshwork within the articular surface. (4) Subsequently, the rupture rapidly propagated into the deeper layers. Greater strains were required for fibrillar reorientation and complete rupture in the ‘perpendicular group’ than in the parallel group. PMID:16761971

  5. The assessment of low probability containment failure modes using dynamic PRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunett, Acacia Joann

    Although low probability containment failure modes in nuclear power plants may lead to large releases of radioactive material, these modes are typically crudely modeled in system level codes and have large associated uncertainties. Conventional risk assessment techniques (i.e. the fault-tree/event-tree methodology) are capable of accounting for these failure modes to some degree, however, they require the analyst to pre-specify the ordering of events, which can vary within the range of uncertainty of the phenomena. More recently, dynamic probabilistic risk assessment (DPRA) techniques have been developed which remove the dependency on the analyst. Through DPRA, it is now possible to perform a mechanistic and consistent analysis of low probability phenomena, with the timing of the possible events determined by the computational model simulating the reactor behavior. The purpose of this work is to utilize DPRA tools to assess low probability containment failure modes and the driving mechanisms. Particular focus is given to the risk-dominant containment failure modes considered in NUREG-1150, which has long been the standard for PRA techniques. More specifically, this work focuses on the low probability phenomena occurring during a station blackout (SBO) with late power recovery in the Zion Nuclear Power Plant, a Westinghouse pressurized water reactor (PWR). Subsequent to the major risk study performed in NUREG-1150, significant experimentation and modeling regarding the mechanisms driving containment failure modes have been performed. In light of this improved understanding, NUREG-1150 containment failure modes are reviewed in this work using the current state of knowledge. For some unresolved mechanisms, such as containment loading from high pressure melt ejection and combustion events, additional analyses are performed using the accident simulation tool MELCOR to explore the bounding containment loads for realistic scenarios. A dynamic treatment in the

  6. ATM CMG bearing failure analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The cause or causes for the failure of ATM CMG S/N 5 (Skylab 1) and the anomalies associated with ATM CMG S/N 6 (Skylab 2) were investigated. Skylab telemetry data were reviewed and presented in the form of parameter distributions. The theory that the problems were caused by marginal bearing lubrication was studied along with the effects of orbital conditions on lubricants. Bearing tests were performed to investigate the effect of lubricant or lack of lubricant in the ATM CMG bearings and the dispersion and migration of the lubricant. The vacuum and weightless conditions of space were simulated in the bearing tests. Analysis of the results of the tests conducted points to inadequate lubrication as the predominant factor causing the failure of ATM CMG S/N 5 (Skylab 1) and the anomalies associated with ATM CMG S/N 6 (Skylab 2).

  7. Failure analysis: Status and future trends

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.E.; Soden, J.M.; Henderson, C.L.

    1995-02-01

    Failure analysis is a critical element in the integrated circuit manufacturing industry. This paper reviews the changing role of failure analysis and describes major techniques employed in the industry today. Several advanced failure analysis techniques that meet the challenges imposed by advancements in integrated circuit technology are described and their applications are discussed. Future trends in failure analysis needed to keep pace with the continuing advancements in integrated circuit technology are anticipated.

  8. Integrated Circuit Failure Analysis Hypertext Help System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-02-23

    This software assists a failure analyst performing failure analysis on integrated circuits. The software can also be used to train inexperienced failure analysts. The software also provides a method for storing information and making it easily available to experienced failure analysts.

  9. Failure Analysis and Mechanisms of Failure of Fibrous Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K. (Compiler); Shuart, M. J. (Compiler); Starnes, J. H., Jr. (Compiler); Williams, J. G. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    The state of the art of failure analysis and current design practices, especially as applied to the use of fibrous composite materials in aircraft structures is discussed. Deficiencies in these technologies are identified, as are directions for future research.

  10. Failure of the ERBE scanner instrument aboard NOAA 10 spacecraft and results of failure analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. B.; Weaver, W. L.; Kopia, L. P.; Howerton, C. E.; Payton, M. G.; Harris, C. J.

    1990-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanner instrument on the NOAA 10 spacecraft malfunctioned on May 22, 1989, after more than 4 years of in-flight operation. After the failure, all instrument operational mode commands were tested and the resulting data analyzed. Details of the tests and analysis of output data are discussed therein. The radiometric and housekeeping data appear to be valid. However, the instrument will not correctly execute operational scan mode commands or the preprogrammed calibration sequences. The data indicate the problem is the result of a failure in the internal address decoding circuity in one of the ROM (read only memory) chips of the instrument computer.

  11. High Fidelity Failure Analysis for a Composite Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jain; Davila, Carlos G.; Chen, Tzi-Kang

    2001-01-01

    A high fidelity delamination failure analysis was developed by combining a local failure analysis with a global full-scale finite element structural analysis to address strength and delamination failure in a single package. The methodology was demonstrated through a local three-dimensional pull-off failure analysis and a geometrically nonlinear structural analysis of a five-foot composite helicopter fuselage section. Pull-off specimens were used to identify potential debonding failure of co-cured skin-stringer/frame fuselage structures. An investigation of the failed pull-off specimens was performed to determine the location of the failure initiation. Three-dimensional strain energy release rate analysis indicates that the delamination initiation and growth is controlled by Mode 1 opening mode. The bending moment at the delamination tip was identified as the crucial factor controlling the failure. The geometrically nonlinear structural analysis of a five-foot composite fuselage section was performed using a detailed finite element model. Loads were applied along the periphery of the subcomponent using displacement fields generated from solutions of a full-vehicle model.

  12. Graphical Displays Assist In Analysis Of Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, Ginger; Wadsworth, David; Razavipour, Reza

    1995-01-01

    Failure Environment Analysis Tool (FEAT) computer program enables people to see and better understand effects of failures in system. Uses digraph models to determine what will happen to system if set of failure events occurs and to identify possible causes of selected set of failures. Digraphs or engineering schematics used. Also used in operations to help identify causes of failures after they occur. Written in C language.

  13. Failure mode and weakening effect of water on sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baud, Patrick; Zhu, Wenlu; Wong, Teng-Fong

    2000-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that brittle strength of a rock is generally reduced in the presence of water. However, for siliciclastic rocks, there is a paucity of data on the waterweakening behavior in the cataclastic flow regime. To compare the weakening effect of water in the brittle faulting and cataclastic flow regime, triaxial compression experiments were conducted on the Berea, Boise, Darley Dale, and Gosford sandstones (with nominal porosities ranging from 11% to 35%) under nominally dry and saturated conditions at room temperature. Inelastic behavior and failure mode of the nominal dry samples were qualitatively similar to those of water-saturated samples. At elevated pressures, shear localization was inhibited, and all the samples failed by strain hardening. The compactive yield strengths (associated with the onset of shear-enhanced compaction) in the saturated samples were lower than those in the dry samples deformed under comparable pressure conditions by 20% to 70%. The reductions of brittle strength in the presence of water ranged from 5% to 17%. The water-weakening effects were most and least significant in the Gosford and Berea sandstones, respectively. The relation between water weakening and failure mode is consistently explained by micromechanical models formulated on the basis that the specific surface energy in the presence of water is lowered than that in vacuum by the ratio λ. In accordance with the Hertzian fracture model the initial yield stress in the compactive cataclastic flow regime scales with the grain-crushing pressure, which is proportional to λ3/2. In the brittle faulting regime, damage mechanics models predict that the uniaxial compressive strength scales with λ1/2. In the presence of water the confined brittle strength is lower due to reductions of both the specific surface energy and friction coefficient.

