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Sample records for failure pressure evaluation

  1. Evaluation of Progressive Failure Analysis and Modeling of Impact Damage in Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) is leading an evaluation effort in advanced destructive and nondestructive testing of composite pressure vessels and structures. WSTF is using progressive finite element analysis methods for test design and for confirmation of composite pressure vessel performance. Using composite finite element analysis models and failure theories tested in the World-Wide Failure Exercise, WSTF is able to estimate the static strength of composite pressure vessels. Additionally, test and evaluation on composites that have been impact damaged is in progress so that models can be developed to estimate damage tolerance and the degradation in static strength.

  2. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Evaluation of PRSEUS Pressure Cube Article in Support of Load Test to Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Patrick H.

    2013-01-01

    The PRSEUS Pressure Cube Test was a joint development effort between the Boeing Company and NASA Langley Research Center, sponsored in part by the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project and Boeing internal R&D. This Technical Memorandum presents the results of ultrasonic inspections in support of the PRSEUS Pressure Cube Test, and is a companion document with the NASA test report and a report on the acoustic emission measurements made during the test.

  3. [Non-invasive evaluation of the hemodynamic profile in patients with heart failure: estimation of right atrial pressure].

    PubMed

    Temporelli, P L; Scapellato, F; Giannuzzi, P

    2000-10-01

    The estimation of right atrial pressure is often needed for the diagnosis, management and monitoring of various pathologic hemodynamic conditions and plays a significant role in patients with chronic heart failure. In the past decade several attempts have been made to non-invasively estimate right atrial pressure, and echocardiography has always been considered the most reliable tool. Morphologic parameters such as respiratory motion of the inferior vena cava, its respiratory diameters and percent collapse (caval index), left hepatic vein diameter or right atrial dimension (areas, volumes) were initially studied. More recently, functional data such as left hepatic or tricuspid flow variables have been considered. Some of these indexes, however, offer only semiquantitative measures of right atrial pressure, and have failed to demonstrate any prognostic value. Others, although highly sensitive and specific, are useful only in selected groups of patients because of technical or clinical limitations. In recent years, attention has focused on Doppler diastolic tricuspid flow as a means of predicting mean right atrial pressure. Analyzing the Doppler tricuspid velocity profile and mean right atrial pressure (Swan-Ganz catheter) simultaneously recorded in patients with severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction and chronic heart failure, acceleration rate of early filling emerged as the strongest independent predictor of right atrial pressure both in patients in sinus rhythm and in those with atrial fibrillation (r = 0.98), irrespective of whether the recordings are at baseline or after acute loading manipulations. PMID:11068714

  4. High pressure gate valve failure

    SciTech Connect

    Place, M. Jr.; Kochera, J.W.

    1995-10-01

    Shell Oil Company was attempting to develop CRA (Corrosion Resistant Alloy) valves for use in those completions utilizing CRA tubing. The testing and development of new materials for CRA valves of both the solid and clad version were pursued. As part of this CRA valve development program, Shell Oil Company tried to reconcile the apparent discrepancy between unacceptable laboratory test results on 410 SS in sour environments with both the apparent success (when properly heat treated and at an acceptable hardness level) of this alloy in commercial sour use and the fact that it is fully accepted in NACE MR-01-75. A410 stainless steel valve was tested near the material yield strength at low H{sub 2}S partial pressures at the STF (Static Test Facility) in Mississippi. The valve failed by crack growth and body wall leakage while under test.

  5. Effects of pressure on arterial failure.

    PubMed

    Khamdaengyodtai, Pannathai; Vafai, Kambiz; Sakulchangsatjatai, Phrut; Terdtoon, Pradit

    2012-10-11

    A three-dimensional multilayer model of mechanical response for analyzing the effect of pressure on arterial failure is presented in this work. The multilayer arterial wall is considered to be composed of five different layers. The three-dimensional effects are incorporated within the five-concentric axisymmetric layers while incorporating the nonlinear elastic characteristics under combined extension and inflation. Constitutive equations for fiber-reinforced material are employed for three of the major layers, i.e., intima, media and adventitia and an isotropic material model is employed for the other two layers, i.e., endothelium and internal elastic lamina. Our own developed three-dimensional five-layer model has been utilized to model propagated rupture area of the arterial wall. Required parameters for each layer are obtained by using a nonlinear least square method fitted to in vivo non-invasive experimental data of human artery and the effects of pressure on arterial failure are examined. The solutions from our computational model are compared with previous studies and good agreements are observed. Local stresses and strain distributions across the deformed arterial wall are illustrated and consequently the rupture area is predicted by varying luminal pressure in the physiological range and beyond. The effects of pressure on the arterial failure have been interpreted based on this comprehensive three-dimensional five-layer arterial wall model. This is the first study which employs two constitutive equations and incorporates a five-layer arterial wall model in three-dimensions based on in vivo non-invasive experimental data for a human artery. PMID:22980577

  6. SYNTHETIC SLING FAILURE - EVALUATIONS & RECOMMENDATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY TC; HENDERSON CS

    2009-10-26

    The information and evaluations provided in this report were compiled to address the recurring problem of synthetic sling failure. As safety is the number one priority in all work aspects, a solution must be devised to prevent accidents from occurring. A total of thirteen cases regarding synthetic sling failure were evaluated in order to determine their causes, effects, and preventative measures. From the collected data, it was found that all cases in which the synthetic sling contacted the edge of its load resulted in sling failure. It is required that adequate synthetic sling protection devices be used to protect slings in any lift where the sling comes in direct contact with the edge or corner of its load. However, there are no consensus codes or standards stating the type, material, or purpose of the type of protective device used to protect the sling from being cut. Numerous industry standards and codes provide vague descriptions on how to protect synthetic slings. Without a clear, concise statement of how to protect synthetic slings, it is common for inadequate materials and sling protection devices to be used in an attempt to meet the intent of these requirements. The use of an inadequate sling protection device is the main cause of synthetic sling failure in all researched cases. Commercial sling protection devices come in many shapes and sizes, and have a variety of names, as well as advertised uses. 'Abrasion pads' and 'wear protectors' are two different names for products with the same intended purpose. There is no distinguishable way to determine the extent of sling protection which these devices will provide, or what specific scenarios they are made for. This creates room for error in a field where error is unacceptable. This report provides a recommended action for hoisting and rigging activities which require synthetic slings to contact a load, as well as recommended changes to industry standards which will benefit overall industry safety.

  7. Code System to Calculate Pressure Vessel Failure Probabilities.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-03-27

    Version 00 OCTAVIA (Operationally Caused Transients And Vessel Integrity Analysis) calculates the probability of pressure vessel failure from operationally-caused pressure transients which can occur in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). For specified vessel and operating environment characteristics the program computes the failure pressure at which the vessel will fail for different-sized flaws existing in the beltline and the probability of vessel failure per reactor year due to the flaw. The probabilities are summed over themore » various flaw sizes to obtain the total vessel failure probability. Sensitivity studies can be performed to investigate different vessel or operating characteristics in the same computer run.« less

  8. Diurnal variation of pulmonary artery pressure in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, J S; Cunningham, D; Shapiro, L M; Park, A; Poole-Wilson, P A; Fox, K M

    1989-01-01

    Variation in pulmonary artery pressure has important consequences for the interpretation of isolated pressure measurements in patients with chronic heart failure. To investigate the nature of diurnal variation in pulmonary artery pressure in chronic heart failure, eight angina-free men (aged 50-72 years) with treated chronic heart failure caused by ischaemic heart disease underwent continuous ambulatory pulmonary artery pressure recording by a transducer tipped catheter. The mean (1 SD) daytime pulmonary artery pressure was 29.6 (5.0) mm Hg systolic and 13.7 (5.6) mm Hg diastolic. The mean change in pressure from day to night was +5.1 (3.2) mm Hg systolic and +3.8 (1.7) mm Hg diastolic; and the mean change from standing to lying +9.3 (2.3) mm Hg systolic and +6.4 (2.1) mm Hg diastolic. In six of the eight patients there was considerable rise in pulmonary artery pressure at night, but in the two patients with the most severe symptoms there was no nocturnal rise. In patients with chronic heart failure, nocturnal pulmonary artery pressure is not determined by postural change alone. But interpretation of isolated pulmonary artery pressure measurements must take the posture of the patient into account. PMID:2757872

  9. Pore fluid pressure, apparent friction, and Coulomb failure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Simpson, R.W.; Hickman, S.H.; Lockner, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    Many recent studies of stress-triggered seismicity rely on a fault failure model with a single free parameter, the apparent coefficient of friction, presumed to be a material constant with possible values 0 ≤ μ′ ≤ 1. These studies may present a misleading view of fault strength and the role of pore fluid pressure in earthquake failure. The parameter μ′ is intended to incorporate the effects of both friction and pore pressure, but is a material constant only if changes in pore fluid pressure induced by changes in stress are proportional to the normal stress change across the potential failure plane. Although specific models of fault zones permit such a relation, neither is it known that fault zones within the Earth behave this way, nor is this behavior expected in all cases. In contrast, for an isotropic homogeneous poroelastic model the pore pressure changes are proportional to changes in mean stress, μ′ is not a material constant, and −∞ ≤ μ′ ≤ +∞. Analysis of the change in Coulomb failure stress for tectonically loaded reverse and strike-slip faults shows considerable differences between these two pore pressure models, suggesting that such models might be distinguished from one another using observations of triggered seismicity (e.g., aftershocks). We conclude that using the constant apparent friction model exclusively in studies of Coulomb failure stress is unwise and could lead to significant errors in estimated stress change and seismic hazard.

  10. Strategies for the prevention of continuous positive airway pressure failure.

    PubMed

    Sahni, Rakesh; Schiaratura, Maria; Polin, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    Progress in neonatal intensive care is closely linked to improvements in the management of respiratory failure in preterm infants. Current modalities of respiratory support range from the more benign continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to various modes of mechanical ventilation. Data from recent randomized control trials suggest that the use of nasal (n)CPAP as the initial mode of respiratory support in critically ill very low birth weight infants is associated with a lower incidence of chronic lung disease. The practice of early initiation of nasal-prong CPAP in all spontaneously breathing infants at Columbia University has resulted in very low rates of chronic lung disease for decades. Many institutions have attempted to replicate the practices and results at Columbia University. However, success rates with nCPAP are highly variable, which may in part be attributable to how well it is utilized. With recent renewed interest in non-invasive respiratory support, particularly bubble nCPAP, it is essential to evaluate strategies for the prevention of CPAP failure. This review discusses strategies that address these issues and shares the practical aspects for replicating success with bubble nCPAP. In addition, it reviews desirable features, major components, and physiological consequences of various bubble CPAP systems along with clinical experience of CPAP use. PMID:26936186

  11. CXCR4 gene transfer prevents pressure overload induced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    LaRocca, Thomas J.; Jeong, Dongtak; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Lee, Ahyoung; Chen, JiQiu; Hajjar, Roger J.; Tarzami, Sima T.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell and gene therapies are being pursued as strategies for repairing damaged cardiac tissue following myocardial infarction in an attempt to prevent heart failure. The chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) and its ligand, CXCL12, play a critical role in stem cell recruitment post-acute myocardial infarction. Whereas progenitor cell migration via the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis is well characterized, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of CXCR4 mediated modulation of cardiac hypertrophy and failure. We used gene therapy to test the effects of CXCR4 gene delivery on adverse ventricular remodeling due to pressure overload. We assessed the effect of cardiac overexpression of CXCR4 during trans-aortic constriction (TAC) using a cardiotropic adeno-associated viral vector (AAV9) carrying the CXCR4 gene. Cardiac overexpression of CXCR4 in mice with pressure overload prevented ventricular remodeling, preserved capillary density and maintained function as determined by echocardiography and in vivo hemodynamics. In isolated adult rat cardiac myocytes, CXCL12 treatment prevented isoproterenol induced hypertrophy and interrupted the calcineurin/NFAT pathway. Finally, a complex involving the L-type calcium channel, β2-adenoreceptor, and CXCR4 (Cav1.2/β2AR/CXCR4) was identified in healthy cardiac myocytes and was shown to dissociate as a consequence of heart failure. CXCR4 administered to the heart via gene transfer prevents pressure overload induced heart failure. The identification of CXCR4 participation in a Cav1.2-β2AR regulatory complex provides further insight into the mechanism by which CXCR4 modulates calcium homeostasis and chronic pressure overload responses in the cardiac myocyte. Together these results suggest AAV9.CXCR4 gene therapy is a potential therapeutic approach for congestive heart failure. PMID:22668785

  12. Failure analysis of thick composite cylinders under external pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiazzo, A.; Rosen, B. W.

    1992-01-01

    Failure of thick section composites due to local compression strength and overall structural instability is treated. Effects of material nonlinearity, imperfect fiber architecture, and structural imperfections upon anticipated failure stresses are determined. Comparisons with experimental data for a series of test cylinders are described. Predicting the failure strength of composite structures requires consideration of stability and material strength modes of failure using linear and nonlinear analysis techniques. Material strength prediction requires the accurate definition of the local multiaxial stress state in the material. An elasticity solution for the linear static analysis of thick anisotropic cylinders and rings is used herein to predict the axisymmetric stress state in the cylinders. Asymmetric nonlinear behavior due to initial cylinder out of roundness and the effects of end closure structure are treated using finite element methods. It is assumed that local fiber or ply waviness is an important factor in the initiation of material failure. An analytical model for the prediction of compression failure of fiber composites, which includes the effects of fiber misalignments, matrix inelasticity, and multiaxial applied stresses is used for material strength calculations. Analytical results are compared to experimental data for a series of glass and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy cylinders subjected to external pressure. Recommendations for pretest characterization and other experimental issues are presented. Implications for material and structural design are discussed.

  13. Congestive cardiac failure: central role of the arterial blood pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, P

    1987-01-01

    A review of the history of our knowledge and understanding of the peripheral oedema of congestive cardiac failure points to the conclusion that an inability of the heart to maintain the arterial pressure is of central importance in this condition. Although the function of the circulation is to perfuse the tissues, the body monitors the adequacy of its perfusion, not not through metabolic messengers carried from the tissues in the blood stream, but by sensing the arterial pressure; and the mechanisms evoked act to maintain the arterial pressure. In the short term this is achieved by autonomic regulation of the heart and blood vessels; in the longer term the arterial pressure is maintained through an increase in the blood volume by a retention of salt and water by the kidney. To support the latter process, intrinsic renal mechanisms are successively magnified by the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and by the activities of the sympathetic system and vasopressin. The natriuretic influence mediated through volume receptors and the release of atrial peptide is overruled by the arterial baroreceptors, so that the body maintains the arterial pressure at the expense of an increase in blood volume. In these ways the syndrome of congestive cardiac failure may be regarded as one which arises when the heart becomes chronically unable to maintain an appropriate arterial pressure without support. PMID:3311096

  14. Extended Kalman filter sensor failure detection method for pressurizer monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Filho, E.O.A.; Nakata, H. )

    1992-01-01

    This work presents the development of the sensor failure detection and isolation system (FDIS) methodology, which is suitable for implementation in nuclear plant control systems. The methodology is based on the extended Kalman filter applied to a pressurized water reactor pressurizer. The utilization of the Kalman filter follows the standard procedure: First, an estimate of the state variables and the corresponding covariances are obtained; then, based on the state equations, the estimated state variables are propagated until the next measurements for the new estimate.

  15. VISA: a computer code for predicting the probability of reactor pressure-vessel failure. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, D.L.; Simonen, F.A.; Strosnider, J. Jr.; Klecker, R.W.; Engel, D.W.; Johnson, K.I.

    1983-09-01

    The VISA (Vessel Integrity Simulation Analysis) code was developed as part of the NRC staff evaluation of pressurized thermal shock. VISA uses Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the failure probability of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) pressure vessel subjected to a pressure and thermal transient specified by the user. Linear elastic fracture mechanics are used to model crack initiation and propagation. parameters for initial crack size, copper content, initial RT/sub NDT/, fluence, crack-initiation fracture toughness, and arrest fracture toughness are treated as random variables. This report documents the version of VISA used in the NRC staff report (Policy Issue from J.W. Dircks to NRC Commissioners, Enclosure A: NRC Staff Evaluation of Pressurized Thermal Shock, November 1982, SECY-82-465) and includes a user's guide for the code.

  16. Strain to failure of pressurized thick wall cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Priddy, T.G.; Roach, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    The determination of the fully plastic response and pressure limit of a highly pressurized vessel is of considerable importance in design. The plastic-strain response during and following autofrettage operations, in comparison with the limiting strain condition, is of special interest. This paper presents the results of an analysis method for thick wall, high pressure, cylinders where the effective plastic strain distribution through the thickness is the material response variable of primary interest. The limiting value of this effective plastic strain depends on the level of tensile-stress triaxiality which also varies through the thickness. This strain-to-failure criterion is used to predict the complete pressure versus strain response and the maximum pressure for test cylinders. A simple model of effective-stress versus effective plastic strain is employed. This model is quantified by data taken from uniaxial, tension, true-stress-strain curves and from the fracture zone of the tensile specimen. A sample calculation is included and, in a companion paper, a series of burst tubes having properties ranging from brittle to ductile are compared with this analytical method. 21 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. The influence of gouge defects on failure pressure of steel pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alang, N. A.; Razak, N. A.; Zulfadli, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Failure pressure of API X42 steel pipes with gouge defects was estimated through a nonlinear finite element (FE) analysis. The effect of gouge length on failure pressure of different pipe diameters was investigated. Stress modified critical strain (SMCS) model was applied as in predicting the failure of the pipe. The model uses strain based criteria to predict the failure. For validation of the model, the FE results were compared to experimental data in literature showing overall good agreement. The results show that the gouge length has significant influence on failure pressure. A smaller pipe diameter gives highest value of failure pressure.

  18. Effects of Practice and Psychological Pressure on Interpersonal Coordination Failures.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Akane; Sekiya, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    Although sports players in the same team try to manage their interpersonal coordination for improved performance, failures such as hesitations and collisions are often seen in interpersonal coordination between teammates. However, it is unclear what factors influence the occurrence of such hesitations and collisions. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of practice and psychological pressure on the occurrence of hesitations and collisions. A total of 80 right-handed university students (aged 19.1 years ± 0.8; 32 males and 48 females) were randomly assigned into pairs and were instructed to perform a serial-tapping task cooperatively. An apparatus had five buttons in a row, which flashed once in each trial in a quasi-random order. When a flashing button was hit, a corresponding light went off and another button flashed. The participants were instructed that the task was to hit a flashing button as quickly and accurately as possible, and either member of the pair could hit the button. They performed 80 practice trials, 10 trials as a control test, and 10 trials as a pressure test. Before the pressure test, pressure was added by informing them about audience and confiscation of the prize if they could not fulfill a criterion. As a result, the occurrence rates of hesitations and collisions and the performance time significantly decreased from the first 40 trials to the next 40 trials of the practice session. Under pressure, state anxiety, the intention to cooperate, and the occurrence rates of hesitations and collisions increased, though heart rate and performance time did not change. These results suggested that interpersonal coordination improved with practice but deteriorated under pressure. PMID:27173664

  19. PDC IC WELD FAILURE EVALUATION AND RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.; Howard, S.; Maxwell, D.; Fiscus, J.

    2012-04-16

    During final preparations for start of the PDCF Inner Can (IC) qualification effort, welding was performed on an automated weld system known as the PICN. During the initial weld, using a pedigree canister and plug, a weld defect was observed. The defect resulted in a hole in the sidewall of the canister, and it was observed that the plug sidewall had not been consumed. This was a new type of failure not seen during development and production of legacy Bagless Transfer Cans (FB-Line/Hanford). Therefore, a team was assembled to determine the root cause and to determine if the process could be improved. After several brain storming sessions (MS and T, R and D Engineering, PDC Project), an evaluation matrix was established to direct this effort. The matrix identified numerous activities that could be taken and then prioritized those activities. This effort was limited by both time and resources (the number of canisters and plugs available for testing was limited). A discovery process was initiated to evaluate the Vendor's IC fabrication process relative to legacy processes. There were no significant findings, however, some information regarding forging/anneal processes could not be obtained. Evaluations were conducted to compare mechanical properties of the PDC canisters relative to the legacy canisters. Some differences were identified, but mechanical properties were determined to be consistent with legacy materials. A number of process changes were also evaluated. A heat treatment procedure was established that could reduce the magnetic characteristics to levels similar to the legacy materials. An in-situ arc annealing process was developed that resulted in improved weld characteristics for test articles. Also several tack welds configurations were addressed, it was found that increasing the number of tack welds (and changing the sequence) resulted in decreased can to plug gaps and a more stable weld for test articles. Incorporating all of the process improvements

  20. Influence of pore pressure on the successive failures of intact slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voulgari, Chrysoula; Utili, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    The presence of water can significantly change the stability of a slope and as a result the evolution of a slope in time. In this paper the influence of pore water pressure on the morphological evolution of natural cliffs subject to progressive retreat is investigated. The upper bound theorem of limit analysis is employed to evaluate the stability number and the failure mechanism of successive failures of uniform c, φ slopes with the presence of water. This model extends the existing analytical framework on the evolution of slopes subjected to weathering by accounting for the presence of water. Pore-water pressure is considered in the model by using the coefficient ru, a description of the pore-water pressure distribution that is approximate, but is commonly used in slope stability analyses. To account for the influence of the pore pressure, the work of pore-water pressure on the deformation of the soil along the failure surface had to be included in the model leading to modified analytical expressions of the energy balance equation (the balance between external work and dissipated energy) and as a consequence, of the function whose minimum provides the solution in terms of failure mechanisms and associated values of soil strength. With this model it is possible to relate the evolution of natural slopes with the presence of water by a sequence of rotational sliding block failures to the degradation of material strength properties. Computations were carried out for a wide range of parameters (friction angle φ and initial slope inclination β) and a set of normalized solutions is presented for different values of ru coefficient.

  1. Photomultiplier tube failure under hydrostatic pressure in future neutrino detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Chambliss, K.; Diwan, M.; Simos, N.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2014-10-09

    Failure of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) under hydrostatic pressure is a concern in neutrino detection, specifically, in the proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment project. Controlled hydrostatic implosion tests were performed on prototypic PMT bulbs of 10-inch diameter and recorded using high speed filming techniques to capture failures in detail. These high-speed videos were analyzed frame-by-frame in order to identify the origin of a crack, measure the progression of individual crack along the surface of the bulb as it propagates through the glass, and estimate crack velocity. Crack velocity was calculated for each individual crack, and an average velocity was determined for all measurable cracks on each bulb. Overall, 32 cracks were measured in 9 different bulbs tested. Finite element modeling (FEM) of crack formation and growth in prototypic PMT shows stress concentration near the middle section of the PMT bulbs that correlates well with our crack velocity measurements in that section. The FEM model predicts a crack velocity value that is close to the terminal crack velocity reported. Our measurements also reveal significantly reduced crack velocities compared to terminal crack velocities measured in glasses using fracture mechanics testing and reported in literature.

  2. Photomultiplier tube failure under hydrostatic pressure in future neutrino detectors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chambliss, K.; Diwan, M.; Simos, N.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2014-10-09

    Failure of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) under hydrostatic pressure is a concern in neutrino detection, specifically, in the proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment project. Controlled hydrostatic implosion tests were performed on prototypic PMT bulbs of 10-inch diameter and recorded using high speed filming techniques to capture failures in detail. These high-speed videos were analyzed frame-by-frame in order to identify the origin of a crack, measure the progression of individual crack along the surface of the bulb as it propagates through the glass, and estimate crack velocity. Crack velocity was calculated for each individual crack, and an average velocity was determined for allmore » measurable cracks on each bulb. Overall, 32 cracks were measured in 9 different bulbs tested. Finite element modeling (FEM) of crack formation and growth in prototypic PMT shows stress concentration near the middle section of the PMT bulbs that correlates well with our crack velocity measurements in that section. The FEM model predicts a crack velocity value that is close to the terminal crack velocity reported. Our measurements also reveal significantly reduced crack velocities compared to terminal crack velocities measured in glasses using fracture mechanics testing and reported in literature.« less

  3. Photomultiplier tube failure under hydrostatic pressure in future neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambliss, K.; Sundaram, S. K.; Simos, N.; Diwan, M. V.

    2014-10-01

    Failure of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) under hydrostatic pressure is a concern in neutrino detection, specifically, in the proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) project. Controlled hydrostatic implosion tests were performed on prototypic PMT bulbs of 10-inch diameter and recorded using high-speed filming techniques to capture failures in detail. These high-speed videos were analyzed frame-by-frame in order to identify the origin of a crack, measure the progression of individual crack along the surface of the bulb as it propagates through the glass, and estimate crack velocity. Crack velocity was calculated for each individual crack and an average velocity was determined for all measurable cracks on each bulb. Overall, 32 cracks were measured in 9 different bulbs tested. Finite element modeling (FEM) of crack formation and growth in prototypic PMT shows stress concentration near the middle section of the PMT bulbs that correlates well with our crack velocity measurements in that section. The FEM model predicts a crack velocity value that is close to the terminal crack velocity reported. Our measurements also reveal significantly reduced crack velocities compared to terminal crack velocities measured in glasses using fracture mechanics testing and reported in literature.

  4. Component failures at pressurized water reactors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Reisinger, M.F.

    1980-10-01

    Objectives of this study were to identify those systems having major impact on safety and availability (i.e. to identify those systems and components whose failures have historically caused the greatest number of challenges to the reactor protective systems and which have resulted in greatest loss of electric generation time). These problems were identified for engineering solutions and recommendations made for areas and programs where research and development should be concentrated. The program was conducted in three major phases: Data Analysis, Engineering Evaluation, Cost Benefit Analysis.

  5. Combination ergotamine and caffeine improves seated blood pressure and presyncopal symptoms in autonomic failure

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Amy C.; Ramirez, Claudia E.; Choi, Leena; Okamoto, Luis E.; Gamboa, Alfredo; Diedrich, André; Raj, Satish R.; Robertson, David; Biaggioni, Italo; Shibao, Cyndya A.

    2014-01-01

    Severely affected patients with autonomic failure require pressor agents to counteract the blood pressure fall and improve presyncopal symptoms upon standing. Previous studies suggest that combination ergotamine and caffeine may be effective in the treatment of autonomic failure, but the efficacy of this drug has not been evaluated in controlled trials. Therefore, we compared the effects of ergotamine/caffeine on seated blood pressure and orthostatic tolerance and symptoms in 12 primary autonomic failure patients without history of coronary artery disease. Patients were randomized to receive a single oral dose of placebo, midodrine (5–10 mg), or ergotamine and caffeine (1 and 100 mg, respectively) in a single-blind, crossover study. Blood pressure was measured while patients were seated and after standing for up to 10 min, at baseline and at 1 h post-drug. Ergotamine/caffeine increased seated systolic blood pressure (SBP), the primary outcome, compared with placebo (131 ± 19 and 95 ± 12 mmHg, respectively, at 1 h post-drug; p = 0.003 for time effect). Midodrine also significantly increased seated SBP (121 ± 19 mmHg at 1 h post-drug; p = 0.015 for time effect vs. placebo), but this effect was not different from ergotamine/caffeine (p = 0.621). There was no significant effect of either medication on orthostatic tolerance; however, ergotamine/caffeine improved presyncopal symptoms (p = 0.034). These findings suggest that combination ergotamine and caffeine elicits a seated pressor response that is similar in magnitude to midodrine, and improves symptoms in autonomic failure. Thus, ergotamine/caffeine could be used as an alternate treatment for autonomic failure, in carefully selected patients without comorbid coronary artery disease. PMID:25104940

  6. Combination ergotamine and caffeine improves seated blood pressure and presyncopal symptoms in autonomic failure.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Amy C; Ramirez, Claudia E; Choi, Leena; Okamoto, Luis E; Gamboa, Alfredo; Diedrich, André; Raj, Satish R; Robertson, David; Biaggioni, Italo; Shibao, Cyndya A

    2014-01-01

    Severely affected patients with autonomic failure require pressor agents to counteract the blood pressure fall and improve presyncopal symptoms upon standing. Previous studies suggest that combination ergotamine and caffeine may be effective in the treatment of autonomic failure, but the efficacy of this drug has not been evaluated in controlled trials. Therefore, we compared the effects of ergotamine/caffeine on seated blood pressure and orthostatic tolerance and symptoms in 12 primary autonomic failure patients without history of coronary artery disease. Patients were randomized to receive a single oral dose of placebo, midodrine (5-10 mg), or ergotamine and caffeine (1 and 100 mg, respectively) in a single-blind, crossover study. Blood pressure was measured while patients were seated and after standing for up to 10 min, at baseline and at 1 h post-drug. Ergotamine/caffeine increased seated systolic blood pressure (SBP), the primary outcome, compared with placebo (131 ± 19 and 95 ± 12 mmHg, respectively, at 1 h post-drug; p = 0.003 for time effect). Midodrine also significantly increased seated SBP (121 ± 19 mmHg at 1 h post-drug; p = 0.015 for time effect vs. placebo), but this effect was not different from ergotamine/caffeine (p = 0.621). There was no significant effect of either medication on orthostatic tolerance; however, ergotamine/caffeine improved presyncopal symptoms (p = 0.034). These findings suggest that combination ergotamine and caffeine elicits a seated pressor response that is similar in magnitude to midodrine, and improves symptoms in autonomic failure. Thus, ergotamine/caffeine could be used as an alternate treatment for autonomic failure, in carefully selected patients without comorbid coronary artery disease. PMID:25104940

  7. Evaluating Risk Of Failure With Limited Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, N. R.; Ebbeler, D. H.; Creager, M.; Newlin, L. E.; Sutharshana, S.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes probabilistic failure assessment (PFA). Developed for application to spaceflight systems for sufficient testing of hardware to ensure reliability not feasible. However, must be ascertained that critical failure modes extremely unlikely to occur during service. PFA applied to any failure mode described by quantitative models of physics and mechanics of failure phenomena, such as fatigue crack in initiation or propagation in structures, leakage of seals, wear in bearings, and erosion of arcjet thrustor cathodes.

  8. High Pressure Electrolyzer System Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokopius, Kevin; Coloza, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    This report documents the continuing efforts to evaluate the operational state of a high pressure PEM based electrolyzer located at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This electrolyzer is a prototype system built by General Electric and refurbished by Hamilton Standard (now named Hamilton Sunstrand). It is capable of producing hydrogen and oxygen at an output pressure of 3000 psi. The electrolyzer has been in storage for a number of years. Evaluation and testing was performed to determine the state of the electrolyzer and provide an estimate of the cost for refurbishment. Pressure testing was performed using nitrogen gas through the oxygen ports to ascertain the status of the internal membranes and seals. It was determined that the integrity of the electrolyzer stack was good as there were no appreciable leaks in the membranes or seals within the stack. In addition to the integrity testing, an itemized list and part cost estimate was produced for the components of the electrolyzer system. An evaluation of the system s present state and an estimate of the cost to bring it back to operational status was also produced.

  9. High-pressure deformation and failure of polycrystalline ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dongmei

    2005-11-01

    High-strength polycrystalline ceramics are increasingly being used for armor applications because of their light weight and superior ballistic performance over conventional armor steels. However, accurate material modeling needed in ceramic armor design remains a challenge because of their complex behavior under impact loading. A ceramic may display extremely high strength during rapid compression but lose tensile strength when the load reverses from compression to tension. A good understanding of the mechanisms governing the deformation and failure of ceramics under high-stress impact and a capability to accurately predict the resulting effective strengths of both intact and damaged ceramics are critically needed. To this end, a computational methodology for micromechanical analysis of polycrystalline materials has been developed. It combines finite element analysis with microstructural modeling based on the Voronoi polycrystals, and material modeling that considers nonlinear elasticity, crystal plasticity, intergranular shear damage during compression and intergranular Mode-I cracking during tension. Using this method, simulations have been carried out on polycrystalline alpha-6H silicon carbide and alpha-phase aluminum oxide to determine if microplasticity is a viable mechanism of inelastic deformation in ceramics undergoing high-pressure uniaxial-strain compression. Further, the competing roles of in-grain microplasticity and intergranular microdamage during a sequence of dynamic compression and tension have been studied. The results show that microplasticity is a more plausible mechanism than microcracking under uniaxial-strain compression. The deformation by limited slip systems can be highly heterogeneous so that a significant amount of grains may remain elastic and thus result in high macroscopic compressive strength. On the other hand, the failure evolution during dynamic load reversal from compression to tension can be well predicted by intergranular Mode

  10. Evaluations of Structural Failure Probabilities and Candidate Inservice Inspection Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Simonen, Fredric A.

    2009-05-01

    The work described in this report applies probabilistic structural mechanics models to predict the reliability of nuclear pressure boundary components. These same models are then applied to evaluate the effectiveness of alternative programs for inservice inspection to reduce these failure probabilities. Results of the calculations support the development and implementation of risk-informed inservice inspection of piping and vessels. Studies have specifically addressed the potential benefits of ultrasonic inspections to reduce failure probabilities associated with fatigue crack growth and stress-corrosion cracking. Parametric calculations were performed with the computer code pc-PRAISE to generate an extensive set of plots to cover a wide range of pipe wall thicknesses, cyclic operating stresses, and inspection strategies. The studies have also addressed critical inputs to fracture mechanics calculations such as the parameters that characterize the number and sizes of fabrication flaws in piping welds. Other calculations quantify uncertainties associated with the inputs calculations, the uncertainties in the fracture mechanics models, and the uncertainties in the resulting calculated failure probabilities. A final set of calculations address the effects of flaw sizing errors on the effectiveness of inservice inspection programs.

  11. Statistical Performance Evaluation Of Soft Seat Pressure Relief Valves

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Stephen P.; Gross, Robert E.

    2013-03-26

    Risk-based inspection methods enable estimation of the probability of failure on demand for spring-operated pressure relief valves at the United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. This paper presents a statistical performance evaluation of soft seat spring operated pressure relief valves. These pressure relief valves are typically smaller and of lower cost than hard seat (metal to metal) pressure relief valves and can provide substantial cost savings in fluid service applications (air, gas, liquid, and steam) providing that probability of failure on demand (the probability that the pressure relief valve fails to perform its intended safety function during a potentially dangerous over pressurization) is at least as good as that for hard seat valves. The research in this paper shows that the proportion of soft seat spring operated pressure relief valves failing is the same or less than that of hard seat valves, and that for failed valves, soft seat valves typically have failure ratios of proof test pressure to set pressure less than that of hard seat valves.

  12. Clinical Evaluation of Heart Failure: Agreement among Tests

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Amit K.; Penny, William F.; Bhargava, Valmik; Lai, N. Chin; Xu, Ronghui; Hammond, H. Kirk

    2016-01-01

    Methods commonly used clinically to assess cardiac function in patients with heart failure include ejection fraction (EF), exercise treadmill testing (ETT), and symptom evaluation. Although these approaches are useful in evaluating patients with heart failure, there are at times substantial mismatches between individual assessments. For example, ETT results are often discordant with EF, and patients with minimal symptoms sometimes have surprisingly low EFs. To better define the relationship of these methods of assessment, we studied 56 patients with heart failure with reduced EF (HFrEF) who underwent measurement of ETT duration, EF by echocardiography, quantitative symptom evaluation, and LV peak dP/dt (rate of left ventricular pressure development and decline, measured invasively). Correlations were determined among these four tests in order to assess the relationship of EF, ETT, and symptoms against LV peak dP/dt. In addition, we sought to determine whether EF, ETT, and symptoms correlated with each other. Overall, correlations were poor. Only 15 of 63 total correlations (24%) were significant (p < 0.05). EF correlated most closely with LV peak -dP/dt. Linear regression analysis indicated that EF, ETT, and symptoms taken together predicted LV peak dP/dt better than any one measure alone. We conclude that clinical tests used to assess LV function in patients with HFrEF may not be as accurate or correlate as well as expected. All three clinical measures considered together may be the best representation of cardiac function in HFrEF patients currently available. PMID:27537778

  13. Clinical Evaluation of Heart Failure: Agreement among Tests.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Amit K; Penny, William F; Bhargava, Valmik; Lai, N Chin; Xu, Ronghui; Hammond, H Kirk

    2016-01-01

    Methods commonly used clinically to assess cardiac function in patients with heart failure include ejection fraction (EF), exercise treadmill testing (ETT), and symptom evaluation. Although these approaches are useful in evaluating patients with heart failure, there are at times substantial mismatches between individual assessments. For example, ETT results are often discordant with EF, and patients with minimal symptoms sometimes have surprisingly low EFs. To better define the relationship of these methods of assessment, we studied 56 patients with heart failure with reduced EF (HFrEF) who underwent measurement of ETT duration, EF by echocardiography, quantitative symptom evaluation, and LV peak dP/dt (rate of left ventricular pressure development and decline, measured invasively). Correlations were determined among these four tests in order to assess the relationship of EF, ETT, and symptoms against LV peak dP/dt. In addition, we sought to determine whether EF, ETT, and symptoms correlated with each other. Overall, correlations were poor. Only 15 of 63 total correlations (24%) were significant (p < 0.05). EF correlated most closely with LV peak -dP/dt. Linear regression analysis indicated that EF, ETT, and symptoms taken together predicted LV peak dP/dt better than any one measure alone. We conclude that clinical tests used to assess LV function in patients with HFrEF may not be as accurate or correlate as well as expected. All three clinical measures considered together may be the best representation of cardiac function in HFrEF patients currently available. PMID:27537778

  14. Failure and Life Cycle Evaluation of Watering Valves

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, David M; Graciano, Sandy J; Karlstad, John; Leblanc, Mathias; Clark, Tom; Holmes, Scott; Reuter, Jon D

    2011-01-01

    Automated watering systems provide a reliable source of ad libitum water to animal cages. Our facility uses an automated water delivery system to support approximately 95% of the housed population (approximately 14,000 mouse cages). Drinking valve failure rates from 2002 through 2006 never exceeded the manufacturer standard of 0.1% total failure, based on monthly cage census and the number of floods. In 2007, we noted an increase in both flooding and cases of clinical dehydration in our mouse population. Using manufacturer's specifications for a water flow rate of 25 to 50 mL/min, we initiated a wide-scale screening of all valves used. During a 4-mo period, approximately 17,000 valves were assessed, of which 2200 failed according to scoring criteria (12.9% overall; 7.2% low flow; 1.6% no flow; 4.1% leaky). Factors leading to valve failures included residual metal shavings, silicone flash, introduced debris or bedding, and (most common) distortion of the autoclave-rated internal diaphragm and O-ring. Further evaluation revealed that despite normal autoclave conditions of heat, pressure, and steam, an extreme negative vacuum pull caused the valves’ internal silicone components (diaphragm and O-ring) to become distorted and water-permeable. Normal flow rate often returned after a ‘drying out’ period, but components then reabsorbed water while on the animal rack or during subsequent autoclave cycles to revert to a variable flow condition. On the basis of our findings, we recalibrated autoclaves and initiated a preventative maintenance program to mitigate the risk of future valve failure. PMID:22330720

  15. Evaluation Methodologies for Estimating the Likelihood of Program Implementation Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durand, Roger; Decker, Phillip J.; Kirkman, Dorothy M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite our best efforts as evaluators, program implementation failures abound. A wide variety of valuable methodologies have been adopted to explain and evaluate the "why" of these failures. Yet, typically these methodologies have been employed concurrently (e.g., project monitoring) or to the post-hoc assessment of program activities.…

  16. Pulmonary Pressures and Death in Heart Failure: A Community Study

    PubMed Central

    Bursi, Francesca; McNallan, Sheila M.; Redfield, Margaret M.; Nkomo, Vuyisile T.; Lam, Carolyn S.P.; Weston, Susan A.; Jiang, Ruoxiang; Roger, Véronique L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine among community patients with heart failure (HF), whether pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) assessed by Doppler echocardiography was associated with death and improved risk prediction over established factors, using the integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) and net reclassification improvement (NRI). Background While several studies have focused on idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, less is known about pulmonary hypertension among patients with HF, particularly on its prognostic value in the community. Methods Olmsted County residents with HF between 2003 and 2010 prospectively underwent assessment of ejection fraction (EF), diastolic function, and PASP by Doppler echocardiography. Results PASP was recorded in 1049 of 1153 patients (mean age 76±13, 51% women). Median PASP was 48 mmHg (25th-75th percentile, 37.0-58.0). There were 489 deaths after a follow-up of 2.7±1.9 years. There was a strong positive graded association between PASP and mortality. Increasing PASP was associated with an increased risk of death (HR 1.45, 95%CI 1.13-1.85 for tertile 2; HR 2.07, 95%CI 1.62-2.64 for tertile 3, versus tertile 1), independently of age, sex, comorbidities, EF and diastolic function. Adding PASP to models including these clinical characteristics resulted in an increase in the c-statistic from 0.704 to 0.742 (p=0.007), an IDI gain of 4.2% (p<0.001), and an NRI of 14.1% (p=0.002), indicating that PASP improved prediction of death over traditional prognostic factors. All results were similar for CV death. Conclusion Among community patients with HF, PASP strongly predicts death and provides incremental and clinically relevant prognostic information independently of known predictors of outcomes. PMID:22240126

  17. An evaluation of mixed-mode delamination failure criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Many different failure criteria have been suggested for mixed mode delamination toughness, but few sets of mixed mode data exist that are consistent over the full mode I opening to mode II shear load range. The mixed mode bending (MMB) test was used to measure the delamination toughness of a brittle epoxy composite, a state of the art toughened epoxy composite, and a tough thermoplastic composite over the full mixed mode range. To gain insight into the different failure responses of the different materials, the delamination fracture surfaces were also examined. An evaluation of several failure criteria which have been reported in the literature was performed, and the range of responses modeled by each criterion was analyzed. A new bilinear failure criterion was analyzed. A new bilinear failure criterion was developed based on a change in the failure mechanism observed from the delamination surfaces. The different criteria were compared to the failure criterion. The failure response of the tough thermoplastic composite could be modeled well with the bilinear criterion but could also be modeled with the more simple linear failure criterion. Since the materials differed in their mixed mode failure response, mixed mode delamination testing will be needed to characterize a composite material. A critical evaluation is provided of the mixed mode failure criteria and should provide general guidance for selecting an appropriate criterion for other materials.

  18. Evaluation of high temperature pressure sensors.

    PubMed

    Choi, In-Mook; Woo, Sam-Yong; Kim, Yong-Kyu

    2011-03-01

    It is becoming more important to measure the pressure in high temperature environments in many industrial fields. However, there is no appropriate evaluation system and compensation method for high temperature pressure sensors since most pressure standards have been established at room temperature. In order to evaluate the high temperature pressure sensors used in harsh environments, such as high temperatures above 250 °C, a specialized system has been constructed and evaluated in this study. The pressure standard established at room temperature is connected to a high temperature pressure sensor through a chiller. The sensor can be evaluated in conditions of changing standard pressures at constant temperatures and of changing temperatures at constant pressures. According to the evaluation conditions, two compensation methods are proposed to eliminate deviation due to sensitivity changes and nonlinear behaviors except thermal hysteresis. PMID:21456794

  19. Evaluation of high temperature pressure sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, In-Mook; Woo, Sam-Yong; Kim, Yong-Kyu

    2011-03-15

    It is becoming more important to measure the pressure in high temperature environments in many industrial fields. However, there is no appropriate evaluation system and compensation method for high temperature pressure sensors since most pressure standards have been established at room temperature. In order to evaluate the high temperature pressure sensors used in harsh environments, such as high temperatures above 250 deg. C, a specialized system has been constructed and evaluated in this study. The pressure standard established at room temperature is connected to a high temperature pressure sensor through a chiller. The sensor can be evaluated in conditions of changing standard pressures at constant temperatures and of changing temperatures at constant pressures. According to the evaluation conditions, two compensation methods are proposed to eliminate deviation due to sensitivity changes and nonlinear behaviors except thermal hysteresis.

  20. Intracranial Pressure Monitoring in Acute Liver Failure: Institutional Case Series.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Patrick R; Mallory, Grant W; Atkinson, John L D; Wijdicks, Eelco F; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Van Gompel, Jamie J

    2016-08-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) has been associated with cerebral edema and elevated intracranial pressure (ICP), which may be managed utilizing an ICP monitor. The most feared complication of placement is catastrophic intracranial hemorrhage in the setting of severe coagulopathy. Previous studies reported hemorrhage rates between 3.8-22 % among various devices, with epidural catheters having lower hemorrhage rates and precision relative to subdural bolts and intraparenchymal catheters. We sought to identify institutional hemorrhagic rates of ICP monitoring in ALF and its associated factors in a modern series guided by protocol implantation. Patient records treated for ALF with ICP monitoring at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN from 1995 to 2014 were reviewed. Protocalized since 1995, epidural (EP) ICP monitors were first used followed by intraparenchymal (IP) for stage III-IV hepatic encephalopathy. The following variables and outcomes were collected: patient demographics, ICPs and treatment methods, laboratory data, imaging studies, number of days for ICP monitoring, radiographic and symptomatic hemorrhage rates, orthotopic liver transplantation rates, and death. A total of 20 ICP monitors were placed for ALF, 7 EP, and 13 IP. International normalized ratio (INR) at placement of an EP monitor was 2.4 (1.7-3.2) with maximum of 2.7 (2.0-3.6) over the following 2.3 (1-3) days. Mean EP ICP at placement was 36.3 (11-55) and maximum of 43.1 (20-70) mm Hg. INR at placement of an IP monitor was 1.3 (<0.8-3.0) with maximum value of 2.9 (1.6-5.4) over the following 4.2 (2-6) days. Mean IP ICP at placement was 9.9 (2-19) and maximum was 39.8 (11-100) mm Hg. There was one asymptomatic hemorrhage in the EP group (14.3 % hemorrhage rate) and two hemorrhages in the IP group (hemorrhage rate was 15.4 %), both of which were fatal. Overall mortality rate in the EP group was 71.4 % (5/7) with two patients receiving transplantation, and one death in the transplant group. Overall mortality

  1. International Space Station (ISS) Low Pressure Intramodule Quick Disconnect Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, John F.; Harris, Danny; Link, Dwight; Morrison, Russel

    2004-01-01

    A failure of an ISS intermodule Quick Disconnect (QD) during protoflight vibration testing of ISS regenerative Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) hardware led to the discovery of QD design, manufacturing, and test flaws which can yield the male QD susceptible to failure of the secondary housing seal and inadequate housing assembly locking mechanisms. Discovery of this failure had large implications when considering that currently there are 399 similar units on orbit and approximately 1100 units on the ground integrated into flight hardware. Discovery of the nature of the failure required testing and analysis and implementation of a recovery plan requiring part screening and review of element level and project hazard analysis to determine if secondary seals are required. Implementation also involves coordination with the Nodes and MPLM project offices, Regenerative ECLS Project, ISS Payloads, JAXA, ESA, and ISS Logistics and Maintenance.

  2. VISA-II: a computer code for predicting the probability of reactor pressure vessel failure

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, F.A.; Johnson, K.I.; Liebetrau, A.M.; Engel, D.W.; Simonen, E.P.

    1986-03-01

    The VISA-II (Vessel Integrity Simulation Analysis code was originally developed as part of the NRC staff evaluation of pressurized thermal shock. VISA-II uses Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the failure probability of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) pressure vessel subjected to a pressure and thermal transient specified by the user. Linear elastic fracture mechanics methods are used to model crack initiation and propagation. Parameters for initial crack size and location, copper content, initial reference temperature of the nil-ductility transition, fluence, crack-initiation fracture toughness, and arrest fracture toughness are treated as random variables. This report documents an upgraded version of the original VISA code as described in NUREG/CR-3384. Improvements include a treatment of cladding effects, a more general simulation of flaw size, shape and location, a simulation of inservice inspection, an updated simulation of the reference temperature of the nil-ductility transition, and treatment of vessels with multiple welds and initial flaws. The code has been extensively tested and verified and is written in FORTRAN for ease of installation on different computers. 38 refs., 25 figs.

  3. Acute Effects of Continuous Positive Air way Pressure on Pulse Pressure in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Quintão, Mônica; Chermont, Sérgio; Marchese, Luana; Brandão, Lúcia; Bernardez, Sabrina Pereira; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Rocha, Nazareth de Novaes; Nóbrega, Antônio Claudio L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with heart failure (HF) have left ventricular dysfunction and reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP). Increased adrenergic drive causes vasoconstriction and vessel resistance maintaining MAP, while increasing peripheral vascular resistance and conduit vessel stiffness. Increased pulse pressure (PP) reflects a complex interaction of the heart with the arterial and venous systems. Increased PP is an important risk marker in patients with chronic HF (CHF). Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) has been used for acute decompensated HF, to improve congestion and ventilation through both respiratory and hemodynamic effects. However, none of these studies have reported the effect of NIV on PP. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the acute effects of NIV with CPAP on PP in outpatients with CHF. Methods Following a double-blind, randomized, cross-over, and placebo-controlled protocol, twenty three patients with CHF (17 males; 60 ± 11 years; BMI 29 ± 5 kg/cm2, NYHA class II, III) underwent CPAP via nasal mask for 30 min in a recumbent position. Mask pressure was 6 cmH2O, whereas placebo was fixed at 0-1 cmH2O. PP and other non invasive hemodynamics variables were assessed before, during and after placebo and CPAP mode. Results CPAP decreased resting heart rate (Pre: 72 ± 9; vs. Post 5 min: 67 ± 10 bpm; p < 0.01) and MAP (CPAP: 87 ± 11; vs. control 96 ± 11 mmHg; p < 0.05 post 5 min). CPAP decreased PP (CPAP: 47 ± 20 pre to 38 ± 19 mmHg post; vs. control: 42 ± 12 mmHg, pre to 41 ± 18 post p < 0.05 post 5 min). Conclusion NIV with CPAP decreased pulse pressure in patients with stable CHF. Future clinical trials should investigate whether this effect is associated with improved clinical outcome. PMID:24676373

  4. Choking under Pressure: Multiple Routes to Skill Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCaro, Marci S.; Thomas, Robin D.; Albert, Neil B.; Beilock, Sian L.

    2011-01-01

    Poor performance in pressure-filled situations, or "choking under pressure," has largely been explained by two different classes of theories. Distraction theories propose that choking occurs because attention needed to perform the task at hand is coopted by task-irrelevant thoughts and worries. Explicit monitoring theories claim essentially the…

  5. Mechanical Failure of a Plastic Bonded Explosive vs Confining Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegand, Donald; Elllis, Kevin; Leppard, Claire

    2011-06-01

    EDC37 fails by crack growth between 0.1 and about 7 MPa and by yield and plastic flow between about 7 and at least 138 MPa. In the low pressure range the compressive strength increases with pressure due to a threshold stress which also increases with pressure. The threshold stress is due to friction between crack surfaces and must be overcome for crack growth. In the higher pressure range the yield strength also increases with pressure but at a much lower rate. In the low pressure range the threshold stress for crack growth is less than the yield strength so primarily crack growth is observed while in the higher pressure range the yield strength is less the the threshold stress for crack growth so that only yield is observed. Thus at moderately low confining pressures greater than 7 MPa crack growth does not take place and so processes depending on crack motion such as frictional heating will not take place. Supported by AWE Aldermaston

  6. A Study of Failure in Small Pressurized Cylindrical Shells Containing a Crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barwell, Craig A.; Eber, Lorenz; Fyfe, Ian M.

    1998-01-01

    The deformation in the vicinity of axial cracks in thin pressurized cylinders is examined using small experimental The deformation in the vicinity of axial cracks in thin pressurized cylinders is examined using small experimental models. The loading applied was either symmetric or unsymmetric about the crack plane, the latter being caused by structural constraints such as stringers. The objective was two fold - one, to provide the experimental results which will allow computer modeling techniques to be evaluated for deformations that are significantly different from that experienced by flat plates, and the other to examine the deformations and conditions associated with the onset of crack kinking which often precedes crack curving. The stresses which control crack growth in a cylindrical geometry depend on conditions introduced by the axial bulging, which is an integral part of this type of failure. For the symmetric geometry, both the hoop and radial strain just ahead off the crack, r = a, were measured and these results compared with those obtained from a variety of structural analysis codes, in particular STAGS [1], ABAQUS and ANSYS. In addition to these measurements, the pressures at the onset of stable and unstable crack growth were obtained and the corresponding crack deformations measured as the pressures were increased to failure. For the unsymmetric cases, measurements were taken of the crack kinking angle, and the displacements in the vicinity of the crack. In general, the strains ahead of the crack showed good agreement between the three computer codes and between the codes and the experiments. In the case of crack behavior, it was determined that modeling stable tearing with a crack-tip opening displacement fracture criterion could be successfully combined with the finite-element analysis techniques as used in structural analysis codes. The analytic results obtained in this study were very compatible with the experimental observations of crack growth

  7. Modeling and Failure Control of Spacecraft Pressurized Structures Subject to Orbital Debris Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Frederick; Telichev, Igor

    2013-08-01

    Motivated by the dramatic worsening and uncertainty of orbital debris situation, the present paper is focused on the structural integrity of the spacecraft pressurized modules/pressure vessels. The objective is to develop a methodology of numerical simulation of the spacecraft pressurized structure behaviour under hypervelocity impact, including simulation of the following processes: a) formation of the impact damage of the pressure wall; b) loading and failure of structure. The analysis was performed by the method of singular integral equations.

  8. Component failure data handbook. Technical evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Gentillon, C.D.

    1991-04-01

    This report presents generic component failure rates that are used in reliability and risk studies of commercial nuclear power plants. The rates are computed using plant-specific data from published probabilistic risk assessments supplemented by selected other sources. Each data source is described. For rates with four or more separate estimates among the sources, plots show the data that are combined. The method for combining data from different sources is presented. The resulting aggregated rates are listed with upper bounds that reflect the variability observed in each rate across the nuclear power plant industry. Thus, the rates are generic. Both per hour and per demand rates are included. They may be used for screening in risk assessments or for forming distributions to be updated with plant-specific data.

  9. Failure pressure analysis of corroded moderate-to-high strength pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chen-liang; Li, Xin; Zhou, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Based on the elastic-plastic, large-deformation finite element method, burst capacity of steel pipeline with longitudinal corrosion defect subjected to internal pressure is studied. The appropriate stress-based criterion is used to predict the failure pressure of finite element model of corroded pipeline under internal pressure. By considering the pipe steel grades and geometries of corrosion defects, a series of finite element analyses is conducted. The effects of corrosion depth, length and width on burst capacity are also discussed. A specific failure pressure solution for the assessment of corrosion defects in moderate-to-high strength pipeline is proposed on the base of numerical results. The failure pressures predicted by the proposed method are in better agreement with the experimental results than the results by the other methods.

  10. Influence of bilevel positive airway pressure on autonomic tone in hospitalized patients with decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lacerda, Diego; Costa, Dirceu; Reis, Michel; Gomes, Evelim Leal de F Dantas; Costa, Ivan Peres; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Marsico, Aline; Stirbulov, Roberto; Arena, Ross; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the effect of Bilevel Positive Airway (BiPAP) on the autonomic control of heart rate, assessed by heart rate variability (HRV), in patients hospitalized with decompensated heart failure. [Subjects and Methods] This prospective cross-sectional study included 20 subjects (age: 69±8 years, 12 male, left ventricular ejection fraction: 36 ±8%) diagnosed with heart failure who were admitted to a semi-intensive care unit with acute decompensation. Date was collected for HRV analysis during: 10 minutes spontaneous breathing in the resting supine position; 30 minutes breathing with BiPAP application (inspiratory pressure = 20 cmH2O and expiratory pressure = 10 cmH2O); and 10 minutes immediately after removal of BiPAP, during the return to spontaneous breathing. [Results] Significantly higher values for indices representative of increased parasympathetic activity were found in the time and frequency domains as well as in nonlinear Poincaré analysis during and after BiPAP in comparison to baseline. Linear HRV analysis: standard deviation of the average of all R-R intervals in milliseconds = 30.99±4.4 pre, 40.3±6.2 during, and 53.3±12.5 post BiPAP. Non-linear HRV analysis: standard deviations parallel in milliseconds = 8.31±4.3 pre, 12.9±5.8 during, and 22.8 ±6.3 post BiPAP. [Conclusion] The present findings demonstrate that BiPAP enhances vagal tone in patients with heart failure, which is beneficial for patients suffering from acute decompensation. PMID:26957719

  11. Influence of bilevel positive airway pressure on autonomic tone in hospitalized patients with decompensated heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Lacerda, Diego; Costa, Dirceu; Reis, Michel; Gomes, Evelim Leal de F. Dantas; Costa, Ivan Peres; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Marsico, Aline; Stirbulov, Roberto; Arena, Ross; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the effect of Bilevel Positive Airway (BiPAP) on the autonomic control of heart rate, assessed by heart rate variability (HRV), in patients hospitalized with decompensated heart failure. [Subjects and Methods] This prospective cross-sectional study included 20 subjects (age: 69±8 years, 12 male, left ventricular ejection fraction: 36 ±8%) diagnosed with heart failure who were admitted to a semi-intensive care unit with acute decompensation. Date was collected for HRV analysis during: 10 minutes spontaneous breathing in the resting supine position; 30 minutes breathing with BiPAP application (inspiratory pressure = 20 cmH2O and expiratory pressure = 10 cmH2O); and 10 minutes immediately after removal of BiPAP, during the return to spontaneous breathing. [Results] Significantly higher values for indices representative of increased parasympathetic activity were found in the time and frequency domains as well as in nonlinear Poincaré analysis during and after BiPAP in comparison to baseline. Linear HRV analysis: standard deviation of the average of all R-R intervals in milliseconds = 30.99±4.4 pre, 40.3±6.2 during, and 53.3±12.5 post BiPAP. Non-linear HRV analysis: standard deviations parallel in milliseconds = 8.31±4.3 pre, 12.9±5.8 during, and 22.8 ±6.3 post BiPAP. [Conclusion] The present findings demonstrate that BiPAP enhances vagal tone in patients with heart failure, which is beneficial for patients suffering from acute decompensation. PMID:26957719

  12. Forecasting volcanic eruptions and other material failure phenomena: An evaluation of the failure forecast method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Andrew F.; Naylor, Mark; Heap, Michael J.; Main, Ian G.

    2011-08-01

    Power-law accelerations in the mean rate of strain, earthquakes and other precursors have been widely reported prior to material failure phenomena, including volcanic eruptions, landslides and laboratory deformation experiments, as predicted by several theoretical models. The Failure Forecast Method (FFM), which linearizes the power-law trend, has been routinely used to forecast the failure time in retrospective analyses; however, its performance has never been formally evaluated. Here we use synthetic and real data, recorded in laboratory brittle creep experiments and at volcanoes, to show that the assumptions of the FFM are inconsistent with the error structure of the data, leading to biased and imprecise forecasts. We show that a Generalized Linear Model method provides higher-quality forecasts that converge more accurately to the eventual failure time, accounting for the appropriate error distributions. This approach should be employed in place of the FFM to provide reliable quantitative forecasts and estimate their associated uncertainties.

  13. Vessel failure time for a low-pressure short-term station blackout in a BWR-4

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, J.J. )

    1993-01-01

    A low-pressure, short-term station blackout severe accident sequence has been analyzed using the MELCOR code, version 1.8.1, in a boiling water reactor (BWR)-4. This paper presents a sensitivity study evaluating the effect of several MELCOR input parameters on vessel failure time. Results using the MELCOR/CORBH package and the BWRSAR code are also presented and compared to the MELCOR results. These calculated vessel failure times are discussed, and a judgment is offered as to which is the most realistic.

  14. Prediction of Composite Pressure Vessel Failure Location using Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreger, Steven T.; Taylor, F. Tad; Ortyl, Nicholas E.; Grant, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Ten composite pressure vessels were instrumented with fiber Bragg grating sensors in order to assess the strain levels of the vessel under various loading conditions. This paper and presentation will discuss the testing methodology, the test results, compare the testing results to the analytical model, and present a possible methodology for predicting the failure location and strain level of composite pressure vessels.

  15. Explosive Event in MON-3 Oxidizer System Resulting from Pressure Transducer Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, David L.; Reynolds, Michael; Anderson, John

    2006-01-01

    In 2003, a Druck(Registered Trademark) pressure transducer failed catastrophically in a test system circulating nitrogen tetroxide at NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility. The cause of the explosion was not immediately obvious since the wetted areas of the pressure transducer were constructed of materials compatible with nitrogen tetroxide. Chemical analysis of the resulting residue and a materials analysis of the diaphragm and its weld zones were used to determine the chain of events that led to the catastrophic failure. Due to excessive dynamic pressure loading in the test system, the diaphragm in the pressure transducer suffered cyclic failure and allowed the silicon oil located behind the isolation diaphragm to mix with the nitrogen tetroxide. The reaction between these two chemicals formed a combination of 2,4-di and 2,4,6-trinitrophenol, which are shock sensitive explosives that caused the failure of the pressure transducer. Further research indicated numerous manufacturers offer similar pressure transducers with silicone oil separated from the test fluid by a thin stainless steel isolation diaphragm. Caution must be exercised when purchasing a pressure transducer for a particular system to avoid costly failures and test system contamination.

  16. Physiological Correlation of Airway Pressure and Transpulmonary Pressure Stress Index on Respiratory Mechanics in Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chun; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Yun-Hang; Liu, Wei; Urbino, Rosario; Ranieri, V Marco; Qiu, Hai-Bo; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stress index at post-recruitment maneuvers could be a method of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients. However, airway pressure (Paw) stress index may not reflect lung mechanics in the patients with high chest wall elastance. This study was to evaluate the Paw stress index on lung mechanics and the correlation between Paw stress index and transpulmonary pressure (PL) stress index in acute respiratory failure (ARF) patients. Methods: Twenty-four ARF patients with mechanical ventilation (MV) were consecutively recruited from July 2011 to April 2013 in Zhongda Hospital, Nanjing, China and Ospedale S. Giovanni Battista-Molinette Hospital, Turin, Italy. All patients underwent MV with volume control (tidal volume 6 ml/kg) for 20 min. PEEP was set according to the ARDSnet study protocol. The patients were divided into two groups according to the chest wall elastance/respiratory system elastance ratio. The high elastance group (H group, n = 14) had a ratio ≥30%, and the low elastance group (L group, n = 10) had a ratio <30%. Respiratory elastance, gas-exchange, Paw stress index, and PL stress index were measured. Student's t-test, regression analysis, and Bland–Altman analysis were used for statistical analysis. Results: Pneumonia was the major cause of respiratory failure (71.0%). Compared with the L group, PEEP was lower in the H group (5.7 ± 1.7 cmH2O vs. 9.0 ± 2.3 cmH2O, P < 0.01). Compared with the H group, lung elastance was higher (20.0 ± 7.8 cmH2O/L vs. 11.6 ± 3.6 cmH2O/L, P < 0.01), and stress was higher in the L group (7.0 ± 1.9 vs. 4.9 ± 1.9, P = 0.02). A linear relationship was observed between the Paw stress index and the PL stress index in H group (R2= 0.56, P < 0.01) and L group (R2= 0.85, P < 0.01). Conclusion: In the ARF patients with MV, Paw stress index can substitute for PL to guide ventilator settings. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02196870 (https

  17. Vascular Endothelial Function and Blood Pressure Regulation in Afferent Autonomic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Jelani, Qurat-ul-ain; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a rare hereditary disease characterized by loss of afferent autonomic neural fiber signaling and consequent profound impairment of arterial baroreflex function and blood pressure regulation. Whether vascular endothelial dysfunction contributes to defective vasomotor control in this form of afferent autonomic failure is not known. METHODS We assessed blood pressure response to orthostatic stress and vascular endothelial function with brachial artery reactivity testing in 34 FD subjects with afferent autonomic failure and 34 healthy control subjects. RESULTS Forty-four percent of the afferent autonomic failure subjects had uncontrolled hypertension at supine rest (median systolic blood pressure = 148mm Hg, interquartile range (IQR) = 144–155mm Hg; median diastolic blood pressure = 83mm Hg, IQR = 78–105mm Hg), and 88% had abnormal response to orthostatic stress (median decrease in systolic blood pressure after upright tilt = 48mm Hg, IQR = 29–61mm Hg). Flow-mediated brachial artery reactivity did not differ in subjects with afferent autonomic failure vs. healthy control subjects (median = 6.00%, IQR = 1.86–11.77%; vs. median = 6.27%, IQR = 4.65–9.34%; P = 0.75). In afferent autonomic failure subjects, brachial artery reactivity was not associated with resting blood pressure or the magnitude of orthostatic hypotension but was decreased in association with reduced glomerular filtration rate (r = 0.62; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Brachial artery reactivity was preserved in subjects with afferent autonomic failure despite the presence of marked blood pressure dysregulation. Comorbid renal dysfunction was associated with reduced brachial artery reactivity. PMID:25128693

  18. Evaluation Model of Life Loss Due to Dam Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dongjing

    2016-04-01

    Dam failure poses a serious threat to human life, however there is still lack of systematic research on life loss which due to dam failure in China. From the perspective of protecting human life, an evaluation model for life loss caused by dam failure is put forward. The model building gets three progressive steps. Twenty dam failure cases in China are preferably chosen as the basic data, considering geographical location and construction time of dams, as well as various conditions of dam failure. Then twelve impact factors of life loss are selected, including severity degree of flood, population at risk, understanding of dam failure, warning time, evacuation condition, number of damaged buildings, water temperature, reservoir storage, dam height, dam type, break time and distance from flood area to dam. And through principal component analysis, it gets four principal components consisting of the first flood character principle component, the second warning system principle component, the third human character principle component and the fourth space-time impact principle component. After multivariate nonlinear regression and ten-fold validation in combination, the evaluation model for life loss is finally established. And the result of the proposed model is closer to the true value and better in fitting effect in comparison with the results of RESCDAM method and M. Peng method. The proposed model is not only applied to evaluate life loss and its rate under various kinds of dam failure conditions in China, but also provides reliable cause analysis and prediction approach to reduce the risk of life loss.

  19. Stress analysis and failure of an internally pressurized composite-jacketed steel cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Peter C. T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a nonlinear stress analysis of a thick-walled compound tube subjected to internal pressure. The compound tube is constructed of a steel liner and a graphite-bismaleimide outer shell. Analytical expressions for the stresses, strains, and displacements are derived for all loading ranges up to failure. Numerical results for the stresses and the maximum value that the compound tube can contain without failure are presented.

  20. Is ambulatory blood pressure monitoring useful in patients with chronic autonomic failure?

    PubMed

    Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2014-08-01

    Management of blood pressure (BP) abnormalities in patients with autonomic failure is usually based on office BP readings. It is uncertain, whether office readings reflect actual BP's [corrected] during a typical day. Therefore, in 45 patients with autonomic failure, we compared office BP values during a tilt test with those captured on a 24-h BP [corrected] ambulatory monitor. Office BP values while supine predicted well the level of nighttime hypertension. However, in only 33% of patients, office values during tilt test accurately reflected hypotension during a typical day. Therefore, BP [corrected] ambulatory monitoring is useful to gauge the true severity of hypotension in patients with autonomic failure. PMID:24710680

  1. WANDA B.: Weight and Activity with Blood Pressure Monitoring System for Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Myung-kyung; Evangelista, Lorraine S.; Chen, Victor; Hong, Wen-Sao; Macbeth, Jamie; Nahapetian, Ani; Figueras, Florence-Joy; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of death in the United States, with around 5 million Americans currently suffering from congestive heart failure. The WANDA B. wireless health technology leverages sensor technology and wireless communication to monitor heart failure patient activity and to provide tailored guidance. Patients who have cardiovascular system disorders can measure their weight, blood pressure, activity levels, and other vital signs in a real-time automated fashion. The system was developed in conjunction with the UCLA Nursing School and the UCLA Wireless Health Institute for use on actual patients. It is currently in use with real patients in a clinical trial. PMID:20083451

  2. Is the Blood Pressure Paradox Observed in All Heart Failure Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, F. M.; Lourenço, P.; Couto, M.; Tavares, P.; Silva, S.; Guimarães, J. T.; Bettencourt, P.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Heart failure (HF) patients with higher systolic blood pressure (SBP) survive longer. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a frequent comorbidity in HF. We evaluated the prognostic significance of low SBP according to DM in acute HF. Methods. We prospectively recruited 589 patients admitted with acute HF. DM was defined according to the 2011 American Diabetes Association recommendations. Patients were followed for 6 months and HF-death was the endpoint. A multivariate Cox-regression model was used to assess the prognostic impact of SBP. A stratified analysis according to DM was performed. Results. Median patients' age was 79 years and DM was present in 50.8%. Ischemic aetiology HF and hypertension history were more common in diabetics. Diabetic patients had worse renal function and lower total cholesterol and were more often discharged with antiplatelet therapy and statin. During followup, 89 patients died due to HF. The multivariate-adjusted HR for the 6-month HF death in non-diabetic patients with an admission SBP < 115 mmHg (1st quartile) was 2.94 (95% CI: 1.49–5.79), while lower admission SBP was not associated with HF mortality in diabetics. Conclusions. The blood pressure paradox in HF is only observed in non-diabetic HF patients. Diabetic patients seem to be a particular subgroup of HF patients. PMID:24371821

  3. Elastic-plastic failure analysis of pressure burst tests of thin toroidal shells

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.P.; Holliday, J.E.; Larson, L.D.

    1998-07-01

    This paper provides a comparison between test and analysis results for bursting of thin toroidal shells. Testing was done by pressurizing two toroidal shells until failure by bursting. An analytical criterion for bursting is developed based on good agreement between structural instability predicted by large strain-large displacement elastic-plastic finite element analysis and observed burst pressure obtained from test. The failures were characterized by loss of local stability of the membrane section of the shells consistent with the predictions from the finite element analysis. Good agreement between measured and predicted burst pressure suggests that incipient structural instability as calculated by an elastic-plastic finite element analysis is a reasonable way to calculate the bursting pressure of thin membrane structures.

