Science.gov

Sample records for faint planetary nebulae

  1. A Study of Planetary Nebulae using the Faint Object Infrared Camera for the SOFIA Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    A planetary nebula is formed following an intermediate-mass (1-8 solar M) star's evolution off of the main sequence; it undergoes a phase of mass loss whereby the stellar envelope is ejected and the core is converted into a white dwarf. Planetary nebulae often display complex morphologies such as waists or torii, rings, collimated jet-like outflows, and bipolar symmetry, but exactly how these features form is unclear. To study how the distribution of dust in the interstellar medium affects their morphology, we utilize the Faint Object InfraRed CAmera for the SOFIA Telescope (FORCAST) to obtain well-resolved images of four planetary nebulae--NGC 7027, NGC 6543, M2-9, and the Frosty Leo Nebula--at wavelengths where they radiate most of their energy. We retrieve mid infrared images at wavelengths ranging from 6.3 to 37.1 micron for each of our targets. IDL (Interactive Data Language) is used to perform basic analysis. We select M2-9 to investigate further; analyzing cross sections of the southern lobe reveals a slight limb brightening effect. Modeling the dust distribution within the lobes reveals that the thickness of the lobe walls is higher than anticipated, or rather than surrounding a vacuum surrounds a low density region of tenuous dust. Further analysis of this and other planetary nebulae is needed before drawing more specific conclusions.

  2. GT2_ncox_1: Faint Extended Dust Envelopes of Young Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, N.

    2011-05-01

    We propose to trace the distribution of cold dust in the extended envelopes of a selected sample of young Planetary Nebulae (PNe). Information on the mass-loss and overall envelope ejection process of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars is imprinted in the morphology of the extended dust shells formed throughout the AGB phase. In particular the origin of asymmetrical PN shapes and their relation to spherical mass-loss presumed to occur on the AGB phase can be illuminated upon. We propose to use PACS to follow-up on AKARI/FIS observations of young PNe to study their mass-loss history. Only Herschel's unprecedented spatial resolution and sensitivity in the far-IR can detect the faint extended cold dust emission in these objects.

  3. Imaging of four planetary nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds using the Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blades, J. C.; Barlow, M. J.; Albrecht, R.; Barbieri, C.; Boksenberg, A.; Crane, P.; Deharveng, J. M.; Disney, M. J.; Jakobsen, P.; Kamperman, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    Using the Faint Object Camera on-board the Hubble Space Telescope, we have obtained images of four planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Magellanic Clouds, namely N2 and N5 in the SMC and N66 and N201 in the LMC. Each nebula was imaged through two narrow-band filters isolating forbidden O III 5007 and H-beta, for a nominal exposure time of 1000 s in each filter. In forbidden O III, SMC N5 shows a circular ring structure, with a peak-to-peak diameter of 0.26 arcsec and a FWHM of 0.35 arcsec while SMC N2 shows an elliptical ring structure with a peak-to-peak diameter of 0.26 x 0.21. The expansion ages corresponding to the observed structures in SMC N2 and N5 are of the order of 3000 yr. LMC N201 is very compact, with a FWHM of 0.2 arcsec in H-beta. The Type I PN LMC N66 is a multipolar nebula, with the brightest part having an extent of about 2 arcsec and with fainter structures extending over 4 arcsec.

  4. Planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gieseking, F.

    1983-02-01

    The first planetary nebula (PN) was discovered by Darquier in 1779. In 1981, a compilation of galactic PN listed a total of 1455 objects. Outside the Milky Way Galaxy, PN are currently known in the Magellanic Clouds and in several members of the local group of galaxies. The PN have a rich emission-line spectrum, which makes it possible to recognize them at large distances. A central stellar object can be observed within the nebula. In 1927, spectral lines at 4959 A and 5007 A emitted by the PN could finally be identified as 'forbidden lines' of O(++). The life expectancy of a PN, estimated on the basis of the observed expansion rate, is only about 30,000 years. The PN have a number of interesting characteristics which are partly related to the high effective temperature and luminosity of the central stars, the presence of a particle system under extreme physical conditions, and the stellar material provided by the PN for the interstellar medium. Attention is given to the determination of the distance of PN, the Shklovsky distances, and two mysterious aspects related to the spectrum

  5. Orion Nebula and Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufour, Reginald J.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the research performed at Rice University related to NASA-Ames University consortium grant NCC2-5199 during the two year period 1996 September 1 through 1998 August 31. The research program, titled Orion Nebula and Planetary Nebulae, involved the analysis of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imagery and spectroscopy of the Orion Nebula and of the planetary nebulae NGC 6818 and NGC 6210. In addition, we analyzed infrared spectra of the Orion Nebula taken with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) The primary collaborators at NASA-Ames were Drs. R. H. Rubin, A. G. C. M. Tielens, S. W. J. Colgan, and S. D. Lord (Tielens & Lord has since changed institutions). Other collaborators include Drs. P. G. Martin (CITA, Toronto), G. J. Ferland (U. KY), J. A. Baldwin (CTIO, Chile), J. J. Hester (ASU), D. K. Walter (SCSU), and P. Harrington (U. MD). In addition to the Principal Investigator, Professor Reginald J. Dufour of the Department of Space Physics & Astronomy, the research also involved two students, Mr. Matthew Browning and Mr. Brent Buckalew. Mr. Browning will be graduating from Rice in 1999 May with a B.A. degree in Physics and Mr. Buckalew continues as a graduate student in our department, having recently received a NASA GSRP research fellowship (sponsored by Ames). The collaboration was very productive, with two refereed papers already appearing in the literature, several others in preparation, numerous meeting presentations and two press releases. Some of our research accomplishments are highlighted below. Attached to the report are copies of the two major publications. Note that this research continues to date and related extensions of it recently has been awarded time with the HST for 1999-2000.

  6. SWIFT/UVOT PHOTOMETRY OF THE PLANETARY NEBULA WeBo 1: UNMASKING A FAINT HOT COMPANION STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Michael H.; Hoversten, Erik; Stark, Michele; Bond, Howard E.; Breeveld, Alice A. E-mail: hoversten@swift.psu.edu E-mail: bond@stsci.edu

    2012-08-15

    We present an analysis of over 150 ks of data on the planetary nebula WeBo 1 (PN G135.6+01.0) obtained with the Swift Ultraviolet Optical Telescope (UVOT). The central object of this nebula has previously been described as a late-type K giant barium star with a possible hot companion, most likely a young pre-white dwarf. UVOT photometry shows that while the optical photometry is consistent with a large cool object, the near-ultraviolet (NUV) photometry shows far more UV flux than could be produced by any late-type object. Using model stellar atmospheres and a comparison to UVOT photometry for the pre-white dwarf PG 1159-035, we find that the companion has a temperature of at least 40,000 K and a radius of, at most, 0.056 R{sub Sun }. While the temperature and radius are consistent with a hot compact stellar remnant, they are lower and larger, respectively, than expected for a typical young pre-white dwarf. This likely indicates a deficiency in the assumed UV extinction curve. We find that higher temperatures more consistent with expectations for a pre-white dwarf can be derived if the foreground dust has a strong 'blue bump' at 2175 A and a lower R{sub V}. Our results demonstrate the ability of Swift to both uncover and characterize hot hidden companion stars and to constrain the UV extinction properties of foreground dust based solely on UVOT photometry.

  7. HUBBLE'S PLANETARY NEBULA GALLERY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [Top left] - IC 3568 lies in the constellation Camelopardalis at a distance of about 9,000 light-years, and has a diameter of about 0.4 light-years (or about 800 times the diameter of our solar system). It is an example of a round planetary nebula. Note the bright inner shell and fainter, smooth, circular outer envelope. Credits: Howard Bond (Space Telescope Science Institute), Robin Ciardullo (Pennsylvania State University) and NASA [Top center] - NGC 6826's eye-like appearance is marred by two sets of blood-red 'fliers' that lie horizontally across the image. The surrounding faint green 'white' of the eye is believed to be gas that made up almost half of the star's mass for most of its life. The hot remnant star (in the center of the green oval) drives a fast wind into older material, forming a hot interior bubble which pushes the older gas ahead of it to form a bright rim. (The star is one of the brightest stars in any planetary.) NGC 6826 is 2,200 light- years away in the constellation Cygnus. The Hubble telescope observation was taken Jan. 27, 1996 with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. Credits: Bruce Balick (University of Washington), Jason Alexander (University of Washington), Arsen Hajian (U.S. Naval Observatory), Yervant Terzian (Cornell University), Mario Perinotto (University of Florence, Italy), Patrizio Patriarchi (Arcetri Observatory, Italy) and NASA [Top right ] - NGC 3918 is in the constellation Centaurus and is about 3,000 light-years from us. Its diameter is about 0.3 light-year. It shows a roughly spherical outer envelope but an elongated inner balloon inflated by a fast wind from the hot central star, which is starting to break out of the spherical envelope at the top and bottom of the image. Credits: Howard Bond (Space Telescope Science Institute), Robin Ciardullo (Pennsylvania State University) and NASA [Bottom left] - Hubble 5 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or bipolar (two-lobed) nebula. The heat generated by fast winds causes

  8. Misclassified planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbadin, F.

    1986-08-01

    The classifications of 130 objects as planetary nebulae (PNs) in the catalogs of Kohoutek (1965, 1969, and 1972) are reexamined by analyzing their images on the IR (755-885-nm) and red (610-690-nm) plates of the NIR photographic survey of the Galactic plane of Hoessel et al. (1985). Factors affecting the IR and red brightness of normal stars and emission-line objects are discussed, and it is shown that PNs should be brighter in the red than in the IR. Thirty-six supposed PNs for which this is not the case are identified, and it is suggested that they have been improperly classified.

  9. Atomic hydrogen in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Stephen E.; Silverglate, Peter R.; Altschuler, Daniel R.; Giovanardi, Carlo

    1987-01-01

    The authors searched for neutral atomic hydrogen associated with 22 planetary nebulae and three evolved stars in the 21 cm line at the Arecibo Observatory. Objects whose radial velocities permitted discrimination from Galactic H I were chosen for observation. Hydrogen was detected in absorption from IC 4997. From the measurements new low limits are derived to the mass of atomic hydrogen associated with the undetected nebulae. Radio continuum observations were also made of several of the nebulae at 12.6 cm. The authors reexamine previous measurements of H I in planetary nebulae, and present the data on a consistent footing. The question of planetary nebula distances is considered at length. Finally, implications of the H I measurements for nebular evolution are discussed and it is suggested that atomic hydrogen seen in absorption was expelled from the progenitor star during the final 1000 yr prior to the onset of ionization.

  10. Kinematics of planetary nebulae. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purgathofer, A.; Perinotto, M.

    1981-08-01

    In a program of study of radial velocities of planetary nebulae, 84 spectra of eight planetary nebulae in the direction of the galactic anticenter have been obtained at the L. Figl Observatory near Vienna with an image tube spectrograph giving a reciprocal dispersion of 26 A/mm. With this material, the kinematical behavior of the objects was studied, and it is shown that most of them deviate significantly from circular motion in the Galaxy.

  11. Physical Structure of Planetary Nebulae. I. The Owl Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Martín A.; Chu, You-Hua; Manchado, Arturo; Kwitter, Karen B.

    2003-06-01

    The Owl Nebula is a triple-shell planetary nebula with the outermost shell being a faint bow-shaped halo. We have obtained deep narrowband images and high-dispersion echelle spectra in the Hα, [O III], and [N II] emission lines to determine the physical structure of each shell in the nebula. These spatiokinematic data allow us to rule out hydrodynamic models that can reproduce only the nebular morphology. Our analysis shows that the inner shell of the main nebula is slightly elongated with a bipolar cavity along its major axis, the outer nebula is a filled envelope coexpanding with the inner shell at 40 km s-1, and the halo has been braked by the interstellar medium as the Owl Nebula moves through it. To explain the morphology and kinematics of the Owl Nebula, we suggest the following scenario for its formation and evolution. The early mass loss at the TP-AGB phase forms the halo, and the superwind at the end of the AGB phase forms the main nebula. The subsequent fast stellar wind compressed the superwind to form the inner shell and excavated an elongated cavity at the center, but this has ceased in the past. At the current old age the inner shell is backfilling the central cavity. Based on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, and with the Burrell Schmidt telescope of the Warner and Swasey Observatory, Case Western Reserve University.

  12. Molecular Hydrogen in Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, Angela K.; Baldridge, Sean; Matsuura, Mikako

    2015-08-01

    Planetary Nebulae (PNe) have long played the role of laboratories for investigating atomic, molecular, dust and plasma physics, which have applications to diverse other astrophysical environments. In this presentation we will discuss clumpy structures within planetary nebulae that are the hosts to, and protectors of molecular gas in an otherwise forbidding ionized zone. We will present new observations of the molecular hydrogen emission from several PNe and discuss their implications for the formation, evolution and survival/demise of such molecular globules. The science behind dust and molecule formation and survival that apply to many other astronomical objects and places.

  13. HUBBLE CAPTURES UNVEILING OF PLANETARY NEBULA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 image captures the infancy of the Stingray nebula (Hen-1357), the youngest known planetary nebula. In this image, the bright central star is in the middle of the green ring of gas. Its companion star is diagonally above it at 10 o'clock. A spur of gas (green) is forming a faint bridge to the companion star due to gravitational attraction. The image also shows a ring of gas (green) surrounding the central star, with bubbles of gas to the lower left and upper right of the ring. The wind of material propelled by radiation from the hot central star has created enough pressure to blow open holes in the ends of the bubbles, allowing gas to escape. The red curved lines represent bright gas that is heated by a 'shock' caused when the central star's wind hits the walls of the bubbles. The nebula is as large as 130 solar systems, but, at its distance of 18,000 light-years, it appears only as big as a dime viewed a mile away. The Stingray is located in the direction of the southern constellation Ara (the Altar). The colors shown are actual colors emitted by nitrogen (red), oxygen (green), and hydrogen (blue). The filters used were F658N ([N II]), F502N ([O III]), and F487N (H-beta). The observations were made in March 1996. Credit: Matt Bobrowsky, Orbital Sciences Corporation and NASA

  14. Planetary nebulae in galaxies beyond the Local Group.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, H. C.; Ciardullo, R.; Jacoby, G. H.; Hui, X.

    Planetary nebulae can be used to estimate the distances to galaxies and to measure stellar dynamics in faint halos. The authors discuss surveys which have netted a total of 665 candidate planetary nebulae in NGC 5128 (Cen A), NGC 5102, NGC 3031 (M81), NGC 3115, three galaxies in the Leo Group (NGC 3379, NGC 3384, NGC 3377), NGC 5866, and finally, in NGC 4486 (M87). The highly consistent distances derived from the brightnesses of the jth nebula and the median nebula in different fields in the same galaxy and from different galaxies in the same group lend strong support to the suggestion that planetaries are an accurate standard candle in old stellar populations. Comparison of theoretical luminosity functions to be observed PNLFs shows that there is a very small dispersion in the central star masses.

  15. Ultraviolet photometry of planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, A. V.

    1972-01-01

    Nine of the planetary nebulae observed by the Wisconsin filter photometers are compared with 15 Monocerotis in the spectral region 1430-4250 A. The data are corrected for the degradation of the filters of stellar photometer number four with time. Comparisons with simple models indicate that most of the observed nebulae are subject to some interstellar extinction in the far ultraviolet. However, NGC 246 and NGC 1360 appear to be nearly unreddened. Thus far no unexpected features have been found in the observations.

  16. The Formation of a Planetary Nebula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpaz, Amos

    1991-01-01

    Proposes a scenario to describe the formation of a planetary nebula, a cloud of gas surrounding a very hot compact star. Describes the nature of a planetary nebula, the number observed to date in the Milky Way Galaxy, and the results of research on a specific nebula. (MDH)

  17. Abundance patterns in planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Richard B. C.

    1990-06-01

    Abundances of He, N, O, and Ne have been uniformly calculated for 192 planetary nebulas residing in the Galactic disk and halo, the LMC, the SMC, and M31. Direct correlations appear to exist for type I as well as non-type I objects for the following pairs of parameters: N/O-He/H, N/O-N/H, and Ne/H-O/H. Separately, type I planetaries show a weak anticorrelation between N/O and O/H, while non-type I's exhibit direct correlations between N/H and O/H and between N/O and O/H. From these patterns, it is inferred that non-type I's synthesize N via the CN cycle. Type I planetaries, on the other hand, manufacture N at least partially via the ON cycle, destroying O in the process. Neither type appears to synthesize O or Ne.

  18. A search for planetary nebulae on the 'POSS'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dengel, J.; Hartl, H.; Weinberger, R.

    1980-05-01

    Results of a search for new planetary nebulae on a quarter of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS) E plates are reported. A total of 218 prints evenly scattered over all accessible galactic longitudes and latitudes was examined, in addition to the entire region between longitudes 33 and 213 deg and latitudes + or - 2 deg. Five objects satisfying the criteria of emission nebulosity characteristic of planetary nebulae and/or a central blue star were detected, as well as another three dozen very faint, roundish unlisted objects. The coordinates, dimensions, central star magnitudes, surfaces brightnesses, nebular magnitudes, volumes and estimated distances of the five probable planetary nebulae are presented, and it is noted that all but one of them are of considerably low surface brightness.

  19. Planetary nebulae and stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maran, S. P.

    1983-01-01

    Newly defined characteristics of planetary nebulae (PN) derived from analysis of a photometric survey of 57 PN are reported. The data were combined with measurements of 27 other PN made since 1918 and were found to indicate core masses ranging from 0.55-1.0 solar mass. N/O elemental abundance ratios observed were correlated with the planetary nuclei masses, and were in direct proportion. IUE data on PN that overlapped a large part of the survey indicated that the PN in the galactic disk are more massive than PN in the halo. It is suggested that PN evolve into white dwarfs, a hypothesis supported by astrometric solutions for three nearby visual binaries featuring white dwarfs with well-determined masses. It is noted, however, that PN with masses exceeding one solar mass have been sighted in the Magellanic Clouds.

  20. Two new evolved neighbouring planetary nebulae in Aquila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A.; Pfleiderer, J.

    1997-08-01

    In the course of a search for faint new non-stellar objects in the Northern Galactic Plane, two neighbouring planetary nebula (PNe) candidates have been detected on film copies of the POSS II. Whereas the morphology of the smaller of the two objects (v = 15 arcsec) is typical for PNe, the nature of the larger one (34 x 18 arcsec^2) defied an even provisional classification, on its photographic appearance alone. Optical spectra, however, allowed both sources, which are separated by 20 arcmin only, to be classified as highly obscured PNe. Both nebulae obviously are rather old, i.e. they are evolved representatives of their kind.

  1. MHD Solutions for Proto-Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Segura, G.; López, J. A.; Franco, J.

    2004-07-01

    This paper provides solutions for the origin of post-AGB winds, their acceleration up to high speed, and the subsequent formation of extremely collimated proto-planetary nebulae. Several wind models with terminal velocities from a few tens of kms up to 103 kms are calculated, which produce proto-planetary nebulae with linear momentum in the range 1036-1040 gcms and with kinetic energies in the range 1042-1047 erg. These results match available observations of proto-planetary nebulae. In the present simplistic scheme, the driver of the wind is just the magnetic pressure at the stellar surface. Other forces are not taken into account in this study, except gravity. We conclude that mass-loss rates of post-AGB stars and transition times from late AGB up to planetary nebula central stars could be directly linked with the production of magnetic field at the stellar core.

  2. 3-D structures of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, W.

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in the 3-D reconstruction of planetary nebulae are reviewed. We include not only results for 3-D reconstructions, but also the current techniques in terms of general methods and software. In order to obtain more accurate reconstructions, we suggest to extend the widely used assumption of homologous nebula expansion to map spectroscopically measured velocity to position along the line of sight.

  3. Several evolutionary channels for bright planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richer, Michael G.; McCall, Marshall L.

    2016-08-01

    The populations of bright planetary nebulae in the discs of spirals appear to differ in their spectral properties from those in ellipticals and the bulges of spirals. The bright planetary nebulae from the bulge of the Milky Way are entirely compatible with those observed in the discs of spiral galaxies. The similarity might be explained if the bulge of the Milky Way evolved secularly from the disc, in which case the bulge should be regarded as a pseudo-bulge.

  4. THE ROTTEN EGG NEBULA A PLANETARY NEBULA IN THE MAKING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The object shown in these NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope images is a remarkable example of a star going through death throes just as it dramatically transforms itself from a normal red giant star into a planetary nebula. This process happens so quickly that such objects are quite rare, even though astronomers believe that most stars like the Sun will eventually go through such a phase. This star, with the prosaic name of OH231.8+4.2, is seen in these infrared pictures blowing out gas and dust in two opposite directions. So much dust has been cast off and now surrounds the star that it cannot be seen directly, only its starlight that is reflected off the dust. The flow of gas is very fast, with a velocity up to 450,000 mph (700,000 km/h). With extreme clarity, these Hubble Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) images reveal that the fast-moving gas and dust are being collimated into several thin streamers (on the right) and a jet-like structure (on the left), which can be seen extending away from the centers of both pictures. On the right, wisps of material in jet-like streamers appear to strike some dense blobs of gas. This interaction must produce strong shock waves in the gas. The pictures represent two views of the object. The color image is a composite of four images taken with different NICMOS infrared filters on March 28, 1998. It shows that the physical properties of the material, both composition and temperature, vary significantly throughout the outflowing material. The black-and-white image was taken with one NICMOS infrared filter. That image is able to show more clearly the faint detail and structure in the nebula than can be achieved with the color composites. Observations by radio astronomers have found many unusual molecules in the gas around this star, including many containing sulfur, such as hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide. These sulfur compounds are believed to be produced in the shock waves passing through the gas

  5. GALEX Observations of Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Swayamtrupta

    2016-05-01

    The first ultraviolet (UV) photometric observations of planetary nebulae (PNe) are presented using observations made by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). We have found 108 PNe detected by GALEX and resolved their angular diameters in near-UV (NUV) and also in far-UV (FUV) for 28 PNe considering a 3σ emission level beyond the background. Of the PNe, 57 are elliptical, 41 are circular and the rest 10 are bipolar in NUV. The emission lines that contribute to the NUV intrinsic flux are C III] and He II. The measured intrinsic luminosities considering the sole contribution from the central stars have been found to lie in the range of 10^37-10^51 erg/s. The comparative study of the angular sizes against effective wavelengths in 5 distinct regimes has shown that the listed PNe are bright in NUV which opens up the discussion related to the extent of hotness, the very high temperatures of the CSPNe and the exact nature of it. The intensity contour plots of the PNe have also provided us with over 10 well-defined candidates having bipolar morphological signatures, the origin and evolution of whose can be traced back to the dynamics of stellar winds in the post-AGB stage.

  6. Zinc abundances of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. L.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Dinerstein, H. L.

    2014-07-01

    Zinc is a useful surrogate element for measuring Fe/H as, unlike iron, it is not depleted in the gas phase media. Zn/H and O/Zn ratios have been derived using the [Zn IV] emission line at 3.625 μm for a sample of nine Galactic planetary nebulae, seven of which are based upon new observations using the Very Large Telescope (VLT). Based on photoionization models, O/O++ is the most reliable ionization correction factor for zinc that can readily be determined from optical emission lines, with an estimated accuracy of 10 per cent or better for all targets in our sample. The majority of the sample is found to be subsolar in [Zn/H]. [O/Zn] in half of the sample is found to be consistent with solar within uncertainties, whereas the remaining half are enhanced in [O/Zn]. [Zn/H] and [O/Zn] as functions of Galactocentric distance have been investigated and there is little evidence to support a trend in either case.

  7. Reconstruction and visualization of planetary nebulae.

    PubMed

    Magnor, Marcus; Kindlmann, Gordon; Hansen, Charles; Duric, Neb

    2005-01-01

    From our terrestrially confined viewpoint, the actual three-dimensional shape of distant astronomical objects is, in general, very challenging to determine. For one class of astronomical objects, however, spatial structure can be recovered from conventional 2D images alone. So-called planetary nebulae (PNe) exhibit pronounced symmetry characteristics that come about due to fundamental physical processes. Making use of this symmetry constraint, we present a technique to automatically recover the axisymmetric structure of many planetary nebulae from photographs. With GPU-based volume rendering driving a nonlinear optimization, we estimate the nebula's local emission density as a function of its radial and axial coordinates and we recover the orientation of the nebula relative to Earth. The optimization refines the nebula model and its orientation by minimizing the differences between the rendered image and the original astronomical image. The resulting model allows creating realistic 3D visualizations of these nebulae, for example, for planetarium shows and other educational purposes. In addition, the recovered spatial distribution of the emissive gas can help astrophysicists gain deeper insight into the formation processes of planetary nebulae. PMID:16144246

  8. COMPARING SYMBIOTIC NEBULAE AND PLANETARY NEBULAE LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Frankowski, Adam; Soker, Noam E-mail: soker@physics.technion.ac.i

    2009-10-01

    We compare the observed symbiotic nebulae (SyN) luminosity function (SyNLF) in the [O III] lambda5007 A line to the planetary nebulae (PN) luminosity function (PNLF) and find that the intrinsic SyNLF (ISyNLF) of galactic SyNs has-within its uncertainty of 0.5-0.8 mag-very similar cutoff luminosity and general shape to those of the PNLF. The [O III]/(Halpha+[N II]) line ratios of SyNs and PNs are shown to be also related. Possible implications of these results for the universality of the PNLF are briefly outlined.

  9. MHD Solutions for Proto-Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Segura, G.; López, J. A.; Franco, J.

    2003-09-01

    This paper provides solutions for the origin of post-AGB winds, their acceleration up to high speed, and the subsequent formation of extremely collimated proto-planetary nebulae. Several wind models with terminal velocities from a few tens of voidb @xkms-1 up to 10^3 voidb @xkms-1 are calculated, which produce proto-planetary nebulae with linear momentum in the range 10^36 - 10^40 voidb @xgcms-1 and with kinetic energies in the range 10^42 - 10^47 erg. These results match available observations of proto-planetary nebulae. In the present simplistic scheme, the driver of the wind is just the magnetic pressure at the stellar surface. Other forces are not taken into account in this study, except gravity. We conclude that mass-loss rates of post-AGB stars and transition times from late AGB up to planetary nebula central stars could be directly linked with the production of magnetic field at the stellar core. As an example, mass-loss rates as large as 8×10^-5 M[ scriptstyle sun ]yr-1 and transition times as short as 5,000 years are predicted.

  10. Nebular UV Absorption Lines in Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinerstein, Harriet

    We propose to continue our Cycle 1 program of studying the Lyman and Werner bands of H_2, seen in absorption against the UV continua of planetary nebula central stars, which arise within neutral-molecular envelopes surrounding the ionized gas. These are the pump lines for a fluorescent cascade of near-infrared emission lines which are observed in many planetary nebulae. By observing the UV lines we can probe the chemical and thermal structure of the envelopes, as well as measure molecular column densities and clarify the excitation processes for the infrared lines. In Cycle 1 we were granted time for three targets, one of which was successfully observed shortly before submission of this proposal. Although the data were not yet available for examination, similar target observed by the project team revealed a rich set of H_2 circumstellar absorption features, demonstrating the feasibility of our program. FUSE spectra also include absorption features from atomic species such as O I and C II, which give rise to important far-infrared fine-structure cooling lines that likewise have been observed from planetary nebulae. In Cycle 2, we add as a secondary goal a search for nebular components of the O VI 032, 1038 AA absorption lines, which trace the presence of hot shocked gas, in nebulae with anomalously strong optical recombination lines of ions of oxygen and nitrogen. This will test a plausible hypothesis for the origin of this anomaly.

  11. Heat conduction fronts in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soker, Noam

    1994-01-01

    We present arguments which suggest that many of the x-ray, some optical, and some UV observations of planetary nebulae, can be explained by the presence of heat conduction fronts. The heat flows from the hot bubble formed by the shocked fast wind to the cool shell and halo. Heat conduction fronts are likely to account for emission of x rays from plasma at lower temperature than the expected temperature of the hot bubble. In the presence of magnetic fields, only a small fraction of the fast wind luminosity emerges as radiation. Heat conduction fronts can naturally produce some unusual line flux ratios, which are observed in some planetary nebulae. Heat conduction fronts may heat the halo and cause some material at the inner surface of the shell to expand slower than the rest of the shell. In the presence of an asymmetrical magnetic field, this flow, the x-ray intensity, and the emission lines, may acquire asymmetrical structure as well.

  12. Molecular line mapping of (young) planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujarrabal, Valentín

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, I will review recent results obtained from high-resolution observations of molecular emission of planetary nebulae in the millimeter and submillimeter waves, stressing the easy interpretation of the data and the great amount of quantitative results obtained from them. Radio interferometers have been shown to be very efficient in the observation of our objects and, particularly since the arrival of ALMA, the amount of results is becoming impressive. We will deal mainly with young planetary nebulae or protoplanetary nebulae, since, as we will see, molecular lines tend to be weak in evolved objects because of photodissociation. In relatively young nebulae, the molecular gas represents most of the nebular material and can be well observed in line emission in mm- and submm-waves. Those observations have yielded many quantitative and accurate results on the structure, dynamics, and physical conditions of this largely dominant nebular component. In more evolved sources, we can follow the evolution of the chemical composition, although the data become rare.

  13. A newly discovered compact planetary nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellaro, E.; Turatto, M.; Sabbadin, F.

    1989-07-01

    An H-alpha emission object is identified in a 103a-E + RG1 objective prism plate taken with the 92/67-cm Schmidt telescope of the Astronomical Observatory of Padua at Asiago (Italy). The object turns out to be a compact planetary nebula located at alpha(1950.0) = 18 h 4.3 min and delta(1950.0) = -8 deg 56.4 arcmin (classification code: 19 + 5 deg 1).

  14. Observations of the planetary nebula RWT 152 with OSIRIS/GTC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, A.; Miranda, L. F.; Olguín, L.; Solano, E.; Ulla, A.

    2016-08-01

    RWT 152 is one of the few known planetary nebulae with an sdO central star. We present subarcsecond red tunable filter Hα imaging and intermediate-resolution, long-slit spectroscopy of RWT 152 obtained with OSIRIS/GTC with the goal of analyzing its properties. The Hα image reveals a bipolar nebula with a bright equatorial region and multiple bubbles in the main lobes. A faint circular halo surrounds the main nebula. The nebular spectra reveal a very low-excitation nebula with weak emission lines from H+, He+, and double-ionized metals, and absence of emission lines from neutral and single-ionized metals, except for an extremely faint [N II] λ6584 emission line. These spectra may be explained if RWT 152 is a density-bounded planetary nebula. Low nebular chemical abundances of S, O, Ar, N, and Ne are obtained in RWT 152, which, together with the derived high peculiar velocity (˜ 92-131 km s-1), indicate that this object is a halo planetary nebula. The available data are consistent with RWT 152 evolving from a low-mass progenitor (˜ 1 M⊙) formed in a metal-poor environment.

  15. Abundances, planetary nebulae, and stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, Lawrence H.

    1994-09-01

    Among Henry Norris Russell's many achievements were his contributions to solar and stellar spectroscopy, in particular, to an analysis of the chemical composition of the solar atmosphere. The question of composition differences between stars was hotly debated; some distinguished astronomers argued that all stars had the solar composition. Some early challenges to this doctrine are described. Determinations of chemical compositions of gaseous nebulae were much more difficult. If we observe the lines of a given chemical element in one ionization stage in a stellar spectrum, we can deduce readily the abundance of that element. No such luxury is available for a planetary or diffuse gaseous nebula. We must measure lines of as many ionization stages as we can. Furthermore, a nebula is an extended object. Often detailed spectroscopy is at hand only for narrow pencil columns taken through the image. Different observers use a variety of apertures. Fortunately it is possible to calculate theoretical spectra for any arbitrary cross section taken through a symmetrical model, so UV, optical, and IR observations all can be compared properly with a prediction. The value of high-resolution spectra obtained with instruments such as the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory is emphasized. Improved fluxes for weak but important transitions are found. Close blends of lines of different ions can be resolved, and checks can be made on predictions of atomic parameters such as Einstein A-values and collision strengths. High spectral resolution data have been obtained and reduced for 22 planetary nebulae of varying size, structure, stellar population membership, dustiness, level of excitation, evolutionary status, and chemical compositions. The promise seems justified that with such extensive, high quality data, additional insights on nebular genesis and late states of stellar evolution can be found. The present survey is confined to nebulae of high surface brightness, but

  16. Abundances, planetary nebulae, and stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aller, Lawrence H.

    1994-01-01

    Among Henry Norris Russell's many achievements were his contributions to solar and stellar spectroscopy, in particular, to an analysis of the chemical composition of the solar atmosphere. The question of composition differences between stars was hotly debated; some distinguished astronomers argued that all stars had the solar composition. Some early challenges to this doctrine are described. Determinations of chemical compositions of gaseous nebulae were much more difficult. If we observe the lines of a given chemical element in one ionization stage in a stellar spectrum, we can deduce readily the abundance of that element. No such luxury is available for a planetary or diffuse gaseous nebula. We must measure lines of as many ionization stages as we can. Furthermore, a nebula is an extended object. Often detailed spectroscopy is at hand only for narrow pencil columns taken through the image. Different observers use a variety of apertures. Fortunately it is possible to calculate theoretical spectra for any arbitrary cross section taken through a symmetrical model, so UV, optical, and IR observations all can be compared properly with a prediction. The value of high-resolution spectra obtained with instruments such as the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory is emphasized. Improved fluxes for weak but important transitions are found. Close blends of lines of different ions can be resolved, and checks can be made on predictions of atomic parameters such as Einstein A-values and collision strengths. High spectral resolution data have been obtained and reduced for 22 planetary nebulae of varying size, structure, stellar population membership, dustiness, level of excitation, evolutionary status, and chemical compositions. The promise seems justified that with such extensive, high quality data, additional insights on nebular genesis and late states of stellar evolution can be found. The present survey is confined to nebulae of high surface brightness, but

  17. Planetary nebulae and the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aller, L. H.

    1986-01-01

    In addition to available published data on planetary nebulae (PN), some 40 objects largely concentrated towards the galactic center and anticenter regions were included. All were observed with the Lick 3(sup m) telescope and image tube scanner. Abundances of C, N, O, Ne, Cl, and Ar were determined by a procedure in which theoretical models were used to obtain ionization correction factors (ICF). Of the 106 PN, 66 are N-rich and 40 are N-poor. There appear to be no significant differences between the average compositions in the solar neighborhood and the average taken over the entire observable portion of the galaxy.

  18. NGC 2242 - A newly discovered planetary nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maehara, H.; Okamura, S.; Noguchi, T.; He, X. T.; Liu, J. Y.; Huang, Y. W.; Feng, X.-C.

    1987-05-01

    Photometric and spectroscopic analyses are made for the object NGC 2242, which was detected in a survey of emission-line galaxies by Liu et al. (1986). Luminosity and color distributions and a small heliocentric velocity (-30 km s-1) are all inconsistent with previous classifications as a galaxy. NGC 2242 is probably a planetary nebula located at ≡2 kpc from the sun and at ≡500 pc above the galactic plane. Characteristics and physical parameters of NGC 2242 are discussed in some detail.

  19. The expansion velocity field within the planetary nebula NGC 7008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbadin, F.; Ortolani, S.; Bianchini, A.; Hamzaoglu, E.