  14. Flexural strength and failure modes of layered ceramic structures

    PubMed Central

    Borba, Márcia; de Araújo, Maico D.; de Lima, Erick; Yoshimura, Humberto N.; Cesar, Paulo F.; Griggs, Jason A.; Bona, Álvaro Della

    2011-01-01

    Objective to evaluate the effect of the specimen design on the flexural strength (σf) and failure mode of ceramic structures, testing the hypothesis that the ceramic material under tension controls the mechanical performance of the structure. Methods Three ceramics used as framework materials for fixed partial dentures (YZ - Vita In-Ceram YZ; IZ - Vita In-Ceram Zirconia; AL - Vita In-Ceram AL) and two veneering porcelains (VM7 and VM9) were studied. Bar-shaped specimens were produced in three different designs (n=10): monolithic, two layers (porcelain-framework) and three layers (TRI) (porcelain-framework-porcelain). Specimens were tested for three-point flexural strength at 1 MPa/s in 37°C artificial saliva. For bi-layered design, the specimens were tested in both conditions: with porcelain (PT) or framework ceramic (FT) layer under tension. Fracture surfaces were analyzed using stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Young’s modulus (E) and Poisson’s ratio (ν) were determined using ultrasonic pulse-echo method. Results were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Student-Newman-Keuls tests. Results Except for VM7 and VM9, significant differences were observed for E values among the materials. YZ showed the highest ν value followed by IZ and AL. YZ presented the highest σf. There was no statistical difference in the σf value between IZ and IZ-FT and between AL and AL-FT. σf values for YZ-PT, IZ-PT, IZ-TRI, AL-PT, AL-TRI were similar to the results obtained for VM7 and VM9. Two types of fracture mode were identified: total and partial failure. Significance The mechanical performance of the specimens was determined by the material under tension during testing, confirming the study hypothesis. PMID:21982199

  15. Probability of pipe fracture in the primary coolant loop of a PWR Plant. Volume 6. Failure mode analysis load combination program. Project I, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Streit, R.D.

    1981-06-01

    Material properties and failure criteria were evaluated to assess the requirements for double-ended guillotine break in the primary coolant loop of the Zion Unit 1 pressurized water reactor. The properties of the 316 stainless steel piping materials were obtained from the literature. Statistical distributions of both the tensile and fracture properties at room and operating temperatures were developed. Yield and ultimate strength tensile properties were combined to estimate the material flow strength. The flow strength and fracture properties were used in the various failure models analyzed. Linear-elastic, elastic-plastic, and fully plastic fracture models were compared, and the governing fracture criterion was determined. For the particular case studied, the fully plastic requirement was found to be the controlling fracture criterion leading to a double-ended guillotine pipe break.

  16. A New Rule-Based Strategy to Determine The Failure modes of Structural Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasnia, R.; Bagheri, M. M.

    2011-07-01

    Parameters affecting types of failure of reinforced concrete structural walls with arbitrary aspect ratios and cross section are investigated using data from numerous wall tests. Basically there are three known primary failure modes that covers prominent behavior of wall at the failure load. Shear failure is known by diagonal tension cracks and premature yielding of shear reinforcement that leads to abrupt none-ductile failure. To insure a ductile flexural failure, it is recommended that strength in shear be equal or grater than strength in flexure. Flexural-shear failure is another type of failure that needs to more details to identify explicitly and it is divided to two different cases namely web crushing or sliding shear failure. A new model is proposed to predict the failure modes of structural walls in terms of shear strength, nominal shear stress, shear force related to flexural capacity, the level of compression in concrete and control of sliding shear failure.

  17. Failure Analysis of Sapphire Refractive Secondary Concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Quinn, George D.

    2009-01-01

    Failure analysis was performed on two sapphire, refractive secondary concentrators (RSC) that failed during elevated temperature testing. Both concentrators failed from machining/handling damage on the lens face. The first concentrator, which failed during testing to 1300 C, exhibited a large r-plane twin extending from the lens through much of the cone. The second concentrator, which was an attempt to reduce temperature gradients and failed during testing to 649 C, exhibited a few small twins on the lens face. The twins were not located at the origin, but represent another mode of failure that needs to be considered in the design of sapphire components. In order to estimate the fracture stress from fractographic evidence, branching constants were measured on sapphire strength specimens. The fractographic analysis indicated radial tensile stresses of 44 to 65 MPa on the lens faces near the origins. Finite element analysis indicated similar stresses for the first RSC, but lower stresses for the second RSC. Better machining and handling might have prevented the fractures, however, temperature gradients and resultant thermal stresses need to be reduced to prevent twinning.

  18. Common-Cause Failure Analysis in Event Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Dana L. Kelly; Dale M. Rasmuson

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes the approach taken by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to the treatment of common-cause failure in probabilistic risk assessment of operational events. The approach is based upon the Basic Parameter Model for common-cause failure, and examples are illustrated using the alpha-factor parameterization, the approach adopted by the NRC in their Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models. The cases of a failed component (with and without shared common-cause failure potential) and a component being unavailable due to preventive maintenance or testing are addressed. The treatment of two related failure modes (e.g., failure to start and failure to run) is a new feature of this paper. These methods are being applied by the NRC in assessing the risk significance of operational events for the Significance Determination Process (SDP) and the Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) program.

  19. Reliability, failure modes, and degradation mechanisms in high power single- and multi-mode InGaAs-AlGaAs strained quantum well lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sin, Yongkun; Presser, Nathan; Lingley, Zachary; Brodie, Miles; Foran, Brendan; Moss, Steven C.

    2016-03-01

    High power single-mode (SM) and multi-mode (MM) InGaAs-AlGaAs strained quantum well (QW) lasers are critical components for both telecommunications and potential space satellite communications systems. However, little has been reported on failure modes of state-of-the-art SM InGaAs-AlGaAs strained QW lasers although it is crucial to understand failure modes and underlying degradation mechanisms in developing these lasers that meet lifetime requirements for space satellite systems, where extremely high reliability of these lasers is required. Our present study addresses the aforementioned issues by performing long-term life tests under different test conditions followed by failure mode analysis (FMA) and physics of failure investigation. We performed long-term accelerated life-tests on state-of-the-art SM and MM InGaAs-AlGaAs strained QW lasers under ACC (automatic current control) mode. Our life-tests have accumulated over 25,000 test hours for SM lasers and over 35,000 test hours for MM lasers. FMA was performed on failed SM lasers using electron beam induced current (EBIC). This technique allowed us to identify failure types by observing dark line defects. All the SM failures we studied showed catastrophic and sudden degradation and all of these failures were bulk failures. Our group previously reported that bulk failure or COBD (catastrophic optical bulk damage) is the dominant failure mode of MM InGaAs-AlGaAs strained QW lasers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that the dominant failure mode of both SM and MM InGaAs-AlGaAs strained QW lasers is the bulk failure. Since degradation mechanisms responsible for COBD are still not well understood, we also employed other techniques including focused ion beam (FIB) processing and high-resolution TEM to further study dark line defects and dislocations in post-aged SM and MM lasers. Our long-term life test results and FMA results are reported.

  20. Failure Analysis at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Victoria L.; Wright, Clara

    2010-01-01

    History has shown that failures occur in every engineering endeavor, and what we learn from those failures contributes to the knowledge base to safely complete future missions. The necessity of failure analysis is at its apex at the end of one aged program (i.e. Shuttle) and at the beginning of a new and untested program (i.e. Constellation). The information that we gain through failure analysis corrects the deficiencies in the current vehicle to make the next generation of vehicles more efficient and safe. The Failure Analysis and Materials Evaluation section in the Materials Science Division at the Kennedy Space Center performs metallurgical, mechanical, electrical, and non-metallic failure analysis and accident investigations on both flight hardware and ground support equipment (GSE) for the Shuttle, International Space Station, Constellation, and Launch Services Programs. This presentation will explore a variety of failure case studies at KSC and the lessons learned that can be applied in future programs.