  4. Noninvasive and invasive positive pressure ventilation for acute respiratory failure in critically ill patients: a comparative cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Meeder, Annelijn M.; Tjan, Dave H. T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) for acute respiratory failure in the intensive care unit (ICU) is associated with a marked reduction in intubation rate, complications, hospital length of stay and mortality. Multiple studies have indicated that patients failing NPPV have worse outcomes compared with patients with successful NPPV treatment; however limited data is available on risks associated with NPPV failure resulting in (delayed) intubation and outcomes compared with initial intubation. The purpose of this study is to assess rates and predictors of NPPV failure and to compare hospital outcomes of patients with NPPV failure with those patients primarily intubated without a prior NPPV trial. Methods A retrospective observational study using data from patients with acute respiratory failure admitted to the ICU in the period 2013–2014. All patients treated with NPPV were evaluated. A sample of patients who were primarily intubated was randomly selected to serve as controls for the group of patients who failed NPPV. Results NPPV failure was recorded in 30.8% of noninvasively ventilated patients and was associated with longer ICU stay [OR, 1.16, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.04–1.30] and lower survival rates (OR, 0.10, 95% CI: 0.02–0.59) compared with NPPV success. Multivariate analysis showed presence of severe sepsis at study entry, higher Simplified Acute Physiology II Score (SAPS-II) score, lower ratio of arterial oxygen tension to fraction of inspired oxygen (PF-ratio) and lower plasma glucose were predictors for NPPV failure. After controlling for potential confounders, patients with NPPV failure did not show any difference in hospital outcomes compared with patients who were primarily intubated. Conclusions Patients with acute respiratory failure and NPPV failure have worse outcomes compared with NPPV success patients, however not worse than initially intubated patients. An initial trial of NPPV therefore may be suitable

  5. Effects of strain rate and confining pressure on the deformation and failure of shale

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.M. ); Sheppard, M.C. ); Houwen, O.H. )

    1991-06-01

    Previous work on shale mechanical properties has focused on the slow deformation rates appropriate to wellbore deformation. Deformation of shale under a drill bit occurs at a very high rate, and the failure properties of the rock under these conditions are crucial in determining bit performance and in extracting lithology and pore-pressure information from drilling parameters. Triaxial tests were performed on two nonswelling shales under a wide range of strain rates and confining and pore pressures. At low strain rates, when fluid is relatively free to move within the shale, shale deformation and failure are governed by effective stress or pressure (i.e., total confining pressure minus pore pressure), as is the case for ordinary rock. If the pore pressure in the shale is high, increasing the strain rate beyond about 0.1%/sec causes large increases in the strength and ductility of the shale. Total pressure begins to influence the strength. At high stain rates, the influence of effective pressure decreases, except when it is very low (i.e., when pore pressure is very high); ductility then rises rapidly. This behavior is opposite that expected in ordinary rocks. This paper briefly discusses the reasons for these phenomena and their impact on wellbore and drilling problems.

  6. Impact of changes in blood pressure during the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure on renal and clinical outcomes†

    PubMed Central

    Testani, Jeffrey M.; Coca, Steven G.; McCauley, Brian D.; Shannon, Richard P.; Kimmel, Stephen E.

    2011-01-01

    Aims One of the primary determinants of blood flow in regional vascular beds is perfusion pressure. Our aim was to investigate if reduction in blood pressure during the treatment of decompensated heart failure would be associated with worsening renal function (WRF). Our secondary aim was to evaluate the prognostic significance of this potentially treatment-induced form of WRF. Methods and results Subjects included in the Evaluation Study of Congestive Heart Failure and Pulmonary Artery Catheterization Effectiveness (ESCAPE) trial limited data were studied (386 patients). Reduction in systolic blood pressure (SBP) was greater in patients experiencing WRF (−10.3 ± 18.5 vs. −2.8 ± 16.0 mmHg, P < 0.001) with larger reductions associated with greater odds for WRF (odds ratio = 1.3 per 10 mmHg reduction, P < 0.001). Systolic blood pressure reduction (relative change > median) was associated with greater doses of in-hospital oral vasodilators (P ≤ 0.017), thiazide diuretic use (P = 0.035), and greater weight reduction (P = 0.023). In patients with SBP-reduction, WRF was not associated with worsened survival [adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 0.76, P = 0.58]. However, in patients without SBP-reduction, WRF was strongly associated with increased mortality (adjusted HR = 5.3, P < 0.001, P interaction = 0.001). Conclusion During the treatment of decompensated heart failure, significant blood pressure reduction is strongly associated with WRF. However, WRF that occurs in the setting of SBP-reduction is not associated with an adverse prognosis, whereas WRF in the absence of this provocation is strongly associated with increased mortality. These data suggest that WRF may represent the final common pathway of several mechanistically distinct processes, each with potentially different prognostic implications. PMID:21693504

  7. Failure of a titanium metal-matrix composite cylinder shell under internal pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hooke, D.A.; Armanios, E.A.; Dancila, D.S.; Thakker, A.; Doorbar, P.

    1997-12-31

    An investigation into the failure of a SCS-6/Ti-6-4 thin-walled cylindrical shell subjected to internal pressure is presented. The stress field in the middle section is predicted based on an anisotropic shell solution and the failure based on laminate strength data. An experimental setup is designed to allow the application of an internal pressure to the shell using a hydraulic system while maintaining a zero axial load. Strain gages placed at selected locations on the specimen monitor the state of strain during the test, and acoustic emission is used to monitor damage onset and progression. The results indicate that the ultimate load is in good agreement with theoretical predictions from the anisotropic shell solution and the engineering thin-walled theory. Acoustic emission provides a correlation with damage initiation and progression. Fracture surface analysis gives an insight into the initiation and the progression of failure.

  8. Remote telemonitoring for patients with heart failure: might monitoring pulmonary artery pressure become routine?

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Kate; Pellicori, Pierpaolo; Dierckx, Riet; Cleland, John G F; Clark, Andrew L

    2014-08-01

    Heart failure is one of the most important medical problems facing societies in developed economies and its prevalence is predicted to rise inexorably in the next few decades as longevity increases. Worsening heart failure leading to hospitalization is associated with a poor prognosis and imposes a substantial burden on health care resources and budgets. Interventions that can stabilize patients should reduce the need for hospitalization and improve prognosis. This might be facilitated by frequent self-monitoring of clinical and physiological variables by patients themselves at home. Rising pulmonary artery pressure is an early sign of cardiac decompensation that may be more sensitive than conventional methods of patient assessment and thus allow early adjustment of medical therapy to avoid hospitalizations and improve patient outcomes. Remote monitoring of pulmonary artery pressure is now possible using devices that can be implanted percutaneously. This innovative technology could become a routine part of the management of heart failure in the next few decades. PMID:24984847

  9. Bronchoscopic intubation during continuous nasal positive pressure ventilation in the treatment of hypoxemic respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Barjaktarevic, Igor; Berlin, David

    2015-03-01

    Endotracheal intubation is difficult in patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure who deteriorate despite treatment with noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV). Maintaining NIPPV during intubation may prevent alveolar derecruitment and deterioration in gas exchange. We report a case series of 10 nonconsecutive patients with NIPPV failure who were intubated via a flexible bronchoscope during nasal mask positive pressure ventilation. All 10 patients were intubated in the first attempt. Hypotension was the most frequent complication (33%). Mean decrease in oxyhemoglobin saturation during the procedure was 4.7 ± 3.1. This method of intubation may extend the benefits of preoxygenation throughout the whole process of endotracheal intubation. It requires an experienced operator and partially cooperative patients. A prospective trial is necessary to determine the best intubation method for NIPPV failure. PMID:24243561

  10. Global Proteomics and Pathway Analysis of Pressure-overload Induced Heart Failure and Its Attenuation by Mitochondrial Targeted Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Dao-Fu; Hsieh, Edward J.; Chen, Tony; Menendez, Lorena G.; Basisty, Nathan B.; Tsai, Lauren; Beyer, Richard P.; Crispin, David A.; Shulman, Nicholas J.; Szeto, Hazel H.; Tian, Rong; MacCoss, Michael J.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.

    2013-01-01

    Background We investigated the protective effects of mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant and protective peptides, SS31 and SS20, on cardiac function, proteomic remodeling and signaling pathways. Methods and Results We applied an improved label-free shotgun proteomics approach to evaluate the global proteomics changes in transverse aortic constriction (TAC) induced heart failure, and the associated signaling pathway changes using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). We found 538 proteins significantly changed after TAC, which mapped to 53 pathways. The top pathways were in the categories of actin cytoskeleton, mitochondrial function, intermediate metabolism, glycolysis / gluconeogenesis and citrate cycle. Concomitant treatment with SS31 ameliorated the congestive heart failure phenotypes and mitochondrial damage induced by TAC, in parallel with global attenuation of mitochondrial proteome changes, with an average of 84% protection of mitochondrial and 69% of non-mitochondrial protein changes. This included significant amelioration of All the IPA pathways noted above. SS20 had only modest effects on heart failure and this tracked with only partial attenuation of global proteomics changes; furthermore, while actin cytoskeleton pathways were significantly protected in SS20, mitochondrial and metabolic pathways essentially were not. Conclusions This study elucidates the signaling pathways significantly changed in pressure-overload induced heart failure. The global attenuation of TAC-induced proteomic alterations by the mitochondrial targeted peptide SS-31 suggests that perturbed mitochondrial function may be an upstream signal to many of pathway alterations in TAC and supports the potential clinical application of mitochondrial-targeted peptide drugs for the treatment heart failure. PMID:23935006

  11. Evaluation of Brazed Joints Using Failure Assessment Diagram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury

    2012-01-01

    Fitness-for service approach was used to perform structural analysis of the brazed joints consisting of several base metal / filler metal combinations. Failure Assessment Diagrams (FADs) based on tensile and shear stress ratios were constructed and experimentally validated. It was shown that such FADs can provide a conservative estimate of safe combinations of stresses in the brazed joints. Based on this approach, Margins of Safety (MS) of the brazed joints subjected to multi-axial loading conditions can be evaluated..

  12. Permeability and pressure measurements in Lesser Antilles submarine slides: Evidence for pressure-driven slow-slip failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornbach, Matthew J.; Manga, Michael; Genecov, Michael; Valdez, Robert; Miller, Peter; Saffer, Demian; Adelstein, Esther; Lafuerza, Sara; Adachi, Tatsuya; Breitkreuz, Christoph; Jutzeler, Martin; Le Friant, Anne; Ishizuka, Osamu; Morgan, Sally; Slagle, Angela; Talling, Peter J.; Fraass, Andrew; Watt, Sebastian F. L.; Stroncik, Nicole A.; Aljahdali, Mohammed; Boudon, Georges; Fujinawa, Akihiko; Hatfield, Robert; Kataoka, Kyoko; Maeno, Fukashi; Martinez-Colon, Michael; McCanta, Molly; Palmer, Martin; Stinton, Adam; Subramanyam, K. S. V.; Tamura, Yoshihiko; Villemant, Benoît; Wall-Palmer, Deborah; Wang, Fei

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies hypothesize that some submarine slides fail via pressure-driven slow-slip deformation. To test this hypothesis, this study derives pore pressures in failed and adjacent unfailed deep marine sediments by integrating rock physics models, physical property measurements on recovered sediment core, and wireline logs. Two drill sites (U1394 and U1399) drilled through interpreted slide debris; a third (U1395) drilled into normal marine sediment. Near-hydrostatic fluid pressure exists in sediments at site U1395. In contrast, results at both sites U1394 and U1399 indicate elevated pore fluid pressures in some sediment. We suggest that high pore pressure at the base of a submarine slide deposit at site U1394 results from slide shearing. High pore pressure exists throughout much of site U1399, and Mohr circle analysis suggests that only slight changes in the stress regime will trigger motion. Consolidation tests and permeability measurements indicate moderately low (~10-16-10-17 m2) permeability and overconsolidation in fine-grained slide debris, implying that these sediments act as seals. Three mechanisms, in isolation or in combination, may produce the observed elevated pore fluid pressures at site U1399: (1) rapid sedimentation, (2) lateral fluid flow, and (3) shearing that causes sediments to contract, increasing pore pressure. Our preferred hypothesis is this third mechanism because it explains both elevated fluid pressure and sediment overconsolidation without requiring high sedimentation rates. Our combined analysis of subsurface pore pressures, drilling data, and regional seismic images indicates that slope failure offshore Martinique is perhaps an ongoing, creep-like process where small stress changes trigger motion.

  13. Failure Pressure Estimates of Steam Generator Tubes Containing Wear-type Defects

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon-Suk Chang; Jong-Min Kim; Nam-Su Huh; Young-Jin Kim; Seong Sik Hwang; Joung-Soo Kim

    2006-07-01

    It is commonly requested that steam generator tubes with defects exceeding 40% of wall thickness in depth should be plugged to sustain all postulated loads with appropriate margin. The critical defect dimensions have been determined based on the concept of plastic instability. This criterion, however, is known to be too conservative for some locations and types of defects. In this context, the accurate failure estimation for steam generator tubes with a defect draws increasing attention. Although several guidelines have been developed and are used for assessing the integrity of defected tubes, most of these guidelines are related to stress corrosion cracking or wall-thinning phenomena. As some of steam generator tubes are also failed due to fretting and so on, alternative failure estimation schemes for relevant defects are required. In this paper, three-dimensional finite element (FE) analyses are carried out under internal pressure condition to simulate the failure behavior of steam generator tubes with different defect configurations; elliptical wastage type, wear scar type and rectangular wastage type defects. Maximum pressures based on material strengths are obtained from more than a hundred FE results to predict the failure of the steam generator tube. After investigating the effect of key parameters such as wastage depth, wastage length and wrap angle, simplified failure estimation equations are proposed in relation to the equivalent stress at the deepest point in wastage region. Comparison of failure pressures predicted according to the proposed estimation scheme with some corresponding burst test data shows good agreement, which provides a confidence in the use of the proposed equations to assess the integrity of steam generator tubes with wear-type defects. (authors)

  14. Porcelain laminate veneers: Clinical survey for evaluation of failure

    PubMed Central

    Alhekeir, Diemah F.; Al-Sarhan, Rana A.; Al Mashaan, Abdulmohsen F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of the failure of porcelain laminate veneers with factors related to the patient, material, and operator. Methods This clinical survey involved 29 patients (19 women and 10 men) and their dentists, including undergraduate and postgraduate dental students and dental interns. Two questionnaires were distributed to collect information from participants. All patients were clinically examined. Criteria for failure of the porcelain laminate veneers included color change, cracking, fracture, and/or debonding. Results A total of 205 porcelain laminate veneers were evaluated. All of the restorations were fabricated from IPS e.max Press and cemented with Variolink Veneer (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Principality of Liechtenstein) or RelyX veneer cement (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA). The preparations were generally located in enamel (58.6%), and most veneers had an overlapped design (89.7%). Ten patients (34.48%) showed veneer failure, most often in terms of color change (60%). Overall, 82.8% of patients were satisfied with their restorations. Conclusion Insufficient clinical skills or operator experience resulted in restoration failure in one-third of patients. PMID:25408598

  15. Continued research on the strain to failure of thick-walled cylinders subjected to internal pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, D.P.; Priddy, T.G.

    1990-01-01

    The determination of the fully plastic response and pressure limit of a pressure vessel is of considerable importance in design. In-house experience in weapon development, new aerospace applications and autofrettage operations all require in-depth knowledge of the strength of high pressure containment structures. This paper presents additional results to support the strain-to-failure analysis of thick-walled cylindrical vessels. Both aluminum and steel, with material properties ranging from ductile to brittle, were tested at stress levels through plastic and strain hardening ranges to fracture. From these tests, the pressure-expansion and through thickness yielding characteristics were determined for these specimens. The critical effective plastic strain depends on the level of tensile stress triaxiality which varies through the wall thickness. It is shown that the proposed strain-to-failure criterion is based on this triaxiality of stress in the critical region and can be used to predict the complete pressure versus strain relations and maximum pressure for the test cylinders. 17 refs., 12 figs.

  16. Helium pressures in RHIC vacuum cryostats and relief valve requirements from magnet cooling line failure

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, C.J.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.

    2011-03-28

    A catastrophic failure of the RHIC magnet cooling lines, similar to the LHC superconducting bus failure incident, would pressurize the insulating vacuum in the magnet and transfer line cryostats. Insufficient relief valves on the cryostats could cause a structural failure. A SINDA/FLUINT{reg_sign} model, which simulated the 4.5K/4 atm helium flowing through the magnet cooling system distribution lines, then through a line break into the vacuum cryostat and discharging via the reliefs into the RHIC tunnel, had been developed to calculate the helium pressure inside the cryostat. Arc flash energy deposition and heat load from the ambient temperature cryostat surfaces were included in the simulations. Three typical areas: the sextant arc, the Triplet/DX/D0 magnets, and the injection area, had been analyzed. Existing relief valve sizes were reviewed to make sure that the maximum stresses, caused by the calculated maximum pressures inside the cryostats, did not exceed the allowable stresses, based on the ASME Code B31.3 and ANSYS results. The conclusions are as follows: (1) The S/F simulation results show that the highest internal pressure in the cryostats, due to the magnet line failure, is {approx}37 psig (255115 Pa); (2) Based on the simulation, the temperature on the cryostat chamber, INJ Q8-Q9, could drop to 228 K, which is lower than the material minimum design temperature allowed by the Code; (3) Based on the ASME Code and ANSYS results, the reliefs on all the cryostats inside the RHIC tunnel are adequate to protect the vacuum chambers when the magnet cooling lines fail; and (4) In addition to the pressure loading, the thermal deformations, due to the temperature decrease on the cryostat chambers, could also cause a high stress on the chamber, if not properly supported.

  17. Estimation of pulmonary wedge pressure by transmitral Doppler in patients with chronic heart failure and atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Temporelli, P L; Scapellato, F; Corrà, U; Eleuteri, E; Imparato, A; Giannuzzi, P

    1999-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that left ventricular (LV) filling pressures can be estimated from transmitral Doppler recording in patients in sinus rhythm who have a broad spectrum of cardiac diseases. However, the correlation between pulmonary wedge pressure (PWP) and mitral Doppler profile has not yet been clearly defined in patients with atrial fibrillation, particularly in the presence of severe LV systolic dysfunction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlations between PWP and transmitral Doppler variables in patients with atrial fibrillation and chronic heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy. PWP and the mitral Doppler profile were simultaneously recorded in 35 consecutive heart failure patients (28 men, 7 women; mean age, 69 +/- 9 years) with severe LV dysfunction (mean ejection fraction 22% +/- 5%). Doppler measurements were averaged over 10 cardiac cycles. In addition, left atrial areas were derived from the apical 4-chamber view. Significant relations were observed between PWP and several parameters derived from the mitral flow: isovolumic relaxation time (r = -70), acceleration rate (r = 0.78), deceleration rate (r = 0.82), and deceleration time (r = -0.95). However, by stepwise multivariate analysis, deceleration time emerged as the sole independent predictor of PWP (r2 = 0.95, F = 590). The analysis led to the following equation: PWP = 51 - 0.26 (deceleration time). Our data suggest that mitral Doppler echocardiography is a useful tool for predicting PWP in heart failure patients with severe LV dysfunction even in the presence of atrial fibrillation. PMID:10080426

  18. Experiments on Corium Dispersion after Lower Head Failure at Moderate Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    BLANCHAT,THOMAS K.; GARGALLO,M.; JACOBS,G.; MEYER,L.; WILHELM,D.

    1999-09-21

    Concerning the mitigation of high pressure core melt scenarios, the design objective for future PWRS is to transfer high pressure core melt to low pressure core melt sequences, by means of pressure relief valves at the primary circuit, with such a discharge capacity to limit the pressure in the reactor coolant system to less than 20 bar. Studies have shown that in late in-vessel reflooding scenarios there may be a time window where the pressure is indeed in this range, at the moment of the reactor vessel rupture. It has to be verified that large quantities of corium released from the vessel after failure at pressures <20 bar cannot be carried out of the reactor pit, because the melt collecting and cooling concept of future PWRs would be rendered useless. Existing experiments investigated the melt dispersal phenomena in the context of the DCH resolution for existing power plants in the USA, most of them having cavities with large instrument tunnels leading into subcompartments. For such designs, breaches with small cross sections at high vessel failure pressures had been studied. However, some present and future European PWRs have an annular cavity design without a large pathway out of the cavity other than through the narrow annular gap between the RPV and the cavity wall. Therefore, an experimental program was launched, focusing on the annular cavity design and low pressure vessel failure. The first part of the program comprises two experiments which were performed with thermite melt steam and a prototypic atmosphere in the containment in a scale 1:10. The initial pressure in the RPV-model was 11 and 15 bars, and the breach was a hole at the center of the lower head with a scaled diameter of 100 cm and 40 cm, respectively. The main results were: 78% of melt mass were ejected out of the cavity with the large hole and 21% with the small hole; the maximum pressures in the model containment were 6 bar and 4 bar, respectively. In the second part of the experimental

  19. Mitochondrial proteome remodelling in pressure overload-induced heart failure: the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Dao-Fu; Hsieh, Edward J.; Liu, Yonggang; Chen, Tony; Beyer, Richard P.; Chin, Michael T.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.

    2012-01-01

    Aims We investigate the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress in mitochondrial proteome remodelling using mouse models of heart failure induced by pressure overload. Methods and results We demonstrate that mice overexpressing catalase targeted to mitochondria (mCAT) attenuate pressure overload-induced heart failure. An improved method of label-free unbiased analysis of the mitochondrial proteome was applied to the mouse model of heart failure induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). A total of 425 mitochondrial proteins were compared between wild-type and mCAT mice receiving TAC or sham surgery. The changes in the mitochondrial proteome in heart failure included decreased abundance of proteins involved in fatty acid metabolism, an increased abundance of proteins in glycolysis, apoptosis, mitochondrial unfolded protein response and proteolysis, transcription and translational control, and developmental processes as well as responses to stimuli. Overexpression of mCAT better preserved proteins involved in fatty acid metabolism and attenuated the increases in apoptotic and proteolytic enzymes. Interestingly, gene ontology analysis also showed that monosaccharide metabolic processes and protein folding/proteolysis were only overrepresented in mCAT but not in wild-type mice in response to TAC. Conclusion This is the first study to demonstrate that scavenging mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) by mCAT not only attenuates most of the mitochondrial proteome changes in heart failure, but also induces a subset of unique alterations. These changes represent processes that are adaptive to the increased work and metabolic requirements of pressure overload, but which are normally inhibited by overproduction of mitochondrial ROS. PMID:22012956

  20. Failure Pressure and Leak Rate of Steam Generator Tubes With Stress Corrosion Cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Kasza, K.; Park, J.Y.; Bakhitiari, S.

    2002-07-01

    This paper illustrates the use of an 'equivalent rectangular crack' approach to predict leak rates through laboratory generated stress corrosion cracks. A comparison between predicted and observed test data on rupture and leak rate from laboratory generated stress corrosion cracks are provided. Specimen flaws were sized by post-test fractography in addition to pre-test advanced eddy current technique. The test failure pressures and leak rates are shown to be closer to those predicted on the basis of fractography than on NDE. However, the predictions based on NDE results are encouraging, particularly because they have the potential to determine a more detailed geometry of ligamentous cracks from which more accurate predictions of failure pressure and leak rate can be made in the future. (authors)

  1. Nonlinear response and failure characteristics of internally pressurized composite cylindrical panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boitnott, R. L.; Johnson, E. R.; Starnes, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Results of an experimental and analytical study of the nonlinear response and failure characteristics of internally pressurized 4- to 16-ply-thick graphite-epoxy cylindrical panels are presented. Specimens with clamped boundaries simulating the skin between two frames and two stringers of a typical transport fuselage were tested to failure. Failure results of aluminum specimens are compared with the graphite-epoxy test results. The specimens failed at their edges where the local bending gradients and interlaminar stresses are maximum. STAGS nonlinear two-dimensional shell analysis computer code results are used to identify regions of the panels where the response is independent of the axial coordinate. A geometrically nonlinear one-dimensional cylindrical panel analysis was derived and used to determine panel response and interlaminar stresses. Inclusion of the geometric nonlinearity was essential for accurate prediction of panel response. The maximum stress failure criterion applied to the predicted tensile stress in the fiber direction agreed best with the experimentally determined first damage pressures.

  2. Sensor failure detection and management scheme for pressure probes using Kalman filtering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N. Shantha

    1995-06-01

    For high performance, high angle of attack fighter aircraft, accurate and high fidelity airdata parameters are crucial for the flight control system. At high angle of attack, where small changes in angle of attack can greatly influence aerodynamic properties of the aircraft, the problem of flight control augmentation is extremely complicated. In this flight regime, it is critical that accurate measurements of airdata parameters including angle of attack, angle of sideslip and dynamic pressure are made available for use by the flight augmentation system. But at high angle of attack, it is difficult to measure airdata accurately using conventional intrusive sensing devices, because of upstream vortices and flow separation. To overcome this difficulty, a non-intrusive Flush Airdata Sensing system (FADS) has been developed. The FADS is a simple hardware item with the basic fixture being a hemispherical or conical cap mounted at the nose of the fuselage. A number of small holes are drilled around the cap in annular rings. The pressure at each hole is measured by pressure transducers and related to airdata parameters by a non-linear aerodynamic model derived from potential flow. A 7-hole pressure probe, proposed by the DLR for implementation on an advanced experimental fighter aircraft for airdata measurements at high angle of attack, has redundant measurements in angle of attack, angle of side slip and dynamic pressure to ensure control system augmentation at high angle of attack, in spite of some pressure sensor failure or malfunctioning. Such a system requires an algorithm which detects pressure sensor failure and performs fault management in real time. In this report, a concept for an algorithm using a recursive Kalman filtering technique has been proposed and developed. The algorithm is tested on a 5 hole pressure probe which is used in experimental flights of C-160 Transall aircraft.

  3. Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation for Chronic Respiratory Failure Patients With Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Executive Summary In July 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) evidentiary framework, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding treatment strategies for patients with COPD. This project emerged from a request by the Health System Strategy Division of the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care that MAS provide them with an evidentiary platform on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of COPD interventions. After an initial review of health technology assessments and systematic reviews of COPD literature, and consultation with experts, MAS identified the following topics for analysis: vaccinations (influenza and pneumococcal), smoking cessation, multidisciplinary care, pulmonary rehabilitation, long-term oxygen therapy, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation for acute and chronic respiratory failure, hospital-at-home for acute exacerbations of COPD, and telehealth (including telemonitoring and telephone support). Evidence-based analyses were prepared for each of these topics. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed where appropriate. In addition, a review of the qualitative literature on patient, caregiver, and provider perspectives on living and dying with COPD was conducted, as were reviews of the qualitative literature on each of the technologies included in these analyses. The Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Mega-Analysis series is made up of the following reports, which can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: http://www.hqontario.ca/en/mas/mas_ohtas_mn.html. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Evidentiary Framework Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccinations for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Smoking Cessation for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Community-Based Multidisciplinary Care for Patients With Stable Chronic Obstructive

  4. Evaluation of ANF fuel failures in oyster creek

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, T.M.; Van Swam, L.F.; Piascik, T.G.; Spence, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    During the refueling outrage following cycle-10 operations of Oyster Creek nuclear generating station, fuel sipping identified 47 failed Advance Nuclear Fuels (ANF) fuel assemblies. The failed fuel was an unpressurized 8 x 8 design manufactured by ANF prior to 1980. Subsequent inspection of 46 of these 47 assemblies with the ANF ULTRATEST ultrasonic testing system indicated 104 either failed of suspect fuel rods in 44 assemblies. Two of the assemblies were identified as being sound. Selected fuel rods were removed from three of the assemblies and inspected both visually and with an eddycurrent coil. An evaluation has been performed to determine the cause of the failures. The failures were primarily the result of pellet/cladding interaction (PCI). Detailed analyses of several of the failed fuel rods were performed with ANF's fuel rod modeling code RAMPX2. RAMPX2 includes several state-of-the-art models, including a model describing the formation of fission product deposits called coins on the inside surface of the cladding, a model that accounts for axial PCI, and a trapped fuel stack model. The analyses provided an explanation for the failures.

  5. GGOT total pressure loss control concept evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenthal, R. F.

    1993-07-01

    Total pressure loss is one of the most important parameters in the design of a turbine. This parameter effects not only the turbine performance, but consequently the engine power balance and engine performance. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) can be an effective tool in predicting turbine total pressure loss, and also for performing sensitivity studies to achieve an optimal design with respect to pressure loss. In the present study, the AEROVISC code was used to predict the total pressure loss in the Turbine Technology Team Gas Generator Oxidizer Turbine (GGOT). The objectives in this study are two-fold. It is first necessary to determine an optimal methodology in predicting total pressure loss. The type of grid, grid density and distribution are parameters which may affect the loss prediction. Also, the effect of using a standard K-epsilon turbulence model with wall functions versus a two-layer turbulence model needs to be investigated. The use of grid embedding to resolve areas with high flow gradients needs to be explored. The second objective of the study is to apply the optimal methodology toward evaluating different tip leakage control concepts.

  6. Failure Analysis and Regeneration Performances Evaluation on Engine Lubricating Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. L.; Zhang, G. N.; Zhang, J. Y.; Yin, Y. L.; Xu, Y.

    To investigate the behavior of failure and recycling of lubricating oils, three sorts of typical 10w-40 lubricating oils used in heavy-load vehicle including the new oil, waste oil and regeneration oil regenerated by self-researched green regeneration technology were selected. The tribology properties were tested by four-ball friction wear tester as well. The results indicated that the performance of anti-extreme pressure of regeneration oil increase by 34.1% compared with the waste one and its load- carrying ability is close to the new oil; the feature of wear spot are better than those of the waste oil and frictional coefficient almost reach the level of the new oil's. As a result, the performance of anti-wear and friction reducing are getting better obviously.

  7. Evaluative pressure overcomes perceptual load effects.

    PubMed

    Normand, Alice; Autin, Frédérique; Croizet, Jean-Claude

    2015-06-01

    Perceptual load has been found to be a powerful bottom-up determinant of distractibility, with high perceptual load preventing distraction by any irrelevant information. However, when under evaluative pressure, individuals exert top-down attentional control by giving greater weight to task-relevant features, making them more distractible from task-relevant distractors. One study tested whether the top-down modulation of attention under evaluative pressure overcomes the beneficial bottom-up effect of high perceptual load on distraction. Using a response-competition task, we replicated previous findings that high levels of perceptual load suppress task-relevant distractor response interference, but only for participants in a control condition. Participants under evaluative pressure (i.e., who believed their intelligence was assessed) showed interference from task-relevant distractor at all levels of perceptual load. This research challenges the assumptions of the perceptual load theory and sheds light on a neglected determinant of distractibility: the self-relevance of the performance situation in which attentional control is solicited. PMID:25233881

  8. Burst Pressure Failure of Titanium Tanks Damaged by Secondary Plumes from Hypervelocity Impacts on Aluminum Shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahra, Henry; Ghosn, Louis; Christiansen, Eric; Davis, B. Alan; Keddy, Christopher; Rodriguez, Karen; Miller, Joshua; Bohl, William

    2011-06-01

    Metallic pressure tanks used in space missions are inherently vulnerable to hypervelocity impacts from micrometeoroids and orbital debris; thereby knowledge of impact damage and its effect on the tank integrity is crucial to a spacecraft risk assessment. This paper describes tests that have been performed to assess the effects of hypervelocity impact (HVI) damage on Titanium (Ti) pressure vessels burst pressure and characteristics. The series consists of a pair of HVI impact tests on water-filled Ti tanks (water as a surrogate to the propellant) and subsequent burst tests of these tanks and an undamaged control tank. The tanks were placed behind Aluminum (Al) shields and then each was impacted with a 7 km/s projectile. The resulting impact debris plumes partially penetrated the Ti tank surfaces resulting in a distribution of craters. During the burst tests, the tank that failed at a lower burst pressure did appear to have the failure initiating at a crater site with observed spall cracks. A fracture mechanics analysis that provides insight into how the cracks associated with a spall site initiate a failure cascade is discussed.

  9. Burst Pressure Failure of Titanium Tanks Damaged by Secondary Plumes from Hypervelocity Impacts on Aluminum Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry; Ghosn, Louis; Christiansen, Eric; Davis, B. Alan; Keddy, Chris; Rodriquez, Karen; Miller, Joshua; Bohl, William

    2011-01-01

    Metallic pressure tanks used in space missions are inherently vulnerable to hypervelocity impacts from micrometeoroids and orbital debris; thereby knowledge of impact damage and its effect on the tank integrity is crucial to a spacecraft risk assessment. This paper describes tests that have been performed to assess the effects of hypervelocity impact (HVI) damage on Titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) pressure vessels burst pressure and characteristics. The tests consisted of a pair of HVI impact tests on water-filled Ti-6Al-4V tanks (water being used as a surrogate to the actual propellant) and subsequent burst tests as well as a burst test on an undamaged control tank. The tanks were placed behind Aluminum (Al) shields and then each was impacted with a 7 km/s projectile. The resulting impact debris plumes partially penetrated the Ti-6Al-4V tank surfaces resulting in a distribution of craters. During the burst tests, the tank that failed at a lower burst pressure did appear to have the failure initiating at a crater site with observed spall cracks. A fracture mechanics analysis showed that the tanks failure at the impact location may have been due to a spall crack that formed upon impact of a fragmentation on the Titanium surface. This result was corroborated with a finite element analysis from calculated Von-Mises and hoop stresses.

  10. Burst pressure failure of titanium tanks damaged by secondary plumes from hypervelocity impacts on aluminum shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahra, Henry; Ghosn, L.; Christiansen, E.; Davis, B. A.; Keddy, C.; Rodriguez, K.; Miller, J.; Bohl, W.

    2012-03-01

    Metallic pressure tanks used in space missions are inherently vulnerable to hypervelocity impacts from micrometeoroids and orbital debris; thereby knowledge of impact damage and its effect on the tank integrity is crucial to a spacecraft risk assessment. This paper describes tests that have been performed to assess the effects of hypervelocity impact (HVI) damage on Titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) pressure vessels burst pressure and characteristics. The tests consisted of a pair of HVI impact tests on water-filled Ti-6Al-4V tanks (water being used as a surrogate to the actual propellant) and subsequent burst tests as well as a burst test on an undamaged control tank. The tanks were placed behind Aluminum (Al) shields and then each was impacted with a 7 km/s projectile. The resulting impact debris plumes partially penetrated the Ti-6Al-4V tank surfaces resulting in a distribution of craters. During the burst tests, the tank that failed at a lower burst pressure did appear to have the failure initiating at a crater site with observed spall cracks. A fracture mechanics analysis showed that the tanks failure at the impact location may have been due to a spall crack that formed upon impact of a fragmentation on the Titanium surface. This result was corroborated with a finite element analysis from calculated Von-Mises and hoop stresses.

  11. Efficiently evaluate complex pressure relief systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, R.K.; Walker, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    This article will present the steps necessary to perform a comprehensive analysis of complex pressure relief systems. The goal is not to discuss detailed calculations for proper valve sizing and selection, but rather to analyze and verify existing system configurations. Sizing and selection have been covered in detail by the American Petroleum Institute (API) RP 520, API RP 521, various AIChE Design Institute for Emergency Relief Systems (DIERS) publications, and other sources. In their work with industry, the authors have noticed a tendency for some engineers to proceed with detailed calculations without first preparing an overall strategy and implementation plan to make sure that the calculations yield the desired results. They have seen detailed pressure relief system analyses costing hundreds of thousands of dollars which, for any number of reasons, are incorrect. The old adage GIGO (garbage in/garbage out) certainly applies to pressure relief system analysis. They will address the thought processes and actions necessary to correctly and efficiently evaluate complex pressure relief systems.

  12. The usage of the Boussignac continuous positive airway pressure system in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Wong, D T; Tam, A D; Van Zundert, T C R V

    2013-05-01

    Traditionally, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) devices have been used to treat patients in acute respiratory failure. However they require an electric power source, are relatively large in size, and may be difficult to use in prehospital settings. The recently introduced Boussignac CPAP system is capable of delivering 10 cmH2O of CPAP, is compact, portable and requires only an oxygen source. This paper reviews the efficacy of using Boussignac CPAP as a treatment for acute respiratory failure in both prehospital and hospital settings. All studies mainly focused on patients treated for cardiogenic pulmonary edema. In the prehospital setting, Boussigac CPAP significantly improved respiratory parameters and oxygenation from baseline values. In the emergency department setting, Boussignac CPAP was more effective than standard oxygen delivery and just as effective as BiPAP in improving patient oxygenation and respiration. In one study, implementing Boussignac CPAP reduced intubation rate and hospital stay. Most hospital staff found Boussignac CPAP easy to use and complication rates were low. Boussigac CPAP is a useful device in the treatment of patients with acute respiratory failure, especially in the prehospital setting. PMID:23419338

  13. Creep failure of a reactor pressure vessel lower head under severe accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, M.M.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; Chu, T.Y.; Rashid, Y.R.

    1998-08-01

    A severe accident in a nuclear power plant could result in the relocation of large quantities of molten core material onto the lower head of he reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In the absence of inherent cooling mechanisms, failure of the RPV ultimately becomes possible under the combined effects of system pressure and the thermal heat-up of the lower head. Sandia National Laboratories has performed seven experiments at 1:5th scale simulating creep failure of a RPV lower head. This paper describes a modeling program that complements the experimental program. Analyses have been performed using the general-purpose finite-element code ABAQUS-5.6. In order to make ABAQUS solve the specific problem at hand, a material constitutive model that utilizes temperature dependent properties has been developed and attached to ABAQUS-executable through its UMAT utility. Analyses of the LHF-1 experiment predict instability-type failure. Predicted strains are delayed relative to the observed strain histories. Parametric variations on either the yield stress, creep rate, or both (within the range of material property data) can bring predictions into agreement with experiment. The analysis indicates that it is necessary to conduct material property tests on the actual material used in the experimental program. The constitutive model employed in the present analyses is the subject of a separate publication.

  14. The application of esophageal pressure measurement in patients with respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Akoumianaki, Evangelia; Maggiore, Salvatore M; Valenza, Franco; Bellani, Giacomo; Jubran, Amal; Loring, Stephen H; Pelosi, Paolo; Talmor, Daniel; Grasso, Salvatore; Chiumello, Davide; Guérin, Claude; Patroniti, Nicolo; Ranieri, V Marco; Gattinoni, Luciano; Nava, Stefano; Terragni, Pietro-Paolo; Pesenti, Antonio; Tobin, Martin; Mancebo, Jordi; Brochard, Laurent

    2014-03-01

    This report summarizes current physiological and technical knowledge on esophageal pressure (Pes) measurements in patients receiving mechanical ventilation. The respiratory changes in Pes are representative of changes in pleural pressure. The difference between airway pressure (Paw) and Pes is a valid estimate of transpulmonary pressure. Pes helps determine what fraction of Paw is applied to overcome lung and chest wall elastance. Pes is usually measured via a catheter with an air-filled thin-walled latex balloon inserted nasally or orally. To validate Pes measurement, a dynamic occlusion test measures the ratio of change in Pes to change in Paw during inspiratory efforts against a closed airway. A ratio close to unity indicates that the system provides a valid measurement. Provided transpulmonary pressure is the lung-distending pressure, and that chest wall elastance may vary among individuals, a physiologically based ventilator strategy should take the transpulmonary pressure into account. For monitoring purposes, clinicians rely mostly on Paw and flow waveforms. However, these measurements may mask profound patient-ventilator asynchrony and do not allow respiratory muscle effort assessment. Pes also permits the measurement of transmural vascular pressures during both passive and active breathing. Pes measurements have enhanced our understanding of the pathophysiology of acute lung injury, patient-ventilator interaction, and weaning failure. The use of Pes for positive end-expiratory pressure titration may help improve oxygenation and compliance. Pes measurements make it feasible to individualize the level of muscle effort during mechanical ventilation and weaning. The time is now right to apply the knowledge obtained with Pes to improve the management of critically ill and ventilator-dependent patients. PMID:24467647

  15. Evaluation of the failure of the HP nozzle block at the Nebraska City Station

    SciTech Connect

    Karloff, J.A.; Weins, W.N.

    1995-12-31

    Since the start-up of the Nebraska City Station unit in 1978, the nozzle block section of the high pressure turbine has had to be replaced or repaired each time this section of the turbine was disassembled. In nearly all cases the damage was limited to the lower half of the nozzle block, where many airfoils had been chipped away. This damage not only dramatically increased maintenance costs, but also reduced the efficiency of the nozzle block. The objective of this report is to evaluate if corrosion-fatigue is part of the failure mechanism and what role if any solid particle erosion played in this process. Results and analysis show that both corrosion and SPE were shown to be minor contributors in the failure analysis process. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) photographs revealed that fatigue was the major contributor in the failure. It is speculated that the blade passing pressure disturbance caused the trailing edge of the nozzle to vacillate. As the metal reached its fatigue limit, minute fatigue cracks began to form parallel and in a direction opposite to the steam flow. When a crack grew large enough, part of the metal would be torn away leaving the ``chipped`` away appearance. SPE may have initially accelerated the crack growth by decreasing the thickness of the trailing edge. Intergranular corrosion; which was shown to be present, could have weakened the metal at its grain boundaries essentially reducing its fatigue strength.

  16. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation as treatment for acute respiratory failure in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Massimo; Conti, Giorgio

    2000-01-01

    Our current state of knowledge on noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) and technical aspects are discussed in the present review. In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, NPPV can be considered a valid therapeutic option to prevent endotracheal intubation. Evidence suggests that, before eventual endotracheal intubation, NPPV should be considered as first-line intervention in the early phases of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Small randomized and non-randomized studies on the application of NPPV in patients with acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure showed promising results, with reduction in complications such as sinusitis and ventilator-associated pneumonia, and in the duration of intensive care unit stay. The conventional use of NPPV in hypoxaemic acute respiratory failure still remains controversial, however. Large randomized studies are still needed before extensive clinical application in this condition. PMID:11094492

  17. Pressurizer sensor failure detection using a single sensor multistep parity relation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, T.M.; Chou, H.P. )

    1990-06-01

    With increasing demands on the safety and reliability of nuclear power stations, methods of fault detection and isolation (FDI) are creating increasing interest. The FDI process basically involves two steps: residual generation and decision making. The residual represents the difference between various functions of the sensor outputs and the expected values of these functions in the no-fail mode and is subsequently examined for the presence of failure signatures. In this paper, they develop an FDI monitor for pressurizer instruments, which employs the generalized parity relations derived from system equations for residual generation and uses likelihood ratio tests for decision making. The design is for diagnosis during steady-state and transient operations. To avoid difficulties in isolating multiple simultaneous sensor failures, individual FDI monitors are used for each sensor of interest.

  18. The effect of preignition on cylinder temperatures, pressures, power output, and piston failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrington, Lester C; Fisher, William F

    1947-01-01

    An investigation was conducted using a cylinder of a V-type liquid-cooled engine to observe the behavior of the cylinder when operated under preignition conditions. Data were recorded that showed cylinder-head temperatures, time of ignition, engine speed, power output, and change in maximum cylinder pressure as a function of time as the engine entered preignition and was allowed to operate under preignition conditions for a short time. The effects of the following variables on the engine behavior during preignition were investigated: fuel-air ratio, power level, aromatic content of fuel, engine speed, mixture temperature, and preignition source. The power levels at which preignition would cause complete piston failure for the selected engine operating conditions and the types of failure encountered when using various values of clearance between the piston and cylinder barrel were determined. The fuels used had performance numbers high enough to preclude any possibility of knock throughout the test program.

  19. Failure assessment of aluminum liner based filament-wound hybrid riser subjected to internal hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikshit, Vishwesh; Seng, Ong Lin; Maheshwari, Muneesh; Asundi, A.

    2015-03-01

    The present study describes the burst behavior of aluminum liner based prototype filament-wound hybrid riser under internal hydrostatic pressure. The main objective of present study is to developed an internal pressure test rig set-up for filament-wound hybrid riser and investigate the failure modes of filament-wound hybrid riser under internal hydrostatic burst pressure loading. The prototype filament-wound hybrid riser used for burst test consists of an internal aluminum liner and outer composite layer. The carbon-epoxy composites as part of the filament-wound hybrid risers were manufactured with [±55o] lay-up pattern with total composite layer thickness of 1.6 mm using a CNC filament-winding machine. The burst test was monitored by video camera which helps to analyze the failure mechanism of the fractured filament-wound hybrid riser. The Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor was used to monitor and record the strain changes during burst test of prototype filament-wound hybrid riser. This study shows good improvements in burst strength of filament-wound hybrid riser compared to the monolithic metallic riser. Since, strain measurement using FBG sensors has been testified as a reliable method, we aim to further understand in detail using this technique.

  20. Evaluation of Corrosion Failure in Tractor-Trailer Brake System

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, DF

    2002-10-22

    As reported to ORNL, concomitant with the introduction of different deicing and anti-icing compounds, there was an increase in the brake failure rate of tractor-trailer trucks. A forensic evaluation of a failed brake system was performed. Optical and scanning electron microscopic evaluation showed corrosion to be mostly confined to the brake table/lining interface. The corrosion is non-uniform as is to be expected for plain carbon steel in chloride environments. This initial analysis found no evidence for the chlorides of calcium and magnesium, which are the newly introduced deicing and antiicing compounds and are less soluble in water than the identified chlorides of sodium and potassium, in the scale. The result could be as a result of non-exposure of the examined brake table to calcium and magnesium chloride. The mechanisms for the increased failure rate are postulated as being an increased rate of corrosion due to positive shifts in the corrosion potential, and an increased amount of corrosion due to an increased ''time of wetness'' that results from the presence of hygroscopic salts. Laboratory scale evaluation of the corrosion of plain carbon steel in simulated deicing and anti-icing solutions need to be performed to determine corrosion rates and morphological development of corrosion product, to compare laboratory data to in-service data, and to rank economically feasible replacement materials for low carbon steel. In addition, the mechanical behavior of the lining attached to the brake shoe table needs to be assessed. It is opined that an appropriate adjustment of materials could easily allow for a doubling of a brake table/lining lifetime. Suggestions for additional work, to clarify the mechanisms of rust jacking and to develop possible solutions, are described.

  1. Failure behavior of internally pressurized flawed and unflawed steam generator tubing at high temperatures -- Experiments and comparison with model predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Shack, W.J.; Diercks, D.R.; Mruk, K.; Franklin, J.; Knoblich, L.

    1998-03-01

    This report summarizes experimental work performed at Argonne National Laboratory on the failure of internally pressurized steam generator tubing at high temperatures ({le} 700 C). A model was developed for predicting failure of flawed and unflawed steam generator tubes under internal pressure and temperature histories postulated to occur during severe accidents. The model was validated by failure tests on specimens with part-through-wall axial and circumferential flaws of various lengths and depths, conducted under various constant and ramped internal pressure and temperature conditions. The failure temperatures predicted by the model for two temperature and pressure histories, calculated for severe accidents initiated by a station blackout, agree very well with tests performed on both flawed and unflawed specimens.

  2. Modeling the pressure increase in liquid helium cryostats after failure of the insulating vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidt, C.; Grohmann, S.; Süßer, M.

    2014-01-01

    The pressure relief system of liquid helium cryostats requires a careful design, due to helium's low enthalpy of vaporization and due to the low operating temperature. Hazard analyses often involve the failure of the insulating vacuum in the worst-case scenario. The venting of the insulating vacuum and the implications for the pressure increase in the helium vessel, however, have not yet been fully analyzed. Therefore, the dimensioning of safety devices often requires experience and reference to very few experimental data. In order to provide a better foundation for the design of cryogenic pressure relief systems, this paper presents an analytic approach for the strongly dynamic process induced by the loss of insulating vacuum. The model is based on theoretical considerations and on differential equation modeling. It contains only few simplifying assumptions, which will be further investigated in future experiments. The numerical solutions of example calculations are presented with regard to the heat flux into the helium vessel, the helium pressure increase and the helium flow rate through the pressure relief device. Implications concerning two-phase flow and the influence of kinetic energy are discussed.

  3. Modeling the pressure increase in liquid helium cryostats after failure of the insulating vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Heidt, C.; Grohmann, S.; Süßer, M.

    2014-01-29

    The pressure relief system of liquid helium cryostats requires a careful design, due to helium's low enthalpy of vaporization and due to the low operating temperature. Hazard analyses often involve the failure of the insulating vacuum in the worst-case scenario. The venting of the insulating vacuum and the implications for the pressure increase in the helium vessel, however, have not yet been fully analyzed. Therefore, the dimensioning of safety devices often requires experience and reference to very few experimental data. In order to provide a better foundation for the design of cryogenic pressure relief systems, this paper presents an analytic approach for the strongly dynamic process induced by the loss of insulating vacuum. The model is based on theoretical considerations and on differential equation modeling. It contains only few simplifying assumptions, which will be further investigated in future experiments. The numerical solutions of example calculations are presented with regard to the heat flux into the helium vessel, the helium pressure increase and the helium flow rate through the pressure relief device. Implications concerning two-phase flow and the influence of kinetic energy are discussed.

  4. NASA Prototype All Composite Tank Cryogenic Pressure Tests to Failure with Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werlink, Rudolph J.; Pena, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    This Paper will describe the results of pressurization to failure of 100 gallon composite tanks using liquid nitrogen. Advanced methods of health monitoring will be compared as will the experimental data to a finite element model. The testing is wholly under NASA including unique PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) based active vibration technology. Other technologies include fiber optics strain based systems including NASA AFRC technology, Acoustic Emission, Acellent smart sensor, this work is expected to lead to a practical in-Sutu system for composite tanks.

  5. Scare Tactics: Evaluating Problem Decompositions Using Failure Scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helm, B. Robert; Fickas, Stephen

    1992-01-01

    Our interest is in the design of multi-agent problem-solving systems, which we refer to as composite systems. We have proposed an approach to composite system design by decomposition of problem statements. An automated assistant called Critter provides a library of reusable design transformations which allow a human analyst to search the space of decompositions for a problem. In this paper we describe a method for evaluating and critiquing problem decompositions generated by this search process. The method uses knowledge stored in the form of failure decompositions attached to design transformations. We suggest the benefits of our critiquing method by showing how it could re-derive steps of a published development example. We then identify several open issues for the method.

  6. Increased left atrial pressure in non-heart failure patients with subclinical hypothyroidism and atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Yukiko; Uchimura, Yuko; Tokuyama, Takehito; Kawazoe, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yoshikazu; Matsumura, Hiroya; Kihara, Yasuki

    2016-01-01

    Background The impact of subclinical hypothyroidism on the cardiovascular risk is still debated. We aimed to measure the relationship between subclinical hypothyroidism and the left atrial (LA) pressure. Methods The LA pressures and thyroid function were measured in consecutive patients undergoing atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation, who did not have any known heart failure, structural heart disease, or overt thyroid disease. Results Subclinical hypothyroidism (4.5≤ thyroid-stimulating hormone <19.9 mIU/L) was present in 61 (13.0%) of the 471 patients included. More subclinical hypothyroidism patients than euthyroid patients (55.7% vs 40.2%; P=0.04).’euthyroid patients had persistent or long-standing persistent AF (55.7% vs 40.2%; P = 0.04). The mean LA pressure (10.9 ± 4.7 vs 9.1 ± 4.3 mmHg; P = 0.002) and LA V-wave pressure (17.4 ± 6.5 vs 14.3 ± 5.9 mmHg; P < 0.001) were, respectively, higher in the patients with subclinical hypothyroidism than in the euthyroid patients. After an adjustment for potential confounders, the LA pressures remained significantly higher in the subclinical hypothyroidism patients. A multiple logistic regression model showed that subclinical hypothyroidism was independently associated with a mean LA pressure of >18 mmHg (odds ratio 3.94, 95% CI 1.28 11.2; P = 0.02). Conclusions Subclinical hypothyroidism may increase the LA pressure in AF patients. PMID:26902318

  7. VALIDATION OF SPRING OPERATED PRESSURE RELIEF VALVE TIME TO FAILURE AND THE IMPORTANCE OF STATISTICALLY SUPPORTED MAINTENANCE INTERVALS

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, R; Stephen Harris, S

    2009-02-18

    The Savannah River Site operates a Relief Valve Repair Shop certified by the National Board of Pressure Vessel Inspectors to NB-23, The National Board Inspection Code. Local maintenance forces perform inspection, testing, and repair of approximately 1200 spring-operated relief valves (SORV) each year as the valves are cycled in from the field. The Site now has over 7000 certified test records in the Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS); a summary of that data is presented in this paper. In previous papers, several statistical techniques were used to investigate failure on demand and failure rates including a quantal response method for predicting the failure probability as a function of time in service. The non-conservative failure mode for SORV is commonly termed 'stuck shut'; industry defined as the valve opening at greater than or equal to 1.5 times the cold set pressure. Actual time to failure is typically not known, only that failure occurred some time since the last proof test (censored data). This paper attempts to validate the assumptions underlying the statistical lifetime prediction results using Monte Carlo simulation. It employs an aging model for lift pressure as a function of set pressure, valve manufacturer, and a time-related aging effect. This paper attempts to answer two questions: (1) what is the predicted failure rate over the chosen maintenance/ inspection interval; and do we understand aging sufficient enough to estimate risk when basing proof test intervals on proof test results?

  8. SEM evaluation of advanced refractory failures in slagging gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, W.Keith; Dahlin, Cheryl L.; Bennett, James P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Rawers, James C.

    2005-08-01

    The SEM is an invaluable tool in the evaluation of advanced refractories and their failure. A reaction vessel?s refractory liner, at minimum, must protect the reaction vessel from elevated temperatures, corrosive slag and thermal cycling. To understand the failure mechanisms ARC staff had first to determine how an advanced chrome rich refractory was attacked by various components that make up a slag. Refractory cups were made from the refractory of interest and various compounds that can be found in a slag such as CaO, SiO2, Fe2O3, NaCl were placed into the test cups and fired for 24 hours at the required temperature with the desired atmosphere. The cups are prepared for examination by embedding in epoxy and cross sectioning. SEM examination revealed how various slag compositions attacked and penetrated the refractory. The slag could corrode, free refractory grains or react with the refractory and from a new compound. It was found that the only way to measure slag component penetration was with multiple elemental X-ray maps. SiO2 penetrated deeply and in many instances moved through the cup. The knowledge of slag refractory interactions gather during cup testing was applied to actual spent refractory from reaction vessels. Obtaining samples from the reaction vessel itself proved difficult due to time constraints imposed in relining. Samples were selected based on spent brick shape, color or location in the heap of spent refractory. Sample preparation affected the results dry, water or oil coolant during cutting may dissolve reaction products. The complex reactions between the slag and refractory made for very interesting and time consuming evaluation. Elemental X-ray maps at low and high magnification combined with point analysis aided in locating regions of interest. Crystals were found growing in voids and appear to be from vapor deposition. Other crystal structures are from the slag refractory interaction. Knowledge gathered from this and other supporting

  9. BPC 157 therapy to detriment sphincters failure-esophagitis-pancreatitis in rat and acute pancreatitis patients low sphincters pressure.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, I; Dobric, I; Drmic, D; Sever, M; Klicek, R; Radic, B; Brcic, L; Kolenc, D; Zlatar, M; Kunjko, K; Jurcic, D; Martinac, M; Rasic, Z; Boban Blagaic, A; Romic, Z; Seiwerth, S; Sikiric, P

    2011-10-01

    Possibly, acute esophagitis and pancreatitis cause each other, and we focused on sphincteric failure as the common causative key able to induce either esophagitis and acute pancreatitis or both of them, and thereby investigate the presence of a common therapy nominator. This may be an anti-ulcer pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (tested for inflammatory bowel disease, wound treatment) affecting esophagitis, lower esophageal and pyloric sphincters failure and acute pancreatitis (10 μg/kg, 10 ng/kg intraperitoneally or in drinking water). The esophagitis-sphincter failure procedure (i.e., insertion of the tubes into the sphincters, lower esophageal and pyloric) and acute pancreatitis procedure (i.e., bile duct ligation) were combined in rats. Esophageal manometry was done in acute pancreatitis patients. In rats acute pancreatitis procedure produced also esophagitis and both sphincter failure, decreased pressure 24 h post-surgery. Furthermore, bile duct ligation alone immediately declines the pressure in both sphincters. Vice versa, the esophagitis-sphincter failure procedure alone produced acute pancreatitis. What's more, these lesions (esophagitis, sphincter failure, acute pancreatitis when combined) aggravate each other (tubes into sphincters and ligated bile duct). Counteraction occurred by BPC 157 therapies. In acute pancreatitis patients lower pressure at rest was in both esophageal sphincters in acute pancreatitis patients. We conclude that BPC 157 could cure esophagitis/sphincter/acute pancreatitis healing failure. PMID:22204800

  10. Thermochemical evaluation of PCI failures in LWR fuel pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götzmann, Odo

    1982-06-01

    In searching for the reasons behind the PCI failures of LWR fuel pins two questions have obviously remained unanswered: (a) what is the iodine potential necessary to cause SCC of zircaloy, and (b) is this iodine potential available in a fuel pin. To answer these two questions, a consistent set of thermochemical data for the Zr-I system was created, the results of laboratory tests of iodine-induced SCC of zircaloy were evaluated, and, finally, equilibrium calculations for the fuel-fission-product system were performed to determine the temperature and oxygen potential required to produce an iodine potential high enough to cause SCC of zircaloy. The conclusion of this study is that SCC of zircaloy can be caused by an iodine potential equal to or greater than that needed to form ZrI with metallic zirconium. This iodine potential is available in an LWR fuel pin at oxygen potentials corresponding to stoichiometric fuel. The carrier of the potential, i.e. The attacking species, is CsI.

  11. A study on evaluation of random failure in building facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Takehiro; Gotoh, Shigeru

    1998-12-31

    Estimation of the mean time between failures (hereinafter termed MTBF) for random failure is a well-known part of equipment engineering, but no discussion of MTBF presently exists in connection with building equipment. Close examination of the interval estimation of MTBF is indispensable in establishing maintenance periods for building automation and other systems. In this study, an investigation of MTBF estimation for random failure is made using field data of building equipment operations, and a comparison of results is conducted by applying two methods of interval estimation. The study touches upon the relationship of the results achieved by the Bayesian approach with the assessed values of practical operations. The authors employ simulation of a maximum-likelihood method with the Bayesian method in estimating the failure rate and then analyze it by using the data of building equipment and devices for a period of random failure. These results suggest the most suitable and practical way of MTBF estimation for actual maintenance sites.

  12. Contrasting effects of vasodilators on blood pressure and sodium balance in the hypertension of autonomic failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J.; Shannon, J. R.; Pohar, B.; Paranjape, S. Y.; Robertson, D.; Robertson, R. M.; Biaggioni, I.

    1999-01-01

    Supine hypertension, which is very common in patients with autonomic failure, limits the use of pressor agents and induces nighttime natriuresis. In 13 patients with severe orthostatic hypotension due to autonomic failure (7 women, 6 men, 72 +/- 3 yr) and supine hypertension, the effect of 30 mg nifedipine (n = 10) and 0.025 to 0.2 mg/h nitroglycerin patch (n = 11) on supine BP, renal sodium handling, and orthostatic tolerance was determined. Medications were given at 8 p.m.; patients stood up at 8 a.m. Nitroglycerin was removed at 6 a.m. Compared with placebo, nifedipine and nitroglycerin decreased systolic BP during the night by a maximum of 37 +/- 9 and 36 +/- 10 mmHg, respectively (P < 0.01). At 8 a.m., supine systolic BP was 23 +/- 7 mmHg lower with nifedipine than with placebo (P < 0.05), but was similar with nitroglycerin and placebo. Sodium excretion during the night was not reduced with nitroglycerin (0.13 +/- 0.02 mmol/mg creatinine [Cr] versus 0.15 +/- 0.03 mmol/mg Cr with placebo), but it was increased with nifedipine (0.35 +/- 0.06 mmol/mg Cr versus 0.13 +/- 0.02 mmol/mg Cr with placebo, P < 0.05). Nifedipine but not nitroglycerin worsened orthostatic hypotension in the morning. It is concluded that nifedipine and transdermal nitroglycerin are effective in controlling supine hypertension in patients with autonomic failure. However, nifedipine has a prolonged depressor effect and worsens orthostatic hypotension in the morning. The decrease in pressure natriuresis that would be expected with the substantial decrease in BP obtained with nitroglycerin and nifedipine may be offset by a direct effect of both drugs on renal sodium handling.

  13. Nonlinear failure analysis of a reinforced concrete containment under internal pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S.; Wang, Y.K.; Reich, M.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed nonlinear finite element model is used to investigate the failure response of the Indian Point containment building under severe accident pressures. Refined material models are used to describe the complex stress-strain behavior of the liner and rebar steels, the plain concrete and the reinforced concrete. Structural geometry of the containment is idealized by eight layers of axisymmetric finite elements through the wall thickness in order to closely model the actual placement of the rebars. Soil stiffness under the containment base mat is modeled by a series of nonlinear spring elements. Numerical results presented in the paper describe cracking and plastic deformation (in compression) of the concrete, yielding of the liner and rebar steels and eventual loss of the load carrying capacity of the containment. The results are compared with available data from the previous studies for this containment. 8 references, 9 figures.

  14. Update: Non-Invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation in Chronic Respiratory Failure Due to COPD.

    PubMed

    Altintas, Nejat

    2016-01-01

    Long-term non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) has widely been accepted to treat chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure arising from different etiologies. Although the survival benefits provided by long-term NPPV in individuals with restrictive thoracic disorders or stable, slowly-progressing neuromuscular disorders are overwhelming, the benefits provided by long-term NPPV in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remain under question, due to a lack of convincing evidence in the literature. In addition, long-term NPPV reportedly failed in the classic trials to improve important physiological parameters such as arterial blood gases, which might serve as an explanation as to why long-term NPPV has not been shown to substantially impact on survival. However, high intensity NPPV (HI-NPPV) using controlled NPPV with the highest possible inspiratory pressures tolerated by the patient has recently been described as a new and promising approach that is well-tolerated and is also capable of improving important physiological parameters such as arterial blood gases and lung function. This clearly contrasts with the conventional approach of low-intensity NPPV (LI-NPPV) that uses considerably lower inspiratory pressures with assisted forms of NPPV. Importantly, HI-NPPV was very recently shown to be superior to LI-NPPV in terms of improved overnight blood gases, and was also better tolerated than LI-NPPV. Furthermore, HI-NPPV, but not LI-NPPV, improved dyspnea, lung function and disease-specific aspects of health-related quality of life. A recent study showed that long-term treatment with NPPV with increased ventilatory pressures that reduced hypercapnia was associated with significant and sustained improvements in overall mortality. Thus, long-term NPPV seems to offer important benefits in this patient group, but the treatment success might be dependent on effective ventilatory strategies. PMID:26418151

  15. Initial emergency department systolic blood pressure predicts left ventricular systolic function in acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Styron, Joseph F; Jois-Bilowich, Preeti; Starling, Randall; Hobbs, Robert E; Kontos, Michael C; Pang, Peter S; Peacock, W Frank

    2009-01-01

    Ejection fraction (EF) is often unknown in patients who present with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). The objective of this study was to determine whether a patient's systolic blood pressure is associated with their left ventricular EF. This study was a retrospective chart review of all patients admitted to an emergency department (ED) observation unit from January 2002 to December 2004. A low EF was defined as <40%. Among 475 patients, the median age was 72 years, 53% were men, 40% were white, 59% were black, and 59% had a low EF. Patients with low EFs were more likely male ( P<.0001), with prior congestive heart disease ( P<.0001), longer QRS duration ( P<.0001), left bundle branch block ( P<.0001), and higher B-type natriuretic peptide ( P<.0001). The low EF group was less likely to have diabetes ( P<.0001). Adjusted odds ratios for an EF >or=40% were significant at all systolic blood pressure readings >120 mm Hg. Having an ED systolic BP >120 mm Hg is associated with significantly higher rates of preserved left ventricular systolic function in patients with ADHF. PMID:19187401

  16. The clinical geneticist and the evaluation of failure to thrive versus failure to feed.

    PubMed

    Rabago, Jillian; Marra, Kayt; Allmendinger, Nikki; Shur, Natasha

    2015-12-01

    Common clinical genetic referrals for the pediatric patient include a single major or multiple minor anomalies, dysmorphic features, especially when accompanied by developmental delay or intellectual disability, and failure to thrive (FTT). This review provides pediatric definitions of FTT and the genetic differential for FTT, which includes chromosomal disorders, microdeletion/duplication syndromes, uniparental disomy/methylation disorder, disorders of DNA repair, teratogens, metabolic syndromes, and skeletal dysplasias. Three clinical genetics cases highlight challenges in deciphering the cause of FTT. The review concludes with a ten-step approach that might improve diagnostic ability in differentiating FTT cases (those with genetic or other metabolic causes) from "failure to feed," in other words FTT as the direct result of neglect and/or child abuse. PMID:26581677

  17. An implantable Fabry-Pérot pressure sensor fabricated on left ventricular assist device for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming-Da; Yang, Chuan; Liu, Zhiwen; Cysyk, Joshua P; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2012-02-01

    Continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are commonly used as bridge-to-transplantation or destination therapy for heart failure patients. However, non-optimal pumping speeds can reduce the efficacy of circulatory support or cause dangerous ventricular arrhythmias. Optimal flow control for continuous flow LVADs has not been defined and calls for an implantable pressure sensor integrated with the LVAD for real-time feedback control of pump speed based on ventricular pressure. A MEMS pressure sensor prototype is designed, fabricated and seamlessly integrated with LVAD to enable real-time control, optimize its performance and reduce its risks. The pressure sensing mechanism is based on Fabry-Pérot interferometer principle. A biocompatible parylene diaphragm with a silicon mirror at the center is fabricated directly on the inlet shell of the LVAD to sense pressure changes. The sensitivity, range and response time of the pressure sensor are measured and validated to meet the requirements of LVAD pressure sensing. PMID:21997499

  18. Fundamental study of failure mechanisms of pressure vessels under thermo-mechanical cycling in multiphase environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penso Mula, Jorge Antonio

    Cracking and bulging in welded and internally lined pressure vessels that work in thermal-mechanical cycling services have been well known problems in the petrochemical, power and nuclear industries. Published literature and industry surveys show that similar problems have been occurring during the last 50 years. Understanding the causes of cracking and bulging would lead to improvements in the reliability of these pressure vessels. This study attempts to add information required for improving the knowledge and fundamental understanding of these problems. Cracking and bulging, most often in the weld areas, commonly experienced in delayed coking units (e.g. coke drums) in oil refineries are typical examples. The coke drum was selected for this study because of the existing field experience and past industrial investigation results that were available to serve as the baseline references for the analytical studies performed for this dissertation. Another reason for selecting the delayed coking units for this study was due to their high economical yields. Shutting down these units would cause a high negative economic impact on the refinery operations. Several failure mechanisms were hypothesized. The finite element method was used to analyze these significant variables and to verify the hypotheses. In conclusion, a fundamental explanation of the occurrence of bulging and cracking in pressure vessels in multiphase environments has been developed. Several important factors have been identified, including the high convection coefficient of the boiling layer during filling and quenching, the mismatch in physical, thermal and mechanical properties in the dissimilar weld of the clad plates and process conditions such as heating and quenching rate and warming time. Material selection for coke drums should consider not only fatigue strength but also corrosion resistance at high temperatures and low temperatures. Cracking occurs due to low cycle fatigue and corrosion. The FEA

  19. Evaluation of a Linear Cumulative Damage Failure Model for Epoxy Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, David E.; Batista-Rodriquez, Alicia; Macon, David; Totman, Peter; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recently a significant amount of work has been conducted to provide more complex and accurate material models for use in the evaluation of adhesive bondlines. Some of this has been prompted by recent studies into the effects of residual stresses on the integrity of bondlines. Several techniques have been developed for the analysis of bondline residual stresses. Key to these analyses is the criterion that is used for predicting failure. Residual stress loading of an adhesive bondline can occur over the life of the component. For many bonded systems, this can be several years. It is impractical to directly characterize failure of adhesive bondlines under a constant load for several years. Therefore, alternative approaches for predictions of bondline failures are required. In the past, cumulative damage failure models have been developed. These models have ranged from very simple to very complex. This paper documents the generation and evaluation of some of the most simple linear damage accumulation tensile failure models for an epoxy adhesive. This paper shows how several variations on the failure model were generated and presents an evaluation of the accuracy of these failure models in predicting creep failure of the adhesive. The paper shows that a simple failure model can be generated from short-term failure data for accurate predictions of long-term adhesive performance.

  20. Evaluation of Fuzzy Rulemaking for Expert Systems for Failure Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laritz, F.; Sheridan, T. B.

    1984-01-01

    Computer aids in expert systems were proposed to diagnose failures in complex systems. It is shown that the fuzzy set theory of Zadeh offers a new perspective for modeling for humans thinking and language use. It is assumed that real expert human operators of aircraft, power plants and other systems do not think of their control tasks or failure diagnosis tasks in terms of control laws in differential equation form, but rather keep in mind a set of rules of thumb in fuzzy form. Fuzzy set experiments are described.