    1983-06-01

    The forbidden O III, H-alpha, and forbidden N II expansion velocity fields within the planetary nebula NGC 7008 have been obtained from high dispersion spectrograms. The photographic and spectroscopic data indicate that this nebula is very inhomogeneous. A rough model consists of two coaxial prolate spheroids of moderate ellipticity. Evidence is presented that K 4-44 (93 + 5 deg 1), classified as a distinct planetary nebula in the Catalogue of Galactic Planetary Nebulae of Perek and Kohoutek (1967) is a condensation within NGC 7008.

  20. Hierarchies of Models: Toward Understanding Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuth, Kevin H.; Hajian, Arsen R.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Stars like our sun (initial masses between 0.8 to 8 solar masses) end their lives as swollen red giants surrounded by cool extended atmospheres. The nuclear reactions in their cores create carbon, nitrogen and oxygen, which are transported by convection to the outer envelope of the stellar atmosphere. As the star finally collapses to become a white dwarf, this envelope is expelled from the star to form a planetary nebula (PN) rich in organic molecules. The physics, dynamics, and chemistry of these nebulae are poorly understood and have implications not only for our understanding of the stellar life cycle but also for organic astrochemistry and the creation of prebiotic molecules in interstellar space. We are working toward generating three-dimensional models of planetary nebulae (PNe), which include the size, orientation, shape, expansion rate and mass distribution of the nebula. Such a reconstruction of a PN is a challenging problem for several reasons. First, the data consist of images obtained over time from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and spectra obtained from Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). These images are of course taken from a single viewpoint in space, which amounts to a very challenging tomographic reconstruction. Second, the fact that we have two disparate and orthogonal data types requires that we utilize a method that allows these data to be used together to obtain a solution. To address these first two challenges we employ Bayesian model estimation using a parameterized physical model that incorporates much prior information about the known physics of the PN. In our previous works we have found that the forward problem of the comprehensive model is extremely time consuming. To address this challenge, we explore the use of a set of hierarchical models, which allow us to estimate increasingly more detailed sets of model parameters. These hierarchical models of increasing complexity are akin

  1. Hierarchies of Models: Toward Understanding Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuth, Kevin H.; Hajian, Arsen R.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Stars like our sun (initial masses between 0.8 to 8 solar masses) end their lives as swollen red giants surrounded by cool extended atmospheres. The nuclear reactions in their cores create carbon, nitrogen and oxygen, which are transported by convection to the outer envelope of the stellar atmosphere. As the star finally collapses to become a white dwarf, this envelope is expelled from the star to form a planetary nebula (PN) rich in organic molecules. The physics, dynamics, and chemistry of these nebulae are poorly understood and have implications not only for our understanding of the stellar life cycle but also for organic astrochemistry and the creation of prebiotic molecules in interstellar space. We are working toward generating three-dimensional models of planetary nebulae (PNe), which include the size, orientation, shape, expansion rate and mass distribution of the nebula. Such a reconstruction of a PN is a challenging problem for several reasons. First, the data consist of images obtained over time from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and spectra obtained from Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). These images are of course taken from a single viewpoint in space, which amounts to a very challenging tomographic reconstruction. Second, the fact that we have two disparate and orthogonal data types requires that we utilize a method that allows these data to be used together to obtain a solution. To address these first two challenges we employ Bayesian model estimation using a parameterized physical model that incorporates much prior information about the known physics of the PN. In our previous works we have found that the forward problem of the comprehensive model is extremely time consuming. To address this challenge, we explore the use of a set of hierarchical models, which allow us to estimate increasingly more detailed sets of model parameters. These hierarchical models of increasing complexity are akin

  2. Abundances in the Planetary Nebula IC 5217

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyung, Siek; Aller, Lawrence H.; Feibelman, Walter A.; Lee, Woo-Baik; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    High resolution optical wavelength spectroscopic data were secured in the optical wavelengths, 3700A - 10,050A, for the planetary nebula IC 5217 with the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory. These optical spectra have been analyzed along with the near-UV and UV archive data. Diagnostic analyses indicate a nebular physical condition with electron temperature of about 10,700 K (from the [O III] lines) and the density of N(sub epsilon) = 5000/cm. Ionic concentrations have been derived with the representative diagnostics, and with the aid of a photoionization model construction, we derived the elemental abundances. Contrary to the previous studies found in the literature, He and C appear to be depleted compared to the average planetary nebula and to the Sun (and S marginally so), while the remaining elements appear to be close to the average value. IC 5217 may have evolved from an O-rich progenitor and the central star temperature of IC 5217 is likely to be 92,000 K.

  3. CRL 618: A Nascent Planetary Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafoya, D.; Loinard, L.; Fonfría, J. P.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Martí-Vidal, I.; Pech, G.

    2014-04-01

    CRL 618 is an object that exhibits characteristics of both AGB and post-AGB star. It also displays a spectacular array of bipolar lobes with a dense equatorial region, which makes it an excellent object to study the development of asymmetries in evolved stars. In the recent decades, an elliptical compact HII region located in the center of the nebula has been seen to be increasing in size and flux. This seems to be due to the ionization of the circumstellar envelope by the central star, and it would be indicating the beginning of the planetary nebula phase for CRL 618. We analyzed interferometric radio continuum data at ~5 and 22 GHz from observations carried out at seven epochs with the VLA. We traced the increase of the flux of the ionized region over a period of ~26 years. We measured the dimensions of the HII region directly from the brightness distribution images to determine the increase of its size over time. For one of the epochs we analyzed observations at six frequencies from which we estimated the electron density distribution. We carried out model calculations of the spectral energy distribution at two different epochs to corroborate our observational results. We found that the radio continuum flux and the size of the ionized region have been increasing monotonically in the last three decades. The size of the major axis of the HII region shows a dependance with frequency, which has been interpreted as a result of a gradient of the electron density in this direction. The growth of the HII region is due to the expansion of an ionized wind whose mass-loss rate increased continuously for a period of ~100 years until a few decades ago, when the mass-loss rate experienced a sudden decline. Our results indicate that the beginning of the ionization of the circumstellar envelope began around 1971, which marks the start of the planetary nebula phase of CRL 618.

  4. Ultraviolet spectra of planetary nebulae. X - Physical conditions in the compact planetary nebula Sw St 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. R.; Goharji, A.; Cohen, M.

    1984-01-01

    Photoelectric visual and ultraviolet observations of the compact planetary nebula Sw St 1 are analyzed. The electron density, determined from the C III 1907/1909 A line ratio, is N(e) = (1.1 + or - 0.1) x 10 to the 5th/cu cm, consistent with the high emission measure and high critical frequency determined from observations of the thermal radio emission. The C/O abundance ratio in the nebula is found to be N(C)/N(O) = 0.72 + or - 0.1, i.e. the envelope is oxygen-rich, as suggested by the identification of the silicate feature in the 8-13 micron infrared spectrum. Difficulties remain in accurately determining the reddening constant to the nebula and its electron temperature.

  5. H2 Imaging of Three Proto-Planetary and Young Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, Kevin; Hrivnak, Bruce J.; Kwok, Sun

    2004-12-01

    High-resolution (0.15") 2.12 μm H2 and narrowband K images have been obtained of one cool proto-planetary nebula, IRAS 20028+3910, and two hot proto-planetary/young planetary nebulae, IRAS 19306+1407 and IRAS 22023+5249. The observations were made with an adaptive optics system and near-infrared imager on the Gemini North 8 m telescope. All three nebulae are seen to be extended, and in two and possibly all three of them H2 is found to be emitting from bipolar lobes. In IRAS 19306+1407, H2 emission is seen arising from a ring close to the star and from the edges of emerging bipolar lobes. In IRAS 20028+3910, one bright lobe and a very faint second lobe are seen in the H2 and K-band images, similar to the published visible images, but in the H2 and K-band images a faint filament appears to connect the two lobes. The central star is not seen in IRAS 20028+3910, indicating that the nebula is optically thick even at 2 μm, which is unusual. The images suggest that extended H2 emission is often the manifestation of fast-slow wind interactions in the bipolar lobes. The paper is based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory with the Adaptive Optics System Hokupa'a/QUIRC, developed and operated by the University of Hawaii Adaptive Optics Group, with support from the National Science Foundation. The Gemini Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), Comisión Nacional de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (CONICYT; Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Laboratório Nacional de Astrofísica (CNPq; Brazil), and Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET; Argentina).

  6. Improved spectral descriptions of planetary nebulae central stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidmann, W. A.; Méndez, R. H.; Gamen, R.

    2015-07-01

    Context. At least 492 central stars of Galactic planetary nebulae (CSPNs) have been assigned spectral types. Since many CSPNs are faint, these classification efforts are frequently made at low spectral resolution. However, the stellar Balmer absorption lines are contaminated with nebular emission; therefore in many cases a low-resolution spectrum does not enable the determination of the H abundance in the CSPN photosphere. Whether or not the photosphere is H deficient is arguably the most important fact we should expect to extract from the CSPN spectrum, and should be the basis for an adequate spectral classification system. Aims: Our purpose is to provide accurate spectral classifications and contribute to the knowledge of central stars of planetary nebulae and stellar evolution. Methods: We have obtained and studied higher quality spectra of CSPNs described in the literature as weak emission-line star (WELS). We provide descriptions of 19 CSPN spectra. These stars had been previously classified at low spectral resolution. We used medium-resolution spectra taken with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS). We provide spectral types in the Morgan-Keenan (MK) system whenever possible. Results: Twelve stars in our sample appear to have normal H rich photospheric abundances, and five stars remain unclassified. The rest (two) are most probably H deficient. Of all central stars described by other authors as WELS, we find that at least 26% of them are, in fact, H rich O stars, and at least 3% are H deficient. This supports the suggestion that the denomination WELS should not be taken as a spectral type, because, as a WELS is based on low-resolution spectra, it cannot provide enough information about the photospheric H abundance.

  7. Atlas of monochromatic images of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidmann, W. A.; Schmidt, E. O.; Vena Valdarenas, R. R.; Ahumada, J. A.; Volpe, M. G.; Mudrik, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present an atlas of more than one hundred original images of planetary nebulae (PNe). These images were taken in a narrow-band filter centred on the nebular emission of the [N ii] during several observing campaigns using two moderate-aperture telescopes, at the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO), and the Estación Astrofísica de Bosque Alegre (EABA), both in Argentina. The data provided by this atlas represent one of the most extensive image surveys of PNe in [N ii]. We compare the new images with those available in the literature, and briefly describe all cases in which our [N ii] images reveal new and interesting structures. The reduced images as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/592/A103

  8. Radial velocities of Planetary Nebulae revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Roberto; Ayala, Sandra A.; Wendolyn Blanco Cárdenas, Mónica; Contreras, María E.; Gómez-Muñoz, Marco Antonio; Guillén, Pedro F.; Olguín, Lorenzo; Ramos-Larios, Gerardo; Sabin, Laurence; Zavala, Saúl A.

    2015-08-01

    We present a new determination of radial velocities of a sample of Galactic Planetary Nebulae (PNe) using a systematic method and the same instrumental setting: the long-slit high-dispersion Manchester Echelle Spectrograph (MES) on the 2.1-m telescope at the San Pedro Mártir Observatory (OAN-SPM; Mexico). This project was inspired by the work of Schneider et al. (1983, A&AS, 52, 399), which has been an important reference during the last decades. Radial velocities of gaseous nebulae can be obtained using the central wavelength of a Gaussian fit, even when there is an expansion velocity, as expected in PNe, but with not enough resolution to see a spectral line splitting. We have used the software SHAPE, a morpho-kinematic modeling and reconstruction tool for astrophysical objects (Steffen et al. 2011, IEEE Trans. Vis. Comput. Graphics, 17, 454), to prove that non-uniform density or brightness, on an expanding shell, can lead to mistaken conclusions about the radial velocity. To determine radial velocities, we only use the spectral data in which a spectral line-splitting is seen, avoiding thus the problem of the possible biased one-Gaussian fit. Cases when this method is not recommended are discussed.This project has been supported by grant PAPIIT-DGAPA-UNAM IN107914. MWB is in grateful receipt of a DGAPA-UNAM postdoctoral scholarship. MAG acknowledges CONACYT for his graduate scholarship.

  9. Temperature Scale of Central Stars Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruk, Jeffry

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this project was to gain new insight into both the true temperatures of the central stars of planetary nebulae and their evolutionary histories. The temperature scale of the hottest central stars of planetary nebulae is poorly known. The temperature diagnostics available at visible wavelengths are not useful for these very hot stars, or suffer from as-yet unresolved systematic uncertainties. However, the combination of FUSE FUV spectra and HST NUV spectra allows precise temperature determinations by utilizing ionization balances of C III, C IV and O V, O VI lines. The sample comprises hot hydrogen-rich central stars covering the hottest phase of post-AGB evolution (T_eff greater than 70,000K). The spectra were analyzed with fully metal line blanketed NLTE model atmospheres in order to determine T_eff, surface gravity, and chemical composition. In addition to the temperature scale, the spectra help address the question of metal abundances at the surface of these stars. Depending on the particular star, the metal abundances are either dominated by ongoing diffusion processes or they originate from dredge-up phases during previous AGB evolution. The sample was selected so as to include objects that were expected to exhibit both processes, in order to assess their relative importance and to gain insight into the evolutionary history of the stars. The objects that show qualitatively a metal abundance pattern which points at dredge-up phases, can be used to quantitatively check against abundance predictions of stellar evolution theory. The other objects, where gravitational diffusion and radiative acceleration determine the photospheric metal abundances, will be used to check our NLTE models which for the first time include diffusion processes self-consistently.

  10. Estimating the Binary Fraction of Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douchin, Dimitri

    2015-01-01

    Planetary nebulae are the end-products of intermediate-mass stars evolution, following a phase of expansion of their atmospheres at the end of their lives. Observationally, it has been estimated that 80% of them have non-spherical shapes. Such a high fraction is puzzling and has occupied the planetary nebula community for more than 30 years. One scenario that would allow to justify the observed shapes is that a comparable fraction of the progenitors of central stars of planetary nebula (CSPN) are not single, but possess a companion. The shape of the nebulae would then be the result of an interaction with this companion. The high fraction of non-spherical planetary nebulae would thus imply a high fraction of binary central stars of planetary nebulae, making binarity a preferred channel for planetary nebula formation. After presenting the current state of knowledge regarding planetary nebula formation and shaping and reviewing the diverse efforts to find binaries in planetary nebulae, I present my work to detect a near-infrared excess that would be the signature of the presence of cool companions. The first part of the project consists in the analysis of data and photometry acquired and conducted by myself. The second part details an attempt to make use of archived datasets: the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 optical survey and the extended database assembled by Frew (2008). I also present results from a radial velocity analysis of VLT/UVES spectra for 14 objects aiming to the detection of spectroscopic companions. Finally I give details of the analysis of optical photometry data from our observations associated to the detection of companions around central stars of planetary nebulae using the photometric variability technique. The main result of this thesis is from the near-infrared excess studies which I combine with previously published data. I conclude that if the detected red and NIR flux excess is indicative of a stellar companion then the binary

  11. ISO Spectroscopy of Proto-Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this program was to determine the chemical properties of the dust shells around protoplanetary nebulae (PPNs) through a study of their short-wavelength (6-45 micron) infrared spectra. PPNs are evolved stars in transition from the asymptotic giant branch to the planetary nebula stages. Spectral features in the 10 to 20 gm region indicate the chemical nature (oxygen- or carbon-rich), and the strengths of the features relate to the physical properties of the shells. A few bright carbon-rich PPNs have been observed to show PAH features and an unidentified 21 micron emission feature. We used the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) to observe a sample of IRAS sources that have the expected properties of PPNs and for which we have accurate positions. Some of these have optical counterparts (proposal SWSPPN01) and some do not (SWSPPN02). We had previously observed these from the ground with near-infrared photometry and, for those with visible counterparts, visible photometry and spectroscopy, which we have combined with these new ISO data in the interpretation of the spectra. We have completed a study of the unidentified emission feature at 21 micron in eight sources. We find the shape of the feature to be the same in all of the sources, with no evidence of any substructure. The ratio of the emission peak to continuum ranges from 0.13 to 1.30. We have completed a study of seven PPNs and two other carbon-rich objects for which we had obtained ISO 2-45 micron observations. The unidentified emission features at 21 and 30 micron were detected in six sources, including four new detections of the 30 micron feature. This previously unresolved 30 micron feature was resolved and found to consist of a broad feature peaking at 27.2 micron (the "30 micron" feature) and a narrower feature peaking at 25.5 micron (the "26 micron" feature). This new 26 micron feature is detected in eight sources and is particularly strong in IRAS Z02229+6208 and 16594-4656. The unidentified

  12. The Very Fast Evolution of Bi-Lobed Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesicki, K.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Morisset, C.

    2015-12-01

    We study the kinematical ages of six Galactic bulge planetary nebulae selected purely on their bi-lobed morphology. The ages are derived from pseudo-3D photoionization and kinematical models, using HST images and UVES spectra and assuming axial symmetry. The bi-lobed nebulae show similar kinematical ages (˜1500 yrs), despite of their different sizes, expansion velocities and stellar temperatures.

  13. The Variable Central Star of Planetary Nebula NGC2346

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohoutek, L.

    1983-06-01

    NGC 2346, known already to Sir William Herschel, has been classified as a planetary nebula by R. Minkowski (1946) on the basis of its appearance on direct photographs. Morphologically it POssesses a distinct axial symmetry and belongs to the class of bipolar nebulae

  14. Asymmetry of planetary nebulae: Collimated ionized jets in butterfly nebulae and dust extinction effects in compact planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ting-Hui

    Planetary Nebulae (PNe) are the transition phase between asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and white dwarfs for stars with masses between 1 and 8 [Special characters omitted.] . Though originally thought to be explainable with simple models, the shapes of PNe have been found to be much more complex in striking images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope ( HST ). I have investigated two possible causes of the asymmetric appearances of PNe: collimated ionized winds and dust extinction. Narrow-waist bipolar nebulae (butterfly nebulae) may be sculpted by a collimated ionized wind from the central binary star system (Livio & Soker 2001). The system consists of a mass-losing AGB star that is responsible for the nebular material and a white dwarf companion star that is responsible for the ionizing flux. Motivated by the discovery of an ionized jet in the bipolar nebula M 2-9 (Lim & Kwok 2003) that may be responsible for sculpting the nebula's mirror-symmetric structure, I have searched for optically thick cores at radio wavelengths--a characteristic signature of collimated ionized winds-- in sixteen butterfly nebulae. 11 northern nebulae were observed with the Very Large Array (VLA) at 1.3 cm and 0.7 cm, and 5 southern nebulae were observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) at 6 cm and 3.6 cm. Two northern objects, 19W32 and M 1-91, and two southern objects, He 2-84 and Mz 3, were found to exhibit a compact radio core with a rising spectrum consistent with an ionized jet. Here I present an analysis of these four radio cores and discuss the implications of the results. The shape of PNe is predominantly axisymmetric. However, many PNe also exhibit non-axisymmetric structures. Non-axisymmetry, such as unequal intensity or size at the two sides, could be caused by the two sides having different amounts of dust extinction along the line of sight. To investigate whether dust extinction might cause the observed asymmetry, I use an indirect method to probe the

  15. Planetary Nebulae with Supporting IR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, J. Patrick

    1999-01-01

    We present new HST/WFPC2 imagery for the planetary nebula (PN) NGC 6818. Observations were made in line filters F437N, F487N, F502N, and F656N plus continuum filter F547M. The primary goal was to develop a high spatial resolution (approx. 0.1 in.) map of the intrinsic line ratio [O III] 4363/5007 and thereby evaluate the electron temperature (T(sub e)) and the mean-square T(sub e) variation (t(sup 2) across the PN. In this process we developed an extinction map from the F487N (H(beta)) and F656N (H(alpha)) images by comparing the observed line ratios in each pixel to the theoretical ratio and computing a c(H(beta)) map which was used to correct the observed 4363/5007 ratios for reddening. We also adjust for the continuum contribution to the line filter data. We present color-coded pictures of the reddening (c(H(beta))) map, the [O III] T(sub e) map, as well as our determinations of t(sup 2). The T(sub e) map shows a decline from approx. 14000 K in the inner regions to approx. 11000 K at the outer edge. Such a radial T(sub e) gradient is expected for a high-excitation nebula with a prominent He(++) zone such as NGC 6818. A composite of images taken in 3 filters (F656N, red; F487N, blue; and F502N, [O III] 5007, green) shows a roughly spherical outer envelope as well as a brighter vase-shaped interior "bubble". There is a prominent orifice to the North and a smaller one to the South, along the major axis, possibly caused by a blow-out from a fast wind. This nebula has an appearance remarkably similar to that of the PN NGC 3918 previously imaged with HST by H. Bond. We note from the continuum images (F547M) two stars in the nebular field that are fainter than the prominent central star; these are roughly 2-4 sec. N and NE of the central star. Further study is needed to establish whether or not there may be a physical association of either star with the central star.

  16. Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae in the LMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianchi, Luciana

    2004-01-01

    In FUSE cycle 2's program B001 we studied Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae (CSPN) in the Large Magellanic Could. All FUSE observations have been successfully completed and have been reduced, analyzed and published. The analysis and the results are summarized below. The FUSE data were reduced using the latest available version of the FUSE calibration pipeline (CALFUSE v2.2.2). The flux of these LMC post-AGB objects is at the threshold of FUSE's sensitivity, and thus special care in the background subtraction was needed during the reduction. Because of their faintness, the targets required many orbit-long exposures, each of which typically had low (target) count-rates. Each calibrated extracted sequence was checked for unacceptable count-rate variations (a sign of detector drift), misplaced extraction windows, and other anomalies. All the good calibrated exposures were combined using FUSE pipeline routines. The default FUSE pipeline attempts to model the background measured off-target and subtracts it from the target spectrum. We found that, for these faint objects, the background appeared to be over-estimated by this method, particularly at shorter wavelengths (i.e., < 1000 A). We therefore tried two other reductions. In the first method, subtraction of the measured background is turned off and and the background is taken to be the model scattered-light scaled by the exposure time. In the second one, the first few steps of the pipeline were run on the individual exposures (correcting for effects unique to each exposure such as Doppler shift, grating motions, etc). Then the photon lists from the individual exposures were combined, and the remaining steps of the pipeline run on the combined file. Thus, more total counts for both the target and background allowed for a better extraction.

  17. A survey for PAH emission in H II regions, planetary and proto-planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuizon, M.; Cox, P.; Lequeux, J.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a systematic investigation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission in H II regions, planetary nebulae (PN), and proto-planetary nebulae (PNN), are reported. Data is obtained from the low resolution spectra (LRS) of IRAS. The results show that: PAHs are formed in carbon rich objects; and PAH emission is ubiquitous in general interstellar medium and requires the presence of ultraviolet photons, in planetary and proto-planetary nebulae, PAH emission is seen only where an ionizing flux is present and in carbon rich objects.

  18. A Study of the Planetary Nebula M57

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archie, Deithra; Moore, Brian

    2000-01-01

    We present an overview of the objects known as planetary nebulae. These emission nebulae are the end-product of the evolution of a dying star. our ground-based imagery is of the most famous of these objects, M57, also known as the Ring Nebula. Taken with the 2.12-meter telescope at San Pedro Matir in Baja, Mexico, these seeing-limited images show variations in ionization, density and temperature as a function of position in the nebula. Our ground-based imagery is compared to similar HST archival images.

  19. A SURVEY FOR PLANETARY NEBULAE IN M31 GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jacoby, George H.; De Marco, Orsola; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Davies, James E.; Kaplan, Evan E-mail: rbc@astro.psu.edu E-mail: mglee@astrog.snu.ac.kr E-mail: hhwang@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: evanskaplan@gmail.com

    2013-05-20

    We report the results of an [O III] {lambda}5007 spectroscopic survey for planetary nebulae (PNe) located within the star clusters of M31. By examining R {approx} 5000 spectra taken with the WIYN+Hydra spectrograph, we identify 3 PN candidates in a sample of 274 likely globular clusters, 2 candidates in objects which may be globular clusters, and 5 candidates in a set of 85 younger systems. The possible PNe are all faint, between {approx}2.5 and {approx}6.8 mag down the PN luminosity function, and, partly as a consequence of our selection criteria, have high excitation, with [O III] {lambda}5007 to H{beta} ratios ranging from 2 to {approx}> 12. We discuss the individual candidates, their likelihood of cluster membership, and the possibility that they were formed via binary interactions within the clusters. Our data are consistent with the suggestion that PN formation within globular clusters correlates with binary encounter frequency, though, due to the small numbers and large uncertainties in the candidate list, this study does not provide sufficient evidence to confirm the hypothesis.

  20. A two-mode planetary nebula luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-González, A.; Hernández-Martínez, L.; Esquivel, A.; Raga, A. C.; Stasińska, G.; Peña, M.; Mayya, Y. D.

    2015-03-01

    Context. We propose a new planetary nebula luminosity function (PNLF) that includes two populations in the distribution. Our PNLF is a direct extension of the canonical function proposed by Jacoby et al. (1987), in order to avoid problems related with the histogram construction, it is cast in terms of cumulative functions. Aims: We are interested in recovering the shape of the faint part of the PNLF in a consistent manner, for galaxies with and without a dip in their PNLFs. Methods: The parameters for the two-mode PNLF are obtained with a genetic algorithm, which obtains a best fit to the PNLF varying all of the parameters simultaneously in a broad parameter space. Results: We explore a sample of nine galaxies with various Hubble types and construct their PNLF. All of the irregular galaxies, except one, are found to be consistent with a two-mode population, while the situation is less clear for ellipticals and spirals.For the case of NGC 6822, we show that the two-mode PNLF is consistent with previous studies of the star formation history within that galaxy. Our results support two episodes of star formation, in which the second episode is significantly stronger.

  1. Planetary nebula progenitors that swallow binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soker, Noam

    2016-01-01

    I propose that some irregular messy planetary nebulae (PNe) owe their morphologies to triple-stellar evolution where tight binary systems evolve inside and/or on the outskirts of the envelope of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. In some cases, the tight binary system can survive, in others, it is destroyed. The tight binary system might break up with one star leaving the system. In an alternative evolution, one of the stars of the broken-up tight binary system falls towards the AGB envelope with low specific angular momentum, and drowns in the envelope. In a different type of destruction process, the drag inside the AGB envelope causes the tight binary system to merge. This releases gravitational energy within the AGB envelope, leading to a very asymmetrical envelope ejection, with an irregular and messy PN as a descendant. The evolution of the triple-stellar system can be in a full common envelope evolution or in a grazing envelope evolution. Both before and after destruction (if destruction takes place), the system might launch pairs of opposite jets. One pronounced signature of triple-stellar evolution might be a large departure from axisymmetrical morphology of the descendant PN. I estimate that about one in eight non-spherical PNe is shaped by one of these triple-stellar evolutionary routes.

  2. Abundances in Eight M31 Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Kerry G.; Kwitter, Karen B.; Corradi, Romano; Galera-Rosillo, R.; Balick, Bruce; Henry, Richard B. C.

    2014-06-01

    As part of a continuing project using planetary nebulae (PNe) to study the chemical evolution and formation history of M31 (see accompanying poster by Balick et al.), we obtained spectra of eight PNe in the fall of 2013 with the OSIRIS spectrograph on the GTC. All of these PNe are located outside M31’s inner disk and bulge. Spectral coverage extended from 3700-7800Å with a resolution of ~6 Å. Especially important in abundance determinations is the detection of the weak, temperature-sensitive auroral line of [O III], at 4363Å, which is often contaminated by Hg I 4358Å from streetlights; the remoteness of the GTC eliminated this difficulty. We reduced and measured the spectra using IRAF, and derived nebular diagnostics and abundances with ELSA, our in-house five-level-atom program. Here we report the chemical abundances determined from these spectra. The bottom line is that the oxygen abundances in these PNe are all within a factor of 2-3 of the solar value, (as are all the other M31 PNe our team has previously measured) despite the significant range of galactocentric distance. Future work will use these abundances to constrain models of the central star to estimate progenitor masses and ages. In particular we will use the results to investigate the hypothesis that these PNe might represent a population related to the encounter between M31 and M33 ~3 Gy ago. We gratefully acknowledge support from Williams College.

  3. Spectroscopy of planetary nebulae in M 33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, L.; Perinotto, M.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Mampaso, A.

    2003-03-01

    Spectroscopic observations of 48 emission-line objects of M 33 have been obtained with the multi-object, wide field, fibre spectrograph AF2/WYFFOS at the 4.2 m WHT telescope (La Palma, Spain). Line intensities and logarithmic extinction, cbeta , are presented for 42 objects. Their location in the Sabbadin & D'Odorico diagnostic diagram (Hα /[S II] vs. Hα /[N II]) suggests that >70% of the candidates are Planetary Nebulae (PNe). Chemical abundances and nebular physical parameters have been derived for the three of the six PNe where the 4363 Å, [O II]i emission line was measurable. These are disc PNe, located within a galactocentric distance of 4.1 kpc, and, to date, they are the farthest PNe with a direct chemical abundance determination. No discrepancy in the helium, Oxygen and Argon abundances has been found in comparison with corresponding abundances of PNe in our Galaxy. Only a lower limit to the sulphur abundance has been obtained since we could not detect any [S III] line. N/H appears to be lower than the Galactic value; some possible explanations for this under-abundance are discussed. Based on observations obtained at the 4.2 m WHT telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias.

  4. Planetary nebulae in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, P.; Stanghellini, L.; Di Criscienzo, M.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Dell'Agli, F.

    2016-08-01

    We analyse the planetary nebulae (PNe) population of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), based on evolutionary models of stars with metallicities in the range 10-3 ≤ Z ≤ 4 × 10-3 and mass 0.9 M⊙ < M < 8 M⊙, evolved through the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. The models used account for dust formation in the circumstellar envelope. To characterize the PNe sample of the SMC, we compare the observed abundances of the various species with the final chemical composition of the AGB models: this study allows us to identify the progenitors of the PNe observed, in terms of mass and chemical composition. According to our interpretation, most of the PNe descend from low-mass (M < 2 M⊙) stars, which become carbon rich, after experiencing repeated third dredge-up episodes, during the AGB phase. A fraction of the PNe showing the signature of advanced CNO processing are interpreted as the progeny of massive AGB stars, with mass above ˜6 M⊙, undergoing strong hot bottom burning. The differences with the chemical composition of the PNe population of the Large Magellanic Cloud is explained on the basis of the diverse star formation history and age-metallicity relation of the two galaxies. The implications of this study for some still highly debated points regarding the AGB evolution are also commented.

  5. Absolute spectrophotometry of northern compact planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, S. A.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Perinotto, M.

    2005-06-01

    We present medium-dispersion spectra and narrowband images of six northern compact planetary nebulae (PNe): BoBn 1, DdDm 1, IC 5117, M 1-5, M 1-71, and NGC 6833. From broad-slit spectra, total absolute fluxes and equivalent widths were measured for all observable emission lines. High signal-to-noise emission line fluxes of Hα, Hβ, [Oiii], [Nii], and HeI may serve as emission line flux standards for northern hemisphere observers. From narrow-slit spectra, we derive systemic radial velocities. For four PNe, available emission line fluxes were measured with sufficient signal-to-noise to probe the physical properties of their electron densities, temperatures, and chemical abundances. BoBn 1 and DdDm 1, both type IV PNe, have an Hβ flux over three sigma away from previous measurements. We report the first abundance measurements of M 1-71. NGC 6833 measured radial velocity and galactic coordinates suggest that it is associated with the outer arm or possibly the galactic halo, and its low abundance ([O/H]=1.3× 10-4) may be indicative of low metallicity within that region.

  6. Planetary nebulae in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, P.; Stanghellini, L.; Di Criscienzo, M.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Dell'Agli, F.

    2016-08-01

    We analyse the planetary nebulae (PNe) population of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), based on evolutionary models of stars with metallicities in the range $10^{-3} \\leq Z \\leq 4\\times 10^{-3}$ and mass $0.9 M\\odot < M < 8M\\odot$, evolved through the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. The models used account for dust formation in the circumstellar envelope. To characterise the PNe sample of the SMC, we compare the observed abundances of the various species with the final chemical composition of the AGB models: this study allows us to identify the progenitors of the PNe observed, in terms of mass and chemical composition. According to our interpretation, most of the PNe descend from low-mass ($M < 2 M\\odot$) stars, which become carbon rich, after experiencing repeated third dredge-up episodes, during the AGB phase. A fraction of the PNe showing the signature of advanced CNO processing are interpreted as the progeny of massive AGB stars, with mass above $\\sim 6 M\\odot$, undergoing strong hot bottom burning. The differences with the chemical composition of the PNe population of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is explained on the basis of the diverse star formation history and age-metallicity relation of the two galaxies. The implications of the present study for some still highly debated points regarding the AGB evolution are also commented.

  7. The Chemical Diversity of Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Geballe, T. R.; Sterling, N. C.

    2014-01-01

    The metallicity of the progenitor star of a planetary nebula (PN) can be inferred from measurements of elements whose abundances are unaffected by nucleosynthesis during the star’s evolution. In practice, nearly all of the observable elements that qualify, such as O, Ne, S, and Ar, are α species (built up by α-capture reactions). On the other hand, the total elemental abundances of the Fe-group nuclei are not directly measurable in ionized nebulae due to the highly refractory character of Fe and most other Fe-group elements. Although emission lines of several Fe ions are seen in many PNe, they generally indicate mildly to severely subsolar gas-phase abundances that are interpreted as the consequence of depletion into dust. The identification of a near-infrared emission line of Zn, the least refractory (by far) Fe-group element, by Dinerstein & Geballe (2001, ApJ, 562, 515) provided the first practical tracer of Fe/H in PNe. In this poster, we recap results to date from observations of Zn in 21 PNe from a range of Milky Way populations including the thin and thick disk and three Local Group dwarf galaxies. Combined with the results of Smith, Zijlstra, & Dinerstein (2013, MNRAS, submitted) for several objects in the Galactic Bulge, we find that PNe echo the abundance patterns of their parent populations: PNe with spatio-kinematic properties of Fe-poor stellar populations (e.g. the thick disk and bulge) tend to have subsolar zinc (<[Zn/H]> ≈ -0.6 dex) accompanied by elevated [O/Zn]. This conforms to the composition profile of the corresponding stars, if [Zn/H] and [O/Zn] can be taken as proxies for [Fe/H] and [α/Fe] respectively. Deducing the Fe/H metallicity of a PN from an α element alone is inadvisable, as a low-[Fe/H], high-[α/Fe] pattern is indistinguishable from one of solar [Fe/H] and [α/Fe]. To estimate [Fe/H] in a PN for which Zn measurements are unavailable or not feasible, the best approach is to measure an α species and scale by [α/Fe] typical

  8. On planetary nebulae as sources of carbon dust: Infrared emission from planetary nebulae of the galactic halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Lester, Daniel F.

