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Sample records for faint object infrared

  1. NIFTE: The Near Infrared Faint-Object Telescope Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, James J.; Lange, Andrew E.; Matsumoto, T.; Eisenhardt, Peter B.; Hacking, Perry B.; Schember, Helene R.

    1994-01-01

    The high sensitivity of large format InSb arrays can be used to obtain deep images of the sky at 3-5 micrometers. In this spectral range cool or highly redshifted objects (e.g. brown dwarfs and protogalaxies) which are not visible at shorter wavelengths may be observed. Sensitivity at these wavelengths in ground-based observations is severly limited by the thermal flux from the telescope and from the earth's atmosphere. The Near Infrared Faint-Object Telescope Experiment (NIFTE), a 50 cm cooled rocket-borne telescope combined with large format, high performance InSb arrays, can reach a limiting flux less than 1 micro-Jy(1-sigma) over a large field-of-view in a single flight. In comparison, the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) will require days of observation to reach a sensitivity more than one order of magnitude worse over a similar area of the sky. The deep 3-5 micrometer images obtained by the rocket-borne telescope will assist in determining the nature of faint red objects detected by ground-based telescopes at 2 micrometers, and by ISO at wavelengths longer than 5 micrometers.

  2. A Study of Planetary Nebulae using the Faint Object Infrared Camera for the SOFIA Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    A planetary nebula is formed following an intermediate-mass (1-8 solar M) star's evolution off of the main sequence; it undergoes a phase of mass loss whereby the stellar envelope is ejected and the core is converted into a white dwarf. Planetary nebulae often display complex morphologies such as waists or torii, rings, collimated jet-like outflows, and bipolar symmetry, but exactly how these features form is unclear. To study how the distribution of dust in the interstellar medium affects their morphology, we utilize the Faint Object InfraRed CAmera for the SOFIA Telescope (FORCAST) to obtain well-resolved images of four planetary nebulae--NGC 7027, NGC 6543, M2-9, and the Frosty Leo Nebula--at wavelengths where they radiate most of their energy. We retrieve mid infrared images at wavelengths ranging from 6.3 to 37.1 micron for each of our targets. IDL (Interactive Data Language) is used to perform basic analysis. We select M2-9 to investigate further; analyzing cross sections of the southern lobe reveals a slight limb brightening effect. Modeling the dust distribution within the lobes reveals that the thickness of the lobe walls is higher than anticipated, or rather than surrounding a vacuum surrounds a low density region of tenuous dust. Further analysis of this and other planetary nebulae is needed before drawing more specific conclusions.

  3. Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harms, R. J.; Beaver, E. A.; Burbidge, E. M.; Angel, J. R. P.; Bartko, F.; Mccoy, J.; Ripp, L.; Bohlin, R.; Davidsen, A. F.; Ford, H.

    1982-01-01

    The Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) designed for use with The Space Telescope (ST), is currently preparing for instrument assembly, integration, alignment, and calibration. Nearly all optical and detector elements have been completed and calibrated, and selection of flight detectors and all but a few optical elements has been made. Calibration results for the flight detectors and optics are presented, and plans for forthcoming system calibration are briefly described.

  4. Orbital objects detection algorithm using faint streaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagawa, Makoto; Yanagisawa, Toshifumi; Kurosaki, Hirohisa; Oda, Hiroshi; Hanada, Toshiya

    2016-02-01

    This study proposes an algorithm to detect orbital objects that are small or moving at high apparent velocities from optical images by utilizing their faint streaks. In the conventional object-detection algorithm, a high signal-to-noise-ratio (e.g., 3 or more) is required, whereas in our proposed algorithm, the signals are summed along the streak direction to improve object-detection sensitivity. Lower signal-to-noise ratio objects were detected by applying the algorithm to a time series of images. The algorithm comprises the following steps: (1) image skewing, (2) image compression along the vertical axis, (3) detection and determination of streak position, (4) searching for object candidates using the time-series streak-position data, and (5) selecting the candidate with the best linearity and reliability. Our algorithm's ability to detect streaks with signals weaker than the background noise was confirmed using images from the Australia Remote Observatory.

  5. Are the infrared-faint radio sources pulsars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, A. D.; Keith, M.; Hobbs, G.; Norris, R. P.; Mao, M. Y.; Middelberg, E.

    2011-07-01

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects which are strong at radio wavelengths but undetected in sensitive Spitzer observations at infrared wavelengths. Their nature is uncertain and most have not yet been associated with any known astrophysical object. One possibility is that they are radio pulsars. To test this hypothesis we undertook observations of 16 of these sources with the Parkes Radio Telescope. Our results limit the radio emission to a pulsed flux density of less than 0.21 mJy (assuming a 50 per cent duty cycle). This is well below the flux density of the IFRS. We therefore conclude that these IFRS are not radio pulsars.

  6. Faint object 3D spectroscopy with PMAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Martin M.; Becker, Thomas; Kelz, Andreas; Bohm, Petra

    2004-09-01

    PMAS is a fiber-coupled lens array type of integral field spectrograph, which was commissioned at the Calar Alto 3.5m Telescope in May 2001. The optical layout of the instrument was chosen such as to provide a large wavelength coverage, and good transmission from 0.35 to 1 μm. One of the major objectives of the PMAS development has been to perform 3D spectrophotometry, taking advantage of the contiguous array of spatial elements over the 2-dimensional field-of-view of the integral field unit. With science results obtained during the first two years of operation, we illustrate that 3D spectroscopy is an ideal tool for faint object spectrophotometry.

  7. PMAS - Faint Object 3D Spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, M. M.; Becker, T.; Kelz, A.

    2002-01-01

    will describe PMAS (Potsdam Multiaperture Spectrophotometer) which was commissioned at the Calar Alto Observatory 3.5m Telescope on May 28-31, 2001. PMAS is a dedicated, highly efficient UV-visual integral field spectrograph which is optimized for the spectrophotometry of faint point sources, typically superimposed on a bright background. PMAS is ideally suited for the study of resolved stars in local group galaxies. I will present results of our preliminary work with MPFS at the Russian 6m Telescope in Selentchuk, involving the development of new 3D data reduction software, and observations of faint planetary nebulae in the bulge of M31 for the determination of individual chemical abundances of these objects. Using this data, it will be demonstrated that integral field spectroscopy provides superior techniques for background subtraction, avoiding the otherwise inevitable systematic errors of conventional slit spetroscopy. The results will be put in perspective of the study of resolved stellar populations in nearby galaxies with a new generation of Extremely Large Telescopes.

  8. Morphology and astrometry of Infrared-Faint Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Randall, Kate; Mao, Minnie; Hales, Christopher

    2008-10-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS, are an unexpected class of object discovered in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey, ATLAS. They are compact 1.4GHz radio sources with no visible counterparts in co-located (relatively shallow) Spitzer infrared and optical images. We have detected two of these objects with VLBI, indicating the presence of an AGN. These observations and our ATLAS data indicate that IFRS are extended on scales of arcseconds, and we wish to image their morphologies to obtain clues about their nature. These observations will also help us to select optical counterparts from very deep, and hence crowded, optical images which we have proposed. With these data in hand, we will be able to compare IFRS to known object types and to apply for spectroscopy to obtain their redshifts.

  9. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    Fainting is a temporary loss of consciousness. If you're about to faint, you'll feel dizzy, ... at the same time, and may fall down. Fainting usually happens when your blood pressure drops suddenly, ...

  10. Astronomical capabilities of the Faint Object Spectrograph on Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harms, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Examples of scientific observing programs planned with the Faint Object Spectrograph on Space Telescope are presented. An overview of the spectrograph design and operation is presented. The expected astronomical performance of the instrument is described in some detail.

  11. VLBI observations of Infrared-Faint Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middelberg, Enno; Phillips, Chris; Norris, Ray; Tingay, Steven

    2006-10-01

    We propose to observe a small sample of radio sources from the ATLAS project (ATLAS = Australia Telescope Large Area Survey) with the LBA, to determine their compactness and map their structures. The sample consists of three radio sources with no counterpart in the co-located SWIRE survey (3.6 um to 160 um), carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. This rare class of sources, dubbed Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS, is inconsistent with current galaxy evolution models. VLBI observations are an essential way to obtain further clues on what these objects are and why they are hidden from infrared observations: we will map their structure to test whether they resemble core-jet or double-lobed morphologies, and we will measure the flux densities on long baselines, to determine their compactness. Previous snapshot-style LBA observations of two other IFRS yielded no detections, hence we propose to use disk-based recording with 512 Mbps where possible, for highest sensitivity. With the observations proposed here, we will increase the number of VLBI-observed IFRS from two to five, soon allowing us to draw general conclusions about this intriguing new class of objects.

  12. X-ray Counterparts of Infrared Faint Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartel, Norbert

    2011-10-01

    Infrared Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are radio sources with extremely faint or even absent infrared emission in deep Spitzer Surveys. Models of their spectral energy distributions, the ratios of radio to infrared flux densities and their steep radio spectra strongly suggest that IFRS are AGN at high redshifts (2infrared fluxes, will constrain the class-specific SED.

  13. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscle control at the same time, and may fall down. Fainting usually happens when your blood pressure drops suddenly, causing a decrease in blood flow to your brain. It is more common in older people. Some causes of fainting include Heat or dehydration ...

  14. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fainting: Certain medicines, including those used for anxiety, depression, and high blood pressure (these drugs may cause a drop in blood pressure) Drug or alcohol use Hyperventilation Low blood sugar Seizures Sudden drop in blood pressure (such as ...

  15. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Meningitis Choosing Your Mood Prescription Drug Abuse ... reasons why teens faint: Physical triggers. Getting too hot or being in a crowded, poorly ventilated setting ...

  16. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain does not get enough oxygen. You lose consciousness, or "pass out," for a brief time (usually ... Taking longer than a few seconds to regain consciousness Fainting when you turn your head to the ...

  17. Evidence for Infrared-faint Radio Sources as z > 1 Radio-loud Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Minh T.; Norris, Ray P.; Siana, Brian; Middelberg, Enno

    2010-02-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRSs) are a class of radio objects found in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey which have no observable mid-infrared counterpart in the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) survey. The extended Chandra Deep Field South now has even deeper Spitzer imaging (3.6-70 μm) from a number of Legacy surveys. We report the detections of two IFRS sources in IRAC images. The non-detection of two other IFRSs allows us to constrain the source type. Detailed modeling of the spectral energy distribution of these objects shows that they are consistent with high-redshift (z >~ 1) active galactic nuclei.

  18. The radio properties of infrared-faint radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Hales, C. A.; Seymour, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Huynh, M. T.; Lenc, E.; Mao, M. Y.

    2011-02-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects that have flux densities of several mJy at 1.4 GHz, but that are invisible at 3.6 μm when using sensitive Spitzer observations with μJy sensitivities. Their nature is unclear and difficult to investigate since they are only visible in the radio. Aims: High-resolution radio images and comprehensive spectral coverage can yield constraints on the emission mechanisms of IFRS and can give hints to similarities with known objects. Methods: We imaged a sample of 17 IFRS at 4.8 GHz and 8.6 GHz with the Australia Telescope Compact Array to determine the structures on arcsecond scales. We added radio data from other observing projects and from the literature to obtain broad-band radio spectra. Results: We find that the sources in our sample are either resolved out at the higher frequencies or are compact at resolutions of a few arcsec, which implies that they are smaller than a typical galaxy. The spectra of IFRS are remarkably steep, with a median spectral index of -1.4 and a prominent lack of spectral indices larger than -0.7. We also find that, given the IR non-detections, the ratio of 1.4 GHz flux density to 3.6 μm flux density is very high, and this puts them into the same regime as high-redshift radio galaxies. Conclusions: The evidence that IFRS are predominantly high-redshift sources driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) is strong, even though not all IFRS may be caused by the same phenomenon. Compared to the rare and painstakingly collected high-redshift radio galaxies, IFRS appear to be much more abundant, but less luminous, AGN-driven galaxies at similar cosmological distances.

  19. Spectrophotometric Redshifts in the Faint Infrared Grism Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pharo, John; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.

    2016-06-01

    We have combined HST grism spectroscopy and deep broadband imaging to measure spectro-photometric redshifts (SPZs) of faint galaxies. Using a technique pioneered by Ryan et al. 2007, one can combine spectra and photometry to yield an SPZ that is more accurate than pure photometric redshifts, and can probe more deeply than ground-based spectroscopic redshifts. By taking mid-resolution spectra from the HST Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS), SPZs can be found for measurements potentially down to 27th magnitude (the typical brightness of a dwarf galaxy at redshift ∼1.5). A galaxy’s redshift is vital for understanding its place in the growth and evolution of the universe. The measurement of high-accuracy SPZs for FIGS sources will improve the faint-end and high-redshift portions of the luminosity function, and make possible a robust analysis of the FIGS fields for signs of Large Scale Structure (LSS). The improved redshift and distance measurements allowed for the identification of a structure at z=0.83 in one of the FIGS fields.

  20. Infrared Faint Radio Sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Minh T.

    2009-01-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRSs) are a class of radio objects found in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) which have no observable counterpart in the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Survey (SWIRE). The extended Chandra Deep Field South now has even deeper Spitzer imaging (3.6 to 70 micron) from a number of Legacy surveys. We report the detections of two IFRS sources in IRAC images. The non-detection of two other IFRSs allows us to constrain the source type. Detailed modeling of the SED of these objects shows that they are consistent with high redshift AGN (z > 2).

  1. Faint Blue Objects in the Hubble Deep Field North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, M.; von Hippel, T.; Mendez, R. A.; Winget, D. E.

    2005-07-01

    Using the deepest and finest resolution images of the Universe acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope and a similar image taken 7 years later for the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey, we have derived proper motions for the point sources in the Hubble Deep Field-North. Two faint blue objects, HDF2234 and HDF3072, are found to display significant proper motions, 10.0 ± 2.5 and 15.5 ± 3.8 mas yr-1. Photometric distances and tangential velocities for these stars are consistent with disk white dwarfs located at ≈500 pc. At least one of these two objects now appears spectroscopically to be a white dwarf (Kilic et al., in preparation). The faint blue objects analyzed by Ibata et al. (1999) and Mendez & Minniti (2000) do not show any significant proper motion; they are not halo white dwarfs and they do not contribute to the Galactic dark matter. These objects are likely to be distant AGN.

  2. The Faint Object Camera for the Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomae, K.-P.; Schmidt, G.

    1981-05-01

    The Faint Object Camera (FOC), one of the four axial scientific instruments located at the focal plane of the NASA Space Telescope, is described. The FOC has overall dimensions of approximately 0.9 x 0.9 x 2.2 cu m, a total weight of about 322 kg, and an average power consumption per orbit of less than 150 W. The FOC is made up of two complete and independent camera systems, each with its dedicated three mirrors optical relay and photon detector device operating in a wavelength range of 1200 A to 7000 A.

  3. Stellar Ultraviolet Rocket Research Program. [faint object spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A 1/4 meter ultraviolet spectrometer, developed to measure the ultraviolet flux from several standard type stars was flown successfully on Aerobee rockets. The ultraviolet flux from alpha Lyr, eta U Ma, zeta Oph, delta Ori, alpha CMa, beta CMa, and alpha Leo were measured. These values agreed with the OAO data obtained by Code in the 1200 to 3400 A region to + or - 9%. The design and calibration of a faint object spectrometer for observing stars and nebula with a 3 A resolution and a 3% accuracy in a 60 second observation are discussed.

  4. Do the enigmatic ``Infrared-Faint Radio Sources'' include pulsars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, George; Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Keith, Michael; Mao, Minnie; Champion, David

    2009-04-01

    The Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) team have surveyed seven square degrees of sky at 1.4GHz. During processing some unexpected infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS sources) were discovered. The nature of these sources is not understood, but it is possible that some of these sources may be pulsars within our own galaxy. We propose to observe the IFRS sources with steep spectral indices using standard search techniques to determine whether or not they are pulsars. A pulsar detection would 1) remove a subset of the IFRS sources from the ATLAS sample so they would not need to be observed with large optical/IR telescopes to find their hosts and 2) be intrinsically interesting as the pulsar would be a millisecond pulsar and/or have an extreme spatial velocity.

  5. Calibration and operation of the Faint Object Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harms, R.; Beaver, E.; Burbidge, E.; Hier, R.; Allen, R.; Angel, R.; Bartko, F.; Bohlin, R.; Ford, H.; Davidson, A.

    1984-01-01

    The design and basic performance characteristics of the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS), one of five instruments built for use on the Space Telescope observatory, is summarized briefly. The results of the recently completed instrument-level calibration are presented with special emphasis on issues affecting plans for FOS astronomical observations. Examples include such fundamental characteristics as: limiting magnitudes (system sensitivity and noise figures), spectral coverage and resolution, scattered light properties, and instrumental polarization and modulation efficiencies. Also gated toward intended users, a rather detailed description of FOS operating modes is given. The discussion begins with the difficulties anticipated during target acquisition and their hoped-for resolution. Both the 'normal' spectroscopic operating modes of the FOS and its 'exotic' features (e.g. spectropolarimetric, time-tagged, and time-resolved modes) are presented. The paper concludes with an overview of the activities to assure proper alignment and operation of the FOS within the entire Space Telescope system (orbital and ground-based).

  6. Infrared-faint radio sources are at high redshifts. Spectroscopic redshift determination of infrared-faint radio sources using the Very Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, A.; Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Sharp, R.; Spitler, L. R.; Parker, Q. A.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are characterised by relatively high radio flux densities and associated faint or even absent infrared and optical counterparts. The resulting extremely high radio-to-infrared flux density ratios up to several thousands were previously known only for high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs), suggesting a link between the two classes of object. However, the optical and infrared faintness of IFRS makes their study difficult. Prior to this work, no redshift was known for any IFRS in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) fields which would help to put IFRS in the context of other classes of object, especially of HzRGs. Aims: This work aims at measuring the first redshifts of IFRS in the ATLAS fields. Furthermore, we test the hypothesis that IFRS are similar to HzRGs, that they are higher-redshift or dust-obscured versions of these massive galaxies. Methods: A sample of IFRS was spectroscopically observed using the Focal Reducer and Low Dispersion Spectrograph 2 (FORS2) at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The data were calibrated based on the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility (IRAF) and redshifts extracted from the final spectra, where possible. This information was then used to calculate rest-frame luminosities, and to perform the first spectral energy distribution modelling of IFRS based on redshifts. Results: We found redshifts of 1.84, 2.13, and 2.76, for three IFRS, confirming the suggested high-redshift character of this class of object. These redshifts and the resulting luminosities show IFRS to be similar to HzRGs, supporting our hypothesis. We found further evidence that fainter IFRS are at even higher redshifts. Conclusions: Considering the similarities between IFRS and HzRGs substantiated in this work, the detection of IFRS, which have a significantly higher sky density than HzRGs, increases the number of active galactic nuclei in the early universe and adds to the problems of explaining the formation of

  7. Astrometric Follow-Up of Faint Near Earth Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, T. (Technical Monitor); Spahr, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    The observing program at Mt. Hopkins using the 48" reflector and funded by the Near- Earth Object Observation Program continues to excel. As in the past, all requested observing time was granted. Minor improvements continue to be made. For example, the telescope is set up to track and non-sidereal rates. This allows the user to track on the target object, rather than relying exclusively on the shift- and-stack technique. Other improvements made by the staff include automatic focus routines, automatic seeing-measurement routines, and improvement in dome seeing and mirror stabilization. The net result is better focus, better seeing, and the ability to expose longer in order to acquire the faintest and most important objects. During the proposal period, this program ranked again very high worldwide in terms of faint Near Earth Objects observed. During this latest proposal cycle, fewer objects were observed than previous cycles, but this was due to the strict targeting of only the faintest observable objects. The follow-up programs of observatory codes 926 (led by P. Holvorcem) and 291 (led by Dr. B. McMillan) have greatly increased their capacity, and as a result less bright objects are in urgent need of follow-up than in years past. Even with this new object selection and additional competition, code 696 still ranked second to code 291 in terms of objects observed fainter than V = 20. Minimal scripting is now in place to allow the telescope to run autonomously for 30-45 minutes at a time.

  8. Image Stacking Method Application for Low Earth Orbit Faint Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagawa, M.; Matsumoto, H.; Yanagisawa, T.; Kurosaki, H.; Oda, H.; Kitazawa, Y.; Hanada, T.

    2013-09-01

    Space situational awareness is one of the most important actions for safe and sustainable space development and its utilization. Tracking and maintaining debris catalog are the basis of the actions. Current minimum size of objects in the catalog that routinely tracked and updated is approximately 10 cm in the Low Earth Orbit region. This paper proposes collaborative observation of space-based sensors and ground facilities to improve tracking capability in low Earth orbit. This observation geometry based on role-sharing idea. A space-based sensor has advantage in sensitivity and observation opportunity however, it has disadvantages in periodic observation which is essential for catalog maintenance. On the other hand, a ground facility is inferior to space-based sensors in sensitivity however; observation network composed of facilities has an advantage in periodic observation. Whole observation geometry is defined as follows; 1) space-based sensors conduct initial orbit estimation for a target 2) ground facility network tracks the target based on estimated orbit 3) the network observes the target periodically and updates its orbit information. The second phase of whole geometry is based on image stacking method developed by the Japan aerospace exploration agency and this method is verified for objects in geostationary orbit. This method enables to detect object smaller than a nominal size limitation by stacking faint light spot along archived time-series frames. The principle of this method is prediction and searching target's motion on the images. It is almost impossible to apply the method to objects in Low Earth Orbit without proper orbit information because Low Earth Orbit objects have varied orbital characteristics. This paper discusses whether or not initial orbit estimation results given by space-based sensors have enough accuracy to apply image stacking method to Low Earth Orbit objects. Ground-based observation procedure is assumed as being composed of

  9. Detection of faint celestial objects by small telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savanevich, Vadim; Bryukhovetskiy, Alexandr; Kozhukhov, Alexandr; Ivaschenko, Yuri; Velichko, Feodor

    an object from class of "Possible objects" by MAST at the multi-frame processing step; • identification of star pattern at the frame via star catalog, calculating rect-angular and angular coordinates of objects. • check-up the obtained measurements with MPC data base, discharge the known objects and forming the decision about new ones. Observations of asteroids were carried out with 60-cm Zeiss reflector at Andrushivka stronomical bservatory (MPC-code A50). Telescope was equipped by FLI PL9000 camera that has CCD array of 3056x3056 pixels. It was possible to detect objects no fainter then 20m of visual brightness for the exposure of 30 sec. It was confirmed, that the method has the reliability of detection of faint objects with nonzero visible motion close to the reliability of detection of motionless ones.

  10. Faint Object Spectrograph Instrument Handbook v. 6.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, C. D.; et al.

    1995-06-01

    This Handbook describes The Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) and its use for Cycle 6 of the Hubble Space Telescope General Observer program. Many presentations have been updated from previous versions, especially those pertaining to target acquisition, brightness limits, and in- strumental sensitivities needed for exposure and S/N calculations. This Handbook draws upon dis- cussions from earlier versions of the Handbook, notably the Version 1.0 FOS Instrument Handbook (Ford 1985), the Supplement to the Version 1.0 Instrument Handbook (Hartig 1989), and the Version 5.0 Handbook (Kinney, 1994). Only the current document should be used for Cy- cle 6. The detectors are described in detail by Harms et al (1979) and Harms (1982). This version of the FOS Instrument Handbook is for the post-COSTAR refurbished tele- scope. The change in focal length introduced by the addition of COSTAR affects the aperture sizes as projected on the sky. However, the pre-COSTAR aperture designations used in the Remote Pro- posal Submission System, version 2 (RPS2) and in the Project Data Base (PDB) have not been changed. Apertures are referred to throughout this document by their size followed in parentheses by their RPS2 exposure level designation (in Courier typeface). Indeed, all RPS2 desig- nations, which are used for proposal preparation, will be denoted in Courier typeface in this Hand- book. For example, the largest circular aperture is referred to as the 0.9'' (1.0) aperture, while the smallest paired apertures are referred to as the 0.09'' paired (0.1-PAIR)apertures.

  11. Faint Object Camera imaging and spectroscopy of NGC 4151

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boksenberg, A.; Catchpole, R. M.; Macchetto, F.; Albrecht, R.; Barbieri, C.; Blades, J. C.; Crane, P.; Deharveng, J. M.; Disney, M. J.; Jakobsen, P.

    1995-01-01

    We describe ultraviolet and optical imaging and spectroscopy within the central few arcseconds of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151, obtained with the Faint Object Camera on the Hubble Space Telescope. A narrowband image including (O III) lambda(5007) shows a bright nucleus centered on a complex biconical structure having apparent opening angle approximately 65 deg and axis at a position angle along 65 deg-245 deg; images in bands including Lyman-alpha and C IV lambda(1550) and in the optical continuum near 5500 A, show only the bright nucleus. In an off-nuclear optical long-slit spectrum we find a high and a low radial velocity component within the narrow emission lines. We identify the low-velocity component with the bright, extended, knotty structure within the cones, and the high-velocity component with more confined diffuse emission. Also present are strong continuum emission and broad Balmer emission line components, which we attribute to the extended point spread function arising from the intense nuclear emission. Adopting the geometry pointed out by Pedlar et al. (1993) to explain the observed misalignment of the radio jets and the main optical structure we model an ionizing radiation bicone, originating within a galactic disk, with apex at the active nucleus and axis centered on the extended radio jets. We confirm that through density bounding the gross spatial structure of the emission line region can be reproduced with a wide opening angle that includes the line of sight, consistent with the presence of a simple opaque torus allowing direct view of the nucleus. In particular, our modelling reproduces the observed decrease in position angle with distance from the nucleus, progressing initially from the direction of the extended radio jet, through our optical structure, and on to the extended narrow-line region. We explore the kinematics of the narrow-line low- and high-velocity components on the basis of our spectroscopy and adopted model structure.

  12. NEUTRAL GAS OUTFLOWS AND INFLOWS IN INFRARED-FAINT SEYFERT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Krug, Hannah B.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Rupke, David S. N. E-mail: veilleux@astro.umd.ed

    2010-01-10

    Previous studies of the Na I D interstellar absorption line doublet have shown that galactic winds occur in most galaxies with high infrared luminosities. However, in infrared-bright composite systems where a starburst coexists with an active galactic nucleus (AGN), it is unclear whether the starburst, the AGN, or both are driving the outflows. The present paper describes the results from a search for outflows in 35 infrared-faint Seyferts with 10{sup 9.9}< L{sub IR}/L{sub sun} < 10{sup 11}, or, equivalently, star formation rates (SFRs) of approx0.4-9 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, to attempt to isolate the source of the outflow. We find that the outflow detection rates for the infrared-faint Seyfert 1s (6%) and Seyfert 2s (18%) are lower than previously reported for infrared-luminous Seyfert 1s (50%) and Seyfert 2s (45%). The outflow kinematics of infrared-faint and infrared-bright Seyfert 2 galaxies resemble those of starburst galaxies, while the outflow velocities in Seyfert 1 galaxies are significantly larger. Taken together, these results suggest that the AGN does not play a significant role in driving the outflows in most infrared-faint and infrared-bright systems, except the high-velocity outflows seen in Seyfert 1 galaxies. Another striking result of this study is the high rate of detection of inflows in infrared-faint galaxies (39% of Seyfert 1s, 35% of Seyfert 2s), significantly larger than in infrared-luminous Seyferts (15%). This inflow may be contributing to the feeding of the AGN in these galaxies, and potentially provides more than enough material to power the observed nuclear activity over typical AGN lifetimes.

  13. The first VLBI image of an infrared-faint radio source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Tingay, S.; Mao, M. Y.; Phillips, C. J.; Hotan, A. W.

    2008-11-01

    Context: We investigate the joint evolution of active galactic nuclei and star formation in the Universe. Aims: In the 1.4 GHz survey with the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the Chandra Deep Field South and the European Large Area ISO Survey - S1 we have identified a class of objects which are strong in the radio but have no detectable infrared and optical counterparts. This class has been called Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS. 53 sources out of 2002 have been classified as IFRS. It is not known what these objects are. Methods: To address the many possible explanations as to what the nature of these objects is we have observed four sources with the Australian Long Baseline Array. Results: We have detected and imaged one of the four sources observed. Assuming that the source is at a high redshift, we find its properties in agreement with properties of Compact Steep Spectrum sources. However, due to the lack of optical and infrared data the constraints are not particularly strong.

  14. Infrared-faint radio sources remain undetected at far-infrared wavelengths. Deep photometric observations using the Herschel Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, A.; Norris, R. P.; Middelberg, E.; Spitler, L. R.; Leipski, C.; Parker, Q. A.

    2015-08-01

    Context. Showing 1.4 GHz flux densities in the range of a few to a few tens of mJy, infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are a type of galaxy characterised by faint or absent near-infrared counterparts and consequently extreme radio-to-infrared flux density ratios up to several thousand. Recent studies showed that IFRS are radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at redshifts ≳2, potentially linked to high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs). Aims: This work explores the far-infrared emission of IFRS, providing crucial information on the star forming and AGN activity of IFRS. Furthermore, the data enable examining the putative relationship between IFRS and HzRGs and testing whether IFRS are more distant or fainter siblings of these massive galaxies. Methods: A sample of six IFRS was observed with the Herschel Space Observatory between 100 μm and 500 μm. Using these results, we constrained the nature of IFRS by modelling their broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED). Furthermore, we set an upper limit on their infrared SED and decomposed their emission into contributions from an AGN and from star forming activity. Results: All six observed IFRS were undetected in all five Herschel far-infrared channels (stacking limits: σ = 0.74 mJy at 100 μm, σ = 3.45 mJy at 500 μm). Based on our SED modelling, we ruled out the following objects to explain the photometric characteristics of IFRS: (a) known radio-loud quasars and compact steep-spectrum sources at any redshift; (b) starburst galaxies with and without an AGN and Seyfert galaxies at any redshift, even if the templates were modified; and (c) known HzRGs at z ≲ 10.5. We find that the IFRS analysed in this work can only be explained by objects that fulfil the selection criteria of HzRGs. More precisely, IFRS could be (a) known HzRGs at very high redshifts (z ≳ 10.5); (b) low-luminosity siblings of HzRGs with additional dust obscuration at lower redshifts; (c) scaled or unscaled versions of Cygnus A at any

  15. Four QSOs found in a survey of faint objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, D. C.; Tritton, K. P.

    1982-02-01

    Four quasars with redshifts z = 0.6185, 0.6267, 0.850, and 1.665 have been found in the central 33.4 arcmin square of the field at 22h.05, -18deg.91 surveyed by Savage and Bolton (1979) and Krug et al. (1980). The first two quasars are separated by 6.8 arcmin and may be associated with groups of faint galaxies. The separation is well within the 20 Mpc or larger dimensions suggested by Oort et al. (1981) for superclusters, and the velocity difference is not unusual if the velocity dispersion is near the upper end of the range of 300-600 km/s

  16. A search for AGN activity in Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenc, Emil; Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Mao, Minnie

    2009-04-01

    We propose to observe a large sample of radio sources from the ATLAS (Australia Telescope Large Area Survey) source catalogue with the LBA, to determine their compactness. The sample consists of 36 sources with no counterpart in the co-located SWIRE survey (3.6 um to 160 um), carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. This rare class of sources, dubber Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS), is inconsistent with current galaxy evolution models. VLBI observations are an essential way to obtain further clues on what these objects are and why they are hidden from infrared observations. We will measure the flux densities on long baselines to determine their compactness. Only five IFRS have been previously targeted with VLBI observations (resulting in two detections). We propose using single baseline (Parkes-ATCA) eVLBI observations with the LBA at 1 Gbps to maximise sensitivity. With the observations proposed here we will increase the number of VLBI-observed IFRS from 5 to 36, allowing us to draw statistical conclusions about this intriguing new class of objects.

  17. A search for AGN activity in Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenc, Emil; Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Mao, Minnie

    2010-04-01

    We propose to observe a large sample of radio sources from the ATLAS (Australia Telescope Large Area Survey) source catalogue with the LBA, to determine their compactness. The sample consists of 36 sources with no counterpart in the co-located SWIRE survey (3.6 um to 160 um), carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. This rare class of sources, dubber Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS), is inconsistent with current galaxy evolution models. VLBI observations are an essential way to obtain further clues on what these objects are and why they are hidden from infrared observations. We will measure the flux densities on long baselines to determine their compactness. Only five IFRS have been previously targeted with VLBI observations (resulting in two detections). We propose using single baseline (Parkes-ATCA) eVLBI observations with the LBA at 1 Gbps to maximise sensitivity. With the observations proposed here we will increase the number of VLBI-observed IFRS from 5 to 36, allowing us to draw statistical conclusions about this intriguing new class of objects.

  18. Infrared guiding with faint stars with the wide-field infrared camera at CFHT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teeple, Douglas; Riopel, Martin; Baril, Marc; Barrick, Gregory; Albert, Loic; Vermeulen, Tom; Ward, Jeff

    2006-06-01

    The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) is commissioning a new Wide field Infrared Camera (WIRCam) that uses a mosaic of 4 HAWAII-2RG near- infrared detectors manufactured by Rockwell. At the heart of the instrument is an On-Chip Guiding System (OCGS) that exploits the unique parallel science/guide frame readout capability of the HAWAII-2RG detectors. A small sub sample of each array is continuously read at a rate of up to 50 Hz while the integration of the science image is ongoing with the full arrays (read at a maximal rate of 1.4 s per full frame). Each of these guiding windows is centered on a star to provide an error signal for the telescope guiding. An Image Stabilizer Unit (ISU) (i.e. a tip-tilt silica plate), provides the corrections. A Proportional Integral Differential (PID) closed loop controls the ISU such that telescope tracking is corrected at a rate of 5 Hz. This paper presents the technical architecture of the guiding system and performance measurements on the sky in engineering runs with WIRCam with faint stars up to magnitude 14.

  19. NOTE: Red, Gray, and Blue: Near Infrared Spectrophotometry of Faint Moons of Uranus and Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trilling, David E.; Brown, Robert H.

    2000-11-01

    Using the CoCo Cold Coronagraph at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea, we observed the uranian satellites Miranda, Puck, Portia, and Rosalind and the neptunian satellite Proteus in the near infrared (JHK) to determine the albedos of those faint satellites. In V-J, all of Puck, Portia, Rosalind, and Proteus are very blue, similar to the colors of many icy satellites and of water ice. The satellites we observed have a wide range of J-H colors, with Miranda being blue, Proteus being gray, and Puck, Portia, and Rosalind being red. For the satellites for which we could determine H-K (Miranda, Puck, and Proteus), the colors are gray to red. As a whole, spectrally, these five satellites lie between icy Solar System satellites (e.g., saturnian satellites or the major uranian satellites) and Kuiper belt objects. The redness of Proteus and Puck and perhaps other satellites suggests the presence of organic material, although the redness is also similar to that of C- and D-class asteroids and some outer jovian moons. In all cases, diagnostic spectral features could be masked by broadband photometry.

  20. The U.S. survey for faint blue objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, K. J.; Howell, S. B.; Usher, P. D.

    1987-01-01

    A spectrophotometric study of the blue and UV-excess starlike objects in the U.S. survey (Usher, 1981) has been conducted. Observations were obtained with a resolution of about 20 A over the 3500-7000-A wavelength range. Considered within the sample are 42 DA white dwarfs, 4 DB/DO white dwarfs, 13 subdwarf B stars, 12 subdwarf O stars, and 13 horizontal branch stars. The sample is analyzed using numerical convolution photometry.

  1. Astrometry and Photometry of Faint, High Priority Solar System Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Robert S.; Larsen, Jeffrey A.; Scotti, James V.; Bressi, Terrence H.; Maleszewski, Chester K.