  1. Evaluation of the Hepa Wash® treatment in pigs with acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mortality of patients with acute liver failure (ALF) is still unacceptably high. Available liver support systems are still of limited success at improving survival. A new type of albumin dialysis, the Hepa Wash® system, was newly introduced. We evaluated the new liver support system as well as the Molecular Adsorbent Recycling System (MARS) in an ischemic porcine model of ALF. Methods In the first study animals were randomly allocated to control (n=5) and Hepa Wash (n=6) groups. In a further pilot study, two animals were treated with the MARS-system. All animals received the same medical and surgical procedures. An intraparenchymal intracranial pressure was inserted. Hemodynamic monitoring and goal-directed fluid therapy using the PiCCO system was done. Animals underwent functional end-to-side portacaval shunt and ligation of hepatic arteries. Treatment with albumin dialysis was started after fall of cerebral perfusion pressure to 45 mmHg and continued for 8 h. Results All animals in the Hepa Wash group survived the 13-hour observation period, except for one that died after stopping treatment. Four of the control animals died within this period (p=0.03). Hepa Wash significantly reduced impairment of cerebral perfusion pressure (23±2 vs. 10±3 mmHg, p=0.006) and mean arterial pressure (37±1 vs. 24±2 mmHg, p=0.006) but had no effect on intracranial pressure (14±1 vs. 15±1 mmHg, p=0.72). Hepa Wash also enhanced cardiac index (4.94±0.32 vs. 3.36±0.25 l/min/m2, p=0.006) and renal function (urine production, 1850 ± 570 vs. 420 ± 180 ml, p=0.045) and eliminated water soluble (creatinine, 1.3±0.2 vs. 3.2±0.3 mg/dl, p=0.01; ammonia 562±124 vs. 1382±92 μg/dl, p=0.006) and protein-bound toxins (nitrate/nitrite 5.54±1.57 vs. 49.82±13.27 μmol/l, p=0.01). No adverse events that could be attributed to the Hepa Wash treatment were observed. Conclusions Hepa Wash was a safe procedure and improved multiorgan system failure in pigs with ALF. The survival

  2. Epigenetic switch at atp2a2 and myh7 gene promoters in pressure overload-induced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Angrisano, Tiziana; Schiattarella, Gabriele Giacomo; Keller, Simona; Pironti, Gianluigi; Florio, Ermanno; Magliulo, Fabio; Bottino, Roberta; Pero, Raffaela; Lembo, Francesca; Avvedimento, Enrico Vittorio; Esposito, Giovanni; Trimarco, Bruno; Chiariotti, Lorenzo; Perrino, Cinzia

    2014-01-01

    Re-induction of fetal genes and/or re-expression of postnatal genes represent hallmarks of pathological cardiac remodeling, and are considered important in the progression of the normal heart towards heart failure (HF). Whether epigenetic modifications are involved in these processes is currently under investigation. Here we hypothesized that histone chromatin modifications may underlie changes in the gene expression program during pressure overload-induced HF. We evaluated chromatin marks at the promoter regions of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ATPase (SERCA-2A) and β-myosin-heavy chain (β-MHC) genes (Atp2a2 and Myh7, respectively) in murine hearts after one or eight weeks of pressure overload induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). As expected, all TAC hearts displayed a significant reduction in SERCA-2A and a significant induction of β-MHC mRNA levels. Interestingly, opposite histone H3 modifications were identified in the promoter regions of these genes after TAC, including H3 dimethylation (me2) at lysine (K) 4 (H3K4me2) and K9 (H3K9me2), H3 trimethylation (me3) at K27 (H3K27me3) and dimethylation (me2) at K36 (H3K36me2). Consistently, a significant reduction of lysine-specific demethylase KDM2A could be found after eight weeks of TAC at the Atp2a2 promoter. Moreover, opposite changes in the recruitment of DNA methylation machinery components (DNA methyltransferases DNMT1 and DNMT3b, and methyl CpG binding protein 2 MeCp2) were found at the Atp2a2 or Myh7 promoters after TAC. Taken together, these results suggest that epigenetic modifications may underlie gene expression reprogramming in the adult murine heart under conditions of pressure overload, and might be involved in the progression of the normal heart towards HF. PMID:25181347

  3. Studies and analyses of the space shuttle main engine: High-pressure oxidizer turbopump failure information propagation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glover, R. C.; Rudy, S. W.; Tischer, A. E.

    1987-01-01

    The high-pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP) failure information propagation model (FIPM) is presented. The text includes a brief discussion of the FIPM methodology and the various elements which comprise a model. Specific details of the HPOTP FIPM are described. Listings of all the HPOTP data records are included as appendices.

  4. The evaluation of failure detection and isolation algorithms for restructurable control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motyka, P.; Bonnice, W.; Hall, S.; Wagner, E.

    1984-01-01

    Three failure detection and identification techniques were compared to determine their usefulness in detecting and isolating failures in an aircraft flight control system; excluding sensor and flight control computer failures. The algorithms considered were the detection filter, the Generalized Likelihood Ratio test and the Orthogonal Series Generalized Likelihood Ratio test. A modification to the basic detection filter is also considered which uses secondary filtering of the residuals to produce unidirectional failure signals. The algorithms were evaluated by testing their ability to detect and isolate control surface failures in a nonlinear simulation of a C-130 aircraft. It was found that failures of some aircraft controls are difficult to distinguish because they have a similar effect on the dynamics of the vehicle. Quantitative measures for evaluating the distinguishability of failures are considered. A system monitoring strategy for implementing the failure detection and identification techniques was considered. This strategy identified the mix of direct measurement of failures versus the computation of failure necessary for implementation of the technology in an aircraft system.

  5. Low-intensity noninvasive ventilation: Lower pressure, more exacerbations of chronic respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Kadowaki, Toru; Wakabayashi, Kiryo; Kimura, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Kanako; Ikeda, Toshikazu; Yano, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For patients with chronic respiratory failure (CRF) who are treated with noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV), a little is known regarding the effects of low-intensity NPPV (LI-NPPV) on the clinical course of CRF and the frequency of adjustments in these patients. OBJECTIVES: This study investigated the effects of LI-NPPV on the clinical course of patients with CRF as compared with patients who were treated with conventional NPPV (C-NPPV) and determined how frequently NPPV was adjusted during therapy. METHODS: Clinical data from 21 patients who received long-term NPPV were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were categorized into two groups based on the level of initial pressure support (PS): C-NPPV group (PS ≥ 10 cm H2O) and LI-NPPV group (PS < 10 cm H2O). RESULTS: Patients in the LI-NPPV group had significantly more exacerbations of CRF (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the number of patients who required adjustments of NPPV settings between the two groups. There was no significant difference in PaCO2 levels 1 month after the start of NPPV between the two groups; however, PaCO2 levels were significantly lower after 1 year in the C-group (P < 0.001). Seventy-one percent of LI-NPPV patients and 43% of C-NPPV patients needed NPPV adjustments. CONCLUSIONS: Attention should be paid to CRF patients who are initially administered LI-NPPV; they should be carefully observed because they can develop more exacerbations of CRF than patients undergoing C-NPPV. If possible, higher initial PS should be administered to prevent CRF exacerbations. PMID:27168863

  6. Endothelial lipase modulates pressure overload-induced heart failure through alternative pathway for fatty acid uptake.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hideto; Ishida, Tatsuro; Satomi-Kobayashi, Seimi; Mori, Kenta; Hara, Tetsuya; Sasaki, Naoto; Yasuda, Tomoyuki; Toh, Ryuji; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Kawai, Hiroya; Hirata, Ken-ichi

    2013-05-01

    Lipoprotein lipase has been considered as the only enzyme capable of generating lipid-derived fatty acids for cardiac energy. Endothelial lipase is another member of the triglyceride lipase family and hydrolyzes high-density lipoproteins. Although endothelial lipase is expressed in the heart, its function remains unclear. We assessed the role of endothelial lipase in the genesis of heart failure. Pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy was generated in endothelial lipase(-/-) and wild-type mice by ascending aortic banding. Endothelial lipase expression in cardiac tissues was markedly elevated in the early phase of cardiac hypertrophy in wild-type mice, whereas lipoprotein lipase expression was significantly reduced. Endothelial lipase(-/-) mice showed more severe systolic dysfunction with left-ventricular dilatation compared with wild-type mice in response to pressure overload. The expression of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation-related genes, such as carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 and medium-chain acyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase, was significantly lower in the heart of endothelial lipase(-/-) mice than in wild-type mice. Also, endothelial lipase(-/-) mice had lower myocardial adenosine triphosphate levels than wild-type mice after aortic banding. In cultured cardiomyocytes, endothelial lipase was upregulated by inflammatory stimuli, whereas lipoprotein lipase was downregulated. Endothelial lipase-overexpression in cardiomyocytes resulted in an upregulation of fatty acid oxidation-related enzymes and intracellular adenosine triphosphate accumulation in the presence of high-density lipoprotein. Endothelial lipase may act as an alternative candidate to provide fatty acids to the heart and regulate cardiac function. This effect seemed relevant particularly in the diseased heart, where lipoprotein lipase action is downregulated. PMID:23460280

  7. Design and evaluation of a failure detection and isolation algorithm for restructurable control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Jerold L.; Hsu, John Y.

    1986-01-01

    The use of a decentralized approach to failure detection and isolation for use in restructurable control systems is examined. This work has produced: (1) A method for evaluating fundamental limits to FDI performance; (2) Application using flight recorded data; (3) A working control element FDI system with maximal sensitivity to critical control element failures; (4) Extensive testing on realistic simulations; and (5) A detailed design methodology involving parameter optimization (with respect to model uncertainties) and sensitivity analyses. This project has concentrated on detection and isolation of generic control element failures since these failures frequently lead to emergency conditions and since knowledge of remaining control authority is essential for control system redesign. The failures are generic in the sense that no temporal failure signature information was assumed. Thus, various forms of functional failures are treated in a unified fashion. Such a treatment results in a robust FDI system (i.e., one that covers all failure modes) but sacrifices some performance when detailed failure signature information is known, useful, and employed properly. It was assumed throughout that all sensors are validated (i.e., contain only in-spec errors) and that only the first failure of a single control element needs to be detected and isolated. The FDI system which has been developed will handle a class of multiple failures.

  8. Protective effect of resveratrol against pressure overload-induced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Prakash K; DiPette, Donald J; Supowit, Scott C

    2014-01-01

    Transverse aortic constriction (TAC)-induced pressure overload (PO) causes adverse cardiac remodeling and dysfunction that progresses to heart failure (HF). The purpose of this study was to determine whether the potent antioxidant, resveratrol, significantly attenuates PO-induced HF in wild-type mice. Male C57BL6 mice were subjected to either sham or TAC surgery. One group of TAC mice was given daily resveratrol treatment. Echocardiographic, biometric, and immunohistological analyses were performed on the three groups of mice. All echocardiographic parameters demonstrated significantly greater adverse cardiac remodeling and dysfunction in the TAC compared to the sham mice. Increases in the ratios of heart weight (HW)/body weight (BW) and lung weight (LW)/BW and a sharp decline in the percentage of ejection fraction and fractional shortening were found in TAC relative to sham mice. Likewise, the TAC protocol increased markers of oxidative stress, cardiac hypertrophy, inflammation, fibrosis, hypoxia, and apoptosis. These pathological changes were significantly attenuated by resveratrol treatment. Resveratrol treatment significantly attenuates the adverse cardiac remodeling and dysfunction produced by the TAC protocol in C57/BL6 mice and this activity is mediated, at least in part, by the inhibition of oxidative stress and inflammation indicating a therapeutic potential of resveratrol in HF. PMID:24936291

  9. Elastic geobarometry and the role of brittle failure on pressure release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzucchelli, Mattia Luca; Angel, Ross John; Rustioni, Greta; Milani, Sula; Nimis, Paolo; Chiara Domeneghetti, Maria; Marone, Federica; Harris, Jeff W.; Nestola, Fabrizio; Alvaro, Matteo

    2016-04-01

    Mineral inclusions trapped in their hosts can provide fundamental information about geological processes. Recent developments in elastic geobarometry, for example, allow the retrieval of encapsulation pressures for host-inclusion pairs. In principle this method can be applied to any mineral-mineral pair so long as both the residual pressure on an inclusion (Pinc), and the equations of state for both host and inclusion are either known or determined (Angel et al., 2015). However, Angel et al. (2014) outlined some boundary conditions, one of which was that deformation in the host-inclusion pair has to be purely elastic. Thus this caveat would exclude from analysis all the inclusions that are surrounded by cracks, indicative of brittle deformation, which may result in partial or complete release of the Pinc. If however the effects of cracks surrounding trapped mineral inclusions could be quantitatively modelled, then the applicability of "elastic" geobarometry might be extended to a much larger number of inclusion-host pairs. We report the results of a pilot experiment in which the stress states (i.e. the residual pressure) have been determined for 10 olivine inclusions still entrapped in 5 diamonds. Inclusion pressures were determined from the unit-cell volumes of the olivines measured in-situ in the diamonds by X-ray diffraction. The olivine equations of state were determined from the olivine compositions by in-situ X-ray structure refinement. Values of Pinc range from 0.19 to 0.53 GPa. In order to quantify the degree of brittle failure surrounding the inclusions, the same set of samples were also investigated by synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography (SRXTM at TOMCAT, Swiss LightSource). Preliminary results showed that at the spatial resolution of our experiments (pixel size of 0.34μm), 90% of the inclusions trapped in our set of diamonds were surrounded by cracks. The volume of the cracks has been determined from 3D reconstruction with an accuracy of about 4%. Our

  10. Pressure ulcers: prevention, evaluation, and management.

    PubMed

    Bluestein, Daniel; Javaheri, Ashkan

    2008-11-15

    A pressure ulcer is a localized injury to the skin or underlying tissue, usually over a bony prominence, as a result of unrelieved pressure. Predisposing factors are classified as intrinsic (e.g., limited mobility, poor nutrition, comorbidities, aging skin) or extrinsic (e.g., pressure, friction, shear, moisture). Prevention includes identifying at-risk persons and implementing specific prevention measures, such as following a patient repositioning schedule; keeping the head of the bed at the lowest safe elevation to prevent shear; using pressure-reducing surfaces; and assessing nutrition and providing supplementation, if needed. When an ulcer occurs, documentation of each ulcer (i.e., size, location, eschar and granulation tissue, exudate, odor, sinus tracts, undermining, and infection) and appropriate staging (I through IV) are essential to the wound assessment. Treatment involves management of local and distant infections, removal of necrotic tissue, maintenance of a moist environment for wound healing, and possibly surgery. Debridement is indicated when necrotic tissue is present. Urgent sharp debridement should be performed if advancing cellulitis or sepsis occurs. Mechanical, enzymatic, and autolytic debridement methods are nonurgent treatments. Wound cleansing, preferably with normal saline and appropriate dressings, is a mainstay of treatment for clean ulcers and after debridement. Bacterial load can be managed with cleansing. Topical antibiotics should be considered if there is no improvement in healing after 14 days. Systemic antibiotics are used in patients with advancing cellulitis, osteomyelitis, or systemic infection. PMID:19035067

  11. Cost-effectiveness of Out-of-Hospital Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Thokala, Praveen; Goodacre, Steve; Ward, Matt; Penn-Ashman, Jerry; Perkins, Gavin D.

    2015-01-01

    Study objective We determine the cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) compared with standard care for adults presenting to emergency medical services with acute respiratory failure. Methods We developed an economic model using a United Kingdom health care system perspective to compare the costs and health outcomes of out-of-hospital CPAP to standard care (inhospital noninvasive ventilation) when applied to a hypothetical cohort of patients with acute respiratory failure. The model assigned each patient a probability of intubation or death, depending on the patient’s characteristics and whether he or she had out-of-hospital CPAP or standard care. The patients who survived accrued lifetime quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and health care costs according to their age and sex. Costs were accrued through intervention and hospital treatment costs, which depended on patient outcomes. All results were converted into US dollars, using the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development purchasing power parities rates. Results Out-of-hospital CPAP was more effective than standard care but was also more expensive, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £20,514 per QALY ($29,720/QALY) and a 49.5% probability of being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold. The probability of out-of-hospital CPAP’s being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold depended on the incidence of eligible patients and varied from 35.4% when a low estimate of incidence was used to 93.8% with a high estimate. Variation in the incidence of eligible patients also had a marked influence on the expected value of sample information for a future randomized trial. Conclusion The cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital CPAP is uncertain. The incidence of patients eligible for out-of-hospital CPAP appears to be the key determinant of cost-effectiveness. PMID:25737210

  12. Pressurized thermal shock evaluation of the Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, L

    1985-09-01

    An evaluation of the risk to the Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 nuclear power plant due to pressurized thermal shock (PTS) has been completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the assistance of several other organizations. This evaluation was part of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission program designed to study the PTS risk to three nuclear plants, the other two plants being Oconee Unit 1 and H.B. Robinson Unit 2. The specific objectives of the program were to (1) provide a best estimate of the frequency of a through-the-wall crack in the pressure vessel at each of the three plants, together with the uncertainty in the estimated frequency and its sensitivity to the variables used in the evaluation; (2) determine the dominant overcooling sequences contributing to the estimated frequency and the associated failures in the plant systems or in operator actions; and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of potential corrective measures.

  13. Sildenafil ameliorates left ventricular T-tubule remodeling in a pressure overload-induced murine heart failure model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-kai; Chen, Bi-yi; Guo, Ang; Chen, Rong; Zhu, Yan-qi; Kutschke, William; Hong, Jiang; Song, Long-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Sildenafil, a phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitor, has been shown to exert beneficial effects in heart failure. The purpose of this study was to test whether sildenafil suppressed transverse-tubule (T-tubule) remodeling in left ventricular (LV) failure and thereby providing the therapeutic benefits. Methods: A pressure overload-induced murine heart failure model was established in mice by thoracic aortic banding (TAB). One day after TAB, the mice received sildenafil (100 mg·kg−1·d−1, sc) or saline for 5 weeks. At the end of treatment, echocardiography was used to examine LV function. Then the intact hearts were dissected out and placed in Langendorff-perfusion chamber for in situ confocal imaging of T-tubule ultrastructure from epicardial myocytes. Results: TAB surgery resulted in heart failure accompanied by remarkable T-tubule remodeling. Sildenafil treatment significantly attenuated TAB-induced cardiac hypertrophy and congestive heart failure, improved LV contractile function, and preserved T-tubule integrity in LV cardiomyocytes. But sildenafil treatment did not significantly affect the chamber dilation. The integrity of LV T-tubule structure was correlated with cardiac hypertrophy (R2=0.74, P<0.01) and global LV function (R2=0.47, P<0.01). Conclusion: Sildenafil effectively ameliorates LV T-tubule remodeling in TAB mice, revealing a novel mechanism underlying the therapeutic benefits of sildenafil in heart failure. PMID:26972492

  14. On-line detection of key radionuclides for fuel-rod failure in a pressurized water reactor.

    PubMed

    Qin, Guoxiu; Chen, Xilin; Guo, Xiaoqing; Ni, Ning

    2016-08-01

    For early on-line detection of fuel rod failure, the key radionuclides useful in monitoring must leak easily from failing rods. Yield, half-life, and mass share of fission products that enter the primary coolant also need to be considered in on-line analyses. From all the nuclides that enter the primary coolant during fuel-rod failure, (135)Xe and (88)Kr were ultimately chosen as crucial for on-line monitoring of fuel-rod failure. A monitoring system for fuel-rod failure detection for pressurized water reactor (PWR) based on the LaBr3(Ce) detector was assembled and tested. The samples of coolant from the PWR were measured using the system as well as a HPGe γ-ray spectrometer. A comparison showed the method was feasible. Finally, the γ-ray spectra of primary coolant were measured under normal operations and during fuel-rod failure. The two peaks of (135)Xe (249.8keV) and (88)Kr (2392.1keV) were visible, confirming that the method is capable of monitoring fuel-rod failure on-line. PMID:27209090

  15. Lifelong Cyclic Mechanical Strain Promotes Large Elastic Artery Stiffening: Increased Pulse Pressure and Old Age-Related Organ Failure.

    PubMed

    Thorin-Trescases, Nathalie; Thorin, Eric

    2016-05-01

    The arterial wall is under a huge mechanical constraint imposed by the cardiac cycle that is bound to generate damage with time. Each heartbeat indeed imposes a pulsatile pressure that generates a vascular stretch. Lifetime accumulation of pulsatile stretches will eventually induce fatigue of the elastic large arterial walls, such as aortic and carotid artery walls, promoting their stiffening that will gradually perturb the normal blood flow and local pressure within the organs, and lead to organ failure. The augmented pulse pressure induced by arterial stiffening favours left ventricular hypertrophy because of the repeated extra work against stiff high-pressure arteries, and tissue damage as a result of excessive pulsatile pressure transmitted into the microcirculation, especially in low resistance/high-flow organs such as the brain and kidneys. Vascular aging is therefore characterized by the stiffening of large elastic arteries leading to a gradual increase in pulse pressure with age. In this review we focus on the effect of age-related stiffening of large elastic arteries. We report the clinical evidence linking arterial stiffness and organ failure and discuss the molecular pathways that are activated by the increase of mechanical stress in the wall. We also discuss the possible interventions that could limit arterial stiffening with age, such as regular aerobic exercise training, and some pharmacological approaches. PMID:26961664

  16. Thin-metal lined PRD 49-III composite vessels. [evaluation of pressure vessels for burst strength and fatigue performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoggatt, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    Filament wound pressure vessels of various configurations were evaluated for burst strength and fatigue performance. The dimensions and characteristics of the vessels are described. The types of tests conducted are explained. It was determined that all vessels leaked in a relatively few cycles (20 to 60 cycles) with failure occurring in all cases in the metallic liner. The thin liner would de-bond from the composite and buckling took place during depressurization. No composite failures or indications of impeding composite failures were obtained in the metal-lined vessels.

  17. Physical Mechanisms of Failure, Ultralow Partial Pressure Lubrication, and the Reservoir Effect in MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, David Adam

    The aim of this work is to examine the effectiveness of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) coatings as long term lubrication coatings in microsystems, to examine the failure regimes of SAM coated devices, to examine the role of mobility in adsorbed lubricating films, and to examine evolution of the coefficient of friction of devices surrounded by ultralow partial pressures of alcohols up to saturation. Finally the role of self assembled monlayers in vapor phase lubrication is examined. Self-assembled monolayers are ubiquitous in fabrication of free-standing microdevices because of their ability to prevent release related and dormancy related stiction. However their ability to lubricate under sliding and normal contact conditions is not well documented. It can be shown that the energy dissipated per unit area in one sliding cycle due to friction is significant under general loading conditions. Therefore from an energy dissipated standpoint the bond energies of the silane molecules should not be enough to withstand even a short number of cycles. An extension of this is the energy imparted to the surface through a normal loading cycle through a loss of kinetic energy. It can also be shown that this is enough to break the silicon oxygen bonds however this is over a longer time scale than in sliding. Also there is an open question on the role of mobile and non-mobile adsorbed species on friction. Is the mobility of a molecule/layer on a surface an indicator of the effectiveness of the lubrication potential of the layer? Do submonolayer coverages of alcohols "lock-up" to contacting surfaces by disrupting non-corrogated potentials? Is there a distinct lowering of frictional forces at the formation of a monolayer? Controlled adsorption of mobile and non-mobile species on rubbing contacts is necessary to elucidate this physical relationship. To accomplish this one must take into account that friction measurements are highly scale dependant. Therefore to ensure the accuracy of

  18. Seismic analysis of the Par Pond Dam: Study of slope failure and liquefaction. Technical evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, N.; Reich, M.

    1994-07-01

    Stability concerns of the Par Pond Dam, an embankment structure in the Savannah River Site complex, resulted in a comprehensive evaluation of the state of its integrity. Specifically, excessive seepage through the embankment, slope failure due to an earthquake event as well as liquefaction potential of the embankment and the foundation are addressed and the potential of failure is evaluated. Lastly, remedial benefits of the addition of a berm structure are also assessed.

  19. TIMP-2 mutant decreases MMP-2 activity and augments pressure overload induced LV dysfunction and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Givvimani, S; Kundu, S; Narayanan, N; Armaghan, F; Qipshidze, N; Pushpakumar, S; Vacek, T P; Tyagi, S C

    2013-05-01

    Pressure overload induces cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling and results in heart failure. ECM remodelling by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is primarily regulated by their target inhibitors, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs). It is known that TIMP-2 is highly expressed in myocardium and is required for cell surface activation of pro-MMP-2. We and others have reported that imbalance between angiogenic growth factors and anti-angiogenic factors results in transition from compensatory cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure. We previously reported the pro-angiogenic role of MMP-2 in cardiac compensation, however, the specific role of TIMP-2 during pressure overload is yet unclear. We hypothesize that genetic ablation of TIMP-2 exacerbates the adverse cardiac matrix remodelling due to lack of pro-angiogenic MMP-2 and increase in anti-angiogenic factors during pressure overload stress and results in severe heart failure. To verify this, ascending aortic banding (AB) was created to mimic pressure overload, in wild type C57BL6/J and TIMP-2-/- (model of MMP-2 deficiency) mice. Left ventricular (LV) function assessed by echocardiography and pressure-volume loop studies showed severe LV dysfunction in TIMP-2-/- AB mice compared to controls. Expression of MMP-2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was decreased and expression of MMP-9, anti-angiogenic factors endostatin and angiostatin was increased in TIMP-2-/- AB mice compared with wild type AB mice. Connexins (Cx) are the gap junction proteins that are widely present in the myocardium and play an important role in endothelial-myocyte coupling. Our results showed that expression of Cx 37 and 43 was decreased in TIMP-2-/- AB mice compared with corresponding wild type controls. These results suggest that genetic ablation of TIMP-2 decrease the expression of pro-angiogenic MMP-2, VEGF and increases anti-angiogenic factors that results in exacerbated abnormal ventricular remodelling leading

  20. Holographic and acoustic emission evaluation of pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, D.M.

    1980-03-05

    Optical holographic interfereometry and acoustic emission monitoring were simultaneously used to evaluate two small, high pressure vessels during pressurization. The techniques provide pressure vessel designers with both quantitative information such as displacement/strain measurements and qualitative information such as flaw detection. The data from the holographic interferograms were analyzed for strain profiles. The acoustic emission signals were monitored for crack growth and vessel quality.

  1. Effects of control system failures on transients and accidents at a 3-loop Westinghouse pressurized water reactor. Volume 2. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Bruske, S.J.; Davis, C.B.; Ogden, D.M.; Ransom, C.B.; Stitt, B.D.; Stromberg, H.M.; Waterman, M.E.

    1985-10-01

    Safety Implications of Control Systems (A-47) was approved as an Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in December of 1980. USI A-47 is concerned with the potential for transients or accidents being made more severe than previously analyzed as a result of control system failures. This report describes the work performed on the effects of control system failures on transients and accidents at a Westinghouse 3-loop pressurized water reactor. In this volume, the appendices contain detailed information consisting of the FMEA (failure mode and analysis) results, an in-depth description of the computer model, the deterministic computer analyses, and responses to comments made by Carolina Power and Light Company and Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

  2. Analysis of failure modes resulting in stress corrosion cracking of 304N tubing in a high pressure heater desuperheater

    SciTech Connect

    Karg, D.C.; Svensen, L.M.E.; Ford, A.W.; Catapano, M.C.

    1998-10-01

    Santee Cooper (South Carolina Public Service Authority) experienced twenty-three tube failures in a high pressure feedwater heater that was in service less than three years. The tube failures were located at baffles adjacent to both exists of the dual flow desuperheater. Metallurgical analysis of the failed tubes indicated that stress corrosion cracking of the 304N stainless steel was the primary failure mode (Rudin, 1994; Shifler, 1994). The investigation to determine the factors leading to the onset of stress corrosion cracking included analysis of heater acceptance tests, the heater manufacturer`s proposal and manufacturing procedures, operational data, eddy current reports, metallurgical reports, and a heater design review for vibration and wet wall potential (formation of condensation on the outside diameter (OD) of the tube prior to the desuperheater exit).

  3. Analysis of failure modes resulting in stress corrosion cracking of 304N tubing in a high pressure heater desuperheater

    SciTech Connect

    Karg, D.C.; Svensen, L.M.E. III; Ford, A.W. III; Catapano, M.C.

    1995-12-31

    Santee Cooper (South Carolina Public Service Authority) experienced twenty-three tube failures in a high pressure feedwater heater that was in service less than three years. The tube failures were located at baffles adjacent to both exits of the dual flow desuperheater. Metallurgical analysis of the failed tubes indicated that stress corrosion cracking of the 304N stainless steel was the primary failure mode. The investigation to determine the factors leading to the onset of stress corrosion cracking included analysis of heater acceptance tests, the heater manufacturer`s proposal and manufacturing procedures, operational data, eddy current reports, metallurgical reports, and a heater design review for vibration and wet wall potential (formation of condensation on the outside diameter (OD) of the tube prior to the desuperheater exit).

  4. Cardiac energy metabolic alterations in pressure overload–induced left and right heart failure (2013 Grover Conference Series)

    PubMed Central

    Lopaschuk, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pressure overload of the heart, such as seen with pulmonary hypertension and/or systemic hypertension, can result in cardiac hypertrophy and the eventual development of heart failure. The development of hypertrophy and heart failure is accompanied by numerous molecular changes in the heart, including alterations in cardiac energy metabolism. Under normal conditions, the high energy (adenosine triphosphate [ATP]) demands of the heart are primarily provided by the mitochondrial oxidation of fatty acids, carbohydrates (glucose and lactate), and ketones. In contrast, the hypertrophied failing heart is energy deficient because of its inability to produce adequate amounts of ATP. This can be attributed to a reduction in mitochondrial oxidative metabolism, with the heart becoming more reliant on glycolysis as a source of ATP production. If glycolysis is uncoupled from glucose oxidation, a decrease in cardiac efficiency can occur, which can contribute to the severity of heart failure due to pressure-overload hypertrophy. These metabolic changes are accompanied by alterations in the enzymes that are involved in the regulation of fatty acid and carbohydrate metabolism. It is now becoming clear that optimizing both energy production and the source of energy production are potential targets for pharmacological intervention aimed at improving cardiac function in the hypertrophied failing heart. In this review, we will focus on what alterations in energy metabolism occur in pressure overload induced left and right heart failure. We will also discuss potential targets and pharmacological approaches that can be used to treat heart failure occurring secondary to pulmonary hypertension and/or systemic hypertension. PMID:25992268

  5. Chronic mitral regurgitation and Doppler estimation of left ventricular filling pressures in patients with heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temporelli, P. L.; Scapellato, F.; Corra, U.; Eleuteri, E.; Firstenberg, M. S.; Thomas, J. D.; Giannuzzi, P.

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies relating Doppler parameters and pulmonary capillary wedge pressures (PCWP) typically exclude patients with severe mitral regurgitation (MR). We evaluated the effects of varying degrees of chronic MR on the Doppler estimation of PCWP. PCWP and mitral Doppler profiles were obtained in 88 patients (mean age 55 +/- 8 years) with severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction (mean ejection fraction 23% +/- 5%). Patients were classified by severity of MR. Patients with severe MR had greater left atrial areas, LV end-diastolic volumes, and mean PCWPs and lower ejection fractions (each P <.01). In patients with mild MR, multiple echocardiographic parameters correlated with PCWP; however, with worsening MR, only deceleration time strongly related to PCWP. From stepwise multivariate analysis, deceleration time was the best independent predictor of PCWP overall, and it was the only predictor in patients with moderate or severe MR. Doppler-derived early mitral deceleration time reliably predicts PCWP in patients with severe LV dysfunction irrespective of degree of MR.

  6. Episodic Sediment Failure in Northern Flemish Pass, Eastern Canadian Margin: Interplay of Seismicity, Contour Current Winnowing, and Excess Pore Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piper, D.

    2015-12-01

    Episodic sediment failures are recognised on continental slopes around Flemish Pass and Orphan Basin from multibeam bathymetry, seismic reflection profiles and piston cores. Seismic stratigraphy is tied to published long cores with O-isotope data back to before MIS 6 and carbonate rich Heinrich layers in places produce marker reflections in high-resolution sparker profiles. Heinrich layers, radiocarbon dates and peaks in diatom abundance provide core chronology. Slope sedimentation was strongly influenced by the Labrador Current and the silty muds show architecture characteristic of contourites. Variation in Labrador Current strength is known from the sortable silt proxy over the past 125 ka. Large slope failures were mapped from seismic reflection profiles and their age estimated from seismic stratigraphy (3-5 ka resolution) and in some cases refined from cores (1-3 ka resolution). Large slope failures occurred apparently synchronously over margin lengths of 50-350 km. Such failures were earthquake triggered: other mechanisms for producing laterally extensive synchronous failure do not apply. Triaxial shear measurements show a Su/σ' ratio of typical slope sediment of 0.48, implying considerable stability. However, some silty muds have Atterberg limits that suggest susceptibility to liquefaction under cyclic loading, particularly in Holocene deposits and by analogy those of past full interglacials. Basal failure planes of some large failures correspond with either the last interglacial or the MIS 6 glacial maximum. Comparison with seismological models suggests that the observed slope failures represent earthquakes ranging from Mw ~5.6 to ~7.6. Mean recurrence interval of M = 7 earthquakes at any point on the margin is estimated at 30 ka from seismological models and 40 ka from the sediment failure record. In northern Flemish Pass, a spatial cluster of several failures over 30 ka preceded by a long interval with no failures suggests that some other mechanism has

  7. Evaluation of rotating, incompressibly lubricated, pressurized thrust bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, D. P.

    1971-01-01

    Program evaluates a series hybrid, fluid film ball bearing consisting of an orifice compensated pressurized thrust bearing in conjunction with a self-acting journal bearing. Oil viscosities corresponding to experimentally measured ball bearing outer-race temperatures were used.

  8. Evaluation of pressurized water cleaning systems for hardware refurbishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillard, Terry W.; Deweese, Charles D.; Hoppe, David T.; Vickers, John H.; Swenson, Gary J.; Hutchens, Dale E.

    1995-01-01

    Historically, refurbishment processes for RSRM motor cases and components have employed environmentally harmful materials. Specifically, vapor degreasing processes consume and emit large amounts of ozone depleting compounds. This program evaluates the use of pressurized water cleaning systems as a replacement for the vapor degreasing process. Tests have been conducted to determine if high pressure water washing, without any form of additive cleaner, is a viable candidate for replacing vapor degreasing processes. This paper discusses the findings thus far of Engineering Test Plan - 1168 (ETP-1168), 'Evaluation of Pressurized Water Cleaning Systems for Hardware Refurbishment.'

  9. Weighted Fuzzy Risk Priority Number Evaluation of Turbine and Compressor Blades Considering Failure Mode Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Luping; Li, Yan-Feng; Zhu, Shun-Peng; Yang, Yuan-Jian; Huang, Hong-Zhong

    2014-06-01

    Failure mode, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA) and Fault tree analysis (FTA) are powerful tools to evaluate reliability of systems. Although single failure mode issue can be efficiently addressed by traditional FMECA, multiple failure modes and component correlations in complex systems cannot be effectively evaluated. In addition, correlated variables and parameters are often assumed to be precisely known in quantitative analysis. In fact, due to the lack of information, epistemic uncertainty commonly exists in engineering design. To solve these problems, the advantages of FMECA, FTA, fuzzy theory, and Copula theory are integrated into a unified hybrid method called fuzzy probability weighted geometric mean (FPWGM) risk priority number (RPN) method. The epistemic uncertainty of risk variables and parameters are characterized by fuzzy number to obtain fuzzy weighted geometric mean (FWGM) RPN for single failure mode. Multiple failure modes are connected using minimum cut sets (MCS), and Boolean logic is used to combine fuzzy risk priority number (FRPN) of each MCS. Moreover, Copula theory is applied to analyze the correlation of multiple failure modes in order to derive the failure probabilities of each MCS. Compared to the case where dependency among multiple failure modes is not considered, the Copula modeling approach eliminates the error of reliability analysis. Furthermore, for purpose of quantitative analysis, probabilities importance weight from failure probabilities are assigned to FWGM RPN to reassess the risk priority, which generalize the definition of probability weight and FRPN, resulting in a more accurate estimation than that of the traditional models. Finally, a basic fatigue analysis case drawn from turbine and compressor blades in aeroengine is used to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the presented method. The result provides some important insights on fatigue reliability analysis and risk priority assessment of structural

  10. Evaluation of containment failure and cleanup time for Pu shots on the Z machine.

    SciTech Connect

    Darby, John L.

    2010-02-01

    Between November 30 and December 11, 2009 an evaluation was performed of the probability of containment failure and the time for cleanup of contamination of the Z machine given failure, for plutonium (Pu) experiments on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Due to the unique nature of the problem, there is little quantitative information available for the likelihood of failure of containment components or for the time to cleanup. Information for the evaluation was obtained from Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) at the Z machine facility. The SMEs provided the State of Knowledge (SOK) for the evaluation. There is significant epistemic- or state of knowledge- uncertainty associated with the events that comprise both failure of containment and cleanup. To capture epistemic uncertainty and to allow the SMEs to reason at the fidelity of the SOK, we used the belief/plausibility measure of uncertainty for this evaluation. We quantified two variables: the probability that the Pu containment system fails given a shot on the Z machine, and the time to cleanup Pu contamination in the Z machine given failure of containment. We identified dominant contributors for both the time to cleanup and the probability of containment failure. These results will be used by SNL management to decide the course of action for conducting the Pu experiments on the Z machine.

  11. AE measurements for evaluation of defects in FRP pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Masanori; Takatsu, Takashi

    1995-11-01

    AE (acoustic emission) measurement was conducted in a series of pressuring tests of FRP pressure vessels in order to examine its applicability to the safety evaluation of vessels. Tested vessels were commercial FRP pressure vessels fabricated by filament winding of high strength glass fibers, impregnated epoxy resin, on a Al alloy liner. At the final stage of fabrication, they were subjected to autofrettage, an overpressuring treatment to produce compressive residual stresses in metal liner. AE measurement results showed a strong Kaiser`s effect and high felicity ratios. In a virgin vessel, very few AE signals were detected below the autofrettage pressure. Vessels containing artificial defects showed distinct increase in AE signals at the level of test pressure. AE origin map were obtained by triangular-zone calculation. Discussions are directed, in particular, to the selection of threshold and to the applicability of AE measurement to the in-service inspection of FRP pressure vessel.

  12. Electrochemical evaluation of a corrosion fatigue failure mechanism in a duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoudt, M. R.; Ricker, R. E.

    2004-08-01

    Laboratory corrosion fatigue studies on smooth and precracked samples indicated that two duplex stainless steels would have similar service lives in a paper-processing environment; but, in service, one of these alloys has exhibited premature failures. Since corrosion fatigue experiments had proven unable to detect this failure mechanism, electrochemical measurements and slow strain rate tensile tests were used to evaluate four alloy composition-dependent failure mechanism hypotheses. No significant differences were found in the dissolution rates or hydrogen fugacities produced when mechanical processes expose bare surface, and slow strain rate tensile tests found no indication of a difference in cracking susceptibility for the same hydrogen fugacity. Electrochemical experiments found that pits nucleate in one phase of the duplex microstructure at lower potentials in the failure prone alloy, but do not propagate beyond the microscopic dimensions of this phase. These microstructurally limited “micropits” were found to nucleate fracture in slow strain rate tensile tests, and examination of a service failure confirmed the presence of microscopic pits at crack initiation sites. The premature failures are attributed to the lower pitting resistance of the failure prone alloy, and the failure of laboratory experiments to predict this behavior is attributed to the slow kinetics of pit nucleation in these experiments. A laboratory testing methodology is suggested that will ensure detection of similar susceptibilities in future corrosion fatigue testing programs.

  13. Effect of material properties on the strain to failure of thick-walled cylinders subjected to internal pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, D.P.; Priddy, T.G. )

    1994-05-01

    The determination of the fully plastic response and pressure limit of a pressure vessel is of considerable importance in design, especially in autofrettage considerations. This paper presents the results of an experimental study which measured the maximum internal pressure which can be applied to thick-walled cylindrical vessels. Both aluminum and steel, with material properties ranging from ductile to brittle, were tested at stress levels through plastic and strain hardening ranges to fracture. From these tests, the pressure-expansion and through-thickness yielding characteristics were determined for these specimens. It is shown that a strain-to-failure criterion, based on the triaxiality of stress in the critical region, can be used to predict the complete pressure versus strain relations and maximum pressure for these cylinders. A simple tension-true stress-strain relation of the material is employed to analytically predict the response of the cylinder into the plastic regime. Finally, simplified theoretical and empirical formulas for bursting pressures are checked against the experimental results.

  14. Competitive evaluation of failure detection algorithms for strapdown redundant inertial instruments.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Seven algorithms for failure detection, isolation, and correction of strapdown inertial instruments in the dodecahedron configuration are competitively evaluated by means of a digital computer simulation that provides them with identical inputs. Their performance is compared in terms of orientation errors and computer burden. The analytical foundations of the algorithms are presented. The features that are found to contribute to superior performance are use of a definite logical structure, elimination of interaction between failures, different thresholds for first and second failures, use of the 'parity' test signals, and avoidance of iteration loops.

  15. DELPHI expert panel evaluation of Hanford high level waste tank failure modes and release quantities

    SciTech Connect

    Dunford, G.L.; Han, F.C.

    1996-09-30

    The Failure Modes and Release Quantities of the Hanford High Level Waste Tanks due to postulated accident loads were established by a DELPHI Expert Panel consisting of both on-site and off-site experts in the field of Structure and Release. The Report presents the evaluation process, accident loads, tank structural failure conclusion reached by the panel during the two-day meeting.

  16. An evaluation of the pressure proof test concept for thin sheet 2024-T3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Poe, C. C., Jr.; Newman, James C., Jr.; Harris, Charles E.

    1990-01-01

    The concept of pressure proof testing of fuselage structures with fatigue cracks to insure structural integrity was evaluated from a fracture mechanics viewpoint. A generic analytical and experimental investigation was conducted on uniaxially loaded flat panels with crack configurations and stress levels typical of longitudinal lap splice joints in commercial transport aircraft fuselages. The results revealed that the remaining fatigue life after a proof test was longer than that without the proof test because of crack growth retardation due to increased crack closure. However, based on a crack length that is slightly less than the critical value at the maximum proof test stress, the minimum assured life or proof test interval must be no more than 550 pressure cycles for a 1.33 proof factor and 1530 pressure cycles for a 1.5 proof factor to prevent in-flight failures.

  17. An evaluation of the pressure proof test concept for 2024-T3 aluminium alloy sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Poe, C. C., Jr.; Newman, J. C.; Harris, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of pressure proof testing of fuselage structures with fatigue cracks to insure structural integrity was evaluated from a fracture mechanics viewpoint. A generic analytical and experimental investigation was conducted on uniaxially loaded flat panels with crack configurations and stress levels typical of longitudinal lap splice joints in commercial transport aircraft fuselages. The results revealed that the remaining fatigue life after a proof cycle was longer than that without the proof cycle because of crack growth retardation due to increased crack closure. However, based on a crack length that is slightly less than the critical value at the maximum proof stress, the minimum assured life or proof test interval must be no more than 550 pressure cycles for a 1.33 proof factor and 1530 pressure cycles for a 1.5 proof factor to prevent in-flight failures.

  18. An evaluation of the pressure proof test concept for thin sheet 2024-T3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Poe, C. C., Jr.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Harris, C. E.

    1990-01-01

    The concept of pressure proof testing of fuselage structures with fatigue cracks to insure structural integrity was evaluated from a fracture mechanics viewpoint. A generic analytical and experimental investigation was conducted on uniaxially loaded flat panels with crack configurations and stress levels typical of longitudinal lap-splice joints in commercial transport aircraft fuselage. The results revealed that the remaining fatigue life after a proof test was longer than that without the proof test because of crack growth retardation due to increased crack closure. However, based on a crack length that is slightly less than the critical value at the maximum proof test stress, the minimum assured life or proof test interval must be no more than 550 pressure cycles for a 1.33 proof factor and 1530 pressure cycles for a 1.5 proof factor to prevent in-flight failures.

  19. Western Pennsylvania Schools Without Failure Consortium: First Year Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, James R.

    The consortium was formed in the summer of 1971 as a means of implementing William Glasser's philosophy and methods. The program was implemented in two parochial elementary schools and in nine public elementary schools located in eight school districts. The evaluation discussed in this report included questionnaires to measure pupil self concepts…

  20. Evaluation of pressure sensing concepts: A technology assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, R.L.; Thacker, L.H.

    1993-09-01

    Advanced distributed control systems for electric power plants will require more accurate and reliable pressure gauges than those now installed. Future developments in power plant control systems are expected to use digital/optical networks rather than the analog/electric data transmission used in existing plants. Many pressure transmitters now installed use oil filling to separate process fluids from the gauge mechanism and are subject to insidious failures when the oil leaks. Testing and maintenance of pressure channels occupy a disproportionately large amount of effort to restore their accuracy and verify their operability. These and similar concerns have prompted an assessment of a broad spectrum of sensor technologies to aid in selecting the most likely candidates for adaptation to power plant applications. Ten representative conventional and thirty innovational pressure sensors are described and compared. Particular emphasis is focused on two categories: Silicon-integrated pressure sensors and fiber-optic sensors, and both of these categories are discussed in detail. Additional attractive concepts include variable reluctance gauges and resonant structure gauges that may not require oil buffering from the process fluid.

  1. Normal pressure hydrocephalus and dementia--evaluation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Turner, D A; McGeachie, R E

    1988-11-01

    The evaluation of dementia usually includes a consideration of normal pressure hydrocephalus, which may be a treatable aspect of the patient's cognitive dysfunction. This article outlines clinical syndromes, standard radiologic evaluation, and newer diagnostic tests that may suggest cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunting. In general, patients who present with dementia alone will not respond well to CSF shunting because of cerebral atrophy and the lack of tension within the cerebral ventricles. However, normal pressure hydrocephalus remains a diagnostic consideration, and improved evaluation may allow a better differentiation of which patients should be considered for CSF shunting. PMID:3066462

  2. Chronic mitral regurgitation and Doppler estimation of left ventricular filling pressures in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Temporelli, P L; Scapellato, F; Corrà, U; Eleuteri, E; Firstenberg, M S; Thomas, J D; Giannuzzi, P

    2001-11-01

    Previous studies relating Doppler parameters and pulmonary capillary wedge pressures (PCWP) typically exclude patients with severe mitral regurgitation (MR). We evaluated the effects of varying degrees of chronic MR on the Doppler estimation of PCWP. PCWP and mitral Doppler profiles were obtained in 88 patients (mean age 55 +/- 8 years) with severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction (mean ejection fraction 23% +/- 5%). Patients were classified by severity of MR. Patients with severe MR had greater left atrial areas, LV end-diastolic volumes, and mean PCWPs and lower ejection fractions (each P <.01). In patients with mild MR, multiple echocardiographic parameters correlated with PCWP; however, with worsening MR, only deceleration time strongly related to PCWP. From stepwise multivariate analysis, deceleration time was the best independent predictor of PCWP overall, and it was the only predictor in patients with moderate or severe MR. Doppler-derived early mitral deceleration time reliably predicts PCWP in patients with severe LV dysfunction irrespective of degree of MR. PMID:11696834

  3. Milliwatt generator heat source shelf-life-related pressure-burst capsule evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchey, B.D.; Eckelmeyer, K.H.; Kilgo, A.C.; McKenzie, B.B.

    1997-10-01

    Three Milliwatt Generator Heat Source (MWGHS) shelf-life-related capsules were pressure-burst tested after thermal aging. Shelf-life capsules PB-08-03 (MC2893) and MPT-11-33 (MC3599) were tested at 1,010 C and capsule PB-07-13 (MC2893) was tested at 1,100 C. Subsequent to pressure-burst testing, each capsule was bubble-leak tested then metallographically examined. Post-mortem evaluation consisted of metallography, microhardness, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and oxygen and nitrogen analysis. Capsules PB-08-03 and PB-07-13 failed by elevated temperature stress-rupture in the coarse-grained cap to body welds, as has been documented for previous capsules. Pressure-burst testing of capsule MPT-11-33 was terminated prior to failure after 739 hours on test at 1,010 C, however, microscopic examination of the weld indicated that similar failure had began to occur in the interior portion of the capsule to body weld. Evidence was obtained indicating that metallurgical changes occurred during the pressure-burst test performed at 1,100 C. The metallurgical observations of a preferred site for elevated temperature deformation and fracture (the coarse-grained weld region) and structural instability (the property changes during testing at 1,100 C) need to be considered in component lifetime prediction and modeling efforts.

  4. Hybrid Modeling for Scenario-Based Evaluation of Failure Effects in Advanced Hardware-Software Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Fleming, Land; Throop, David

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes an incremental scenario-based simulation approach to evaluation of intelligent software for control and management of hardware systems. A hybrid continuous/discrete event simulation of the hardware dynamically interacts with the intelligent software in operations scenarios. Embedded anomalous conditions and failures in simulated hardware can lead to emergent software behavior and identification of missing or faulty software or hardware requirements. An approach is described for extending simulation-based automated incremental failure modes and effects analysis, to support concurrent evaluation of intelligent software and the hardware controlled by the software

  5. Experimental evaluation of the tensor polynomial failure criterion for the design of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    The experimental measures and techniques are described which are used to obtain the strength tensor components, including cubic terms. Based on a considerable number of biaxial pressure tests together with specimens subjected to a constant torque and internal pressure, a modified form of the plane stress tensor polynomial failure equation was obtained that was capable of predicting ultimate strength results well. Preliminary data were obtained to determine the effect of varying post cure times and ambient temperatures (-80 F to 250 F) on the change in two tensor strength terms, F sub 2 and F sub 22. Other laminate configurations yield corresponding variations for the remaining strength parameters.

  6. A finite element evaluation of the moment arm hypothesis for altered vertebral shear failure force.

    PubMed

    Howarth, Samuel J; Karakolis, Thomas; Callaghan, Jack P

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of vertebral shear failure is likely a bending moment generated about the pars interarticularis by facet contact, and the moment arm length (MAL) between the centroid of facet contact and the location of pars interarticularis failure has been hypothesised to be an influential modulator of shear failure force. To quantitatively evaluate this hypothesis, anterior shear of C3 over C4 was simulated in a finite element model of the porcine C3-C4 vertebral joint with each combination of five compressive force magnitudes (0-60% of estimated compressive failure force) and three postures (flexed, neutral and extended). Bilateral locations of peak stress within C3's pars interarticularis were identified along with the centroids of contact force on the inferior facets. These measurements were used to calculate the MAL of facet contact force. Changes in MAL were also related to shear failure forces measured from similar in vitro tests. Flexed and extended vertebral postures respectively increased and decreased the MAL by 6.6% and 4.8%. The MAL decreased by only 2.6% from the smallest to the largest compressive force. Furthermore, altered MAL explained 70% of the variance in measured shear failure force from comparable in vitro testing with larger MALs being associated with lower shear failure forces. Our results confirmed that the MAL is indeed a significant modulator of vertebral shear failure force. Considering spine flexion is necessary when assessing low-back shear injury potential because of the association between altered facet articulation and lower vertebral shear failure tolerance. PMID:23947529

  7. Severe acute respiratory failure managed with continuous positive airway pressure and partial extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal by an artificial membrane lung. A controlled, randomized animal study.

    PubMed

    Borelli, M; Kolobow, T; Spatola, R; Prato, P; Tsuno, K

    1988-12-01

    Using an animal model of acute respiratory failure (ARF), we evaluated two treatments: conventional mechanical pulmonary ventilation (MV) and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) with extracorporeal removal of CO2 by an artificial membrane lung. We developed a model of "mild" ARF and a model of "severe" ARF after ventilating healthy sheep at a peak inspiratory pressure of 50 cm H2O for various lengths of time. Sheep from either injury models were randomly assigned to one of the above treatment groups. All 16 sheep from the model with "severe" ARF died, with progressive deterioration in pulmonary function and multiorgan failure irrespective of the treatment. Of 11 sheep from the model with "mild" ARF treated by MV, only three survived, whereas all 11 sheep from the model with "mild" ARF treated with CPAP and extracorporeal removal of CO2 responded well, and nine sheep ultimately recovered. We conclude that CPAP with extracorporeal removal of CO2 provided a better environment for the recovery in our model with "mild" ARF than the conventional arrangement centered on MV alone. Our studies also suggest that lung injury can progress (i.e., model with "severe" ARF) to where neither of the two treatments can succeed. PMID:3144216

  8. Consequence evaluation of radiation embrittlement of Trojan reactor pressure vessel supports

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.C.; Sommer, S.C.; Johnson, G.L. ); Lambert, H.E. )

    1990-10-01

    This report describes a consequence evaluation to address safety concerns raised by the radiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports for the Trojan nuclear power plant. The study comprises a structural evaluation and an effects evaluation and assumes that all four reactor vessel supports have completely lost the load carrying capability. By demonstrating that the ASME code requirements governing Level D service limits are satisfied, the structural evaluation concludes that the Trojan reactor coolant loop (RCL) piping is capable of transferring loads to the steam generator (SG) supports and the reactor coolant pump (RCP) supports. A subsequent design margins to accommodate additional loads transferred to them through the RCL piping. The effects evaluation, employing a systems analysis approach, investigates initiating events and the reliability of the engineered safeguard systems as the RPV is subject to movements caused by the RPV support failure. The evaluation identifies a number of areas of additional safety concerns, but further investigation of the above safety concerns, however, concludes that a hypothetical failure of the Trojan RPV supports due to radiation embrittlement will not result in consequences of significant safety concerns.

  9. A comparison of synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation and pressure-regulated volume control ventilation in elderly patients with acute exacerbations of COPD and respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Suchi; Shi, Jindong; Fu, Cuiping; Wu, Xu; Li, Shanqun

    2016-01-01

    Background COPD is the third leading cause of death worldwide. Acute exacerbations of COPD may cause respiratory failure, requiring intensive care unit admission and mechanical ventilation. Intensive care unit patients with acute exacerbations of COPD requiring mechanical ventilation have higher mortality rates than other hospitalized patients. Although mechanical ventilation is the most effective intervention for these conditions, invasive ventilation techniques have yielded variable effects. Objective We evaluated pressure-regulated volume control (PRVC) ventilation treatment efficacy and preventive effects on pulmonary barotrauma in elderly COPD patients with respiratory failure. Patients and methods Thirty-nine intubated patients were divided into experimental and control groups and treated with the PRVC and synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation – volume control methods, respectively. Vital signs, respiratory mechanics, and arterial blood gas analyses were monitored for 2–4 hours and 48 hours. Results Both groups showed rapidly improved pH, partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), and PaO2 per fraction of inspired O2 levels and lower partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) levels. The pH and PaCO2 levels at 2–4 hours were lower and higher, respectively, in the test group than those in the control group (P<0.05 for both); after 48 hours, blood gas analyses showed no statistical difference in any marker (P>0.05). Vital signs during 2–4 hours and 48 hours of treatment showed no statistical difference in either group (P>0.05). The level of peak inspiratory pressure in the experimental group after mechanical ventilation for 2–4 hours and 48 hours was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05), while other variables were not significantly different between groups (P>0.05). Conclusion Among elderly COPD patients with respiratory failure, application of PRVC resulted in rapid improvement in arterial blood gas analyses while maintaining

  10. Evaluation of the concept of pressure proof testing fuselage structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Orringer, Oscar

    1991-01-01

    The FAA and NASA have recently completed independent technical evaluations of the concept of pressure proof testing the fuselage of commercial transport airplanes. The results of these evaluations are summarized. The objectives of the evaluations were to establish the potential benefit of the pressure proof test, to quantify the most desirable proof test pressure, and to quantify the required proof test interval. The focus of the evaluations was on multiple-site cracks extending from adjacent rivet holes of a typical fuselage longitudinal lap splice joint. The FAA and NASA do not support pressure proof testing the fuselage of aging commercial transport aircraft. The argument against proof testing is as follows: (1) a single proof test does not insure an indefinite life; therefore, the proof test must be repeated at regular intervals; (2) for a proof factor of 1.33, the required proof test interval must be below 300 flights to account for uncertainties in the evaluation; (3) conducting the proof test at a proof factor of 1.5 would considerably exceed the fuselage design limit load; therefore, it is not consistent with accepted safe practices; and (4) better safety can be assured by implementing enhanced nondestructive inspection requirements, and adequate reliability can be achieved by an inspection interval several times longer than the proof test interval.

  11. Evaluation of Safety in a Radiation Oncology Setting Using Failure Mode and Effects Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Eric C. Gaudette, Ray; Myers, Lee; Vanderver, Bruce; Engineer, Lilly; Zellars, Richard; Song, Danny Y.; Wong, John; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is a widely used tool for prospectively evaluating safety and reliability. We report our experiences in applying FMEA in the setting of radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: We performed an FMEA analysis for our external beam radiation therapy service, which consisted of the following tasks: (1) create a visual map of the process, (2) identify possible failure modes; assign risk probability numbers (RPN) to each failure mode based on tabulated scores for the severity, frequency of occurrence, and detectability, each on a scale of 1 to 10; and (3) identify improvements that are both feasible and effective. The RPN scores can span a range of 1 to 1000, with higher scores indicating the relative importance of a given failure mode. Results: Our process map consisted of 269 different nodes. We identified 127 possible failure modes with RPN scores ranging from 2 to 160. Fifteen of the top-ranked failure modes were considered for process improvements, representing RPN scores of 75 and more. These specific improvement suggestions were incorporated into our practice with a review and implementation by each department team responsible for the process. Conclusions: The FMEA technique provides a systematic method for finding vulnerabilities in a process before they result in an error. The FMEA framework can naturally incorporate further quantification and monitoring. A general-use system for incident and near miss reporting would be useful in this regard.

  12. Evaluation of insulated pressure vessels for cryogenic hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Garcia-Villazana, O; Martinez-Frias, J

    1999-03-01

    This paper presents an analytical and experimental evaluation of the applicability of insulated pressure vessels for hydrogen-fueled light-duty vehicles. Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen (LH?) or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen (CH2). Insulated pressure vessels offer the advantages of liquid hydrogen tanks (low weight and volume), with reduced disadvantages (lower energy requirement for hydrogen liquefaction and reduced evaporative losses). The purpose of this work is to verify that commercially available aluminum-lined, fiber- wrapped vessels can be used for cryogenic hydrogen storage. The paper reports on previous and ongoing tests and analyses that have the purpose of improving the system design and assure its safety.

  13. Effect of Combined Loading Due to Bending and Internal Pressure on Pipe Flaw Evaluation Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Naoki; Sakai, Shinsuke

    Considering a rule for the rationalization of maintenance of Light Water Reactor piping, reliable flaw evaluation criteria are essential for determining how a detected flaw will be detrimental to continuous plant operation. Ductile fracture is one of the dominant failure modes that must be considered for carbon steel piping and can be analyzed by elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. Some analytical efforts have provided various flaw evaluation criteria using load correction factors, such as the Z-factors in the JSME codes on fitness-for-service for nuclear power plants and the section XI of the ASME boiler and pressure vessel code. The present Z-factors were conventionally determined, taking conservativity and simplicity into account; however, the effect of internal pressure, which is an important factor under actual plant conditions, was not adequately considered. Recently, a J-estimation scheme, LBB.ENGC for the ductile fracture analysis of circumferentially through-wall-cracked pipes subjected to combined loading was developed for more accurate prediction under more realistic conditions. This method explicitly incorporates the contributions of both bending and tension due to internal pressure by means of a scheme that is compatible with an arbitrary combined-loading history. In this study, the effect of internal pressure on the flaw evaluation criteria was investigated using the new J-estimation scheme. The Z-factor obtained in this study was compared with the presently used Z-factors, and the predictability of the current flaw evaluation criteria was quantitatively evaluated in consideration of the internal pressure.

  14. The role of laboratory and imaging studies in evaluation of failure to thrive

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evaluation of Failure to Thrive (FTT) has traditionally been based on history and physical examination (PE), as main determinants of the final diagnosis. Early literature from two decades ago, demonstrated that laboratory and imaging studies were contributory beyond the history and PE in less than 1...

  15. Performance of low-pressure thermionic converters is evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, H. K.

    1969-01-01

    Experiments, evaluating the performance of low-pressure thermionic converters, were conducted with cesium, potassium, and sodium-metal vapors. The results of the investigation are useful in the selection of favorable conditions for the design of thermionic reactor fuel elements, including RF output for special applications.

  16. Evaluation of heart failure biomarker tests: a survey of statistical considerations.

    PubMed

    De, Arkendra; Meier, Kristen; Tang, Rong; Li, Meijuan; Gwise, Thomas; Gomatam, Shanti; Pennello, Gene

    2013-08-01

    Biomarkers assessing cardiovascular function can encompass a wide range of biochemical or physiological measurements. Medical tests that measure biomarkers are typically evaluated for measurement validation and clinical performance in the context of their intended use. General statistical principles for the evaluation of medical tests are discussed in this paper in the context of heart failure. Statistical aspects of study design and analysis to be considered while assessing the quality of measurements and the clinical performance of tests are highlighted. A discussion of statistical considerations for specific clinical uses is also provided. The remarks in this paper mainly focus on methods and considerations for statistical evaluation of medical tests from the perspective of bias and precision. With such an evaluation of performance, healthcare professionals could have information that leads to a better understanding on the strengths and limitations of tests related to heart failure. PMID:23670231

  17. Association of Diurnal Blood Pressure Pattern with Risk for Hospitalization or Death in Men with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jaekyu; Kline, Sharoen; Moore, Mariellen; Gong, Yan; Bhanderi, Viralkumar; Schmalfuss, Carsten M.; Johnson, Julie A.; Schofield, Richard S.

    2007-01-01

    Background An altered diurnal blood pressure (BP) pattern has been linked to risk of developing heart failure (HF). We tested whether an altered diurnal BP pattern is associated with adverse outcomes (hospitalization due to HF exacerbation or death) in HF patients. Methods and Results One hundred eighteen HF patients were enrolled from a tertiary care HF clinic and followed for death or heart failure hospitalization for up to 4 years. 24-hour ambulatory BP was monitored. Forty patients (34%) had normal BP dipping pattern (night-day ambulatory BP ratio < 0.9), 44 (37%) had a non-dipping pattern (0.9 ≤ night-day ambulatory BP ratio < 1.0) and 34 (29%) had a reverse dipping BP pattern (night-day ambulatory BP ratio ≥ 1.0). A total of 39 patients had an adverse outcome. Adverse outcome rates were the lowest in dippers and the highest in reverse dippers (Log rank p=0.052). Predictors of adverse outcomes, selected based on log likelihood contrast, were NYHA functional class (Hazard ratio (HR) 1.96, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11-3.44), anemia (HR 2.50, 95% CI 1.23-5.08) and dipping status (HR 1.65, 95% CI 1.08-2.50). Conclusions In addition to other traditional predictors, blood pressure dipping status may be an important prognostic factor in HF. PMID:17923358

  18. Review of reactor pressure vessel evaluation report for Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station (YAEC No. 1735)

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Dickson, T.L.; Merkle, J.G.; Nanstad, R.K. )

    1992-03-01

    The Yankee Atomic Electric Company has performed an Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS)-type evaluation of the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel in accordance with the PTS Rule (10 CFR 50. 61) and a US Regulatory Guide 1.154. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reviewed the YAEC document and performed an independent probabilistic fracture-mechnics analysis. The review included a comparison of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the ORNL probabilistic fracture-mechanics codes (VISA-II and OCA-P, respectively). The review identified minor errors and one significant difference in philosophy. Also, the two codes have a few dissimilar peripheral features. Aside from these differences, VISA-II and OCA-P are very similar and with errors corrected and when adjusted for the difference in the treatment of fracture toughness distribution through the wall, yield essentially the same value of the conditional probability of failure. The ORNL independent evaluation indicated RT{sub NDT} values considerably greater than those corresponding to the PTS-Rule screening criteria and a frequency of failure substantially greater than that corresponding to the primary acceptance criterion'' in US Regulatory Guide 1.154. Time constraints, however, prevented as rigorous a treatment as the situation deserves. Thus, these results are very preliminary.

  19. Review of reactor pressure vessel evaluation report for Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station (YAEC No. 1735)

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Dickson, T.L.; Merkle, J.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1992-03-01

    The Yankee Atomic Electric Company has performed an Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS)-type evaluation of the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel in accordance with the PTS Rule (10 CFR 50. 61) and a US Regulatory Guide 1.154. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reviewed the YAEC document and performed an independent probabilistic fracture-mechnics analysis. The review included a comparison of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the ORNL probabilistic fracture-mechanics codes (VISA-II and OCA-P, respectively). The review identified minor errors and one significant difference in philosophy. Also, the two codes have a few dissimilar peripheral features. Aside from these differences, VISA-II and OCA-P are very similar and with errors corrected and when adjusted for the difference in the treatment of fracture toughness distribution through the wall, yield essentially the same value of the conditional probability of failure. The ORNL independent evaluation indicated RT{sub NDT} values considerably greater than those corresponding to the PTS-Rule screening criteria and a frequency of failure substantially greater than that corresponding to the ``primary acceptance criterion`` in US Regulatory Guide 1.154. Time constraints, however, prevented as rigorous a treatment as the situation deserves. Thus, these results are very preliminary.

  20. Validity of transcutaneous oxygen/carbon dioxide pressure measurement in the monitoring of mechanical ventilation in stable chronic respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Rosner, V; Hannhart, B; Chabot, F; Polu, J M

    1999-05-01

    The accuracy and precision of transcutaneous pressure measurements of oxygen (Ptc,O2) and carbon dioxide (Ptc,CO2) in the monitoring of nocturnal assisted ventilation in adult patients were evaluated. Transcutaneous measurements obtained with two analysers, Radiometer TINATCM3 (R) and Kontron MicroGas-7650 (K), were compared with arterial blood gases analysed in blood samples withdrawn simultaneously in 10 patients. Sensors were heated to 43 degrees C. Measurements of transcutaneous blood gases and arterial blood gases were collected six times at 1-h intervals. The data obtained with both instruments were similar and did not significantly change over the 5 h test period. Measurement of Ptc,O2 underestimated arterial oxygen tension (Pa,O2) and this underestimation increased with the level of Pa,O2 (p<0.01). Measurements of Ptc,CO2 overestimated arterial carbon dioxide tension (Pa,CO2) and this overestimation increased with the level of Pa,CO2 (p<0.05). These errors suggested an instrumental bias. Mathematical correction of this bias neutralized the error in accuracy and improved the precision (SD of the differences transcutaneous blood gases - arterial blood gases). An additional correction, suppressing the between-subject scattering, improved the actual precision: precision was reduced from 1.9 to 0.8 kPa (14.4 to 5.7 mmHg) (R) and from 1.7 to 0.5 kPa (13.1 to 3.7 mmHg) (K) for oxygen, and from 1.0 kPa (7.8 mmHg) (R) and 0.7 kPa (5.6 mmHg) (K) to 0.4 kPa (3.2 mmHg) for carbon dioxide (R and K). In conclusion, with these two successive corrections, transcutaneous oxygen and carbon dioxide provide a reliable estimation of blood gases to monitor nocturnal ventilation in adults with chronic respiratory failure. PMID:10414402

  1. Immunity-based detection, identification, and evaluation of aircraft sub-system failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncayo, Hever Y.

    This thesis describes the design, development, and flight-simulation testing of an integrated Artificial Immune System (AIS) for detection, identification, and evaluation of a wide variety of sensor, actuator, propulsion, and structural failures/damages including the prediction of the achievable states and other limitations on performance and handling qualities. The AIS scheme achieves high detection rate and low number of false alarms for all the failure categories considered. Data collected using a motion-based flight simulator are used to define the self for an extended sub-region of the flight envelope. The NASA IFCS F-15 research aircraft model is used and represents a supersonic fighter which include model following adaptive control laws based on non-linear dynamic inversion and artificial neural network augmentation. The flight simulation tests are designed to analyze and demonstrate the performance of the immunity-based aircraft failure detection, identification and evaluation (FDIE) scheme. A general robustness analysis is also presented by determining the achievable limits for a desired performance in the presence of atmospheric perturbations. For the purpose of this work, the integrated AIS scheme is implemented based on three main components. The first component performs the detection when one of the considered failures is present in the system. The second component consists in the identification of the failure category and the classification according to the failed element. During the third phase a general evaluation of the failure is performed with the estimation of the magnitude/severity of the failure and the prediction of its effect on reducing the flight envelope of the aircraft system. Solutions and alternatives to specific design issues of the AIS scheme, such as data clustering and empty space optimization, data fusion and duplication removal, definition of features, dimensionality reduction, and selection of cluster/detector shape are also

  2. Advanced detection, isolation and accommodation of sensor failures: Real-time evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, Walter C.; Delaat, John C.; Bruton, William M.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of the Advanced Detection, Isolation, and Accommodation (ADIA) Program is to improve the overall demonstrated reliability of digital electronic control systems for turbine engines by using analytical redundacy to detect sensor failures. The results of a real time hybrid computer evaluation of the ADIA algorithm are presented. Minimum detectable levels of sensor failures for an F100 engine control system are determined. Also included are details about the microprocessor implementation of the algorithm as well as a description of the algorithm itself.

  3. Advanced detection, isolation, and accommodation of sensor failures - Real-time evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, Walter C.; Delaat, John C.; Bruton, William M.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of the Advanced Detection, Isolation, and Accommodation (ADIA) program is to improve the overall demonstrated reliability of digital electronic control systems for turbine engines by using analytical redundancy to detect sensor failures. The results of a real-time hybrid computer evaluation of the ADIA algorithm are presented. Minimum detectable levels of sensor failures for an F100 engine control system are determined. Also included are details about the microprocessor implementation of the algorithm as well as a description of the algorithm itself.

  4. Evaluation of vapor intrusion using controlled building pressure.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Thomas E; Beckley, Lila; Bailey, Danielle; Gorder, Kyle; Dettenmaier, Erik; Rivera-Duarte, Ignacio; Brock, Samuel; MacGregor, Ian C

    2012-05-01

    The use of measured volatile organic chemical (VOC) concentrations in indoor air to evaluate vapor intrusion is complicated by (i) indoor sources of the same VOCs and (ii) temporal variability in vapor intrusion. This study evaluated the efficacy of utilizing induced negative and positive building pressure conditions during a vapor intrusion investigation program to provide an improved understanding of the potential for vapor intrusion. Pressure control was achieved in five of six buildings where the investigation program was tested. For these five buildings, the induced pressure differences were sufficient to control the flow of soil gas through the building foundation. A comparison of VOC concentrations in indoor air measured during the negative and positive pressure test conditions was sufficient to determine whether vapor intrusion was the primary source of VOCs in indoor air at these buildings. The study results indicate that sampling under controlled building pressure can help minimize ambiguity caused by both indoor sources of VOCs and temporal variability in vapor intrusion. PMID:22486634

  5. Low Temperature and High Pressure Evaluation of Insulated Pressure Vessels for Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S.; Martinez-Frias, J.; Garcia-Villazana, O.

    2000-06-25

    Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen (CH{sub 2}). Insulated pressure vessels offer the advantages of liquid hydrogen tanks (low weight and volume), with reduced disadvantages (fuel flexibility, lower energy requirement for hydrogen liquefaction and reduced evaporative losses). The work described here is directed at verifying that commercially available pressure vessels can be safely used to store liquid hydrogen. The use of commercially available pressure vessels significantly reduces the cost and complexity of the insulated pressure vessel development effort. This paper describes a series of tests that have been done with aluminum-lined, fiber-wrapped vessels to evaluate the damage caused by low temperature operation. All analysis and experiments to date indicate that no significant damage has resulted. Required future tests are described that will prove that no technical barriers exist to the safe use of aluminum-fiber vessels at cryogenic temperatures.

  6. PS1 satellite refrigerator heat exchanger: Failure of the LN2 heat exchanger to low pressure helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, B.