    1990-01-01

    Planetary nebulae of the galactic disk are generally seen to emit a thermal continuum due to dust grains heated by stellar and nebular photons. This continuum typically peaks between 25 and 60 micron m, so that the total power emitted by the dust is sampled well by the broad-band measurements made by IRAS. Researchers examine here the characteristics of the infrared emission from the four planetary nebulae which are believed on the basis of their low overall metallicities to belong to the halo population. These nebulae are of particular interest because they are the most metal-poor ionized nebulae known in our Galaxy, and offer the opportunity to probe possible dependences of the dust properties on nebular composition. Researchers present fluxes extracted from co-addition of the IRAS data, as well as ground-based near infrared measurements. Each of the four halo objects, including the planetary nebula in the globular cluster M15, is detected in at least one infrared band. Researchers compare the estimated infrared excesses of these nebulae (IRE, the ratio of measured infrared power to the power available in the form of resonantly-trapped Lyman alpha photons) to those of disk planetary nebulae with similar densities but more normal abundances. Three of the halo planetaries have IRE values similar to those of the disk nebulae, despite the fact that their Fe- and Si-peak gas phase abundances are factors of 10 to 100 lower. However, these halo nebulae have normal or elevated C/H ratios, due to nuclear processing and mixing in their red giant progenitors. Unlike the other halo planetaries, DDDM1 is deficient in carbon as well as in the other light metals. This nebula has a substantially lower IRE than the other halo planetaries, and may be truly dust efficient. Researchers suggest that the deficiency is due to a lack of the raw material for producing carbon-based grains, and that the main bulk constituent of the dust in these planetary nebulae is carbon.

  9. Abundances of Planetary Nebula NGC 5315

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pottasch, S. R.; Beintema, D. A.; Koorneef, J.; Salas, J. Bernard; Feibelman, W. A.; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The ISO and IUE spectra of the elliptical nebula NGC 5315 is presented. These spectra axe combined with the spectra in the visual wavelength region to obtain a complete, extinction corrected, spectrum. The chemical composition of the nebulae is then calculated and compared to previous determinations. The HST Nicmos observations of the nebula in 3 emission lines are also presented. These observations are used to determine the helium abundance as a function of position in the nebula. A discussion is given of possible evolutionary effects.

  10. Asymmetric Planetary Nebulae VI: the conference summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, O.

    2014-04-01

    The Asymmetric Planetary Nebulae conference series, now in its sixth edition, aims to resolve the shaping mechanism of PN. Eighty percent of PN have non spherical shapes and during this conference the last nails in the coffin of single stars models for non spherical PN have been put. Binary theories abound but observational tests are lagging. The highlight of APN6 has been the arrival of ALMA which allowed us to measure magnetic fields on AGB stars systematically. AGB star halos, with their spiral patterns are now connected to PPN and PN halos. New models give us hope that binary parameters may be decoded from these images. In the post-AGB and pre-PN evolutionary phase the naked post-AGB stars present us with an increasingly curious puzzle as complexity is added to the phenomenologies of objects in transition between the AGB and the central star regimes. Binary central stars continue to be detected, including the first detection of longer period binaries, however a binary fraction is still at large. Hydro models of binary interactions still fail to give us results, if we make an exception for the wider types of binary interactions. More promise is shown by analytical considerations and models driven by simpler, 1D simulations such as those carried out with the code MESA. Large community efforts have given us more homogeneous datasets which will yield results for years to come. Examples are the ChanPlaN and HerPlaNe collaborations that have been working with the Chandra and Herschel space telescopes, respectively. Finally, the new kid in town is the intermediate-luminosity optical transient, a new class of events that may have contributed to forming several peculiar PN and pre-PN.

  11. Planetary Nebula Kinematics in M101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Ciardullo, Robin

    2011-02-01

    Look at a spiral; what do you see? Stars zooming `round in the galaxy! Their motions indicate total mass, but how much is DM, stars, and gas? Study motions in and out; first find monochromatic stars- that's my kind. Find us, get our velocities, then: determine disk mass! I'm a PN! Rotation curves indicate the total mass of spirals, but halo mass profiles cannot be decoupled from the visible disk mass using rotation curves alone. To break this disk-halo degeneracy, we have been using planetary nebulae (PNe) to measure the z-component of the stellar velocity dispersion in the disks of face-on spirals. These measurements of σ_z, coupled with straightforward assumptions, have yielded disk surface mass estimates over several scale lengths (h_R) in 6 spirals. We find that in the inner regions of galaxies (R < 3.5 h_R), the values of σ_z are consistent with those expected from a constant mass-to-light ratio (M/L), constant scale-height disk and this trend continues into the outer regions of M74 and IC 342. However, in M83 and M94, σ_z flattens and becomes constant with radius. We have interpreted this as evidence for satellite accretion with disk flaring, but an increasing disk M/L may also contribute to the behavior. To investigate this phenomenon more thoroughly, we are proposing to extend the survey of an additional galaxy, M101, to R > 8 h_R. Last year we imaged M101 with the wide-field Mosaic camera on the KPNO 4-m telescope. This proposal is to perform follow-up spectroscopy on ~240 PNe in M101 with WIYN/Hydra.

  12. Molecular chemistry and the missing mass problem in planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, R. K.; Gruenwald, R.; Aleman, I.

    2012-05-01

    Context. Detections of molecular lines, mainly from H2 and CO, reveal molecular material in planetary nebulae. Observations of a variety of molecules suggest that the molecular composition in these objects differs from that found in interstellar clouds or in circumstellar envelopes. The success of the models, which are mostly devoted to explain molecular densities in specific planetary nebulae, is still partial however. Aims: The present study aims at identifying the influence of stellar and nebular properties on the molecular composition of planetary nebulae by means of chemical models. A comparison of theoretical results with those derived from the observations may provide clues to the conditions that favor the presence of a particular molecule. Methods: A self-consistent photoionization numerical code was adapted to simulate cold molecular regions beyond the ionized zone. The code was used to obtain a grid of models and the resulting column densities are compared with those inferred from observations. Results: Our models show that the inclusion of an incident flux of X-rays is required to explain the molecular composition derived for planetary nebulae. We also obtain a more accurate relation for the N(CO)/N(H2) ratio in these objects. Molecular masses obtained by previous works in the literature were then recalculated, showing that these masses can be underestimated by up to three orders of magnitude. We conclude that the problem of the missing mass in planetary nebulae can be solved by a more accurate calculation of the molecular mass.

  13. A Survey for hot Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae I. Methods and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanarek, Graham C.; Shara, Michael M.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Zurek, David; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of initial spectrographic followup with the Very Large Telescope (UT3, Melipal) for Ks ≥ 14 Galactic plane C IV emission-line candidates in the near-infrared (NIR). These 7 faint stars all display prominent He I and/or C IV emission lines characteristic of a carbon-rich Wolf-Rayet star. They have NIR colours which are much too blue to be those of distant, classical WR stars. The magnitudes and colours are compatible with those expected for central stars of planetary nebulae, and are likely to come from massive progenitor populations. Our survey has identified thousands of such candidates.

  14. The Stingray nebula: watching the rapid evolution of a newly born planetary nebula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrowsky, M.; Sahu, K. C.; Parthasarathy, M.; García-Lario, Pedro

    The formation and early evolution of planetary nebulae represent one of the most poorly understood phases of stellar evolution ( Kwok, 1987; Maddox, 1995). One of the youngest, the Stingray Nebula (He3-1357) ( Henize, 1967; Henize, 1976), shows all the tell-tale signs of a newly born planetary nebula: it has become ionized only within the past few decades ( Parthasarathy et al., 1993); the mass-loss from the central star has ceased within the past few years; and the central star is becoming hotter and fainter as expected from a star on its way to becoming a DA white dwarf ( Parthasarathy et al., 1995). The Stingray Nebula thus provides the ideal laboratory for examining the early structure and evolution of this class of objects. Images of the Stingray Nebula, obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope, show for the first time that its multiple expulsions of matter are focused by an equatorial ring and bubbles of gas located on opposite sides of the ring ( Bobrowsky et al., 1995). The position angle of the outflows has changed, possibly as a result of precessional motion induced by the presence of a companion star. This is consistent with the precessing jet model by Livio & Pringle (1996). Indeed, we have reported the discovery of a companion star in the Stingray Nebula ( Bobrowsky et al., 1998). Finally, we present evidence of the companion star dynamically distorting the gas in this newly-born planetary nebula.

  15. On the formation of ansae in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soker, Noam

    1990-01-01

    Formation mechanisms for the two optical bright knots in planetary nebulae, 'ansae', are investigated. Adiabatic two-dimensional numerical simulations of the interacting winds flow at early stages of the planetary nebulae evolution are performed. It is found that no real focusing of the shocked fast wind material toward the symmetry axis occurs, and thus the interaction of winds by itself will not form the ansae. A model is proposed, in which jets from the central star form the ansae. These jets are presumably being formed during the few hundred years in the period between the end of the slow wind and the beginning of the fast wind. It is shown that a companion to the progenitor red giant can lead to the degree of asymmetry observed in elliptical planetary nebulae.

  16. The abundances of neon, sulfur, and argon in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, S. C.; Lacy, J. H.; Townes, C. H.; Aller, L. H.; Geballe, T. R.; Baas, F.

    1981-01-01

    New infrared observations of Ne II, Ar III, and S IV are used in optical observations of other ionization states of the considered elements to evaluate the abundances of neon, argon, and sulfur in 18 planetary nebulae. Attention is also given to one or more of the infrared lines in 18 other nebulae. It is pointed out that S IV was detected in approximately 90% of the observed objects, while Ar III was found in about 80%, and Ne II in roughly one-third. It is noted that optical observations typically include only a limited region of the nebula, while the infrared measurements frequently involve integration over the entire nebular image.

  17. Planetary Nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopita, M. A.

    The relative closeness, the low reddening, and accurately known distance to the Magellanic Clouds give the ideal set of circumstances to pursue quantitative examinations of individual stellar at metallicities lower than solar. Our understanding of the population of PN in the Magellanic Clouds has been much enhanced recently by imaging and spectroscopic studies using the HST. With the HST, details of the internal nebular structure are resolved as well as ground-based telescopes resolve galactic PN. In the UV, the low line of sight reddening ensures that high signal to noise nebular and central star spectra can be obtained; sufficient to examine the P-Cygni profiles of the mass-losing central stars in some cases. In conjuction with ground-based spectrophotometry, absolute flux, expansion velocity and density information, this data set permits fully self consistent diameters, ages, masses, and abundances to be derived for the nebulae, and the central stars can be accurately placed on the H-R Diagram. Thus, we can examine the details of the evolution, and of the mass- and age-dependent dredge-up processes in a way which is just not possible in the case of Galactic PN. A brief summary of the highlights of the results: * The younger, low excitation, compact planetary nebulae appear to have a central reservoir of dense atomic and molecular gas. This gas lies close to the central star and is undergoing ionisation and being accelerated into outflow, consistent with the "two-wind" model of PN evolution and shaping. * The PN previously classified as nitrogen-rich objects (Peimbert Type I), show the bipolar "butterfly" symmetry that is also a characteristic of their Galactic counterparts. These have been shown to have the most massive precursor stars, as had been long suspected for the Galactic Type I PN. * The PN divide into two evolutionary groups according to kinematic age / size relationships, which may be identified with stars which leave the AGB as He- or as H- burners

  18. The "Príncipes de Asturias" nebula: a new quadrupolar planetary nebula from the IPHAS survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mampaso, A.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Viironen, K.; Leisy, P.; Greimel, R.; Drew, J. E.; Barlow, M. J.; Frew, D. J.; Irwin, J.; Morris, R. A. H.; Parker, Q. A.; Phillipps, S.; Rodríguez-Flores, E. R.; Zijlstra, A. A.

    2006-10-01

    Context: .The Isaac Newton Telescope Photometric Hα Survey (IPHAS) is currently mapping the Northern Galactic plane reaching to r'=20 mag with typically 1primeprime resolution. Hundreds of Planetary Nebulae (PNe), both point-like and resolved, are expected to be discovered. We report on the discovery of the first new PN from this survey: it is an unusual object located at a large galactocentric distance and has a very low oxygen abundance. Aims: .Detecting and studying new PNe will lead to improved estimates of the population size, binary fraction and lifetimes, and yield new insights into the chemistry of the interstellar medium at large galactocentric distances. Methods: .Compact nebulae are searched for in the IPHAS photometric catalogue, selecting those candidates with a strong Hα excess in the r'-Hα vs. r'-i' colour-colour diagram. Searches for extended nebulae are by visual inspection of the mosaics of continuum-subtracted Hα images at a spatial sampling of 5×5 arcsec^2. Follow-up spectroscopy enables confirmation of the PNe, and their physico-chemical study. Results: .The first planetary nebula discovered via IPHAS imagery shows an intricate morphology: there is an inner ring surrounding the central star, bright inner lobes with an enhanced waist, and very faint lobular extensions reaching up to more than 100''. We classify it as a quadrupolar PN, a rather unusual class of planetary showing two pairs of misaligned lobes. From long-slit spectroscopy we derive T_e[ Nii] =12 800±1000 K, Ne = 390±40 cm-3, and chemical abundances typical of Peimbert's type I nebulae (He/H =0.13, N/O =1.8) with an oxygen abundance of 12+log(O/H)=8.17±0.15. A kinematic distance of 7.0+4.5-3.0 kpc is derived, implying an unusually large size of >4 pc for the nebula. The photometry of the central star indicates the presence of a relatively cool companion. This, and the evidence for a dense circumstellar disk and quadrupolar morphology, all of which are rare among PNe, support

  19. Interacting winds and the shaping of planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soker, Noam; Livio, Mario

    1989-01-01

    Using two-dimensional hydrodynamics, the problem of shaping of planetary nebulae by the interacting winds model is studied. The shock structure is obtained and it is shown that interacting winds are capable of producing morphologies similar to the ones observed in planetary nebulae, provided that a density contrast exists between the equatorial and polar directions. This confirms recent suggestions by Balick. Mechanisms that can produce the required density contrast are discussed and it is shown that binary central stars provide the most natural mechanism, especially via common envelope evolution. It is not yet entirely clear whether stellar rotation is sufficient to generate the required contrast in the case of single central stars.

  20. Planetary nebulae in 2014: A review of research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zijlstra, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Planetary nebulae had a double anniversary in 2014, 250 years since their discovery and 150 years since the correct spectroscopic identification. This paper gives an overview of planetary nebula research published in 2014. Topics include surveys, central stars, abundances, morphologies, magnetic fields, stellar population and galactic dynamics. An important continuing controversy is the discrepancy between recombination-line and forbidden-line abundances. A new controversy is the relation between symbiotic stars and [WC] stars. PN of the year is undoubtedly CRL 618, with papers on its binary symbiotic/[WC] nucleus, rapid stellar evolution, expanding jets and magnetic fields.

  1. Investigating potential planetary nebula/cluster pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moni Bidin, C.; Majaess, D.; Bonatto, C.; Mauro, F.; Turner, D.; Geisler, D.; Chené, A.-N.; Gormaz-Matamala, A. C.; Borissova, J.; Kurtev, R. G.; Minniti, D.; Carraro, G.; Gieren, W.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Fundamental parameters characterizing the end-state of intermediate-mass stars may be constrained by discovering planetary nebulae (PNe) in open clusters (OCs). Cluster membership may be exploited to establish the distance, luminosity, age, and physical size for PNe, and the intrinsic luminosity and mass of its central star. Aims: Four potential PN-OC associations were investigated to assess the cluster membership for the PNe. Methods: Radial velocities were measured from intermediate-resolution optical spectra, complemented with previous estimates in the literature. When the radial velocity study supported the PN/OC association, we analyzed whether other parameters (e.g., age, distance, reddening, central star brightness) were consistent with this conclusion. Results: Our measurements imply that the PNe VBe 3 and HeFa 1 are not members of the OCs NGC 5999 and NGC 6067, respectively, and that they very likely belong to the background bulge population. Conversely, consistent radial velocities indicate that NGC 2452/NGC 2453 could be associated, but our results are not conclusive so additional observations are warranted. Finally, we demonstrate that all the available information point to He 2-86 being a young, highly internally obscured PN member of NGC 4463. New near-infrared photometry acquired via the Vista Variables in the Via Lactea ESO public survey was used in tandem with existing UBV photometry to measure the distance, reddening, and age of NGC 4463, finding d = 1.55 ± 0.10 kpc, E(B - V) = 0.41 ± 0.02, and τ = 65 ± 10 Myr, respectively. The same values should be adopted for the PN if the proposed cluster membership is confirmed. Based on observations gathered with ESO-VISTA telescope (program ID 172.B-2002).Based on observations gathered at Las Campanas observatory (program ID CN2012A-080).The spectra as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  2. Infrared Study of Fullerene Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hernández, D. A.; Villaver, E.; García-Lario, P.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Manchado, A.; Stanghellini, L.; Shaw, R. A.; Cataldo, F.

    2012-12-01

    We present a study of 16 planetary nebulae (PNe) where fullerenes have been detected in their Spitzer Space Telescope spectra. This large sample of objects offers a unique opportunity to test conditions of fullerene formation and survival under different metallicity environments because we are analyzing five sources in our own Galaxy, four in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), and seven in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Among the 16 PNe studied, we present the first detection of C60 (and possibly also C70) fullerenes in the PN M 1-60 as well as of the unusual ~6.6, 9.8, and 20 μm features (attributed to possible planar C24) in the PN K 3-54. Although selection effects in the original samples of PNe observed with Spitzer may play a potentially significant role in the statistics, we find that the detection rate of fullerenes in C-rich PNe increases with decreasing metallicity (~5% in the Galaxy, ~20% in the LMC, and ~44% in the SMC) and we interpret this as a possible consequence of the limited dust processing occurring in Magellanic Cloud (MC) PNe. CLOUDY photoionization modeling matches the observed IR fluxes with central stars that display a rather narrow range in effective temperature (~30,000-45,000 K), suggesting a common evolutionary status of the objects and similar fullerene formation conditions. Furthermore, the data suggest that fullerene PNe likely evolve from low-mass progenitors and are usually of low excitation. We do not find a metallicity dependence on the estimated fullerene abundances. The observed C60 intensity ratios in the Galactic sources confirm our previous finding in the MCs that the fullerene emission is not excited by the UV radiation from the central star. CLOUDY models also show that line- and wind-blanketed model atmospheres can explain many of the observed [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratios using photoionization, suggesting that possibly the UV radiation from the central star, and not shocks, is triggering the decomposition of the

  3. INFRARED STUDY OF FULLERENE PLANETARY NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Manchado, A.; Garcia-Lario, P.; Stanghellini, L.; Shaw, R. A.; Cataldo, F. E-mail: amt@iac.es E-mail: Pedro.Garcia-Lario@sciops.esa.int E-mail: letizia@noao.edu

    2012-12-01

    We present a study of 16 planetary nebulae (PNe) where fullerenes have been detected in their Spitzer Space Telescope spectra. This large sample of objects offers a unique opportunity to test conditions of fullerene formation and survival under different metallicity environments because we are analyzing five sources in our own Galaxy, four in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), and seven in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Among the 16 PNe studied, we present the first detection of C{sub 60} (and possibly also C{sub 70}) fullerenes in the PN M 1-60 as well as of the unusual {approx}6.6, 9.8, and 20 {mu}m features (attributed to possible planar C{sub 24}) in the PN K 3-54. Although selection effects in the original samples of PNe observed with Spitzer may play a potentially significant role in the statistics, we find that the detection rate of fullerenes in C-rich PNe increases with decreasing metallicity ({approx}5% in the Galaxy, {approx}20% in the LMC, and {approx}44% in the SMC) and we interpret this as a possible consequence of the limited dust processing occurring in Magellanic Cloud (MC) PNe. CLOUDY photoionization modeling matches the observed IR fluxes with central stars that display a rather narrow range in effective temperature ({approx}30,000-45,000 K), suggesting a common evolutionary status of the objects and similar fullerene formation conditions. Furthermore, the data suggest that fullerene PNe likely evolve from low-mass progenitors and are usually of low excitation. We do not find a metallicity dependence on the estimated fullerene abundances. The observed C{sub 60} intensity ratios in the Galactic sources confirm our previous finding in the MCs that the fullerene emission is not excited by the UV radiation from the central star. CLOUDY models also show that line- and wind-blanketed model atmospheres can explain many of the observed [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratios using photoionization, suggesting that possibly the UV radiation from the central star, and

  4. Imaging the Elusive H-poor Gas in the High adf Planetary Nebula NGC 6778

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Rojas, Jorge; Corradi, Romano L. M.; Monteiro, Hektor; Jones, David; Rodríguez-Gil, Pablo; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    We present the first direct image of the high-metallicity gas component in a planetary nebula (NGC 6778), taken with the OSIRIS Blue Tunable Filter centered on the O ii λ4649+50 Å optical recombination lines (ORLs) at the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias. We show that the emission of these faint O ii ORLs is concentrated in the central parts of the planetary nebula and is not spatially coincident either with emission coming from the bright [O iii] λ5007 Å collisionally excited line (CEL) or the bright Hα recombination line. From monochromatic emission line maps taken with VIMOS at the 8.2 m Very Large Telescope, we find that the spatial distribution of the emission from the auroral [O iii] λ4363 line resembles that of the O ii ORLs but differs from nebular [O iii] λ5007 CEL distribution, implying a temperature gradient inside the planetary nebula. The centrally peaked distribution of the O ii emission and the differences with the [O iii] and H i emission profiles are consistent with the presence of an H-poor gas whose origin may be linked to the binarity of the central star. However, determination of the spatial distribution of the ORLs and CELs in other PNe and a comparison of their dynamics are needed to further constrain the geometry and ejection mechanism of the metal-rich (H-poor) component and hence, understand the origin of the abundance discrepancy problem in PNe.

  5. PLANETARY NEBULAE IN FACE-ON SPIRAL GALAXIES. II. PLANETARY NEBULA SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Ciardullo, Robin E-mail: rbc@astro.psu.ed

    2009-09-20

    As the second step in our investigation of the mass-to-light ratio of spiral disks, we present the results of a spectroscopic survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in five nearby, low-inclination galaxies: IC 342, M74 (NGC 628), M83 (NGC 5236), M94 (NGC 4736), and M101 (NGC 5457). Using 50 setups of the WIYN/Hydra and Blanco/Hydra spectrographs, and 25 observations with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope's Medium Resolution Spectrograph, we determine the radial velocities of 99, 102, 162, 127, and 48 PNe, respectively, to a precision better than 15 km s{sup -1}. Although the main purpose of this data set is to facilitate dynamical mass measurements throughout the inner and outer disks of large spiral galaxies, our spectroscopy has other uses as well. Here, we co-add these spectra to show that, to first order, the [O III] and Balmer line ratios of PNe vary little over the top {approx}1.5 mag of the PN luminosity function. The only obvious spectral change occurs with [N II], which increases in strength as one proceeds down the luminosity function. We also show that typical [O III]-bright planetaries have E(B - V) {approx} 0.2 of circumstellar extinction, and that this value is virtually independent of [O III] luminosity. We discuss the implications this has for understanding the population of PN progenitors.

  6. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    Fainting is a temporary loss of consciousness. If you're about to faint, you'll feel dizzy, ... at the same time, and may fall down. Fainting usually happens when your blood pressure drops suddenly, ...

  7. Probing Early-Type Galaxy Halos Using Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrifield, Michael; Arnaboldi, Magda; Coccato, Lodovico; Gerhard, Ortwin; Napolitano, Nicola; Pulsoni, Claudia; Planetary Nebula Spectrograph Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Planetary nebulae offer an invaluable probe of the stellar kinematics at very large radii in early-type galaxies, reaching regimes where we can learn about both the dark matter halo of the system and the formation history of the stellar component. We present results from the largest kinematic survey to-date of extragalactic planetary nebulae in the outer halos early-type galaxies, obtained using the custom Planetary Nebula Spectrograph instrument. The survey currently comprises validated homogeneous catalogs for 33 early-type galaxies, with data typically extending to beyond 5 effective radii.This survey confirms that planetary nebulae trace the bulk stellar population very closely, allowing these data to be combined with more conventional absorption-line spectral studies at smaller radii. Analysis shows that: (1) there is a kinematic dichotomy amongst the galaxies between those that display rapidly-falling velocity disperson profiles and those where the dispersion remains roughly constant with radius - a distinction that reflects both orbital and mass profile differences; (2) rotation in outer regions correlates strongly with rotation in inner regions - they are fairly monolithic systems; (3) the velocity field usually contains symmetries that indicate triaxiality; (4) some systems have outer velocity fields that imply these regions are not in any sort of equilibrium.

  8. Optical Spectrum of the Compact Planetary Nebula IC 5117

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyung, Siek; Aller, Lawrence H.; Feibelman, Walter A.; Lee, Seong-Jae; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    High resolution spectroscopic data of the very compact planetary nebula IC 5117 are obtained in the optical wavelengths, 3700A - 10050A, with the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory, and which have been analyzed along with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) UV archive data. Although a diagnostic diagram shows significant density and temperature fluctuations, our analysis indicates that the nebular gas may be represented by a homogeneous shell of extremely high density gas, N(sub epsilon) approx. 90 000 /cu cm. The average electron temperatures, e.g. indicated by the [OIII] diagnostics, are around 12 000 K. We construct a photoionization model to represent most of the observed line intensities, and the physical condition of this compact nebulosity. Based on the semi-empirical ionization correction approach, and model indications, we derived the elemental abundances: He, C, N, O, Ne, and Ar appear to be normal or marginally depleted compared to the average planetary nebula, while the remaining elements, S, Cl, and K appear to be enhanced. IC 5117 is perhaps a very young compact planetary nebula, slightly more evolved than the other well-known compact planetary nebula IC 4997. The central stellar temperature is likely to be around 120 000 K, evolved from a C-rich AGB progenitor.

  9. The spectrum of planetary nebula K 1-27

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henize, K. G.; Fairall, A. P.

    1981-01-01

    The spectrum of K 1-27 shows He II 4686 stronger than either H-beta or forbidden O III 4959. K 1-27 therefore appears to belong to the small group of old, very hot planetary nebulae which also includes NGC 246, NGC 4361, and Abell 36.

  10. The Extended Region Around the Planetary Nebula NGC 3242

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This ultraviolet image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows NGC 3242, a planetary nebula frequently referred to as 'Jupiter's Ghost.'

    The unfortunate name of 'planetary nebula' for this class of celestial object is a historical legacy credited to William Herschel during the 18th century a time when telescopes where small and objects like these, at least the central region, looked very similar to gas-giant planets such as Saturn and Jupiter. In fact, NGC 3242 has no relation to Jupiter or any other planet.

    Telescopes and their detectors have dramatically improved over the past few centuries. Our understanding of what planetary nebulae truly are has improved accordingly.

    When stars with a mass similar to our sun approach the end of their lives by exhausting supplies of hydrogen and helium fuel in their cores, they swell up into cool red-giant stars. In a last gasp before death, they expel the layers of gas in their outer atmosphere. This exposes the core of the dying star, a dense hot ball of carbon and oxygen called a white dwarf. The white dwarf is so hot that it shines very brightly in the ultraviolet. The ultraviolet light from the white dwarf, in turn, ionizes the gaseous material expelled by the star causing it to glow. A planetary nebula is really the death of a low-mass star.

    Although low-mass stars like our sun live for billions of years, planetary nebulae only last for about ten thousand years. As the central white dwarf quickly cools and the ultraviolet light dwindles, the surrounding gas also cools and fades.

    In this image of NGC 3242 from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, the extended region around the planetary nebula is shown in dramatic detail. The small circular white and blue area at the center of the image is the well-known portion of the famous planetary nebula. The precise origin and composition of the extended wispy white features is not known for certain. It is most likely material ejected during the star's red

  11. Carbon Chemistry in Planetary Nebulae: Observations of the CCH Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Deborah Rose; Ziurys, Lucy

    2015-08-01

    The presence of infrared (IR) emission features observed in interstellar environments is consistent with models that suggest they are produced by complex organic species containing both aliphatic and aromatic components (Kwok & Zhang 2011). These IR signals change drastically over the course of the AGB, proto-planetary, and planetary nebulae phases, and this dramatic variation is yet to be understood. The radical CCH is a potential tracer of carbon chemistry and its evolution in dying stars. CCH is very common in carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes of AGB stars, and is present in the proto-planetary nebulae. It has also been observed at one position in the very young planetary nebula, NGC 7027 (Hasegawa & Kwok 2001), as well as at one position in the Helix Nebula (Tenenbaum et al. 2009) - a dense clump east of the central white dwarf. In order to further probe the chemistry of carbon, we have initiated a search for CCH in eight PNe previously detected in HCN and HCO+ from a survey conducted by Schmidt and Ziurys, using the telescopes of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). Observations of the N=1→0 transition of CCH at 87 GHz have been conducted using the new ARO 12-m ALMA prototype antenna, while measurements of the N=3→2 transition at 262 GHz are being made with the ARO Sub-Millimeter Telescope (SMT). We also have extended our study in the Helix Nebula. Thus far, CCH has been detected at 8 new positions across the Helix Nebula, and appears to be widespread in this source. The radical has also been identified in K4-47, M3-28, K3-17, and K3-58. These sources represent a range of nebular ages. Additional observations are currently being conducted for CCH in other PNe, as well as abundance analyses. These results will be presented.

  12. A Detailed Study of the Structure of the Nested Planetary Nebula, Hb 12, the Matryoshka Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. M.; López, J. A.; Edwards, M. L.; Winge, C.

    2014-11-01

    We present near-IR, integral field spectroscopic observations of the planetary nebula (PN) Hb 12 using Near-infrared Integral Field Spectrograph (NIFS) on Gemini-North. Combining NIFS with the adaptive optics system Altair, we provide a detailed study of the core and inner structure of this PN. We focus the analysis in the prominent emission lines [Fe II] (1.6436 μm), He I (2.0585 μm), H2 (2.1214 μm), and Brγ (2.16553 μm). We find that the [Fe II] emission traces a tilted system of bipolar lobes, with the northern lobe being redshifted and the southern lobe blueshifted. The [Fe II] emission is very faint at the core and only present close to the systemic velocity. There is no H2 emission in the core, whereas the core is prominent in the He I and Brγ recombination lines. The H2 emission is concentrated in equatorial arcs of emission surrounding the core and expanding at ~30 km s-1. These arcs are compared with Hubble Space Telescope images and shown to represent nested loops belonging to the inner sections of a much larger bipolar structure that replicates the inner one. The He I and Brγ emission from the core clearly show a cylindrical central cavity that seems to represent the inner walls of an equatorial density enhancement or torus. The torus is 0.''2 wide (≡200 AU radius at a distance of 2000 pc) and expanding at <=30 km s-1. The eastern wall of the inner torus is consistently more intense than the western wall, which could indicate the presence of an off-center star, such as is observed in the similar hourglass PN, MyCn 18. A bipolar outflow is also detected in Brγ emerging within 0.''1 from the core at ~ ± 40 km s-1.

  13. The Chandra planetary nebula survey (CHANPLANS). II. X-ray emission from compact planetary nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, M.; Kastner, J. H.; Montez, R. Jr.; Balick, B.; Frew, D. J.; De Marco, O.; Parker, Q. A.; Jones, D.; Miszalski, B.; Sahai, R.; Blackman, E.; Frank, A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Guerrero, M. A.; Zijlstra, A.; Bujarrabal, V.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Nordhaus, J.; and others

    2014-10-20

    We present results from the most recent set of observations obtained as part of the Chandra X-ray observatory Planetary Nebula Survey (CHANPLANS), the first comprehensive X-ray survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood (i.e., within ∼1.5 kpc of the Sun). The survey is designed to place constraints on the frequency of appearance and range of X-ray spectral characteristics of X-ray-emitting PN central stars and the evolutionary timescales of wind-shock-heated bubbles within PNe. CHANPLANS began with a combined Cycle 12 and archive Chandra survey of 35 PNe. CHANPLANS continued via a Chandra Cycle 14 Large Program which targeted all (24) remaining known compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.4 pc), young PNe that lie within ∼1.5 kpc. Results from these Cycle 14 observations include first-time X-ray detections of hot bubbles within NGC 1501, 3918, 6153, and 6369, and point sources in HbDs 1, NGC 6337, and Sp 1. The addition of the Cycle 14 results brings the overall CHANPLANS diffuse X-ray detection rate to ∼27% and the point source detection rate to ∼36%. It has become clearer that diffuse X-ray emission is associated with young (≲ 5 × 10{sup 3} yr), and likewise compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.15 pc), PNe with closed structures and high central electron densities (n{sub e} ≳ 1000 cm{sup –3}), and is rarely associated with PNe that show H{sub 2} emission and/or pronounced butterfly structures. Hb 5 is one such exception of a PN with a butterfly structure that hosts diffuse X-ray emission. Additionally, two of the five new diffuse X-ray detections (NGC 1501 and NGC 6369) host [WR]-type central stars, supporting the hypothesis that PNe with central stars of [WR]-type are likely to display diffuse X-ray emission.

  14. SOFIA Observations of the Planetary Nebula NGC7027

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuck, Timothy; Werner, M. W.; Sahai, R.; Hartley, M.; Herter, T. L.; Horner, J.; Keller, L. D.; Livingston, J.; Morris, M.

    2013-01-01

    NGC7027 is one of the brightest and best-studied planetary nebulae. The nebula is 2900 light years from earth, and approximately 0.08 parsec in physical size making it one of the youngest known planetary nebula with an estimated age of just 600 years. NGC7027’s central 16th magnitude star is pumping out the energy of 6000 suns, and at 185,000 Kelvin the star is one of the hottest known. NGC7027 was imaged using the FORCAST instrument on SOFIA at 6.4, 6.6, 11.1, 19.7, 24.2, 33.6, and 37.1 microns. The HBPW of the measurements is 4-to-6 pixels 3 to 4.5 arc sec] across the bands. Analysis indicates a bright well-resolved nebula with an overall angular size of ~10 X 13 arc sec. The morphology is similar to what is seen in ground-based infrared and radio continuum images. The size varies little with wavelength. The SED derived from the SOFIA observations varies moderately but systematically across the nebula, with the longer wavelengths becoming relatively brighter at the edges. Analysis of the images has been carried out under the NASA-IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program with portions of the work being carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, operated by the California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA.

  15. PLANETARY NEBULAE IN FACE-ON SPIRAL GALAXIES. III. PLANETARY NEBULA KINEMATICS AND DISK MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Ciardullo, Robin E-mail: rbc@astro.psu.ed

    2009-11-10

    Much of our understanding of dark matter halos comes from the assumption that the mass-to-light ratio (Y) of spiral disks is constant. The best way to test this hypothesis is to measure the disk surface mass density directly via the kinematics of old disk stars. To this end, we have used planetary nebulae (PNe) as test particles and have measured the vertical velocity dispersion (sigma{sub z}) throughout the disks of five nearby, low-inclination spiral galaxies: IC 342, M74 (NGC 628), M83 (NGC 5236), M94 (NGC 4736), and M101 (NGC 5457). By using H I to map galactic rotation and the epicyclic approximation to extract sigma{sub z} from the line-of-sight dispersion, we find that, with the lone exception of M101, our disks do have a constant Y out to approx3 optical scale lengths (h{sub R} ). However, once outside this radius, sigma{sub z} stops declining and becomes flat with radius. Possible explanations for this behavior include an increase in the disk mass-to-light ratio, an increase in the importance of the thick disk, and heating of the thin disk by halo substructure. We also find that the disks of early type spirals have higher values of Y and are closer to maximal than the disks of later-type spirals, and that the unseen inner halos of these systems are better fit by pseudo-isothermal laws than by NFW models.

  16. The planetary nebula system and dynamics of NGC 5128. I - Planetary nebulae as standard candles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Xiaohui; Ford, Holland C.; Ciardullo, Robin; Jacoby, George H.

