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Sample records for faint red sequence

  1. On the origin of the faint-end of the red sequence in high-density environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, Alessandro; Gavazzi, Giuseppe

    2014-11-01

    With the advent of the new generation wide-field cameras it became possible to survey in an unbiased mode galaxies spanning a variety of local densities, from the core of rich clusters, to compact and loose groups, down to filaments and voids. The sensitivity reached by these instruments allowed to extend the observation to dwarf galaxies, the most "fragile" objects in the universe. At the same time models and simulations have been tailored to quantify the different effects of the environment on the evolution of galaxies. Simulations, models, and observations consistently indicate that star-forming dwarf galaxies entering high-density environments for the first time can be rapidly stripped from their interstellar medium. The lack of gas quenches the activity of star formation, producing on timescales of 1 Gyr quiescent galaxies with spectro-photometric, chemical, structural, and kinematical properties similar to those observed in dwarf early-type galaxies inhabiting rich clusters and loose groups. Simulations and observations consistently identify ram pressure stripping as the major effect responsible for the quenching of the star-formation activity in rich clusters. Gravitational interactions (galaxy harassment) can also be important in groups or in clusters whenever galaxies have been members since early epochs. The observation of clusters at different redshifts combined with the present high infalling rate of galaxies onto clusters indicate that the quenching of the star-formation activity in dwarf systems and the formation of the faint end of the red sequence is a very recent phenomenon.

  2. On the clustering of faint red galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haojie; Zheng, Zheng; Guo, Hong; Zhu, Ju; Zehavi, Idit

    2016-08-01

    Faint red galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey show a puzzling clustering pattern in previous measurements. In the two-point correlation function (2PCF), they appear to be strongly clustered on small scales, indicating a tendency to reside in massive haloes as satellite galaxies. However, their weak clustering on large scales suggests that they are more likely to be found in low-mass haloes. The interpretation of the clustering pattern suffers from the large sample variance in the 2PCF measurements, given the small volume of the volume-limited sample of such faint galaxies. We present improved clustering measurements of faint galaxies by making a full use of a flux-limited sample to obtain volume-limited measurements with an increased effective volume. In the improved 2PCF measurements, the fractional uncertainties on large scales drop by more than 40 per cent, and the strong contrast between small-scale and large-scale clustering amplitudes seen in previous work is no longer prominent. From halo occupation distribution modelling of the measurements, we find that a considerable fraction of faint red galaxies to be satellites in massive haloes, a scenario supported by the strong covariance of small-scale 2PCF measurements and the relative spatial distribution of faint red galaxies and luminous galaxies. However, the satellite fraction is found to be degenerate with the slope of the distribution profile of satellites in inner haloes. We compare the modelling results with semi-analytic model predictions and discuss the implications.

  3. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    Fainting is a temporary loss of consciousness. If you're about to faint, you'll feel dizzy, ... at the same time, and may fall down. Fainting usually happens when your blood pressure drops suddenly, ...

  4. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscle control at the same time, and may fall down. Fainting usually happens when your blood pressure drops suddenly, causing a decrease in blood flow to your brain. It is more common in older people. Some causes of fainting include Heat or dehydration ...

  5. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fainting: Certain medicines, including those used for anxiety, depression, and high blood pressure (these drugs may cause a drop in blood pressure) Drug or alcohol use Hyperventilation Low blood sugar Seizures Sudden drop in blood pressure (such as ...

  6. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Meningitis Choosing Your Mood Prescription Drug Abuse ... reasons why teens faint: Physical triggers. Getting too hot or being in a crowded, poorly ventilated setting ...

  7. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain does not get enough oxygen. You lose consciousness, or "pass out," for a brief time (usually ... Taking longer than a few seconds to regain consciousness Fainting when you turn your head to the ...

  8. NOTE: Red, Gray, and Blue: Near Infrared Spectrophotometry of Faint Moons of Uranus and Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trilling, David E.; Brown, Robert H.

    2000-11-01

    Using the CoCo Cold Coronagraph at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea, we observed the uranian satellites Miranda, Puck, Portia, and Rosalind and the neptunian satellite Proteus in the near infrared (JHK) to determine the albedos of those faint satellites. In V-J, all of Puck, Portia, Rosalind, and Proteus are very blue, similar to the colors of many icy satellites and of water ice. The satellites we observed have a wide range of J-H colors, with Miranda being blue, Proteus being gray, and Puck, Portia, and Rosalind being red. For the satellites for which we could determine H-K (Miranda, Puck, and Proteus), the colors are gray to red. As a whole, spectrally, these five satellites lie between icy Solar System satellites (e.g., saturnian satellites or the major uranian satellites) and Kuiper belt objects. The redness of Proteus and Puck and perhaps other satellites suggests the presence of organic material, although the redness is also similar to that of C- and D-class asteroids and some outer jovian moons. In all cases, diagnostic spectral features could be masked by broadband photometry.

  9. The accelerated build-up of the red sequence in high-redshift galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerulo, P.; Couch, W. J.; Lidman, C.; Demarco, R.; Huertas-Company, M.; Mei, S.; Sánchez-Janssen, R.; Barrientos, L. F.; Muñoz, R. P.

    2016-04-01

    We analyse the evolution of the red sequence in a sample of galaxy clusters at redshifts 0.8 < z < 1.5 taken from the HAWK-I Cluster Survey (HCS). The comparison with the low-redshift (0.04 < z < 0.08) sample of the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) and other literature results shows that the slope and intrinsic scatter of the cluster red sequence have undergone little evolution since z = 1.5. We find that the luminous-to-faint ratio and the slope of the faint end of the luminosity distribution of the HCS red sequence are consistent with those measured in WINGS, implying that there is no deficit of red galaxies at magnitudes fainter than M_V^{ast } at high redshifts. We find that the most massive HCS clusters host a population of bright red sequence galaxies at MV < -22.0 mag, which are not observed in low-mass clusters. Interestingly, we also note the presence of a population of very bright (MV < -23.0 mag) and massive (log (M*/M⊙) > 11.5) red sequence galaxies in the WINGS clusters, which do not include only the brightest cluster galaxies and which are not present in the HCS clusters, suggesting that they formed at epochs later than z = 0.8. The comparison with the luminosity distribution of a sample of passive red sequence galaxies drawn from the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field in the photometric redshift range 0.8 < zphot < 1.5 shows that the red sequence in clusters is more developed at the faint end, suggesting that halo mass plays an important role in setting the time-scales for the build-up of the red sequence.

  10. Abundance ratios of red giants in low-mass ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, P.; Monaco, L.; Bonifacio, P.; Moni Bidin, C.; Geisler, D.; Sbordone, L.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Low-mass dwarf spheroidal galaxies are key objects for our understanding of the chemical evolution of the pristine Universe and the Local Group of galaxies. Abundance ratios in stars of these objects can be used to better understand their star formation and chemical evolution. Aims: We report on the analysis of a sample of 11 stars belonging to five different ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies (UfDSph) that is based on X-Shooter spectra obtained at the VLT. Methods: Medium-resolution spectra have been used to determine the detailed chemical composition of their atmosphere. We performed a standard 1D LTE analysis to compute the abundances. Results: Considering all the stars as representative of the same population of low-mass galaxies, we found that the [α/Fe] ratios vs.s [Fe/H] decreases as the metallicity of the star increases in a way similar to that which is found for the population of stars that belong to dwarf spheroidal galaxies. The main difference is that the solar [α/Fe] is reached at a much lower metallicity for the UfDSph than for the dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We report for the first time the abundance of strontium in CVn II. The star we analyzed in this galaxy has a very high [Sr/Fe] and a very low upper limit of barium which makes it a star with an exceptionally high [Sr/Ba] ratio.

  11. The built-up of the red sequence in the Hercules cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agulli, I.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Dominguez Palmero, L.; Diaferio, A.

    2016-09-01

    We present the study of the colour-magnitude diagram of the cluster Abell 2151 (A 2151), with a particular focus on the low-mass end. The deep spectroscopy with AF2/WYFFOS@WHT and the caustic method enable us to obtain 360 members within 1.3 R200 and absolute magnitude M_r ≲ M_r^{ast }+6. This nearby cluster shows a well defined red sequence up to Mr ˜ -18.5; at fainter magnitudes only 36 per cent of the galaxies lie on the extrapolation of the red sequence. We compare the red sequences of A 2151 and Abell 85, which is another nearby cluster with similar spectroscopic data, but with different mass and dynamical state. Both clusters show similar red sequences at the bright end (Mr ≤ -19.5), whereas large differences appear at the faint end. This result suggests that the reddening of bright galaxies is independent of environment, unlike the dwarf population (Mr ≥ -18.0).

  12. A TALE OF DWARFS AND GIANTS: USING A z = 1.62 CLUSTER TO UNDERSTAND HOW THE RED SEQUENCE GREW OVER THE LAST 9.5 BILLION YEARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rudnick, Gregory H.; Tran, Kim-Vy; Papovich, Casey; Momcheva, Ivelina; Willmer, Christopher

    2012-08-10

    We study the red sequence in a cluster of galaxies at z = 1.62 and follow its evolution over the intervening 9.5 Gyr to the present day. Using deep YJK{sub s} imaging with the HAWK-I instrument on the Very Large Telescope, we identify a tight red sequence and construct its rest-frame i-band luminosity function (LF). There is a marked deficit of faint red galaxies in the cluster that causes a turnover in the LF. We compare the red-sequence LF to that for clusters at z < 0.8, correcting the luminosities for passive evolution. The shape of the cluster red-sequence LF does not evolve between z = 1.62 and z = 0.6 but at z < 0.6 the faint population builds up significantly. Meanwhile, between z = 1.62 and 0.6 the inferred total light on the red sequence grows by a factor of {approx}2 and the bright end of the LF becomes more populated. We construct a simple model for red-sequence evolution that grows the red sequence in total luminosity and matches the constant LF shape at z > 0.6. In this model the cluster accretes blue galaxies from the field whose star formation is quenched and who are subsequently allowed to merge. We find that three to four mergers among cluster galaxies during the 4 Gyr between z = 1.62 and z = 0.6 match the observed LF evolution between the two redshifts. The inferred merger rate is consistent with other studies of this cluster. Our result supports the picture that galaxy merging during the major growth phase of massive clusters is an important process in shaping the red-sequence population at all luminosities.

  13. Fainting (Syncope)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Fainting (Syncope) Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Caregiving How ...

  14. Measuring the Red Sequence Slope in a Distant Galaxy Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Erin; Rudnick, G.

    2013-01-01

    Our project goal is to constrain the possible stellar mass dependence of galaxy ages for red sequence galaxies. We use the Y, J, and K-band data collected from the Very Large Telescope in Chile of the z = 1.62 galaxy cluster XMM-LSS J02182-051020. This spectroscopically confirmed galaxy cluster is one of the only known massive clusters at an epoch close to the time when stars stopped forming within red sequence galaxies. For red sequence galaxies, which have little recent star formation and little dust, the color is an indicator of the luminosity weighted age of the stars. This is in turn correlated to the last epoch of significant star formation. At the same time, the mass of such a galaxy is correlated to its magnitude. The more stars a galaxy contains, the more massive and brighter the galaxy. The slope of the red sequence in color-magnitude space, therefore, gives an indication of the dependence of galaxy age on stellar mass. We use the age-sensitive Y-J color and measure a slope of zero for the red sequence in Y-J vs. J. We interpret this to mean that the age does not depend strongly on the mass of the galaxy. We will present the limits on the slope of the color-magnitude relation and will discuss what limits this corresponds to on the age dependence with mass.

  15. MODELING THE RED SEQUENCE: HIERARCHICAL GROWTH YET SLOW LUMINOSITY EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Skelton, Rosalind E.; Bell, Eric F.; Somerville, Rachel S.

    2012-07-01

    We explore the effects of mergers on the evolution of massive early-type galaxies by modeling the evolution of their stellar populations in a hierarchical context. We investigate how a realistic red sequence population set up by z {approx} 1 evolves under different assumptions for the merger and star formation histories, comparing changes in color, luminosity, and mass. The purely passive fading of existing red sequence galaxies, with no further mergers or star formation, results in dramatic changes at the bright end of the luminosity function and color-magnitude relation. Without mergers there is too much evolution in luminosity at a fixed space density compared to observations. The change in color and magnitude at a fixed mass resembles that of a passively evolving population that formed relatively recently, at z {approx} 2. Mergers among the red sequence population ('dry mergers') occurring after z = 1 build up mass, counteracting the fading of the existing stellar populations to give smaller changes in both color and luminosity for massive galaxies. By allowing some galaxies to migrate from the blue cloud onto the red sequence after z = 1 through gas-rich mergers, younger stellar populations are added to the red sequence. This manifestation of the progenitor bias increases the scatter in age and results in even smaller changes in color and luminosity between z = 1 and z = 0 at a fixed mass. The resultant evolution appears much slower, resembling the passive evolution of a population that formed at high redshift (z {approx} 3-5), and is in closer agreement with observations. We conclude that measurements of the luminosity and color evolution alone are not sufficient to distinguish between the purely passive evolution of an old population and cosmologically motivated hierarchical growth, although these scenarios have very different implications for the mass growth of early-type galaxies over the last half of cosmic history.

  16. OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS ON RED AND BLUE HELIUM BURNING SEQUENCES

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Holtzman, Jon

    2011-10-10

    We derive the optical luminosity, colors, and ratios of the blue and red helium burning (HeB) stellar populations from archival Hubble Space Telescope observations of nineteen starburst dwarf galaxies and compare them with theoretical isochrones from Padova stellar evolution models across metallicities from Z = 0.001 to 0.009. We find that the observational data and the theoretical isochrones for both blue and red HeB populations overlap in optical luminosities and colors and the observed and predicted blue to red HeB ratios agree for stars older than 50 Myr over the time bins studied. These findings confirm the usefulness of applying isochrones to interpret observations of HeB populations. However, there are significant differences, especially for the red HeB population. Specifically, we find (1) offsets in color between the observations and theoretical isochrones of order 0.15 mag (0.5 mag) for the blue (red) HeB populations brighter than M{sub V} {approx} -4 mag, which cannot be solely due to differential extinction; (2) blue HeB stars fainter than M{sub V} {approx} -3 mag are bluer than predicted; (3) the slope of the red HeB sequence is shallower than predicted by a factor of {approx}3; and (4) the models overpredict the ratio of the most luminous blue to red HeB stars corresponding to ages {approx}< 50 Myr. Additionally, we find that for the more metal-rich galaxies in our sample (Z {approx}> 0.5 Z{sub sun}), the red HeB stars overlap with the red giant branch stars in the color-magnitude diagrams, thus reducing their usefulness as indicators of star formation for ages {approx}> 100 Myr.

  17. THE FAINT STELLAR HALOS OF MASSIVE RED GALAXIES FROM STACKS OF MORE THAN 42,000 SDSS LRG IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Tal, Tomer; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2011-04-20

    We study the properties of massive galaxies at an average redshift of z {approx} 0.34 through stacking more than 42,000 images of luminous red galaxies (LRGs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This is the largest data set ever used for such an analysis and it allows us to explore the outskirts of massive red galaxies at unprecedented physical scales. Our image stacks extend farther than 400 kpc, where the r-band profile surface brightness reaches 30 mag arcsec{sup -2}. This analysis confirms that the stellar bodies of LRGs follow a simple Sersic profile out to 100 kpc. At larger radii, the profiles deviate from the best-fit Sersic models and exhibit extra light in the r-, i-, and z-band stacks. This excess light can probably be attributed to unresolved intragroup or intracluster light or a change in the light profile itself. We further show that standard analyses of SDSS-depth images typically miss 20% of the total stellar light and underestimate the size of LRGs by 10% compared to our best-fit r-band Sersic model of n = 5.5 and r{sub e} = 13.1 kpc. If the excess light at r > 100 kpc is considered to be part of the galaxy, the best-fit r-band Sersic parameters are n = 5.8 and r{sub e} = 13.6 kpc. In addition, we study the radially dependent stack ellipticity and find an increase with radius from {epsilon} = 0.25 at r = 10 kpc to {epsilon} = 0.3 at r = 100 kpc. This provides support that the stellar light that we trace out to at least 100 kpc is physically associated with the galaxies themselves and may confirm that the halos of individual LRGs have higher ellipticities than their central parts. Lastly, we show that the broadband color gradients of the stacked images are flat beyond roughly 40 kpc, suggesting that the stellar populations do not vary significantly with radius in the outer parts of massive ellipticals.

  18. PRIMUS: Obscured Star Formation on the Red Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangtun; Blanton, Michael R.; Burles, Scott M.; Coil, Alison L.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Moustakas, John; Wong, Kenneth C.; Aird, James

    2011-01-01

    We quantify the fraction of galaxies at moderate redshifts (0.1 < z < 0.5) that appear red-and-dead in the optical, but in fact contain obscured star formation detectable in the infrared (IR), with the PRIsm MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS). PRIMUS has measured ~120,000 robust redshifts with a precision of σ z /(1 + z) ~ 0.5% over 9.1 deg2 of the sky to the depth of i ~ 23 (AB), up to redshift z ~ 1. We specifically targeted 6.7 deg2 fields with existing deep IR imaging from the Spitzer Space Telescope from the SWIRE and S-COSMOS surveys. We select in these fields an i-band flux-limited sample (i < 20 mag in the SWIRE fields and i < 21 mag in the S-COSMOS field) of 3310 red-sequence galaxies at 0.1 < z < 0.5 for which we can reliably classify obscured star-forming (SF) and quiescent galaxies using IR color. Our sample constitutes the largest galaxy sample at intermediate redshift to study obscured star formation on the red sequence, and we present the first quantitative analysis of the fraction of obscured SF galaxies as a function of luminosity. We find that on average, at L ~ L*, about 15% of red-sequence galaxies have IR colors consistent with SF galaxies. The percentage of obscured SF galaxies increases by ~8% per mag with decreasing luminosity from the highest luminosities to L ~ 0.2 L*. Our results suggest that a significant fraction of red-sequence galaxies have ongoing star formation and that galaxy evolution studies based on optical color therefore need to account for this complication.

  19. PRIMUS: OBSCURED STAR FORMATION ON THE RED SEQUENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Guangtun; Blanton, Michael R.; Burles, Scott M.; Coil, Alison L.; Moustakas, John; Aird, James; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Wong, Kenneth C.

    2011-01-10

    We quantify the fraction of galaxies at moderate redshifts (0.1 < z < 0.5) that appear red-and-dead in the optical, but in fact contain obscured star formation detectable in the infrared (IR), with the PRIsm MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS). PRIMUS has measured {approx}120,000 robust redshifts with a precision of {sigma}{sub z}/(1 + z) {approx} 0.5% over 9.1 deg{sup 2} of the sky to the depth of i {approx} 23 (AB), up to redshift z {approx} 1. We specifically targeted 6.7 deg{sup 2} fields with existing deep IR imaging from the Spitzer Space Telescope from the SWIRE and S-COSMOS surveys. We select in these fields an i-band flux-limited sample (i < 20 mag in the SWIRE fields and i < 21 mag in the S-COSMOS field) of 3310 red-sequence galaxies at 0.1 < z < 0.5 for which we can reliably classify obscured star-forming (SF) and quiescent galaxies using IR color. Our sample constitutes the largest galaxy sample at intermediate redshift to study obscured star formation on the red sequence, and we present the first quantitative analysis of the fraction of obscured SF galaxies as a function of luminosity. We find that on average, at L {approx} L*, about 15% of red-sequence galaxies have IR colors consistent with SF galaxies. The percentage of obscured SF galaxies increases by {approx}8% per mag with decreasing luminosity from the highest luminosities to L {approx} 0.2 L*. Our results suggest that a significant fraction of red-sequence galaxies have ongoing star formation and that galaxy evolution studies based on optical color therefore need to account for this complication.

  20. RCSLenS: The Red Cluster Sequence Lensing Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, H.; Choi, A.; Heymans, C.; Blake, C.; Erben, T.; Miller, L.; Nakajima, R.; van Waerbeke, L.; Viola, M.; Buddendiek, A.; Harnois-Déraps, J.; Hojjati, A.; Joachimi, B.; Joudaki, S.; Kitching, T. D.; Wolf, C.; Gwyn, S.; Johnson, N.; Kuijken, K.; Sheikhbahaee, Z.; Tudorica, A.; Yee, H. K. C.

    2016-08-01

    We present the Red-sequence Cluster Lensing Survey (RCSLenS), an application of the methods developed for the Canada France Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) to the ˜785 deg2, multi-band imaging data of the Red-sequence Cluster Survey 2 (RCS2). This project represents the largest public, sub-arcsecond seeing, multi-band survey to date that is suited for weak gravitational lensing measurements. With a careful assessment of systematic errors in shape measurements and photometric redshifts we extend the use of this data set to allow cross-correlation analyses between weak lensing observables and other data sets. We describe the imaging data, the data reduction, masking, multi-colour photometry, photometric redshifts, shape measurements, tests for systematic errors, and a blinding scheme to allow for more objective measurements. In total we analyse 761 pointings with r-band coverage, which constitutes our lensing sample. Residual large-scale B-mode systematics prevent the use of this shear catalogue for cosmic shear science. The effective number density of lensing sources over an unmasked area of 571.7 deg2 and down to a magnitude limit of r ˜ 24.5 is 8.1 galaxies per arcmin2 (weighted: 5.5 arcmin-2) distributed over 14 patches on the sky. Photometric redshifts based on 4-band griz data are available for 513 pointings covering an unmasked area of 383.5 deg2. We present weak lensing mass reconstructions of some example clusters as well as the full survey representing the largest areas that have been mapped in this way. All our data products are publicly available through CADC at http://www.cadc-ccda.hia-iha.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/en/community/rcslens/query.html in a format very similar to the CFHTLenS data release.

  1. Red Dwarfs and the End of the Main Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, F. C.; Graves, G. J. M.; Laughlin, G.

    2004-12-01

    This paper celebrates the contributions of Peter Bodenheimer to our understanding of stellar evolution by focusing on the long term development of red dwarf stars. We show that these diminutive stellar objects remain convective over most of their lives, they continue to burn hydrogen for trillions of years, and they do not experience red giant phases in their old age. Instead, red dwarfs turn into blue dwarfs and finally white dwarfs. This work shows (in part) why larger stars do become red giants.

  2. Precision Measurements of the Cluster Red Sequence using an Error Corrected Gaussian Mixture Model

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Jiangang; Koester, Benjamin P.; Mckay, Timothy A.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Rozo, Eduardo; Evrard, August; Annis, James; Becker, Matthew; Busha, Michael; Gerdes, David; Johnston, David E.; /Northwestern U. /Brookhaven

    2009-07-01

    The red sequence is an important feature of galaxy clusters and plays a crucial role in optical cluster detection. Measurement of the slope and scatter of the red sequence are affected both by selection of red sequence galaxies and measurement errors. In this paper, we describe a new error corrected Gaussian Mixture Model for red sequence galaxy identification. Using this technique, we can remove the effects of measurement error and extract unbiased information about the intrinsic properties of the red sequence. We use this method to select red sequence galaxies in each of the 13,823 clusters in the maxBCG catalog, and measure the red sequence ridgeline location and scatter of each. These measurements provide precise constraints on the variation of the average red galaxy populations in the observed frame with redshift. We find that the scatter of the red sequence ridgeline increases mildly with redshift, and that the slope decreases with redshift. We also observe that the slope does not strongly depend on cluster richness. Using similar methods, we show that this behavior is mirrored in a spectroscopic sample of field galaxies, further emphasizing that ridgeline properties are independent of environment. These precise measurements serve as an important observational check on simulations and mock galaxy catalogs. The observed trends in the slope and scatter of the red sequence ridgeline with redshift are clues to possible intrinsic evolution of the cluster red-sequence itself. Most importantly, the methods presented in this work lay the groundwork for further improvements in optically-based cluster cosmology.

  3. WHAT DOES CLUSTERING TELL US ABOUT THE BUILDUP OF THE RED SEQUENCE?

    SciTech Connect

    Tinker, Jeremy L.; Wetzel, Andrew R.

    2010-08-10

    We analyze the clustering of red and blue galaxies from four samples spanning a redshift range of 0.4 < z < 2.0 to test the various scenarios by which galaxies evolve onto the red sequence. The data are taken from the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey, DEEP2, and COMBO-17. The use of clustering allows us to determine what fraction of the red sequence is made up of central galaxies and satellite galaxies. At all redshifts, including z = 0, the data are consistent with {approx}60% of satellite galaxies being red or quenched, implying that {approx}1/3 of the red sequence is comprised of satellite galaxies. More than three-fourths of red satellite galaxies were moved to the red sequence after they were accreted onto a larger halo. The constant fraction of satellite galaxies that are red yields a quenching time for satellite galaxies that depends on redshift in the same way as halo dynamical times: t{sub Q} {approx} (1 + z){sup -1.5}. In three of the four samples, the data favor a model in which red central galaxies are a random sample of all central galaxies; there is no preferred halo mass scale at which galaxies make the transition from star-forming to red and dead. The large errors on the fourth sample inhibit any conclusions. Theoretical models in which star formation is quenched above a critical halo mass are excluded by these data. A scenario in which mergers create red central galaxies imparts a weaker correlation between halo mass and central galaxy color, but even the merger scenario creates tension with red galaxy clustering at redshifts above 0.5. These results suggest that the mechanism by which central galaxies become red evolves from z = 0.5 to z = 0.

  4. Can the magnetic susceptibility record of Chinese Red Clay sequence be used for palaeomonsoon reconstructions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guoyong; Han, Yan; Liu, Xiuming; Chang, Liao; Lü, Bin; Chen, Qu; Guo, Xuelian; Yan, Junhui; Yan, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Red Clay underlying the loess-palaeosol sequences on the Chinese Loess Plateau is an eolian deposit. There is a controversy over whether magnetic susceptibility (χ) variations in Red Clay sequence can be used as an indicator of summer palaeomonsoon intensity. This study investigates the magnetic mineralogy, magnetic concentration and magnetic grain size distribution of Jiaxian Red Clay with multimagnetic methods. Our results indicate that the magnetic properties of Jiaxian Red Clay are similar to those of the Quaternary loess-palaeosol sequences, and ultrafine ferrimagnetic grains produced during pedogenesis are responsible for an increase in susceptibility, therefore the χ enhancement mechanism of Red Clay is similar to that of the overlying loess-palaeosol sequences. This paper explores χ variations in the Red Clay sequence through spatial and temporal analysis. The susceptibility variation of six sites along a NNE to SSW transect correlate to palaeoclimatic cycles, so χ can be used to trace the summer palaeomonsoon intensity from a spatial perspective. However, a simple loess-derived calibration function cannot be used to quantitative reconstruct the palaeomonsoon intensity variations thought time. An adjusted calibration function for palaeosols from Red Clay sequence needs to be developed, so that χ can be used to quantitative reconstruct palaeomonsoon intensity. Further study is necessary to develop such a transfer function.

  5. Cosmological Constraints from the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladders, Michael D.; Yee, H. K. C.; Majumdar, Subhabrata; Barrientos, L. Felipe; Hoekstra, Henk; Hall, Patrick B.; Infante, Leopoldo

    2007-01-01

    We present a first cosmological analysis of a refined cluster catalog from the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS). The input cluster sample is derived from the deepest 72.07 deg2 of the RCS images, which probe to the highest redshift and lowest mass limits. The catalog contains 956 clusters over 0.35

  6. THE WiggleZ DARK ENERGY SURVEY: GALAXY EVOLUTION AT 0.25 {<=} z {<=} 0.75 USING THE SECOND RED-SEQUENCE CLUSTER SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Li, I. H.; Blake, Chris; Contreras, Carlos; Couch, Warrick J.; Glazebrook, Karl; Yee, H. K. C.; Brough, Sarah; Colless, Matthew; Croom, Scott M.; Jelliffe, Ben; Davis, Tamara; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Forster, Karl; Martin, D. Christopher; Gilbank, David G.; Gladders, M. G.; Hsieh, Bau-ching; Jurek, Russell J.; Madore, Barry; Pimbblet, Kevin; and others

    2012-03-10

    We study the evolution of galaxy populations around the spectroscopic WiggleZ sample of star-forming galaxies at 0.25 {<=} z {<=} 0.75 using the photometric catalog from the Second Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS2). We probe the optical photometric properties of the net excess neighbor galaxies. The key concept is that the marker galaxies and their neighbors are located at the same redshift, providing a sample of galaxies representing a complete census of galaxies in the neighborhood of star-forming galaxies. The results are compared with those using the RCS WiggleZ Spare-Fibre (RCS-WSF) sample as markers, representing galaxies in cluster environments at 0.25 {<=} z {<=} 0.45. By analyzing the stacked color-color properties of the WiggleZ neighbor galaxies, we find that their optical colors are not a strong function of indicators of star-forming activities such as EW([O II]) or Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) near-UV luminosity of the markers. The galaxies around the WiggleZ markers exhibit a bimodal distribution on the color-magnitude diagram, with most of them located in the blue cloud. The optical galaxy luminosity functions (GLFs) of the blue neighbor galaxies have a faint-end slope {alpha} of {approx} - 1.3, similar to that for galaxies in cluster environments drawn from the RCS-WSF sample. The faint-end slope of the GLF for the red neighbors, however, is {approx} - 0.4, significantly shallower than the {approx} - 0.7 found for those in cluster environments. This suggests that the buildup of the faint end of the red sequence in cluster environments is in a significantly more advanced stage than that in the star-forming and lower galaxy density WiggleZ neighborhoods. We find that the red galaxy fraction (f{sub red}) around the star-forming WiggleZ galaxies has similar values from z {approx} 0.3 to z {approx} 0.6 with f{sub red} {approx} 0.28, but drops to f{sub red} {approx} 0.20 at z {approx}> 0.7. This change of f{sub red} with redshift suggests that there

  7. Fainting Starting Parenteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Pederiva, Federica; Barbi, Egidio; Zennaro, Floriana; Neri, Elena

    2015-09-01

    Complications such as mechanical accidents, infections, and thrombosis are commonly described in the presence of a central venous catheter. We present a case of a boy who had fainting episodes due to dislocation of a central venous catheter. PMID:25853719

  8. Galaxy Zoo Hubble: First results of the redshift evolution of disk fraction in the red sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, Melanie; Willett, Kyle; Fortson, Lucy; Scarlata, Claudia; Beck, Melanie; Masters, Karen; Melvin, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The transition of galaxies from the blue cloud to the red sequence is commonly linked to a morphological transformation from disk to elliptical structure. However, the correlation between color and morphology is not one-to-one, as evidenced by the existence of a significant population of red disks. As this stage in a galaxy's evolution is likely to be transitory, the mechanism by which red disks are formed offers insight to the processes that trigger quenching of star formation and the galaxy's position on the star-forming sequence. To study the population of disk galaxies in the red sequence as a function of cosmic time, we utilize data from the Galaxy Zoo: Hubble project, which uses crowdsourced visual classifications of images of galaxies selected from the AEGIS, COSMOS, GEMS, and GOODS surveys. We construct a large sample of over 10,000 disk galaxies spanning a wide (0 < z < 1.0) redshift range. We use this sample to examine the change in the fraction of disks in the red sequence with respect to all disks from z˜1 to the present day. Preliminary results confirm that the fraction of disks in the red sequence decreases as the Universe evolves. We discuss the quenching processes which may explain this trend, and which morphological transformations are most affected by it.

  9. Evolution of Group Galaxies from the First Red-Sequence Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, I. H.; Yee, H. K. C.; Hsieh, B. C.; Gladders, M.

    2012-04-01

    We study the evolution of the red-galaxy fraction (f red) in 905 galaxy groups with 0.15 <= z < 0.52. The galaxy groups are identified by the "probability friends-of-friends" algorithm from the first Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS1) photometric-redshift sample. There is a high degree of uniformity in the properties of the red sequence of the group galaxies, indicating that the luminous red-sequence galaxies in the groups are already in place by z ~ 0.5 and that they have a formation epoch of z >~ 2. In general, groups at lower redshifts exhibit larger f red than those at higher redshifts, showing a group Butcher-Oemler effect. We investigate the evolution of f red by examining its dependence on four parameters, one of which can be classified as intrinsic and three of which can be classified as environmental: galaxy stellar mass (M *), total group stellar mass (M *, grp, a proxy for group halo mass), normalized group-centric radius (r grp), and local galaxy density (Σ5). We find that M * is the dominant parameter such that there is a strong correlation between f red and galaxy stellar mass. Furthermore, the dependence of f red on the environmental parameters is also a strong function of M *. Massive galaxies (M * >~ 1011 M ⊙) show little dependence of f red on r grp, M *, grp, and Σ5 over the redshift range. The dependence of f red on these parameters is primarily seen for galaxies with lower masses, especially for M * <~ 1010.6 M ⊙. We observe an apparent "group down-sizing" effect, in that galaxies in lower-mass halos, after controlling for galaxy stellar mass, have lower f red. We find a dependence of f red on both r grp and Σ5 after the other parameters are controlled. At a fixed r grp, there is a significant dependence of f red on Σ5, while r grp gradients of f red are seen for galaxies in similar Σ5 regions. This indicates that galaxy group environment has a residual effect over that of local galaxy density (or vice versa), and both parameters need

  10. Probing the Deep End of the Milky Way with Kepler: Asteroseismic Analysis of 854 Faint Red Giants Misclassified as Cool Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, S.; García, R. A.; Huber, D.; Regulo, C.; Stello, D.; Beck, P. G.; Houmani, K.; Salabert, D.

    2016-08-01

    Asteroseismology has proven to be an excellent tool to determine not only global stellar properties with good precision, but also to infer the stellar structure, dynamics, and evolution for a large sample of Kepler stars. Prior to the launch of the mission, the properties of Kepler targets were inferred from broadband photometry, leading to the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). The KIC was later revised in the Kepler Star Properties Catalog, based on literature values and an asteroseismic analysis of stars that were unclassified in the KIC. Here, we present an asteroseismic analysis of 45,400 stars that were classified as dwarfs in the Kepler Star Properties Catalog. We found that around 2% of the sample shows acoustic modes in the typical frequency range that put them in the red-giant category rather than the cool dwarf category. We analyze the asteroseismic properties of these stars, derive their surface gravities, masses, and radii, and present updated effective temperatures and distances. We show that the sample is significantly fainter than the previously known oscillating giants in the Kepler field, with the faintest stars reaching down to a Kepler magnitude of Kp ˜ 16. We demonstrate that 404 stars are at distances beyond 5 kpc and that the stars are significantly less massive than for the original Kepler red-giant sample, consistent with a population of distant halo giants. A comparison with a galactic population model shows that up to 40 stars might be genuine halo giants, which would increase the number of known asteroseismic halo stars by a factor of 4. The detections presented here will provide a valuable sample for galactic archeology studies.

  11. Evidence for the Universality of Properties of Red-sequence Galaxies in X-Ray- and Red-Sequence-Selected Clusters at z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foltz, R.; Rettura, A.; Wilson, G.; van der Burg, R. F. J.; Muzzin, A.; Lidman, C.; Demarco, R.; Nantais, Julie; DeGroot, A.; Yee, H.

    2015-10-01

    We study the slope, intercept, and scatter of the color-magnitude and color-mass relations for a sample of 10 infrared red-sequence-selected clusters at z ˜ 1. The quiescent galaxies in these clusters formed the bulk of their stars above z ≳ 3 with an age spread Δt ≳ 1 Gyr. We compare UVJ color-color and spectroscopic-based galaxy selection techniques, and find a 15% difference in the galaxy populations classified as quiescent by these methods. We compare the color-magnitude relations from our red-sequence selected sample with X-ray- and photometric-redshift-selected cluster samples of similar mass and redshift. Within uncertainties, we are unable to detect any difference in the ages and star formation histories of quiescent cluster members in clusters selected by different methods, suggesting that the dominant quenching mechanism is insensitive to cluster baryon partitioning at z ˜ 1.