    2014-02-01

    We propose to use MOSAIC 1.1 on the Mayall 4-meter telescope to improve knowledge of the orbits and magnitudes of high priority classes of Near Earth Objects (NEOs) and other small solar system bodies that cannot be reached with our Spacewatch telescopes. Many asteroids and comets are being lost owing to insufficient followup astrometry, but only the most important ones can continue to be observed with the limited resources available. Objects flagged as high scientific priority and urgently in need of further observations include freshly discovered virtual impactors (VIs) and NEOs discovered by the soon-to-be reactivated WISE spacecraft. It is better to follow objects longer during their discovery apparitions than to search tens of degrees of arc for them when they return years later, hence our need to reach fainter magnitudes. Other targets for recovery include future targets of radar, NEOs previously detected by WISE with orbits or albedos suggesting potential for cometary activity, potential destinations for spacecraft, and returning NEOs with hard-won albedos and diameters previously determined by WISE in need of astrometry.

  2. On the Automated and Objective Detection of Emission Lines in Faint-Object Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sungryong; Dey, Arjun; Prescott, Moire K. M.

    2014-11-01

    Modern spectroscopic surveys produce large spectroscopic databases, generally with sizes well beyond the scope of manual investigation. The need arises, therefore, for an automated line detection method with objective indicators for detection significance. In this paper, we present an automated and objective method for emission line detection in spectroscopic surveys and apply this technique to observed spectra from a Lyα emitter survey at z ~ 2.7, obtained with the Hectospec spectrograph on the MMT Observatory (MMTO). The basic idea is to generate on-source (signal plus noise) and off-source (noise only) mock observations using Monte Carlo simulations, and calculate completeness and reliability values, (C,R), for each simulated signal. By comparing the detections from real data with the Monte Carlo results, we assign the completeness and reliability values to each real detection. From 1574 spectra, we obtain 881 raw detections and, by removing low reliability detections, we finalize 652 detections from an automated pipeline. Most of high completeness and reliability detections, (C,R) ≈ (1.0,1.0), are robust detections when visually inspected; the low C and R detections are also marginal on visual inspection. This method of detecting faint sources is dependent on the accuracy of the sky subtraction.

  3. Astrometry and Photometry of Faint, High Priority Solar System Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Robert S.; Larsen, Jeff; Scotti, Jim; Bressi, Terry; Spahr, Tim; Maleszewski, Chet

    2014-08-01

    We request MOSAIC 1.1 on the Mayall 4-meter telescope to improve knowledge of the orbits and magnitudes of high priority classes of Near Earth Objects (NEOs) and other small solar system bodies that cannot be reached with our Spacewatch telescopes. Targets include freshly discovered virtual impactors (VIs), other close approachers, and NEOs discovered by the NEOWISE spacecraft. It is better to follow objects longer during their discovery apparitions than to search tens of degrees of arc for them when they return years later, hence the need to reach fainter magnitudes on short notice. About half of our targets are therefore unknown at the time of this proposal. Other targets for recovery include future targets of radar, NEOs previously detected by WISE with orbits or albedos suggesting potential for cometary activity, potential destinations for spacecraft, and returning NEOs with hard-won albedos and diameters determined by WISE that need astrometry. Our past use of the Mayall telescope has been determined by Co-Investigator Tim Spahr of the Minor Planet Center to provide ``dramatic improvement'' to orbits.

  4. A Faint Near-Infrared Counterpart to the AXP 1E 2259+58.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulleman, F.; Tennant, Allyn F., Jr.; vanKerkwijk, M. H.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Kouveliotou, C.; Patel, S. K.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present near-infrared and optical observations of the field of the Anomalous X-ray Pulsar 1E 2259+58.6 taken with the Keck telescope. We derive a subarcsecond Chandra position and tie it to our optical reference frame using other stars in the field. We find a very faint source, K(s) = 21.7 +/- 0.2 mag, with a position coincident with the Chandra position. We argue that this is the counterpart. In the J, I, and R bands, we derive (two sigma) limits of 23.8, 25.6 and 26.4mag, respectively. As with 4U 0142+61, for which a similarly faint counterpart was found, our results are inconsistent with models in which the source is powered by accretion from a disk. The only model that is not inconsistent, appears to be that in which 1E 2259+58.6 is a magnetar.

  5. Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Camera calculated point-spread functions.

    PubMed

    Lyon, R G; Dorband, J E; Hollis, J M

    1997-03-10

    A set of observed noisy Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Camera point-spread functions is used to recover the combined Hubble and Faint Object Camera wave-front error. The low-spatial-frequency wave-front error is parameterized in terms of a set of 32 annular Zernike polynomials. The midlevel and higher spatial frequencies are parameterized in terms of set of 891 polar-Fourier polynomials. The parameterized wave-front error is used to generate accurate calculated point-spread functions, both pre- and post-COSTAR (corrective optics space telescope axial replacement), suitable for image restoration at arbitrary wavelengths. We describe the phase-retrieval-based recovery process and the phase parameterization. Resultant calculated precorrection and postcorrection point-spread functions are shown along with an estimate of both pre- and post-COSTAR spherical aberration. PMID:18250862

  6. The Search for Faint Infrared Calibration Standards - Extending Landolt's Standards to V=19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidger, M.; González-Pérez, J. N.; Martín-Luis, F.; Cohen, M.

    ISO has shown the need to obtain a reliable calibration network of good pedigree to permit data from a wide range of instruments, covering an enormous wavelength range, to be calibrated on a consistent scale. We describe the first results of a programme to extend the Landolt calibration standards to at least V=19. At the same time we calibrate into the near-infrared JHK bands and measure fields separated from the celestial equator. This programme is one of several coordinated efforts to find faint type AV and KIII stars suitable for the mid-IR calibration of the Spanish 10-m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). We have obtained a total of 34 712 measurements of 373 stars in 26 quasar fields between Declination -30o and +70o, calculating magnitudes with high precision in the visible and near-infrared (UBVRIJHK). We describe the results obtained and the characteristics of the sample of stars. The typical error on the magnitude in a single band is <1%, including all error sources. Very few candidate type AV or KIII stars are found, either in our sample, or amongst the fainter Landolt stars. We conclude that both samples are increasingly dominated by local dwarfs at increasingly faint magnitudes. We discuss the implications for taking mid-infrared calibration to the increasingly faint limits required by post-ISO instrumentation. The next steps in this project will be: -- To increase significantly the number of fields covered to ˜40. -- To take additional observations of all poorly covered fields and to add JHK data where none is available. -- To use our existing database to extend Landolt photometry of Selected Areas to include many stars not previously measured. -- To assign a spectral type to all candidate KIII and AV stars in our sample.

  7. FAME Astrometry of Faint Objects and the Kinematics of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, S.; Gould, A.; Olling, R.

    2001-12-01

    We explore what the Full-Sky Astrometric Mapping Explorer (FAME) can achieve by observing a ``small'' (< 106) sample of faint objects (R< ~18) in addition to its standard R<15 magnitude limited catalog of 40x 106 stars. Observing some 50,000 quasars will improve the accuracy of the reference frame from 16 micro-as/yr to 6 micro-as/yr, allowing proper motion of the Galactic center due to reflex of the Sun's motion to be determined with an accuracy of 0.1%. It will also permit very accurate proper motions of the Magellanic Clouds. Quasar observations also offer a powerful check on any unmodeled parallax systematics. Proper motions of 30,000 faint field blue horizontal branch stars will allow stellar halo rotation to be mapped to beyond 35 kpc. Halo substructures producing clumps in the velocity space will be detectable to 10 kpc. In addition to this, allowing inclusion of objects with R>15 will increase the number of good parallaxes of late M-dwarfs 30-fold, and provide distances of over 200 L-dwarfs. FAME could obtain good (10%) parallaxes for 3700 white dwarfs, a 10-fold increase over the R<15 sample. These parallaxes will yield precise mass and luminosity functions. Candidate quasars, BHB stars, and nearby stars will be selected from existing and planned surveys (SDSS, USNO, 2MASS, etc.) The total number of faint candidates should be about 500,000, a small fraction of the FAME input catalog.

  8. In-flight performance of the Faint Object Camera of the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenfield, P.; Paresce, F.; Baxter, D.; Hodge, P.; Hook, R.; Jakobsen, P.; Jedrzejewski, R.; Nota, A.; Sparks, W. B.; Towers, N.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the Faint Object Camera and its performance to date is presented. In particular, the detector's efficiency, the spatial uniformity of response, distortion characteristics, detector and sky background, detector linearity, spectrography, and operation are discussed. The effect of the severe spherical aberration of the telescope's primary mirror on the camera's point spread function is reviewed, as well as the impact it has on the camera's general performance. The scientific implications of the performance and the spherical aberration are outlined, with emphasis on possible remedies for spherical aberration, hardware remedies, and stellar population studies.

  9. Rocket instrument for far-UV spectrophotometry of faint astronomical objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartig, G. F.; Fastie, W. G.; Davidsen, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    A sensitive sounding rocket instrument for moderate (about 10-A) resolution far-UV (1160-1750-A) spectrophotometry of faint astronomical objects has been developed. The instrument employes a photon-counting microchannel plate imaging detector and a concave grating spectrograph behind a 40-cm Dall-Kirkham telescope. A unique remote-control pointing system, incorporating an SIT vidicon aspect camera, two star trackers, and a tone-encoded command telemetry link, permits the telescope to be oriented to within 5 arc sec of any target for which suitable guide stars can be found. The design, construction, calibration, and flight performance of the instrument are discussed.

  10. Rocket instrument for far-UV spectrophotometry of faint astronomical objects.

    PubMed

    Hartig, G F; Fastie, W G; Davidsen, A F

    1980-03-01

    A sensitive sounding rocket instrument for moderate (~10-A) resolution far-UV (lambda1160-lambda1750-A) spectrophotometry of faint astronomical objects has been developed. The instrument employs a photon-counting microchannel plate imaging detector and a concave grating spectrograph behind a 40-cm Dall-Kirkham telescope. A unique remote-control pointing system, incorporating an SIT vidicon aspect camera, two star trackers, and a tone-encoded command telemetry link, permits the telescope to be oriented to within 5 arc sec of any target for which suitable guide stars can be found. The design, construction, calibration, and flight performance of the instrument are discussed. PMID:20220923

  11. Spectral evolution of galaxies. III - Cosmological predictions for the Space Telescope faint object camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzual A., G.

    1983-10-01

    The galactic spectral evolutionary models of Bruzual A. (1981) are employed to estimate parameters which will be observable by the wide-field camera and faint-object camera of the Space Telescope. The capabilities and bandpasses of the instruments are reviewed, and the results are presented in tables and graphs. Parameters calculated include the amplitude of the Lyman discontinuity at 912 A, stellar and galaxy rest-frame colors, color evolution, two-color diagrams as a function of redshift, luminosity evolution, surface brightness profiles, galaxy counts, and color and redshift distributions. In general, it is predicted that the space measurements will follow the trends noted in round-based observations.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Faint Blue Objects at High Galactic Latitude (Warnock+ 1982)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnock, A., III; Usher, P. D.

    1995-05-01

    The data set of Faint Blue Objects at High Galactic Latitude is a catalog of objects selected according to relative ultraviolet excess from ubv three-color 1.2-m Palomar Schmidt plates. Five selected area fields centered on SA28, SA29, SA55, SA57 and SA94 are included. The data consist of color classifications, B magnitudes, 1950 equatorial coordinates and remarks; the current file contains 3678 objects. Three selected area fields were included originally, centered on SA57 (Usher 1981), SA29 (Usher, Mattson and Warnock 1982) and SA28 (Usher and Mitchell 1982). Areas centered on SA55 and SA94 were added in 1984. (1 data file).

  13. The ISON international campaigns for monitoring of faint high altitude objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotov, Igor; Agapov, Vladimir; Rumyantsev, Vasiliy; Biryukov, Vadim; Schildknecht, Thomas; Bakhtigaraev, Nail; Ibrahimov, Mansur; Papushev, Pavel; Minikulov, Nasredin; Andrievsky, Sergei

    The research of the space debris fragments at high orbits is one of the main directions of the International Scientific Optical Network (ISON) activities. Therefore the dedicated ISON subsystem for high altitude faint space debris observations is arranged with the aim of detection and continuous tracking of as large number of unknown high altitude faint objects as possible. The subsystem includes the number of large telescopes that are able to detect the objects down to 20m-21m and the middle-size telescopes for the observations of the space objects of 15m-18m. The 1-m ZIMLAT in Zimmerwald, Switzerland, 1.5-m AZT-33IK in Mondy, Siberia, 64-cm AT- 64 in Nauchniy, Crimea, 60-cm RK-600 in Mayaki near Odessa, Ukraine, 60-cm Zeiss-600 in Maidanak, Uzbekistan, 70-cm AZT-8 in Gissar, Tajikistan are regularly participating in ISON observing campaigns in collaboration with 1-m Zeiss-1000 ESA space debris telescope in Teide, Canaries islands. 2.6-m ZTSh in Nauchniy, Crimea, 2-m Zeiss-2000 in Terskol, North Caucasus, 1-m Zeiss-1000 in Simeiz, Crimea, 1-m Zeiss-1000 in Arkhyz, North Caucasus are joining during few nights per month. The 60-cm Zeiss-600 in Arkhyz, 70-cm AZT-8 in Evpatoria, Crimea, 60-cm Zeiss-600 in Tarija, Bolivia, 80-cm RK-800 in Mayaki, 80-cm K-800 in Terskol, 50-cm in Ussuriysk, Far East will be added to the subsystem during 2008. The observing campaigns are coordinates by the Center on space debris data collection, processing and analysis of the KIAM RAS in cooperation with the AIUB space debris team. 353 faint objects are discovered in GEO region surveys during the last 3 years (about 100000 measurements were collected for this time), including objects with high AMR. Results are publishing monthly by KIAM in High Geocentric Orbit Space Debris Circular. We will discuss the most interesting of obtained results. Many of discovered fragments are associated with space debris clouds appeared as a result of known or suspected fragmentations occurred in GEO region

  14. Faint quasi-stellar-object candidates in selected areas 28 and 68 identified from multicolor photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, J.C.; Koo, D.C.; Kron, R.C.; California Univ., Berkeley; Lick Observatory, Santa Cruz, CA; Yerkes Observatory, Williams Bay, WI )

    1989-04-01

    Forty-five QSO candidates over a total area of 0.53 square degree in two fields at high Galactic latitudes have been identified. These candidates reached B of about 21.5 for field Lynx.3 in SA 28 and B of about 22 for field SA68.2, and were selected from a subset of objects in catalogs generated from multicolor photometry (UBV) of deep Kitt Peak 4-m plates with limits of B of about 24. This subset consists of all objects which appeared stellar-like in size but which did not have the UBV colors of common Galactic stars. Besides several probable high-redshift QSOs, this study yields faint QSO counts consistent with those from other surveys, and thus provides further support to models that include mainly the luminosity evolution of QSOs. 29 refs.

  15. Hubble Space Telescope: Faint object camera instrument handbook. Version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paresce, Francesco (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The Faint Object Camera (FOC) is a long focal ratio, photon counting device designed to take high resolution two dimensional images of areas of the sky up to 44 by 44 arcseconds squared in size, with pixel dimensions as small as 0.0007 by 0.0007 arcseconds squared in the 1150 to 6500 A wavelength range. The basic aim of the handbook is to make relevant information about the FOC available to a wide range of astronomers, many of whom may wish to apply for HST observing time. The FOC, as presently configured, is briefly described, and some basic performance parameters are summarized. Also included are detailed performance parameters and instructions on how to derive approximate FOC exposure times for the proposed targets.

  16. Hubble Space Telescope faint object camera instrument handbook (Post-COSTAR), version 5.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nota, A. (Editor); Jedrzejewski, R. (Editor); Greenfield, P. (Editor); Hack, W. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The faint object camera (FOC) is a long-focal-ratio, photon-counting device capable of taking high-resolution two-dimensional images of the sky up to 14 by 14 arc seconds squared in size with pixel dimensions as small as 0.014 by 0.014 arc seconds squared in the 1150 to 6500 A wavelength range. Its performance approaches that of an ideal imaging system at low light levels. The FOC is the only instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to fully use the spatial resolution capabilities of the optical telescope assembly (OTA) and is one of the European Space Agency's contributions to the HST program.

  17. The optical-infrared colour distribution of a statistically complete sample of faint field spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menanteau, F.; Ellis, R. S.; Abraham, R. G.; Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.

    1999-10-01

    In hierarchical models, where spheroidal galaxies are primarily produced via a continuous merging of disc galaxies, the number of intrinsically red systems at faint limits will be substantially lower than in `traditional' models where the bulk of star formation was completed at high redshifts. In this paper we analyse the optical-near-infrared colour distribution of a large flux-limited sample of field spheroidal galaxies identified morphologically from archival Hubble Space Telescope data. The I_814-HK' colour distribution for a sample jointly limited at I_814<23mag and HK'<19.5mag is used to constrain their star formation history. We compare visual and automated methods for selecting spheroidals from our deep HST images and, in both cases, detect a significant deficit of intrinsically red spheroidals relative to the predictions of high-redshift monolithic-collapse models. However, the overall space density of spheroidals (irrespective of colour) is not substantially different from that seen locally. Spectral synthesis modelling of our results suggests that high-redshift spheroidals are dominated by evolved stellar populations polluted by some amount of subsidiary star formation. Despite its effect on the optical-infrared colour, this star formation probably makes only a modest contribution to the overall stellar mass. We briefly discuss the implications of our results in the context of earlier predictions based on models where spheroidals assemble hierarchically.

  18. Improving the ability of image sensors to detect faint stars and moving objects using image deconvolution techniques.

    PubMed

    Fors, Octavi; Núñez, Jorge; Otazu, Xavier; Prades, Albert; Cardinal, Robert D

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we show how the techniques of image deconvolution can increase the ability of image sensors as, for example, CCD imagers, to detect faint stars or faint orbital objects (small satellites and space debris). In the case of faint stars, we show that this benefit is equivalent to double the quantum efficiency of the used image sensor or to increase the effective telescope aperture by more than 30% without decreasing the astrometric precision or introducing artificial bias. In the case of orbital objects, the deconvolution technique can double the signal-to-noise ratio of the image, which helps to discover and control dangerous objects as space debris or lost satellites. The benefits obtained using CCD detectors can be extrapolated to any kind of image sensors. PMID:22294896

  19. Improving the Ability of Image Sensors to Detect Faint Stars and Moving Objects Using Image Deconvolution Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Fors, Octavi; Núñez, Jorge; Otazu, Xavier; Prades, Albert; Cardinal, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we show how the techniques of image deconvolution can increase the ability of image sensors as, for example, CCD imagers, to detect faint stars or faint orbital objects (small satellites and space debris). In the case of faint stars, we show that this benefit is equivalent to double the quantum efficiency of the used image sensor or to increase the effective telescope aperture by more than 30% without decreasing the astrometric precision or introducing artificial bias. In the case of orbital objects, the deconvolution technique can double the signal-to-noise ratio of the image, which helps to discover and control dangerous objects as space debris or lost satellites. The benefits obtained using CCD detectors can be extrapolated to any kind of image sensors. PMID:22294896

  20. Statistical Track-Before-Detect Methods Applied to Faint Optical Observations of Resident Space Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, K.; Yanagisawa, T.; Uetsuhara, M.

    Automated detection and tracking of faint objects in optical, or bearing-only, sensor imagery is a topic of immense interest in space surveillance. Robust methods in this realm will lead to better space situational awareness (SSA) while reducing the cost of sensors and optics. They are especially relevant in the search for high area-to-mass ratio (HAMR) objects, as their apparent brightness can change significantly over time. A track-before-detect (TBD) approach has been shown to be suitable for faint, low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) images of resident space objects (RSOs). TBD does not rely upon the extraction of feature points within the image based on some thresholding criteria, but rather directly takes as input the intensity information from the image file. Not only is all of the available information from the image used, TBD avoids the computational intractability of the conventional feature-based line detection (i.e., "string of pearls") approach to track detection for low SNR data. Implementation of TBD rooted in finite set statistics (FISST) theory has been proposed recently by Vo, et al. Compared to other TBD methods applied so far to SSA, such as the stacking method or multi-pass multi-period denoising, the FISST approach is statistically rigorous and has been shown to be more computationally efficient, thus paving the path toward on-line processing. In this paper, we intend to apply a multi-Bernoulli filter to actual CCD imagery of RSOs. The multi-Bernoulli filter can explicitly account for the birth and death of multiple targets in a measurement arc. TBD is achieved via a sequential Monte Carlo implementation. Preliminary results with simulated single-target data indicate that a Bernoulli filter can successfully track and detect objects with measurement SNR as low as 2.4. Although the advent of fast-cadence scientific CMOS sensors have made the automation of faint object detection a realistic goal, it is nonetheless a difficult goal, as measurements

  1. Astrometric and Photometric Follow-Up of Faint Near Earth Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spahr, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    During the last year, the Near-Earth Object (NEO) follow-up program at Mt. Hopkins funded by the Near-Earth Object Observations (NEOO) program continued to improve. The Principal Investigator was again granted all the requested observing time. In addition to the requested time on the 4 8 in. telescope, 2 nights were also granted on the MMT for observations of extremely faint main-belt asteroids and NEOs. It is expected that the MMT can easily reach V = 25 over a 24 X 24 arcminute field of view. Improvements in the last year included more tweaks to the automatic astrometric routine for higher-quality astrometric fits. Use of the new USNO-B1.0 reference catalog has allowed the PI to push the average RMS of reference star solutions below 0.2 in.. Shift-and- stack techniques are used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the target objects. The 48 in. telescope at Mt. Hopkins is completely automated, and can be run remotely from either the Principal Investigator's office at SAO, or even his study at home. Most observing runs are now done remotely.

  2. Robotic telescope systems for CCD photometry of faint objects in crowded fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruch, John E.; da Luz Vieira, Janice

    1993-11-01

    This paper first considers the design of robotic telescopes to monitor faint objects in crowded fields. It shows that the mechanical design problems have been solved by the use of precision control and modelling software developed for the latest large telescopes. Modern design methods mean that these telescopes can be produced relatively cheaply. The largest part of the cost of a robotic telescope is the software to enable it to work as an autonomous robot. Conventional software techniques are inadequate and inefficient for many purposes associated with robotic operation. These include: to optimize and monitor their operation and efficiency, to schedule their observing, to evaluate their environment, to generate confidence in the target acquisition pattern recognition parameters, to evaluate the quality of the CCD images and the photometry of the objects within the images, and to return reduced data to the astronomer with the required indices to gives the astronomer confidence in the data. The paper evaluates AI, neural nets and fuzzy logic techniques applied to these different problems.

  3. Track-Before-Detect Algorithm for Faint Moving Objects based on Random Sampling and Consensus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, P.; Rast, R.; Schlaegel, W.; Schmidt, V.; Dentamaro, A.

    2014-09-01

    There are many algorithms developed for tracking and detecting faint moving objects in congested backgrounds. One obvious application is detection of targets in images where each pixel corresponds to the received power in a particular location. In our application, a visible imager operated in stare mode observes geostationary objects as fixed, stars as moving and non-geostationary objects as drifting in the field of view. We would like to achieve high sensitivity detection of the drifters. The ability to improve SNR with track-before-detect (TBD) processing, where target information is collected and collated before the detection decision is made, allows respectable performance against dim moving objects. Generally, a TBD algorithm consists of a pre-processing stage that highlights potential targets and a temporal filtering stage. However, the algorithms that have been successfully demonstrated, e.g. Viterbi-based and Bayesian-based, demand formidable processing power and memory. We propose an algorithm that exploits the quasi constant velocity of objects, the predictability of the stellar clutter and the intrinsically low false alarm rate of detecting signature candidates in 3-D, based on an iterative method called "RANdom SAmple Consensus” and one that can run real-time on a typical PC. The technique is tailored for searching objects with small telescopes in stare mode. Our RANSAC-MT (Moving Target) algorithm estimates parameters of a mathematical model (e.g., linear motion) from a set of observed data which contains a significant number of outliers while identifying inliers. In the pre-processing phase, candidate blobs were selected based on morphology and an intensity threshold that would normally generate unacceptable level of false alarms. The RANSAC sampling rejects candidates that conform to the predictable motion of the stars. Data collected with a 17 inch telescope by AFRL/RH and a COTS lens/EM-CCD sensor by the AFRL/RD Satellite Assessment Center is

  4. First results from the faint object camera - High-resolution imaging of the Pluto-Charon system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, R.; Barbieri, C.; Blades, J. C.; Boksenberg, A.; Crane, P.

    1991-01-01

    The first observations of a solar system target with the Faint Object Camera of the HST are reported. Observations of the Pluto-Charon system were obtained in f/96 and f/288 mode. Pluto and Charon were clearly resolved, and the observed separation and diameters are in accordance with expectations. The f/96 data were astrometrically and photometrically analyzed; preliminary results are presented.

  5. Correction of the geomagnetically induced image motion problem on the Hubble Space Telescope's Faint Object Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitch, John E.; Hartig, George F.; Beaver, Edward A.; Hier, Richard G.

    1993-11-01

    During the Science Verification phase of the Hubble Space Telescope mission, it was determined that the Faint Object Spectrograph's (FOS) Red detector displayed significant image motions which correlated with orbital changes in the geomagnetic field. The Blue detector exhibited similar but less pronounced motions. The cause of this motion was determined to be inadequate magnetic shielding of the instrument's Digicon detectors. The results of these motions were decreases in onboard target acquisition accuracy, spectral resolution, and photometric accuracy. The Space Telescope Science Institute and the FOS Investigation Definition Team, set about correcting this Geomagnetically-induced Image Motion Problem (GIMP) through a real-time on-board correction scheme. This correction required modifications to almost all aspects of the HST ground system as well as additional NSSC1 flight software and the use of an existing software 'hook' in the FOS microprocessor firmware. This paper presents a detailed description of the problem, the proposed solution, and results of on-orbit testing of the correction mechanism.

  6. First results from the Faint Object Camera - Imaging the core of R Aquarii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paresce, F.; Albrecht, R.; Barbieri, C.; Blades, J. C.; Boksenberg, A.

    1991-01-01

    The Faint Object Camera on the HST was pointed toward the symbiotic long-period M7e Mira variable R Aquarii, and very high resolution images of the inner core, mainly in the ionized oxygen emission lines in the optical, are reported. Both images show bright arcs, knots, and filaments superposed on a fainter, diffuse nebulosity extending in a general SW-NE direction from the variable to the edge of the field at 10 arcsec distance. The core is resolved in forbidden O III 5007 A and forbidden O II 3727 A into at least two bright knots of emission whose positions and structures are aligned with PA = 50 deg. The central knots appear to be the source of a continuous, well-collimated, stream of material extending out to 3-4 arcsec in the northern sector corresponding to a linear distance of about 1000 AU. The northern stream seems to bend around an opaque obstacle and form a spiral before breaking up into wisps and knots. The southern stream is composed of smaller, discrete parcels of emitting gas curving to the SE.

  7. Faint Object Camera observations of M87 - The jet and nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boksenberg, A.; Macchetto, F.; Albrecht, R.; Barbieri, C.; Blades, J. C.; Crane, P.; Deharveng, J. M.; Disney, M. J.; Jakobsen, P.; Kamperman, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    UV and optical images of the central region and jet of the nearby elliptical galaxy M87 have been obtained with about 0.1 arcsec resolution in several spectral bands with the Faint Object Camera (FOC) on the HST, including polarization images. Deconvolution enhances the contrast of the complex structure and filamentary patterns in the jet already evident in the aberrated images. Morphologically there is close similarity between the FOC images of the extended jet and the best 2-cm radio maps obtained at similar resolution, and the magnetic field vectors from the UV and radio polarimetric data also correspond well. We observe structure in the inner jet within a few tenths arcsec of the nucleus which also has been well studied at radio wavelengths. Our UV and optical photometry of regions along the jet shows little variation in spectral index from the value 1.0 between markedly different regions and no trend to a steepening spectrum with distance along the jet.

  8. Constraints to the Cold Classical KBO population from HST observations of faint objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penteado, Paulo F.; Trilling, David; Grundy, William

    2015-11-01

    The size distribution of the known Kuiper Belt Objects has been described by a double power law, with a break at R magnitude 25. There are two leading interpretations to this break: 1) It is the result of the collisional evolution among these KBOs, with the objects smaller than the break being the population most affected by collisional erosion. 2) The size distribution break is primordial, set during the Kuiper Belt formation.The low inclination Kuiper Belt Objects, the Cold Classical population, is thought to have been dynamically isolated since the formation of the Solar System, and thus only collisions between Cold Classicals would have affected their size distribution. If the size distribution is collisional, it probes parameters of the Kuiper Belt history: strengths of the bodies, impact energies and frequency, and the the number of objects. If the distribution is primordial, it reveals parameters of the Kuiper Belt accretion, as well as limits on its subsequent collisional history.In this work, we obtained new HST observations of 5 faint Cold Classicals, which we combine with previous HST observations, to examine the distribution of two properties of the smallest KBOs: colors and binary fraction. These two properties can differentiate between a primordial and a collisional origin of the size distribution break. If the smaller bodies have been through extensive collisional evolution, they will have exposed materials from their interiors, which has not been exposed to weathering, and thus should be bluer than the old surfaces of the larger bodies. An independent constraint can be derived from the fraction of binary objects: the angular momentum of the observed binaries is typically too high to result from collisions, thus a collisionally-evolved population would have a lower binary fraction, due to the easier separation of binaries, compared to the disruption of similar-sized bodies, and the easier disruption of the binary components, due to the smaller size

  9. Hubble Space Telescope: Faint object spectrograph instrument handbook. Version 1.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Holland C. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) has undergone substantial rework since the 1985 FOS Instrument Handbook was published, and we are now more knowledgeable regarding the spacecraft and instrument operations requirements and constraints. The formal system for observation specification has also evolved considerably, as the GTO programs were defined in detail. This supplement to the FOS Instrument Handbook addresses the important aspects of these changes, to facilitate proper selection and specification of FOS observing programs. Since the Handbook was published, the FOS red detector has been replaced twice, first with the best available spare in 1985 (which proved to have a poor, and steadily degrading red response), and later with a newly developed Digicon, which exhibits a high, stable efficiency and a dark-count rate less than half that of its predecessors. Also, the FOS optical train was realigned in 1987-88 to eliminate considerable beam-vignetting losses, and the collimators were both removed and recoated for greater reflectivity. Following the optics and detector rework, the FOS was carefully recalibrated (although only ambient measurements were possible, so the far-UV characteristics could not be re-evaluated directly). The resulting efficiency curves, including improved estimates of the telescope throughput, are shown. A number of changes in the observing-mode specifications and addition of several optional parameters resulted as the Proposal Instructions were honed during the last year. Target-brightness limitations, which have only recently been formulated carefully, are described. Although these restrictions are very conservative, it is imperative that the detector safety be guarded closely, especially during the initial stages of flight operations. Restrictions on the use of the internal calibration lamps and aperture-illumination sources (TA LEDs), also resulting from detector safety considerations, are outlined. Finally, many changes have been made to

  10. Infrared-based object tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervais, Jon; Youngblood, Austin; Delashmit, Walter H.

    2009-05-01

    Often it is necessary to track moving objects on horizontal paths. Human error and the associated cost and dangers of using humans lead to a requirement to automate this task. The system presented here was designed, built and tested. The system uses an IR beacon and a microcontroller receiver/controller module. The design consists of a field programmable gate array (FPGA) based IR transmitter and a microcontroller based IR receiver/controller. The design consisted of two main parts, the transmitter (beacon) and the receiver/controller module. The receiver was implemented with a FPGA so that the characteristics of the beacon signal could be adjusted more quickly and with greater precision. The controller module was integrated with the receivers and detailed system integration tests were performed. Measurements were collected, recorded and analyzed.

  11. High-resolution imaging of the Pluto-Charon system with the Faint Object Camera of the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, R.; Barbieri, C.; Adorf, H.-M.; Corrain, G.; Gemmo, A.; Greenfield, P.; Hainaut, O.; Hook, R. N.; Tholen, D. J.; Blades, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Images of the Pluto-Charon system were obtained with the Faint Object Camera (FOC) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) after the refurbishment of the telescope. The images are of superb quality, allowing the determination of radii, fluxes, and albedos. Attempts were made to improve the resolution of the already diffraction limited images by image restoration. These yielded indications of surface albedo distributions qualitatively consistent with models derived from observations of Pluto-Charon mutual eclipses.

  12. Active galactic nuclei cores in infrared-faint radio sources. Very long baseline interferometry observations using the Very Long Baseline Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, A.; Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Spitler, L. R.; Deller, A. T.; Collier, J. D.; Parker, Q. A.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) form a new class of galaxies characterised by radio flux densities between tenths and tens of mJy and faint or absent infrared counterparts. It has been suggested that these objects are radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at significant redshifts (z ≳ 2). Aims: Whereas the high redshifts of IFRS have been recently confirmed based on spectroscopic data, the evidence for the presence of AGNs in IFRS is mainly indirect. So far, only two AGNs have been unquestionably confirmed in IFRS based on very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations. In this work, we test the hypothesis that IFRS contain AGNs in a large sample of sources using VLBI. Methods: We observed 57 IFRS with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) down to a detection sensitivity in the sub-mJy regime and detected compact cores in 35 sources. Results: Our VLBA detections increase the number of VLBI-detected IFRS from 2 to 37 and provide strong evidence that most - if not all - IFRS contain AGNs. We find that IFRS have a marginally higher VLBI detection fraction than randomly selected sources with mJy flux densities at arcsec-scales. Moreover, our data provide a positive correlation between compactness - defined as the ratio of milliarcsec- to arcsec-scale flux density - and redshift for IFRS, but suggest a decreasing mean compactness with increasing arcsec-scale radio flux density. Based on these findings, we suggest that IFRS tend to contain young AGNs whose jets have not formed yet or have not expanded, equivalent to very compact objects. We found two IFRS that are resolved into two components. The two components are spatially separated by a few hundred milliarcseconds in both cases. They might be components of one AGN, a binary black hole, or the result of gravitational lensing.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Faint Blue Objects at High Galactic Latitude (Warnock+ 1982-1990)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnock, A., III; Usher, P. D.

    2007-02-01

    The data set of Faint Blue Objects at High Galactic Latitude is a catalog of objects selected according to relative ultraviolet excess from ubv three-color 1.2-m Palomar Schmidt plates. Five selected area fields centered on SA28, SA29, SA55, SA57 and SA94 are included. The data consist of color classifications, B magnitudes, 1950 equatorial coordinates and remarks; the current file contains 3678 objects. Three selected area fields were included originally, centered on SA57 (Usher 1981), SA29 (Usher, Mattson and Warnock 1982) and SA28 (Usher and Mitchell 1982). Areas centered on SA55 and SA94 were added in 1984; areas centered on SA71 (Usher et al., Paper V, 1988ApJS...66....1U) and SA82 (Usher & Mitchell, Paper VI, 1990ApJS...74..885U) were added in 2007 by CDS. (1 data file).

  14. First results from the faint object camera - High-resolution observations of the central object R136 in the 30 Doradus nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weigelt, G.; Albrecht, R.; Barbieri, C.; Blades, J. C.; Boksenberg, A.; Crane, P.; Deharveng, J. M.; Disney, M. J.; Jakobsen, P.; Kamperman, T. M.