    1993-01-01

    We present the result of a planetary nebula (PN) survey of the nearby giant elliptical galaxy NGC 5128 performed with CCD cameras at the prime focus of the CTIO 4 m telescope. By comparing CCD images centered on the characteristic emission line forbidden O III 5007 A and on the adjacent continuum, we identify a total of 785 PNs in areas extending 20 kpc along the photometric major axis and covering the whole galaxy to 10 kpc. From these data, we form a complete sample of 224 PNs extending to a dereddened limiting magnitude of m5007 = 24.8, which extends 1.5 mag down the PN luminosity function (PNLF). Adopting a foreground extinction of E(B-V) = 0.1, we derive a distance to the galaxy of 3.5 +/- 0.2 Mpc, in excellent agreement with the surface brightness fluctuation method. No population effect on the bright cutoff of PNLF is observed in the isophotal radius range of 2-16 kpc, but the luminosity specific PN density seems to increase with radius inside of 7 kpc, in agreement with the alpha(2.5)-color relation observed for other galaxies.

  17. A spectroscopic and photometric study of the planetary nebulae Kn 61 and Pa 5

    SciTech Connect

    García-Díaz, Ma. T.; González-Buitrago, D.; López, J. A.; Zharikov, S.; Tovmassian, G.; Borisov, N.; Valyavin, G. E-mail: dgonzalez@astro.unam.mx E-mail: zhar@astro.unam.mx E-mail: borisov@sao.ru

    2014-09-01

    We present the first morpho-kinematical analysis of the planetary nebulae Kn 61 and Pa 5 and explore the nature of their central stars. Our analysis is based on high-resolution and medium-resolution spectroscopic observations, deep narrow-band imaging, and integral photometry. This material allows us to identify the morphological components and study their kinematics. The direct images and spectra indicate an absence of the characteristic [N II] and [S II] emission lines in both nebulae. The nebular spectrum of Kn 61 suggests a hydrogen deficient planetary nebula and the stellar spectrum of the central star reveals a hydrogen-deficient PG 1159-type star. The [O III] position velocity diagram reveals that Kn 61 is a closed, empty, spherical shell with a thin border and a filamentary surface expanding at 67.6 km s{sup –1} and the shell is currently not expanding isotropically. We derived a kinematic age of ∼1.6 × 10{sup 4} yr for an assumed distance of 4 kpc. A photometric period of ∼5.7(±0.4) days has been detected for Kn 61, indicating the presence of a possible binary system at its core. A possible link between filamentary spherical shells and PG 1159-type stars is noted. The morphology of Pa 5 is dominated by an equatorial toroid and faint polar extensions. The equatorial region of this planetary nebula is expanding at 45.2 km s{sup –1}. The stellar spectrum corresponds to a very hot star and is dominated by a steep blue rising continuum and He II, Balmer, and Ca II photospheric lines.

  18. Weak magnetic fields in central stars of planetary nebulae?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, M.; Hubrig, S.; Todt, H.; Schöller, M.; Hamann, W.-R.; Sandin, C.; Schönberner, D.

    2014-10-01

    Context. It is not yet clear whether magnetic fields play an essential role in shaping planetary nebulae (PNe), or whether stellar rotation alone and/or a close binary companion, stellar or substellar, can account for the variety of the observed nebular morphologies. Aims: In a quest for empirical evidence verifying or disproving the role of magnetic fields in shaping planetary nebulae, we follow up on previous attempts to measure the magnetic field in a representative sample of PN central stars. Methods: We obtained low-resolution polarimetric spectra with FORS 2 installed on the Antu telescope of the VLT for a sample of 12 bright central stars of PNe with different morphologies, including two round nebulae, seven elliptical nebulae, and three bipolar nebulae. Two targets are Wolf-Rayet type central stars. Results: For the majority of the observed central stars, we do not find any significant evidence for the existence of surface magnetic fields. However, our measurements may indicate the presence of weak mean longitudinal magnetic fields of the order of 100 Gauss in the central star of the young elliptical planetary nebula IC 418 as well as in the Wolf-Rayet type central star of the bipolar nebula Hen 2-113 and the weak emission line central star of the elliptical nebula Hen 2-131. A clear detection of a 250 G mean longitudinal field is achieved for the A-type companion of the central star of NGC 1514. Some of the central stars show a moderate night-to-night spectrum variability, which may be the signature of a variable stellar wind and/or rotational modulation due to magnetic features. Conclusions: Since our analysis indicates only weak fields, if any, in a few targets of our sample, we conclude that strong magnetic fields of the order of kG are not widespread among PNe central stars. Nevertheless, simple estimates based on a theoretical model of magnetized wind bubbles suggest that even weak magnetic fields below the current detection limit of the order of 100

  19. The Herschel Planetary Nebula Survey (HerPlaNS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, T.; Ladjal, D.; HerPlaNS Team

    2012-12-01

    The Herschel Planetary Nebula Survey (HerPlaNS, PI: T. Ueta) is one of the largest Herschel Open Time 1 program in which we explore the far-infrared aspects of 11 planetary nebulae (PNs) with the Herschel Space Observatory, exploiting its unprecedented capabilities in broadband photometry mapping, spectral mapping, and integral-field spectroscopy. We perform (1) deep PACS/SPIRE broadband mapping to account for the coldest dust component of the nebulae and determine the spatial distribution of the dusty haloes in the target PNs, (2) exhaustive PACS/SPIRE line mapping in far-IR atomic and molecular lines in two representative PNs to diagnose the energetics of the nebulae as a function of location in the nebulae, and (3) PACS/SPIRE spectral-energy-distribution spectroscopy at several positions in the target PNs to understand variations in the physical conditions as a function of location in the nebulae, to build a more complete picture of the interplay between the dust and gas components as a function of location in the nebulae. The HerPlaNS survey is distinguished from the existing guaranteed-time Key Program (KPGT), "Mass Loss of Evolved StarS" (MESS, PI: M. Groenewegen, including 10 PNs) by the extra dimension added by spectral mapping and integral-field spatio-spectroscopy that permit simultaneous probing of the gas and dust component in the target PNs. Through these investigations, we will consider the energetics of the entire gas-dust system as a function of location in the nebulae, which is a novel approach that has rarely been taken previously. HerPlaNS is conducted in collaboration with the Chandra Planetary Survey (ChanPlaNS, PI: J.H. Kastner) to furnish substantial PN data resources that would allow us—a community of PN astronomers—to tackle a multitude of unanswered issues in PN physics, from the shaping mechanisms of the nebulae to the energetics of the multi-phased gas-dust system surrounding the central white dwarf. These PN surveys, combined with

  20. Ultraviolet observations of close-binary and pulsating nuclei of planetary nebulae; Winds and shells around low-mass supergiants; The close-binary nucleus of the planetary nebula HFG-1; A search for binary nuclei of planetary nebulae; UV monitoring of irregularly variable planetary nuclei; and The pulsating nucleus of the planetary nebula Lo 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Howard E.

    1992-01-01

    A brief summary of the research highlights is presented. The topics covered include the following: binary nuclei of planetary nebulae; other variable planetary nuclei; low-mass supergiants; and other IUE-related research.

  1. Kinematic study of planetary nebulae in NGC 6822

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Durán, S. N.; Peña, M.; Hernández-Martínez, L.; García-Rojas, J.; Ruiz, M. T.

    2014-08-01

    Context. The kinematics of planetary nebulae in external galaxies and in our own is a clue for understanding the behavior of the low- and intermediate-mass stars and their relation with other components of the galaxies. Aims: By measuring precise radial velocities of planetary nebulae (which belong to the intermediate-age population), H ii regions and A-type supergiant stars (which are members of the young population) in NGC 6822, we aim to determine whether both types of population share the kinematics of the disk of H i found in this galaxy. Methods: Spectroscopic data for six planetary nebulae were obtained with the high spectral-resolution spectrograph Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle (MIKE) on the Magellan telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. Data for another three PNe and one H ii region were obtained from the SPM Catalog of Extragalactic Planetary Nebulae, which employed the Manchester Echelle Spectrometer attached to the 2.1m telescope at the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, México. An additional PN and one H ii region were observed with this same telescope-spectrograph in 2013. Thus, in total we have high-quality data for 10 of the 26 PNe detected in this galaxy. In the wavelength calibrated spectra, the heliocentric radial velocities were measured with a precision better than 5-6 km s-1. Data for two additional H ii regions and two A-type supergiant stars were collected from the literature. The heliocentric radial velocities of the different objects were compared to the velocities of the H i disk at the same position. Results: From the analysis of radial velocities we found that H ii regions and A-type supergiants do share the kinematics of the H i disk at the same position, as expected for these young objects. In contrast, most planetary nebula velocities differ significantly (more than 12 km s-1) from that of the H i at the same position. The kinematics of planetary nebulae is different from the young population kinematics and is more similar to

  2. Hubble Space Telescope observations of planetary nebulae in the magellanic clouds. 2: SMP 85, a young planetary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dopita, Michael A.; Vassiliadis, Emanuel; Meatheringham, Stephen J.; Ford, Holland C.; Bohlin, Ralph; Wood, Peter R.; Stecher, Theodore P.; Maran, Stephen P.; Harrington, J. Patrick

    1994-01-01

    We have obtained Hubble Space Telescope Planetary Camera images in the (O III) lambda 5007 A emission line, and Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) UV spectrophotometry of the low-excitation planetary nebula SMP 85 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. By combining these results with existing optical spectrophotometry, absolute flux measurements, and dynamical and density information, we have been able to construct a fully self-consistent nebular model. This proves that SMP 85 is a dense, young, carbon-rich object which started to be ionized about 500-1000 years ago, and which contains a substantial inner reservoir of atomic or molecular gas, probably in the form of many small cloudlets. These cloudlets have been ejected at a velocity not exceeding 6 km/s, a result which, together with the morphology is an important clue to mass loss during late asymptotic giant branch (AGB) evolution. We have directly detected the central star through its UV continuum emission, and from both Zanstra techniques and nebular modeling derive a stellar temperature of 46000 +/- 2000 K, a stellar luminosity of 7300 +/- 700 solar luminosity, and a core mass of 0.63-0.67 solar mass. The nebular analysis also demonstrates that there is severe depletion of the nebular gases onto dust grains, most likely of the calcium magnesium silicate variety; a surprising result in view of the carbon-rich nature of the ionized nebula.

  3. Faint X-Ray Structure in the Crab Pulsar Wind Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seward, F. D.; Tucker, W. H.; Fesen, R. A.

    2006-12-01

    We report on a Chandra observation of the Crab Nebula that gives the first clear view of the faint boundary of the Crab's X-ray-emitting pulsar wind nebula. There is structure in all directions. Fingers, loops, bays, and the south pulsar jet all indicate that either filamentary material or the magnetic field is controlling the relativistic electrons. In general, spectra soften as distance from the pulsar increases but do not change rapidly along linear features. This is particularly true for the pulsar jet. The termination of the jet is abrupt; the east side is close to an [O III] optical filament, which may be blocking propagation on this side. We argue that linear features have ordered magnetic fields and that the structure is determined by the synchrotron lifetime of particles diffusing perpendicular and parallel to the magnetic field. We find no significant evidence for thermal X-rays inside the filamentary envelope.

  4. MULTIPOLAR PLANETARY NEBULAE: NOT AS GEOMETRICALLY DIVERSIFIED AS THOUGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, S.-N.; Imai, H.; Chibueze, J.; Kwok, Sun; Tafoya, D. E-mail: sunkwok@hku.hk

    2012-12-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) have diverse morphological shapes, including point-symmetric and multipolar structures. Many PNe also have complicated internal structures such as tori, lobes, knots, and ansae. A complete accounting of all the morphological structures through physical models is difficult. A first step toward such an understanding is to derive the true three-dimensional structure of the nebulae. In this paper, we show that a multipolar nebula with three pairs of lobes can explain many such features, if orientation and sensitivity effects are taken into account. Using only six parameters-the inclination and position angles of each pair-we are able to simulate the observed images of 20 PNe with complex structures. We suggest that multipolar structure is an intrinsic structure of PNe and the statistics of multipolar PNe have been severely underestimated in the past.

  5. [Fe iii] lines in the planetary nebula NGC 2392

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Fang, Xuan; Chau, Wayne; Hsia, Chin-Hao; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Kwok, Sun

    2012-08-01

    The Eskimo Nebula (NGC 2392) is a young double-shell planetary nebula (PN). Its intrinsic structure and the responsible shaping mechanism are still not fully understood. We present new optical spectroscopy of NGC 2392 at two different locations to obtain the spectra of the inner and outer shells. Several [Fe iii] lines are clearly detected. We find that these [Fe iii] lines mostly originate from the inner shell. Therefore, we suggest that NGC 2392 might have an intrinsic structure similar to the Ant Nebula Mz 3, which exhibits a number of [Fe iii] lines from the central dense regions. In this scenario, the inner and outer shells correspond to the central emission core and the outer lobes of Mz 3, respectively.

  6. Spectrophotometry of Planetary Nebulae in the Bulge of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Martin M.; Becker, Thomas; Kelz, Andreas; Schmoll, Jürgen

    2004-03-01

    We introduce crowded-field integral field (3D) spectrophotometry as a useful technique for the study of resolved stellar populations in nearby galaxies. The spectroscopy of individual extragalactic stars, which is now feasible with efficient instruments and large telescopes, is confronted with the observational challenge of accurately subtracting the bright, spatially and wavelength-dependent nonuniform background of the underlying galaxy. As a methodological test, we present a pilot study with selected extragalactic planetary nebulae (XPNe) in the bulge of M31, demonstrating how 3D spectroscopy is able to improve the limited accuracy of background subtraction that one would normally obtain with classical slit spectroscopy. It is shown that because of the absence of slit effects, 3D spectroscopy is a most suitable technique for spectrophometry. We present spectra and line intensities for five XPNe in M31, obtained with the MPFS instrument at the Russian 6 m Bolshoi Teleskop Azimutal'nij, INTEGRAL at the William Herschel Telescope , and PMAS at the Calar Alto 3.5 m telescope. The results for two of our targets, for which data are available in the literature, are compared with previously published emission-line intensities. The three remaining PNe have been observed spectroscopically for the first time. One object is shown to be a previously misidentified supernova remnant. Our monochromatic Hα maps are compared with direct Fabry-Pérot and narrowband filter images of the bulge of M31, verifying the presence of filamentary emission of the interstellar medium in the vicinity of our objects. We present an example of a flux-calibrated and continuum-subtracted filament spectrum and demonstrate how the interstellar medium component introduces systematic errors in the measurement of faint diagnostic PN emission lines when conventional observing techniques are employed. It is shown how these errors can be eliminated with 3D spectroscopy, using the full two

  7. Spatial studies of planetary nebulae with IRAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, G. W.; Zuckerman, B.

    1991-01-01

    The infrared sizes at the four IRAS wavelengths of 57 planetaries, most with 20-60 arcsec optical size, are derived from spatial deconvolution of one-dimensional survey mode scans. Survey observations from multiple detectors and hours confirmed (HCON) observations are combined to increase the sampling to a rate that is sufficient for successful deconvolution. The Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm is used to obtain an increase in resolution of a factor of about 2 or 3 from the normal IRAS detector sizes of 45, 45, 90, and 180 arcsec at wavelengths 12, 25, 60, and 100 microns. Most of the planetaries deconvolve at 12 and 25 microns to sizes equal to or smaller than the optical size. Some of the planetaries with optical rings 60 arcsec or more in diameter show double-peaked IRAS profiles. Many, such as NGC 6720 and NGC 6543 show all infrared sizes equal to the optical size, while others indicate increasing infrared size with wavelength. Deconvolved IRAS profiles are presented for the 57 planetaries at nearly all wavelengths where IRAS flux densities are 1-2 Jy or higher.

  8. Spatial studies of planetary nebulae with IRAS

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, G.W.; Zuckerman, B. )

    1991-06-01

    The infrared sizes at the four IRAS wavelengths of 57 planetaries, most with 20-60 arcsec optical size, are derived from spatial deconvolution of one-dimensional survey mode scans. Survey observations from multiple detectors and hours confirmed (HCON) observations are combined to increase the sampling to a rate that is sufficient for successful deconvolution. The Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm is used to obtain an increase in resolution of a factor of about 2 or 3 from the normal IRAS detector sizes of 45, 45, 90, and 180 arcsec at wavelengths 12, 25, 60, and 100 microns. Most of the planetaries deconvolve at 12 and 25 microns to sizes equal to or smaller than the optical size. Some of the planetaries with optical rings 60 arcsec or more in diameter show double-peaked IRAS profiles. Many, such as NGC 6720 and NGC 6543 show all infrared sizes equal to the optical size, while others indicate increasing infrared size with wavelength. Deconvolved IRAS profiles are presented for the 57 planetaries at nearly all wavelengths where IRAS flux densities are 1-2 Jy or higher. 60 refs.

  9. Forbidden O III electron temperature in planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, F. P.; Aggarwal, K. M.

    1989-06-01

    The electron-temperature-sensitive emission-line ratio I(2s2 2p2 1D - 2s2 2p2 1S)/I(2s2 2p2 3P1,2 - 2s2 2p2 1D) = I(4363 A)/I(4959 + 5007 A) has been determined based upon relative level populations for O III obtained using impact excitation rates calculated with the R-matrix code. Results are presented for a temperature range which is applicable to planetary nebulae. Electron temperatures derived from the observed R values of several planetary nebulae agree well with those determined from electron-temperature-sensitive line ratios is such other species as (semiforbidden C III)/C II, forbidden N II, and forbidden Ar II.

  10. Probing Shocks of the Young Planetary Nebula NGC 7027

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montez, Rodolfo

    2013-09-01

    The rapid evolution of the planetary nebula NGC 7027 provides a rare glimpse at the evolution of the shocks. We propose a detailed spatial and spectroscopic study of the shock conditions in NGC 7027 that will enhance and bridge our understanding of the shocks seen in other planetary nebula. Comparison between the Cycle 1 observation and a new Cycle 15 observation will (i) confirm the presence of the two components in the extended X-ray emission, (ii) measure the changes (spatial and spectral) in the components, and, (iii) provide a valuable trove of tests and inputs for shock conditions and hydrodynamical simulations. We rely on the unprecedented spatial resolution and soft-sensitivity of Chandra.

  11. Supernova remnants, planetary nebulae and the distance to NGC 4214

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopita, Michael A.; Calzetti, Daniela; Maíz Apellániz, Jesús; Blair, William P.; Long, Knox S.; Mutchler, Max; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Bond, Howard E.; MacKenty, John; Balick, Bruce; Carollo, Marcella; Disney, Michael; Frogel, Jay A.; O'Connell, Robert; Hall, Donald; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick; Paresce, Francesco; Saha, Abhijit; Walker, Alistair R.; Silk, Joe; Sirianni, Marco; Trauger, John; Windhorst, Rogier; Young, Erick

    2010-11-01

    We present narrow band, continuum subtracted H α, [S ii], H β, [O iii] and [O ii] data taken with the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope in the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy NGC 4214. From these images, we identify seventeen new planetary nebula candidates, and seven supernova remnant candidates. We use the observed emission line luminosity function of the planetary nebulae to establish a new velocity-independent distance to NGC 4214. We conclude that the PNLF technique gives a reddening independent distance to NGC 4214 of 3.19±0.36 Mpc, and that our current best-estimate of the distance to this galaxy ids 2.98±0.13 Mpc.

  12. Elemental abundances in high-excitation planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marionni, P. A.; Harrington, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    The IUE satellite was used to obtain low dispersion spectra of the high excitation planetary nebulae IC 351, IC 2003, NGC 2022, IC 2165, NGC 2440, Hu 1-2, and IC 5217. Numerical modeling was undertaken to determine the chemical composition of these objects with particular emphasis on obtaining elemental carbon and nitrogen abundances. Large variations in the C/N ratio from object to object are suggested.

  13. Morphology of the Red Rectangle Proto-planetary Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koning, N.; Kwok, Sun; Steffen, W.

    2011-10-01

    The morphology of the Red Rectangle (RR) exhibits several singular attributes. Most prominent are a series of linear features perpendicular to the symmetry axis which appear as "ladder rungs" across the nebula. At the edge of each "rung" gas seemingly flows from bright knots in a parabolic shape toward the center of the nebula. We present a new model of the RR which explains these features as a projection effect of the more common concentric arcs seen in other proto-planetary nebulae (e.g., Egg Nebula). Using the three-dimensional morpho-kinematic modeling software SHAPE, we have created a model of the RR that consists of spherical shells evacuated by a bi-conical outflow. When the symmetry axis is oriented perpendicular to the line of sight, the spherical shells become linear, thereby reproducing the "rungs" seen in the RR. When oriented at different inclinations, the linear features become spherical as observed in the Egg Nebula. The model also accurately reproduces the bright knots and the parabolic outflows from these knots that have proven difficult to explain in the past. Using this model, we are able to place a lower limit on the speed of the outflow of ~158 km s-1.

  14. MORPHOLOGY OF THE RED RECTANGLE PROTO-PLANETARY NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, N.; Kwok, Sun; Steffen, W. E-mail: sunkwok@hku.hk

    2011-10-10

    The morphology of the Red Rectangle (RR) exhibits several singular attributes. Most prominent are a series of linear features perpendicular to the symmetry axis which appear as 'ladder rungs' across the nebula. At the edge of each 'rung' gas seemingly flows from bright knots in a parabolic shape toward the center of the nebula. We present a new model of the RR which explains these features as a projection effect of the more common concentric arcs seen in other proto-planetary nebulae (e.g., Egg Nebula). Using the three-dimensional morpho-kinematic modeling software SHAPE, we have created a model of the RR that consists of spherical shells evacuated by a bi-conical outflow. When the symmetry axis is oriented perpendicular to the line of sight, the spherical shells become linear, thereby reproducing the 'rungs' seen in the RR. When oriented at different inclinations, the linear features become spherical as observed in the Egg Nebula. The model also accurately reproduces the bright knots and the parabolic outflows from these knots that have proven difficult to explain in the past. Using this model, we are able to place a lower limit on the speed of the outflow of {approx}158 km s{sup -1}.

  15. A detailed study of the structure of the nested planetary nebula, Hb 12, the Matryoshka nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D. M.; López, J. A.; Edwards, M. L.; Winge, C. E-mail: jal@astrosen.unam.mx E-mail: cwinge@gemini.edu

    2014-11-01

    We present near-IR, integral field spectroscopic observations of the planetary nebula (PN) Hb 12 using Near-infrared Integral Field Spectrograph (NIFS) on Gemini-North. Combining NIFS with the adaptive optics system Altair, we provide a detailed study of the core and inner structure of this PN. We focus the analysis in the prominent emission lines [Fe II] (1.6436 μm), He I (2.0585 μm), H{sub 2} (2.1214 μm), and Br{sub γ} (2.16553 μm). We find that the [Fe II] emission traces a tilted system of bipolar lobes, with the northern lobe being redshifted and the southern lobe blueshifted. The [Fe II] emission is very faint at the core and only present close to the systemic velocity. There is no H{sub 2} emission in the core, whereas the core is prominent in the He I and Br{sub γ} recombination lines. The H{sub 2} emission is concentrated in equatorial arcs of emission surrounding the core and expanding at ∼30 km s{sup –1}. These arcs are compared with Hubble Space Telescope images and shown to represent nested loops belonging to the inner sections of a much larger bipolar structure that replicates the inner one. The He I and Br{sub γ} emission from the core clearly show a cylindrical central cavity that seems to represent the inner walls of an equatorial density enhancement or torus. The torus is 0.''2 wide (≡200 AU radius at a distance of 2000 pc) and expanding at ≤30 km s{sup –1}. The eastern wall of the inner torus is consistently more intense than the western wall, which could indicate the presence of an off-center star, such as is observed in the similar hourglass PN, MyCn 18. A bipolar outflow is also detected in Br{sub γ} emerging within 0.''1 from the core at ∼ ± 40 km s{sup –1}.

  16. THE [O III] NEBULA OF THE MERGER REMNANT NGC 7252: A LIKELY FAINT IONIZATION ECHO

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, Francois; Kelson, Daniel D.; Villanueva, Edward V.; Seitzer, Patrick; Walth, Gregory L.

    2013-08-20

    We present images and spectra of a {approx}10 kpc-sized emission-line nebulosity discovered in the prototypical merger remnant NGC 7252 and dubbed the ''[O III] nebula'' because of its dominant [O III] {lambda}5007 line. This nebula seems to yield the first sign of episodic active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity still occurring in the remnant, {approx}220 Myr after the coalescence of two gas-rich galaxies. Its location and kinematics suggest it belongs to a stream of tidal-tail gas falling back into the remnant. Its integrated [O III] {lambda}5007 luminosity is 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}, and its spectrum features some high-excitation lines, including He II {lambda}4686. In diagnostic line-ratio diagrams, the nebula lies in the domain of Seyfert galaxies, suggesting that it is photoionized by a source with a power-law spectrum. Yet, a search for AGN activity in NGC 7252 from X-rays to radio wavelengths yields no detection, with the most stringent upper limit set by X-ray observations. The upper luminosity limit of L{sub 2-10{sub keV,0}}<5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} estimated for the nucleus is {approx}10{sup 3} times lower than the minimum ionizing luminosity of {approx}> 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} necessary to excite the nebula. This large discrepancy suggests that the nebula is a faint ionization echo excited by a mildly active nucleus that has declined by {approx}3 orders of magnitude over the past 20,000-200,000 yr. In many ways this nebula resembles the prototypical ''Hanny's Voorwerp'' near IC 2497, but its size is 3 Multiplication-Sign smaller and its [O III] luminosity {approx}100 Multiplication-Sign lower. We propose that it be classified as an extended emission-line region (EELR). The [O III] nebula is then the lowest-luminosity ionization echo and EELR discovered so far, indicative of recent, probably sputtering AGN activity of Seyfert-like intensity in NGC 7252.

  17. A kinematic study of planetary nebulae in the dwarf irregular galaxy IC10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Denise R.; Teodorescu, Ana M.; Alves-Brito, Alan; Méndez, Roberto H.; Magrini, Laura

    2012-10-01

    We present positions, kinematics and the planetary nebula luminosity function (PNLF) for 35 planetary nebulae (PNe) in the nearest starburst galaxy IC10 extending out to 3 kpc from the galaxy's centre. We take advantage of the deep imaging and spectroscopic capabilities provided by the Faint Object Camera and Spectrograph on the 8.2 m Subaru Telescope. The PN velocities were measured through the slitless-spectroscopy technique, which allows us to explore the kinematics of IC10 with high precision. Using these velocities, we conclude that there is a kinematic connection between the H I envelope located around IC10 and the galaxy's PN population. By assuming that the PNe in the central regions and in the outskirts have similar ages, our results put strong observational constraints on the past tidal interactions in the Local Group. This is so because by dating the PN central stars, we, therefore, infer the epoch of a major episode of star formation likely linked to the first encounter of the H I extended envelope with the galaxy. Our deep [O III] images also allow us to use the PNLF to estimate a distance modulus of 24.1 ± 0.25, which is in agreement with recent results in the literature based on other techniques. Based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  18. ChanPlaNS: The Chandra Planetary Nebula Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, Joel; Montez, Rodolfo; Freeman, Marcus; ChanPlaNS Team

    2015-01-01

    The physical mechanisms responsible for the morphological diversity among planetary nebulae (PNe) have been the subject of intense interest and hot debate among PN researchers over the past two decades. The PN shaping problem is multifaceted, with connections to (and implications for) a wide variety of astrophysical systems. Two areas of particular importance are (1) binary star astrophysics and (2) wind interactions and their implications for nebular shaping. X-ray observations play a pivotal role in the study of both of these fundamental aspects of PNe, by revealing (1) point-like X-ray sources at PN central stars that may be indicative of binary companions, and (2) diffuse X-ray emission generated by energetic, PN-shaping shocks. To assess the frequency of appearance and characteristics of these respective PN X-ray sources, we have undertaken the Chandra Planetary Nebula Survey (ChanPlaNS), the first comprehensive X-ray survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood. ChanPlaNS began with a combined Cycle 12 Large Program and archival survey of 35 PNe, with emphasis on high-excitation nebulae, and continued via a Cycle 14 Large Program targeting an additional 24 known compact (R_neb <~ 0.4 pc) PNe. For the latter category of relatively young nebulae, we estimate that the ChanPlaNS survey is ~90% complete within ~1.5 kpc from the Sun. For the ~60 nebulae within this distance observed by Chandra, the point source detection rate is ~36%, and the diffuse X-ray source detection rate is ~27%. However, the point-like and diffuse X-ray detection rates, respectively, are significantly higher for PNe known to harbor binary central stars (~60%) and for the compact (young) PN subsample (~50%). These results demonstrate the potential for insight into PN shaping processes provided by ChanPlaNS. In companion presentations at this meeting (Montez et al.; Freeman et al.), we present highlights of the astrophysics gleaned to date from these Chandra detections (and

  19. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscle control at the same time, and may fall down. Fainting usually happens when your blood pressure drops suddenly, causing a decrease in blood flow to your brain. It is more common in older people. Some causes of fainting include Heat or dehydration ...

  20. Magellanic cloud planetary nebula with suspected strong forbidden iron lines.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H; Czyzak, S J

    1983-03-01

    The relatively high-excitation nebula (Westerlund-Smith object 25) in the large Magellanic cloud shows prominent forbidden lines of [Ar IV], the close [Ne IV] pair lambda4724, 4726, [Ca V] lambda5309, [Fe V] lambda4227, and probably [Fe VI] and [Fe VII], as well. A conventional interpretation of observations secured with a vidicon detector at the Cerro Tololo 4-m telescopes indicates an essentially "normal" helium abundance but depletions of N, O, Ne, and other elements with respect to our own galaxy. When a comparison is made with diffuse nebulae or H II regions in the large Magellanic cloud, we find helium to be more abundant, oxygen to be depleted, and nitrogen, neon, and argon to be comparable. The abundance of sulfur is uncertain. Iron in the gaseous phase is certainly more plentiful than in conventional planetaries. PMID:16593294

  1. Spectrophotometry of Bowen resonance fluorescence lines in three planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, C. R.; Miller, Christopher O.

    1992-01-01

    The results are presented of a uniquely complete, carefully reduced set of observations of the O III Bowen fluorescence lines in the planetary nebulae NGC 6210, NGC 7027, and NGC 7662. A detailed comparison with the predictions of radiative excitation verify that some secondary lines are enhanced by selective population by the charge exchange mechanism involving O IV. Charge exchange is most important in NGC 6210, which is of significantly lower ionization than the other nebulae. In addition to the principal Bowen lines arising from Ly-alpha pumping of the O III O1 line, lines arising from pumping of the O3 line are also observed. Comparison of lines produced by O1 and O3 with the theoretical predictions of Neufeld indicate poor agreement; comparison with the theoretical predictions of Harrington show agreement with NGC 7027 and NGC 7662.

  2. Magellanic Cloud Planetary Nebula with Suspected Strong Forbidden Iron Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, L. H.; Czyzak, S. J.

    1983-03-01

    The relatively high-excitation nebula (Westerlund-Smith object 25) in the large Magellanic cloud shows prominent forbidden lines of [Ar IV], the close [Ne IV] pair λ 4724, 4726, [Ca V] λ 5309, [Fe V] λ 4227, and probably [Fe VI] and [Fe VII], as well. A conventional interpretation of observations secured with a vidicon detector at the Cerro Tololo 4-m telescopes indicates an essentially ``normal'' helium abundance but depletions of N, O, Ne, and other elements with respect to our own galaxy. When a comparison is made with diffuse nebulae or H II regions in the large Magellanic cloud, we find helium to be more abundant, oxygen to be depleted, and nitrogen, neon, and argon to be comparable. The abundance of sulfur is uncertain. Iron in the gaseous phase is certainly more plentiful than in conventional planetaries.

  3. Magellanic cloud planetary nebula with suspected strong forbidden iron lines

    PubMed Central

    Aller, L. H.; Czyzak, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    The relatively high-excitation nebula (Westerlund-Smith object 25) in the large Magellanic cloud shows prominent forbidden lines of [Ar IV], the close [Ne IV] pair λ4724, 4726, [Ca V] λ5309, [Fe V] λ4227, and probably [Fe VI] and [Fe VII], as well. A conventional interpretation of observations secured with a vidicon detector at the Cerro Tololo 4-m telescopes indicates an essentially “normal” helium abundance but depletions of N, O, Ne, and other elements with respect to our own galaxy. When a comparison is made with diffuse nebulae or H II regions in the large Magellanic cloud, we find helium to be more abundant, oxygen to be depleted, and nitrogen, neon, and argon to be comparable. The abundance of sulfur is uncertain. Iron in the gaseous phase is certainly more plentiful than in conventional planetaries. PMID:16593294

  4. Planetary nebulae and their mimics: The MASH-MEN Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boissay, Rozenn; Parker, Quentin A.; Frew, David J.; Bojicic, Ivan

    2012-08-01

    The total number of true, likely and possible planetary nebulae (PN) now known in the Milky Way is about 3000, approximately twice the number known a decade ago. The new discoveries are a legacy of the recent availability of wide-field, narrowband imaging surveys, primarily in the light of Hα. The two most important are the AAO/UKST SuperCOSMOS Hα survey SHS and the Isaac Newton photometric Hα survey IPHAS, which are responsible for most of the new discoveries. A serious problem with previous PN catalogs is that several different kinds of astrophysical objects are able to mimic PN in some of their observed properties leading to significant contamination. These objects include H~II regions and Strömgren zones around young O/B stars, reflection nebulae, Wolf-Rayet ejecta, supernova remnants, Herbig-Haro objects, young stellar objects, B[e] stars, symbiotic stars and outflows, late-type stars, cataclysmic variables, low redshift emission-line galaxies, and even image/detector flaws. PN catalogs such as the Macquarie/AAO/Strasbourg Hα Planetary Nebula catalog (MASH) have been carefully vetted to remove these mimics using the wealth of new wide-field multi-wavelength data and our 100% follow-up spectroscopy to produce a compilation of new PN discoveries of high purity. During this process significant numbers of PN mimics have been identified. The aim of this project is to compile these MASH rejects into a catalog of Miscellaneous Emission Nebulae (MEN) and to highlight the most unusual and interesting examples. A new global analysis of these MEN objects is underway before publishing the MEN catalog online categorizing objects by type together with their spectra and multi-wavelength images.

  5. Hubble Space Telescope Image: Planetary Nebula IC 4406

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This Hubble Space Telescope image reveals a rainbow of colors in this dying star, called IC 446. Like many other so-called planetary nebulae, IC 4406 exhibits a high degree of symmetry. The nebula's left and right halves are nearly mirror images of the other. If we could fly around IC 446 in a spaceship, we would see that the gas and dust form a vast donut of material streaming outward from the dying star. We do not see the donut shape in this photograph because we are viewing IC 4406 from the Earth-orbiting HST. From this vantage point, we are seeing the side of the donut. This side view allows us to see the intricate tendrils of material that have been compared to the eye's retina. In fact, IC 4406 is dubbed the 'Retina Nebula.' The donut of material confines the intense radiation coming from the remnant of the dying star. Gas on the inside of the donut is ionized by light from the central star and glows. Light from oxygen atoms is rendered blue in this image; hydrogen is shown as green, and nitrogen as red. The range of color in the final image shows the differences in concentration of these three gases in the nebula. This image is a composite of data taken by HST's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 in June 2001 and in January 2002 by Bob O'Dell (Vanderbilt University) and collaborators, and in January by the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI). Filters used to create this color image show oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen gas glowing in this object.