  1. Reliability analysis based on the losses from failures.

    PubMed

    Todinov, M T

    2006-04-01

    The conventional reliability analysis is based on the premise that increasing the reliability of a system will decrease the losses from failures. On the basis of counterexamples, it is demonstrated that this is valid only if all failures are associated with the same losses. In case of failures associated with different losses, a system with larger reliability is not necessarily characterized by smaller losses from failures. Consequently, a theoretical framework and models are proposed for a reliability analysis, linking reliability and the losses from failures. Equations related to the distributions of the potential losses from failure have been derived. It is argued that the classical risk equation only estimates the average value of the potential losses from failure and does not provide insight into the variability associated with the potential losses. Equations have also been derived for determining the potential and the expected losses from failures for nonrepairable and repairable systems with components arranged in series, with arbitrary life distributions. The equations are also valid for systems/components with multiple mutually exclusive failure modes. The expected losses given failure is a linear combination of the expected losses from failure associated with the separate failure modes scaled by the conditional probabilities with which the failure modes initiate failure. On this basis, an efficient method for simplifying complex reliability block diagrams has been developed. Branches of components arranged in series whose failures are mutually exclusive can be reduced to single components with equivalent hazard rate, downtime, and expected costs associated with intervention and repair. A model for estimating the expected losses from early-life failures has also been developed. For a specified time interval, the expected losses from early-life failures are a sum of the products of the expected number of failures in the specified time intervals covering the

  2. A novel approach for evaluating the risk of health care failure modes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Dong Shang; Chung, Jenq Hann; Sun, Kuo Lung; Yang, Fu Chiang

    2012-12-01

    Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) can be employed to reduce medical errors by identifying the risk ranking of the health care failure modes and taking priority action for safety improvement. The purpose of this paper is to propose a novel approach of data analysis. The approach is to integrate FMEA and a mathematical tool-Data envelopment analysis (DEA) with "slack-based measure" (SBM), in the field of data analysis. The risk indexes (severity, occurrence, and detection) of FMEA are viewed as multiple inputs of DEA. The practicality and usefulness of the proposed approach is illustrated by one case of health care. Being a systematic approach for improving the service quality of health care, the approach can offer quantitative corrective information of risk indexes that thereafter reduce failure possibility. For safety improvement, these new targets of the risk indexes could be used for management by objectives. But FMEA cannot provide quantitative corrective information of risk indexes. The novel approach can surely overcome this chief shortcoming of FMEA. After combining DEA SBM model with FMEA, the two goals-increase of patient safety, medical cost reduction-can be together achieved. PMID:22773135

  3. Failure Analysis at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Victoria L.; Wright, M. Clara

    2010-01-01

    History has shown that failures occur in every engineering endeavor, and what we learn from those failures contributes to the knowledge base to safely complete future missions. The necessity of failure analysis is at its apex at the end of one aged program and at the beginning of a new and untested program. The information that we gain through failure analysis corrects the deficiencies in the current vehicle to make the next generation of vehicles more efficient and safe. The Failure Analysis and Materials Evaluation Branch in the Materials Science Division at the Kennedy Space Center performs metallurgical, mechanical, electrical, and non-metallic materials failure analyses and accident investigations on both flight hardware and ground support equipment for the Space Shuttle, International Space Station, Constellation, and Launch Services Programs. This paper will explore a variety of failure case studies at the Kennedy Space Center and the lessons learned that can be applied in future programs.

  4. Future technology challenges for failure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.E.; Soden, J.M.; Henderson, C.L.

    1995-08-01

    Failure analysis is a critical element in the integrated circuit manufacturing industry. This paper explores the challenges for IC failure analysis in the environment of present and future silicon IC technology trends, using the 1994 National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors as a technology guide. Advanced failure analysis techniques that meet the challenges of state-of-the-art IC technology are described and their applications are discussed. New paradigms will be required for failure analysis to keep pace with future advancements in IC technology.

  5. Shear bond strength, failure modes, and confocal microscopy of bonded amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Cianconi, Luigi; Conte, Gabriele; Mancini, Manuele

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strength, failure modes, and confocal microscopy of two different amalgam alloy restorations lined with five adhesive systems. Two regular-set high-copper dental amalgam alloys, Amalcap Plus and Valiant Ph.D, and five commercially available adhesive systems were selected. One hundred and twenty freshly-extracted human third molars were used for the study. The results were statistically evaluated using two-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA). The shear bond strength (SBS) of amalgam to dentin was significantly affected by both the adhesive (p<0.0001) and amalgam alloy (p<0.0002). Regarding mode of failure (MF), among samples restored with Valiant Ph.D, 31 of 50 exhibited adhesive failure, and 19 displayed mixed failure. Laser optical microscopy (OM) of the bonded interface revealed the presence of a good hybrid layer was evident in all experimental groups. Higher bond strengths were measured for four of the five adhesives when used in combination with the spherical alloy. PMID:21383518

  6. Fabric Controls on the Failure Mode of Strongly Deformed Metamorphic Rocks with Multiple Anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliardi, F.; Zanchetta, S.; Crosta, G. B.; Barberini, V.; Fusi, N.; De Ponti, E.

    2012-12-01

    resolutions (MicroCT: 40-60 μm; medical CT: 625 μm) and micro-structural analysis of thin sections. Investigation results suggest that the failure of strongly deformed metamorphic rocks is controlled by the occurrence of multiple anisotropies related to micro-fabric, not always characterised by clear meso-scale expression, including crenulation folding, shape preferred orientation, intracrystalline deformation microstructure. Different failure modes dominate depending on the geometrical arrangement of both foliation and fold axial surfaces, in turn affecting the values of rock strength and deformability. The results of this study point to the need of accounting for the effects of multiple, geometrically complex anisotropies in setting up realistic models of rock fracturing at different scale and for different geological and engineering applications.

  7. Reliability and fatigue failure modes of implant-supported aluminum-oxide fixed dental prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Stappert, Christian F. J.; Baldassarri, Marta; Zhang, Yu; Hänssler, Felix; Rekow, Elizabeth D.; Thompson, Van P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate failure modes and reliability of implant-supported aluminum-oxide three-unit fixed-dental-prostheses (FDPs) using two different veneering porcelains. Material and methods Thirty-six aluminum-oxide FDP-frameworks were CAD/CAM fabricated and either hand-veneered(n=18) or over-pressed(n=18). All FDPs were adhesively luted to custom-made zirconium-oxide-abutments attached to dental implant fixtures (RP-4×13mm). Specimens were stored in water prior to mechanical testing. A Step-Stress-Accelerated-Life-Test (SSALT) with three load/cycles varying profiles was developed based on initial single-load-to-failure testing. Failure was defined by veneer chipping or chipping in combination with framework fracture. SSALT was performed on each FDP inclined 30° with respect to the applied load direction. For all specimens, failure modes were analyzed using polarized-reflected-light-microscopy and scanning-electron-microscopy (SEM). Reliability was computed using Weibull analysis software (Reliasoft). Results The dominant failure mode for the over-pressed FDPs was buccal chipping of the porcelain in the loading area of the pontic, while hand-veneered specimens failed mainly by combined failure modes in the veneering porcelain, framework and abutments. Chipping of the porcelain occurred earlier in the over-pressed specimens (350 N/85k, load/cycles) than in the hand-veneered (600 N/110k)(profile I). Given a mission at 300 N load and 100k or 200 K cycles the computed Weibull reliability (2-sided at 90.0 % confidence bounds) was 0.99(1/0.98) and 0.99(1/0.98) for hand-veneered FDPs, and 0.45(0.76/0.10) and 0.05(0.63/0) for over-pressed FDPs, respectively. Conclusions In the range of average clinical loads (300–700 N), hand-veneered aluminum-oxide FDPs showed significantly less failure by chipping of the veneer than the over-pressed. Hand-veneered FDPs under fatigue loading failed at loads ≥ 600N. PMID:22093019

  8. Failure analysis issues in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS).

    SciTech Connect

    Walraven, Jeremy Allen

    2005-07-01

    Failure analysis and device characterization of MEMS components are critical steps in understanding the root causes of failure and improving device performance. At the wafer and die level these tasks can be performed with little or no sample preparation. Larger challenges occur after fabrication when the device is packaged, capped, sealed, or otherwise obstructed from view. The challenges and issues of MEMS failure analysis lie in identifying the root cause of failure for these packaged, capped, and sealed devices without perturbing the device or its immediate environment. Novel methods of gaining access to the device or preparing the device for analysis are crucial to accurately determining the root cause of failure. This paper will discuss issues identified in performing root cause failure analysis of packaged MEMS devices, as well as the methods employed to analyze them.