  12. Cyclostratigraphy for Chinese red clay sequences: Implications to changing previous age models and paleoclimate interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, T.; Kravchinsky, V. A.; Zhang, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Chinese Loess Plateau contains red clay sequence which has continuous alternation of sedimentary cycles with recurrent paleoclimatic fluctuations. Absence of abundant fossils and inability of radiometric dating method made magnetostratigraphy a leading method to build age model for the red clay. Here magnetostratigraphic age model in red clay sequence is tested using cyclostratigraphy as orbital parameters of Earth are known. Milankovitch periodicities recorded in magnetic susceptibility and grain size in the Shilou red clay section are investigated and previously found age of 11 Ma for this section is re-evaluated. Magnetostratigraphy dating based on only visual correlation could potentially lead to erroneous age model. In this study the correlation is executed through the iteration procedure until it is supported by cyclostratigraphy; i.e. Milankovitch cycles are resolved in the best possible manner. Our new approach provides an age of 5.2 Ma for the Shilou profile. Wavelet analysis reveals that a 400 kyr eccentricity cycle is well preserved and the existence of a 100 kyr eccentricity in the red clay sequence on the eastern Chinese Loess Plateau suggests that eccentricity plays a vital role in Pliocene climate evolution. Paleomonsoon evolution is reconstructed and divided into three intervals (5.2-4.5 Ma, 4.5-3.6 Ma and 3.6-2.58 Ma). The earliest stage indicates that summer and winter monsoon cycles may rapidly alter, whereas the middle stage reflects an intensification of winter monsoon and aridification in Asia, and the youngest stage is characterized by relatively intensified summer monsoon. This study demonstrates that cyclostratigraphy can greatly assist magnetostratigraphy in dating the red clay sequences, and implies that many published age models for the red clay sequences should likely be re-assessed where possible. An evaluation of the monsoon system and climate change in eastern Asia might prominently benefit from this approach.

  13. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Tibetan red fox (Vulpes vulpes montana).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Honghai; Zhao, Chao; Chen, Lei; Sha, Weilai; Liu, Guangshuai

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of the Tibetan red fox (Vulpes Vulpes montana) was sequenced for the first time using blood samples obtained from a wild female red fox captured from Lhasa in Tibet, China. Qinghai--Tibet Plateau is the highest plateau in the world with an average elevation above 3500 m. Sequence analysis showed it contains 12S rRNA gene, 16S rRNA gene, 22 tRNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes and 1 control region (CR). The variable tandem repeats in CR is the main reason of the length variability of mitochondrial genome among canide animals. PMID:24456141

  14. Sequence divergence of the red and green visual pigments in great apes and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Deeb, S S; Jorgensen, A L; Battisti, L; Iwasaki, L; Motulsky, A G

    1994-01-01

    We have determined the coding sequences of red and green visual pigment genes of the chimpanzee, gorilla, and orangutan. The deduced amino acid sequences of these pigments are highly homologous to the equivalent human pigments. None of the amino acid differences occurred at sites that were previously shown to influence pigment absorption characteristics. Therefore, we predict the spectra of red and green pigments of the apes to have wavelengths of maximum absorption that differ by < 2 nm from the equivalent human pigments and that color vision in these nonhuman primates will be very similar, if not identical, to that in humans. A total of 14 within-species polymorphisms (6 involving silent substitutions) were observed in the coding sequences of the red and green pigment genes of the great apes. Remarkably, the polymorphisms at 6 of these sites had been observed in human populations, suggesting that they predated the evolution of higher primates. Alleles at polymorphic sites were often shared between the red and green pigment genes. The average synonymous rate of divergence of red from green sequences was approximately 1/10th that estimated for other proteins of higher primates, indicating the involvement of gene conversion in generating these polymorphisms. The high degree of homology and juxtaposition of these two genes on the X chromosome has promoted unequal recombination and/or gene conversion that led to sequence homogenization. However, natural selection operated to maintain the degree of separation in peak absorbance between the red and green pigments that resulted in optimal chromatic discrimination. This represents a unique case of molecular coevolution between two homologous genes that functionally interact at the behavioral level. PMID:8041777

  15. The complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of Red clover vein mosaic virus (genus Carlavirus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover vein mosaic virus (RCVMV) is a serious pathogen of legume crops including pea, chickpea and lentil. The complete nucleotide sequence was generated from an isolate obtained from chickpea in Washington State. The complete genome of RCVMV consists of 8605 nucleotides excluding the poly(A) ...

  16. EVOLUTION OF GROUP GALAXIES FROM THE FIRST RED-SEQUENCE CLUSTER SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Li, I. H.; Yee, H. K. C.; Hsieh, B. C.; Gladders, M. E-mail: hyee@astro.utoronto.ca E-mail: gladders@oddjob.uchicago.edu

    2012-04-20

    We study the evolution of the red-galaxy fraction (f{sub red}) in 905 galaxy groups with 0.15 {<=} z < 0.52. The galaxy groups are identified by the 'probability friends-of-friends' algorithm from the first Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS1) photometric-redshift sample. There is a high degree of uniformity in the properties of the red sequence of the group galaxies, indicating that the luminous red-sequence galaxies in the groups are already in place by z {approx} 0.5 and that they have a formation epoch of z {approx}> 2. In general, groups at lower redshifts exhibit larger f{sub red} than those at higher redshifts, showing a group Butcher-Oemler effect. We investigate the evolution of f{sub red} by examining its dependence on four parameters, one of which can be classified as intrinsic and three of which can be classified as environmental: galaxy stellar mass (M{sub *}), total group stellar mass (M{sub *,grp}, a proxy for group halo mass), normalized group-centric radius (r{sub grp}), and local galaxy density ({Sigma}{sub 5}). We find that M{sub *} is the dominant parameter such that there is a strong correlation between f{sub red} and galaxy stellar mass. Furthermore, the dependence of f{sub red} on the environmental parameters is also a strong function of M{sub *}. Massive galaxies (M{sub *} {approx}> 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }) show little dependence of f{sub red} on r{sub grp}, M{sub *,grp}, and {Sigma}{sub 5} over the redshift range. The dependence of f{sub red} on these parameters is primarily seen for galaxies with lower masses, especially for M{sub *} {approx}< 10{sup 10.6} M{sub Sun }. We observe an apparent 'group down-sizing' effect, in that galaxies in lower-mass halos, after controlling for galaxy stellar mass, have lower f{sub red}. We find a dependence of f{sub red} on both r{sub grp} and {Sigma}{sub 5} after the other parameters are controlled. At a fixed r{sub grp}, there is a significant dependence of f{sub red} on {Sigma}{sub 5}, while r{sub grp

  17. RED-SEQUENCE GALAXIES AT HIGH REDSHIFT BY THE COMBO-17+4 SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, Marie-Helene; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Wolf, Christian; Tapken, Christian E-mail: meise@mpia.de E-mail: ctapken@aip.de

    2011-01-20

    We investigate the evolution of the galaxy population since redshift 2 with a focus on the color bimodality and mass density of the red sequence. We obtain precise and reliable photometric redshifts up to z = 2 by supplementing the optical survey COMBO-17 with observations in four near-infrared bands on 0.2 deg{sup 2} of the COMBO-17 A901-field. Our results are based on an H-band-selected catalog of 10,692 galaxies complete to H = 21fm7. We measure the rest-frame color (U{sub 280}-V) of each galaxy, which across the redshift range of our interest requires no extrapolation and is robust against moderate redshift errors by staying clear of the 4000 A break. We measure the color-magnitude relation of the red sequence as a function of look-back time from the peak in a color-error-weighted histogram, and thus trace the galaxy bimodality out to z {approx_equal} 1.65. The (U{sub 280}-V) of the red sequence is found to evolve almost linearly with look-back time. At high redshift, we find massive galaxies in both the red and the blue population. Red-sequence galaxies with log M{sub *}/M{sub sun}>11 increase in mass density by a factor of {approx}4 from z {approx} 2 to 1 and remain nearly constant at z < 1. However, some galaxies as massive as log M{sub *}/M{sub sun} = 11.5 are already in place at z {approx} 2.

  18. The first symbiont-free genome sequence of marine red alga, Susabi-nori (Pyropia yezoensis).

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yoji; Sasaki, Naobumi; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Ojima, Nobuhiko; Yasuike, Motoshige; Shigenobu, Yuya; Satomi, Masataka; Fukuma, Yoshiya; Shiwaku, Koji; Tsujimoto, Atsumi; Kobayashi, Takanori; Nakayama, Ichiro; Ito, Fuminari; Nakajima, Kazuhiro; Sano, Motohiko; Wada, Tokio; Kuhara, Satoru; Inouye, Kiyoshi; Gojobori, Takashi; Ikeo, Kazuho

    2013-01-01

    Nori, a marine red alga, is one of the most profitable mariculture crops in the world. However, the biological properties of this macroalga are poorly understood at the molecular level. In this study, we determined the draft genome sequence of susabi-nori (Pyropia yezoensis) using next-generation sequencing platforms. For sequencing, thalli of P. yezoensis were washed to remove bacteria attached on the cell surface and enzymatically prepared as purified protoplasts. The assembled contig size of the P. yezoensis nuclear genome was approximately 43 megabases (Mb), which is an order of magnitude smaller than the previously estimated genome size. A total of 10,327 gene models were predicted and about 60% of the genes validated lack introns and the other genes have shorter introns compared to large-genome algae, which is consistent with the compact size of the P. yezoensis genome. A sequence homology search showed that 3,611 genes (35%) are functionally unknown and only 2,069 gene groups are in common with those of the unicellular red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae. As color trait determinants of red algae, light-harvesting genes involved in the phycobilisome were predicted from the P. yezoensis nuclear genome. In particular, we found a second homolog of phycobilisome-degradation gene, which is usually chloroplast-encoded, possibly providing a novel target for color fading of susabi-nori in aquaculture. These findings shed light on unexplained features of macroalgal genes and genomes, and suggest that the genome of P. yezoensis is a promising model genome of marine red algae. PMID:23536760

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Uncultured SAR324 Bacterium lautmerah10, Binned from a Red Sea Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Luke R.

    2016-01-01

    A draft genome of SAR324 bacterium lautmerah10 was assembled from a metagenome of a surface water sample from the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia. The genome is more complete and has a higher G+C content than that of previously sequenced SAR324 representatives. Its genomic information shows a versatile metabolism that confers an advantage to SAR324, which is reflected in its distribution throughout different depths of the marine water column. PMID:26868398

  20. Alignment of Red-Sequence Cluster Dwarf Galaxies: From the Frontier Fields to the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkhouse, Wayne Alan; Archer, Haylee; Burgad, Jaford; Foote, Gregory; Rude, Cody; Lopez-Cruz, Omar

    2015-08-01

    Galaxy clusters are the largest virialized structures in the universe. Due to their high density and mass, they are an excellent laboratory for studying the environmental effects on galaxy evolution. Numerical simulations have predicted that tidal torques acting on dwarf galaxies as they fall into the cluster environment will cause the major axis of the galaxies to align with their radial position vector (a line that extends from the cluster center to the galaxy's center). We have undertaken a study to measure the redshift evolution of the alignment of red-sequence cluster dwarf galaxies based on a sample of 57 low-redshift Abell clusters imaged at KPNO using the 0.9-meter telescope, and 64 clusters from the WINGS dataset. To supplement our low-redshift sample, we have included galaxies selected from the Hubble Space Telescope Frontier fields. Leveraging the HST data allows us to look for evolutionary changes in the alignment of red-sequence cluster dwarf galaxies over a redshift range of 0 < z < 0.35. The alignment of the major axis of the dwarf galaxies is measured by fitting a Sersic function to each red-sequence galaxy using GALFIT. The quality of each model is checked visually after subtracting the model from the galaxy. The cluster sample is then combined by scaling each cluster by r200. We present our preliminary results based on the alignment of the red-sequence dwarf galaxies with: 1) the major axis of the brightest cluster galaxy, 2) the major axis of the cluster defined by the position of cluster members, and 3) a radius vector pointing from the cluster center to individual dwarf galaxies. Our combined cluster sample is sub-divided into different radial regions and redshift bins.

  1. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of tarim red deer (Cervus elaphus yarkandensis).

    PubMed

    Shao, Yuanchen; Xing, Xiumei; Zha, Daiming; Yang, Fuhe

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the tarim red deer, Cervus elaphus yarkandensis, was determined by accurate polymerase chain reaction. The entire genome was 16,351 bp in length and contained 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and 1 control region, all of which were arranged in a typical vertebrate manner. The overall base composition of the northeast sika deer's mitochondrial genome was 33.3% of A, 24.4% of C, 28.9% of T and 13.4% of G. A termination-associated sequence and several conserved central sequence block domains were discovered within the control region. PMID:24438284

  2. Unmixing hysteresis loops of the late Miocene–early Pleistocene loess-red clay sequence

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Necula, Cristian; Heslop, David; Nie, Junsheng

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic paleoclimatic records often represent mixed environmental signals. Unmixing these signals may improve our understanding of the paleoenvironmental information contained within these records, but such a task is challenging. Here we report an example of numerical unmixing of magnetic hysteresis data obtained from Chinese loess and red clay sequences. We find that the mixed magnetic assemblages of the loess and red clay sediments both contain a component characterized by a narrow hysteresis loop, the abundance of which is positively correlated with magnetic susceptibility. This component has grain sizes close to the superparamagnetic/stable single domain boundary and is attributed to pedogenic activity. Furthermore, a wasp-waisted component is found in both the loess and red clay, however, the wasp-waisted form is more constricted in the red clay. We attribute this component to a mixture of detrital ferrimagnetic grains with pedogenic hematite. The abundance of this component decreases from the base to the top of the red clay, a pattern we attribute to decreased hematite production over the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) due to long-term climate cooling. This work demonstrates the potential of hysteresis loop unmixing to recover quantitative paleoclimatic information carried by both low and high coercivity magnetic minerals. PMID:27389499

  3. Unmixing hysteresis loops of the late Miocene-early Pleistocene loess-red clay sequence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Necula, Cristian; Heslop, David; Nie, Junsheng

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic paleoclimatic records often represent mixed environmental signals. Unmixing these signals may improve our understanding of the paleoenvironmental information contained within these records, but such a task is challenging. Here we report an example of numerical unmixing of magnetic hysteresis data obtained from Chinese loess and red clay sequences. We find that the mixed magnetic assemblages of the loess and red clay sediments both contain a component characterized by a narrow hysteresis loop, the abundance of which is positively correlated with magnetic susceptibility. This component has grain sizes close to the superparamagnetic/stable single domain boundary and is attributed to pedogenic activity. Furthermore, a wasp-waisted component is found in both the loess and red clay, however, the wasp-waisted form is more constricted in the red clay. We attribute this component to a mixture of detrital ferrimagnetic grains with pedogenic hematite. The abundance of this component decreases from the base to the top of the red clay, a pattern we attribute to decreased hematite production over the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) due to long-term climate cooling. This work demonstrates the potential of hysteresis loop unmixing to recover quantitative paleoclimatic information carried by both low and high coercivity magnetic minerals. PMID:27389499

  4. Unmixing hysteresis loops of the late Miocene–early Pleistocene loess-red clay sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Necula, Cristian; Heslop, David; Nie, Junsheng

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic paleoclimatic records often represent mixed environmental signals. Unmixing these signals may improve our understanding of the paleoenvironmental information contained within these records, but such a task is challenging. Here we report an example of numerical unmixing of magnetic hysteresis data obtained from Chinese loess and red clay sequences. We find that the mixed magnetic assemblages of the loess and red clay sediments both contain a component characterized by a narrow hysteresis loop, the abundance of which is positively correlated with magnetic susceptibility. This component has grain sizes close to the superparamagnetic/stable single domain boundary and is attributed to pedogenic activity. Furthermore, a wasp-waisted component is found in both the loess and red clay, however, the wasp-waisted form is more constricted in the red clay. We attribute this component to a mixture of detrital ferrimagnetic grains with pedogenic hematite. The abundance of this component decreases from the base to the top of the red clay, a pattern we attribute to decreased hematite production over the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) due to long-term climate cooling. This work demonstrates the potential of hysteresis loop unmixing to recover quantitative paleoclimatic information carried by both low and high coercivity magnetic minerals.

  5. Sequencing and de novo assembly of the red cusk-eel (Genypterus chilensis) transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Aedo, J E; Maldonado, J; Estrada, J M; Fuentes, E N; Silva, H; Gallardo-Escarate, C; Molina, A; Valdés, J A

    2014-12-01

    The red cusk-eel (Genypterus chilensis) is an endemic fish species distributed along the coasts of the Eastern South Pacific. Biological studies on this fish are scarce, and genomic information for G. chilensis is practically non-existent. Thus, transcriptome information for this species is an essential resource that will greatly enrich molecular information and benefit future studies of red cusk-eel biology. In this work, we obtained transcriptome information of G. chilensis using the Illumina platform. The RNA sequencing generated 66,307,362 and 59,925,554 paired-end reads from skeletal muscle and liver tissues, respectively. De novo assembly using the CLC Genomic Workbench version 7.0.3 produced 48,480 contigs and created a reference transcriptome with a N50 of 846bp and average read coverage of 28.3×. By sequence similarity search for known proteins, a total of 21,272 (43.9%) contigs were annotated for their function. Out of these annotated contigs, 33.5% GO annotation results for biological processes, 32.6% GO annotation results for cellular components and 34.5% GO annotation results for molecular functions. This dataset represents the first transcriptomic resource for the red cusk-eel and for a member of the Ophidiimorpharia taxon. PMID:25139027

  6. Recent Galaxy Mergers and Residual Star Formation of Red Sequence Galaxies in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Ree, Chang H.; Jaffé, Yara; Demarco, Ricardo; Treister, Ezequiel

    2016-08-01

    This study explored the Galaxy Evolution Explorer ultraviolet (UV) properties of optical red sequence galaxies in four rich Abell clusters at z≤slant 0.1. In particular, we tried to find a hint of merger-induced recent star formation (RSF) in red sequence galaxies. Using the NUV - r\\prime colors of the galaxies, RSF fractions were derived based on various criteria for post-merger galaxies and normal galaxies. Following k-correction, about 36% of the post-merger galaxies were classified as RSF galaxies with a conservative criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5), and that number was doubled (∼72%) when using a generous criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5.4). The trend was the same when we restricted the sample to galaxies within 0.5 × R 200. Post-merger galaxies with strong UV emission showed more violent, asymmetric features in the deep optical images. The RSF fractions did not show any trend along the clustocentric distance within R 200. We performed a Dressler–Shectman test to check whether the RSF galaxies had any correlation with the substructures in the galaxy clusters. Within R 200 of each cluster, the RSF galaxies did not appear to be preferentially related to the clusters’ substructures. Our results suggested that only 30% of RSF red sequence galaxies show morphological hints of recent galaxy mergers. This implies that internal processes (e.g., stellar mass loss or hot gas cooling) for the supply of cold gas to early-type galaxies may play a significant role in the residual star formation of early-type galaxies at a recent epoch.

  7. Recent Galaxy Mergers and Residual Star Formation of Red Sequence Galaxies in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Ree, Chang H.; Jaffé, Yara; Demarco, Ricardo; Treister, Ezequiel

    2016-08-01

    This study explored the Galaxy Evolution Explorer ultraviolet (UV) properties of optical red sequence galaxies in four rich Abell clusters at z≤slant 0.1. In particular, we tried to find a hint of merger-induced recent star formation (RSF) in red sequence galaxies. Using the NUV - r\\prime colors of the galaxies, RSF fractions were derived based on various criteria for post-merger galaxies and normal galaxies. Following k-correction, about 36% of the post-merger galaxies were classified as RSF galaxies with a conservative criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5), and that number was doubled (˜72%) when using a generous criterion (NUV - r\\prime ≤slant 5.4). The trend was the same when we restricted the sample to galaxies within 0.5 × R 200. Post-merger galaxies with strong UV emission showed more violent, asymmetric features in the deep optical images. The RSF fractions did not show any trend along the clustocentric distance within R 200. We performed a Dressler–Shectman test to check whether the RSF galaxies had any correlation with the substructures in the galaxy clusters. Within R 200 of each cluster, the RSF galaxies did not appear to be preferentially related to the clusters’ substructures. Our results suggested that only 30% of RSF red sequence galaxies show morphological hints of recent galaxy mergers. This implies that internal processes (e.g., stellar mass loss or hot gas cooling) for the supply of cold gas to early-type galaxies may play a significant role in the residual star formation of early-type galaxies at a recent epoch.

  8. Detection of sequence polymorphisms in red junglefowl and White Leghorn ESTs.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimmons, C J; Savolainen, P; Amini, B; Hjälm, G; Lundeberg, J; Andersson, L

    2004-10-01

    Over 16,000 high quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from red junglefowl (RJ) and White Leghorn (WL) brain and testis cDNA libraries were generated. Here, we have used this resource for detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and also completed full-length sequencing of 46 pairs of clones, representing the same gene from both the RJ and WL libraries. From the main set of ESTs, which were assembled using Phrap, 746 putative SNPs were identified, of which 76% were transitions and 24% were transversions. A subset of SNPs was evaluated by sequence analysis of five RJ and five WL birds. Nine of 12 SNPs were verified in this limited sample, suggesting that a majority of the putative polymorphisms documented in this study represent real SNPs. During full-length sequencing of the 46 RJ/WL clones 100 SNPs were identified, which translated to a frequency of 1.90 SNPs/1000 bp. The number of transitions and transversions were 77% and 23%, respectively, and the proportion of non-synonymous vs. synonymous SNPs was 20% and 80%, respectively. Four large insertions/deletions were identified between the RJ and WL full-length sequences, and they appear to represent different splice variants. PMID:15373743

  9. THE MID-INFRARED AND NEAR-ULTRAVIOLET EXCESS EMISSIONS OF QUIESCENT GALAXIES ON THE RED SEQUENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Jongwan; Lee, Jong Chul; Hwang, Ho Seong; Sohn, Young-Jong

    2013-04-10

    We study the mid-infrared (IR) and near-ultraviolet (UV) excess emissions of spectroscopically selected quiescent galaxies on the optical red sequence. We use the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mid-IR and Galaxy Evolution Explorer near-UV data for a spectroscopic sample of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 to study the possible connection between quiescent red-sequence galaxies with and without mid-IR/near-UV excess. Among 648 12 {mu}m detected quiescent red-sequence galaxies without H{alpha} emission, 26% and 55% show near-UV and mid-IR excess emissions, respectively. When we consider only bright (M{sub r} < -21.5) galaxies with an early-type morphology, the fraction of galaxies with recent star formation is still 39%. The quiescent red-sequence galaxies with mid-IR and near-UV excess emissions are optically fainter and have slightly smaller D{sub n} 4000 than those without mid-IR and near-UV excess emissions. We also find that mid-IR weighted mean stellar ages of quiescent red-sequence galaxies with mid-IR excess are larger than those with near-UV excess, and smaller than those without mid-IR and near-UV excess. The environmental dependence of the fraction of quiescent red-sequence galaxies with mid-IR and near-UV excess seems strong even though the trends of quiescent red-sequence galaxies with near-UV excess differ from those with mid-IR excess. These results indicate that the recent star formation traced by near-UV ({approx}< 1 Gyr) and mid-IR ({approx}< 2 Gyr) excess is not negligible among nearby, quiescent, red, early-type galaxies. We suggest a possible evolutionary scenario of quiescent red-sequence galaxies from quiescent red-sequence galaxies with near-UV excess to those with mid-IR excess to those without near-UV and mid-IR excess.

  10. Red Sea isolation history suggested by Plio-Pleistocene seismic reflection sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Neil C.; Ligi, Marco; Rohling, Eelco J.

    2015-11-01

    High evaporation rates in the desert climate of the Red Sea ensure that, during glacial sea level lowstands when water exchange with the Indian Ocean was more restricted, water salinity and δ18 O became unusually extreme. Modeling of the effect on Red Sea sedimentary δ18 O has been used previously to reconstruct relative sea level to 500 ka and now poses the question of whether that sea-level model could be extended if continuous core material of older sediment became available. We attempt to address this question here by examining seismic reflection data. The upper Pleistocene hemipelagic sediments in the Red Sea contain intervals of inorganic aragonite precipitated during supersaturated conditions of sea-level lowstands. Seismic impedance changes associated with boundaries to those aragonite-rich layers appear to explain seismic reflection sequences. A segment of Chirp sediment profiler data from the central Red Sea reveals prominent reflections at ∼1, ∼5, ∼23, ∼26 and ∼36 ms two-way travel time (TWT) from the seabed. Based on depths to the glacial marine isotope stages (MIS) in cores, we relate the upper three reflections to the tops of aragonite-rich layers and hence the sea level rises immediately following MIS 2, 6 and 12. The reflection at 26 ms is related to an unusually rapid fall into MIS 12 predicted by one sea level reconstruction, which may have created an abrupt lower boundary to the MIS 12 aragonite-rich layer. With the aid of seismogram modeling, we tentatively associate the ∼36 ms reflection with the top of an aragonite-rich layer formed during MIS 16. Furthermore, some segments of lower frequency (airgun and sparker) seismic data from the central and southern Red Sea show a lower (earlier) Plio-Pleistocene (PP) interval that is less reflective than the upper (late) PP interval. This implies less variability in sediment impedance and that extreme variability in water salinity did not develop; water exchange with the Indian Ocean

  11. A study on the multicolour evolution of red-sequence galaxy populations: insights from hydrodynamical simulations and semi-analytical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, A. D.; Kang, Xi; Contini, E.; Sommer-Larsen, J.; Fassbender, R.; Napolitano, N. R.; Antonuccio-Delogu, V.; Gavignaud, I.

    2015-09-01

    Context. By means of our own cosmological-hydrodynamical simulation (SIM) and semi-analytical model (SAM), we studied galaxy population properties in clusters and groups, spanning over ten different bands from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared (NIR), and their evolution since redshift z = 2. Aims: We compare our results in terms of red/blue galaxy fractions and of the luminous-to-faint ratio (LFR) on the red sequence (RS) with recent observational data reaching beyond z = 1.5. Methods: Different selection criteria were tested to retrieve the galaxies that effectively belong to the RS: either by their quiescence degree measured from their specific star formation rate (sSFR; the so-called "dead sequence"), or by their position in a colour-colour plane, which is also a function of sSFR. In both cases, the colour cut and the lower limit magnitude thresholds were let to evolve with redshift so that they would follow the natural shift of the characteristic luminosity in the luminosity function (LF). Results: We find that the Butcher-Oemler effect is wavelength-dependent, with the fraction of blue galaxies increasing more steeply in optical-optical than in NIR-optical colours. Moreover, a steep trend in the blue fraction can only be reproduced when an optically fixed luminosity-selected sample is chosen, while the trend flattens when selecting samples by stellar mass or by an evolving magnitude limit. We also find that the RS-LFR behaviour, highly debated in the literature, is strongly dependent on the galaxy selection function: in particular, the very mild evolution that is recovered when using a mass-selected galaxy sample agrees with values reported for some of the highest redshift-confirmed (proto)clusters. For differences that are attributable to environments, we find that normal groups and (to a lesser extent) cluster outskirts present the highest values of both the star-forming fraction and LFR at low z, while fossil groups and cluster cores have the lowest

  12. First ancient DNA sequences from the Late Pleistocene red deer (Cervus elaphus) in the Crimea, Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanković, Ana; Nadachowski, Adam; Doan, Karolina; Stefaniak, Krzysztof; Baca, Mateusz; Socha, Paweł; Wegleński, Piotr; Ridush, Bogdan

    2010-05-01

    The Late Pleistocene has been a period of significant population and species turnover and extinctions among the large mammal fauna. Massive climatic and environmental changes during Pleistocene significantly influenced the distribution and also genetic diversity of plants and animals. The model of glacial refugia and habitat contraction to southern peninsulas in Europe as areas for the survival of temperate animal species during unfavourable Pleistocene glaciations is at present widely accepted. However, both molecular data and the fossil record indicate the presence of northern and perhaps north-eastern refugia in Europe. In recent years, much new palaeontological data have been obtained in the Crimean Peninsula, Ukraine, following extensive investigations. The red deer (Cervus elaphus) samples for aDNA studies were collected in Emine-Bair-Khosar Cave, situated on the north edge of Lower Plateau of the Chatyrdag Massif (Crimean Mountains). The cave is a vertical shaft, which functioned as a huge mega-trap over a long period of time (probably most of the Pleistocene). The bone assemblages provided about 5000 bones belonging to more than 40 species. The C. elaphus bones were collected from three different stratigraphical levels, radiocarbon dated by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) method. The bone fragments of four specimens of red deer were used for the DNA isolation and analysis. The mtDNA (Cytochome b) was successfully isolated from three bone fragments and the cytochrome b sequences were amplified by multiplex PCR. The sequences obtained so far allowed for the reconstruction of only preliminary phylogenetic trees. A fragment of metatarsus from level dated to ca. 48,500±2,000 years BP, yielded a sequence of 513 bp, allowing to locate the specimen on the phylogenetic tree within modern C. elaphus specimens from southern and middle Europe. The second bone fragment, a fragment of mandible, collected from level dated approximately to ca. 33,500±400 years BP

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Colletotrichum falcatum - A Prelude on Screening of Red Rot Pathogen in Sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Rasappa; Prasanth, Chandrasekaran Naveen; Malathi, Palaniyandi; Sundar, Amalraj Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum falcatum, a concealed fungal ascomycete causes red rot, which is a serious disease in sugarcane. It infects economically important stalk tissues, considered as store house of sugar in sugarcane. The study is to find genetic complexities of C. falcatum in establishing this as a stalk infecting pathogen and to decipher the unique lifestyle of this pathogen using NGS technology. We report the draft genome of C. falcatum of about 48.16 Mb in size with 12,270 genes. The genome sequences were compared with other fungal species which revealed that C. falcatum is closely related to C. graminicola and C.sublineola the causal organisms of anthracnose in maize and sorghum. These results brought a new revelation to explore the lifestyle of this unique pathogen which is specialized to infect sugarcane stalk tissues in detail. PMID:26958090

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Colletotrichum falcatum - A Prelude on Screening of Red Rot Pathogen in Sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Rasappa; Prasanth, Chandrasekaran Naveen; Malathi, Palaniyandi; Sundar, Amalraj Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum falcatum, a concealed fungal ascomycete causes red rot, which is a serious disease in sugarcane. It infects economically important stalk tissues, considered as store house of sugar in sugarcane. The study is to find genetic complexities of C. falcatum in establishing this as a stalk infecting pathogen and to decipher the unique lifestyle of this pathogen using NGS technology. We report the draft genome of C. falcatum of about 48.16 Mb in size with 12,270 genes. The genome sequences were compared with other fungal species which revealed that C. falcatum is closely related to C. graminicola and C.sublineola the causal organisms of anthracnose in maize and sorghum. These results brought a new revelation to explore the lifestyle of this unique pathogen which is specialized to infect sugarcane stalk tissues in detail. PMID:26958090

  15. A Photometric redshift galaxy catalog from the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Yee, H.K.C.; Lin, H.; Gladders, M.D.; /Carnegie Inst. Observ.

    2005-02-01

    The Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS) provides a large and deep photometric catalog of galaxies in the z' and R{sub c} bands for 90 square degrees of sky, and supplemental V and B data have been obtained for 33.6 deg{sup 2}. They compile a photometric redshift catalog from these 4-band data by utilizing the empirical quadratic polynomial photometric redshift fitting technique in combination with CNOC2 and GOODS/HDF-N redshift data. The training set includes 4924 spectral redshifts. The resulting catalog contains more than one million galaxies with photometric redshifts < 1.5 and R{sub c} < 24, giving an rms scatter {delta}({Delta}z) < 0.06 within the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.5 and {sigma}({Delta}z) < 0.11 for galaxies at 0.0 < z < 1.5. They describe the empirical quadratic polynomial photometric redshift fitting technique which they use to determine the relation between red-shift and photometry. A kd-tree algorithm is used to divide up the sample to improve the accuracy of the catalog. They also present a method for estimating the photometric redshift error for individual galaxies. They show that the redshift distribution of the sample is in excellent agreement with smaller and much deeper photometric and spectroscopic redshift surveys.

  16. Extracellular DNA amplicon sequencing reveals high levels of benthic eukaryotic diversity in the central Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Pearman, John K; Irigoien, Xabier; Carvalho, Susana

    2016-04-01

    The present study aims to characterize the benthic eukaryotic biodiversity patterns at a coarse taxonomic level in three areas of the central Red Sea (a lagoon, an offshore area in Thuwal and a shallow coastal area near Jeddah) based on extracellular DNA. High-throughput amplicon sequencing targeting the V9 region of the 18S rRNA gene was undertaken for 32 sediment samples. High levels of alpha-diversity were detected with 16,089 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) being identified. The majority of the OTUs were assigned to Metazoa (29.2%), Alveolata (22.4%) and Stramenopiles (17.8%). Stramenopiles (Diatomea) and Alveolata (Ciliophora) were frequent in a lagoon and in shallower coastal stations, whereas metazoans (Arthropoda: Maxillopoda) were dominant in deeper offshore stations. Only 24.6% of total OTUs were shared among all areas. Beta-diversity was generally lower between the lagoon and Jeddah (nearshore) than between either of those and the offshore area, suggesting a nearshore-offshore biodiversity gradient. The current approach allowed for a broad-range of benthic eukaryotic biodiversity to be analysed with significantly less labour than would be required by other traditional taxonomic approaches. Our findings suggest that next generation sequencing techniques have the potential to provide a fast and standardised screening of benthic biodiversity at large spatial and temporal scales. PMID:26525270

  17. High-Throughput Sequencing and De Novo Assembly of Red and Green Forms of the Perilla frutescens var. crispa Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Atsushi; Nakamura, Michimi; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Saito, Kazuki; Yamazaki, Mami

    2015-01-01

    Perilla frutescens var. crispa (Labiatae) has two chemo-varietal forms, i.e. red and green forms of perilla, that differ in the production of anthocyanins. To facilitate molecular biological and biochemical studies in perilla-specialized metabolism we used Illumina RNA-sequencing technology in our comprehensive comparison of the transcriptome map of the leaves of red and green forms of perilla. Sequencing generated over 1.2 billion short reads with an average length of 101 nt. De novo transcriptome assembly yielded 47,788 and 47,840 unigenes in the red and green forms of perilla plants, respectively. Comparison of the assembled unigenes and existing perilla cDNA sequences showed highly reliable alignment. All unigenes were annotated with gene ontology (GO) and Enzyme Commission numbers and entered into the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. We identified 68 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in red and green forms of perilla. GO enrichment analysis of the DEGs showed that genes involved in the anthocyanin metabolic process were enriched. Differential expression analysis revealed that the transcript level of anthocyanin biosynthetic unigenes encoding flavonoid 3’-hydroxylase, dihydroflavonol 4-reductase, and anthocyanidin synthase was significantly higher in red perilla, while the transcript level of unigenes encoding limonene synthase was significantly higher in green perilla. Our data serve as a basis for future research on perilla bio-engineering and provide a shortcut for the characterization of new functional genes in P. frutescens. PMID:26070213

  18. Kinematics of faint white dwarfs.

    PubMed

    Luyten, W J

    1978-10-01

    An analysis has been made for solar motion for 128 very faint white dwarfs of color class b or a. While about 40% of these stars may be high-velocity objects, it seems definitely indicated that the luminosity of all of them is considerably lower than that for the "normal" white dwarf of the same color. PMID:16592566

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Avian Paramyxovirus Strain APMV-6/red-crested pochard/Balkhash/5842/2013 from Kazakhstan

    PubMed Central

    Kydyrmanov, Aidyn; Seidalina, Aigerim; Jenckel, Maria; Starick, Elke; Grund, Christian; Asanova, Saule; Khan, Elizaveta; Daulbayeva, Klara; Kasymbekov, Yermukhammet; Zhumatov, Kainar; Sayatov, Marat; Beer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    An avian paramyxovirus 6 strain was isolated during a wild bird monitoring study in Kazakhstan in 2013. The virus was isolated from a wild duck red-crested pochard (Netta rufina) in southeastern Kazakhstan. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of the virus. PMID:26184926

  20. Survey on viral pathogens in wild red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in Germany with emphasis on parvoviruses and analysis of a DNA sequence from a red fox parvovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Truyen, U.; Müller, T.; Heidrich, R.; Tackmann, K.; Carmichael, L. E.