  6. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fainting: Certain medicines, including those used for anxiety, depression, and high blood pressure (these drugs may cause a drop in blood pressure) Drug or alcohol use Hyperventilation Low blood sugar Seizures Sudden drop in blood pressure (such as ...

  7. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Meningitis Choosing Your Mood Prescription Drug Abuse ... reasons why teens faint: Physical triggers. Getting too hot or being in a crowded, poorly ventilated setting ...

  8. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain does not get enough oxygen. You lose consciousness, or "pass out," for a brief time (usually ... Taking longer than a few seconds to regain consciousness Fainting when you turn your head to the ...

  9. Planetary Nebulae and their parent stellar populations. Tracing the mass assembly of M87 and Intracluster light in the Virgo cluster core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaboldi, Magda; Longobardi, Alessia; Gerhard, Ortwin

    2016-08-01

    The diffuse extended outer regions of galaxies are hard to study because they are faint, with typical surface brightness of 1% of the dark night sky. We can tackle this problem by using resolved star tracers which remain visible at large distances from the galaxy centers. This article describes the use of Planetary Nebulae as tracers and the calibration of their properties as indicators of the star formation history, mean age and metallicity of the parent stars in the Milky Way and Local Group galaxies. We then report on the results from a deep, extended, planetary nebulae survey in a 0.5 deg2 region centered on the brightest cluster galaxy NGC 4486 (M87) in the Virgo cluster core, carried out with SuprimeCam@Subaru and FLAMES-GIRAFFE@VLT. Two planetary nebulae populations are identified out to 150 kpc distance from the center of M87. One population is associated with the M87 halo and the second one with the intracluster light in the Virgo cluster core. They have different line-of-sight velocity and spatial distributions, as well as different planetary nebulae specific frequencies and luminosity functions. The intracluster planetary nebulae in the surveyed region correspond to a luminosity of four times the luminosity of the Large Magellanic Cloud. The M87 halo planetary nebulae trace an older, more metal-rich, parent stellar population. A substructure detected in the projected phase-space of the line-of-sight velocity vs. major axis distance for the M87 halo planetary nebulae provides evidence for the recent accretion event of a satellite galaxy with luminosity twice that of M33. The satellite stars were tidally stripped about 1 Gyr ago, and reached apocenter at a major axis distance of 60-90 kpc from the center of M87. The M87 halo is still growing significantly at the distances where the substructure is detected.

  10. Chemical evolution models for NGC 6822 using planetary nebulae abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Martínez, Liliana; Carigi, Leticia; Peña, Miriam; Peimbert, Manuel

    2012-08-01

    We present chemical evolution models for the dwarf irregular NGC 6822, using chemical abundances of Planetary Nebulae (PNe) and HII regions and also the mass of gas (M gas ) as observational constraints. Chemical evolution models have been calculated to reproduce the abundances as derived from both, collisionally excited lines (CELs) and recombination lines (RLs). In our models, the chemical contribution of low and intermediate mass stars (LIMS) is time delayed, while for the massive stars the chemical contribution is instantaneous, as in Franco & Carigi (2008). The chemical contribution of SNIa is included in our model, thus we are also able to reproduce the observational Fe/H abundance obtained from A stars.

  11. Planetary nebulae as probes of galactic evolution and populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanghellini, Letizia

    2016-05-01

    Planetary Nebulae (PNe), the relics of the envelope ejected by low and intermediate-mass stars at the end of their evolution, carry a lot of information of the life of their progenitors and the environment where they originated. The field of PN and its population is more active than even, especially given the new generation of space- and ground-based datasets that have became available in the last few decades. In this paper we review a selection of topics centered in the importance of PNe as probes of galaxy evolution and populations.

  12. The forbidden S II electron density distribution over the planetary nebula NGC 7009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meaburn, J.; Walsh, J. R.

    1981-08-01

    Electron densities have been measured from [S ii] 6716/6731 A line ratios for a grid of points over the surface of the planetary nebula NGC 7009 using a photon counting detector. The radial dependence of the electron density has been modelled, and the relationship provides possible evidence that the planetary nebula shell is driven by a strong stellar wind

  13. The remarkably high excitation planetary nebula GC 6537.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H; Hung, S; Feibelman, W A

    1999-05-11

    NGC 6537 is an unusually high excitation point symmetric planetary nebula with a rich spectrum. Its kinematical structures are of special interest. We are here primarily concerned with the high resolution spectrum as revealed by the Hamilton echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory (resolution approximately 0.2 A) and supplemented by UV and near-UV data. These extensive data permit a determination of interstellar extinction, plasma diagnostics, and ionic concentrations. The photoionization models that have been used successfully for many planetary nebulae are not entirely satisfactory here. The plasma electron temperature of a photoionization model cannot much exceed 20,000 K, but plasma diagnostics show that regions emitting radiation of highly ionized atoms such as [NeIV] and [NeV] are much hotter, showing that shock excitation must be important, as suggested by the remarkable kinematics of this object. Hence, instead of employing a strict photoionization model, we are guided by the nebular diagnostics, which reveal how electron temperature varies with ionization potential and accommodates density effects. The predictions of the photoionization model may be useful in estimating ionization correction factor. In effect, we have estimated the chemical composition by using both photoionization and shock considerations. PMID:10318889

  14. Broad Halpha Wing Formation in the Planetary Nebula IC 4997.

    PubMed

    Lee; Hyung

    2000-02-10

    The young and compact planetary nebula IC 4997 is known to exhibit very broad wings with a width exceeding 5000 km s-1 around Halpha. We propose that the broad wings are formed through Rayleigh-Raman scattering that involves atomic hydrogen, by which Lybeta photons with a velocity width of a few 102 km s-1 are converted to optical photons and fill the Halpha broad wing region. The conversion efficiency reaches 0.6 near the line center, where the scattering optical depth is much larger than 1, and rapidly decreases in the far wings. Assuming that close to the central star there exists an unresolved inner compact core of high density, nH approximately 109-1010 cm-3, we use the photoionization code "CLOUDY" to show that sufficient Lybeta photons for scattering are produced. Using a top-hat-incident profile for the Lybeta flux and a scattering region with a H i column density NHi=2x1020 cm-2 and a substantial covering factor, we perform a profile-fitting analysis in order to obtain a satisfactory fit to the observed flux. We briefly discuss the astrophysical implications of the Rayleigh-Raman processes in planetary nebulae and other emission objects. PMID:10642203

  15. Magnetic fields around AGB stars and Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlemmings, W. H. T.

    2014-08-01

    Stars with a mass up to a few solar masses are one of the main contributors to the enrichment of the interstellar medium in dust and heavy elements. However, while significant progress has been made, the process of the mass-loss responsible for this enrichment is still not exactly known and forces beyond radiation pressure might be required. Often, the mass lost in the last phases of the stars life will become a spectacular planetary nebula. The shaping process of often strongly a-spherical PNe is equally elusive. Both binaries and magnetic fields have been suggested to be possible agents although a combination of both might also be a natural explanation. Here I review the current evidence for magnetic fields around AGB and post-AGB stars pre-Planetary Nebulae and PNe themselves. Magnetic fields appear to be ubiquitous in the envelopes of apparently single stars, challenging current ideas on its origin, although we have found that binary companions could easily be hidden from view. There are also strong indications of magnetically collimated outflows from post-AGB/pre-PNe objects supporting a significant role in shaping the circumstellar envelope.

  16. Planetary Nebulae: Reviews and Previews of a Rapidly Evolving Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balick, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Observational results from the ground and space in the past decade and covering the entire spectrum have jolted and energized research into the nature, the formation, and the evolution of planetary nebulae (PNs). The 101-level bubble structure of PNs turned out to be a pleasant but misleading fantasy as observations by HST and ALMA revealed basic details of their infancy. Some combination of close geriatric binary stars (the precusrors of SN Ia's) and magnetic fields dredged into the dusty winds appear to play vital roles in the ejection and collimation of AGB atmospheres. As a result, PNe and their antecedents, AGB stars and prePNs, are providing an array of new opportunities to study asymmetric wind formation, complex gas dynamics, CNO production rates in various galactic environments, and galaxy structure and evolution. I shall review the highlights of recent results, summarize their interpretations, and show some of the observational opportunities to monitor in the next decade, many of which couple strongly to research to related fields.This talk is dedicated to the career of Olivier Chesneau (1972-2014) who pioneered new high-resolution imaging methods that peered into the deep inner cores of nascent planetary nebulae. We remember Olivier as everyone's enthusiastic friend and colleague whose career ended in full stride.

  17. A Bipolar Planetary Nebula NGC 6537: Photoionization or Shock Heating?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyung, Siek

    1999-04-01

    NGC 6537 is an extremely high excitation bipolar planetary nebula. It exhibits a huge range of excitation from lines of [N I] to [Si VI] or [Fe VII], i.e. from neutral atoms to atoms requiring an ionization potential of 167eV. Its kinematical structures are of special interest. We are here primarily concerned with its high resolution spectrum as revealed by the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory (resolution 0.2 A,) and supplemented by UV and near-UV data. Photoionization model reproduces the observed global spectrum of NGC 6537, the absolute H beta flux, and the observed visual or blue magnitude fairly well. The nebulosity of NGC 6537 is likely to be the result of photo-ionization by a very hot star of Teff 180,000 K, although the global nebular morphology and kinematics suggest an effect by strong stellar winds and resulting shock heating. NGC 6537 can be classified as a Peimbert Type I planetary nebula. It is extremely young and it may have originated from a star of about 5 M_sun.

  18. The ionization structure of planetary nebulae. VII. New observations of the Ring Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, Timothy

    1987-01-01

    New optical spectrophotometric observations of emission-line intensities have been made in eight positions in the Ring Nebula corresponding to those observed previously with the Ultraviolet Explorer satellite; the total coverage is therefore 1400 to 7200 A. The intensities are in generally good agreement with those found previously in corresponding positions. The Oand Balmer continuum electron temperatures agree well on the average and, like the Nelectron temperatures, decrease with increasing distance from the central star. As found previously for the Ring Nebula and for other planetaries in this series, the lambda 4267 C 2 line intensity near the central star implies a Cabundance that is higher than that determined from the lambda 1906, 1909 C 3 lines. The discrepancy again decreases with increasing distance from the central star and vanishes from the outermost positions, again suggesting that the excitation mechanism from the lambda 4267 line is not understood. Standard equations used to correct for the existence of elements in other than the optically observable ionization stages give results that are consistent and in appropriate agreement with abundances calculated using UV lines. The rather high abundances of O, N, and C, and, to some extent N, indicate that some mixing of CNO processed material into the nebular shell may have occurred in the Ring Nebula.

  19. A study of the far infrared counterparts of new candidates for planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyengar, K. V. K.

    1986-05-01

    The IRAS Point Source Catalog was searched for infrared counterparts of the fourteen new candidates for planetary nebulae of low surface brightness detected by Hartl and Tritton (1985). Five of these candidates were identified with sources in the Catalog. All five nebulae are found in regions of high cirrus flux at 100 microns, and all have both point sources and small size extended sources with numbers varying from field to field. The infrared emission from these nebulae is connected with dust temperatures of about 100 K, characteristic of planetary nebulae.

  20. Post Asymptotic Giant Branch and Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Post asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars, central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPNe) and planetary nebulae (PNe) are important phases of stellar evolution as the material they feedback is the seed of subsequent star formation in a galaxy. The majority of low and intermediate mass stars are expected to evolve through these channels, however, it is uncertain how many actually do, and at what rate. The Galactic halo, with its older population, provides a direct test of evolutionary models for low mass stars. Birthrate estimates of PNe are uncertain and worse still, are in contradiction with accepted white dwarf (WD) birthrate estimates. Much of the uncertainty stems from the lack of complete samples and poorly determined distance estimates. New surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Galaxy Evolutionary Explorer (GALEX) and the INT Photometric Ha Survey (IPHAS) have discovered many new PNe and have observed the far edges of the Galaxy. Improved methods of determining distances to CSPNe are presented here, using model atmospheres, evolutionary tracks and high resolution reddening maps utilising these revolutionary surveys. Locating the CSPN is non-trivial particularly for evolved PNe, as they are extended with their central star often displaced from the centre of the nebula. Therefore, photometric criteria are required to locate the CSPN in the nebula's field. Synthetic photometry of the CSPNe is derived from spectral energy distributions (SEDs) computed from a grid of model atmospheres covering the parameter range of CSPNe. The SEDs are convolved with filter transmission curves to compute synthetic magnitudes for a given photometric system which are then calibrated with standard stars and WDs. A further project borne out of a search for luminous central stars of faint PNe, resulted in a systematic search for post-AGB stars in the Galactic halo. In this work, new candidate halo post-AGB stars are discovered from a search through the SDSS spectroscopic

  1. UNUSUAL DUST EMISSION FROM PLANETARY NEBULAE IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard-Salas, J.; Sloan, G. C.; Gutenkunst, S.; Houck, J. R.; Peeters, E.; Matsuura, M.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Zijlstra, A. A.

    2009-07-10

    We present a Spitzer Space Telescope spectroscopic study of a sample of 25 planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Magellanic Clouds (MCs). The low-resolution modules are used to analyze the dust features present in the infrared spectra. This study complements a previous work by the same authors where the same sample was analyzed in terms of neon and sulfur abundances. Over half of the objects (14) show emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, typical of carbon-rich dust environments. We compare the hydrocarbon emission in our objects to those of Galactic H II regions and PNe, and Large Magellanic Cloud/Small Magellanic Cloud H II regions. Amorphous silicates are seen in just two objects, enforcing the now well known fact that oxygen-rich dust is less common at low metallicities. Besides these common features, some PNe show very unusual dust. Nine objects show a strong silicon carbide feature at 11 {mu}m and 12 of them show magnesium sulfide emission starting at 25 {mu}m. The high percentage of spectra with silicon carbide in the MCs is not common. Two objects show a broadband which may be attributed to hydrogenated amorphous carbon and weak low-excitation atomic lines. It is likely that these nebulae are very young. The spectra of the remaining eight nebulae are dominated by the emission of fine-structure lines with a weak continuum due to thermal emission of dust, although in a few cases the signal-to-noise ratio in the spectra is low, and weak dust features may not have been detected.

  2. Ring Planetary Nebulae Ejected from Close Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, H. E.; Ciardullo, R.; Webbink, R.

    1996-12-01

    We report photometric observations of the central stars of three planetary nebulae (PNe) which appear to be thin circular rings. All three central stars have proven to be close binaries, from CCD observations made at the CTIO and KPNO 0.9-m telescopes. The southern-hemisphere PN Sp 1 is a nearly perfect circular ring. Its central star has a light curve which is a low-amplitude sinusoid with a period of 2.9 days, suggesting a reflection effect in a binary system seen nearly pole-on. We therefore suggested (Bond & Livio, ApJ 355, 568, 1990) that the nebula must be a true toroidal annulus, likewise seen nearly pole-on. SuWt 2 is another southern PN, which appears as a thin ellipse. If it were an Sp 1-like PN, seen almost edge-on, and also ejected from a close binary, we might hope to detect actual stellar eclipses. This has proven to be the case: the central star is an eclipsing binary with a period of 4.8 days. WeBo 1 is a northern PN recently discovered by Webbink and Bond. Morphologically the nebula is extremely similar to SuWt 2, in being an almost mathematically perfect ellipse. Recent observations at KPNO reveal that its central star is also a close binary, with a sinusoidal light curve and a period of approximately 5 days. It is thus becoming clear that some close binaries can undergo a common-envelope interaction that results in a much shorter orbital period accompanied by ejection of a thin nebular ring. Parallels with other objects, including SN 1987A, should be explored.

  3. The ionization structure of planetary nebulae. Part 4: NGC 7662

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, T.

    1985-01-01

    Spectrophotometric observations of emission-line intensities over the spectral range 1400 to 7200 A were made in five positions in the planetary nebula NGC 7662. Standard equations used to correct for the existence of elements in other than the optically observable ionization stages show a consistent and approximate agreement with abundances calculated using ultraviolet lines. The abundances of C and N indicate that some mixing of CNO-processed material into the nebular shell may have occurred in NGC 7662; the low He abundance, however, indicates that little or no He enrichment occurred. The Ar, Ne, and O and S abundances appear to be low. It is suggested that the progenitor to NGC 7662 may have formed out of somewhat metal-poor material.

  4. Near-infrared spectroscopy of proto-planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.; Kwok, Sun; Geballe, T. R.

    1994-01-01

    Sixteen proto-planetary nebulae were observed with low-resolution infrared spectroscopy in the H and K bands, and four were observed in the L band. In the H band, most of the objects show hydrogen Brackett lines (from n = 10 goes to 4 to n = 20 goes to 4) in absorption. In the K band, absorption bands (delta (nu) = 2) of CO were observed to as high as nu = 6 goes to 4, and in three cases the CO bands are in emission. The CO spectrum of 22272 + 5435 was found to change from emission to absorption over a 3 month interval. The CO emission most likely arises from collisional excitation resulting from recent episodes of mass loss. One new object which possibly shows weak 3.3 micron emission was found.

  5. Wolf-Rayet central stars of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todt, H.; Hamann, W.-R.

    A significant number of the central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPNe) are hydrogen-deficient, showing a chemical composition of helium, carbon, and oxygen. Most of them exhibit Wolf-Rayet-like emission line spectra, similar to those of the massive WC Pop I stars, and are therefore classified as of spectral type [WC]. In the last years, CSPNe of other Wolf-Rayet spectral subtypes have been identified, namely PB 8, which is of spectral type [WN/C], and IC 4663 and Abell 48, which are of spectral type [WN]. We review spectral analyses of Wolf-Rayet type central stars of different evolutionary stages and discuss the results in the context of stellar evolution. Especially we consider the question of a common evolutionary channel for [WC] stars. The constraints on the formation of [WN] or [WC/N] subtype stars will also be addressed.

  6. Discovery of new planetary nebulae in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drašković, D.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W. A.; Stupar, M.

    2016-07-01

    We present six new planetary nebulae (PNe) discovered in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) from deep UK Schmidt telescope (UKST) narrow band Ha and broad-band short- red “SR” continuum images and confirmed spectroscopically. These 6 preliminary discoveries provide a 6% increase to the previously known SMC PN population of ∼⃒100. Once spectroscopic follow-up of all our newly identified candidates is complete, we expect to increase the total number of known SMC PNe by up to 50%. This will permit a significant improvement to determination of the SMC PN luminosity function (PNLF) and enable further insights into the chemical evolution and kinematics of the SMC PN population.

  7. Radio-continuum Emission from Magellanic Clouds Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipovic, Miroslav

    2015-08-01

    Comparison of recent Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) / Parkes mosaic surveys of the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) with positions of known planetary nebulae (PNe) have revealed a total of about 50 radio counterparts. Six (15) Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) candidates were found in 5~GHz surveys, while ~35 were found in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Followup high resolution ATCA observations at 6 and 3 cm (4" and 2" beams, respectively) reveal that these sources are located within 1" of their optical counterparts. They are extended with higher than expected flux densities. Complimentary optical PNe spectra have typical electron temperatures and densities. Estimates of nebular ionized mass, based on these elevated radio flux densities, suggest they may be the result of significant circumstellar envelopes. These envelopes may have been formed from winds ejected from high mass (up to 8 solar) progenitor stars.

  8. FORMATION OF FULLERENES IN H-CONTAINING PLANETARY NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    GarcIa-Hernandez, D. A.; Manchado, A.; Stanghellini, L.; Shaw, R. A.; Villaver, E.; Szczerba, R.; Perea-Calderon, J. V. E-mail: amt@iac.e E-mail: shaw@noao.ed E-mail: eva.villaver@uam.e E-mail: Jose.Perea@sciops.esa.in

    2010-11-20

    Hydrogen depleted environments are considered an essential requirement for the formation of fullerenes. The recent detection of C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} fullerenes in what was interpreted as the hydrogen-poor inner region of a post-final helium shell flash planetary nebula (PN) seemed to confirm this picture. Here, we present strong evidence that challenges the current paradigm regarding fullerene formation, showing that it can take place in circumstellar environments containing hydrogen. We report the simultaneous detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and fullerenes toward C-rich and H-containing PNe belonging to environments with very different chemical histories such as our own Galaxy and the Small Magellanic Cloud. We suggest that PAHs and fullerenes may be formed by the photochemical processing of hydrogenated amorphous carbon. These observations suggest that modifications may be needed to our current understanding of the chemistry of large organic molecules as well as the chemical processing in space.

  9. What is shaping the planetary nebula K3-35?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Y.; Tafoya, D.; Anglada, G.; Miranda, L. F.; Uscanga, L.; Torrelles, J. M.; Velázquez, P. F.

    2011-02-01

    K 3-35 is a very young planetary nebula (PN) with a characteristic S-shaped radio emission morphology. It is the first PN where water vapor maser was detected: the emission is located in a torus-like structure with a radius of 100 AU and also at the surprisingly large distance of 5000 AU from the star, in the tips of the bipolar lobes. Several mechanism have been proposed to explain the bipolar morphology of PNe, and in the case of K 3-35 we believe we may be observing several of them at the same time: i) a disk-like structure traced by the H2O masers, ii) a precessing bipolar jet probably due to the presence of a binary companion and iii) circular polarization in the OH 1665 MHz masers, which suggests the presence of a magnetic field. Additional observations and modeling are needed to establish what mechanisms are shaping K 3-35.

  10. EXPANSION PARALLAX OF THE PLANETARY NEBULA IC 418

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman, Lizette; Loinard, Laurent; Gomez, Yolanda; Morisset, Christophe

    2009-07-15

    In this paper, we present radio continuum observations of the planetary nebula IC 418 obtained at two epochs separated by more than 20 years. These data allow us to show that the angular expansion rate of the ionization front in IC 418 is 5.8 {+-} 1.5 mas yr{sup -1}. If the expansion velocity of the ionization front is equal to the expansion velocity of the gas along the line of sight as measured by optical spectroscopy, then the distance to IC 418 must be 1.1 {+-} 0.3 kpc. Recent theoretical predictions appropriate for the case of IC 418, however, suggest that the ionization front may be expanding about 20% faster than the material. Under this assumption, the distance to IC 418 would increase to 1.3 {+-} 0.4 kpc.

  11. An ISO and IUE Study of Planetary Nebula NGC 2440

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, J. Bernard; Pottasch, S. R.; Feibelman, W. A.; Wesselius, P. R.; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The infrared and ultraviolet spectra of planetary nebula NGC 2440 is presented. The observations were made respectively by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) These data, in conjunction with published optical observations have been used to derive electron temperature and density. A trend of electron temperature with ionization potential is found. In particular the electron temperature increases from 11000 to 18000 K with increasing IBM. The electron density has a constant value of 4500/cu cm in agreement with previous determination. The chemical abundance has been derived for the following elements; helium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, sulfur and argon. The ionization correction factor turns out to be very small (almost unnecessary) for all species except sulfur.

  12. Abundances of planetary nebulae in the Galactic bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottasch, S. R.; Bernard-Salas, J.

    2015-11-01

    Context. Planetary nebulae (PNe) abundances are poorly known for those nebulae in the Galactic bulge. This is because of the high and uneven extinction in the bulge which makes visual spectral measurements difficult. In addition, the extinction corrections may be unreliable. Elements considered are O, N, Ne, S, Ar, and Cl. Aims: We determine the abundances in 19 PNe, 18 of which are located in the bulge. This doubles the number of PNe abundance determinations in the bulge. The Galactic abundance gradient is discussed for five elements. Methods: The mid-infrared spectra measured by the Spitzer Space Telescope are used to determine the abundances. This part of the spectrum is little affected by extinction for which an uncertain correction is no longer necessary. In addition the connection with the visible and ultraviolet spectrum becomes simpler because hydrogen lines are observed both in the infrared and in the visible spectra. In this way we more than double the number of PNe with reliable abundances. Results: Reliable abundances are obtained for O, N, Ne, S, and Ar for Galactic bulge PNe. Conclusions: The Galactic abundance gradient is less steep than previously thought. This is especially true for oxygen. The sulfur abundance is reliable because all stages of ionization expected have been measured. It is not systematically low compared to oxygen as has been found for some Galactic PNe. Based on observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology.

  13. A search for pulsations in planetary nebulae nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hine, B.P.A. III.

    1988-01-01

    The author presents the results of a survey of the central stars of planetary nebulae design to detect g-mode pulsations driven by hydrogen and/or helium shell burning. Using newly developed high-speed photometric instrumentation to overcome the inherent difficulties in observing these central stars in the presence of their nebulae, he has obtained time-series photometric data for 51 central stars in an effort to detect the g-mode pulsations predicted by Kawaler and his colleagues. He detects no periodic variations, for periods between 40 and 500 seconds, in the data down to a limit of approximately 0.5 (average) millimagnitudes. Since the theoretical calculations require these pulsations in the presence of shell burning, he must conclude that either the shell burning sources are extinguished prior to this evolutionary stage, or some mechanism is inhibiting the growth of these pulsations. If the shell burning source is indeed extinguished prior to the central star becoming a white dwarf, then this implies that white dwarfs are formed with hydrogen layer masses less than 10{sup {minus}6}M mass of sum.

  14. The spectrum of the planetary nebula IC 418

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyung, Siek; Aller, Lawrence H.; Feibelman, Walter A.

    1994-01-01

    A detailed high-spectral-resolution study of the spectrum of IC 418 is made for the region 3650 to 10050 A, using the Hamilton echelle spectrograph of Lick Observatory, and of the UV spectral region with archival International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) data. From high-resolution images in both the near- and mid-infrared, Hora et al. (1993) showed that IC 418 probably has a compact shell interior to the detached, well-known, main shell emission. If one assumes a black body or Hubeny (or standard LTE) model atmosphere energy distribution, it does not appear possible to construct a fully satisfactory nebula model that will simultaneously represent the H-beta flux, the (O III) 5007/H-beta ratio, and the scale of this planetary nebula (PN). Fortunately, IUE and IR data supply information on ions in addition to those optically observed so that the chemical composition can be reasonably well established by summing over concentrations of observed ions. In spite of the fact that IC 418 is carbon rich in sense of having a C/O ratio exceeding the solar value, it is a 'metal-poor' object. Possibly it resembles IC 4997 but in a more advanced evolutionary phase. The central star is variable and has a strong wind.

  15. The Conical Outflow of NGC 7026, a Multipolar Planetary Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, David M.; López, J.; Steffen, W.; Richer, M. G.

    2013-01-01

    We use the 3-dimensional visualization and kinematic program, Shape, together with high-resolution spectra and detailed HST images to study the complex planetary nebula (PN) NGC 7026. The spectra were acquired using the Manchester Echelle Spectrometer at San Pedro Martir Observatory in Baja California, Mexico. This PN displays remarkable symmetry consisting of three pairs of lobes and four sets of knots, all symmetrical about the nucleus and exhibiting a conical outflow. We also investigate the relationship between the 3-D structure and extended X-ray emission using recently acquired XMM-Newton observations from the literature. The X-ray emission is predominantly confined to the closed, northern lobes of this PN and also shows an abrupt termination in the middle of the SE lobe, which our long slit data shows to be open. Here is where the shocked, fast wind appears to be escaping the interior of the nebula and the X-ray emission cools rapidly in this region.

  16. Recombination Line vs. Forbidden Line Abundances in Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson-Tessi, M.; Garnett, D. R.

    2004-05-01

    Recombination lines (RLs) of C II, N II, and O II in planetary nebulae (PNe) have been found to give abundances that are much larger in some cases than abundances from collisionally-excited forbidden lines (CELs). The origins of this abundance discrepancy are highly debated. We present new spectroscopic observations of O II and C II recombination lines for six planetary nebulae. With these data we compare the abundances derived from the optical recombination lines with those determined from collisionally-excited lines. Combining our new data with published results on RLs in other PNe, we examine the discrepancy in abundances derived from RLs and CELs. We find that there is a wide range in the measured abundance discrepancy Δ (O+2) = log O+2(RL) - log O+2(CEL), ranging from approximately 0.1 dex (within the 1σ measurement errors) up to 1.3 dex. This tends to rule out errors in the recombination coefficients as a source of the discrepancy. Most RLs yield similar abundances, with the notable exception of O II multiplet V15, known to arise primarily from dielectronic recombination, which gives abundances averaging 0.6 dex higher than other O II RLs. We compare Δ (O+2) against a variety of physical properties of the PNe to look for clues as to the mechanism responsible for the abundance discrepancy. The strongest correlation is found with Balmer surface brightness; high surface brightness, compact PNe show small values of Δ (O+2), while large low surface brightness PNe show the largest discrepancies. Rougher correlations of Δ (O+2) are found with He+2/He+ and with the expansion velocity. No correlations are seen with electron temperature, electron density, central star effective temperature and luminosity, stellar mass loss rate, or nebular morphology. Similar results are found for carbon, comparing C II RL abundances with ultraviolet measurements of C III]. This work is supported by NSF grant AST-0203905.

  17. Deuterium Astration in the Planetary Nebula Sh 2-216?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Cristina M.; Chayer, P.; Moos, H. Warren; Kruk, J. W.; Rauch, T.

    2006-12-01

    Sh 2-216 is a large and old low surface brightness planetary nebula at a distance of 130 pc. Its central star, WD0439+466, has been observed by FUSE and STIS allowing us to derive abundances of several elements along the sightline: D/H = (0.76 + 0.12 -0.11)E-5, O/H = (0.89 + 0.13 0.11)E-4, and N/H = (3.24 + 0.61 0.53)E-5. This fairly short sightline contains a large amount of hydrogen, most of which is in molecular form (J=0 through J=9), leading to an average volume density of 0.54 cm^(-3), higher than that of similar sightlines. In addition, we detect also absorption by HD J=0,1 and CO. We argue that most of the gas along this sightline is associated with the planetary nebula and that the low D/H ratio is likely the result of this gas being recently astrated. This would be the first time that the D/H ratio has been directly measured in astrated gas. The O/H and N/H ratios derived here are lower than typical values measured in other PN; however there is a large scatter in PN abundances. For these two species, ionization corrections not taken into account here might be important. Financial support to U. S. participants has been provided in part by NASA contract NAS5-32985 to Johns Hopkins University.

  18. Planetary systems and real planetary nebulae from planet destruction near white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bear, Ealeal; Soker, Noam

    2015-07-01

    We suggest that tidal destruction of Earth-like and icy planets near a white dwarf (WD) might lead to the formation of one or more low-mass - Earth-like and lighter - planets in tight orbits around the WD. The formation of the new WD planetary system starts with a tidal breakup of the parent planet to planetesimals near the tidal radius of about 1 R⊙. Internal stress forces keep the planetesimal from further tidal breakup when their radius is less than about 100 km. We speculate that the planetesimals then bind together to form new sub-Earth daughter-planets at a few solar radii around the WD. More massive planets that contain hydrogen supply the WD with fresh nuclear fuel to reincarnate its stellar-giant phase. Some of the hydrogen will be inflated in a large envelope. The envelope blows a wind to form a nebula that is later (after the entire envelope is lost) ionized by the hot WD. We term this glowing ionized nebula that originated from a planet a real planetary nebula (RPN). This preliminary study of daughter-planets from a planet and the RPN scenarios are of speculative nature. More detailed studies must follow to establish whether the suggested scenarios can indeed take place.

  19. International Ultraviolet Explorer observations of the white dwarf nucleus of the very old, diffuse planetary nebula, IW-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruhweiler, F. C.; Feibelman, Walter A.

    1993-01-01

    UV low-dispersion spectra of the central star of the faint planetary nebula, IW-2, were obtained with the IUE. The apparent large diameter of the very diffuse nebula, about half that of the moon, as seen on the Palomar Sky Survey plates by Ishida and Weinberger (1987), indicates this object to be potentially quite evolved, and nearby. The IUE spectra clearly reveal a hot stellar continuum extending over the entire wavelength range of the short-wavelength prime camera (1200-2000 A). This object with V = 17.7 +/- 0.4 is definitely one of the faintest stars ever successfully observed with the IUE. Comparisons of the IUE observed fluxes with those from white dwarf model atmospheres suggest extinction near E(B - V) = 0.45 for a white dwarf of T(eff) roughly 100,000 K. Constraints from estimates of the nebular emission measure and observed visual magnitude also argue for a white dwarf of T(eff) roughly 100,000 K at a distance of 300 to 350 pc. The nucleus of IW-2 is one of the most evolved stars to be identified with a planetary nebula.

  20. Recombination Line versus Forbidden Line Abundances in Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson-Tessi, Mark; Garnett, Donald R.

    2005-04-01

    Recombination lines (RLs) of C II, N II, and O II in planetary nebulae (PNs) have been found to give abundances that are much larger in some cases than abundances from collisionally excited forbidden lines (CELs). The origins of this abundance discrepancy are highly debated. We present new spectroscopic observations of O II and C II recombination lines for six planetary nebulae. With these data we compare the abundances derived from the optical recombination lines with those determined from collisionally excited lines. Combining our new data with published results on RLs in other PNs, we examine the discrepancy in abundances derived from RLs and CELs. We find that there is a wide range in the measured abundance discrepancy Δ(O+2)=logO+2(RL)-logO+2(CEL), ranging from approximately 0.1 dex (within the 1 σ measurement errors) up to 1.4 dex. This tends to rule out errors in the recombination coefficients as a source of the discrepancy. Most RLs yield similar abundances, with the notable exception of O II multiplet V15, known to arise primarily from dielectronic recombination, which gives abundances averaging 0.6 dex higher than other O II RLs. We compare Δ(O+2) against a variety of physical properties of the PNs to look for clues as to the mechanism responsible for the abundance discrepancy. The strongest correlations are found with the nebula diameter and the Balmer surface brightness; high surface brightness, compact PNs show small values of Δ(O+2), while large low surface brightness PNs show the largest discrepancies. An inverse correlation of Δ(O+2) with nebular density is also seen. A marginal correlation of Δ(O+2) is found with expansion velocity. No correlations are seen with electron temperature, He+2/He+, central star effective temperature and luminosity, stellar mass-loss rate, or nebular morphology. Similar results are found for carbon in comparing C II RL abundances with ultraviolet measurements of C III].

  1. Multiwavelength Imaging of Planetary Nebulae: Resolving & Disentangling Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Marcus J.