    1991-01-01

    R136 is the luminous central object of the giant H II region 30 Doradus in the LMC. The first high-resolution observations of R136 with the Faint Object Camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope are reported. The physical nature of the brightest component R136a has been a matter of some controversy over the last few years. The UV images obtained show that R136a is a very compact star cluster consisting of more than eight stars within 0.7 arcsec diameter. From these high-resolution images a mass upper limit can be derived for the most luminous stars observed in R136.

  15. SELFI: an object-based, Bayesian method for faint emission line source detection in MUSE deep field data cubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meillier, Céline; Chatelain, Florent; Michel, Olivier; Bacon, Roland; Piqueras, Laure; Bacher, Raphael; Ayasso, Hacheme

    2016-04-01

    We present SELFI, the Source Emission Line FInder, a new Bayesian method optimized for detection of faint galaxies in Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) deep fields. MUSE is the new panoramic integral field spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) that has unique capabilities for spectroscopic investigation of the deep sky. It has provided data cubes with 324 million voxels over a single 1 arcmin2 field of view. To address the challenge of faint-galaxy detection in these large data cubes, we developed a new method that processes 3D data either for modeling or for estimation and extraction of source configurations. This object-based approach yields a natural sparse representation of the sources in massive data fields, such as MUSE data cubes. In the Bayesian framework, the parameters that describe the observed sources are considered random variables. The Bayesian model leads to a general and robust algorithm where the parameters are estimated in a fully data-driven way. This detection algorithm was applied to the MUSE observation of Hubble Deep Field-South. With 27 h total integration time, these observations provide a catalog of 189 sources of various categories and with secured redshift. The algorithm retrieved 91% of the galaxies with only 9% false detection. This method also allowed the discovery of three new Lyα emitters and one [OII] emitter, all without any Hubble Space Telescope counterpart. We analyzed the reasons for failure for some targets, and found that the most important limitation of the method is when faint sources are located in the vicinity of bright spatially resolved galaxies that cannot be approximated by the Sérsic elliptical profile. The software and its documentation are available on the MUSE science web service (muse-vlt.eu/science).

  16. First results from the Edinburgh-Cape faint blue object survey - Normal stars at high galactic latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilkenny, D.; O'Donoghue, D.; Stobie, R. S.

    1991-02-01

    A simple analysis using low-dispersion Reticon spectroscopy and Stromgren photometry is presented for a sample of 20 apparently normal early-type stars detected in the Edinburgh-Cape faint blue object survey of high galactic latitudes. Four stars are not normal, showing high gravity or helium abundance anomalies; 12 stars appear to be at moderate distances from the galactic plane and four stars have derived z-distances greater than about 5 kpc. The sample was selected from 33 survey fields completed to B = 16.5 mag and indicates that the total galactic population of 'very high-z' B stars is only of the order 100-1000. The Dyson and Hartquist (1983) model for the formation of such objects by cloudlet-cloudlet collisions within high-velocity clouds cannot therefore be ruled out on the basis of star formation rates.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Infrared-faint radio sources catalog (Collier+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, J. D.; Banfield, J. K.; Norris, R. P.; Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Kimball, A. E.; Filipovic, M. D.; Jarrett, T. H.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Tothill, N. F. H.

    2014-11-01

    The 20cm radio data come from the Unified Radio Catalog (URC) compiled by Kimball & Ivezic (2008AJ....136..684K). This radio catalogue combines data from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) VLA Sky Survey (NVSS; Condon et al., 1998, Cat. VIII/65), Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters (FIRST; Becker, White & Helfand, 1995, cat. VIII/92), Green Bank 6cm survey (GB6; Gregory et al., 1996, Cat. VIII/40), the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS; Rengelink et al. 1997; de Bruyn et al. 2000, Cat. VIII/62) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 (SDSS DR6; Adelman-McCarthy et al., 2008, Cat. II/282). We use updated NVSS and FIRST data from the URC version 2.0 (Kimball & Ivezic, in preparation), which includes a number of new sources as well as updated positions and flux densities. The IR data come from WISE (Wright et al. (WISE Team) 2009, Cat. II/311), which is an all-sky survey centred at 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22um (referred to as bands W1, W2, W3 and W4), with respective angular resolutions of 6.1, 6.4, 6.5 and 12.0-arcsec (full width at half-maximum, FWHM), and typical 5σ sensitivity levels of 0.08, 0.11, 1 and 6mJy, with sensitivity increasing towards the ecliptic poles. (1 data file).

  18. Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph and ground-based observations of the broad absorption line quasar 0226-1024

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korista, Kirk T.; Weymann, Ray J.; Morris, Simon L.; Kopko, Michael, Jr.; Turnshek, David A.; Hartig, George F.; Foltz, Craig B.; Burbidge, E. M.; Junkkarinen, Vesa T.

    1992-01-01

    Faint Object Spectrograph data from the Hubble Space Telescope of the broad absorption line quasar 0226-1024 have revealed the presence of 8-10 absorbing ions between 680 and 1000 A (restframe): C III, N III, N IV, O III, O IV, O VI, S V, S VI, possibly Ne VIII, and possibly O V* arising from a metastable excited state. We also present ground-based optical observations of the broad line troughs for the following ions: H I, C IV, N V, Si IV, and possibly Fe III, S IV, P V, and C III* (also arising from a metastable excited state). The results of this fit are used to estimate the absorbing ionic column densities. There is evidence that the broad absorption line clouds are optically thick and either do not completely cover the continuum source or narrow unresolved lines are present.

  19. Faint blue objects at high Galactic latitude. V - Palomar Schmidt field centered on selected area 71

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usher, Peter D.; Mitchell, Kenneth J.; Warnock, Archibald, III

    1988-01-01

    Starlike objects with both blue and ultraviolet excess have been selected from a Palomar 1.2 m Schmidt field centered on Kapteyn selected area 71. The method of selection is that used in the previous papers of this series, but modified to account for the differential reddening that occurs across the field. The color classes, color subclasses, positions, and magnitudes of the selected objects are listed.

  20. An Automatic Technique for Finding Faint Moving Objects in Wide Field CCD Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainaut, O. R.; Meech, K. J.

    1996-09-01

    The traditional method used to find moving objects in astronomical images is to blink pairs or series of frames after registering them to align the background objects. While this technique is extremely efficient in terms of the low signal-to-noise ratio that the human sight can detect, it proved to be extremely time-, brain- and eyesight-consuming. The wide-field images provided by the large CCD mosaic recently built at IfA cover a field of view of 20 to 30' over 8192(2) pixels. Blinking such images is an enormous task, comparable to that of blinking large photographic plates. However, as the data are available digitally (each image occupying 260Mb of disk space), we are developing a set of computer codes to perform the moving object identification in sets of frames. This poster will describe the techniques we use in order to reach a detection efficiency as good as that of a human blinker; the main steps are to find all the objects in each frame (for which we rely on ``S-Extractor'' (Bertin & Arnouts (1996), A&ASS 117, 393), then identify all the background objects, and finally to search the non-background objects for sources moving in a coherent fashion. We will also describe the results of this method applied to actual data from the 8k CCD mosaic. {This work is being supported, in part, by NSF grant AST 92-21318.}

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Faint blue objects at high galactic latitude (Mitchell+, 2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, K. J.; Usher, P. D.

    2006-11-01

    The US survey has cataloged 3987 objects in seven high Galactic latitude fields according to their optical colors, magnitudes, and morphologies using photographic techniques. This paper analyzes the effectiveness of the survey at producing finding lists for complete samples of hot stars and quasars that exhibit blue and/or ultraviolet excess (B-UVX) relative to the colors of halo F and G subdwarf stars. A table of 599 spectroscopic identifications summarizes the spectroscopic coverage of the US objects that has been accomplished to date. (6 data files).

  2. ALMA constraints on the faint millimetre source number counts and their contribution to the cosmic infrared background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniani, S.; Maiolino, R.; De Zotti, G.; Negrello, M.; Marconi, A.; Bothwell, M. S.; Capak, P.; Carilli, C.; Castellano, M.; Cristiani, S.; Ferrara, A.; Fontana, A.; Gallerani, S.; Jones, G.; Ohta, K.; Ota, K.; Pentericci, L.; Santini, P.; Sheth, K.; Vallini, L.; Vanzella, E.; Wagg, J.; Williams, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    We have analysed 18 ALMA continuum maps in Bands 6 and 7, with rms down to 7.8 μJy, to derive differential number counts down to 60 μJy and 100 μJy at λ = 1.3 mm and λ = 1.1 mm, respectively. Furthermore, the non-detection of faint sources in the deepest ALMA field enabled us to set tight upper limits on the number counts down to 30 μJy. This is a factor of four deeper than the currently most stringent upper limit. The area covered by the combined fields is 9.5 × 10-4 deg2 at 1.1 mm and 6.6 × 10-4 deg2 at 1.3 mm. With respect to previous works, we improved the source extraction method by requiring that the dimension of the detected sources be consistent with the beam size. This method enabled us to remove spurious detections that have plagued the purity of the catalogues in previous studies. We detected 50 faint sources (at fluxes <1 mJy) with signal-to-noise (S/N) >3.5 down to 60 μJy, hence improving the statistics by a factor of four relative to previous studies. The inferred differential number counts are dN/ d(Log10S) = 1 × 105 deg2 at a 1.1 mm flux Sλ = 1.1 mm = 130 μJy, and dN/ d(Log10S) = 1.1 × 105 deg2 at a 1.3 mm flux Sλ = 1.3 mm = 60 μJy. At the faintest flux limits probed by our data, i.e. 30 μJy and 40 μJy, we obtain upper limits on the differential number counts of dN/ d(Log10S) < 7 × 105 deg2 and dN/ d(Log10S) < 3 × 105 deg2, respectively. Determining the fraction of cosmic infrared background (CIB) resolved by the ALMA observations was hampered by the large uncertainties plaguing the CIB measurements (a factor of four in flux). However, our results provide a new lower limit to CIB intensity of 17.2 Jy deg-2 at 1.1 mm and of 12.9 Jy deg-2 at 1.3 mm. Moreover, the flattening of the integrated number counts at faint fluxes strongly suggests that we are probably close to the CIB intensity. Our data imply that galaxies with star formation rate (SFR) < 40 M⊙/yr certainly contribute less than 50% to the CIB (and probably a much lower

  3. Faint Blue Objects at High Galactic Latitude. VIII. Performance Characteristics of the US Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Kenneth J.; Usher, P. D.

    2004-07-01

    The US survey has cataloged 3987 objects in seven high Galactic latitude fields according to their optical colors, magnitudes, and morphologies using photographic techniques. This paper analyzes the effectiveness of the survey at producing finding lists for complete samples of hot stars and quasars that exhibit blue and/or ultraviolet excess (B-UVX) relative to the colors of halo F and G subdwarf stars. A table of 599 spectroscopic identifications summarizes the spectroscopic coverage of the US objects that has been accomplished to date. In addition, some of the survey plates have been reexamined for objects missed during the original selection, and the literature has been searched for all other spectroscopically identified blue stars and quasars with z<2.2 that have been selected by other surveys within the US survey areas. These results are used to estimate empirically both the accuracy of the US survey selection boundaries (in color, morphology, and brightness) and the completeness of the resulting samples of B-UVX US objects within those boundaries. In particular, it is shown that the reliability of the US color classifications is high and that the previously derived US morphological boundary for the complete selection of unresolved quasars is accurate. The contribution of color and morphological classification errors to B-UVX sample incompleteness is therefore correspondingly small. The empirical tests indicate high levels of completeness (95+1-2%) for the samples of US quasars and hot stars isolated within the stated survey selection limits. Errata and improvements to some of the published catalog data are presented in Appendices.

  4. Infrared-faint radio sources: a cosmological view. AGN number counts, the cosmic X-ray background and SMBH formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinn, P.-C.; Middelberg, E.; Ibar, E.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are extragalactic emitters clearly detected at radio wavelengths but barely detected or undetected at optical and infrared wavelengths, with 5σ sensitivities as low as 1 μJy. Aims: Spectral energy distribution (hereafter SED) modelling and analyses of their radio properties indicate that IFRS are consistent with a population of (potentially extremely obscured) high-redshift AGN at 3 ≤ z ≤ 6. We demonstrate some astrophysical implications of this population and compare them to predictions from models of galaxy evolution and structure formation. Methods: We compiled a list of IFRS from four deep extragalactic surveys and extrapolated the IFRS number density to a survey-independent value of (30.8 ± 15.0) deg-2. We computed the IFRS contribution to the total number of AGN in the Universe to account for the cosmic X-ray background. By estimating the black hole mass contained in IFRS, we present conclusions for the SMBH mass density in the early universe and compare it to relevant simulations of structure formation after the Big Bang. Results: The number density of AGN derived from the IFRS density was found to be ~310 deg-2, which is equivalent to a SMBH mass density of the order of 103 M⊙ Mpc-3 in the redshift range 3 ≤ z ≤ 6. This produces an X-ray flux of 9 × 10-16 W m-2 deg-2 in the 0.5-2.0 keV band and 3 × 10-15 W m-2 deg-2 in the 2.0-10 keV band, in agreement with the missing unresolved components of the Cosmic X-ray Background. To address SMBH formation after the Big Bang we invoke a scenario involving both halo gas accretion and major mergers.

  5. Faint CO Line Wings in Four Star-forming (Ultra)luminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Adam K.; Walter, Fabian; Decarli, Roberto; Bolatto, Alberto; Zschaechner, Laura; Weiss, Axel

    2015-09-01

    We report the results of a search for large velocity width, low-intensity line wings—a commonly used signature of molecular outflows—in four low redshift (ultra)luminous infrared galaxies that appear to be dominated by star formation. The targets were drawn from a sample of fourteen targets presented in Chung et al., who showed the stacked CO spectrum of the sample to exhibit 1000 km s-1-wide line wings. We obtained sensitive, wide bandwidth imaging of our targets using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. We detect each target at very high significance but do not find the claimed line wings in these four targets. Instead, we constrain the flux in the line wings to be only a few percent. Casting our results as mass outflow rates following Cicone et al. we show them to be consistent with a picture in which very high mass loading factors preferentially occur in systems with high active galactic nucleus contributions to their bolometric luminosity. We identify one of our targets, IRAS 05083 (VII Zw 31), as a candidate molecular outflow.

  6. Imaging of four planetary nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds using the Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blades, J. C.; Barlow, M. J.; Albrecht, R.; Barbieri, C.; Boksenberg, A.; Crane, P.; Deharveng, J. M.; Disney, M. J.; Jakobsen, P.; Kamperman, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    Using the Faint Object Camera on-board the Hubble Space Telescope, we have obtained images of four planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Magellanic Clouds, namely N2 and N5 in the SMC and N66 and N201 in the LMC. Each nebula was imaged through two narrow-band filters isolating forbidden O III 5007 and H-beta, for a nominal exposure time of 1000 s in each filter. In forbidden O III, SMC N5 shows a circular ring structure, with a peak-to-peak diameter of 0.26 arcsec and a FWHM of 0.35 arcsec while SMC N2 shows an elliptical ring structure with a peak-to-peak diameter of 0.26 x 0.21. The expansion ages corresponding to the observed structures in SMC N2 and N5 are of the order of 3000 yr. LMC N201 is very compact, with a FWHM of 0.2 arcsec in H-beta. The Type I PN LMC N66 is a multipolar nebula, with the brightest part having an extent of about 2 arcsec and with fainter structures extending over 4 arcsec.

  7. Object Cueing System For Infrared Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranganath, H. S.; McIngvale, Pat; Speigle, Scott

    1987-09-01

    This paper considers the design of an object cueing system as a rule-based expert system. The architecture is modular and the control strategy permits dynamic scheduling of tasks. In this approach, results of several algorithms and many object recognition heuristics are combined to achieve better performance levels. Importance of spatial knowledge representatiOn is also discussed.

  8. [Calculation of infrared temperature measurement on non-Lambertian objects].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen; Zhang, Shi-cheng; Yang, Li

    2010-08-01

    According to the theory of infrared radiation and principles of temperature measurement using infrared imager, a universal mathematical model of infrared imager is established. Based on the normal emissivity characteristics of measured surface, the mathematical model is simplified, and the formula of temperature measurement using infrared imager is obtained. Through the relevant experiment, it is proved that the sum of emissivity and reflectivity of objects remained basically unchanged in a certain temperature range. The sum of emissivity and reflectivity of objects is relevant to the object types, surface conditions and the object temperature. The closer an object to Lambertian objects, the greater the sum is and the closer it is to 1. The farther the surface conditions deviate from the Lambertian surface, or the smoother the surface, the smaller the sum is. Experimental results show that if the object is close to Lambertian objects, it could be regarded as Lambertian, without the need for amendments to the actual objects. For non-Lambertian body (especially the smooth surfaces and low-emissivity objects), the amendment is necessary, or the temperature measurement error will increase, or even the obtained temperature is very far away from its true temperature. The study shows that, through the amendment, infrared temperature measurement on non-Lambertian objects is available. PMID:20939314

  9. Infrared system for monitoring movement of objects

    DOEpatents

    Valentine, Kenneth H.; Falter, Diedre D.; Falter, Kelly G.

    1991-01-01

    A system for monitoring moving objects, such as the flight of honeybees and other insects, using a pulsed laser light source. This system has a self-powered micro-miniaturized transmitting unit powered, in the preferred embodiment, with an array solar cells. This transmitting unit is attached to the object to be monitored. These solar cells provide current to a storage energy capacitor to produce, for example, five volts for the operation of the transmitter. In the simplest embodiment, the voltage on the capacitor operates a pulse generator to provide a pulsed energizing signal to one or more very small laser diodes. The pulsed light is then received at a receiving base station using substantially standard means which converts the light to an electrical signal for processing in a microprocessor to create the information as to the movement of the object. In the case of a unit for monitoring honeybees and other insects, the transmitting unit weighs less than 50 mg, and has a size no larger than 1.times.3.times.5 millimeters. Also, the preferred embodiment provides for the coding of the light to uniquely identify the particular transmitting unit that is being monitored. A "wake-up" circuit is provided in the preferred embodiment whereby there is no transmission until the voltage on the capacitor has exceeded a pre-set threshold. Various other uses of the motion-detection system are described.

  10. Infrared system for monitoring movement of objects

    DOEpatents

    Valentine, K.H.; Falter, D.D.; Falter, K.G.

    1991-04-30

    A system is described for monitoring moving objects, such as the flight of honeybees and other insects, using a pulsed laser light source. This system has a self-powered micro-miniaturized transmitting unit powered, in the preferred embodiment, with an array of solar cells. This transmitting unit is attached to the object to be monitored. These solar cells provide current to a storage energy capacitor to produce, for example, five volts for the operation of the transmitter. In the simplest embodiment, the voltage on the capacitor operates a pulse generator to provide a pulsed energizing signal to one or more very small laser diodes. The pulsed light is then received at a receiving base station using substantially standard means which converts the light to an electrical signal for processing in a microprocessor to create the information as to the movement of the object. In the case of a unit for monitoring honeybees and other insects, the transmitting unit weighs less than 50 mg, and has a size no larger than 1[times]3[times]5 millimeters. Also, the preferred embodiment provides for the coding of the light to uniquely identify the particular transmitting unit that is being monitored. A wake-up' circuit is provided in the preferred embodiment whereby there is no transmission until the voltage on the capacitor has exceeded a pre-set threshold. Various other uses of the motion-detection system are described. 4 figures.

  11. Fainting (Syncope)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Fainting (Syncope) Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Caregiving How ...

  12. Infrared hyperspectral upconversion imaging using spatial object translation.

    PubMed

    Kehlet, Louis Martinus; Sanders, Nicolai; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Pedersen, Christian

    2015-12-28

    In this paper hyperspectral imaging in the mid-infrared wavelength region is realised using nonlinear frequency upconversion. The infrared light is converted to the near-infrared region for detection with a Si-based CCD camera. The object is translated in a predefined grid by motorized actuators and an image is recorded for each position. A sequence of such images is post-processed into a series of monochromatic images in a wavelength range defined by the phasematch condition and numerical aperture of the upconversion system. A standard USAF resolution target and a polystyrene film are used to impart spatial and spectral information unto the source. PMID:26832059

  13. Near-infrared spectroscopy of faint discrete X-ray point sources constituting the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morihana, Kumiko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Dubath, Pierre; Yoshida, Tessei; Suzuki, Kensuke; Ebisawa, Ken

    2016-05-01

    The Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE) is an apparently extended X-ray emission along the Galactic plane. The X-ray spectrum is characterized by a hard continuum with a strong Fe K emission feature in the 6-7 keV band. A substantial fraction (˜80%) of the GRXE in the Fe band was resolved into point sources by deep Chandra imaging observations; thus GRXE is mostly composed of dim Galactic X-ray point sources, at least in this energy band. To investigate the populations of these dim X-ray point sources, we carried out near-infrared (NIR) follow-up spectroscopic observations in two deep Chandra fields located in the Galactic plane at (l, b) = (0.1°, -1.4°) and (28.5°, 0.0°) using NTT/SofI and Subaru/MOIRCS. We obtained well-exposed NIR spectra from 65 objects and found that there are three main classes of Galactic sources based on the X-ray color and NIR spectral features: those having (A) hard X-ray spectra and NIR emission features such as H I (Brγ), He I, and He II (2 objects), (B) soft X-ray spectra and NIR absorption features such as H I, Na I, Ca I, and CO (46 objects), and (C) hard X-ray spectra and NIR absorption features such as H I, Na I, Ca I, and CO (17 objects). From these features, we argue that class A sources are cataclysmic variables (CVs), and class B sources are late-type stars with enhanced coronal activity, which is in agreement with current knowledge. Class C sources possibly belong to a new group of objects, which has been poorly studied so far. We argue that the candidate sources for class C are the binary systems hosting white dwarfs and late-type companions with very low accretion rates. It is likely that this newly recognized class of sources contribute to a non-negligible fraction of the GRXE, especially in the Fe K band.

  14. Near-infrared spectroscopy of faint discrete X-ray point sources constituting the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morihana, Kumiko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Dubath, Pierre; Yoshida, Tessei; Suzuki, Kensuke; Ebisawa, Ken

    2016-08-01

    The Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE) is an apparently extended X-ray emission along the Galactic plane. The X-ray spectrum is characterized by a hard continuum with a strong Fe K emission feature in the 6-7 keV band. A substantial fraction (˜80%) of the GRXE in the Fe band was resolved into point sources by deep Chandra imaging observations; thus GRXE is mostly composed of dim Galactic X-ray point sources, at least in this energy band. To investigate the populations of these dim X-ray point sources, we carried out near-infrared (NIR) follow-up spectroscopic observations in two deep Chandra fields located in the Galactic plane at (l, b) = (0.1°, -1.4°) and (28.5°, 0.0°) using NTT/SofI and Subaru/MOIRCS. We obtained well-exposed NIR spectra from 65 objects and found that there are three main classes of Galactic sources based on the X-ray color and NIR spectral features: those having (A) hard X-ray spectra and NIR emission features such as H I (Brγ), He I, and He II (2 objects), (B) soft X-ray spectra and NIR absorption features such as H I, Na I, Ca I, and CO (46 objects), and (C) hard X-ray spectra and NIR absorption features such as H I, Na I, Ca I, and CO (17 objects). From these features, we argue that class A sources are cataclysmic variables (CVs), and class B sources are late-type stars with enhanced coronal activity, which is in agreement with current knowledge. Class C sources possibly belong to a new group of objects, which has been poorly studied so far. We argue that the candidate sources for class C are the binary systems hosting white dwarfs and late-type companions with very low accretion rates. It is likely that this newly recognized class of sources contribute to a non-negligible fraction of the GRXE, especially in the Fe K band.

  15. THE OPTICAL SPECTRA OF SPITZER 24 mum GALAXIES IN THE COSMIC EVOLUTION SURVEY FIELD. II. FAINT INFRARED SOURCES IN THE zCOSMOS-BRIGHT 10k CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Caputi, K. I.; Lilly, S. J.; Maier, C.; Carollo, C. M.; Aussel, H.; Floc'h, E. Le; Frayer, D.; Contini, T.; Kneib, J.-P.; Le Fevre, O.; Mainieri, V.; Renzini, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Scoville, N.; Zamorani, G.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Coppa, G.; Bongiorno, A.

    2009-12-20

    We have used the zCOSMOS-bright 10k sample to identify 3244 Spitzer/MIPS 24 mum-selected galaxies with 0.06 mJy < S{sub 24{sub m}}u{sub m} approx< 0.50 mJy and I{sub AB} < 22.5, over 1.5 deg{sup 2} of the COSMOS field, and studied different spectral properties, depending on redshift. At 0.2 < z < 0.3, we found that different reddening laws of common use in the literature explain the dust extinction properties of approx80% of our infrared (IR) sources, within the error bars. For up to 16% of objects, instead, the Halpha lambda6563/Hbeta lambda4861 ratios are too high for their IR/UV attenuations, which is probably a consequence of inhomogeneous dust distributions. In only a few of our galaxies at 0.2 < z < 0.3, the IR emission could be mainly produced by dust heated by old rather than young stars. Besides, the line ratios of approx22% of our galaxies suggest that they might be star-formation/nuclear-activity composite systems. At 0.5 < z < 0.7, we estimated galaxy metallicities for 301 galaxies: at least 12% of them are securely below the upper-branch mass-metallicity trend, which is consistent with the local relation. Finally, we performed a combined analysis of the H{sub d}elta equivalent width versus D{sub n} (4000) diagram for 1722 faint and bright 24 mum galaxies at 0.6 < z < 1.0, spanning two decades in mid-IR luminosity. We found that, while secondary bursts of star formation are necessary to explain the position of the most luminous IR galaxies in that diagram, quiescent, exponentially declining star formation histories can well reproduce the spectral properties of approx40% of the less luminous sources. Our results suggest a transition in the possible modes of star formation at total IR luminosities L{sub TIR} approx (3 +- 2) x 10{sup 11} L{sub sun}.

  16. Hubble Space Telescope faint object spectrograph Quasar Absorption System Snapshot Survey (AbSnap). 1: Astrometric optical positions and finding charts of 269 bright QSO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, David V.; Osmer, Samantha J.; Blades, J. Chris; Tytler, David; Cottrell, Lance; Fan, Xiao-Ming; Lanzetta, Kenneth M.

    1994-01-01

    We present finding charts and optical positions accurate to less than 1 arcsec for 269 bright (V less than or = 18.5) Quasi-Stellar Objects (QSOs). These objects were selected as candidates for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Quasar Absorption System Snapshot Survey (AbSnap), a program designed to use the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) to obtain short exposure ultraviolet (UV) spectra of bright QSOs. Many quasars were included because of their proximity to bright, low redshift galaxies and positions of these QSOs are measured accurately for the first time. Data were obtained using the digitized sky survey produced by the Space Telescope Science Institute's Guide Stars Selection System Astrometric Support Program.

  17. MID-INFRARED SPECTRAL VARIABILITY ATLAS OF YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kospal, A.; Abraham, P.; Kun, M.; Moor, A.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Henning, Th.; Leinert, Ch.; Turner, N. J.

    2012-08-01

    Optical and near-infrared variability is a well-known property of young stellar objects. However, a growing number of recent studies claim that a considerable fraction of them also exhibit mid-infrared flux changes. With the aim of studying and interpreting variability on a decadal timescale, here we present a mid-infrared spectral atlas containing observations of 68 low- and intermediate-mass young stellar objects. The atlas consists of 2.5-11.6 {mu}m low-resolution spectra obtained with the ISOPHOT-S instrument on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) between 1996 and 1998, as well as 5.2-14.5 {mu}m low-resolution spectra obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph instrument on board the Spitzer Space Telescope between 2004 and 2007. The observations were retrieved from the ISO and Spitzer archives and were post-processed interactively by our own routines. For those 47 objects where multi-epoch spectra were available, we analyze mid-infrared spectral variability on annual and/or decadal timescales. We identify 37 variable candidate sources. Many stars show wavelength-independent flux changes, possibly due to variable accretion rates. In several systems, all exhibiting 10 {mu}m silicate emission, the variability of the 6-8 {mu}m continuum, and the silicate feature exhibit different amplitudes. A possible explanation is variable shadowing of the silicate-emitting region by an inner disk structure of changing height or extra silicate emission from dust clouds in the disk atmosphere. Our results suggest that mid-infrared variability, in particular, the wavelength-dependent changes, is more ubiquitous than was known before. Interpreting this variability is a new possibility for exploring the structure of the disk and its dynamical processes.

  18. Cygnids and Taurids - Two classes of infrared objects.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strecker, D. W.; Ney, E. P.; Murdock, T. L.

    1973-01-01

    In a study of the anonymous objects from the IRC Survey, we have found that about 10 percent have large long wave excesses. These infrared stars seem to belong to two classes, one group like NML Cygni (Cygnids) and the other like NML Tauri (Taurids).

  19. Dual-band infrared capabilities for imaging buried object sites

    SciTech Connect

    Del Grande, N.K.; Durbin, P.F.; Gorvad, M.R.; Perkins, D.E.; Clark, G.A.; Hernandez, J.E.; Sherwood, R.J.

    1993-04-02

    We discuss dual-band infrared (DBIR) capabilities for imaging buried object sizes. We identify physical features affecting thermal contrast needed to distinguish buried object sites from undisturbed sites or surface clutter. Apart from atmospheric transmission and system performance, these features include: object size, shape, and burial depth; ambient soil, disturbed soil and object site thermal diffusivity differences; surface temperature, emissivity, plant-cover, slope, albedo and roughness variations; weather conditions and measurement times. We use good instrumentation to measure the time-varying temperature differences between buried object sites and undisturbed soil sites. We compare near surface soil temperature differences with radiometric infrared (IR) surface temperature differences recorded at 4.7 {plus_minus} 0.4 {mu}m and at 10.6 {plus_minus} 1.0 {mu}m. By producing selective DBIR image ratio maps, we distinguish temperature-difference patterns from surface emissivity effects. We discuss temperature differences between buried object sites, filled hole site (without buried objects), cleared (undisturbed) soil sites, and grass-covered sites (with and without different types of surface clutter). We compare temperature, emissivity-ratio, visible and near-IR reflectance signatures of surface objects, leafy plants and sod. We discuss the physical aspects of environmental, surface and buried target features affecting interpretation of buried targets, surface objects and natural backgrounds.

  20. Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. II - The IRAS faint source survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonsdale, Carol J.; Hacking, Perry B.; Conrow, T. P.; Rowan-Robinson, M.

    1990-07-01

    The new IRAS Faint Source Survey data base is used to confirm the conclusion of Hacking et al. (1987) that the 60 micron source counts fainter than about 0.5 Jy lie in excess of predictions based on nonevolving model populations. The existence of an anisotropy between the northern and southern Galactic caps discovered by Rowan-Robinson et al. (1986) and Needham and Rowan-Robinson (1988) is confirmed, and it is found to extend below their sensitivity limit to about 0.3 Jy in 60 micron flux density. The count anisotropy at f(60) greater than 0.3 can be interpreted reasonably as due to the Local Supercluster; however, no one structure accounting for the fainter anisotropy can be easily identified in either optical or far-IR two-dimensional sky distributions. The far-IR galaxy sky distributions are considerably smoother than distributions from the published optical galaxy catalogs. It is likely that structure of the large size discussed here have been discriminated against in earlier studies due to insufficient volume sampling.

  1. Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. II - The IRAS faint source survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lonsdale, Carol J.; Hacking, Perry B.; Conrow, T. P.; Rowan-Robinson, M.

    1990-01-01

    The new IRAS Faint Source Survey data base is used to confirm the conclusion of Hacking et al. (1987) that the 60 micron source counts fainter than about 0.5 Jy lie in excess of predictions based on nonevolving model populations. The existence of an anisotropy between the northern and southern Galactic caps discovered by Rowan-Robinson et al. (1986) and Needham and Rowan-Robinson (1988) is confirmed, and it is found to extend below their sensitivity limit to about 0.3 Jy in 60 micron flux density. The count anisotropy at f(60) greater than 0.3 can be interpreted reasonably as due to the Local Supercluster; however, no one structure accounting for the fainter anisotropy can be easily identified in either optical or far-IR two-dimensional sky distributions. The far-IR galaxy sky distributions are considerably smoother than distributions from the published optical galaxy catalogs. It is likely that structure of the large size discussed here have been discriminated against in earlier studies due to insufficient volume sampling.

  2. Galaxy evolution and large-scale structure in the far-infrared. II. The IRAS faint source survey

    SciTech Connect

    Lonsdale, C.J.; Hacking, P.B.; Conrow, T.P.; Rowan-Robinson, M. Queen Mary College, London )

    1990-07-01

    The new IRAS Faint Source Survey data base is used to confirm the conclusion of Hacking et al. (1987) that the 60 micron source counts fainter than about 0.5 Jy lie in excess of predictions based on nonevolving model populations. The existence of an anisotropy between the northern and southern Galactic caps discovered by Rowan-Robinson et al. (1986) and Needham and Rowan-Robinson (1988) is confirmed, and it is found to extend below their sensitivity limit to about 0.3 Jy in 60 micron flux density. The count anisotropy at f(60) greater than 0.3 can be interpreted reasonably as due to the Local Supercluster; however, no one structure accounting for the fainter anisotropy can be easily identified in either optical or far-IR two-dimensional sky distributions. The far-IR galaxy sky distributions are considerably smoother than distributions from the published optical galaxy catalogs. It is likely that structure of the large size discussed here have been discriminated against in earlier studies due to insufficient volume sampling. 105 refs.

  3. HerMES: Current Cosmic Infrared Background Estimates Can Be Explained by Known Galaxies and Their Faint Companions at z < 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viero, M. P.; Moncelsi, L.; Quadri, R. F.; Béthermin, M.; Bock, J.; Burgarella, D.; Chapman, S. C.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conversi, L.; Duivenvoorden, S.; Dunlop, J. S.; Farrah, D.; Franceschini, A.; Halpern, M.; Ivison, R. J.; Lagache, G.; Magdis, G.; Marchetti, L.; Álvarez-Márquez, J.; Marsden, G.; Oliver, S. J.; Page, M. J.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Schulz, B.; Scott, Douglas; Valtchanov, I.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, L.; Wardlow, J.; Zemcov, M.

    2015-08-01

    We report contributions to cosmic infrared background (CIB) intensities originating from known galaxies and their faint companions at submillimeter wavelengths. Using the publicly available UltraVISTA catalog and maps at 250, 350, and 500 μm from the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey, we perform a novel measurement that exploits the fact that uncataloged sources may bias stacked flux densities—particularly if the resolution of the image is poor—and intentionally smooth the images before stacking and summing intensities. By smoothing the maps we are capturing the contribution of faint (undetected in {K}S˜ 23.4) sources that are physically associated, or correlated, with the detected sources. We find that the cumulative CIB increases with increased smoothing, reaching 9.82 ± 0.78, 5.77 ± 0.43 and 2.32+/- 0.19 {{nWm}}-2 {{sr}}-1 at 250, 350, and 500 μm at 300 {arcsec} FWHM. This corresponds to a fraction of the fiducial CIB of 0.94 ± 0.23, 1.07 ± 0.31, and 0.97 ± 0.26 at 250, 350, and 500 μm, where the uncertainties are dominated by those of the absolute CIB. We then propose, with a simple model combining parametric descriptions for stacked flux densities and stellar mass functions, that emission from galaxies with log(M/{M}⊙ )\\gt 8.5 can account for most of the measured total intensities and argue against contributions from extended, diffuse emission. Finally, we discuss prospects for future survey instruments to improve the estimates of the absolute CIB levels, and observe any potentially remaining emission at z\\gt 4.

  4. GTC/OSIRIS SPECTROSCOPIC IDENTIFICATION OF A FAINT L SUBDWARF IN THE UKIRT INFRARED DEEP SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Lodieu, N.