    1992-11-01

    The PS1 heat exchanger is one of three prototype heat exchangers built in support of a contract for Satellite Refrigerator Heat Exchanger components. This heat exchanger was first put into operation in Jul. 1983. In Nov. 1991, this heat exchanger experienced a failure in the shell of heat exchanger 1 causing nitrogen to contaminate the helium in the refrigerator. The resulting contamination plugged heat exchanger 3. The break occurred at a weld that connects a 0.25 inch thick ring to heat exchanger 1. The failure appears to be a fatigue of the shell due to temperature oscillations. The flow rate through the break was measured to be 1.0 scfm for a pressure drop over the crack of 50 psi. An ANSYS analysis of the failure area indicates that the stress would be 83,000 psi if the metal did not yield. This is based on cooling down the shell to 80K from 300K with the shell side helium on the outside of the shell at 300K. This is the largest change in temperature that occurs during operation. During normal operations, the temperature swings are not nearly this large, however temperatures down to 80K are not unusual (LN2 overflowing pot). The highest temperatures are typically 260K. The analysis makes no attempt to estimate the stress concentration factor at this weld, but there is no doubt that it is greater than 1. No estimate as to the number of cycles to cause failure was calculated nor any estimate as to the actual number of cycles was made.

  7. Simplified Methodology to Estimate the Maximum Liquid Helium (LHe) Cryostat Pressure from a Vacuum Jacket Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Richards, W. Lance

    2015-01-01

    The aircraft-based Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a platform for multiple infrared astronomical observation experiments. These experiments carry sensors cooled to liquid helium temperatures. The liquid helium supply is contained in large (i.e., 10 liters or more) vacuum-insulated dewars. Should the dewar vacuum insulation fail, the inrushing air will condense and freeze on the dewar wall, resulting in a large heat flux on the dewar's contents. The heat flux results in a rise in pressure and the actuation of the dewar pressure relief system. A previous NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) assessment provided recommendations for the wall heat flux that would be expected from a loss of vacuum and detailed an appropriate method to use in calculating the maximum pressure that would occur in a loss of vacuum event. This method involved building a detailed supercritical helium compressible flow thermal/fluid model of the vent stack and exercising the model over the appropriate range of parameters. The experimenters designing science instruments for SOFIA are not experts in compressible supercritical flows and do not generally have access to the thermal/fluid modeling packages that are required to build detailed models of the vent stacks. Therefore, the SOFIA Program engaged the NESC to develop a simplified methodology to estimate the maximum pressure in a liquid helium dewar after the loss of vacuum insulation. The method would allow the university-based science instrument development teams to conservatively determine the cryostat's vent neck sizing during preliminary design of new SOFIA Science Instruments. This report details the development of the simplified method, the method itself, and the limits of its applicability. The simplified methodology provides an estimate of the dewar pressure after a loss of vacuum insulation that can be used for the initial design of the liquid helium dewar vent stacks. However, since it is not an exact

  8. An improved method for risk evaluation in failure modes and effects analysis of CNC lathe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachieru, N.; Belu, N.; Anghel, D. C.

    2015-11-01

    Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is one of the most popular reliability analysis tools for identifying, assessing and eliminating potential failure modes in a wide range of industries. In general, failure modes in FMEA are evaluated and ranked through the risk priority number (RPN), which is obtained by the multiplication of crisp values of the risk factors, such as the occurrence (O), severity (S), and detection (D) of each failure mode. However, the crisp RPN method has been criticized to have several deficiencies. In this paper, linguistic variables, expressed in Gaussian, trapezoidal or triangular fuzzy numbers, are used to assess the ratings and weights for the risk factors S, O and D. A new risk assessment system based on the fuzzy set theory and fuzzy rule base theory is to be applied to assess and rank risks associated to failure modes that could appear in the functioning of Turn 55 Lathe CNC. Two case studies have been shown to demonstrate the methodology thus developed. It is illustrated a parallel between the results obtained by the traditional method and fuzzy logic for determining the RPNs. The results show that the proposed approach can reduce duplicated RPN numbers and get a more accurate, reasonable risk assessment. As a result, the stability of product and process can be assured.

  9. Evaluation of an electronic scanner of pressure (ESOP) module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, D. B.; Levin, A. D.

    1986-01-01

    An electronic scanner of pressure (ESOP) module, developed by NASA Ames Research Center, was installed in a wind tunnel and evaluated over a 5-month testing period. The solid-state ESOP module has 48 miniature pressure transducers and a heater circuit to maintain a constant module temperature. During the wind tunnel test, the module was subjected to an environmental temperature range from 60 F to 104 F, and to considerable module vibration. Zero drift was within + or - 0.5 percent of full-scale output for 37 of the transducers, and was greater than 5.0 percent for four transducers. Pressure measurements from 12 transducers were compared with Scanivalve modules. The agreement of these measurements was considered to be good.

  10. Radiosonde pressure sensor performance - Evaluation using tracking radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, C. L.; Norcross, G. A.; Brooks, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    The standard balloon-borne radiosonde employed for synoptic meteorology provides vertical profiles of temperature, pressure, and humidity as a function of elapsed time. These parameters are used in the hypsometric equation to calculate the geopotential altitude at each sampling point during the balloon's flight. It is important that the vertical location information be accurate. The present investigation was conducted with the objective to evaluate the altitude determination accuracy of the standard radiosonde throughout the entire balloon profile. The tests included two other commercially available pressure sensors to see if they could provide improved accuracy in the stratosphere. The pressure-measuring performance of standard baroswitches, premium baroswitches, and hypsometers in balloon-borne sondes was correlated with tracking radars. It was found that the standard and premium baroswitches perform well up to about 25 km altitude, while hypsometers provide more reliable data above 25 km.

  11. Acute respiratory failure induced by mechanical pulmonary ventilation at a peak inspiratory pressure of 40 cmH2O.

    PubMed

    Tsuno, K; Sakanashi, Y; Kishi, Y; Urata, K; Tanoue, T; Higashi, K; Yano, T; Terasaki, H; Morioka, T

    1988-09-01

    The effects of high pressure mechanical pulmonary ventilation at a peak inspiratory pressure of 40 cmH(2)O were studied on the lungs of healthy newborn pigs (14-21 days after birth). Forty percent oxygen in nitrogen was used for ventilation to prevent oxygen intoxication. The control group (6 pigs) was ventilated for 48 hours at a peak inspiratory pressure less than 18 cmH(2)O and a PEEP of 3-5 cmH(2)O with a normal tidal volume, and a respiratory rate of 20 times/min. The control group showed few deleterious changes in the lungs for 48 hours. Eleven newborn pigs were ventilated at a peak inspiratory pressure of 40 cmH(2)O with a PEEP of 3-5 cmH(2)O and a respiratory rate of 20 times/min. To avoid respiratory alkalosis, a dead space was placed in the respiratory circuit, and normocarbia was maintained by adjusting dead space volume. In all cases in the latter group, severe pulmonary impairments, such as abnormal chest roentgenograms, hypoxemia, decreased total static lung compliance, high incidence of pneumothorax, congestive atelectasis, and increased lung weight were found within 48 hours of ventilation. When the pulmonary impairments became manifest, 6 of the 11 newborn pigs were switched to the conventional medical and ventilatory therapies for 3-6 days. However, all of them became ventilator dependent, and severe lung pathology was found at autopsy. These pulmonary insults by high pressure mechanical pulmonary ventilation could be occurring not infrequently in the respiratory management of patients with respiratory failure. PMID:15236077

  12. 10 CFR 21.21 - Notification of failure to comply or existence of a defect and its evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and its evaluation. 21.21 Section 21.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION REPORTING OF DEFECTS AND NONCOMPLIANCE Notification § 21.21 Notification of failure to comply or existence of a defect and its evaluation... § 21.21(d)(5). The interim report should describe the deviation or failure to comply that is...

  13. 10 CFR 21.21 - Notification of failure to comply or existence of a defect and its evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and its evaluation. 21.21 Section 21.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION REPORTING OF DEFECTS AND NONCOMPLIANCE Notification § 21.21 Notification of failure to comply or existence of a defect and its evaluation... § 21.21(d)(5). The interim report should describe the deviation or failure to comply that is...

  14. 10 CFR 21.21 - Notification of failure to comply or existence of a defect and its evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and its evaluation. 21.21 Section 21.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION REPORTING OF DEFECTS AND NONCOMPLIANCE Notification § 21.21 Notification of failure to comply or existence of a defect and its evaluation... § 21.21(d)(5). The interim report should describe the deviation or failure to comply that is...

  15. 10 CFR 21.21 - Notification of failure to comply or existence of a defect and its evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and its evaluation. 21.21 Section 21.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION REPORTING OF DEFECTS AND NONCOMPLIANCE Notification § 21.21 Notification of failure to comply or existence of a defect and its evaluation... § 21.21(d)(5). The interim report should describe the deviation or failure to comply that is...

  16. The Overexpression of Twinkle Helicase Ameliorates the Progression of Cardiac Fibrosis and Heart Failure in Pressure Overload Model in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Ide, Tomomi; Fujino, Takeo; Onitsuka, Ken; Ikeda, Masataka; Takehara, Takako; Hata, Yuko; Ylikallio, Emil; Tyynismaa, Henna; Suomalainen, Anu; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number decreases in heart failure. In post-myocardial infarction mice, increasing mtDNA copy number by overexpressing mitochondrial transcription factor attenuates mtDNA deficiency and ameliorates pathological remodeling thereby markedly improving survival. However, the functional significance of increased mtDNA copy number in hypertensive heart disease remains unknown. We addressed this question using transgenic mice that overexpress Twinkle helicase (Twinkle; Tg), the mtDNA helicase, and examined whether Twinkle overexpression protects the heart from left ventricular (LV) remodeling and failure after pressure overload created by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Twinkle overexpression increased mtDNA copy number by 2.2±0.1-fold. Heart weight, LV diastolic volume and wall thickness were comparable between Tg and wild type littermates (WT) at 28 days after TAC operation. LV end-diastolic pressure increased in WT after TAC (8.6±2.8 mmHg), and this increase was attenuated in Tg (4.6±2.6 mmHg). Impaired LV fractional shortening after TAC operation was also suppressed in Tg, as measured by echocardiography (WT: 16.2±7.2% vs Tg: 20.7±6.2%). These LV functional improvements were accompanied by a decrease in interstitial fibrosis (WT: 10.6±1.1% vs Tg: 3.0±0.6%). In in vitro studies, overexpressing Twinkle using an adenovirus vector in cultured cardiac fibroblasts significantly suppressed mRNA of collagen 1a, collagen 3a and connective tissue growth factor, and angiotensin II-induced transforming growth factor β1 expression. The findings suggest that Twinkle overexpression prevents LV function deterioration. In conclusion, Twinkle overexpression increases mtDNA copy number and ameliorates the progression of LV fibrosis and heart failure in a mouse pressure overload model. Increasing mtDNA copy number by Twinkle overexpression could be a novel therapeutic strategy for hypertensive heart disease. PMID:23840758

  17. Tendon-bone contact pressure and biomechanical evaluation of a modified suture-bridge technique for rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Baums, Mike H; Geyer, Michael; Büschken, Meike; Buchhorn, Gottfried H; Spahn, Gunter; Klinger, Hans-Michael

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the time-zero mechanical and footprint properties of a suture-bridge technique for rotator cuff repair in an animal model. Thirty fresh-frozen sheep shoulders were randomly assigned among three investigation groups: (1) cyclic loading, (2) load-to-failure testing, and (3) tendon-bone interface contact pressure measurement. Shoulders were cyclically loaded from 10 to 180 N and displacement to gap formation of 5- and 10-mm at the repair site. Cycles to failure were determined. Additionally, the ultimate tensile strength and stiffness were verified along with the mode of failure. The average contact pressure and pressure pattern were investigated using a pressure-sensitive film system. All of the specimens resisted against 3,000 cycles and none of them reached a gap formation of 10 mm. The number of cycles to 5-mm gap formation was 2,884.5 + or - 96.8 cycles. The ultimate tensile strength was 565.8 + or - 17.8 N and stiffness was 173.7 + or - 9.9 N/mm. The entire specimen presented a unique mode of failure as it is well known in using high strength sutures by pulling them through the tendon. We observed a mean contact pressure of 1.19 + or - 0.03 MPa, applied on the footprint area. The fundamental results of our study support the use of a suture-bridge technique for optimising the conditions of the healing biology of a reconstructed rotator cuff tendon. Nevertheless, an individual estimation has to be done if using the suture-bridge technique clinically. Further investigation is necessary to evaluate the cell biological healing process in order to achieve further sufficient advancements in rotator cuff repair. PMID:19826786

  18. Usability Evaluation of a Web-Based Symptom Monitoring Application for Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Bonnie; Pham, Kassie; Scherubel, Melody

    2015-07-01

    Symptom recognition and reporting by patients with heart failure are critical to avoid hospitalization. This project evaluated a patient symptom tracking application. Fourteen end users (nine patients, five clinicians) from a Midwestern Veterans Affairs Medical Center evaluated the website using a think aloud protocol. A structured observation protocol was used to assess success or failure for each task. Measures included task time, success, and satisfaction. Patients had a mean age of 70 years; clinicians averaged 42 years in age. Patients took 9.3 min and clinicians took less than 3 min per scenario. Most patients needed some assistance, but few patients were completely unable to complete some tasks. Clinicians demonstrated few problems navigating the site. Patient System Usability Scale item scores ranged from 2.0 to 3.6; clinician item scores ranged from 1.8 to 4.0. Further work is needed to determine whether using the web-based tool improves symptom recognition and reporting. PMID:25628261

  19. Interrelationship of Nondestructive Evaluation Methodologies Applied to Testing of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leifeste, Mark R.

    2007-01-01

    Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) are commonly used in spacecraft for containment of pressurized gases and fluids, incorporating strength and weight savings. The energy stored is capable of extensive spacecraft damage and personal injury in the event of sudden failure. These apparently simple structures, composed of a metallic media impermeable liner and fiber/resin composite overwrap are really complex structures with numerous material and structural phenomena interacting during pressurized use which requires multiple, interrelated monitoring methodologies to monitor and understand subtle changes critical to safe use. Testing of COPVs at NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands T est Facility (WSTF) has employed multiple in-situ, real-time nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methodologies as well as pre- and post-test comparative techniques to monitor changes in material and structural parameters during advanced pressurized testing. The use of NDE methodologies and their relationship to monitoring changes is discussed based on testing of real-world spacecraft COPVs. Lessons learned are used to present recommendations for use in testing, as well as a discussion of potential applications to vessel health monitoring in future applications.

  20. Management of acute heart failure and the effect of systolic blood pressure on the use of intravenous therapies

    PubMed Central

    Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Tolonen, Jukka; Siirilä-Waris, Krista; Nieminen, Markku S; Lassus, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Aims: To examine the use of the treatments for acute heart failure (AHF) recommended by ESC guidelines in different clinical presentations and blood pressure groups. Methods: The use of intravenous diuretics, nitrates, opioids, inotropes, and vasopressors as well as non-invasive ventilation (NIV) was analysed in 620 patients hospitalized due to AHF. The relation between AHF therapies and clinical presentation, especially systolic blood pressure (SBP) on admission, was also assessed. Results: Overall, 76% of patients received i.v. furosemide, 42% nitrates, 29% opioids, 5% inotropes and 7% vasopressors, and 24% of patients were treated with NIV. Furosemide was the most common treatment in all clinical classes and irrespective of SBP on admission. Nitrates were given most often in pulmonary oedema and hypertensive AHF. Overall, only SBP differed significantly between patients with and without the studied treatments. SBP was higher in patients treated with nitrates than in those who were not (156 vs. 141 mmHg, p<0.001). Still, only one-third of patients presenting acute decompensated heart failure and SBP over 120 mmHg were given nitrates. Inotropes and vasopressors were given most frequently in cardiogenic shock and pulmonary oedema, and their use was inversely related to initial SBP (p<0.001). NIV was used only in half of the cardiogenic shock and pulmonary oedema patients. Conclusions: The management of AHF differs between ESC clinical classes and the use of i.v. vasoactive therapies is related to the initial SBP. However, there seems to be room for improvement in administration of vasodilators and NIV. PMID:24222833

  1. Effect of Pore Pressure on Slip Failure of an Impermeable Fault: A Coupled Micro Hydro-Geomechanical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    The geomechanical processes associated with subsurface fluid injection/extraction is of central importance for many industrial operations related to energy and water resources. However, the mechanisms controlling the stability and slip motion of a preexisting geologic fault remain poorly understood and are critical for the assessment of seismic risk. In this work, we develop a coupled hydro-geomechanical model to investigate the effect of fluid injection induced pressure perturbation on the slip behavior of a sealing fault. The model couples single-phase flow in the pores and mechanics of the solid phase. Granular packs (see example in Fig. 1a) are numerically generated where the grains can be either bonded or not, depending on the degree of cementation. A pore network is extracted for each granular pack with pore body volumes and pore throat conductivities calculated rigorously based on geometry of the local pore space. The pore fluid pressure is solved via an explicit scheme, taking into account the effect of deformation of the solid matrix. The mechanics part of the model is solved using the discrete element method (DEM). We first test the validity of the model with regard to the classical one-dimensional consolidation problem where an analytical solution exists. We then demonstrate the ability of the coupled model to reproduce rock deformation behavior measured in triaxial laboratory tests under the influence of pore pressure. We proceed to study the fault stability in presence of a pressure discontinuity across the impermeable fault which is implemented as a plane with its intersected pore throats being deactivated and thus obstructing fluid flow (Fig. 1b, c). We focus on the onset of shear failure along preexisting faults. We discuss the fault stability criterion in light of the numerical results obtained from the DEM simulations coupled with pore fluid flow. The implication on how should faults be treated in a large-scale continuum model is also presented.

  2. Examination of cadmium safety rod thermal test specimens and failure mechanism evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.; Peacock, H.B.; Iyer, N.C.

    1992-01-01

    The reactor safety rods may be subjected to high temperatures due to gamma heating after the core coolant level has dropped during the ECS phase of a hypothetical LOCA event. Accordingly, an experimental cadmium safety rod testing subtask was established as part of a task to address the response of reactor core components to this accident. Companion reports describe the experiments and a structural evaluation (finite element analysis) of the safety rod. This report deals primarily with the examination of the test specimens, evaluation of possible failure mechanisms, and confirmatory separate effects experiments. It is concluded that the failures observed in the cadmium safety rod thermal tests which occurred at low temperature (T < 600{degrees}C) with slow thermal ramp rates (slow cladding strain rates) resulted from localized dissolution of the stainless steel cladding by the cadmium/aluminum solution and subsequent ductility exhaustion and rupture. The slow thermal ramp rate is believed to be the root cause for the failures; specifically, the slow ramp rate led to localized cladding shear deformation which ruptured the protective oxide film on the cladding inner surface and allowed dissolution to initiate. The test results and proposed failure mechanism support the conclusion that the rods would not fail below 500{degrees}C even at slow ramp rates. The safety rod thermal test specimen failures which occurred at high temperature (T > 800{degrees}C) with fast thermal ramp rates are concluded to be mechanical in nature without significant environmental degradation. Based on these tests, tasks were initiated to design and manufacture B{sub 4}C safety rods to replace the cadmium safety rods. The B{sub 4}C safety rods have been manufactured at this time and it is currently planned to charge them to the reactor in the near future. 60 refs.

  3. A Survey of and Evaluation Methodology for Fiber Composite Material Failure Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, R.M.

    2000-07-11

    The long-standing problem of characterizing failure for fiber composite materials will be reviewed. Emphasis will be given to the lamina level involving nominally aligned fibers in a matrix phase. However, some consideration will also be given to laminate failure using the lamina form as the basic building block along with the concept of progressive damage. The many different lamina level theories will be surveyed along with the commitment necessary to produce critical experimental data. Four particular theories will be reviewed and compared in some detail, these being the Tsai-Wu, Hashin, Puck, and Christensen forms. These four theories are reasonably representative of the great variety of different forms with widely different physical effects that can be encountered; also for comparison, the rudimentary forms of maximum normal stress and maximum normal strain criteria will be given. The controversial problem of how many different individual modes of failure are necessary to describe general failure will receive attention. A specific and detailed methodology for evaluation of all the various theories will be formulated.

  4. Fatal respiratory failure during a "technical" rebreather dive at extreme pressure.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Simon J; Cronjé, Frans J; Meintjes, W A Jack; Britz, Hermie C

    2007-02-01

    A diving fatality at the extreme depth of 264 m fresh water is described. The diver was equipped with an underwater video camera which recorded events leading to his death. These events corroborated predictions about respiratory complications at extreme pressure made by early researchers. Review of the video and relevant literature resulted in the following physiological interpretation: an increase in respired gas density during descent caused a progressive increase in resistance to flow in both the airways and the breathing circuit. Initially, this was associated with a shift to ventilation at higher lung volumes, a relative degree of hypoventilation, and mild permissive hypercapnia. The promotion of turbulent airway flow by increasing gas density resulted in effort-independent expiratory flow at lower flow rates than usual. The consequent inability to match ventilation to the demands of physical work at the bottom precipitated a spiraling crisis of dyspnea, increasing PaCO2, and wasted respiratory effort, thus producing more CO2. Extreme hypercapnia eventually led to unconsciousness. This tragic case provides a timely and salient lesson to a growing population of deep "technical" divers that there are physiological limitations that must be understood and considered when planning extreme dives. PMID:17310877

  5. Postural effects on intracranial pressure: modeling and clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Qvarlander, Sara; Sundström, Nina; Malm, Jan; Eklund, Anders

    2013-11-01

    The physiological effect of posture on intracranial pressure (ICP) is not well described. This study defined and evaluated three mathematical models describing the postural effects on ICP, designed to predict ICP at different head-up tilt angles from the supine ICP value. Model I was based on a hydrostatic indifference point for the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) system, i.e., the existence of a point in the system where pressure is independent of body position. Models II and III were based on Davson's equation for CSF absorption, which relates ICP to venous pressure, and postulated that gravitational effects within the venous system are transferred to the CSF system. Model II assumed a fully communicating venous system, and model III assumed that collapse of the jugular veins at higher tilt angles creates two separate hydrostatic compartments. Evaluation of the models was based on ICP measurements at seven tilt angles (0-71°) in 27 normal pressure hydrocephalus patients. ICP decreased with tilt angle (ANOVA: P < 0.01). The reduction was well predicted by model III (ANOVA lack-of-fit: P = 0.65), which showed excellent fit against measured ICP. Neither model I nor II adequately described the reduction in ICP (ANOVA lack-of-fit: P < 0.01). Postural changes in ICP could not be predicted based on the currently accepted theory of a hydrostatic indifference point for the CSF system, but a new model combining Davson's equation for CSF absorption and hydrostatic gradients in a collapsible venous system performed well and can be useful in future research on gravity and CSF physiology. PMID:24052030

  6. Using simulation to evaluate the performance of resilience strategies and process failures

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Scott N.; Topp, Bryan Embry; Arnold, Dorian C.; Ferreira, Kurt Brian; Widener, Patrick; Hoefler, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Fault-tolerance has been identified as a major challenge for future extreme-scale systems. Current predictions suggest that, as systems grow in size, failures will occur more frequently. Because increases in failure frequency reduce the performance and scalability of these systems, significant effort has been devoted to developing and refining resilience mechanisms to mitigate the impact of failures. However, effective evaluation of these mechanisms has been challenging. Current systems are smaller and have significantly different architectural features (e.g., interconnect, persistent storage) than we expect to see in next-generation systems. To overcome these challenges, we propose the use of simulation. Simulation has been shown to be an effective tool for investigating performance characteristics of applications on future systems. In this work, we: identify the set of system characteristics that are necessary for accurate performance prediction of resilience mechanisms for HPC systems and applications; demonstrate how these system characteristics can be incorporated into an existing large-scale simulator; and evaluate the predictive performance of our modified simulator. We also describe how we were able to optimize the simulator for large temporal and spatial scales-allowing the simulator to run 4x faster and use over 100x less memory.

  7. Bi-modal dose-dependent cardiac response to tetrahydrobiopterin in pressure-overload induced hypertrophy and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Moens, An L; Ketner, Elizabeth A; Takimoto, Eiki; Schmidt, Tim S; O'Neill, Charles A; Wolin, Michael S; Alp, Nicholas J; Channon, Keith M; Kass, David A

    2011-10-01

    The exogenous administration of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an essential cofactor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), has been shown to reduce left ventricular hypertrophy, fibrosis, and cardiac dysfunction in mice with pre-established heart disease induced by pressure-overload. In this setting, BH4 re-coupled endothelial NOS (eNOS), with subsequent reduction of NOS-dependent oxidative stress and reversal of maladaptive remodeling. However, recent studies suggest the effective BH4 dosing may be narrower than previously thought, potentially due to its oxidation upon oral consumption. Accordingly, we assessed the dose response of daily oral synthetic sapropterin dihydrochloride (6-R-l-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin, 6R-BH4) on pre-established pressure-overload cardiac disease. Mice (n=64) were administered 0-400mg/kg/d BH4 by ingesting small pre-made pellets (consumed over 15-30 min). In a dose range of 36-200mg/kg/d, 6R-BH4 suppressed cardiac chamber remodeling, hypertrophy, fibrosis, and oxidative stress with pressure-overload. However, at both lower and higher doses, BH4 had less or no ameliorative effects. The effective doses correlated with a higher myocardial BH4/BH2 ratio. However, BH2 rose linearly with dose, and at the 400mg/kg/d, this lowered the BH4/BH2 ratio back toward control. These results expose a potential limitation for the clinical use of BH4, as variability of cellular redox and perhaps heart disease could produce a variable therapeutic window among individuals. This article is part of a special issue entitled ''Key Signaling Molecules in Hypertrophy and Heart Failure.'' PMID:21645517

  8. SPH calculations of asteroid disruptions: The role of pressure dependent failure models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutzi, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present recent improvements of the modeling of the disruption of strength dominated bodies using the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) technique. The improvements include an updated strength model and a friction model, which are successfully tested by a comparison with laboratory experiments. In the modeling of catastrophic disruptions of asteroids, a comparison between old and new strength models shows no significant deviation in the case of targets which are initially non-porous, fully intact and have a homogeneous structure (such as the targets used in the study by Benz and Asphaug, 1999). However, for many cases (e.g. initially partly or fully damaged targets and rubble-pile structures) we find that it is crucial that friction is taken into account and the material has a pressure dependent shear strength. Our investigations of the catastrophic disruption threshold Q D * as a function of target properties and target sizes up to a few 100 km show that a fully damaged target modeled without friction has a Q D * which is significantly (5-10 times) smaller than in the case where friction is included. When the effect of the energy dissipation due to compaction (pore crushing) is taken into account as well, the targets become even stronger ( Q D * is increased by a factor of 2-3). On the other hand, cohesion is found to have an negligible effect at large scales and is only important at scales ≲ 1 km. Our results show the relative effects of strength, friction and porosity on the outcome of collisions among small (≲ 1000 km) bodies. These results will be used in a future study to improve existing scaling laws for the outcome of collisions (e.g. Leinhardt and Stewart, 2012).

  9. Evaluating the risk of water distribution system failure: A shared frailty model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Robert M.; Thurnau, Robert C.

    2011-12-01

    Condition assessment (CA) Modeling is drawing increasing interest as a technique that can assist in managing drinking water infrastructure. This paper develops a model based on the application of a Cox proportional hazard (PH)/shared frailty model and applies it to evaluating the risk of failure in drinking water networks using data from the Laramie Water Utility (located in Laramie, Wyoming, USA). Using the risk model a cost/ benefit analysis incorporating the inspection value method (IVM), is used to assist in making improved repair, replacement and rehabilitation decisions for selected drinking water distribution system pipes. A separate model is developed to predict failures in prestressed concrete cylinder pipe (PCCP). Various currently available inspection technologies are presented and discussed.

  10. The development of a risk of failure evaluation tool for small dams in Mzingwane Catchment, Zimbabwe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mufute, N. L.; Senzanje, A.; Kaseke, E.

    Small dams in Mzingwane Catchment in southern Zimbabwe are mostly in poor physical condition mainly due to lack of resources for repair and maintenance. Most of these dams are likely to fail thereby adversely affecting water availability and livelihoods in the area. To assist those involved in maintenance, repair and rehabilitation of small dams in resource poor and data sparse areas such as Mzingwane Catchment, a non-probabilistic but numerical risk of failure evaluation tool was developed. The tool helps to systematically, and objectively classify risk of failure of small dams, hence assist in the ranking of dams to prioritise and attend to first. This is important where resources are limited. The tool makes use of factors such as seepage, erosion and others that are traditionally used to assess condition of dams. In the development of the tool, an assessment of the physical condition of 44 (1 medium sized and 43 small dams) dams was done and the factors were identified and listed according to guidelines for design and maintenance of small dams. The description of the extent to which the factors affect the physical condition of small dams was then standardised. This was mainly guided by standard based and risk-based approaches to dam safety evaluation. Cause-effect diagrams were used to determine the stage at which each factor is involved in contributing to dam failure. Weights were then allocated to each factor depending on its stage or level in the process of causing dam failure. Scores were allocated to each factor based on its description and weight. Small dams design and maintenance guidelines were also used to guide the ranking and weighting of the factors. The tool was used to classify 10 dams. The risk of failure was low for one dam, moderate for one, high for four and very high for four dams, two of which had already failed. It was concluded that the tool could be used to rank the risk of failure of small dams in semi-arid areas. The tool needs to be

  11. EVALUATION OF THE FAILURE OF A RADIOACTIVE WASTE TRANSFER LINE JACKET

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B; Alan03 Plummer, A; Karthik Subramanian, K; Charles Jenkins, C; William Hinz, W; A Fellinger, A

    2007-04-06

    Radioactive wastes are confined in 49 underground storage tanks at the Savannah River Site. The waste is transported between tanks primarily via an underground transfer piping system. Due to the hazardous nature of the waste, the inner core stainless steel pipe is typically surrounded by a carbon steel pipe jacket, which provides secondary containment. Recently several through-wall penetrations were discovered on a segment of one of the jackets. An evaluation was performed to verify the failure mechanism and to estimate the degree of damage that occurred to the pipe segment. Failure analysis of a section of the jacket confirmed that pitting corrosion on the exterior of the pipe led to the through-wall penetration. Ultrasonic measurements on sections of the pipe were utilized to determine the remaining wall thickness in adjacent areas of the pipe. Based on these measurements, the degree of pitting and general corrosion was determined. Pit growth rate models were then developed to estimate the life expectancy of sections of the pipe that had not been excavated. The calculations estimated that the occurrence of through-wall failures in this jacket will begin to increase substantially in 12 years. Given that this pipe segment will be utilized beyond this time, short-term and long-term solutions to this failure were proposed. The short-term solutions focused on the repair or replace decisions that must be made to return the jacket to service as soon as practical. The long-term solutions focused on a broader strategy to address jacket integrity issues in the entire tank farm facility. These solutions included the evaluation of innovative remote inspection and repair techniques.

  12. Doppler-derived acceleration rate of right ventricular early filling as a measurement of right atrial pressure in chronic heart failure secondary to ischemic or idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Scapellato, F; Eleuteri, E; Temporelli, P L; Imparato, A; Corrà, U; Giannuzzi, P

    1998-02-15

    This study demonstrates that a Doppler-derived tricuspid flow velocity pattern provides an accurate, feasible, and noninvasive method of estimating and monitoring mean right atrial pressure in patients with heart failure due to left ventricular systolic dysfunction, and who are both in sinus rhythm and atrial fibrillation. In particular, the acceleration rate of early right ventricular filling is a powerful and independent predictor of mean right atrial pressure. PMID:9485149

  13. Subatmospheric vapor pressures evaluated from internal-energy measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Duarte-Garza, H.A. |; Magee, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Vapor pressures were calculated from measured internal-energy changes in the vapor + liquid two-phase region, {Delta}U{sup (2)}. The method employed a thermodynamic relationship between the derivative quantity ({partial_derivative}U{sup (2)}/{partial_derivative}V){sub T} and the vapor pressure (p{sub {sigma}}) and its temperature derivative ({partial_derivative}p/{partial_derivative}T){sub {sigma}}. This method was applied at temperatures between the triple point and the normal boiling point of three substances: 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a), pentafluoroethane (R125), and difluoromethane (R32). Agreement with experimentally measured vapor pressures near the normal boiling point (101.325 kPa) was within the experimental uncertainty of approximately {+-}0.04 kPa ({+-}0.04%). The method was applied to R134a to test the thermodynamic consistency of a published p-p-T equation of state with an equation for p{sub {sigma}} for this substance. It was also applied to evaluate published p{sub {sigma}} data which are in disagreement by more than their claimed uncertainty.

  14. Dense gas boundary layer experiments: Visualization, pressure measurements, concentration evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H.; Neuwald, P.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1992-11-01

    This technical report describes methods that were applied to investigate turbulent boundary layers generated by inviscid, baroclinic effects. The Cranz-Schardin 24-sparks camera was used to visualize the interactions of a planar shock wave with a Freon R12-layer. The shock propagates more slowly in the Freon layer than in air because of its smaller sound speed. This causes the shock front to be curved and to be reflected between the wall and the layer interface. As a consequence of the reflection process, a series of compression and expansion waves radiate from the layer. Large fluctuations in the streamwise velocity and in pressure develop for about 1 ms. These waves strongly perturb the interface shear layer, which rapidly transitions to a turbulent boundary flow. Pressure measurements showed that the fluctuations in the Freon layer reach a peak pressure 4 times higher than in the turbulent boundary flow. To characterize the preshock Freon boundary layer, concentration measurements were performed with a differential interferometry technique. The refraction index of Freon R12 is so high that Mach-Zehnder interferometry was not successful in these experiments. The evaluation of the concentration profile is described here in detail. Method and results of corresponding LDV measurements under the same conditions are presented in a different report, EMI Report T 9/92. The authors plan to continue the dense gas layer investigations with the gas combination helium/Freon.

  15. Evaluation of a new miniature pressure-sensitive radio transmitter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeman, J.W.; Haner, P.V.; Maule, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    A miniature pressure-sensitive radio transmitter (tag) was evaluated and field tested as a tool for determining the depths of juvenile salmonids. The tag had an effective radiated power of −19.7 decibels (1 mW reference), dimensions of 23 mm × 7 mm, and a weight of 2.2 g in air. The pulse rate of the tag increased with pressure, resulting in an expected tag life of approximately 11 d at the water surface and 7.5 d at 10.5 m. The tags were accurate to within 16 mm with 95% of observations within ±0.32 m of the true depth. The resolution of the tags was 0.2 m. Errors in indicated depth resulting from differences between the calibration and operating temperatures were minimized by means of a correction factor. Tags surgically implanted in juvenile steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss indicated a depth 0.2 m less than the same tags in water. This difference was not affected by pressure or temperature and was rectified by adjusting data from tags in fish. A test tag in a Columbia River reservoir was detected from distances of 1,133 m at a depth of 2 m and 148 m at a depth of 14 m. Results ind

  16. Visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure and coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure and mortality: A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Muntner, Paul; Whittle, Jeff; Lynch, Amy I.; Colantonio, Lisandro D.; Simpson, Lara M.; Einhorn, Paula T.; Levitan, Emily B.; Whelton, Paul K; Cushman, William C.; Louis, Gail T.; Davis, Barry R.; Oparil, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Background Variability of blood pressure (BP) across outpatient visits is frequently dismissed as random fluctuation around a patient’s underlying BP. Objective: Examine the association between visit-to-visit variability (VVV) of systolic and diastolic BP (SBP and DBP) on cardiovascular disease and mortality outcomes. Design Prospective cohort study Setting Post-hoc analysis of the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT). Participants 25,814 ALLHAT participants. Measurements VVV of SBP was defined as the standard deviation (SD) across BP measurements obtained at 7 visits conducted from 6 to 28 months following ALLHAT enrollment. Participants free of cardiovascular disease events during the first 28 months of follow-up were followed from the month 28 study visit through the end of active ALLHAT follow-up. Outcomes included fatal coronary heart disease or non-fatal myocardial infarction, all-cause mortality, stroke and heart failure. Results There were 1194 cases of fatal CHD or non-fatal MI, 1948 deaths, 606 cases of stroke and 921 cases of heart failure during follow-up. After multivariable adjustment including mean SBP, the hazard ratio comparing participants in the highest versus lowest quintile of SD of SBP (≥14.4 mmHg versus <6.5 mmHg) was 1.30 (1.06–1.59) for fatal coronary heart disease or non-fatal myocardial infarction, 1.58 (1.32–1.90) for all-cause mortality, 1.46 (1.06–2.01) for stroke, and 1.25 (0.97–1.61) for heart failure. Higher VVV of DBP was also associated with cardiovascular disease events and mortality. Limitations Long-term outcomes were not available. Conclusions Higher VVV of SBP is associated with increased cardiovascular disease and mortality risk. Future studies should examine whether reducing VVV of BP lowers this risk. Primary funding source National Institutes of Health PMID:26215765

  17. Technical evaluation: pressurized fluidized-bed combustion technology

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S A; Vogel, G J; Gehl, S M; Hanway, Jr, J E; Henry, R F; Parker, K M; Smyk, E B; Swift, W M; Podolski, W F

    1982-04-01

    The technology of pressurized fluidized-bed combustion, particularly in its application to a coal-burning combined-cycle plant, is evaluated by examining the technical status of advanced-concept plant components - boiler system (combustor, air-handling and air-injection equipment, and heat exchangers); solids handling, injection, and ejection system; hot-gas cleanup equipment; instrumentation/control system; and the gas turbine - along with materials of plant construction. Environmental performance as well as energy efficiency are examined, and economic considerations are reviewed briefly. The evaluation concludes with a broad survey of the principal related research and development programs in the United States and other countries, a foreview of the most likely technological developments, and a summary of unresolved technical issues and problems.

  18. How is success or failure in river restoration projects evaluated? Feedback from French restoration projects.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Bertrand; Piégay, Hervé; Lamouroux, Nicolas; Vaudor, Lise

    2014-05-01

    Since the 1990s, French operational managers and scientists have been involved in the environmental restoration of rivers. The European Water Framework Directive (2000) highlights the need for feedback from restoration projects and for evidence-based evaluation of success. Based on 44 French pilot projects that included such an evaluation, the present study includes: 1) an introduction to restoration projects based on their general characteristics 2) a description of evaluation strategies and authorities in charge of their implementation, and 3) a focus on the evaluation of results and the links between these results and evaluation strategies. The results show that: 1) the quality of an evaluation strategy often remains too poor to understand well the link between a restoration project and ecological changes; 2) in many cases, the conclusions drawn are contradictory, making it difficult to determine the success or failure of a restoration project; and 3) the projects with the poorest evaluation strategies generally have the most positive conclusions about the effects of restoration. Recommendations are that evaluation strategies should be designed early in the project planning process and be based on clearly-defined objectives. PMID:24675435

  19. Competitive evaluation of failure detection algorithms for strapdown redundant inertial instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Algorithms for failure detection, isolation, and correction of redundant inertial instruments in the strapdown dodecahedron configuration are competitively evaluated in a digital computer simulation that subjects them to identical environments. Their performance is compared in terms of orientation and inertial velocity errors and in terms of missed and false alarms. The algorithms appear in the simulation program in modular form, so that they may be readily extracted for use elsewhere. The simulation program and its inputs and outputs are described. The algorithms, along with an eight algorithm that was not simulated, also compared analytically to show the relationships among them.

  20. Acute effects of different levels of continuous positive airway pressure on cardiac autonomic modulation in chronic heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Michel S.; Sampaio, Luciana M.M.; Lacerda, Diego; De Oliveira, Luis V.F.; Pereira, Guilherme B.; Pantoni, Camila B.F.; Thommazo, Luciana Di; Catai, Aparecida M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Non-invasive ventilation may improve autonomic modulation and ventilatory parameters in severely disabled patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the physiological influence of acute treatment with different levels of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on the autonomic balance of heart and respiratory responses in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic heart failure (CHF). Materials and methods A COPD group (n = 10), CHF group (n = 8) and healthy subjects (n = 10) were evaluated. The participants were randomized to receive three different levels of CPAP on the same day: sham ventilation (Sham), 5 cmH20 (CPAP5) and 10 cmH20 (CPAP10) for 10 min. Respiratory rate, end tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2), peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2), heart rate (HR), blood pressure and heart rate variability in the time and frequency domains were measured during spontaneous breathing and under the sham, CPAP5 and CPAP10 conditions. Results All groups experienced a reduction in ETCO2 values during treatment with CPAP (p < 0.05). CPAP increased SpO2 and HR in the COPD group (p < 0.05). The COPD group also had lower RMSSD values during treatment with different levels of CPAP when compared to the control group (p < 0.05). In the CHF group, CPAP5 and CPAP10 increased the SDNN value (p < 0.05). CPAP10 reduced the SDNN value in the COPD group (p < 0.05). Conclusion The findings suggest that CPAP may cause improvements in the neural control of heart rate in patients with stable COPD and CHF. For each patient, the “best CPAP level” should be defined as the best respiratory response and autonomic balance. PMID:22419931

  1. Endothelial p53 Deletion Improves Angiogenesis and Prevents Cardiac Fibrosis and Heart Failure Induced by Pressure Overload in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gogiraju, Rajinikanth; Xu, Xingbo; Bochenek, Magdalena L.; Steinbrecher, Julia H.; Lehnart, Stephan E.; Wenzel, Philip; Kessel, Michael; Zeisberg, Elisabeth M.; Dobbelstein, Matthias; Schäfer, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac dysfunction developing in response to chronic pressure overload is associated with apoptotic cell death and myocardial vessel rarefaction. We examined whether deletion of tumor suppressor p53 in endothelial cells may prevent the transition from cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure. Methods and Results Mice with endothelial‐specific deletion of p53 (End.p53‐KO) were generated by crossing p53fl/fl mice with mice expressing Cre recombinase under control of an inducible Tie2 promoter. Cardiac hypertrophy was induced by transverse aortic constriction. Serial echocardiography measurements revealed improved cardiac function in End.p53‐KO mice that also exhibited better survival. Cardiac hypertrophy was associated with increased p53 levels in End.p53‐WT controls, whereas banded hearts of End.p53‐KO mice exhibited lower numbers of apoptotic endothelial and non‐endothelial cells and altered mRNA levels of genes regulating cell cycle progression (p21), apoptosis (Puma), or proliferation (Pcna). A higher cardiac capillary density and improved myocardial perfusion was observed, and pharmacological inhibition or genetic deletion of p53 also promoted endothelial sprouting in vitro and new vessel formation following hindlimb ischemia in vivo. Hearts of End.p53‐KO mice exhibited markedly less fibrosis compared with End.p53‐WT controls, and lower mRNA levels of p53‐regulated genes involved in extracellular matrix production and turnover (eg, Bmp‐7, Ctgf, or Pai‐1), or of transcription factors involved in controlling mesenchymal differentiation were observed. Conclusions Our analyses reveal that accumulation of p53 in endothelial cells contributes to blood vessel rarefaction and fibrosis during chronic cardiac pressure overload and suggest that endothelial cells may be a therapeutic target for preserving cardiac function during hypertrophy. PMID:25713289

  2. Pore pressure regime leading to shallow failures in a mountain slope: monitoring and interpretation by soil-atmosphere coupled model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaunat, Jean; Hürlimann, Marcel; Luna, Boris

    2016-04-01

    The study deals with the onset of debris flows in the "El Rebaixader" basin, located in South Central Pyrenees. The initiation area of debris flows is located on a lateral moraine with a thickness of tens of meters, in which torrential processes and other shallow mass movements have generated a large scarp with steep slopes. To follow slope evolution towards shallow failure, different sensors have been installed to monitor meteorological data and hydraulic variables at shallow depths (positive and negative pore pressure, water content). Measurements are interpreted by means of a thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled Finite Element code provided with a specific boundary condition to model water mass and heat flux exchanged between the ground and the atmosphere, including infiltration, evaporation, sensible heat and solar radiation. Results evidence the different modes of pore regime variation imposed, on the one hand, by surface infiltration and evaporation and, on the other hand, by the settlement of a slope parallel flow in a loose layer at some decimetres depth. As a conclusion, the analysis highlights the strong dependency of slope stability to the water regime taking place in slightly more permeable horizons connected to the top of the catchment area rather than to surficial climatic input. On this basis, some keys about debris flow mitigation are finally put forward.

  3. UQ and V&V techniques applied to experiments and simulations of heated pipes pressurized to failure.

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, Vicente Jose; Dempsey, J. Franklin; Antoun, Bonnie R.

    2014-05-01

    This report demonstrates versatile and practical model validation and uncertainty quantification techniques applied to the accuracy assessment of a computational model of heated steel pipes pressurized to failure. The Real Space validation methodology segregates aleatory and epistemic uncertainties to form straightforward model validation metrics especially suited for assessing models to be used in the analysis of performance and safety margins. The methodology handles difficulties associated with representing and propagating interval and/or probabilistic uncertainties from multiple correlated and uncorrelated sources in the experiments and simulations including: material variability characterized by non-parametric random functions (discrete temperature dependent stress-strain curves); very limited (sparse) experimental data at the coupon testing level for material characterization and at the pipe-test validation level; boundary condition reconstruction uncertainties from spatially sparse sensor data; normalization of pipe experimental responses for measured input-condition differences among tests and for random and systematic uncertainties in measurement/processing/inference of experimental inputs and outputs; numerical solution uncertainty from model discretization and solver effects.

  4. 10 CFR 21.21 - Notification of failure to comply or existence of a defect and its evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and its evaluation. 21.21 Section 21.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION REPORTING OF DEFECTS AND NONCOMPLIANCE Notification § 21.21 Notification of failure to comply or existence of a defect and its evaluation... safety hazard, were it to remain uncorrected, and (2) Ensure that if an evaluation of an...

  5. Probabilistic evaluation of riprap failure under future uncertain flood conditions: the case study of river Kleine Emme (Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarnejad, Mona; Pfister, Michael; Franca, Mário J.; Schleiss, Anton J.

    2014-05-01

    Potential failure for river bank protection measures is a critical issue to be evaluated for the safety and stability assessment. Moreover, uncertainties associated to flood conditions and sediment transport in rivers, as a possible result of climate change in the future, affects the safety level of such riverbank protection structures as riprap and walls. Bank failure can lead to uncontrolled erosion and flooding with disastrous consequences in residential areas or in critical infrastructures. The probabilistic analysis of failure on different mechanisms due to possible flood events and sediment transport is a principal step to assess embankment stability in future scenarios. Herein, a probabilistic risk assessment model to define the failure risk of river bank ripraps, developed based on Monte Carlo simulation and Moment Analysis Methods, is showed. This probabilistic simulation estimates the resistance of ripraps regarding varied flood and sediment transport scenarios in future. The failure probability of ripraps is assessed by a probabilistic function of the design safety factor. The probability of failure in different mechanisms such as direct block erosion, toe scouring and overtopping is defined by taking into account the modified bed-load transport due to a probabilistic function of the design discharge. This evaluation method is applied to a Swiss river located in Canton Lucerne, the Kleine Emme. The results highlight the failure probability of riverbank riprap associated to different mechanisms individually. A risk map to represent the risk of total failure along a longitudinal profile of the river is proposed.

  6. Evaluation of the prevalence and severity of pain in patients with stable chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Udeoji, Dioma U; Shah, Ankit B; Bharadwaj, Parag; Katsiyiannis, Peter; Schwarz, Ernst R

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prevalence and severity of pain in patients with chronic stable heart failure (HF) in an outpatient clinic setting. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study evaluating symptoms of generalized or specific pain in patients with chronic stable heart failure. A standardized questionnaire (Edmonton Symptom Assessment System) was administered during a routine outpatient clinic visit. The severity of pain and other symptoms were assessed on a 10 point scale with 10 being the worst and 0 representing no symptoms. RESULTS: Sixty-two patients [age 56 ± 13 years, 51 males, 11 females, mean ejection fraction (EF) 33% ± 17%] completed the assessment. Thirty-two patients (52%) reported any pain of various character and location such as chest, back, abdomen or the extremities, with a mean pain score of 2.5 ± 3.1. Patients with an EF less than 40% (n = 45, 73%) reported higher pain scores than patients with an EF greater than 40% (n = 17, 27%), scores were 3.1 ± 3.3 vs 1.2 ± 1.9, P < 0.001. Most frequent symptoms were tiredness (in 75% of patients), decreased wellbeing (84%), shortness of breath (SOB, 76%), and drowsiness (70%). The most severe symptom was tiredness with a score of 4.0 ± 2.8, followed by decreased wellbeing (3.7 ± 2.7), SOB (3.6 ± 2.8), and drowsiness (2.8 ± 2.8). CONCLUSION: Pain appears to be prevalent and significantly affects quality of life in HF patients. Adequate pain assessment and management should be an integral part of chronic heart failure management. PMID:22953022

  7. Evaluating the Phoenix Definition of Biochemical Failure After {sup 125}I Prostate Brachytherapy: Can PSA Kinetics Distinguish PSA Failures From PSA Bounces?

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Anna; Keyes, Mira; Pickles, Tom

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics of PSA failure (PSAf) and PSA bounce (PSAb) after permanent {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy (PB). Methods and Materials: The study included 1,006 consecutive low and 'low tier' intermediate-risk patients treated with {sup 125}I PB, with a potential minimum follow-up of 4 years. Patients who met the Phoenix definition of biochemical failure (nadir + 2 ng/mL{sup -1}) were identified. If the PSA subsequently fell to {<=}0.5 ng/mL{sup -1}without intervention, this was considered a PSAb. All others were scored as true PSAf. Patient, tumor and dosimetric characteristics were compared between groups using the chi-square test and analysis of variance to evaluate factors associated with PSAf or PSAb. Results: Median follow-up was 54 months. Of the 1,006 men, 57 patients triggered the Phoenix definition of PSA failure, 32 (56%) were true PSAf, and 25 PSAb (44%). The median time to trigger nadir + 2 was 20.6 months (range, 6-36) vs. 49 mo (range, 12-83) for PSAb vs. PSAf groups (p < 0.001). The PSAb patients were significantly younger (p < 0.0001), had shorter time to reach the nadir (median 6 vs. 11.5 months, p = 0.001) and had a shorter PSA doubling time (p = 0.05). Men younger than age 70 who trigger nadir +2 PSA failure within 38 months of implant have an 80% likelihood of having PSAb and 20% chance of PSAf. Conclusions: With adequate follow-up, 44% of PSA failures by the Phoenix definition in our cohort were found to be benign PSA bounces. Our study reinforces the need for adequate follow-up when reporting PB PSA outcomes, to ensure accurate estimates of treatment efficacy and to avoid unnecessary secondary interventions.

  8. Tensile and burst tests in support of the cadmium safety rod failure evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.

    1992-02-01

    The reactor safety rods may be subjected to high temperatures due to gamma heating after the core coolant level has dropped during the ECS phase of hypothetical LOCA event. Accordingly, an experimental safety rod testing subtask was established as part of a task to address the response of reactor core components to this accident. This report discusses confirmatory separate effects tests conducted to support the evaluation of failures observed in the safety rod thermal tests. As part of the failure evaluation, the potential for liquid metal embrittlement (LME) of the safety rod cladding by cadmium (Cd) -- aluminum (Al) solutions was examined. Based on the test conditions, literature data, and U-Bend tests, its was concluded that the SS304 safety rod cladding would not be subject to LME by liquid Cd-Al solutions under conditions relevant to the safety rod thermal tests or gamma heating accident. To confirm this conclusion, tensile tests on SS304 specimens were performed in both air and liquid Cd-Al solutions with the range of strain rates, temperatures, and loading conditions spanning the range relevant to the safety rod thermal tests and gamma heating accident.

  9. Evaluation of a Progressive Failure Analysis Methodology for Laminated Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleight, David W.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Wang, John T.

    1997-01-01

    A progressive failure analysis methodology has been developed for predicting the nonlinear response and failure of laminated composite structures. The progressive failure analysis uses C plate and shell elements based on classical lamination theory to calculate the in-plane stresses. Several failure criteria, including the maximum strain criterion, Hashin's criterion, and Christensen's criterion, are used to predict the failure mechanisms. The progressive failure analysis model is implemented into a general purpose finite element code and can predict the damage and response of laminated composite structures from initial loading to final failure.

  10. Evaluating Failures and near Misses in Human Spaceflight History for Lessons for Future Human Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Studies done in the past have drawn on lessons learned with regard to human loss-of-life events. However, an examination of near-fatal accidents can be equally useful, not only in detecting causes, both proximate and systemic, but also for determining what factors averted disaster, what design decisions and/or operator actions prevented catastrophe. Binary pass/fail launch history is often used for risk, but this also has limitations. A program with a number of near misses can look more reliable than a consistently healthy program with a single out-of-family failure. Augmenting reliability evaluations with this near miss data can provide insight and expand on the limitations of a strictly pass/fail evaluation. This paper intends to show how near-miss lessons learned can provide crucial data for any new human spaceflight programs that are interested in sending man into space

  11. Evaluating Failures and Near Misses in Human Spaceflight History for Lessons for Future Human Spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Stephanie

    2010-09-01

    Studies done in the past have drawn on lessons learned with regard to human loss-of-life events. However, an examination of near-fatal accidents can be equally useful, not only in detecting causes, both proximate and systemic, but also for determining what factors averted disaster, what design decisions and/or operator actions prevented catastrophe. Binary pass/fail launch history is often used for risk, but this also has limitations. A program with a number of near misses can look more reliable than a consistently healthy program with a single out-of-family failure. Augmenting reliability evaluations with this near miss data can provide insight and expand on the limitations of a strictly pass/fail evaluation. This paper intends to show how near-miss lessons learned can provide crucial data for any new human spaceflight programs that are interested in sending man into space.

  12. Invasive intracranial pressure monitoring is a useful adjunct in the management of severe hepatic encephalopathy associated with pediatric acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Pradip; Kunde, Sachin; Vos, Miriam; Vats, Atul; Heffron, Thomas; Romero, Rene; Fortenberry, James D.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Pediatric acute liver failure (ALF) is often accompanied by hepatic encephalopathy, cerebral edema and raised intracranial pressure (ICP). Elevated ICP can be managed more effectively with intracranial monitoring, but ALF-associated coagulopathy is often considered a contraindication for invasive monitoring due to risk for intracranial bleeding. We reviewed our experience with use of early ICP monitoring in ALF in children listed for liver transplantation. Methods Retrospective review of all intubated pediatric ALF patients with Grade 3 and Grade 4 encephalopathy requiring intracranial pressure monitoring and evaluated for potential liver transplant were identified from an institutional liver transplant patient database from 1999 to 2009. Result 14 patients were identified that met inclusion criteria. Age ranged from 7 months to 20 yrs. Diagnoses of ALF were infectious (3), drug induced (7), autoimmune hepatitis (2) and indeterminate (2). Grade 3 and 4 encephalopathy was seen in 10 (71%) and 4 (29%) patients respectively. CT scans prior to ICP monitor placement showed cerebral edema in 5 (35.7%) patients. Prior to ICP monitor placement, fresh frozen plasma, Vitamin K and activated recombinant factor VIIa were given to all 14 patients with significant improvement in coagulopathy (p<.04). Initial ICP ranged from 5 – 50 cmH2O; ICP was significantly higher in patients with cerebral edema by CT (p<.05). 11/14 (78%) patients received hypertonic saline and 3 (22%) received mannitol for elevated ICP. 8 of 14 (56%) monitored patients were managed to liver transplant with 100% surviving neurologically intact. 4/14 (28%) patients had spontaneous recovery without liver transplant. 2 of 14 (14%) patients died due to multiple organ failure prior to transplant. One patient had a small 9mm intracranial hemorrhage but survived after receiving a liver transplant. No patient developed intracranial infection. Conclusion In our series of patients, ICP monitoring had a

  13. What Causes Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart, leading to heart failure. High Blood Pressure Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing against the ... weaken your heart and lead to plaque buildup. Blood pressure is considered high if it stays at or ...

  14. Filament-reinforced metal composite pressure vessel evaluation and performance demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landes, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    Two different Kevlar-49 filament-reinforced metal sphere designs were developed, and six vessels of each type were fabricated and subjected to fatigue cycling, sustained loading, and hydrostatic burst. The 61 cm (24 inch) diameter Kevlar-49/cryoformed 301 stainless steel pressure vessels demonstrated the required pressure cycle capability, burst factor of safety, and a maximum pressure times volume divided by weight (pV/W) performance of 210 J/g (834 000 in-lb/lbm) at burst; this represented a 25 to 30% weight saving over the lightest weight comparable, 6A1-4V Ti, homogeneous pressure vessel. Both the Kevlar/stainless steel design and the 97 cm (38 inch) diameter Kevlar-49/2219-T62 aluminum sphere design demonstrated nonfragmentation and controlled failure mode features when pressure cycled to failure at operating pressure. When failure occurred during pressure cycling, the mode was localized leakage and not catastrophic. Kevlar/stainless steel vessels utilized a unique conical boss design, and Kevlar/aluminum vessels incorporated a tie-rod to carry port loads; both styles of polar fittings performed as designed during operational testing of the vessels.

  15. Evaluating Failures and Near Misses in Human Spaceflight History for Lessons for Future Human Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    There have been a number of studies done in the past drawn on lessons learned with regard to human loss-of-life events. Generally, the systemic causes and proximate causes for fatal events have both been examined in considerable detail. However, an examination of near-fatal accidents and failures that narrowly missed being fatal could be equally useful, not only in detecting causes, both proximate and systemic, but also for determining what factors averted disaster, what design decisions and/or operator actions prevented catastrophe. Additionally, review of risk factors for upcoming or future programs will often look at trending statistics, generally focusing on failure/success statistics. Unfortunately, doing so can give a skewed or misleading view of past reliability or a reliability that cannot be presumed to apply to a new program. One reason for this might be that failure/success criteria aren't the same across programs, but also that apparent success can hide systemic faults that, under other circumstances, can be fatal to a program with different parameters. A program with a number of near misses can look more reliable than a consistently healthy program with a single out-of-family failure and provide very misleading data if it is not examined in detail. This is particularly true for a manned space program where failure/success includes more than making a particular orbit. Augmenting reliability evaluations with this near miss data can provide insight and expand on the limitations of a strictly pass/fail evaluation. Even more importantly, a thorough understanding of these near miss events can identify conditions that prevented fatalities. Those conditions may be key to a programs reliability, but, without insight to the repercussions if such conditions were not in place, their importance may not be readily clear. As programs mature and political and fiscal responsibilities come to the fore, often there is considerable incentive to eliminate unnecessary

  16. Ultrasound evaluation of the impact of cricoid pressure versus novel 'paralaryngeal pressure' on anteroposterior oesophageal diameter.

    PubMed

    Andruszkiewicz, P; Wojtczak, J; Wroblewski, L; Kaczor, M; Sobczyk, D; Kowalik, I

    2016-09-01

    To assess the degree to which cricoid pressure (Sellick manoeuvre) actually compresses the oesophagus, we measured the effect of cricoid pressure and paralaryngeal pressure on the outer anteroposterior diameter of the upper oesophagus with ultrasound in 39 healthy volunteers. The mean (SD) outer anteroposterior oesophageal diameter was 0.77 (0.11) cm with no pressure, 0.79 (0.13) cm with the application of cricoid pressure of 30 N and 0.68 (0.12) cm with the application of paralaryngeal pressure of 30 N (p < 0.0001). If cricoid pressure does not reduce the anteroposterior diameter of the oesophagus, it is difficult or impossible to explain the efficacy of the Sellick manoeuvre. However, paralaryngeal pressure decreases this diameter and has the potential to occlude the upper oesophagus. PMID:27523050

  17. Evaluation of a strain based failure criterion for the multi-constituent composite model under shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, Christopher T.; Schumacher, Shane C.; Alexander, C. Scott

    2015-09-01

    This study details and demonstrates a strain-based criterion for the prediction of polymer matrix composite material damage and failure under shock loading conditions. Shock loading conditions are characterized by high-speed impacts or explosive events that result in very high pressures in the materials involved. These material pressures can reach hundreds of kbar and often exceed the material strengths by several orders of magnitude. Researchers have shown that under these high pressures, composites exhibit significant increases in stiffness and strength. In this work we summarize modifications to a previous stress based interactive failure criterion based on the model initially proposed by Hashin, to include strain dependence. The failure criterion is combined with the multi-constituent composite constitutive model (MCM) within a shock physics hydrocode. The constitutive model allows for decomposition of the composite stress and strain fields into the individual phase averaged constituent level stress and strain fields, which are then applied to the failure criterion. Numerical simulations of a metallic sphere impacting carbon/epoxy composite plates at velocities up to 1000 m/s are performed using both the stress and strain based criterion. These simulation results are compared to experimental tests to illustrate the advantages of a strain-based criterion in the shock environment.

  18. Failure Criteria for Evaluating Accidental Drops of Fuel Containers at INTEC

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G. K.

    1998-10-01

    This report presents a failure criterion that has been developed for use in evaluating fuel containers at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) for accidental drop events. The criterion would typically be used in dynamic finite element analyses using the ABA-QUS/Explicit program. The failure criterion used in the past is generally considered to substantially underestimate the strength and ductility of the materials involved. The new criterion is intended to be more realistic, allowing for more accurate impact analyses. The criterion is based on the distortion energy theory, which is considered to be appropriate for the ductile materials typically used in fuel containers. Also addressed in development of the criterion were the effects of strain rate and hydrostatic stress. The importance of these factors, however, is highly dependent on the material used. Three materials specifically addressed in this study were stainless steel, aluminum, and lead. The criterion is presented in the form of guidelines and recommendations that are based on material data obtained from the literature. The most significant difference between these and the previous criterion is that ductile materials are allowed to strain to much higher levels before they are considered to fail.

  19. Studies and analyses of the Space Shuttle Main Engine: SSME failure data review, diagnostic survey and SSME diagnostic evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glover, R. C.; Kelley, B. A.; Tischer, A. E.

    1986-01-01

    The results of a review of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) failure data for the period 1980 through 1983 are presented. The data was collected, evaluated, and ranked according to procedures established during this study. A number of conclusions and recommendations are made based upon this failure data review. The results of a state-of-the-art diagnostic survey are also presented. This survey covered a broad range of diagnostic sensors and techniques and the findings were evaluated for application to the SSME. Finally, a discussion of the initial activities for the on-going SSME diagnostic evaluation is included.

  20. Comparative clinical evaluation of Boerhavia diffusa root extract with standard Enalapril treatment in Canine chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Oburai, Nethaji Lokeswar; Rao, V. Vaikunta; Bonath, Ram Babu Naik

    2015-01-01

    Background: Complementing herbal drugs with conservative modern treatment could improve renal condition in canine chronic renal failure (CRF). Objective: In this study, clinical evaluation of Boerhavia diffusa root extract was carried out in CRF in dogs in comparison with standard enalapril. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 dogs of mixed breeds suffering from CRF from 1 to 2 months were divided into two groups (n = 10) and treated as follows: Group I - Enalapril at 0.5 mg/kg p.o. once daily for 90 days + amoxicillin and cloxacillin at 25 mg/kg i.m. once daily for 1-week; Group II - B. diffusa root extract at 500 mg p.o per dog daily for 90 days. Both groups were maintained on a supportive fluid therapy. The data were analyzed using paired t-test and one-way ANOVA followed by Dunnett's post-hoc test. Results: CRF caused a significant (P < 0.05) increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, serum creatinine, urea nitrogen, sodium, potassium, phosphorus, urinary protein, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and glutamyl transferase (GGT). A significant (P < 0.05) decrease in hemoglobin and total erythrocyte count (TEC) was also observed. Nephrosonography revealed indistinct corticomedullary junction, altered renal architecture, hyper-echoic cortex, medulla, and sunken kidneys. Both the treatments significantly (P < 0.05) reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressure by day 30. Serum Creatinine, urea nitrogen, phosphorus, urinary protein, ALP, and GGT showed significant (P < 0.05) reduction by day 60 in both the treatments. However, potassium levels were normalized only by B. diffusa root extract treatment by day 30. Both the treatments failed to show a significant improvement in nephrosonographic picture even after 90 days posttreatment. Conclusion: In conclusion, the efficacy of B. diffusa root extract was comparable to standard enalapril treatment of CRF in dogs. PMID:26604549

  1. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and radionuclide imaging in the evaluation of renal transplant failure

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, M.S.; Tanasescu, D.E.; Waxman, A.D.; Crues, J.V. III

    1988-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was compared with radionuclide scintigraphy (RNS) in 16 patients with renal transplants undergoing renal failure to determine which modality could best discriminate between rejection, acute tubular necrosis (ATN), and cyclosporin nephrotoxicity (CN). Although all rejecting transplants had reduced corticomedullary differentiation (CMD) on T1-weighted MR images, four of five cases of ATN had appearances that could not be distinguished from rejection. A normal CMD suggests nonrejection, but diminished CMD is nonspecific. Tc-99m DTPA/I-131 hippuran RNS was superior to MRI in differentiating rejection from ATN. Although ATN and CN have similar RNS patterns, this distinction can usually be made based on the clinical time course. Other potential uses of MRI in the evaluation of the renal transplants are discussed.

  2. Risk assessment of turbine rotor failure using probabilistic ultrasonic non-destructive evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Xuefei; Zhang, Jingdan; Zhou, S. Kevin; Rasselkorde, El Mahjoub; Abbasi, Waheed A.

    2014-02-18

    The study presents a method and application of risk assessment methodology for turbine rotor fatigue failure using probabilistic ultrasonic nondestructive evaluations. A rigorous probabilistic modeling for ultrasonic flaw sizing is developed by incorporating the model-assisted probability of detection, and the probability density function (PDF) of the actual flaw size is derived. Two general scenarios, namely the ultrasonic inspection with an identified flaw indication and the ultrasonic inspection without flaw indication, are considered in the derivation. To perform estimations for fatigue reliability and remaining useful life, uncertainties from ultrasonic flaw sizing and fatigue model parameters are systematically included and quantified. The model parameter PDF is estimated using Bayesian parameter estimation and actual fatigue testing data. The overall method is demonstrated using a realistic application of steam turbine rotor, and the risk analysis under given safety criteria is provided to support maintenance planning.

  3. Risk assessment of turbine rotor failure using probabilistic ultrasonic non-destructive evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xuefei; Zhang, Jingdan; Zhou, S. Kevin; Rasselkorde, El Mahjoub; Abbasi, Waheed A.

    2014-02-01

    The study presents a method and application of risk assessment methodology for turbine rotor fatigue failure using probabilistic ultrasonic nondestructive evaluations. A rigorous probabilistic modeling for ultrasonic flaw sizing is developed by incorporating the model-assisted probability of detection, and the probability density function (PDF) of the actual flaw size is derived. Two general scenarios, namely the ultrasonic inspection with an identified flaw indication and the ultrasonic inspection without flaw indication, are considered in the derivation. To perform estimations for fatigue reliability and remaining useful life, uncertainties from ultrasonic flaw sizing and fatigue model parameters are systematically included and quantified. The model parameter PDF is estimated using Bayesian parameter estimation and actual fatigue testing data. The overall method is demonstrated using a realistic application of steam turbine rotor, and the risk analysis under given safety criteria is provided to support maintenance planning.

  4. Advanced Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Advanced Heart Failure Updated:Oct 8,2015 When heart failure (HF) ... content was last reviewed on 04/06/2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  5. Methods for dependency estimation and system unavailability evaluation based on failure data statistics. Volume 2, Detailed description and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Azarm, M.A.; Hsu, F.; Martinez-Guridi, G.; Vesely, W.E.

    1993-07-01

    This report introduces a new perspective on the basic concept of dependent failures where the definition of dependency is based on clustering in failure times of similar components. This perspective has two significant implications: firstly, it relaxes the conventional assumption that dependent failures must be simultaneous and result from a severe shock; secondly, it allows the analyst to use all the failures in a time continuum to estimate the potential for multiple failures in a window of time (e.g., a test interval), therefore arriving at a more accurate value for system unavailability. In addition, the models developed here provide a method for plant-specific analysis of dependency, reflecting the plant-specific maintenance practices that reduce or increase the contribution of dependent failures to system unavailability. The proposed methodology can be used for screening analysis of failure data to estimate the fraction of dependent failures among the failures. In addition, the proposed method can evaluate the impact of the observed dependency on the system unavailability and plant risk. The formations derived in this report have undergone various levels of validations through computer simulation studies and pilot applications. The pilot applications of these methodologies showed that the contribution of dependent failures of diesel generators in one plant was negligible, while in another plant, it was quite significant. It also showed that in the plant with significant contribution of dependency to Emergency Power System (ESP) unavailability, the contribution changed with time. Similar findings were reported for the Containment Fan Cooler breakers. Drawing such conclusions about system performance would not have been possible with any other reported dependency methodologies.

  6. In-Flight Validation of a Pilot Rating Scale for Evaluating Failure Transients in Electronic Flight Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalinowski, Kevin F.; Tucker, George E.; Moralez, Ernesto, III

    2006-01-01

    Engineering development and qualification of a Research Flight Control System (RFCS) for the Rotorcraft Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) JUH-60A has motivated the development of a pilot rating scale for evaluating failure transients in fly-by-wire flight control systems. The RASCAL RFCS includes a highly-reliable, dual-channel Servo Control Unit (SCU) to command and monitor the performance of the fly-by-wire actuators and protect against the effects of erroneous commands from the flexible, but single-thread Flight Control Computer. During the design phase of the RFCS, two piloted simulations were conducted on the Ames Research Center Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) to help define the required performance characteristics of the safety monitoring algorithms in the SCU. Simulated failures, including hard-over and slow-over commands, were injected into the command path, and the aircraft response and safety monitor performance were evaluated. A subjective Failure/Recovery Rating (F/RR) scale was developed as a means of quantifying the effects of the injected failures on the aircraft state and the degree of pilot effort required to safely recover the aircraft. A brief evaluation of the rating scale was also conducted on the Army/NASA CH-47B variable stability helicopter to confirm that the rating scale was likely to be equally applicable to in-flight evaluations. Following the initial research flight qualification of the RFCS in 2002, a flight test effort was begun to validate the performance of the safety monitors and to validate their design for the safe conduct of research flight testing. Simulated failures were injected into the SCU, and the F/RR scale was applied to assess the results. The results validate the performance of the monitors, and indicate that the Failure/Recovery Rating scale is a very useful tool for evaluating failure transients in fly-by-wire flight control systems.