    2015-10-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) represent the late stages of low-mass stellar evolution. The formation of the myriad of PNe morphologies involves processes that are present in many other astrophysical systems such as the wind-blown bubbles of massive stars. In this dissertation we present the results of an X-ray study of PNe, and two modeling projects that incorporate the resulting data with the goal of furthering our understanding of their X-ray properties and morphologies, and the 3D multiwavelength structure of PNe. This work expands the Chandra Planetary Nebula Survey (ChanPlaNS), which was designed to investigate X-ray emission from PNe, from 35 to 59 objects. The results from Cycle 14 Chandra observations of 24 PNe brought the overall ChanPlaNS diffuse X-ray detection rate to ~27% and the point source detection rate to ∼36%. The detection of diffuse X-ray emission is unmistakably associated with young (≲ 5 × 10^3 yr), compact (R_neb ≲ 0.15 pc) PNe that exhibit closed elliptical structures and high electron densities (n_e ≳ 10^3 cm^-3). Utilizing the ChanPlaNS data for 14 PNe that exhibit diffuse X-ray emission, we constructed simple, spherically symmetric two-phase models using the astrophysical modeling tool, SHAPE. Our models consisted of a hot bubble and swept-up shell with the intent of investigating the X- ray morphology of these objects and the extinction caused by the swept-up shell. We compared simulated and observed radial profiles and we conclude that while most (∼79%) PNe are best described by a limb-darkened X-ray morphology, this is due to nebular extinction of an intrinsically limb-brightened hot bubble structure. Expanding upon our two-phase model, we used SHAPE to generate a 3D model of the brightest diffuse X-ray PN, BD+30 3639, with the model constrained by previously published multiwavelength data extending from the radio to the X-ray regimes. Our aim was to investigate the multiwavelength 3D morphology of this well-studied nebula and

  2. OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF THE MULTISTRUCTURED PLANETARY NEBULA NGC 7354

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras, M. E.; Vazquez, R.; Miranda, L. F.; Zavala, S.; Ayala, S. E-mail: vazquez@astrosen.unam.mx E-mail: lorenzo@astro.uson.mx E-mail: sayala@ideabc.org

    2010-04-15

    We present an observational study of the planetary nebula (PN) NGC 7354 consisting of narrowband H{alpha} and [N II]{lambda}6584 imaging as well as low- and high-dispersion long-slit spectroscopy, and VLA-D radio continuum. According to our imaging and spectroscopic data, NGC 7354 has four main structures: a quite round outer shell and an elliptical inner shell, a collection of low-excitation bright knots roughly concentrated on the equatorial region of the nebula, and two asymmetrical jet-like features, not aligned either with the shells' axes, or with each other. We have obtained physical parameters like electron temperature and electron density as well as ionic and elemental abundances for these different structures. Electron temperature and electron density slightly vary throughout the nebula going from {approx_equal}11, 000 to {approx_equal}14, 000 K, and from {approx_equal}1000 to {approx_equal} 3000 cm{sup -3}, respectively. The local extinction coefficient c {sub H{beta}} shows an increasing gradient from south to north and a decreasing gradient from east to west consistent with the number of equatorial bright knots present in each direction. Abundance values show slight internal variations but most of them are within the estimated uncertainties. In general, abundance values are in good agreement with the ones expected for PNe. Radio continuum data are consistent with optically thin thermal emission. Mean physical parameters derived from the radio emission are electron density n{sub e} = 710 cm{sup -3} and M(H II) = 0.22 M {sub sun}. We have used the interactive three-dimensional modeling tool SHAPE to reproduce the observed morphokinematic structures in NGC 7354 with different geometrical components. Our observations and model show evidence that the outer shell is moving faster ({approx_equal}35 km s{sup -1}) than the inner one ({approx_equal} 30 km s{sup -1}). Our SHAPE model includes several small spheres placed on the outer shell wall to reproduce

  3. The star fish twins: Two young planetary nebulae with extreme multipolar morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahai, R.

    2000-01-01

    We present alpha images of two objects, He 2-47 and M1-37, obtained during a Hubble Space Telescope imaging survey of young planetary nebulae (PNs) selected on the basis of their low-excitation characteristics.

  4. An atlas of emission line fluxes of planetary nebulae in the 1150-3200 A region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feibelman, W. A.; Mccracken, C. W.

    1981-01-01

    Emission line fluxes for 28 planetary nebulae are presented. The nebulae were chosen to cover a wide range of excitation classes, apparent diameters, location in the sky, and types of central stars. All objects were observed in the low dispersion mode of the IUE spectrographs, using the large entrance aperture.

  5. WISE properties of planetary nebulae from the DSH catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronberger, M.; Jacoby, G. H.; Harmer, D.; Patchick, D.

    2014-04-01

    A decade has passed since the discovery of Patchick 1, the first planetary nebula (PN) found by an amateur astronomer since the early days of PN research. Since then, the members of the Deep Sky Hunters (DSH) collaboration have identified ˜200 PN candidates in fields mostly outside of the boundaries covered by the IPHAS and SHS surveys . Further investigations based on narrowband imaging, primarily to reveal H-alpha and [OIII] line emission, and/or spectroscopic observations on 157 of these enabled classifying 64 candidates as true PNe on those morphologies and spectral properties. Additional 42 objects with unavailable spectra are considered as probable or possible PNe based on their morphologies alone. The remaining 51 objects were found to be PN mimics of various nature, such as supernova remnants, interlopers, reflection nebulae, or plate faults. The majority of the PN candidates from the DSH sample were found by the visual inspection of multicolour imagery from the Digitized Sky Survey (DSS), the Sloan Digitized Sky Survey (SDSS), and widefield narrowband images of the Milky Way. However, in recent years, the candidate selection process has been facilitated by the availability of deep satellite-based wide-field surveys providing images at wavelengths outside the optical regime, such as the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). In this contribution, we provide an overview on the current status of the DSH project and discuss the mid-infrared properties of a subsample of the true and probable DSH PNe located at Galactic latitudes |b| > 5¬∞. It is shown that spherical PNe are significantly less likely to appear on WISE band images than PNe of other morphological classes.

  6. Planetary nebulae: understanding the physical and chemical evolution of dying stars.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, R; Kerber, F

    1997-05-30

    Planetary nebulae are one of the few classes of celestial objects that are active in every part of the electromagnetic spectrum. These fluorescing and often dusty expanding gaseous envelopes were recently found to be quite complex in their dynamics and morphology, but refined theoretical models can account for these discoveries. Great progress was also made in understanding the mechanisms that shape the nebulae and the spectra of their central stars. In addition, applications for planetary nebulae have been worked out; for example, they have been used as standard candles for long-range distances and as tracers of the enigmatic dark matter. PMID:9161999

  7. Imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy of the Planetary Nebula NGC 3242

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Muñoz, Marco Antonio; Wendolyn Blanco Cárdenas, Mónica; Vázquez, Roberto; Zavala, Saúl A.; Guillén, Pedro F.; Ayala, Sandra A.

    2015-08-01

    We present a high-resolution imaging and high-dispersion spectroscopy study of the complex morphological and kinematical structure of the planetary nebula NGC 3242. We analyze narrowband Hα, [O III] and [N II] images, addressing important morphological features: in the [O III] image we found one knot oriented to PA=-4°, in the [N II] image, three knots oriented at PA1=155°, PA2=+157°, and PA3=-45.5°, and in the Hα image, two bubbles in the internal region, one of them oriented toward SE and the other toward NW. Additionally we used the unsharp-masking technique and found faint structures in the halo that have not been studied before. These structures are presented in two pairs of arcs, one pair oriented toward PA=-35° and the other toward PA=140°. NGC 3242 is a morphologically rich PN with bubbles, asymmetrical outflows, and some knots in a double-shell nebular structure. Ground-based long-slit echelle spectra were obtained crossing NGC 3242 at twelve different positions to precisely determine kinematical features in the structure of the nebula. We obtain a systemic velocity of VLSR=-6.6 km/s. We have used the software SHAPE (Steffen et al. 2011, IEEE Trans. Vis. Comput. Graphics, 17, 454), to reconstruct a 3D model of NGC 3242 which fits all our observational data. Preliminary results (deprojected velocities and kinematical ages) of all these structures will be presented.This project has been supported by grant PAPIIT-DGAPA-UNAM IN107914. MWB is in grateful receipt of a DGAPA-UNAM postdoctoral scholarship. MAG acknowledges CONACYT for his graduate scholarship.

  8. First release of the IPHAS catalogue of new extended planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabin, L.; Parker, Q. A.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Guzman-Ramirez, L.; Morris, R. A. H.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Bojičić, I. S.; Frew, D. J.; Guerrero, M.; Stupar, M.; Barlow, M. J.; Mora, F. Cortés; Drew, J. E.; Greimel, R.; Groot, P.; Irwin, J. M.; Irwin, M. J.; Mampaso, A.; Miszalski, B.; Olguín, L.; Phillipps, S.; García, M. Santander; Viironen, K.; Wright, N. J.

    2014-10-01

    We present the first results of our search for new, extended planetary nebulae (PNe) based on careful, systematic, visual scrutiny of the imaging data from the Isaac Newton Telescope Photometric Hα Survey of the Northern Galactic plane (IPHAS). The newly uncovered PNe will help to improve the census of this important population of Galactic objects that serve as key windows into the late-stage evolution of low- to intermediate-mass stars. They will also facilitate study of the faint end of the ensemble Galactic PN luminosity function. The sensitivity and coverage of IPHAS allows PNe to be found in regions of greater extinction in the Galactic plane and/or those PNe in a more advanced evolutionary state and at larger distances compared to the general Galactic PN population. Using a set of newly revised optical diagnostic diagrams in combination with access to a powerful, new, multiwavelength imaging data base, we have identified 159 true, likely and possible PNe for this first catalogue release. The ability of IPHAS to unveil PNe at low Galactic latitudes and towards the Galactic Anticentre, compared to previous surveys, makes this survey an ideal tool to contribute to the improvement of our knowledge of the whole Galactic PN population.

  9. VLT/X-shooter Spectroscopy of a dusty planetary nebula discovered with Spitzer/IRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, I.; Overzier, R. A.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Spezzi, L.

    2011-02-01

    As part of a mid-infrared spectroscopic survey of young stars with the Spitzer Space Telescope, an unclassified red emission line object was discovered. Based on its high ionization state indicated by the Spitzer spectrum, this object could either be a dusty supernova remnant (SNR) or a planetary nebula (PN). In this research note, the object is classified and the available spectroscopic data are presented to the community for further analysis. UV/optical/NIR spectra were obtained during the science verification run of the VLT/X-shooter. A large number of emission lines are identified allowing the determination of the nature of this object. The presence of strong, narrow (Δv ~8 - 74 km s-1) emission lines, combined with very low line ratios of, e.g., [N ii]/Hα and [S ii]/Hα show that the object is a PN that lies at an undetermined distance behind the Serpens Molecular Cloud. This illustrates the potential of X-shooter as an efficient tool for constraining the nature of faint sources with unknown spectral properties or colors.

  10. Carbon and Nitrogen Enrichment Patterns in Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Reginald

    2011-10-01

    The goal of this project is to assess the role played in carbon production by low and intermediate mass stars {LIMS}, i.e. the progenitors of planetary nebulae {PNe}. One of the most pressing problems in galactic chemical evolution today is understanding the relative roles of LIMS {1-8 M_sun} versus massive stars {8-120 M_sun} in affecting the cosmic level of the element C. We are launching a fresh, ambitious project whose purpose is to employ STIS to obtain UV spectra of unprecedented-quality of 10 carefully chosen, bright solar metallicity PNe spanning a broad range in progenitor mass. Line strength measurements of important emission lines of C, N, and O such as OIII] 1660-6, NIII] 1747-54, CIII] 1907-9, and {when He++ is strong} CIV] 1550 and OIV] 1400 in each object will be used along with our own in-house abundance software to determine ion and element abundances for these three species. In turn, these results will be used to assess stellar yields {productivity rates} available in the literature. Favored yield sets will be used to calculate our own chemical evolution models in order to assess directly the importance of intermediate-mass stars in the cosmic evolution of C.

  11. An Observational Study of Pulsations in Proto-Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.; Lu, Wenxian; Henson, Gary D.; Hillwig, Todd C.

    2016-01-01

    We have been carrying out a long-term monitoring program to study the light variability in proto-planetary nebulae (PPNe). PPNe are post-Asymptotic Giant Branch objects in transition between the AGB and PN phases in the evolution of low and intermediate-mass stars. As such, it is not surprising that they display pulsational variability. We have been carrying out photometric monitoring of 30 of these at the Valparaiso University campus observatory over the last 20 years, with the assistance of undergraduate students. The sample size has been enlarged over the past six years by observations made using telescopes in the SARA consortium at KPNO and CTIO. Periods have been determined for those of F-G spectral types. We have also enlarged the sample with PPNe from outside the Milky Way by determining periods of eight PPNe in the lower metalicity environment of the Magellanic Clouds. Periods for the entire sample range from 35 to 160 days. Some clear patterns have emerged, with those of higher temperature possessing shorter periods and smaller amplitudes, indicating a reduction in period and pulsation amplitude as the objects evolve. Radial velocity monitoring of several of the brightest of these has allowed us to document their changes in brightness, color, and size during a pulsation cycle. The results of this study will be presented. This research is supported by grants from the National Science Foundation (most recently AST 1413660), with additional student support from the Indiana Space Grant Consortium.

  12. Radio planetary nebulae in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leverenz, Howard; Filipović, Miroslav D.; Bojičić, I. S.; Crawford, E. J.; Collier, J. D.; Grieve, K.; Drašković, D.; Reid, W. A.

    2016-03-01

    We present ten new radio continuum (RC) detections at catalogued planetary nebula (PN) positions in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC): SMP S6, LIN 41, LIN 142, SMP S13, SMP S14, SMP S16, J 18, SMP S18, SMP S19 and SMP S22. Additionally, six SMC radio PNe previously detected, LIN 45, SMP S11, SMP S17, LIN 321, LIN 339 and SMP S24 are also investigated (re-observed) here making up a population of 16 radio detections of catalogued PNe in the SMC. These 16 radio detections represent ˜15 % of the total catalogued PN population in the SMC. We show that six of these objects have characteristics that suggest that they are PN mimics: LIN 41, LIN 45, SMP S11, LIN 142, LIN 321 and LIN 339. We also present our results for the surface brightness—PN radius relation (Σ-D) of the SMC radio PN population. These are consistent with previous SMC and LMC PN measurements of the (Σ-D) relation.

  13. THE CURIOUS CONUNDRUM REGARDING SULFUR ABUNDANCES IN PLANETARY NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, R. B. C.; Maguire, Mason; Speck, Angela; Karakas, Amanda I.; Ferland, Gary J. E-mail: mr.magu@ou.edu E-mail: akarakas@mso.anu.edu.au

    2012-04-10

    Sulfur abundances derived from optical emission line measurements and ionization correction factors (ICFs) in planetary nebulae are systematically lower than expected for the objects' metallicities. We have carefully considered a large range of explanations for this 'sulfur anomaly', including: (1) correlations between the size of the sulfur deficit and numerous nebular and central star properties, (2) ICFs which undercorrect for unobserved ions, (3) effects of dielectronic recombination on the sulfur ionization balance, (4) sequestering of S into dust and/or molecules, and (5) excessive destruction of S or production of O by asymptotic giant branch stars. It appears that all but the second scenario can be ruled out. However, we find evidence that the sulfur deficit is generally reduced but not eliminated when S{sup +3} abundances determined directly from IR measurements are used in place of the customary sulfur ICF. We tentatively conclude that the sulfur anomaly is caused by the inability of commonly used ICFs to properly correct for populations of ionization stages higher than S{sup +2}.

  14. THE DECELERATION OF NEBULAR SHELLS IN EVOLVED PLANETARY NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Pereyra, Margarita; Richer, Michael G.; Lopez, Jose Alberto E-mail: richer@astrosen.unam.mx

    2013-07-10

    We have selected a group of 100 evolved planetary nebulae (PNe) and study their kinematics based upon spatially-resolved, long-slit, echelle spectroscopy. The data have been drawn from the San Pedro Martir Kinematic Catalogue of PNe. The aim is to characterize in detail the global kinematics of PNe at advanced stages of evolution with the largest sample of homogenous data used to date for this purpose. The results reveal two groups that share kinematics, morphology, and photo-ionization characteristics of the nebular shell and central star luminosities at the different late stages under study. The typical flow velocities we measure are usually larger than seen in earlier evolutionary stages, with the largest velocities occurring in objects with very weak or absent [N II] {lambda}6584 line emission, by all indications the least evolved objects in our sample. The most evolved objects expand more slowly. This apparent deceleration during the final stage of PNe evolution is predicted by hydrodynamical models, but other explanations are also possible. These results provide a template for comparison with the predictions of theoretical models.

  15. Single rotating stars and the formation of bipolar planetary nebula

    SciTech Connect

    García-Segura, G.; Villaver, E.; Langer, N.; Yoon, S.-C.; Manchado, A.

    2014-03-10

    We have computed new stellar evolution models that include the effects of rotation and magnetic torques under different hypotheses. The goal is to test whether a single star can sustain the rotational velocities needed in the envelope for magnetohydrodynamical(MHD) simulations to shape bipolar planetary nebulae (PNe) when high mass-loss rates take place. Stellar evolution models with main sequence masses of 2.5 and 5 M {sub ☉} and initial rotational velocities of 250 km s{sup –1} have been followed through the PNe formation phase. We find that stellar cores have to be spun down using magnetic torques in order to reproduce the rotation rates observed for white dwarfs. During the asymptotic giant branch phase and beyond, the magnetic braking of the core has a practically null effect on increasing the rotational velocity of the envelope since the stellar angular momentum is efficiently removed by the wind. We have also tested the best possible case scenarios in rather non-physical contexts to give enough angular momentum to the envelope. We find that we cannot get the envelope of a single star to rotate at the speeds needed for MHD simulations to form bipolar PNe. We conclude that single stellar rotators are unlikely to be the progenitors of bipolar PNe under the current MHD model paradigm.

  16. Hydrogen-deficient Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todt, H.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Gvaramadze, V. V.; Hamann, W.-R.; Pena, M.; Graefener, G.; Buckley, D.; Crause, L.; Crawford, S. M.; Gulbis, A. A. S.; Hettlage, C.; Hooper, E.; Husser, T.-O.; Kotze, P.; Loaring, N.; Nordsieck, K. H.; O'Donoghue, D.; Pickering, T.; Potter, S.; Romero-Colmenero, E.; Vaisanen, P.; Williams, T.; Wolf, M.

    2015-06-01

    A significant number of the central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPNe) are hydrogen-deficient and are considered as the progenitors of H-deficient white dwarfs. Almost all of these H-deficient CSPNe show a chemical composition of helium, carbon, and oxygen. Most of them exhibit Wolf-Rayet-like emission line spectra and are therefore classified as of spectral type [WC]. In the last years, CSPNe of other Wolf-Rayet spectral subtypes have been identified, namely PB 8 (spectral type [WN/WC]), IC 4663 and Abell 48 (spectral type [WN]). We performed spectral analyses for a number of Wolf-Rayet type central stars of different evolutionary stages with the help of our Potsdam Wolf-Rayet (PoWR) model code for expanding atmospheres to determine relevant stellar parameters. The results of our recent analyses will be presented in the context of stellar evolution and white dwarf formation. Especially the problems of a uniform evolutionary channel for [WC] stars as well as constraints to the formation of [WN] or [WN/WC] subtype stars will be addressed.

  17. Polarization properties of OH emission in planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, José F.; Uscanga, Lucero; Green, James A.; Miranda, Luis F.; Suárez, Olga; Bendjoya, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    We present the interferometric, full-polarization observations of the four ground-state transitions of OH, towards five confirmed and one candidate OH-emitting planetary nebulae (OHPNe). OHPNe are believed to be very young PNe, and information on their magnetic fields (provided by their polarization) could be key to understand the early evolution of PNe. We detect significant circular and linear polarization in four and two objects, respectively. Possible Zeeman pairs are seen in JaSt 23 and IRAS 17393-2727, resulting in estimates of magnetic field strengths between 0.8 and 24 mG. We also report the new detection of OH emission at 1720 MHz towards Vy 2-2, making it the third known PN with this type of emission. We suggest that younger PNe have spectra dominated by narrow maser features and higher degrees of polarization. Shock-excited emission at 1720 MHz seems to be more common in PNe than in early evolutionary phases, and could be related to equatorial ejections during the early PN phase.

  18. Dust and molecules in extra-galactic planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Hernandez, Domingo Aníbal

    2015-08-01

    Extra-galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) permit the study of dust and molecules in metallicity environments other than the Galaxy. Their known distances lower the number of free parameters in the observations vs. models comparison, providing strong constraints on the gas-phase and solid-state astrochemistry models. Observations of PNe in the Galaxy and other Local Group galaxies such as the Magellanic Clouds (MC) provide evidence that metallicity affects the production of dust as well as the formation of complex organic molecules and inorganic solid-state compounds in their circumstellar envelopes. In particular, the lower metallicity MC environments seem to be less favorable to dust production and the frequency of carbonaceous dust features and complex fullerene molecules is generally higher with decreasing metallicity. Here, I present an observational review of the dust and molecular content in extra-galactic PNe as compared to their higher metallicity Galactic counterparts. A special attention is given to the level of dust processing and the formation of complex organic molecules (e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fullerenes, and graphene precursors) depending on metallicity.

  19. Spectroscopy of planetary nebulae in the region of Canis Major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniazev, A. Yu.

    2012-11-01

    We present the results of a pilot project of spectroscopic observations for planetary nebulae (PNe) and PN candidates in Canis Major, a sky region where the remnant of a disrupted dwarf galaxy cannibalized by the Milky Way may be located. The spectra of seven objects were taken while testing the SALT spectrograph (South African Astronomical Observatory). All elemental abundances have been obtained by the T e method, where the electron temperature is calculated directly using the measured weak auroral [OIII] λ 4363 Å and/or [NII] λ 5755 Å lines. We have measured the intensities of all the detected emission lines and determined the abundances of oxygen and several other elements (N, Ne, S, Cl, C, and He) in all PNe. The radial velocity for one PN has been measured for the first time and the velocities for all of the remaining PNe have been measured with a considerably better accuracy than that of the previously published ones. The elemental abundances for three PNe have been calculated for the first time and the accuracies of determining the abundances for three others have been improved. The measured heavy-element abundance ratios (S/O, Ne/O, Cl/O) are in good agreement with their typical values for HII regions. Among the PNe studied, ESO 428-05 is the first and so far the most likely candidate for belonging to the remnants of a possible dwarf galaxy disrupted by the tidal interaction with the Milky Way.

  20. Searching for Intracluster Planetary Nebulae in the Dorado group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmeier, John; Ciardullo, Robin; Jacoby, George; Durrell, Pat

    2002-08-01

    A key problem in extragalactic astronomy is how galaxy clusters and groups dynamically evolve. Although the properties of these systems depend sensitively on the rates of galactic cannibalism, outside accretion, and tidal-stripping, the relative importance of these mechanisms is unknown. The one property we can observe, the fraction of light removed from galaxies via tidal-stripping, is difficult to detect, and until recently, had only been observed in a few very rich galaxy clusters. Over the past few years, we have successfully detected intracluster planetary nebulae (IPN) in large numbers in both the Virgo and Fornax clusters. However, the amount of intracluster starlight in poorer clusters and groups is still mostly unknown. This is unfortunate because theoretical scenarios of intracluster star production make strong predictions on the amount of intracluster starlight as a function of cluster richness. If the intracluster stars are primarily produced by collisions with other galaxies, the fraction of intracluster starlight should correlate strongly with cluster richness. We propose to use the CTIO 4-meter, and the MOSAIC II imager to search the Dorado galaxy group for intracluster PN. Dorado is intermediate in richness to the clusters already studied, and has evidence for tidal interaction. We also plan to study the PN population around two early-type galaxies in the cluster core that are strongly interacting, using the PN as dynamical test particles.

  1. Central stars of planetary nebulae: New spectral classifications and catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidmann, W. A.; Gamen, R.

    2011-02-01

    Context. There are more than 3000 confirmed and probable known Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe), but central star spectroscopic information is available for only 13% of them. Aims: We undertook a spectroscopic survey of central stars of PNe at low resolution and compiled a large list of central stars for which information was dispersed in the literature. Methods: We observed 45 PNs using the 2.15 m telescope at Casleo, Argentina. Results: We present a catalogue of 492 confirmed and probable CSPN and provide a preliminary spectral classification for 45 central star of PNe. This revises previous values of the proportion of CSPN with atmospheres poor in hydrogen in at least 30% of cases and provide statistical information that allows us to infer the origin of H-poor stars. Based on data collected at the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO), which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina y Universidades Nacionales de La Plata, Córdoba y San Juan, Argentina.

  2. Three New Candidate Planetary Nebulae near the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Janet P.; Sellgren, Kristen; Ramirez, Solange; Cotera, Angela; An, Deokkeun

    2015-08-01

    We report the discovery of three candidate planetary nebulae (PNe) detected in lines of sight close to our Galactic Center: G0.098-0.051, G0.399+0.208, and G359.963-0.120. These objects are identified by being compact continuum sources with exceptionally high excitation as seen in spectra of forbidden lines taken with Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Spectrograph and downloaded from the Spitzer Heritage Archive. In particular, the high excitation lines include [Na III] 7.32 micron, [O IV] 25.9 micron, and [Ne V] 14.3 and 24.3 micron. Such lines are not seen in Galactic H II regions but only are found in PNe and supernova remnants; we exclude the last by the existance of the co-located continuum sources of size a few arcsec. We note that none of these sources has any significant associated emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which is otherwise common in the Galactic Center and in PNe. We will present spectra, abundance analyses, additional data from radio and near-infrared telescopes, and photoionization and shock models computed with Cloudy (Ferland et al. 2013) and MAPPINGS III (Allen et al. 2008).

  3. The density profile of the elliptical planetary nebula NGC 3242

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soker, Noam; Zucker, Daniel B.; Balick, Bruce

    1992-01-01

    We present the three-dimensional density structure of the elliptical planetary nebula NGC 3242, deconvolved from its H-alpha image. Using the simplistic assumptions that each mass element preserves its original velocity, which is radial and depends only on latitude, we deduce from this density profile the variation of mass-loss rate from the progenitor of NGC 3242 with latitude and time. The resulting somewhat qualitative mass-loss geometry and history are used to constrain models for the formation of the elliptical structure of NGC 3242. We argue that a triple system, with a very close brown dwarf companion and a more massive distant tertiary star, is compatible with the morphology of NGC 3242. In this model the brown dwarf, of about 0.01 solar mass, shared a common envelope with the progenitor star, and spun up the envelope through deposition of angular momentum. The oblate rotating envelope blew an axisymmetrical wind. We suggest that the presence of a third star, with a mass of about 1 solar mass and an orbital period of about 4000 years, could have caused the large scale deviation from axial symmetry seen in the density structure.

  4. Chemical Abundances of Compact Planetary Nebulae in the Galactic Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ting-Hui; Shaw, R. A.; Stanghellini, L.

    2014-01-01

    We present preliminary results from an optical spectroscopic survey of compact planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Galactic disk. This is an ongoing optical+infrared spectral survey of 150 compact PNe to build a complete sample of PN chemical abundances in the Galactic disk. The optical spectra will be combined with Spitzer spectra of IR collisional lines to improve abundance constraints. Our targets are mostly young PNe, which are well suited for studying the impact of metallicity and dust on PN morphology. Our main objectives are: (1) to constrain stellar evolution models, particularly the metallicity-dependent onset of hot-bottom burning; (2) to quantify the contribution of low- to intermediate-mass stars to chemical enrichment; and (3) to improve the ionization correction factors for Ne, O, S, and Ar that we have observed in the IR. We will also compare these findings to our optical+IR Magellanic Cloud PN abundances to better understand the influence of environment metallicity on stellar chemical yields.

  5. Spitzer mid-infrared spectroscopic observations of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, H.; Ramos-Larios, G.; Guerrero, M. A.; Nigoche-Netro, A.; Toalá, J. A.; Fang, X.; Rubio, G.; Kemp, S. N.; Navarro, S. G.; Corral, L. J.

    2016-06-01

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope archival mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectroscopy of a sample of 11 planetary nebulae (PNe). The observations, acquired with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS), cover the spectral range 5.2-14.5 μm that includes the H2 0-0 S(2) to S(7) rotational emission lines. This wavelength coverage has allowed us to derive the Boltzmann distribution and calculate the H2 rotational excitation temperature (Tex). The derived excitation temperatures have consistent values ≃900 ± 70 K for different sources despite their different structural components. We also report the detection of mid-IR ionic lines of [Ar III], [S IV], and [Ne II] in most objects, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features in a few cases. The decline of the [Ar III]/[Ne II] line ratio with the stellar effective temperature can be explained either by a true neon enrichment or by high density circumstellar regions of PNe that presumably descend from higher mass progenitor stars.

  6. Magnetic fields in Planetary Nebulae: paradigms and related MHD frontiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Eric G.

    2009-04-01

    Many, if not all, post AGB stellar systems swiftly transition from a spherical to a powerful aspherical pre-planetary nebula (pPNE) outflow phase before waning into a PNe. The pPNe outflows require engine rotational energy and a mechanism to extract this energy into collimated outflows. Just radiation and rotation are insufficient but a symbiosis between rotation, differential rotation and large scale magnetic fields remains promising. Present observational evidence for magnetic fields in evolved stars is suggestive of dynamically important magnetic fields, but both theory and observation are rife with research opportunity. I discuss how magnetohydrodynamic outflows might arise in pPNe and PNe and distinguish different between approaches that address shaping vs. those that address both launch and shaping. Scenarios involving dynamos in single stars, binary driven dynamos, or accretion engines cannot be ruled out. One appealing paradigm involves accretion onto the primary post-AGB white dwarf core from a low mass companion whose decaying accretion supply rate owers first the pPNe and then the lower luminosity PNe. Determining observational signatures of different MHD engines is a work in progress. Accretion disk theory and large scale dynamos pose many of their own fundamental challenges, some of which I discuss in a broader context.

  7. Owl Nebula (M97, NGC 3587)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A planetary nebula in the constellation Ursa Major, position RA 11 h 14.8 m, dec. +55° 01'. The Owl is 3' across and gets its name from two adjacent dark patches that have the appearance of large eyes. The nebula is eleventh magnitude, and the central star is a faint magnitude 16....

  8. Kinematical Structure of the Planetary Nebula NGC 7009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seong-Jae; Hyung, S.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the line profiles of the planetary nebula NGC 7009 using the (10-m) Keck HIRES and (1.8-m) BOES spectral data, obtained in 1998, August 14-16 and 2009, October 2. The HIRES long-slit data were secured along the major and minor axes, while the BOES fiber data were obtained from the central region of the nebula. The Keck 2D kinematical data, i.e., sky-field vs. velocity frame, suggest some interesting features. We confirmed the high density inner boundary of the main shell consisting of numerous high density structures, a receding hot-bubble like structure & approaching 2-3" high density blobs in W-SW cap region; and sub-arc second scale blobs in the hollow zone along the major axis. We also identified the density range of the main & outer shells near S-SE bright rim and 2" diameter hot bubble-like structure near the N-NW bright rim along the minor axis. For the 5 strategically important positions, E-NE & W-SW caps; S-SE & N-NW rims; and CSPN, we decomposed the one-dimensional spectral line profiles of the important lines in the wavelength range of 3250-8725A. The analyzed lines are HeI5875, 6678, 7065; HeII7592, 4686; [OII]7319; [OIII]4363, 4959, 5007; [NII]6548, 6583; NIII4097; [SII]6716, 6730; [SIII]6312, 9068; [ArIII]7136, 7751; [ArIV]4711, 4740; and [ClIV]7529, 8045. Most of the low-to-medium excitation lines and some of high excitation lines showed double + 3rd wing components. The 3rd wing component in the low-to-medium excitation lines are due to the outer ring or high density blobs, but in some cases, the fast blue or red wing component found in the low-to-medium lines profile is likely to be an independent geometrical feature, similar to the jet-like outflows. Inside the main shell, there appears to be an inner zone that is responsible for some unusual feature in the high excitation HeI and HeII line profiles.

  9. POSSIBLE STELLAR STREAMS IN THE EDGE-ON SPIRAL NGC 891 DISCOVERED FROM KINEMATICS OF PLANETARY NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Mendez, Roberto H. E-mail: mendez@ifa.hawaii.ed

    2010-12-10

    We have found 125 planetary nebulae (PNs) in NGC 891, using an [O III] {lambda}5007 on-band/off-band filter technique with the Faint Object Camera and Spectrograph (FOCAS) at the Cassegrain focus of the Subaru telescope, Mauna Kea. Radial velocities were measured for all detected sources, using a method of slitless spectroscopy which we briefly describe. The radial velocities allow us to study the motions of different stellar populations in NGC 891. The PN kinematics show rotation at large distances from the galactic plane. Of particular interest is the strong asymmetry of PN distribution at large height, which we interpret as two possible stellar streams that could be orbiting the galaxy at large angles to the main structure. These streams, if real, are probably remnants of a previous minor merging episode. This idea finds support in recent reports of clump-like, incompletely mixed structures from deep HST/ACS images of this galaxy.

  10. Evolution of planetary nebulae. III. Position-velocity images of butterfly-type nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Icke, V.; Preston, H.L.; Balick, B.

    1989-02-01

    Observations of the motions of the shells of the planetary nebulae NGC 2346, NGC 2371-2, NGC 2440, NGC 6058, NGC 6210, IC 1747, IC 5217, J-320, and M2-9 are presented. These are all 'butterfly' type PNs, and show evidence for bipolar shocks. The observations are interpreted in terms of a fast spherical wind, driven by the central star into a quasi-toroidal envelope deposited earlier by the star, during its slow-wind phase on the asymptotic giant branch. It is shown that this model, which is a straightforward extension of a mechanism previously invoked to account for elliptical PNs, reproduces the essential kinematic features of butterfly PNs. It is inferred that the envelopes of butterflies must have a considerable equator-to-pole density gradient, and it is suggested that the origin of this asphericity must be sought in an as yet unknown mechanism during the AGB, Mira, or OH/IR phases of late stellar evolution. 28 references.

  11. Evolution of planetary nebulae. I. An improved synthetic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marigo, P.; Girardi, L.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Weiss, A.