    1998-01-01

    The seroprevalence of canine parvovirus (CPV), canine distemper virus (CDV), canine adenovirus (CAV) and canine herpesvirus (CHV) infections in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) was determined in fox sera collected between 1991 and 1995. A total of 500 sera were selected and the seroprevalences were estimated to be 13% (65 of 500 sera) for CPV, 4.4% (17 of 383 sera) for CDV, 35% (17 of 485 sera) for CAV, and 0.4% (2 of 485 sera) for CHV, respectively. No statistically significant differences were observed between the two (rural and suburban) areas under study. Parvovirus DNA sequences were amplified from tissues of free-ranging foxes and compared to those of prototype viruses from dogs and cats. We report here a parvovirus sequence indicative of a true intermediate between the feline panleukopenia virus-like viruses and the canine parvovirus-like viruses. The red fox parvoviral sequence, therefore, appears to represent a link between those viral groups. The DNA sequence together with a significant seroprevalence of parvovirus infections in foxes supports the hypothesis that the sudden emergence of canine parvovirus in the domestic dog population may have involved the interspecies transmission between wild and domestic carnivores. PMID:9825797

  1. ON THE DEARTH OF COMPACT, MASSIVE, RED SEQUENCE GALAXIES IN THE LOCAL UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Edward N.; Franx, Marijn; Brinchmann, Jarle; Glazebrook, Karl; Van der Wel, Arjen; Van Dokkum, Pieter G

    2010-09-01

    We set out to test the claim that the recently identified population of compact, massive, and quiescent galaxies at z {approx} 2.3 must undergo significant size evolution to match the properties of galaxies found in the local universe. Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS; Data Release 7), we have conducted a search for local red sequence galaxies with sizes and masses comparable to those found at z {approx} 2.3. The SDSS spectroscopic target selection algorithm excludes high surface brightness objects; we show that this makes incompleteness a concern for such massive, compact galaxies, particularly for low redshifts (z {approx}< 0.05). We have identified 63 M{sub *}>10{sup 10.7} M{sub sun} ({approx}5 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}) red sequence galaxies at 0.066 < z{sub spec} < 0.12 which are smaller than the median size-mass relation by a factor of 2 or more. Consistent with expectations from the virial theorem, the median offset from the mass-velocity dispersion relation for these galaxies is 0.12 dex. We do not, however, find any galaxies with sizes and masses comparable to those observed at z {approx} 2.3, implying a decrease in the comoving number density of these galaxies, at fixed size and mass, by a factor of {approx}>5000. This result cannot be explained by incompleteness: in the 0.066 < z < 0.12 interval, we estimate that the SDSS spectroscopic sample should typically be {approx}>75% complete for galaxies with the sizes and masses seen at high redshift, although for the very smallest galaxies it may be as low as {approx}20%. In order to confirm that the absence of such compact massive galaxies in SDSS is not produced by spectroscopic selection effects, we have also looked for such galaxies in the basic SDSS photometric catalog, using photometric redshifts. While we do find signs of a slight bias against massive, compact galaxies, this analysis suggests that the SDSS spectroscopic sample is missing at most a few objects in the regime we consider

  2. THE RISE AND FALL OF PASSIVE DISK GALAXIES: MORPHOLOGICAL EVOLUTION ALONG THE RED SEQUENCE REVEALED BY COSMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Bundy, Kevin; Hopkins, Philip; Ma, Chung-Pei; Scarlata, Claudia; Capak, Peter; Carollo, C. M.; Oesch, Pascal; Ellis, Richard S.; Salvato, Mara; Scoville, Nick; Drory, Niv; Leauthaud, Alexie; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Murray, Norman; Ilbert, Olivier; Pozzetti, Lucia

    2010-08-20

    The increasing abundance of passive 'red-sequence' galaxies since z {approx} 1-2 is mirrored by a coincident rise in the number of galaxies with spheroidal morphologies. In this paper, however, we show in detail, that, the correspondence between galaxy morphology and color is not perfect, providing insight into the physical origin of this evolution. Using the COSMOS survey, we study a significant population of red-sequence galaxies with disk-like morphologies. These passive disks typically have Sa-Sb morphological types with large bulges, but they are not confined to dense environments. They represent nearly one-half of all red-sequence galaxies and dominate at lower masses ({approx}<10{sup 10} M{sub sun}) where they are increasingly disk-dominated. As a function of time, the abundance of passive disks with M {sub *} {approx}< 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} increases, but not as fast as red-sequence spheroidals in the same mass range. At higher mass, the passive disk population has declined since z {approx} 1, likely because they transform into spheroidals. Based on these trends, we estimate that as much as 60% of galaxies transitioning onto the red sequence evolve through a passive disk phase. The origin of passive disks therefore has broad implications for our understanding of how star formation shuts down. Because passive disks tend to be more bulge-dominated than their star-forming counterparts, a simple fading of blue disks does not fully explain their origin. We explore the strengths and weaknesses of several more sophisticated explanations, including environmental effects, internal stabilization, and disk regrowth during gas-rich mergers. While previous work has sought to explain color and morphological transformations with a single process, these observations open the way to new insight by highlighting the fact that galaxy evolution may actually proceed through several separate stages.

  3. The nature of faint emission-line galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smetanka, John J.

    1993-01-01

    One of the results of faint galaxy redshift surveys is the increased fraction of galaxies which have strong emission-line spectra. These faint surveys find that roughly 50 percent of the galaxies have an equivalent width of (OII), W sub 3727, greater than 20 A while this fraction is less than 20 percent in the DARS survey. This has been interpreted as evidence for strong evolution in the galaxy population at redshifts less than 0.5. In order to further investigate the properties of the galaxies in faint redshift surveys, two important factors must be addressed. The first is the observed correlation between color, luminosity, and W sub 3727. There is a correlation between color and the strength of emission lines, bluer galaxies having stronger emission features, as evident for Markarian galaxies and for galaxies in Kennicutt's spectrophotometric atlas. This correlation also applies galaxies in faint redshift surveys. In addition, low luminosity galaxies have a larger average W sub 3727 (and bluer colors) than higher luminosity galaxies. This is illustrated for Kennicutt's low z late-type galaxies, for the Durham Faint Surveys, and for galaxies in SA68. The second factor which must be incorporated into any interpretation of the faint emission galaxies is the different luminosity functions for galaxies depending on color. This is usually modeled by varying M* for different color classes (or morphological types); however, the shape of the luminosity function is different for galaxies with different colors. Low luminosity, blue galaxies have a much larger number density than low luminosity, red galaxies. Furthermore, the low luminosity end of the blue galaxy luminosity function is not well fit by a Schechter function. These two factors have been included in a very simple, no-evolution, model for the galaxy population. This model uses the luminosity functions from Shanks (1990) and spectral energy distributions (SED's) from Bruzual (1988). W sub 3727 is predicted using

  4. Chemical overprint on the natural remanent magnetization of a subtropical red soil sequence in the Bose Basin, southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Chenglong; Liu, Qingsong; Wang, Wei; Liu, Caicai

    2007-11-01

    We present a high-resolution paleomagnetic investigation of the subtropical red soil sequence at the Damei section, Bose Basin, southern China. Maghemite with low coercivities and fine-grained hematite with high coercivities but relatively low unblocking temperatures were identified as main carriers of the natural remanent magnetization (NRM). Strong chemical weathering occurring under subtropical climatic conditions in southern China led to a chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) overprint that is sufficiently strong to mask the primary NRM. Analysis of the Bose Basin soil sequence indicates that the CRM has a large lock-in depth (>4 m). This example shows that magnetostratigraphic studies on red soil sequences in subtropical-tropical southern China should be interpreted with caution.

  5. Complete Sequence and Analysis of Plastid Genomes of Two Economically Important Red Algae: Pyropia haitanensis and Pyropia yezoensis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Mao, Yunxiang; Kong, Fanna; Li, Guiyang; Ma, Fei; Zhang, Baolong; Sun, Peipei; Bi, Guiqi; Zhang, Fangfang; Xue, Hongfan; Cao, Min

    2013-01-01

    Background Pyropia haitanensis and P. yezoensis are two economically important marine crops that are also considered to be research models to study the physiological ecology of intertidal seaweed communities, evolutionary biology of plastids, and the origins of sexual reproduction. This plastid genome information will facilitate study of breeding, population genetics and phylogenetics. Principal Findings We have fully sequenced using next-generation sequencing the circular plastid genomes of P. hatanensis (195,597 bp) and P. yezoensis (191,975 bp), the largest of all the plastid genomes of the red lineage sequenced to date. Organization and gene contents of the two plastids were similar, with 211–213 protein-coding genes (including 29–31 unknown-function ORFs), 37 tRNA genes, and 6 ribosomal RNA genes, suggesting a largest coding capacity in the red lineage. In each genome, 14 protein genes overlapped and no interrupted genes were found, indicating a high degree of genomic condensation. Pyropia maintain an ancient gene content and conserved gene clusters in their plastid genomes, containing nearly complete repertoires of the plastid genes known in photosynthetic eukaryotes. Similarity analysis based on the whole plastid genome sequences showed the distance between P. haitanensis and P. yezoensis (0.146) was much smaller than that of Porphyra purpurea and P. haitanensis (0.250), and P. yezoensis (0.251); this supports re-grouping the two species in a resurrected genus Pyropia while maintaining P. purpurea in genus Porphyra. Phylogenetic analysis supports a sister relationship between Bangiophyceae and Florideophyceae, though precise phylogenetic relationships between multicellular red alage and chromists were not fully resolved. Conclusions These results indicate that Pyropia have compact plastid genomes. Large coding capacity and long intergenic regions contribute to the size of the largest plastid genomes reported for the red lineage. Possessing the largest

  6. Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harms, R. J.; Beaver, E. A.; Burbidge, E. M.; Angel, J. R. P.; Bartko, F.; Mccoy, J.; Ripp, L.; Bohlin, R.; Davidsen, A. F.; Ford, H.

    1982-01-01

    The Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) designed for use with The Space Telescope (ST), is currently preparing for instrument assembly, integration, alignment, and calibration. Nearly all optical and detector elements have been completed and calibrated, and selection of flight detectors and all but a few optical elements has been made. Calibration results for the flight detectors and optics are presented, and plans for forthcoming system calibration are briefly described.

  7. HUBBLE'S SEARCH FOR FAINT FIELD STARS IN GALACTIC HALO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Left A NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of a randomly selected area of sky taken to search for faint red stars that might constitute dark matter in our Milky Way Galaxy. (Dark matter is material of an unknown type that makes up most of the mass of our galaxy). If the dark matter in our Galaxy was made of faint red stars -- as many scientists have previously conjectured -- then about 38 such stars should have been visible in this HST image. The simulated stars (diamond-shaped symbols), based on theoretical calculations, illustrate what scientists would have seen if the dark matter were locked-up in faint red stars. These surprising results rule out dim stars as an explanation for dark matter in our Galaxy. Right The unmodified HST image shows the region is actually so devoid of stars that far more distant background galaxies can easily be seen. The field is in the constellation Eridanus, far outside the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy. This region was chosen to highlight stars in the galactic halo, where dark matter exists, and to avoid the contribution of faint stars in the plane of the Galaxy. Technical Information: The image was constructed from seven exposures totaling almost three hours of searching by HST. The field shown is about 1.5 arc-minutes across. The image was taken in near-infrared light (814 nm) with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, on Feb 8, 1994. This observation is part of the HST parallel observing program. Credit: J Bahcall, Institute for Advance Study, Princeton and NASA

  8. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of a Hungarian red deer (Cervus elaphus hippelaphus) from high-throughput sequencing data and its phylogenetic position within the family Cervidae.

    PubMed

    Frank, Krisztián; Barta, Endre; Bana, Nóra Á; Nagy, János; Horn, Péter; Orosz, László; Stéger, Viktor

    2016-06-01

    Recently, there has been considerable interest in genetic differentiation in the Cervidae family. A common tool used to determine genetic variation in different species, breeds and populations is mitochondrial DNA analysis, which can be used to estimate phylogenetic relationships among animal taxa and for molecular phylogenetic evolution analysis. With the development of sequencing technology, more and more mitochondrial sequences have been made available in public databases, including whole mitochondrial DNA sequences. These data have been used for phylogenetic analysis of animal species, and for studies of evolutionary processes. We determined the complete mitochondrial genome of a Central European red deer, Cervus elaphus hippelaphus, from Hungary by a next generation sequencing technology. The mitochondrial genome is 16 354 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes, two rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and a control region, all of which are arranged similar as in other vertebrates. We made phylogenetic analyses with the new sequence and 76 available mitochondrial sequences of Cervidae, using Bos taurus mitochondrial sequence as outgroup. We used 'neighbor joining' and 'maximum likelihood' methods on whole mitochondrial genome sequences; the consensus phylogenetic trees supported monophyly of the family Cervidae; it was divided into two subfamilies, Cervinae and Capreolinae, and five tribes, Cervini, Muntiacini, Alceini, Odocoileini, and Capreolini. The evolutionary structure of the family Cervidae can be reconstructed by phylogenetic analysis based on whole mitochondrial genomes; which method could be used broadly in phylogenetic evolutionary analysis of animal taxa. PMID:27165525

  9. Magneto- and cyclostratigraphy in the red clay sequence: New age model and paleoclimatic implication for the eastern Chinese Loess Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Taslima; Kravchinsky, Vadim A.; Zhang, Rui

    2015-10-01

    The Chinese Loess Plateau red clay sequences display a continuous alternation of sedimentary cycles that represent recurrent climatic fluctuations from 2.58 Ma to the Miocene. Deciphering such a record can provide us with vital information on global and Asian climatic variations. Lack of fossils and failure of absolute dating methods made magnetostratigraphy a leading method to build age models for the red clay sequences. Here we test the magnetostratigraphic age model against cyclostratigraphy. For this purpose we investigate the climate cyclicity recorded in magnetic susceptibility and sedimentary grain size in a red clay section previously dated 11 Myr old with magnetostratigraphy alone. Magnetostratigraphy dating based on only visual correlation could potentially lead to erroneous age model. In this study the correlation is executed through the iteration procedure until it is supported by cyclostratigraphy; i.e., Milankovitch cycles are resolved in the best possible manner. Our new age model provides an age of 5.2 Ma for the Shilou profile. Based on the new age model, wavelet analysis reveals the well-preserved 400 kyr and possible 100 kyr eccentricity cycles on the eastern Chinese Loess Plateau. Further, paleomonsoon evolution during 2.58-5.2 Ma is reconstructed and divided into three intervals (2.58-3.6 Ma, 3.6-4.5 Ma, and 4.5-5.2 Ma). The upper part, the youngest stage, is characterized by a relatively intensified summer monsoon, the middle stage reflects an intensification of the winter monsoon and aridification in Asia, and the earliest stage indicates that summer and winter monsoon cycles may have rapidly altered. The use of cyclostratigraphy along with magnetostratigraphy gives us an effective method of dating red clay sequences, and our results imply that many presently published age models for the red clay deposits should be perhaps re-evaluated.

  10. Classification, Naming and Evolutionary History of Glycosyltransferases from Sequenced Green and Red Algal Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Ulvskov, Peter; Paiva, Dionisio Soares; Domozych, David; Harholt, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    The Archaeplastida consists of three lineages, Rhodophyta, Virideplantae and Glaucophyta. The extracellular matrix of most members of the Rhodophyta and Viridiplantae consists of carbohydrate-based or a highly glycosylated protein-based cell wall while the Glaucophyte covering is poorly resolved. In order to elucidate possible evolutionary links between the three advanced lineages in Archaeplastida, a genomic analysis was initiated. Fully sequenced genomes from the Rhodophyta and Virideplantae and the well-defined CAZy database on glycosyltransferases were included in the analysis. The number of glycosyltransferases found in the Rhodophyta and Chlorophyta are generally much lower then in land plants (Embryophyta). Three specific features exhibited by land plants increase the number of glycosyltransferases in their genomes: (1) cell wall biosynthesis, the more complex land plant cell walls require a larger number of glycosyltransferases for biosynthesis, (2) a richer set of protein glycosylation, and (3) glycosylation of secondary metabolites, demonstrated by a large proportion of family GT1 being involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis. In a comparative analysis of polysaccharide biosynthesis amongst the taxa of this study, clear distinctions or similarities were observed in (1) N-linked protein glycosylation, i.e., Chlorophyta has different mannosylation and glucosylation patterns, (2) GPI anchor biosynthesis, which is apparently missing in the Rhodophyta and truncated in the Chlorophyta, (3) cell wall biosynthesis, where the land plants have unique cell wall related polymers not found in green and red algae, and (4) O-linked glycosylation where comprehensive orthology was observed in glycosylation between the Chlorophyta and land plants but not between the target proteins. PMID:24146880

  11. Classification, naming and evolutionary history of glycosyltransferases from sequenced green and red algal genomes.

    PubMed

    Ulvskov, Peter; Paiva, Dionisio Soares; Domozych, David; Harholt, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    The Archaeplastida consists of three lineages, Rhodophyta, Virideplantae and Glaucophyta. The extracellular matrix of most members of the Rhodophyta and Viridiplantae consists of carbohydrate-based or a highly glycosylated protein-based cell wall while the Glaucophyte covering is poorly resolved. In order to elucidate possible evolutionary links between the three advanced lineages in Archaeplastida, a genomic analysis was initiated. Fully sequenced genomes from the Rhodophyta and Virideplantae and the well-defined CAZy database on glycosyltransferases were included in the analysis. The number of glycosyltransferases found in the Rhodophyta and Chlorophyta are generally much lower then in land plants (Embryophyta). Three specific features exhibited by land plants increase the number of glycosyltransferases in their genomes: (1) cell wall biosynthesis, the more complex land plant cell walls require a larger number of glycosyltransferases for biosynthesis, (2) a richer set of protein glycosylation, and (3) glycosylation of secondary metabolites, demonstrated by a large proportion of family GT1 being involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis. In a comparative analysis of polysaccharide biosynthesis amongst the taxa of this study, clear distinctions or similarities were observed in (1) N-linked protein glycosylation, i.e., Chlorophyta has different mannosylation and glucosylation patterns, (2) GPI anchor biosynthesis, which is apparently missing in the Rhodophyta and truncated in the Chlorophyta, (3) cell wall biosynthesis, where the land plants have unique cell wall related polymers not found in green and red algae, and (4) O-linked glycosylation where comprehensive orthology was observed in glycosylation between the Chlorophyta and land plants but not between the target proteins. PMID:24146880

  12. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... severely dehydrated ) Standing up very suddenly from a lying position Less common but more serious reasons for ... avoid or change them. Get up from a lying or seated position slowly. If having blood drawn ...

  13. Fainting

    MedlinePlus

    ... kids: drink plenty of fluids, especially in hot weather or during physical activity take frequent breaks and move around as much as possible when sitting or standing for long periods of time slowly breathe into a paper bag ... Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart. ...

  14. Faintness

    MedlinePlus

    ... decisions about when and where they should receive healthcare. Unfortunately, most people lack the medical knowledge needed to make these decisions safely. FreeMD.com is powered by a computer program that performs symptom triage. The goal of ...

  15. Complete sequence of the mitochondrial DNA of the red alga Porphyra purpurea. Cyanobacterial introns and shared ancestry of red and green algae.

    PubMed Central

    Burger, G; Saint-Louis, D; Gray, M W; Lang, B F

    1999-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of Porphyra purpurea, a circular-mapping genome of 36,753 bp, has been completely sequenced. A total of 57 densely packed genes has been identified, including the basic set typically found in animals and fungi, as well as seven genes characteristic of protist and plant mtDNAs and specifying ribosomal proteins and subunits of succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase. The mitochondrial large subunit rRNA gene contains two group II introns that are extraordinarily similar to those found in the cyanobacterium Calothrix sp, suggesting a recent lateral intron transfer between a bacterial and a mitochondrial genome. Notable features of P. purpurea mtDNA include the presence of two 291-bp inverted repeats that likely mediate homologous recombination, resulting in genome rearrangement, and of numerous sequence polymorphisms in the coding and intergenic regions. Comparative analysis of red algal mitochondrial genomes from five different, evolutionarily distant orders reveals that rhodophyte mtDNAs are unusually uniform in size and gene order. Finally, phylogenetic analyses provide strong evidence that red algae share a common ancestry with green algae and plants. PMID:10488235

  16. MULTIPLE HYDROXYCINNAMOYL TRANSFERASES FROM RED CLOVER DIFFER IN SEQUENCE, EXPRESSION PATTERN, AND ENZYMATIC ACTIVITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenylpropanoid o-diphenols accumulate in tissues of many plants, functioning as defensive molecules and antioxidants. Red clover leaves accumulate high levels of two o-diphenols, phasalic acid [2-O-(caffeoyl)-L-malate, see Fig. 1] and clovamide [N-(caffeoyl)-L-DOPA]. In red clover, post-harvest oxi...

  17. Genome Sequence of Acidovorax avenae Strain T10_61 Associated with Sugarcane Red Stripe in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Cecilia A.; Bassi, Daniela; Puglisi, Edoardo; Salazar, Sergio M.; Vignolo, Graciela M.; Coccocelli, Pier S.

    2016-01-01

    Red stripe of sugarcane in Argentina is a bacterial disease caused by Acidovorax avenae. The genome sequence from the first isolate of this bacterium in Argentina is presented here. The draft genome of the A. avenae T10_61 strain contains 5,646,552 bp and has a G+C content of 68.6 mol%. PMID:26847889

  18. The UV-Optical Galaxy Color-Magnitude Diagram. III. Constraints on Evolution from the Blue to the Red Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, D. Christopher; Wyder, Ted K.; Schiminovich, David; Barlow, Tom A.; Forster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G.; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan G.; Seibert, Mark; Small, Todd; Welsh, Barry Y.; Bianchi, Luciana; Donas, José; Heckman, Timothy M.; Lee, Young-Wook; Madore, Barry F.; Milliard, Bruno; Rich, R. Michael; Szalay, Alex S.; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2007-12-01

    We introduce a new quantity, the mass flux density of galaxies evolving from the blue sequence to the red sequence. We propose a simple technique for constraining this mass flux using the volume-corrected number density in the extinction-corrected UV-optical color-magnitude distribution, the stellar age indexes HδA and Dn(4000), and a simple prescription for spectral evolution using a quenched star formation history. We exploit the excellent separation of red and blue sequences in the NUV-r band Hess function. The final value we measure, ρT˙=0.033 Msolar yr-1 Mpc-3, is strictly speaking an upper limit due to the possible contributions of bursting, composite, and extincted galaxies. However, it compares favorably with estimates of the average mass flux that we make based on the red luminosity function evolution derived from the DEEP2 and COMBO-17 surveys, ρ˙R=+0.034 Msolar yr-1 Mpc-3. We find that the blue sequence mass has remained roughly constant since z=1 (ρB˙~=0.01 Msolar yr-1 Mpc-3, but the average on-going star formation of ρ˙SF~=0.037 Msolar yr-1 Mpc-3 over 0sequence. We explore the nature of the galaxies in the transition zone with particular attention to the frequency and impact of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The AGN fraction peaks in the transition zone. We find circumstantial, albeit weak evidence that the quench rates are higher in higher luminosity AGNs.

  19. THE RED-SEQUENCE CLUSTER SURVEY-2 (RCS-2): SURVEY DETAILS AND PHOTOMETRIC CATALOG CONSTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbank, David G.; Gladders, M. D.; Yee, H. K. C.; Hsieh, B. C.

    2011-03-15

    The second Red-sequence Cluster Survey (RCS-2) is a {approx}1000 deg{sup 2}, multi-color imaging survey using the square-degree imager, MegaCam, on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. It is designed to detect clusters of galaxies over the redshift range 0.1 {approx}< z {approx}< 1. The primary aim is to build a statistically complete, large ({approx}10{sup 4}) sample of clusters, covering a sufficiently long redshift baseline to be able to place constraints on cosmological parameters via the evolution of the cluster mass function. Other main science goals include building a large sample of high surface brightness, strongly gravitationally lensed arcs associated with these clusters, and an unprecedented sample of several tens of thousands of galaxy clusters and groups, spanning a large range of halo mass, with which to study the properties and evolution of their member galaxies. This paper describes the design of the survey and the methodology for acquiring, reducing, and calibrating the data for the production of high-precision photometric catalogs. We describe the method for calibrating our griz imaging data using the colors of the stellar locus and overlapping Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry. This yields an absolute accuracy of <0.03 mag on any color and {approx}0.05 mag in the r-band magnitude, verified with respect to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Our astrometric calibration is accurate to <<0.''3 from comparison with SDSS positions. RCS-2 reaches average 5{sigma} point-source limiting magnitudes of griz = [24.4, 24.3, 23.7, 22.8], approximately 1-2 mag deeper than the SDSS. Due to the queue-scheduled nature of the observations, the data are highly uniform and taken in excellent seeing, mostly FWHM {approx}< 0.''7 in the r band. In addition to the main science goals just described, these data form the basis for a number of other planned and ongoing projects (including the WiggleZ survey), making RCS-2 an important next-generation imaging survey.

  20. Freeze, flight, fight, fright, faint: adaptationist perspectives on the acute stress response spectrum.

    PubMed

    Bracha, H Stefan

    2004-09-01

    This article reviews the existing evolutionary perspectives on the acute stress response habitual faintness and blood-injection-injury type-specific phobia (BIITS phobia). In this article, an alternative evolutionary perspective, based on recent advances in evolutionary psychology, is proposed. Specifically, that fear-induced faintness (eg, fainting following the sight of a syringe, blood, or following a trivial skin injury) is a distinct Homo sapiens-specific extreme-stress survival response to an inescapable threat. The article suggests that faintness evolved in response to middle paleolithic intra-group and inter-group violence (of con-specifics) rather than as a pan-mammalian defense response, as is presently assumed. Based on recent literature, freeze, flight, fight, fright, faint provides a more complete description of the human acute stress response sequence than current descriptions. Faintness, one of three primary physiological reactions involved in BIITS phobia, is extremely rare in other phobias. Since heritability estimates are higher for faintness than for fears or phobias, the author suggests that trait-faintness may be a useful complement to trait-anxiety as an endophenotype in research on the human fear circuitry. Some implications for the forthcoming Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition as well as for clinical, health services, and transcriptomic research are briefly discussed. PMID:15337864

  1. TESTING SCALING RELATIONS FOR SOLAR-LIKE OSCILLATIONS FROM THE MAIN SEQUENCE TO RED GIANTS USING KEPLER DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, D.; Bedding, T. R.; Stello, D.; Hekker, S.; Mathur, S.; Mosser, B.; Verner, G. A.; Elsworth, Y. P.; Hale, S. J.; Chaplin, W. J.; Bonanno, A.; Buzasi, D. L.; Campante, T. L.; Kallinger, T.; Silva Aguirre, V.; De Ridder, J.; Garcia, R. A.; Frandsen, S.; Houdek, G.; and others

    2011-12-20

    We have analyzed solar-like oscillations in {approx}1700 stars observed by the Kepler Mission, spanning from the main sequence to the red clump. Using evolutionary models, we test asteroseismic scaling relations for the frequency of maximum power ({nu}{sub max}), the large frequency separation ({Delta}{nu}), and oscillation amplitudes. We show that the difference of the {Delta}{nu}-{nu}{sub max} relation for unevolved and evolved stars can be explained by different distributions in effective temperature and stellar mass, in agreement with what is expected from scaling relations. For oscillation amplitudes, we show that neither (L/M){sup s} scaling nor the revised scaling relation by Kjeldsen and Bedding is accurate for red-giant stars, and demonstrate that a revised scaling relation with a separate luminosity-mass dependence can be used to calculate amplitudes from the main sequence to red giants to a precision of {approx}25%. The residuals show an offset particularly for unevolved stars, suggesting that an additional physical dependency is necessary to fully reproduce the observed amplitudes. We investigate correlations between amplitudes and stellar activity, and find evidence that the effect of amplitude suppression is most pronounced for subgiant stars. Finally, we test the location of the cool edge of the instability strip in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram using solar-like oscillations and find the detections in the hottest stars compatible with a domain of hybrid stochastically excited and opacity driven pulsation.

  2. The evolutionary paths among galaxy types on the Red Sequence at 0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliche-Moral, M. C.; Prieto, M.; Balcells, M.; Abreu, D.; Barro, G.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; Domínguez Palmero, L.; Erwin, P.; Gallego, J.; Guzmán, R.; Hempel, A.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Zamorano, J.

    2013-05-01

    We have studied the main evolutionary paths among the galaxy types residing on the massive end of the Red Sequence and nearby locations on the Green Valley during the last ~9 Gyr. The morphological and star formation properties of a sample of these galaxies at 0.35×10^10 M_⊙ have been analysed. We present direct observational evidence for the first time of the existence of two main evolutionary paths among the different red galaxy types since z~1.5, which provide some clues on the nature of the processes that have governed the assembly of present-day massive quiescent galaxies. The results are in excellent agreement with the hierarchical evolutionary framework proposed in the Eliche-Moral et al. (2010) model. Data from SHARDS (one of the ESO/GTC Large Programmes approved in 2009A) will complement and improve the present findings, shedding some light into many of the still unsettled questions concerning the migration of galaxies from the Blue Cloud to the Red Sequence at z<1.5.

  3. Development and transferability of black and red raspberry microsatellite markers from short-read sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies has been a boon to the cost-effective development of molecular markers, particularly in non-model species. Here, we demonstrate the efficiency of microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker development from short-read sequences using th...

  4. Sediment budget as affected by construction of a sequence of dams in the lower Red River, Viet Nam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xi Xi; Oeurng, Chantha; Le, Thi Phuong Quynh; Thuy, Duong Thi

    2015-11-01

    Dam construction is one of the main factors resulting in riverine sediment changes, which in turn cause river degradation or aggradation downstream. The main objective of this work is to examine the sediment budget affected by a sequence of dams constructed upstream in the lower reach of the Red River. The study is based on the longer-term annual data (1960-2010) with a complementary daily water and sediment data set (2008-2010). The results showed that the stretch of the river changed from sediment surplus (suggesting possible deposition processes) into sediment deficit (possible erosion processes) after the first dam (Thac Ba Dam) was constructed in 1972 and changed back to deposition after the second dam (Hoa Binh Dam) was constructed in 1985. The annual sediment deposition varied between 1.9 Mt/y and 46.7 Mt/y with an annual mean value of 22.9 Mt/y (1985-2010). The sediment deposition at the lower reach of the Red River would accelerate river aggradation which would change river channel capacity in the downstream of the Red River. The depositional processes could be sustained or changed back to erosional processes after more dams (the amount of sediment deposit was much less after the latest two dams Tuyen Quang Dam in 2009 and Sonla Dam in 2010) are constructed, depending on the water and sediment dynamics. This study revealed that the erosional and depositional processes could be shifted for the same stretch of river as affected by a sequence of dams and provides useful insights in river management in order to reduce flood frequency along the lower reach of the Red River.

  5. Mitochondrial DNA sequence analyses and phylogenetic relationships among two Nigerian goat breeds and the South African Kalahari Red.

    PubMed

    Awotunde, Esther O; Bemji, Martha N; Olowofeso, Olajide; James, Ikechukwu J; Ajayi, O O; Adebambo, Ayotunde O

    2015-01-01

    The first hypervariable (HV1) region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of two popular Nigerian goat breeds: West African Dwarf (WAD) (n=35) and Red Sokoto (RS) (n=37) and one exotic breed: Kalahari Red (KR) (n=38) imported from South Africa were sequenced to investigate sequence diversity, genetic structure, origin, and demographic history of the populations. A total of 68 polymorphic sites were found in 110 sequences that grouped into 68 haplotypes. Average haplotype and nucleotide diversities for all breeds were 0.982±0.005 and 0.02350±0.00213, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two mtDNA lineages (A and B). Lineage A was predominant and included all haplotypes from WAD and RS and 5 out of 11 haplotypes of KR goats. The remaining haplotypes (6) of KR belong to lineage B. The analysis of molecular variance revealed a high-within breed genetic variance of 82.4% and a low-between breed genetic variance of 17.6%. The three breeds clustered with Capra aegagrus as their wild ancestor. Mismatch distribution analysis showed that WAD, RS and haplogroup A have experienced population expansion events. The study has revealed very high diversity within the three breeds which are not strongly separated from each other based on mtDNA analysis. The information obtained on the genetic structure of the breeds will be useful in planning improvement and conservation programs for the local populations. PMID:25695640

  6. Deep COI sequencing of standardized benthic samples unveils overlooked diversity of Jordanian coral reefs in the northern Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Al-Rshaidat, Mamoon M D; Snider, Allison; Rosebraugh, Sydney; Devine, Amanda M; Devine, Thomas D; Plaisance, Laetitia; Knowlton, Nancy; Leray, Matthieu

    2016-09-01

    High-throughput sequencing (HTS) of DNA barcodes (metabarcoding), particularly when combined with standardized sampling protocols, is one of the most promising approaches for censusing overlooked cryptic invertebrate communities. We present biodiversity estimates based on sequencing of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene for coral reefs of the Gulf of Aqaba, a semi-enclosed system in the northern Red Sea. Samples were obtained from standardized sampling devices (Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structures (ARMS)) deployed for 18 months. DNA barcoding of non-sessile specimens >2 mm revealed 83 OTUs in six phyla, of which only 25% matched a reference sequence in public databases. Metabarcoding of the 2 mm - 500 μm and sessile bulk fractions revealed 1197 OTUs in 15 animal phyla, of which only 4.9% matched reference barcodes. These results highlight the scarcity of COI data for cryptobenthic organisms of the Red Sea. Compared with data obtained using similar methods, our results suggest that Gulf of Aqaba reefs are less diverse than two Pacific coral reefs but much more diverse than an Atlantic oyster reef at a similar latitude. The standardized approaches used here show promise for establishing baseline data on biodiversity, monitoring the impacts of environmental change, and quantifying patterns of diversity at regional and global scales. PMID:27584940

  7. Faint dwarfs in nearby groups

    SciTech Connect

    Speller, Ryan; Taylor, James E. E-mail: taylor@uwaterloo.ca

    2014-06-20

    The number and distribution of dwarf satellite galaxies remain a critical test of cold dark matter-dominated structure formation on small scales. Until recently, observational information about galaxy formation on these scales has been limited mainly to the Local Group. We have searched for faint analogues of Local Group dwarfs around nearby bright galaxies, using a spatial clustering analysis of the photometric catalog of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8. Several other recent searches of SDSS have detected clustered satellite populations down to Δm{sub r} ≡ (m{sub r,} {sub sat} – m{sub r,} {sub main}) ∼ 6-8, using photometric redshifts to reduce background contamination. SDSS photometric redshifts are relatively imprecise, however, for faint and nearby galaxies. Instead, we use angular size to select potential nearby dwarfs and consider only the nearest isolated bright galaxies as primaries. As a result, we are able to detect an excess clustering signal from companions down to Δm{sub r} = 12, 4 mag fainter than most recent studies. We detect an overdensity of objects at separations <400 kpc, corresponding to about 4.6 ± 0.5 satellites per central galaxy, consistent with the satellite abundance expected from the Local Group, given our selection function. Although the sample of satellites detected is incomplete by construction, since it excludes the least and most compact dwarfs, this detection provides a lower bound on the average satellite luminosity function, down to luminosities corresponding to the faintest ''classical'' dwarfs of the Local Group.