  9. A review of the technology and process on integrated circuits failure analysis applied in communications products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Zhimao; Ling, Xiaodong; Bai, Xiaoshu; Zong, Bo

    2016-02-01

    The failure analysis of integrated circuits plays a very important role in the improvement of the reliability in communications products. This paper intends to mainly introduce the failure analysis technology and process of integrated circuits applied in the communication products. There are many technologies for failure analysis, include optical microscopic analysis, infrared microscopic analysis, acoustic microscopy analysis, liquid crystal hot spot detection technology, optical microscopic analysis technology, micro analysis technology, electrical measurement, microprobe technology, chemical etching technology and ion etching technology. The integrated circuit failure analysis depends on the accurate confirmation and analysis of chip failure mode, the search of the root failure cause, the summary of failure mechanism and the implement of the improvement measures. Through the failure analysis, the reliability of integrated circuit and rate of good products can improve.

  10. Failure analysis of PB-1 (EBTS Be/Cu mockup)

    SciTech Connect

    Odegard, B.C. Jr.; Cadden, C.H.

    1996-11-01

    Failure analysis was done on PB-1 (series of Be tiles joined to Cu alloy) following a tile failure during a high heat flux experiment in EBTS (electron beam test system). This heat flux load simulated ambient conditions inside ITER; the Be tiles were bonded to the Cu alloy using low-temperature diffusion bonding, which is being considered for fabricating plasma facing components in ITER. Results showed differences between the EBTS failure and a failure during a room temperature tensile test. The latter occurred at the Cu-Be interface in an intermetallic phase formed by reaction of the two metals at the bonding temperature. Fracture strengths measured by these tests were over 300 MPa. The high heat flux specimens failed at the Cu-Cu diffusion bond. Fracture morphology in both cases was a mixed mode of dimple rupture and transgranular cleavage. Several explanations for this difference in failure mechanism are suggested.

  11. Signal analysis techniques for incipient failure detection in turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffin, T.

    1985-01-01

    Signal analysis techniques for the detection and classification of incipient mechanical failures in turbomachinery were developed, implemented and evaluated. Signal analysis techniques available to describe dynamic measurement characteristics are reviewed. Time domain and spectral methods are described, and statistical classification in terms of moments is discussed. Several of these waveform analysis techniques were implemented on a computer and applied to dynamic signals. A laboratory evaluation of the methods with respect to signal detection capability is described. Plans for further technique evaluation and data base development to characterize turbopump incipient failure modes from Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) hot firing measurements are outlined.

  12. Failure modes of protective coatings: Who`s at fault?

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, L.D.

    1999-04-01

    This article abstracts information from 42 articles in industry journals and magazines, and 41 case studies of failure analyses conducted by consultants. The studies demonstrate that 75% of all coating failures are not solely the fault of the contractor, as is commonly believed. Owners, engineers, specifiers, and contractors/applicators share most of the responsibility. A joint responsibility among all parties involved in a coating project is required. The most effective answer to preventing coating failures is training.

  13. SNS STRIPPER FOIL FAILURE MODES AND THEIR CURES

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, John D; Luck, Chris; Plum, Michael A; Shaw, Robert W; Ladd, Peter; Raparia, Deepak; Macek, Robert James; Kim, Sang-Ho; Peters, Charles C; Polsky, Yarom

    2010-01-01

    The diamond stripper foils in use at the Spallation Neutron Source worked successfully with no failures until May 3, 2009, when we started experiencing a rash of foil system failures after increasing the beam power to ~840 kW. The main contributors to the failures are thought to be 1) convoy electrons, stripped from the incoming H beam, that strike the foil bracket and may also reflect back from the electron catcher, and 2) vacuum breakdown from the charge developed on the foil by secondary electron emission. In this paper we will detail these and other failure mechanisms, and describe the improvements we have made to mitigate them.

  14. Predicting Ductility and Failure Modes of TRIP Steels under Different Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-06-12

    We study the ultimate ductility and failure modes of a TRIP (TRansformation-Induced Plasticity) 800 steel under different loading conditions with an advanced micromechanics-based finite element analysis. The representative volume element (RVE) for the TRIP800 under examination is developed based on an actual microstructure obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The evolution of retained austenite during deformation process and the mechanical properties of the constituent phases of the TRIP800 steel are obtained from the synchrotron-based in-situ high-energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD) experiments and a self-consistent (SC) model. The ductile failure of the TRIP800 under different loading conditions is predicted in the form of plastic strain localization without any prescribed failure criteria for the individual phases. Comparisons of the computational results with experimental measurements suggest that the microstructure-based finite element analysis can well capture the overall macroscopic behavior of the TRIP800 steel under different loading conditions. The methodology described in this study may be extended for studying the ultimate ductile failure mechanisms of TRIP steels as well as the effects of the various processing parameters on the macroscopic behaviors of TRIP steels.

  15. Space Shuttle Stiffener Ring Foam Failure Analysis, a Non-Conventional Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Philip M.

    2015-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Program made use of the excellent properties of rigid polyurethane foam for cryogenic tank insulation and as structural protection on the solid rocket boosters. When foam applications de-bond, classical methods of failure analysis did not provide root cause of the failure of the foam. Realizing that foam is the ideal media to document and preserve its own mode of failure, thin sectioning was seen as a logical approach for foam failure analysis to observe the three dimensional morphology of the foam cells. The cell foam morphology provided a much greater understanding of the failure modes than previously achieved.

  16. The assessment of low probability containment failure modes using dynamic PRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunett, Acacia Joann

    Although low probability containment failure modes in nuclear power plants may lead to large releases of radioactive material, these modes are typically crudely modeled in system level codes and have large associated uncertainties. Conventional risk assessment techniques (i.e. the fault-tree/event-tree methodology) are capable of accounting for these failure modes to some degree, however, they require the analyst to pre-specify the ordering of events, which can vary within the range of uncertainty of the phenomena. More recently, dynamic probabilistic risk assessment (DPRA) techniques have been developed which remove the dependency on the analyst. Through DPRA, it is now possible to perform a mechanistic and consistent analysis of low probability phenomena, with the timing of the possible events determined by the computational model simulating the reactor behavior. The purpose of this work is to utilize DPRA tools to assess low probability containment failure modes and the driving mechanisms. Particular focus is given to the risk-dominant containment failure modes considered in NUREG-1150, which has long been the standard for PRA techniques. More specifically, this work focuses on the low probability phenomena occurring during a station blackout (SBO) with late power recovery in the Zion Nuclear Power Plant, a Westinghouse pressurized water reactor (PWR). Subsequent to the major risk study performed in NUREG-1150, significant experimentation and modeling regarding the mechanisms driving containment failure modes have been performed. In light of this improved understanding, NUREG-1150 containment failure modes are reviewed in this work using the current state of knowledge. For some unresolved mechanisms, such as containment loading from high pressure melt ejection and combustion events, additional analyses are performed using the accident simulation tool MELCOR to explore the bounding containment loads for realistic scenarios. A dynamic treatment in the

  17. X ray computed tomography for failure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossi, Richard H.; Crews, Alan R.; Georgeson, Gary E.

    1992-08-01

    Under a preliminary testing task assignment of the Advanced Development of X-Ray Computed Tomography Application program, computed tomography (CT) has been studied for its potential as a tool to assist in failure analysis investigations. CT provides three-dimensional spatial distribution of material that can be used to assess internal configurations and material conditions nondestructively. This capability has been used in failure analysis studies to determine the position of internal components and their operation. CT is particularly advantageous on complex systems, composite failure studies, and testing under operational or environmental conditions. CT plays an important role in reducing the time and effort of a failure analysis investigation. Aircraft manufacturing or logistical facilities perform failure analysis operations routinely and could be expected to reduce schedules, reduce costs and/or improve evaluation on about 10 to 30 percent of the problems they investigate by using CT.