    2001-11-01

    We present a new synthetic model to follow the evolution of a planetary nebula (PN) and its central star, starting from the onset of AGB phase up to the white dwarf cooling sequence. The model suitably combines various analytical prescriptions to account for different (but inter-related) aspects of planetary nebulae, such as: the dynamical evolution of the primary shell and surrounding ejecta, the photoionisation of H and He by the central star, the nebular emission of a few relevant optical lines (e.g. Hβ ; He II lambda 4686; [O III] lambda 5007). Particular effort has been put into the analytical description of dynamical effects such as the three-winds interaction and the shell thickening due to ionisation (i.e. the thin-shell approximation is relaxed), that are nowadays considered important aspects of the PN evolution. Predictions of the synthetic model are tested by comparison with both findings of hydrodynamical calculations, and observations of Galactic PNe. The sensitiveness of the results to the model parameters (e.g. transition time, mass of the central star, H-/He-burning tracks, etc.) is also discussed. We briefly illustrate the systematic differences that are expected in the luminosities and lifetimes of PNe with either H- or He-burning central stars, which result in different ``detection probabilities'' across the H-R diagram, in both Hβ and [OIII] lambda5007 lines. Adopting reasonable values of the model parameters, we are able to reproduce, in a satisfactory way, many general properties of PNe, like the ionised mass-nebular radius relationship, the trends of a few main nebular line ratios, and the observed ranges of nebular shell thicknesses, electron densities, and expansion velocities. The models naturally predict also the possible transitions from optically-thick to optically-thin configurations (and vice versa). In this context, our analysis indicates that the condition of optical thinness to the H continuum plays an important role in producing

  12. Chandra Discovers Elusive "Hot Bubble" in Planetary Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-06-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has imaged for the first time a "hot bubble" of gas surrounding a dying, Sun-like star. This large region of very hot gas in the planetary nebula BD+30 3639 has a peculiar shape and contains elements produced in the core of the dying star. "The new Chandra image offers conclusive proof for the existence of the "hot bubble" that theorists have long predicted," said Professor Joel Kastner, of the Chester F. Carlson Center of Imaging Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. Kastner leads a team of scientists who reported on this observation at the 196th national meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Rochester, New York. The Chandra image shows a region of 3 million degree Celsius gas that appears to fit inside the shell of ionized gas seen by the Hubble Space Telescope. The optical and X-ray emitting regions of BD+30 3639, which lies between 5000 and 8000 light years away, are roughly one million times the volume of our solar system. A planetary nebula (so called because it looks like a planet when viewed with a small telescope) is formed when a dying red giant star puffs off its outer layer, leaving behind a hot core that will eventually collapse to form a dense star called a white dwarf. According to theory, a "hot bubble" is formed when a new, two million mile per hour wind emanating from the hot core rams into the ejected atmosphere, producing energetic shocks and heating the interaction region to temperatures of millions of degrees. Previous X-ray observations hinted that X rays might be coming from a region larger than the central star but it remained for Chandra to provide definite proof. The shape of the X-ray emission was a surprise to the researchers. "This suggests that the red giant atmosphere was not ejected symmetrically,"said Kastner. "It might be pointing to an unseen companion star," The spectrum shows a large abundance of neon in the X-ray-emitting gas. This indicates that gas contained in the hot

  13. HST Search for Planetary Nebulae in Local Group Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Howard E.

    2015-01-01

    If every star of about solar mass produces a planetary nebula (PN) near the end of its life, there should be several dozen PNe in the globular clusters (GCs) of the Local Group. However, ground-based surveys of Milky Way GCs have revealed only 4 PNe. A converse argument is that it is likely that the remnants of stars now evolving in ancient GCs leave the AGB so slowly that any ejected PN dissipates long before the star becomes hot enough to ionize it. Thus there should not be any PNe in Milky Way GCs--but there are four! It has been suggested that these PNe are the result of binary mergers of binary stars within GCs, i.e., that they are descendants of blue stragglers. To explore these issues and extend them beyond the Milky Way, I carried out a Snapshot imaging survey of GCs throughout the Local Group with the Hubble Space Telescope. Observations were made with the WFPC2 camera in 2007-2008, and with WFC3 in 2009-2011. Frames were obtained in a narrow-band [O III] 5007 filter and in a broad V filter (F555W). In this filter combination, a PN will have a comparable signal in both bandpasses, but stars will be much brighter in the V filter. I surveyed 41 GCs in M31, 4 in M33, 8 in the Magellanic Clouds, 2 in Fornax, and 1 each in NGC 6822, WLM, and NGC 147. Only one candidate PN was found, in the M31 GC B086. My results appear to be consistent with a ground-based spectroscopic survey for PNe in the M31 GCs by Jacoby et al. (2013), which found only 3 PN candidates in 274 clusters. PNe are very rare in GCs, but a few do exist, and they may require binary interactions for their formation.

  14. THE FIRST ''WATER FOUNTAIN'' COLLIMATED OUTFLOW IN A PLANETARY NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez, José F.; Miranda, Luis F.; Guerrero, Martín A.; Rizzo, J. Ricardo; García-García, Enrique; Green, James A.; Uscanga, Lucero; Ramos-Larios, Gerardo

    2015-02-01

    ''Water fountains'' (WFs) are evolved objects showing high-velocity, collimated jets traced by water maser emission. Most of them are in the post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) and they may represent one of the first manifestations of collimated mass loss in evolved stars. We present water maser, carbon monoxide, and mid-infrared spectroscopic data (obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, Herschel Space Observatory, and the Very Large Telescope, respectively) toward IRAS 15103–5754, a possible planetary nebula (PN) with WF characteristics. Carbon monoxide observations show that IRAS 15103–5754 is an evolved object, while the mid-IR spectrum displays unambiguous [Ne II] emission, indicating that photoionization has started and thus, its nature as a PN is confirmed. Water maser spectra show several components spreading over a large velocity range (≅ 75 km s{sup –1}) and tracing a collimated jet. This indicates that the object is a WF, the first WF known that has already entered the PN phase. However, the spatial and kinematical distribution of the maser emission in this object are significantly different from those in other WFs. Moreover, the velocity distribution of the maser emission shows a ''Hubble-like'' flow (higher velocities at larger distances from the central star), consistent with a short-lived, explosive mass-loss event. This velocity pattern is not seen in other WFs (which are presumably in earlier evolutionary stages). We therefore suggest that we are witnessing a fundamental change of mass-loss processes in WFs, with water masers being pumped by steady jets in post-AGB stars, but tracing explosive/ballistic events as the object enters the PN phase.

  15. Dusty disks around central stars of planetary nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Geoffrey C.; De Marco, Orsola; Nordhaus, Jason; Green, Joel; Rauch, Thomas; Werner, Klaus; Chu, You-Hua E-mail: orsola@science.mq.edu.au E-mail: joel@astro.as.utexas.edu E-mail: werner@astro.uni-tuebingen.de

    2014-06-01

    Only a few percent of cool, old white dwarfs (WDs) have infrared excesses interpreted as originating in small hot disks due to the infall and destruction of single asteroids that come within the star's Roche limit. Infrared excesses at 24 μm were also found to derive from the immediate vicinity of younger, hot WDs, most of which are still central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPNe). The incidence of CSPNe with this excess is 18%. The Helix CSPN, with a 24 μm excess, has been suggested to have a disk formed from collisions of Kuiper belt-like objects (KBOs). In this paper, we have analyzed an additional sample of CSPNe to look for similar infrared excesses. These CSPNe are all members of the PG 1159 class and were chosen because their immediate progenitors are known to often have dusty environments consistent with large dusty disks. We find that, overall, PG 1159 stars do not present such disks more often than other CSPNe, although the statistics (five objects) are poor. We then consider the entire sample of CSPNe with infrared excesses and compare it to the infrared properties of old WDs, as well as cooler post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. We conclude with the suggestion that the infrared properties of CSPNe more plausibly derive from AGB-formed disks rather than disks formed via the collision of KBOs, although the latter scenario cannot be ruled out. Finally, there seems to be an association between CSPNe with a 24 μm excess and confirmed or possible binarity of the central star.

  16. The First "Water Fountain" Collimated Outflow in a Planetary Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, José F.; Suárez, Olga; Bendjoya, Philippe; Rizzo, J. Ricardo; Miranda, Luis F.; Green, James A.; Uscanga, Lucero; García-García, Enrique; Lagadec, Eric; Guerrero, Martín A.; Ramos-Larios, Gerardo

    2015-02-01

    "Water fountains" (WFs) are evolved objects showing high-velocity, collimated jets traced by water maser emission. Most of them are in the post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) and they may represent one of the first manifestations of collimated mass loss in evolved stars. We present water maser, carbon monoxide, and mid-infrared spectroscopic data (obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, Herschel Space Observatory, and the Very Large Telescope, respectively) toward IRAS 15103-5754, a possible planetary nebula (PN) with WF characteristics. Carbon monoxide observations show that IRAS 15103-5754 is an evolved object, while the mid-IR spectrum displays unambiguous [Ne II] emission, indicating that photoionization has started and thus, its nature as a PN is confirmed. Water maser spectra show several components spreading over a large velocity range (sime 75 km s-1) and tracing a collimated jet. This indicates that the object is a WF, the first WF known that has already entered the PN phase. However, the spatial and kinematical distribution of the maser emission in this object are significantly different from those in other WFs. Moreover, the velocity distribution of the maser emission shows a "Hubble-like" flow (higher velocities at larger distances from the central star), consistent with a short-lived, explosive mass-loss event. This velocity pattern is not seen in other WFs (which are presumably in earlier evolutionary stages). We therefore suggest that we are witnessing a fundamental change of mass-loss processes in WFs, with water masers being pumped by steady jets in post-AGB stars, but tracing explosive/ballistic events as the object enters the PN phase.

  17. Observing Planetary Nebulae with JWST and Extremely Large Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra

    2015-01-01

    Most stars in the Universe that leave the main sequence in a Hubble time will end their lives evolving through the Planetary Nebula (PN) evolutionary phase. The heavy mass loss which occurs during the preceding AGB phase is important across astrophysics, dramatically changing the course of stellar evolution, dominantly contributing to the dust content of the interstellar medium, and influencing its chemical composition. The evolution from the AGB phase to the PN phases remains poorly understood, especially the dramatic transformation that occurs in the morphology of the mass-ejecta as AGB stars and their round circumstellar envelopes evolve into mostly PNe, the majority of which deviate strongly from spherical symmetry. In addition, although the PN [OIII] luminosity function (PNLF) has been used as a standard candle (on par with distance indicators such as Cepheids), we do not understand why it works. It has been argued that the resolution of these issues may be linked to binarity and associated processes such as mass transfer and common envelope evolution.Thus, understanding the formation and evolution of PNe is of wide astrophysical importance. PNe have long been known to emit across a very large span of wavelengths, from the radio to X-rays. Extensive use of space-based observatories at X-ray (Chandra/ XMM-Newton), optical (HST) and far-infrared (Spitzer, Herschel) wavelengths in recent years has produced significant new advances in our knowledge of these objects. Given the expected advent of the James Webb Space Telescope in the near future, and ground-based Extremely Large Telescope(s) somewhat later, this talk will focus on future high-angular-resolution, high-sensitivity observations at near and mid-IR wavelengths with these facilities that can help in addressing the major unsolved problems in the study of PNe.

  18. Abell 58 - a Planetary Nebula with an ONe-rich knot: a signature of binary interaction? .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, H. H. B.; De Marco, O.; Liu, X.-W.

    We have investigated the possibility that binary evolution is involved in the formation of the planetary nebula Abell 58. In particular, we assume a neon nova is responsible for the observed high oxygen and neon abundances of the central hydrogen-deficient knot of the H-deficient planetary nebula Abell 58 and the ejecta from the explosion are mixed with the planetary nebula. We have investigated different scenarios involving mergers and wind accretion and found that the most promising formation scenario involves a primary SAGB star that ends its evolution as an ONe white dwarf with an AGB companion at a moderately close separation. Mass is deposited on the white dwarf through wind accretion. So neon novae could occur just after the secondary AGB companion undergoes its final flash. However, the initial separation has to be fine-tuned. To estimate the frequency of such systems we evolve a population of binary systems and find that that Abell 58-like objects should indeed be rare and the fraction of Abell-58 planetary nebula is on the order of 10-4, or lower, among all planetary nebulae.

  19. Water-maser emission from a planetary nebula with a magnetized torus.

    PubMed

    Miranda, L F; Gómez, Y; Anglada, G; Torrelles, J M

    2001-11-15

    A star like the Sun becomes a planetary nebula towards the end of its life, when the envelope ejected during the earlier giant phase becomes photoionized as the surface of the remnant star reaches a temperature of approximately 30,000 K. The spherical symmetry of the giant phase is lost in the transition to a planetary nebula, when non-spherical shells and powerful jets develop. Molecules that were present in the giant envelope are progressively destroyed by the radiation. The water-vapour masers that are typical of the giant envelopes therefore are not expected to persist in planetary nebulae. Here we report the detection of water-maser emission from the planetary nebula K3-35. The masers are in a magnetized torus with a radius of about 85 astronomical units and are also found at the surprisingly large distance of about 5,000 astronomical units from the star, in the tips of bipolar lobes of gas. The precessing jets from K3-35 are probably involved in the excitation of the distant masers, although their existence is nevertheless puzzling. We infer that K3-35 is being observed at the very moment of its transformation from a giant star to a planetary nebula. PMID:11713522

  20. International Ultraviolet Explorer satellite observations of seven high-excitation planetary nebulae.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H; Keyes, C D

    1980-03-01

    Observations of seven high-excitation planetary nebulae secured with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite were combined with extensive ground-based data to obtain electron densities, gas kinetic temperatures, and ionic concentrations. We then employed a network of theoretical model nebulae to estimate the factors by which observed ionic concentrations must be multiplied to obtain elemental abundances. Comparison with a large sample of nebulae for which extensive ground-based observations have been obtained shows nitrogen to be markedly enhanced in some of these objects. Possibly most, if not all, high-excitation nebulae evolve from stars that have higher masses than progenitors of nebulae of low-to-moderate excitation. PMID:16592781

  1. POSSIBLE SUBGROUPS OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS AND PLANETARY NEBULAE IN NGC 5128

    SciTech Connect

    Woodley, Kristin A.; Harris, William E. E-mail: harris@physics.mcmaster.ca

    2011-01-15

    We use recently compiled position and velocity data for the globular cluster and planetary nebula subsystems in NGC 5128, the nearby giant elliptical, to search for evidence of past dwarf-satellite accretion events. Beyond a 10' ({approx}11 kpc) radius in galactocentric distance, we find tentative evidence for four subgroups of globular clusters and four subgroups of planetary nebulae. These each have more than four members within a search radius of 2' and internal velocity dispersion of {approx}<40 km s{sup -1}, typical parameters for a dwarf galaxy. In addition, two of the globular cluster groupings overlap with two of the planetary nebulae groupings, and two subgroupings also appear to overlap with previously known arc and shell features in the halo light. Simulation tests of our procedure indicate that the probability of finding false groups due to chance is <1%.

  2. Extinction-independent determination of temperatures for central stars of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grewing, M.; Neri, R.

    1990-09-01

    A method to determine temperatures for central stars of planetary nebulae from ultraviolet color indices which are essentially extinction-independent is described and applied. Using a standard extinction law (Seaton, 1979) and assuming that the continuum emission from the nuclei of planetary nebulae can be approximated by black-body distributions, It is shown that the color indices m(1225-1475) -m(1910-2140), m(1225-1475) -m(2195-2395), and m(1475-1725) -m(1738-1951) satisfy the condition of extinction independence for EB-V between the values of 0 and 1.0 for all temperatures T between 20,000 and 100,000 K within an accuracy of a few percent. Using data retrieved from the Unified Low Dispersion Archive of the IUE database for 40 planetary nebulae, their UV color indices were determined, and, from these, their color temperatures were found.

  3. Near-infrared and ultraviolet spectrophotometry of the young planetary nebula Hubble 12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudy, Richard J.; Rossano, George S.; Erwin, Peter; Puetter, R. C.; Feibelman, Walter A.

    1993-01-01

    The young planetary nebula Hubble 12 is observed using near-IR and UV spectrophotometry. The brightness of the O I lines, which is greater than in any other planetary nebula yet measured, indicates that fluorescent excitation by stellar continuum is the principal mechanism generating these lines. Extinction, electron density, and electron temperature are determined using infrared measurements combined with UV data and published optical observations. The range in extinction, density, and temperature implies that, within the ionized region, pockets of emission with distinctly different conditions exist. Logarithmic abundances for helium, oxygen, and sulfur are presented.

  4. Morphological study of three Abell's planetary nebulae - A33, A36, and A79

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, C. T.; Nguyen-Trong, T.

    1983-01-01

    The Abell list discovered in the Palomar Sky Survey includes the three objects A33, A36 and A79, which have been classified as old planetary nebulae. The monochromatic images of these three objects in H-alpha, H-beta, and the forbidden lines N II 6584 A and S II 6717 A, are presented and discussed. The forbidden line N II/H-alpha intensity ratio is found to be useful because of its implications in the evolutionary behavior of planetary nebulae.

  5. Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae in the SMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianchi, Luciana

    2004-01-01

    In FUSE cycle 3's program C056 we studied four Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae (CSPN) in the Small Magellanic Could. All FUSE observations have been successfully completed and have been reduced and analyzed. The observation of one object (SMP SMC 5) appeared to be off-target and no useful stellar flux was gathered. For another observation (SMP SMC 1) the voltage problems resulted in the loss of data from one of the SiC detectors, but we were still able to analyze the remaining data. The analysis and the results are summarized below. The FUSE data were reduced using the latest available version of the FUSE calibration pipeline (CALFUSE v2.4). The flux of these SMC post-AGB objects is at the threshold of FUSE S sensitivity, and the targets required many orbit-long exposures, each of which typically had low (target) count-rates. The background subtraction required special care during the reduction, and was done in a similar manner to our FUSE cycle 2 BOO1 objects. The resulting calibrated data from the different channels were compared in the overlapping regions for consistency. The final combined, extracted spectra of each target was then modeled to determine the stellar and nebular parameters. The FUSE spectra, combined with archival HST spectra, have been analyzed using stellar atmospheres codes such as TLUSTY and CMFGEN to derive photospheric and wind parameters of the central stars, and with ISM models to determine the amount and temperature of the surrounding atomic and molecular hydrogen. We have combined these results with those of our cycle 4 (D034) program (CSPN of the LMC) in Herald & Bianchi 2004a (paper in preparation, will be submitted to ApJ in June 2004). Two of the three SMC objects analyzed were found to have significantly lower stellar temperatures than had been predicted using nebular photoionization models, indicating either a hotter ionizing companion or the existence of strong shocks in the nebular environment. The analysis also revealed that

  6. Far-Infrared Spectroscopy of Planetary Nebulae with the KAO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Robert H.; Colgan, S.; Haas, M. R.; Lord, S. D.; Simpson, Janet P.

    1996-01-01

    We present new far-infrared line observations of the planetary nebulae (PNs) NGC 7027, NGC 7009, and NGC 6210 obtained with the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). The bulk of our data are for NGC 7027 and NGC 7009, including [Ne(V)] 24 micrometers, [O(IV)] 26 micrometers, [O(III)] (52, 88) micrometers, and [N(III)] 57 micrometers. Our data for [O(III)] (52, 88) and [N(III)] 57 in NGC 7027 represent the first measurements of these lines in this source. The large [O(III)] 52/88-micrometer flux ratio implies an electron density (cubic cm) of log N(sub e)[O(III)] = 4.19, the largest Ne ever inferred from these lines. We derive N(++)/O(++) = 0.394 +/- 0.062 for NGC 7027 and 0.179 +/- 0.043 for NGC 6210. We are able to infer the O(+3)/O(++) ionic ratio from our data. As gauged by this ionic ratio, NGC 7027 is substantially higher ionization than is NGC 7009 - consistent with our observation that the former produces copious [Ne(V)] emission while the latter does not. These data help characterize the stellar ionizing radiation field. From our [O(IV)] and [O(III)] fluxes, we are able to show that O(++) is by far the dominant oxygen ion in NGC 7009. As a result, the O/H abundance inferred using these data tends to corroborate the value found from UV/optical, collisionally excited lines. We determined accurate rest wavelengths for the [Ne(V)] 2s(2)2p(2)P(sub 1) to 2s(2)2p(2)3P(sub 0) (lambda(sub rest) = 24.316 +/- 0.008 micrometers) and [O(IV)] 2s(2)2p(2)P(sup 0, sub 3/2) to 2s(2)2p(2)P(sup 0, sub 1/2) (lambda(sub rest) = 25.887 +/- 0.007 micrometers) transitions from observations of one or both of the bright PNs NGC 7027 and NGC 7009. Our [O(IV)] value, to the best of our knowledge, is the most accurate direct determination of this lambda(sub rest). These new KAO data will be beneficial for comparison with ISO observations of these PNs.

  7. Evolution of Planetary Nebulae with WR-type Central Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danehkar, Ashkbiz

    2014-04-01

    This thesis presents a study of the kinematics, physical conditions and chemical abundances for a sample of Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) with Wolf-Rayet (WR) and weak emission-line stars (wels), based on optical integral field unit (IFU) spectroscopy obtained with the Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS) on the Australian National University 2.3 telescope at Siding Spring Observatory, and complemented by spectra from the literature. PNe surrounding WR-type stars constitute a particular study class for this study. A considerable fraction of currently well-identified central stars of PNe exhibit 'hydrogen-deficient' fast expanding atmospheres characterized by a large mass-loss rate. Most of them were classified as the carbon-sequence and a few of them as the nitrogen-sequence of the WR-type stars. What are less clear are the physical mechanisms and evolutionary paths that remove the hydrogen-rich outer layer from these degenerate cores, and transform it into a fast stellar wind. The aim of this thesis is to determine kinematic structure, density distribution, thermal structure and elemental abundances for a sample of PNe with different hydrogen-deficient central stars, which might provide clues about the origin and formation of their hydrogen-deficient stellar atmospheres. Hα and [N II] emission features have been used to determine kinematic structures. Based on spatially resolved observations of these emission lines, combined with archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging for compact PNe, morphological structures of these PNe have been determined. Comparing the velocity maps from the IFU spectrograph with those provided by morpho-kinematic models allowed disentangling of the different morphological components of most PNe, apart from the compact objects. The results indicate that these PNe have axisymmetric morphologies, either bipolar or elliptical. In many cases, the associated kinematic maps for PNe around hot WR-type stars also show the presence of so-called fast

  8. High-dispersion Spectrum of the Halo Planetary Nebula DdDm 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Masaaki; Hyung, Siek; Lee, Seong-Jae; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Tajitsu, Akito

    2009-11-01

    Using the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS) at the Subaru Telescope, we secured the high-resolution line spectra in the 3600-7500 Å wavelength range of the Galactic halo planetary nebula DdDm 1. We also analyzed the Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph data in the 1200-6730 Å wavelength range. The diagnostic results indicate the electron temperatures of T epsilon~ 11,000-14,000 K and the electron number densities of N epsilon~ 2000-10,500 cm-3. In spite of high gaseous temperatures, we have not detected high excitation lines, e.g., He II. We derived abundance based on the ionic concentration of permitted and forbidden lines and the photoionization model. A comparison of the ionic concentrations from forbidden lines to recombination lines shows the abundance discrepancy between them. We tested various possibilities, e.g., temperature fluctuation and high-density blob components, to explain the discrepancy. The high-density components or density fluctuation might be partly responsible for the discrepancy. DdDm 1 shows a low carbon abundance that corresponds to metal-poor stars, [Fe/H] <=-1. Assuming a distance of 10 kpc to DdDm 1, theoretical models suggest that the central star has T effsime 39,000 K and Lsime 2000-3000 L sun. The relatively high gas temperatures appear to be caused by very low heavy elemental abundances or insufficient coolants in the shell gas. Its progenitor, born in an extremely carbon-poor environment as an initial mass of about 0.9 M sun, had probably experienced only the first dredge-up. Based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Prop. ID S05B-178S (M. Otsuka).

  9. A catalogue of integrated Hα fluxes for 1258 Galactic planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frew, David J.; Bojičić, Ivan S.; Parker, Q. A.

    2013-05-01

    We present a catalogue of new integrated Hα fluxes for 1258 Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe), with the majority, totalling 1234, measured from the Southern Hα Sky Survey Atlas (SHASSA) and/or the Virginia Tech Spectral-line Survey (VTSS). Aperture photometry on the continuum-subtracted digital images was performed to extract Hα+[N II] fluxes in the case of SHASSA, and Hα fluxes from VTSS. The [N II] contribution was then deconvolved from the SHASSA flux using spectrophotometric data taken from the literature or derived by us. Comparison with previous work shows that the flux scale presented here has no significant zero-point error. Our catalogue is the largest compilation of homogeneously derived PN fluxes in any waveband yet measured, and will be an important legacy and fresh benchmark for the community. Amongst its many applications, it can be used to determine statistical distances for these PNe, determine new absolute magnitudes for delineating the faint end of the PN luminosity function, provide baseline data for photoionization and hydrodynamical modelling, and allow better estimates of Zanstra temperatures for PN central stars with accurate optical photometry. We also provide total Hα fluxes for another 75 objects which were formerly classified as PNe, as well as independent reddening determinations for ˜270 PNe, derived from a comparison of our Hα data with the best literature Hβ fluxes. In an appendix, we list corrected Hα fluxes for 49 PNe taken from the literature, including 24 PNe not detected on SHASSA or VTSS, re-calibrated to a common zero-point.

  10. Optical and infrared imaging and spectroscopy of the multiple-shell planetary nebula NGC 6369

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Larios, G.; Guerrero, M. A.; Vázquez, R.; Phillips, J. P.

    2012-03-01

    NGC 6369 is a double-shell planetary nebula consisting of a bright annular inner shell with faint bipolar extensions and a filamentary envelope. We have used ground- and space-based narrow-band optical and near-infrared (near-IR) images, broad-band mid-IR images, optical long-slit echelle spectra and mid-IR spectra to investigate its physical structure. These observations indicate that the inner shell of NGC 6369 can be described as a barrel-like structure shape with polar bubble-like protrusions, and reveal evidence for H2 and strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons emission from a photodissociative region (PDR) with molecular inclusions located outside the bright inner shell. High-resolution Hubble Space Telescope narrow-band images reveal an intricate excitation structure of the inner shell and a system of 'cometary' knots. The knotty appearance of the envelope, the lack of kinematical evidence for shell expansion and the apparent presence of emission from ionized material outside the PDR make us suggest that the envelope of NGC 6369 is not a real shell, but a flattened structure at its equatorial regions. We report the discovery of irregular knots and blobs of diffuse emission in low-excitation and molecular line emission that are located up to 80 arcsec from the central star, well outside the main nebular shells. We also show that the filaments associated to the polar protrusions have spatial extents consistent with post-shock cooling regimes, and likely represent regions of interaction of these structures with surrounding material.

  11. HIGH-DISPERSION SPECTRUM OF THE HALO PLANETARY NEBULA DdDm 1

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, Masaaki; Hyung, Siek; Lee, Seong-Jae; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Tajitsu, Akito

    2009-11-01

    Using the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS) at the Subaru Telescope, we secured the high-resolution line spectra in the 3600-7500 A wavelength range of the Galactic halo planetary nebula DdDm 1. We also analyzed the Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph data in the 1200-6730 A wavelength range. The diagnostic results indicate the electron temperatures of T {sub e}psilonapprox 11,000-14,000 K and the electron number densities of N {sub e}psilonapprox 2000-10,500 cm{sup -3}. In spite of high gaseous temperatures, we have not detected high excitation lines, e.g., He II. We derived abundance based on the ionic concentration of permitted and forbidden lines and the photoionization model. A comparison of the ionic concentrations from forbidden lines to recombination lines shows the abundance discrepancy between them. We tested various possibilities, e.g., temperature fluctuation and high-density blob components, to explain the discrepancy. The high-density components or density fluctuation might be partly responsible for the discrepancy. DdDm 1 shows a low carbon abundance that corresponds to metal-poor stars, [Fe/H] <=-1. Assuming a distance of 10 kpc to DdDm 1, theoretical models suggest that the central star has T {sub eff}approx = 39,000 K and Lapprox = 2000-3000 L {sub sun}. The relatively high gas temperatures appear to be caused by very low heavy elemental abundances or insufficient coolants in the shell gas. Its progenitor, born in an extremely carbon-poor environment as an initial mass of about 0.9 M {sub sun}, had probably experienced only the first dredge-up.

  12. The collimated outflows of the planetary nebula Hu 1-2: proper motion and radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, L. F.; Blanco, M.; Guerrero, M. A.; Riera, A.

    2012-04-01

    Hu 1-2 is a planetary nebula that contains an isolated knot located north-west of the main nebula, which could be related to a collimated outflow. We present a subarcsecond Hα+[N II] image and a high-resolution, long-slit spectrum of Hu 1-2 that allow us to identify the south-eastern counterpart of the north-western knot and to establish their high-velocity (>340 km s-1), collimated bipolar outflow nature. The detection of the north-western knot in Palomar Observatory Sky Atlas (POSS) red plates allows us to carry out a proper motion analysis by combining three POSS red plates and two narrow-band Hα+[N II] CCD images, with a time baseline of ≃57 yr. A proper motion of 20 ± 6 mas yr-1 along position angle 312°± 15° and a dynamical age of 1375? yr are obtained for the bipolar outflow. The measured proper motion and the spatio-kinematical properties of the bipolar outflow yield a lower limit of 2.7 kpc for the distance to Hu 1-2. The Andalucia Faint Object Spectrograph and Camera (ALFOSC) is provided by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAA) under a joint agreement with the University of Copenhagen and NOTSA. The IACUB uncrossed echelle spectrograph was built in a collaboration between the IAC and the Queen's University of Belfast.

  13. The Nucleus of the Planetary Nebula EGB 6 as a Post-Mira Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Howard E.; Ciardullo, Robin; Esplin, Taran L.; Hawley, Steven A.; Liebert, James; Munari, Ulisse

    2016-08-01

    EGB 6 is a faint, large, ancient planetary nebula (PN). Its central star, a hot DAOZ white dwarf (WD), is a prototype of a rare class of PN nuclei associated with dense, compact emission-line knots. The central star also shows excess fluxes in both the near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR). In a 2013 paper, we used Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images to show that the compact nebula is a point-like source, located 0.″16 (˜118 AU) from the WD. We attributed the NIR excess to an M dwarf companion star, which appeared to coincide with the dense emission knot. We now present new ground-based NIR spectroscopy, showing that the companion is actually a much cooler source with a continuous spectrum, apparently a dust-enshrouded low-luminosity star. New HST images confirm common proper motion of the emission knot and red source with the WD. The I-band, NIR, and MIR fluxes are variable, possibly on timescales as short as days. We can fit the spectral energy distribution (SED) with four blackbodies (the WD, a ˜1850 K NIR component, and MIR dust at 385 and 175 K). Alternatively, we show that the NIR/MIR SED is very similar to that of Class 0/I young stellar objects. We suggest a scenario in which the EGB 6 nucleus is descended from a wide binary similar to the Mira system, in which a portion of the wind from an AGB star was captured into an accretion disk around a companion star; a remnant of this disk has survived to the present time and is surrounded by gas photoionized by UV radiation from the WD. Based in part on data obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained by the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Also based in part on observations with the 1.5 m telescope operated by the SMARTS Consortium at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory.

  14. The Nucleus of the Planetary Nebula EGB 6 as a Post-Mira Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Howard E.; Ciardullo, Robin; Esplin, Taran L.; Hawley, Steven A.; Liebert, James; Munari, Ulisse

    2016-08-01

    EGB 6 is a faint, large, ancient planetary nebula (PN). Its central star, a hot DAOZ white dwarf (WD), is a prototype of a rare class of PN nuclei associated with dense, compact emission-line knots. The central star also shows excess fluxes in both the near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR). In a 2013 paper, we used Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images to show that the compact nebula is a point-like source, located 0.″16 (∼118 AU) from the WD. We attributed the NIR excess to an M dwarf companion star, which appeared to coincide with the dense emission knot. We now present new ground-based NIR spectroscopy, showing that the companion is actually a much cooler source with a continuous spectrum, apparently a dust-enshrouded low-luminosity star. New HST images confirm common proper motion of the emission knot and red source with the WD. The I-band, NIR, and MIR fluxes are variable, possibly on timescales as short as days. We can fit the spectral energy distribution (SED) with four blackbodies (the WD, a ∼1850 K NIR component, and MIR dust at 385 and 175 K). Alternatively, we show that the NIR/MIR SED is very similar to that of Class 0/I young stellar objects. We suggest a scenario in which the EGB 6 nucleus is descended from a wide binary similar to the Mira system, in which a portion of the wind from an AGB star was captured into an accretion disk around a companion star; a remnant of this disk has survived to the present time and is surrounded by gas photoionized by UV radiation from the WD. Based in part on data obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained by the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Also based in part on observations with the 1.5 m telescope operated by the SMARTS Consortium at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory.

  15. An imaging and spectroscopic study of the planetary nebulae in NGC 5128 (Centaurus A). Planetary nebulae catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.; Rejkuba, M.; Walton, N. A.

    2015-02-01

    Context. Planetary nebulae (PNe) are excellent tracers of the common low mass stars through their strong and narrow emission lines. The velocities of large numbers of PNe are excellent tracers of galaxy kinematics. NGC 5128, the nearest large early-type galaxy, offers the possibility to gather a large sample. Aims: Imaging and spectroscopic observations of PNe in NGC 5128 were obtained to find and measure their velocities. Combined with literature data, a large sample of high quality kinematic probes is assembled for dynamical studies. Methods: NTT imaging was obtained in 15 fields in NGC 5128 across 1° with EMMI and [O III] and off-band filters. Newly detected sources, combined with literature PN, were used as input for FLAMES multi-fibre spectroscopy in MEDUSA mode. Spectra of the 4600-5100 Å region were analysed and velocities measured based on [O III]4959, 5007 Å and often Hβ. Results: The chief results are catalogues of 1118 PN candidates and 1267 spectroscopically confirmed PNe in NGC 5128. The catalogue of PN candidates contains 1060 PNe discovered with NTT EMMI imaging and 58 from literature surveys. The spectroscopic PN catalogue has FLAMES radial velocity and emission line measurements for 1135 PNe, of which 486 are new. Another 132 PN radial velocities are available from the literature. For 629 PNe observed with FLAMES, Hβ was measured in addition to [O III]. Nine targets show double-lined or more complex profiles, and their possible origin is discussed. FLAMES spectra of 48 globular clusters were also targetted: 11 had emission lines detected (two with multiple components), but only 3 are PNe likely to belong to the host globular. Conclusions: The total of 1267 confirmed PNe in NGC 5128 with radial velocity measurements (1135 with small velocity errors) is the largest collection of individual kinematic probes in an early-type galaxy. This PN dataset, as well as the catalogue of PN candidates, are valuable resources for detailed investigation of NGC

  16. Compact reflection nebulae, a transit phase of evolution from post-AGB to planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, J. Y.; Slijkhuis, S.

    1989-01-01

    In a search of the optical counter-part of candidates of protoplanetary nebulae on the plates of UK Schmidt, ESO Schmidt, and POSS, five compact reflection nebulae associated with post-AGB stars were found. A simplified model (dust shell is spherical symmetric, expansion velocity of dust shell is constant, Q(sub sca)(lambda) is isotropic, and the dust grain properties are uniform) is used to estimate the visible condition of the dust shell due to the scattering of the core star's light. Under certain conditions the compact reflection nebulae can be seen of the POSS or ESO/SRC survey plates.

  17. Polarization due to dust scattering in the planetary nebula Cn1-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Harish C.

    1989-01-01

    The peculiar emission-line object Cn1-1 (=HDE330036=PK330+4 degrees 1), classified both as a symbiotic star and as a planetary nebula, was detected by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) as a strong source of far-infrared dust in the system. Bhatt and Mallik (1986) discussed the nature of the dust in Cn1-1 and argued that the object is a Type I protoplanetary nebula in a binary system. The argument presented here is that the polarization is intrinsic to Cn1-1 and is due to scattering by large (compared to interstellar) dust grains in the protoplanetary nebula that are asymmetrically distributed around the central star. The large degree of polarization (approximately 3 percent for the Cn1-1 distance of approximately 450 pc) with a large lambda(sub max) is naturally explained if it is caused by scattering by large dust grains in the Cn1-1 nebula. Since the H(sub alpha) line is also polarized at the same level and position angle as the continuum, the dust must be asymmetrically distributed around the central star. The morphology of the protoplanetary nebula in Cn1-1 may be bipolar. Thus, the polarization observations support the suggestion that Cn1-1 is a bipolar Type I planetary nebula.

  18. Spectrum and chemical analysis of the double-ring planetary nebula IC 1297

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aller, Lawrence H.; Keyes, Charles D.; Feibelman, Walter A.