  8. The lambda red proteins promote efficient recombination between diverged sequences: implications for bacteriophage genome mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Martinsohn, Jann T; Radman, Miroslav; Petit, Marie-Agnès

    2008-05-01

    Genome mosaicism in temperate bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) is so great that it obscures their phylogeny at the genome level. However, the precise molecular processes underlying this mosaicism are unknown. Illegitimate recombination has been proposed, but homeologous recombination could also be at play. To test this, we have measured the efficiency of homeologous recombination between diverged oxa gene pairs inserted into lambda. High yields of recombinants between 22% diverged genes have been obtained when the virus Red Gam pathway was active, and 100 fold less when the host Escherichia coli RecABCD pathway was active. The recombination editing proteins, MutS and UvrD, showed only marginal effects on lambda recombination. Thus, escape from host editing contributes to the high proficiency of virus recombination. Moreover, our bioinformatics study suggests that homeologous recombination between similar lambdoid viruses has created part of their mosaicism. We therefore propose that the remarkable propensity of the lambda-encoded Red and Gam proteins to recombine diverged DNA is effectively contributing to mosaicism, and more generally, that a correlation may exist between virus genome mosaicism and the presence of Red/Gam-like systems. PMID:18451987

  9. Source mechanisms of the June 2004 Tabuk earthquake sequence, Eastern Red Sea margin, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldamegh, K. S.; Abou Elenean, K. M.; Hussein, H. M.; Rodgers, A. J.

    2009-10-01

    A sequence of earthquakes took place in June 2004 approximately 60 km southeast of Tabuk, Saudi Arabia. The first felt event ( M W = 3.9) occurred on June 9 and caused minor damage in the epicentral area according to the National Earthquake Information Center and the local reports. Another moderate size event occurred on June 22 ( M W = 5.1) and was followed by a few felt aftershocks without any reported damage. This earthquake sequence caused considerable alarm at Tabuk and highlights the fact that damaging earthquakes can occur in this region away from the major plate boundary in the Red Sea. Being the largest well-recorded event in the area for which the digital and broadband records from Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Turkey, Cyprus, and Kuwait are available, it provides an excellent opportunity to study the tectonic process and present day stress field acting on this area. The digital records from these regional networks were used to relocate the largest three events of this sequence. Focal mechanisms were obtained from full waveform inversion and indicate normal faulting mechanisms with two nodal planes oriented NW-SE in parallel to the faults bounding the Tabuk graben and the Red Sea rift axis. These events originated at shallow focal depths of 4-5 km, possibly contributing to the widely felt ground motions. These events offer a unique opportunity to study the active tectonics of the region as well as inform future studies of seismic hazard in northwestern Saudi Arabia, the Gulf of Aqaba, and eastern Egypt.

  10. Paleokarstic phenomena of the Lower Ordovician red bed sequences of the Arbuckle group, southern Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Musselman, J.L. )

    1991-06-01

    Oil and gas production has been reported recently from paleokarstic Arbuckle reservoirs in the Ardmore and Arkoma basin. The West Spring Creek and the Kindblade formations apparently exhibit karstic features. The most extensive surface exposure of these formations is on the southern flank of the Arbuckle anticline along Interstate 35 north of Ardmore, Oklahoma. The lithology is predominantly limestone, ranging from argillaceous mudstone to oolitic and/or bioclastic grainstones. However, minor amounts of sandstone were also observed.These lithologies are characteristic of various peritidal facies. Of particular interest in this outcrop are three distinct red bed zones. Although the zones are part of the repetitive shallowing-upward cycles that characterize the West Spring Creek Formation, ample evidence suggests the red beds represent subaerial exposure surfaces where karstification took place. Many of the thin bedded, rubbly mudstones and wackestones actually represent varieties of breccia commonly associated with karst. Collapse and crackle breccia are most commonly observed. Small solution channels and other vugs are usually completely occluded by calcite cement. However, solution cavities or vugs with diameters larger than 10 cm (3.9 in.) are lined with drusy calcite. Hematite-impregnated sediment occurs as thinly laminated infilling of solution vugs and cavities and also acts as a cementing agent of collapse breccias. Preliminary evidence suggests that karstification processes were active during Arbuckle deposition.

  11. Pedogenic slickensides, indicators of strain and deformation processes in red bed sequences of the Appalachian foreland

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M.B. ); Nickelsen, R.P. )

    1989-01-01

    Pedogenic slickensides are convex-concave slip surfaces that form during expansion/contraction in expansive clay soils such as Vertisols. In the central Appalachians, they occur near the tops of fining-upward cycles in Paleozoic red beds such as the Bloomsburg, Catskill, and Mauch Chunk Formations. Pedogenic slickensides are found in association with other pedogenic (or paleosol) features such as clay-skinned peds, in situ calcareous nodules, and root impressions. Repeated movements along these shear planes during pedogenesis produce strongly aligned clay particles adjacent to pedogenic slickensides; as a result, they are preserved as discrete fractures throughout diagenesis, compaction, and superimposed tectonic deformation. During whole-rock deformation, pedogenic slickensides segregate penetratively deformed rocks into independent, foliate packets and serve as discontinuities that are followed by later structural features. Because the original morphology of pedogenic slickensides is known, they can be used as crude strain markers.

  12. A comparison of heavy mineral assemblage between the loess and the Red Clay sequences on the Chinese Loess Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Wenbin; Wang, Zhao; Song, Yougui; Pfaff, Katharina; Luo, Zeng; Nie, Junsheng; Chen, Wenhan

    2016-06-01

    QEMSCAN-based (Quantitative Evaluation of Minerals by Scanning Electron Microscopy) heavy mineral analysis has recently been demonstrated an efficient way to allow a rapid extraction of provenance information from sediments. However, one key issue to correctly obtain a provenance signal using this technique is to clearly separate effects of diagenetic alteration on heavy minerals in sediments, especially in fine-grained loess. Here we compare heavy mineral assemblages of bottom Quaternary loess (L33) and upper Pliocene Red Clay of three sites on the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP). Two sites (Chaona and Luochuan) with similar modern climate conditions show similar heavy mineral assemblages but contain much less of the unstable heavy mineral amphibole than the drier Xifeng site. This result provides strong evidence supporting that climate-caused diagenesis is an important factor controlling heavy mineral assemblages of fine-grained loess. However, heavy mineral assemblages are similar for loess and paleosol layers deposited after 0.5 Ma on the Chinese Loess Plateau regardless of climate differences, suggesting that time is also a factor controlling heavy mineral assemblages of loess and Red Clay. Our high resolution sampling of the upper Miocene-Pliocene Chaona Red Clay sequence reveals similar heavy mineral compositions with a minor amphibole content, different from the drier Xifeng site results of the same age. This result indicates that the monsoonal climate pattern might have been maintained since the late Miocene. Furthermore, it indicates that the heavy mineral method is promising in tracing provenance for sites northwest of the Xifeng site on the Loess Plateau.

  13. A comparison of zircon U-Pb age results of the Red Clay sequence on the central Chinese Loess Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Hujun; Nie, Junsheng; Wang, Zhao; Peng, Wenbin; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Yunxiang

    2016-01-01

    Single grain zircon U-Pb geochronology has demonstrated great potentials in extracting tectonic and atmospheric circulation signal carried by aeolian, fluvial, and fluviolacustrine sediments. A routine in this sort of studies is analyzing 100–150 grains and then compares zircon U-Pb age spectra between the measured sample and the potential sources. Here we compared the zircon U-Pb age results of the late Miocene-Pliocene Red Clay sequence of two neighboring sites from the Chinese Loess Plateau where similar provenance signal is expected. Although the results from the 5.5 Ma sediment support this prediction, the results from the 3 Ma sediment at these two sites differ from each other significantly. These results emphasize the importance of increasing analysis number per sample and combining the zircon U-Pb geochronology with other provenance tools in order to get reliable provenance information. PMID:27538343

  14. A comparison of zircon U-Pb age results of the Red Clay sequence on the central Chinese Loess Plateau.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hujun; Nie, Junsheng; Wang, Zhao; Peng, Wenbin; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Yunxiang

    2016-01-01

    Single grain zircon U-Pb geochronology has demonstrated great potentials in extracting tectonic and atmospheric circulation signal carried by aeolian, fluvial, and fluviolacustrine sediments. A routine in this sort of studies is analyzing 100-150 grains and then compares zircon U-Pb age spectra between the measured sample and the potential sources. Here we compared the zircon U-Pb age results of the late Miocene-Pliocene Red Clay sequence of two neighboring sites from the Chinese Loess Plateau where similar provenance signal is expected. Although the results from the 5.5 Ma sediment support this prediction, the results from the 3 Ma sediment at these two sites differ from each other significantly. These results emphasize the importance of increasing analysis number per sample and combining the zircon U-Pb geochronology with other provenance tools in order to get reliable provenance information. PMID:27538343

  15. Analysis of rbcL sequences reveals the global biodiversity, community structure, and biogeographical pattern of thermoacidophilic red algae (Cyanidiales).

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Zhan, Shing Hei; Lin, Yiching; Tang, Sen-Lin; Liu, Shao-Lun

    2015-08-01

    Thermoacidophilic cyanidia (Cyanidiales) are the primary photosynthetic eukaryotes in volcanic areas. These red algae also serve as important model organisms for studying life in extreme habitats. The global biodiversity and community structure of Cyanidiales remain unclear despite previous sampling efforts. Here, we surveyed the Cyanidiales biodiversity in the Tatun Volcano Group (TVG) area in Taiwan using environmental DNA sequencing. We generated 174 rbcL sequences from eight samples from four regions in the TVG area, and combined them with 239 publicly available rbcL sequences collected worldwide. Species delimita-tion using this large rbcL data set suggested at least 20 Cyanidiales OTUs (operational taxono-mic units) worldwide, almost three times the presently recognized seven species. Results from environmental DNA showed that OTUs in the TVG area were divided into three groups: (i) dominant in hot springs with 92%-99% sequence identity to Galdieria maxima; (ii) largely distributed in drier and more acidic microhabitats with 99% identity to G. partita; and (iii) primarily distributed in cooler microhabitats and lacking identity to known cyanidia species (a novel Cyanidiales lineage). In both global and individual area analyses, we observed greater species diversity in non-aquatic than aquatic habitats. Community structure analysis showed high similarity between the TVG community and West Pacific-Iceland communities, reflecting their geographic proximity to each other. Our study is the first examination of the global species diversity and biogeographic affinity of cyanidia. Additionally, our data illuminate the influence of microhabitat type on Cyanidiales diversity and highlight intriguing questions for future ecological research. PMID:26986790

  16. The Luminosity Distribution at the Bright End of Red-Sequence Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Y. S.; Strauss, M. A.

    We study the bright end of the distribution of galaxies in fields with Luminous Red Galaxies (LRG) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Using 2099 square degree of SDSS imaging data, we search for bright (> L_*) early-type galaxies within 1 Mpc of 12,608 spectroscopic LRG in the volume-limited redshift range 0.12 < z < 0.38. The brightest galaxies within 1 Mpc of LRG are too bright to be consistent with an exponentially decaying luminosity function of other members in the same field. The luminosity gap, M12 between the first and the second-rank galaxy is large(˜ 0.8 mag). When the LRG fields were split into group-like and cluster-like environments, the former gives (1) a more luminous brightest member, and (2) a larger gap M12. The large luminosity gap shows little evolution with redshifts, putting stringent constraints on the scenerio of the growth of Brightest Cluster (or Group) Galaxies by recent cannibalism of cluster/group members.

  17. The bright end of the luminosity function of red sequence galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Yeong-Shang; Strauss, Michael A.

    2006-02-01

    We study the bright end of the luminosity distribution of galaxies in fields with luminous red galaxies (LRG) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Using 2099deg2 of SDSS imaging data, we search for luminous (>~L*) early-type galaxies within 1.0h-1Mpc of a volume-limited sample of 12608 spectroscopic LRG in the redshift range 0.12 < z < 0.38. Most of these objects lie in rich environments, with the LRG being the brightest object within 1.0h-1Mpc. The luminosity gap, M12, between the first- and second-ranked galaxies within 1.0h-1Mpc is large (~0.8 mag), substantially larger than can be explained with an exponentially decaying luminosity function of galaxies. The brightest member is less luminous (by 0.1-0.2 mag) and shows a larger gap in LRG selected groups than in cluster-like environments. The large luminosity gap shows little evolution with redshift to z= 0.4, ruling out the scenario that these LRG selected brightest cluster or group galaxies grow by recent cannibalism of cluster members.

  18. Complete genome sequence of the orange-red pigmented, radioresistant Deinococcus proteolyticus type strain (MRPT)

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, Alex; Zeytun, Ahmet; Yassawong, Montri; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes; Pukall, Rüdiger; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2012-01-01

    Deinococcus proteolyticus (ex Kobatake et al. 1973) Brook and Murray 1981 is one of currently 47 species in the genus Deinococcus within the family Deinococcaceae. Strain MRPT was isolated from feces of Lama glama and possesses extreme radiation resistance, a trait is shares with various other species of the genus Deinococcus, with D. proteolyticus being resistant up to 1.5 Mrad of gamma radiation. Strain MRPT is of further interest for its carotenoid pigment. The genome presented here is only the fifth completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Deinococcus (and the forth type strain) to be published, and will hopefully contribute to a better understanding of how members of this genus adapted to high gamma- or UV ionizing-radiation. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2,886,836 bp long genome with its four large plasmids of lengths 97 kbp, 132 kbp, 196 kbp and 315 kbp harbors 2,741 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:22768367

  19. Complete genome sequence of the orange-red pigmented, radioresistant Deinococcus proteolyticus type strain (MRPT)

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, A; Zeytun, Ahmet; Yasawong, Montri; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Mavromatis, K; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes; Pukall, Rudiger; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2012-01-01

    Deinococcus proteolyticus (ex Kobatake et al. 1973) Brook and Murray 1981 is one of currently 47 species in the genus Deinococcus within the family Deinococcaceae. Strain MRPTT was isolated from faeces of Lama glama; it shares with various other species of the genus the extreme radiation resistance, with D. proteolyticus being resistant up to 1.5 Mrad of gamma radiation. Strain MRPT{sup T} is of further interest for its carotenoid pigment. The genome presented here is only the fifth completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Deinococcus (and the forth type strain) to be published, and will hopefully contribute to a better understanding of how members of this genus adapted to high gamma- or UV ionizing-radiation. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2,886,836 bp long genome with its four large plasmids of 97 kbp, 132 kbp, 196 kbp and 315 kbp harbours 2,741 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  20. THE ASSEMBLY OF THE RED SEQUENCE AT z {approx} 1: THE COLOR AND SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF GALAXIES IN THE Cl1604 SUPERCLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Lemaux, B. C.; Gal, R. R.; Lubin, L. M.; Fassnacht, C. D.; and others

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the properties of the 525 spectroscopically confirmed members of the Cl1604 supercluster at z {approx} 0.9 as part of the Observations of Redshift Evolution in Large Scale Environments survey. In particular, we focus on the photometric, stellar mass, morphological, and spectral properties of the 305 member galaxies of the eight clusters and groups that comprise the Cl1604 supercluster. Using an extensive Keck Low-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS)/DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph (DEIMOS) spectroscopic database in conjunction with ten-band ground-based, Spitzer, and Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we investigate the buildup of the red sequence in groups and clusters at high redshift. Nearly all of the brightest and most massive red-sequence galaxies present in the supercluster environment are found to lie within the bounds of the cluster and group systems, with a surprisingly large number of such galaxies present in low-mass group systems. Despite the prevalence of these red-sequence galaxies, we find that the average cluster galaxy has a spectrum indicative of a star-forming galaxy, with a star formation rate between those of z {approx} 1 field galaxies and moderate-redshift cluster galaxies. The average group galaxy is even more active, exhibiting spectral properties indicative of a starburst. The presence of massive, red galaxies and the high fraction of starbursting galaxies present in the group environment suggest that significant processing is occurring in group environments at z {approx} 1 and earlier. There is a deficit of low-luminosity red-sequence galaxies in all Cl1604 clusters and groups, suggesting that such galaxies transition to the red sequence at later times. Extremely massive ({approx}10{sup 12} M{sub sun}) red-sequence galaxies routinely observed in rich clusters at z {approx} 0 are also absent from the Cl1604 clusters and groups. We suggest that such galaxies form at later times through merging processes. There are

  1. Transcriptomic analysis of the venom gland of the red-headed krait (Bungarus flaviceps) using expressed sequence tags

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Red-headed krait (Bungarus flaviceps, Squamata: Serpentes: Elapidae) is a medically important venomous snake that inhabits South-East Asia. Although the venoms of most species of the snake genus Bungarus have been well characterized, a detailed compositional analysis of B. flaviceps is currently lacking. Results Here, we have sequenced 845 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from the venom gland of a B. flaviceps. Of the transcripts, 74.8% were putative toxins; 20.6% were cellular; and 4.6% were unknown. The main venom protein families identified were three-finger toxins (3FTxs), Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitors (including chain B of β-bungarotoxin), phospholipase A2 (including chain A of β-bungarotoxin), natriuretic peptide (NP), CRISPs, and C-type lectin. Conclusion The 3FTxs were found to be the major component of the venom (39%). We found eight groups of unique 3FTxs and most of them were different from the well-characterized 3FTxs. We found three groups of Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitors (SPIs); one group was comparable to the classical SPIs and the other two groups to chain B of β-bungarotoxins (with or without the extra cysteine) based on sequence identity. The latter group may be functional equivalents of dendrotoxins in Bungarus venoms. The natriuretic peptide (NP) found is the first NP for any Asian elapid, and distantly related to Australian elapid NPs. Our study identifies several unique toxins in B. flaviceps venom, which may help in understanding the evolution of venom toxins and the pathophysiological symptoms induced after envenomation. PMID:20350308

  2. NIFTE: The Near Infrared Faint-Object Telescope Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, James J.; Lange, Andrew E.; Matsumoto, T.; Eisenhardt, Peter B.; Hacking, Perry B.; Schember, Helene R.

    1994-01-01

    The high sensitivity of large format InSb arrays can be used to obtain deep images of the sky at 3-5 micrometers. In this spectral range cool or highly redshifted objects (e.g. brown dwarfs and protogalaxies) which are not visible at shorter wavelengths may be observed. Sensitivity at these wavelengths in ground-based observations is severly limited by the thermal flux from the telescope and from the earth's atmosphere. The Near Infrared Faint-Object Telescope Experiment (NIFTE), a 50 cm cooled rocket-borne telescope combined with large format, high performance InSb arrays, can reach a limiting flux less than 1 micro-Jy(1-sigma) over a large field-of-view in a single flight. In comparison, the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) will require days of observation to reach a sensitivity more than one order of magnitude worse over a similar area of the sky. The deep 3-5 micrometer images obtained by the rocket-borne telescope will assist in determining the nature of faint red objects detected by ground-based telescopes at 2 micrometers, and by ISO at wavelengths longer than 5 micrometers.

  3. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Thiomicrospira Strains Isolated from the Brine-Seawater Interface of Kebrit Deep in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guishan; Fauzi Haroon, Mohamed; Zhang, Ruifu; Hikmawan, Tyas; Stingl, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Two Thiomicrospira strains, WB1 and XS5, were isolated from the Kebrit Deep brine-seawater interface in the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia. Here, we present the draft genome sequences of these gammaproteobacteria, which both produce sulfuric acid from thiosulfate in culture. PMID:26966216

  4. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Thiomicrospira Strains Isolated from the Brine-Seawater Interface of Kebrit Deep in the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guishan; Fauzi Haroon, Mohamed; Zhang, Ruifu; Hikmawan, Tyas

    2016-01-01

    Two Thiomicrospira strains, WB1 and XS5, were isolated from the Kebrit Deep brine-seawater interface in the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia. Here, we present the draft genome sequences of these gammaproteobacteria, which both produce sulfuric acid from thiosulfate in culture. PMID:26966216

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudoalteromonas sp. Strain XI10 Isolated from the Brine-Seawater Interface of Erba Deep in the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guishan; Fauzi Haroon, Mohamed; Zhang, Ruifu; Hikmawan, Tyas

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain XI10 was isolated from the brine-seawater interface of Erba Deep in the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of strain XI10, a gammaproteobacterium that synthesizes polysaccharides for biofilm formation when grown in liquid culture. PMID:26966209

  6. A Study of Planetary Nebulae using the Faint Object Infrared Camera for the SOFIA Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    A planetary nebula is formed following an intermediate-mass (1-8 solar M) star's evolution off of the main sequence; it undergoes a phase of mass loss whereby the stellar envelope is ejected and the core is converted into a white dwarf. Planetary nebulae often display complex morphologies such as waists or torii, rings, collimated jet-like outflows, and bipolar symmetry, but exactly how these features form is unclear. To study how the distribution of dust in the interstellar medium affects their morphology, we utilize the Faint Object InfraRed CAmera for the SOFIA Telescope (FORCAST) to obtain well-resolved images of four planetary nebulae--NGC 7027, NGC 6543, M2-9, and the Frosty Leo Nebula--at wavelengths where they radiate most of their energy. We retrieve mid infrared images at wavelengths ranging from 6.3 to 37.1 micron for each of our targets. IDL (Interactive Data Language) is used to perform basic analysis. We select M2-9 to investigate further; analyzing cross sections of the southern lobe reveals a slight limb brightening effect. Modeling the dust distribution within the lobes reveals that the thickness of the lobe walls is higher than anticipated, or rather than surrounding a vacuum surrounds a low density region of tenuous dust. Further analysis of this and other planetary nebulae is needed before drawing more specific conclusions.

  7. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Red knobby newt Tylototriton shanjing (Amphibia: Caudata).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ye; Yang, Mingxian; Han, Fuyao; Li, Yan; Ni, Qingyong; Yao, Yongfang; Xu, Huailiang; Li, Ying; Zhang, Mingwang

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitogenome of Tylototriton shanjing is 16,661 bp in length with GenBank accession number KR154461, which contains 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNA genes (tRNA), 2 ribosomal RNA genes (rRNA), and 1 control region (CR). The overall base composition of this mitogenome is biased toward AT content at 59.45%. Most of the PCGs and tRNA genes are located on the H-strand, except for ND6 subunit gene and eight tRNA genes, which were distributed on the L-strand. The PCGs used "ATG" and "GTG" as the start codons, while "TAA", "TAG", "AGA", and "T-" are used as stop codons. Almost all tRNA genes were folded into typical cloverleaf secondary structures. The T. shanjing genome had two tandem repeat sequences in the cob-noncoding region. The mitogenomic phylogenetic analyses shows that the genera Echinotriton and Tylototriton were clustered into a strong supported monophyletic clade, which is a sister clade to the genus Pleurodeles, this confirms the previous phylogenetic results. PMID:26065853

  8. Genetic characterization of red-colored heartwood genotypes of Chinese fir using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers.

    PubMed

    Duan, H J; Hu, R Y; Wu, B; Chen, D X; Huang, K Y; Dai, J; Chen, Q; Wei, Z C; Cao, S; Sun, Y H; Li, Y

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the genetic characterization of red-colored heartwood Chinese fir [Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook.] in Guangxi using 21 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and analyzes of the genetic variation (N = 149) in samples obtained from five sites in Guangxi Province, China. The number of different alleles and the Shannon's information index per locus ranged from 3 to 12 and from 0.398 to 2.258 with average values of 6 and 1.211, respectively, indicating moderate levels of genetic diversity within this germplasm collection. The observed and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.199 to 0.827 and from 0.198 to 0.878 with an average of 0.562 and 0.584, respectively. Although, the mean fixation index was 0.044, indicative of a low level of genetic differentiation among germplasms, analysis of molecular variance revealed considerable differentiation (99%) within the samples. The neighbor-joining dendrogram revealed that the majority of red-colored Chinese fir genotypes were apparently not associated with their geographic origins. Further analysis by STRUCTURE showed that this Guangxi germplasm collection could be divided into three genetic groups comprising 76, 37, and 36 members, respectively; these were classified into mixed groups with no obvious population structure. These results were consistent with those of the cluster analysis. On the whole, our data provide a starting point for the management and conservation of the current Guangxi germplasm collection as well as for their efficient use in Chinese fir-breeding programs. PMID:26782503

  9. ASSEMBLY OF THE RED SEQUENCE IN INFRARED-SELECTED GALAXY CLUSTERS FROM THE IRAC SHALLOW CLUSTER SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Gregory F.; Brodwin, Mark; Mancone, Conor M.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Zeimann, Gregory R.; Stanford, S. A.; Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Brown, Michael J. I.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell; Perlmutter, Saul

    2012-09-10

    We present results for the assembly and star formation histories (SFHs) of massive ({approx}L*) red sequence galaxies (RSGs) in 11 spectroscopically confirmed, infrared-selected galaxy clusters at 1.0 < z < 1.5, the precursors to present-day massive clusters with M {approx} 10{sup 15} M{sub Sun }. Using rest-frame optical photometry, we investigate evolution in the color and scatter of the RSG population, comparing with models of possible SFHs. In contrast to studies of central cluster galaxies at lower redshift (z < 1), these data are clearly inconsistent with the continued evolution of stars formed and assembled primarily at a single, much earlier time. Specifically, we find that the colors of massive cluster galaxies at z Almost-Equal-To 1.5 imply that the bulk of star formation occurred at z {approx} 3, whereas by z Almost-Equal-To 1 their colors imply formation at z {approx} 2; therefore these galaxies exhibit approximately the same luminosity-weighted stellar age at 1 < z < 1.5. This likely reflects star formation that occurs over an extended period, the effects of significant progenitor bias, or both. Our results generally indicate that massive cluster galaxy populations began forming a significant mass of stars at z {approx}> 4, contained some red spheroids by z Almost-Equal-To 1.5, and were actively assembling much of their final mass during 1 < z < 2 in the form of younger stars. Qualitatively, the slopes of the cluster color-magnitude relations are consistent with no significant evolution relative to local clusters.

  10. Size growth of red-sequence early-type galaxies in clusters in the last 10 Gyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreon, S.; Dong, Hui; Raichoor, A.

    2016-08-01

    We carried out a photometric and structural analysis in the rest-frame V band of a mass-selected (log M/M⊙> 10.7) sample of red-sequence galaxies in 14 galaxy clusters, 6 of which are at z> 1.45, namely JKCS041, IDCS J1426.5+3508, SpARCS104922.6+564032.5, SpARCSJ021524-034331, XDCPJ0044.0-2033, and SPT-CLJ2040-4451. To this end, we reduced/analyzed about 300 orbits of multicolor images taken with the Advanced Camera for Survey and the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope. We uniformly morphologically classified galaxies from z = 0.023 to z = 1.803, and we homogeneously derived sizes (effective radii) for the entire sample. Furthermore, our size derivation allows, and therefore is not biased by, the presence of the usual variety of morphological structures seen in early-type galaxies, such as bulges, bars, disks, isophote twists, and ellipiticy gradients. By using such a mass-selected sample, composed of 244 red-sequence early-type galaxies, we find that the log of the galaxy size at a fixed stellar mass, log M/M⊙ = 11, has increased with time at a rate of 0.023 ± 0.002 dex per Gyr over the last 10 Gyr, in marked contrast with the threefold increase found in the literature for galaxies in the general field over the same period. This suggests, at face value, that secular processes should be excluded as the primary drivers of size evolution because we observed an environmental dependent size growth. Using spectroscopic ages of Coma early-type galaxies we also find that recently quenched early-type galaxies are a numerically minor population not different enough in size to alter the mean size at a given mass, which implies that the progenitor bias is minor, i.e., that the size evolution measured by selecting galaxies at the redshift of observation is indistinguishable from the one that compares ancestors and descendents. Full Table 3 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  11. Development and characterization of novel microsatellite markers by Next Generation Sequencing for the blue and red shrimp Aristeus antennatus

    PubMed Central

    Heras, Sandra; Planella, Laia; Caldarazzo, Ilaria; Vera, Manuel; García-Marín, José-Luis

    2016-01-01

    The blue and red shrimp, Aristeus antennatus, is a commercially important crustacean, in the Mediterranean Sea, which has been listed as a priority species for fishery management. Hypervariable microsatellite markers could be a useful tool to identify genetic stocks among geographically close fishing grounds. Potential microsatellite markers (97) identified from next-generation sequencing of an individual shrimp using a 454 GS Junior Pyrosequencer were tested on a preliminary panel of 15 individuals representing the four worldwide genetic stocks of the species from which 35 polymorphic loci were identified and used to characterize an additional 20 individuals from the Western Mediterranean Sea. In the Western Mediterranean sample, 32 out of 35 were polymorphic loci and the number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 14 and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.050 to 0.968. No linkage disequilibrium was detected, indicating the independence of the loci. These novel microsatellites provide additional tools to address questions relating to genetic diversity, parentage studies and connectivity patterns of A. antennatus populations and help develop effective strategies to ensure long-term sustainability of this resource. PMID:27547526

  12. Inferring Invasion History of Red Swamp Crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) in China from Mitochondrial Control Region and Nuclear Intron Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanhe; Guo, Xianwu; Chen, Liping; Bai, Xiaohui; Wei, Xinlan; Zhou, Xiaoyun; Huang, Songqian; Wang, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the dispersal pathways of an invasive species is useful for adopting the appropriate strategies to prevent and control its spread. However, these processes are exceedingly complex. So, it is necessary to apply new technology and collect representative samples for analysis. This study used Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) in combination with traditional genetic tools to examine extensive sample data and historical records to infer the invasion history of the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, in China. The sequences of the mitochondrial control region and the proPOx intron in the nuclear genome of samples from 37 sites (35 in China and one each in Japan and the USA) were analyzed. The results of combined scenarios testing and historical records revealed a much more complex invasion history in China than previously believed. P. clarkii was most likely originally introduced into China from Japan from an unsampled source, and the species then expanded its range primarily into the middle and lower reaches and, to a lesser extent, into the upper reaches of the Changjiang River in China. No transfer was observed from the upper reaches to the middle and lower reaches of the Changjiang River. Human-mediated jump dispersal was an important dispersal pathway for P. clarkii. The results provide a better understanding of the evolutionary scenarios involved in the rapid invasion of P. clarkii in China. PMID:26132567

  13. Crowded Field Photometry in the CLASH Clusters: Measuring the Red Sequence of Cluster Galaxies with Robust Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John; Kelson, Daniel; Coe, Dan A.; Postman, Marc; CLASH Team

    2016-01-01

    The Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) is an HST multi-cycle treasury program investigating 25 massive clusters of galaxies with X-ray gas Tx > 5 keV, spanning ~5 to ~30 x 10^14 solar masses, and a redshift range of 0.15 < z < 0.9. With 500 orbits of HST time and 16-filter, ultraviolet to infrared photometry of each cluster, this survey offers an unprecedented dataset for cluster galaxy photometry across a span of age and mass, but obtaining robust photometry for the cluster members has been hampered by the crowded field. We have developed a new technique to detect and define objects despite the presence of overlapping light profiles and to measure photometry of galaxies overlapping the extended haloes of massive galaxies. Utilizing spectral energy distribution fitting, we infer the properties of the detected galaxies, including their abundances and the time since their first star formation. Here we will discuss our technique and results, including the role metallicity and age play in shaping the red sequence of cluster galaxies.

  14. Development and characterization of novel microsatellite markers by Next Generation Sequencing for the blue and red shrimp Aristeus antennatus.

    PubMed

    Heras, Sandra; Planella, Laia; Caldarazzo, Ilaria; Vera, Manuel; García-Marín, José-Luis; Roldán, Maria Ines

    2016-01-01

    The blue and red shrimp, Aristeus antennatus, is a commercially important crustacean, in the Mediterranean Sea, which has been listed as a priority species for fishery management. Hypervariable microsatellite markers could be a useful tool to identify genetic stocks among geographically close fishing grounds. Potential microsatellite markers (97) identified from next-generation sequencing of an individual shrimp using a 454 GS Junior Pyrosequencer were tested on a preliminary panel of 15 individuals representing the four worldwide genetic stocks of the species from which 35 polymorphic loci were identified and used to characterize an additional 20 individuals from the Western Mediterranean Sea. In the Western Mediterranean sample, 32 out of 35 were polymorphic loci and the number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 14 and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.050 to 0.968. No linkage disequilibrium was detected, indicating the independence of the loci. These novel microsatellites provide additional tools to address questions relating to genetic diversity, parentage studies and connectivity patterns of A. antennatus populations and help develop effective strategies to ensure long-term sustainability of this resource. PMID:27547526

  15. Faint detection of exoplanets in microlensing surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Robert A.

    2014-06-20

    We propose a new approach to discovering faint microlensing signals below traditional thresholds, and for estimating the binary-lens mass ratio and the apparent separation from such signals. The events found will be helpful in accurately estimating the true distribution of planetary semimajor axes, which is an important goal of space microlensing surveys.

  16. STELLAR POPULATIONS AND STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF ULTRA FAINT DWARF GALAXIES, CANES VENATICI I, BOOeTES I, CANES VENATICI II, AND LEO IV

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Sakurako; Arimoto, Nobuo; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Onodera, Masato

    2012-01-10

    We take deep images of four ultra faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies, Canes Venatici I (CVn I), Booetes I (Booe I), Canes Venatici II (CVn II), and Leo IV, using the Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. Color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) extend below main-sequence turnoffs (MSTOs) and yield measurements of the ages of stellar populations. The stellar populations of three faint galaxies, the Booe I, CVn II, and Leo IV dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), are estimated to be as old as the Galactic globular cluster M92. We confirm that Booe I dSph has no intrinsic color spread in the MSTO and no spatial difference in the CMD morphology, which indicates that Booe I dSph is composed of an old single stellar population. One of the brightest UFDs, CVn I dSph, shows a relatively younger age ({approx}12.6 Gyr) with respect to Booe I, CVn II, and Leo IV dSphs, and the distribution of red horizontal branch (HB) stars is more concentrated toward the center than that of blue HB stars, suggesting that the galaxy contains complex stellar populations. Booe I and CVn I dSphs show the elongated and distorted shapes. CVn II dSph has the smallest tidal radius of a Milky Way satellite and has a distorted shape, while Leo IV dSph shows a less concentrated spherical shape. The simple stellar population of faint UFDs indicates that the gases in their progenitors were removed more effectively than those of brighter dSphs at the occurrence of their initial star formation. This is reasonable if the progenitors of UFDs belong to less massive halos than those of brighter dSphs.