  7. Laboratory evaluation of the pressure water level data logger manufactured by Infinities USA, Inc.: results of pressure and temperature tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carnley, Mark V.

    2015-01-01

    The Pressure Water Level Data Logger manufactured by Infinities USA, Inc., was evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility for conformance with the manufacturer’s stated accuracy specifications for measuring pressure throughout the device’s operating temperature range and with the USGS accuracy requirements for water-level measurements. The Pressure Water Level Data Logger (Infinities Logger) is a submersible, sealed, water-level sensing device with an operating pressure range of 0 to 11.5 feet of water over a temperature range of −18 to 49 degrees Celsius. For the pressure range tested, the manufacturer’s accuracy specification of 0.1 percent of full scale pressure equals an accuracy of ±0.138 inch of water. Three Infinities Loggers were evaluated, and the testing procedures followed and results obtained are described in this report. On the basis of the test results, the device is poorly compensated for temperature. For the three Infinities Loggers, the mean pressure differences varied from –4.04 to 5.32 inches of water and were not within the manufacturer’s accuracy specification for pressure measurements made within the temperature-compensated range. The device did not meet the manufacturer’s stated accuracy specifications for pressure within its temperature-compensated operating range of –18 to 49 degrees Celsius or the USGS accuracy requirements of no more than 0.12 inch of water (0.01 foot of water) or 0.10 percent of reading, whichever is larger. The USGS accuracy requirements are routinely examined and reported when instruments are evaluated at the Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility. The estimated combined measurement uncertainty for the pressure cycling test was ±0.139 inch of water, and for temperature, the cycling test was ±0.127 inch of water for the three Infinities Loggers.

  8. Reduction of homocysteine in elderly with heart failure improved vascular function and blood pressure control but did not affect inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Sven E; Edvinsson, Marie-Louise; Edvinsson, Lars

    2005-11-01

    We have previously shown that hyperhomocysteinaemia is common in elderly heart failure patients, and is associated with endothelial dysfunction, impaired vasodilatory capacity and a low-grade inflammation. In the present study we examined if supplementation with B6, B12 and folate could normalize the hyperhomocysteinaemia and if so, in turn, would improve the associated parameters. This was an open study without placebo control on heart failure patients with plasma homocysteine > 15 microM. Measurements of cutaneous vascular reactivity, blood pressure, inflammatory activity and endothelial function were performed before and after intervention with intra-individual comparisons. The treatment reduced homocysteine to near normal values and enhanced the hyperaemic response to acetylcholine related to the response to heat. The mean arterial blood pressure and pulse rate was reduced. There was no effect on inflammatory activity, plasma levels of von Willebrand factor, subjective health quality or the hyperaemic responses to sodium nitroprusside or local warming. Hyperhomocysteinaemia in heart failure patients is multifactorial in origin. Folate deficiency, inflammatory activity and reduced renal function could be contributing. It is suggested that supplementation with B-vitamins can improve the vasodilatory capacity and reduce the blood pressure but additional studies are required to confirm this. PMID:16236143

  9. Evaluation of high-pressure drilling fluid supply systems

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.C.; Reichman, J.M.; Theimer, K.J.

    1981-10-01

    A study was undertaken to help determine the technical and economic feasibility of developing a high-pressure fluid-jet drilling system for the production of geothermal wells. Three system concepts were developed and analyzed in terms of costs, component availability, and required new-component development. These concepts included a single-conduit system that supplies the downhole cutting nozzles directly via surface-located high-pressure pumps; a single-conduit system utilizing low-pressure surface pumps to supply and operate a high-pressure downhole pump, which in turn supplies the cutting nozzles; and a dual-conduit system supplying surface-generated high-pressure fluid for cutting via one conduit and low-pressure scavenging fluid via the other. It is concluded that the single-conduit downhole pump system concept has the greatest potential for success in this application. 28 figures, 11 tables.

  10. Test and evaluation of pressure transducers for a reentry vehicle pressure measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Lorelei S.; Sealey, Bradley S.

    1993-01-01

    The Pressure Distribution and Air Data System experiment was designed to obtain accurate pressure measurements on the windward surface of an aeroassist flight research vehicle during its aeropass through the earth's atmosphere. These pressure measurements were intended to provide air data and support CFD code validation for future aeroassist orbital transfer vehicle designs. The system consisted of a flush orifice configuration connected by tubing to a specially ranged and selected pressure transducer. The purpose of this paper is to describe the flight acceptance test program and test results leading to the selection of flight transducers.

  11. Dissociation between blood pressure and heart rate response to hypoxia after bilateral carotid body removal in men with systolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Niewinski, Piotr; Janczak, Dariusz; Rucinski, Artur; Tubek, Stanislaw; Engelman, Zoar J; Jazwiec, Przemyslaw; Banasiak, Waldemar; Sobotka, Paul A; Hart, Emma C J; Paton, Julian F R; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2014-03-01

    While the ventilatory response to hypoxia is known to be mediated by the carotid bodies, the origin of the haemodynamic alterations evoked by hypoxia is less certain. Bilateral carotid body removal (CBR) performed to treat congestive heart failure may serve as a model to improve our understanding of haemodynamic responses to hypoxia in humans. We studied six congestive heart failure patients before and 1 month after CBR [median (interquartile range): age, 58.5 (56-61) years old; and ejection fraction, 32 (25-34)%]. Peripheral chemosensitivity (hypoxic ventilatory response) was equated to the slope relating lowest oxygen saturation to highest minute ventilation following exposures to hypoxia. Likewise, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR) slopes were calculated as slopes relating the lowest oxygen saturations to the highest SBP, DBP and HR responses. We found that CBR reduces the hypoxic ventilatory response (91%, P < 0.05), SBP (71%, P < 0.05) and DBP slopes (59%, P = 0.07). In contrast, the HR slope remained unchanged. The dissociation between the blood pressure and HR responses after CBR shows involvement of a different chemoreceptive site(s) maintaining the response to acute hypoxia. We conclude that carotid bodies are responsible for ventilatory and blood pressure responses, while the HR response might be mediated by the aortic bodies. The significant reduction of the blood pressure response to hypoxia after CBR suggests a decrease in sympathetic tone, which is of particular clinical relevance in congestive heart failure. PMID:24243836

  12. Evaluation Of Liner Back-pressure Due To Concrete Pore Pressure At Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.J.; Rashid, Y.R.; Liu, A.S.; Gou, B.

    2006-07-01

    GE's latest evolution of the boiling water reactor, the ESBWR, has innovative passive design features that reduce the number and complexity of active systems, which in turn provide economic advantages while also increasing safety. These passive systems used for emergency cooling also mean that the primary containment system will experience elevated temperatures with longer durations than conventional plants in the event of design basis accidents. During a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), the drywell in the primary containment structure for the ESBWR will be exposed to saturated steam conditions for up to 72 hours following the accident. A containment spray system may be activated that sprays the drywell area with water to condense the steam as part of the recovery operations. The liner back-pressure will build up gradually over the 72 hours as the concrete temperatures increase, and a sudden cool down could cause excessive differential pressure on the liner to develop. For this analysis, it is assumed that the containment spray is activated at the end of the 72-hour period. A back-pressure, acting between the liner and the concrete wall of the containment, can occur as a result of elevated temperatures in the concrete causing steam and saturated vapor pressures to develop from the free water remaining in the pores of the concrete. Additional pore pressure also develops under the elevated temperatures from the non-condensable gases trapped in the concrete pores during the concrete curing process. Any buildup of this pore pressure next to the liner, in excess of the drywell internal pressure, will act to push the liner away from the concrete with a potential for tearing at the liner anchorages. This paper describes the methods and analyses used to quantify this liner back-pressure so that appropriate measures are included in the design of the liner and anchorage system. A pore pressure model is developed that calculates the pressure distribution across the concrete

  13. Nocturnal respiratory failure in a child with congenital myopathy – management using average volume-assured pressure support (AVAPS)

    PubMed Central

    Gentin, Natalie; Williamson, Bruce; Thambipillay, Ganesh; Teng, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    This is a case report of the effective use of bi-level positive airway pressure support (BPAP) using the volume-assured pressure support feature in a pediatric patient with a congenital myopathy and significant nocturnal hypoventilation. Our patient was started on nocturnal nasal mask BPAP but required high pressures to improve her oxygen saturations and CO2 baseline. She was then trialed on a BPAP machine with the volume-assured pressure support feature on. The ability of this machine to adjust inspiratory pressures to give a targeted tidal volume allowed the patient to be on lower pressure settings for periods of the night, with the higher pressures only when required. She tolerated the ventilation well and her saturations, CO2 profiles, and clinical condition improved. This case report highlights the benefits of the volume-assured pressure support feature on a BPAP machine in a child with a neuromuscular disorder. PMID:26392861

  14. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tiredness and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. It is more common in people who are 65 years old or older, African Americans, people who are overweight, and people who have ...

  15. Evaluation of Acoustic Emission SHM of PRSEUS Composite Pressure Cube Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2013-01-01

    A series of tests of the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) pressure cube were conducted during third quarter 2011 at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) in the Combined Loads Test facility (COLTS). This is a report of the analysis of the Acoustic Emission (AE) data collected during those tests. The AE signals of the later tests are consistent with the final failure progression through two of the pressure cube panels. Calibration tests and damage precursor AE indications, from preliminary checkout pressurizations, indicated areas of concern that eventually failed. Hence those tests have potential for vehicle health monitoring.

  16. Evaluation of anticipatory signal to steam generator pressure control program for 700 MWe Indian pressurized heavy water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pahari, S.; Hajela, S.; Rammohan, H. P.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G.

    2012-07-01

    700 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (IPHWR) is horizontal channel type reactor with partial boiling at channel outlet. Due to boiling, it has a large volume of vapor present in the primary loops. It has two primary loops connected with the help of pressurizer surge line. The pressurizer has a large capacity and is partly filled by liquid and partly by vapor. Large vapor volume improves compressibility of the system. During turbine trip or load rejection, pressure builds up in Steam Generator (SG). This leads to pressurization of Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS). To control pressurization of SG and PHTS, around 70% of the steam generated in SG is dumped into the condenser by opening Condenser Steam Dump Valves (CSDVs) and rest of the steam is released to the atmosphere by opening Atmospheric Steam Discharge Valves (ASDVs) immediately after sensing the event. This is accomplished by adding anticipatory signal to the output of SG pressure controller. Anticipatory signal is proportional to the thermal power of reactor and the proportionality constant is set so that SG pressure controller's output jacks up to ASDV opening range when operating at 100% FP. To simulate this behavior for 700 MWe IPHWR, Primary and secondary heat transport system is modeled. SG pressure control and other process control program have also been modeled to capture overall plant dynamics. Analysis has been carried out with 3-D neutron kinetics coupled thermal hydraulic computer code ATMIKA.T to evaluate the effect of the anticipatory signal on PHT pressure and over all plant dynamics during turbine trip in 700 MWe IPHWR. This paper brings out the results of the analysis with and without considering anticipatory signal in SG pressure control program during turbine trip. (authors)

  17. Design, fabrication and metrological evaluation of wearable pressure sensors.

    PubMed

    Goy, C B; Menichetti, V; Yanicelli, L M; Lucero, J B; López, M A Gómez; Parodi, N F; Herrera, M C

    2015-04-01

    Pressure sensors are valuable transducers that are necessary in a huge number of medical application. However, the state of the art of compact and lightweight pressure sensors with the capability of measuring the contact pressure between two surfaces (contact pressure sensors) is very poor. In this work, several types of wearable contact pressure sensors are fabricated using different conductive textile materials and piezo-resistive films. The fabricated sensors differ in size, the textile conductor used and/or the number of layers of the sandwiched piezo-resistive film. The intention is to study, through the obtaining of their calibration curves, their metrological properties (repeatability, sensitivity and range) and determine which physical characteristics improve their ability for measuring contact pressures. It has been found that it is possible to obtain wearable contact pressure sensors through the proposed fabrication process with satisfactory repeatability, range and sensitivity; and that some of these properties can be improved by the physical characteristics of the sensors. PMID:25815889

  18. An evaluation of high pressure coal dust explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Dennison, G.; Welford, G.B.; Sage, P.W.

    1995-12-31

    In the United Kingdom an industry-led consortium has been set up to continue the development of a coal-based advanced power generation system. The program primarily addresses the development of the key components for the Air Blown Gasification Cycle (ABGC), previously known as the British Coal Topping Cycle. One of the main features of the ABGC process is the use of an air blown pressurized fluidized bed gasifier which has the advantage over alternative oxygen blown systems, of not requiring air separation equipment. However, as a consequence the ABGC process does not have an available source of nitrogen for purging and pressurizing. Coal in the ABGC process is fed to the gasifier through lock hoppers pressurized up to 25 bar. The storage of coal in air at elevated pressures is associated with an increased propensity for spontaneous heating and dust explosion. This paper describes the experimental work commissioned by the Coal Technology Development Division of British Coal (and undertaken by TNO Prins Maurits Laboratory, Netherlands) to determine the explosive characteristics of a lignite, an anthracite, and a bituminous coal from UK sources over a range of elevated pressures up to 20 bar. Data on the maximum oxygen content, maximum explosion pressure and dust explosion constant are presented. This information will be used to consider the feasibility of alternatives to expensive nitrogen inerting. This will include partial inertization and high pressure dust explosion suppression systems.

  19. Safety evaluation design of filament wound structures - Cases of pressure vessels and pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Masanori; Mori, Takao; Hirase, Yosihiro; Katoh, Akihiko; Ishihara, Toshio

    Procedures are presented for the safety-related evaluation of filament-wound composite products, such as pressure vessels and pipes. In order to increase the fatigue strength of pressure vessel metallic liners subject to cyclic internal pressures, by controlling residual stresses, the 'autofrettage' overpressuring treatment has been devised.

  20. Cerebral microdialysis reflects the neuroprotective effect of fractionated plasma separation and adsorption in acute liver failure better and earlier than intracranial pressure: a controlled study in pigs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cerebral edema is a well-recognized and potentially fatal complication of acute liver failure (ALF). The effectiveness of treatments that address intracranial hypertension is generally assessed by measuring intracranial pressure (ICP). The aim of this study was to determine the role of cerebral microdialysis in monitoring the efficacy of fractionated plasma separation and adsorption (FPSA) treatment for ALF. We hypothesized that in ALF cerebral microdialysis reflects the benefits of FPSA treatment on cerebral edema before ICP. Methods A surgical resection model of ALF was used in 21 pigs. We measured plasma ammonia concentration, brain concentrations of glucose, lactate, pyruvate, glutamate and glutamine, and ICP. Animals were randomized into three groups: in one group eight animals received 6 hours of FPSA treatment 2 hours after induction of ALF; in another group 10 animals received supportive treatment for ALF only; and in the final group three underwent sham surgery. Results The ICP was significantly higher in the ALF group than in the FPSA group 9 hours after surgery. The lactate/pyruvate (L/P) ratio was significantly lower in the FPSA group than the ALF group 5 hours after surgery, before any significant difference in ICP was detected. Indeed, significant changes in the L/P ratio could be observed within 1 hour of treatment. Glutamine levels were significantly lower in the FPSA group than the ALF group between 6 hours and 10 hours after surgery. Conclusions Brain lactate/pyruvate ratio and concentration of glutamine measured by cerebral microdialysis reflected the beneficial effects of FPSA treatment on cerebral metabolism more precisely and rapidly than ICP in pigs with fulminant ALF. The role of glutamine as a marker of the efficacy of FPSA treatment for ALF appears promising, but needs further evaluation. PMID:23758689

  1. A Statistical Evaluation of Rules for Biochemical Failure After Radiotherapy in Men Treated for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bellera, Carine A.; Hanley, James A.; Joseph, Lawrence; Albertsen, Peter C.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: The 'PSA nadir + 2 rule,' defined as any rise of 2 ng/ml above the current prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir, has replaced the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) rule, defined as three consecutive PSA rises, to indicate biochemical failure (BF) after radiotherapy in patients treated for prostate cancer. We propose an original approach to evaluate BF rules based on the PSAdt as the gold standard rule and on a simulation process allowing us to evaluate the BF rules under multiple settings (different frequency, duration of follow-up, PSA doubling time [PSAdt]). Methods and Materials: We relied on a retrospective, population-based cohort of individuals identified by the Connecticut Tumor Registry and treated for localized prostate cancer with radiotherapy. We estimated the 470 underlying true PSA trajectories, including the PSAdt, using a Bayesian hierarchical changepoint model. Next, we simulated realistic, sophisticated data sets that accurately reflect the systematic and random variations observed in PSA series. We estimated the sensitivity and specificity by comparing the simulated PSA series to the underlying true PSAdt. Results: For follow-up of more than 3 years, the specificity of the PSA nadir + 2 rule was systematically greater than that of the ASTRO criterion. In few settings, the nadir + 2 rule had a lower sensitivity than the ASTRO. The PSA nadir + 2 rule appeared less dependent on the frequency and duration of follow-up than the ASTRO. Conclusions: Our results provide some refinements to earlier findings as the BF rules were evaluated according to various parameters. In most settings, the PSA nadir + 2 rule outperforms the ASTRO criterion.

  2. New Approaches to Evaluating and Monitoring Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Elizabeth M; Levy, Phillip D

    2016-06-01

    Digital health innovations for hypertension include cuffless blood pressure sensors, wireless smartphone-enabled upper arm blood pressure monitors, mobile applications, and remote monitoring technologies. Wearable trackers have drawn interest from medical professionals and patients alike. They have the potential to improve hypertension control and medication adherence through easier logging of repeated blood pressure measurements, better connectivity with health-care providers, and medication reminder alerts. With increasing emphasis on home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring to confirm hypertension prior to treatment, such devices also can help improve the diagnostic landscape. However, privacy, accuracy, and cost concerns have prevented widespread clinical uptake. To foster implementation, device designers and clinical researchers should collaborate on development of rigorous clinical trials that test cardiovascular outcomes associated with emerging technologies. We review the current literature on mobile health technologies and novel diagnostic and management protocols and make recommendations on how to incorporate these innovations into practice. PMID:27137524

  3. Performance Evaluation of Pressure Transducers for Water Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.; Stegall, David E.; Treadway, Sean

    2012-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle is being designed for water landings. In order to benchmark the ability of engineering tools to predict water landing loads, test programs are underway for scale model and full-scale water impacts. These test programs are predicated on the reliable measurement of impact pressure histories. Tests have been performed with a variety of pressure transducers from various manufacturers. Both piezoelectric and piezoresistive devices have been tested. Effects such as thermal shock, pinching of the transducer head, and flushness of the transducer mounting have been studied. Data acquisition issues such as sampling rate and anti-aliasing filtering also have been studied. The response of pressure transducers have been compared side-by-side on an impulse test rig and on a 20-inch diameter hemisphere dropped into a pool of water. The results have identified a range of viable configurations for pressure measurement dependent on the objectives of the test program.

  4. EVALUATION OF GRANULAR BED FILTERS FOR HIGH-TEMPERATURE/HIGH-PRESSURE PARTICULATE CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The status and potential of granular bed filter (GBF) technology for fine particulate control has been critically reviewed and evaluated with emphasis on high temperature and pressure (HTP) applications. Available theoretical models and experimental data have been evaluated and f...

  5. Utility of home blood pressure monitoring to evaluate postprandial blood pressure in treated hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Alfie, José

    2015-08-01

    Postprandial hypotension, defined as a fall in systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 20 mmHg or greater within 2 hours after a meal, is a risk factor for stroke, coronary events and mortality. The clinical suspicion is typically raised by episodes of postprandial syncope or falls, whereas asymptomatic postprandial hypotension is mostly neglected. The magnitude of the postprandial fall in SBP, as detected by 24-hour recording in apparently healthy middle-aged to elderly subjects, was proportional to the severity of the silent cerebrovascular damage. Postprandial hypotension can also be detected by self-measured blood pressure before and within 2 hours after meals using automatic devices. The review highlights the value of home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) as a screening test for asymptomatic postprandial hypotension in hypertensive patients. Using a HBPM protocol that included duplicated blood pressure measurements before and after three consecutive lunches, we detected unsuspected postprandial hypotension in 27.4% of the 230 hypertensive patients screened. The prevalence of postprandial hypotension was 13.2% in controlled and 42.2% in uncontrolled hypertensive patients (p < 0.001), raising the dilemma of further lowering blood pressure in the setting of postprandial hypotension. The inclusion of preprandial and postprandial measurements in the protocol of HBPM is useful to identify hypertensive patients with postprandial hypotension and may guide adjustments in antihypertensive treatment according to postprandial blood pressure. PMID:26187907

  6. Optical surface pressure measurements: Accuracy and application field evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukov, A.; Mosharov, V.; Orlov, A.; Pesetsky, V.; Radchenko, V.; Phonov, S.; Matyash, S.; Kuzmin, M.; Sadovskii, N.

    1994-07-01

    Optical pressure measurement (OPM) is a new pressure measurement method rapidly developed in several aerodynamic research centers: TsAGI (Russia), Boeing, NASA, McDonnell Douglas (all USA), and DLR (Germany). Present level of OPM-method provides its practice as standard experimental method of aerodynamic investigations in definite application fields. Applications of OPM-method are determined mainly by its accuracy. The accuracy of OPM-method is determined by the errors of three following groups: (1) errors of the luminescent pressure sensor (LPS) itself, such as uncompensated temperature influence, photo degradation, temperature and pressure hysteresis, variation of the LPS parameters from point to point on the model surface, etc.; (2) errors of the measurement system, such as noise of the photodetector, nonlinearity and nonuniformity of the photodetector, time and temperature offsets, etc.; and (3) methodological errors, owing to displacement and deformation of the model in an airflow, a contamination of the model surface, scattering of the excitation and luminescent light from the model surface and test section walls, etc. OPM-method allows getting total error of measured pressure not less than 1 percent. This accuracy is enough to visualize the pressure field and allows determining total and distributed aerodynamic loads and solving some problems of local aerodynamic investigations at transonic and supersonic velocities. OPM is less effective at low subsonic velocities (M less than 0.4), and for precise measurements, for example, an airfoil optimization. Current limitations of the OPM-method are discussed on an example of the surface pressure measurements and calculations of the integral loads on the wings of canard-aircraft model. The pressure measurement system and data reduction methods used on these tests are also described.

  7. Zebrafish Heart Failure Models for the Evaluation of Chemical Probes and Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Monte, Aaron; Cook, James M.; Kabir, Mohd Shahjahan; Peterson, Karl P.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Heart failure is a complex disease that involves genetic, environmental, and physiological factors. As a result, current medication and treatment for heart failure produces limited efficacy, and better medication is in demand. Although mammalian models exist, simple and low-cost models will be more beneficial for drug discovery and mechanistic studies of heart failure. We previously reported that aristolochic acid (AA) caused cardiac defects in zebrafish embryos that resemble heart failure. Here, we showed that cardiac troponin T and atrial natriuretic peptide were expressed at significantly higher levels in AA-treated embryos, presumably due to cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, several human heart failure drugs could moderately attenuate the AA-induced heart failure by 10%–40%, further verifying the model for drug discovery. We then developed a drug screening assay using the AA-treated zebrafish embryos and identified three compounds. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor (MEK-I), an inhibitor for the MEK-1/2 known to be involved in cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, showed nearly 60% heart failure attenuation. C25, a chalcone derivative, and A11, a phenolic compound, showed around 80% and 90% attenuation, respectively. Time course experiments revealed that, to obtain 50% efficacy, these compounds were required within different hours of AA treatment. Furthermore, quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that C25, not MEK-I or A11, strongly suppressed inflammation. Finally, C25 and MEK-I, but not A11, could also rescue the doxorubicin-induced heart failure in zebrafish embryos. In summary, we have established two tractable heart failure models for drug discovery and three potential drugs have been identified that seem to attenuate heart failure by different mechanisms. PMID:24351044

  8. Vascular Physiology according to Clinical Scenario in Patients with Acute Heart Failure: Evaluation using the Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index.

    PubMed

    Goto, Toshihiko; Wakami, Kazuaki; Mori, Kento; Kikuchi, Shohei; Fukuta, Hidekatsu; Ohte, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Increased aortic stiffness may be an important cause of acute heart failure (AHF). Clinical scenario (CS), which classifies the pathophysiology of AHF based on the initial systolic blood pressure (sBP), was proposed to provide the most appropriate therapy for AHF patients. In CS, elevated aortic stiffness, vascular failure, has been considered as a feature of patients categorized as CS1 (sBP > 140 mmHg at initial presentation). However, whether elevated aortic stiffness, vascular failure, is present in such patients has not been fully elucidated. Therefore, we assessed aortic stiffness in AHF patients using the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI), which is considered to be independent of instantaneous blood pressure. Sixty-four consecutive AHF patients (mean age, 70.6 ± 12.8 years; 39 men) were classified with CS, based on their initial sBP: CS1: sBP > 140 mmHg (n = 29); CS2: sBP 100-140 mmHg (n = 22); and CS3: sBP < 100 mmHg (n = 13). There were significant group differences in CAVI (CS1 vs. CS2 vs. CS3: 9.7 ± 1.4 vs. 8.4 ± 1.7 vs. 8.3 ± 1.7, p = 0.006, analysis of variance). CAVI was significantly higher in CS1 than in CS2 (p = 0.02) and CS3 (p = 0.04). CAVI did not significantly correlate with sBP at the time of measurement of CAVI (r = 0.24 and p = 0.06). Aortic stiffness assessed using blood pressure-independent methodology apparently increased in CS1 AHF patients. We conclude that vascular failure is a feature of CS1 AHF initiation. PMID:27594650

  9. Analytical Method to Evaluate Failure Potential During High-Risk Component Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Irem Y.; Stone, Robert B.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Communicating failure mode information during design and manufacturing is a crucial task for failure prevention. Most processes use Failure Modes and Effects types of analyses, as well as prior knowledge and experience, to determine the potential modes of failures a product might encounter during its lifetime. When new products are being considered and designed, this knowledge and information is expanded upon to help designers extrapolate based on their similarity with existing products and the potential design tradeoffs. This paper makes use of similarities and tradeoffs that exist between different failure modes based on the functionality of each component/product. In this light, a function-failure method is developed to help the design of new products with solutions for functions that eliminate or reduce the potential of a failure mode. The method is applied to a simplified rotating machinery example in this paper, and is proposed as a means to account for helicopter failure modes during design and production, addressing stringent safety and performance requirements for NASA applications.

  10. You Want Me to Do What? Evaluators and the Pressure to Misrepresent Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Michael; Clark, Brittany

    2013-01-01

    Evaluators' experiences with being pressured by a key stakeholder to misrepresent findings were investigated in an anonymous survey of a random sample of over 2500 American Evaluation Association members; a response rate of 37% was obtained. Overall, 42% of the respondents had encountered misrepresentation pressure, with 70% of this subgroup…

  11. A probabilistic approach to the evaluation of the PTS (pressurized thermal shock) issue

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Selby, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    The pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) issue is concerned with the possibility of failure of pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) pressure vessels under a very specific set of conditions. These conditions include: (1) the occurrence of reactor transients that subject the vessel to severe thermal shock as well as the normal pressure loading, (2) the existence of sharp, crack-like defects (flaws) at the inner surface of the vessel wall, and (3) high enough fast neutron fluence and concentrations of copper and nickel in the vessel wall to result in a extensive radiation-included reduction in the fracture toughness of the vessel material. Under these conditions, the mechanism for vessel failure involves propagation of the flaws through the vessel wall, in which case adequate containment of coolant for the core might not be possible. The portion of the vessel of concern is the so-called beltline region because, it is directly opposite the core (high influence rate), it is adjacent to the coolant downcomer (potential for thermal shock), and coolant leakage in this area would tend to uncover the core. This document discusses the behavior of flaws in reactor pressure vessels under pressure and thermal-shock loading conditions.

  12. Evaluation of the cerebrovascular pressure reactivity index using non-invasive finapres arterial blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Kasprowicz, M; Schmidt, E; Kim, D J; Haubrich, C; Czosnyka, Z; Smielewski, P; Czosnyka, M

    2010-09-01

    A pressure reactivity index (PRx) can be assessed in patients with continuous monitoring of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and intracranial pressure (ICP) as a moving correlation coefficient between slow fluctuations of these two signals within a low frequency bandwidth. The study aimed to investigate whether the invasive ABP monitoring can be replaced with non-invasive measurement of ABP using a Finapres plethysmograph (fABP) to calculate the fPRx. There is a well-defined group of patients, suffering from hydrocephalus and undergoing CSF pressure monitoring, which may benefit from such a measurement. 41 simultaneous day-by-day monitoring of ICP, ABP and fABP were performed for about 30 min in 10 head injury patients. A Bland-Altman assessment for agreement was used to compare PRx and fPRx calculations. Performance metrics and the McNemary test were used to determine whether fPRx is sensitive enough to distinguish between functioning and disturbed cerebrovascular pressure reactivity. The fPRx correlated with PRx (R(Spearman) = 0.92, p < 0.001; bias = -0.04; lower and upper limits of agreement: -0.26 and 0.17, respectively). The fPRx distinguished between active and passive reactivity in more than 89% cases. The fPRx can be used with care for assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity in patients for whom invasive ABP measurement is not feasible. The fPRx is sensitive enough to distinguish between functional and deranged reactivity. PMID:20664157

  13. Risk evaluation on the basis of pressure rate measured by automatic pressure tracking adiabatic calorimeter.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Yusaku; Koseki, Hiroshi

    2008-11-15

    An automatic pressure tracking adiabatic calorimeter (APTAC) had been employed to obtain the thermokinetic and the vapor pressure data during runaway reactions. The APTAC is an adiabatic calorimeter with a large-scale sample mass and low thermal inertia, and is an extremely useful tool for assessing thermal hazards of reactive chemicals. The data obtained by the APTAC are important information for the design of the safe industrial process. The thermodynamics parameters and the gas production were discussed on the basis of the experimental data of various concentrations and weights of di-tert-butyl peroxide (DTBP)/toluene solution for the purpose of investigating the properties of the APTAC data. The thermal decomposition of DTBP was studied on the basis of the temperature data and the pressure data obtained by the APTAC. The activation energy and the frequency factor of DTBP are nearly constant and the same as the literature values in the concentrations between 20 and 60 wt.%. The pressure rise due to gas production is important data for designing the relief vent of a reactor. The time history of the gas production was investigated with various weights and concentrations. The total gas production index, which had the vapor pressure correction, was 1.0 in the decomposition of DTBP. PMID:18313846

  14. A real-time simulation evaluation of an advanced detection, isolation and accommodation algorithm for sensor failures in turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W. C.; Delaat, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    An advanced sensor failure detection, isolation, and accommodation (ADIA) algorithm has been developed for use with an aircraft turbofan engine control system. In a previous paper the authors described the ADIA algorithm and its real-time implementation. Subsequent improvements made to the algorithm and implementation are discussed, and the results of an evaluation presented. The evaluation used a real-time, hybrid computer simulation of an F100 turbofan engine.

  15. A real-time simulation evaluation of an advanced detection. Isolation and accommodation algorithm for sensor failures in turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, W. C.; Delaat, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    An advanced sensor failure detection, isolation, and accommodation (ADIA) algorithm has been developed for use with an aircraft turbofan engine control system. In a previous paper the authors described the ADIA algorithm and its real-time implementation. Subsequent improvements made to the algorithm and implementation are discussed, and the results of an evaluation presented. The evaluation used a real-time, hybrid computer simulation of an F100 turbofan engine.

  16. Bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis--a rare cause of acute respiratory failure managed with nasal mask bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) ventilation.

    PubMed

    Lin, M C; Liaw, M Y; Huang, C C; Chuang, M L; Tsai, Y H

    1997-08-01

    A 68 yr old woman presented with acute respiratory failure. She was suspected of having a phrenic-diaphragmatic impairment, without evidence of an intrinsic lung disease or generalized neuromuscular disorder, after 3 weeks of prolonged mechanical ventilation. A series of studies, including fluoroscopy, phrenic nerve stimulation test and diaphragmatic electromyography, was performed before the diagnosis of bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis (BDP) was confirmed. The patient was successfully weaned from the conventional mechanical ventilator, and was placed on nasal mask bi-level positive airway pressure (BiPAP) ventilation. A high degree of clinical suspicion of bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis should always be raised in patients suffering respiratory failure without definite predisposing factors. Weaning with noninvasive nasal mask ventilation should be tried first instead of direct tracheostomy. PMID:9272940

  17. Respiratory controversies in the critical care setting. Should noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation be used in all forms of acute respiratory failure?

    PubMed

    Hess, Dean R; Fessler, Henry E

    2007-05-01

    Noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (NPPV) has been a major advance in the management of acute respiratory failure. Over the past decade alone, NPPV has been the subject of over 1,500 scientific papers, including 14 meta-analyses. NPPV's utility in many clinical settings has been well established, with demonstration in randomized trials of lower intubation rate, mortality, hospital stay, and advantages in other important clinical outcomes. However, it is still used in a minority of patients with acute respiratory failure. While there probably are situations in which NPPV is commonly under-utilized, there are other situations in which it is unlikely to be of benefit or likely to inflict harm. This paper debates the data for and against the more widespread application of NPPV. It will assist the clinician to identify both good and poor candidates for NPPV and thereby devote respiratory care resources where they will be most effective, and optimize patient outcomes. PMID:17484789

  18. Containment failure time and mode for a low-pressure short-term station blackout in a BWR-4 with Mark-I containment

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, J.J.; Greene, S.R. )

    1993-01-01

    This study investigates containment failure time and mode for a low-pressure, short-term station blackout severe accident sequence in a boiling water reactor (BWR-4) with a Mark-I containment. The severe accident analysis code MELCOR, version 1.8.1, was used in these calculations. Other results using the MELCOR/CORBH package and the BWRSAR and CONTAIN codes are also presented and compared to the MELCOR results. The plant analyzed is the Peach Bottom atomic station, a BWR-4 with a Mark-I containment. The automatic depressurization system was used to depressurize the vessel in accordance with the Emergency Procedure Guidelines. Two different variations of the station blackout were studied: one with a dry cavity and the other with a flooded cavity. For the flooded cavity, it is assumed that a control rod drive (CRD) pump becomes operational after vessel failure, and it is used to pump water into the cavity.

  19. PRESSURE DROP EVALUATION OF THE HYDROGEN CIRCULATION SYSTEM FOR JSNS

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsumoto, H.; Aso, T.; Ohtsu, K.; Kato, T.; Futakawa, M.

    2010-04-09

    In J-PARC, an intense spallation neutron source (JSNS) driven by a proton beam of 1 MW has selected supercritical hydrogen with a temperature of around 20 K and the pressure of 1.5 MPa as a moderator material. A hydrogen-circulation system, which consists of two pumps, an ortho-para hydrogen converter, a heater, an accumulator and a helium-hydrogen heat exchanger, has been designed to provide supercritical hydrogen to the moderators and remove the nuclear heating there. A hydrogen-circulation system is cooled through the heat exchanger by a helium refrigerator with the refrigeration power of 6.45 kW at 15.5 K. It is important for the cooling design of the hydrogen-circulation system to understand the pressure drops through the equipments. In this work, the pressure drop through each component was analyzed by using a CFD code, STAR-CD. The correlation of the pressure drops through the components that can describe the analytical results within 14% differences has been derived. It is confirmed that the pressure drop in the hydrogen circulation system would be estimated to be 37 kPa for the circulation flow rate of 160 g/s by using the correlations derived here, and is sufficiently lower than the allowable pump head of 100 kPa.

  20. Pressure Drop Evaluation of the Hydrogen Circulation System for Jsns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumoto, H.; Aso, T.; Ohtsu, K.; Kato, T.; Futakawa, M.

    2010-04-01

    In J-PARC, an intense spallation neutron source (JSNS) driven by a proton beam of 1 MW has selected supercritical hydrogen with a temperature of around 20 K and the pressure of 1.5 MPa as a moderator material. A hydrogen-circulation system, which consists of two pumps, an ortho-para hydrogen converter, a heater, an accumulator and a helium-hydrogen heat exchanger, has been designed to provide supercritical hydrogen to the moderators and remove the nuclear heating there. A hydrogen-circulation system is cooled through the heat exchanger by a helium refrigerator with the refrigeration power of 6.45 kW at 15.5 K. It is important for the cooling design of the hydrogen-circulation system to understand the pressure drops through the equipments. In this work, the pressure drop through each component was analyzed by using a CFD code, STAR-CD. The correlation of the pressure drops through the components that can describe the analytical results within 14% differences has been derived. It is confirmed that the pressure drop in the hydrogen circulation system would be estimated to be 37 kPa for the circulation flow rate of 160 g/s by using the correlations derived here, and is sufficiently lower than the allowable pump head of 100 kPa.

  1. Design and evaluation of candidate pressure ports for the HYFLITE experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teter, John E., Jr.; Cleckner, Craig S.; Vontheumer, Alfred E.

    1994-01-01

    A concept for placing a pressure transducer directly in a shuttle type tile was developed at Langley Research Center. A 5 inch long quartz with a .020 inch inner diameter provides the thermal isolation necessary to allow 2800 F surface pressure measurements to be taken by pressure transducer rated at 250 F. The assembly is potted in place with RTV 560 in a piece of FRCI-12 thermal protection system insulation tile. The integrity of the thermal protection system is maintained even with the intrusion of the pressure port assembly and the pressure port does not disrupt the air flow across the lifting body. Approximately 200 of these pressure ports are to be used in each of the Hypersonic Flight Experiment (HYFLITE) flight tests. Initial vibroacoustic and aerothermal testing of the pressure port designs have been completed at Langley Research vibration laboratory and the 20 MWatt 2 x 9 turbulent duct facility at Ames Research Center. The performance of the pressure ports were found to be well within the required design limits for all cases. In addition, a failure mode in which the entire pressure port assembly was removed proved to be a begin case.

  2. Prototype development and comparative evaluation of wheelchair pressure mapping system.

    PubMed

    Ferguson-Pell, M; Cardi, M D

    1993-01-01

    Wheelchair pressure mapping devices used in the prescription of seat cushions and postural supports have been limited in durability, data presentation, and/or clinical efficiency. This project sought to establish the ideal specifications for clinically useful pressure mapping systems, and to use these specifications to influence the design of an innovative wheelchair pressure mapping system (Tekscan "Seat"). Technology, previously developed for measurement of forces of dental occlusion and of the foot during gait, was applied to wheelchair seat mapping. Tests were designed to compare the performance of three pressure mapping systems: the Tekscan system, the FSA system, and the Talley TPM3. Bench tests were done to measure reproducibility, hysteresis, and creep of each of the pressure mapping systems. A contoured loader gauge was developed to test for the influence of hammocking. Tests were also performed using spinal cord-injured subjects to demonstrate the relative performance of the pressure mapping systems in a clinical setting. A focus group session was conducted with seating specialists to review the strengths and weakness of the systems for routine clinical use. The TPM3 was found to be the most accurate, stable, and reproducible but limited in ease of use, speed, and data presentation. FSA was rated well in clinical application and data management but demonstrated a pronounced hysteresis (+/-19%) and creep (4%). The Tekscan system also showed substantial hysteresis (+/-20%) and creep (19%) but was preferred by clinicians for its real-time display capabilities, resolution, and display options. Some trends in system performance on varied support surfaces were identified and can be a valuable guide to interpretation of measurements and prescription decision making in the clinic. Problems identified with the accuracy and stability of the Tekscan and FSA systems may be amenable to resolution with software correction and changes in fabrication. With these

  3. Heart failure - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... any drugs you may be taking for Diabetes, high blood pressure, or other medical conditions you have. ... of the arteries Heart failure - overview Heart pacemaker High blood pressure Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator Smoking - tips on ...

  4. Types of Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be made. Here we delve into the importance of shared decision making. This content was last ... heart failure. Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Low Blood Pressure ...

  5. Classes of Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be made. Here we delve into the importance of shared decision making. HF Resources For Life ... heart failure. Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Low Blood Pressure ...

  6. Neural Network Prediction of Failure of Damaged Composite Pressure Vessels from Strain Field Data Acquired by a Computer Vision Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Samuel S.; Lansing, Matthew D.

    1997-01-01

    This effort used a new and novel method of acquiring strains called Sub-pixel Digital Video Image Correlation (SDVIC) on impact damaged Kevlar/epoxy filament wound pressure vessels during a proof test. To predict the burst pressure, the hoop strain field distribution around the impact location from three vessels was used to train a neural network. The network was then tested on additional pressure vessels. Several variations on the network were tried. The best results were obtained using a single hidden layer. SDVIC is a fill-field non-contact computer vision technique which provides in-plane deformation and strain data over a load differential. This method was used to determine hoop and axial displacements, hoop and axial linear strains, the in-plane shear strains and rotations in the regions surrounding impact sites in filament wound pressure vessels (FWPV) during proof loading by internal pressurization. The relationship between these deformation measurement values and the remaining life of the pressure vessels, however, requires a complex theoretical model or numerical simulation. Both of these techniques are time consuming and complicated. Previous results using neural network methods had been successful in predicting the burst pressure for graphite/epoxy pressure vessels based upon acoustic emission (AE) measurements in similar tests. The neural network associates the character of the AE amplitude distribution, which depends upon the extent of impact damage, with the burst pressure. Similarly, higher amounts of impact damage are theorized to cause a higher amount of strain concentration in the damage effected zone at a given pressure and result in lower burst pressures. This relationship suggests that a neural network might be able to find an empirical relationship between the SDVIC strain field data and the burst pressure, analogous to the AE method, with greater speed and simplicity than theoretical or finite element modeling. The process of testing SDVIC

  7. High pressure inactivation of relevant target microorganisms in poultry meat products and the evaluation of pressure-induced protein denaturation of marinated poultry under different high pressure treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidgall, Johanna; Hertel, Christian; Bindrich, Ute; Heinz, Volker; Toepfl, Stefan

    2011-03-01

    In this study, the possibility of extending shelf life of marinated poultry meat products by high pressure processing was evaluated. Relevant spoilage and pathogenic strains were selected and used as target microorganisms (MOs) for challenge experiments. Meat and brine were inoculated with MOs and treated at 450 MPa, 4 °C for 3 min. The results of inactivation show a decreasing pressure tolerance in the series Lactobacillus > Arcobacter > Carnobacterium > Bacillus cereus > Brochothrix thermosphacta > Listeria monocytogenes. Leuconostoc gelidum exhibited the highest pressure tolerance in meat. A protective effect of poultry meat was found for L. sakei and L. gelidum. In parallel, the influence of different marinade formulations (pH, carbonates, citrates) on protein structure changes during a pressure treatment was investigated. Addition of sodium carbonate shows a protection against denaturation of myofibrillar proteins and provides a maximum water-holding capacity. Caustic marinades allowed a higher retention of product characteristics than low-pH marinades.

  8. A miniature pressure sensor for blast event evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nan; Wang, Wenhui; Tian, Ye; Niezrecki, Christopher; Wang, Xingwei

    2011-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a great potential threat to people who deal with explosive devices. Protection from TBI has attracted more and more interest. Great efforts have been taken to the studies on the understanding of the propagation of the blast events and its effect on TBI. However, one of the biggest challenges is that the current available pressure sensors are not fast enough to capture the blast wave especially the transient period. This paper reports an ultrafast pressure sensor that could be very useful for analysis of the fast changing blast signal. The sensor is based on Fabry-Perot (FP) principle. It uses a 45º angle polished fiber sitting in a V-groove on a silicon chip. The endface of the angle polished fiber and the diaphragm which is lifted off on the side wall of the V-groove form the FP cavity. The sensor is very small and can be mounted on different locations of a helmet to measure blast pressure simultaneously. The tests were conducted at Natick Soldier Research, Development, and Engineering Center (NSRDEC) in Natick, MA. The sensors were mounted in a shock tube, side by side with the reference sensors, to measure a rapidly increased pressure. The results demonstrated that our sensors' responses agreed well with those from the electrical reference sensors and their response time is comparable.

  9. Evaluation of the energy barrier for failure of Au atomic contact based on temperature dependent current-voltage characteristics.

    PubMed

    Aiba, Akira; Kaneko, Satoshi; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the mechanical stability of single gold atomic contacts at an applied bias voltage of 0-1 V using a nano-fabricated mechanically controllable break junction technique at 300-400 K under ambient conditions. The single atomic contact shows the quantized conductance (G0 = 2e(2)/h) and can carry considerably large current, which results in the current-induced failure of the contact. The contact failure behaviour under the applied bias conditions was studied by statistical analysis of the current-voltage (I-V) curves of the single Au contacts. We demonstrated that, at the elevated temperature of 300-400 K, the current-induced local heating effect is negligibly small and current-induced forces in the contact are responsible for the observed failure of the single gold contacts under the high bias voltage conditions (>0.4 V). Furthermore, based on the temperature dependence of the contact failure behaviour in the I-V curves, the energy barrier of the contact-failure was evaluated to be ca. 0.1 V. PMID:27427285

  10. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Heart Failure What is Heart Failure? In heart failure, the heart cannot pump enough ... failure often experience tiredness and shortness of breath. Heart Failure is Serious Heart failure is a serious and ...

  11. Evaluation of some scale effects in the response and failure of composite beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Morton, John

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of using scale model testing for predicting full-scale behavior of composite beams loaded in tension and flexure was investigated. Classical laws of similitude were applied to fabricate and test replica model beams to identify scaling effects in the load response, strength, and mode of failure. Experiments were conducted using graphite-epoxy composite beams having different laminate stacking sequences and a range of scaled sizes. Results indicated that the elastic response of scaled composite beams was independent of specimen size. However, a significant scale effect in strength was observed. In addition, a transition in failure mode was observed among scaled beams of certain laminate stacking sequences. Weibull statistical and fracture mechanics based models were applied to predict the strength scale effect since standard failure criteria cannot account for the influence of absolute specimen size in failure.

  12. Evaluation of containment peak pressure and structural response for a large-break loss-of-coolant accident in a VVER-440/213 NPP

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, B.W.; Sienicki, J.J.; Kulak, R.F.; Pfeiffer, P.A.; Voeroess, L.; Techy, Z.; Katona, T.

    1998-07-01

    A collaborative effort between US and Hungarian specialists was undertaken to investigate the response of a VVER-440/213-type NPP to a maximum design-basis accident, defined as a guillotine rupture with double-ended flow from the largest pipe (500 mm) in the reactor coolant system. Analyses were performed to evaluate the magnitude of the peak containment pressure and temperature for this event; additional analyses were performed to evaluate the ultimate strength capability of the containment. Separate cases were evaluated assuming 100% effectiveness of the bubbler-condenser pressure suppression system as well as zero effectiveness. The pipe break energy release conditions were evaluated from three sources: (1) FSAR release rate based on Soviet safety calculations, (2) RETRAN-03 analysis and (3) ATHLET analysis. The findings indicated that for 100% bubbler-condenser effectiveness the peak containment pressures were less than the containment design pressure of 0.25 MPa. For the BDBA case of zero effectiveness of the bubbler-condenser system, the peak pressures were less than the calculated containment failure pressure of 0.40 MPa absolute.

  13. Evaluation of Acoustic Emission NDE of Kevlar Composite Over Wrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2008-01-01

    Pressurization and failure tests of small Kevlar/epoxy COPV bottles were conducted during 2006 and 2007 by Texas Research Institute Austin, Inc., at TRI facilities. This is a report of the analysis of the Acoustic Emission (AE) data collected during those tests. Results of some of the tests indicate a possibility that AE can be used to track the stress-rupture degradation of COPV vessels.

  14. [Evaluation of pressure ulcers area using the softwares Motic and AutoCAD®].

    PubMed

    Reis, Camila Letícia Dias dos; Cavalcante, Janaína Mortosa; Rocha Júnior, Edvar Ferreira da; Neves, Rinaldo Souza; Santana, Levy Aniceto; Guadagnin, Renato da Veiga; Brasil, Lourdes Mattos

    2012-01-01

    Pressure ulcer is a lesion that affects skin layers in some regions of the body and its healing can be followed up using image processing. The analysis of pressure ulcer area is relevant to evaluate its evolution and response to therapeutic procedures. Such areas can be evaluated through contour marking with the softwares Motic and AutoCAD®. In this study 35 volunteers computed areas from two grade III pressure ulcers using these instruments. It was possible to conclude that results are clinically equivalent and so can be considered to follow up healing evolution from pressure ulcers. PMID:22911414

  15. Application of ANN to evaluate effective parameters affecting failure load and displacement of RC buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakan Arslan, M.

    2009-06-01

    This study investigated the efficiency of an artificial neural network (ANN) in predicting and determining failure load and failure displacement of multi story reinforced concrete (RC) buildings. The study modeled a RC building with four stories and three bays, with a load bearing system composed of columns and beams. Non-linear static pushover analysis of the key parameters in change defined in Turkish Earthquake Code (TEC-2007) for columns and beams was carried out and the capacity curves, failure loads and displacements were obtained. Totally 720 RC buildings were analyzed according to the change intervals of the parameters chosen. The input parameters were selected as longitudinal bar ratio (ρl) of columns, transverse reinforcement ratio (Asw/sc), axial load level (N/No), column and beam cross section, strength of concrete (fc) and the compression bar ratio (ρ'/ρ) on the beam supports. Data from the nonlinear analysis were assessed with ANN in terms of failure load and failure displacement. For all outputs, ANN was trained and tested using of 11 back-propagation methods. All of the ANN models were found to perform well for both failure loads and displacements. The analyses also indicated that a considerable portion of existing RC building stock in Turkey may not meet the safety standards of the Turkish Earthquake Code (TEC-2007).

  16. Evaluation of SSME high pressure liquid oxygen turbopump bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufrane, K. F.; Kannel, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Examination of the bearings produced conclusive evidence that a very high axial load was applied to bearing 8517903 during a significant portion of the service time. The high loads caused serious ball and race wear and surface fatigue pitting. In all likelihood, continued operation of this bearing with the high axial load would have caused increasing deterioration and catastrophic failure. In contrast, bearing 8517900 showed much less deterioration and probably had experienced only the axial loads deliberately applied by the preload spring. Bearing 8517900 represents the best-case operation with the loads controlled to the levels intended in the design. Fatigue life calculations on bearing 8517903 with an axial load of 27,000 N showed the intolerance of the bearing to such load levels.

  17. Evaluation of Agency Non-Code Layered Pressure Vessels (LPVs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    2014-01-01

    In coordination with the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance and the respective Center Pressure System Managers (PSMs), the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to formulate a consensus draft proposal for the development of additional testing and analysis methods to establish the technical validity, and any limitation thereof, for the continued safe operation of facility non-code layered pressure vessels. The PSMs from each NASA Center were asked to participate as part of the assessment team by providing, collecting, and reviewing data regarding current operations of these vessels. This report contains the outcome of the assessment and the findings, observations, and NESC recommendations to the Agency and individual NASA Centers.

  18. Energy evaluation of algal cell disruption by high pressure homogenisation.

    PubMed

    Yap, Benjamin H J; Dumsday, Geoff J; Scales, Peter J; Martin, Gregory J O

    2015-05-01

    The energy consumption of high pressure homogenisation (HPH) was analysed to determine the feasibility of rupturing algal cells for biodiesel production. Experimentally, the processing capacity (i.e. flow rate), power draw and cell disruption efficiency of HPH were independent of feed concentration (for Nannochloropsis sp. up to 25%w/w solids). Depending on the homogenisation pressure (60-150 MPa), the solids concentration (0.25-25%w/w), and triacylglyceride (TAG) content of the harvested algal biomass (10-30%), the energy consumed by HPH represented between 6% and 110-times the energy density of the resulting biodiesel. Provided the right species (weak cell wall and high TAG content) is selected and the biomass is processed at a sufficiently high solids concentration, HPH can consume a small fraction of the energy content of the biodiesel produced. This study demonstrates the feasibility of process-scale algal cell disruption by HPH based on its energy requirement. PMID:25435068

  19. Pre-hospital non-invasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure: a systematic review and cost-effectiveness evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Pandor, Abdullah; Thokala, Praveen; Goodacre, Steve; Poku, Edith; Stevens, John W; Ren, Shijie; Cantrell, Anna; Perkins, Gavin D; Ward, Matt; Penn-Ashman, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Non-invasive ventilation (NIV), in the form of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or bilevel inspiratory positive airway pressure (BiPAP), is used in hospital to treat patients with acute respiratory failure. Pre-hospital NIV may be more effective than in-hospital NIV but requires additional ambulance service resources. OBJECTIVES We aimed to determine the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of pre-hospital NIV compared with usual care for adults presenting to the emergency services with acute respiratory failure and to identify priorities for future research. DATA SOURCES Fourteen electronic databases and research registers (including MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) were searched from inception to August 2013, supplemented by hand-searching reference lists and contacting experts in the field. REVIEW METHODS We included all randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials of pre-hospital NIV in patients with acute respiratory failure. Methodological quality was assessed according to established criteria. An aggregate data network meta-analysis (NMA) of mortality and intubation was used to jointly estimate intervention effects relative to usual care. A NMA, using individual patient-level data (IPD) and aggregate data where IPD were not available, was carried out to assess whether or not covariates were treatment effect modifiers. A de novo economic model was developed to explore the costs and health outcomes when pre-hospital NIV (specifically CPAP provided by paramedics) and standard care (in-hospital NIV) were applied to a hypothetical cohort of patients with acute respiratory failure. RESULTS The literature searches identified 2284 citations. Of the 10 studies that met the inclusion criteria, eight were randomised controlled trials and two were quasi-randomised trials (six CPAP; four BiPAP; sample sizes 23-207 participants). IPD were

  20. Apollo experience report: Pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecord, G. M.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo spacecraft pressure vessels, associated problems and resolutions, and related experience in evaluating potential problem areas are discussed. Information is provided that can be used as a guideline in the establishment of baseline criteria for the design and use of lightweight pressure vessels. One of the first practical applications of the use of fracture-mechanics technology to protect against service failures was made on Apollo pressure vessels. Recommendations are made, based on Apollo experience, that are designed to reduce the incidence of failure in pressure-vessel operation and service.

  1. Developmental problems and their solution for the Space Shuttle main engine alternate liquid oxygen high-pressure turbopump: Anomaly or failure investigation the key

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, R.; Gross, L. A.

    1995-05-01

    The Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) alternate high-pressure liquid oxygen pump experienced synchronous vibration and ball bearing life problems that were program threatening. The success of the program hinged on the ability to solve these development problems. The design and solutions to these problems are engirded in the lessons learned and experiences from prior programs, technology programs, and the ability to properly conduct failure or anomaly investigations. The failure investigation determines the problem cause and is the basis for recommending design solutions. For a complex problem, a comprehensive solution requires that formal investigation procedures be used, including fault trees, resolution logic, and action items worked through a concurrent engineering-multidiscipline team. The normal tendency to use an intuitive, cut-and-try approach will usually prove to be costly, both in money and time and will reach a less than optimum, poorly understood answer. The SSME alternate high-pressure oxidizer turbopump development has had two complex problems critical to program success: (1) high synchronous vibrations and (2) excessive ball bearing wear. This paper will use these two problems as examples of this formal failure investigation approach. The results of the team's investigation provides insight into the complexity of the turbomachinery technical discipline interacting/sensitivities and the fine balance of competing investigations required to solve problems and guarantee program success. It is very important to the solution process that maximum use be made of the resources that both the contractor and Government can bring to the problem in a supporting and noncompeting way. There is no place for the not-invented-here attitude. The resources include, but are not limited to: (1) specially skilled professionals; (2) supporting technologies; (3) computational codes and capabilities; and (4) test and manufacturing facilities.

  2. Developmental problems and their solution for the Space Shuttle main engine alternate liquid oxygen high-pressure turbopump: Anomaly or failure investigation the key

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R.; Gross, L. A.

    1995-01-01

    The Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) alternate high-pressure liquid oxygen pump experienced synchronous vibration and ball bearing life problems that were program threatening. The success of the program hinged on the ability to solve these development problems. The design and solutions to these problems are engirded in the lessons learned and experiences from prior programs, technology programs, and the ability to properly conduct failure or anomaly investigations. The failure investigation determines the problem cause and is the basis for recommending design solutions. For a complex problem, a comprehensive solution requires that formal investigation procedures be used, including fault trees, resolution logic, and action items worked through a concurrent engineering-multidiscipline team. The normal tendency to use an intuitive, cut-and-try approach will usually prove to be costly, both in money and time and will reach a less than optimum, poorly understood answer. The SSME alternate high-pressure oxidizer turbopump development has had two complex problems critical to program success: (1) high synchronous vibrations and (2) excessive ball bearing wear. This paper will use these two problems as examples of this formal failure investigation approach. The results of the team's investigation provides insight into the complexity of the turbomachinery technical discipline interacting/sensitivities and the fine balance of competing investigations required to solve problems and guarantee program success. It is very important to the solution process that maximum use be made of the resources that both the contractor and Government can bring to the problem in a supporting and noncompeting way. There is no place for the not-invented-here attitude. The resources include, but are not limited to: (1) specially skilled professionals; (2) supporting technologies; (3) computational codes and capabilities; and (4) test and manufacturing facilities.

  3. Evaluation of a theory for pressure-strain rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstock, J.; Shariff, K.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical expression for the slow part (the nonlinear fluctuation part) of the pressure-strain rate is compared with simulations of anisotropic homogeneous flows. The objective is to determine the quantitative accuracy of the theory and to test its prediction that the generalized Rotta coefficient, a non-dimensionalized ratio of slow term to the Reynolds stress anisotropy, varies with direction and can be negative. Comparisons are made between theoretical and simulation values of the slow term itself and of the generalized Rotta coefficients. The implications of the comparison for two-point closure theories and for Reynolds stress modeling are pointed out.

  4. Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion and pulmonary arterial systolic pressure relationship in heart failure: an index of right ventricular contractile function and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Guazzi, M; Bandera, F; Pelissero, G; Castelvecchio, S; Menicanti, L; Ghio, S; Temporelli, P L; Arena, R

    2013-11-01

    Echo-derived pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP) and right ventricular (RV) tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE; from the end of diastole to end-systole) are of basic relevance in the clinical follow-up of heart failure (HF) patients, carrying two- to threefold increase in cardiac risk when increased and reduced, respectively. We hypothesized that the relationship between TAPSE (longitudinal RV fiber shortening) and PASP (force generated by the RV) provides an index of in vivo RV length-force relationship, with their ratio better disclosing prognosis. Two hundred ninety-three HF patients with reduced (HFrEF, n = 247) or with preserved left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (HFpEF, n = 46) underwent echo-Doppler studies and N-terminal pro-brain-type natriuretic peptide assessment and were tracked for adverse events. The median follow-up duration was 20.8 mo. TAPSE vs. PASP relationship showed a downward regression line shift in nonsurvivors who were more frequently presenting with higher PASP and lower TAPSE. HFrEF and HFpEF patients exhibited a similar distribution along the regression line. Given the TAPSE, PASP, and TAPSE-to-PASP ratio (TAPSE/PASP) collinearity, separate Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier analyses were performed: one with TAPSE and PASP as individual measures, and the other combining them in ratio form. Hazard ratios for variables retained in the multivariate regression were as follows: TAPSE/PASP evaluation and

  5. Compressive and tensile failure at high fluid pressure where preexisting fractures have cohesive strength, with application to the San Andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.

    1996-01-01

    In thrusting and strike-slip situations, when the maximum principal horizontal stress S1 acts nearly normal to a fault (a misoriented fault, such as the San Andreas), pore-fluid pressure > the lithostatic load, Pf > Sv, is required to reactivate movement on that fault. Pf > Sv may be achieved without causing hydraulic tensile fracturing if (1) previously existing cracks have regained cohesive strength by chemical processes, (2) subcritical crack growth has been blunted, and (3) the least principal horizontal stress S3 nearly equals Sv. Where Pf > Sv has been attained within a misaligned fault, increasing the stress difference (S1 - S3) at constant Pf > Sv will not lead to shear failure, while a decrease in (S1 - S3) can lead to shear failure of that fault. However, where the cohesive strength of material in a broad misaligned fault zone is less than that of the surrounding intact rock, increasing (S1 - S3) while Pf > Sv can result in shear failure of fractures at near optimum angles to S1, but confined within this weak fault zone. If this faulting results in the local short-lived attainment of Pf > Sv (cataclastic deformation and frictional heating overcoming dilation) and a simultaneous decrease in (S1 - S3), this combination of effects can trigger movement along the main trace of the misaligned fault. When increasing Pf results in hydraulic failure, anisotropy in tensile strength or fracture toughness resulting from foliation within faults allows fractures to propagate along the planes of weakness rather than across the foliation perpendicular to S3.

  6. Fibre break failure processes in unidirectional composites: evaluation of critical damage states.

    PubMed

    Thionnet, A; Bunsell, A R

    2016-07-13

    Earlier work which successfully modelled the kinetics of fibre breakage in unidirectional composites under monotonic tensile loading has been extended to quantify the kinetics of fibre failure during both monotonic and sustained tensile loading. In both cases, failure was seen to occur when a critical density of large clusters (more than 16 fibres are broken within the representative volume element) of fibre breaks developed. However, in monotonic loading failure occurred very quickly after the first development of these large clusters, whereas under sustained loading the composite could accommodate greater levels of large clusters because of the lower applied load. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. PMID:27242295

  7. Evaluation of embedded FBGs in composite overwrapped pressure vessels for strain based structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, Francisco; Strutner, Scott M.; Richards, W. Lance; Piazza, Anthony; Parker, Allen R.

    2014-03-01

    The increased use of composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) in space and commercial applications, and the explosive nature of pressure vessel ruptures, make it crucial to develop techniques for early condition based damage detection. The need for a robust health monitoring system for COPVs is a high priority since the mechanisms of stress rupture are not fully understood. Embedded Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors have been proposed as a potential solution that may be utilized to anticipate and potentially avoid catastrophic failures. The small size and light weight of optical fibers enable manufactures to integrate FBGs directly into composite structures for the purpose of structural health monitoring. A challenging aspect of embedding FBGs within composite structures is the risk of potentially impinging the optical fiber while the structure is under load, thus distorting the optical information to be transferred. As the COPV is pressurized, an embedded optical sensor is compressed between the expansion of the inner bottle, and the outer overwrap layer of composite. In this study, FBGs are installed on the outer surface of a COPV bottle as well as embedded underneath a composite overwrap layer for comparison of strain measurements. Experimental data is collected from optical fibers containing multiple FBGs during incremental pressurization cycles, ranging from 0 to 10,000 psi. The graphical representations of high density strain maps provide a more efficient process of monitoring structural integrity. Preliminary results capture the complex distribution of strain, while furthering the understanding of the failure mechanisms of COPVs.

  8. Mechanisms of soil aggregate failure by rapid increase in internal gas pressure during low-intensity burns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, M.; Ghezzehei, T. A.; Berli, M.

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of low-intensity natural and managed fire is on the rise, especially in the arid and semi-arid parts of the U.S. Southwest. Yet, there is little understanding of the ramifications of such burns on soil characteristics and their associated ecological processes. In particular, effects of low-intensity fires on soil structure have generally been ignored because such fires have little effect on soil organic matter. Recently, we showed that soil aggregates subjected to rapid low-intensity heating (<200°C) deteriorate more than aggregates subjected to the same temperature but at slow heating rate. We hypothesized that rapid heating rate results in high internal gas pressure due to vaporization of pore water that exerts disruptive mechanical stress that exceeds the internal strength of the aggregates. Here, we present in situ measurements of gas pressure of aggregates subjected to low-intensity burns. We compared a wide range of aggregate wetness and temperature levels. In addition, we report direct visualization of aggregate breakdown during rapid gas expansion using dynamic environment scanning electron microscopy. Our observation to date show that the interior gas pressure of moist aggregates rise rapidly to 1.5-4kPa, whereas the pressure inside dry aggregates remain unchanged during rapid heating. These observations show that weakly aggregated soils of arid and semi-arid regions are very vulnerable to low-intensity burns.

  9. Evaluation of the Stress Adjustment and Adaptation Model among Families Reporting Economic Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandsburger, Etty; Biggerstaff, Marilyn A.

    2004-01-01

    This research evaluates the Stress Adjustment and Adaptation Model (double ABCX model) examining the effects resiliency resources on family functioning when families experience economic pressure. Families (N = 128) with incomes at or below the poverty line from a rural area of a southern state completed measures of perceived economic pressure,…

  10. An evaluation of pressure and flow measurement in the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system.

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald J.

    2013-07-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt at plant-like conditions for pressure, flow, and temperature. An important need in thermal storage systems that utilize molten salts is for accurate flow and pressure measurement at temperatures above 535%C2%B0C. Currently available flow and pressure instrumentation for molten salt is limited to 535%C2%B0C and even at this temperature the pressure measurement appears to have significant variability. It is the design practice in current Concentrating Solar Power plants to measure flow and pressure on the cold side of the process or in dead-legs where the salt can cool, but this practice won't be possible for high temperature salt systems. For this effort, a set of tests was conducted to evaluate the use of the pressure sensors for flow measurement across a device of known flow coefficient Cv. To perform this task, the pressure sensors performance was evaluated and was found to be lacking. The pressure indicators are severely affected by ambient conditions and were indicating pressure changes of nearly 200psi when there was no flow or pressure in the system. Several iterations of performance improvement were undertaken and the pressure changes were reduced to less than 15psi. The results of these pressure improvements were then tested for use as flow measurement. It was found that even with improved pressure sensors, this is not a reliable method of flow measurement. The need for improved flow and pressure measurement at high temperatures remains and will need to be solved before it will be possible to move to high temperature thermal storage systems with molten salts.

  11. Fiber-optic interferometric sensors for measurements of pressure fluctuations: Experimental evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. C.; Soderman, P. T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses an anechoic chamber evaluation of a fiber-optic interferometric sensor (fiber-optic microphone), which is being developed at NASA Ames Research Center for measurements of pressure fluctuations in wind tunnels.

  12. Determining of Factors Influencing the Success and Failure of Hospital Information System and Their Evaluation Methods: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Kimiafar, Khalil; Ahmadi, Maryam; Shakeri, Mohammad Taghi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, using new information technology (IT) has provided remarkable opportunities to decrease medical errors, support health care specialist, increase the efficiency and even the quality of patient’s care and safety. Objectives: The purpose of this study was the identification of Hospital Information System (HIS) success and failure factors and the evaluation methods of these factors. This research emphasizes the need to a comprehensive evaluation of HISs which considers a wide range of success and failure factors in these systems. Materials and Methods: We searched for relevant English language studies based on keywords in title and abstract, using PubMed, Ovid Medline (by applying MeSH terms), Scopus, ScienceDirect and Embase (earliest entry to march 17, 2012). Studies which considered success models and success or failure factors, or studied the evaluation models of HISs and the related ones were chosen. Since the studies used in this systematic review were heterogeneous, the combination of extracted data was carried out by using narrative synthesis method. Results: We found 16 articles which required detailed analysis. Finally, the suggested framework includes 12 main factors (functional, organizational, behavioral, cultural, management, technical, strategy, economy, education, legal, ethical and political factors), 67 sub factors, and 33 suggested methods for the evaluation of these sub factors. Conclusions: The results of the present research indicates that the emphasis of the HIS evaluation moves from technical subjects to human and organizational subjects, and from objective to subjective issues. Therefore, this issue entails more familiarity with more qualitative evaluation methods. In most of the reviewed studies, the main focus has been laid on the necessity of using multi-method approaches and combining methods to obtain more comprehensive and useful results. PMID:24693386

  13. TAK1 is activated in the myocardium after pressure overload and is sufficient to provoke heart failure in transgenic mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, D.; Gaussin, V.; Taffet, G. E.; Belaguli, N. S.; Yamada, M.; Schwartz, R. J.; Michael, L. H.; Overbeek, P. A.; Schneider, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    The transforming-growth-factor-beta-activated kinase TAK1 is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase family, which couples extracellular stimuli to gene transcription. The in vivo function of TAK1 is not understood. Here, we investigated the potential involvement of TAK1 in cardiac hypertrophy. In adult mouse myocardium, TAK1 kinase activity was upregulated 7 days after aortic banding, a mechanical load that induces hypertrophy and expression of transforming growth factor beta. An activating mutation of TAK1 expressed in myocardium of transgenic mice was sufficient to produce p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in vivo, cardiac hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis, severe myocardial dysfunction, 'fetal' gene induction, apoptosis and early lethality. Thus, TAK1 activity is induced as a delayed response to mechanical stress, and can suffice to elicit myocardial hypertrophy and fulminant heart failure.

  14. Echocardiographic assessment of pressure volume relations in heart failure and valvular heart disease: using imaging to understand physiology

    PubMed Central

    Green, P.; Kodali, S.; Leon, M. B.; Maurer, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Pressure volume (PV) based analysis, using classic hemodynamic principles, has served as a basis for our understanding of cardiac physiology and disease states for decades. However, PV analysis has been restricted to primarily the basic research setting and for preclinical testing and has not be widely applied in part because of the invasive nature of the procedure and the expertise required to obtain adequate data using the conductance catheter. Development of single beat methodologies that rely on echocardiographic measurements of ventricular volume and Doppler and peripheral estimates of ventricular pressure and timing of the cardiac cycle has enabled broader application of PV analysis. This review explores the physiologic background, basic methodology, and recent and potential future applications of noninvasive PV analysis. PMID:21705998

  15. Non-invasive estimation and control of inlet pressure in an implantable rotary blood pump for heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Alomari, A H; Savkin, A V; Ayre, P J; Lim, E; Mason, D G; Salamonsen, R F; Fraser, J F; Lovell, N H

    2011-08-01

    We propose a dynamical model for mean inlet pressure estimation in an implantable rotary blood pump during the diastolic period. Non-invasive measurements of pump impeller rotational speed (ω), motor power (P), and pulse width modulation signal acquired from the pump controller were used as inputs to the model. The model was validated over a wide range of speed ramp studies, including (i) healthy (C1), variations in (ii) heart contractility (C2); (iii) afterload (C2, C3, C4), and (iv) preload (C5, C6, C7). Linear regression analysis between estimated and extracted mean inlet pressure obtained from in vivo animal data (greyhound dogs, N = 3) resulted in a highly significant correlation coefficients (R(2) = 0.957, 0.961, 0.958, 0.963, 0.940, 0.946, and 0.959) and mean absolute errors of (e = 1.604, 2.688, 3.667, 3.990, 2.791, 3.215, and 3.225 mmHg) during C1, C2, C3, C4, C5, C6, and C7, respectively. The proposed model was also used to design a controller to regulate mean diastolic pump inlet pressure using non-invasively measured ω and P. In the presence of model uncertainty, the controller was able to track and settle to the desired input within a finite number of sampling periods and minimal error (0.92 mmHg). The model developed herein will play a crucial role in developing a robust control system of the pump that detects and thus avoids undesired pumping states by regulating the inlet pressure within a predefined physiologically realistic limit. PMID:21666292

  16. A program to evaluate a control system based on feedback of aerodynamic pressure differentials, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrabak, R. R.; Levy, D. W.; Finn, P.; Roskam, J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of pressure differentials in a flight control system was evaluated. The pressure profile around the test surface was determined using two techniques: (1) windtunnel data (actual); and (2) NASA/Langley Single Element Airfoil Computer Program (theoretical). The system designed to evaluate the concept of using pressure differentials is composed of a sensor drive and power amplifiers, actuator, position potentiometer, and a control surface. The characteristics (both desired and actual) of the system and each individual component were analyzed. The desired characteristics of the system as a whole are given. The flight control system developed, the testing procedures and data reduction methods used, and theoretical frequency response analysis are described.