    1986-01-01

    The double-ring planetary nebula IC 1297 resembles NGC 7662 in appearance, although it is of much lower surface brightness. What is remarkable is the great strength of the dielectronic recombination O V line. Although this line is seen as a P Cygni feature in a number of planetary nebulae, it is in those instances accompanied by a strong continuum and other easily recognized features of stellar origin. No star is visible on CCD images of IC 1297. Optical region measurements are supplemented by IUE observations. The following logarithmic abundance values are found: log N(He) = 11.065; log N(forbidden C) = 8.6; log N(N) = 8.1; log N(O) = 8.74; log N(Ne) = 8.16; log N(S) = 7.0; log N(Cl) = 5.4; log N(Ar) = 6.2. The nebula shows no dramatic pattern of nucleogenesis events.

  19. Physical parameters for 12 planetary nebulae and their central stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aller, Lawrence H.; Keyes, Charles D.; Maran, Stephen P.; Gull, Theodore R.; Michalitsianos, Andrew G.; Stecher, Theodore P.

    1987-01-01

    Nebular and central star parameters and elemental abundances of C, N, O, Ne, S, and Ar are presented for the planetary nebulae N2, N5, N43, N54, and N67 in the SMC and P2, P7, P9, P25, P33, and P40 in the LMC. The nebular chemical compositions are affected by nuclear processes in the precursor stars, which may not have been sufficiently massive to synthesize Ne, S, or Ar, which appear to be deficient with respect to their solar abundances by factors of roughly four and five for the LMC and SMC, respectively. Even after excluding nebulae formed by stars in which O apparently was destroyed by nuclear processes, O depletion in the LMC and SMC nebulae is significantly greater than in galactic planetaries. The estimated masses of the 12 remnant central stars range from 0.58 to 0.71 solar mass.

  20. The morphology and interaction with the interstellar medium of the planetary nebula IC 4593

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zucker, Daniel B.; Soker, Noam

    1993-01-01

    We present a morphological study of the planetary nebula IC 4593, based on our observations in H-alpha, forbidden O III, and forbidden S II. From the H-alpha intensity map, we calculate densities and masses for constituent structures and for the nebula as a whole. We argue that the morphology of IC 4593 suggests that it is moving supersonically through the ISM, and that the ISM shock may be thermally unstable, oscillating between adiabatic and radiative (isothermal) shock conditions. Spectroscopic observations are necessary to further explore the nature of the interaction between IC 4593 and the ISM. An improved understanding of such interactions will greatly expand the potential use of planetary nebulae to probe the ISM.

  1. Dynamos in asymptotic-giant-branch stars as the origin of magnetic fields shaping planetary nebulae.

    PubMed

    Blackman, E G; Frank, A; Markiel, J A; Thomas, J H; Van Horn, H M

    2001-01-25

    Planetary nebulae are thought to be formed when a slow wind from the progenitor giant star is overtaken by a subsequent fast wind generated as the star enters its white dwarf stage. A shock forms near the boundary between the winds, creating the relatively dense shell characteristic of a planetary nebula. A spherically symmetric wind will produce a spherically symmetric shell, yet over half of known planetary nebulae are not spherical; rather, they are elliptical or bipolar in shape. A magnetic field could launch and collimate a bipolar outflow, but the origin of such a field has hitherto been unclear, and some previous work has even suggested that a field could not be generated. Here we show that an asymptotic-giant-branch (AGB) star can indeed generate a strong magnetic field, having as its origin a dynamo at the interface between the rapidly rotating core and the more slowly rotating envelope of the star. The fields are strong enough to shape the bipolar outflows that produce the observed bipolar planetary nebulae. Magnetic braking of the stellar core during this process may also explain the puzzlingly slow rotation of most white dwarf stars. PMID:11206538

  2. THE EVOLUTION OF THE KINEMATICS OF NEBULAR SHELLS IN PLANETARY NEBULAE IN THE MILKY WAY BULGE

    SciTech Connect

    Richer, Michael G.; Lopez, Jose Alberto; Garcia-Diaz, Maria Teresa; Clark, David M.; Pereyra, Margarita; Diaz-Mendez, Enrique E-mail: jal@astrosen.unam.m E-mail: dmclark@astrosen.unam.m E-mail: e.d.mendez@tcu.ed

    2010-06-10

    We study the line widths in the [O III]{lambda}5007 and H{alpha} lines for two groups of planetary nebulae in the Milky Way bulge based upon spectroscopy obtained at the Observatorio Astronomico Nacional in the Sierra San Pedro Martir (OAN-SPM) using the Manchester Echelle Spectrograph. The first sample includes objects early in their evolution, having high H{beta} luminosities, but [O III]{lambda}5007/H{beta} < 3. The second sample comprises objects late in their evolution, with He II {lambda}4686/H{beta}>0.5. These planetary nebulae represent evolutionary phases preceding and following those of the objects studied by Richer et al. in 2008. Our sample of planetary nebulae with weak [O III]{lambda}5007 has a line width distribution similar to that of the expansion velocities of the envelopes of asymptotic giant branch stars and shifted to systematically lower values as compared to the less evolved objects studied by Richer et al. The sample with strong He II {lambda}4686 has a line width distribution indistinguishable from that of the more evolved objects from Richer et al., but a distribution in angular size that is systematically larger and so they are clearly more evolved. These data and those of Richer et al. form a homogeneous sample from a single Galactic population of planetary nebulae, from the earliest evolutionary stages until the cessation of nuclear burning in the central star. They confirm the long-standing predictions of hydrodynamical models of planetary nebulae, where the kinematics of the nebular shell are driven by the evolution of the central star.

  3. Planetary Nebula Spectrograph survey of S0 galaxy kinematics - II. Clues to the origins of S0 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortesi, A.; Merrifield, M. R.; Coccato, L.; Arnaboldi, M.; Gerhard, O.; Bamford, S.; Napolitano, N. R.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Douglas, N. G.; Kuijken, K.; Capaccioli, M.; Freeman, K. C.; Saha, K.; Chies-Santos, A. L.

    2013-06-01

    The stellar kinematics of the spheroids and discs of S0 galaxies contain clues to their formation histories. Unfortunately, it is difficult to disentangle the two components and to recover their stellar kinematics in the faint outer parts of the galaxies using conventional absorption line spectroscopy. This paper therefore presents the stellar kinematics of six S0 galaxies derived from observations of planetary nebulae, obtained using the Planetary Nebula Spectrograph. To separate the kinematics of the two components, we use a maximum-likelihood method that combines the discrete kinematic data with a photometric component decomposition. The results of this analysis reveal that: the discs of S0 galaxies are rotationally supported; however, the amount of random motion in these discs is systematically higher than in comparable spiral galaxies; and the S0s lie around one magnitude below the Tully-Fisher relation for spiral galaxies, while their spheroids lie nearly one magnitude above the Faber-Jackson relation for ellipticals. All of these findings are consistent with a scenario in which spirals are converted into S0s through a process of mild harassment or `pestering,' with their discs somewhat heated and their spheroid somewhat enhanced by the conversion process. In such a scenario, one might expect the properties of S0s to depend on environment. We do not see such an effect in this fairly small sample, although any differences would be diluted by the fact that the current location does not necessarily reflect the environment in which the transformation occurred. Similar observations of larger samples probing a broader range of environments, coupled with more detailed modelling of the transformation process to match the wide range of parameters that we have shown can now be measured, should take us from these first steps to the definitive answer as to how S0 galaxies form.

  4. THE CHANDRA PLANETARY NEBULA SURVEY (ChanPlaNS). III. X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE CENTRAL STARS OF PLANETARY NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Montez, R. Jr.; Kastner, J. H.; Freeman, M.; and others

    2015-02-10

    We present X-ray spectral analysis of 20 point-like X-ray sources detected in Chandra Planetary Nebula Survey observations of 59 planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood. Most of these 20 detections are associated with luminous central stars within relatively young, compact nebulae. The vast majority of these point-like X-ray-emitting sources at PN cores display relatively ''hard'' (≥0.5 keV) X-ray emission components that are unlikely to be due to photospheric emission from the hot central stars (CSPN). Instead, we demonstrate that these sources are well modeled by optically thin thermal plasmas. From the plasma properties, we identify two classes of CSPN X-ray emission: (1) high-temperature plasmas with X-ray luminosities, L {sub X}, that appear uncorrelated with the CSPN bolometric luminosity, L {sub bol} and (2) lower-temperature plasmas with L {sub X}/L {sub bol} ∼ 10{sup –7}. We suggest these two classes correspond to the physical processes of magnetically active binary companions and self-shocking stellar winds, respectively. In many cases this conclusion is supported by corroborative multiwavelength evidence for the wind and binary properties of the PN central stars. By thus honing in on the origins of X-ray emission from PN central stars, we enhance the ability of CSPN X-ray sources to constrain models of PN shaping that invoke wind interactions and binarity.

  5. The Chandra Planetary Nebula Survey (ChanPlaNS). III. X-Ray Emission from the Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montez, R., Jr.; Kastner, J. H.; Balick, B.; Behar, E.; Blackman, E.; Bujarrabal, V.; Chu, Y.-H.; Corradi, R. L. M.; De Marco, O.; Frank, A.; Freeman, M.; Frew, D. J.; Guerrero, M. A.; Jones, D.; Lopez, J. A.; Miszalski, B.; Nordhaus, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Sahai, R.; Sandin, C.; Schonberner, D.; Soker, N.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Steffen, M.; Toalá, J. A.; Ueta, T.; Villaver, E.; Zijlstra, A.

    2015-02-01

    We present X-ray spectral analysis of 20 point-like X-ray sources detected in Chandra Planetary Nebula Survey observations of 59 planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood. Most of these 20 detections are associated with luminous central stars within relatively young, compact nebulae. The vast majority of these point-like X-ray-emitting sources at PN cores display relatively "hard" (>=0.5 keV) X-ray emission components that are unlikely to be due to photospheric emission from the hot central stars (CSPN). Instead, we demonstrate that these sources are well modeled by optically thin thermal plasmas. From the plasma properties, we identify two classes of CSPN X-ray emission: (1) high-temperature plasmas with X-ray luminosities, L X, that appear uncorrelated with the CSPN bolometric luminosity, L bol and (2) lower-temperature plasmas with L X/L bol ~ 10-7. We suggest these two classes correspond to the physical processes of magnetically active binary companions and self-shocking stellar winds, respectively. In many cases this conclusion is supported by corroborative multiwavelength evidence for the wind and binary properties of the PN central stars. By thus honing in on the origins of X-ray emission from PN central stars, we enhance the ability of CSPN X-ray sources to constrain models of PN shaping that invoke wind interactions and binarity.

  6. Deciphering the bipolar planetary nebula Abell 14 with 3D ionization and morphological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akras, S.; Clyne, N.; Boumis, P.; Monteiro, H.; Gonçalves, D. R.; Redman, M. P.; Williams, S.

    2016-04-01

    Abell 14 is a poorly studied object despite being considered a born-again planetary nebula. We performed a detailed study of its 3D morphology and ionization structure using the SHAPE and MOCASSIN codes. We found that Abell 14 is a highly evolved, bipolar nebula with a kinematical age of ˜19 400 yr for a distance of 4 kpc. The high He abundance, and N/O ratio indicate a progenitor of 5 M⊙ that has experienced the third dredge-up and hot bottom burning phases. The stellar parameters of the central source reveal a star at a highly evolved stage near to the white dwarf cooling track, being inconsistent with the born-again scenario. The nebula shows unexpectedly strong [N I] λ5200 and [O I] λ6300 emission lines indicating possible shock interactions. Abell 14 appears to be a member of a small group of highly evolved, extreme type-I planetary nebulae (PNe). The members of this group lie at the lower-left corner of the PNe regime on the [N II]/Hα versus [S II]/Hα diagnostic diagram, where shock-excited regions/objects are also placed. The low luminosity of their central stars, in conjunction with the large physical size of the nebulae, result in a very low photoionization rate, which can make any contribution of shock interaction easily perceptible, even for small velocities.

  7. Ionized magnesium in the planetary nebula NGC 7027

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, N. J., II; Natta, A.; Russell, R. W.; Wyant, J.; Beckwith, S.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of NGC 7027 are presented for six ionic lines: Mg(+3) (4.48 microns), Mg(+4) (5.61 microns), H(0) (4.05 and 7.46 microns), Ne(+5) (7.64 microns), and Ar(+5) (4.53 microns). The magnesium lines are consistent with the measurements of Russell, Soifer, and Willner (1977), and the hydrogen lines are consistent with the line strengths predicted from the radio flux. Upper limits were obtained for the neon and argon lines. The abundance of magnesium in the central part of the nebula is highly uncertain because the fine-structure collision strengths are poorly known. The strong gradient of magnesium abundance from the inner to the outer portions of the nebula derived by Pequignot and Stasinska (1980) could be an artifact of this uncertainty. A brief analysis of the effective stellar temperature derived from the magnesium line ratios is given.

  8. X-ray Emission from the Pre-planetary Nebula Henize 3-1475

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Kastner, Joel H.; Frank, Adam; Morris, Mark; Blackman, Eric G.

    2003-01-01

    We report the first detection of X-ray emission in a pre-planetary nebula, He 3-1475. Pre-planetary nebulae are rare objects in the short transition stage between the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and planetary nebula evolutionary phases, and He 3-1475, characterized by a remarkable S-shaped chain of optical knots, is one of the most noteworthy members of this class. Observations with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer on board the Chandra X-Ray Observatory show the presence of compact emission coincident with the brightest optical knot in this bipolar object, which is displaced from the central star by 2'.7 along the polar axis. Model fits to the X-ray spectrum indicate an X-ray temperature and luminosity, respectively, of (4.3-5.7) x 10(exp 6) K and (4 +/- 1.4) x 10(exp 31) (D/5 kpc)(exp 2) ergs s(exp -1) respectively. Our 3 sigma upper limit on the luminosity of compact X-ray emission from the central star in He 3-1475 is approximately equal to 5 x 10(exp 31) (D/5 kpc)(exp 2) ergs s(exp -1). The detection of X-rays in He 3-1475 is consistent with models in which fast collimated post-AGB outflows are crucial to the shaping of nebulae; we discuss such models in the context of our observations.

  9. Mysteries and Discoveries from the Chandra Planetary Nebulae Suvery (ChanPlaNS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montez, Rodolfo; Kastner, J. H.; ChanPlaNS Team

    2013-04-01

    Chandra observations of planetary nebulae (PNe) have ushered in a new wave of discoveries and mysteries in this class of evolved stars. The X-ray emission from PNe comes in two flavors: compact sources in the vicinity of the central star and extended sources that fill the nebular cavities generated during the PN formation process. The latter variety, called hot bubbles, are chemically-enriched with helium shell burning products (C, O, and Ne) and their temperatures seem to be regulated by heat conduction across the bubble-nebula interface or by charge-exchange with "pickup ions" within the bubble. Perhaps more exotic are the compact sources at PN central stars. The (relatively hard) X-ray spectral energy distributions of all but one of these point sources cannot be explained by blackbody-like emission from the hot central stars but, instead, suggest the presence of even hotter thermal plasmas. The origin of this plasma emission may be coronae of binary companions, NLTE photospheric emission from the central (proto) white dwarfs, low-level accretion, or shocks in the chemically-enriched stellar wind. We are uncovering and investigating all of these phenomena via the Chandra Planetary Nebulae Survey (ChanPlaNS), a volume-limited archival and multi-cycle survey of planetary nebulae in the solar neighborhood. I present the highlights from our analysis and results and the promising prospects afforded by ChanPlaNS.

  10. Light Variations of the Anomalous Central Star of Planetary Nebula Sh 2-71

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulášek, Z.; Skopal, A.; Zejda, M.; Pejcha, O.; Kohoutek, L.; Motl, D.; Vittone, A. A.; Errico, L.

    2007-03-01

    We present an analysis of light variations in UBV (RI)_{C} of the anomalous object in the center of planetary nebula Sh 2-71. We refined the linear ephemeris of the light maxima to JD_{max}=2449862.0+68.101(E-96), but also identified long-term, obviously non-periodic variations. The latter manifest themselves in large O-C shifts, a variable profile of light curves (hereafter LC) and changes in the mean brightness of the object. Our spectroscopic observations suggested the presence of a superdense nebula in the center of Sh 2-71.

  11. Evolution of Planetary Nebulae with WR-type Central Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danehkar, Ashkbiz

    2014-04-01

    This thesis presents a study of the kinematics, physical conditions and chemical abundances for a sample of Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) with Wolf-Rayet (WR) and weak emission-line stars (wels), based on optical integral field unit (IFU) spectroscopy obtained with the Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS) on the Australian National University 2.3 telescope at Siding Spring Observatory, and complemented by spectra from the literature. PNe surrounding WR-type stars constitute a particular study class for this study. A considerable fraction of currently well-identified central stars of PNe exhibit 'hydrogen-deficient' fast expanding atmospheres characterized by a large mass-loss rate. Most of them were classified as the carbon-sequence and a few of them as the nitrogen-sequence of the WR-type stars. What are less clear are the physical mechanisms and evolutionary paths that remove the hydrogen-rich outer layer from these degenerate cores, and transform it into a fast stellar wind. The aim of this thesis is to determine kinematic structure, density distribution, thermal structure and elemental abundances for a sample of PNe with different hydrogen-deficient central stars, which might provide clues about the origin and formation of their hydrogen-deficient stellar atmospheres. Hα and [N II] emission features have been used to determine kinematic structures. Based on spatially resolved observations of these emission lines, combined with archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging for compact PNe, morphological structures of these PNe have been determined. Comparing the velocity maps from the IFU spectrograph with those provided by morpho-kinematic models allowed disentangling of the different morphological components of most PNe, apart from the compact objects. The results indicate that these PNe have axisymmetric morphologies, either bipolar or elliptical. In many cases, the associated kinematic maps for PNe around hot WR-type stars also show the presence of so-called fast

  12. Symmetric and asymmetric planetary nebulae and the time variation of the radial abundance gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciel, W.; Costa, R. D. D.

    2014-04-01

    Planetary nebulae (PN) are excellent laboratories to study the chemical evolution of their host galaxies, especially concerning the radial abundance gradients and their time and spatial variations. Current chemical evolution models predict either some steepening or flattening of the abundance gradients with time, and PN can be useful in order to provide observational constraints on this issue. It is generally believed that asymmetrical nebulae, especially bipolars, are formed by younger, more massive progenitor stars, while symmetrical nebulae, such as the round and elliptical objects, are formed by older, less massive stars. As a consequence, if the abundance gradients change with time, some differences are expected between the gradients measured in symmetrical and asymmetrical nebulae. We have considered a large sample of well-studied galactic PN for which accurate abundances of O, S, Ne, and Ar are known, and for which a reliable morphological classification can be made. Average abundances and radial gradients of the ratios O/H, S/H, Ne/H and Ar/H were then determined for the main morphological classes, comprising B, E, R, and P nebulae. It is found that the average abundances of the younger objects are larger than those of the older nebulae, as expected on chemical evolution grounds, but the derived gradients are essentially the same within the uncertainties. It can then be concluded that the radial abundance gradients have not changed appreciably since the older progenitor stars were born, approximately 4 to 5 Gyr ago.

  13. Unidentified infrared features in proto-planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, S.; Hrivnak, B. J.

    1989-01-01

    The discovery of an unidentified emission feature at 21 microns in the spectra of three protoplanetary nebulae is reported. These objects show large far infrared excess due to a circumstellar dust envelope surrounding a carbon rich central star. Optical, infrared and radio observations of three cool Infrared Astronomy Satellite sources suggest that they are carbon rich objects. Their low resolution spectra show a broad unidentified emission feature at 21 microns which could originate from the bending mode of a hydrocarbon molecule. The similarity of all three objects suggests that this feature is unlikely to be the result of instrumental effects.

  14. New Planetary Nebulae Discovered by French Astrophotographs-Amateurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acker, A.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2012, French amateurs in astrophotography have been equipped with CCD imagers with high sensitivity and ˜1 arcsec resolution, allowing them to obtain images with high resolution and contrast, and with unprecedented depth, using narrow-band filters. On the other hand, they have been methodically scanning the digital sky survey (DSS), thereby visually identifying dozens of faint PN candidates in the Galaxy. These two methods lead to the discovery of 88 possible/probable PN. The large bipolar object Ou4 is one of the most interesting PN known.

  15. AN OPTICAL-INFRARED STUDY OF THE YOUNG MULTIPOLAR PLANETARY NEBULA NGC 6644

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, Chih Hao; Kwok Sun; Zhang Yong; Koning, Nico; Volk, Kevin E-mail: sunkwok@hku.h E-mail: nkoning@iras.ucalgary.c

    2010-12-10

    High-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the compact planetary nebula NGC 6644 has revealed two pairs of bipolar lobes and a central ring lying close to the plane of the sky. From mid-infrared imaging obtained with the Gemini Telescope, we have found a dust torus which is oriented nearly perpendicular to one pair of the lobes. We suggest that NGC 6644 is a multipolar nebula and construct a three-dimensional model that allows the visualization of the object from different lines of sight. These results suggest that NGC 6644 may have similar intrinsic structures as other multipolar nebulae and the phenomenon of multipolar nebulosity may be more common than previously believed.

  16. Far-infrared line observations of planetary nebulae. I - The forbidden O III spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinerstein, H. L.; Lester, D. F.; Werner, M. W.

    1985-04-01

    Observations of the far-infrared fine structure lines of O III have been obtained for six planetary nebulae. The infrared measurements are combined with optical O III line fluxes to probe physical conditions in the gas. From the observed line intensity ratios, a simultaneous solution was obtained for electron temperature and density, as well as means of evaluating the importance of inhomogeneities. Densities determined from the far-infrared O III lines agree well with density diagnostics from other ions, indicating a fairly homogeneous density in the emitting gas. Temperatures are determined separately from the O III 4363/5007 A and 5007 A/52 micron intensity ratios and compared. Systematically higher values are derived from the former ratio, which is expected from a nebula which is not isothermal. Allowance for the presence of temperature variations within these nebulae raises their derived oxygen abundances, determinations to be reconciled with the solar value.

  17. Measurement of S II forbidden lines in three southern planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macron, A.; Louise, R.

    1990-06-01

    Three southern planetary nebulae (NGC 2818, He 2-130, and NGC 3132) have been observed with the IDS (Image Dessector Scanner) combined with the Boller and Chivens spectrograph mounted at the Cassegrain focus of the 1.52 m telescope of the ESO in Chile. The spectrograph dispersion was 60 A/mm in the spectral range 6170-7298 A. Spectra were obtained from an array of positions across each nebula along the E-W direction and/or N-S direction. In order to derive electron density, only the S II forbidden lines (6617 A-6731 A) are given here. The results are in agreement with a shell structure for the observed nebulae.

  18. Observations and morphological study of ring planetary nebulae in forbidden O III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louise, R.

    1982-03-01

    A photometric study is presented of the morphology of forbidden O III emission from 10 ring planetary nebulae. Observations were made in a narrowband interference filter centered at 5007 A for the objects NGC 40, 1514, 2392, 6543, 6781, 6826, 7354, 7048, 7009 and 7662, and used to obtain values for the major axis, the distance separating two successive maxima of the photometric profile, the ring/center intensity ratio and eccentricity. These parameters are found to be consistent with a shell model for most of the nebulae, although it is noted that the model only applies to the O III distribution. Fine structure is also found in certain nebulae, indicating the presence of more complex structures to which the shell model is only a first approximation.

  19. Far-infrared line observations of planetary nebulae. 1: The O 3 spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinerstein, H. L.; Lester, D. F.; Werner, M. W.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of the far-infrared fine structure lines of O III have been obtained for six planetary nebulae. The infrared measurements are combined with optical O III line fluxes to probe physical conditions in the gas. From the observed line intensity ratios, a simultaneous solution was obtained for electron temperature and density, as well as means of evaluating the importance of inhomogeneities. Densities determined from the far-infrared O III lines agree well density diagnostics from other ions, indicating a fairly homogeneous density in the emitting gas. Temperatures are determined separately from the O III 4363/5007 A and 5007 A/52 micron intensity ratios and compared. Systematically higher values are derived from the former ratio, which is expected from a nebula which is not isothermal. Allowance for the presence of temperature variations within these nebulae raises their derived oxygen abundances, determinations to be reconciled with the solar value.

  20. Observing Infrared Emission Lines of Neutron-Capture Species in Planetary Nebulae: New Detections with IGRINS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Sterling, N. C.; Kaplan, Kyle F.; Bautista, Manuel A.

    2015-08-01

    As the former envelopes of evolved stars, planetary nebulae (PNe) present an opportunity to study slow neutron-capture reactions (the “s-process”) during the AGB. Such studies differ from those of AGB stars in two ways. First, PNe represent the end point of self-enrichment and dredge-up in the star and most of its mass return to the ISM, enabling us to infer the nucleosynthetic yield of a specific element. Second, some s-process products are observable in PNe but difficult or impossible to observe in cool stars. These include some species with nuclear charge Z in the 30’s for which the major synthesis sites are uncertain. Optical emission lines of trans-iron species have been observed in some PNe, but are faint and can suffer from blending with lines of more abundant elements (Péquignot & Baluteau 1994, A&A, 283, 593; Sharpee et al. 2007, ApJ, 659, 1265). Observing infrared transitions from low energy states has proven to be a fruitful alternate approach. We used K-band lines of Se (Z=34) and Kr (Z=36) to study the demographics of their abundances in a large sample of Milky Way PNe (Dinerstein 2001, ApJ, 550, L223; Sterling & Dinerstein 2008, ApJ, 174, 158; Sterling, Porter, & Dinerstein 2015, submitted). An L-band emission line of Zn identified by Dinerstein & Geballe (2001, ApJ, 562, 515) and further observed by Smith, Zijlstra, & Dinerstein 2014 (MNRAS, 441, 3161), can be used as a tracer of the Fe-group, enabling determinations of the key stellar population diagnostic ratio [alpha/Fe] in PNe (see poster by Dinerstein et al., Focus Meeting 4). Using IGRINS, a high spectral resolution H and K band spectrometer (Park & Jaffe et al. 2014, Proc SPIE, 9147), we have discovered several new lines not previously reported in any astronomical object. Our detection of an H-band line of Rb (Z=37) confirms previous claims of optical Rb detections and indicates enrichment by a factor of ~4 in the PN NGC 7027 (Sterling, Dinerstein, Kaplan, & Bautista, in preparation

  1. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING OF THE BINARY NUCLEUS OF THE PLANETARY NEBULA EGB 6

    SciTech Connect

    Liebert, James; Bond, Howard E.; Ciardullo, Robin; Dufour, P.; Meakes, Michael G.; Renzini, Alvio; Gianninas, A. E-mail: bond@stsci.edu E-mail: mgmeakes@gmail.com E-mail: alvio.renzini@oapd.inaf.it

    2013-05-20

    EGB 6 is an ancient, low-surface-brightness planetary nebula. The central star, also cataloged as PG 0950+139, is a very hot DAOZ white dwarf (WD) with an apparent M dwarf companion, unresolved from the ground but detected initially through excesses in the JHK bands. Its kinematics indicates membership in the Galactic disk population. Inside of EGB 6 is an extremely dense emission knot-completely unexpected since significant mass loss from the WD should have ceased {approx}10{sup 5} yr ago. The electron density of the compact nebula is very high (2.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}), as indicated by collisional de-excitation of forbidden emission lines. Hubble Space Telescope imaging and grism spectroscopy are reported here. These resolve the WD and apparent dM companion-at a separation of 0.''166, or a projected 96{sub -45}{sup +204} AU at the estimated distance of 576{sub -271}{sup +1224} pc (using the V magnitude). Much to our surprise, we found that the compact emission nebula is superposed on the dM companion, far from the photoionizing radiation of the WD. Moreover, a striking mid-infrared excess has recently been reported in the Spitzer/IRAC and MIPS bands, best fit with two dust shells. The derived ratio L{sub IR}/L{sub WD} = 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} is the largest yet found for any WD or planetary nucleus. The compact nebula has maintained its high density for over three decades. We discuss two possible explanations for the origin and confinement of the compact nebula, neither of which is completely satisfactory. This leaves the genesis and confinement of the compact nebula an astrophysical puzzle, yet similar examples appear in the literature.

  2. Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of the Binary Nucleus of the Planetary Nebula EGB 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, James; Bond, Howard E.; Dufour, P.; Ciardullo, Robin; Meakes, Michael G.; Renzini, Alvio; Gianninas, A.

    2013-05-01

    EGB 6 is an ancient, low-surface-brightness planetary nebula. The central star, also cataloged as PG 0950+139, is a very hot DAOZ white dwarf (WD) with an apparent M dwarf companion, unresolved from the ground but detected initially through excesses in the JHK bands. Its kinematics indicates membership in the Galactic disk population. Inside of EGB 6 is an extremely dense emission knot—completely unexpected since significant mass loss from the WD should have ceased ~105 yr ago. The electron density of the compact nebula is very high (2.2 × 106 cm-3), as indicated by collisional de-excitation of forbidden emission lines. Hubble Space Telescope imaging and grism spectroscopy are reported here. These resolve the WD and apparent dM companion—at a separation of 0.''166, or a projected 96_{-45}^{+204} AU at the estimated distance of 576_{-271}^{+1224} pc (using the V magnitude). Much to our surprise, we found that the compact emission nebula is superposed on the dM companion, far from the photoionizing radiation of the WD. Moreover, a striking mid-infrared excess has recently been reported in the Spitzer/IRAC and MIPS bands, best fit with two dust shells. The derived ratio L IR/L WD = 2.7 × 10-4 is the largest yet found for any WD or planetary nucleus. The compact nebula has maintained its high density for over three decades. We discuss two possible explanations for the origin and confinement of the compact nebula, neither of which is completely satisfactory. This leaves the genesis and confinement of the compact nebula an astrophysical puzzle, yet similar examples appear in the literature. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (HST), obtained by the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  3. The dusty side of planetary nebulae: a HerPlaNS view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, Toshiya; Ladjal, Djazia; pre=", HerPlaNS team

    2016-07-01

    HerPlaNS (Herschel Planetary Nebula Survey) is a far-IR imaging/spectroscopic survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) using the Herschel Space Observatory. In this presentation, we review our investigation into the physical properties of the cold dust component of the target PNe. We find that the far-IR surface brightness emission from PNe is generally dominated by thermal dust emission, which exhibits particular characteristics in terms of the dust emissivity and dust temperature compared with dust grains found elsewhere. The PN dust displays little variation in the emissivity while a large spread in the temperature, suggesting the presence of rather homogeneous dust chemistry and size distribution in the circumstellar environs.

  4. ABUNDANCES OF PLANETARY NEBULAE IN THE OUTER DISK OF M31

    SciTech Connect

    Kwitter, Karen B.; Lehman, Emma M. M.; Balick, Bruce; Henry, R. B. C. E-mail: emmalehman@gmail.com E-mail: rhenry@ou.edu

    2012-07-01

    We present spectroscopic observations and chemical abundances of 16 planetary nebulae (PNe) in the outer disk of M31. The [O III] {lambda}4363 line is detected in all objects, allowing a direct measurement of the nebular temperature essential for accurate abundance determinations. Our results show that the abundances in these M31 PNe display the same correlations and general behaviors as Type II PNe in the Milky Way. We also calculate photoionization models to derive estimates of central star properties. From these we infer that our sample PNe, all near the bright-end cutoff of the planetary nebula luminosity function, originated from stars near 2 M{sub Sun }. Finally, under the assumption that these PNe are located in M31's disk, we plot the oxygen abundance gradient, which appears shallower than the gradient in the Milky Way.

  5. Detection of C60 and C70 in a young planetary nebula.

    PubMed

    Cami, Jan; Bernard-Salas, Jeronimo; Peeters, Els; Malek, Sarah Elizabeth

    2010-09-01

    In recent decades, a number of molecules and diverse dust features have been identified by astronomical observations in various environments. Most of the dust that determines the physical and chemical characteristics of the interstellar medium is formed in the outflows of asymptotic giant branch stars and is further processed when these objects become planetary nebulae. We studied the environment of Tc 1, a peculiar planetary nebula whose infrared spectrum shows emission from cold and neutral C60 and C70. The two molecules amount to a few percent of the available cosmic carbon in this region. This finding indicates that if the conditions are right, fullerenes can and do form efficiently in space. PMID:20651118

  6. New DSH planetary nebulae and candidates from optical and infrared surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronberger, Matthias; Parker, Quentin A.; Jacoby, George H.; Acker, Agnes; Alves, Filipe; Bojicic, Ivan; Eigenthaler, Paul; Frew, David J.; Harmer, Dianne; Patchick, Dana; Reid, Warren; Schedler, Johannes

    2016-07-01

    To date, the planetary nebula (PN) survey of the Deep Sky Hunters collaboration has led to the detection of more than 250 previously unknown candidate planetary nebulae (PNe). About 60% of them were found during the past two years and are expected to be true, likely or possible PNe because careful vetting has already thrown out more doubtful objects. The majority of the new PN candidates are located within the boundaries of the SHS and IPHAS Ha surveys and were discovered by combining MIR data from the WideField Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) with optical data from the IPHAS, SHS and DSS surveys, and UV data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer(GALEX).

  7. A far-infrared emission feature in carbon-rich stars and planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, W. J.; Houck, J. R.; Mccarthy, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    The 16-30 micron spectra of several carbon stars and the planetary nebulae IC 418 and NGC 6572 have been obtained using the NASA C-141 Kuiper Airborne Observatory. A newly observed emission feature appears in the spectrum of IRC +10216 and several other carbon stars at wavelengths greater than 24 microns. The feature is interpreted as resulting from a solid-state resonance in the dust grains which have condensed around these stars. A similar feature appears in the spectra of IC 418 and NGC 6572, implying that the same type of dust is present. Since the dust probably condensed from a carbon-rich gas, this indicates an evolutionary link between carbon stars and these planetary nebulae. No identification for the grain material has been found, but some clues are apparent which could aid in the identification.

  8. The Complex Environment of the High Excitation Planetary Nebula NGC 3242

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noriega-Crespo, A.; Meaburn, J.; Lopez, J.

    1999-01-01

    Spatially resolved profiles of the H (alpha), [N II] 6584 A and [O III] 5007 A nebular emission lines, obtained with the Manchester echelle spectrometer combined with the 2.1 m San Pedro Martir telescope have revealed the velocity structure of the nebular core and of one of the three (A,B and C) inner haloes of the high excitation planetary nebula NGC 3242.

  9. Interleaved FITS DS9 segmentation with shell script metaprogramming for planetary nebulae detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenborg, T. N.

    2014-04-01

    A technique for efficient inspection of large volumes of imaging data for planetary nebulae (PNe) is demonstrated. Image segmentation to subscreen size is automated. Inspection of consecutive small images mitigates inadvertently missing sections of large images with manual image traversal. Automated interleaving of on-band and off-band images with corresponding difference imaging is carried out. Bi-directional single-click navigation of a segmented, interleaved data set allows blinking of complementary images and efficient identification of PNe candidates.

  10. Search with Copernicus for ultraviolet emission lines in the planetary nebula NGC 3242

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. D.; Snow, T. P., Jr.; Upson, W. L., II

    1978-01-01

    The high-excitation planetary nebula NGC 3242 has been observed with the ultraviolet telescope-spectrometer aboard Copernicus. Wavelength intervals corresponding to the emission lines of O VI at 1032 A, He II at 1085 A, Si III at 1206 A, and N V at 1239 A have been scanned. Upper limits to the observed fluxes are reported and compared with predicted emission-line fluxes from this object.