  17. Extreme Faint Flux Imaging with an EMCCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Olivier; Carignan, Claude; Gach, Jean-Luc; Guillaume, Christian; Lessard, Simon; Fortin, Charles-Anthony; Blais-Ouellette, Sébastien

    2009-08-01

    An EMCCD camera, designed from the ground up for extreme faint flux imaging, is presented. CCCP, the CCD Controller for Counting Photons, has been integrated with a CCD97 EMCCD from e2v technologies into a scientific camera at the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique Expérimentale (LAE), Université de Montréal. This new camera achieves subelectron readout noise and very low clock-induced charge (CIC) levels, which are mandatory for extreme faint flux imaging. It has been characterized in laboratory and used on the Observatoire du Mont Mégantic 1.6 m telescope. The performance of the camera is discussed and experimental data with the first scientific data are presented.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Coriobacterium glomerans type strain (PW2T) from the midgut of Pyrrhocoris apterus L. (red soldier bug)

    SciTech Connect

    Stackebrandt, Erko; Zeytun, Ahmet; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chang, Yun-Juan; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Rohde, Manfred; Pukall, Rudiger; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Coriobacterium glomerans Haas and Ko nig 1988, is the only species of the genus Coriobacterium, family Coriobacteriaceae, order Coriobacteriales, phylum Actinobacteria. The bacterium thrives as an endosymbiont of pyrrhocorid bugs, i.e. the red fire bug Pyrrhocoris apterus L. The rationale for sequencing the genome of strain PW2T is its endosymbiotic life style which is rare among members of Actinobacteria. Here we describe the features of this symbiont, together with the complete genome sequence and its annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Coriobacterium and the sixth member of the order Coriobacteriales for which complete genome sequences are now available. The 2,115,681 bp long single replicon genome with its 1,804 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  19. Spectrophotometry of faint comets: The asteroid approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degewij, J.

    1981-01-01

    Observing programs at optical (0.35-0.8 micron) and near-infrared (1.1-2.4 micron) wavelengths, directed at the acquisition of reflection spectra of faint and distant comets, are described. The ultimate goal is to obtain spectrophotometric measurements of comets for which a significant part of the light is expected to be reflected by the solid surface of the nucleus.

  20. Complete nucleotide sequence and organization of the mitogenome of the red-spotted apollo butterfly, Parnassius bremeri (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) and comparison with other lepidopteran insects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Man Il; Baek, Jee Yeon; Kim, Min Jee; Jeong, Heon Cheon; Kim, Ki-Gyoung; Bae, Chang Hwan; Han, Yeon Soo; Jin, Byung Rae; Kim, Iksoo

    2009-10-31

    The 15,389-bp long complete mitogenome of the endangered red-spotted apollo butterfly, Parnassius bremeri (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) was determined in this study. The start codon for the COI gene in insects has been extensively discussed, and has long remained a matter of some controversy. Herein, we propose that the CGA (arginine) sequence functions as the start codon for the COI gene in lepidopteran insects, on the basis of complete mitogenome sequences of lepidopteran insects, including P. bremeri, as well as additional sequences of the COI start region from a diverse taxonomic range of lepidopteran species (a total of 53 species from 15 families). In our extensive search for a tRNA-like structure in the A+T-rich region, one tRNA(Trp)-like sequence and one tRNA(Leu) (UUR)-like sequence were detected in the P. bremeri A+T-rich region, and one or more tRNA-like structures were detected in the A+T-rich region of the majority of other sequenced lepidopteran insects, thereby indicating that such features occur frequently in the lepidopteran mitogenomes. Phylogenetic analysis using the concatenated 13 amino acid sequences and nucleotide sequences of PCGs of the four macrolepidopteran superfamilies together with the Tortricoidea and Pyraloidea resulted in the successful recovery of a monophyly of Papilionoidea and a monophyly of Bombycoidea. However, the Geometroidea were unexpectedly identified as a sister group of the Bombycoidea, rather than the Papilionoidea. PMID:19823774

  1. Red, green, blue equals 1, 2, 3: Digit-color synesthetes can use structured digit information to boost recall of color sequences.

    PubMed

    Teichmann, A Lina; Nieuwenstein, Mark R; Rich, Anina N

    2015-01-01

    Digit-color synesthetes report experiencing colors when perceiving letters and digits. The conscious experience is typically unidirectional (e.g., digits elicit colors but not vice versa) but recent evidence shows subtle bidirectional effects. We examined whether short-term memory for colors could be affected by the order of presentation reflecting more or less structure in the associated digits. We presented a stream of colored squares and asked participants to report the colors in order. The colors matched each synesthete's colors for digits 1-9 and the order of the colors corresponded either to a sequence of numbers (e.g., [red, green, blue] if 1 = red, 2 = green, 3 = blue) or no systematic sequence. The results showed that synesthetes recalled sequential color sequences more accurately than pseudo-randomized colors, whereas no such effect was found for the non-synesthetic controls. Synesthetes did not differ from non-synesthetic controls in recall of color sequences overall, providing no evidence of a general advantage in memory for serial recall of colors. PMID:26114381

  2. Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene sequence variation and melanism in the gray (Sciurus carolinensis), fox (Sciurus niger), and red (Sciurus vulgaris) squirrel.

    PubMed

    McRobie, Helen R; King, Linda M; Fanutti, Cristina; Coussons, Peter J; Moncrief, Nancy D; Thomas, Alison P M

    2014-01-01

    Sequence variations in the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene are associated with melanism in many different species of mammals, birds, and reptiles. The gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis), found in the British Isles, was introduced from North America in the late 19th century. Melanism in the British gray squirrel is associated with a 24-bp deletion in the MC1R. To investigate the origin of this mutation, we sequenced the MC1R of 95 individuals including 44 melanic gray squirrels from both the British Isles and North America. Melanic gray squirrels of both populations had the same 24-bp deletion associated with melanism. Given the significant deletion associated with melanism in the gray squirrel, we sequenced the MC1R of both wild-type and melanic fox squirrels (Sciurus niger) (9 individuals) and red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) (39 individuals). Unlike the gray squirrel, no association between sequence variation in the MC1R and melanism was found in these 2 species. We conclude that the melanic gray squirrel found in the British Isles originated from one or more introductions of melanic gray squirrels from North America. We also conclude that variations in the MC1R are not associated with melanism in the fox and red squirrels. PMID:24534267

  3. The Population of Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Barker, Ed; Buckalew, Brent; Burkhardt, Andrew; Cowardin, Heather; Frith, James; Gomez, Juan; Kaleida, Catherine; Lederer, Susan M.; Lee, Chris H.

    2016-01-01

    The 6.5-m Magellan telescope 'Walter Baade' at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile has been used for spot surveys of the GEO orbital regime to study the population of optically faint GEO debris. The goal is to estimate the size of the population of GEO debris at sizes much smaller than can be studied with 1-meter class telescopes. Despite the small size of the field of view of the Magellan instrument (diameter 0.5-degree), a significant population of objects fainter than R = 19th magnitude have been found with angular rates consistent with circular orbits at GEO. We compare the size of this population with the numbers of GEO objects found at brighter magnitudes by smaller telescopes. The observed detections have a wide range in characteristics starting with those appearing as short uniform streaks. But there are a substantial number of detections with variations in brightness, flashers, during the 5-second exposure. The duration of each of these flashes can be extremely brief: sometimes less than half a second. This is characteristic of a rapidly tumbling object with a quite variable projected size times albedo. If the albedo is of the order of 0.2, then the largest projected size of these objects is around 10-cm. The data in this paper was collected over the last several years using Magellan's IMACS camera in f/2 mode. The analysis shows the brightness bins for the observed GEO population as well as the periodicity of the flashers. All objects presented are correlated with the catalog: the focus of the paper will be on the uncorrelated, optically faint, objects. The goal of this project is to better characterize the faint debris population in GEO that access to a 6.5-m optical telescope in a superb site can provide.

  4. Expressed sequence tags from the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta: Annotation and utilization for discovery of viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An expression library was created and 2,300 clones sequenced from a monogyne colony of Solenopsis invicta with the primary intention of discovering viruses infecting this ant pest. After assembly and removal of mitochondrial and poor quality sequences, 1,054 unique sequences were yielded and deposi...

  5. Spectroscopic surveys of faint blue stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegner, Gary; Boley, Forrest I.; Swanson, Steven R.; Mcmahan, Robert K.

    1987-01-01

    Spectroscopy of 450 faint blue stars obtained with the spectrograph and intensified Reticon scanner on the 1.3 m telescope at the McGraw Hill Observatory located at Kitt Peak are examined. The study is limited to objects brighter than V = 17.0 in magnitude. It is found that the relative numbers of objects such as white dwarfs, QSOs and CVs in the Kisco survey (Noguchi et al. 1980) is similar to that in the survey of Green et al., (1986).

  6. The formation of Jupiter's faint rings

    PubMed

    Burns; Showalter; Hamilton; Nicholson; de Pater I; Ockert-Bell; Thomas

    1999-05-14

    Observations by the Galileo spacecraft and the Keck telescope showed that Jupiter's outermost (gossamer) ring is actually two rings circumscribed by the orbits of the small satellites Amalthea and Thebe. The gossamer rings' unique morphology-especially the rectangular end profiles at the satellite's orbit and the enhanced intensities along the top and bottom edges of the rings-can be explained by collisional ejecta lost from the inclined satellites. The ejecta evolves inward under Poynting-Robertson drag. This mechanism may also explain the origin of Jupiter's main ring and suggests that faint rings may accompany all small inner satellites of the other jovian planets. PMID:10325220

  7. Galaxy population properties of the massive X-ray luminous galaxy cluster XDCP J0044.0-2033 at z = 1.58. Red-sequence formation, massive galaxy assembly, and central star formation activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassbender, R.; Nastasi, A.; Santos, J. S.; Lidman, C.; Verdugo, M.; Koyama, Y.; Rosati, P.; Pierini, D.; Padilla, N.; Romeo, A. D.; Menci, N.; Bongiorno, A.; Castellano, M.; Cerulo, P.; Fontana, A.; Galametz, A.; Grazian, A.; Lamastra, A.; Pentericci, L.; Sommariva, V.; Strazzullo, V.; Šuhada, R.; Tozzi, P.

    2014-08-01

    cluster-core population comprises post-quenched galaxies transitioning toward the red sequence at intermediate magnitudes, while additionally a significant blue-cloud population of faint star-forming galaxies is present even in the densest central regions. Based on a color-color selection performed to separate different cluster galaxy types, we find that the blue star-forming population is concentrated in clumpy structures and dominates in particular at and beyond the R500 radius. On the other hand, the fraction of post-starburst galaxies steadily increases toward the center, while the red-locus population and red-sequence transition galaxies seem to reach their peak fractions already at intermediate cluster-centric radii of about r ~ 200 kpc. Conclusions: Our observations support the scenario in which the dominant effect of the dense z ≃ 1.6 cluster environment is an accelerated mass-assembly timescale (~1 Gyr or shorter) through merging activity that is responsible for driving core galaxies across the mass-quenching threshold of log (M∗/M⊙) ≃ 10.4. Beyond this mass limit, star formation is suppressed on timescales of ~1 Gyr, while the direct environmental quenching process seems to be subdominant and is acting on significantly longer timescales (~2-3 Gyr). Based on observations under programme ID 084.A-0844, 087.A-0351, and 089.A-0419 collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile.J- and Ks-band FITS files are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/568/A5

  8. Microbial Diversity of the Brine-Seawater Interface of the Kebrit Deep, Red Sea, Studied via 16S rRNA Gene Sequences and Cultivation Methods

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Wolfgang; Jahnke, Linda L.; Schmidt, Mark; Huber, Robert

    2001-01-01

    The brine-seawater interface of the Kebrit Deep, northern Red Sea, was investigated for the presence of microorganisms using phylogenetic analysis combined with cultivation methods. Under strictly anaerobic culture conditions, novel halophiles were isolated. The new rod-shaped isolates belong to the halophilic genus Halanaerobium and are the first representatives of the genus obtained from deep-sea, anaerobic brine pools. Within the genus Halanaerobium, they represent new species which grow chemoorganotrophically at NaCl concentrations ranging from 5 to 34%. The cellular fatty acid compositions are consistent with those of other Halanaerobium representatives, showing unusually large amounts of Δ7 and Δ11 16:1 fatty acids. Phylogenetic analysis of the brine-seawater interface sample revealed the presence of various bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences dominated by cultivated members of the bacterial domain, with the majority affiliated with the genus Halanaerobium. The new Halanaerobium 16S rRNA clone sequences showed the highest similarity (99.9%) to the sequence of isolate KT-8-13 from the Kebrit Deep brine. In this initial survey, our polyphasic approach demonstrates that novel halophiles thrive in the anaerobic, deep-sea brine pool of the Kebrit Deep, Red Sea. They may contribute significantly to the anaerobic degradation of organic matter enriched at the brine-seawater interface. PMID:11425725

  9. Cold H I in faint dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Narendra Nath; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Kaisin, Serafim S.; Begum, Ayesha

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of a study of the amount and distribution of cold atomic gas, as well its correlation with recent star formation in a sample of extremely faint dwarf irregular galaxies. Our sample is drawn from the Faint Irregular Galaxy GMRT Survey (FIGGS) and its extension, FIGGS2. We use two different methods to identify cold atomic gas. In the first method, line-of-sight H I spectra were decomposed into multiple Gaussian components and narrow Gaussian components were identified as cold H I. In the second method, the brightness temperature (TB ) is used as a tracer of cold H I. We find that the amount of cold gas identified using the TB method is significantly larger than the amount of gas identified using Gaussian decomposition. We also find that a large fraction of the cold gas identified using the TB method is spatially coincident with regions of recent star formation, although the converse is not true. That is only a small fraction of the regions with recent star formation are also covered by cold gas. For regions where the star formation and the cold gas overlap, we study the relationship between the star formation rate density and the cold H I column density. We find that the star formation rate density has a power-law dependence on the H I column density, but that the slope of this power law is significantly flatter than that of the canonical Kennicutt-Schmidt relation.

  10. PMAS - Faint Object 3D Spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, M. M.; Becker, T.; Kelz, A.

    2002-01-01

    will describe PMAS (Potsdam Multiaperture Spectrophotometer) which was commissioned at the Calar Alto Observatory 3.5m Telescope on May 28-31, 2001. PMAS is a dedicated, highly efficient UV-visual integral field spectrograph which is optimized for the spectrophotometry of faint point sources, typically superimposed on a bright background. PMAS is ideally suited for the study of resolved stars in local group galaxies. I will present results of our preliminary work with MPFS at the Russian 6m Telescope in Selentchuk, involving the development of new 3D data reduction software, and observations of faint planetary nebulae in the bulge of M31 for the determination of individual chemical abundances of these objects. Using this data, it will be demonstrated that integral field spectroscopy provides superior techniques for background subtraction, avoiding the otherwise inevitable systematic errors of conventional slit spetroscopy. The results will be put in perspective of the study of resolved stellar populations in nearby galaxies with a new generation of Extremely Large Telescopes.

  11. Controversial age spreads from the main sequence turn-off and red clump in intermediate-age clusters in the LMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederhofer, F.; Bastian, N.; Kozhurina-Platais, V.; Hilker, M.; de Mink, S. E.; Cabrera-Ziri, I.; Li, C.; Ercolano, B.

    2016-02-01

    Most star clusters at an intermediate age (1-2 Gyr) in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds show a puzzling feature in their color-magnitude diagrams (CMD) that is not in agreement with a simple stellar population. The main sequence turn-off of these clusters is much broader than expected from photometric uncertainties. One interpretation of this feature is that age spreads of the order of 200-500 Myr exist within individual clusters, although this interpretation is highly debated. Such large age spreads should affect other parts of the CMD, which are sensitive to age, as well. In this study, we analyze the CMDs of a sample of 12 intermediate-age clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud that all show an extended turn-off using archival optical data taken with the Hubble Space Telescope. We fit the star formation history of the turn-off region and the red clump region independently. We find that in most cases, the age spreads inferred from the red clumps are smaller than those that result from the turn-off region. However, the age ranges that result from the red clump region are broader than expected for a single age. Only two out of 12 clusters in our sample show a red clump which seems to be consistent with a single age. As our results are ambiguous, by fitting the star formation histories to the red clump regions, we cannot ultimately tell if the extended main sequence turn-off feature is the result of an age spread or not. However, we do find that the width of the extended main sequence turn-off feature is correlated with the age of the clusters in a way which would be unexplained in the so-called age spread interpretation, but which may be expected if stellar rotation is the cause of the spread at the turn-off. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, and obtained from the Hubble Legacy Archive, which is a collaboration between the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI/NASA), the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST

  12. Spectroscopic Confirmation of a Massive Red-sequence Selected Galaxy Cluster at Z=1.34 in the SpARCS-South Cluster Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Gillian; Demarco, Ricardo; Muzzin, Adam; Yee, H.K.C.; Lacy, Mark; Surace, Jason; Gilbank, David; Blindert, Kris; Hoekstra, Henk; Majumdar, Subhabrata; Gardner, Jonathan P; Gladders, Michael D.; Lonsdale, Carol

    2008-01-01

    The Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-sequence Cluster Survey (SpARCS) is a z'-passband imaging survey, consisting of deep (z' approx. 24 AB) observations made from both hemispheres using the CFHT 3.6m and CTIO 4m telescopes. The survey was designed with the primary aim of detecting galaxy clusters at z > 1. In tandem with pre-existing 3.6 micron observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope SWIRE Legacy Survey, SpARCS detects clusters using an infrared adaptation of the two-filter red-sequence cluster technique. The total effective area of the SpARCS cluster survey is 41.9 sq deg. In this paper, we provide an overview of the 13.6 sq deg Southern CTIO/MOSAICII observations. The 28.3 sq deg Northern CFHT/MegaCam observations are summarized in a companion paper by Muzzin et al. (2008a). In this paper, we also report spectroscopic confirmation of SpARCS J003550-431224, a very rich galaxy cluster at z = 1.335, discovered in the ELAIS-S1 field. To date, this is the highest spectroscopically confirmed redshift for a galaxy cluster discovered using the red-sequence technique. Based on nine confirmed members, SpARCS J003550-431224 has a preliminary velocity dispersion of 1050+/-230 km/s. With its proven capability for efficient cluster detection, SpARCS is a demonstration that we have entered an era of large, homogeneously-selected z > 1 cluster surveys.

  13. De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing Analysis of cDNA Library and Large-Scale Unigene Assembly in Japanese Red Pine (Pinus densiflora)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Le; Zhang, Shijie; Lian, Chunlan

    2015-01-01

    Japanese red pine (Pinus densiflora) is extensively cultivated in Japan, Korea, China, and Russia and is harvested for timber, pulpwood, garden, and paper markets. However, genetic information and molecular markers were very scarce for this species. In this study, over 51 million sequencing clean reads from P. densiflora mRNA were produced using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. It yielded 83,913 unigenes with a mean length of 751 bp, of which 54,530 (64.98%) unigenes showed similarity to sequences in the NCBI database. Among which the best matches in the NCBI Nr database were Picea sitchensis (41.60%), Amborella trichopoda (9.83%), and Pinus taeda (4.15%). A total of 1953 putative microsatellites were identified in 1784 unigenes using MISA (MicroSAtellite) software, of which the tri-nucleotide repeats were most abundant (50.18%) and 629 EST-SSR (expressed sequence tag- simple sequence repeats) primer pairs were successfully designed. Among 20 EST-SSR primer pairs randomly chosen, 17 markers yielded amplification products of the expected size in P. densiflora. Our results will provide a valuable resource for gene-function analysis, germplasm identification, molecular marker-assisted breeding and resistance-related gene(s) mapping for pine for P. densiflora. PMID:26690126

  14. De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing Analysis of cDNA Library and Large-Scale Unigene Assembly in Japanese Red Pine (Pinus densiflora).

    PubMed

    Liu, Le; Zhang, Shijie; Lian, Chunlan

    2015-01-01

    Japanese red pine (Pinus densiflora) is extensively cultivated in Japan, Korea, China, and Russia and is harvested for timber, pulpwood, garden, and paper markets. However, genetic information and molecular markers were very scarce for this species. In this study, over 51 million sequencing clean reads from P. densiflora mRNA were produced using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. It yielded 83,913 unigenes with a mean length of 751 bp, of which 54,530 (64.98%) unigenes showed similarity to sequences in the NCBI database. Among which the best matches in the NCBI Nr database were Picea sitchensis (41.60%), Amborella trichopoda (9.83%), and Pinus taeda (4.15%). A total of 1953 putative microsatellites were identified in 1784 unigenes using MISA (MicroSAtellite) software, of which the tri-nucleotide repeats were most abundant (50.18%) and 629 EST-SSR (expressed sequence tag- simple sequence repeats) primer pairs were successfully designed. Among 20 EST-SSR primer pairs randomly chosen, 17 markers yielded amplification products of the expected size in P. densiflora. Our results will provide a valuable resource for gene-function analysis, germplasm identification, molecular marker-assisted breeding and resistance-related gene(s) mapping for pine for P. densiflora. PMID:26690126

  15. Sarcocystis species in red deer revisited: with a re-description of two known species as Sarcocystis elongata n. sp. and Sarcocystis truncata n. sp. based on mitochondrial cox1 sequences.

    PubMed

    Gjerde, Bjørn

    2014-03-01

    In a previous investigation, five Sarcocystis species were described from Norwegian red deer and believed to be conspecific with species occurring in either reindeer or moose based on sarcocyst morphology and nucleotide sequences of the nuclear ribosomal DNA unit. The aim of the present study was to characterize numerous isolates of these sarcocyst types at the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (cox1) in order to corroborate or refute previous species designations of Sarcocystis in red deer. The Sarcocystis tarandi- and Sarcocystis rangiferi-like taxa in red deer and reindeer, respectively, were thoroughly compared by sequencing 14-27 isolates of each type. Sequence comparisons revealed four distinct sequence types, which by phylogenetic analyses were placed in four monophyletic groups according to host origin, and they were therefore considered to represent four separate species. The two taxa of this type in red deer were named Sarcocystis elongata and Sarcocystis truncata, respectively. Sequencing of many isolates of Sarcocystis hjorti and Sarcocystis ovalis from red deer and moose confirmed that these species occur in both hosts. A revised description of the two new species is given and the current knowledge concerning all six Sarcocystis species in red deer is reviewed. PMID:24230915

  16. A Search For Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitzer, P.; Lederer, S.; Barker, E.; Cowardin, H.; Abercromby, K.; Silha, J.; Burkhardt, A.

    2011-09-01

    Existing optical surveys for debris at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) have been conducted with meter class telescopes, which have detection limits in the range of 18th-19th magnitude. We report on a new search for optically faint debris at GEO using the 6.5-m Magellan telescope ‘Walter Baade’ at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Our goal is to go as faint as possible and characterize the brightness distribution of debris fainter than R = 20th magnitude, corresponding to a size smaller than 10 cm assuming an albedo of 0.175. We wish to compare the inferred size distribution for GEO debris with that for LEO debris. We describe preliminary results obtained during 9.4 hours of observing time during 25-27 March 2011. We used the IMACS f/2 instrument, which has a mosaic of 8 CCDs, and a field of view of 30 arc-minutes in diameter. This is the widest field of view of any instrument on either Magellan telescope. All observations were obtained through a Sloan r’ filter. The limiting magnitude for 5 second exposures is measured to be fainter tan R = 21. With this small field of view and the limited observing time, our objective was to search for optically faint objects from the Titan 3C Transtage (1968-081) fragmentation in 1992. Eight debris pieces and the parent rocket body are in the Space Surveillance Network public catalog. We successfully tracked two cataloged pieces of Titan debris (SSN # 25001 and 33519) with the 6.5-m telescope, followed by a survey for objects on similar orbits but with a spread in mean anomaly. To detect bright objects over a wider field of view (1.6x1.6 degrees), we observed the same field centers at the same time through a similar filter with the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. We will describe our experiences using Magellan, a telescope never used previously for orbital debris research, and our initial results.

  17. A Search for Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Lederer, Susan M.; Barker, Edwin S.; Cowardin, Heather; Abercromby, Kira J.; ilha, Jiri

    2011-01-01

    Existing optical surveys for debris at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) have been conducted with meter class telescopes, which have detection limits in the range of 18th-19th magnitude. We report on a new search for optically faint debris at GEO using the 6.5-m Magellan 1 telescope Walter Baade at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Our goal is to go as faint as possible and characterize the brightness distribution of debris fainter than R = 20th magnitude, corresponding to a size smaller than 10 cm assuming an albedo of 0.175. We wish to compare the inferred size distribution for GEO debris with that for LEO debris. We describe results obtained during 9.4 hours of observing time during 25-27 March 2011. We used the IMACS f/2 instrument, which has a mosaic of 8 CCDs, and a field of view of 30 arc-minutes in diameter. This is the widest field of view of any instrument on either Magellan telescope. All observations were obtained through a Sloan r filter. The limiting magnitude for 5 second exposures is estimated to be fainter than 22. With this small field of view and the limited observing time, our objective was to search for optically faint objects from the Titan 3C Transtage (1968-081) fragmentation in 1992. Eight debris pieces and the parent rocket body are in the Space Surveillance Network public catalog. We successfully tracked two cataloged pieces of Titan debris (SSN # 25001 and 33519) with the 6.5-m telescope, followed by a survey for objects on similar orbits but with a spread in mean anomaly. To detect bright objects over a wider field of view (1.6x1.6 degrees), we observed the same field centers at the same time through a similar filter with the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. We will describe our experiences using Magellan, a telescope never used previously for orbital debris research, and our initial results.

  18. A unique charged tyrosine-containing member of the adipokinetic hormone/red-pigment-concentrating hormone peptide family isolated and sequenced from two beetle species.

    PubMed

    Gäde, G

    1991-05-01

    An identical neuropeptide was isolated from the corpora cardiaca of two beetle species, Melolontha melolontha and Geotrupes stercorosus. Its primary structure was determined by pulsed-liquid-phase sequencing employing Edman chemistry after enzymically deblocking the N-terminal pyroglutamate residue. The C-terminus was also blocked, as indicated by the lack of digestion when the peptide was incubated with carboxypeptidase A. The sequence of this peptide, which is designated Mem-CC, is pGlu-Leu-Asn-Tyr-Ser-Pro-Asp-Trp-NH2. It is a new member of the adipokinetic hormone/red-pigment-concentrating hormone (AKH/RPCH) family of peptides with two unusual structural features: it is charged and contains a tyrosine residue at position 4, where all other family members have a phenylalanine residue. Structure-activity studies in the migratory locust (Locusta migratoria) and the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) revealed that the peptide was poorly active, owing to its structural uniqueness. PMID:2039445

  19. Revealing a comet-like shape of the faint periphery of the nearby galaxy M 32

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Ts. B.

    2016-02-01

    We performed BVRI photometry of the galaxy M 32 building images and isophote maps in magnitudes and in color indexes. While searching for the faint thick disk of M 32 we apply median filtering with aperture of 7.3 arcmin to detach the residual image of M 32 and its periphery above the surrounding magnitude or color background. The residual images in all photometric systems show that the periphery of M 32 possesses a comet-like shape with a tail oriented to SSE, in a direction opposite to the direction of M 110. The images calibrated in color indexes (b - v) and (b - v)+(r - i) show that the tail is redder than the local median background. The residual images in color indexes show that the red tail broadens and curves in direction towards S and SW. Simultaneously, the brightest part of M 32 occurs bounded from NW-NE-SE sides by a sickle-like formation with a significantly lower red color index. Generally, we do not find a faint thick disk of M 32. However, the comet-like shape on the periphery of M 32, especially as a formation with an increased red color index, provokes involuntarily the impression that the satellite M 32 overtakes the Andromeda galaxy. The redshifts show that the intimacy velocity of M 32 and Andromeda galaxy is about 100 km/s.

  20. Faint object 3D spectroscopy with PMAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Martin M.; Becker, Thomas; Kelz, Andreas; Bohm, Petra

    2004-09-01

    PMAS is a fiber-coupled lens array type of integral field spectrograph, which was commissioned at the Calar Alto 3.5m Telescope in May 2001. The optical layout of the instrument was chosen such as to provide a large wavelength coverage, and good transmission from 0.35 to 1 μm. One of the major objectives of the PMAS development has been to perform 3D spectrophotometry, taking advantage of the contiguous array of spatial elements over the 2-dimensional field-of-view of the integral field unit. With science results obtained during the first two years of operation, we illustrate that 3D spectroscopy is an ideal tool for faint object spectrophotometry.

  1. Orbital objects detection algorithm using faint streaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagawa, Makoto; Yanagisawa, Toshifumi; Kurosaki, Hirohisa; Oda, Hiroshi; Hanada, Toshiya

    2016-02-01

    This study proposes an algorithm to detect orbital objects that are small or moving at high apparent velocities from optical images by utilizing their faint streaks. In the conventional object-detection algorithm, a high signal-to-noise-ratio (e.g., 3 or more) is required, whereas in our proposed algorithm, the signals are summed along the streak direction to improve object-detection sensitivity. Lower signal-to-noise ratio objects were detected by applying the algorithm to a time series of images. The algorithm comprises the following steps: (1) image skewing, (2) image compression along the vertical axis, (3) detection and determination of streak position, (4) searching for object candidates using the time-series streak-position data, and (5) selecting the candidate with the best linearity and reliability. Our algorithm's ability to detect streaks with signals weaker than the background noise was confirmed using images from the Australia Remote Observatory.

  2. Observing Faint Companions Close to Bright Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serabyn, Eugene

    2012-04-01

    Progress in a number of technical areas is enabling imaging and interferometric observations at both smaller angular separations from bright stars and at deeper relative contrast levels. Here we discuss recent progress in several ongoing projects at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. First, extreme adaptive optics wavefront correction has recently enabled the use of very short (i.e., blue) wavelengths to resolve close binaries. Second, phase-based coronagraphy has recently allowed observations of faint companions to within nearly one diffraction beam width of bright stars. Finally, rotating interferometers that can observe inside the diffraction beam of single aperture telescopes are being developed to detect close-in companions and bright exozodiacal dust. This paper presents a very brief summary of the techniques involved, along with some illustrative results.

  3. Searching for Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Lederer, Susan M.; Abercromby, Kira J.; Barker, Edwin S.; Burkhardt, Andrew; Cowardin, Heather; Krisko, Paula; Silha, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    We report on results from a search for optically faint debris (defined as R > 20th magnitude, or smaller than 10 cm assuming an albedo of 0.175)) at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) using the 6.5-m Magellan telescope "Walter Baade" at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Our goal is to characterize the brightness distribution of debris to the faintest limiting magnitude possible. Our data was obtained during 6 hours of observing time during the photometric nights of 26 and 27 March 2011 with the IMACS f/2 instrument, which has a field of view (fov) of 0.5 degrees in diameter. All observations were obtained through a Sloan r filter, and calibrated by observations of Landolt standard stars. Our primary objective was to search for optically faint objects from one of the few known fragmentations at GEO: the Titan 3C Transtage (1968-081) fragmentation in 1992. Eight debris pieces and the parent rocket body are in the Space Surveillance Network public catalog. We successfully tracked two cataloged pieces of Titan debris with the 6.5-m telescope, followed by a survey for unknown objects on similar orbits but with different mean anomalies. To establish the bright end of the debris population, calibrated observations were acquired on the same field centers, telescope rates, and time period with a similar filter on the 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), located 100 km to the south of Magellan at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. We will show the calibrated brightness distributions from both telescopes, and compare the observed brightness distributions with that predicted for various population models of debris of different sizes.

  4. First Results from the ISO-IRAS Faint Galaxy Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolstencroft, R. D.; Wehrle, A. E.; Levine, D. A.

    1997-01-01

    We present the first result from the ISO-IRAS Faint Galaxy Survey (IIFGS), a program designed to obtain ISO observations of the most distant and luminous galaxies in the IRAS Faint Source Survey by filling short gaps in the ISO observing schedule with pairs of 12um ISOCAM AND 90um ISOPHOT observation.

  5. MEASURING THE UNDETECTABLE: PROPER MOTIONS AND PARALLAXES OF VERY FAINT SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Dustin; Hogg, David W.; Jester, Sebastian; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2009-05-15

    The near future of astrophysics involves many large solid-angle, multi-epoch, multiband imaging surveys. These surveys will, at their faint limits, have data on a large number of sources that are too faint to be detected at any individual epoch. Here, we show that it is possible to measure in multi-epoch data not only the fluxes and positions, but also the parallaxes and proper motions of sources that are too faint to be detected at any individual epoch. The method involves fitting a model of a moving point source simultaneously to all imaging, taking account of the noise and point-spread function (PSF) in each image. By this method it is possible to measure the proper motion of a point source with an uncertainty close to the minimum possible uncertainty given the information in the data, which is limited by the PSF, the distribution of observation times (epochs), and the total signal-to-noise in the combined data. We demonstrate our technique on multi-epoch Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging of the SDSS Southern Stripe (SDSSSS). We show that with our new technique we can use proper motions to distinguish very red brown dwarfs from very high-redshift quasars in these SDSS data, for objects that are inaccessible to traditional techniques, and with better fidelity than by multiband imaging alone. We rediscover all 10 known brown dwarfs in our sample and present nine new candidate brown dwarfs, identified on the basis of significant proper motion.

  6. A Peculiar Faint Satellite in the Remote Outer Halo of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, A. D.; Huxor, A. P.; Martin, N. F.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Dotter, A.; McConnachie, A. W.; Ibata, R. A.; Irwin, M. J.; Lewis, G. F.; Sakari, C. M.; Tanvir, N. R.; Venn, K. A.

    2013-06-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope imaging of a newly discovered faint stellar system, PAndAS-48, in the outskirts of the M31 halo. Our photometry reveals this object to be comprised of an ancient and very metal-poor stellar population with age >~ 10 Gyr and [Fe/H] lsim -2.3. Our inferred distance modulus (m - M)0 = 24.57 ± 0.11 confirms that PAndAS-48 is most likely a remote M31 satellite with a three-dimensional galactocentric radius of 149^{+19}_{-8} kpc. We observe an apparent spread in color on the upper red giant branch that is larger than the photometric uncertainties should allow, and briefly explore the implications of this. Structurally, PAndAS-48 is diffuse, faint, and moderately flattened, with a half-light radius r_h=26^{+4}_{-3} pc, integrated luminosity MV = -4.8 ± 0.5, and ellipticity \\epsilon =0.30^{+0.08}_{-0.15}. On the size-luminosity plane it falls between the extended globular clusters seen in several nearby galaxies and the recently discovered faint dwarf satellites of the Milky Way; however, its characteristics do not allow us to unambiguously classify it as either type of system. If PAndAS-48 is a globular cluster then it is among the most elliptical, isolated, and metal-poor of any seen in the Local Group, extended or otherwise. Conversely, while its properties are generally consistent with those observed for the faint Milky Way dwarfs, it would be a factor of ~2-3 smaller in spatial extent than any known counterpart of comparable luminosity. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO 12515.

  7. A PECULIAR FAINT SATELLITE IN THE REMOTE OUTER HALO OF M31

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, A. D.; Dotter, A.; Huxor, A. P.; Martin, N. F.; Ibata, R. A.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; McConnachie, A. W.; Irwin, M. J.; Lewis, G. F.; Sakari, C. M.; Venn, K. A.; Tanvir, N. R.

    2013-06-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope imaging of a newly discovered faint stellar system, PAndAS-48, in the outskirts of the M31 halo. Our photometry reveals this object to be comprised of an ancient and very metal-poor stellar population with age {approx}> 10 Gyr and [Fe/H] {approx}< -2.3. Our inferred distance modulus (m - M){sub 0} = 24.57 {+-} 0.11 confirms that PAndAS-48 is most likely a remote M31 satellite with a three-dimensional galactocentric radius of 149{sup +19}{sub -8} kpc. We observe an apparent spread in color on the upper red giant branch that is larger than the photometric uncertainties should allow, and briefly explore the implications of this. Structurally, PAndAS-48 is diffuse, faint, and moderately flattened, with a half-light radius r{sub h}=26{sup +4}{sub -3} pc, integrated luminosity M{sub V} = -4.8 {+-} 0.5, and ellipticity {epsilon}=0.30{sup +0.08}{sub -0.15}. On the size-luminosity plane it falls between the extended globular clusters seen in several nearby galaxies and the recently discovered faint dwarf satellites of the Milky Way; however, its characteristics do not allow us to unambiguously classify it as either type of system. If PAndAS-48 is a globular cluster then it is among the most elliptical, isolated, and metal-poor of any seen in the Local Group, extended or otherwise. Conversely, while its properties are generally consistent with those observed for the faint Milky Way dwarfs, it would be a factor of {approx}2-3 smaller in spatial extent than any known counterpart of comparable luminosity.