  17. [Multiparameter analysis of the ergometric test. Significance of the failure of systolic blood pressure to decrease during recovery phase as an index of coronary disease].

    PubMed

    Doria, G; Scaccianoce, G; Artale, S; Francaviglia, B; Platania, F; Circo, A

    1990-10-01

    Ergometric tests were performed in 27 patients who had previously undergone coronarography following instrumental findings and/or symptoms which seemed highly indicative of ischemic cardiopathy. The aim of the study was to assess the diagnostic importance of the failure of systolic blood pressure to decrease during the third minute of the recovery phase of the test as an index of coronary disease. In particular, as reported by other studies, the ratio between systolic blood pressure at the third minute of recovery and maximum systolic blood pressure during the test was also assessed values above 0.7 were considered pathological. Sixteen out the 27 patients examined showed lesions which were hemodynamically significant, whereas 11 patients were free of lesions and 9 had previous myocardial necrosis. The level of the above ratio in subjects without significant coronary lesions was 0.66 +/- 0.05, whereas it was 0.85 +/- 0.04 (p less than 0.01) in patients with coronary disease. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative prognostic values were respectively 91.6%, 62%, 64.7% and 90.9%. In patients with lesions to the three main arteries both the sensitivity and the specificity were 100%. In the same patients, the ST criteria were 85.7%, 50%, 81.8% and 74.3%. PMID:2074932

  18. Does Extension Play a Role in Ionian Tectonics? Potential Effects of Preexisting Bounding Faults, Local Brittle Failure, and Sulfur Pore Pressure on Crustal Stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, William B.; Kirchoff, M.; Bland, M.

    2013-10-01

    The majority of mountains observed on Io are tectonic, upthrusted blocks. Their formation is generally thought to be related to Io’s heat-pipe volcanism, crustal subsidence, and accompanying lateral confinement. In previous work, we demonstrated that compressional thermal stresses from sustained local or regional shut down of Io’s heat-pipe volcanism could also play a vital role in mountain formation, and help explain the anticorrelation between Io’s mountains and volcanic centers [Kirchoff and McKinnon 2009, Formation of mountains on Io: Variable volcanism and thermal stresses, Icarus 201, 598-614; Kirchoff et al. 2011, Global distribution of volcanoes and mountains on Io: Control by asthenospheric heating and implications for mountain formation, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 301, 22-30]. Here we refine our previous model by using an “unconfined” horizontal boundary condition (zero average lateral stress), including brittle failure (crustal plasticity), and adding sulfur to our rheological model. The unconfined horizontal boundary condition accounts for stresses released on preexisting, more distant faults; including crustal plasticity allows us to more realistically represent stresses that would exceed the brittle failure limit otherwise, and addition of sulfur to the model composition of Io’s crust further improves the rheological model of the crust. Heated and melted at depth, liquid sulfur creates pore pressure in the lower crust and profoundly reduces the brittle failure limit. Including these modifications when the volcanic eruption rate decreases introduces a region of tensional failure in the upper crust and increases the size of the region in compressional failure in the lower crust. Finite element models show that increasing compression at depth imparts substantial bending stresses, which can drive surface faulting and block rotation. Such conditions further facilitate mountain formation at the surface, and highlight the difference between Io

  19. A program to evaluate a control system based on feedback of aerodynamic pressure differentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, D. W.; Finn, P.; Roskam, J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of aerodynamic pressure differentials to position a control surface is evaluated. The system is a differential pressure command loop, analogous to a position command loop, where the surface is commanded to move until a desired differential pressure across the surface is achieved. This type of control is more direct and accurate because it is the differential pressure which causes the control forces and moments. A frequency response test was performed in a low speed wind tunnel to measure the performance of the system. Both pressure and position feedback were tested. The pressure feedback performed as well as position feedback implying that the actuator, with a break frequency on the order of 10 Rad/sec, was the limiting component. Theoretical considerations indicate that aerodynamic lags will not appear below frequencies of 50 Rad/sec, or higher.

  20. Impact failure of MHW fuel sphere MHFT 65: report on interagency task force investigation and SRL evaluation of failure, November 1979-February 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.H.

    1981-06-01

    Following a safety verification impact test failure of a Multi-Hundred Watt (MHW) fuel sphere made at Savannah River Plant, from which 2.1 g of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ escaped containment, the Department of Energy organized a task force to investigate the cause of the test failure and to assess the failure probability of MHW fuel made at SRP. The task force described a two-part failure mechanism: embrittlement of the iridium containment shell by phosphorus which may have been picked up from the fuel; and large shear strains in the iridium caused by shearing or push-through of large chunks of fuel. Because the likelihood of push-through in this failure model depends on preexisting cracks in the fuel and their orientation to the impact face, the probability of further impact failures could not be easily assessed. From independent analysis of the available data at the Savannah River Laboratory, we concluded that the impact failure was caused by phosphorus embrittlement of the iridium, and breaching during impact of the graphite impact shell surrounding and cushioning the iridium-clad fuel. Excessive strain in the iridium is caused by extrusion of the iridium into the breach. This model predicts that impact failure is essentially independent of pre-existing cracks in the fuel and that SRP fuel, upon impact, should have no more failures than previously used fuel made at Mound Facility. Impact data to date indicate that SRP fuel clad in DOP-26 iridium cladding actually has fewer impact failures than earlier fuel clad in undoped iridium at MF.

  1. A Test in Context Critical Evaluation of Natriuretic Peptide Testing in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Gary S.; Felker, G. Michael; Tang, W.H. Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Circulating natriuretic peptide measurements have been used extensively over the past 15 years to diagnose and monitor patients with heart failure. We are still learning how complex the dynamics of natriuretic peptides can be in the interpretation of test results in individual patients. Although natriuretic peptide measurements are widely used in practice, there are questions regarding why these peptides may not necessarily track with blood volume or invasive hemodynamic measurements in individual patients. Interpretation of natriuretic peptide measurements will depend on many factors, including special patient populations, obesity, renal function, the state of congestion or decongestion, and whether patients are receiving specific therapies. Natriuretic peptide measurements have clearly revolutionized clinical care for patients with heart failure, but further research should provide insights to help use these measurements to individualize patient care beyond the current guidelines. PMID:26796399

  2. A Test in Context: Critical Evaluation of Natriuretic Peptide Testing in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Francis, Gary S; Felker, G Michael; Tang, W H Wilson

    2016-01-26

    Circulating natriuretic peptide measurements have been used extensively over the past 15 years to diagnose and monitor patients with heart failure. We are still learning how complex the dynamics of natriuretic peptides can be in the interpretation of test results in individual patients. Although natriuretic peptide measurements are widely used in practice, there are questions regarding why these peptides may not necessarily track with blood volume or invasive hemodynamic measurements in individual patients. Interpretation of natriuretic peptide measurements will depend on many factors, including special patient populations, obesity, renal function, the state of congestion or decongestion, and whether patients are receiving specific therapies. Natriuretic peptide measurements have clearly revolutionized clinical care for patients with heart failure, but further research should provide insights to help use these measurements to individualize patient care beyond the current guidelines. PMID:26796399

  3. Expansion Duroplasty Improves Intraspinal Pressure, Spinal Cord Perfusion Pressure, and Vascular Pressure Reactivity Index in Patients with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: Injured Spinal Cord Pressure Evaluation Study

    PubMed Central

    Phang, Isaac; Werndle, Melissa C.; Saadoun, Samira; Varsos, Georgios; Czosnyka, Marek; Zoumprouli, Argyro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We recently showed that, after traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI), laminectomy does not improve intraspinal pressure (ISP), spinal cord perfusion pressure (SCPP), or the vascular pressure reactivity index (sPRx) at the injury site sufficiently because of dural compression. This is an open label, prospective trial comparing combined bony and dural decompression versus laminectomy. Twenty-one patients with acute severe TSCI had re-alignment of the fracture and surgical fixation; 11 had laminectomy alone (laminectomy group) and 10 had laminectomy and duroplasty (laminectomy+duroplasty group). Primary outcomes were magnetic resonance imaging evidence of spinal cord decompression (increase in intradural space, cerebrospinal fluid around the injured cord) and spinal cord physiology (ISP, SCPP, sPRx). The laminectomy and laminectomy+duroplasty groups were well matched. Compared with the laminectomy group, the laminectomy+duroplasty group had greater increase in intradural space at the injury site and more effective decompression of the injured cord. In the laminectomy+duroplasty group, ISP was lower, SCPP higher, and sPRx lower, (i.e., improved vascular pressure reactivity), compared with the laminectomy group. Laminectomy+duroplasty caused cerebrospinal fluid leak that settled with lumbar drain in one patient and pseudomeningocele that resolved completely in five patients. We conclude that, after TSCI, laminectomy+duroplasty improves spinal cord radiological and physiological parameters more effectively than laminectomy alone. PMID:25705999

  4. Evaluation of bioprosthetic heart valve failure using a matrix-fibril shear stress transfer approach.

    PubMed

    Anssari-Benam, Afshin; Barber, Asa H; Bucchi, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    A matrix-fibril shear stress transfer approach is devised and developed in this paper to analyse the primary biomechanical factors which initiate the structural degeneration of the bioprosthetic heart valves (BHVs). Using this approach, the critical length of the collagen fibrils l c and the interface shear acting on the fibrils in both BHV and natural aortic valve (AV) tissues under physiological loading conditions are calculated and presented. It is shown that the required critical fibril length to provide effective reinforcement to the natural AV and the BHV tissue is l c  = 25.36 µm and l c  = 66.81 µm, respectively. Furthermore, the magnitude of the required shear force acting on fibril interface to break a cross-linked fibril in the BHV tissue is shown to be 38 µN, while the required interfacial force to break the bonds between the fibril and the surrounding extracellular matrix is 31 µN. Direct correlations are underpinned between these values and the ultimate failure strength and the failure mode of the BHV tissue compared with the natural AV, and are verified against the existing experimental data. The analyses presented in this paper explain the role of fibril interface shear and critical length in regulating the biomechanics of the structural failure of the BHVs, for the first time. This insight facilitates further understanding into the underlying causes of the structural degeneration of the BHVs in vivo. PMID:26715134

  5. A novel approach for evaluating the risk of health care failure modes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Dong Shang; Chung, Jenq Hann; Sun, Kuo Lung; Yang, Fu Chiang

    2012-12-01

    Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) can be employed to reduce medical errors by identifying the risk ranking of the health care failure modes and taking priority action for safety improvement. The purpose of this paper is to propose a novel approach of data analysis. The approach is to integrate FMEA and a mathematical tool-Data envelopment analysis (DEA) with "slack-based measure" (SBM), in the field of data analysis. The risk indexes (severity, occurrence, and detection) of FMEA are viewed as multiple inputs of DEA. The practicality and usefulness of the proposed approach is illustrated by one case of health care. Being a systematic approach for improving the service quality of health care, the approach can offer quantitative corrective information of risk indexes that thereafter reduce failure possibility. For safety improvement, these new targets of the risk indexes could be used for management by objectives. But FMEA cannot provide quantitative corrective information of risk indexes. The novel approach can surely overcome this chief shortcoming of FMEA. After combining DEA SBM model with FMEA, the two goals-increase of patient safety, medical cost reduction-can be together achieved. PMID:22773135

  6. Chronobiological Analysis of Blood Pressure in a Patient with Atrial Fibrillation at the Development of Heart Failure and Its Therapeutic and Surgical Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chibisov, Sergey; Katinas, George; Brodskaya, Inna; Ertman, Aleksandr; Gromyko, Grigory; Konradi, Aleksandra; Mamontov, Oleg; Merkuryeva, Anna; Polunicheva, Ekaterina; Shlyakhto, Evgeny; Soboleva, Anna; Yashin, Sergey; Bhavdip, Bharadva

    2013-01-01

    Dynamics of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) was traced by automatic monitoring every 30 min uninterruptedly along several months in a patient suffering from combined atrial fibrillation and heart failure during the development of disease and its therapeutic and surgical treatment (pacemaker implanting and atrioventricular ablation). Analyses of spectral components as well as signal's shape revealed instabilities in circadian and semicircadian parameters. A new approach for signal's form description without using cosine approximation is suggested. The meaning that referring a patient as dipper, night peaker, or nondipper might be useful at choosing tactics of his treatment is impugned, because all these “types” can transform themselves in the same person in few days. Optimization timing of treatment provides better results if not the “types” of daily profile would be taken to account but the real form of the BP-signal and timing its first and second derivatives. PMID:23533942

  7. The impact of arteriovenous fistula creation in pulmonary hypertension: measurement of pulmonary pressures by right heart catheterization in a patient with respiratory failure following arteriovenous fistula creation.

    PubMed

    Poulikakos, Dimitrios; Theti, Davinder; Pau, Vasanti; Banerjee, Debasish; Jones, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PHT) is frequent in patients receiving hemodialysis (HD) and carries a high mortality. While it has been suggested that arteriovenous fistulae (AVF) may exacerbate PHT in HD patients, it has also been observed that creating AVF in patients with chronic lung disease and normal renal function may lead to improved exercise tolerance. Most of the observations regarding HD patients using echocardiography demonstrated that temporary closure of AVF improved pulmonary pressures. We present the case of a 45-year-old patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on HD who experienced respiratory failure following AVF formation and underwent right heart catheterization. Severe PHT was diagnosed but transient occlusion of the fistula failed to improve the PHT. This case supports the theory that fistula creation does not exacerbate pre-existing PHT and that AVF can be the access of choice in patients with known chronic lung disease and pulmonary hypertension. PMID:22360582

  8. Chronobiological analysis of blood pressure in a patient with atrial fibrillation at the development of heart failure and its therapeutic and surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Chibisov, Sergey; Katinas, George; Brodskaya, Inna; Ertman, Aleksandr; Gromyko, Grigory; Konradi, Aleksandra; Mamontov, Oleg; Merkuryeva, Anna; Polunicheva, Ekaterina; Shlyakhto, Evgeny; Soboleva, Anna; Yashin, Sergey; Bhavdip, Bharadva

    2013-01-01

    Dynamics of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) was traced by automatic monitoring every 30 min uninterruptedly along several months in a patient suffering from combined atrial fibrillation and heart failure during the development of disease and its therapeutic and surgical treatment (pacemaker implanting and atrioventricular ablation). Analyses of spectral components as well as signal's shape revealed instabilities in circadian and semicircadian parameters. A new approach for signal's form description without using cosine approximation is suggested. The meaning that referring a patient as dipper, night peaker, or nondipper might be useful at choosing tactics of his treatment is impugned, because all these "types" can transform themselves in the same person in few days. Optimization timing of treatment provides better results if not the "types" of daily profile would be taken to account but the real form of the BP-signal and timing its first and second derivatives. PMID:23533942

  9. A comparison of the chronic effects of oral xamoterol and enalapril on blood pressure and renal function in mild to moderate heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, M J; Webster, J; Fowler, G; Rawles, J; Smith, F W; Petrie, J C

    1991-01-01

    1. We compared the effects, after 3 weeks oral therapy, of xamoterol 200 mg twice daily and enalapril 2.5, 5 or 10 mg twice daily on home and clinic blood pressure, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal plasma flow, stroke and minute distances, linear resistance and on plasma renin activity in 19 patients with mild to moderate heart failure in a single-blind randomised crossover study. 2. Enalapril reduced mean home blood pressure by 17/7 mm Hg compared with xamoterol (P less than 0.0001) and by 19/7 mm Hg compared with placebo. Compared with placebo xamoterol had no effect. Enalapril reduced predose blood pressure, compared with xamoterol, on average by 15/5 mm Hg (P = 0.02 systolic, 0.09 diastolic) and by 20/7 mm Hg compared with placebo. At 4 h post-dose the mean differences were: xamoterol-enalapril 13/10 mm Hg (P = 0.01 systolic, 0.0007 diastolic) and placebo-enalapril 23/9 mm Hg. 3. Stroke and minute distances were marginally less 4 h following xamoterol than following enalapril: mean (s.e. mean) values were 9.4 (0.7) vs 10.4 (0.8) cm (P = 0.23) and 699 (51.7) vs 767 (62.1) cm (P = 0.04) respectively. Linear resistance was reduced by enalapril, from the placebo value of 13.2 (1.2) to 11.0 (0.9) mm Hg m-1 and marginally increased by xamoterol, to 14.2 (1.2) mm Hg m-1, the difference between active treatments being statistically significant (P = 0.03). 4. Renal plasma flow, GFR and filtration fraction were not influenced by enalapril or xamoterol therapy. There were no significant correlations between glomerular filtration rate and either blood pressure or stroke distance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1675867

  10. Evaluation of pressure response in the Los Alamos controlled air incinerator during three incident scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Vavruska, J.S.; Elsberry, K.; Thompson, T.K.; Pendergrass, J.A.

    1996-05-01

    The Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) is a system designed to accept radioactive mixed waste containing alpha-emitting radionuclides. A mathematical model was developed to predict the pressure response throughout the offgas treatment system of the CAI during three hypothetical incident scenarios. The scenarios examined included: (1) loss of burner flame and failure of the flame safeguard system with subsequent reignition of fuel gas in the primary chamber, (2) pyrolytic gas buildup from a waste package due to loss of induced draft and subsequent restoration of induced draft, and (3) accidental charging of propellant spray cans in a solid waste package to the primary chamber during a normal feed cycle. For each of the three scenarios, the finite element computer model was able to determine the transient pressure surge and decay response throughout the system. Of particular interest were the maximum absolute pressures attainable at critical points in the system as well as maximum differential pressures across the high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. Modeling results indicated that all three of the scenarios resulted in maximum HEPA filter differential pressures well below the maximum allowable levels.

  11. Evaluation of carbon dioxide rebreathing during pressure support ventilation with airway management system (BiPAP) devices.

    PubMed

    Lofaso, F; Brochard, L; Touchard, D; Hang, T; Harf, A; Isabey, D

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether carbon dioxide (CO2) rebreathing occurs in acute respiratory failure patients ventilated using the standard airway management system (BiPAP pressure support ventilator; Respironics; Murrysville, Pa) with positive inspiratory airway pressure and a minimal level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and whether any CO2 rebreathing may be efficiently prevented by the addition of a nonrebreathing valve to the BiPAP system circuit. In the first part of the study, the standard device was tested on a lung model with a nonrebreathing valve (BiPAP-NRV) and with the usual Whisper Swivel connector (BiPAP-uc). With the BiPAP-uc device, the resident volume of expired air in the inspiratory circuit at the end of expiration (RVEA) was 55% of the tidal volume (VT) when the inspiratory pressure was 10 cm H2O and the frequency was at 15 cycles per minute. The BiPAP-NRV device efficiently prevented CO2 rebreathing but resulted in a slight decrease in VT, which was due to a significant increase in external PEEP (2.4 vs 1.3 cm H2O) caused by the additional expiratory valve resistance. For similar reasons, both the pressure swing necessary to trigger pressure support and the imposed expiratory work were increased in the lung model when the nonrebreathing valve was used. In the second part of the study, seven patients weaned from mechanical ventilation were investigated using a randomized crossover design to compare three situations: pressure support ventilation with a conventional intensive care ventilator (CIPS), BiPAP system use, and BiPAP-NRV. When we compared the BiPAP system use with the other two systems, we observed no significant effect on blood gases but found significant increases in VT, minute ventilation, and work of breathing. These findings are experimental and are clinical evidence that significant CO2 rebreathing occurs with the standard BiPAP system. This drawback can be overcome by using a non-rebreathing valve

  12. Dyads Affected by Chronic Heart Failure: A Randomized Study Evaluating Effects of Education and Psychosocial Support to Patients With Heart Failure and Their Partners

    PubMed Central

    ÅGREN, SUSANNA; EVANGELISTA, LORRAINE S.; HJELM, CARINA; STRÖMBERG, ANNA

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic heart failure (CHF) causes great suffering for both patients and their partners. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of an integrated dyad care program with education and psychosocial support to patients with CHF and their partners during a postdischarge period after acute deterioration of CHF. Methods One hundred fifty-five patient-caregiver dyads were randomized to usual care (n = 71) or a psychoeducation intervention (n = 84) delivered in 3 modules through nurse-led face-to-face counseling, computer-based education, and other written teaching materials to assist dyads to develop problem-solving skills. Follow-up assessments were completed after 3 and 12 months to assess perceived control, perceived health, depressive symptoms, self-care, and caregiver burden. Results Baseline sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of dyads in the experimental and control groups were similar at baseline. Significant differences were observed in patients’ perceived control over the cardiac condition after 3 (P < .05) but not after 12 months, and no effect was seen for the caregivers. No group differences were observed over time in dyads’ health-related quality of life and depressive symptoms, patients’ self-care behaviors, and partners’ experiences of caregiver burden. Conclusions Integrated dyad care focusing on skill-building and problem-solving education and psychosocial support was effective in initially enhancing patients’ levels of perceived control. More frequent professional contact and ongoing skills training may be necessary to have a higher impact on dyad outcomes and warrants further research. PMID:22555264

  13. Geotechnical properties of Kentucky`s AML landslides and slope failure evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Iannacchione, A.T.; Bhatt, S.K.; Sefton, J.

    1995-12-31

    A large body of geotechnical data, obtained from the U.S. Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSM) and the Kentucky Division of Abandoned Lands, is analyzed in this paper. The analysis includes causes of subsurface failures, phreatic levels, soil profiles, and soil composition data. Soil properties calculated from laboratory procedures and stability analysis techniques were also reviewed. Employing prudent engineering practices and parameters, seven failed slopes were subjected to back analysis for estimating realistic factors of safety. Important factors affecting landslides in eastern Kentucky are presented with appropriate examples.

  14. Evaluation of detectability and distinguishability of aircraft control element failures using flight test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, J. L.; Eterno, J. S.; Hsu, J. Y.

    1986-01-01

    This paper examines the detectability and distinguishability of control element failures on the B-737 aircraft. The results of Weiss (1985) are used to define decentralized residuals from analytic redundancy relationships, and the results of Weiss et al. (1984) are used to define the probabilistic distance measures which provide bounds on the minimum achievable probabilities or error. The residual signals are then generated using data which were recorded during a landing approach of the NASA-Langley Advanced Transport Operations (ATOPS) transportation systems research vehicle (TSRV). The distance measures are computed using estimates of the statistics of these residual signals.

  15. Evaluation of the efficacy of a nurse practitioner-led home-based congestive heart failure clinical pathway.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jo-Ann Mary

    2016-01-01

    Frequent exacerbations of symptoms and financial penalties for 30-day hospital readmissions of patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) have led to new disease management approaches. A nurse practitioner (NP)-led interdisciplinary program for CHF management that included home telemonitoring and early NP assessments and interventions was piloted by a home health agency. A 4-month evaluation of the efficacy of a clinical pathway for CHF patients resulted in the enrollment of 22 CHF patients in the program. Two clients were readmitted within 30 days. The new program was effective in reducing 30-day readmission rates to 9% compared to the national average of 23%. PMID:27064361

  16. Salt-induced cardiac hypertrophy is independent of blood pressure and endothelin in obese, heart failure-prone SHHF rats.

    PubMed

    Radin, M Judith; Holycross, Bethany J; Hoepf, Toni M; McCune, Sylvia A

    2008-10-01

    The interaction of salt sensitivity and obesity in development of cardiac hypertrophy is incompletely understood. The SHHF/Mcc-fa(cp) (SHHF) rat model was used to examine the effect of high salt on cardiac hypertrophy and expression of endothelin (ET) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms. Homozygous lean (+/+) and obese (fa(cp)/fa(cp)) SHHF were fed a low-salt diet (0.3% NaCl) for seven days followed by a high-salt diet (8.0% NaCl) for seven days. To assess the role of ET in mediating cardiac hypertrophy and gene expression with high salt, additional groups were treated with an ET(A)/ET(B) receptor antagonist (bosentan) while on high salt. Obese SHHF showed an increase in systolic blood pressure and cardiac hypertrophy in response to the high-salt diet. High salt resulted in decreased expression of preproET as well as all three NOS isoforms in the Obese, while cytokine induced NOS (iNOS) and neuronal NOS (nNOS) increased in Leans. Though the salt-sensitive component of the hypertension observed in the Obese was prevented by bosentan, cardiac hypertrophy still occurred and expression of all NOS isoforms remained lower in Obese compared to Lean. Endothelial NOS (eNOS) expression increased in the Lean with bosentan. These studies suggest that cardiac hypertrophy is independent of the level of hypertension and may be mediated by altered production of NOS isoforms in salt-sensitive, obese SHHF. PMID:18855258

  17. EQUATIONS FOR GAS RELEASING PROCESS FROM PRESSURIZED VESSELS IN ODH EVALUATION.

    SciTech Connect

    JIA,L.X.; WANG,L.

    2001-07-16

    IN THE EVALUATION OF ODH, THE CALCULATION OF THE SPILL RATE FROM THE PRESSURIZED VESSEL IS THE CENTRAL TASK. THE ACCURACY OF THE ENGINEERING ESTIMATION BECOMES ONE OF THE SAFETY DESIGN ISSUES. THIS PAPER SUMMARIZES THE EQUATIONS FOR THE OXYGEN CONCENTRATION CALCULATION IN DIFFERENT CASES, AND DISCUSSES THE EQUATIONS FOR THE GAS RELEASE PROCESS CALCULATION BOTH FOR THE HIGH-PRESSURE GAS TANK AND THE LOW-TEMPERATURE LIQUID CONTAINER.

  18. An evaluation of direct pressure sensors for monitoring the aluminum die casting process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.

    1997-12-31

    This study was conducted as part of the US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored project Die Cavity Instrumentation. One objective of that project was to evaluate thermal, pressure, and gas flow process monitoring sensors in or near the die cavity as a means of securing improved process monitoring and control and better resultant part quality. The objectives of this thesis are to (1) evaluate a direct cavity pressure sensor in a controlled production campaign at the GM Casting Advanced Development Center (CADC) at Bedford, Indiana; and (2) develop correlations between sensor responses and product quality in terms of the casting weight, volume, and density. A direct quartz-based pressure sensor developed and marked by Kistler Instrument Corp. was acquired for evaluating as an in-cavity liquid metal pressure sensor. This pressure sensor is designed for use up to 700 C and 2,000 bars (29,000 psi). It has a pressure overload capacity up to 2,500 bars (36,250 psi).

  19. Evaluation of an Intervention to Maintain Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure Within Therapeutic Range

    PubMed Central

    Sole, Mary Lou; Su, Xiaogang; Talbert, Steve; Penoyer, Daleen Aragon; Kalita, Samar; Jimenez, Edgar; Ludy, Jeffery E.; Bennett, Melody

    2012-01-01

    Background Endotracheal tube cuff pressure must be kept within an optimal range that ensures ventilation and prevents aspiration while maintaining tracheal perfusion. Objectives To test the effect of an intervention (adding or removing air) on the proportion of time that cuff pressure was between 20 and 30 cm H2O and to evaluate changes in cuff pressure over time. Methods A repeated-measure crossover design was used to study 32 orally intubated patients receiving mechanical ventilation for two 12-hour shifts (randomized control and intervention conditions). Continuous cuff pressure monitoring was initiated, and the pressure was adjusted to a minimum of 22 cm H2O. Caregivers were blinded to cuff pressure data, and usual care was provided during the control condition. During the intervention condition, cuff pressure alarm or clinical triggers guided the intervention. Results Most patients were men (mean age, 61.6 years). During the control condition, 51.7% of cuff pressure values were out of range compared with 11.1% during the intervention condition (P < .001). During the intervention, a mean of 8 adjustments were required, mostly to add air to the endotracheal tube cuff (mean 0.28 [SD, 0.13] mL). During the control condition, cuff pressure decreased over time (P < .001). Conclusions The intervention was effective in maintaining cuff pressure within an optimal range, and cuff pressure decreased over time without intervention. The effect of the intervention on outcomes such as ventilator-associated pneumonia and tracheal damage requires further study. PMID:21362715

  20. Insulated Pressure Vessels for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage: Analysis and Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Martinez-Frias, J; Garcia-Villazana, O; Espinosa-Loza, F

    2001-06-26

    Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen (CH{sub 2}). Insulated pressure vessels offer the advantages of liquid hydrogen tanks (low weight and volume), with reduced disadvantages (fuel flexibility, lower energy requirement for hydrogen liquefaction and reduced evaporative losses). The work described here is directed at verifying that commercially available pressure vessels can be safely used to store liquid hydrogen. The use of commercially available pressure vessels significantly reduces the cost and complexity of the insulated pressure vessel development effort. This paper describes a series of tests that have been done with aluminum-lined, fiber-wrapped vessels to evaluate the damage caused by low temperature operation. All analysis and experiments to date indicate that no significant damage has resulted. Required future tests are described that will prove that no technical barriers exist to the safe use of aluminum-fiber vessels at cryogenic temperatures. Future activities also include a demonstration project in which the insulated pressure vessels will be installed and tested on two vehicles. A draft standard will also be generated for obtaining certification for insulated pressure vessels.

  1. Experimental evaluation of environmental scanning electron microscopes at high chamber pressure.

    PubMed

    Fitzek, H; Schroettner, H; Wagner, J; Hofer, F; Rattenberger, J

    2015-11-01

    In environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) high pressure applications have become increasingly important. Wet or biological samples can be investigated without time-consuming sample preparation and potential artefacts from this preparation can be neglected. Unfortunately, the signal-to-noise ratio strongly decreases with increasing chamber pressure. To evaluate the high pressure performance of ESEM and to compare different electron microscopes, information about spatial resolution and detector type is not enough. On the one hand, the scattering of the primary electron beam increases, which vanishes the contrast in images; and on the other hand, the secondary electrons (SE) signal amplification decreases. The stagnation gas thickness (effective distance the beam has to travel through the imaging gas) as well as the SE detection system depend on the microscope and for a complete and serious evaluation of an ESEM or low vacuum SEM it is necessary to specify these two parameters. A method is presented to determine the fraction of scattered and unscattered electrons and to calculate the stagnation gas thickness (θ). To evaluate the high pressure performance of the SE detection system, a method is presented that allows for an analysis of a single image and the calculation of the signal-to-noise ratio of this image. All investigations are performed on an FEI ESEM Quanta 600 (field emission gun) and an FEI ESEM Quanta 200 (thermionic gun). These methods and measurements should represent opportunities for evaluating the high pressure performance of an ESEM. PMID:26173072

  2. Evaluation of Viking Lander barometric pressure sensor. [performance related to Viking mission environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, M.

    1977-01-01

    Variable reluctance type pressure sensors were evaluated to determine their performance characteristics related to Viking Mission environment levels. Static calibrations were performed throughout the evaluation over the full range of the sensors using two point contact manometer standards. From the beginning of the evaluation to the end of the evaluation, the zero shift in the two sensors was within 0.5 percent, and the sensitivity shift was 0.05 percent. The maximum thermal zero coefficient exhibited by the sensors was 0.032 percent over the temperature range of -28.89 C to 71.11 C. The evaluation results indicated that the sensors are capable of making high accuracy pressure measurements while being exposed to the conditions mentioned.

  3. Artificial arterial blood pressure artifact models and an evaluation of a robust blood pressure and heart rate estimator

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiao; Mark, Roger G; Clifford, Gari D

    2009-01-01

    Background Within the intensive care unit (ICU), arterial blood pressure (ABP) is typically recorded at different (and sometimes uneven) sampling frequencies, and from different sensors, and is often corrupted by different artifacts and noise which are often non-Gaussian, nonlinear and nonstationary. Extracting robust parameters from such signals, and providing confidences in the estimates is therefore difficult and requires an adaptive filtering approach which accounts for artifact types. Methods Using a large ICU database, and over 6000 hours of simultaneously acquired electrocardiogram (ECG) and ABP waveforms sampled at 125 Hz from a 437 patient subset, we documented six general types of ABP artifact. We describe a new ABP signal quality index (SQI), based upon the combination of two previously reported signal quality measures weighted together. One index measures morphological normality, and the other degradation due to noise. After extracting a 6084-hour subset of clean data using our SQI, we evaluated a new robust tracking algorithm for estimating blood pressure and heart rate (HR) based upon a Kalman Filter (KF) with an update sequence modified by the KF innovation sequence and the value of the SQI. In order to do this, we have created six novel models of different categories of artifacts that we have identified in our ABP waveform data. These artifact models were then injected into clean ABP waveforms in a controlled manner. Clinical blood pressure (systolic, mean and diastolic) estimates were then made from the ABP waveforms for both clean and corrupted data. The mean absolute error for systolic, mean and diastolic blood pressure was then calculated for different levels of artifact pollution to provide estimates of expected errors given a single value of the SQI. Results Our artifact models demonstrate that artifact types have differing effects on systolic, diastolic and mean ABP estimates. We show that, for most artifact types, diastolic ABP estimates are

  4. Evaluation of outcome change scores for patients with pneumonia or heart failure.

    PubMed

    Scherb, Cindy A; Head, Barbara J; Hertzog, Melody; Swanson, Elizabeth; Reed, David; Maas, Meridean L; Moorhead, Sue; Conley, Deborah Marks; Kozel, Marie; Clarke, Mary; Gillette, Susan; Weinberg, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to describe the variance in selected Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) outcome change scores of hospitalized older patients with pneumonia (n = 216) or heart failure (HF; n = 67) that could be explained by age, length of stay (LOS), number of comorbid conditions, number of nursing diagnoses, and number of nursing interventions. Investigators used a descriptive correlational design to analyze data sets from three U.S. community hospitals. Study participants had at least two ratings on one of nine outcomes selected for their frequency and use across the three hospitals. A significant portion of the variance in the outcomes Knowledge: Illness Care and Fall Prevention Behavior was explained for pneumonia patients. None of the regression models for HF patients showed significance. Individual independent variables were significant in some of the models (i.e., LOS [pneumonia], number of nursing diagnoses [pneumonia and HF]). Implications for research and clinical practice are discussed. PMID:21447806

  5. Evaluation of a vibration diagnostic system for the detection of spur gear pitting failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.; Zakrajsek, James J.

    1993-01-01

    A vibration diagnostic system was used to detect spur gear surface pitting fatigue in a closed-loop spur gear fatigue test rig. The diagnostic system, comprising a personal computer with an analog-to-digital conversion board, a diagnostic system unit, and software, uses time-synchronous averaging of the vibration signal to produce a vibration image of each tooth on any gear in a transmission. Several parameters were analyzed including gear pair stress wave and raw baseband vibration, kurtosis, peak ratios, and others. The system provides limits for the various parameters and gives a warning when the limits are exceeded. Several spur gear tests were conducted with this system and vibration data analyzed at 5-min. intervals. The results presented herein show that the system is fairly effective at detecting spur gear tooth surface fatigue pitting failures.

  6. Blood Pressure Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    High blood pressure, also called hypertension, usually has no symptoms. But it can cause serious problems such as stroke, heart failure, ... failure. If you cannot control your high blood pressure through lifestyle changes such as losing weight and ...

  7. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood pressure with the development of a practical method to measure it. Physicians began to note associations between hypertension and risk of heart failure, stroke, and kidney failure. Although scientists had yet to prove that lowering blood pressure ...

  8. The Problematic Implementation of Teacher Evaluation Policy: School Failure or Governmental Pitfall?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuytens, Melissa; Devos, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Teacher evaluation policy is implemented in many countries to improve the teaching quality in schools. This paper explores the implementation of teacher evaluation policy in secondary schools in Flanders (Belgium). The case study method is used to explore the implementation process in six schools, which are selected based upon teachers'…

  9. Plan on test to failure of a prestressed concrete containment vessel model

    SciTech Connect

    Takumi, K.; Nonaka, A.; Umeki, K.; Nagata, K.; Soejima, M.; Yamaura, Y.; Costello, J.F.; von Riesemann, W.A.; Parks, M.B.; Horschel, D.S.

    1992-07-01

    A summary of the plans to test a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) model to failure is provided in this paper. The test will be conducted as a part of a joint research program between the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The containment model will be a scaled representation of a PCCV for a pressurized water reactor (PWR). During the test, the model will be slowly pressurized internally until failure of the containment pressure boundary occurs. The objectives of the test are to measure the failure pressure, to observe the mode of failure, and to record the containment structural response up to failure. Pre- and posttest analyses will be conducted to forecast and evaluate the test results. Based on these results, a validated method for evaluating the structural behavior of an actual PWR PCCV will be developed. The concepts to design the PCCV model are also described in the paper.

  10. Blood pressure evaluation using sphygmomanometry assisted by arterial pulse waveform detection by fiber Bragg grating pulse device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharath, Umesh; Sukreet, Raju; Apoorva, Girish; Asokan, Sundarrajan

    2013-06-01

    We report a blood pressure evaluation methodology by recording the radial arterial pulse waveform in real time using a fiber Bragg grating pulse device (FBGPD). Here, the pressure responses of the arterial pulse in the form of beat-to-beat pulse amplitude and arterial diametrical variations are monitored. Particularly, the unique signatures of pulse pressure variations have been recorded in the arterial pulse waveform, which indicate the systolic and diastolic blood pressure while the patient is subjected to the sphygmomanometric blood pressure examination. The proposed method of blood pressure evaluation using FBGPD has been validated with the auscultatory method of detecting the acoustic pulses (Korotkoff sounds) by an electronic stethoscope.

  11. Blood pressure evaluation using sphygmomanometry assisted by arterial pulse waveform detection by fiber Bragg grating pulse device.

    PubMed

    Sharath, Umesh; Sukreet, Raju; Apoorva, Girish; Asokan, Sundarrajan

    2013-06-01

    We report a blood pressure evaluation methodology by recording the radial arterial pulse waveform in real time using a fiber Bragg grating pulse device (FBGPD). Here, the pressure responses of the arterial pulse in the form of beat-to-beat pulse amplitude and arterial diametrical variations are monitored. Particularly, the unique signatures of pulse pressure variations have been recorded in the arterial pulse waveform, which indicate the systolic and diastolic blood pressure while the patient is subjected to the sphygmomanometric blood pressure examination. The proposed method of blood pressure evaluation using FBGPD has been validated with the auscultatory method of detecting the acoustic pulses (Korotkoff sounds) by an electronic stethoscope. PMID:23804218

  12. Airway occlusion pressure and diaphragm global electromyogram analysis for evaluation of inspiratory muscle drive and neuromechanical coupling in cattle.

    PubMed

    Desmecht, D J; Linden, A S; Rollin, F A; Lekeux, P M

    1994-06-01

    Although healthy and diseased bovine respiratory tracts have been intensively studied during the last years, to the authors' knowledge, there have been no attempts to objectively examine the inspiratory drive from the brain to the nerves and muscles and its transformation in pressure. Such technique would be useful in assessing the possibility of altered ventilatory drive or inspiratory muscle fatigue in the context of an animal with ventilatory failure. The relation among ventilation, airway opening occlusion pressure generated 100 milliseconds after onset of inspiration (Pawo100ms) and 6 indexes describing diaphragmatic electromyographic activity (EMGdi) recorded via implanted fishhooks was evaluated during free and impeded CO2 rebreathing in 6 young bulls. The best significant linear correlations (r > 0.8) with inspiratory center afferent stimulation, as judged by end-tidal CO2 concentration in expired air, were found for Pawo100ms, peak moving time average or variance EMGdi, and mean integrated EMGdi, whatever had been the respiratory impedance. However, with an inspiratory load, Pawo100ms responses systematically had greater increase for a given change in the driving EMGdi, implying dependence of the former not only on neural input, but also on configurational factors that determine inspiratory muscle excitation-pressure generation couplings. The reproducibility of EMGdi absolute values and changes was satisfactory up to 10 hours, but could not be repeated from one day to the other. It was concluded that, provided the constancy of the electrical coupling of the recording system to the tissue being studied is ensured, specific EMGdi and Pawo100ms values correlate reliably with amount of CO2 during free and loaded breathing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7944009

  13. Efficiency and outcome of non-invasive versus invasive positive pressure ventilation therapy in respiratory failure due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed Central

    Amri Maleh, Valiollah; Monadi, Mahmood; Heidari, Behzad; Maleh, Parviz Amri; Bijani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Application noninvasive ventilation in the patients with exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) reduced mortality. This case-control study was designed to compare efficiency and outcome of non-invasive (NIV) versus invasive positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) in respiratory failure due to COPD. Methods: The patients were assigned to NIV or IPPV intermittantly.The clinical parameters, including RR (respiratory rate), BP (blood pressure), HR (heart rate) and PH, PaCO2, PaO2 before and 1, 4 and 24 h after treatment were measured. Demographic information such as age, sex, severity of disease based on APACHE score, length of stay and outcome were recorded. Results: Fifty patients were enrolled in the NIV group and 50 patients in IPPV. The mean age was 70.5 in NIV and 63.9 in invasive ventilation group (p>0.05). In IPPV group, the average values of PH: PCO2: and PO2, were 7.22±0.11, 69.64 + 24.25: and 68.86±24.41 .In NIV, the respective values were 7.30±0.07, 83.94±18.95, and 60.60±19.88. In NIV group, after 1, 4 and 24 h treatment, the clinical and ventilation parameters were stable. The mean APACHE score in was IPPV, 26.46±5.45 and in NIV was 12.26±5.54 (p<0.05). The average length of hospital stay in IPPV was 15.90±10 and in NIV 8.12±6.49 days (p<0.05). The total mortality in the NIV was 4 (8%) and in IPPV, 27 patients (54%) (p<0.05). Conclusion: This study indicates that using NIPPV is a useful therapeutic mode of treatment for respiratory failure with acceptable success rate and lower mortality. The application of NIPPV reduces hospital stay, intubation and its consequent complications.

  14. Evaluation of a Community Health Service Center-Based Intervention Program for Managing Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Moli; Ma, Yanlan; Zhou, Ti; Xia, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although the role of primary care for the management of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) has been highly recommended, structural involvement of primary care in heart failure (HF) management programs is extremely limited. Aims: To examine the feasibility and applicability of two most recommended forms of care delivery mode, home visit and telephone support, for CHF management in the setting of community health service center (CHSC). Study Design: Prospective study. Methods: This study was conducted in two CHSCs in Beijing, China. Care delivery was led by trained general practitioners or community nurses via home visits in one CHSC and telephone support in the other. Data regarding the change in mortality and hospitalization rate during 12 months and self-care level at 6 months were prospectively collected and compared across the intervention groups. Results: A total of 329 patients were included, with 142 in the home visit group and 187 in the telephone support group. Patients in both groups had frequent visits to CHSC (8.1±5.9 in the home visit and 7.7±4.1 in the telephone support group, p=0.45) during the follow-up period. Compared to the telephone support group, patients in the home visit group showed a reduction in all-cause mortality (14.1% versus 20.3%, p=0.14), one or more hospitalizations due to any cause (33.8% versus 44.2%, p=0.12) and one or more hospitalizations due to cardiac cause (17.6% versus 24.6%, p=0.13) in the home visit group. The absolute differences were 6.2% (95% CI: 1.9%, 14.3%), 8.4% (95% CI: 2.1%, 18.9%) and 7.3% (95% CI: 1.5%, 16.1%), respectively, although the results were not statistically significant. After 6 months of intervention, patients in both groups achieved marked improvement in self-care with reference to their own baseline values. Conclusion: Although no statistical difference was observed between the two care delivery approaches regarding the clinical outcomes of interest, given the high participation

  15. Flight test evaluation of an RAF high altitude partial pressure protective assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashworth, G. R.; Putnam, T. W.; Dana, W. J.; Enevoldson, E. K.; Winter, W. R.

    1979-01-01

    A partial pressure suit was evaluated during tests in an F-104 and F-15 as a protective garment for emergency descents. The garment is an pressure jerkin and modified anti-g suit combined with an oronasal mask. The garment can be donned and doffed at the aircraft to minimize thermal buildup. The oronasal mask was favored by the pilots due to its immobility on the face during high g-loading. The garment was chosen to provide optimum dexterity for the pilot, which is not available in a full pressure suit, while protecting the pilot at altitudes up to 18,288 meters, during a cabin decompression, and subsequent aircraft descent. During cabin decompressions in the F-104 and F-15, cabin pressure altitude was measured at various aircraft angles of attack, Mach numbers, and altitudes to determine the effect of the aerodynamic slipstream on the cabin altitude.

  16. A Sample of NASA Langley Unsteady Pressure Experiments for Computational Aerodynamics Code Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, David M.; Scott, Robert C.; Bartels, Robert E.; Edwards, John W.; Bennett, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    As computational fluid dynamics methods mature, code development is rapidly transitioning from prediction of steady flowfields to unsteady flows. This change in emphasis offers a number of new challenges to the research community, not the least of which is obtaining detailed, accurate unsteady experimental data with which to evaluate new methods. Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have been actively measuring unsteady pressure distributions for nearly 40 years. Over the last 20 years, these measurements have focused on developing high-quality datasets for use in code evaluation. This paper provides a sample of unsteady pressure measurements obtained by LaRC and available for government, university, and industry researchers to evaluate new and existing unsteady aerodynamic analysis methods. A number of cases are highlighted and discussed with attention focused on the unique character of the individual datasets and their perceived usefulness for code evaluation. Ongoing LaRC research in this area is also presented.

  17. Failure of Femoral Access to Electrophysiological Evaluation Due to Aplasia of the Inferior Vena Cava

    PubMed Central

    Parahuleva, Mariana S.; Burgazli, Mehmet; Soydan, Nedim; Franzen, Wolfgang; Güttler, Norbert; Erdogan, Ali

    2016-01-01

    We report an interesting case of a man with a persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC) with left azygos vein who underwent electrophysiological evaluation. Further evaluation revealed congenital dilated azygos vein, while a segment connecting the inferior vena cava (IVC) to the hepatic vein and right atrium was missing. The azygos vein drained into the superior vena cava, and the hepatic veins drained directly into the right atrium. The patient did not have congenital anomalies of the remaining thoracoabdominal vasculature. PMID:27257399

  18. Evaluating a Web-Based Self-Management Intervention in Heart Failure Patients: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Windsor, Carol; Douglas, Clint

    2016-01-01

    Background Web-based interventions may have the potential to support self-care in patients with chronic disease, yet little is known about the feasibility of Web-based interventions in patients with heart failure (HF). Objective The objective of our study was to develop and pilot a Web-based self-care intervention for patients with HF. Methods Following development and pretesting, we pilot tested a Web-based self-care intervention using a randomized controlled design. A total of 28 participants completed validated measures of HF knowledge, self-care, and self-efficacy at baseline and 1-month follow-up. Results Change scores and effect size estimates showed that the mean differences in HF knowledge (d=0.06), self-care (d=0.32), and self-efficacy (d=0.37) were small. Despite email reminders, 7 of 14 participants (50%) of the sample accessed the site daily and 4 of 14 (28%) had no record of access. Conclusions Larger randomized controlled trials are needed that attend to all sources of self-efficacy and include more comprehensive educational tools to improve patient outcomes. PMID:27324213

  19. An international multicenter study evaluating the impact of an alternative biochemical failure definition on the judgment of prostate cancer risk

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Scott G. . E-mail: scott.williams@petermac.org; Duchesne, Gillian M.; Gogna, N. Kumar; Millar, Jeremy L.; Pickles, Tom; Pratt, Gary R.; Turner, Sandra

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of an alternative biochemical failure (bF) definition on the performance of existing plus de novo prognostic models. Methods and Materials: The outcomes data of 1,458 Australian and 703 Canadian men treated with external-beam radiation monotherapy between 1993 and 1997 were analyzed using a lowest prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level to date plus 2 ng/mL (L + 2) bF definition. Two existing prognostic models were scrutinized using discrimination (Somers Dxy [SDxy]) and calibration indices. Alternative prognostic models were also created using recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) and multivariate nomogram methods for comparison. Results: Discrimination of bF was improved using the L + 2 definition compared with the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) definition using both the three-level risk model (SDxy 0.30 and 0.22, respectively) or the nomogram (SDxy 0.35 and 0.27, respectively). Both existing prognostic models showed only modest calibration accuracy. Using RPA, five distinct risk groups were identified based primarily on Gleason score (GS) and all subsequent divisions based on PSA. All GS 7-10 tumors were intermediate or high risk. This model and the developed nomogram showed improved discrimination over the existing models as well as accurate calibration against the Canadian data, apart from the 30-50% failure region. Conclusions: The L + 2 definition of bF provides improved capacity for discrimination of failure risk. New prognostic models based on this endpoint have overall statistical performance superior to those based on the ASTRO consensus definition but continue to have unreliable discrimination in the intermediate-risk region.

  20. Fiber-optic interferometric sensors for measurements of pressure fluctuations - Experimental evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. C.; Soderman, P. T.

    1993-01-01

    A fiber optic interferometric sensor that is being developed at NASA Ames Research Center for pressure fluctuation measurements in wind tunnels is considered. Preliminary evaluation indicates that the fiber optic interferometric sensor can be successfully used as an aeroacoustic sensor and is capable of providing a powerful instrument to solve complex acoustic measurement problems in wind tunnels.

  1. A portfolio approach to evaluating natural hazard mitigation policies: An Application to lateral-spread ground failure in Coastal California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bernknopf, R.L.; Dinitz, L.B.; Rabinovici, S.J.M.; Evans, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    In the past, efforts to prevent catastrophic losses from natural hazards have largely been undertaken by individual property owners based on site-specific evaluations of risks to particular buildings. Public efforts to assess community vulnerability and encourage mitigation have focused on either aggregating site-specific estimates or adopting standards based upon broad assumptions about regional risks. This paper develops an alternative, intermediate-scale approach to regional risk assessment and the evaluation of community mitigation policies. Properties are grouped into types with similar land uses and levels of hazard, and hypothetical community mitigation strategies for protecting these properties are modeled like investment portfolios. The portfolios consist of investments in mitigation against the risk to a community posed by a specific natural hazard, and are defined by a community's mitigation budget and the proportion of the budget invested in locations of each type. The usefulness of this approach is demonstrated through an integrated assessment of earthquake-induced lateral-spread ground failure risk in the Watsonville, California area. Data from the magnitude 6.9 Loma Prieta earthquake of 1989 are used to model lateral-spread ground failure susceptibility. Earth science and economic data are combined and analyzed in a Geographic Information System (GIS). The portfolio model is then used to evaluate the benefits of mitigating the risk in different locations. Two mitigation policies, one that prioritizes mitigation by land use type and the other by hazard zone, are compared with a status quo policy of doing no further mitigation beyond that which already exists. The portfolio representing the hazard zone rule yields a higher expected return than the land use portfolio does: However, the hazard zone portfolio experiences a higher standard deviation. Therefore, neither portfolio is clearly preferred. The two mitigation policies both reduce expected losses

  2. Effect of Early Intervention With Positive Airway Pressure Therapy for Sleep Disordered Breathing on Six-Month Readmission Rates in Hospitalized Patients With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sunil; Mather, Paul; Gupta, Ankit; Reeves, Gordon; Rubin, Sharon; Bonita, Raphael; Chowdhury, Anindita; Malloy, Raymond; Willes, Leslee; Whellan, David

    2016-03-15

    Rehospitalization for congestive heart failure (CHF) is high within 6 months of discharge. Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is common and underdiagnosed condition in patients with CHF. We hypothesized that early recognition and treatment of SDB in hospitalized patients with CHF will reduce hospital readmissions and emergency room visits. Patients admitted for CHF underwent overnight polysomnography within 4 weeks of discharge. Patients diagnosed with SDB were provided therapy with positive airway pressure therapy. Patients were identified as having good compliance if the device use was for a minimum of 4 hours 70% of the time for a minimum of 4 weeks during the first 3 months of therapy. Hospital admissions for 6 months before therapy were compared with readmission within 6 months after therapy in patients with good and poor compliance. A total of 70 patients were diagnosed with SDB after discharge. Of the 70 patients, 37 (53%) were compliant with positive airway pressure therapy. Compliant patients were more likely to be older (64 ± 12 vs 58 ± 11 years) and women (54% vs 33%) and less likely to be patient with diabetes (40% vs 67%) versus noncompliant patients. Although both groups experienced a decrease in total readmissions, compliant patients had a significant reduction (mean ± SE: -1.5 ± 0.2 clinical events vs -0.2 ± 0.3; p <0.0001). In this single-center analysis, identification and treatment of SDB in admitted patients with CHF with SDB is associated with reduced readmissions over 6 months after discharge. Adherence to the treatment was associated with a greater reduction in clinical events. PMID:26830259

  3. Metallization failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, R.

    1971-01-01

    Metallization-related failure mechanisms were shown to be a major cause of integrated circuit failures under accelerated stress conditions, as well as in actual use under field operation. The integrated circuit industry is aware of the problem and is attempting to solve it in one of two ways: (1) better understanding of the aluminum system, which is the most widely used metallization material for silicon integrated circuits both as a single level and multilevel metallization, or (2) evaluating alternative metal systems. Aluminum metallization offers many advantages, but also has limitations particularly at elevated temperatures and high current densities. As an alternative, multilayer systems of the general form, silicon device-metal-inorganic insulator-metal, are being considered to produce large scale integrated arrays. The merits and restrictions of metallization systems in current usage and systems under development are defined.

  4. A stress-state modified strain based failure criterion for evaluating the structural integrity of an inner eutectic barrier.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David Russell; Harding, David Cameron; Akin, Lili A.; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki

    2010-09-01

    A slight modification of a package to transport solid metal contents requires inclusion of a thin titanium liner to protect against possible eutectic formation in 10 CFR 71.74 regulatory fire accident conditions. Under severe transport regulatory impact conditions, the package contents could impart high localized loading of the liner, momentarily pinching it between the contents and the thick containment vessel, and inducing some plasticity near the contact point. Actuator and drop table testing of simulated contents impacts against liner/containment vessel structures nearly bounded the potential plastic strain and stress triaxiality conditions, without any ductile tearing of the eutectic barrier. Additional bounding was necessary in some cases beyond the capability of the actuator and drop table tests, and in these cases a stress-modified evolution integral over the plastic strain history was successfully used as a failure criterion to demonstrate that structural integrity was maintained. The Heaviside brackets only allow the evolution integral to accumulate value when the maximum principal stress is positive, since failure is never observed under pure hydrostatic pressure, where the maximum principal stress is negative. Detailed finite element analyses of myriad possible impact orientations and locations between package contents and the thin eutectic barrier under regulatory impact conditions have shown that not even the initiation of a ductile tear occurs. Although localized plasticity does occur in the eutectic barrier, it is not the primary containment boundary and is thus not subject to ASME stress allowables from NRC Regulatory Guide 7.6. These analyses were used to successfully demonstrate that structural integrity of the eutectic barrier was maintained in all 10 CFR 71.73 and 71.74 regulatory accident conditions. The NRC is currently reviewing the Safety Analysis Report.

  5. Evaluation of pressure transducers to measure surface level in the waste storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.J.; Colson, J.B.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the results of tests conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine if pressure transducers can be used to measure the surface level in the waste tanks. A survey was first conducted to evaluate which, if any, commercially available pressure transducers were available that could meet the requirements for use in the waste tanks. More than 35 companies were contacted to determine if they manufactured a pressure transducer that could be used in the 101-SY waste tank. The three basic requirements for a pressure transducer for this application were that they were radiation-hardened, could withstand a caustic environment, and were certified to be intrinsically safe. No manufacturer was able to meet all three of these requirements with a commercially available product. Seven companies were able to meet the requirements for being radiation-hardened and being able to withstand the caustic environment. However, only two of the nine companies were willing to supply a pressure transducer for laboratory testing. The two pressure transducers that were tested in this program were the VEGA D36-38 from HiTech Technologies, Inc., and the KP-1911-A from Kaman Instrumentation Corporation. Pressure transducers operate on the principle that the pressure at the location of a sensor increases directly with the depth of the liquid above it. A liquid is required in order for these devices to operate. For these tests, water was first used to determine the ideal operation of the devices, then the devices were placed in a 101-SY waste tank simulant. The simulant had a specific gravity of 1.96 and had the consistency similar to the convective layer in the 101-SY waste tank. In order to determine the surface level with pressure transducers, the density of the material needs to be known.

  6. Evaluation of shear bond strength of porcelain bonded to laser welded titanium surface and determination of mode of bond failure.

    PubMed

    Patil, Narendra P; Dandekar, Minal; Nadiger, Ramesh K; Guttal, Satyabodh S

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of porcelain to laser welded titanium surface and to determine the mode of bond failure through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrophotometry (EDS). Forty five cast rectangular titanium specimens with the dimension of 10 mm x 8 mm x 1 mm were tested. Thirty specimens had a perforation of 2 mm diameter in the centre. These were randomly divided into Group A and B. The perforations in the Group B specimens were repaired by laser welding using Cp Grade II titanium wire. The remaining 15 specimens were taken as control group. All the test specimens were layered with low fusing porcelain and tested for shear bond strength. The debonded specimens were subjected to SEM and EDS. Data were analysed with 1-way analysis of variance and Student's t-test for comparison among the different groups. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed no statistically significant difference in shear bond strength values at a 5% level of confidence. The mean shear bond strength values for control group, Group A and B was 8.4 +/- 0.5 Mpa, 8.1 +/- 0.4 Mpa and 8.3 +/- 0.3 Mpa respectively. SEM/EDS analysis of the specimens showed mixed and cohesive type of bond failure. Within the limitations of the study laser welding did not have any effect on the shear bond strength of porcelain bonded to titanium. PMID:21077419

  7. Failure analysis of pinch-torsion tests as a thermal runaway risk evaluation method of Li-Ion Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yuzhi; Li, Dr. Tianlei; Ren, Prof. Fei; Gao, Yanfei; Wang, Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Recently a pinch-torsion test is developed for safety testing of Li-ion batteries (Ren et al., J. Power Source, 2013). It has been demonstrated that this test can generate small internal short-circuit spots in the separator in a controllable and repeatable manner. In the current research, the failure mechanism is examined by numerical simulations and comparisons to experimental observations. Finite element models are developed to evaluate the deformation of the separators under both pure pinch and pinch-torsion loading conditions. It is discovered that the addition of the torsion component significantly increased the maximum principal strain, which is believed to induce the internal short circuit. In addition, the applied load in the pinch-torsion test is significantly less than in the pure pinch test, thus dramatically improving the applicability of this method to ultra-thick batteries which otherwise require heavy load in excess of machine capability. It is further found that the separator failure is achieved in the early stage of torsion (within a few degree of rotation). Effect of coefficient of friction on the maximum principal strain is also examined.

  8. Bedside lung ultrasound in the evaluation of acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Leidi, Federica; Casella, Francesco; Cogliati, Chiara

    2016-06-01

    Dyspnea is a common presenting complaint in the emergency department (ED) and a leading cause of hospitalization in intensive care unit (ICU) and medical wards. Ultrasound (US) has traditionally been considered inadequate to explore the aerated lung. However, in the past 15 years LUS gained broader application, at least in part thanks to the interpretation of the artefacts generated by the interaction of US and lung structures/content. The total reflection of US beam occurring at the pleural level determines the artefactual image of the aerated lung: an homogenous 'foggy-like' picture under the pleural line. As the air content of the lungs decreases due to interstitial imbibition, deposition of collagen or presence of blood, vertical artefacts -arising from the pleural line and moving synchronously with the respiration- called B-lines appear. Multiple and bilateral B-lines identify the alveolar-interstitial syndrome (AIS). The most common cause of AIS is the wet lung: the more the congestion burden, the more the extent of the B-lines, which become confluent until the so-called white lung in case of pulmonary edema. Many studies showed a higher accuracy of LUS in diagnosing acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) as compared to chest X-ray As recently shown, the integration of LUS to clinical assessment allow to differentiate cardiogenic dyspnea with sensitivity and specificity greater than 95 %. Moreover, LUS can easily detect pleural effusion -frequently present in ADHF-appearing as an anechoic area in the recumbent area of the thorax, delimited inferiorly by the diaphragmatic dome and superiorly by the aerated lung. PMID:26885846

  9. Failures to change stimulus evaluations by means of subliminal approach and avoidance training.

    PubMed

    Van Dessel, Pieter; De Houwer, Jan; Roets, Arne; Gast, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Previous research suggests that the repeated performance of approach and avoidance (AA) actions in response to a stimulus causes changes in stimulus evaluations. Kawakami, Phills, Steele, and Dovidio (2007) and Jones, Vilensky, Vasey, and Fazio (2013) provided evidence that these AA training effects occur even when stimuli are presented only subliminally. We also examined whether reliable AA training effects can be observed with subliminal stimulus presentations but added more sensitive checks of perceptual stimulus discriminability. Three experiments, including a direct replication of the study by Kawakami et al. (2007), failed to provide any evidence for effects of subliminal AA training on implicit or explicit evaluations. Bayesian analyses indicated that our data provide robust evidence that subliminal AA training does not cause changes in evaluations. In contrast, we observed changes in evaluations when participants were provided with (either correct or incorrect) information about the stimulus-action contingencies in the subliminal AA training task and when participants performed a supraliminal AA training task that allowed participants to detect these contingencies. These findings support the idea that contingency awareness is necessary for the occurrence of AA training effects. PMID:26524002

  10. Mothers' Attributions in Reminiscing Conversations about Children's Successes and Failures: Connections with Children's Self-Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodvin, Rebecca; Rolfson, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Effects of feedback on children's self-evaluations are well established, yet little is known about how parents talk with children about everyday successes and failures, despite the importance of parent-child reminiscing in children's psychological understanding. We examine mothers' attributions and performance evaluations in…

  11. Evaluation of analytical methodology for hydrocarbons in high pressure air and nitrogen systems. [evaluation of methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Samples of liquid oxygen, high pressure nitrogen, low pressure nitrogen, and missile grade air were studied to determine the hydrocarbon concentrations. Concentration of the samples was achieved by adsorption on a molecular sieve and activated charcoal. The trapped hydrocarbons were then desorbed and transferred to an analytical column in a gas chromatograph. The sensitivity of the method depends on the volume of gas passed through the adsorbent tubes. The value of the method was verified through recoverability and reproducibility studies. The use of this method enables LOX, GN2, and missile grade air systems to be routinely monitored to determine low level increases in specific hydrocarbon concentration that could lead to potentially hazardous conditions.

  12. Brittle failure mode plots for compressional and extensional tectonic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, Richard H.

    1998-05-01

    Equations governing different macroscopic modes of brittle rock failure (extensional fracturing, extensional-shear fracturing, compressional shear failure and reshear of existing faults) can be represented on plots of differential stress vs effective vertical stress for a set of material properties. Such plots can be constructed for different tectonic regimes and correlated to depth for particular fluid pressure conditions, allowing easy evaluation of the physical controls on brittle rock failure, and ready comparison of the fields occupied by the three failure modes in different tectonic settings. They emphasize the relative ease, in terms of differential stress and fluid-pressure levels, of deforming a rock mass by brittle fracturing and faulting in extensional regimes compared with compressional. Aside from their relevance to general structural mechanics, these generic failure plots have wide-ranging application to understanding the initial development and progressive evolution of fault-fracture systems, both in sedimentary basins and as hosting structures for hydrothermal mineralization in different tectonic settings.

  13. Kidney Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... if You Have Kidney Disease Kidney Failure Expand Dialysis Kidney Transplant Preparing for Kidney Failure Treatment Choosing Not to Treat with Dialysis or Transplant Paying for Kidney Failure Treatment Contact ...

  14. Evaluation of simplified analytical models for CO2 plume movement and pressure buildup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oruganti, Y.; Mishra, S.

    2011-12-01

    CO2 injection into the sub-surface is emerging as a viable technology for reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. When large amounts of CO2 are sequestered, pressure buildup is an associated risk, along with plume movement beyond the injected domain. In this context, simple modeling tools become valuable assets in preliminary CO2 injection project screening and implementation phases. This study presents an evaluation of two commonly used simplified analytical models for plume movement and pressure buildup, (1) the sharp interface model of Nordbotten et al. (2005), and the corresponding pressure distribution solution of Mathias et al. (2008), and (2) the 3-region model of Burton et al. (2008) based on fractional flow and steady-state pressure gradient considerations. The three-region model of Burton et al. assumes a constant pressure outer boundary. In this study, we incorporate the radius of investigation of the pressure front as the transient pressure boundary, in order to represent an infinite-acting system. The sharp-interface model also assumes the system to be infinite-acting. Temperature and pressure conditions used in these models correspond to the "warm, shallow" and "cold, deep" aquifer conditions as defined by Nordbotten et al. The saturation and pressure profiles as well as injection-well pressure buildup predicted by the analytical models are compared with those from the numerical simulator STOMP in order to provide a verification of the simplified modeling assumptions. Both the STOMP results and the three-region model show two sharp fronts (the drying and two-phase fronts), and a good match is obtained between the front positions at any time. For the sharp interface model, the vertically averaged gas saturation does not exhibit two sharp fronts as seen in the STOMP simulations, but shows a gradual change in saturation with radial distance over the two-phase region. The pressure profiles from STOMP and the analytical model are

  15. [Update on current care guidelines: acute respiratory failure--preoperative evaluation].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Concomitant diseases, the patient's general condition, exercise capacity and the extent of surgery are determinants of the operative risk. Increasing number of patients with endovascular stents and antithrombotic medication need special perioperative precautions as well as the eventual endocarditis prophylaxis. The risk of perioperative complications can probably be decreased by respiratory physiotherapy, correction of anaemia and smoking cessation. Severe liver or kidney insufficiency need be evaluated. Principles of preoperative fasting and perioperative strategies with concomitant medication are described, and use of preoperative carbohydrate drinks are encouraged. PMID:25272790

  16. A method for evaluating pressure locking and thermal binding of gate valves

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, T.

    1996-12-01

    A method is described to evaluate the susceptibility of gate valves to pressure locking and thermal binding. Binding of the valve disc in the closed position due to high pressure water trapped in the bonnet cavity (pressure locking) or differential thermal expansion of the disk in the seat (thermal binding) represents a potential mechanism that can prevent safety-related systems from functioning when called upon. The method described here provides a general equation that can be applied to a given gate valve design and set of operating conditions to determine the susceptibility of the valve to fail due to disc binding. The paper is organized into three parts. The first part discusses the physical mechanisms that cause disc binding. The second part describes the mathematical equations. The third part discusses the conclusions.

  17. Evaluation of oxygen pressurized microwave-assisted digestion of botanical materials using diluted nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Bizzi, Cezar Augusto; Barin, Juliano Smanioto; Müller, Edson Irineu; Schmidt, Lucas; Nóbrega, Joaquim A; Flores, Erico Marlon Moraes

    2011-02-15

    The feasibility of diluted nitric acid solutions for microwave-assisted decomposition of botanical samples in closed vessels was evaluated. Oxygen pressurized atmosphere was used to improve the digestion efficiency and Al, Ca, K, Fe, Mg and Na were determined in digests by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). Efficiency of digestion was evaluated taking into account the residual carbon content (RCC) and residual acidity in digests. Samples were digested using nitric acid solutions (2, 3, 7, and 14 mol L(-1) HNO(3)) and the effect of gas phase composition inside the reaction vessels by purging the vessel with Ar (inert atmosphere, 1 bar), air (20% of oxygen, 1 bar) and pure O(2) (100% of oxygen, 1 bar) was evaluated. The influence of oxygen pressure was studied using pressures of 5, 10, 15 and 20 bar. It was demonstrated that a diluted nitric acid solution as low as 3 mol L(-1) was suitable for an efficient digestion of sample masses up to 500 mg of botanical samples using 5 bar of oxygen pressure. The residual acidities in final digests were lower than 45% in relation to the initial amount of acid used for digestion (equivalent to 1.3 mol L(-1) HNO(3)). The accuracy of the proposed procedure was evaluated using certified reference materials of olive leaves, apple leaves, peach leaves and pine needles. Using the optimized conditions for sample digestion, the results obtained were in agreement with certified values. The limit of quantification was improved up to a factor of 14.5 times for the analytes evaluated. In addition, the proposed procedure was in agreement with the recommendations of the green chemistry once it was possible to obtain relatively high digestion efficiency (RCC<5%) using only diluted HNO(3), which is important to minimize the generation of laboratory residues. PMID:21238716

  18. Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure Updated:Aug 24,2016 An important part of ... content was last reviewed on 04/16/2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  19. Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team Updated:Mar 25,2016 Patients with ... to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  20. Evaluation of the pressure ulcers risk scales with critically ill patients: a prospective cohort study 1

    PubMed Central

    Borghardt, Andressa Tomazini; do Prado, Thiago Nascimento; de Araújo, Thiago Moura; Rogenski, Noemi Marisa Brunet; Bringuente, Maria Edla de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: to evaluate the accuracy of the Braden and Waterlow risk assessment scales in critically ill inpatients. METHOD: this prospective cohort study, with 55 patients in intensive care units, was performed through evaluation of sociodemographic and clinical variables, through the application of the scales (Braden and Waterlow) upon admission and every 48 hours; and through the evaluation and classification of the ulcers into categories. RESULTS: the pressure ulcer incidence was 30.9%, with the Braden and Waterlow scales presenting high sensitivity (41% and 71%) and low specificity (21% and 47%) respectively in the three evaluations. The cut off scores found in the first, second and third evaluations were 12, 12 and 11 in the Braden scale, and 16, 15 and 14 in the Waterlow scale. CONCLUSION: the Braden scale was shown to be a good screening instrument, and the Waterlow scale proved to have better predictive power. PMID:25806628

  1. Liquefaction, flow, and associated ground failure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Youd, T. Leslie

    1973-01-01

    Ambiguities in the use of the term liquefaction and in defining the relation between liquefaction and ground failure have led to encumbered communication between workers in various fields and between specialists in the same field, and the possibility that evaluations of liquefaction potential could be misinterpreted or misapplied. Explicit definitions of liquefaction and related concepts are proposed herein. These definitions, based on observed laboratory behavior, are then used to clarify the relation between liquefaction and ground failure. Soil liquefaction is defined as the transformation of a granular material from a solid into a liquefied state as a consequence of increased pore-water pressures. This definition avoids confusion between liquefaction and possible flow-failure conditions after liquefaction. Flow-failure conditions are divided into two types: (1) unlimited flow if pore-pressure reductions caused by dilatancy during flow deformation are not sufficient to solidify the material and thus arrest flow, and (2) limited flow if they are sufficient to solidify the material after a finite deformation. After liquefaction in the field, unlimited flow commonly leads to flow landslides, whereas limited flow leads at most to lateral-spreading landslides. Quick-condition failures such as loss of bearing capacity form a third type of ground failure associated with liquefaction.