  18. Lunar Module Electrical Power System Design Considerations and Failure Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the design and redesign considerations of the Apollo lunar module electrical power system. Included in the work are graphics showing the lunar module power system. It describes the in-flight failures, and the lessons learned from these failures.

  19. Failure risk assessment by analysis and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, N.; Ebbeler, D.; Creager, M.

    1992-01-01

    The sources of information on which to base an evaluation of reliability or failure risk of an aerospace flight system are (1) experience from tests and flights and (2) engineering analysis. It is rarely feasible to establish high reliability at high confidence by testing aerospace systems or components. Moreover, failure prediction by conventional, deterministic methods of engineering analysis can become arbitrary and subject to serious misinterpretation when uncertain or approximate information is used to establish analysis parameter values and to calibrate the accuracy of engineering models. The limitations of testing to evaluate failure risk are discussed, and a statistical approach which incorporates both engineering analysis and testing is presented.

  20. Analysis of failure in manufacturing machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaiman, S.; Abidin Ismail, N.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents information about how to interpret the machine failure in suitable ways. The concept in this paper focuses on the methodology and creates active thinking with positive attitude to solve the machine failure. It is also described few topic on elaborate the technique towards investigate and develop a better understanding of using this concept in manufacturing industry. Failure analysis (FA) in manufacturing has its own value for each characteristic and to communicate, it needs specific data. Two methods were discussed to perform FA i.e. Why-why analysis and PM analysis (is a philosophy which aims to clarify the mechanism behind the chronically defective phenomena by analyzing the phenomena in terms of physical principle). For Why-why analysis, it is mainly effective in preventing the recurrence of failures that occur at the initial period. Whereas PM analysis is mainly effective for resolving on a fundamental problem that occur in the accidental period.

  1. Progressive Failure Analysis of Composite Stiffened Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Yarrington, Phillip W.; Collier, Craig S.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    A new progressive failure analysis capability for stiffened composite panels has been developed based on the combination of the HyperSizer stiffened panel design/analysis/optimization software with the Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC). MAC/GMC discretizes a composite material s microstructure into a number of subvolumes and solves for the stress and strain state in each while providing the homogenized composite properties as well. As a result, local failure criteria may be employed to predict local subvolume failure and the effects of these local failures on the overall composite response. When combined with HyperSizer, MAC/GMC is employed to represent the ply level composite material response within the laminates that constitute a stiffened panel. The effects of local subvolume failures can then be tracked as loading on the stiffened panel progresses. Sample progressive failure results are presented at both the composite laminate and the composite stiffened panel levels. Deformation and failure model predictions are compared with experimental data from the World Wide Failure Exercise for AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy laminates.

  2. Global Failure Modes in Composite Structures for High Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauss, W. G.

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments under the referenced grant. The work described was started under the guidance and supervision of the late Dr. James Stames as the technical contact. It was aimed at investigating the development of analysis tools to deal with the problem of rupture in reinforced structural skin of future composites-based aircraft. It was of particular interest to assess methods by which failure features reminiscent of cracks in metallic structures would develop and propagate in fiber reinforced structures in interaction with the reinforcing frame. To eventually achieve that goal it was necessary to first understand the stress or strain distribution at the front of such features so that interactions between such features and reinforcing agents could be assessed computationally. Thus the major emphasis here was on the assessment of damage front and methods on how to assess or characterize it. During the conduct of this research program Dr. Stames changed to a different NASA- internal assignment, which divorced him of the direct supervision of this grant. A student who was approximately % into the completion of his Ph.D. research needed to finish this work, and NASA funds were made available under Dr. Damodar Ambur, the successor Branch Manager for Dr. James Starnes, for the completion of this work. The current grant was the thus a new and fmal support increment for completion of the started research. Final reports for previous funding have been completed and submitted. Because of the interconnection of this last phase of the investigation with previous work it is deemed useful to make the Ph.D. thesis by Luis Gonzales the body of this report.

  3. Applications of interference theory to single failure modes

    SciTech Connect

    Rauth, D.R.; Lusardi, D.J.

    1988-12-31

    REL02 is a computer code which provides a designer and analyst with a mathematical tool to calculate the expected failure probability under a variety of assumptions of the form of two overlapping probability distributions. This code has extended the solutions of closed-form calculations to the applications involving truncated normal and Weibull distribution as well as the uniform distribution. These distributions have been found to describe the variations which exist in (a) analytical predictions of stress parameters and (b) accumulated test results of strength data. REL02 has been written to calculate the general failure probability based on the interaction of a specified applied stress distribution and a known failure strength distribution. This program has been useful to quantitatively evaluate the adequacy of design margins and the acceptability of discrepant fabrication conditions. Examples of the application of this code to engineering problems are presented.

  4. Life Prediction and Classification of Failure Modes in Solid State Luminaires Using Bayesian Probabilistic Models

    SciTech Connect

    Lall, Pradeep; Wei, Junchao; Sakalaukus, Peter

    2014-05-27

    A new method has been developed for assessment of the onset of degradation in solid state luminaires to classify failure mechanisms by using metrics beyond lumen degradation that are currently used for identification of failure. Luminous Flux output, Correlated Color Temperature Data on Philips LED Lamps has been gathered under 85°C/85%RH till lamp failure. The acquired data has been used in conjunction with Bayesian Probabilistic Models to identify luminaires with onset of degradation much prior to failure through identification of decision boundaries between lamps with accrued damage and lamps beyond the failure threshold in the feature space. In addition luminaires with different failure modes have been classified separately from healthy pristine luminaires. It is expected that, the new test technique will allow the development of failure distributions without testing till L70 life for the manifestation of failure.

  5. Failure modes of a concrete nuclear-containment building subjected to hydrogen detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Fugelso, L.E.; Butler, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    Calculated response for the Indian Point reactor containment building to static internal pressure and one case of a dynamic pressure representing hydrogen combustion and detonation are presented. Comparison of the potential failure modes is made. 9 figures.

  6. TYPE B RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGE FAILURE MODES AND CONTENTS COMPLIANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, R; Steve Hensel, S; Allen Smith, A

    2007-02-21

    Type B radioactive material package failures can occur due to any one of the following: inadequate design, manufacture, and maintenance of packages, load conditions beyond those anticipated in the regulations, and improper package loading and operation. The rigorous package design evaluations performed in the certification process, robust package manufacture quality assurance programs, and demanding load conditions prescribed in the regulations are all well established. This paper focuses on the operational aspects of Type B package loading with respect to an overbatch which may cause a package failure.

  7. Reliability and failure mode investigation of high-power multimode InGaAs strained quantum well single emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sin, Yongkun; Foran, Brendan; Presser, Nathan; Mason, Maribeth; Moss, Steven C.

    2007-02-01

    In recent years record performance characteristics from multi-mode InGaAs strained quantum well single emitters at 920-980nm have been reported including a maximum CW optical output power of ~20W and a power conversion efficiency of ~75%. These excellent performance characteristics are only possible through combined optimization of laser structure design, chip fabrication processes, and packaging. Whereas broad area multi-mode single emitters likely have sufficient reliability for industrial uses, reliability of these lasers still remains a concern for communications applications including deployment in potential space satellite systems where high reliability is required. Most of previous reports on these lasers have been focused on their performance characteristics with very limited reports on failure mode analysis although understanding the physics of failure is crucial in developing a proper lifetime model for these lasers. We thus report on the reliability and failure mode analysis of high power multi-mode single emitters. The lasers studied were broad area strained InGaAs single QW lasers at 940-980nm with typical aperture widths of around 100μm. At an injection current of 7A typical CW output powers were over 6W at 25°C with a wall plug efficiency of ~60%. First, various lasing characteristics were measured including spatial and thermal characteristics that are critical to understanding performance and reliability of these devices. ACC burn-in tests with different stress conditions were performed on these devices until their failure. We report accelerated lifetest results with over 5000 accumulated test hours. Finally, we report failure mode investigation results of the degraded lasers.