    2010-01-10

    We present the discovery of an L subdwarf in 234 deg{sup 2} common to the UK InfraRed Telescope (UKIRT) Infrared Deep Sky Survey Large Area Survey Data Release 2 and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 3. This is the fifth L subdwarf announced to date, the first one identified in the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey, and the faintest known. The blue optical and near-infrared colors of ULAS J135058.86+081506.8 and its overall spectra energy distribution are similar to the known mid-L subdwarfs. Low-resolution optical (700-1000 nm) spectroscopy with the Optical System for Imaging and low Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy spectrograph on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio de Canarias reveals that ULAS J135058.86+081506.8 exhibits a strong K I pressure-broadened line at 770 nm and a red slope longward of 800 nm, features characteristics of L-type dwarfs. From direct comparison with the four known L subdwarfs, we estimate its spectral type to be sdL4-sdL6 and derive a distance in the interval 94-170 pc. We provide a rough estimate of the space density for mid-L subdwarfs of 1.5 x 10{sup -4} pc{sup -3}.

  5. INFRARED SPECTRAL OBSERVATION OF EIGHT BL LAC OBJECTS FROM THE SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P. S.; Shan, H. G.

    2011-05-01

    The Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) low-resolution spectra for eight BL Lac objects are presented in this paper. It can be seen that the infrared spectrum of S5 0716+714 shows in the IRS region many emission features that would be from a nearby galaxy. It is also shown that, except for the silicate absorptions around 10 {mu}m for some sources, emission lines in the infrared spectra for the other seven BL Lac objects are indeed very weak or absent. In addition, ignoring the silicate feature, all spectra can be well fitted by a power-law distribution indicative of the emission mechanism of the synchrotron radiation for these BL Lac objects in the IRS region.

  6. The AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor young stellar object catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, L. Viktor; Marton, Gábor; Zahorecz, Sarolta; Balázs, Lajos G.; Ueno, Munetaka; Tamura, Motohide; Kawamura, Akiko; Kiss, Zoltán T.; Kitamura, Yoshimi

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate the use of the AKARI all-sky survey photometric data in the study of galactic star formation. Our aim was to select young stellar objects (YSOs) in the AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) Bright Source Catalogue. We used AKARI/FIS and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data to derive mid- and far-infrared colors of YSOs. Classification schemes based on quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) have been given for YSOs and the training catalog for QDA was the whole-sky selection of previously known YSOs (i.e., listed in the SIMBAD database). A new catalog of AKARI FIS YSO candidates including 44001 sources has been prepared; the reliability of the classification is over 90%, as tested in comparison to known YSOs. As much as 76% of our YSO candidates are from previously uncatalogued types. The vast majority of these sources are Class I and II types according to the Lada classification. The distribution of AKARI FIS YSOs is well correlated with that of the galactic ISM; local over-densities were found on infrared loops and towards the cold clumps detected by Planck.

  7. Preliminary analysis of an ultraviolet Hubble Space Telescope faint object camera image of the center of M31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, I. R.; Deharveng, J. M.; Albrecht, R.; Barbieri, C.; Blades, J. C.; Boksenberg, A.; Crane, P.; Disney, M. J.; Jakobsen, P.; Kamperman, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    A 5161 s exposure was taken with the FOC on the central 44 arcsec of M31, through a filter centered at 1750 A. Much of the light is redleak from visible wavelengths, but nearly half of it is genuine UV. The image shows the same central peak found earlier by Stratoscope, with a somewhat steeper dropoff outside that peak. More than 100 individual objects are seen, some pointlike and some slightly extended. We identify them as post-asymptotic giant branch stars, some of them surrounded by a contribution from their accompanying planetary nebulae. These objects contribute almost a fifth of the total UV light, but fall far short of accounting for all of it. We suggest that the remainder may result from the corresponding evolutionary tracks in a population more metal-rich than solar.

  8. INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF INTERMEDIATE-MASS YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Pitann, Jan; Bouwman, Jeroen; Krause, Oliver; Henning, Thomas; Hennemann, Martin

    2011-12-10

    In this paper, we present Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectroscopy for 14 intermediate-mass young stellar objects (YSOs). We use Spitzer spectroscopy to investigate the physical properties of these sources and their environments. Our sample can be divided into two types of objects: young isolated, embedded objects with spectra that are dominated by ice and silicate absorption bands, and more evolved objects that are dominated by extended emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pure H{sub 2} rotational lines. We are able to constrain the illuminating FUV fields by classifying the PAH bands below 9 {mu}m. For most of the sources we are able to detect several atomic fine structure lines. In particular, the [Ne II] line appearing in two regions could originate from unresolved photodissociation regions or J-shocks. We relate the identified spectral features to observations obtained from NIR through submillimeter imaging. The spatial extent of several H{sub 2} and PAH bands is matched with morphologies identified in previous Infrared Array Camera observations. This also allows us to distinguish between the different H{sub 2} excitation mechanisms. In addition, we calculate the optical extinction from the silicate bands and use this to constrain the spectral energy distribution fit, allowing us to estimate the masses of these YSOs.

  9. Nonuniform Dust Outflow Observed around Infrared Object NML Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnier, J. D.; Bester, M.; Danchi, W. C.; Johnson, M. A.; Lipman, E. A.; Townes, C. H.; Tuthill, P. G.; Geballe, T. R.; Nishimoto, D.; Kervin, P. W.

    1997-05-01

    Measurements by the University of California Berkeley Infrared Spatial Interferometer at 11.15 μm have yielded strong evidence for multiple dust shells and/or significant asymmetric dust emission around NML Cyg. New observations reported also include multiple 8-13 μm spectra taken from 1994-1995 and N-band (10.2 μm) photometry from 1980-1992. These and past measurements are analyzed and fitted to a model of the dust distribution around NML Cyg. No spherically symmetric single dust shell model is found consistent with both near- and mid-infrared observations. However, a circularly symmetric maximum entropy reconstruction of the 11 μm brightness distribution suggests a double-shell model for the dust distribution. Such a model, consisting of a geometrically thin shell of intermediate optical depth (τ11 μm ~ 1.9) plus an outer shell (τ11 μm ~ 0.33), is consistent not only with the 11 μm visibility data but also with near-infrared speckle measurements, the broadband spectrum, and the 9.7 μm silicate feature. The outer shell, or large-scale structure, is revealed only by long-baseline interferometry at 11 μm, being too cold (~400 K) to contribute in the near-infrared and having no unambiguous spectral signature in the mid-infrared. The optical constants of Ossenkopf, Henning, & Mathis proved superior to the Draine & Lee (1984) constants in fitting the detailed shape of the silicate feature and broadband spectrum for this object. Recent observations of H2O maser emission around NML Cyg by Richards, Yates, & Cohen (1996) are consistent with the location of the two dust shells and provide further evidence for the two-shell model.

  10. Fast calculation of object infrared spectral scattering based on CUDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang-chao; Niu, Wu-bin; Wu, Zhen-sen

    2010-11-01

    Computational unified device architecture (CUDA) is used for paralleling the spectral scattering calculation from non-Lambertian object of sky and earth background irradiation. The bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of five parameter model is utilized in object surface element scattering calculation. The calculation process is partitioned into many threads running in GPU kernel and each thread computes a visible surface element infrared spectral scattering intensity in a specific incident direction, all visible surface elements' intensity are weighted and averaged to obtain the object surface scattering intensity. The comparison of results of the CPU calculation and CUDA parallel calculation of a cylinder shows that the CUDA parallel calculation speed improves more than two hundred times in meeting the accuracy, with a high engineering value.

  11. A study of ultraviolet absorption lines through the complete Galactic halo by the analysis of HST faint object spectrograph spectra of active Galactic nuclei, 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burks, Geoffrey S.; Bartko, Frank; Shull, J. Michael; Stocke, John T.; Sachs, Elise R.; Burbidge, E. Margaret; Cohen, Ross D.; Junkkarinen, Vesa T.; Harms, Richard J.; Massa, Derck

    1994-01-01

    The ultraviolet (1150 - 2850 A) spectra of a number of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) have been used to study the properties of the Galactic halo. The objects that served as probes are 3C 273, PKS 0454-220, Pg 1211+143, CSO 251, Ton 951, and PG 1351+640. The equivalent widths of certain interstellar ions have been measured, with special attention paid to the C IV/C II and Si IV/Si II ratios. These ratios have been intercompared, and the highest values are found in the direction of 3C 273, where C IV/C II = 1.2 and Si IV/Si II greater than 1. These high ratios may be due to a nearby supernova remnant, rather than to ionized gas higher up in the Galactic halo. Our data give some support to the notion that QSO metal-line systems may arise from intervening galaxies which contain high supernova rates, galactic fountains, and turbulent mixing layers.

  12. Discovery of Associated Absorption Lines in an X-Ray Warm Absorber: Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph Observations of MR 2251-178

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monier, Eric M.; Mathur, Smita; Wilkes, Belinda; Elvis, Martin

    2001-01-01

    The presence of a 'warm absorber' was first suggested to explain spectral variability in an X-ray spectrum of the radio-quiet quasi-stellar object (QSO) MR 2251-178. A unified picture, in which X-ray warm absorbers and 'intrinsic' UV absorbers are the same, offers the opportunity to probe the nuclear environment of active galactic nuclei. To test this scenario and understand the physical properties of the absorber, we obtained a UV spectrum of MR 2251-178 with the Faint Object Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The HST spectrum clearly shows absorption due to Lyalpha, N v, and C IV, blueshifted by 300 km s(exp -1) from the emission redshift of the QSO. The rarity of both X-ray and UV absorbers in radio-quiet QSOs suggests these absorbers are physically related, if not identical. Assuming the unified scenario, we place constraints on the physical parameters of the absorber and conclude the mass outflow rate is essentially the same as the accretion rate in MR 2251-178.

  13. Characteristics analysis of infrared polarization for several typical artificial objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Han, Jian-tao; Li, Jicheng; Yang, Wei-ping; Gong, Ting

    2014-10-01

    It is a difficult point to detect and recognize artificial targets under the disturbance of the complex ground clutter when remote sensing and detection to the earth. Using the different polarization information between artificial object and natural scenery, the ability to distinguish artificial targets from natural scenery can be promoted effectively. On account that the differences of polarization characteristics is an important factor in designing the target recognition method, this paper focuses attention on the application of remote sensing and reconnaissance and makes detailed research on the long wave infrared polarization characteristics of several typical metallic targets, such as aluminum plate and iron plate and the aluminum plate that be coated with black paint or yellow green camouflage. Then, the changing rules of the degree and angle of the long wave infrared polarization changing with the measurement temperature are analyzed and researched. Work of this paper lays the theoretical foundation for the design of remote sensing and detection system based on the infrared polarization information in the future.

  14. Design of adaptive objective lens for ultrabroad near infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Gongpu; Li, Guoqiang

    2016-03-01

    We present a compound adaptive objective lens in which a water-filled membrane lens is inserted into a front group (one lens) and a back group (two lenses). This adaptive objective lens works in the ultrabroad near infrared waveband (760nm ~ 920nm) with the volume scan of > 1mm3 and the resolution of 2.8 μm (calculated at the wavelength of 840 nm). The focal range is 19.5mm ~ 20.5mm and the numerical number is 0.196. The size of the adaptive lens is 10mm (diameter) × 17mm (length). This kind of lens can be widely used in three-dimensional (3D) volume biomedical imaging instruments, such as confocal microscope, optical coherence tomography (OCT), two photon microscope, etc.

  15. Rapid response near-infrared spectrophotometric characterization of Near Earth Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mommert, Michael; Trilling, David; Axelrod, Tim; Butler, Nat; Jedicke, Robert; Moskovitz, Nicholas; Pichardo, Barbara; Reyes, Mauricio

    2014-11-01

    Small NEOs are, as a whole, poorly characterized, and we know nothing about the physical properties of the majority of all NEOs. The rate of NEO discoveries is increasing each year, and projects to determine the physical properties of NEOs are lagging behind. NEOs are faint, and generally even fainter by the time that follow-up characterizations can be made days or weeks later. There is a need for a high-throughput, high-efficiency physical characterization strategy in which hundreds of faint NEOs can be characterized each year. Broadband photometry in the near-infrared is sufficiently diagnostic to assign taxonomic types, and hence constrain both the individual and ensemble properties of NEOs. We will present results from our recently initiated program of rapid response near-infrared spectrophotometric characterization of NEOs. We are using UKIRT (on Mauna Kea) and the RATIR instrument on the 1.5m telescope at the San Pedro Martir Observatory (Mexico) to allow us to make observations most nights of the year in robotic/queue mode. This technique is powerful and fast. We have written automated software that allows us to observe NEOs very soon after discovery. Our targets are NEOs that are generally too faint for other characterization techniques. We are on pace to characterize hundreds of NEOs per year.

  16. A Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph Survey for Broad Absorption Lines in a Sample of Low-redshift Weak [O III] Quasi-stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnshek, David A.; Monier, Eric M.; Sirola, Christopher J.; Espey, Brian R.

    1997-02-01

    The study by Boroson & Meyers led to the suggestion that radio-quiet QSOs with weak [O III] and strong Fe II emission spectra form a class of QSOs that has a high probability of exhibiting broad absorption lines (BALs) in their spectra. Furthermore, they argued that since narrow-line [O III] emission is almost certainly emitted isotropically, this indicates that such objects have relatively large BAL region covering factors. Low covering factor models are consistent with scenarios in which most QSOs have BAL regions, while higher covering factor models are consistent with scenarios in which there are special classes of QSOs with large BAL region outflows. By making Hubble Space Telescope (HST) FOS observations and using IUE or HST archival data when available, the details of the Boroson & Meyers suggestion have been explored by directly searching for classical C IV BALs in a sample of 18 QSOs with weak [O III] and often strong Fe II emission. Six of the 18 QSOs are found to exhibit C IV BALs. (In the archival sample, four of six objects have BALs, while two of the 12 new objects observed with the HST FOS have BALs.) However, there is evidence that the sample is heterogeneous, with IRAS-selected objects and high-luminosity objects having a greater tendency to exhibit BALs. If an isotropic model for [O III] emission equivalent width is considered, the results suggest that for the 18 object sample as a whole the average BAL region covering factor is ~0.33+0.20-0.09, which is significantly larger (with a more than 99% probability) than the overall fraction of QSOs observed to have BALs (normally taken as ~0.1). Given possible selection effects, in the context of an isotropic model the results may indicate that some of the sample objects have covering factors <<0.33, while others have covering factors >>0.33. At the same time, it is impossible to rule out in a non-model-dependent way a scenario in which orientation effects are important and covering factors are

  17. Optical-faint, Far-infrared-bright Herschel Sources in the CANDELS Fields: Ultra-luminous Infrared Galaxies at z > 1 and the Effect of Source Blending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Haojing; Stefanon, Mauro; Ma, Zhiyuan; Willner, S. P.; Somerville, Rachel; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Davé, Romeel; Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Cava, Antonio; Wiklind, Tommy; Kocevski, Dale; Rafelski, Marc; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Cooray, Asantha; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Grogin, Norman A.

    2014-07-01

    The Herschel very wide field surveys have charted hundreds of square degrees in multiple far-IR (FIR) bands. While the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is currently the best resource for optical counterpart identifications over such wide areas, it does not detect a large number of Herschel FIR sources and leaves their nature undetermined. As a test case, we studied seven "SDSS-invisible," very bright 250 μm sources (S 250 > 55 mJy) in the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey fields where we have a rich multi-wavelength data set. We took a new approach to decompose the FIR sources, using the near-IR or the optical images directly for position priors. This is an improvement over the previous decomposition efforts where the priors are from mid-IR data that still suffer from the problem of source blending. We found that in most cases the single Herschel sources are made of multiple components that are not necessarily at the same redshifts. Our decomposition succeeded in identifying and extracting their major contributors. We show that these are all ultra-luminous infrared galaxies at z ~ 1-2 whose high L IR is mainly due to dust-obscured star formation. Most of them would not be selected as submillimeter galaxies. They all have complicated morphologies indicative of mergers or violent instability, and their stellar populations are heterogeneous in terms of stellar masses, ages, and formation histories. Their current ultra-luminous infrared galaxy phases are of various degrees of importance in their stellar mass assembly. Our practice provides a promising starting point for developing an automatic routine to reliably study bright Herschel sources.

  18. OPTICAL-FAINT, FAR-INFRARED-BRIGHT HERSCHEL SOURCES IN THE CANDELS FIELDS: ULTRA-LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES AT z > 1 AND THE EFFECT OF SOURCE BLENDING

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Haojing; Stefanon, Mauro; Ma, Zhiyuan; Willner, S. P.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Somerville, Rachel; Davé, Romeel; Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Cava, Antonio; Wiklind, Tommy; Kocevski, Dale; Rafelski, Marc; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Cooray, Asantha; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Grogin, Norman A.

    2014-07-01

    The Herschel very wide field surveys have charted hundreds of square degrees in multiple far-IR (FIR) bands. While the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is currently the best resource for optical counterpart identifications over such wide areas, it does not detect a large number of Herschel FIR sources and leaves their nature undetermined. As a test case, we studied seven ''SDSS-invisible'', very bright 250 μm sources (S {sub 250} > 55 mJy) in the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey fields where we have a rich multi-wavelength data set. We took a new approach to decompose the FIR sources, using the near-IR or the optical images directly for position priors. This is an improvement over the previous decomposition efforts where the priors are from mid-IR data that still suffer from the problem of source blending. We found that in most cases the single Herschel sources are made of multiple components that are not necessarily at the same redshifts. Our decomposition succeeded in identifying and extracting their major contributors. We show that these are all ultra-luminous infrared galaxies at z ∼ 1-2 whose high L {sub IR} is mainly due to dust-obscured star formation. Most of them would not be selected as submillimeter galaxies. They all have complicated morphologies indicative of mergers or violent instability, and their stellar populations are heterogeneous in terms of stellar masses, ages, and formation histories. Their current ultra-luminous infrared galaxy phases are of various degrees of importance in their stellar mass assembly. Our practice provides a promising starting point for developing an automatic routine to reliably study bright Herschel sources.

  19. The Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 Early Release Science Data: Panchromatic Faint Object Counts for 0.2-2 μm Wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windhorst, Rogier A.; Cohen, Seth H.; Hathi, Nimish P.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Ryan, Russell E., Jr.; Yan, Haojing; Baldry, Ivan K.; Driver, Simon P.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hill, David T.; Kelvin, Lee S.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Mechtley, Matt; O'Connell, Robert W.; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Rutkowski, Michael J.; Seibert, Mark; Straughn, Amber N.; Tuffs, Richard J.; Balick, Bruce; Bond, Howard E.; Bushouse, Howard; Calzetti, Daniela; Crockett, Mark; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Kimble, Randy A.; MacKenty, John W.; Mutchler, Max; Paresce, Francesco; Saha, Abihit; Silk, Joseph I.; Trauger, John T.; Walker, Alistair R.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Young, Erick T.

    2011-04-01

    We describe the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) Early Release Science (ERS) observations in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) South field. The new WFC3 ERS data provide calibrated, drizzled mosaics in the UV filters F225W, F275W, and F336W, as well as in the near-IR filters F098M (Ys ), F125W (J), and F160W (H) with 1-2 HST orbits per filter. Together with the existing HST Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) GOODS-South mosaics in the BViz filters, these panchromatic 10-band ERS data cover 40-50 arcmin2 at 0.2-1.7 μm in wavelength at 0farcs07-0farcs15 FWHM resolution and 0farcs090 Multidrizzled pixels to depths of AB sime 26.0-27.0 mag (5σ) for point sources, and AB sime 25.5-26.5 mag for compact galaxies. In this paper, we describe (1) the scientific rationale, and the data taking plus reduction procedures of the panchromatic 10-band ERS mosaics, (2) the procedure of generating object catalogs across the 10 different ERS filters, and the specific star-galaxy separation techniques used, and (3) the reliability and completeness of the object catalogs from the WFC3 ERS mosaics. The excellent 0farcs07-0farcs15 FWHM resolution of HST/WFC3 and ACS makes star-galaxy separation straightforward over a factor of 10 in wavelength to AB sime 25-26 mag from the UV to the near-IR, respectively. Our main results are: (1) proper motion of faint ERS stars is detected over 6 years at 3.06 ± 0.66 mas year-1 (4.6σ), consistent with Galactic structure models; (2) both the Galactic star counts and the galaxy counts show mild but significant trends of decreasing count slopes from the mid-UV to the near-IR over a factor of 10 in wavelength; (3) combining the 10-band ERS counts with the panchromatic Galaxy and Mass Assembly survey counts at the bright end (10 mag <~ AB lsim 20 mag) and the Hubble Ultra Deep Field counts in the BVizYsJH filters at the faint end (24 mag <~ AB lsim 30 mag) yields galaxy counts that are well measured over the entire

  20. A 21 Centimeter Absorber Identified with a Spiral Galaxy: Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph and Wide-Field Camera Observations of 3CR 196

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Ross D.; Beaver, E. A.; Diplas, Athanassios; Junkkarinen, Vesa T.; Barlow, Thomas A.; Lyons, Ronald W.

    1996-01-01

    We present imaging and spectroscopy of the quasar 3CR 196 (z(sub e) = 0.871), which has 21 cm and optical absorption at z(sub a) = 0.437. We observed the region of Ly alpha absorption in 3CR 196 at z(sub a) = 0.437 with the Faint Object Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. This region of the spectrum is complicated because of the presence of a Lyman limit and strong lines from a z(sub a) approx. z(sub e) system. We conclude that there is Ly alpha absorption with an H I column density greater than 2.7 x 10(exp 19) cm(exp -2) and most probably 1.5 x 10(exp 20) cm(exp -2). Based on the existence of the high H I column density along both the optical and radio lines of sight, separated by more than 15 kpc, we conclude that the Ly alpha absorption must arise in a system comparable in size to the gaseous disks of spiral galaxies. A barred spiral galaxy, previously reported as a diffuse object in the recent work of Boisse and Boulade, can be seen near the quasar in an image taken at 0.1 resolution with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on the HST. If this galaxy is at the absorption redshift, the luminosity is approximately L(sub *) and any H I disk should extend in front of the optical quasar and radio lobes of 3CR 196, giving rise to both the Ly alpha and 21 cm absorption. In the z(sub a) approx. z(sub e) system we detect Lyman lines and the Lyman limit, as well as high ion absorption lines of C III, N V, S VI, and O VI. This absorption probably only partially covers the emission-line region. The ionization parameter is approximately 0.1. Conditions in this region may be similar to those in broad absorption line QSOs.

  1. Object tracking in a stereo and infrared vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colantonio, S.; Benvenuti, M.; Di Bono, M. G.; Pieri, G.; Salvetti, O.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we deal with the problem of real-time detection, recognition and tracking of moving objects in open and unknown environments using an infrared (IR) and visible vision system. A thermo-camera and two stereo visible-cameras synchronized are used to acquire multi-source information: three-dimensional data about target geometry and its thermal information are combined to improve the robustness of the tracking procedure. Firstly, target detection is performed by extracting its characteristic features from the images and then by storing the computed parameters on a specific database; secondly, the tracking task is carried on using two different computational approaches. A Hierarchical Artificial Neural Network (HANN) is used during active tracking for the recognition of the actual target, while, when partial occlusions or masking occur, a database retrieval method is used to support the search of the correct target followed. A prototype has been tested on case studies regarding the identification and tracking of animals moving at night in an open environment, and the surveillance of known scenes for unauthorized access control.

  2. Robust visual tracking of infrared object via sparse representation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Junkai; Liu, Haibo; Chang, Zheng; Hui, Bin

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a robust tracking method for infrared object. We introduce the appearance model and the sparse representation in the framework of particle filter to achieve this goal. Representing every candidate image patch as a linear combination of bases in the subspace which is spanned by the target templates is the mechanism behind this method. The natural property, that if the candidate image patch is the target so the coefficient vector must be sparse, can ensure our algorithm successfully. Firstly, the target must be indicated manually in the first frame of the video, then construct the dictionary using the appearance model of the target templates. Secondly, the candidate image patches are selected in following frames and the sparse coefficient vectors of them are calculated via l1-norm minimization algorithm. According to the sparse coefficient vectors the right candidates is determined as the target. Finally, the target templates update dynamically to cope with appearance change in the tracking process. This paper also addresses the problem of scale changing and the rotation of the target occurring in tracking. Theoretic analysis and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is effective and robust.

  3. Alignment and Performance of the Infrared Multi-Object Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connelly, Joseph A.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Mentzell, J. Eric; Madison, Timothy J.; Hylan, Jason E.; Mink, Ronald G.; Saha, Timo T.; Tveekrem, June L.; Sparr, Leroy M.; Chambers, V. John; Fitzgerald, Danetter; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; MacKenty, John W.

    2004-01-01

    The Infrared Multi-Object Spectrometer (IRMOS) is a principle investigator class instrument for the Kitt Peak National Observatory 4 and 2.1 meter telescopes. IRMOS is a near-IR (0.8 - 2.5 micron) spectrometer with low-to mid-resolving power (R = 300 - 3000). IRMOS produces simultaneous spectra of approximately 100 objects in its 2.8 x 2.0 arc-min field of view (4 m telescope) using a commercial Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) micro-mirror array (MMA) from Texas Instruments. The IRMOS optical design consists of two imaging subsystems. The focal reducer images the focal plane of the telescope onto the MMA field stop, and the spectrograph images the MMA onto the detector. We describe ambient breadboard subsystem alignment and imaging performance of each stage independently, and ambient imaging performance of the fully assembled instrument. Interferometric measurements of subsystem wavefront error serve as a qualitative alignment guide, and are accomplished using a commercial, modified Twyman-Green laser unequal path interferometer. Image testing provides verification of the optomechanical alignment method and a measurement of near-angle scattered light due to mirror small-scale surface error. Image testing is performed at multiple field points. A mercury-argon pencil lamp provides a spectral line at 546.1 nanometers, a blackbody source provides a line at 1550 nanometers, and a CCD camera and IR camera are used as detectors. We use commercial optical modeling software to predict the point-spread function and its effect on instrument slit transmission and resolution. Our breadboard and instrument level test results validate this prediction. We conclude with an instrument performance prediction for cryogenic operation and first light in late 2003.

  4. MOIRCS: multi-object infrared camera and spectrograph for SUBARU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Takashi; Suzuki, Ryuji; Tokoku, Chihiro; Uchimoto, Yuka Katsuno; Konishi, Masahiro; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Yamada, Toru; Tanaka, Ichi; Omata, Koji; Nishimura, Tetsuo

    2006-06-01

    MOIRCS is a new Cassegrain instrument of Subaru telescope, dedicated for wide field imaging and multi-object spectroscopy in near-infrared. MOIRCS has been constructed jointly by Tohoku University and the Subaru Telescope and saw the first light in Sept., 2004. The commissioning observations to study both imaging and spectroscopic performance were conducted for about one year. MOIRCS mounts two 2048 × 2048 HAWAII2 arrays and provides a field of view of 4' x 7' with a pixel scale of 0."117. All-lens optical design is optimized for 0.8 to 2.5 μm with no practical chromatic aberration. Observations confirm the high image quality over the field of view without any perceptible degradation even at the field edge. The best seeing we have obtained so far is FWHM=0."18. A novel design of MOIRCS enables us to perform multi-object spectroscopy with aluminum slit masks, which are housed in a carrousel dewar and cooled to ~ 110 K. When choosing MOS mode, a manipulator pulls out a slit mask from the carrousel into the MOIRCS main dewar and sets it properly at the Cassegrain focus. The carrousel is shuttered by a gate valve, so that it can be warmed and cooled independently to exchange slit-mask sets during daytime. We have tested various configurations of 30 or more multi-slit positions in various sky fields and found that targets are dropped at the centers of slits or guide holes within a dispersion of about 0.3 pixels (0."03). MOIRCS has been open to common use specifically for imaging observations since Feb. 2006. The MOS function will be available in next August.

  5. Alignment and performance of the Infrared Multi-Object Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connelly, Joseph A.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Mentzell, J. E.; Madison, Timothy J.; Hylan, Jason E.; Mink, Ronald G.; Saha, Timo T.; Tveekrem, June L.; Sparr, Leroy M.; Chambers, Victor J.; Fitzgerald, Danette L.; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; MacKenty, John W.

    2003-10-01

    The Infrared Multi-Object Spectrometer (IRMOS) is a principle investigator class instrument for the Kitt Peak National Observatory 4 and 2.1 m telescopes. IRMOS is a near-IR (0.8 2.5 μm) spectrometer with low- to mid-resolving power (R = 300 3000). IRMOS produces simultaneous spectra of ~100 objects in its 2.8 ´ 2.0 arc-min field of view (4 m telescope) using a commercial Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) micro-mirror array (MMA) from Texas Instruments. The IRMOS optical design consists of two imaging subsystems. The focal reducer images the focal plane of the telescope onto the MMA field stop, and the spectrograph images the MMA onto the detector. We describe ambient breadboard subsystem alignment and imaging performance of each stage independently, and ambient imaging performance of the fully assembled instrument. Interferometric measurements of subsystem wavefront error serve as a qualitative alignment guide, and are accomplished using a commercial, modified Twyman-Green laser unequal path interferometer. Image testing provides verification of the optomechanical alignment method and a measurement of near-angle scattered light due to mirror small-scale surface error. Image testing is performed at multiple field points. A mercury-argon pencil lamp provides a spectral line at 546.1 nm, a blackbody source provides a line at 1550 nm, and a CCD camera and IR camera are used as detectors. We use commercial optical modeling software to predict the point-spread function and its effect on instrument slit transmission and resolution. Our breadboard and instrument level test results validate this prediction. We conclude with an instrument performance prediction for cryogenic operation and first light in late 2003.

  6. Kinematics of faint white dwarfs.

    PubMed

    Luyten, W J

    1978-10-01

    An analysis has been made for solar motion for 128 very faint white dwarfs of color class b or a. While about 40% of these stars may be high-velocity objects, it seems definitely indicated that the luminosity of all of them is considerably lower than that for the "normal" white dwarf of the same color. PMID:16592566

  7. Cataloged infrared sources in NIPSS data. I - The RSO 1 catalog. [Near Infrared Photographic Sky Survey Red Stellar Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horner, V. M.; Craine, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    A small number of selected near-infrared and visual photographic pairs from the Steward Observatory Near Infrared Photographic Sky Survey have been examined for content of stars more red than (V-I) of about 2.5 magnitudes. A simple manual extraction of these objects was carried out as a part of a preliminary evaluation of survey data and techniques for reducing it; the resulting list has been compiled as the first installment of a Catalog of Red Stellar Objects (Craine et al. 1979). Results of a cross correlation of this catalog with the IRC, AFGL, and EIC infrared catalogs are here presented. The results indicate that these photographs may be particularly useful for purposes of optical identification of short-wavelength infrared sources to limits much fainter than represented by presently existing infrared catalogs.

  8. The correction model and error analysis of infrared radiation temperature measurement of semitransparent object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaolong; Yang, Li

    2015-10-01

    Based on the theory of infrared radiation and of the infrared thermography, the mathematical correction model of the infrared radiation temperature measurement of semitransparent object is developed taking account by the effects of the atmosphere, surroundings, radiation of transmissivity and many other factors. The effects of the emissivity, transmissivity and measurement error are analysed on temperature measurement error of the infrared thermography. The measurement error of semitransparent object are compared with that of opaque object. The countermeasures to reduce the measurement error are also discussed.

  9. An infrared salient object stereo matching algorithm based on epipolar rectification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Wu, Lei; Han, Jing; Bai, Lian-fa

    2016-02-01

    Due to the higher noise and less details in infrared images, general matching algorithms are prone to obtaining unsatisfying results. Combining the idea of salient object, we propose a novel infrared stereo matching algorithm which applies to unconstrained stereo rigs. Firstly, we present an epipolar rectification method introducing particle swarm optimization and K-nearest neighbor to deal with the problem of epipolar constraint. Then we make use of transition region to extract salient object in the rectified infrared image pairs. Finally, disparity map is generated by matching salient regions. Experiments show that our algorithm deals with the infrared stereo matching of unconstrained stereo rigs with better accuracy and higher speed.

  10. The HST quasar absorption line key project. 4: HST faint-object spectrograph and ground-based observations of the unusual low-redshift broad absorption-line quasi-stellar object PG 0043+039

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turnshek, David A.; Espey, Brian R.; Kopko, Michael, Jr.; Rauch, Michael; Weymann, Ray J.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Boksenberg, Alec; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Hartig, George F.; Sargent, W. L. W.

    1994-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph (HST FOS) observations have shown that the spectrum of the low-redshift (z(sub em) approximately equal to 0.384) QSO PG 0043+039 exhibits weak broad absorption lines (BALs). The BALs were discovered during the course of UV spectrophotometry made for the HST Quasar Absorption Line Key Project. The HST data are analyzed along with ground-based optical and IUE spectrophotometry. The object is found to have a number of atypical properties relative to normal non-BAL QSOs. The observed continuum is atypical in the sense that it is much weaker than that of a normal optically selected QSO at rest wavelengths approximately less than 2200 A. Intrinsic reddening of E(B-V) approximately equal to 0.11 mag by dust similar to that found in the SMC at the redshift of PG 0043+039 conservatively accounts for the observed continuum shape moderately well. These observed characteristics are typical of low-ionization BAL QSOs, but convincing evidence for BALs due to low-ionization transitions of Mg II, Al III, Al II, or C II does not exist. Therefore, this object may be a misaligned BAL QSO having many of the characteristics of low-ionization BAL QSOs with the sight line passing through a putative dusty region, but evidently missing clouds of high enough column density to produce observable low-ionization BALs. If the intrinsic dust-extinction model is correct, the observations suggest that the dust is not confined to the presumably higher density, low-ionization BAL clouds, but that it has drifted to nearby high-ionization BAL regions. We also consider other possible mechanisms for producing the shape of the continuous energy distribution which cannot be ruled out. We compare the Fe II emission in PG 0043+039 with that in another Key Project QSO, NGC 2841-UB 3, which has optical Fe II emission comparable in strength to that in PG 0043+039, but has anomalously weak UV Fe II emission. In addition, from an analysis of UV and optical

  11. Fainting Starting Parenteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Pederiva, Federica; Barbi, Egidio; Zennaro, Floriana; Neri, Elena

    2015-09-01

    Complications such as mechanical accidents, infections, and thrombosis are commonly described in the presence of a central venous catheter. We present a case of a boy who had fainting episodes due to dislocation of a central venous catheter. PMID:25853719

  12. Search for high-proper motion objects with infrared excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorani, Massimo

    2014-12-01

    The possibility of interstellar migration has been theorized during the past thirty years in the form of 'Dysonships' that, using non-relativistic propulsion systems, are able to colonize the Galaxy in a relatively short time compared to the age of the Galaxy and consequently penetrate inside our solar system too. Observational evidence of this can be potentially obtained using the present state of the art of telescopes and related sensors, by following aimed searches and an expanded SETI protocol. Some transient and unrepeated radio signals recorded during standard SETI observations might be due to the transit of high-proper motion artificial sources of extraterrestrial origin, which are expected to show a very weak optical emission, a strong infrared excess and occasional high-energy bursts in the X and Gamma-ray wavelength ranges. Such artificial sources might show an interest to Earth by sending probes to visit it: such a possibility can be investigated scientifically as well.