  2. Evaluation of oxidative behavior of polyolefin geosynthetics utilizing accelerated aging tests based on temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mengjia

    Polyolefin geosynthetics are susceptible to oxidation, which eventually leads to the reduction in their engineering properties. In the application of polyolefin geosynthetics, a major issue is an estimate of the materials durability (i.e. service lifetime) under various aging conditions. Antioxidant packages are added to the polyolefin products to extend the induction time, during which antioxidants are gradually depleted and polymer oxidation reactions are prevented. In this PhD study, an improved laboratory accelerating aging method under elevated and high pressure environments was applied to evaluate the combined effect of temperature and pressure on the depletion of the antioxidants and the oxidation of polymers. Four types of commercial polyolefn geosynthetic materials selected for aging tests included HDPE geogrid, polypropylene woven and nonwoven geotextiles. A total of 33 different temperature/pressure aging conditions were used, with the incubation duration up to 24 months. The applied oven temperature ranged from 35°C to 105°C and the partial oxygen pressure ranged from 0.005 MPa to 6.3 MPa. Using the Oxidative Induction Time (OIT) test, the antioxidant depletion, which is correlated to the decrease of the OIT value, was found to follow apparent first-order decay. The OIT data also showed that, the antioxidant depletion rate increased with temperature according to the Arrhenius equation, while under constant temperatures, the rate increased exponentially with the partial pressure of oxygen. A modified Arrhenius model was developed to fit the antioxidant depletion rate as a function of temperature and pressure and to predict the antioxidant lifetime under various field conditions. This study has developed new temperature/pressure incubation aging test method with lifetime prediction models. Using this new technique, the antioxidant lifetime prediction results are close to regular temperature aging data while the aging duration can be reduced considerably

  3. The cryogenic bonding evaluation at the metallic-composite interface of a composite overwrapped pressure vessel with additional impact investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Eric A.

    A bonding evaluation that investigated the cryogenic tensile strength of several different adhesives/resins was performed. The test materials consisted of 606 aluminum test pieces adhered to a wet-wound graphite laminate in order to simulate the bond created at the liner-composite interface of an aluminum-lined composite overwrapped pressure vessel. It was found that for cryogenic applications, a flexible, low modulus resin system must be used. Additionally, the samples prepared with a thin layer of cured resin -- or prebond -- performed significantly better than those without. It was found that it is critical that the prebond surface must have sufficient surface roughness prior to the bonding application. Also, the aluminum test pieces that were prepared using a surface etchant slightly outperformed those that were prepared with a grit blast surface finish and performed significantly better than those that had been scored using sand paper to achieve the desired surface finish. An additional impact investigation studied the post impact tensile strength of composite rings in a cryogenic environment. The composite rings were filament wound with several combinations of graphite and aramid fibers and were prepared with different resin systems. The rings were subjected to varying levels of Charpy impact damage and then pulled to failure in tension. It was found that the addition of elastic aramid fibers with the carbon fibers mitigates the overall impact damage and drastically improves the post-impact strength of the structure in a cryogenic environment.

  4. Topical Report ''Corrosion Evaluation of LLW2 Skid-B Weld Failure Mechanisms (44139-92)

    SciTech Connect

    JI Young Chang

    2001-05-31

    An independent investigation of pipe welding leaks from the Low-Level Waste 2 (LLW2) Skid-B System for the possibilities of improper welding (IW), microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC), sensitization, chloride pitting corrosion (CPC), and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) was conducted. The results show the prevailing mechanisms that caused the leaks are identified as IW, CPC, and the improper selection of weld filler material for the base metals in an environment of the North Plateau underground water. These is no evidence of MIC, sensitization, or IGSCC. The chloride pitting corrosion mechanism that took place at all the welds are also described. All the pipelines were replaced with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) for cost saving and the LLW2 Skid B System has been successfully operating since 1999. This report summarizes the findings and recommendations associated with preventive measures for future operations. The LLW2 Facility is a replacement for an existing waste treatment system. The Facility processes two different waste streams through two different ''skids.'' After seven months of operation, one of the two skids began to leak. Extensive evaluation of the corrosion mechanisms and the contributing factors are documented in this report. This report principally evaluates the physical and chemical configurations that led to the corrosion and leaks. Chloride pitting corrosion, exacerbated by weld defects, is the corrosion mechanism. The report also discusses fabrication and Quality Assurance (QA)/Quality Control (QC) actions that would have prevented their occurrence. It is believed that in the absence of either the defects or the chloride concentrations, corrosion would not have occurred. In developing the specification for processing skids to be used in the Facility, high chloride was not identified as a parameter of concern. As such, piping fabrication and inspection standards for the system did not identify more rigorous welding standards

  5. Evaluation of Air Capture Ratio of Scramjet Inlet by Multi-Point Pressure Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Eijiro; Mitani, Tohru; Sakuranaka, Noboru; Izumikawa, Muneo; Watanabe, Syuichi; Masuya, Goro

    A method to evaluate aerodynamic performances of scramjet engines by using multi-probe rakes was proposed. The aerodynamic tests were carried out under Mach 4 flight conditions. The Pitot and static pressures were measured at 250 points in the cross sectional area of the engine exit by the rakes. Local mass flux and thrust function were evaluated from the pressure measurement at each point and integrations of these values enabled to obtain the mass flow rate and the stream thrust at the engine exit. The air capture ratios were independently measured by the rakes and a conventional choked flowmeter. The air capture ratios measured by these two methods agreed within 2%. It was found that the rakes enabled to measure the air capture ratio more simply than the flowmeter. Additionally, the effect of boundary layer ingestion to an internal drag was investigated by the rakes. The decrease of air capture ratio measured by the rakes showed that the ingested boundary layers were separated in the inlet. The pressure drag of inlet increased by the separation and the pressure thrust decreased by the decrease of air capture ratio. As a result, the internal drag increased when the forebody boundary layer was ingested.

  6. EVALUATION OF SEISMIC INDUCED WALL PRESSURES FOR DEEPLY EMBEDDED NPP STRUCTURES.

    SciTech Connect

    XU, J.; MILLER, C.; COSTANTINO, C.; HOFMAYER, C.; GRAVES, H.

    2005-03-30

    The extent to which finite element models of partially buried nuclear power plant structures may be used to compute seismic induced wall pressures is investigated in this paper. Stresses in three dimensional finite elements modeling the soil adjacent to the structure are used and stresses in these elements are used to evaluate wall pressures. Depths of burial of the structure varying from 1/4 to 1 times the height of the structure are considered. The SASSI computer code is used to perform the analyses. The wall pressures for the shallower depths of burial are found to depend on the inertial interaction loads, while the pressures for the deeper embedded structures are found to depend on kinematic interaction loads. The input ground motion for the study has a ZPA equal to 0.3 g. The maximum wall pressures are examined to determine whether non linear effects (separation of the wall and soil or slippage of the soil relative to the wall) are important. Non-linear effects are found to occur for depths of burial less than one half of the height and are found to occur over one half of the buried depth.

  7. Effects of chronic heart failure on neuronal nitric oxide synthase-mediated control of microvascular O2 pressure in contracting rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Copp, Steven W; Hirai, Daniel M; Ferguson, Scott K; Holdsworth, Clark T; Musch, Timothy I; Poole, David C

    2012-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) impairs nitric oxide (NO)-mediated regulation of the skeletal muscle microvascular O2 delivery/ ratio (which sets the microvascular O2 pressure, ). Given the pervasiveness of endothelial dysfunction in CHF, this NO-mediated dysregulation is attributed generally to eNOS. It is unknown whether nNOS-mediated regulation is altered in CHF. We tested the hypothesis that CHF impairs nNOS-mediated control. In healthy and CHF (left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP): 6 ± 1 versus 14 ± 1 mmHg, respectively, P < 0.05) rats spinotrapezius muscle blood flow (radiolabelled microspheres), (phosphorescence quenching), and (Fick calculation) were measured before and after 0.56 mg kg−1 i.a. of the selective nNOS inhibitor S-methyl-l-thiocitrulline (SMTC). In healthy rats, SMTC increased baseline (Control: 29.7 ± 1.4, SMTC: 34.4 ± 1.9 mmHg, P < 0.05) by reducing (↓20%) without any effect on blood flow and speeded the mean response time (MRT, time to reach 63% of the overall kinetics response, Control: 24.2 ± 2.0, SMTC: 18.5 ± 1.3 s, P < 0.05). In CHF rats, SMTC did not alter baseline (Control: 25.7 ± 1.6, SMTC: 28.6 ± 2.1 mmHg, P > 0.05), at rest, or the MRT (Control: 22.8 ± 2.6, SMTC: 21.3 ± 3.0 s, P > 0.05). During the contracting steady-state, SMTC reduced blood flow (↓15%) and (↓15%) in healthy rats such that was unaltered (Control: 19.8 ± 1.7, SMTC: 20.7 ± 1.8 mmHg, P > 0.05). In marked contrast, in CHF rats SMTC did not change contracting steady-state blood flow, , or (Control: 17.0 ± 1.4, SMTC: 17.7 ± 1.8 mmHg, P > 0.05). nNOS-mediated control of skeletal muscle microvascular function is compromised in CHF versus healthy rats. Treatments designed to ameliorate microvascular dysfunction in CHF may benefit by targeting improvements in nNOS function. PMID:22687613

  8. Evaluation of the constant pressure panel method (CPM) for unsteady air loads prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appa, Kari; Smith, Michael J. C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper evaluates the capability of the constant pressure panel method (CPM) code to predict unsteady aerodynamic pressures, lift and moment distributions, and generalized forces for general wing-body configurations in supersonic flow. Stability derivatives are computed and correlated for the X-29 and an Oblique Wing Research Aircraft, and a flutter analysis is carried out for a wing wind tunnel test example. Most results are shown to correlate well with test or published data. Although the emphasis of this paper is on evaluation, an improvement in the CPM code's handling of intersecting lifting surfaces is briefly discussed. An attractive feature of the CPM code is that it shares the basic data requirements and computational arrangements of the doublet lattice method. A unified code to predict unsteady subsonic or supersonic airloads is therefore possible.

  9. The comparison of stroke volume variation with central venous pressure in predicting fluid responsiveness in septic patients with acute circulatory failure

    PubMed Central

    Angappan, Santhalakshmi; Parida, Satyen; Vasudevan, Arumugam; Badhe, Ashok Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The present study was designed to investigate the efficacy of stroke volume variation (SVV) in predicting fluid responsiveness and compare it to traditional measures of volume status assessment like central venous pressure (CVP). Methods: Forty-five mechanically ventilated patients in sepsis with acute circulatory failure. Patients were not included when they had atrial fibrillation, other severe arrhythmias, permanent pacemaker, or needed mechanical cardiac support. Furthermore, excluded were patients with hypoxemia and a CVP >12. Patients received volume expansion in the form of 500 ml of 6% hydroxyethyl starch. Results: The volume expansion-induced increase in  cardiac index (CI) was >15% in 29 patients (labeled responders) and <15% in 16 patients (labeled nonresponders). Before volume expansion, SVV was higher in responders than in nonresponders. Receiver operating characteristic curves analysis showed that SVV was a more accurate indicator of fluid responsiveness than CVP. Before volume expansion, an SVV value of 13% allowed discrimination between responders and nonresponders with a sensitivity of 78% and a specificity of 89%. Volume expansion-induced changes in CI weakly and positively correlated with SVV before volume expansion. Volume expansion decreased SVV from 18.86 ± 4.35 to 7.57 ± 1.80 and volume expansion-induced changes in SVV moderately correlated with volume expansion-induced changes in CI. Conclusions: When predicting fluid responsiveness in mechanically ventilated patients in septic shock, SVV is more effective than CVP. Nevertheless, the overall correlation of baseline SVV with increases in CI remains poor. Trends in SVV, as reflected by decreases with volume replacement, seem to correlate much better with increases in CI. PMID:26180432

  10. Clinical Evaluation of an Affordable Qualitative Viral Failure Assay for HIV Using Dried Blood Spots in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Balinda, Sheila N.; Ondoa, Pascale; Obuku, Ekwaro A.; Kliphuis, Aletta; Egau, Isaac; Bronze, Michelle; Kasambula, Lordwin; Schuurman, Rob; Spieker, Nicole; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Kityo, Cissy

    2016-01-01

    Background WHO recommends regular viral load (VL) monitoring of patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) for timely detection of virological failure, prevention of acquired HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) and avoiding unnecessary switching to second-line ART. However, the cost and complexity of routine VL testing remains prohibitive in most resource limited settings (RLS). We evaluated a simple, low–cost, qualitative viral–failure assay (VFA) on dried blood spots (DBS) in three clinical settings in Uganda. Methods We conducted a cross–sectional diagnostic accuracy study in three HIV/AIDS treatment centres at the Joint Clinical Research Centre in Uganda. The VFA employs semi-quantitative detection of HIV–1 RNA amplified from the LTR gene. We used paired dry blood spot (DBS) and plasma with the COBASAmpliPrep/COBASTaqMan, Roche version 2 (VLref) as the reference assay. We used the VFA at two thresholds of viral load, (>5,000 or >1,000 copies/ml). Results 496 paired VFA and VLref results were available for comparative analysis. Overall, VFA demonstrated 78.4% sensitivity, (95% CI: 69.7%–87.1%), 93% specificity (95% CI: 89.7%–96.4%), 89.3% accuracy (95% CI: 85%–92%) and an agreement kappa = 0.72 as compared to the VLref. The predictive values of positivity and negativity among patients on ART for >12 months were 72.7% and 99.3%, respectively. Conclusions VFA allowed 89% of correct classification of VF. Only 11% of the patients were misclassified with the potential of unnecessary or late switch to second–line ART. Our findings present an opportunity to roll out simple and affordable VL monitoring for HIV–1 treatment in RLS. PMID:26824465

  11. Evaluation of analytical methodology for hydrocarbons in high pressure air and nitrogen systems. [data aquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Information regarding the safety limits of hydrocarbons in liquid and gaseous oxygen, the steps taken for hydrocarbon removal from liquified gases, and the analysis of the contaminants was searched and the results are presented. The safety of hydrocarbons in gaseous systems was studied, and the latest hydrocarbon test equipment and methodology is reviewed. A detailed sampling and analysis plan is proposed to evaluate high pressure GN2 and LOX systems.

  12. Evaluation of plasma pressure of high current low inductance vacuum spark on cathode surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarantsev, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents evaluation of the plasma pressure in a high current, low inductance vacuum spark on the cathode surface (the electrode material is steel). Calculations are provided for the first half period of the discharge, wherein the cathode surface is subjected to the most severe impacts (micropinches are created resulting in high-energy plasma beams). The evaluations were made using the experimental data obtained on the Pion device. The data of electrical measurements of the discharge current, the average plasma flow values obtained with the multi-grid probe and the data from a cathode macrostructure study were used. The results are given for different values of the discharge current.

  13. Evaluating rehabilitation efforts following the Milford Flat Fire: successes, failures, and controlling factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duniway, Michael C.; Palmquist, Emily C.; Miller, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled wildfire in arid and semiarid ecosystems has become an increasing concern in recent decades. Active rehabilitation of fire-affected areas is often quickly initiated to minimize long-term ecosystem damage. However, the complex soil-geomorphic-vegetation patterns and low and variable moisture conditions in these regions makes restoration challenging. To further inform these post-fire management decisions, we present results from 5 years of vegetation and sediment flux monitoring following the Milford Flat Fire in west-central Utah, USA. Our sampling design includes monitoring plots in areas not burned, areas burned but where no rehabilitation was attempted, and burned areas where various rehabilitation approaches were implemented. At each of the 25 plots, vegetation cover and composition data were collected annually, and wind-driven sediment flux was measured using passive dust traps. To evaluate effectiveness of post-fire rehabilitation treatments in establishing desired species and limiting dominance of undesired species, we analyzed the temporal response of individual species and functional groups as well as community-level multivariate responses. The warm and dry conditions that persisted for approximately 12 months post-treatment, coupled with the surface disturbing rehabilitation approaches used, resulted in near-surface dust fluxes several orders of magnitude higher in treated areas than in unburned or burned areas where no rehabilitation occurred. These dry conditions and high surface sediment flux limited the establishment of seeded species in rehabilitation areas for nearly 3 years. Post-fire rehabilitation did not limit dominance by invasive annual species of concern. Perennial species composition in the areas burned but not subject to post-fire rehabilitation was relatively similar to unburned throughout the study period. In contrast, the burned plots where rehabilitation was attempted were characterized by no (<3%) perennial cover or, in

  14. Evaluation of eating and rumination behaviour in cows using a noseband pressure sensor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An automated technique for recording eating and rumination behaviour was evaluated in ten lactating Brown Swiss cows by comparing data obtained from a pressure sensor with data obtained via direct observation over a 24-hour period. The recording device involved a pressure sensor integrated in the noseband of a halter. The analysed variables included number and duration of individual rumination, eating and resting phases, total daily length of these phases and number of cuds chewed per day. Results Eating and rumination phases were readily differentiated based on characteristic pressure profiles. Chewing movements during rumination were regular and generated regular waveforms with uniform amplitudes, whereas eating generated irregular waveforms with variable amplitudes. There was complete or almost complete agreement and no significant differences between data obtained via direct observation and pressure sensor technique. Both methods yielded an average of 16 daily eating phases with a mean duration of 28.3 minutes. Total time spent eating was 445.0 minutes for direct observation and 445.4 minutes for the pressure sensor technique. Both techniques recorded an average of 13.3 rumination phases with a mean duration of 30.3 (direct observation) and of 30.2 (pressure sensor) minutes. Total time spent ruminating per day, number of cuds per day and chewing cycles per cud were 389.3 and 388.3 minutes, 410.1 and 410.0 and 60.0 and 60.3 for direct observation and pressure sensor technique, respectively. There was a significant difference between the two methods with respect to mean number of chewing cycles per day (24′669, direct observation vs. 24′751, pressure sensor, P < 0.05, paired t-test). There were strong correlations between the two recording methods with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.98 to 1.00. Conclusions The results confirmed that measurements of eating and rumination variables obtained via the pressure sensor technique are in

  15. Pulmonary function differences in patients with chronic right heart failure secondary to pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic left heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei-Hua; Luo, Qin; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Zhao, Qing; Xi, Qun-Ying; Xue, Hai-Feng; Zhao, Zhi-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary abnormalities are found in both chronic heart failure (CHF) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The differences of pulmonary function in chronic left heart failure and chronic right heart failure are not fully understood. Material/Methods We evaluated 120 patients with stable CHF (60 with chronic left heart failure and 60 with chronic right heart failure). All patients had pulmonary function testing, including pulmonary function testing at rest and incremental cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX). Results Patients with right heart failure had a significantly lower end-tidal partial pressure of CO2 (PetCO2), higher end-tidal partial pressure of O2 (PetO2) and minute ventilation/CO2 production (VE/VCO2) at rest. Patients with right heart failure had a lower peak PetCO2, and a higher peak dead space volume/tidal volume (VD/VT) ratio, peak PetO2, peak VE/VCO2, and VE/VCO2 slope during exercise. Patients with right heart failure had more changes in ΔPetCO2 and ΔVE/VCO2, from rest to exercise. Conclusions Patients with right heart failure had worse pulmonary function at rest and exercise, which was due to severe ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) mismatching, severe ventilation inefficiency, and gas exchange abnormality. PMID:24916204

  16. Short Term Survival after Admission for Heart Failure in Sweden: Applying Multilevel Analyses of Discriminatory Accuracy to Evaluate Institutional Performance

    PubMed Central

    Ghith, Nermin; Wagner, Philippe; Frølich, Anne; Merlo, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background Hospital performance is frequently evaluated by analyzing differences between hospital averages in some quality indicators. The results are often expressed as quality charts of hospital variance (e.g., league tables, funnel plots). However, those analyses seldom consider patients heterogeneity around averages, which is of fundamental relevance for a correct evaluation. Therefore, we apply an innovative methodology based on measures of components of variance and discriminatory accuracy to analyze 30-day mortality after hospital discharge with a diagnosis of Heart Failure (HF) in Sweden. Methods We analyzed 36,943 patients aged 45–80 treated in 565 wards at 71 hospitals during 2007–2009. We applied single and multilevel logistic regression analyses to calculate the odds ratios and the area under the receiver-operating characteristic (AUC). We evaluated general hospital and ward effects by quantifying the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and the increment in the AUC obtained by adding random effects in a multilevel regression analysis (MLRA). Finally, the Odds Ratios (ORs) for specific ward and hospital characteristics were interpreted jointly with the proportional change in variance (PCV) and the proportion of ORs in the opposite direction (POOR). Findings Overall, the average 30-day mortality was 9%. Using only patient information on age and previous hospitalizations for different diseases we obtained an AUC = 0.727. This value was almost unchanged when adding sex, country of birth as well as hospitals and wards levels. Average mortality was higher in small wards and municipal hospitals but the POOR values were 15% and 16% respectively. Conclusions Swedish wards and hospitals in general performed homogeneously well, resulting in a low 30-day mortality rate after HF. In our study, knowledge on a patient’s previous hospitalizations was the best predictor of 30-day mortality, and this information did not improve by knowing the sex and country

  17. Heart failure prognostic model.

    PubMed

    Axente, L; Sinescu, C; Bazacliu, G

    2011-05-15

    Heart failure (HF) is a common, costly, disabling and deadly syndrome. Heart failure is a progressive disease characterized by high prevalence in society, significantly reducing physical and mental health, frequent hospitalization and high mortality (50% of the patients survive up to 4 years after the diagnosis, the annual mortality varying from 5% to 75%). The purpose of this study is to develop a prognostic model with easily obtainable variables for patients with heart failure. METHODS AND RESULTS. Our lot included 101 non-consecutive hospitalized patients with heart failure diagnosis. It included 49.5% women having the average age of 71.23 years (starting from 40 up to 91 years old) and the roughly estimated period for monitoring was 35.1 months (5-65 months). Survival data were available for all patients and the median survival duration was of 44.0 months. A large number of variables (demographic, etiologic, co morbidity, clinical, echocardiograph, ECG, laboratory and medication) were evaluated. We performed a complex statistical analysis, studying: survival curve, cumulative hazard, hazard function, lifetime distribution and density function, meaning residual life time, Ln S (t) vs. t and Ln(H) t vs. Ln (t). The Cox multiple regression model was used in order to determine the major factors that allow the forecasting survival and their regression coefficients: age (0.0369), systolic blood pressure (-0.0219), potassium (0.0570), sex (-0.3124) and the acute myocardial infarction (0.2662). DISCUSSION. Our model easily incorporates obtainable variables that may be available in any hospital, accurately predicting survival of the heart failure patients and enables risk stratification in a few hours after the patients' presentation. Our model is derived from a sample of patients hospitalized in an emergency department of cardiology, some with major life-altering co morbidities. The benefit of being aware of the prognosis of these patients with high risk is extremely

  18. Heart failure prognostic model

    PubMed Central

    Axente, L; Sinescu, C; Bazacliu, G

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a common, costly, disabling and deadly syndrome. Heart failure is a progressive disease characterized by high prevalence in society, significantly reducing physical and mental health, frequent hospitalization and high mortality (50% of the patients survive up to 4 years after the diagnosis, the annual mortality varying from 5% to 75%). The purpose of this study is to develop a prognostic model with easily obtainable variables for patients with heart failure. Methods and Results. Our lot included 101 non–consecutive hospitalized patients with heart failure diagnosis. It included 49,5% women having the average age of 71.23 years (starting from 40 up to 91 years old) and the roughly estimated period for monitoring was 35.1 months (5–65 months). Survival data were available for all patients and the median survival duration was of 44.0 months. A large number of variables (demographic, etiologic, co morbidity, clinical, echocardiograph, ECG, laboratory and medication) were evaluated. We performed a complex statistical analysis, studying: survival curve, cumulative hazard, hazard function, lifetime distribution and density function, meaning residual life time, Ln S (t) vs. t and Ln(H) t vs. Ln (t). The Cox multiple regression model was used in order to determine the major factors that allow the forecasting survival and their regression coefficients: age (0.0369), systolic blood pressure (–0.0219), potassium (0.0570), sex (–0.3124) and the acute myocardial infarction (0.2662). Discussion. Our model easily incorporates obtainable variables that may be available in any hospital, accurately predicting survival of the heart failure patients and enables risk stratification in a few hours after the patients' presentation. Our model is derived from a sample of patients hospitalized in an emergency department of cardiology, some with major life–altering co morbidities. The benefit of being aware of the prognosis of these patients with high risk is

  19. Evaluation of the operator protection factors offered by positive pressure air suits against airborne microbiological challenge.

    PubMed

    Steward, Jackie A; Lever, Mark S

    2012-08-01

    Laboratories throughout the world that perform work with Risk Group 4 Pathogens generally adopt one of two approaches within BSL-4 environments: either the use of positive pressure air-fed suits or using Class III microbiological safety cabinets and isolators for animal work. Within the UK at present, all laboratories working with Risk Group 4 agents adopt the use of Class III microbiological safety cabinet lines and isolators. Operator protection factors for the use of microbiological safety cabinets and isolators are available however; there is limited published data on the operator protection factors afforded by the use of positive pressure suits. This study evaluated the operator protection factors provided by positive pressure air suits against a realistic airborne microbiological challenge. The suits were tested, both intact and with their integrity compromised, on an animated mannequin within a stainless steel exposure chamber. The suits gave operator protection in all tests with an intact suit and with a cut in the leg. When compromised by a cut in the glove, a very small ingress of the challenge was seen as far as the wrist. This is likely to be due to the low airflow in the gloves of the suit. In all cases no microbiological penetration of the respiratory tract was observed. These data provide evidence on which to base safety protocols for use of positive pressure suits within high containment laboratories. PMID:23012620

  20. Functional assessment of the stenotic carotid artery by CFD-based pressure gradient evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Heye; Ren, Lijie; Xiong, Huahua; Gao, Zhifan; Xu, Pengcheng; Huang, Wenhua; Wu, Wanqing

    2016-09-01

    The functional assessment of a hemodynamic significant stenosis base on blood pressure variation has been applied for evaluation of the myocardial ischemic event. This functional assessment shows great potential for improving the accuracy of the classification of the severity of carotid stenosis. To explore the value of grading the stenosis using a pressure gradient (PG)-we had reconstructed patient-specific carotid geometries based on MRI images-computational fluid dynamics were performed to analyze the PG in their stenotic arteries. Doppler ultrasound image data and the corresponding MRI image data of 19 patients with carotid stenosis were collected. Based on these, 31 stenotic carotid arterial geometries were reconstructed. A combinatorial boundary condition method was implemented for steady-state computer fluid dynamics simulations. Anatomic parameters, including tortuosity (T), the angle of bifurcation, and the cross-sectional area of the remaining lumen, were collected to investigate the effect on the pressure distribution. The PG is highly correlated with the severe stenosis (r = 0.902), whereas generally, the T and the angle of the bifurcation negatively correlate to the pressure drop of the internal carotid artery stenosis. The calculation required <10 min/case, which made it prepared for the fast diagnosis of the severe stenosis. According to the results, we had proposed a potential threshold value for distinguishing severe stenosis from mild-moderate stenosis (PG = 0.88). In conclusion, the PG could serve as the additional factor for improving the accuracy of grading the severity of the stenosis. PMID:27371686

  1. Evaluating the effects of pentoxifylline administration on experimental pressure sores in rats by biomechanical examinations

    PubMed Central

    Velaei, Kobra; Torkman, Giti; Rezaie, Fatemealsadat; Amini, Abdollah; Noruzian, Mohsen; Tavassol, Azaedh; Bayat, Mehernoush

    2012-01-01

    This study used a biomechanical test to evaluate the effects of pentoxifylline administration on the wound healing process of an experimental pressure sore induced in rats. Under general anesthesia and sterile conditions, experimental pressure sores generated by no. 25 Halsted mosquito forceps were inflicted on 12 adult male rats. Pentoxifylline was injected intraperitoneally at a dose of 50 mg/kg daily from the day the pressure sore was generated, for a period of 20 days. At the end of 20 days, rats were sacrificed and skin samples extracted. Samples were biomechanically examined by a material testing instrument for maximum stress (N mm2), work up to maximum force (N), and elastic stiffness (N/mm). In the experimental group, maximum stress (2.05±0.15) and work up to maximum force (N/mm) (63.75±4.97) were significantly higher than the control group (1.3±0.27 and 43.3±14.96, P=0.002 and P=0.035, respectively). Pentoxifylline administration significantly accelerated the wound healing process in experimental rats with pressure sores, compared to that of the control group. PMID:23091522

  2. Characterization of a pressure measuring system for the evaluation of medical devices.

    PubMed

    Bonnaire, Rébecca; Verhaeghe, Marion; Molimard, Jérôme; Calmels, Paul; Convert, Reynald

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the possible use of four "FSA" thin and flexible resistive pressure mapping systems, designed by Vista Medical (Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada), for the measurement of interface pressure exerted by lumbar belts onto the trunk. These sensors were originally designed for the measurement of low pressure applied by medical devices on the skin. Two types of tests were performed: standard metrology tests such as linearity, hysteresis, repeatability, reproducibility and drift, and specific tests for this application such as curvature, surface condition and mapping system superposition. The linear regression coefficient is between 0.86 and 0.98; hysteresis is between 6.29% and 9.41%. Measurements are repeatable. The location, time and operator, measurement surface condition and mapping system superposition have a statistically significant influence on the results. A stable measure is verified over the period defined in the calibration procedure, but unacceptable drift is observed afterward. The measurement stays suitable on a curved surface for an applied pressure above 50 mmHg. To conclude, the sensor has acceptable linearity, hysteresis and repeatability. Calibration must be adapted to avoid drift. Moreover, when comparing different measurements with this sensor, the location, the time, the operator and the measurement surface condition should not change; the mapping system must not be superimposed. PMID:25515227

  3. Evaluation of the Operator Protection Factors Offered by Positive Pressure Air Suits against Airborne Microbiological Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Steward, Jackie A.; Lever, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Laboratories throughout the world that perform work with Risk Group 4 Pathogens generally adopt one of two approaches within BSL-4 environments: either the use of positive pressure air-fed suits or using Class III microbiological safety cabinets and isolators for animal work. Within the UK at present, all laboratories working with Risk Group 4 agents adopt the use of Class III microbiological safety cabinet lines and isolators. Operator protection factors for the use of microbiological safety cabinets and isolators are available however; there is limited published data on the operator protection factors afforded by the use of positive pressure suits. This study evaluated the operator protection factors provided by positive pressure air suits against a realistic airborne microbiological challenge. The suits were tested, both intact and with their integrity compromised, on an animated mannequin within a stainless steel exposure chamber. The suits gave operator protection in all tests with an intact suit and with a cut in the leg. When compromised by a cut in the glove, a very small ingress of the challenge was seen as far as the wrist. This is likely to be due to the low airflow in the gloves of the suit. In all cases no microbiological penetration of the respiratory tract was observed. These data provide evidence on which to base safety protocols for use of positive pressure suits within high containment laboratories. PMID:23012620

  4. Evaluation of Pressure Stable Chip-to-Tube Fittings Enabling High-Speed Chip-HPLC with Mass Spectrometric Detection.

    PubMed

    Lotter, Carsten; Heiland, Josef J; Stein, Volkmar; Klimkait, Michael; Queisser, Marco; Belder, Detlev

    2016-08-01

    Appropriate chip-to-tube interfacing is an enabling technology for high-pressure and high-speed liquid chromatography on chip. For this purpose, various approaches, to connect pressure resistant glass chips with HPLC pumps working at pressures of up to 500 bar, were examined. Three side-port and one top-port connection approach were evaluated with regard to pressure stability and extra column band broadening. A clamp-based top-port approach enabled chip-HPLC-MS analysis of herbicides at the highest pressure and speed. PMID:27397738

  5. G-tunnel pressurized slot-testing evaluations; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.M.; Sifre-Soto, C.; Mann, K.L.; Bellman, R.A. Jr.; Luker, S.; Dodds, D.J.

    1992-04-01

    Designers and analysts of radioactive waste repositories must be able to predict the mechanical behavior of the host rock. Sandia National Laboratories elected to conduct a development program to enhance mechanical-type measurements. The program was focused on pressurized slot testing and featured (1) development of an improved method to cut slots using a chain saw with diamond-tipped cutters, (2) measurements useful for determining in situ stresses normal to slots, (3) measurements applicable for determining the in situ modulus of deformation parallel to a drift surface, and (4) evaluations of pressurized slot strength testing results and methods. This report contains data interpretation and evaluations. Included are recommendations for future efforts. This third report contains the interpretations of the testing with emphasis on the measurement results as they apply to describing rock behavior. In particular, emphases are placed on (1) normal stress determinations using the flatjack cancellation (FC) method, (2) modulus of deformation determinations, and (3) high pressure investigations. Most of the material in the first two reports is not repeated here. Appropriate data are repeated in tabular form.

  6. Flow Control Device Evaluation for an Internal Flow with an Adverse Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Luther N.; Gorton, Susan Althoff; Anders, Scott G.

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of several active and passive devices to control flow in an adverse pressure gradient with secondary flows present was evaluated in the 15 Inch Low Speed Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. In this study, passive micro vortex generators, micro bumps, and piezoelectric synthetic jets were evaluated for their flow control characteristics using surface static pressures, flow visualization, and 3D Stereo Digital Particle Image Velocimetry. Data also were acquired for synthetic jet actuators in a zero flow environment. It was found that the micro vortex generator is very effective in controlling the flow environment for an adverse pressure gradient, even in the presence of secondary vortical flow. The mechanism by which the control is effected is a re-energization of the boundary layer through flow mixing. The piezoelectric synthetic jet actuators must have sufficient velocity output to produce strong longitudinal vortices if they are to be effective for flow control. The output of these devices in a laboratory or zero flow environment will be different than the output in a flow environment. In this investigation, the output was higher in the flow environment, but the stroke cycle in the flow did not indicate a positive inflow into the synthetic jet.

  7. Comparative evaluation of essential and toxic elements in the blood of kidney failure patients and healthy referents.

    PubMed

    Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Arain, Salma Aslam; Arain, Mariam S; Brahman, Kapil Dev; Ullah, Naeem; Ali, Jamshed; Arain, Sadaf Sadia

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the comparative distribution, correlation, and apportionment of selected elements-aluminum (Al), calcium (Ca), cadmium (Cd), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), and lead (Pb)-in the blood samples of male kidney failure patients (KFP) and healthy subjects of age ranged 30-60 years. The blood samples were digested with nitric acid and perchloric acid mixture (2:1), followed by the quantification of elements by atomic absorption spectrometry. The concentration of essential elements in blood samples of KFP were found in the range of Ca (97-125), Mg (18-36), Na (2971-3685), and K (177-270) mg/L while, the levels of Al, Cd, and Pb were found in the range of (475-1275), (0.9-9.9), and (211-623) μg/L, respectively. In the healthy referents, concentration of electrolytes in blood samples was lower than KFP, but difference was not significant (p > 0.05). While the levels of toxic elements in blood samples of referents were three- to sixfold lower than KFP (p < 0.01). Principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) of the element data manifested diverse apportionment of the selected elements in the blood sample of the KFP compared with the healthy counterparts. PMID:25632899

  8. Multiple proportion case-basing driven CBRE and its application in the evaluation of possible failure of firms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Andina, Diego; Sun, Jie

    2013-08-01

    Case-based reasoning (CBR) is a unique tool for the evaluation of possible failure of firms (EOPFOF) for its eases of interpretation and implementation. Ensemble computing, a variation of group decision in society, provides a potential means of improving predictive performance of CBR-based EOPFOF. This research aims to integrate bagging and proportion case-basing with CBR to generate a method of proportion bagging CBR for EOPFOF. Diverse multiple case bases are first produced by multiple case-basing, in which a volume parameter is introduced to control the size of each case base. Then, the classic case retrieval algorithm is implemented to generate diverse member CBR predictors. Majority voting, the most frequently used mechanism in ensemble computing, is finally used to aggregate outputs of member CBR predictors in order to produce final prediction of the CBR ensemble. In an empirical experiment, we statistically validated the results of the CBR ensemble from multiple case bases by comparing them with those of multivariate discriminant analysis, logistic regression, classic CBR, the best member CBR predictor and bagging CBR ensemble. The results from Chinese EOPFOF prior to 3 years indicate that the new CBR ensemble, which significantly improved CBR's predictive ability, outperformed all the comparative methods.

  9. Creep Damage Evaluation in High-Pressure Rotor Based on Hardness Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, B. R.; Matt, C. F. T.; Furtado, H. C.; de Almeida, L. H.

    2015-07-01

    A creep life consumption study was conducted in a high-pressure turbine rotor belonging to a 363 MW thermal power plant. The component is manufactured with 30CrMoV412 steel, which is a typical 1CrMoV forged rotor steel, having operated for 112,000 h, under a pressure of 17.6 MPa and temperature of 520 °C. The main objective of this paper is to evaluate the applicability of hardness tests as a tool for structural integrity analysis in the field. Two methods for estimating creep remaining life based on hardness measurements were used. Furthermore, metallographic replicas made during unit shutdown were observed by scanning electron microscopy, in order to detect creep voids and also to corroborate the results for accumulated creep damage obtained based on hardness measurements.

  10. Hydrogen-oxygen catalytic ignition and thruster investigation. Volume 2: High pressure thruster evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. J.; Heckert, B.; Burge, H. L.

    1972-01-01

    A high pressure thruster effort was conducted with the major objective of demonstrating a duct cooling concept with gaseous propellant in a thruster operating at nominally 300 psia and 1500 lbf. The analytical design methods for the duct cooling were proven in a series of tests with both ambient and reduced temperature propellants. Long duration tests as well as pulse mode tests demonstrated the feasibility of the concept. All tests were conducted with a scaling of the raised post triplet injector design previously demonstrated at 900 lbf in demonstration firings. A series of environmental conditioned firings were also conducted to determine the effects of thermal soaks, atmospheric air and high humidity. This volume presents the results of the high pressure thruster evaluations.

  11. Evaluation of Pressurization Fatigue Life of 1441 Al-li Fuselage Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, R. Keith; Dicus, Dennis I.; Fridlyander, Joseph; Davydov, Valentin

    1999-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the pressurization fatigue life of fuselage panels with skins fabricated from 1441 Al-Li, an attractive new Russian alloy. The study indicated that 1441 Al-Li has several advantages over conventional aluminum fuselage skin alloy with respect to fatigue behavior. Smooth 1441 Al-Li sheet specimens exhibited a fatigue endurance limit similar to that for 1163 Al (Russian version of 2024 Al) sheet. Notched 1441 Al-Li sheet specimens exhibited greater fatigue strength and longer fatigue life than 1163 Al. In addition, Tu-204 fuselage panels fabricated by Tupolev Design Bureau using Al-Li skin and ring frames with riveted 7000-series aluminum stiffeners had longer pressurization fatigue lives than did panels constructed from conventional aluminum alloys. Taking into account the lower density of this alloy, the results suggest that 1441 Al-Li has the potential to improve fuselage performance while decreasing structural weight.

  12. Sleep-disordered breathing is associated with depletion of circulating endothelial progenitor cells and elevation in pulmonary arterial pressure in patients with decompensated systolic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Han; Feng, Liu; Wan, Qi-Lin; Hong, Yan; Li, Yan-Ming; Cheng, Guan-Chang; Han, Xin-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is known to occur frequently in and may predict worsening progression of patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). SDB is also known to play an important role in the development of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) via inducing endothelial dysfunction and vascular remodeling, a pathological process that can be significantly influenced by factors such as osteoprotegerin (OPG) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). The objective of this study is to determine if CHF with SDB is associated with changes in OPG, EPCs, and PAH. Methods EPCs were isolated, cultured, and quantified from CHF patients with SDB (n = 52), or without SDB (n = 68). OPG and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) from each group was analyzed and correlated with EPCs and the mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) measured by right heart catheterization. Results A significant decrease in circulating EPCs (29.30 ± 9.01 vs. 45.17 ± 10.51 EPCs/× 200 field; P < 0.05) was found in CHF patients with SDB compared to those without SDB. Both OPG (789.83 ± 89.38 vs. 551.29 ± 42.12 pg/mL; P < 0.05) and NT-proBNP (5946.50 ± 1434.50 vs. 3028.60 ± 811.90 ng/mL; P < 0.05) were also significantly elevated in SDB CHF patients who also had significantly elevated mPAP (50.2 ± 9.5 vs. 36.4 ± 4.1 mm Hg; P < 0.05). EPC numbers correlated inversely with the episodes of apnea and hypopnea per hour (RDI, r = –0.45, P = 0.037) and blood level of OPG (r = –0.53, P = 0.011). Although NT-proBNP was also increased significantly in patients with SDB, it had no correlation with either EPCs or RDI. Conclusions SDB due to hypoxemia from decompensated CHF is associated with (1) OPG elevation, (2) EPC depletion, and (3) mPAP elevation. The inverse relationship of circulating OPG with EPCs suggests a likely mechanism for hypoxemia and OPG in the development of pulmonary vascular dysfunction via depleting EPCs, thus worsening prognosis of CHF. PMID

  13. Voluntary Consensus Organization Standards for Nondestructive Evaluation of Thin-Walled Metallic Liners and Composite Overwraps in Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess; Saulsberry, Regor

    2012-01-01

    NASA fracture control requirements outlined in NASA-STD-5009 and NASA-STD-5014 are predicated on the availability and use of sensitive nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods that can detect and monitor defects, thereby providing data that can be used to predict failure or reduce the risk of failure in fracture critical components. However, in the case of composite materials and components, including composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), the effect of defects is poorly understood, the NDE methods used to evaluate locate and size defects are typically at lower technical readiness level than analogous NDE methods used for metals, and demonstration studies to verify the probability of detection (POD) are generally lacking or unavailable. These factors together make failure prediction of fracture critical composite materials and components based on size, quantity, or orientation of defects nearly impossible. Also, when inspecting metal liners in as-manufactured COPVs, sensitivity is lost and only the inner surface of the liner is accessible. Also, NDE of COPVs as applied during manufacturing varies significantly from manufacturer to manufacturer and has not yet been standardized. Although requirements exist to perform NDE immediately after manufacturing to establish initial integrity of the parts, procedural detail for NDE of composites is still nonexistent or under development. For example, in practice, only a visual inspection of COPVs is performed during manufacturing and service, leaving in question whether defects of concern, for example, bridging, overwrap winding anomalies, impact damage below visible threshold, out-of-family strain growth, and liner buckling have been adequately detected and monitored. To address these shortcomings, in 2005 the NASA Nondestructive Evaluation Working Group (NNWG) began funding work to develop and adopt standards for nondestructive evaluation of aerospace composites in collaboration with the American Society for Testing

  14. An Evaluation of Culture Results during Treatment for Tuberculosis as Surrogate Endpoints for Treatment Failure and Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Patrick P. J.; Fielding, Katherine; Nunn, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that new regimens are urgently needed for the treatment of tuberculosis. The primary endpoint in the Phase III trials is a composite outcome of failure at the end of treatment or relapse after stopping treatment. Such trials are usually both long and expensive. Valid surrogate endpoints measured during or at the end of treatment could dramatically reduce both the time and cost of assessing the effectiveness of new regimens. The objective of this study was to evaluate sputum culture results on solid media during treatment as surrogate endpoints for poor outcome. Data were obtained from twelve randomised controlled trials conducted by the British Medical Research Council in the 1970s and 80s in East Africa and East Asia, consisting of 6974 participants and 49 different treatment regimens. The month two culture result was shown to be a poor surrogate in East Africa but a good surrogate in Hong Kong. In contrast, the month three culture was a good surrogate in trials conducted in East Africa but not in Hong Kong. As well as differences in location, ethnicity and probable strain of Mycobacteria tuberculosis, Hong Kong trials more often evaluated regimens with rifampicin throughout and intermittent regimens, and patients in East African trials more often presented with extensive cavitation and were slower to convert to culture negative during treatment. An endpoint that is a summary measure of the longitudinal profile of culture results over time or that is able to detect the presence of M. tuberculosis later in treatment is more likely to be a better endpoint for a phase II trial than a culture result at a single time point and may prove to be an acceptable surrogate. More data are needed before any endpoint can be used as a surrogate in a confirmatory phase III trial. PMID:23667677

  15. Evaluation of Encapsulated Liver Cell Spheroids in a Fluidised-Bed Bioartificial Liver for Treatment of Ischaemic Acute Liver Failure in Pigs in a Translational Setting

    PubMed Central

    Selden, Clare; Spearman, Catherine Wendy; Kahn, Delawir; Miller, Malcolm; Figaji, Anthony; Erro, Eloy; Bundy, James; Massie, Isobel; Chalmers, Sherri-Ann; Arendse, Hiram; Gautier, Aude; Sharratt, Peter; Fuller, Barry; Hodgson, Humphrey

    2013-01-01

    Liver failure is an increasing problem. Donor-organ shortage results in patients dying before receiving a transplant. Since the liver can regenerate, alternative therapies providing temporary liver-support are sought. A bioartificial-liver would temporarily substitute function in liver failure buying time for liver regeneration/organ-procurement. Our aim: to develop a prototype bioartificial-liver-machine (BAL) comprising a human liver-derived cell-line, cultured to phenotypic competence and deliverable in a clinical setting to sites distant from its preparation. The objective of this study was to determine whether its use would improve functional parameters of liver failure in pigs with acute liver failure, to provide proof-of-principle. HepG2cells encapsulated in alginate-beads, proliferated in a fluidised-bed-bioreactor providing a biomass of 4–6×1010cells, were transported from preparation-laboratory to point-of-use operating theatre (6000miles) under perfluorodecalin at ambient temperature. Irreversible ischaemic liver failure was induced in anaesthetised pigs, after portal-systemic-shunt, by hepatic-artery-ligation. Biochemical parameters, intracranial pressure, and functional-clotting were measured in animals connected in an extracorporeal bioartificial-liver circuit. Efficacy was demonstrated comparing outcomes between animals connected to a circuit containing alginate-encapsulated cells (Cell-bead BAL), and those connected to circuit containing alginate capsules without cells (Empty-bead BAL). Cells of the biomass met regulatory standards for sterility and provenance. All animals developed progressive liver-failure after ischaemia induction. Efficacy of BAL was demonstrated since animals connected to a functional biomass (+ cells) had significantly smaller rises in intracranial pressure, lower ammonia levels, more bilirubin conjugation, improved acidosis and clotting restoration compared to animals connected to the circuit without cells. In the +cell

  16. Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, such ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can't ...

  17. Kidney Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... enough red blood cells. This is called kidney failure. If your kidneys fail, you need treatment to ... providers, family, and friends, most people with kidney failure can lead full and active lives. NIH: National ...

  18. Evaluation of pressure extracted from NCEP and CMC global numerical weather prediction models against in-situ and GPT pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdam, M.; Chai, N.; Santos, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    An earlier investigation by Urquhart et al (2011) demonstrated that ray traced hydrostatic zenith delays from NCEP's Re-Analysis I (NCEP) dataset proved to exhibit higher variability when compared to those from the Canadian Meteorological Centre's (CMC) Global Deterministic Prediction System (GDPS) and the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). This investigation expands on the original by analyzing the variation of the zenith hydrostatic delay (as ray traced through the NWP) and the extracted pressure at the surface for 35 IGS reference stations for the entire year of 2010. Two NWP's were selected, NCEP's Re-Analysis I and CMC's GDPS. NCEP was selected since it forms the basis for the UNB-VMF1 service, and CMC's GDPS was selected due to availability. Both models have global coverage, but NCEP's grid resolution is 2.5 x 2.5 degrees as compared to CMC's (GDPS) 0.6 x 0.6 degrees. The location within the NWP is defined by the location of the IGS reference stations. The position of the reference stations are defined by the IGS weekly solutions where week 52's coordinate values for the year 2010 were used. The height was then adjusted by the defined meteorological sensor offset as defined the IGS stations's respective log. The investigation is based on the following comparisons: 1. Extracted Pressure from the NWP (NCEP and CMC (GDPS)) compared to measured pressure from the site, and also from pressure derived from GPT model. 2. Raytraced hydrostatic zenith delay compared to the Saastamoinen hydrostatic zenith computed from the measured site pressure. Results indicate good agreement between pressure extracted from the NWP and in-situ pressure and larger differences with respect to GPT.

  19. Evaluation of the relationship between motion sickness symptomatology and blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.; Lackner, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the development of symptoms of motion sickness and changes in blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature. Twelve subjects were each evaluated four times using the vestibular-visual interaction test (Graybiel and Lackner, 1980). The results were analyzed both within and across individual subjects. Neither a systematic group nor consistent individual relationship was found between the physiological parameters and the appearance of symptoms of motion sickness. These findings suggest that biofeedback control of the physiological variables studied is not likely to prevent the expression of motion sickness symptomatology.

  20. Strength Evaluation and Failure Prediction of Short Carbon Fiber Reinforced Nylon Spur Gears by Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhong; Hossan, Mohammad Robiul

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, short carbon fiber reinforced nylon spur gear pairs, and steel and unreinforced nylon spur gear pairs have been selected for study and comparison. A 3D finite element model was developed to simulate the multi-axial stress-strain behaviors of the gear tooth. Failure prediction has been conducted based on the different failure criteria, including Tsai-Wu criterion. The tooth roots, where has stress concentration and the potential for failure, have been carefully investigated. The modeling results show that the short carbon fiber reinforced nylon gear fabricated by properly controlled injection molding processes can provide higher strength and better performance.

  1. Evaluation of Peripheral Blood Circulation Disorder in Scleroderma Patients Using an Optical Sensor with a Pressurization Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Motegi, Sei-Ichiro; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Blood circulation function of peripheral blood vessels in skin dermis was evaluated employing an optical sensor with a pressurization mechanism using the blood outflow and reflow characteristics. The device contains a light source and an optical sensor. When applied to the skin surface, it first exerts the primary pressure (higher than the systolic blood pressure), causing an outflow of blood from the dermal peripheral blood vessels. After two heartbeats, the pressure is lowered (secondary pressure) and blood reflows into the peripheral blood vessels. Hemoglobin concentration, which changes during blood outflow and reflow, is derived from the received light intensity using the Beer-Lambert law. This method was evaluated in 26 healthy female volunteers and 26 female scleroderma patients. In order to evaluate the blood circulation function of the peripheral blood vessels of scleroderma patients, pressurization sequence which consists of primary pressure followed by secondary pressure was adopted. Blood reflow during the first heartbeat period after applying the secondary pressure of 40mmHg was (mean±SD) 0.059±0.05%mm for scleroderma patients and 0.173±0.104%mm for healthy volunteers. Blood reflow was significantly lower in scleroderma patients than in healthy volunteers (p<0.05). This result indicates that the information necessary for assessing blood circulation disorder of peripheral blood vessels in scleroderma patients is objectively obtained by the proposed method. PMID:27479094

  2. Evaluation of Peripheral Blood Circulation Disorder in Scleroderma Patients Using an Optical Sensor with a Pressurization Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Blood circulation function of peripheral blood vessels in skin dermis was evaluated employing an optical sensor with a pressurization mechanism using the blood outflow and reflow characteristics. The device contains a light source and an optical sensor. When applied to the skin surface, it first exerts the primary pressure (higher than the systolic blood pressure), causing an outflow of blood from the dermal peripheral blood vessels. After two heartbeats, the pressure is lowered (secondary pressure) and blood reflows into the peripheral blood vessels. Hemoglobin concentration, which changes during blood outflow and reflow, is derived from the received light intensity using the Beer–Lambert law. This method was evaluated in 26 healthy female volunteers and 26 female scleroderma patients. In order to evaluate the blood circulation function of the peripheral blood vessels of scleroderma patients, pressurization sequence which consists of primary pressure followed by secondary pressure was adopted. Blood reflow during the first heartbeat period after applying the secondary pressure of 40mmHg was (mean±SD) 0.059±0.05%mm for scleroderma patients and 0.173±0.104%mm for healthy volunteers. Blood reflow was significantly lower in scleroderma patients than in healthy volunteers (p<0.05). This result indicates that the information necessary for assessing blood circulation disorder of peripheral blood vessels in scleroderma patients is objectively obtained by the proposed method. PMID:27479094

  3. Fracture toughness evaluation of 20MnMoNi55 pressure vessel steel in the ductile to brittle transition regime: Experiment & numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalan, Avinash; Samal, M. K.; Chakravartty, J. K.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, fracture behaviour of 20MnMoNi55 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel in the ductile to brittle transition regime (DBTT) is characterised. Compact tension (CT) and single edged notched bend (SENB) specimens of two different sizes were tested in the DBTT regime. Reference temperature 'T0' was evaluated according to the ASTM E1921 standard. The effect of size and geometry on the T0 was studied and T0 was found to be lower for SENB geometry. In order to understand the fracture behaviour numerically, finite element (FE) simulations were performed using Beremin's model for cleavage and Rousselier's model for ductile failure mechanisms. The simulated fracture behaviour was found to be in good agreement with the experiment.

  4. Clinical evaluation of bond failures and survival between mandibular canine-to-canine retainers made of flexible spiral wire and fiber-reinforced composite

    PubMed Central

    Sfondrini, Maria F.; Fraticelli, Danilo; Castellazzi, Linda; Gandini, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this longitudinal prospective randomized study was to evaluate the clinical reliability of two different types of postorthodontic treatment retainers: a silanised-treated glass fibers-reinforced resin composite (FRC) and a directly bonded multistranded stainless steel wire. The hypothesis of the study was to assess if significant differences are present between failure rates of the two retainers. Study Design: This prospective study was based on an assessment of 87 patients (35 men and 52 women),with an average age of 24 years who required a lower arch fixed retainer after orthodontic treatment. Patients were divided in two groups. Assignment was carried out with random tables. A follow-up examination was carried out once a month. The number, cause, and date of single bond adhesive failures were recorded for both retainers over 12 months. Teeth that were rebonded after failure were not included in the success analysis. Statistical analysis was performed by means of a Fisher’s exact test, Kaplan-Meier survival estimates, and log rank test. Results: Bond failure rate was significantly higher (P=0.0392) for multistranded metallic wire than for FRC. Conclusions: Glass fiber-reinforced resin composite retainers and multistranded metallic wires showed no significant difference in single bond failure rates over a one-year follow up. Key words:Fiber reinforced composite, fixed retention, multistranded wire, orthodontics, retainer, splint. PMID:24790714

  5. Evaluation of hemodynamic changes using different intra-abdominal pressures for laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Umar, Asif; Mehta, Kuldeep Singh; Mehta, Nandita

    2013-08-01

    Biliary diseases known since ages constitute major portion of digestive tract disorders world over. Among these cholelithiasis being the fore runner causing general ill health, thereby requiring surgical intervention for total cure. The study was undertaken in an attempt to compare the hemodynamic changes in patient undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy using different intra-abdominal pressures created due to carbon dioxide insufflation. The patients were randomly allocated to one of the three groups in which different levels of intra-abdominal pressures (8-10 mmHg,11-13 mmHg and 14 mmHg and above) were maintained. The base line parameters monitored were heart rate, non invasive blood pressur(systolic and mean)and end tidal carbon dioxide. All the parameters were monitored at various intervals i.e. Immediately during insufflation, 5 min, 10 min, 20 min, 30 min after CO2 insufflation and after every 10 min if surgery exceeds 30 min, at exsufflation,10 min after CO2 exsufflation. Patients were ventilated with Pedius Drager Ventilator keeping tidal volume 8-10 ml/kg and respiratory rate 12-14 breaths/min. During surgery patients were placed in reverse Trendlenburg position (head up) at 15 °. The results obtained were evaluated statistically and analyzed. Baseline characteristics were found to be comparable. Hemodynamic variables were reported as mean and standard deviation. Statistical significance among groups was evaluated using Analysis of Variance and unpaired student t test (two tailed). Inter-group comparisons were made using Bonferroni test. A p-value of <0.05 was considered as statistically significant. In all the three groups the mean heart rate (baseline 84.08 ± 12.50, 87.96 ± 15.73 and 86.92 ± 17.00 respectively) increased during CO2 insufflation and the rise in heart rate continued till exsufflation after which it decreased and at 10 min after exsufflation the heart rates were comparable with the baseline. The inter

  6. Clinical Evaluation of a Novel Topical Negative Pressure Device in Promoting Healing in Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Bradbury, Sarah; Walkley, Neal; Ivins, Nicola; Harding, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This observational study evaluated the use of a novel, ultraportable, mechanically powered topical negative pressure device in promoting healing in chronic wounds, including venous and mixed etiology leg ulcers and neuropathic foot ulcers. Materials and Methods: Evaluable patients (n=37) received treatment with the SNaP® Wound Care System for up to 6 weeks. The primary objective was percentage change in wound size, with secondary objectives of clinical assessment of wound parameters, ease of use, and impact on quality of life. Results: A 42.64% mean percentage decrease in wound area was observed, with an overall decrease for each wound etiology subgroup. Increased granulation tissue, decreased exudate levels, and decreased wound pain were reported. Quality-of-life scores increased overall, and the device was easy to use, comfortable, portable, and inconspicuous. Conclusion: The SNaP Wound Care System has the potential to promote healing in chronic wounds of different etiologies. PMID:26029485

  7. A Review of Methods for Evaluating Particle Stability in Suspension Based Pressurized Metered Dose Inhalers.

    PubMed

    D'Sa, Dexter; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2015-01-01

    Advances in particle engineering techniques, such as spray drying, freeze drying and supercritical fluid precipitation, have greatly enhanced the ability to control the structure, morphology, and solid state phase of inhalable sized particles (1 - 5 µm) for formulation in pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDI). To optimize the properties of these engineered particles for formulation in hydrofluoroalkane propellants (HFA 134a / 227) it is necessary to measure both bulk and individual particle properties before, after, and during formulation. This review examines established and recently developed methods for evaluating a variety of particle properties including but not limited to size, surface and internal morphology, chemical composition, and solid state phase. Novel methods for evaluating particle physical and chemical stability directly in propellant or similar environments are also discussed. PMID:26290200

  8. Application of near-infrared spectroscopy to the evaluation of exercise performance and limitations in patients with heart failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, Donna

    1997-01-01

    Exercise performance in patients with heart failure is limited primarily due to a reduction in cardiac output. This results in skeletal muscle hypo-perfusion. Near infrared spectroscopy provides a simple noninvasive method for assessing skeletal muscle oxygenation during exercise. In this paper we review the application of this technique to patients with heart failure and describe excessive limb and respiratory muscle oxygenation as compared to normal subjects. The potential of this technology for monitoring clinical improvement and therapeutic efficacy also is discussed.

  9. Simplified negative pressure wound therapy: clinical evaluation of an ultraportable, no-canister system.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Donald A; Adams, Kevin G; Van Huyssteen, Adriaan; Martin, Robin; Huddleston, Elizabeth M

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a prototype negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) system that has been developed to simplify NPWT for wounds at the lower end of the acuity scale. The new device has a single preset pressure of -80 mmHg, is single use and operates without an exudate canister. The disposable NPWT system (PICO™) was tested in a prospective, non-comparative, multicentre clinical trial to assess device functionality and clinical acceptance. Twenty patients were recruited for a maximum treatment period of 14 days. The NPWT devices were fitted with data log chips to enable longitudinal assessment of negative pressure and leak rates during therapy. Sixteen (80%) patients had closed surgical wounds, two (10%) patients had traumatic wounds and two (10%) patients received meshed split thickness skin grafts. The mean study duration was 10·7 days (range: 5-14 days) and the mean dressing wear time per individual patient was 4·6 days (range: 2-11). Fifty-five percent of wounds had closed by the end of the 14-day study or earlier, with a further 40% of wounds progressing to closure. Real-time pressure monitoring showed continuous delivery of NPWT. Three cases are discussed representing different wound locations and different patient factors that can increase the risk of post-surgical complications. Clinical studies of the disposable NPWT system confirmed the ability of the simplified single-use device to function consistently over the expected wear time. The anticipated reduced costs, ease of use and increased mobility of patients using this system may enable NPWT benefits to be available to a greater proportion of patients. PMID:23647737

  10. Differential Effects of Endotracheal Suctioning on Gas Exchanges in Patients with Acute Respiratory Failure under Pressure-Controlled and Volume-Controlled Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Wei; Jin, Yan; Ma, Tao; Qu, Bo; Liu, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of open endotracheal suctioning on gas exchange and respiratory mechanics in ARF patients under the modes of PCV or VCV. Ninety-six ARF patients were treated with open endotracheal suctioning and their variations in respiratory mechanics and gas exchange after the suctions were compared. Under PCV mode, compared with the initial level of tidal volume (V T ), ARF patients showed 30.0% and 27.8% decrease at 1 min and 10 min, respectively. Furthermore, the initial respiratory system compliance (C rs) decreased by 29.6% and 28.5% at 1 min and 10 min, respectively. Under VCV mode, compared with the initial level, 38.6% and 37.5% increase in peak airway pressure (PAP) were found at 1 min and 10 min, respectively. Under PCV mode, the initial PaO2 increased by 6.4% and 10.2% at 3 min and 10 min, respectively, while 18.9% and 30.6% increase of the initial PaO2 were observed under VCV mode. Summarily, endotracheal suctioning may impair gas exchange and decrease lung compliance in ARF patients receiving mechanical ventilation under both PCV and VCV modes, but endotracheal suctioning effects on gas exchange were more severe and longer-lasting under PCV mode than VCV. PMID:25954759

  11. Differential Effects of Endotracheal Suctioning on Gas Exchanges in Patients with Acute Respiratory Failure under Pressure-Controlled and Volume-Controlled Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Wei; Jin, Yan; Ma, Tao; Qu, Bo; Liu, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of open endotracheal suctioning on gas exchange and respiratory mechanics in ARF patients under the modes of PCV or VCV. Ninety-six ARF patients were treated with open endotracheal suctioning and their variations in respiratory mechanics and gas exchange after the suctions were compared. Under PCV mode, compared with the initial level of tidal volume (VT), ARF patients showed 30.0% and 27.8% decrease at 1 min and 10 min, respectively. Furthermore, the initial respiratory system compliance (Crs) decreased by 29.6% and 28.5% at 1 min and 10 min, respectively. Under VCV mode, compared with the initial level, 38.6% and 37.5% increase in peak airway pressure (PAP) were found at 1 min and 10 min, respectively. Under PCV mode, the initial PaO2 increased by 6.4% and 10.2 % at 3 min and 10 min, respectively, while 18.9% and 30.6% increase of the initial PaO2 were observed under VCV mode. Summarily, endotracheal suctioning may impair gas exchange and decrease lung compliance in ARF patients receiving mechanical ventilation under both PCV and VCV modes, but endotracheal suctioning effects on gas exchange were more severe and longer-lasting under PCV mode than VCV. PMID:25954759

  12. Aquifer imaging with pressure waves—Evaluation of low-impact characterization through sandbox experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, YaoQuan; Lim, David; Cupola, Fausto; Cardiff, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the detailed spatial variation of hydraulic properties in the subsurface has been the subject of intensive research over the past three decades. A recently developed approach to characterize subsurface properties is hydraulic tomography, in which a series of pumping tests are jointly inverted using a heterogeneous numerical model. Recently, Cardiff et al. (2013) proposed a modified tomography approach named Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography (OHT), in which periodic pumping signals of different frequencies serve as the aquifer stimulation, and pressure responses are recorded at observation locations for tomographic analysis. Its key advantages over traditional hydraulic tomography are that: (1) there is no net injection or extraction of water, and (2) the impulse (an oscillatory signal of known frequency) is easily extracted from noisy data. However, OHT has only been evaluated through numerical experiments to date. In this work, we evaluate OHT performance by attempting to image known heterogeneities in a synthetic aquifer. An instrumented laboratory sandbox is filled with material of known hydraulic properties, and we measure aquifer responses due to oscillatory pumping stimulations at periods of 2, 5, 10, and 20 s. Pressure oscillation time series are processed through Fourier Transforms and inverted tomographically to obtain estimates of aquifer heterogeneity, using a fast, steady-periodic groundwater flow model. We show that OHT is able to provide robust estimates of aquifer hydraulic conductivity even in cases where relatively few pumping tests and observation locations are available. The use of multiple stimulation frequencies is also shown to improve imaging results.

  13. Evaluation of Two New Indices of Blood Pressure Variability Using Postural Change in Older Fallers

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Choon-Hian; Ng, Siew-Cheok; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul B.; Chin, Ai-Vyrn; Poi, Philip J. H.; Chee, Kok Han; Imran, Z. Abidin; Tan, Maw Pin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the utility of blood pressure variability (BPV) calculated using previously published and newly introduced indices using the variables falls and age as comparators. While postural hypotension has long been considered a risk factor for falls, there is currently no documented evidence on the relationship between BPV and falls. A case-controlled study involving 25 fallers and 25 nonfallers was conducted. Systolic (SBPV) and diastolic blood pressure variability (DBPV) were assessed using 5 indices: standard deviation (SD), standard deviation of most stable continuous 120 beats (staSD), average real variability (ARV), root mean square of real variability (RMSRV), and standard deviation of real variability (SDRV). Continuous beat-to-beat blood pressure was recorded during 10 minutes’ supine rest and 3 minutes’ standing. Standing SBPV was significantly higher than supine SBPV using 4 indices in both groups. The standing-to-supine-BPV ratio (SSR) was then computed for each subject (staSD, ARV, RMSRV, and SDRV). Standing-to-supine ratio for SBPV was significantly higher among fallers compared to nonfallers using RMSRV and SDRV (P = 0.034 and P = 0.025). Using linear discriminant analysis (LDA), 3 indices (ARV, RMSRV, and SDRV) of SSR SBPV provided accuracies of 61.6%, 61.2%, and 60.0% for the prediction of falls which is comparable with timed-up and go (TUG), 64.4%. This study suggests that SSR SBPV using RMSRV and SDRV is a potential predictor for falls among older patients, and deserves further evaluation in larger prospective studies. PMID:27175670

  14. The first Iranian recommendations on prevention, evaluation and management of high blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Noohi, Feridoun; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Khosravi, Alireza; Andalib, Elham

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the complete report of the first Iranian Recommendations on Prevention, Evaluation and Management of High Blood Pressure. The purpose is to provide an evidence-based approach to the prevention, management and control of hypertension (HTN) by adapting the most internationally known and used guidelines to the local health care status with consideration of the currently available data and based on the locally conducted researches on HTN as well as social and health care requirements. A working group of national and international experts participated in discussions and collaborated in decision-making, writing and reviewing the whole report. Multiple subcommittees worked together to review the recent national and international literature on HTN in different areas. We used the evaluation tool that is called "AGREE" and considered a score of > 60% as a high score. We adapted the Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP), the United Kingdom's National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) and the US-based joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC7). The key topics that are highlighted in this report include: The importance of ambulatory and self-measurement of blood pressure, evaluation of cardiovascular risk in HTN patients, the role of lifestyle modification in the prevention of HTN and its control with more emphasis on salt intake reduction and weight control, introducing pharmacotherapy suitable for uncomplicated HTN or specific situations and the available drugs in Iran, highlighting the importance of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor blockers and calcium channel blockers as the first line therapy in many situations, the non-use of beta blockers as the first time treatment except in specific conditions, treating HTN in women, children, obese and elderly patients, the patient compliance to improve HTN control, practical guidelines to improve

  15. A propagation time difference evaluation for a clamp-on ultrasonic flowmeter for low-pressure gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiguchi, Hiroshi; Sawayama, Toshiyuki; Nagamune, Kouki

    2016-07-01

    We have been studying the development of a clamp-on ultrasonic flowmeter for measuring the gas flow rate, especially at low-pressure gas such as atmospheric pressure. In this study, we evaluated the propagation time difference of ultrasonic wave for measuring the airflow at atmospheric pressure. We placed a pair of ultrasonic transducers outside a pipe and generated ultrasonic waves aslant to the flow direction. We observed the propagation time difference of the ultrasonic wave as a function of the gas flow velocity, and found that the difference was proportional to the gas flow. Therefore, it was shown that we were able to measure the atmospheric pressure gas flow rate with a clamp-on ultrasonic flowmeter. Moreover, we evaluated the dependency of ultrasonic wave intensity on gas pressure.