  8. Deformation and Brittle Failure of Folded Gneiss in Triaxial Compression: Failure Modes, Acoustic Signatures and Microfabric Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliardi, F.; Vinciguerra, S.; Dobbs, M. R.; Zanchetta, S.

    2014-12-01

    Fabric anisotropy is a key control of rock behavior in different geological settings and over different timescales. However, the effect of tectonically folded fabrics on the brittle strength and failure mode of metamorphic rocks is poorly understood. Recent data, obtained from uniaxial compression experiments on folded gneiss (Agliardi et al., 2014), demonstrated that their brittle failure modes depend upon the arrangement of two anisotropies (i.e. foliation and fold axial planes) and that rock strength correlates with failure mode. Since lithostatic pressure may significantly affect this rock behavior, we investigated its effect in triaxial compression experiments. We tested the Monte Canale Gneiss (Italian Alps), characterized by low phyllosilicate content and compositional layering folded at the cm-scale. We used a servo-controlled hydraulic loading system to test 19 air-dry cylindrical specimens (ø = 54 mm) that were characterized both in terms of fold geometry and orientation of foliation and fold axial planes to the axial load direction. The specimens were instrumented with direct contact axial and circumferential strain gauges. Acoustic emissions and P- and S-wave velocities were measured by piezoelectric transducers mounted in the compression platens. The tests were performed at confining pressures of 40 MPa and axial strain rates of 5*10-6 s-1. Post-failure study of fracture mechanisms and related microfabric controls was undertaken using X-ray CT, optical microscopy and SEM. Samples failed in three distinct brittle modes produced by different combinations of fractures parallel to foliation, fractures parallel to fold axial planes, or mm-scale shear bands. The failure modes, consistent with those described in uniaxial compression experiments, were found to be associated with distinct stress-strain and acoustic emission signatures. Failure modes involving quartz-dominated axial plane anisotropy correspond to higher peak strength and axial strain, less

  9. Effect of Different Groundwater Levels on Seismic Dynamic Response and Failure Mode of Sandy Slope.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuai; Lv, Yuejun; Peng, Yanju; Zhang, Lifang; Xiu, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    Heavy seismic damage tends to occur in slopes when groundwater is present. The main objectives of this paper are to determine the dynamic response and failure mode of sandy slope subjected simultaneously to seismic forces and variable groundwater conditions. This paper applies the finite element method, which is a fast and efficient design tool in modern engineering analysis, to evaluate dynamic response of the slope subjected simultaneously to seismic forces and variable groundwater conditions. Shaking table test is conducted to analyze the failure mode and verify the accuracy of the finite element method results. The research results show that dynamic response values of the slope have different variation rules under near and far field earthquakes. And the damage location and pattern of the slope are different in varying groundwater conditions. The destruction starts at the top of the slope when the slope is in no groundwater, which shows that the slope appears obvious whipping effect under the earthquake. The destruction starts at the toe of the slope when the slope is in the high groundwater levels. Meanwhile, the top of the slope shows obvious seismic subsidence phenomenon after earthquake. Furthermore, the existence of the groundwater has a certain effect of damping. PMID:26560103

  10. Effect of Different Groundwater Levels on Seismic Dynamic Response and Failure Mode of Sandy Slope

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shuai; Lv, Yuejun; Peng, Yanju; Zhang, Lifang; Xiu, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    Heavy seismic damage tends to occur in slopes when groundwater is present. The main objectives of this paper are to determine the dynamic response and failure mode of sandy slope subjected simultaneously to seismic forces and variable groundwater conditions. This paper applies the finite element method, which is a fast and efficient design tool in modern engineering analysis, to evaluate dynamic response of the slope subjected simultaneously to seismic forces and variable groundwater conditions. Shaking table test is conducted to analyze the failure mode and verify the accuracy of the finite element method results. The research results show that dynamic response values of the slope have different variation rules under near and far field earthquakes. And the damage location and pattern of the slope are different in varying groundwater conditions. The destruction starts at the top of the slope when the slope is in no groundwater, which shows that the slope appears obvious whipping effect under the earthquake. The destruction starts at the toe of the slope when the slope is in the high groundwater levels. Meanwhile, the top of the slope shows obvious seismic subsidence phenomenon after earthquake. Furthermore, the existence of the groundwater has a certain effect of damping. PMID:26560103

  11. An assessment of BWR (boiling water reactor) Mark III containment challenges, failure modes, and potential improvements in performance

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.A.; Pafford, D.J.; Kelly, D.L.; Jones, K.R.; Dallman, F.J. )

    1991-01-01

    This report describes risk-significant challenges posed to Mark III containment systems by severe accidents as identified for Grand Gulf. Design similarities and differences between the Mark III plants that are important to containment performance are summarized. The accident sequences responsible for the challenges and the postulated containment failure modes associated with each challenge are identified and described. Improvements are discussed that have the potential either to prevent or delay containment failure, or to mitigate the offsite consequences of a fission product release. For each of these potential improvements, a qualitative analysis is provided. A limited quantitative risk analysis is provided for selected potential improvements. 21 refs., 5 figs., 46 tabs.

  12. Survey of failure modes from 122 residential solar water heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    This report describes the results of a survey on the operation of active solar heating and cooling systems and their components. Questionnaires were sent to homeowners and installers, covering 122 systems. Results were categorized according to problem severity, location, system type, length of system operation, and time of the year. Approximately 47% of the systems had at least one reliability problem over a two-year period. Flat-plate collector and storage systems were highly reliable. Improper operation of these components was attributed to installation problems. Drainback designs also had the greatest reliability; draindown systems were the least reliable, largely because of the failure of draindown valves. Differential controllers caused the largest number of failures that resulted in a repair cost in excess of $50 to the homeowner.

  13. Failure analysis of thick composite cylinders under external pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiazzo, A.; Rosen, B. W.

    1992-01-01

    Failure of thick section composites due to local compression strength and overall structural instability is treated. Effects of material nonlinearity, imperfect fiber architecture, and structural imperfections upon anticipated failure stresses are determined. Comparisons with experimental data for a series of test cylinders are described. Predicting the failure strength of composite structures requires consideration of stability and material strength modes of failure using linear and nonlinear analysis techniques. Material strength prediction requires the accurate definition of the local multiaxial stress state in the material. An elasticity solution for the linear static analysis of thick anisotropic cylinders and rings is used herein to predict the axisymmetric stress state in the cylinders. Asymmetric nonlinear behavior due to initial cylinder out of roundness and the effects of end closure structure are treated using finite element methods. It is assumed that local fiber or ply waviness is an important factor in the initiation of material failure. An analytical model for the prediction of compression failure of fiber composites, which includes the effects of fiber misalignments, matrix inelasticity, and multiaxial applied stresses is used for material strength calculations. Analytical results are compared to experimental data for a series of glass and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy cylinders subjected to external pressure. Recommendations for pretest characterization and other experimental issues are presented. Implications for material and structural design are discussed.

  14. Launch Vehicle Failure Dynamics and Abort Triggering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, John M.; Hill, Ashely D.; Beard, Bernard B.

    2011-01-01

    Launch vehicle ascent is a time of high risk for an on-board crew. There are many types of failures that can kill the crew if the crew is still on-board when the failure becomes catastrophic. For some failure scenarios, there is plenty of time for the crew to be warned and to depart, whereas in some there is insufficient time for the crew to escape. There is a large fraction of possible failures for which time is of the essence and a successful abort is possible if the detection and action happens quickly enough. This paper focuses on abort determination based primarily on data already available from the GN&C system. This work is the result of failure analysis efforts performed during the Ares I launch vehicle development program. Derivation of attitude and attitude rate abort triggers to ensure that abort occurs as quickly as possible when needed, but that false positives are avoided, forms a major portion of the paper. Some of the potential failure modes requiring use of these triggers are described, along with analysis used to determine the success rate of getting the crew off prior to vehicle demise.