  13. Spectral matching factors between low-light-level and infrared fusion optoelectronic detector and objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Fan, Yinghao; Chang, Benkang

    2009-09-01

    According to the response of photoelectric device to a light source, the formula of spectral matching factor of low-lightlevel and infrared fusion optoelectronic detector-object combination is deduced. The spectral matching factors of photo cathode and infrared detector for green vegetation are calculated and compared. Through the analysis of results it shows that spectral matching factor has influence on the performance of low light level and infrared fusion night vision system.

  14. Herbig-Haro Objects and Mid-infrared Outflows in the Vela C Molecular Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Miaomiao; Wang, Hongchi; Henning, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    We have performed a deep [S II] λλ6717/6731 wide field Herbig-Haro (HH) object survey toward the Vela C molecular cloud with a sky coverage of about 2 deg2. In total, 18 new HH objects, HH 1090-1107, are discovered and the two previously known HH objects, HH 73-74, are also detected in our [S II] images. We also present an investigation of mid-infrared outflows in the Vela C molecular cloud using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer images taken from AllWISE data release. Using the method suggested by Zhang & Wang, 11 extended green objects (EGOs) are identified to be the mid-infrared outflows, including 6 new mid-infrared outflows that have not been detected previously at other wavelengths and 5 mid-infrared counterparts of the HH objects detected in this work. Using the AllWISE Source Catalog and the source classification scheme suggested by Koenig et al., we have identified 56 young stellar object (YSO) candidates in the Vela C molecular cloud. The possible driving sources of the HH objects and EGOs are discussed based on the morphology of HH objects and EGOs and the locations of HH objects, EGOs and YSO candidates. Finally we associate 12 HH objects and 5 EGOs with 10 YSOs and YSO candidates. The median length of the outflows in Vela C is 0.35 pc and the outflows seem to be oriented randomly.

  15. Herbig-haro objects and mid-infrared outflows in the VELA C molecular cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Miaomiao; Wang, Hongchi; Henning, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    We have performed a deep [S II] λλ6717/6731 wide field Herbig-Haro (HH) object survey toward the Vela C molecular cloud with a sky coverage of about 2 deg{sup 2}. In total, 18 new HH objects, HH 1090-1107, are discovered and the two previously known HH objects, HH 73-74, are also detected in our [S II] images. We also present an investigation of mid-infrared outflows in the Vela C molecular cloud using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer images taken from AllWISE data release. Using the method suggested by Zhang and Wang, 11 extended green objects (EGOs) are identified to be the mid-infrared outflows, including 6 new mid-infrared outflows that have not been detected previously at other wavelengths and 5 mid-infrared counterparts of the HH objects detected in this work. Using the AllWISE Source Catalog and the source classification scheme suggested by Koenig et al., we have identified 56 young stellar object (YSO) candidates in the Vela C molecular cloud. The possible driving sources of the HH objects and EGOs are discussed based on the morphology of HH objects and EGOs and the locations of HH objects, EGOs and YSO candidates. Finally we associate 12 HH objects and 5 EGOs with 10 YSOs and YSO candidates. The median length of the outflows in Vela C is 0.35 pc and the outflows seem to be oriented randomly.

  16. Infrared detection, recognition and identification of handheld objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adomeit, Uwe

    2012-10-01

    A main criterion for comparison and selection of thermal imagers for military applications is their nominal range performance. This nominal range performance is calculated for a defined task and standardized target and environmental conditions. The only standardization available to date is STANAG 4347. The target defined there is based on a main battle tank in front view. Because of modified military requirements, this target is no longer up-to-date. Today, different topics of interest are of interest, especially differentiation between friend and foe and identification of humans. There is no direct way to differentiate between friend and foe in asymmetric scenarios, but one clue can be that someone is carrying a weapon. This clue can be transformed in the observer tasks detection: a person is carrying or is not carrying an object, recognition: the object is a long / medium / short range weapon or civil equipment and identification: the object can be named (e. g. AK-47, M-4, G36, RPG7, Axe, Shovel etc.). These tasks can be assessed experimentally and from the results of such an assessment, a standard target for handheld objects may be derived. For a first assessment, a human carrying 13 different handheld objects in front of his chest was recorded at four different ranges with an IR-dual-band camera. From the recorded data, a perception experiment was prepared. It was conducted with 17 observers in a 13-alternative forced choice, unlimited observation time arrangement. The results of the test together with Minimum Temperature Difference Perceived measurements of the camera and temperature difference and critical dimension derived from the recorded imagery allowed defining a first standard target according to the above tasks. This standard target consist of 2.5 / 3.5 / 5 DRI line pairs on target, 0.24 m critical size and 1 K temperature difference. The values are preliminary and have to be refined in the future. Necessary are different aspect angles, different

  17. Design of polarized infrared athermal telephoto objective for penetrating the fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Duorui; Fu, Qiang; Zhao, Zhao; Zhao, Bin; Zhong, Lijun; Zhan, Juntong

    2014-11-01

    Polarized infrared imaging technology is a new detection technique which own the ability of spying through the fog, highlighting the target and recognizing the forgeries, these characters make it a good advantage of increasing the work distance in the fog. Compared to the traditional infrared imaging method, polarized infrared imaging can identify the background and target easily, that is the most distinguishing feature of polarized infrared imaging technology. Owning to the large refractive index of the infrared material, temperature change will bring defocus seriously, athermal infrared objective is necessarily. On the other hand, athermal objective has large total length, and hard to be integrated for their huge volume. However telephoto objective has the character of small volume and short total length. The paper introduce a method of polarized and athermal infrared telephoto objective which can spy the fog. First assign the optical power of the fore group and the rear group on the basis of the principle of telephoto objective, the power of the fore group is positive and the rear group is negative; then distribute the optical power within each group to realize the ability of athermalization, finally computer-aided software is used to correct aberration. In order to prove the feasibility of the scheme, an athermal optical system was designed by virtue of ZEMAX software which works at 8~12 µm, the focal length of 150mm, F number is 2, and total length of the telephoto objective is 120mm. The environment temperature analysis shows that the optical system have stable imaging quality, MTF is close to diffraction limit. This telephoto objective is available for infrared polarized imaging.

  18. NEAR-INFRARED PROPERTIES OF THE X-RAY-EMITTING YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE CARINA NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Preibisch, Thomas; Hodgkin, Simon; Irwin, Mike; Lewis, James R.; King, Robert R.; McCaughrean, Mark J.; Zinnecker, Hans; Townsley, Leisa; Broos, Patrick

    2011-05-01

    The Great Nebula in Carina (NGC 3372) is the best target to study in detail the process of violent massive star formation and the resulting feedback effects of cloud dispersal and triggered star formation. While the population of massive stars is rather well studied, the associated low-mass stellar population was largely unknown up to now. The near-infrared study in this paper builds on the results of the Chandra Carina Complex Project, that detected 14,368 X-ray sources in the 1.4 deg{sup 2} survey region, an automatic source classification study that classified 10,714 of these X-ray sources as very likely young stars in Carina, and an analysis of the clustering properties of the X-ray-selected Carina members. In order to determine physical properties of the X-ray-selected stars, most of which were previously unstudied, we used HAWK-I at the ESO Very Large Telescope to conduct a very deep near-IR survey with subarcsecond angular resolution, covering an area of about 1280 arcmin{sup 2}. The HAWK-I images reveal more than 600,000 individual infrared sources, whereby objects as faint as J {approx} 23, H {approx} 22, and K{sub s} {approx} 21 are detected at signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) {>=}3. While less than half of the Chandra X-ray sources have counterparts in the Two Micron All Sky Survey catalog, the {approx}5 mag deeper HAWK-I data reveal infrared counterparts to 6636 (=88.8%) of the 7472 Chandra X-ray sources in the HAWK-I field. We analyze near-infrared color-color and color-magnitude diagrams to derive information about the extinctions, infrared excesses (as tracers for circumstellar disks), ages, and masses of the X-ray-selected objects. The near-infrared properties agree well with the results of the automatic X-ray source classification, showing that the remaining contamination in the X-ray-selected sample of Carina members is very low ({approx}<7%). The shape of the K-band luminosity function of the X-ray-selected Carina members agrees well with that derived

  19. Shape distortions induced by convective effect on hot object in visible, near infrared and infrared bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmas, Anthony; Maoult, Yannick Le; Buchlin, Jean-Marie; Sentenac, Thierry; Orteu, Jean-José

    2013-04-01

    The goal of this study is to examine the perturbation induced by the convective effect (or mirage effect) on shape measurement and to give an estimation of the error induced. This work explores the mirage effect in different spectral bands and single wavelengths. A numerical approach is adopted and an original setup has been developed in order to investigate easily all the spectral bands of interest with the help of a CCD camera (Si, 0.35-1.1 μm), a near infrared camera (VisGaAs, 0.8-1.7 μm) or infrared cameras (8-12 μm). Displacements due to the perturbation for each spectral band are measured and finally some hints about how to correct them are given.

  20. First Results from the Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS): First Simultaneous Detection of Lyα Emission and Lyman Break from a Galaxy at z = 7.51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilvi, V.; Pirzkal, N.; Malhotra, S.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Rhoads, J. E.; Windhorst, R.; Grogin, N. A.; Koekemoer, A.; Zakamska, N. L.; Ryan, R.; Christensen, L.; Hathi, N.; Pharo, J.; Joshi, B.; Yang, H.; Gronwall, C.; Cimatti, A.; Walsh, J.; O’Connell, R.; Straughn, A.; Ostlin, G.; Rothberg, B.; Livermore, R. C.; Hibon, P.; Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2016-08-01

    Galaxies at high redshifts are a valuable tool for studying cosmic dawn, therefore it is crucial to reliably identify these galaxies. Here, we present an unambiguous and first simultaneous detection of both the Lyα emission and the Lyman break from a z=7.512 +/- 0.004 galaxy, observed in the Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS). These spectra, taken with the G102 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), show a significant emission line detection (6σ ) in two observational position angles (PAs), with Lyα line flux of 1.06+/- 0.19× {10}-17 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2. The line flux is nearly a factor of four higher than that in the archival MOSFIRE spectroscopic observations. This is consistent with other recent observations, implying that ground-based near-infrared spectroscopy underestimates the total emission line fluxes, and if confirmed, can have strong implications for reionization studies that are based on ground-based Lyα measurements. A 4σ detection of the NV line in one PA also suggests a weak active galactic nucleus (AGN), and if confirmed, would make this source the highest-redshift AGN yet found. These observations from HST thus clearly demonstrate the sensitivity of the FIGS survey, and the capability of grism spectroscopy for studying the epoch of reionization.

  1. Infrared recombination lines of hydrogen from young objects in the southern Galactic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Sara C.; Fischer, Jacqueline; Smith, Howard A.

    1991-01-01

    Near infrared recombination lines of hydrogen are observed in twelve young objects in the southern Galactic plane. The sample includes Herbig-Haro objects and IRAS dark-cloud point sources from the 1987 catalog of Persson and Campbell. In four of the IRAS sources two or three infrared lines are measured, and their intensity ratios are consistent with models of optically thick ionized winds. The intrinsic line shapes, retrieved from maximum-entropy deconvolutions, indicate gas velocities of 100 km/s or more as expected from ionized winds. These sources are apparently embedded pre-main-sequence objects with outflows. They include some of the brightest known YSOs.

  2. Non-destructively reading out information embedded inside real objects by using far-infrared light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Ayumi; Silapasuphakornwong, Piyarat; Suzuki, Masahiro; Torii, Hideyuki; Takashima, Youichi; Uehira, Kazutake

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a technique that can non-destructively read out information embedded inside real objects by using far-infrared-light. We propose a technique that can protect the copyrights of digital content for homemade products using digital fabrication technologies such as those used in 3D printers. It embeds information on copyrights inside real objects produced by 3D printers by forming fine structures inside the objects as a watermark that cannot be observed from the outside. Fine structures are formed near the surface inside real objects when they are being fabricated. Information embedded inside real objects needs to be read out non-destructively. We used a technique that could non-destructively read out information from inside real objects by using far-infrared light. We conducted experiments where we structured fine cavities inside objects. The disposition of the fine domain contained valuable information. We used the flat and curved surfaces of the objects to identify them. The results obtained from the experiments demonstrated that the disposition patterns of the fine structures appeared on the surface of objects as a temperature profile when far-infrared light was irradiated on their surface. Embedded information could be read out successfully by analyzing the temperature profile images of the surface of the objects that were captured with thermography and these results demonstrated the feasibility of the technique we propose.

  3. Near-Infrared Faint Galaxies in the Subaru Deep Field: Comparing the Theory with Observations for Galaxy Counts, Colors, and Size Distributions to K ~ 24.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totani, Tomonori; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Maihara, Toshinori; Iwamuro, Fumihide; Motohara, Kentaro

    2001-10-01

    Galaxy counts in the K band, (J-K) colors, and apparent size distributions of faint galaxies in the Subaru Deep Field (SDF) down to K~24.5 were studied in detail. Special attention has been paid to take into account various selection effects, including the cosmological dimming of surface brightness, to avoid any systematic bias that may be the origin of controversy in previously published results. We also tried to be very careful about systematic model uncertainties; we present a comprehensive survey of these systematic uncertainties and dependence on various parameters, and we have shown that the dominant factors to determine galaxy counts in this band are cosmology and number evolution. We found that the pure luminosity evolution (PLE) model is very consistent with all the SDF data down to K~22.5, without any evidence for number or size evolution in a low-density, Λ-dominated flat universe, which is now favored by various cosmological observations. On the other hand, a number evolution of galaxies with η~2, when invoked as the luminosity conserving mergers as φ*~(1+z)η and L*~(1+z)-η for all types of galaxies, is necessary to explain the data in the Einstein-de Sitter universe. If the popular Λ-dominated universe is taken for granted, our result then gives a strong constraint on the number evolution of giant elliptical or early-type galaxies to z~1-2 that must be met by any models in the hierarchically clustering universe, since such galaxies are the dominant population in this magnitude range (K<~22.5). A number evolution with η~1 is already difficult to reconcile with the data in this universe. On the other hand, number evolution of late-type galaxies and/or dwarf galaxies, which has been suggested by previous studies of optical galaxies, is allowed from the data. In the fainter magnitude range of K>~22.5, we found a slight excess of observed counts over the prediction of the PLE model when elliptical galaxies are treated as a single population. We

  4. The development of ground-based infrared multi-object spectrograph based on the microshutter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Dae-Sik; Sivanandam, Suresh; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.; Graham, James R.; Roy, Aishwarya

    2014-07-01

    We report on our development of a near-infrared multi-object spectrograph for ground-based applications using the micro-shutter array, which was originally developed for the Near Infrared Spectrograph of the James Webb Space Telescope. The micro-shutter array in this case acts as a source selector at a reimaged telescope focal plane. The developed spectrograph will be implemented either with ground-layer adaptive optics system or multi-conjugate adaptive optics system on a large telescope. This will enable for the first time fully reconfigurable infrared multi-object spectroscopy with adaptive optics systems. We envision studying diverse astronomical objects with our spectrograph, including high-redshift galaxies, galaxy clusters and super star clusters.

  5. Characterization and Application of a Grazing Angle Objective for Quantitative Infrared Reflection Microspectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Stephen V.

    1995-01-01

    A grazing angle objective on an infrared microspectrometer is studied for quantitative spectroscopy by considering the angular dependence of the incident intensity within the objective's angular aperture. The assumption that there is no angular dependence is tested by comparing the experimental reflectance of Si and KBr surfaces with the reflectance calculated by integrating the Fresnel reflection coefficient over the angular aperture under this assumption. Good agreement was found, indicating that the specular reflectance of surfaces can straight-forwardly be quantitatively integrated over the angular aperture without considering non-uniform incident intensity. This quantitative approach is applied to the thickness determination of dipcoated Krytox on gold. The infrared optical constants of both materials are known, allowing the integration to be carried out. The thickness obtained is in fair agreement with the value determined by ellipsometry in the visible. Therefore, this paper illustrates a method for more quantitative use of a grazing angle objective for infrared reflectance microspectroscopy.

  6. Spatiotemporal saliency model for small moving object detection in infrared videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Ning, Chen; Xu, Lizhong

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a novel spatiotemporal saliency model based on three-dimensional Difference-of-Gaussians filters is proposed for small moving object detection in infrared videos. First, instead of utilizing the spatial Difference-of-Gaussians (DoG) filter which has been used to build saliency model for static images, we propose to extend the spatial DoG filter to construct three-dimensional (3D) Difference-of-Gaussians filters for measuring the center-surround difference in the spatiotemporal receptive field. Second, an effective spatiotemporal saliency model is generated based on these filters. This model provides a good basis for accurate and robust infrared small moving object detection. Experimental results show that the proposed saliency model consistently outperforms state-of-the-art saliency models for infrared moving object detection under various complex backgrounds.

  7. Spectrophotometry of faint comets: The asteroid approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degewij, J.

    1981-01-01

    Observing programs at optical (0.35-0.8 micron) and near-infrared (1.1-2.4 micron) wavelengths, directed at the acquisition of reflection spectra of faint and distant comets, are described. The ultimate goal is to obtain spectrophotometric measurements of comets for which a significant part of the light is expected to be reflected by the solid surface of the nucleus.

  8. Infrared Telescope Facility's Spectrograph Observations of Human-Made Space Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abercromby, K.; Buckalew, B.; Abell, P.; Cowardin, H.

    2015-01-01

    Presented here are the results of the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) spectral observations of human-made space objects taken from 2006 to 2008. The data collected using the SpeX infrared spectrograph cover the wavelength range 0.7-2.5 micrometers. Overall, data were collected on 20 different orbiting objects at or near the geosynchronous (GEO) regime. Four of the objects were controlled spacecraft, seven were non-controlled spacecraft, five were rocket bodies, and the final four were cataloged as debris pieces. The remotely collected data are compared to the laboratory-collected reflectance data on typical spacecraft materials, thereby general materials are identified but not specific types. These results highlight the usefulness of observations in the infrared by focusing on features from hydrocarbons, silicon, and thermal emission. The spacecraft, both the controlled and non-controlled, show distinct features due to the presence of solar panels, whereas the rocket bodies do not. Signature variations between rocket bodies, due to the presence of various metals and paints on their surfaces, show a clear distinction from those objects with solar panels, demonstrating that one can distinguish most spacecraft from rocket bodies through infrared spectrum analysis. Finally, the debris pieces tend to show featureless, dark spectra. These results show that the laboratory data in its current state give excellent indications as to the nature of the surface materials on the objects. Further telescopic data collection and model updates to include noise, surface roughness, and material degradation are necessary to make better assessments of orbital object material types. However, based on the current state of the comparison between the observations and the laboratory data, infrared spectroscopic data are adequate to classify objects in GEO as spacecraft, rocket bodies, or debris.

  9. A substation infrared temperature monitoring and warning system with object separation and image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lihua; Wu, Dongmei; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Xinghua

    2010-08-01

    To find the defects of the apparatus in a substation in the early stage, an infrared temperature monitoring and warning system is established. This system can monitor the electrical equipment automatically the movement condition. The systemic circulation gathers the transformer substation electrical equipment the infrared imagery, the extraction goal equipment temperature information, and with the history database creation connection, the synthesis distinguishes the equipment failure information. In view of image gathering when because the mechanical drive creates the deviation, proposed one kind of object-oriented division and the image matching adjustment algorithm, first carries on the object division and the configuration definition to the image, then uses based on the phase correlation carries on the matching with the Harris vertex match image matching method to the deviation image. In this paper, a infrared remote-viewing image registration based on phase correlation and feature points matching is presented. Several experiments illustrate that this method has a good performance of reliability and accuracy.

  10. The Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 Early Release Science Data: Panchromatic Faint Object Counts From 0.2-2 Micron To Ab=26-27 Mag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windhorst, Rogier A.; McCarthy, P.; Cohen, S.; Ryan, R.; Driver, S.; Hathi, N.; Koekemoer, A.; Mechtley, M.; O'Connell, R.; Rutkowski, M.; Yan, H.; SOC, WFC3

    2010-01-01

    We describe the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) Early Release Science (ERS) observations in the GOODS-South field. The new WFC3 ERS data provide calibrated, drizzled mosaics with FHWM=0.07--0.15" in the near-UV (filters F225W, F275W, and F336W) and near-IR (F098W, F125W, and F160W) in typically 2 orbits per filter. Together with the existing HST/ACS GOODS-S mosaics in the BVi'z' filters, the 10-band ERS data cover 40-50 sq. arcmin to AB=26-27.0 mag (10-sigma for point sources). In this poster, we describe the: (1) scientific rationale, data taking and reduction procedures of the WFC3 ERS mosaics; (2) object cataloging and star-galaxy separation techniques used in these 10 different filters; (3) reliability and completeness of the 10-band object catalogs from the ERS mosaics; (4) object counts in 10 different filters from 0.2-1.7 microns to AB=26.0-27.0 mag; and (5) the full-color 10-band ERS images. We discuss the panchromatic structure for a variety of interesting ERS objects at intermediate redshifts (z=0.5-3), including examples of galaxies with nuclear star-forming rings, bars, or weak AGN activity, UV-dropout galaxies at redshifts z=2-3, and objects of other interesting appearance. The 10-band panchromatic ERS data base is very rich in morphological structure at all restframe wavelengths where young or older stars shine during the peak epoch in the cosmic star-formation rate (at z=1-2). This work is based on ERS observations made by the WFC3 Scientific Oversight Committee. We are grateful to the Space Telescope Science Institute Director for awarding Director's Discretionary time for this program. Support for HST program 11359 was provided by NASA through grants GO-11359.0*.A from STScI, which is operated by AURA under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. We dedicate this paper to the memory of the STS-107 Columbia Shuttle astronauts, and of Dr. Rodger Doxsey.

  11. New method for moving objects segmentation based on human vision perception in infrared video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Chaobo

    2013-07-01

    A new method for moving object segmentation based on human vision perception in infrared video is proposed. In this paper, we introduce a new region growing method to achieve the accurate and complete segmentation of the moving objects. At first, the ideal seeds of every moving object are extracted based on the "hole" effect of temporal difference, respectively. At the next step, on the basis of the consideration that human vision system (HVS) is most sensitive to the local contrast between targets and surrounding, we proposed a metric for "good" infrared target segmentation based on human vision perception. And according to this metric, a search method based on fine and rough adjustment is applied to determine the best growing threshold for every moving object. The segmented mask of every moving object is grown from the relevant seeds with the best growing threshold. At last, the segmented masks of all moving objects are merged into a complete segmented mask. Experimental results show that the proposed method is superior and effective on segmentation of moving object in infrared video.

  12. The Lack of Torus Emission from BL Lacertae Objects: An Infrared View of Unification with WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotkin, Richard M.; Anderson, Scott F.; Brandt, W. N.; Markoff, Sera; Shemmer, Ohad; Wu, Jianfeng

    2012-02-01

    We use data from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) to perform a statistical study on the mid-infrared (IR) properties of a large number (~102) of BL Lac objects—low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with a jet beamed toward the Earth. As expected, many BL Lac objects are so highly beamed that their jet synchrotron emission dominates their IR spectral energy distributions. In other BL Lac objects, however, the jet is not strong enough to completely dilute the rest of the AGN emission. We do not see observational signatures of the dusty torus from these weakly beamed BL Lac objects. The lack of observable torus emission is consistent with suggestions that BL Lac objects are fed by radiatively inefficient accretion disks. Implications for the "nature versus nurture" debate for FR I and FR II radio galaxies are briefly discussed. Our study supports the notion that, beyond orientation, accretion rate plays an important role in AGN unification.

  13. OBJECT X: THE BRIGHTEST MID-INFRARED POINT SOURCE IN M33

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Rubab; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Bonanos, A. Z. E-mail: kstanek@astronomy.ohio-state.edu E-mail: bonanos@astro.noa.gr

    2011-05-01

    We discuss the nature of the brightest mid-IR point source (which we dub Object X) in the nearby galaxy M33. Although multi-wavelength data on this object have existed in the literature for some time, it had not previously been recognized as the most luminous mid-IR object in M33 because it is entirely unremarkable in both optical and near-IR light. In the Local Group Galaxies Survey, Object X is a faint red source visible in VRI and H{alpha} but not U or B. It was easily seen at JHK{sub s} in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. It is the brightest point source in all four Spitzer IRAC bands and is also visible in the MIPS 24 {mu}m band. Its bolometric luminosity is {approx}5 x 10{sup 5} L{sub sun}. The source is optically variable on short timescales (tens of days) and is also slightly variable in the mid-IR, indicating that it is a star. Archival photographic plates (from 1949 and 1991) show no optical source, so the star has been obscured for at least half a century. Its properties are similar to those of the Galactic OH/IR star IRC+10420, which has a complex dusty circumstellar structure resulting from episodic low-velocity mass ejections. We propose that Object X is an M {approx}> 30 M{sub sun} evolved star obscured in its own dust ejected during episodic mass-loss events over at least {approx}half a century. It may emerge from its current ultra-short evolutionary phase as a hotter post-red-supergiant star analogous to M33 Var A. The existence and rarity of such objects can be an important probe of a very brief yet eventful stellar evolutionary phase.

  14. Technical considerations for designing low-cost, long-wave infrared objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desroches, Gerard; Dalzell, Kristy; Robitaille, Blaise

    2014-06-01

    With the growth of uncooled infrared imaging in the consumer market, the balance between cost implications and performance criteria in the objective lens must be examined carefully. The increased availability of consumer-grade, long-wave infrared cameras is related to a decrease in military usage but it is also due to the decreasing costs of the cameras themselves. This has also driven up demand for low-cost, long-wave objectives that can resolve smaller pixels while maintaining high performance. Smaller pixels are traditionally associated with high cost objectives because of higher resolution requirements but, with careful consideration of all the requirements and proper selection of materials, costs can be moderated. This paper examines the cost/performance trade-off implications associated with optical and mechanical requirements of long-wave infrared objectives. Optical performance, f-number, field of view, distortion, focus range and thermal range all affect the cost of the objective. Because raw lens material cost is often the most expensive item in the construction, selection of the material as well as the shape of the lens while maintaining acceptable performance and cost targets were explored. As a result of these considerations, a low-cost, lightweight, well-performing objective was successfully designed, manufactured and tested.

  15. Polarization state imaging in long-wave infrared for object detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieszczad, Grzegorz; Gogler, Sławomir; Krupiński, Michał

    2013-10-01

    The article discusses the use of modern imaging polarimetry from the visible range of the spectrum to the far infrared. The paper presents the analyzes the potential for imaging polarimetry in the far infrared for remote sensing applications. In article a description of measurement stand is presented for examination of polarization state in LWIR. The stand consists of: infrared detector array with electronic circuitry, polarizer plate and software enabling detection method. The article also describes first results of measurements in presented test bed. Based on these measurements it was possible to calculate some of the Stokes parameters of radiation from the scene. The analysis of the measurement results show that the measurement of polarization state can be used to detect certain types of objects. Measuring the degree of polarization may allow for the detection of objects on an infrared image, which are not detectable by other techniques, and in other spectral ranges. In order to at least partially characterize the polarization state of the scene it is required to measure radiation intensity in different configurations of the polarizing filter. Due to additional filtering elements in optical path of the camera, the NETD parameter of the camera with polarizer in proposed measurement stand was equal to about 240mK. In order to visualize the polarization characteristics of objects in the infrared image, a method of imaging measurement results imposing them on the thermal image. Imaging of measurement results of radiation polarization is made by adding color and saturation to black and white thermal image where brightness corresponds to the intensity of infrared radiation.

  16. Image processing techniques for detection of buried objects with infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerón-Correa, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    This document describes the principles of infrared thermography and its application to humanitarian demining in the world as well as the factors influencing its application in a country like Colombia which suffers badly the problem posed by antipersonnel mines. The main factors that affect the images taken by different sensors are: day time, mine size and material, installation angle, object's burial depth, moisture, emissivity, wind, rain, as well as other objects in the proximity shadowing the images. Infrared image processing methods and results of tests done in different sites of the country such as Cartagena, Bogota, and Tolemaida are also shown. Finally, a method for the detection of the presence of a buried object is presented with its successful results.

  17. A bio-inspired infrared imager with on chip object computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarley, Paul L.; Caulfield, John T.

    2014-06-01

    This paper discusses a Biologically Inspired Shortwave Infrared (SWIR) imager that performs on chip object detection using temporal and spatial processing embedded in the imager's readout integrated circuit (ROIC). The sensor circuit is designed to detect pixel level intensity changes and correlate the change with nearby intensity changes using multiple thresholding criteria to output object exceedances. The sensor is capable of automatically outputting both normal video and also a reduced data set of binarized exceedances. Therefore this SWIR sensor with onboard temporal spatial sensing should be well suited to both manned and unmanned sensing scenarios which could benefit from automated object detection and reduced data sets.

  18. Machine learning in infrared object classification - an all-sky selection of YSO candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, Gabor; Zahorecz, Sarolta; Toth, L. Viktor; Magnus McGehee, Peregrine; Kun, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Object classification is a fundamental and challenging problem in the era of big data. I will discuss up-to-date methods and their application to classify infrared point sources.We analysed the ALLWISE catalogue, the most recent public source catalogue of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) to compile a reliable list of Young Stellar Object (YSO) candidates. We tested and compared classical and up-to-date statistical methods as well, to discriminate source types like extragalactic objects, evolved stars, main sequence stars, objects related to the interstellar medium and YSO candidates by using their mid-IR WISE properties and associated near-IR 2MASS data.In the particular classification problem the Support Vector Machines (SVM), a class of supervised learning algorithm turned out to be the best tool. As a result we classify Class I and II YSOs with >90% accuracy while the fraction of contaminating extragalactic objects remains well below 1%, based on the number of known objects listed in the SIMBAD and VizieR databases. We compare our results to other classification schemes from the literature and show that the SVM outperforms methods that apply linear cuts on the colour-colour and colour-magnitude space. Our homogenous YSO candidate catalog can serve as an excellent pathfinder for future detailed observations of individual objects and a starting point of statistical studies that aim to add pieces to the big picture of star formation theory.

  19. Circumstellar Environments of Luminous Infrared Stellar Objects in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azari, Abigail; Sahai, Raghvendra

    2011-01-01

    Young stars are formed out of the interstellar medium (ISM) which is replenished by mass loss rates from evolved stars. Circumstellar matter around young and evolved stellar objects usually emits energy in the infrared (IR) wavelength range as the matter is heated by the central star. Surveys of the Magellanic Clouds with the Spitzer Space Telescope in the 3.6-160 micron range have previously been completed. These surveys have led to catalogs of infrared sources: which include HII regions, young stars, super giants, asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars, and planetary nebulae. The utility of such surveys can be improved upon by using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data. HST provides higher angular resolution than Spitzer and has allowed for more detailed investigation of these luminous IR objects. This project used previously obtained HST archival data to examine luminous IR objects at optical wavelengths. This allows for the reclassification of stellar objects previously thought as one type of object or in a particular stage of their stellar evolution. An overall objective of this project included looking for extended nebulosity around evolved stars to better understand the life cycle of such objects and classify these nebulae by shape.

  20. Near-infrared (JHK) spectroscopy of young stellar and substellar objects in orion

    SciTech Connect

    Ingraham, P.; Albert, L.; Doyon, R.; Artigau, E.

    2014-02-10

    We performed low-resolution (R ∼ 40) near-infrared (0.9-2.4 μm) multi-object spectroscopy of 240 isolated point sources having apparent H-band magnitudes between 9 and 18 in the central 5' × 6' of the Orion Trapezium cluster. The observations were performed over four nights at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope using the visiting instrument SIMON, an infrared imager and multi-object spectrograph. We present the spectra of 104 objects with accurately derived spectral types including 7 new objects having masses below the hydrogen-burning limit, and 6 objects with masses below the deuterium-burning limit. The spectral classification is performed by fitting previously classified spectral templates of dwarf stars (K4-M3) and optically classified young stellar and substellar objects (M4-L0), to the entire 0.9-2.4 μm spectral energy distribution in order to assign a spectral type and visual extinction for each object. Of the 104 objects studied, 44 have been previously classified spectroscopically using various techniques. We perform a rigorous comparison between the previous classifications and our own and find them to be in good agreement. Using the dereddened H-band magnitudes, the classified objects are used to create an Hertzsprung-Russell diagram for the cluster. We find that the previous age estimates of ∼1 Myr to be consistent with our results. Consistent with previous studies, numerous objects are observed to have luminosities several magnitudes above the 1 Myr isochrone. Numerous objects exhibiting emission features in the J band are also reported.

  1. Near-infrared observations of young stellar objects in the Rho Ophiuchi dark cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Thomas P.; Young, Erick T.

    1992-01-01

    We have conducted an imaging survey of 1.4 sq pc of the Rho Ophiuchi dark cloud in the J, H, and K near-infrared photometric bands. Approximately 337 of our 481 detected sources are associated with the cloud, and we estimate that 48 percent of these have near-infrared excesses, indicative of disks or circumstellar material surrounding these young stellar objects (YSOs). The K-band luminosity function is significantly different in different regions of our survey area, suggesting that YSOs in these regions have different ages or mass functions. We estimate that the entire survey area has a high star-formation efficiency, at roughly 23 percent. Finally, our many newly detected sources provide a relatively large, uniformly sensitive sample of objects for study at longer wavelengths to better determine true source luminosities and evolutionary lifetimes.

  2. Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) early performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harms, Richard; Fitch, John

    1991-01-01

    The on-orbit performance of the HST + FOS instrument is described and illustrated with examples of initial scientific results. The effects of the spherical aberration from the misfiguring of the HST primary mirror upon isolated point sources and in complex fields such as the nuclei of galaxies are analyzed. Possible means for eliminating the effects of spherical aberration are studied. Concepts include using image enhancement software to extract maximum spatial and spectral information from the existing data as well as several options to repair or compensate for the HST's optical performance. In particular, it may be possible to install corrective optics into the HST which will eliminate the spherical aberration for the FOS and some of the other instruments. The more promising ideas and calculations of the expected improvements in performance are briefly described.

  3. A novel objective sour taste evaluation method based on near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Ayaka; Aoki, Soichiro; Kouno, Emi; Ogasawara, Masashi; Onaka, Takashi; Miura, Yutaka; Mamiya, Kanji

    2014-05-01

    One of the most important themes in the development of foods and drinks is the accurate evaluation of taste properties. In general, a sensory evaluation system is frequently used for evaluating food and drink. This method, which is dependent on human senses, is highly sensitive but is influenced by the eating experience and food palatability of individuals, leading to subjective results. Therefore, a more effective method for objectively estimating taste properties is required. Here we show that salivary hemodynamic signals, as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy, are a useful objective indicator for evaluating sour taste stimulus. In addition, the hemodynamic responses of the parotid gland are closely correlated to the salivary secretion volume of the parotid gland in response to basic taste stimuli and respond to stimuli independently of the hedonic aspect. Moreover, we examined the hemodynamic responses to complex taste stimuli in food-based solutions and demonstrated for the first time that the complicated phenomenon of the "masking effect," which decreases taste intensity despite the additional taste components, can be successfully detected by near-infrared spectroscopy. In summary, this study is the first to demonstrate near-infrared spectroscopy as a novel tool for objectively evaluating complex sour taste properties in foods and drinks. PMID:24474216

  4. Faint dwarfs in nearby groups

    SciTech Connect

    Speller, Ryan; Taylor, James E. E-mail: taylor@uwaterloo.ca

    2014-06-20

    The number and distribution of dwarf satellite galaxies remain a critical test of cold dark matter-dominated structure formation on small scales. Until recently, observational information about galaxy formation on these scales has been limited mainly to the Local Group. We have searched for faint analogues of Local Group dwarfs around nearby bright galaxies, using a spatial clustering analysis of the photometric catalog of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8. Several other recent searches of SDSS have detected clustered satellite populations down to Δm{sub r} ≡ (m{sub r,} {sub sat} – m{sub r,} {sub main}) ∼ 6-8, using photometric redshifts to reduce background contamination. SDSS photometric redshifts are relatively imprecise, however, for faint and nearby galaxies. Instead, we use angular size to select potential nearby dwarfs and consider only the nearest isolated bright galaxies as primaries. As a result, we are able to detect an excess clustering signal from companions down to Δm{sub r} = 12, 4 mag fainter than most recent studies. We detect an overdensity of objects at separations <400 kpc, corresponding to about 4.6 ± 0.5 satellites per central galaxy, consistent with the satellite abundance expected from the Local Group, given our selection function. Although the sample of satellites detected is incomplete by construction, since it excludes the least and most compact dwarfs, this detection provides a lower bound on the average satellite luminosity function, down to luminosities corresponding to the faintest ''classical'' dwarfs of the Local Group.