  8. Expressed sequence tags from the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta: annotation and utilization for discovery of viruses.

    PubMed

    Valles, Steven M; Strong, Charles A; Hunter, Wayne B; Dang, Phat M; Pereira, Roberto M; Oi, David H; Williams, David F

    2008-09-01

    An expression library was created and 2304 clones sequenced from a monogyne colony of Solenopsis invicta. The primary intention of the project was to utilize homologous gene identification to facilitate discovery of viruses infecting this ant pest that could potentially be used in pest management. Additional genes were identified from the ant host and associated pathogens that serve as an important resource for studying these organisms. After assembly and removal of mitochondrial and poor quality sequences, 1054 unique sequences were yielded and deposited into the GenBank database under Accession Nos. EH412746 through EH413799. At least nine expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were identified as possessing microsatellite motifs and 15 ESTs exhibited significant homology with microsporidian genes. These sequences most likely originated from Thelohania solenopsae, a well-characterized microsporidian that infects S. invicta. Six ESTs exhibited significant homology with single-stranded RNA viruses (3B4, 3F6, 11F1, 12G12, 14D5, and 24C10). Subsequent analysis of these putative viral ESTs revealed that 3B4 was most likely a ribosomal gene of S. invicta, 11F1 was a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) virus contaminant introduced into the colony from the cricket food source, 12G12 appeared to be a plant-infecting tenuivirus also introduced into the colony as a field contaminant, and 3F6, 14D5, and 24C10 were all from a unique ssRNA virus found to infect S. invicta. The sequencing project illustrates the utility of this method for discovery of viruses and pathogens that may otherwise go undiscovered. PMID:18329665

  9. Is the faint young Sun paradox solved?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, E. T.; Toon, O. B.

    2013-12-01

    How did the early Earth remain warm despite weak solar luminosity? The faint young Sun paradox has stubbornly resisted a self-consistent solution since it was first introduced by Sagan and Mullen [1] over four decades ago. However, recent revisions to expected paleo-ocean temperatures [2, 3] along with new results from three-dimensional climate models [4] may allow this long standing problem to be finally put to rest. Here we use a modified version of the Community Atmosphere Model version 3 from the National Center for Atmospheric Research to study early climate. We find that resolving the faint young Sun paradox becomes less problematic when viewing a full representation of the climate system. For the late Archean climate (80% solar constant), relatively modest amounts of CO2 (≤0.02 bar) and CH4 (0.001 bar) yield surface temperatures equal to the present day with no other alterations to climate. Cooler climates with large ice caps but with temperate tropical regions can be supported with considerably smaller greenhouse gas burdens. The incorporation of systematic climate system elements expected for the Archean such as fewer cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) [5], reduced land albedos [5], and an increased atmospheric inventory of N2 [6], can provide a combined 10 to 20 K of additional surface warming given reasonable assumptions. With the inclusion of 0.001 bar of CH4, 2 PAL of N2, reduced land albedos, and reduced CCN, present day mean surface temperatures can be maintained for the earliest Archean (75% solar constant) with only ~0.01 bar of CO2. However, lower requirements for atmospheric CO2 may imply that photochemical hazes were frequent during the Archean. [1] Sagan, C., & Mullen, G. Science 177, 52 (1972) [2] Hren, M.T., Tice, M.M., & Chamberlin, C.P. Nature 462, 205 (2009) [3] Blake. R.E., Chang, S.J., & Lepland, A. Nature 464, 1029 (2010) [4] Wolf, E.T., & Toon, O.B. Astrobiology 13(7), 1 (2013) [5] Rosing, M.T., Bird, D.K., Sleep, N.H., & Bjerrum, C

  10. Genome Sequence of the Red Pigment-Forming Meiothermus taiwanensis Strain RP Isolated from Paniphala Hot Spring, India

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Trinetra; Bose, Sucharita; Sen, Urmimala; Roy, Chayan; Rameez, Moidu Jameela; Ghosh, Wriddhiman

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the draft genome sequence of Meiothermus taiwanensis strain RP (MCC 2966), isolated from the Paniphala hot spring of India, which contains genes encoding for enzymes of the methyl erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis and carotenoid backbone synthesis. PMID:27365353

  11. Genome Sequence of the Red Pigment-Forming Meiothermus taiwanensis Strain RP Isolated from Paniphala Hot Spring, India.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Trinetra; Bose, Sucharita; Sen, Urmimala; Roy, Chayan; Rameez, Moidu Jameela; Ghosh, Wriddhiman; Mukhopadhyay, Subhra Kanti

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the draft genome sequence of Meiothermus taiwanensis strain RP (MCC 2966), isolated from the Paniphala hot spring of India, which contains genes encoding for enzymes of the methyl erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis and carotenoid backbone synthesis. PMID:27365353

  12. THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF INTERACTIVE BINARY STARS TO DOUBLE MAIN-SEQUENCE TURNOFFS AND DUAL RED CLUMP OF INTERMEDIATE-AGE STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Wuming; Bi Shaolan; Tian Zhijia; Li Tanda; Liu Kang; Meng Xiangcun E-mail: woomyang@gmail.com

    2011-04-20

    Double or extended main-sequence turnoffs (DMSTOs) and dual red clump (RC) were observed in intermediate-age clusters, such as in NGC 1846 and 419. The DMSTOs are interpreted as that the cluster has two distinct stellar populations with differences in age of about 200-300 Myr but with the same metallicity. The dual RC is interpreted as a result of a prolonged star formation. Using a stellar population-synthesis method, we calculated the evolution of a binary-star stellar population. We found that binary interactions and merging can reproduce the dual RC in the color-magnitude diagrams of an intermediate-age cluster, whereas in actuality only a single population exists. Moreover, the binary interactions can lead to an extended main-sequence turnoff (MSTO) rather than DMSTOs. However, the rest of the main sequence, subgiant branch, and first giant branch are hardly spread by the binary interactions. Part of the observed dual RC and extended MSTO may be the results of binary interactions and mergers.

  13. Carbon Dioxide Cycling, Climate, Impacts, and the Faint Young Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, K. J.; Sleep, H. H.

    1999-01-01

    Evidence for relatively mild climates on ancient Earth and Mars has been a puzzle in light of the faint early sun. The geologic evidence, although far from conclusive, would appear to indicate that the surfaces of both planets were, if anything, warmer ca. 3-4 Ga than they are now. The astrophysical argument that the sun ought to have brightened approx. 30% since it reached the main sequence is hard to refute. There results a paradox between the icehouse we expect and the greenhouse we think we see. The usual fix has been to posit massive CO2 atmospheres, although reduced gases (e.g., NH3 or CH4 ) have had their partisans. Evidence against siderite in paleosols dated 2.2-2.75 Ga sets a rough upper limit of 30 PAL (present atmospheric levels) on pCO2 at that time. This is an order of magnitude short of what is needed to defeat the fainter sun. We present here an independent argument against high pCO2 on early Earth that applies not only to the Archean but yet more forcefully to the Hadean era. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  14. Accurate shear measurement with faint sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Foucaud, Sebastien; Luo, Wentao E-mail: walt@shao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    For cosmic shear to become an accurate cosmological probe, systematic errors in the shear measurement method must be unambiguously identified and corrected for. Previous work of this series has demonstrated that cosmic shears can be measured accurately in Fourier space in the presence of background noise and finite pixel size, without assumptions on the morphologies of galaxy and PSF. The remaining major source of error is source Poisson noise, due to the finiteness of source photon number. This problem is particularly important for faint galaxies in space-based weak lensing measurements, and for ground-based images of short exposure times. In this work, we propose a simple and rigorous way of removing the shear bias from the source Poisson noise. Our noise treatment can be generalized for images made of multiple exposures through MultiDrizzle. This is demonstrated with the SDSS and COSMOS/ACS data. With a large ensemble of mock galaxy images of unrestricted morphologies, we show that our shear measurement method can achieve sub-percent level accuracy even for images of signal-to-noise ratio less than 5 in general, making it the most promising technique for cosmic shear measurement in the ongoing and upcoming large scale galaxy surveys.

  15. Spectral Indices of Faint Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gim, Hansung B.; Hales, Christopher A.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Yun, Min Su

    2015-01-01

    The significant improvement in bandwidth and the resultant sensitivity offered by the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) allows us to explore the faint radio source population. Through the study of the radio continuum we can explore the spectral indices of these radio sources. Robust radio spectral indices are needed for accurate k-corrections, for example in the study of the radio - far-infrared (FIR) correlation. We present an analysis of measuring spectral indices using two different approaches. In the first, we use the standard wideband imaging algorithm in the data reduction package CASA. In the second, we use a traditional approach of imaging narrower bandwidths to derive the spectral indices. For these, we simulated data to match the observing parameter space of the CHILES Con Pol survey (Hales et al. 2014). We investigate the accuracy and precision of spectral index measurements as a function of signal-to noise, and explore the requirements to reliably probe possible evolution of the radio-FIR correlation in CHILES Con Pol.

  16. Detection of Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, P.; Lederer, S.; Barker, E.; Cowardin, H.; Abercromby, K.; Silha, J.; Burkhardt, A.

    2014-01-01

    There have been extensive optical surveys for debris at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) conducted with meter-class telescopes, such as those conducted with MODEST (the Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope, a 0.6-m telescope located at Cerro Tololo in Chile), and the European Space Agency's 1.0-m space debris telescope (SDT) in the Canary Islands. These surveys have detection limits in the range of 18th or 19th magnitude, which corresponds to sizes larger than 10 cm assuming an albedo of 0.175. All of these surveys reveal a substantial population of objects fainter than R = 15th magnitude that are not in the public U.S. Satellite Catalog. To detect objects fainter than 20th magnitude (and presumably smaller than 10 cm) in the visible requires a larger telescope and excellent imaging conditions. This combination is available in Chile. NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office has begun collecting orbital debris observations with the 6.5-m (21.3-ft diameter) "Walter Baade" Magellan telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. The goal is to detect objects as faint as possible from a ground-based observatory and begin to understand the brightness distribution of GEO debris fainter than R = 20th magnitude.

  17. DISCOVERY OF A NEW FAINT DWARF GALAXY ASSOCIATED WITH NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    Sand, D. J.; Crnojević, D.; Strader, J.; Toloba, E.; Guhathakurta, P.; Caldwell, N.; McLeod, B.; Seth, A. C.

    2014-09-20

    We report the discovery of a new faint dwarf galaxy, which we dub Scl-MM-Dw1, at a projected distance of ∼65 kpc from the spiral galaxy NGC 253. The discovery results from the Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor (PISCeS), a program with the Magellan/Megacam imager to study faint substructure in resolved stellar light around massive galaxies outside of the Local Group. We measure a tip of the red giant branch distance to Scl-MM-Dw1 of D = 3.9 ± 0.5 Mpc, consistent with that of NGC 253, making their association likely. The new dwarf's stellar population is complex, with an old, metal-poor red giant branch (≳10 Gyr, [Fe/H] ∼ –2), and an asymptotic giant branch with an age of ∼500 Myr. Scl-MM-Dw1 has a half-light radius of r{sub h} = 340 ± 50 pc and an absolute magnitude of M{sub V}  = –10.3 ± 0.6 mag, comparable to the Milky Way's satellites at the same luminosity. Once complete, our imaging survey of NGC 253 and other nearby massive galaxies will provide a census of faint substructure in halos beyond the Local Group, both to put our own environment into context and to confront models of hierarchical structure formation.

  18. Seismic strain tensor in the area to the South of Ras Mohamed region during the November-December, 2011 seismic sequence, Northern Red Sea, Egypt.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Gad-Elkareem; Abdallah, Saud

    2016-04-01

    We calculated the strain tensor for a sequence of earthquakes that occurred in front of Ras Mohamed, Northern Red Sea within the period from 19th November up to 31st of December 2011. The value and the direction of the strain are evaluated based on a reliable number of focal mechanism solutions. Most of the solutions indicate the dominance of normal faulting. The principal strain axis shows that the deformation is taken up mainly as an extension in the NE-SW direction with a very small crustal thinning rate. The orientation of the principal strain axes deduced from the eigenvectors is in good agreement with the main trend of the focal mechanisms of the selected events (normal type faulting).

  19. Spectroscopic Confirmation of Three Red-sequence Selected Galaxy Clusters at z = 0.87, 1.16, and 1.21 from the SpARCS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demarco, Ricardo; Wilson, Gillian; Muzzin, Adam; Lacy, Mark; Surace, Jason; Yee, H. K. C.; Hoekstra, Henk; Blindert, Kris; Gilbank, David

    2010-03-01

    The Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-sequence Cluster Survey (SpARCS) is a z'-passband imaging survey of the 50 deg2 Spitzer SWIRE Legacy fields, designed with the primary aim of creating the first large, homogeneously selected sample of massive clusters at z > 1. SpARCS uses an infrared adaptation of the two-filter cluster red-sequence technique. In this paper, we report Keck/LRIS spectroscopic confirmation of two new exceptionally rich galaxy clusters, SpARCS J161315+564930 at z = 0.871 ± 0.002, with 14 high-confidence members and a rest-frame velocity dispersion of σ v = 1230 ± 320 km s-1, and SpARCS J161641+554513 at z = 1.161 ± 0.003, with seven high-confidence members (including one active galactic nucleus) and a rest-frame velocity dispersion of σ v = 950 ± 330 km s-1. We also report confirmation of a third new system, SpARCS J161037+552417 at z = 1.210 ± 0.002, with seven high-confidence members and a rest-frame velocity dispersion of σ v = 410 ± 300 km s-1. These three new spectroscopically confirmed clusters further demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of two-filter imaging for detecting bona fide galaxy clusters at high redshift. We conclude by demonstrating that prospects are good for the current generation of surveys aiming to estimate cluster redshifts and masses at z >~ 1 directly from optical-infrared imaging. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  20. Spectroscopic Confirmation of Two Massive Red-sequence-selected Galaxy Clusters at Z Approximately Equal to 1.2 in the Sparcs-North Cluster Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muzzin, Adam; Wilson, Gillian; Yee, H.K.C.; Hoekstra, Henk; Gilbank, David; Surace, Jason; Lacy, Mark; Blindert, Kris; Majumdar, Subhabrata; Demarco, Ricardo; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Gladders, Mike; Lonsdale, Carol

    2008-01-01

    The Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-sequence Cluster Survey (SpARCS) is a deep z -band imaging survey covering the Spitzer SWIRE Legacy fields designed to create the first large homogeneously-selected sample of massive clusters at z > 1 using an infrared adaptation of the cluster red-sequence method. We present an overview of the northern component of the survey which has been observed with CFHT/MegaCam and covers 28.3 deg(sup 2). The southern component of the survey was observed with CTIO/MOSAICII, covers 13.6 deg(sup 2), and is summarized in a companion paper by Wilson et al. (2008). We also present spectroscopic confirmation of two rich cluster candidates at z approx. 1.2. Based on Nod-and- Shuffle spectroscopy from GMOS-N on Gemini there are 17 and 28 confirmed cluster members in SpARCS J163435+402151 and SpARCS J163852+403843 which have spectroscopic redshifts of 1.1798 and 1.1963, respectively. The clusters have velocity dispersions of 490 +/- 140 km/s and 650 +/- 160 km/s, respectively which imply masses (M(sub 200)) of (1.0 +/- 0.9) x 10(exp 14) Stellar Mass and (2.4 +/- 1.8) x 10(exp 14) Stellar Mass. Confirmation of these candidates as bonafide massive clusters demonstrates that two-filter imaging is an effective, yet observationally efficient, method for selecting clusters at z > 1.

  1. Chemical abundances in the multiple sub-giant branch of 47 Tucanae: insights on its faint sub-giant branch component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, A. F.; Milone, A. P.; Casagrande, L.; Collet, R.; Dotter, A.; Johnson, C. I.; Lind, K.; Bedin, L. R.; Jerjen, H.; Aparicio, A.; Sbordone, L.

    2016-06-01

    The globular cluster 47 Tuc exhibits a complex sub-giant branch (SGB) with a faint-SGB comprising only about the 10 per cent of the cluster mass and a bright-SGB hosting at least two distinct populations. We present a spectroscopic analysis of 62 SGB stars including 21 faint-SGB stars. We thus provide the first chemical analysis of the intriguing faint-SGB population and compare its abundances with those of the dominant populations. We have inferred abundances of Fe, representative light elements C, N, Na, and Al, α elements Mg and Si for individual stars. Oxygen has been obtained by co-adding spectra of stars on different sequences. In addition, we have analysed 12 stars along the two main RGBs of 47 Tuc. Our principal results are (i) star-to-star variations in C/N/Na among RGB and bright-SGB stars; (ii) substantial N and Na enhancements for the minor population corresponding to the faint-SGB; (iii) no high enrichment in C+N+O for faint-SGB stars. Specifically, the C+N+O of the faint-SGB is a factor of 1.1 higher than the bright-SGB, which, considering random (±1.3) plus systematic errors (±0.3), means that their C+N+O is consistent within observational uncertainties. However, a small C+N+O enrichment for the faint-SGB, similar to what predicted on theoretical ground, cannot be excluded. The N and Na enrichment of the faint-SGB qualitatively agrees with this population possibly being He-enhanced, as suggested by theory. The iron abundance of the bright and faint-SGB is the same to a level of ˜0.10 dex, and no other significant difference for the analysed elements has been detected.

  2. Faint solar radio structures from decametric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briand, C.; Zaslavsky, A.; Maksimovic, M.; Zarka, P.; Lecacheux, A.; Rucker, H. O.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Abranin, E. P.; Dorovsky, V. V.; Stanislavsky, A. A.; Melnik, V. N.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: Decameter radio observations of the solar corona reveal the presence of numerous faint frequency drifting emissions, similar to “solar S bursts” which are reported in the literature. We present a statistical analysis of the characteristics of these emissions and propose a mechanism to excite the Langmuir waves thought to be at the origin of these emissions. Methods: The observations were performed between 1998 and 2002 with the Digital Spectro Polarimeter (DSP) receivers operated at the UTR-2 and Nançay decameter radio telescopes in the frequency range 15-30 MHz. Our theoretical explanation is based on Vlasov-Ampère simulations. Results: Based on the frequency drift rate, three populations of structures can be identified. The largest population presents an average negative frequency drift of -0.9 MHz s-1 and a lifetime up to 11 s (median value of 2.72 s). A second population shows a very small frequency drift of -0.1 MHz s-1 and a short lifetime of about 1 s. The third population presents an average positive frequency drift of +0.95 MHz s-1 and a lifetime of up to 3 s. Also, the frequency drift as a function of frequency is consistent with the former results, which present results in higher frequency range. No specific relationship was found between the occurrence of these emissions and the solar cycle or presence of flares. Assuming that these emissions are produced by “electron clouds” propagating the solar corona, we deduce electron velocities of about 3-5 times the electron thermal velocity. As previously shown, a localized, time-dependent modulation of the electron distribution function (heating) leads to low velocity electron clouds (consistent with observations), which, in turn, can generate Langmuir waves and electromagnetic signals by nonlinear processes.

  3. Clouds and the Faint Young Sun Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldblatt, C.; Zahnle, K. J.

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the role which clouds could play in resolving the Faint Young Sun Paradox (FYSP). Lower solar luminosity in the past means that less energy was absorbed on Earth (a forcing of -50 W m-2 during the late Archean), but geological evidence points to the Earth having been at least as warm as it is today, with only very occasional glaciations. We perform radiative calculations on a single global mean atmospheric column. We select a nominal set of three layered, randomly overlapping clouds, which are both consistent with observed cloud climatologies and reproduced the observed global mean energy budget of Earth. By varying the fraction, thickness, height and particle size of these clouds we conduct a wide exploration of how changed clouds could affect climate, thus constraining how clouds could contribute to resolving the FYSP. Low clouds reflect sunlight but have little greenhouse effect. Removing them entirely gives a forcing of +25 W m-2 whilst more modest reduction in their efficacy gives a forcing of +10 to +15 W m-2. For high clouds, the greenhouse effect dominates. It is possible to generate +50 W m-2 forcing from enhancing these, but this requires making them 3.5 times thicker and 14 K colder than the standard high cloud in our nominal set and expanding their coverage to 100% of the sky. Such changes are not credible. More plausible changes would generate no more than +15 W m-2 forcing. Thus neither fewer low clouds nor more high clouds can provide enough forcing to resolve the FYSP. Decreased surface albedo can contribute no more than +5 W m-2 forcing. Some models which have been applied to the FYSP do not include clouds at all. These overestimate the forcing due to increased CO2 by 20 to 25% when pCO2 is 0.01 to 0.1 bar.

  4. The ISO-IRAS Faint Galaxy Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Harding E.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the ISO-IRAS Faint Galaxy Survey ISO Satellite observations of over 600 IRAS sources have been obtained with the ISOCAM instrument. Because our survey strategy involved relatively short integrations, great care was required in developing analysis software including cosmic-ray and transient removal and calibration. These observations have now been through final pipeline processing at IPAC and ground-based follow-up is ongoing. The observations are for sources from two samples: a " Filler' sample selected to be at z greater than 0.1 and a fainter sample which selected for the highest redshift galaxies in the IRAS survey, with redshifts 0.2 less than z less than 1.0. I now have obtained ground-based follow-up spectrophotometry at Lick and Palomar observatories for 100 LFIRGs with 0.1 less than z less than 0.7. Our observations have confirmed that these systems are comparable to nearby LFIRGs such as Arp 220, with L (sub -)(fir) greater than 10(exp 11) L(sub -) sun and typically HII/Liner optical excitation. About 10% of the galaxies show true AGN (Sy2) excitation. Based on our work on a nearby complete sample of LFIRGS, we believe that the majority of these systems are luminous Starbursts, thus this project is tracing the luminous end of the galaxy star-forming luminosity function - the (infrared) star-formation history of the Universe to z approx. 1, a topic of some considerable recent interest. A by-product of these ISOCAM observations is approximately 1 square degree of deep 2 microns pointings outside the IRAS error boxes, allowing us an independent estimate of the mid-infrared log N - log S relation. Ground-based observations of this sample are continuing.

  5. a Faint and Lonely Brown Dwarf in the Solar Vicinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-04-01

    Discovery of KELU-1 Promises New Insights into Strange Objects Brown Dwarfs are star-like objects which are too small to become real stars, yet too large to be real planets. Their mass is too small to ignite those nuclear processes which are responsible for the large energies and high temperatures of stars, but it is much larger than that of the planets we know in our solar system. Until now, very few Brown Dwarfs have been securely identified as such. Two are members of double-star systems, and a few more are located deep within the Pleiades star cluster. Now, however, Maria Teresa Ruiz of the Astronomy Department at Universidad de Chile (Santiago de Chile), using telescopes at the ESO La Silla observatory, has just discovered one that is all alone and apparently quite near to us. Contrary to the others which are influenced by other objects in their immediate surroundings, this new Brown Dwarf is unaffected and will thus be a perfect object for further investigations that may finally allow us to better understand these very interesting celestial bodies. It has been suggested that Brown Dwarfs may constitute a substantial part of the unseen dark matter in our Galaxy. This discovery may therefore also have important implications for this highly relevant research area. Searching for nearby faint stars The story of this discovery goes back to 1987 when Maria Teresa Ruiz decided to embark upon a long-term search (known as the Calan-ESO proper-motion survey ) for another type of unusual object, the so-called White Dwarfs , i.e. highly evolved, small and rather faint stars. Although they have masses similar to that of the Sun, such stars are no larger than the Earth and are therefore extremely compact. They are particularly interesting, because they most probably represent the future end point of evolution of our Sun, some billions of years from now. For this project, the Chilean astronomer obtained large-field photographic exposures with the 1-m ESO Schmidt telescope at

  6. NASA Researches the 'FaINT' Side of Sonic Booms

    NASA Video Gallery

    As the latest in a continuing progression of NASA supersonics research projects aimed at reducing or mitigating the effect of sonic booms, the Farfield Investigation of No Boom Threshold, or FaINT,...

  7. Astronomical capabilities of the Faint Object Spectrograph on Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harms, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Examples of scientific observing programs planned with the Faint Object Spectrograph on Space Telescope are presented. An overview of the spectrograph design and operation is presented. The expected astronomical performance of the instrument is described in some detail.

  8. A comparison of coding sequence and cytogenetic localization of the myostatin gene in the dog, red fox, arctic fox and Chinese raccoon dog.

    PubMed

    Grzes, M; Nowacka-Woszuk, J; Szczerbal, I; Czerwinska, J; Gracz, J; Switonski, M

    2009-01-01

    The gene encoding myostatin (MSTN), due to its crucial function for growth of skeletal muscle mass, is an important candidate for muscularity. In this study we analyzed the nucleotide sequence and FISH localization of this gene in 4 canids, including 3 farm species. The nucleotide sequence of the MSTN coding fragment turned out to be highly conserved, since its identity among the studied species was very high and varied between 99.4 and 99.7%. Only 1, widely spread, silent single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was found in exon 1 of the Chinese raccoon dog. The MSTN gene was localized close to the centromere in one-armed chromosomes of the dog (37q11) and bi-armed chromosomes of the red fox (16p11) and arctic fox (10q11), with an exception of the Chinese raccoon dog chromosome (2q14-q21). This chromosome is orthologous to 3 canine chromosomes and thus the MSTN was found more interstitially. Our results are in agreement with the hypothesis that karyotypes of the canids evolved mainly through centric fusion/fission events, while tandem fusions occurred rarely. PMID:20016167

  9. THE ORIGIN OF [O II] IN POST-STARBURST AND RED-SEQUENCE GALAXIES IN HIGH-REDSHIFT CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Lemaux, B. C.; Lubin, L. M.; Kocevski, D.; Shapley, A.; Gal, R. R.; Squires, G. K.

    2010-06-20

    We present the first results from a near-IR spectroscopic campaign of the Cl1604 supercluster at z {approx} 0.9 and the cluster RX J1821.6+6827 at z {approx} 0.82 to investigate the nature of [O II] {lambda}3727 emission in cluster galaxies at high redshift. Of the 401 members in Cl1604 and RX J1821+6827 confirmed using the Keck II/DEIMOS spectrograph, 131 galaxies have detectable [O II] emission with no other signs of current star formation activity, as well as strong absorption features indicative of a well-established older stellar population. The combination of these features suggests that the primary source of [O II] emission in these galaxies is not a result of star formation processes, but rather due to the presence of a low-ionization nuclear emission-line region (LINER) or Seyfert component. Using the NIRSPEC spectrograph on the Keck II 10 m telescope, 19 such galaxies were targeted, as well as 6 additional [O II]-emitting cluster members that exhibited signs of ongoing star formation activity. Nearly half ({approx}47%) of the 19 [O II]-emitting, absorption-line-dominated galaxies exhibit [O II] to H{alpha} equivalent width (EW) ratios higher than unity, the typical observed value for star-forming galaxies, with an EW distribution similar to that observed for LINERs at low redshift. A majority ({approx}68%) of these 19 galaxies are classified as LINER/Seyfert based primarily on the emission-line ratio of [N II] {lambda}6584 and H{alpha}. The fraction of LINER/Seyferts increases to {approx}85% for red [O II]-emitting, absorption-line-dominated galaxies. The LINER/Seyfert galaxies in our Cl1604 sample exhibit average L([O II])/L(H{alpha}) ratios that are significantly higher than that observed in populations of star-forming galaxies, suggesting that [O II] is a poor indicator of star formation in a significant fraction of high-redshift cluster members. From the prevalence of [O II]-emitting, absorption-line-dominated galaxies in both systems and the fraction

  10. Seeing Red

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    volcanos. Though the plume deposits are red, the plume itself is blue, because it is composed of very tiny particles that preferentially scatter blue light, like smoke. Also faintly visible in the left image is the pale-colored Prometheus plume, almost on the edge of the disk on the equator at the 9 o'clock position.

    Io was 2.4 million kilometers from the spacecraft when the picture was taken, and the center of Io's disk is at 77 degrees West longitude, 5 degrees South latitude. The solar phase angle was 107 degrees.

  11. The Role of Major Gas-rich Mergers on the Evolution of Galaxies from the Blue Cloud to the Red Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Rui; Hao, Cai-Na; Xia, X. Y.; Mao, Shude; Shi, Yong

    2016-07-01

    With the aim of exploring the fast evolutionary path from the blue cloud of star-forming galaxies to the red sequence of quiescent galaxies in the local universe, we select a local advanced merging infrared luminous and ultraluminous galaxy (adv-merger (U)LIRGs) sample and perform careful dust extinction corrections to investigate their positions in the star formation rate–M *, u ‑ r, and NUV ‑ r color–mass diagrams. The sample consists of 89 (U)LIRGs at the late merger stage, obtained from cross-correlating the Infrared Astronomical Satellite Point Source Catalog Redshift Survey and 1 Jy ULIRGs samples with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 database. Our results show that 74 % +/- 5 % of adv-merger (U)LIRGs are localized above the 1σ line of the local star-forming galaxy main sequence. We also find that all adv-merger (U)LIRGs are more massive than and as blue as the blue cloud galaxies after corrections for Galactic and internal dust extinctions, with 95 % +/- 2 % and 81 % +/- 4 % of them outside the blue cloud on the u ‑ r and NUV ‑ r color–mass diagrams, respectively. These results, combined with the short timescale for exhausting the molecular gas reservoir in adv-merger (U)LIRGs (3× {10}7 to 3× {10}8 years), imply that the adv-merger (U)LIRGs are likely at the starting point of the fast evolutionary track previously proposed by several groups. While the number density of adv-merger (U)LIRGs is only ∼ 0.1 % of the blue cloud star-forming galaxies in the local universe, this evolutionary track may play a more important role at high redshift.

  12. The faint galaxy contribution to the diffuse extragalactic background light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Shaun; Treyer, Marie-Agnes; Silk, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Models of the faint galaxy contribution to the diffuse extragalactic background light are presented, which are consistent with current data on faint galaxy number counts and redshifts. The autocorrelation function of surface brightness fluctuations in the extragalactic diffuse light is predicted, and the way in which these predictions depend on the cosmological model and assumptions of biasing is determined. It is confirmed that the recent deep infrared number counts are most compatible with a high density universe (Omega-0 is approximately equal to 1) and that the steep blue counts then require an extra population of rapidly evolving blue galaxies. The faintest presently detectable galaxies produce an interesting contribution to the extragalactic diffuse light, and still fainter galaxies may also produce a significant contribution. These faint galaxies still only produce a small fraction of the total optical diffuse background light, but on scales of a few arcminutes to a few degrees, they produce a substantial fraction of the fluctuations in the diffuse light.

  13. Chemical enrichment in Ultra-Faint Dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Donatella

    2016-08-01

    Our view of the Milky Way's satellite population has radically changed after the discovery, ten years ago, of the first Ultra-Faint Dwarf galaxies (UFDs). These extremely faint, dark-matter dominated, scarcely evolved stellar systems are found in ever-increasing number in our cosmic neighbourhood and constitute a gold-mine for studies of early star formation conditions and early chemical enrichment pathways. Here we show what can be learned from the measurements of chemical abundances in UFD stars read through the lens of chemical evolution studies, point out the limitations of the classic approach, and discuss the way to go to improve the models.

  14. CONFIRMATION OF FAINT DWARF GALAXIES IN THE M81 GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    Chiboucas, Kristin; Jacobs, Bradley A.; Tully, R. Brent; Karachentsev, Igor D. E-mail: bjacobs@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: ikar@luna.sao.ru

    2013-11-01

    We have followed up on the results of a 65 deg{sup 2} CFHT/MegaCam imaging survey of the nearby M81 Group searching for faint and ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. The original survey turned up 22 faint candidate dwarf members. Based on two-color HST ACS/WFC and WFPC2 photometry, we now confirm 14 of these as dwarf galaxy members of the group. Distances and stellar population characteristics are discussed for each. To a completeness limit of M{sub r{sup '}}= -10, we find a galaxy luminosity function slope of –1.27 ± 0.04 for the M81 Group. In this region, there are now 36 M81 Group members known, including 4 blue compact dwarfs; 8 other late types including the interacting giants M81, NGC 3077, and M82; 19 early type dwarfs; and at least 5 potential tidal dwarf galaxies. We find that the dSph galaxies in M81 appear to lie in a flattened distribution, similar to that found for the Milky Way and M31. One of the newly discovered dSph galaxies has properties similar to the ultra-faint dwarfs being found in the Local Group with a size R{sub e} ∼ 100 pc and total magnitude estimates M{sub r{sup '}}= -6.8 and M{sub I} ∼ –9.1.

  15. 1. Dyea Dock looking south. Note faint evenly spaced circular ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Dyea Dock looking south. Note faint evenly spaced circular dark pieces of grass up through the middle of the picture indicating posts making up the pier. Photograph made from park service cherry picker. - Dyea Dock & Association (Ruins), Skagway, Skagway, AK

  16. The Historical Demography and Genetic Variation of the Endangered Cycas multipinnata (Cycadaceae) in the Red River Region, Examined by Chloroplast DNA Sequences and Microsatellite Markers

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yi-Qing; Zhan, Qing-Qing; Nguyen, Khang Sinh; Nguyen, Hiep Tien; Wang, Yue-Hua; Gong, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Cycas multipinnata C.J. Chen & S.Y. Yang is a cycad endemic to the Red River drainage region that occurs under evergreen forest on steep limestone slopes in Southwest China and northern Vietnam. It is listed as endangered due to habitat loss and over-collecting for the ornamental plant trade, and only several populations remain. In this study, we assess the genetic variation, population structure, and phylogeography of C. multipinnata populations to help develop strategies for the conservation of the species. 60 individuals from six populations were used for chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) sequencing and 100 individuals from five populations were genotyped using 17 nuclear microsatellites. High genetic differentiation among populations was detected, suggesting that pollen or seed dispersal was restricted within populations. Two main genetic clusters were observed in both the cpDNA and microsatellite loci, corresponding to Yunnan China and northern Vietnam. These clusters indicated low levels of gene flow between the regions since their divergence in the late Pleistocene, which was inferred from both Bayesian and coalescent analysis. In addition, the result of a Bayesian skyline plot based on cpDNA portrayed a long history of constant population size followed by a decline in the last 50,000 years of C. multipinnata that was perhaps affected by the Quaternary glaciations, a finding that was also supported by the Garza-Williamson index calculated from the microsatellite data. The genetic consequences produced by climatic oscillations and anthropogenic disturbances are considered key pressures on C. multipinnata. To establish a conservation management plan, each population of C. multipinnata should be recognized as a Management Unit (MU). In situ and ex situ actions, such as controlling overexploitation and creating a germplasm bank with high genetic diversity, should be urgently implemented to preserve this species. PMID:25689828

  17. The historical demography and genetic variation of the endangered Cycas multipinnata (Cycadaceae) in the red river region, examined by chloroplast DNA sequences and microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yi-Qing; Zhan, Qing-Qing; Nguyen, Khang Sinh; Nguyen, Hiep Tien; Wang, Yue-Hua; Gong, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Cycas multipinnata C.J. Chen & S.Y. Yang is a cycad endemic to the Red River drainage region that occurs under evergreen forest on steep limestone slopes in Southwest China and northern Vietnam. It is listed as endangered due to habitat loss and over-collecting for the ornamental plant trade, and only several populations remain. In this study, we assess the genetic variation, population structure, and phylogeography of C. multipinnata populations to help develop strategies for the conservation of the species. 60 individuals from six populations were used for chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) sequencing and 100 individuals from five populations were genotyped using 17 nuclear microsatellites. High genetic differentiation among populations was detected, suggesting that pollen or seed dispersal was restricted within populations. Two main genetic clusters were observed in both the cpDNA and microsatellite loci, corresponding to Yunnan China and northern Vietnam. These clusters indicated low levels of gene flow between the regions since their divergence in the late Pleistocene, which was inferred from both Bayesian and coalescent analysis. In addition, the result of a Bayesian skyline plot based on cpDNA portrayed a long history of constant population size followed by a decline in the last 50,000 years of C. multipinnata that was perhaps affected by the Quaternary glaciations, a finding that was also supported by the Garza-Williamson index calculated from the microsatellite data. The genetic consequences produced by climatic oscillations and anthropogenic disturbances are considered key pressures on C. multipinnata. To establish a conservation management plan, each population of C. multipinnata should be recognized as a Management Unit (MU). In situ and ex situ actions, such as controlling overexploitation and creating a germplasm bank with high genetic diversity, should be urgently implemented to preserve this species. PMID:25689828

  18. The high-mass end of the red sequence at z ˜ 0.55 from SDSS-III/BOSS: completeness, bimodality and luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Swanson, Molly; Dawson, Kyle; Prada, Francisco; Eisenstein, Daniel; Maraston, Claudia; Thomas, Daniel; Comparat, Johan; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; McBride, Cameron K.; Favole, Ginevra; Guo, Hong; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-09-01

    We have developed an analytical method based on forward-modelling techniques to characterize the high-mass end of the red sequence (RS) galaxy population at redshift z ˜ 0.55, from the DR10 BOSS (Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey) CMASS spectroscopic sample, which comprises ˜600 000 galaxies. The method, which follows an unbinned maximum likelihood approach, allows the deconvolution of the intrinsic CMASS colour-colour-magnitude distributions from photometric errors and selection effects. This procedure requires modelling the covariance matrix for the i-band magnitude, g - r colour and r - i colour using Stripe 82 multi-epoch data. Our results indicate that the error-deconvolved intrinsic RS distribution is consistent, within the photometric uncertainties, with a single point (<0.05 mag) in the colour-colour plane at fixed magnitude, for a narrow redshift slice. We have computed the high-mass end (0.55Mi ≲ -22) of the 0.55i-band RS luminosity function (RS LF) in several redshift slices within the redshift range 0.52 < z < 0.63. In this narrow redshift range, the evolution of the RS LF is consistent, within the uncertainties in the modelling, with a passively evolving model with Φ* = (7.248 ± 0.204) × 10- 4 Mpc-3 mag-1, fading at a rate of 1.5 ± 0.4 mag per unit redshift. We report RS completeness as a function of magnitude and redshift in the CMASS sample, which will facilitate a variety of galaxy-evolution and clustering studies using BOSS. Our forward-modelling method lays the foundations for future studies using other dark-energy surveys like the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey or the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, which are affected by the same type of photometric blurring/selection effects.