  15. Analysis of a Memory Device Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolas, David P.; Devaney, John; Gores, Mark; Dicken, Howard

    1998-01-01

    The recent failure of a vintage memory device presented a unique challenge to failure analysts. Normally device layouts, fabrication parameters and other technical information were available to assist the analyst in the analysis. However, this device was out of production for many years and the manufacturer was no longer in business, so the information was not available. To further complicate this analysis, the package leads were all but removed making additional electrical testing difficult. Under these conditions, new and innovative methods were used to analyze the failure. The external visual exam, radiography, PIND, and leak testing were performed with nominal results. Since electrical testing was precluded by the short lead lengths, the device was delidded to expose the internal structures for microscopic examination. No failure mechanism was identified. The available electrical data suggested an ESD or low level EOS type mechanism which left no visible surface damage. Due to parallel electrical paths, electrical probing on the chip failed to locate the failure site. Two non-destructive Scanning Electron Microscopy techniques, CIVA (Charge Induced Voltage Alteration) and EBIC (Electron Beam Induced Current), and a liquid crystal decoration technique which detects localized heating were employed to aid in the analysis. CIVA and EBIC isolated two faults in the input circuitry, and the liquid crystal technique further localized two hot spots in regions on two input gates. Removal of the glassivation and metallization revealed multiple failure sites located in the gate oxide of two input transistors suggesting machine (testing) induced damage.

  16. Failure mode diagram of rubble pile asteroids: Application to (25143) asteroid Itokawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Masatoshi; Scheeres, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Proposing a diagram which shows the variation in asteroidal failure as a function of a spin period, later called the failure mode diagram, this paper considers the failure modes and conditions of asteroid (25143) Itokawa. This diagram is useful to describe when and where failure occurs in an asteroid. Assuming that Itokawa is homogeneous, we use a plastic finite element code to obtain the diagram for this object. The results show that if the bulk cohesive strength is less than 0.1 Pa, Itokawa experiences compressional failure on the neck surface at the current spin period 12.1 hours. At a spin period shorter than 4.5 hours, tension across the neck causes this asteroid to split into two components. It is also found that if the breakup spin period is longer than 5.2 hours, their motion is bounded. This implies that once Itokawa splits, the components may escape from one another.

  17. Influence of Martensite Mechanical Properties on Failure Mode and Ductility of Dual Phase Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, the effects of the mechanical properties of the martensite phase on the failure mode and ductility of dual phase (DP) steels are investigated using a micromechanics-based finite element method. Actual microstructures of DP sheet steels obtained from scanning electron microscopy are used as representative volume element (RVE) in two-dimensional plane-stress finite element calculations. Failure is predicted as plastic strain localization in the RVE during deformation. The mechanical properties of the ferrite and martensite phases in a commercial DP 980 steel are obtained based on the in-situ X-ray diffraction measurements of a uniaxial tensile test. Computations are then conducted on the RVE in order to investigate the influence of the martensite mechanical properties and volume fraction on the macroscopic behavior and failure mode of DP steels. The computations show that, as the strength and volume fraction of the martensite phase increase, the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of DP steels increases but the UTS strain and failure strain decrease. These results agree well with the general experimental observations on DP steels. Additionally, shear dominant failure modes usually develop for DP steels with lower martensite strengths, whereas split failure modes typically develop for DP steels with higher martensite strengths.

  18. Failure Analysis of Ceramic Components

    SciTech Connect

    B.W. Morris

    2000-06-29

    Ceramics are being considered for a wide range of structural applications due to their low density and their ability to retain strength at high temperatures. The inherent brittleness of monolithic ceramics requires a departure from the deterministic design philosophy utilized to analyze metallic structural components. The design program ''Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life'' (CARES/LIFE) developed by NASA Lewis Research Center uses a probabilistic approach to predict the reliability of monolithic components under operational loading. The objective of this study was to develop an understanding of the theories used by CARES/LIFE to predict the reliability of ceramic components and to assess the ability of CARES/LIFE to accurately predict the fast fracture behavior of monolithic ceramic components. A finite element analysis was performed to determine the temperature and stress distribution of a silicon carbide O-ring under diametral compression. The results of the finite element analysis were supplied as input into CARES/LIFE to determine the fast fracture reliability of the O-ring. Statistical material strength parameters were calculated from four-point flexure bar test data. The predicted reliability showed excellent correlation with O-ring compression test data indicating that the CARES/LIFE program can be used to predict the reliability of ceramic components subjected to complicated stress states using material properties determined from simple uniaxial tensile tests.

  19. Analysis of multistate models for electromigration failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, V. M.

    2010-02-01

    The application of a multistate Markov chain is considered as a model of electromigration interconnect degradation and eventual failure. Such a model has already been used [Tan et al., J. Appl. Phys. 102, 103703 (2007)], maintaining that, in general, it leads to a failure distribution described by a gamma mixture, and that as a result, this type of distribution (rather than a lognormal) should be used as a prior in any Bayesian mode fitting and subsequent reliability budgeting. Although it appears that the model is able to produce reasonably realistic resistance curves R(t), we are unable to find any evidence that the failure distribution is a simple gamma mixture except under contrived conditions. The distributions generated are largely sums of exponentials (phase-type distributions), convolutions of gamma distributions with different scales, or roughly normal. We note also some inconsistencies in the derivation of the gamma mixture in the work cited above and conclude that, as it stands, the Markov chain model is probably unsuitable for electromigration modeling and a change from lognormal to gamma mixture distribution generally cannot be justified in this way. A hidden Markov model, which describes the interconnect behavior at time t rather than its resistance, in terms of generally observed physical processes such as void nucleating, slitlike growth (where the growth is slow and steady), transverse growth, current shunting (where the resistance jumps in value), etc., seems a more likely prospect, but treating failure in such a manner would still require significant justification.

  20. Temperature effect on the performance of a dissipative dielectric elastomer generator with failure modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. E.; Deng, L.; He, Z. C.; Li, Eric; Li, G. Y.

    2016-05-01

    Research on dielectric elastomer generators (DEGs) which can be utilized to convert mechanical energy to electrical energy has gained wide attention lately. However, very few works account for the operating temperature, viscoelasticity and current leakage in the analysis of DEGs simultaneously. In this study, under several compound four-stroke conversion cycles, the electromechanical performance and energy conversion of a dissipative DEG made of a very-high-bond (VHB) elastomer are investigated at different operating temperatures. The performance parameters such as energy density and conversion efficiency are calculated under different temperatures. Moreover, the common failure modes of the generator are considered: material rupture, loss of tension, electrical breakdown and electromechanical instability. The numerical results have distinctly shown that the operating temperature plays an important role in the performance of DEGs, which could possibly make a larger conversion efficiency for the DEG.