  5. THE LACK OF TORUS EMISSION FROM BL LACERTAE OBJECTS: AN INFRARED VIEW OF UNIFICATION WITH WISE

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, Richard M.; Markoff, Sera; Anderson, Scott F.; Brandt, W. N.; Wu Jianfeng; Shemmer, Ohad

    2012-02-15

    We use data from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) to perform a statistical study on the mid-infrared (IR) properties of a large number ({approx}10{sup 2}) of BL Lac objects-low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with a jet beamed toward the Earth. As expected, many BL Lac objects are so highly beamed that their jet synchrotron emission dominates their IR spectral energy distributions. In other BL Lac objects, however, the jet is not strong enough to completely dilute the rest of the AGN emission. We do not see observational signatures of the dusty torus from these weakly beamed BL Lac objects. The lack of observable torus emission is consistent with suggestions that BL Lac objects are fed by radiatively inefficient accretion disks. Implications for the 'nature versus nurture' debate for FR I and FR II radio galaxies are briefly discussed. Our study supports the notion that, beyond orientation, accretion rate plays an important role in AGN unification.

  6. Safe VISITOR: visible, infrared, and terahertz object recognition for security screening application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, T.; Zieger, G.; Anders, S.; Zakosarenko, V.; Meyer, H.-G.; Schubert, M.; Starkloff, M.; Rößler, M.; Thorwirth, G.; Krause, U.

    2009-05-01

    Security solutions with the purpose to detect hidden objects underneath the clothing of persons are desired in many environments. With the variety of application scenarios criteria like flexibility and mobility become more important. So, many developments trend to focus on cameras, which can image scenes from a distance. This new generation of tools will have the advantage of hidden operation, which is believed by experts to add to the security because of its unpredictability. Such stand-off cameras do have some divergent requirements compared to mm-wave portal scanners. They will benefit from shorter wavelengths because of the higher optical resolution. In contrast to that, the needed transmission properties might become impractical at higher frequencies. A commonly accepted compromise is the use of wavelengths around 0.5mm. However, for stand-off cameras without oversized optical apertures, a resolution around 1cm is a practical limit. For our security camera "Safe VISITOR" (Safe VISible, Infrared and Terhaertz Object recognition) we have chosen to combine images from three different camera modules: a CCD for visible light, a microbolometer for long infrared (14μm) and a superconducting bolometer for 870μm. This combines the highest optical resolution (visible), the unprecedented temperature resolution at infrared and the almost perfect transmission at terahertz. We have built a first prototype and tested it in a field trial. We will present experimental results and try to assess the false error rate of our system.

  7. A multifrequency radio continuum and IRAS faint source survey of markarian galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bicay, M. D.; Kojoian, G.; Seal, J.; Dickinson, D. F.; Malkan, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    Results are presented from a multifrequency radio continumm survey of Markarian galaxies (MRKs) and are supplemented by IRAS infrared data from the Faint Source Survey. Radio data are presented for 899 MRKs observed at nu = 4.755 GHz with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO)-Green Bank 300 foot (91 m) telescope, including nearly 88% of those objects in Markarian lists VI-XIV. In addition, 1.415 GHz measurements of 258 MRKs, over 30% of the MRKs accessible from the National Aeronomy and Ionosphere Center (NAIC)-Arecibo, are reported. Radio continuum observations of smaller numbers of MRKs were made at 10.63 GHz and at 23.1 GHz and are also presented. Infrared data from the IRAS Faint Source Survey (Ver. 2) are presented for 944 MRKs, with reasonably secure identifications extracted from the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database. MRKs exhibit the same canonical infrared characteristics as those reported for various other galaxy samples, that is well-known enhancement of the 25 micrometer/60 micrometer color ratio among Seyfert MRKs, and a clear tendency for MRKs with warmer 60 micrometer/100 micrometer colors to also possess cooler 12 micrometer/25 micrometer colors. In addition, non-Seyfert are found to obey the well-documented infrared/radio luminosity correlation, with the tightest correlation seen for starburst MRKs.

  8. CENTAURS AND SCATTERED DISK OBJECTS IN THE THERMAL INFRARED: ANALYSIS OF WISE/NEOWISE OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, James M.; Grav, Tommy; Blauvelt, Erin; Collaboration: WISE Team; PTF Team; and others

    2013-08-10

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) observed 52 Centaurs and scattered disk objects (SDOs) in the thermal infrared, including 15 new discoveries. We present analyses of these observations to estimate sizes and mean optical albedos. We find mean albedos of 0.08 {+-} 0.04 for the entire data set. Thermal fits yield average beaming parameters of 0.9 {+-} 0.2 that are similar for both SDO and Centaur sub-classes. Biased cumulative size distributions yield size-frequency distribution power law indices of {approx}-1.7 {+-} 0.3. The data also reveal a relation between albedo and color at the 3{sigma} level. No significant relation between diameter and albedos is found.

  9. Results and analyses of faint field galaxy surveys with the Keck Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, D. W.

    1996-12-01

    A large collaboration at Caltech has been using the Keck and other telescopes to perform UBVRIKL imaging and take spectra of faint galaxies. The spectroscopic samples contain several hundred objects to K=20 mag or R=24 mag and the imaging samples contain thousands of sources to R~ 27. Faint field galaxies are found to be strongly clustered in velocity space; the angular coherence, masses and morphologies in configuration space of these structures are investigated. In cooperation with the University of Hawaii group, the luminosity function of galaxies is computed in the near-infrared; strong evolution is found in the number of low-luminosity galaxies to z~ 1, although the statistical properties of high-luminosity objects are relatively constant. A range of models for the faint galaxy counts are constructed, not on the basis of a priori information about galaxy properties (from, say, cosmogonic theory) but rather by ``inverting'' the data under a range of qualitatively distinct simplifying assumptions. Predictions are made for ongoing or future imaging and spectroscopy surveys which will clearly distinguish the models. The prospects for a ``meta-analysis'' of a large collection of heterogeneous surveys to create consistent galaxy evolution models from z=0 to the highest observed redshifts are discussed.

  10. Passive signatures concealed objects recorded by multispectral and hyperspectral systems in visible, infrared and terahertz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastek, Mariusz; Kowalski, Marcin; Polakowski, Henryk; Lagueux, Philippe; Gagnon, Marc-André

    2014-06-01

    Risks to the safety of public zones (generally available for people) are related mainly to the presence of hidden dangerous objects (such as knives, guns, bombs etc.) and their usage. Modern system for the monitoring of such zones attempt to detect dangerous tools using multispectral cameras working in different spectral ranges: the visible radiation, near, medium and long range infrared and recently also in terahertz range. In order to develop methods and algorithms to detect hidden objects it is necessary to determine the thermal signatures of such objects of interest. The laboratory measurements were conducted to determine the thermal signatures of dangerous tools hidden under various clothes in different ambient conditions. Cameras used for measurements were working in spectral range 0.6-12.5 µm. An infrared imaging Fourier transform spectroradiometer was also used, working in spectral range 7.7-11.7 µm. Analysis of registered thermograms and hyperspectral datacubes has yielded the thermal signatures for: two types of guns, two types of knives and home-made explosive bombs. The determined thermal signatures will be used in the development of method and algorithms of image analysis implemented in proposed monitoring systems.

  11. Characterization of high proper motion objects from the wide-field infrared survey explorer

    SciTech Connect

    Luhman, K. L.; Sheppard, Scott S.

    2014-06-01

    We present an analysis of high proper motion objects that we have found in a recent study and in this work with multi-epoch astrometry from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using photometry and proper motions from the Two Micron All-Sky Survey and WISE, we have identified the members of this sample that are likely to be late-type, nearby, or metal-poor. We have performed optical and near-infrared spectroscopy on 41 objects, from which we measure spectral types that range from M4-T2.5. This sample includes 11 blue L dwarfs and 5 subdwarfs; the latter were also classified as such in the recent study by Kirkpatrick and coworkers. Based on their spectral types and photometry, several of our spectroscopic targets may have distances of <20 pc with the closest at ∼12 pc. The tangential velocities implied by the spectrophotometric distances and proper motions indicate that four of the five subdwarfs are probably members of the Galactic halo while several other objects, including the early-T dwarf WISE J210529.08–623558.7, may belong to the thick disk.

  12. Objective assessment of biomagnetic devices and alternative clinical therapies using infrared thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockley, Graham J.

    2001-03-01

    The overwhelming introduction of magnetic devices and other alternative therapies into the health care market prompts the need for objective evaluation of these techniques through the use of infrared thermal imaging. Many of these therapies are reported to promote the stimulation of blood flow or the relief of pain conditions. Infrared imaging is an efficient tool to assess such changes in the physiological state. Therefore, a thermal imager can help document and substantiate whether these therapies are in fact providing an effective change to the local circulation. Thermal images may also indicate whether the change is temporary or sustained. As a specific case example, preliminary findings will be presented concerning the use of magnets and the effect they have on peripheral circulation. This will include a discussion of the recommended protocols for this type of infrared testing. This test model can be applied to the evaluation of other devices and therapeutic procedures which are reputed to affect circulation such as electro acupuncture, orthopedic footwear and topical ointments designed to relieve pain or inflammation.

  13. Infrared Spectroscopy and Young Stellar Objects: Characterizing the Dust and Gas in Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruger, Andrew James

    In this dissertation, I describe my work in infrared spectroscopy and in studying the circumstellar disks around young stellar objects. In the first part, I detail an electronic component I designed for the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES), which has acted as a visiting instrument on Gemini North and the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. In order to detect the incoming infrared flux, a bias voltage is applied across the detector to sweep out the photo-excited electrons. If the bias voltage is too weak, the electrons can recombine before being swept out, while a strong bias can create unstable photoconductive gain. The initial design of TEXES required the operator to open the electronics and change the bias voltage by hand. However, the optimal bias is not the same for different instrument modes, which wasted substantial observing time when changing instrument modes. In order to save future observing time, and to fulfill a precondition set by Gemini North for TEXES to act as a visiting instrument, I created an electronic component to change the detector bias from the computer control room. I investigate and characterize the optimal voltages for the Raytheon 2562 SiAs IBC "SIRTF" array for the different instrument modes used by TEXES. In the following sections, I describe our observing campaign using the Spitzer IRS module and three ground-based telescopes to investigate edge-on circumstellar disks and classical infrared companions. Observations of the terrestrial planet forming regions of circumstellar disks are difficult to obtain, but recent detections of molecular absorption originating from these regions have proven valuable for disk models. We were granted time with the Spitzer Space Telescope to observe seven targets classified as young stellar objects, likely with their disks seen edge-on, to search for molecular absorption features. We used ground-based telescopes, including Gemini South, W. M. Keck Observatory, and the European Southern

  14. THE ORIGIN OF THE INFRARED EMISSION IN RADIO GALAXIES. III. ANALYSIS OF 3CRR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Dicken, D.; Axon, D.; Robinson, A.; Kharb, P.; Tadhunter, C.; Morganti, R. E-mail: djasps@rit.ed E-mail: c.tadhunter@sheffield.ac.u

    2010-10-20

    We present Spitzer photometric data for a complete sample of 19 low-redshift (z< 0.1) 3CRR radio galaxies as part of our efforts to understand the origin of the prodigious mid- to far-infrared (MFIR) emission from radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Our results show a correlation between AGN power (indicated by [O III]{lambda}5007 emission line luminosity) and 24 {mu}m luminosity. This result is consistent with the 24 {mu}m thermal emission originating from warm dust heated directly by AGN illumination. Applying the same correlation test for 70 {mu}m luminosity against [O III] luminosity we find this relation to suffer from increased scatter compared to that of 24 {mu}m. In line with our results for the higher-radio-frequency-selected 2 Jy sample, we are able to show that much of this increased scatter is due to heating by starbursts that boost the far-infrared emission at 70 {mu}m in a minority of objects (17%-35%). Overall this study supports previous work indicating AGN illumination as the dominant heating mechanism for MFIR emitting dust in the majority of low-to-intermediate redshift radio galaxies (0.03 < z < 0.7), with the advantage of strong statistical evidence. However, we find evidence that the low-redshift broad-line objects (z < 0.1) are distinct in terms of their positions on the MFIR versus [O III] correlations.

  15. Dust in BL Lac objects and Fanaroff-Riley radio galaxies: infrared region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seal Braun, P.

    2015-12-01

    Here 28 BL Lac objects, 18 FR I type radio galaxies, 4 FR I/II type radio galaxies and 10 FR II type radio galaxies are studied from FIR (far infrared) to optical region (180 μm to 0.44 μm) to understand the nature of infrared emission from these objects and the physical properties of dust in the emitting region. Using the flux densities from 2MASS, IRAS, ISO, SCUBA (40 % samples), WISE All-sky Data, AKARI (10 % samples) data and optical (B) observations, the spectral energy distributions are constructed. FIR and NIR spectral indices (α_{FIR} and α_{NIR}) are estimated. The dust temperatures and dust masses of all the samples are estimated from FIR flux densities. The SEDs of most of the samples (90 %) show steep slopes from FIR to optical region and about 10 % of the samples show flat continuous spectra from FIR to NIR region. The SEDs of 80 % FR I type radio galaxies and 1 out of 4 FR I/II type radio galaxies and two RBLs show a bump in the NIR to optical region. The SEDs of these sources are compared with Radiative transfer models. From FIR to MIR region, the SEDs of 90 % of the objects studied here can be fitted to the models with luminosities L˜ 10^{9.5} L0, considering uncertainty from 10 % to 20 %. But the observable fluxes in the NIR region are higher and can be fitted to other models with higher L˜ 10^{12.5} L0. Since there is a difference in emission in NIR region, mainly for FR I radio galaxies, so the variation of apparent K magnitudes with logarithm of redshift z is also studied. The WISE colours, (W1 - W2) and (W2 - W3) are compared with isodensity contours. Comparing with radiative transfer models it can be suggested that, in the FIR and MIR region the infrared emission is from the dust containing large grains, small graphites and PAHs at temperature ˜50 K-100 K. In the NIR region hot dust is mainly due to small grains at temperature ˜1200 K and the emission is mainly from synchrotron radiation produced in the inner part of the relativistic

  16. Infrared object detection using global and local cues based on LARK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Wei; Han, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lian-fa

    2016-05-01

    Object detection has become a challenging problem in computer vision. Locally Adaptive Regression Kernel (LARK) based detection methods are able to produce visually pleasing results without any training. We in this paper present an effective object detection method by exploring global and local cues based on LARK features. First, we encode the local context similarity by exploiting region Structural LARK (SLARK) features, which measure the likeness of a pixel to its surroundings in the query image and the test image. Second, a global constraint based on SLARK features via Heat equation is learned to detect similar features in the test image. Results from matrix cosine similarity are computed to estimate similar regions between these computed features. A compactness score is provided to refine these regions. Next, we detect the location of objects in the test image using non-maxima suppression. We show in experiments that the proposed method significantly outperforms other methods on the infrared image datasets, localizing the objects in the test images effectively.

  17. The Population of Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Barker, Ed; Buckalew, Brent; Burkhardt, Andrew; Cowardin, Heather; Frith, James; Gomez, Juan; Kaleida, Catherine; Lederer, Susan M.; Lee, Chris H.

    2016-01-01

    The 6.5-m Magellan telescope 'Walter Baade' at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile has been used for spot surveys of the GEO orbital regime to study the population of optically faint GEO debris. The goal is to estimate the size of the population of GEO debris at sizes much smaller than can be studied with 1-meter class telescopes. Despite the small size of the field of view of the Magellan instrument (diameter 0.5-degree), a significant population of objects fainter than R = 19th magnitude have been found with angular rates consistent with circular orbits at GEO. We compare the size of this population with the numbers of GEO objects found at brighter magnitudes by smaller telescopes. The observed detections have a wide range in characteristics starting with those appearing as short uniform streaks. But there are a substantial number of detections with variations in brightness, flashers, during the 5-second exposure. The duration of each of these flashes can be extremely brief: sometimes less than half a second. This is characteristic of a rapidly tumbling object with a quite variable projected size times albedo. If the albedo is of the order of 0.2, then the largest projected size of these objects is around 10-cm. The data in this paper was collected over the last several years using Magellan's IMACS camera in f/2 mode. The analysis shows the brightness bins for the observed GEO population as well as the periodicity of the flashers. All objects presented are correlated with the catalog: the focus of the paper will be on the uncorrelated, optically faint, objects. The goal of this project is to better characterize the faint debris population in GEO that access to a 6.5-m optical telescope in a superb site can provide.

  18. NEAR-INFRARED VARIABILITY AMONG YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE STAR FORMATION REGION CYGNUS OB7

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, Scott J.; Rice, Thomas S.; Aspin, Colin

    2013-08-20

    We present an analysis of near-infrared time-series photometry in J, H, and K bands for about 100 epochs of a 1 Degree-Sign Multiplication-Sign 1 Degree-Sign region of the Lynds 1003/1004 dark cloud in the Cygnus OB7 region. Augmented by data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, we identify 96 candidate disk bearing young stellar objects (YSOs) in the region. Of these, 30 are clearly Class I or earlier. Using the Wide-Field Imaging Camera on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope, we were able to obtain photometry over three observing seasons, with photometric uncertainty better than 0.05 mag down to J Almost-Equal-To 17. We study detailed light curves and color trajectories of {approx}50 of the YSOs in the monitored field. We investigate the variability and periodicity of the YSOs and find the data are consistent with all YSOs being variable in these wavelengths on timescales of a few years. We divide the variability into four observational classes: (1) stars with periodic variability stable over long timescales, (2) variables which exhibit short-lived cyclic behavior, (3) long-duration variables, and (4) stochastic variables. Some YSO variability defies simple classification. We can explain much of the observed variability as being due to dynamic and rotational changes in the disk, including an asymmetric or changing blocking fraction, changes to the inner disk hole size, as well as changes to the accretion rate. Overall, we find that the Class I:Class II ratio of the cluster is consistent with an age of <1 Myr, with at least one individual, wildly varying source {approx}100, 000 yr old. We have also discovered a Class II eclipsing binary system with a period of 17.87 days.

  19. Spectroscopic surveys of faint blue stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegner, Gary; Boley, Forrest I.; Swanson, Steven R.; Mcmahan, Robert K.

    1987-01-01

    Spectroscopy of 450 faint blue stars obtained with the spectrograph and intensified Reticon scanner on the 1.3 m telescope at the McGraw Hill Observatory located at Kitt Peak are examined. The study is limited to objects brighter than V = 17.0 in magnitude. It is found that the relative numbers of objects such as white dwarfs, QSOs and CVs in the Kisco survey (Noguchi et al. 1980) is similar to that in the survey of Green et al., (1986).

  20. An objective method for computing advective surface velocities from sequential infrared satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emery, W. J.; Thomas, A. C.; Collins, M. J.; Crawford, W. R.; Mackas, D. L.

    1986-11-01

    Using cross correlations between sequential infrared satellite images, an objective technique is developed to compute advective sea surface velocities. Cross correlations are computed in 32 × 32 pixel search (second image) and 22 × 22 template (first image) windows from gradients of sea surface temperature computed from the satellite images. Velocity vectors, computed from sequential images of the British Columbia coastal ocean, generally appear coherent and consistent with the seasonal surface current in the region. During periods of strong wind forcing, as indicated by maps of sea level pressure, the image advective velocities are stronger and more coherent spatially and appear to cross surface temperature gradients; when winds are weaker, the advective velocities correspond better with the infrared temperature patterns, suggesting the increased contribution of the geostrophic current to the surface flow. Velocities determined from coincident, near-surface drogued (5-10 m) buoys, positioned every half hour by internal LORAN-C units in mid-June, show excellent agreement with the image advective velocities. In addition, conductivity, temperature, and depth (CTD) measurements (taken during the buoy tracking) confirm the homogeneity of the upper 10 m, and CTD-derived geostrophic currents are consistent with both buoy and sequential image displacement velocities.

  1. Visible and infrared investigations of planet-crossing asteroids and outer solar system objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tholen, David J.

    1991-01-01

    A major effort was directed toward 951 Gaspra in preparation for the Galileo encounter in October 1991. Most of the observational work involved photometry, for purposes of investigating the rotational state and phase function of the asteroid to help plan the encounter, and for purposes of navigating the spacecraft to the object. Work was also done with radiometric data obtained with the IRTF at NASA's request, for which simultaneous visible photometry was acquired with the University of Hawaii 2.24-m telescope. The results from the observations made during the 1990 opposition were published by Goldader et al. The main results reported include a rotational period of 7.04246 hours, an absolute visual magnitude of 11.8026, a slope parameter of 0.285, an early estimate of a high obliquity, an infrared spectrum indicating an olivine-rich composition, and 13 astrometric positions.

  2. Near-Infrared Colors of the Binary Kuiper Belt Object 1998 WW31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takato, Naruhisa; Fuse, Tetsuharu; Gaessler, Wolfgang; Goto, Miwa; Kanzawa, Tomio; Kobayashi, Naoto; Minowa, Yosuke; Oya, Shin; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Saint-Jacque, D.; Takami, Hideki; Terada, Hiroshi; Hayano, Yutaka; Iye, Masanori; Kamata, Yukiko; Tokunaga, A. T.

    2003-06-01

    We have measured near-infrared colors of the binary Kuiper Belt object (KBO) 1998 WW31 using the Subaru Telescope with adaptive optics. The satellite was detected near its perigee and apogee (0.18'' and 1.2'' apart from the primary). The primary and the satellite have similar H-K colors, while the satellite is redder than the primary in J-H. Combined with the R band magnitude previously published by Veillet et al., 2002, the color of the primary is consistent with that of optically red KBOs. The satellite's R-, J-, H-colors suggest the presence of ~1 μm absorption band due to rock-forming minerals. If the surface of the satellite is mainly composed by olivine, the satellite's albedo is higher value than the canonically assumed value of 4%.

  3. Comparison of broadband and hyperspectral thermal infrared imaging of buried threat objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, John E.; Achal, Steve B.; Diaz, Alejandra U.; Faust, Anthony A.

    2013-06-01

    Previous research by many groups has shown that broad-band thermal infrared (TIR) imagers can detect buried explosive threat devices, such as unexploded ordnance (UXO), landmines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs). Broad-band detection measures the apparent temperature - an average over the wave band of the product of the true soil surface temperature and the emissivity. Broad-band detection suffers from inconsistent performance (low signal, high clutter rates), due in part to diurnal variations, environmental and meteorological conditions, and soil surface effects. It has been suggested that hyperspectral TIR imaging might have improved performance since it can, in principle, allow extraction of the wavelength-dependent emissivity and the true soil surface temperature. This would allow the surface disturbance effects to be separated from the soil column (bulk) effects. A significant, and as yet unanswered, question is whether hyperspectral TIR images provide better detection capability (higher probability of detection and/or lower false alarm rate) than do broad-band thermal images. TIR hyperspectral image data of threat objects, buried and surface-laid in bare soil, were obtained in arid, desert-like conditions over full diurnal cycles for several days. Regions of interest containing threat objects and backgrounds were extracted throughout the time period. Simulated broad-band images were derived from the hyperspectral images. The diurnal variation of the images was studied. Hyperspectral was found to provide some advantage over broad-band imaging in detection of buried threat objects for the limited data set studied.

  4. The faint galaxy contribution to the diffuse extragalactic background light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Shaun; Treyer, Marie-Agnes; Silk, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Models of the faint galaxy contribution to the diffuse extragalactic background light are presented, which are consistent with current data on faint galaxy number counts and redshifts. The autocorrelation function of surface brightness fluctuations in the extragalactic diffuse light is predicted, and the way in which these predictions depend on the cosmological model and assumptions of biasing is determined. It is confirmed that the recent deep infrared number counts are most compatible with a high density universe (Omega-0 is approximately equal to 1) and that the steep blue counts then require an extra population of rapidly evolving blue galaxies. The faintest presently detectable galaxies produce an interesting contribution to the extragalactic diffuse light, and still fainter galaxies may also produce a significant contribution. These faint galaxies still only produce a small fraction of the total optical diffuse background light, but on scales of a few arcminutes to a few degrees, they produce a substantial fraction of the fluctuations in the diffuse light.

  5. A Mid-Infrared Imaging Survey of Embedded Young Stellar Objects in the (rho) Ophiuchi Cloud Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsony, Mary; Ressler, Michael E.; Marsh, Kenneth A.

    2005-01-01

    Results of a comprehensive, new, ground-based mid-infrared imaging survey of the young stellar population of the (rho) Ophiuchi cloud are presented. Data were acquired at the Palomar 5m and at the Keck 10m telescopes with the MIRLIN and LWS instruments, at 0'.5 and 0'.25 resolutions, respectively. Of 172 survey objects, 85 were detected. Among the 22 multiple systems observed, 15 were resolved and their individual component fluxes determined. A plot of the frequency distribution of the detected objects with SED spectral slope shows that YSOs spend approx.4 x 10(exp 5) yr in the flat-spectrum phase, clearing out their remnant infall envelopes. Mid-infrared variability is found among a significant fraction of the surveyed objects and is found to occur for all SED classes with optically thick disks. Large-amplitude near-infrared variability, also found for all SED classes with optically thick disks, seems to occur with somewhat higher frequency at the earlier evolutionary stages. Although a general trend of mid-infrared excess and near-infrared veiling exists progressing through SED classes, with Class I objects generally exhibiting r(sub K) >= 1, flat-spectrum objects with r(sub K) >= 0.58, and Class III objects with r(sub K) =0, Class II objects exhibit the widest range of r(sub K) values, ranging from 0 <= r(sub K) <= 4.5. However, the highly variable value of veiling that a single source can exhibit in any of the SED classes in which active disk accretion can take place is striking and is direct observational evidence for highly time-variable accretion activity in disks. Finally, by comparing mid-infrared versus near-infrared excesses in a subsample with well-determined effective temperatures and extinction values, disk-clearing mechanisms are explored. The results are consistent with disk clearing proceeding from the inside out.

  6. Infrared near-Earth-object survey modeling for observatories interior to the Earth's orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buie, M.

    2014-07-01

    The search for and dynamical characterization of the near-Earth population of objects (NEOs) has been a busy topic for surveys for many years. Most of the work thus far has been from ground-based optical surveys such as the Catalina Sky Survey and LINEAR. These surveys have essentially reached a complete inventory of objects down to 1 km diameter and have shown that the known objects do not pose any significant impact threat. Smaller objects are correspondingly smaller threats but there are more of them and fewer of them have so far been discovered. The next generation of surveys is looking to extend their reach down to much smaller sizes. From an impact risk perspective, those objects as small as 30--40 m are still of interest (similar in size to the Tunguska bolide). Smaller objects than this are largely of interest from a space resource or in-situ analysis efforts. A recent mission concept promoted by the B612 Foundation and Ball Aerospace calls for an infrared survey telescope in a Venus-like orbit, known as the Sentinel Mission. This wide-field facility has been designed to complete the inventory down to a 140 m diameter while also providing substantial constraints on the NEO population down to a Tunguska-sized object. I have been working to develop a suite of tools to provide survey modeling for this class of survey telescope. The purpose of the tool is to uncover hidden complexities that govern mission design and operation while also working to quantitatively understand the orbit quality provided on its catalog of objects without additional followup assets. The baseline mission design calls for a 6.5 year survey lifetime. This survey model is a statistically based tool for establishing completeness as a function of object size and survey duration. Effects modeled include the ability to adjust the field-of-regard (includes all pointing restrictions), field-of-view, focal plane array fill factor, and the observatory orbit. Consequences tracked include time

  7. Integration, Testing and Performance of the Infrared Multi-Object Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohl, Raymond G.; Connelly, Joseph A.; Boyle, Robert F.; Derro, Rebecca J.; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Madison, Timothy J.; Mentzell, J. Eric; Sparr, Leroy M.; Hylan, Jason E.; Ray, Knute

    2003-01-01

    The Infrared Multi-Object Spectrometer (IRMOS) is a principle investigator-class instrument for the Kitt Peak National Observatory 2.1 m and Mayall 3.8 m telescopes. IRMOS is a near-IR (0.8 - 2.5 micron) spectrometer with low-to mid-resolving power (R = lambda/delta lambda = 300 - 3000). On the 3.8 m telescope, IRMOS produces simultaneous spectra of approximately 100 objects in its approximately 3 x 2 arcmin field of view using a commercial micro electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) digital micro-mirror device (DMD) from Texas Instruments. The multi-mirror array DMD operates as a real-time programmable slit mask. The all-reflective optical design consists of two imaging subsystems. The focal reducer images the focal plane of the telescope onto the DMD field stop, and the spectrograph images the DMD onto a large-format detector. The instrument operates at approximately 80 K, cooled by a single electro-mechanical cryocooler. The bench and all components are made from aluminum 6061-T651. There are three cryogenic mechanisms. We describe laboratory integration and test of IRMOS before shipment to Kitt Peak. We give an overview of the optical alignment technique and integration of optical, mechanical, electrical and cryogenic subsystems. We compare optical test results to model predictions of point spread function size and morphology, contrast, and stray light. We discuss some lessons learned and conclude with a prediction for performance on the telescope.

  8. The Planning Process for Multi-Object Spectroscopy with the JWST Near-Infrared Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Tracy L.; Karakla, D. M.; Shyrokov, A.; Pontoppidan, K.; Soderblom, D. R.; Valenti, J. A.; Kassin, S. A.; Gilbert, K.; Blair, W. P.; Muzerolle, J.; Tumlinson, J.; Keyes, C. D.; Pavlovsky, C. M.; LeBlanc, T.

    2014-01-01

    The Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will have a powerful multi-object spectroscopy mode using four configurable Micro-Shutter Arrays (MSAs). The contiguous MSA shutters can be opened to form slits on astronomical targets, for simultaneous spectroscopy of up to 100 sources per exposure. The NIRSpec MSA shutters are in a fixed grid pattern, and careful analysis in the observation planning process will be crucial for optimal definition of science exposures. Our goal is to maximize the number of astronomical science sources observed in the fewest number of MSA slit configurations. We are developing algorithms in the NIRSpec MSA Planning Tool (MPT) to improve the quality of planned observations using several common science observing strategies as test use cases. For example, the needs for planning extremely deep exposures on a small number of JWST discovered z > 10 galaxy candidates will differ significantly from the requirements for planning spectral observations on a representative sample of stars from a galactic star cluster catalog. In this poster, we present a high level overview of our plans to develop and optimize the MPT for the JWST NIRSpec multi-object spectroscopy mode.

  9. Integration, testing, and performance of the Infrared Multi-Object Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohl, Raymond G.; Connelly, Joseph A.; Boyle, Robert F.; Derro, Rebecca J.; Fitzgerald, Danette L.; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Madison, Timothy J.; Mentzell, John E.; Nord, Brian; Sparr, Leroy M.; Hylan, Jason E.; Ray, Knute; MacKenty, John W.

    2004-09-01

    The Infrared Multi-Object Spectrometer (IRMOS) is a principle investigator-class instrument for the Kitt Peak National Observatory 2.1 m and Mayall 3.8 m telescopes. IRMOS is a near-IR (0.8--2.5 micron) spectrometer with low- to mid-resolving power (R = λ/Δλ = 300-3000). On the 3.8 m telescope, IRMOS produces simultaneous spectra of ~100 objects in its 2.8 ' 2.0 arcmin field of view using a commercial micro electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) digital micro-mirror device (DMD) from Texas Instruments. The multi-mirror array DMD operates as a real-time programmable slit mask. The all-reflective optical design consists of two imaging subsystems. The focal reducer images the focal plane of the telescope onto the DMD field stop, and the spectrograph images the DMD onto a large-format detector. The instrument operates at ~90 K, cooled by a single electro-mechanical cryocooler. The bench and all components are made from aluminum 6061. There are three cryogenic mechanisms. We describe laboratory integration and test of IRMOS before shipment to Kitt Peak National Observatory. We give an overview of the optical alignment technique and integration of optical, mechanical, electrical and cryogenic subsystems. We compare optical test results to model predictions of point spread function size. We discuss some lessons learned and conclude with a prediction for performance on the telescope.

  10. a Faint and Lonely Brown Dwarf in the Solar Vicinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-04-01

    La Silla, each covering a sky area of 5 o.5 x 5 o.5. When comparing plates of the same sky field obtained at time intervals of several years [1] , she was able to detect, among the hundreds of thousands of stellar images on the plates, a few faint ones whose positions had changed a little in the meantime. The search technique is based on the fact that such a shift is a good indicator of the object being relatively nearby. It must therefore also be intrinsically faint, i.e. a potential White Dwarf candidate. On every pair of plates, approximately twenty faint moving objects were detected with proper motions [2] of more than 0.25 arcsec per year. Indeed, follow-up spectroscopic observations showed that about 20 percent of these or about four per plate were White Dwarfs. Until now, a total of forty new White Dwarfs have been discovered during this very successful project, i.e. over ten times more than originally expected. And then - a Brown Dwarf! Caption to ESO PR Photo 11/97 [JPEG, 144k] ESO Press Photo 11/97 When checking two plates with a time inverval of 11 years, Maria Teresa Ruiz earlier this year discovered a very faint object in the southern constellation of Hydra (The Water-Snake), moving at 0.35 arcsec per year (cf. ESO Press Photo 11/97). In order to establish its true nature, she obtained its spectrum (in the visual to near-infrared region from wavelengths 450-1000 nm) on March 15 using the ESO 3.6-m telescope and the EFOSC1 spectrograph. Caption to ESO PR Photo 12/97 [GIF, 35k] ESO Press Photo 12/97 To her great surprise, the spectrum was of a type never seen before and certainly not that of a White Dwarf or any other easily identifiable type of star (cf. ESO Press Photo 12/97). In particular, there were no signs of spectral bands of titanium oxide (TiO) or vanadium oxide (VO) which are common in very cool stars, nor of the spectral lines seen in White Dwarfs. On the other hand, an absorption line of the short-lived element lithium was identified, as well

  11. An Infrared Multi-Object Spectrograph (IRMS) with adaptive optics for TMT: the science case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobasher, Bahram; Crampton, David; Simard, Luc

    2010-07-01

    It has been recognized that a Near-Infrared Multi-object Spectrograph (IRMS) as one of the first light instrument on the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) would significantly increase the scientific capability of the observatory. The IRMS is planned to be a clone of the MOSFIRE instrument on the Keck telescope. As a result, we use the already available MOSFIRE design and expertise, significantly reducing the total cost and its development time. The IRMS will be a quasi diffraction limited multi-slit spectrograph with moderate resolution (R~4000), fed by Narrow-Field Infrared Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS). It images over the 2 arcmin diameter field of view of the NFIRAOS. There are a number of exceedingly important scientific questions, waiting to be addressed by the TMT/IRMS combination. Given its relatively small field of view, it is less affected by the sky background, which is a limiting factor in ground-based observations at near-IR wavelengths. The IRMS is the ideal instrument for studying spectroscopic properties of galaxies at the re-ionization epoch (z > 7), where the Lyman alpha line shifts to the near-ir wavelenghths. It can be used to measure rotation curves of spiral and velocity dispersion of elliptical galaxies at z~2-3 and hence, their spectroscopic mass. It can be used to search for population III stars via their spectroscopic signature and to perform measurement of spectroscopic lines at high redshifts, diagnostic of metallicity. Finally, IRMS allows measurement of the blue shifts in the rest-frame MgII line for high redshift galaxies, used to study the winds, leading to the feedback mechanism, responsible for quenching star formation activity in galaxies.