  19. Phylogeny of geminivirus coat protein sequences and digital PCR aid in identifying Spissistilus festinus (Say) as a vector of Grapevine red blotch-associated virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grapevine red blotch-associated virus (GRBaV) is a newly identified virus of grapevines, and a putative member of a new genus within the family Geminiviridae. This virus is associated with red blotch disease that was first reported in California in 2008. It affects the profitability of vineyards by ...

  20. KIM 3: An Ultra-faint Star Cluster in the Constellation of Centaurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongwon; Jerjen, Helmut; Mackey, Dougal; Da Costa, Gary S.; Milone, Antonino P.

    2016-04-01

    We report the discovery of an ultra-faint star cluster in the constellation of Centaurus. This new stellar system, Kim 3, features a half-light radius of {r}h={2.29}-0.52+1.28 pc and a total luminosity of MV = +0.7 ± 0.3. Approximately 26 stars are identified as candidate member stars down to four magnitudes below the main-sequence turn-off, which makes Kim 3 the least luminous star cluster known to date. The compact physical size and extreme low luminosity place it close to faint star clusters in the size-luminosity plane. The stellar population of Kim 3 appears to be relatively young ({9.5}-1.7+3.0 Gyr) and metal-poor ([Fe/H]\\quad =\\quad -{1.6}-0.30+0.45) at a heliocentric distance of {15.14}-0.28+1.00 kpc. The cluster lacks a well-defined center, and a small but prominent group of stars consistent with the Kim 3 isochrone is present approximately 9.7 pc in projection south of the cluster center. Both are signs of the cluster being in the final stage of tidal disruption.

  1. A CCD survey for faint high-latitude carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Paul J.; Margon, Bruce; Anderson, Scott F.; Cook, Kem H.

    1994-01-01

    We describe a wide-area CCD survey to search for faint high-latitude carbon (FHLC) stars. Carbon giants provide excellent probes of the structure and kinematics of the outer Galactic halo. We use two-color photometric selection with large-format CCDs to cover 52 sq deg of sky to a depth of about V = 18. Of 94 faint C star candidates from our own CCD survey, one highly ranked V = 17 candidate was found to have a strong carbon and CN bands. We estimate that, to a depth of V = 18, the surface density of FHLC stars is 0.02 deg(exp -2). An updated FHLC sample is used to constrain halo kinematic and structural parameters. Although larger samples are needed, the effective radius of FHLC giants, assuming a de Vancouleurs law distribution, is larger than that for Galactic globular clusters.

  2. X-ray Counterparts of Infrared Faint Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartel, Norbert

    2011-10-01

    Infrared Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are radio sources with extremely faint or even absent infrared emission in deep Spitzer Surveys. Models of their spectral energy distributions, the ratios of radio to infrared flux densities and their steep radio spectra strongly suggest that IFRS are AGN at high redshifts (2

  3. FAINT FUZZY STAR CLUSTERS IN NGC 1023 AS REMNANTS OF MERGED STAR CLUSTER COMPLEXES

    SciTech Connect

    Bruens, R. C.; Kroupa, P.; Fellhauer, M. E-mail: pavel@astro.uni-bonn.de

    2009-09-10

    In the lenticular galaxy NGC 1023 a third population of globular clusters (GCs), called faint fuzzies (FFs), was discovered next to the blue and red GC populations by Larsen and Brodie. While these FFs have colors comparable to the red population, the new population is fainter, larger (R{sub eff}>7 pc) and, most importantly, shows clear signs of corotation with the galactic disk of NGC 1023. We present N-body simulations verifying the hypothesis that these disk-associated FFs are related to the young massive cluster complexes (CCs) observed by Bastian et al. in M51, who discovered a mass-radius relation for these CCs. Our models have an initial configuration based on the observations from M51 and are placed on various orbits in a galactic potential derived for NGC 1023. All computations end up with a stable object containing 10%-60% of the initial CC mass after an integration time of 5 Gyr. A conversion to visual magnitudes demonstrates that the resulting objects cover exactly the observed range for FFs. Moreover, the simulated objects show projected half-mass radii between 3.6 and 13.4 pc, in good agreement with the observed FF sizes. We conclude that objects like the young massive CCs in M51 are likely progenitors of the FFs observed in NGC 1023.

  4. The optical-infrared colour distribution of a statistically complete sample of faint field spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menanteau, F.; Ellis, R. S.; Abraham, R. G.; Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.

    1999-10-01

    In hierarchical models, where spheroidal galaxies are primarily produced via a continuous merging of disc galaxies, the number of intrinsically red systems at faint limits will be substantially lower than in `traditional' models where the bulk of star formation was completed at high redshifts. In this paper we analyse the optical-near-infrared colour distribution of a large flux-limited sample of field spheroidal galaxies identified morphologically from archival Hubble Space Telescope data. The I_814-HK' colour distribution for a sample jointly limited at I_814<23mag and HK'<19.5mag is used to constrain their star formation history. We compare visual and automated methods for selecting spheroidals from our deep HST images and, in both cases, detect a significant deficit of intrinsically red spheroidals relative to the predictions of high-redshift monolithic-collapse models. However, the overall space density of spheroidals (irrespective of colour) is not substantially different from that seen locally. Spectral synthesis modelling of our results suggests that high-redshift spheroidals are dominated by evolved stellar populations polluted by some amount of subsidiary star formation. Despite its effect on the optical-infrared colour, this star formation probably makes only a modest contribution to the overall stellar mass. We briefly discuss the implications of our results in the context of earlier predictions based on models where spheroidals assemble hierarchically.

  5. Faint Submillimeter Galaxies Behind the Frontier Field Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Li-Yen; Cowie, Lennox; Barger, Amy; Wang, Wei-Hao; Chen, Chian-Chou

    2015-08-01

    Faint submillimeter galaxies are the major contributors to the submillimeter extragalactic background light and hence the dominant star-forming population in the dusty universe. Determining how much these galaxies overlap the optically selected samples is critical to fully account for the cosmic star formation history. To explore this faint submillimeter population, we have been observing nine galaxy clusters with the SCUBA-2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, including five of the clusters in the HST Frontier Fields program. We have also been using the Submillimeter Array to determine the positions of our detected sources precisely. Our recent observations have discovered several high-redshift dusty galaxies with far-infrared luminosities similar to that of the Milky Way or luminous infrared galaxies but which are undetected in current deep radio, optical and near-infrared images. These remarkable results suggest that a substantial amount of star formation in even the faint submillimeter population may be hidden from rest-frame optical surveys.

  6. Can waterbelt climates resolve the faint young Sun paradox?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, E. T.; Toon, O. B.

    2012-12-01

    Ancient sediments indicate that liquid water and primitive life were ubiquitous on the Archean Earth despite the faint young Sun. However, energy balance and radiative-convective models require improbably high greenhouse gas abundances to obtain non-glacial climates, violating constraints from geochemical data. A self-consistent solution to the faint young Sun paradox has remained elusive. Here we use the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model version 3 with thermodynamic ocean and sea ice components to simulate the climate circa 2.8 billion years ago. To maintain present day surface temperatures, 0.06 bar of CO2 in a 1 bar atmosphere is required to compensate for a 20 percent reduction in the solar constant. However, waterbelt climates having stable low latitude sea ice margins can be maintained with as little as 500 ppm of CO2 and no additional trace greenhouse species. With 5000 ppm of CO2 nearly 60 percent of the planet remains free from ice. The early Earth is resistant to hard snowball glaciations instead favoring waterbelt climates. The coexistence of a faint young Sun and a weak greenhouse does not exclude the presence of liquid water at the Archean surface.

  7. The faint end of the galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treyer, Marie A.; Silk, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The evolution of the B- and K-band luminosity functions of galaxies is inferred in a relatively model-independent way from deep spectroscopic and photometric surveys. We confirm earlier evidence by Eales for an increase in the amplitude of the B-band galaxy luminosity function at modest redshift (z less than or approx. 0.2). We find in addition that the slope of the faint end of the luminosity function must systematically steepen and progress toward more luminous galaxies with increasing lookback time, assuming that the galaxy redshift distribution may be smoothly extrapolated 2 mag fainter than observed, as suggested by recent gravitational lensing studies. This evolution is shown to be color-dependent, and we predict the near-infrared color distribution of faint galaxies. The luminosity function of blue (B - K less than or approx. 4) galaxies in the range 0.2 less than or approx. z less than or approx. 1 can be represented by a Schechter function with characteristic light density phi(sup *) L(sup *) comparable to that of present-day late-type galaxies, but with a steeper faint end slope alpha approx. 1.4.

  8. Spectrophotometric Redshifts in the Faint Infrared Grism Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pharo, John; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.

    2016-06-01

    We have combined HST grism spectroscopy and deep broadband imaging to measure spectro-photometric redshifts (SPZs) of faint galaxies. Using a technique pioneered by Ryan et al. 2007, one can combine spectra and photometry to yield an SPZ that is more accurate than pure photometric redshifts, and can probe more deeply than ground-based spectroscopic redshifts. By taking mid-resolution spectra from the HST Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS), SPZs can be found for measurements potentially down to 27th magnitude (the typical brightness of a dwarf galaxy at redshift ∼1.5). A galaxy’s redshift is vital for understanding its place in the growth and evolution of the universe. The measurement of high-accuracy SPZs for FIGS sources will improve the faint-end and high-redshift portions of the luminosity function, and make possible a robust analysis of the FIGS fields for signs of Large Scale Structure (LSS). The improved redshift and distance measurements allowed for the identification of a structure at z=0.83 in one of the FIGS fields.

  9. Differentiation between Focal Malignant Marrow-Replacing Lesions and Benign Red Marrow Deposition of the Spine with T2*-Corrected Fat-Signal Fraction Map Using a Three-Echo Volume Interpolated Breath-Hold Gradient Echo Dixon Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Pyo; Kannengiesser, Stephan; Paek, Mun-Young; Chung, Tae-Sub; Yoo, Yeon Hwa; Yoon, Choon-Sik; Song, Ho-Taek; Lee, Young Han; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility of T2*-corrected fat-signal fraction (FF) map by using the three-echo volume interpolated breath-hold gradient echo (VIBE) Dixon sequence to differentiate between malignant marrow-replacing lesions and benign red marrow deposition of vertebrae. Materials and Methods We assessed 32 lesions from 32 patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging after being referred for assessment of a known or possible vertebral marrow abnormality. The lesions were divided into 21 malignant marrow-replacing lesions and 11 benign red marrow depositions. Three sequences for the parameter measurements were obtained by using a 1.5-T MR imaging scanner as follows: three-echo VIBE Dixon sequence for FF; conventional T1-weighted imaging for the lesion-disc ratio (LDR); pre- and post-gadolinium enhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted images for the contrast-enhancement ratio (CER). A region of interest was drawn for each lesion for parameter measurements. The areas under the curve (AUC) of the parameters and their sensitivities and specificities at the most ideal cutoff values from receiver operating characteristic curve analysis were obtained. AUC, sensitivity, and specificity were respectively compared between FF and CER. Results The AUCs of FF, LDR, and CER were 0.96, 0.80, and 0.72, respectively. In the comparison of diagnostic performance between the FF and CER, the FF showed a significantly larger AUC as compared to the CER (p = 0.030), although the difference of sensitivity (p = 0.157) and specificity (p = 0.157) were not significant. Conclusion Fat-signal fraction measurement using T2*-corrected three-echo VIBE Dixon sequence is feasible and has a more accurate diagnostic performance, than the CER, in distinguishing benign red marrow deposition from malignant bone marrow-replacing lesions. PMID:25469090

  10. The Chemical Evolution of the Bootes I Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frebel, Anna; Norris, John E.; Gilmore, Gerard; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2016-08-01

    We present chemical abundance measurements of two metal-poor red giant stars in the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Boötes I, based on Magellan/MIKE high-resolution spectra. For Boo-980, with {{[Fe/H]}}=-3.1, we present the first elemental abundance measurements, while Boo-127, with {{[Fe/H]}}=-2.0, shows abundances in good agreement with previous measurements. Light and iron-peak element abundance ratios in the two Boötes I stars, as well as those of most other Boötes I members, collected from the literature, closely resemble those of regular metal-poor halo stars. Neutron-capture element abundances Sr and Ba are systematically lower than the main halo trend and also show a significant abundance spread. Overall, this is similar to what has been found for other ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. We apply corrections to the carbon abundances (commensurate with stellar evolutionary status) of the entire sample and find 21% of stars to be carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars, compared to 13% without using the carbon correction. We reassess the metallicity distribution functions for the CEMP stars and non-CEMP stars, and confirm earlier claims that CEMP stars might belong to a different, earlier population. Applying a set of abundance criteria to test to what extent Boötes I could be a surviving first galaxy suggests that it is one of the earliest assembled systems that perhaps received gas from accretion from other clouds in the system, or from swallowing a first galaxy or building block type object. This resulted in the two stellar populations observable today. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  11. Particle-based ablation model for faint meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokan, E.; Campbell-Brown, M.

    2014-07-01

    Modeling the ablation of meteoroids as they enter the atmosphere is a way of determining their physical structure and elemental composition. This can provide insight into the structure of parent bodies when combined with an orbit computed from observations. The Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory (CAMO) is a source of new, high-resolution observations of faint meteors [1]. These faint objects tend to have pre-atmospheric masses around 10^{-5} kg, corresponding to a radius of 1 mm. A wide-field camera with a 28° field of view provides guidance to a high-resolution camera that tracks meteors in flight with 1.5° field of view. Meteors are recorded with a scale of 4 m per pixel at a range of 135 km, at 110 frames per second, allowing us to investigate detailed meteor morphology. This serves as an important new constraint for ablation models, in addition to meteor brightness (lightcurves) and meteoroid deceleration. High-resolution observations of faint meteors have revealed that contemporary ablation models are not able to predict meteor morphology, even while matching the observed lightcurve and meteoroid deceleration [2]. This implies that other physical processes, in addition to fragmentation, must be considered for faint meteor ablation. We present a new, particle-based approach to modeling the ablation of small meteoroids. In this model, we simulate the collisions between atmospheric particles and the meteoroid to determine the rate of evaporation and deceleration. Subsequent collisions simulated between evaporated meteoroid particles and ambient atmospheric particles then produce light that would be observed by high-resolution cameras. Preliminary results show simultaneous agreement with meteor morphology, lightcurves, and decelerations recorded with CAMO. A sample comparison of simulated and observed meteor morphology is given in the attached figure. Several meteoroids are well-represented as solid, stony bodies, but some require modeling as a dustball [3

  12. Eye redness

    MedlinePlus

    Bloodshot eyes; Red eyes; Scleral infection; Conjunctival infection ... There are many causes of a red eye or eyes. Some are medical emergencies and some are a cause for concern, but not an emergency. Others are nothing to worry about. ...

  13. Red Clover

    MedlinePlus

    ... 17):2057–2071. Red clover. Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Web site. Accessed at www.naturaldatabase.com on July 22, 2009. Red clover ( Trifolium pratense ). Natural Standard Database Web site. Accessed at www.naturalstandard.com on July ...

  14. Red clover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) is an important forage legume grown on approximately 4 million hectares worldwide. An estimated 2.8 million kg of red clover seed per year was produced worldwide in 2005-2007. This amount of seed would be enough to maintain approximately 4 million hectares of red...

  15. Red Sea

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  The Red Sea     View Larger Image ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) image of the Red Sea was acquired on August 13, 2000. Located between the East African coast and the Saudi Arabian peninsula, the Red Sea got its name because the blooms of a type of algae,  Trichodesmium ...

  16. THE EVOLUTION OF DUSTY STAR FORMATION IN GALAXY CLUSTERS TO z = 1: SPITZER INFRARED OBSERVATIONS OF THE FIRST RED-SEQUENCE CLUSTER SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, T. M. A.; O'Donnell, D.; Coppin, Kristen; Faloon, Ashley; Geach, James E.; Noble, Allison; Yee, H. K. C.; Gilbank, David; Ellingson, Erica; Gladders, Mike; Muzzin, Adam; Wilson, Gillian; Yan, Renbin

    2013-10-01

    We present the results of an infrared (IR) study of high-redshift galaxy clusters with the MIPS camera on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. We have assembled a sample of 42 clusters from the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey-1 over the redshift range 0.3 < z < 1.0 and spanning an approximate range in mass of 10{sup 14-15} M {sub ☉}. We statistically measure the number of IR-luminous galaxies in clusters above a fixed inferred IR luminosity of 2 × 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}, assuming a star forming galaxy template, per unit cluster mass and find it increases to higher redshift. Fitting a simple power-law we measure evolution of (1 + z){sup 5.1±1.9} over the range 0.3 < z < 1.0. These results are tied to the adoption of a single star forming galaxy template; the presence of active galactic nuclei, and an evolution in their relative contribution to the mid-IR galaxy emission, will alter the overall number counts per cluster and their rate of evolution. Under the star formation assumption we infer the approximate total star formation rate per unit cluster mass (ΣSFR/M {sub cluster}). The evolution is similar, with ΣSFR/M {sub cluster} ∼ (1 + z){sup 5.4±1.9}. We show that this can be accounted for by the evolution of the IR-bright field population over the same redshift range; that is, the evolution can be attributed entirely to the change in the in-falling field galaxy population. We show that the ΣSFR/M {sub cluster} (binned over all redshift) decreases with increasing cluster mass with a slope (ΣSFR/M{sub cluster}∼M{sub cluster}{sup -1.5±0.4}) consistent with the dependence of the stellar-to-total mass per unit cluster mass seen locally. The inferred star formation seen here could produce ∼5%-10% of the total stellar mass in massive clusters at z = 0, but we cannot constrain the descendant population, nor how rapidly the star-formation must shut-down once the galaxies have entered the cluster environment. Finally, we show a clear decrease in the number of IR

  17. Use of Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) markers for DNA fingerprinting and diversity analysis of sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) cultivars resistant and susceptible to red rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years SSR markers have been used widely for the genetic analysis. The objective of present research was to use SSR markers to develop DNA-based genetic identification and analyze genetic relationship of sugarcane cultivars grown in Pakistan either resistant or susceptible to red rot. Twent...

  18. Revisiting the concept of behavior patterns in animal behavior with an example from food-caching sequences in wolves (Canis lupus), coyotes (Canis latrans), and red foxes (Vulpes vulpes).

    PubMed

    Gadbois, Simon; Sievert, Olivia; Reeve, Catherine; Harrington, F H; Fentress, J C

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the history, conceptualization, and relevance of behavior patterns in modern ethology by explaining the evolution of the concepts of fixed action patterns and modal action patterns. We present the movement toward a more flexible concept of natural action sequences with significant degrees of (production and expressive) freedom. An example is presented with the food caching behavior of three Canidae species: red fox (Vulpes vulpes), coyote (Canis latrans) and gray wolf (Canis lupus). Evolutionary, ecological, and neuroecological/neuroethological arguments are presented to explain the difference in levels of complexity and stereotypy between Canis and Vulpes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Canine Behavior. PMID:25446624

  19. DISCOVERY OF A CLOSE PAIR OF FAINT DWARF GALAXIES IN THE HALO OF CENTAURUS A

    SciTech Connect

    Crnojević, D.; Sand, D. J.; Caldwell, N.; McLeod, B.; Guhathakurta, P.; Toloba, E.; Simon, J. D.; Strader, J.

    2014-11-10

    As part of the Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor (PISCeS), we report the discovery of a pair of faint dwarf galaxies (CenA-MM-Dw1 and CenA-MM-Dw2) at a projected distance of ∼90 kpc from the nearby elliptical galaxy NGC 5128 (CenA). We measure a tip of the red giant branch distance to each dwarf, finding D = 3.63 ± 0.41 Mpc for CenA-MM-Dw1 and D = 3.60 ± 0.41 Mpc for CenA-MM-Dw2, both of which are consistent with the distance to NGC 5128. A qualitative analysis of the color-magnitude diagrams indicates stellar populations consisting of an old, metal-poor red giant branch (≳12 Gyr, [Fe/H] ∼ –1.7 to –1.9). In addition, CenA-MM-Dw1 seems to host an intermediate-age population as indicated by its candidate asymptotic giant branch stars. The derived luminosities (M{sub V} = –10.9 ± 0.3 for CenA-MM-Dw1 and –8.4 ± 0.6 for CenA-MM-Dw2) and half-light radii (r{sub h} = 1.4 ± 0.04 kpc for CenA-MM-Dw1 and 0.36 ± 0.08 kpc for CenA-MM-Dw2) are consistent with those of Local Group dwarfs. CenA-MM-Dw1's low central surface brightness (μ {sub V,} {sub 0} = 27.3 ± 0.1 mag arcsec{sup –2}) places it among the faintest and most extended M31 satellites. Most intriguingly, CenA-MM-Dw1 and CenA-MM-Dw2 have a projected separation of only 3 arcmin (∼3 kpc): we are possibly observing the first, faint satellite of a satellite in an external group of galaxies.

  20. Whence the red panda?

    PubMed

    Flynn, J J; Nedbal, M A; Dragoo, J W; Honeycutt, R L

    2000-11-01

    The evolutionary history of the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) plays a pivotal role in the higher-level phylogeny of the "bear-like" arctoid carnivoran mammals. Characters from morphology and molecules have provided inconsistent evidence for placement of the red panda. Whereas it certainly is an arctoid, there has been major controversy about whether it should be placed with the bears (ursids), ursids plus pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, walrus), raccoons (procyonids), musteloids (raccoons plus weasels, skunks, otters, and badgers [mustelids]), or as a monotypic lineage of uncertain phylogenetic affinities. Nucleotide sequence data from three mitochondrial genes and one nuclear intron were analyzed, with more complete taxonomic sampling of relevant taxa (arctoids) than previously available in analyses of primary molecular data, to clarify the phylogenetic relationships of the red panda to other arctoid carnivorans. This study provides detailed phylogenetic analyses (both parsimony and maximum-likelihood) of primary character data for arctoid carnivorans, including bootstrap and decay indices for all arctoid nodes, and three statistical tests of alternative phylogenetic hypotheses for the placement of the red panda. Combined phylogenetic analyses reject the hypotheses that the red panda is most closely related to the bears (ursids) or to the raccoons (procyonids). Rather, evidence from nucleotide sequences strongly support placement of the red panda within a broad Musteloidea (sensu lato) clade, including three major lineages (the red panda, the skunks [mephitids], and a clearly monophyletic clade of procyonids plus mustelids [sensu stricto, excluding skunks]). Within the Musteloidea, interrelationships of the three major lineages are unclear and probably are best considered an unresolved trichotomy. These data provide compelling evidence for the relationships of the red panda and demonstrate that small taxonomic sample sizes can result in misleading or possibly erroneous

  1. Distribution of Faint Atomic Gas in Hickson Compact Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Yun, Min Su; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Heckman, Timothy M.; Zhu, Guangtun; Braatz, James A.

    2015-10-01

    We present 21 cm H i observations of four Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) with evidence for a substantial intragroup medium using the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). By mapping H i emission in a region of 25‧ × 25‧ (140–650 kpc) surrounding each HCG, these observations provide better estimates of H i masses. In particular, we detected 65% more H i than that detected in the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) imaging of HCG 92. We also identify whether the diffuse gas has the same spatial distribution as the high surface brightness (HSB) H i features detected in the VLA maps of these groups by comparing the H i strengths between the observed and modeled masses based on VLA maps. We found that the H i observed with the GBT has a similar spatial distribution to the HSB structures in HCG 31 and HCG 68. Conversely, the observed H i distributions in HCG 44 and HCG 92 were extended and showed significant offsets from the modeled masses. Most of the faint gas in HCG 44 lies to the northeast–southwest region and in HCG 92 lies in the northwest region of their respective groups. The spatial and dynamical similarities between the total (faint+HSB) and the HSB H i indicate that the faint gas is of tidal origin. We found that the gas will survive ionization by the cosmic UV background and the escaping ionizing photons from the star-forming regions and stay primarily neutral for at least 500 Myr.

  2. The Faint Object Camera for the Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomae, K.-P.; Schmidt, G.

    1981-05-01

    The Faint Object Camera (FOC), one of the four axial scientific instruments located at the focal plane of the NASA Space Telescope, is described. The FOC has overall dimensions of approximately 0.9 x 0.9 x 2.2 cu m, a total weight of about 322 kg, and an average power consumption per orbit of less than 150 W. The FOC is made up of two complete and independent camera systems, each with its dedicated three mirrors optical relay and photon detector device operating in a wavelength range of 1200 A to 7000 A.

  3. CCD time-resolved photometry of faint cataclysmic variables. III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Steve B.; Szkody, Paula; Kreidl, Tobias J.; Mason, Keith O.; Puchnarewicz, E. M.

    1990-01-01

    CCD time-resolved photometry in V, B, and near-IR for 17 faint cataclysmic variables (CVs) is presented and analyzed. The data are obtained at Kitt Peak National Observatory, the Perkins reflector, Lowell Observatory, and the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos from April-June 1989. The degree of variability and periodicities for the CVs are examined. It is observed that the variability of most of the stars is consistent with CV class behavior. Orbital periods for five CVs are determined, and three potential eclipsing systems are detected.

  4. Stellar Ultraviolet Rocket Research Program. [faint object spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A 1/4 meter ultraviolet spectrometer, developed to measure the ultraviolet flux from several standard type stars was flown successfully on Aerobee rockets. The ultraviolet flux from alpha Lyr, eta U Ma, zeta Oph, delta Ori, alpha CMa, beta CMa, and alpha Leo were measured. These values agreed with the OAO data obtained by Code in the 1200 to 3400 A region to + or - 9%. The design and calibration of a faint object spectrometer for observing stars and nebula with a 3 A resolution and a 3% accuracy in a 60 second observation are discussed.

  5. Are the infrared-faint radio sources pulsars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, A. D.; Keith, M.; Hobbs, G.; Norris, R. P.; Mao, M. Y.; Middelberg, E.

    2011-07-01

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects which are strong at radio wavelengths but undetected in sensitive Spitzer observations at infrared wavelengths. Their nature is uncertain and most have not yet been associated with any known astrophysical object. One possibility is that they are radio pulsars. To test this hypothesis we undertook observations of 16 of these sources with the Parkes Radio Telescope. Our results limit the radio emission to a pulsed flux density of less than 0.21 mJy (assuming a 50 per cent duty cycle). This is well below the flux density of the IFRS. We therefore conclude that these IFRS are not radio pulsars.

  6. Surprising Rapid Collapse of Sirius B from Red Giant to White Dwarf Through Mass Transfer to Sirius a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, Shahinaz; Ali, Ola

    2013-03-01

    Sirius was observed in antiquity as a red star. In his famous astronomy textbook the Almagest written 140 AD, Ptolemy described the star Sirius as fiery red. He curiously depicted it as one of six red-colored stars. The other five are class M and K stars, such as Arcturus and Betelgeuse. Apparent confirmation in ancient Greek and Roman sources are found and Sirius was also reported red in Europe about 1400 years ago. Sirius must have changed to a white dwarf in the night of Ascension. The star chapter in the Quran started with "by the star as it collapsed (1) your companion have not gone astray nor being misled (2), and in verse 49 which is the rotation period of the companion Sirius B around Sirius A, it is said" He is the Lord of Sirius (49). If Sirius actually was red what could have caused it to change into the brilliant bluish-white star we see today? What the naked eye perceives as a single star is actually a binary star system, consisting of a white main sequence star of spectral type A1V, termed Sirius A, and a faint white dwarf companion of spectral type DA2, termed Sirius B. The red color indicates that the star seen then was a red giant. It looks that what they have seen in antiquity was Sirius B which was then a red giant and it collapsed to form a white dwarf. Since there is no evidence of a planetary nebula, then the red Sirius paradox can be solved in terms of stellar evolution with mass transfer. Sirius B was the most massive star which evolved to a red giant and filled the Roche lobe. Mass transfer to Sirius A occurred through the Lagrangian point. Sirius A then became more massive while Sirius B lost mass and shrank. Sirius B then collapsed abruptly into a white dwarf. In the case of Algol, Ptolmy observed it as white star but it was red at the time of El sufi. At present it is white. The rate of mass transfer from Sirius B to Sirius A, and from Algol B to A is estimated from observational data of colour change from red to bullish white to be 0

  7. ALMA Census of Faint 1.2 mm Sources Down to ~ 0.02 mJy: Extragalactic Background Light and Dust-poor, High-z Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Seiji; Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Ishigaki, Masafumi; Nagai, Hiroshi; Momose, Rieko

    2016-01-01

    We present statistics of 133 faint 1.2 mm continuum sources detected in about 120 deep Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) pointing data that include all the archival deep data available by 2015 June. We derive number counts of 1.2 mm continuum sources down to 0.02 mJy partly with the assistance of gravitational lensing, and find that the total integrated 1.2 mm flux of the securely identified sources is {22.9}-5.6+6.7 Jy deg-2 which corresponds to {104}-25+31% of the extragalactic background light (EBL) measured by Cosmic Background Explorer observations. These results suggest that the major 1.2 mm EBL contributors are sources with 0.02 mJy, and that very faint 1.2 mm sources with ≲0.02 mJy contribute negligibly to the EBL with the possible flattening and/or truncation of number counts in this very faint flux regime. To understand the physical origin of our faint ALMA sources, we measure the galaxy bias bg by the counts-in-cells technique, and place a stringent upper limit of bg < 3.5 that is not similar to bg values of massive distant red galaxies and submillimeter galaxies but comparable to those of UV-bright, star-forming BzK galaxies (sBzKs) and Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). Moreover, in the optical and near-infrared (NIR) deep fields, we identify optical-NIR counterparts for 59% of our faint ALMA sources, the majority of which have luminosities, colors, and the IRX-β relation the same as sBzKs and LBGs. We thus conclude that about a half of our faint ALMA sources are dust-poor, high-z galaxies as known as sBzKs and LBGs in optical studies, and that these faint ALMA sources are not miniature (U)LIRGs simply scaled down with the infrared brightness.

  8. A white dwarf companion to the main-sequence star 4 Omicron(1) Orionis and the binary hypothesis for the origin of peculiar red giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ake, Thomas B.; Johnson, Hollis R.

    1988-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectra of the peculiar red giants (PRGs) called MS stars are investigated, and the discovery of a white dwarf (WD) companion to the MS star 4 Omicron(1) Orionis is reported. The observations and data analysis are discussed and compared with those for field WDs in order to derive parameters for the WD and the luminosity of the primary. Detection limits for the other MS stars investigated are derived, and the binary hypothesis for PRGs is reviewed.

  9. Detectability of Ultra Faint Dwarf Galaxies with Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateu, C.; Antoja, T.; Aguilar, L.; Figueras, F.; Brown, A.; Antiche, E.; Hernández-Pérez, F.; Valenzuela, O.; Aparicio, A.; Hidalgo, S.; Velázquez, H.

    2014-07-01

    We present a technique to detect Ultra-Faint Dwarf Galaxies (UFDs) in the Galactic Halo, using sky and proper motion information.The method uses wavelet transforms to detect peaks in the sky and proper motion planes, and to evaluate the probability of these being stochastic fluctuations. We aim to map thoroughly the detection limits of this technique. For this, we have produced a library of 15,000 synthetic UFDs, embedded in the Gaia Universe Model Snapshot (GUMS) background (Robin et al. 2012), each at a different distance, different luminosity, half-light radius, velocity dispersion and center-of-mass velocity, varying in ranges that extend well beyond those spanned by known classical and ultra-faint dSphs. We use these synthetic UFDs as a benchmark to characterize the completeness and detection limits of our technique, and present our results as a function of different physical and observable parameters of the UFDs (see full poster for more details at https://gaia.ub.edu/Twiki/pub/GREATITNFC/ProgramFinalconference/Poster_UFGX_Bcn_C_Mateu.pdf).

  10. Faint Blue Objects in the Hubble Deep Field North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, M.; von Hippel, T.; Mendez, R. A.; Winget, D. E.

    2005-07-01

    Using the deepest and finest resolution images of the Universe acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope and a similar image taken 7 years later for the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey, we have derived proper motions for the point sources in the Hubble Deep Field-North. Two faint blue objects, HDF2234 and HDF3072, are found to display significant proper motions, 10.0 ± 2.5 and 15.5 ± 3.8 mas yr-1. Photometric distances and tangential velocities for these stars are consistent with disk white dwarfs located at ≈500 pc. At least one of these two objects now appears spectroscopically to be a white dwarf (Kilic et al., in preparation). The faint blue objects analyzed by Ibata et al. (1999) and Mendez & Minniti (2000) do not show any significant proper motion; they are not halo white dwarfs and they do not contribute to the Galactic dark matter. These objects are likely to be distant AGN.