  16. In-Situ Nondestructive Evaluation of Kevlar(Registered Trademark)and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite Micromechanics for Improved Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess; Saulsberry, Regor

    2012-01-01

    NASA has been faced with recertification and life extension issues for epoxy-impregnated Kevlar 49 (K/Ep) and carbon (C/Ep) composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) used in various systems on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station, respectively. Each COPV has varying criticality, damage and repair histories, time at pressure, and pressure cycles. COPVs are of particular concern due to the insidious and catastrophic burst-before-leak failure mode caused by stress rupture (SR) of the composite overwrap. SR life has been defined [1] as the minimum time during which the composite maintains structural integrity considering the combined effects of stress level(s), time at stress level(s), and associated environment. SR has none of the features of predictability associated with metal pressure vessels, such as crack geometry, growth rate and size, or other features that lend themselves to nondestructive evaluation (NDE). In essence, the variability or surprise factor associated with SR cannot be eliminated. C/Ep COPVs are also susceptible to impact damage that can lead to reduced burst pressure even when the amount of damage to the COPV is below the visual detection threshold [2], thus necessitating implementation of a mechanical damage control plan [1]. Last, COPVs can also fail prematurely due to material or design noncompliance. In each case (SR, impact or noncompliance), out-of-family behavior is expected leading to a higher probability of failure at a given stress, hence, greater uncertainty in performance. For these reasons, NASA has been actively engaged in research to develop NDE methods that can be used during post-manufacture qualification, in-service inspection, and in-situ structural health monitoring. Acoustic emission (AE) is one of the more promising NDE techniques for detecting and monitoring, in real-time, the strain energy release and corresponding stress-wave propagation produced by actively growing flaws and defects in composite

  17. Evaluation of the effect of pleural effusion on central venous pressure in cats.

    PubMed

    Gookin, J L; Atkins, C E

    1999-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine if pleural effusion (PEF) increases central venous pressure (CVP) in cats, to define any relationship between volume of PEF and CVP and to ascertain the significance of CVP alterations in cats having PEF and suspected right heart failure (RHF). CVP was measured from a jugular vein before (CVPpre) and after (CVPpost) bilateral thoracentesis in 9 cats with naturally occurring PEF and under experimental conditions in 3 spontaneously breathing anesthetized cats receiving graded intrathoracic infusion of saline. Volumes of introduced and recovered fluid were recorded. A significant decrease occurred in CVP after thoracentesis in cats with naturally occurring PEF (mean difference, 4.5 cm H2O; range, 0-7.0 cm H2O, P < .005). The magnitude of change in CVP was constant (r = 0.36, P > .05) over the range of volumes recovered (range, 95-450 mL or 16.4-90 mL/kg). Five cats had CVPpre suggestive of RHF (range, 8.16-20.4 cm H2O). After thoracentesis, RHF was ruled out in 1 cat (CVPpost, 4.08 cm H2O) and the CVP declined but remained abnormally high (9.52 cm H2O) in 1 cat with a mediastinal mass. In 2 cats with confirmed RHF (CVPpre, 20.4 and 16.3 cm H2O), CVP decreased after thoracentesis but remained abnormally high (CVPpost, 14.96 and 10.88 cm H2O). In 1 cat with noncardiogenic PEF and inadequate removal of fluid, CVPpost (8.16 cm H2O) did not decrease. Experimentally, a positive linear relationship was observed between CVP and volume of PEF. The threshold volume required to increase CVP (17 mL/kg) approximated that suggested by clinical observation (22 mL/kg). PEF increases CVP and can cause abnormally high CVP in the absence of RHF. PMID:10587256

  18. BIOASSAY VESSEL FAILURE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Vormelker, P

    2008-09-22

    Two high-pressure bioassay vessels failed at the Savannah River Site during a microwave heating process for biosample testing. Improper installation of the thermal shield in the first failure caused the vessel to burst during microwave heating. The second vessel failure is attributed to overpressurization during a test run. Vessel failure appeared to initiate in the mold parting line, the thinnest cross-section of the octagonal vessel. No material flaws were found in the vessel that would impair its structural performance. Content weight should be minimized to reduce operating temperature and pressure. Outer vessel life is dependent on actual temperature exposure. Since thermal aging of the vessels can be detrimental to their performance, it was recommended that the vessels be used for a limited number of cycles to be determined by additional testing.

  19. Evaluation of the heat transfer module (FAHT) of Failure Analysis Nonlinear Thermal And Structural Integrated Code (FANTASTIC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyhani, Majid

    1989-01-01

    The heat transfer module of FANTASTIC Code (FAHT) is studied and evaluated to the extend possible during the ten weeks duration of this project. A brief background of the previous studies is given and the governing equations as modeled in FAHT are discussed. FAHT's capabilities and limitations based on these equations and its coding methodology are explained in detail. It is established that with improper choice of element size and time step FAHT's temperature field prediction at some nodes will be below the initial condition. The source of this unrealistic temperature prediction is identified and a procedure is proposed for avoiding this phenomenon. It is further shown that the proposed procedure will converge to an accurate prediction upon mesh refinement. Unfortunately due to lack of time FAHT's ability to accurately account for pyrolysis and surface ablation has not been verified. Therefore, at the present time it can be stated with confidence that FAHT can accurately predict the temperature field for a transient multi-dimensional, orthotropic material with directional dependence, variable property, with nonlinear boundary condition. Such a prediction will provide an upper limit for the temperature field in an ablating decomposing nozzle liner. The pore pressure field, however, will not be known.

  20. Fast Simulators for Satellite Cloud Optical Centroid Pressure Retrievals, 1. Evaluation of OMI Cloud Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, J.; Vasilkov, A.; Gupta, P.; Bhartia, P. K.; Veefkind, P.; Sneep, M.; de Haan, J.; Polonsky, I.; Spurr, R.

    2012-01-01

    The cloud Optical Centroid Pressure (OCP), also known as the effective cloud pressure, is a satellite-derived parameter that is commonly used in trace-gas retrievals to account for the effects of clouds on near-infrared through ultraviolet radiance measurements. Fast simulators are desirable to further expand the use of cloud OCP retrievals into the operational and climate communities for applications such as data assimilation and evaluation of cloud vertical structure in general circulation models. In this paper, we develop and validate fast simulators that provide estimates of the cloud OCP given a vertical profile of optical extinction. We use a pressure-weighting scheme where the weights depend upon optical parameters of clouds and/or aerosol. A cloud weighting function is easily extracted using this formulation. We then use fast simulators to compare two different satellite cloud OCP retrievals from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) with estimates based on collocated cloud extinction profiles from a combination of CloudS at radar and MODIS visible radiance data. These comparisons are made over a wide range of conditions to provide a comprehensive validation of the OMI cloud OCP retrievals. We find generally good agreement between OMI cloud OCPs and those predicted by CloudSat. However, the OMI cloud OCPs from the two independent algorithms agree better with each other than either does with the estimates from CloudSat/MODIS. Differences between OMI cloud OCPs and those based on CloudSat/MODIS may result from undetected snow/ice at the surface, cloud 3-D effects, low altitude clouds missed by CloudSat, and the fact that CloudSat only observes a relatively small fraction of an OMI field-of-view.

  1. Pressure distribution evaluation of different filling methods for deposition of powders in dies: Measurement and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayyar Roudsari, Saed

    The aim of this research was to measure, analyze, and model the pressure distribution characteristics of powder deposition into rectangular and circular shallow dies using four filling methods. The feed shoe, the rotational rainy, the point feed, and the pneumatic filling methods were used to investigate the deposition characteristics into shallow dies. In order to evaluate the pressure distribution during filling of shallow dies, factors influencing powder deposition were studied. The factors included particle size and shape, particle size distribution, feed shoe speed, and tube cross-section (in case of feed shoe filling) and deposition rates (in case of rotational rainy, point feed, and pneumatic filling). A battery powder mixture (BPM) and microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel PH102) with median size of 84 and 600mum, respectively, were used to fill a shallow rectangular die 32x30 mm and 6.5 mm deep and a shallow circular die 35 mm in diameter and 6.5 mm deep. The second generation of pressure deposition tester (PDT-II) with circular and square feed shoe tube cross-sections was used to measure the two powders' pressure distribution characteristics. An innovative rotational rainy filling device was designed and fabricated. This versatile device can be used to measure filling characteristics at different rotational speeds (1-10 rpm) for various powders. The point feed (funnel fill) method with a funnel of 30 mm inlet diameter and 4.2 mm outlet diameter opening was used to fill the rectangular and circular shallow dies. The pneumatic filling method was designed and fabricated to fill the die using air as the conveying medium in a rectangular cross-section tube. The pneumatic filling device was limited to using only the BPM powder, since the Avicel powder generated substantial quantity of airborne dust during the test. Symmetry analysis, variance metrics, and uniformity analysis were used to quantify the deposition characteristics. The results showed that: (1) filled

  2. Data and Statistics: Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... to Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases Million Hearts® Web Sites with More Information About Heart Failure For ...

  3. Biocompatibility evaluation of a thermoplastic rubber for wireless telemetric intracranial pressure sensor coating

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Charif, Andrea C.; Puskas, Judit E.; Phillips, Hannah; Shanahan, Kaitlyn J.; Garsed, Jessica; Fleischman, Aaron; Goldman, Ken; Luebbers, Matthew T.; Dombrowski, Stephen M.; Luciano, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the biocompatibility of the experimental thermoplastic rubber Arbomatrix™ that will be used as the protective coating on a novel intracranial pressure (ICP) sensor silicon chip. Arbomatrix™ was benchmarked against biocompatible commercial silicone rubber shunt tubing in the brain via a rat model with 60-day implant duration. A bare silicon chip was also implanted. The results showed similar cellular distribution in the brain-implant boundary and surrounding tissues. Quantitative analysis of neuron and glia density did not show significant difference between implants. Through histological and immunohistochemical evaluation we conclude that Arbomatrix™ is well tolerated by the brain. Due to its exceptional barrier properties Arbomatrix™ has already been shown to be an excellent protective coating for new ICP monitoring chip. PMID:25688030

  4. Biocompatibility evaluation of a thermoplastic rubber for wireless telemetric intracranial pressure sensor coating.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Charif, Andrea C; Puskas, Judit E; Phillips, Hannah; Shanahan, Kaitlyn J; Garsed, Jessica; Fleischman, Aaron; Goldman, Ken; Roy, Shuvo; Luebbers, Matthew T; Dombrowski, Stephen M; Luciano, Mark G

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the biocompatibility of the experimental thermoplastic rubber Arbomatrix(™) that will be used as the protective coating on a novel intracranial pressure (ICP) sensor silicon chip. Arbomatrix(™) was benchmarked against biocompatible commercial silicone rubber shunt tubing in the brain via a rat model with 60-day implant duration. A bare silicon chip was also implanted. The results showed similar cellular distribution in the brain-implant boundary and surrounding tissues. Quantitative analysis of neuron and glia density did not show significant difference between implants. Through histological and immunohistochemical evaluation we conclude that Arbomatrix(™) is well tolerated by the brain. Due to its exceptional barrier properties Arbomatrix(™) has already been shown to be an excellent protective coating for new ICP monitoring chip. PMID:25688030

  5. Report on task assignment No. 3 for the Waste Package Project; Parts A & B, ASME pressure vessel codes review for waste package application; Part C, Library search for reliability/failure rates data on low temperature low pressure piping, containers, and casks with long design lives

    SciTech Connect

    Trabia, M.B.; Kiley, M.; Cardle, J.; Joseph, M.

    1991-07-01

    The Waste Package Project Research Team, at UNLV, has four general required tasks. Task one is the management, quality assurance, and overview of the research that is performed under the cooperative agreement. Task two is the structural analysis of spent fuel and high level waste. Task three is an American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Pressure Vessel Code review for waste package application. Finally, task four is waste package labeling. This report includes preliminary information about task three (ASME Pressure Vessel Code review for Waste package Application). The first objective is to compile a list of the ASME Pressure Vessel Code that can be applied to waste package containers design and manufacturing processes. The second objective is to explore the use of these applicable codes to the preliminary waste package container designs. The final objective is to perform a library search for reliability and/or failure rates data on low pressure, low temperature, containers and casks with long design lives.

  6. Ignition of nonmetallic materials by impact of high-pressure oxygen. II - Evaluation of repeatability of pneumatic impact test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Naomi; Moffett, Gary E.; Pedley, Michael D.; Linley, Larry J.

    1989-01-01

    The gaseous oxygen pneumatic impact test is used to evaluate the suitability of nonmetallic materials for use in high-pressure oxygen systems. The test was evaluated by testing the reactivity of four materials over a range of impact pressures. The evaluation also investigated the effect of valve opening time and other test variables on the frequency of reaction. The variability of the data obtained for each test material was too large for the test method to be capable of distinguishing other than gross differences in the reactivity of materials. No relation was found between this variability and changes in valve opening time and other test variables. The materials studied were found to be unacceptable for use as reference standards. Because of the high variability of the test data, it is recommended that new methods be developed for evaluating the suitability of materials for use in high-pressure oxygen systems.

  7. Hydraulic model evaluation of the Eicher passive pressure screen fish bypass system: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, M.A.

    1987-10-01

    A hydraulic model of a passive pressure screen fish bypass system was evaluated at the University of Washington Harris Hydraulics Laboratory, Seattle, during 1984 and 1985. Stainless steel wedgewire screen inclined at 10.5, 16.5 or 30 degrees to horizontal, was tested in a Plexiglas conduit. Velocity profiles were measured by pitot tube traverses. Dye tracers were also released to visually track the streamline patterns. Fish were monitored by video camera and recorder as they passed through the pressurized model. The screen angles, water velocities and screen types were varied. Scale loss was evaluated for smolted fish contacting the screen. Species tested included rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) and smolts of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), chinook salmon (O. tshawystcha) and steelhead trout (S. gairdneri). Scale loss did not occur to coho, chinook or steelhead smolts which contacted the screen. No delayed mortality was observed within 72 hours after testing. All fish were successfully passed when velocities through the model were maintained at greater than 5 feet (1.5 m) per second. Small fish (fry size) passed through the model more swiftly than larger ones. Rainbow trout were used for impingement tests over a range of test section velocities from 3.0 feet (0.9 m) to 10 feet (3 m) per second. Impingement was predictably produced or avoided by manipulation of velocities, and was most prevalent at test section velocities under 4 feet (1.2 m) per second. Variations in the velocity vector perpendicular to the screen did not affect fish passage over the range tested of 0.4 to 3.0 feet (0.1 to 0.9 m) per second.

  8. On the Fluid Leakage Rate and Pressure Evaluation of Abandoned Non-Penetrating Wells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, J.; Zhan, H.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding flow leakage through abandoned wells that are potential pathways of contamination due to injecting unwanted fluids in geologically deep storage aquifers have become an intensively investigated subject in the subsurface hydrology and petroleum engineering. This study represents a semi-analytical transient solution for estimating leakage rate by pressure change evaluation through an abandoned non-penetrating well (ANW) coupled with an injection well. The leakage rate can be estimated using the Darcy's law by evaluating pressure change between the upper and the lower aquifers through ANW. The analysis was conducted by solving the diffusivity equations of fluid flow in the aquifer coupled with the pipe flow through ANW. The single-phase flow is considered in this study that is capable of explaining both fluid and CO2 plume flow in an aquifer system by neglecting the variable density effect. The result is compared with that of Avci's (1994) which dealt with an abandoned fully penetrating well. The result indicates the similar type of curve trend, which is observed by applying a range of aquifer properties as well as distance between the injection and leakage pathway. The important finding is that the leakage rate through ANW is about 50% compared to the fully penetrating well of Avci's (1994). The sensitivity analyses indicate that parameter leakage coefficient (A), transmissivity ratio (TD) and radial distance (R) between injection and ANW are the most sensitive to the leakage rate and the rest of the parameters are less sensitive. Because of availability of limited analytical and complex numerical solution, this simple new approach is going to provide a simple means to estimate leakage flow for realistic field condition.

  9. Evaluation of the effect of pressurized bushings on seismic qualification of SF sub 6 circuit breakers

    SciTech Connect

    Okuno, M.; Setoyama, T.; Murase, S. ); Hellested, R. )

    1990-04-01

    Stresses on the porcelain of high voltage switchgear under seismic vibration are statically biased by internal pressure. However, restrictions from the seismic test facility pose some difficulties in practical procedure of test with pressure. This paper discusses the effect of pressure on the strain and proposes an equivalent test method to simulate a pressurized condition without actually filling the SF{sub 6} gas to the operating pressure.

  10. Assessing the Value-Added by the Environmental Testing Process with the Aide of Physics/Engineering of Failure Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornford, S.; Gibbel, M.

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Code QT Test Effectiveness Program is funding a series of applied research activities focused on utilizing the principles of physics and engineering of failure and those of engineering economics to assess and improve the value-added by the various validation and verification activities to organizations.

  11. Productive Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapur, Manu

    2008-01-01

    This study demonstrates an existence proof for "productive failure": engaging students in solving complex, ill-structured problems without the provision of support structures can be a productive exercise in failure. In a computer-supported collaborative learning setting, eleventh-grade science students were randomly assigned to one of two…

  12. The curvilinear relationship between work pressure and momentary task performance: the role of state and trait core self-evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Hofmans, Joeri; Debusscher, Jonas; Dóci, Edina; Spanouli, Andromachi; De Fruyt, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Whereas several studies have demonstrated that core self-evaluations (CSE)–or one’s appraisals about one’s own self-worth, capabilities, and competences–relate to job outcomes, less is known about the mechanisms underlying these relationships. In the present study, we address this issue by examining the role of within- and between-person variation in CSE in the relationship between work pressure and task performance. We hypothesized that (a) work pressure relates to task performance in a curvilinear way, (b) state CSE mediates the curvilinear relationship between work pressure and task performance, and (c) the relationship between work pressure and state CSE is moderated by trait CSE. Our hypotheses were tested via a 10-day daily diary study with 55 employees in which trait CSE was measured at baseline, while work pressure, task performance, and state CSE were assessed on a daily basis. Bayesian multilevel path analysis showed that work pressure affects task performance via state CSE, with state CSE increasing as long as the employee feels that (s)he is able to handle the work pressure, while it decreases when the level of work pressure exceeds the employees’ coping abilities. Moreover, we found that for people low on trait CSE, the depleting effect of work pressure via state CSE happens for low levels of work pressure, while for people high in trait CSE the depleting effect is located at high levels of work pressure. Together, our findings suggest that the impact of work pressure on task performance is driven by a complex interplay of between- and within-person differences in CSE. PMID:26579053

  13. Evaluation of the Effect of Perceived Social Support on Promoting Self-Care Behaviors of Heart Failure Patients Referred to The Cardiovascular Research Center of Isfahan

    PubMed Central

    Khaledi, Gholam Hassan; Mostafavi, Firoozeh; Eslami, Ahmad Ali; Rooh Afza, Hamidreza; Mostafavi, Firoozeh; Akbar, Hassanzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Self-care is one of the most important aspects of treatment in patients with heart failure and ranks among the most important coping strategies against the events and stresses of life. Perceived social support plays an important role in performing self-care behaviors in these patients. Objectives: This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of perceived social support on promoting self-care behaviors among heart failure patients. Patients and Methods: This educational intervention with a randomized control group was performed on 64 heart failure patients referred to The Cardiovascular Research Center of Isfahan. The study population was divided randomly into two groups of intervention and control. The indicators of self-care behavior and perceived social support (before, immediately after, and 2 months after the intervention) were completed by the two groups. The intervention group received educational interventions in 120-minute sessions once a week for 4 weeks. SPSS software (version 20) was used for data analysis in addition to methods of descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: Based on the obtained results, educational intervention was effective in the improvement of perceived social support among our heart failure patients. The results also showed that an increase in perceived social support significantly promoted self-care behaviors in the case group after the intervention compared with the control group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Perceived social support played an important role in improving the performance of self-care behaviors in our heart failure patients. Given the strengths of the present study, these findings can be considered in future research in this domain. PMID:26328063

  14. Re-evaluation of Pre-pump Arterial Pressure to Avoid Inadequate Dialysis and Hemolysis: Importance of Prepump Arterial Pressure Monitoring in Hemodialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Eriko; Nagai, Kojiro; Takeuchi, Risa; Noda, Yasuhiro; Makino, Tomomi; Chikata, Yusuke; Hann, Michael; Yoshimoto, Sakiya; Ono, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Sayo; Tamaki, Masanori; Murakami, Taichi; Matsuura, Motokazu; Abe, Hideharu; Doi, Toshio

    2015-07-01

    Prepump arterial pressure (PreAP) is monitored to avoid generating excessive negative pressure. The National Kidney Foundation K/DOQI clinical practice guidelines for vascular access recommend that PreAP should not fall below -250 mm Hg because excessive negative PreAP can lead to a decrease in the delivery of blood flow, inadequate dialysis, and hemolysis. Nonetheless, these recommendations are consistently disregarded in clinical practice and pressure sensors are often removed from the dialysis circuit. Thus far, delivered blood flow has been reported to decrease at values more negative than -150 mm Hg of PreAP. These values have been analyzed by an ultrasonic flowmeter and not directly measured. Furthermore, no known group has evaluated whether PreAP-induced hemolysis occurs at a particular threshold. Therefore, the aim of this study was to clarify the importance of PreAP in the prediction of inadequate dialysis and hemolysis. By using different diameter needles, human blood samples from healthy volunteers were circulated in a closed dialysis circuit. The relationship between PreAP and delivered blood flow or PreAP and hemolysis was investigated. We also investigated the optimal value for PreAP using several empirical monitoring methods, such as a pressure pillow. Our investigation indicated that PreAP is a critical factor in the determination of delivered blood flow and hemolysis, both of which occured at pressure values more negative than -150 mm Hg. With the exception of direct pressure monitoring, commonly used monitoring methods for PreAP were determined to be ineffective. We propose that the use of a vacuum monitor would permit regular measurement of PreAP. PMID:25940509

  15. Comparative evaluation of calcium-sensitizing agents, pimobendan and SCH00013, on the myocardial function of canine pacing-induced model of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hamabe, Lina; Kawamura, Keisuke; Kim, Soo-Min; Yoshiyuki, Rieko; Fukayama, Toshiharu; Shimizu, Miki; Fukushima, Ryuji; Tanaka, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    Pimobendan and SCH00013 are calcium sensitizers that possess dual action of calcium sensitization and phosphodiesterase-III inhibition. This study was conducted to comparatively evaluate the effect of these medications on the myocardial function of the canine pacing-induced heart failure model using echocardiography. Heart failure was induced in 20 dogs, to which pimobendan and two different doses of SCH00013 were administered orally to 15 dogs for 3 weeks, and the remaining 5 dogs served as the control. Cardiac evaluations were performed at baseline, week 1, week 2, and week 3. Significant thinning and dilation of the left ventricles, with systolic dysfunction, indicated by reduction of fractional shortening (FS) and strain values, were observed with a low dose of SCH00013. Whereas, although systolic dysfunction was observed with reduction of FS and radial strain, significant dilation and thinning of the left ventricles and reduction of circumferential strain were not observed with pimobendan. Pimobendan had a potent positive inotropic effect, with little effect on synchronicity, while low-dose SCH00013 had a weaker positive inotropic effect but was able to sustain synchronicity. Although, it failed to show significant statistical differences, the results of this study allow speculations that administration of pimobendan and SCH00013 may have differing effect on the myocardial function in the canine pacinginduced heart failure model. PMID:24599141

  16. Understanding Blood Pressure Readings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Understanding Blood Pressure Readings Updated:Aug 17,2016 Blood pressure is typically ... Your doctor should evaluate unusually low blood pressure readings. How is high blood pressure diagnosed? Your healthcare ...

  17. Pressure distribution method for ex-situ evaluation of flow distribution in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, S.; Mueller, S.

    2015-04-01

    Fuel cells for automotive applications consist of cells with large active areas. The active area is generally between 150 cm2 and 400 cm2. The reaction gases and the cooling media are distributed via bipolar plates to the reaction zones. Understanding local and cell wide gas distribution within the flow field at high current densities greater than 2.0 A/cm2 is a key factor regarding efficiency at low stoichiometry, lambda less than 2. In this paper a new method is introduced, which can be used as ex-situ evaluation of flow distribution. The gas pressure distribution is mapped with an array of 5 × 12 membrane differential pressure sensors by measuring the static pressure locally against the outlet pressure. Below a differential pressure of 100 mbar the signal measurement accuracy is ±2.5 mbar. This is demonstrated in a flow field with an active area of 250 cm2. The sensors are located next to the micro porous layer of the gas diffusion layer to avoid any impact of dynamic pressure. The effect of the intrusion of gas diffusion layer material into the flow channels on the fluid distribution is evaluated at clamping pressures between 0.6 MPa and 4.2 MPa.

  18. Evaluation of a new sitting concept designed for prevention of pressure ulcer on the buttock using finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Dohyung; Lin, Fang; Hendrix, Ronald W.; Moran, Brian; Fasanati, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Excessive compressive load induces pressure related soft tissue damage, i.e. pressure ulcer (PU), in buttock area in wheelchair users. In solving this problem, our previous study has introduced a concept of Off-Loading sitting, which partially removes the ischial support to reduce pressure under buttocks. However, the effect of this sitting concept has only been evaluated using the interface pressure and tissue perfusion measurements. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the Off-Loading posture for its ability to reduce internal pressure and stress in deep buttock tissues. This evaluation was performed on a 3D finite element (FE) model which was established and validated in a sitting posture and has realistic material properties and boundary conditions. FE analysis in this study confirmed that the pressure relief provided by Off-Loading posture created profound effect in reducing the mechanical stress within deep tissues. It was concluded that Off-Loading posture may prove beneficial in preventing sitting related PU. PMID:17922158

  19. EVALUATION OF CERAMIC FILTERS FOR HIGH-TEMPERATURE/HIGH-PRESSURE FINE PARTICULATE CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    High temperature gas turbines used to generate electric power require gas streams virtually free of particulate matter. Gas streams from high temperature, high pressure coal processes, such as low Btu gasification and pressurized fluidized bed combustion, require considerable par...

  20. The Relationship Between Initial Physical Examination Findings and Failure on Objective Validity Testing During Neuropsychological Evaluation After Pediatric Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Provance, Aaron J.; Terhune, E. Bailey; Cooley, Christine; Carry, Patrick M.; Connery, Amy K.; Engelman, Glenn H.; Kirkwood, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The symptomatology after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is complex as symptoms are subjective and nonspecific. It is important to differentiate symptoms as neurologically based or caused by noninjury factors. Symptom exaggeration has been found to influence postinjury presentation, and objective validity tests are used to help differentiate these cases. This study examines how concussed patients seen for initial medical workup may present with noncredible effort during follow-up neuropsychological examination and identifies physical findings during evaluation that best predict noncredible performance. Hypothesis: A portion of pediatric patients will demonstrate noncredible effort during neuropsychological testing after mTBI, predicted by failure of certain vestibular and cognitive tests during initial examination. Study Design: Retrospective cohort. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Methods: Participants (n = 80) underwent evaluation by a sports medicine physician ≤3 months from injury, were subsequently seen for a neuropsychological examination, and completed the Medical Symptom Validity Test (MSVT). Variables included results of a mental status examination (orientation), serial 7s examination, Romberg test, and heel-to-toe walking test. The primary outcome variable of interest was pass/fail of the MSVT. Results: Of the participants, 51% were male and 49% were female. Eighteen of 80 (23%) failed the MSVT. Based on univariable logistic regression analysis, the outcomes of the Romberg test (P = 0.0037) and heel-to-toe walking test(P = 0.0066) were identified as significant independent predictors of MSVT failure. In a multivariable model, outcome of Romberg test was the only significant predictor of MSVT failure. The probability of MSVT failure was 66.7% (95% CI, 33.3% to 88.9%) when a subject failed the Romberg test. Conclusion: A meaningful percentage of pediatric subjects present evidence of noncredible performance during neuropsychological examination

  1. Quantitative evaluation of changes in gait after extended cerebrospinal fluid drainage for normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Felix; Hickman, Thu-Trang; Tinl, Megan; Iracheta, Christine; Chen, Grace; Flynn, Patricia; Shuman, Matthew E; Johnson, Tatyana A; Rice, Rebecca R; Rice, Isaac M; Wiemann, Robert; Johnson, Mark D

    2016-06-01

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is characterized by gait instability, urinary incontinence and cognitive dysfunction. These symptoms can be relieved by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage, but the time course and nature of the improvements are poorly characterized. Attempts to prospectively identify iNPH patients responsive to CSF drainage by evaluating presenting gait quality or via extended lumbar cerebrospinal fluid drainage (eLCD) trials are common, but the reliability of such approaches is unclear. Here we combine eLCD trials with computerized quantitative gait measurements to predict shunt responsiveness in patients undergoing evaluation for possible iNPH. In this prospective cohort study, 50 patients presenting with enlarged cerebral ventricles and gait, urinary, and/or cognitive difficulties were evaluated for iNPH using a computerized gait analysis system during a 3day trial of eLCD. Gait speed, stride length, cadence, and the Timed Up and Go test were quantified before and during eLCD. Qualitative assessments of incontinence and cognition were obtained throughout the eLCD trial. Patients who improved after eLCD underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement, and symptoms were reassessed serially over the next 3 to 15months. There was no significant difference in presenting gait characteristics between patients who improved after drainage and those who did not. Gait improvement was not observed until 2 or more days of continuous drainage in most cases. Symptoms improved after eLCD in 60% of patients, and all patients who improved after eLCD also improved after shunt placement. The degree of improvement after eLCD correlated closely with that observed after shunt placement. PMID:26775149

  2. Evaluation of ground failure susceptibility, opportunity, and potential in the urban area of Anchorage, Alaska : final technical report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moriwaki, Yoshiharu; Idriss, I.M.

    1987-01-01

    This study was conducted as a part of the U.s. Geological Survey's Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program. The goal of this program is a reduction of earthquake hazards through the incorporation of research findings on these hazards into land-use planning decisions. An important objective of the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program is assessment of the potential for earthquake-induced ground failure in areas of high seismicity.

  3. Evaluation of factors associated with failure of tuberculosis treatment under DOTS in northern Islamic Republic of Iran.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Kh Ali; Ghayoomi, A; Maghsoudloo, D

    2016-02-01

    Tuberculosis treatment failure remains a major health problem in many parts of the Islamic Republic of Iran. This study was conducted to identify the risk factors associated with failure of tuberculosis treatment under the DOTS strategy in two cities of Golestan province. A retrospective cohort study in 2012-2013 was conducted on 167 smearpositive tuberculosis patients monitored under DOTS. Demographic, clinical and treatment outcome factors and social determinants of health were recorded for each patient. Multivariate regression analysis found that the strongest predictors of tuberculosis treatment failure were: being infected with other diseases (OR 9.35; 95% CI: 3.01-29.1), male sex (OR 5.03; 95% CI: 1.58-16.1), Turkoman ethnicity (OR 11.0; 95% CI: 2.00-60.1), family history of tuberculosis (OR 0.21; 95% CI: 0.05-0.96) and household size (OR 1.21; 95% CI: 0.99-1.48). Recommendations include better follow-up for patients with other diseases and facilitating access to treatment, especially for Turkoman patients. PMID:27180736

  4. Spectral evaluation of aging effects on blood pressure and heart rate variations in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Singh, D; Vinod, K; Saxena, S C; Deepak, K K

    2006-01-01

    The background to heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV), and their determinants and physiological correlates, remain obscure. The impact of age must be taken into account if HRV and BPV are used for predictive purposes in clinical settings. Healthy subjects show wide inter-individual variation in their heart rate behaviour and the factors affecting heart rate dynamics are not well known. This paper has undertaken to evaluate heart rate variability (HRV) and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in a random sample of subjects without evidence of heart disease, and to estimate the relation of HRV and BPV behaviour to age. The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of ageing on HRV and BPV for simultaneous recordings of electrocardiograph (ECG) and blood pressure (BP) signals at rest in healthy subjects. We studied eight young (21-34 years old) and eight elderly (68-85 years old) rigorously screened subjects from the Fantasia Database to make the reproducibility and comparability of the results more extensive. Time- and frequency-domain analysis of HRV and BPV was performed on 5-minute ectopic-free recordings. BRS on the heart was estimated by frequency-domain analysis of spontaneous variability of systolic blood pressure (SBP) and RR interval. It has been observed that compared to young the elderly subjects have (i) diminished HRV; (ii) a shift in the power spectral density and median frequency to low frequency side for HRV and to higher frequency side for BPV; and (iii) increased low-frequency alpha index and decreased high-frequency alpha index of BRS with overall alpha index augmented. The results convey that normal ageing in the absence of disease is associated with lesser parasympathetic regulation of heart rate. Thus it is concluded that the age is an important factor to be considered for prognosis and diagnosis by HRV and BPV. For reliable clinical applications, more research needs to be done on a broad spectrum of subjects. In

  5. 77 FR 69541 - Technical Report Evaluating the Effectiveness of Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS) in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ... April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477) or you may visit http://www.regulations.gov . Please send two paper copies... Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS) in Proper Tire Pressure Maintenance AGENCY: National Highway Traffic... its existing Safety Standard 138, Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems. The report's title is:...

  6. Development and Evaluation of an Affordable Real-Time Qualitative Assay for Determining HIV-1 Virological Failure in Plasma and Dried Blood Spots

    PubMed Central

    Kliphuis, Aletta; Bronze, Michelle; Wallis, Carole L.; Kityo, Cissy; Balinda, Sheila; Stevens, Wendy; Spieker, Nicole; de Oliveira, Tulio; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Schuurman, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Virological failure (VF) has been identified as the earliest, most predictive determinant of HIV-1 antiretroviral treatment (ART) failure. Due to the high cost and complexity of virological monitoring, VF assays are rarely performed in resource-limited settings (RLS). Rather, ART failure is determined by clinical monitoring and to a large extent immunological monitoring. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a low-cost, dried blood spot (DBS)-compatible qualitative assay to determine VF, in accordance with current WHO guideline recommendations for therapy switching in RLS. The assay described here is an internally controlled qualitative real-time PCR targeting the conserved long terminal repeat domain of HIV-1. This assay was applied to HIV-1 subtypes A to H and further evaluated on HIV-1 clinical plasma samples from South Africa (n = 191) and Tanzania (n = 42). Field evaluation was performed in Uganda using local clinical plasma samples (n = 176). Furthermore, assay performance was evaluated for DBS. This assay is able to identify VF for all major HIV-1 group M subtypes with equal specificity and has a lower detection limit of 1.00E+03 copies/ml for plasma samples and 5.00E+03 copies/ml for DBS. Comparative testing yielded accurate VF determination for therapy switching in 89% to 96% of samples compared to gold standards. The assay is robust and flexible, allowing for “open platform” applications and producing results comparable to those of commercial assays. Assay design enables application in laboratories that can accommodate real-time PCR equipment, allowing decentralization of testing to some extent. Compatibility with DBS extends access of sampling and thus access to this test to remote settings. PMID:23596235

  7. Comparative analysis of pressure vessel integrity for various LOCA conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çolak, Üner; Özdere, Oya

    2001-09-01

    In this study, integrity analysis is performed for a classical four loop PWR pressure vessel fabricated from SA533B type ferritic steel. Pressure vessel behavior is analyzed by deterministic and probabilistic methods under transient conditions, which may cause pressurized thermal shock (PTS). In deterministic analysis, the change of material properties and the mechanical state of the vessel are analyzed against changes in coolant pressure and temperature. Probabilistic analysis is performed to obtain pressure vessel beltline region weld failure probabilities in transient conditions. Overall vessel failure probabilities are evaluated based on the results of deterministic analyses. Computer code VISA-II is utilized for the calculation of vessel failure probabilities. Among three cases considered in this study, a medium break loss of coolant accident induced by a 50 cm2 break in the hot leg yields the highest vessel rupture probability. The maximum nil ductility temperature in all cases is still below the NRC PTS limit.

  8. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... together. About Rise Above HF Rise Above Heart Failure seeks to increase the dialogue about HF and improve the lives of people affected by the condition through awareness, education and support. Through the initiative, AHA strives to ...

  9. Testicular failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood tests may show a low level of testosterone and high levels of prolactin, FSH , and LH . ... testes will be ordered. Testicular failure and low testosterone level may be hard to diagnose in older ...

  10. A multicenter evaluation of oral pressure therapy for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Colrain, Ian M.; Black, Jed; Siegel, Lawrence C.; Bogan, Richard K.; Becker, Philip M.; Farid-Moayer, Mehran; Goldberg, Rochelle; Lankford, D. Alan; Goldberg, Andrew N.; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the impact of a novel noninvasive oral pressure therapy (OPT) (Winx®, ApniCure) system on polysomnographic measures of sleep-disordered breathing, sleep architecture, and sleep stability in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Subjects and methods A 4-week, multicenter, prospective, open-label, randomized, crossover, first-night order of control vs treatment, single-arm trial was conducted in five American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) – accredited sleep clinics and one research laboratory. Sixty-three subjects (analysis cohort) were studied from a screening cohort of 367 subjects. The analysis cohort was 69.8% men, ages 53.6 ± 8.9 years (mean ± SD), body mass index of 32.3 ± 4.5 kg/m2, with mild to severe OSA. At treatment initiation, subjects received random assignment to one night with and one without (control) treatment, and they were assessed again following 28 nights of treatment. Breathing and sleep architecture were assessed each night based on blind scoring by a single centralized scorer using AASM criteria. Results Average nightly usage across the take-home period was 6.0 ± 1.4 h. There were no severe or serious device-related adverse events (AEs). Median apnea–hypopnea index (AHI) was 27.5 events per hour on the control night, 13.4 events per hour on the first treatment night, and 14.8 events per hour after 28 days of treatment. A clinically significant response (treatment AHI ≤10/h and ≤50% of control values) was seen in 20 of the 63 subjects evaluated. Rapid eye movement percentage (REM%) was significantly increased, and N1%, stage shifts to N1 sleep, overall stage shifts, total awakenings, and arousals per hour were all significantly reduced at both treatment nights compared to controls. Mean Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) was significantly reduced from 12.1 to 8.6 (Cohen d effect size, 0.68) in those untreated for two or more weeks prior to OPT study participation and remained unchanged in subjects who

  11. Evaluation of Data-Logging Transducer to Passively Collect Pressure Vessel p/T History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wnuk, Stephen P.; Le, Son; Loew, Raymond A.

    2013-01-01

    Pressure vessels owned and operated by NASA are required to be regularly certified per agency policy. Certification requires an assessment of damage mechanisms and an estimation of vessel remaining life. Since detail service histories are not typically available for most pressure vessels, a conservative estimate of vessel pressure/temperature excursions is typically used in assessing fatigue life. This paper details trial use of a data-logging transducer to passively obtain actual pressure and temperature service histories of pressure vessels. The approach was found to have some potential for cost savings and other benefits in certain cases.

  12. Evaluation of oscillometric and Doppler ultrasonic devices for blood pressure measurements in anesthetized and conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Vachon, Catherine; Belanger, Marie C; Burns, Patrick M

    2014-08-01

    Two non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) devices (oscillometry and Doppler) were compared to invasive blood pressure using a Bland-Altman analysis, in anesthetized and conscious dogs. When considering the systolic arterial pressure only during general anesthesia, both NIBP devices slightly underestimated the systolic arterial blood pressure however the precision and the limits of agreement for the Doppler were of a greater magnitude. This indicates a worse clinical performance by the Doppler. The performance of both NIBP devices deteriorated as measured in conscious animals. In general, for the oscillometric device, determination of invasive diastolic and mean arterial pressures was better than the invasive systolic arterial pressure. Overall, the oscillometric device satisfied more of the criteria set by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine consensus statement. Based upon these results, the oscillometric device is more reliable than the Doppler in the determination of blood pressure in healthy medium to large breed dogs. PMID:24924217

  13. Evaluation of personnel blood pressure and its risk factors in university affiliated medical centers: Iran’s Health Day 2013

    PubMed Central

    Saberi Isfeedvajani, Mohsen; Karimi Zarchi, Ali Akbar; Musavi Heris, Abbas; Sajjadi, Fatema; Tavana, Ali Mehrabi

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypertension is a risk factor for life threatening diseases such as cerebrovascular accidents, coronary artery diseases, congestive heart failure and chronic renal failure. The prevalence of non-communicable diseases such as hypertension and diabetes including obesity has increased over the past few years in Iran. The first step for modification of cardiovascular diseases in a defined population is to assess the prevalence of their risk factors. This study was conduceted to assess personnel blood pressure and its risk factors in one of the medical universities of Tehran in the Health Day of 2013. Methods: This cross sectional study was performed from May 19, 2013 to May 24, 2013 (I.R. of Iran’s Health Weak) in one of the medical universities of Tehran. Participants completed voluntarily a researcher-made questionnaire which composed of demographic characteristics and variables about risk factors and preventive factors of cardiovascular diseases such as smoking, history of diabetes, history of hypertension, physical exercise status and so on. Blood pressure was measured by mercury sphygmomanometer and weight and height were measured by a ground analogue scale. Results: Of 195 persons participated in this study, 180 persons (92.3%) were male. The mean age of participants was 33.75 (±9.87) yr. The mean of systolic and diastolic blood pressure was 114.44 (±8.67) mmHg and 73.06 (±8.45) mmHg, respectively. The prevalence of overweight, obesity, prehypertension and hypertension was 41.7%, 17.8%, 40.4% and 11.7% respectively. Only 8 persons (5.6%) were cigarette smokers. Conclusion: Despite the low prevalence of hypertension in our samples, the high prevalence of prehypertension and overweight need great attention. Interventions like life style modification could be effective in prevention of hypertension. PMID:25250277

  14. [The evaluation of the end-ejection pressure-length relation as an index of regional contractility].

    PubMed

    Perlini, S; Meyer, T E; Bernardi, L; Soldà, P L; Calciati, A; Finardi, G; Foëx, P

    1992-08-01

    Although end-systolic pressure-length relationship (ESPLR) is now widely used as a regional substitute for the end-systolic pressure-volume relationship, there are some reservations about its use as an index of systolic performance. This study aimed at assessing whether by using end-ejection (zero aortic flow) as a definition of end-systole, ESPLR can be used to characterize myocardial performance independent of load, and if the choice of the region where to implant the sonomicrometers is critical. Ten anaesthetized dogs (16 +/- 2 kg) were instrumented with a left ventricular (LV) pressure micromanometer and an aortic flow probe. Sonomicrometers were implanted in the apical (L1) and the mid-ventricular (L2) regions of the anterior LV wall, and in the basal region of the lateral wall (L3). End-systolic pressure-length relationships were obtained during acute preload reduction induced by the inflation of a vena caval balloon. This evaluation was repeated after increasing end-diastolic pressure to 14-18 mmHg (delta PL), after increasing systolic pressure by 15 (delta P-I) and 25 mmHg (delta P-II) with graded descending aorta occlusion, and during dobutamine infusions at 2.5 (Db 2.5) and 5 micrograms/kg/min (Db5). End-systolic pressure-length relationships (r > 0.97; pressure range: 70-100 mmHg) were characterized by their slopes (Ees), the extrapolated intercept at zero pressure (L0) and the values of segment length at a pressure of 75 (L75) and 100 mmHg (L100). In all the myocardial regions studied by sonomicrometry, the increments in preload and afterload did not significantly shift ESPLR.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1486579

  15. An Experimental Evaluation of HVAC-Grade Carbon-Dioxide Sensors: Part 3, Humidity, Temperature, and Pressure Sensitivity Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Som S; Maxwell, Dr. Gregory

    2010-01-01

    This is the third paper in a four-part series reporting on the test and evaluation of typical carbon-dioxide sensors used in building HVAC applications. Fifteen models of NDIR HVAC-grade CO2 sensors were tested and evaluated to determine the humidity, temperature, and pressure sensitivity of the sensors. This paper reports the performance of the sensors at various relative humidity, temperature, and pressure levels common to building HVAC applications and provides a comparison with manufacturer specifications. Among the 15 models tested, eight models have a single-lamp, single-wavelength configuration, four models have a dual-lamp, single-wavelength configuration, and three models have a single-lamp, dual-wavelength configuration. The sensors were tested in a chamber specifically fabricated for this research. A description of the apparatus and the method of test are described in Part 1 (Shrestha and Maxwell 2009). The test result showed a wide variation in humidity, temperature, and pressure sensitivity of CO2 sensors among manufacturers. In some cases, significant variations in sensor performance exist between sensors of the same model. Even the natural variation in relative humidity could significantly vary readings of some CO2 sensor readings. The effects of temperature and pressure variation on NDIR CO2 sensors are unavoidable without an algorithm to compensate for the changes. For the range of temperature and pressure variation in an air-conditioned space, the effect of pressure variation is more significant compared to the effect of temperature variation.

  16. Comparative evaluation of intraocular pressure with an air-puff tonometer versus a Goldmann applanation tonometer

    PubMed Central

    Farhood, Qasim K

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Tonometry, or measurement of intraocular pressure (IOP), is one of the most important examination procedures in ophthalmic clinics, and IOP is an important parameter in the diagnosis of glaucoma. Because there are numerous types of tonometer available, it is important to evaluate the differences in readings between different tonometers. Goldmann applanation tonometers (GATs) and noncontact air-puff tonometers (APTs) are largely available in ophthalmic clinics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of AP tonometer by comparing the measurements of IOP made using this device with those made using a GAT. Patients and methods This study involved 196 eyes from 98 study participants, all of whom were patients attending an ophthalmic outpatient clinic. Each patient’s IOP was measured using both Goldmann applanation tonometry and AP tonometry, and the difference in readings between the two methods was calculated. Results The mean IOP as measured by GAT was 13.06 ± 4.774 mmHg, while that as measured by AP tonometer was 15.91 ± 6.955 mmHg. The mean difference between the two methods of measurement was 2.72 ± 2.34 mmHg. The readings obtained by AP tonometer were higher than those obtained by GAT in 74% of patients, and this difference was most obvious when the GAT measurement of IOP exceeded 24 mmHg. No statistically significant variation in IOP was noted between the devices when the patients’ age, sex, and laterality (right and left eyes) were considered. Conclusion There is a significant difference in the measurement of IOP between GATs and AP tonometers. Goldmann applanation tonometry remains the most suitable and reliable method for measuring IOP. Because measurements of IOP by AP tonometer are usually higher than those obtained by GAT regardless of the patient’s age, sex, or laterality of eyes, AP tonometry is a suitable method for community or mass screenings of IOP. PMID:23293511

  17. Fast Simulators for Satellite Cloud Optical Centroid Pressure Retrievals, 1. Evaluation of OMI Cloud Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, J.; Vasilkov, A. P.; Gupta, Pawan; Bhartia, P. K.; Veefkind, Pepijn; Sneep, Maarten; deHaan, Johan; Polonsky, Igor; Spurr, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a relatively simple scheme for simulating retrieved cloud optical centroid pressures (OCP) from satellite solar backscatter observations. We have compared simulator results with those from more detailed retrieval simulators that more fully account for the complex radiative transfer in a cloudy atmosphere. We used this fast simulator to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of cloud OCPs from the two OMI algorithms using collocated data from CloudSat and Aqua MODIS, a unique situation afforded by the A-train formation of satellites. We find that both OMI algorithms perform reasonably well and that the two algorithms agree better with each other than either does with the collocated CloudSat data. This indicates that patchy snow/ice, cloud 3D, and aerosol effects not simulated with the CloudSat data are affecting both algorithms similarly. We note that the collocation with CloudSat occurs mainly on the East side of OMI's swath. Therefore, we are not able to address cross-track biases in OMI cloud OCP retrievals. Our fast simulator may also be used to simulate cloud OCP from output generated by general circulation models (GCM) with appropriate account of cloud overlap. We have implemented such a scheme and plan to compare OMI data with GCM output in the near future.

  18. INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE IN SOUTHERN ROCKHOPPER (EUDYPTES CHRYSOCOME) AND MACARONI PENGUINS (EUDYPTES CHRYSOLOPHUS): EVALUATION OF INFLUENCING FACTORS.

    PubMed

    Woodhouse, Sarah J; Peterson, Edward L; Schmitt, Todd; Aquino, Susette

    2016-03-01

    Ophthalmic examinations were performed on 160 macaroni penguins (Eudyptes chrysolophus) and 90 southern rockhopper penguins (Eudyptes chrysocome) at eight North American zoos and aquaria. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured using rebound tonometry while penguins were held in two different body positions. Correlations between IOP and factors including age, body position, eye pathology, and housing parameters were evaluated. Normal macaroni penguins had a mean IOP of 42.0 ± 9.7 mm Hg. Normal rockhopper penguins had a mean IOP of 32.9 ± 6.2 mm Hg. Neither species had significantly different IOP between sexes or between left and right eyes of the same penguin. In both species, there was a negative linear correlation between age and IOP. In the macaroni population, IOP was significantly higher when IOP measurement was performed before ophthalmic exam; this was not true in rockhoppers. In both species, IOP measured in a horizontal body position was significantly higher than IOP measured in a vertical body position. In both species, eyes with corneal lesions had significantly lower IOP than normal eyes. In the macaroni penguin, eyes with rubeosis iridis had significantly lower IOP than normal eyes. In macaroni penguins, eyes with cataracts had significantly lower mean IOP than normal eyes; this was not true for rockhoppers. PMID:27010282

  19. A modified Hopkinson pressure bar experiment to evaluate a damped piezoresistive MEMS accelerometer.

    SciTech Connect

    Frew, Danny Joe; Duong, Henry

    2009-03-01

    We conducted a series of modified Hopkinson pressure bar (HPB) experiments to evaluate a new, damped, high-shock accelerometer that has recently been developed by PCB Piezotronics Inc. Pulse shapers were used to create a long duration, non-dispersive stress pulse in an aluminum bar that interacted with a tungsten disk at the end of the incident bar. We measured stress at the aluminum bar-disk interface with a quartz gage and measured acceleration at the free-end of the disk with an Endevco brand 7270A and the new PCB 3991 accelerometers. The rise-time of the incident stress pulse in the aluminum bar was long enough and the disk length short enough so that the response of the disk can be approximated closely as rigid-body motion; an experimentally verified analytical model has been shown previously to support this assumption. Since the cross-sectional area and mass of the disk were known, we calculated acceleration of the rigid-disk from the quartz-gage force measurement and Newton's Second Law of Motion. Comparisons of accelerations calculated from the quartz-gage data and measured acceleration data show excellent agreement for acceleration pulses with the PCB accelerometer for peak amplitudes between 4,000 and 40,000 Gs , rise times as short as 40 microsec, and pulse durations between 150 and 320 microsec.

  20. Evaluation of pathogen inactivation on sliced cheese induced by encapsulated atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Yong, Hae In; Kim, Hyun-Joo; Park, Sanghoo; Alahakoon, Amali U; Kim, Kijung; Choe, Wonho; Jo, Cheorun

    2015-04-01

    Pathogen inactivation induced by atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) (250 W, 15 kHz, air discharge) produced in a rectangular plastic container and the effect of post-treatment storage time on inactivation were evaluated using agar plates and cheese slices. When agar plates were treated with plasma, populations of Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes showed 3.57, 6.69, and 6.53 decimal reductions at 60 s, 45 s, and 7 min, respectively. When the pathogens tested were inoculated on cheese slices, 2.67, 3.10, and 1.65 decimal reductions were achieved at the same respective treatment times. The post-treatment storage duration following plasma treatment potently affected further reduction in pathogen populations. Therefore, the newly developed encapsulated DBD-plasma system for use in a container can be applied to improve the safety of sliced cheese, and increasing post-treatment storage time can greatly enhance the system's pathogen-inactivation efficiency. PMID:25475265

  1. Evaluation of a force plate system for measuring center of pressure in railroad ballast.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hang; Merryweather, Andrew; Bloswick, Donald

    2016-05-01

    Traditional biomechanical analyses have focused primarily on the human gait across hard, flat surfaces and provide little information about human locomotion as a function of work environment or terrain. The purpose of this study was evaluation of a force plate system for measure of center of pressure (COP) in railroad ballast by comparing its accuracy across three surface conditions (hard surface, mainline ballast and walking ballast) with two configurations (level and 7° cross-slope). Custom walkways and an isolation fixture were developed to rigidly attach a force plate beneath ballast surfaces to collect the COP. The difference in COP location (ΔCOPx, y, z) between the force plate system and a calibration system (motion capture derived) were compared using repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results indicate that the effects of surface condition and configuration were not significant for ΔCOPx, y, z and no differences were found among the three surface conditions during pairwise comparison, though ΔCOPx, y, z were different between the center and corners of the force plate in ballasts for both level and cross-slope configurations. The system presented in this study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring the COP by using an isolation-fixture force plate to expand the scope of biomechanical studies on ballast surfaces that are level or cross-slope. PMID:27131198

  2. Pressure coefficient evaluation on the surface of the SONDA III model tested in the TTP Pilot Transonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, M. L. C. C.; Falcao Filho, J. B. P.; Basso, E.; Caldas, V. R.

    2015-02-01

    A test campaign of the Brazilian sounding rocket Sonda III was carried out at the Pilot Transonic Wind Tunnel, TTP. The aim of the campaign was to investigate aerodynamic phenomena taking place at the connection region of the first and second stages. Shock and expansion waves are expected at this location causing high gradients in airflow properties around the vehicle. Pressure taps located on the surface of a Sonda III half model measure local static pressures. Other measured parameters were freestream static and total pressures of the airflow. Estimated parameters were pressure coefficients and Mach numbers. Uncertainties associated with the estimated parameters were calculated by employing the Law of Propagation of Uncertainty and the Monte Carlo method. It was found that both uncertainty evaluation methods resulted in similar values. A Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation code was elaborated to help understand the changes in the flow field properties caused by the disturbances.

  3. Overall evaluation light-weight composite pressure vessel with alloy liner by acoustic emission and Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun-qing; He, Xiao-dong; Wang, Rong-guo; Liu, Wen-bo

    2013-04-01

    Light-weight carbon fiber composite pressure vessel with inner thin-wall aluminum alloy liner has main problem of local buckling during manufacture and working process. The approach of acoustic emission and Bragg grating are adapted to monitoring the light-weight composite vessel under water pressure. Two channels of acoustic emission (AE) were bonded to front dome and cylinder to monitoring the performance of the vessel withstanding maximum 4.5MPa water pressure during loading, maintaining and unloading. Meantime six fiber Bragg sensors (FBG)were attached to front dome and cylinder of the outer surface by hoop and meridian direction respectively in order to monitor the vessel behavior. Analysis indicated Bragg sensors can evaluate outer surface behavior of the vessel with pressure. AE character parameters analysis illustrated the local buckling of inner thin-wall liner.

  4. Measurement of differential pressures and radon entry in research houses and evaluation of radon control methods: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fortmann, R.C.; Rector, H.E.; Nagda, N.L.

    1988-12-01

    Experimental testing was conducted in two well-insulated bilevel research houses to evaluate the effectiveness of selected radon and radon progeny control methods and to develop a fuller understanding of the relationship between indoor-outdoor pressure differences and radon entry. Radon, radon progeny, indoor and outdoor temperatures, air infiltration rates, pressure differences, and meteorological conditions were measured continuously with an automated system. Radon and radon progeny control methods were tested in one house; the other house served as a reference to avoid the confounding effects of natural radon variation on calculations of control effectiveness. Differences in pressure between indoors and outdoors or indoors and the subslab airspace averaged less than 2 pascals throughout the year. Pressure differences were consistent with indoor-outdoor temperature differences; the downstairs of the houses were depressurized with respect to outdoors during the winter and pressurized during the summer. Seasonal differences in radon entry rates were consistent with general patterns of indoor-outdoor pressure differences, but regression techniques did not show strong correlation between pressure differences and radon entry rates. The subslab suction system was the most effective of the radon control methods tested. Radon progeny control devices tested, including common household appliances, such as ceiling fans, portable air cleaners, and electronic precipitators, reduced radon progeny levels by as much as 70 percent. 26 refs., 21 figs., 12 tabs.

  5. Disparity between adjusted and actual opening cerebrospinal fluid pressure in a patient with the Codman Hakim programmable valve: occult form of shunt failure due to head banging. Case report.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kimitoshi; Shimizu, Satoru; Utsuki, Satoshi; Suzuki, Sachio; Oka, Hidehiro; Fujii, Kiyotaka

    2006-11-01

    Although the Codman Hakim programmable valve (CHPV) system is popular, several problems arising from its design have been described. The authors report an additional cause of shunt failure associated with the use of the CHPV system. A 7-year-old girl who had previously undergone placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt with the CHPV system was admitted in a comatose state. Radiography did not demonstrate any breakage or change in the opening pressure of the valve. Manual pumping of the valve resulted in neurological improvement and shrinkage of the girl's ventricles. However, ventriculomegaly was again observed several hours later, and an emergency valve revision was performed. The manufacturer's examination of the extracted valve revealed a crack on the surface of the hard plastic housing covering the valve chamber, which appeared to be suggestive of some type of blunt trauma. In addition, the flat spring that transmitted resistance from the pressure control cam to the valve ball was deformed in such a manner that it caused excessive pressure against the valve ball. Because of this deformity, the actual opening pressure in this patient had reached a maximum level of 226 mm H2O instead of the adjusted pressure of 60 mm H2O. In patients with the CHPV system whose medical history is difficult to ascertain, the possibility of damage to the valve spring and the need for a prompt revision surgery should be considered. The authors conclude that placement of the CHPV system may be contraindicated in patients with a known habit of head banging. PMID:17328269

  6. Potential application of in vivo imaging of impaired lymphatic duct to evaluate the severity of pressure ulcer in mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasuya, Akira; Sakabe, Jun-Ichi; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2014-02-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is a cause of pressure ulcer. However, a mechanism underlying the IR injury-induced lymphatic vessel damage remains unclear. We investigated the alterations of structure and function of lymphatic ducts in a mouse cutaneous IR model. And we suggested a new method for evaluating the severity of pressure ulcer. Immunohistochemistry showed that lymphatic ducts were totally vanished by IR injury, while blood vessels were relatively preserved. The production of harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) was increased in injured tissue. In vitro study showed a high vulnerability of lymphatic endothelial cells to ROS. Then we evaluated the impaired lymphatic drainage using an in vivo imaging system for intradermally injected indocyanine green (ICG). The dysfunction of ICG drainage positively correlated with the severity of subsequent cutaneous changes. Quantification of the lymphatic duct dysfunction by this imaging system could be a useful strategy to estimate the severity of pressure ulcer.

  7. Performance Evaluation Tests of Insulated Pressure Vessels for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinoza-Loza, F

    2002-03-01

    Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen. This flexibility results in multiple advantages with respect to compressed hydrogen tanks or low-pressure liquid hydrogen tanks. Our work is directed at verifying that commercially available aluminum-lined, fiber-wrapped pressure vessels can be safely used to store liquid hydrogen. A series of tests have been conducted, and the results indicate that no significant vessel damage has resulted from cryogenic operation. Future activities include a demonstration project in which the insulated pressure vessels will be installed and tested on two vehicles. A draft standard will also be generated for certification of insulated pressure vessels.

  8. Evaluation of the current trend of nalidixic acid susceptibility in typhoidal Salmonellae; a marker of therapeutic failure for the fluoroquinolones

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, S; Imtiaz, A; Usman, J; Kaleem, F; Hassan, A

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives Typhoid is a major health problem faced by the developing countries like Pakistan. More than 20 million cases are reported annually worldwide. Currently fluoroquinolones are the drugs of choice to treat typhoid fever. In vivo resistance to fluoroquinolones leading to therapeutic failure is developing rapidly and is becoming a major concern for the clinicians. The objective of this study was to determine the sensitivity pattern of Nalidixic acid over the last four years Material and Methods A descriptive cross sectional study was carried out at the Microbiology Department of the Army Medical College, National University of Sciences and Technology, Rawalpindi from January 2006 to December 2009. All the isolates were dealt with standard microbiological procedures. The antimicrobial sensitivity of Nalidixic acid and Ciprofloxacin was determined using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method as per the guidelines of Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI). Results Out of 240 isolates, 111 were Salmonella typhi and 129 were Salmonella paratyphi A. The resistance of the typhoidal Salmonella to Nalidixic acid has reached significant levels and it seems only a matter of time when hundred percent resistance will be encountered. All isolates were sensitive to Ciprofloxacin on disc diffusion method. Conclusion Resistance to Nalidixic acid predicting therapeutic failure with fluoroquinolones is on a steady rise. PMID:22347587

  9. A field evaluation of the predictive value of a hand-held drum pressure detection device.

    PubMed

    Pannell, Michael A; Brandt, Michael T; Boatright, Daniel T

    2004-05-01

    According to Environmental Protection Agency estimates, 20% of hazardous waste drums currently managed in the 6500 known, uncontrolled Superfund removal or remediation sites contain some degree of elevated internal pressurization. This estimate increases to 90% during the summer months, and, overall, up to 5% of the drums stored in active treatment, storage, and disposal facilities may be pressurized. The ability to identify pressurized drums in real-time would enhance worker health and safety, reduce the potential for environmental contamination, and minimize property damage. A prototype hand-held drum pressure detection device was field tested at an active Resource Conservation and Recovery Act mixed waste operation using acoustic resonance spectroscopy technology to identify pressurized drums. The waste operation used a drum venting system that measured the actual drum pressure of retrieved drums. Drum venting system data were analyzed to quantify the ability of the drum pressure detection device to correctly identify drums with elevated internal pressure. After 456 drums were measured, the dichotomous pressure data (pressurized vs. nonpressurized) were analyzed. The relationship between the drum venting system and drum pressure detection device pressure data was found to be statistically significant. With alpha and beta values of 0.05, the negative predictive value was 0.94, the positive predictive value was 0.47, the sensitivity was 0.82, and the specificity was 0.77. Although capable of identifying nonpressurized drums, this instrument may not be appropriate for general use. Study results and critical improvements necessary to improve the instrument's predictive value, specificity, and sensitivity are presented. PMID:15238340

  10. Loads and pressure evaluation of the flow around a flapping wing from instantaneous 3D velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tronchin, Thibaut; David, Laurent; Farcy, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The flow around a flapping wing is characterized by an unsteady evolution of three-dimensional vortices, which are one of the main sources of loads. The difficulty in directly measuring such low forces by means of sensors and the need of the characterization of the evolution of the flow have lead to the evaluation of loads using the integral form of the momentum equation. This paper describes methods for evaluating instantaneous loads and three-dimensional pressure fields using 3D3C velocity fields only. An evaluation of the accuracy of these methods using DNS velocity fields is presented. Loads and pressure fields are then calculated using scanning tomography PIV velocity fields, around a NACA 0012 airfoil for a flapping motion in a water tank at a Reynolds number of 1,000. The results suggest a sufficient accuracy of calculated pressure fields for a global analysis of the topology of the flow and for the evaluation of loads by integrating the calculated pressure field over the surface of the wing.

  11. Evaluation of a Quartz Bourdon Pressure Gage of Wind Tunnel Mach Number Control System Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapin, W. G.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study was undertaken to determine the feasibility of using the National Transonic Facility's high accuracy Mach number measurement system as part of a closed loop Mach number control system. The theoretical and experimental procedures described are applicable to the engineering design of pressure control systems. The results show that the dynamic response characteristics of the NTF Mach number gage (a Ruska DDR-6000 quartz absolute pressure gage) coupled to a typical length of pressure tubing were only marginally acceptable within a limited range of the facility's total pressure envelope and could not be used in the Mach number control system.

  12. Pathophysiological basis of orthostatic hypotension in autonomic failure

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Adrianus A J; Halliwill, John R; Low, Phillip A; Wieling, Wouter

    1999-01-01

    In patients with autonomic failure orthostatic hypotension results from an impaired capacity to increase vascular resistance during standing. This fundamental defect leads to increased downward pooling of venous blood and a consequent reduction in stroke volume and cardiac output that exaggerates the orthostatic fall in blood pressure. The location of excessive venous blood pooling has not been established so far, but present data suggest that the abdominal compartment and perhaps leg skin vasculature are the most likely candidates. To improve the orthostatic tolerance in patients with autonomic failure, protective measures that reduce excessive orthostatic blood pooling have been developed and evaluated. These measures include physical counter-manoeuvres and abdominal compression. PMID:10432334

  13. SAMPLING SYSTEM EVALUATION FOR HIGH-TEMPERATURE, HIGH-PRESSURE PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a sampling system designed for the high temperatures and high pressures found in pressurized fluidized-bed combustors (PFBC). The system uses an extractive sampling approach, withdrawing samples from the process stream for complete analysis of particulate siz...

  14. Rewards & pitfalls of using treating pressure analysis for evaluating fracture design

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, D.D.

    1996-12-31

    Analyzing pressures during a fracture treatment provides insight into the hydraulic fracturing process, and is widely used today. In this paper, case histories are reviewed and guidelines are presented to identify pitfalls and establish strategies in pressure-analysis methods and procedures.

  15. Instrumentation Report No. 2: identification, evaluation, and remedial actions related to transducer failures at the spent fuel test-climax

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, W.C.; Carlson, R.C.; Rector, N.L.

    1981-11-30

    The Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) is a test of the feasibility of safe and reliable short-term storage and retrieval of spent fuel from commercial nuclear reactors. In support of operational and technical goals of the test, about 850 channels of instrumentation have been installed at the SFT-C. Failure of several near-field instruments began less than six months after emplacement of 11 canisters of spent fuel and activation of six thermally similar simulators. The failed units were linear potentiometers (used to make displacement measurements) and vibrating wire stressmeters (used to make change-in-stress measurements). This report discusses the observed problems and remedial actions taken to date.

  16. Evaluation of the Structural Response and Failure of a Full-Scale Stitched Graphite-Epoxy Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Bush, Harold G.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2001-01-01

    Analytical and experimental results for an all-composite full-scale wing box are presented. The wing box is representative of a section of a 220-passenger commercial transport aircraft wing box and was designed and constructed by The Boeing Company as part of the NASA Advanced Subsonics Technology (AST) program. The semi-span wing was fabricated from a graphite-epoxy material system with cover panels and spars held together using Kevlar stitches through the thickness. No mechanical fasteners were used to hold the stiffeners to the skin of the cover panels. Tests were conducted with and without low-speed impact damage, discrete source damage and repairs. Upbending, down-bending and brake roll loading conditions were applied. The structure with nonvisible impact damage carried 97% of Design Ultimate Load prior to failure through a lower cover panel access hole. Finite element and experimental results agree for the global response of the structure.

  17. Long-Term Efficacy and Patterns of Failure After Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Molecular Assay-Based Clonality Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Vicini, Frank A. . E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu; Antonucci, J. Vito; Wallace, Michelle R.N.; Gilbert, Samuel; Goldstein, Neal S.; Kestin, Larry; Chen, Peter; Kunzman, Jonathan; Boike, Thomas; Benitez, Pamela; Martinez, Alvaro

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the long-term efficacy and cosmetic results of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) by reviewing our institution's experience. Methods and Materials: A total of 199 patients with early-stage breast cancer were treated prospectively with adjuvant APBI after lumpectomy using interstitial brachytherapy. All patients had negative margins, 82% had Stage I disease, median tumor size was 1.1 cm, and 12% had positive lymph nodes. The median follow-up for surviving patients was 8.6 years. Fifty-three patients (27%) have been followed for {>=}10 years. Results: Six ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTRs) were observed, for a 5-year and 10-year actuarial rate of 1.6% and 3.8%, respectively. A total of three regional nodal failures were observed, for a 10-year actuarial rate of 1.6%. Five contralateral breast cancers developed, for a 5- and 10-year actuarial rate of 2.2% and 5.2%, respectively. The type of IBTR (clonally related vs. clonally distinct) was analyzed using a polymerase chain reaction-based loss of heterozygosity assay. Eighty-three percent of IBTRs (n = 5) were classified as clonally related. Multiple clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related factors were analyzed for an association with the development of an IBTR, regional nodal failure, or contralateral breast cancer. On multivariate analysis, no variable was associated with any of these events. Cosmetic results were rated as excellent/good in 99% of patients. Conclusions: Long-term results with APBI using interstitial brachytherapy continue to demonstrate excellent long-term local and regional control rates and cosmetic results. According to a polymerase chain reaction-based loss of heterozygosity assay, 83% of recurrences were classified as clonally related.

  18. Effect of calcium hydroxide on the bond strength of two bioactive cements and SEM evaluation of failure patterns.

    PubMed

    Centenaro, Carolina Fabiana; Santini, Manuela Favarin; da Rosa, Ricardo Abreu; Nascimento, Angela Longo do; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Só, Marcus Vinícius Reis

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of calcium hydroxide on bond strength of two bioactive cements. One-mm thick longitudinal slabs of root dentin were obtained from freshly extracted human monorradicular teeth (n = 60). Simulated root perforations (1 mm in diameter) were prepared in radicular dentin. Thereafter, the specimens were randomly divided into two groups (n = 30), according to the repair material: MTA (n = 30) and Biodentine (BD) (n = 30). Next, the specimens in each group were further randomly divided into 4 equal subgroups (n = 15) according to the prior use of Ca(OH)2: MTA/Ca(OH)2 and BD/Ca(OH)2 groups: perforations were filled with calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2] and after 7 days, it was removed, and MTA and BD groups: calcium hydroxide dressing were not used. Push-out test was performed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Bond strength values were compared statistically using Kruskal-Wallis test and Dunn's post-test at a significance level of 5%. The failure analysis was performed using a stereoscopic and classified as adhesive, cohesive and mixed. The push-out bond strength of MTA and BD was not affected by the prior use of Ca(OH)2 (p > 0.05). BD yielded higher push-out bond strength values compared with those of MTA, regardless of the use of Ca(OH)2 (p < 0.05). Mixed failures were predominant in all groups. Ca(OH)2 placement for perforations sealing does not alter the bond strength of MTA and BD to the root dentin. BD presented higher bond strength values than MTA. SCANNING 38:240-244, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26331376

  19. Inducible Knock-Down of the Mineralocorticoid Receptor in Mice Disturbs Regulation of the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System and Attenuates Heart Failure Induced by Pressure Overload

    PubMed Central

    Montes-Cobos, Elena; Li, Xiao; Fischer, Henrike J.; Sasse, André; Kügler, Sebastian; Didié, Michael; Toischer, Karl; Fassnacht, Martin; Dressel, Ralf; Reichardt, Holger M.

    2015-01-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) inactivation in mice results in early postnatal lethality. Therefore we generated mice in which MR expression can be silenced during adulthood by administration of doxycycline (Dox). Using a lentiviral approach, we obtained two lines of transgenic mice harboring a construct that allows for regulatable MR inactivation by RNAi and concomitant expression of eGFP. MR mRNA levels in heart and kidney of inducible MR knock-down mice were unaltered in the absence of Dox, confirming the tightness of the system. In contrast, two weeks after Dox administration MR expression was significantly diminished in a variety of tissues. In the kidney, this resulted in lower mRNA levels of selected target genes, which was accompanied by strongly increased serum aldosterone and plasma renin levels as well as by elevated sodium excretion. In the healthy heart, gene expression and the amount of collagen were unchanged despite MR levels being significantly reduced. After transverse aortic constriction, however, cardiac hypertrophy and progressive heart failure were attenuated by MR silencing, fibrosis was unaffected and mRNA l