  12. MASSIVE YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE GALACTIC CENTER. I. SPECTROSCOPIC IDENTIFICATION FROM SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    An, Deokkeun; RamIrez, Solange V.; Boogert, A. C. Adwin; Sellgren, Kris; Arendt, Richard G.; Schultheis, Mathias; Cotera, Angela S.; Stolovy, Susan R.

    2011-08-01

    We present results from our spectroscopic study, using the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on board the Spitzer Space Telescope, designed to identify massive young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Galactic center (GC). Our sample of 107 YSO candidates was selected based on Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) colors from the high spatial resolution, high sensitivity Spitzer/IRAC images in the Central Molecular Zone, which spans the central {approx}300 pc region of the Milky Way. We obtained IRS spectra over 5-35 {mu}m using both high- and low-resolution IRS modules. We spectroscopically identify massive YSOs by the presence of a 15.4 {mu}m shoulder on the absorption profile of 15 {mu}m CO{sub 2} ice, suggestive of CO{sub 2} ice mixed with CH{sub 3}OH ice on grains. This 15.4 {mu}m shoulder is clearly observed in 16 sources and possibly observed in an additional 19 sources. We show that nine massive YSOs also reveal molecular gas-phase absorption from CO{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, and/or HCN, which traces warm and dense gas in YSOs. Our results provide the first spectroscopic census of the massive YSO population in the GC. We fit YSO models to the observed spectral energy distributions and find YSO masses of 8-23 M{sub sun}, which generally agree with the masses derived from observed radio continuum emission. We find that about 50% of photometrically identified YSOs are confirmed with our spectroscopic study. This implies a preliminary star formation rate of {approx}0.07 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} at the GC.

  13. Deep infrared galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, Matthew; Houck, J. R.; Hacking, Perry B.

    1992-01-01

    High signal-to-noise ratio optical spectra of 17 infrared-bright emission-line galaxies near the north ecliptic pole are presented. Reddening-corrected line ratios forbidden O III 5007/H-beta, N II 6583/H-alpha, S II (6716 + 6731)/H-alpha, and O I 6300/H-alpha are used to discriminate between candidate energy generation mechanisms in each galaxy. These criteria have frequently been applied to optically selected samples of galaxies in the past, but this is the first time they have been applied to a set of faint flux-limited infrared-selected objects. The analysis indicates the sample contains seven starburst galaxies and three (AGN). However, seven galaxies in the present sample elude the classification scheme based on these line ratios. It is concluded that a two-component (starburst plus AGN) model for energy generation is inadequate for infrared galaxies.

  14. Young stellar object variability (YSOVAR): Long timescale variations in the mid-infrared

    SciTech Connect

    Rebull, L. M.; Cody, A. M.; Stauffer, J. R.; Morales-Calderón, M.; Carey, S. J.; Covey, K. R.; Günther, H. M.; Poppenhaeger, K.; Wolk, S. J.; Hora, J. L.; Hillenbrand, L. A.; Plavchan, P.; Gutermuth, R.; Song, I.; Barrado, D.; Bayo, A.; James, D.; Vrba, F. J.; Alves de Oliveira, C.; Bouvier, J.; and others

    2014-11-01

    The YSOVAR (Young Stellar Object VARiability) Spitzer Space Telescope observing program obtained the first extensive mid-infrared (3.6 and 4.5 μm) time series photometry of the Orion Nebula Cluster plus smaller footprints in 11 other star-forming cores (AFGL 490, NGC 1333, Mon R2, GGD 12-15, NGC 2264, L1688, Serpens Main, Serpens South, IRAS 20050+2720, IC 1396A, and Ceph C). There are ∼29,000 unique objects with light curves in either or both IRAC channels in the YSOVAR data set. We present the data collection and reduction for the Spitzer and ancillary data, and define the 'standard sample' on which we calculate statistics, consisting of fast cadence data, with epochs roughly twice per day for ∼40 days. We also define a 'standard sample of members' consisting of all the IR-selected members and X-ray-selected members. We characterize the standard sample in terms of other properties, such as spectral energy distribution shape. We use three mechanisms to identify variables in the fast cadence data—the Stetson index, a χ{sup 2} fit to a flat light curve, and significant periodicity. We also identified variables on the longest timescales possible of six to seven years by comparing measurements taken early in the Spitzer mission with the mean from our YSOVAR campaign. The fraction of members in each cluster that are variable on these longest timescales is a function of the ratio of Class I/total members in each cluster, such that clusters with a higher fraction of Class I objects also have a higher fraction of long-term variables. For objects with a YSOVAR-determined period and a [3.6]-[8] color, we find that a star with a longer period is more likely than those with shorter periods to have an IR excess. We do not find any evidence for variability that causes [3.6]-[4.5] excesses to appear or vanish within our data set; out of members and field objects combined, at most 0.02% may have transient IR excesses.

  15. Infrared Astronomical Satellite /IRAS/ and Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility /SIRTF/ - Implications of scientific objectives on focal plane sensitivity requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, C. R.; Walker, R. G.; Witteborn, F. C.

    1978-01-01

    The full potential of infrared astronomy can be realized only through observations made with space-based telescopes cooled to cryogenic temperatures. The paper outlines the scientific mission, system description, and focal plane requirements for two cryogenic telescopes: the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) and the Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). IRAS, a 60-cm superfluid-helium-cooled telescope system, will perform a one-year 8-120-micron IR sky survey; it will provide results of high reliability and sensitivity, produce the first complete survey data for the 30-120-micron region, and fill in missing portions (spectrally and spatially) of previous surveys short of 30 microns; its focal plane assembly is being designed to approach background-limited performance with an array of 62 discrete detectors. The SIRTF design will allow detailed follow-up studies in the 1-1000-micron range with a 116-160-cm observatory-class instrument. The Shuttle sortie capability introduces the unique SIRTF concept of an easily refurbishable or replaceable focal plane instrument complement in an orbiting cryogenic telescope.

  16. WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER OBSERVATIONS OF YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE WESTERN CIRCINUS MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wilson M.; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Padgett, Deborah L.; Leisawitz, David; Koenig, Xavier P.

    2011-05-20

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer has uncovered a population of young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Western Circinus molecular cloud. Images show the YSOs to be clustered into two main groups that are coincident with dark filamentary structure in the nebulosity. Analysis of photometry shows numerous Class I and II objects. The locations of several of these objects are found to correspond to known dense cores and CO outflows. Class I objects tend to be concentrated in dense aggregates, and Class II objects more evenly distributed throughout the region.

  17. Subaru Near-Infrared Multicolor Images of Class II Young Stellar Object, RNO 91

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayama, Satoshi; Tamura, Motohide; Hayashi, Masahiko; Itoh, Yoichi; Ishii, Miki; Fukagawa, Misato; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Oasa, Yumiko; Kudo, Tomoyuki

    2007-12-01

    We conducted subarcsecond near-infrared imaging observations of RNO 91 with CIAO (Coronagraphic Imager with Adaptive Optics) mounted on the 8.2m Subaru telescope. We present our JHK band data along with optical images, which when considered together reveal a complex circumstellar structure. We examined the colors of associated nebulae and compared the geometry of the outflow/disk system suggested by our data with that already proposed on the basis of previous studies. Our K-band image shows bright circumstellar nebulosity detected within ˜ 2" around the central source, while it is less conspicuous at shorter wavelengths. PA and the size of this red color nebulosity agree with those of the previously detected polarization disk. Agreements among these data indicate that this bright nebulosity region, which follows the reddening law, might be attributed to a disklike structure. At J and optical wavelengths, several blue knotlike structures are detected around and beyond the bright circumstellar nebulosity. We suggest that these knotty reflection nebulae may represent disintegrating fragments of an infalling envelope. The three-color composite image has the appearance of arc-shaped nebulosity. We interpret these structures as being roots of a bipolar cavity opening toward the northeast and the southwest. The complex distribution of reflection nebulosity seen around RNO 91 appears to confirm the interpretation that this source is an object dispersing its molecular envelope while transitioning from protostar to T Tauri star.

  18. Spectrum from Faint Galaxy IRAS F00183-7111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has detected the building blocks of life in the distant universe, albeit in a violent milieu. Training its powerful infrared eye on a faint object located at a distance of 3.2 billion light-years, Spitzer has observed the presence of water and organic molecules in the galaxy IRAS F00183-7111. With an active galactic nucleus, this is one of the most luminous galaxies in the universe, rivaling the energy output of a quasar. Because it is heavily obscured by dust (see visible-light image in the inset), most of its luminosity is radiated at infrared wavelengths.

    The infrared spectrograph instrument onboard Spitzer breaks light into its constituent colors, much as a prism does for visible light. The image shows a low-resolution spectrum of the galaxy obtained by the spectrograph at wavelengths between 4 and 20 microns. Spectra are graphical representations of a celestial object's unique blend of light. Characteristic patterns, or fingerprints, within the spectra allow astronomers to identify the object's chemical composition and to determine such physical properties as temperature and density.

    The broad depression in the center of the spectrum denotes the presence of silicates (chemically similar to beach sand) in the galaxy. An emission peak within the bottom of the trough is the chemical signature for molecular hydrogen. The hydrocarbons (orange) are organic molecules comprised of carbon and hydrogen, two of the most common elements on Earth. Since it has taken more than three billion years for the light from the galaxy to reach Earth, it is intriguing to note the presence of organics in a distant galaxy at a time when life is thought to have started forming on our home planet.

    Additional features in the spectrum reveal the presence of water ice (blue), carbon dioxide ice (green) and carbon monoxide (purple) in both gas and solid forms. The magenta peak corresponds to singly ionized neon gas, a spectral line often used by

  19. MOSFIRE, the multi-object spectrometer for infra-red exploration at the Keck Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Ian S.; Steidel, Charles C.; Epps, Harland W.; Konidaris, Nicholas; Matthews, Keith Y.; Adkins, Sean; Aliado, Theodore; Brims, George; Canfield, John M.; Cromer, John L.; Fucik, Jason; Kulas, Kristin; Mace, Greg; Magnone, Ken; Rodriguez, Hector; Rudie, Gwen; Trainor, Ryan; Wang, Eric; Weber, Bob; Weiss, Jason

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes the as-built performance of MOSFIRE, the multi-object spectrometer and imager for the Cassegrain focus of the 10-m Keck 1 telescope. MOSFIRE provides near-infrared (0.97 to 2.41 μm) multi-object spectroscopy over a 6.1' x 6.1' field of view with a resolving power of R~3,500 for a 0.7" (0.508 mm) slit (2.9 pixels in the dispersion direction), or imaging over a field of view of ~6.9' diameter with ~0.18" per pixel sampling. A single diffraction grating can be set at two fixed angles, and order-sorting filters provide spectra that cover the K, H, J or Y bands by selecting 3rd, 4th, 5th or 6th order respectively. A folding flat following the field lens is equipped with piezo transducers to provide tip/tilt control for flexure compensation at the <0.1 pixel level. Instead of fabricated focal plane masks requiring frequent cryo-cycling of the instrument, MOSFIRE is equipped with a cryogenic Configurable Slit Unit (CSU) developed in collaboration with the Swiss Center for Electronics and Microtechnology (CSEM). Under remote control the CSU can form masks containing up to 46 slits with ~0.007-0.014" precision. Reconfiguration time is < 6 minutes. Slits are formed by moving opposable bars from both sides of the focal plane. An individual slit has a length of 7.0" but bar positions can be aligned to make longer slits in increments of 7.5". When masking bars are retracted from the field of view and the grating is changed to a mirror, MOSFIRE becomes a wide-field imager. The detector is a 2K x 2K H2-RG HgCdTe array from Teledyne Imaging Sensors with low dark current and low noise. Results from integration and commissioning are presented.

  20. Subsystem Imaging Performance and Modeling of the Infrared Multi-Object Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connelly, Joseph A.; Tveekrem, June L.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Mink, Ronald; Chambers, V. John; Mentzell, J. Eric; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; MacKenty, John W.; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Infrared Multi-Object Spectrograph (IRMOS) is a facility instrument for the Kitt Peak National Observatory Mayall Telescope (3.8 meter). IRMOS is a near-IR (0.8 - 2.5 micron) spectrograph with low to mid resolution (R=lambda/delta, lambda = 300 - 3800). The IRMOS spectrograph produces simultaneous spectra of - 100 objects in its 2.8 x 2.0 arc-min field of view using a commercial MEMS multi-mirror array device (MMA). The IRMOS optical design consists of two imaging systems, or "stages." The focal reducer, stage one, images the focal plane of the telescope onto the MMA. The spectrograph, stage two, images the MMA onto the detector. We describe the breadboard alignment method and imaging and scattered light performance for both the focal reducer and spectrograph. This testing provides verification of the optomechanical alignment method, and a measurement of the contribution of scattered light in the system due to mirror small scale surface error. After the stage I and 2 optics are integrated with the instrument, our test results will make it possible to distinguish between scattered light from the mirrors and the MMA. Image testing will be done at four wavelengths in the visible and near-IR. A mercury-argon pencil lamp will provide spectral lines at 546.1 and 1012 nm, and a blackbody radiation source lines at 1600 and 2200 nm. A CCD camera will be used as a detector for the visible wavelengths, and an IR photodiode will be used for the IR wavelengths. We compare our data with a theoretical analysis using a commercial software package. Mirror surface error is modeled by treating each surface as a superposition of various gratings (e.g., diamond turning tool marks, features due to the impurities of Al 6061, and periodic mid-frequency errors due to drift during machining).

  1. Imaging performance and modeling of the Infrared Multi-Object Spectrometer focal reducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connelly, Joseph A.; Ohl, Raymond G., IV; Saha, Timo T.; Hadjimichael, Theo; Mentzell, John E.; Mink, Ronald G.; Hylan, Jason E.; Sparr, Leroy M.; Chambers, John; Hagopian, John J.; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Winsor, Robert S.; MacKenty, John W.

    2003-03-01

    The Infrared Multi-Object Spectrometer (IRMOS) is a facility instrument for the Kitt Peak National Observatory 4 and 2.1 meter telescopes. IRMOS is a near-IR (0.8 2.5 μm) spectrometer with low- to mid-resolving power (R = 300 3000). The IRMOS spectrometer produces simultaneous spectra of ~100 objects in its 2.8 x 2.0 arcmin field of view using a commercial MEMS multi-mirror array device (MMA) from Texas Instruments. The IRMOS optical design consists of two imaging subsystems. The focal reducer images the focal plane of the telescope onto the MMA field stop, and the spectrograph images the MMA onto the detector. We describe the breadboard subsystem alignment method and imaging performance of the focal reducer. This testing provides verification of the optomechanical alignment method and a measurement of near-angle scattered light due to mirror small-scale surface error. Interferometric measurements of subsystem wavefront error serve to verify alignment and are accomplished using a commercial, modified Twyman-Green laser unequal path interferometer. Image testing is then performed for the central field point. A mercury-argon pencil lamp provides the spectral line at 546.1 nm, and a CCD camera is the detector. We use the Optical Surface Analysis Code to predict the point-spread function and its effect on instrument slit transmission, and our breadboard test results validate this prediction. Our results show that scattered light from the subsystem and encircled energy is slightly worse than expected. Finally, we perform component level image testing of the MMA, and our results show that scattered light from the MMA is of the same magnitude as that of the focal reducer.

  2. Ambient and Cryogenic Alignment Verification and Performance of the Infrared Multi-Object Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connelly, Joseph A.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Mink, Ronald G.; Mentzell, J. Eric; Saha, Timo T.; Tveekrem, June L.; Hylan, Jason E.; Sparr, Leroy M.; Chambers, V. John; Hagopian, John G.

    2003-01-01

    The Infrared Multi-Object Spectrometer (IRMOS) is a facility instrument for the Kitt Peak National Observatory 4 and 2.1 meter telescopes. IRMOS is a near-IR (0.8 - 2.5 micron) spectrometer with low- to mid-resolving power (R = 300 - 3000). IRMOS produces simultaneous spectra of approximately 100 objects in its 2.8 x 2.0 arc-min field of view using a commercial Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) Digital Micro-mirror Device (DMD) from Texas Instruments. The IRMOS optical design consists of two imaging subsystems. The focal reducer images the focal plane of the telescope onto the DMD field stop, and the spectrograph images the DMD onto the detector. We describe ambient breadboard subsystem alignment and imaging performance of each stage independently, and the ambient and cryogenic imaging performance of the fully assembled instrument. Interferometric measurements of subsystem wavefront error serve to venfy alignment, and are accomplished using a commercial, modified Twyman-Green laser unequal path interferometer. Image testing provides further verification of the optomechanical alignment method and a measurement of near-angle scattered light due to mirror small-scale surface error. Image testing is performed at multiple field points. A mercury-argon pencil lamp provides spectral lines at 546.1 nm and 1550 nm, and a CCD camera and IR camera are used as detectors. We use commercial optical modeling software to predict the point-spread function and its effect on instrument slit transmission and resolution. Our breadboard test results validate this prediction. We conclude with an instrument performance prediction for first light.

  3. Faint Submillimeter Galaxies Behind the Frontier Field Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Li-Yen; Cowie, Lennox; Barger, Amy; Wang, Wei-Hao; Chen, Chian-Chou

    2015-08-01

    Faint submillimeter galaxies are the major contributors to the submillimeter extragalactic background light and hence the dominant star-forming population in the dusty universe. Determining how much these galaxies overlap the optically selected samples is critical to fully account for the cosmic star formation history. To explore this faint submillimeter population, we have been observing nine galaxy clusters with the SCUBA-2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, including five of the clusters in the HST Frontier Fields program. We have also been using the Submillimeter Array to determine the positions of our detected sources precisely. Our recent observations have discovered several high-redshift dusty galaxies with far-infrared luminosities similar to that of the Milky Way or luminous infrared galaxies but which are undetected in current deep radio, optical and near-infrared images. These remarkable results suggest that a substantial amount of star formation in even the faint submillimeter population may be hidden from rest-frame optical surveys.

  4. MID-INFRARED SIZE SURVEY OF YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS: DESCRIPTION OF KECK SEGMENT-TILTING EXPERIMENT AND BASIC RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Monnier, J. D.; Tannirkulam, A.; Tuthill, P. G.; Ireland, M.; Cohen, R.; Perrin, M. D.

    2009-07-20

    The mid-infrared properties of pre-planetary disks are sensitive to the temperature and flaring profiles of disks for the regions where planet formation is expected to occur. In order to constrain theories of planet formation, we have carried out a mid-infrared ({lambda} = 10.7 {mu}m) size survey of young stellar objects using the segmented Keck telescope in a novel configuration. We introduced a customized pattern of tilts to individual mirror segments to allow efficient sparse-aperture interferometry, allowing full aperture synthesis imaging with higher calibration precision than traditional imaging. In contrast to previous surveys on smaller telescopes and with poorer calibration precision, we find that most objects in our sample are partially resolved. Here, we present the main observational results of our survey of five embedded massive protostars, 25 Herbig Ae/Be stars, 3 T Tauri stars, 1 FU Ori system, and five emission-line objects of uncertain classification. The observed mid-infrared sizes do not obey the size-luminosity relation found at near-infrared wavelengths and a companion paper will provide further modeling analysis of this sample. In addition, we report imaging results for a few of the most resolved objects, including complex emission around embedded massive protostars, the photoevaporating circumbinary disk around MWC 361A, and the subarcsecond binaries T Tau, FU Ori, and MWC 1080.

  5. NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF INFRARED-EXCESS STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANT G54.1+0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Koo, Bon-Chul; Moon, Dae-Sik E-mail: koo@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2013-09-01

    We present the results of broadband near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the recently discovered mysterious stellar objects in the young supernova remnant G54.1+0.3. These objects, which show significant mid-infrared-excess emission, are embedded in a diffuse loop structure of {approx}1' in radius. Their near-infrared spectra reveal characteristics of late O- or early B-type stars with numerous H and He I absorption lines, and we classify their spectral types to be between O9 and B2 based on an empirical relation derived here between the equivalent widths of the H lines and stellar photospheric temperatures. The spectral types, combined with the results of spectral energy distribution fits, constrain the distance to the objects to be 6.0 {+-} 0.4 kpc. The photometric spectral types of the objects are consistent with those from the spectroscopic analyses, and the extinction distributions indicate a local enhancement of matter in the western part of the loop. If these objects originate via triggered formation by the progenitor star of G54.1+0.3, then their formations likely began during the later evolutionary stages of the progenitor, although a rather earlier formation may still be possible. If the objects and the progenitor belong to the same cluster of stars, then our results constrain the progenitor mass of G54.1+0.3 to be between 18 and {approx}35 M{sub Sun} and suggest that G54.1+0.3 was either a Type IIP supernova or, with a relatively lower possibility, Type Ib/c from a binary system.

  6. Near-infrared Spectroscopy of Infrared-excess Stellar Objects in the Young Supernova Remnant G54.1+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Koo, Bon-Chul; Moon, Dae-Sik

    2013-09-01

    We present the results of broadband near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the recently discovered mysterious stellar objects in the young supernova remnant G54.1+0.3. These objects, which show significant mid-infrared-excess emission, are embedded in a diffuse loop structure of ~1' in radius. Their near-infrared spectra reveal characteristics of late O- or early B-type stars with numerous H and He I absorption lines, and we classify their spectral types to be between O9 and B2 based on an empirical relation derived here between the equivalent widths of the H lines and stellar photospheric temperatures. The spectral types, combined with the results of spectral energy distribution fits, constrain the distance to the objects to be 6.0 ± 0.4 kpc. The photometric spectral types of the objects are consistent with those from the spectroscopic analyses, and the extinction distributions indicate a local enhancement of matter in the western part of the loop. If these objects originate via triggered formation by the progenitor star of G54.1+0.3, then their formations likely began during the later evolutionary stages of the progenitor, although a rather earlier formation may still be possible. If the objects and the progenitor belong to the same cluster of stars, then our results constrain the progenitor mass of G54.1+0.3 to be between 18 and ~35 M ⊙ and suggest that G54.1+0.3 was either a Type IIP supernova or, with a relatively lower possibility, Type Ib/c from a binary system.

  7. Optical and Near Infrared Study of the Cepheus E Outflow, a Very Low Excitation Object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noreiga-Crespo, A.; Ayala, S.; Garnavich, P.; Curiel, S.; Raga, A.; Bohm, K.; Raymond, J.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we explore the link between the physical properties of the outflow as determined from optical imaging and spectroscopy, and compare these results with those obtained from observations in the near infrared.

  8. YOUNG STELLAR OBJECT SEARCH TOWARD THE BOUNDARY OF THE CENTRAL MOLECULAR ZONE WITH NEAR-INFRARED POLARIMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, Tatsuhito; Nagata, Tetsuya; Nishiyama, Shogo; Kwon, Jungmi; Tamura, Motohide E-mail: nagata@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2014-08-01

    We have carried out near-infrared polarimetry toward the boundary of the Central Molecular Zone, in the field of (–1.°4 ≲ l ≲ –0.°3 and 1.°0 ≲ l ≲ 2.°9, |b| ≲ 0.°1), using the near-infrared polarimetric camera SIRPOL on the 1.4 m Infrared Survey Facility telescope. We have selected 112 intrinsically polarized sources on the basis of the estimate of interstellar polarization on Stokes Q/I – U/I planes. The selected sources are brighter than K{sub S} = 14.5 mag and have polarimetric uncertainty δP < 1%. Ten of these distinctive polarized sources are fit well with spectral energy distributions of young stellar objects when using the photometry in the archive of the Spitzer Space Telescope mid-infrared data. However, many sources have spectral energy distributions of normal stars suffering from heavy interstellar extinction; these might be stars behind dark clouds. Due to the small number of distinctive polarized sources and candidates of young stellar objects, we cannot judge if they are declining in number outside the Central Molecular Zone. Many massive candidates for young stellar objects in the literature have only small intrinsic polarization. This might suggest that their masses are 4-15 M {sub ☉}, whose intrinsic polarization has been expected to be small.

  9. Development of an integral field unit for a near-infrared multi-object imaging spectrograph SWIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Shinobu; Kitagawa, Yutaro; Motohara, Kentaro; Konishi, Masahiro; Takahashi, Hidenori; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Tateuchi, Ken; Kato, Natsuko

    2012-09-01

    We are developing an integral field unit (IFU) for a near-infrared multi-object imaging spectrograph SWIMS (Simultaneous-color Wide-field Infrared Multi-object Spectrograph). SWIMS is an instrument for the 6.5m telescope of the University of Tokyo Atacama Observatory (TAO) project on the summit of Co. Chajnantor (altitude of 5,640m) in northern Chile. Most of near infrared integral field spectrographs (IFSs) on 8-10m class telescopes are used with adaptive optics and have fine spatial sampling. Compared with them, SWIMS IFU has higher sensitivity for extended objects because it has coarser spatial sampling optimized for seeing-limit observations. We have investigated the feasible optical design, and found a possible layout whose field of view is about 14 x 10 arcsec2 with 0.4 arcsec slice width. All IFU mirror arrays will be made of aluminum alloy to match the thermal expansion with support structures, as they are placed in a cryogenic environment. They will be fabricated monolithically with high precision machining to reduce alignment process. We have carried out a fabrication test of a spherical surface and confirmed that surface roughness and surface figure error are enough low for near-infrared light. As a next step, fabrication of a prototype mirror array with 3 reflective surfaces is planned. In this paper, we will show our project outline, the IFU optical design and the results of prototyping works.

  10. Near-Infrared Rotational Variability in Comet-Asteroid Transition Object 944 Hidalgo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campins, Humberto; Licandro, J.; Fernandez, Y.; Hergenrother, C.; Ziffer, J.; Emery, J.; Cruikshank, D.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.

    2006-09-01

    Dynamical arguments indicate that 944 Hidalgo is most likely an extinct or dormant comet. Hidalgo's Tisserand invariant (T = 2.07) suggests strongly that this object came either from the Kuiper belt or the Oort cloud (e.g., Weissman et al. 2002). We obtained low-resolution near-infrared spectra in the 0.8-2.4 micron region on UT Oct 22, 23, Nov 19 and Dec 11, 2004, using the SpeX instrument on NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii (Oct. and Nov.) and the NICS instrument on the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) on La Palma, Spain (Dec.). Our reflectance spectra show a range of slopes. To characterize these slope differences, we normalized each spectrum to 1.0 reflectance at 1.25 microns and measured the reflectance at 2.2 microns. These values are listed in the table for the seven spectra obtained on the two dates when we have temporal coverage, Oct 22 and 23. The uncertainty in each reflectance value is ± 3%. Hidalgo's rotational light curve has a period of 10.06 hours and amplitudes ranging from 0.31 to 0.6 magnitudes in the visible (Harris and Warner 2006, Minor Planet Center). We define the time of our first observation on Oct. 22 as zero rotational phase and give the other six phases in the table. The table shows a systematic temporal variation of the spectral slope consistent with the rotational period. Based on an unpublished visible light curve obtained 10 days earlier (C. Hergenrother personal communication) we determine that one of the small ends of Hidalgo corresponds to our "reddest” spectrum (phase 0.36) while one of the broad sides has the flattest spectrum (phase 0.77).

    Reflectance at 2.2 μm1.261.311.391.36a Faint and Lonely Brown Dwarf in the Solar Vicinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-04-01

    La Silla, each covering a sky area of 5 o.5 x 5 o.5. When comparing plates of the same sky field obtained at time intervals of several years [1] , she was able to detect, among the hundreds of thousands of stellar images on the plates, a few faint ones whose positions had changed a little in the meantime. The search technique is based on the fact that such a shift is a good indicator of the object being relatively nearby. It must therefore also be intrinsically faint, i.e. a potential White Dwarf candidate. On every pair of plates, approximately twenty faint moving objects were detected with proper motions [2] of more than 0.25 arcsec per year. Indeed, follow-up spectroscopic observations showed that about 20 percent of these or about four per plate were White Dwarfs. Until now, a total of forty new White Dwarfs have been discovered during this very successful project, i.e. over ten times more than originally expected. And then - a Brown Dwarf! Caption to ESO PR Photo 11/97 [JPEG, 144k] ESO Press Photo 11/97 When checking two plates with a time inverval of 11 years, Maria Teresa Ruiz earlier this year discovered a very faint object in the southern constellation of Hydra (The Water-Snake), moving at 0.35 arcsec per year (cf. ESO Press Photo 11/97). In order to establish its true nature, she obtained its spectrum (in the visual to near-infrared region from wavelengths 450-1000 nm) on March 15 using the ESO 3.6-m telescope and the EFOSC1 spectrograph. Caption to ESO PR Photo 12/97 [GIF, 35k] ESO Press Photo 12/97 To her great surprise, the spectrum was of a type never seen before and certainly not that of a White Dwarf or any other easily identifiable type of star (cf. ESO Press Photo 12/97). In particular, there were no signs of spectral bands of titanium oxide (TiO) or vanadium oxide (VO) which are common in very cool stars, nor of the spectral lines seen in White Dwarfs. On the other hand, an absorption line of the short-lived element lithium was identified, as well

  11. A Search For Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitzer, P.; Lederer, S.; Barker, E.; Cowardin, H.; Abercromby, K.; Silha, J.; Burkhardt, A.

    2011-09-01

    Existing optical surveys for debris at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) have been conducted with meter class telescopes, which have detection limits in the range of 18th-19th magnitude. We report on a new search for optically faint debris at GEO using the 6.5-m Magellan telescope ‘Walter Baade’ at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Our goal is to go as faint as possible and characterize the brightness distribution of debris fainter than R = 20th magnitude, corresponding to a size smaller than 10 cm assuming an albedo of 0.175. We wish to compare the inferred size distribution for GEO debris with that for LEO debris. We describe preliminary results obtained during 9.4 hours of observing time during 25-27 March 2011. We used the IMACS f/2 instrument, which has a mosaic of 8 CCDs, and a field of view of 30 arc-minutes in diameter. This is the widest field of view of any instrument on either Magellan telescope. All observations were obtained through a Sloan r’ filter. The limiting magnitude for 5 second exposures is measured to be fainter tan R = 21. With this small field of view and the limited observing time, our objective was to search for optically faint objects from the Titan 3C Transtage (1968-081) fragmentation in 1992. Eight debris pieces and the parent rocket body are in the Space Surveillance Network public catalog. We successfully tracked two cataloged pieces of Titan debris (SSN # 25001 and 33519) with the 6.5-m telescope, followed by a survey for objects on similar orbits but with a spread in mean anomaly. To detect bright objects over a wider field of view (1.6x1.6 degrees), we observed the same field centers at the same time through a similar filter with the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. We will describe our experiences using Magellan, a telescope never used previously for orbital debris research, and our initial results.

  12. A Search for Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Lederer, Susan M.; Barker, Edwin S.; Cowardin, Heather; Abercromby, Kira J.; ilha, Jiri

    2011-01-01

    Existing optical surveys for debris at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) have been conducted with meter class telescopes, which have detection limits in the range of 18th-19th magnitude. We report on a new search for optically faint debris at GEO using the 6.5-m Magellan 1 telescope Walter Baade at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Our goal is to go as faint as possible and characterize the brightness distribution of debris fainter than R = 20th magnitude, corresponding to a size smaller than 10 cm assuming an albedo of 0.175. We wish to compare the inferred size distribution for GEO debris with that for LEO debris. We describe results obtained during 9.4 hours of observing time during 25-27 March 2011. We used the IMACS f/2 instrument, which has a mosaic of 8 CCDs, and a field of view of 30 arc-minutes in diameter. This is the widest field of view of any instrument on either Magellan telescope. All observations were obtained through a Sloan r filter. The limiting magnitude for 5 second exposures is estimated to be fainter than 22. With this small field of view and the limited observing time, our objective was to search for optically faint objects from the Titan 3C Transtage (1968-081) fragmentation in 1992. Eight debris pieces and the parent rocket body are in the Space Surveillance Network public catalog. We successfully tracked two cataloged pieces of Titan debris (SSN # 25001 and 33519) with the 6.5-m telescope, followed by a survey for objects on similar orbits but with a spread in mean anomaly. To detect bright objects over a wider field of view (1.6x1.6 degrees), we observed the same field centers at the same time through a similar filter with the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. We will describe our experiences using Magellan, a telescope never used previously for orbital debris research, and our initial results.

  13. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... severely dehydrated ) Standing up very suddenly from a lying position Less common but more serious reasons for ... avoid or change them. Get up from a lying or seated position slowly. If having blood drawn ...

  14. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... kids: drink plenty of fluids, especially in hot weather or during physical activity take frequent breaks and move around as much as possible when sitting or standing for long periods of time slowly breathe into a paper bag ... Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart. ...

  15. Faintness

    MedlinePlus

    ... decisions about when and where they should receive healthcare. Unfortunately, most people lack the medical knowledge needed to make these decisions safely. FreeMD.com is powered by a computer program that performs symptom triage. The goal of ...

  16. Detection of buried objects by fusing dual-band infrared images

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G.A.; Sengupta, S.K.; Sherwood, R.J.; Buhl, M.R.; Schaich, P.C.; Kane, R.J.; Barth, M.J.; Fields, D.J.; Carter, M.R.

    1993-11-01

    We have conducted experiments to demonstrate the enhanced detectability of buried land mines using sensor fusion techniques. Multiple sensors, including visible imagery, infrared imagery, and ground penetrating radar (GPR), have been used to acquire data on a number of buried mines and mine surrogates. Because the visible wavelength and GPR data are currently incomplete. This paper focuses on the fusion of two-band infrared images. We use feature-level fusion and supervised learning with the probabilistic neural network (PNN) to evaluate detection performance. The novelty of the work lies in the application of advanced target recognition algorithms, the fusion of dual-band infrared images and evaluation of the techniques using two real data sets.

  17. Recursive estimation techniques for detection of small objects in infrared image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidler, J. R.; Soni, T.; Ku, W. H.

    1992-04-01

    This paper describes a recursive detection scheme for point targets in infrared (IR) images. Estimation of the background noise is done using a weighted autocorrelation matrix update method and the detection statistic is calculated using a recursive technique. A weighting factor allows the algorithm to have finite memory and deal with nonstationary noise characteristics. The detection statistic is created by using a matched filter for colored noise, using the estimated noise autocorrelation matrix. The relationship between the weighting factor, the nonstationarity of the noise and the probability of detection is described. Some results on one- and two-dimensional infrared images are presented.