  1. Principal elementary mode analysis (PEMA).

    PubMed

    Folch-Fortuny, Abel; Marques, Rodolfo; Isidro, Inês A; Oliveira, Rui; Ferrer, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) has been widely applied in fluxomics to compress data into a few latent structures in order to simplify the identification of metabolic patterns. These latent structures lack a direct biological interpretation due to the intrinsic constraints associated with a PCA model. Here we introduce a new method that significantly improves the interpretability of the principal components with a direct link to metabolic pathways. This method, called principal elementary mode analysis (PEMA), establishes a bridge between a PCA-like model, aimed at explaining the maximum variance in flux data, and the set of elementary modes (EMs) of a metabolic network. It provides an easy way to identify metabolic patterns in large fluxomics datasets in terms of the simplest pathways of the organism metabolism. The results using a real metabolic model of Escherichia coli show the ability of PEMA to identify the EMs that generated the different simulated flux distributions. Actual flux data of E. coli and Pichia pastoris cultures confirm the results observed in the simulated study, providing a biologically meaningful model to explain flux data of both organisms in terms of the EM activation. The PEMA toolbox is freely available for non-commercial purposes on http://mseg.webs.upv.es. PMID:26905301

  2. FAILURE ANALYSIS: WASTEWATER DRUM BULGING

    SciTech Connect

    Vormelker, P

    2008-09-15

    A 55 gallon wastewater drum lid was found to be bulged during storage in a remote area. Drum samples were obtained for analysis. The interior surface of these samples revealed blistering and holes in the epoxy phenolic drum liner and corrosion of the carbon steel drum. It is suspected that osmotic pressure drove permeation of the water through the epoxy phenolic coating which was weakened from exposure to low pH water. The coating failed at locations throughout the drum interior. Subsequent corrosion of the carbon steel released hydrogen which pressurized the drum causing deformation of the drum lid. Additional samples from other wastewater drums on the same pallet were also evaluated and limited corrosion was visible on the interior surfaces. It is suspected that, with time, the corrosion would have advanced to cause pressurization of these sealed drums.

  3. Specific Energy as an Index to Identify the Critical Failure Mode Transition Depth in Rock Cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xianqun; Xu, Chaoshui

    2016-04-01

    Rock cutting typically involves driving a rigid cutter across the rock surface at certain depth of cut and is used to remove rock material in various engineering applications. It has been established that there exist two distinct failure modes in rock cutting, i.e. ductile mode and brittle mode. The ductile mode takes precedence when the cut is shallow and the increase in the depth of cut leads to rock failure gradually shifted to brittle-dominant mode. The threshold depth or the critical transition depth, at which rock failure under cutting changes from the ductile to the brittle mode, is associated with not only the rock properties but also the cutting operational parameters and the understanding of this threshold is important to optimise the tool design and operational parameters. In this study, a new method termed the specific cutting energy transition model is proposed from an energy perspective which is demonstrated to be much more effective in identifying the critical transition depth compared with existing approaches. In the ductile failure cutting mode, the specific cutting energy is found to be independent of the depth of cut; but in the brittle failure cutting mode, the specific cutting energy is found to be dependent on the depth of cut following a power-law relationship. The critical transition depth is identified as the intersection point between these two relationships. Experimental tests on two types of rocks with different combinations of cutting velocity, depth of cut and back rake angle are conducted and the application of the proposed model on these cutting datasets has demonstrated that the model can provide a very effective tool to analyse the cutting mechanism and to identify the critical transition depth.

  4. DELPHI expert panel evaluation of Hanford high level waste tank failure modes and release quantities

    SciTech Connect

    Dunford, G.L.; Han, F.C.

    1996-09-30

    The Failure Modes and Release Quantities of the Hanford High Level Waste Tanks due to postulated accident loads were established by a DELPHI Expert Panel consisting of both on-site and off-site experts in the field of Structure and Release. The Report presents the evaluation process, accident loads, tank structural failure conclusion reached by the panel during the two-day meeting.

  5. General Monte Carlo reliability simulation code including common mode failures and HARP fault/error-handling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, M. E.; Lewis, E. E.; Boehm, F.

    1991-01-01

    A Monte Carlo Fortran computer program was developed that uses two variance reduction techniques for computing system reliability applicable to solving very large highly reliable fault-tolerant systems. The program is consistent with the hybrid automated reliability predictor (HARP) code which employs behavioral decomposition and complex fault-error handling models. This new capability is called MC-HARP which efficiently solves reliability models with non-constant failures rates (Weibull). Common mode failure modeling is also a specialty.

  6. Effects of soil-engineering properties on the failure mode of shallow landslides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenna, Jonathan Peter; Santi, Paul Michael; Amblard, Xavier; Negri, Jacquelyn

    2012-01-01

    Some landslides mobilize into flows, while others slide and deposit material immediately down slope. An index based on initial dry density and fine-grained content of soil predicted failure mode of 96 landslide initiation sites in Oregon and Colorado with 79% accuracy. These material properties can be used to identify potential sources for debris flows and for slides. Field data suggest that loose soils can evolve from dense soils that dilate upon shearing. The method presented herein to predict failure mode is most applicable for shallow (depth 8), with few to moderate fines (fine-grained content <18%), and with liquid limits <40.

  7. Interface failure modes explain non-monotonic size-dependent mechanical properties in bioinspired nanolaminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Z. Q.; Ni, Y.; Peng, L. M.; Liang, H. Y.; He, L. H.

    2016-03-01

    Bioinspired discontinuous nanolaminate design becomes an efficient way to mitigate the strength-ductility tradeoff in brittle materials via arresting the crack at the interface followed by controllable interface failure. The analytical solution and numerical simulation based on the nonlinear shear-lag model indicates that propagation of the interface failure can be unstable or stable when the interfacial shear stress between laminae is uniform or highly localized, respectively. A dimensionless key parameter defined by the ratio of two characteristic lengths governs the transition between the two interface-failure modes, which can explain the non-monotonic size-dependent mechanical properties observed in various laminate composites.

  8. Interface failure modes explain non-monotonic size-dependent mechanical properties in bioinspired nanolaminates.

    PubMed

    Song, Z Q; Ni, Y; Peng, L M; Liang, H Y; He, L H

    2016-01-01

    Bioinspired discontinuous nanolaminate design becomes an efficient way to mitigate the strength-ductility tradeoff in brittle materials via arresting the crack at the interface followed by controllable interface failure. The analytical solution and numerical simulation based on the nonlinear shear-lag model indicates that propagation of the interface failure can be unstable or stable when the interfacial shear stress between laminae is uniform or highly localized, respectively. A dimensionless key parameter defined by the ratio of two characteristic lengths governs the transition between the two interface-failure modes, which can explain the non-monotonic size-dependent mechanical properties observed in various laminate composites. PMID:27029955

  9. Interface failure modes explain non-monotonic size-dependent mechanical properties in bioinspired nanolaminates

    PubMed Central

    Song, Z. Q.; Ni, Y.; Peng, L. M.; Liang, H. Y.; He, L. H.

    2016-01-01

    Bioinspired discontinuous nanolaminate design becomes an efficient way to mitigate the strength-ductility tradeoff in brittle materials via arresting the crack at the interface followed by controllable interface failure. The analytical solution and numerical simulation based on the nonlinear shear-lag model indicates that propagation of the interface failure can be unstable or stable when the interfacial shear stress between laminae is uniform or highly localized, respectively. A dimensionless key parameter defined by the ratio of two characteristic lengths governs the transition between the two interface-failure modes, which can explain the non-monotonic size-dependent mechanical properties observed in various laminate composites. PMID:27029955

  10. Analysis of Cascading Failure in Gene Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Longxiao; Wang, Shudong; Li, Kaikai; Meng, Dazhi

    2012-01-01

    It is an important subject to research the functional mechanism of cancer-related genes make in formation and development of cancers. The modern methodology of data analysis plays a very important role for deducing the relationship between cancers and cancer-related genes and analyzing functional mechanism of genome. In this research, we construct mutual information networks using gene expression profiles of glioblast and renal in normal condition and cancer conditions. We investigate the relationship between structure and robustness in gene networks of the two tissues using a cascading failure model based on betweenness centrality. Define some important parameters such as the percentage of failure nodes of the network, the average size-ratio of cascading failure, and the cumulative probability of size-ratio of cascading failure to measure the robustness of the networks. By comparing control group and experiment groups, we find that the networks of experiment groups are more robust than that of control group. The gene that can cause large scale failure is called structural key gene. Some of them have been confirmed to be closely related to the formation and development of glioma and renal cancer respectively. Most of them are predicted to play important roles during the formation of glioma and renal cancer, maybe the oncogenes, suppressor genes, and other cancer candidate genes in the glioma and renal cancer cells. However, these studies provide little information about the detailed roles of identified cancer genes. PMID:23248647