  18. A near-infrared spectroscopic survey of massive jets towards extended green objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caratti o Garatti, A.; Stecklum, B.; Linz, H.; Garcia Lopez, R.; Sanna, A.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Protostellar jets and outflows are the main outcome of the star formation process, and their analysis can provide us with major clues about the ejection and accretion history of young stellar objects (YSOs). Aims: We aim at deriving the main physical properties of massive jets from near-infrared (NIR) observations, comparing them to those of a large sample of jets from low-mass YSOs, and relating them to the main features of their driving sources. Methods: We present a NIR imaging (H2 and Ks) and low-resolution spectroscopic (0.95-2.50 μm) survey of 18 massive jets towards GLIMPSE extended green objects (EGOs), driven by intermediate- and high-mass YSOs, which have bolometric luminosities (Lbol) between 4 × 102 and 1.3 × 105 L⊙. Results: As in low-mass jets, H2 is the primary NIR coolant, detected in all the analysed flows, whereas the most important ionic tracer is [Fe ii], detected in half of the sampled jets. Our analysis indicates that the emission lines originate from shocks at high temperatures and densities. No fluorescent emission is detected along the flows, regardless of the source bolometric luminosity. On average, the physical parameters of these massive jets (i.e. visual extinction, temperature, column density, mass, and luminosity) have higher values than those measured in their low-mass counterparts. The morphology of the H2 flows is varied, mostly depending on the complex, dynamic, and inhomogeneous environment in which these massive jets form and propagate. All flows and jets in our sample are collimated, showing large precession angles. Additionally, the presence of both knots and jets suggests that the ejection process is continuous with burst episodes, as in low-mass YSOs. We compare the flow H2 luminosity with the source bolometric luminosity confirming the tight correlation between these two quantities. Five sources, however, display a lower LH2/Lbol efficiency, which might be related to YSO evolution. Most important, the

  19. Searching for Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Lederer, Susan M.; Abercromby, Kira J.; Barker, Edwin S.; Burkhardt, Andrew; Cowardin, Heather; Krisko, Paula; Silha, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    We report on results from a search for optically faint debris (defined as R > 20th magnitude, or smaller than 10 cm assuming an albedo of 0.175)) at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) using the 6.5-m Magellan telescope "Walter Baade" at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Our goal is to characterize the brightness distribution of debris to the faintest limiting magnitude possible. Our data was obtained during 6 hours of observing time during the photometric nights of 26 and 27 March 2011 with the IMACS f/2 instrument, which has a field of view (fov) of 0.5 degrees in diameter. All observations were obtained through a Sloan r filter, and calibrated by observations of Landolt standard stars. Our primary objective was to search for optically faint objects from one of the few known fragmentations at GEO: the Titan 3C Transtage (1968-081) fragmentation in 1992. Eight debris pieces and the parent rocket body are in the Space Surveillance Network public catalog. We successfully tracked two cataloged pieces of Titan debris with the 6.5-m telescope, followed by a survey for unknown objects on similar orbits but with different mean anomalies. To establish the bright end of the debris population, calibrated observations were acquired on the same field centers, telescope rates, and time period with a similar filter on the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. We will show the calibrated brightness distributions from both telescopes, and compare the observed brightness distributions with that predicted for various population models of debris of different sizes.

    1. Wide-field infrared survey explorer observations of young stellar objects in the Lynds 1509 dark cloud in Auriga

      SciTech Connect

      Liu, Wilson M.; McCollum, Bruce; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Padgett, Deborah L.; Terebey, Susan; Angione, John; Rebull, Luisa M.; Leisawitz, David

      2014-06-01

      The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has uncovered a striking cluster of young stellar object (YSO) candidates associated with the L1509 dark cloud in Auriga. The WISE observations, at 3.4 μm, 4.6 μm, 12 μm, and 22 μm, show a number of objects with colors consistent with YSOs, and their spectral energy distributions suggest the presence of circumstellar dust emission, including numerous Class I, flat spectrum, and Class II objects. In general, the YSOs in L1509 are much more tightly clustered than YSOs in other dark clouds in the Taurus-Auriga star forming region, with Class I and flat spectrum objects confined to the densest aggregates, and Class II objects more sparsely distributed. We estimate a most probable distance of 485-700 pc, and possibly as far as the previously estimated distance of 2 kpc.

    2. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of Young Stellar Objects in the Lynds 1509 Dark Cloud in Auriga

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Liu, Wilson M.; Padgett, Deborah L.; Terebey, Susan; Angione, John; Rebull, Luisa M.; McCollum, Bruce; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Leisawitz, David

      2015-01-01

      The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has uncovered a striking cluster of young stellar object (YSO) candidates associated with the L1509 dark cloud in Auriga. The WISE observations, at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 microns, show a number of objects with colors consistent with YSOs, and their spectral energy distributions suggest the presence of circumstellar dust emission, including numerous Class I, flat spectrum, and Class II objects. In general, the YSOs in L1509 are much more tightly clustered than YSOs in other dark clouds in the Taurus-Auriga star forming region, with Class I and flat spectrum objects confined to the densest aggregates, and Class II objects more sparsely distributed. We estimate a most probable distance of 485-700 pc, and possibly as far as the previously estimated distance of 2 kpc.

    3. Investigation of Variability of Faint Galactic Early-Type Carbon Stars from the First Byurakan Spectral Sky Survey

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Gigoyan, K. S.; Kostandyan, G. R.; Paronyan, G. M.

      2016-06-01

      In this poster, we discuss the nature of 66 faint carbon (C) stars which have been discovered by scrutinizing the plates of the First Byurakan Survey (FBS). These plates display low-resolution spectra of objects located at high Galactic latitudes and have a limiting magnitude of about V=16. Our sample of 66 confirmed spectroscopically to be C stars. These 66 objects are those which show early-type spectra. To better characterize these objects, medium-resolution CCD spectra were obtained and are exploited for them all, together with consideration of their 2MASS near-infrared (NIR) colors and their optical variability. We derive effective temperatures from photometry. Finally, the optical variability of our objects are studied by using the data of the Catalina Sky Survey (CSS). It is found that the vast majority does not display variability. However, for some of them, the phased light curve may indicate the presence of a secondary component.

    4. Near infrared photographic sky survey. 1: Catalog of red stellar objects

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Craine, E. R.; Duerr, R. E.; Horner, V. M.; Imhoff, C. L.; Routsis, D. E.; Swihart, D. L.; Turnshek, D. A.

      1979-01-01

      Red stellar objects for which V-1 was greater than a value of about 2 (supm). 5 were extracted from photographs of 23 program fields. Tabular data for each field show the object name; the 1950 epoch right ascension, declination, galactic longitude, galactic latitude; radial distance from field venter in decimal degrees; color classes; and objects ordered by redness.

    5. Spectral Indices of Faint Radio Sources

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Gim, Hansung B.; Hales, Christopher A.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Yun, Min Su

      2015-01-01

      The significant improvement in bandwidth and the resultant sensitivity offered by the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) allows us to explore the faint radio source population. Through the study of the radio continuum we can explore the spectral indices of these radio sources. Robust radio spectral indices are needed for accurate k-corrections, for example in the study of the radio - far-infrared (FIR) correlation. We present an analysis of measuring spectral indices using two different approaches. In the first, we use the standard wideband imaging algorithm in the data reduction package CASA. In the second, we use a traditional approach of imaging narrower bandwidths to derive the spectral indices. For these, we simulated data to match the observing parameter space of the CHILES Con Pol survey (Hales et al. 2014). We investigate the accuracy and precision of spectral index measurements as a function of signal-to noise, and explore the requirements to reliably probe possible evolution of the radio-FIR correlation in CHILES Con Pol.

    6. High-sensitivity, and cost-effective system for infrared imaging of concealed objects in dynamic mode.

      SciTech Connect

      Gordiyenko, E.; Yefremenko, V.; Pearson, J.; Bader, S.; Novosad, V.; Materials Science Division

      2005-08-05

      Novel, cost-efficient, and highly-sensitive IR imaging systems play an important role in homeland security functions. Technical limitations in the areas of sensitivity, contrast ratio, bandwidth and cost continue to constrain imaging capabilities. We have designed and prototyped a compact computer-piloted high sensitivity infrared imaging system. The device consists of infrared optics, cryostat, low-noise pre-amplifier, Analog-to-Digital hardware, feedback electronics, and unique image processing software. Important advantages of the developed system are: (i) Eight electronic channels are available for simultaneous registration of IR and visible images in multiple spectral ranges, (ii) Capability of real-time analysis such as comparing the 'sensed' image with 'reference' images from a database, (iii) High accuracy temperature measurement of multiple points on the image by referencing the radiation intensity from the object to a black body model, (iv) Image generation by real-time integration of images from multiple sensors operating from the visible to the terahertz range. The device was tested with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled, single-pixel HgCdTe detector for imaging in 8-12 microns range. The demonstrated examples of infrared imaging of concealed objects in static and dynamic modes include a hammer (metal head and wooden handle), plastic imitator of handguns hidden under clothes, powder in an envelope, and revealing complex wall structures under decorative plaster.

    7. The ISO-IRAS Faint Galaxy Survey

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Smith, Harding E.

      1999-01-01

      As part of the ISO-IRAS Faint Galaxy Survey ISO Satellite observations of over 600 IRAS sources have been obtained with the ISOCAM instrument. Because our survey strategy involved relatively short integrations, great care was required in developing analysis software including cosmic-ray and transient removal and calibration. These observations have now been through final pipeline processing at IPAC and ground-based follow-up is ongoing. The observations are for sources from two samples: a " Filler' sample selected to be at z greater than 0.1 and a fainter sample which selected for the highest redshift galaxies in the IRAS survey, with redshifts 0.2 less than z less than 1.0. I now have obtained ground-based follow-up spectrophotometry at Lick and Palomar observatories for 100 LFIRGs with 0.1 less than z less than 0.7. Our observations have confirmed that these systems are comparable to nearby LFIRGs such as Arp 220, with L (sub -)(fir) greater than 10(exp 11) L(sub -) sun and typically HII/Liner optical excitation. About 10% of the galaxies show true AGN (Sy2) excitation. Based on our work on a nearby complete sample of LFIRGS, we believe that the majority of these systems are luminous Starbursts, thus this project is tracing the luminous end of the galaxy star-forming luminosity function - the (infrared) star-formation history of the Universe to z approx. 1, a topic of some considerable recent interest. A by-product of these ISOCAM observations is approximately 1 square degree of deep 2 microns pointings outside the IRAS error boxes, allowing us an independent estimate of the mid-infrared log N - log S relation. Ground-based observations of this sample are continuing.

    8. Object detection utilizing a linear retrieval algorithm for thermal infrared imagery

      SciTech Connect

      Ramsey, M.S.

      1996-11-01

      Thermal infrared (TIR) spectroscopy and remote sensing have been proven to be extremely valuable tools for mineralogic discrimination. One technique for sub-pixel detection and data reduction, known as a spectral retrieval or unmixing algorithm, will prove useful in the analysis of data from scheduled TIR orbital instruments. This study represents the first quantitative attempt to identify the limits of the model, specifically concentrating on the TIR. The algorithm was written and applied to laboratory data, testing the effects of particle size, noise, and multiple endmembers, then adapted to operate on airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner data of the Kelso Dunes, CA, Meteor Crater, AZ, and Medicine Lake Volcano, CA. Results indicate that linear spectral unmixmg can produce accurate endmember detection to within an average of 5%. In addition, the effects of vitrification and textural variations were modeled. The ability to predict mineral or rock abundances becomes extremely useful in tracking sediment transport, decertification, and potential hazard assessment in remote volcanic regions. 26 refs., 3 figs.

    9. Small object detection in forward-looking infrared images with sea clutter using context-driven Bayesian saliency model

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Yu, Jin-Gang; Xia, Gui-Song; Deng, Jianjin; Tian, Jinwen

      2015-11-01

      There are two common challenges for small object detection in forward-looking infrared (FLIR) images with sea clutter, namely, detection ambiguity and scale variance. This paper presents a context-driven Bayesian saliency model to deal with these two issues. By inspecting the camera geometry of the FLIR imaging under the background of sea and sky, we observed that there exists dependency relationship between the locations and scales at which objects may occur, and the context which is defined to be the location of horizon line. Based on this observation, we propose to incorporate contextual information into the basic bottom-up saliency computation, and a unified Bayesian model is developed to achieve this goal. The proposed model is generic and can be potentially applied to other circumstances where context is available for facilitating object detection. Experimental results have demonstrated the effectiveness of our method.

    10. Responses of infrared-sensitive tectal units of the pit viper Crotalus atrox to moving objects.

      PubMed

      Kaldenbach, Felix; Bleckmann, Horst; Kohl, Tobias

      2016-06-01

      Rattlesnakes perceive IR radiation with their pit organs. This enables them to detect and strike towards warm-blooded prey even in the dark. In addition, the IR sense allows rattlesnakes to find places for thermoregulation. Animate objects (e.g., prey) tend to move and thus cause moving IR images across the pit membrane. Even when an object is stationary, scanning head movements of rattlesnakes will result in moving IR images across the pit membrane. We recorded the neuronal activity of IR-sensitive tectal neurons of the rattlesnake Crotalus atrox while stimulating the snakes with an IR source that moved horizontally at various velocities. As long as object velocity was low (angular velocity of ~5°/s) IR-sensitive tectal neurons hardly showed any responses. With increasing object velocity though, neuronal activity reached a maximum at ~50°/s. A further increase in object velocity up to ~120°/s resulted in a slight decrease of neuronal activity. Our results demonstrate the importance of moving stimuli for the snake's IR detection abilities: in contrast to fast moving objects, stationary or slowly moving objects will not be detected when the snake is motionless, but might be detected by scanning head movements. PMID:26906281

    11. Detection of Optically Faint GEO Debris

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Seitzer, P.; Lederer, S.; Barker, E.; Cowardin, H.; Abercromby, K.; Silha, J.; Burkhardt, A.

      2014-01-01

      There have been extensive optical surveys for debris at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) conducted with meter-class telescopes, such as those conducted with MODEST (the Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope, a 0.6-m telescope located at Cerro Tololo in Chile), and the European Space Agency's 1.0-m space debris telescope (SDT) in the Canary Islands. These surveys have detection limits in the range of 18th or 19th magnitude, which corresponds to sizes larger than 10 cm assuming an albedo of 0.175. All of these surveys reveal a substantial population of objects fainter than R = 15th magnitude that are not in the public U.S. Satellite Catalog. To detect objects fainter than 20th magnitude (and presumably smaller than 10 cm) in the visible requires a larger telescope and excellent imaging conditions. This combination is available in Chile. NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office has begun collecting orbital debris observations with the 6.5-m (21.3-ft diameter) "Walter Baade" Magellan telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. The goal is to detect objects as faint as possible from a ground-based observatory and begin to understand the brightness distribution of GEO debris fainter than R = 20th magnitude.

    12. The faint end of the galaxy luminosity function

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Treyer, Marie A.; Silk, Joseph

      1994-01-01

      The evolution of the B- and K-band luminosity functions of galaxies is inferred in a relatively model-independent way from deep spectroscopic and photometric surveys. We confirm earlier evidence by Eales for an increase in the amplitude of the B-band galaxy luminosity function at modest redshift (z less than or approx. 0.2). We find in addition that the slope of the faint end of the luminosity function must systematically steepen and progress toward more luminous galaxies with increasing lookback time, assuming that the galaxy redshift distribution may be smoothly extrapolated 2 mag fainter than observed, as suggested by recent gravitational lensing studies. This evolution is shown to be color-dependent, and we predict the near-infrared color distribution of faint galaxies. The luminosity function of blue (B - K less than or approx. 4) galaxies in the range 0.2 less than or approx. z less than or approx. 1 can be represented by a Schechter function with characteristic light density phi(sup *) L(sup *) comparable to that of present-day late-type galaxies, but with a steeper faint end slope alpha approx. 1.4.

    13. Using near-infrared spectroscopy to assess neural activation during object processing in infants.

      PubMed

      Wilcox, Teresa; Bortfeld, Heather; Woods, Rebecca; Wruck, Eric; Boas, David A

      2005-01-01

      The capacity to represent the world in terms of numerically distinct objects (i.e., object individuation) is a milestone in early cognitive development and forms the foundation for more complex thought and behavior. Over the past 10 to 15 yr, infant researchers have expended a great deal of effort to identify the origins and development of this capacity. In contrast, relatively little is known about the neural mechanisms that underlie the ability to individuate objects, in large part because there are a limited number of noninvasive techniques available to measure brain functioning in human infants. Recent research suggests that near-IR spectroscopy (NIRS), an optical imaging technique that uses relative changes in total hemoglobin concentration and oxygenation as an indicator of neural activation, may be a viable procedure for assessing the relation between object processing and brain function in human infants. We examine the extent to which increased neural activation, as measured by NIRS, could be observed in two neural areas known to be involved in object processing, the primary visual cortex and the inferior temporal cortex, during an object processing task. Infants aged 6.5 months are presented with a visual event in which two featurally distinct objects emerge successively to opposite sides of an occluder and neuroimaging data are collected. As predicted, increased neural activation is observed in both the primary visual and inferior cortex during the visual event, suggesting that these neural areas support object processing in the young infant. The outcome has important implications for research in cognitive development, developmental neuroscience, and optical imaging. PMID:15847576

    14. Infrared

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Vollmer, M.

      2013-11-01

      'Infrared' is a very wide field in physics and the natural sciences which has evolved enormously in recent decades. It all started in 1800 with Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel's discovery of infrared (IR) radiation within the spectrum of the Sun. Thereafter a few important milestones towards widespread use of IR were the quantitative description of the laws of blackbody radiation by Max Planck in 1900; the application of quantum mechanics to understand the rotational-vibrational spectra of molecules starting in the first half of the 20th century; and the revolution in source and detector technologies due to micro-technological breakthroughs towards the end of the 20th century. This has led to much high-quality and sophisticated equipment in terms of detectors, sources and instruments in the IR spectral range, with a multitude of different applications in science and technology. This special issue tries to focus on a few aspects of the astonishing variety of different disciplines, techniques and applications concerning the general topic of infrared radiation. Part of the content is based upon an interdisciplinary international conference on the topic held in 2012 in Bad Honnef, Germany. It is hoped that the information provided here may be useful for teaching the general topic of electromagnetic radiation in the IR spectral range in advanced university courses for postgraduate students. In the most general terms, the infrared spectral range is defined to extend from wavelengths of 780 nm (upper range of the VIS spectral range) up to wavelengths of 1 mm (lower end of the microwave range). Various definitions of near, middle and far infrared or thermal infrared, and lately terahertz frequencies, are used, which all fall in this range. These special definitions often depend on the scientific field of research. Unfortunately, many of these fields seem to have developed independently from neighbouring disciplines, although they deal with very similar topics in respect of the

    15. HUBBLE'S SEARCH FOR FAINT FIELD STARS IN GALACTIC HALO

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      2002-01-01

      Left A NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of a randomly selected area of sky taken to search for faint red stars that might constitute dark matter in our Milky Way Galaxy. (Dark matter is material of an unknown type that makes up most of the mass of our galaxy). If the dark matter in our Galaxy was made of faint red stars -- as many scientists have previously conjectured -- then about 38 such stars should have been visible in this HST image. The simulated stars (diamond-shaped symbols), based on theoretical calculations, illustrate what scientists would have seen if the dark matter were locked-up in faint red stars. These surprising results rule out dim stars as an explanation for dark matter in our Galaxy. Right The unmodified HST image shows the region is actually so devoid of stars that far more distant background galaxies can easily be seen. The field is in the constellation Eridanus, far outside the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy. This region was chosen to highlight stars in the galactic halo, where dark matter exists, and to avoid the contribution of faint stars in the plane of the Galaxy. Technical Information: The image was constructed from seven exposures totaling almost three hours of searching by HST. The field shown is about 1.5 arc-minutes across. The image was taken in near-infrared light (814 nm) with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, on Feb 8, 1994. This observation is part of the HST parallel observing program. Credit: J Bahcall, Institute for Advance Study, Princeton and NASA

    16. Visible and infrared investigations of planet-crossing asteroids and outer solar system objects

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Tholen, David J.

      1991-01-01

      The project is supporting lightcurve photometry, colorimetry, thermal radiometry, and astrometry of selected asteroids. Targets include the planet-crossing population, particularly Earth approachers, which are believed to be the immediate source of terrestrial meteorites, future spacecraft targets, and those objects in the outer belt, primarily the Hilda and Trojan populations, that are dynamically isolated from the main asteroid belt. Goals include the determination of population statistics for the planet-crossing objects, the characterization of spacecraft targets to assist in encounter planning and subsequent interpretation of the data, a comparison of the collisional evolution of dynamically isolated Hilda and Trojan populations with the main belt, and the determination of the mechanism driving the activity of the distant object 2060 Chiron.

    17. Functional connectivity in the prefrontal cortex measured by near-infrared spectroscopy during ultrarapid object recognition

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Medvedev, Andrei V.; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Borisov, Sergey V.; Vanmeter, John

      2011-01-01

      Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a developing technology for low-cost noninvasive functional brain imaging. With multichannel optical instruments, it becomes possible to measure not only local changes in hemoglobin concentrations but also temporal correlations of those changes in different brain regions which gives an optical analog of functional connectivity traditionally measured by fMRI. We recorded hemodynamic activity during the Go-NoGo task from 11 right-handed subjects with probes placed bilaterally over prefrontal areas. Subjects were detecting animals as targets in natural scenes pressing a mouse button. Data were low-pass filtered <1 Hz and cardiac/respiration/superficial layers artifacts were removed using Independent Component Analysis. Fisher's transformed correlations of poststimulus responses (30 s) were averaged over groups of channels unilaterally in each hemisphere (intrahemispheric connectivity) and the corresponding channels between hemispheres (interhemispheric connectivity). The hemodynamic response showed task-related activation (an increase/decrease in oxygenated/deoxygenated hemoglobin, respectively) greater in the right versus left hemisphere. Intra- and interhemispheric functional connectivity was also significantly stronger during the task compared to baseline. Functional connectivity between the inferior and the middle frontal regions was significantly stronger in the right hemisphere. Our results demonstrate that optical methods can be used to detect transient changes in functional connectivity during rapid cognitive processes.

    18. Quantifying the Infrared Spectra of Icy Methanol - A New Investigation for Solar System Objects

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Hudson, Reggie L.; Tway, Tatiana; Gerakines, Perry

      2015-11-01

      The presence and abundances of organic molecules in extraterrestrial settings, such as on TNOs, can be determined using infrared (IR) spectroscopy, but significant challenges exist. Although reference IR spectra for organics under relevant conditions are vital for such work, for many molecules the data needed either do not exist or exist only in fragmentary form. In this presentation we describe new laboratory results for a three-element molecule, methanol (CH3OH), which has been reported to be present in planetary and interstellar ices. Near- and mid-IR spectra at various ice thicknesses and temperatures are presented, band strengths are calculated, and optical constants are derived. Results are compared to those of earlier workers, the influence of assumptions found in the literature is explored, and possible revisions to the literature are described. Although IR spectra of solid CH3OH has been reported by many low-temperature laboratory-astrochemistry groups over the past 25 - 30 years, our work appears to be the first that aims to determine the densities, refractive indices, and resulting mid-IR band strengths and optical constants of both the amorphous and crystalline phases of methanol. The majority of the laboratory work in this project was done by Tatiana Tway, who was supported by a summer internship through the DREAM2 program, which in turn is supported by a grant from NASA’s SSERVI program.

    19. Scientific objectives and selection of targets for the SMART-1 Infrared Spectrometer (SIR)

      USGS Publications Warehouse

      Basilevsky, A.T.; Keller, H.U.; Nathues, A.; Mall, U.; Hiesinger, H.; Rosiek, M.

      2004-01-01

      The European SMART-1 mission to the Moon, primarily a testbed for innovative technologies, was launched in September 2003 and will reach the Moon in 2005. On board are several scientific instruments, including the point-spectrometer SMART-1 Infrared Spectrometer (SIR). Taking into account the capabilities of the SMART-1 mission and the SIR instrument in particular, as well as the open questions in lunar science, a selection of targets for SIR observations has been compiled. SIR can address at least five topics: (1) Surface/regolith processes; (2) Lunar volcanism; (3) Lunar crust structure; (4) Search for spectral signatures of ices at the lunar poles; and (5) Ground truth and study of geometric effects on the spectral shape. For each topic we will discuss specific observation modes, necessary to achieve our scientific goals. The majority of SIR targets will be observed in the nadir-tracking mode. More than 100 targets, which require off-nadir pointing and off-nadir tracking, are planned. It is expected that results of SIR observations will significantly increase our understanding of the Moon. Since the exact arrival date and the orbital parameters of the SMART-1 spacecraft are not known yet, a more detailed planning of the scientific observations will follow in the near future. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    20. The infrared moving object detection and security detection related algorithms based on W4 and frame difference

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Yin, Jiale; Liu, Lei; Li, He; Liu, Qiankun

      2016-07-01

      This paper presents the infrared moving object detection and security detection related algorithms in video surveillance based on the classical W4 and frame difference algorithm. Classical W4 algorithm is one of the powerful background subtraction algorithms applying to infrared images which can accurately, integrally and quickly detect moving object. However, the classical W4 algorithm can only overcome the deficiency in the slight movement of background. The error will become bigger and bigger for long-term surveillance system since the background model is unchanged once established. In this paper, we present the detection algorithm based on the classical W4 and frame difference. It cannot only overcome the shortcoming of falsely detecting because of state mutations from background, but also eliminate holes caused by frame difference. Based on these we further design various security detection related algorithms such as illegal intrusion alarm, illegal persistence alarm and illegal displacement alarm. We compare our method with the classical W4, frame difference, and other state-of-the-art methods. Experiments detailed in this paper show the method proposed in this paper outperforms the classical W4 and frame difference and serves well for the security detection related algorithms.

    1. Massive Young Stellar Object W42-MME: the Discovery of an Infrared Jet Using VLT/NACO Near-infrared Images

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Dewangan, L. K.; Mayya, Y. D.; Luna, A.; Ojha, D. K.

      2015-04-01

      We report on the discovery of an infrared jet from a deeply embedded infrared counterpart of the 6.7 GHz methanol maser emission (MME) in W42 (i.e., W42-MME). We show that W42-MME drives a parsec-scale H2 outflow, with the detection of a bow shock feature at ˜0.52 pc to the north. The inner ˜0.4 pc part of the H2 outflow has a position angle of ˜18° and the position angle of ˜40° is found farther away on either side of the outflow from W42-MME. W42-MME is detected at wavelengths longer than 2.2 μm and is a massive young stellar object with an estimated stellar mass of 19 ± 4 {{M}⊙ }. We map the inner circumstellar environment of W42-MME using Very Large Telescope (VLT)/NACO adaptive optics Ks and L‧ observations at resolutions of ˜0.″ 2 and ˜0.″1, respectively. We discover a collimated jet in the inner 4500 AU using the L‧ band, which contains prominent Brα line emission. The jet is located inside an envelope/cavity (extent ˜10,640 AU) that is tapered at both ends and is oriented along the north-south direction. Such observed morphology of the outflow cavity around the massive star is scarcely known and is very crucial for understanding the jet-outflow formation process in massive star formation. Along the flow axis, which is parallel to the previously known magnetic field, two blobs are found in both the NACO images at distances of ˜11800 AU, located symmetrically from W42-MME. The observed W42-MME jet-outflow configuration can be used to constrain the jet launching and jet collimation models in massive star formation.

    2. High-resolution reconstruction of objects from cloud-covered infrared images

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Wang, Jing; Ralph, Jason F.; Goulermas, John Y.

      2009-05-01

      FLIR images are essential for the detection and recognition of ground targets. Small targets can be enhanced using super-resolution techniques to improve the effective resolution of the target area using a sequence of low-resolution images. However, when there is significant cloud cover, several problems can arise: clouds can obscure a target (partially or fully), they can affect the accuracy of image registration algorithms, and they can reduce the contrast of the object against the background. To reconstruct an image in the presence of cloud cover, image correlation metrics from optical flow and a robust super-resolution algorithm have been used to compile a 'best' frame.

    3. The gas environment of the young stellar object GL 2591 studied by infrared spectroscopy

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Mitchell, George F.; Curry, Charles; Maillard, Jean-Pierre; Allen, Mark

      1989-01-01

      High-resolution M band (4.6 microns) spectroscopy of GL 2591 is presented. Physical structures noted include an absorption feature with an outflow velocity of about 17 km/s, cold gas (identified with the core of the molecular cloud within which the object is embedded), and very broad C-12O lines formed in a neutral wind. The detection of hot low-velocity gas together with warm high-velocity gas suggests the scenario of a warm neutral wind accelerating from an accretion disk.

    4. The gas environment of the young stellar object GL 2591 studied by infrared spectroscopy

      SciTech Connect

      Mitchell, G.F.; Curry, C.; Maillard, J.; Allen, M.; CNR, Institut d'Astrophysique, Paris; California Institute of Technology, Pasadena )

      1989-06-01

      High-resolution M band (4.6 microns) spectroscopy of GL 2591 is presented. Physical structures noted include an absorption feature with an outflow velocity of about 17 km/s, cold gas (identified with the core of the molecular cloud within which the object is embedded), and very broad C-12O lines formed in a neutral wind. The detection of hot low-velocity gas together with warm high-velocity gas suggests the scenario of a warm neutral wind accelerating from an accretion disk. 32 refs.

    5. Infrared and Radio Observations of a Small Group of Protostellar Objects in the Molecular Core, L1251-C

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Kim, Jungha; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Choi, Minho; Bourke, Tyler L.; Evans, Neal J., II; Di Francesco, James; Cieza, Lucas A.; Dunham, Michael M.; Kang, Miju

      2015-05-01

      We present a multi-wavelength observational study of a low-mass star-forming region, L1251-C, with observational results at wavelengths from the near-infrared to the millimeter. Spitzer Space Telescope observations confirmed that IRAS 22343+7501 is a small group of protostellar objects. The extended emission in the east-west direction with its intensity peak at the center of L1251A has been detected at 350 and 850 μm with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory and James Clerk Maxwell telescopes, tracing dense envelope material around L1251A. The single-dish data from the Korean VLBI Network and TRAO telescopes show inconsistencies between the intensity peaks of several molecular emission lines and that of the continuum emission, suggesting complex distributions of molecular abundances around L1251A. The Submillimeter Array interferometer data, however, show intensity peaks of CO 2-1 and 13CO 2-1 located at the position of IRS 1, which is both the brightest source in the Infrared Array Camera image and the weakest source in the 1.3 mm dust-continuum map. IRS 1 is the strongest candidate for the driving source of the newly detected compact CO 2-1 outflow. Over the entire region (14‧ × 14‧) of L125l-C, 3 Class I and 16 Class II sources have been detected, including three young stellar objects (YSOs) in L1251A. A comparison between the average projected distance among the 19 YSOs in L1251-C and that among the 3 YSOs in L1251A suggests that L1251-C is an example of low-mass cluster formation where protostellar objects form in a small group.

    6. Algorithms for Planning Multi-Object Spectroscopy Observations with the JWST Near-Infrared Spectrograph

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Karakla, Diane M.; Pontoppidan, K.; Shyrokov, A.; Beck, T. L.; Valenti, J. A.; Soderblom, D. R.; Tumlinson, J.; Muzerolle, J.

      2014-01-01

      Planning observations for the JWST NIRSpec Multi-Object Spectroscopy will be complex because of the fixed-grid nature of the Micro-Shutter Arrays (MSAs) used for this instrument mode. Two algorithms have been incorporated into the 'MSA Planning Tool' (MPT) in the Astronomers Proposal Tools (APT) for this NIRSpec observation planning process. The 'Basic Algorithm' and the 'Constrained Algorithm' both determine a set of on-sky pointing positions which yield an optimal number of science sources observed per MSA shutter configuration, but these algorithms have different strategies for generating their observing plans. The Basic algorithm uses a defined set of fixed dithers specified by the observer, while the Constrained algorithm can more flexibly define dithers by merely constraining offsets from one pointing position to the next. Each algorithm offers advantages for different observing cases. This poster describes the two algorithms and their products, and clarifies observing cases where clear planning advantages are offered by each.

    7. Multi-Object Spectroscopy with the James Webb Space Telescope’s Near Infrared Spectrograph: Observing Resolved Stellar Populations

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Gilbert, Karoline; Karakla, Diane M.; Beck, Tracy

      2015-08-01

      The James Webb Space Telescope’s (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) will provide a multi-object spectroscopy mode through the four Micro-Shutter Arrays (MSAs). Each MSA is a grid of contiguous shutters that can be configured to form slits on more than 100 astronomical targets simultaneously. The combination of JWST’s sensitivity and superb resolution in the infrared and NIRSpec’s full wavelength coverage from 0.6 to 5 μm will open new parameter space for studies of galaxies and resolved stellar populations alike. We describe a NIRSpec MSA observing scenario for obtaining spectroscopy of individual stars in an external galaxy, and investigate the technical challenges posed by this scenario. We examine the multiplexing capability of the MSA as a function of the possible MSA configuration design choices, and investigate the primary sources of error in velocity measurements and the prospects for minimizing them. We give examples of how this and other use cases are guiding development of the NIRSpec user interfaces, including proposal planning and pipeline calibrations.

    8. Near-infrared spectra of ISO selected Chamaeleon I young stellar objects

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Gómez, M.; Persi, P.

      2002-07-01

      We present 0.95-2.5 mu m moderate (R ~ 500) resolution spectra of 19 ISOCAM detected sources in the Chamaeleon I dark cloud. Thirteen of these stars are candidate very low mass members of the cloud proposed by Persi et al. (\\cite{per00}) on basis of the mid-IR color excess. The sample also includes a bona-fide young brown dwarf (Cha Hα 1), a transition - stellar/sub-stellar - object (Cha Hα 2), one previously known T Tauri star (Sz 33) and three ISOCAM sources with no mid-IR excess. The spectra of the mid-IR color excess sources are relatively flat and featureless in this wavelength range. Both atomic and molecular lines (when in absorption) are partially veiled suggesting the presence of continuum emission from circumstellar dust. In addition some of the sources show Paschen and Brackett lines in emission. We apply the 2 mu m water vapor index defined by Wilking et al. (\\cite{wil99}) to estimate spectral types. These stars have spectral types M0-8. We use Persi et al.'s stellar luminosity determinations, in combination with D'Antona & Mazzitelli latest pre-main sequence evolutionary tracks, to estimate masses and ages. The ISOCAM detected mid-IR excess sources have sub-solar masses down to the H-burning limit and a median age of few x106 yr, in good agreement with the higher mass members of this cloud. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, (ESO proposal N.65.I-0054).

    9. Robust detection of small infrared objects in maritime scenarios using local minimum patterns and spatio-temporal context

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Qi, Baojun; Wu, Tao; He, Hangen

      2012-02-01

      Here, we describe a novel approach for small surface object detection with an onboard infrared (IR) camera working in maritime scenes. First, we propose a simple but effective tool called the local minimum patterns (LMP), which are theoretically the approximated coefficients of some stationary wavelet transforms, for single image background estimation. Second, potential objects are segmented by an adaptive threshold estimated from the saliency map, which is obtained by background subtraction. Using the LMP based wavelet transforms and the histogram of the saliency map, the threshold can be automatically determined by singularity analysis. Next, we localize potential objects by our proposed fast clustering algorithm, which, compared with popular K-Means, is much faster and less sensitive to noises. To make the surveillance system more reliable, we finally discuss how to integrate multiple cues, such as scene geometry constraints and spatio-temporal context, into detections by Bayesian inference. The proposed method has shown to be both effective and efficient by our extensive experiments on some challenging data sets with a competitive performance over some state-of-the-art techniques.

    10. Investigation of small solar system objects with the space telescope

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Morrison, D.

      1979-01-01

      The application of the space telescope (ST) to study small objects in the solar system in order to understand the birth and the early evolution of the solar system is discussed. The upper size limit of the small bodies is defined as approximately 5000 km and includes planetary satellites, planetary rings, asteroids, and comets.The use of the astronomical instruments aboard the ST, such as the faint object camera, ultraviolet and infrared spectrometers, and spectrophotometers, to study the small solar system objects is discussed.