  11. Rapid Rotation of Low-mass Red Giants Using APOKASC: A Measure of Interaction Rates on the Post-main-sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayar, Jamie; Ceillier, Tugdual; García-Hernández, D. A.; Troup, Nicholas W.; Mathur, Savita; García, Rafael A.; Zamora, O.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Mészáros, Szabolcs; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne; Hekker, Saskia; Nidever, David L.; Salabert, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Serenelli, Aldo; Shetrone, Matthew; Stello, Dennis

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the occurrence rate of rapidly rotating (v{sin}i >10 km s-1), low-mass giant stars in the Apache Point Observatory Galaxy Evolution Experiment-Kepler (APOKASC) fields with asteroseismic mass and surface gravity measurements. Such stars are likely merger products and their frequency places interesting constraints on stellar population models. We also identify anomalous rotators, i.e., stars with 5 km s-1 < v{sin}i < 10 km s-1 that are rotating significantly faster than both angular momentum evolution predictions and the measured rates of similar stars. Our data set contains fewer rapid rotators than one would expect given measurements of the Galactic field star population, which likely indicates that asteroseismic detections are less common in rapidly rotating red giants. The number of low-mass moderate (5-10 km s-1) rotators in our sample gives a lower limit of 7% for the rate at which low-mass stars interact on the upper red giant branch because single stars in this mass range are expected to rotate slowly. Finally, we classify the likely origin of the rapid or anomalous rotation where possible. KIC 10293335 is identified as a merger product and KIC 6501237 is a possible binary system of two oscillating red giants.

  12. Color and Variability Characteristics of Point Sources in the Faint Sky Variability Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, M E; Everett, M E; Howell, S B

    2005-03-07

    The authors present an analysis of the color and variability characteristics for point sources in the Faint Sky Variability Survey (FSVS). The FSVS cataloged {approx} 23 square degrees in BVI filters from {approx} 16-24 mag to investigate variability in faint sources at moderate to high Galactic latitudes. Point source completeness is found to be >83% for a selected representative sample (V - 17.5-22.0 mag, B-V = 0.0-1.5) containing both photometric B, V detections and 80% of the time-sampled V data available compared to a basic internal source completeness of 99%. Multi-epoch (10-30) observations in V spanning minutes to years modeled by light curve simulations reveal amplitude sensitivities to {approx} 0.015-0.075 mag over a representative V = 18-22 mag range. Periodicity determinations appear viable to time-scales of an order 1 day or less using the most sampled fields ({approx} 30 epochs). The fraction of point sources is found to be generally variable at 5-8% over V = 17.5-22.0 mag. For V brighter than 19 mag, the variable population is dominated by low amplitude (< 0.05 mag) and blue (B-V < 0.35) sources, possibly representing a population of {gamma} Doradus stars. Overall, the dominant population of variable sources are bluer than B-V = 0.65 and have Main Sequence colors, likely reflecting larger populations of RR Lyrae, SX Phe, {gamma} Doradus, and W UMa variables.

  13. Hydra II: A Faint and Compact Milky Way Dwarf Galaxy Found in the Survey of the Magellanic Stellar History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicolas F.; Nidever, David L.; Besla, Gurtina; Olsen, Knut; Walker, Alistair R.; Vivas, A. Katherina; Gruendl, Robert A.; Kaleida, Catherine C.; Muñoz, Ricardo R.; Blum, Robert D.; Saha, Abhijit; Conn, Blair C.; Bell, Eric F.; Chu, You-Hua; Cioni, Maria-Rosa L.; de Boer, Thomas J. L.; Gallart, Carme; Jin, Shoko; Kunder, Andrea; Majewski, Steven R.; Martinez-Delgado, David; Monachesi, Antonela; Monelli, Matteo; Monteagudo, Lara; Noël, Noelia E. D.; Olszewski, Edward W.; Stringfellow, Guy S.; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2015-05-01

    We present the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Hydra II, found serendipitously within the data from the ongoing Survey of the Magellanic Stellar History conducted with the Dark Energy Camera on the Blanco 4 m Telescope. The new satellite is compact ({{r}h}=68 ± 11 pc) and faint ({{M}V}=-4.8 ± 0.3), but well within the realm of dwarf galaxies. The stellar distribution of Hydra II in the color-magnitude diagram is well-described by a metal-poor ([Fe/H]=-2.2) and old (13 Gyr) isochrone and shows a distinct blue horizontal branch, some possible red clump stars, and faint stars that are suggestive of blue stragglers. At a heliocentric distance of 134 ± 10 kpc, Hydra II is located in a region of the Galactic halo that models have suggested may host material from the leading arm of the Magellanic Stream. A comparison with N-body simulations hints that the new dwarf galaxy could be or could have been a satellite of the Magellanic Clouds.

  14. FAINT TIDAL FEATURES IN GALAXIES WITHIN THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY WIDE FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, Adam M.; Abraham, Roberto G.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.

    2013-03-01

    We present an analysis of the detectability of faint tidal features in galaxies from the wide-field component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. Our sample consists of 1781 luminous (M{sub r{sup '}}<-19.3 mag) galaxies in the magnitude range 15.5 mag < r' < 17 mag and in the redshift range 0.04 < z < 0.2. Although we have classified tidal features according to their morphology (e.g., streams, shells, and tails), we do not attempt to interpret them in terms of their physical origin (e.g., major versus minor merger debris). Instead, we provide a catalog that is intended to provide raw material for future investigations which will probe the nature of low surface brightness substructure around galaxies. We find that around 12% of the galaxies in our sample show clear tidal features at the highest confidence level. This fraction rises to about 18% if we include systems with convincing, albeit weaker tidal features, and to 26% if we include systems with more marginal features that may or may not be tidal in origin. These proportions are a strong function of rest-frame color and of stellar mass. Linear features, shells, and fans are much more likely to occur in massive galaxies with stellar masses >10{sup 10.5} M {sub Sun }, and red galaxies are twice as likely to show tidal features than are blue galaxies.

  15. Correction of the geomagnetically induced image motion problem on the Hubble Space Telescope's Faint Object Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitch, John E.; Hartig, George F.; Beaver, Edward A.; Hier, Richard G.

    1993-11-01

    During the Science Verification phase of the Hubble Space Telescope mission, it was determined that the Faint Object Spectrograph's (FOS) Red detector displayed significant image motions which correlated with orbital changes in the geomagnetic field. The Blue detector exhibited similar but less pronounced motions. The cause of this motion was determined to be inadequate magnetic shielding of the instrument's Digicon detectors. The results of these motions were decreases in onboard target acquisition accuracy, spectral resolution, and photometric accuracy. The Space Telescope Science Institute and the FOS Investigation Definition Team, set about correcting this Geomagnetically-induced Image Motion Problem (GIMP) through a real-time on-board correction scheme. This correction required modifications to almost all aspects of the HST ground system as well as additional NSSC1 flight software and the use of an existing software 'hook' in the FOS microprocessor firmware. This paper presents a detailed description of the problem, the proposed solution, and results of on-orbit testing of the correction mechanism.

  16. Faint Tidal Features in Galaxies within the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey Wide Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, Adam M.; Abraham, Roberto G.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.

    2013-03-01

    We present an analysis of the detectability of faint tidal features in galaxies from the wide-field component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. Our sample consists of 1781 luminous (M_{r^\\prime }<-19.3 mag) galaxies in the magnitude range 15.5 mag < r' < 17 mag and in the redshift range 0.04 < z < 0.2. Although we have classified tidal features according to their morphology (e.g., streams, shells, and tails), we do not attempt to interpret them in terms of their physical origin (e.g., major versus minor merger debris). Instead, we provide a catalog that is intended to provide raw material for future investigations which will probe the nature of low surface brightness substructure around galaxies. We find that around 12% of the galaxies in our sample show clear tidal features at the highest confidence level. This fraction rises to about 18% if we include systems with convincing, albeit weaker tidal features, and to 26% if we include systems with more marginal features that may or may not be tidal in origin. These proportions are a strong function of rest-frame color and of stellar mass. Linear features, shells, and fans are much more likely to occur in massive galaxies with stellar masses >1010.5 M ⊙, and red galaxies are twice as likely to show tidal features than are blue galaxies.

  17. HAWAII QUASAR AND T DWARF SURVEY. I. METHOD AND DISCOVERY OF FAINT FIELD ULTRACOOL DWARFS ,

    SciTech Connect

    Kakazu, Yuko; Capak, Peter L.; Hu, Esther M.; Liu, Michael C.; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Wang Weihao

    2010-11-01

    The Hawaii Quasar and T dwarf survey (HQT Survey) is a wide-field, red optical survey carried out with the Suprime-Cam mosaic CCD camera on the 8.2 m Subaru telescope. The HQT survey is designed to search for low-luminosity (M{sub AB1450} < -23) quasars at high redshift (z>5.7) as well as T dwarfs, both of which are selected by their very red I - z' colors. We use an optical narrowband filter NB816 to break a well-known I - z' color degeneracy between high-z quasars and foreground M and L dwarfs, which are more numerous than quasars. This paper is the first in a series of papers from the HQT survey and we report on the discovery of six faint (19 {<=} J {<=} 20) ultracool dwarfs found over a {approx}9.3 deg{sup 2} area with a limiting magnitude of z'{sub AB} {<=} 23.3. These dwarfs were confirmed by near-IR imaging and/or spectroscopy conducted at various facilities on Mauna Kea. With estimated distances of 60-170 pc, these are among the most distant spectroscopically confirmed field brown dwarfs to date. Limits on the proper motions of these ultracool dwarfs suggest that they are old members of the Galactic disk, though future follow-up observations are necessary to minimize errors. Our finding rate of ultracool dwarfs is within model predictions of Liu et al. However, the large brightening amplitude ({approx}1 mag) previously reported for the L/T transition objects appears to overpredict the numbers. We also examine how the survey field latitude affects the survey sensitivity to the vertical scale height of ultracool dwarfs.

  18. Hubble Space Telescope: Faint object spectrograph instrument handbook. Version 1.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Holland C. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) has undergone substantial rework since the 1985 FOS Instrument Handbook was published, and we are now more knowledgeable regarding the spacecraft and instrument operations requirements and constraints. The formal system for observation specification has also evolved considerably, as the GTO programs were defined in detail. This supplement to the FOS Instrument Handbook addresses the important aspects of these changes, to facilitate proper selection and specification of FOS observing programs. Since the Handbook was published, the FOS red detector has been replaced twice, first with the best available spare in 1985 (which proved to have a poor, and steadily degrading red response), and later with a newly developed Digicon, which exhibits a high, stable efficiency and a dark-count rate less than half that of its predecessors. Also, the FOS optical train was realigned in 1987-88 to eliminate considerable beam-vignetting losses, and the collimators were both removed and recoated for greater reflectivity. Following the optics and detector rework, the FOS was carefully recalibrated (although only ambient measurements were possible, so the far-UV characteristics could not be re-evaluated directly). The resulting efficiency curves, including improved estimates of the telescope throughput, are shown. A number of changes in the observing-mode specifications and addition of several optional parameters resulted as the Proposal Instructions were honed during the last year. Target-brightness limitations, which have only recently been formulated carefully, are described. Although these restrictions are very conservative, it is imperative that the detector safety be guarded closely, especially during the initial stages of flight operations. Restrictions on the use of the internal calibration lamps and aperture-illumination sources (TA LEDs), also resulting from detector safety considerations, are outlined. Finally, many changes have been made to

  19. Witnessing the Birth of the Red Sequence: ALMA High-resolution Imaging of [C II] and Dust in Two Interacting Ultra-red Starbursts at z = 4.425

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oteo, I.; Ivison, R. J.; Dunne, L.; Smail, I.; Swinbank, A. M.; Zhang, Z.-Y.; Lewis, A.; Maddox, S.; Riechers, D.; Serjeant, S.; Van der Werf, P.; Biggs, A. D.; Bremer, M.; Cigan, P.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; Eales, S.; Ibar, E.; Messias, H.; Michałowski, M. J.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; van Kampen, E.

    2016-08-01

    Exploiting the sensitivity and spatial resolution of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, we have studied the morphology and the physical scale of the interstellar medium—both gas and dust—in SGP 38326, an unlensed pair of interacting starbursts at z = 4.425. SGP 38326 is the most luminous star bursting system known at z > 4, with a total IR luminosity of L IR ˜ 2.5 × 1013 L ⊙ and a star formation rate of ˜ 4500 M ⊙ yr‑1. SGP 38326 also contains a molecular gas reservoir among the most massive yet found in the early universe, and it is the likely progenitor of a massive, red-and-dead elliptical galaxy at z ˜ 3. Probing scales of ˜0.″1 or ˜800 pc we find that the smooth distribution of the continuum emission from cool dust grains contrasts with the more irregular morphology of the gas, as traced by the [C ii] fine structure emission. The gas is also extended over larger physical scales than the dust. The velocity information provided by the resolved [C ii] emission reveals that the dynamics of the two interacting components of SGP 38326 are each compatible with disk-like, ordered rotation, but also reveals an ISM which is turbulent and unstable. Our observations support a scenario where at least a subset of the most distant extreme starbursts are highly dissipative mergers of gas-rich galaxies.

  20. Witnessing the Birth of the Red Sequence: ALMA High-resolution Imaging of [C II] and Dust in Two Interacting Ultra-red Starbursts at z = 4.425

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oteo, I.; Ivison, R. J.; Dunne, L.; Smail, I.; Swinbank, A. M.; Zhang, Z.-Y.; Lewis, A.; Maddox, S.; Riechers, D.; Serjeant, S.; Van der Werf, P.; Biggs, A. D.; Bremer, M.; Cigan, P.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; Eales, S.; Ibar, E.; Messias, H.; Michałowski, M. J.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; van Kampen, E.

    2016-08-01

    Exploiting the sensitivity and spatial resolution of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, we have studied the morphology and the physical scale of the interstellar medium—both gas and dust—in SGP 38326, an unlensed pair of interacting starbursts at z = 4.425. SGP 38326 is the most luminous star bursting system known at z > 4, with a total IR luminosity of L IR ∼ 2.5 × 1013 L ⊙ and a star formation rate of ∼ 4500 M ⊙ yr‑1. SGP 38326 also contains a molecular gas reservoir among the most massive yet found in the early universe, and it is the likely progenitor of a massive, red-and-dead elliptical galaxy at z ∼ 3. Probing scales of ∼0.″1 or ∼800 pc we find that the smooth distribution of the continuum emission from cool dust grains contrasts with the more irregular morphology of the gas, as traced by the [C ii] fine structure emission. The gas is also extended over larger physical scales than the dust. The velocity information provided by the resolved [C ii] emission reveals that the dynamics of the two interacting components of SGP 38326 are each compatible with disk-like, ordered rotation, but also reveals an ISM which is turbulent and unstable. Our observations support a scenario where at least a subset of the most distant extreme starbursts are highly dissipative mergers of gas-rich galaxies.

  1. The galaxy luminosity function in groups and clusters: the faint-end upturn and the connection to the field luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Ting-Wen; Ménard, Brice; Mo, Houjun

    2016-07-01

    We characterize the luminosity functions of galaxies residing in z ˜ 0 groups and clusters over the broadest ranges of luminosity and mass reachable by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our measurements cover four orders of magnitude in luminosity, down to about Mr = -12 mag or L = 107 L⊙, and three orders of magnitude in halo mass, from 1012 to 1015 M⊙. We find a characteristic scale, Mr ˜ -18 mag or L ˜ 109 L⊙, below which the slope of the luminosity function becomes systematically steeper. This trend is present for all halo masses and originates mostly from red satellites. This ubiquitous faint-end upturn suggests that it is formation, rather than halo-specific environmental effect, that plays a major role in regulating the stellar masses of faint satellites. We show that the satellite luminosity functions can be described in a simple manner by a double Schechter function with amplitudes scaling with halo mass over the entire range of observables. Combining these conditional luminosity functions with the dark matter halo mass function, we accurately recover the entire field luminosity function over 10 visual magnitudes and reveal that satellite galaxies dominate the field luminosity function at magnitudes fainter than -17. We find that the luminosity functions of blue and red satellite galaxies show distinct shapes and we present estimates of the stellar mass fraction as a function of halo mass and galaxy type. Finally, using a simple model, we demonstrate that the abundances and the faint-end slopes of blue and red satellite galaxies can be interpreted in terms of their formation history, with two distinct modes separated by some characteristic time.

  2. Four QSOs found in a survey of faint objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, D. C.; Tritton, K. P.

    1982-02-01

    Four quasars with redshifts z = 0.6185, 0.6267, 0.850, and 1.665 have been found in the central 33.4 arcmin square of the field at 22h.05, -18deg.91 surveyed by Savage and Bolton (1979) and Krug et al. (1980). The first two quasars are separated by 6.8 arcmin and may be associated with groups of faint galaxies. The separation is well within the 20 Mpc or larger dimensions suggested by Oort et al. (1981) for superclusters, and the velocity difference is not unusual if the velocity dispersion is near the upper end of the range of 300-600 km/s

  3. A sample of Swift/SDSS faint blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, Bernardo; Giommi, Paolo; Turriziani, Sara

    2015-12-01

    We aim here to provide a complete sample of faint (fr ≳ 1 mJy, fx ≳ 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1) blazars and blazar candidates serendipitously discovered in deep Swift images centered on Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). By stacking all available images, we obtain exposures ranging from 104 to more than a million seconds. Since GRBs are thought to explode randomly across the sky, this set of deep fields can be considered as an unbiased survey of ≈ 12 square degrees of extragalactic sky, with sensitivities reaching a few 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 0.5-2 keV band. We then derive the x-ray Log N Log S and show that, considering that our sample may be contaminated by sources other than blazars, we are in agreement with previous estimations based on data and simulations.

  4. The faint young sun-climate paradox - Continental influences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endal, A. S.; Schatten, K. H.

    1982-01-01

    We examine the various mechanisms which have been proposed to compensate for the climatic effects of a 30% increase in the solar luminosity over the past 4 1/2 billion years. Although atmospheric greenhouse effects have received most attention, other mechanisms may have played a role of comparable importance. In particular, we note that the development of continents during the past 2 1/2 billion years could have had a significant secular effect on the atmosphere-ocean heat transport system. As a result, past climates may have been less susceptible to complete freeze-over. A simple energy balance model is used to demonstrate the magnitude of this effect. Because the CO2 greenhouse effect is not the only means of compensating for solar evolution, the faint-young-sun problem should not be used to infer past levels of atmospheric CO2.

  5. Calibration and operation of the Faint Object Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harms, R.; Beaver, E.; Burbidge, E.; Hier, R.; Allen, R.; Angel, R.; Bartko, F.; Bohlin, R.; Ford, H.; Davidson, A.

    1984-01-01

    The design and basic performance characteristics of the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS), one of five instruments built for use on the Space Telescope observatory, is summarized briefly. The results of the recently completed instrument-level calibration are presented with special emphasis on issues affecting plans for FOS astronomical observations. Examples include such fundamental characteristics as: limiting magnitudes (system sensitivity and noise figures), spectral coverage and resolution, scattered light properties, and instrumental polarization and modulation efficiencies. Also gated toward intended users, a rather detailed description of FOS operating modes is given. The discussion begins with the difficulties anticipated during target acquisition and their hoped-for resolution. Both the 'normal' spectroscopic operating modes of the FOS and its 'exotic' features (e.g. spectropolarimetric, time-tagged, and time-resolved modes) are presented. The paper concludes with an overview of the activities to assure proper alignment and operation of the FOS within the entire Space Telescope system (orbital and ground-based).

  6. Very faint X-ray binaries with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armas Padilla, M.

    2016-06-01

    A population of very faint X-ray binaries has been discovered in the last years thanks to the improvement in sensitivity and resolution of the new generations of X-ray missions. These systems show anomalously low luminosities, below 10^{36} ergs/sec, challenging our understanding of accretion physics and binary evolution models, and thereby opening new windows for both observational and theoretical work on accretion onto compact objects. XMM-Newton is playing a crucial role in the study of this dim family of objects thanks to its incomparable spectral capabilities at low luminosities. I will review the state-of-the-art of the field and present our XMM results in both black hole and neutron star objects. Finally, I will discuss the possibilities that the new generation of X-ray telescopes offer for this research line.

  7. Mass influx obtained from LLLTV observations of faint meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.; Clifton, K. S.

    1972-01-01

    Since the advent of low light level television (LLLTV) systems, it has been recognized that such devices offer the ability to observe meteors as faint as 10th magnitude which allows the extension of optical meteor data to masses as small as 0.0001 grams. The Space Sciences Lab at Marshall Space Flight Center has been actively engaged in such observations using image orthicons and intensified SEC vidicons. The results of these observations are presented along with an interpretation in terms of mass-flux. This interpretation includes the development of a relationship between peak luminosity of a meteor and mass, velocity, and zenith angle that was derived from single body meteor theory and compares favorably with results obtained from the Artificial Program. Also included in the mass flux interpretation is an analysis of the observation response of a LLLTV system to fixed and moving point sources.

  8. Do the enigmatic ``Infrared-Faint Radio Sources'' include pulsars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, George; Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Keith, Michael; Mao, Minnie; Champion, David

    2009-04-01

    The Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) team have surveyed seven square degrees of sky at 1.4GHz. During processing some unexpected infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS sources) were discovered. The nature of these sources is not understood, but it is possible that some of these sources may be pulsars within our own galaxy. We propose to observe the IFRS sources with steep spectral indices using standard search techniques to determine whether or not they are pulsars. A pulsar detection would 1) remove a subset of the IFRS sources from the ATLAS sample so they would not need to be observed with large optical/IR telescopes to find their hosts and 2) be intrinsically interesting as the pulsar would be a millisecond pulsar and/or have an extreme spatial velocity.

  9. Morphology and astrometry of Infrared-Faint Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Randall, Kate; Mao, Minnie; Hales, Christopher

    2008-10-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS, are an unexpected class of object discovered in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey, ATLAS. They are compact 1.4GHz radio sources with no visible counterparts in co-located (relatively shallow) Spitzer infrared and optical images. We have detected two of these objects with VLBI, indicating the presence of an AGN. These observations and our ATLAS data indicate that IFRS are extended on scales of arcseconds, and we wish to image their morphologies to obtain clues about their nature. These observations will also help us to select optical counterparts from very deep, and hence crowded, optical images which we have proposed. With these data in hand, we will be able to compare IFRS to known object types and to apply for spectroscopy to obtain their redshifts.

  10. MEASURING SIZES OF ULTRA-FAINT DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, Ricardo R.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Geha, Marla

    2012-02-01

    The discovery of ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies in the halo of the Milky Way extends the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function to a few hundred solar luminosities. This extremely low luminosity regime poses a significant challenge for the photometric characterization of these systems. We present a suite of simulations aimed at understanding how different observational choices related to the properties of a low-luminosity system impact our ability to determine its true structural parameters such as half-light radius and central surface brightness. We focus on estimating half-light radii (on which mass estimates depend linearly) and find that these numbers can have up to 100% uncertainties when relatively shallow photometric surveys, such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, are used. Our simulations suggest that to recover structural parameters within 10% or better of their true values: (1) the ratio of the field of view to the half-light radius of the satellite must be greater than three, (2) the total number of stars, including background objects should be larger than 1000, and (3) the central to background stellar density ratio must be higher than 20. If one or more of these criteria are not met, the accuracy of the resulting structural parameters can be significantly compromised. In the context of future surveys such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, the latter condition will be closely tied to our ability to remove unresolved background galaxies. Assessing the reliability of measured structural parameters will become increasingly critical as the next generation of deep wide-field surveys detects UFDs beyond the reach of current spectroscopic limits.

  11. A spectroscopic search for faint secondaries in cataclysmic variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vande Putte, D.; Smith, Robert Connon; Hawkins, N. A.; Martin, J. S.

    2003-06-01

    The secondary in cataclysmic variables (CVs) is usually detected by cross-correlation of the CV spectrum with that of a K or M dwarf template, to produce a radial velocity curve. Although this method has demonstrated its power, it has its limits in the case of noisy spectra, such as are found when the secondary is faint. A method of coadding spectra, called skew mapping, has been proposed in the past. Gradually, examples of its application are being published; none the less, so far no journal article has described the technique in detail. To answer this need, this paper explores in detail the capabilities of skew mapping when determining the amplitude of the radial velocity for faint secondaries. It demonstrates the power of the method over techniques that are more conventional, when the signal-to-noise ratio is poor. The paper suggests an approach to assessing the quality of results. This leads in the case of the investigated objects to a first tier of results, where we find K2= 127 +/- 23 km s-1 for SY Cnc, K2= 144 +/- 18 km s-1 for RW Sex and K2= 262 +/- 14 km s-1 for UX UMa. These we believe to be the first direct determinations of K2 for these objects. Furthermore, we also obtain K2= 263 +/- 30 km s-1 for RW Tri, close to a skew mapping result obtained elsewhere. In the first three cases, we use these results to derive the mass of the white dwarf companion. A second tier of results includes UU Aqr, EX Hya and LX Ser, for which we propose more tentative values of K2. Clear failures of the method are also discussed (EF Eri, VV Pup and SW Sex).

  12. a Faint and Lonely Brown Dwarf in the Solar Vicinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-04-01

    Discovery of KELU-1 Promises New Insights into Strange Objects Brown Dwarfs are star-like objects which are too small to become real stars, yet too large to be real planets. Their mass is too small to ignite those nuclear processes which are responsible for the large energies and high temperatures of stars, but it is much larger than that of the planets we know in our solar system. Until now, very few Brown Dwarfs have been securely identified as such. Two are members of double-star systems, and a few more are located deep within the Pleiades star cluster. Now, however, Maria Teresa Ruiz of the Astronomy Department at Universidad de Chile (Santiago de Chile), using telescopes at the ESO La Silla observatory, has just discovered one that is all alone and apparently quite near to us. Contrary to the others which are influenced by other objects in their immediate surroundings, this new Brown Dwarf is unaffected and will thus be a perfect object for further investigations that may finally allow us to better understand these very interesting celestial bodies. It has been suggested that Brown Dwarfs may constitute a substantial part of the unseen dark matter in our Galaxy. This discovery may therefore also have important implications for this highly relevant research area. Searching for nearby faint stars The story of this discovery goes back to 1987 when Maria Teresa Ruiz decided to embark upon a long-term search (known as the Calan-ESO proper-motion survey ) for another type of unusual object, the so-called White Dwarfs , i.e. highly evolved, small and rather faint stars. Although they have masses similar to that of the Sun, such stars are no larger than the Earth and are therefore extremely compact. They are particularly interesting, because they most probably represent the future end point of evolution of our Sun, some billions of years from now. For this project, the Chilean astronomer obtained large-field photographic exposures with the 1-m ESO Schmidt telescope at

  13. Red Sky with Red Mesa

    SciTech Connect

    2011-04-14

    The Red Sky/Red Mesa supercomputing platform dramatically reduces the time required to simulate complex fuel models, from 4-6 months to just 4 weeks, allowing researchers to accelerate the pace at which they can address these complex problems. Its speed also reduces the need for laboratory and field testing, allowing for energy reduction far beyond data center walls.

  14. Red Sky with Red Mesa

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-06-23

    The Red Sky/Red Mesa supercomputing platform dramatically reduces the time required to simulate complex fuel models, from 4-6 months to just 4 weeks, allowing researchers to accelerate the pace at which they can address these complex problems. Its speed also reduces the need for laboratory and field testing, allowing for energy reduction far beyond data center walls.

  15. Red Capes, Red Herrings, and Red Flags.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiske, Donald W.

    The argument that the personality structures obtained from retrospective ratings reflect semantic similarity structures has been as provocative as a red cape in the bull ring. High congruence between those two kinds of structures seems well established. What is less clear is how and why those structures differ from that for immediate judgments of…

  16. A white dwarf companion to the main-sequence star 4 Omicron(1) Orionis and the binary hypothesis for the origin of peculiar red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ake, Thomas B.; Johnson, Hollis R.

    1988-04-01

    In the course of an investigation with the IUE satellite of the ultraviolet spectra of peculiar red giants, the authors have discovered a white dwarf companion to the MS star 4 ο1Ori. They discuss the reductions performed for the ο1Ori IUE observations, and compare these with field white dwarfs to derive parameters of the white dwarf and the luminosity of the primary. Upper detection limits are derived for hot degenerate companions to four other bright MS stars, HR 363, RS Cnc, ST Her, and OP Her. Combined with the ο1Ori observations, it is argued that the nondetections for these stars are consistent with the statistics of field giant binaries and that either mass-transfer effects are not responsible for the incipient S-star nature of the MS stars, if their abundance peculiarities are recent, or that the MS stars must be older than 106yr.

  17. Serendipitous discovery of the faint solar twin Inti 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galarza, Jhon Yana; Meléndez, Jorge; Cohen, Judith G.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Solar twins are increasingly the subject of many studies owing to their wide range of applications from testing stellar evolution models to the calibration of fundamental observables; these stars are also of interest because high precision abundances could be achieved that are key to investigating the chemical anomalies imprinted by planet formation. Furthermore, the advent of photometric surveys with large telescopes motivates the identification of faint solar twins in order to set the zero point of fundamental calibrations. Aims: We intend to perform a detailed line-by-line differential analysis to verify whether 2MASS J23263267-0239363 (designated here as Inti 1) is indeed a solar twin. Methods: We determine the atmospheric parameters and differential abundances using high-resolution (R ≈ 50 000), high signal-to-noise (S/N ≈ 110-240 per pixel) Keck/HIRES spectra for our solar twin candidate, the previously known solar twin HD 45184, and the Sun (using reflected light from the asteroid Vesta). Results: For the bright solar twin HD 45184, we found Teff = 5864 ± 9 K, log g = 4.45 ± 0.03 dex, vt = 1.11 ± 0.02 km s-1, and [Fe/H] = 0.04 ± 0.01 dex, which are in good agreement with previous works. Our abundances are in excellent agreement with a recent high-precision work, with an element-to-element scatter of only 0.01 dex. The star Inti 1 has atmospheric parameters Teff = 5837 ± 11 K, log g = 4.42 ± 0.03 dex, vt = 1.04 ± 0.02 km s-1, and [Fe/H] = 0.07 ± 0.01 dex that are higher than solar. The age and mass of the solar twin HD 45184 (3 Gyr and 1.05 M⊙) and the faint solar twin Inti 1 (4 Gyr and 1.04 M⊙) were estimated using isochrones. The differential analysis shows that HD 45184 presents an abundance pattern that is similar to typical nearby solar twins; this means this star has an enhanced refractory relative to volatile elements, while Inti 1 has an abundance pattern closer to solar, albeit somewhat enhanced in refractories. The abundance

  18. Serendipitous discovery of the faint solar twin Inti 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galarza, Jhon Yana; Meléndez, Jorge; Cohen, Judith G.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Solar twins are increasingly the subject of many studies owing to their wide range of applications from testing stellar evolution models to the calibration of fundamental observables; these stars are also of interest because high precision abundances could be achieved that are key to investigating the chemical anomalies imprinted by planet formation. Furthermore, the advent of photometric surveys with large telescopes motivates the identification of faint solar twins in order to set the zero point of fundamental calibrations. Aims: We intend to perform a detailed line-by-line differential analysis to verify whether 2MASS J23263267-0239363 (designated here as Inti 1) is indeed a solar twin. Methods: We determine the atmospheric parameters and differential abundances using high-resolution (R ≈ 50 000), high signal-to-noise (S/N ≈ 110-240 per pixel) Keck/HIRES spectra for our solar twin candidate, the previously known solar twin HD 45184, and the Sun (using reflected light from the asteroid Vesta). Results: For the bright solar twin HD 45184, we found Teff = 5864 ± 9 K, log g = 4.45 ± 0.03 dex, vt = 1.11 ± 0.02 km s-1, and [Fe/H] = 0.04 ± 0.01 dex, which are in good agreement with previous works. Our abundances are in excellent agreement with a recent high-precision work, with an element-to-element scatter of only 0.01 dex. The star Inti 1 has atmospheric parameters Teff = 5837 ± 11 K, log g = 4.42 ± 0.03 dex, vt = 1.04 ± 0.02 km s-1, and [Fe/H] = 0.07 ± 0.01 dex that are higher than solar. The age and mass of the solar twin HD 45184 (3 Gyr and 1.05 M⊙) and the faint solar twin Inti 1 (4 Gyr and 1.04 M⊙) were estimated using isochrones. The differential analysis shows that HD 45184 presents an abundance pattern that is similar to typical nearby solar twins; this means this star has an enhanced refractory relative to volatile elements, while Inti 1 has an abundance pattern closer to solar, albeit somewhat enhanced in refractories. The abundance

  19. Faint Blue Galaxies and the Epoch of Dwarf Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babul, Arif; Ferguson, Henry C.

    1996-02-01

    Several independent lines of reasoning, both theoretical and observational, suggest that the very faint (B ≳ 24) galaxies seen in deep images of the sky are small low-mass galaxies that experienced a short starburst at redshifts 0.5 ≲ z ≲ 1 and have since faded into low-luminosity, low surface brightness (LSB) objects. We examine this hypothesis in detail in order to determine whether a model incorporating such dwarfs can account for the observed wavelength-dependent number counts, as well as redshift, color, and size distributions. Low-mass galaxies generically arise in large numbers in hierarchical clustering scenarios with realistic initial conditions. Generally, these galaxies are expected to form at high redshifts. Babul & Rees have argued that the formation epoch of these galaxies is, in fact, delayed until z ≲ 1 due to the photoionization of the gas by the metagalactic UV radiation at high redshifts. We combine these two elements, along with simple heuristic assumptions regarding star formation histories and efficiency, to construct our bursting dwarf model. The slope and the normalization of the mass function of the dwarf galaxies are derived from the initial conditions and are not adjusted to fit the data. We further augment the model with a phenomenological prescription for the formation and evolution of the locally observed population of galaxies (E, S0, Sab, Sbc, and Sdm types). We use spectral synthesis and Monte Carlo methods to generate realistic model galaxy catalogs for comparison with observations. We find that for reasonable choices of the star formation histories for the dwarf galaxies, the model results are in very good agreement with the results of the deep galaxy surveys. Such a dwarf-dominated model is also qualitatively supported by recent studies of faint galaxy gravitational lensing and clustering, by galaxy size distributions measured with the Hubble Space Telescope, and by the evidence for very modest evolution in regular galaxy

  20. The cDNA Sequence of Two Hemocyanin Subunits from Red Swamp Crayfish Procambarus clarkii and their Responses to White Spot Syndrome Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yong

    2016-03-01

    Hemocyanin, the respiratory protein of crustaceans, participates in the innate immune defense in these organisms. We cloned two hemocyanin subunit genes (PcHc1 and PcHc2), by using a degenerate primer PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) approach, from the hepatopancreas of red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii. The transcripts of these two subunits were only detected in the hepatopancreas by reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis. The neighbor-joining and maximum parsimony phylogenetic analyses indicated that PcHc2 associated with a clade belong to the α-type hemocyanins and PcHc1 associated with another clade belonging to the β-type hemocyanins. The data obtained from the RT-qPCR indicated that the mRNA expression levels of these subunit genes followed almost the same regulation pattern in the crayfish challenged with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). The fluctuation of mRNA expression levels of these two subunits after the WSSV challenge indicated that both of them may participate in the antiviral immune response of crayfish. Received April 12, 2015; accepted November 22, 2015. PMID:26949985

  1. Identification and Analysis of Red Sea Mangrove (Avicennia marina) microRNAs by High-Throughput Sequencing and Their Association with Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Khraiwesh, Basel; Pugalenthi, Ganesan; Fedoroff, Nina V.

    2013-01-01

    Although RNA silencing has been studied primarily in model plants, advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies have enabled profiling of the small RNA components of many more plant species, providing insights into the ubiquity and conservatism of some miRNA-based regulatory mechanisms. Small RNAs of 20 to 24 nucleotides (nt) are important regulators of gene transcript levels by either transcriptional or by posttranscriptional gene silencing, contributing to genome maintenance and controlling a variety of developmental and physiological processes. Here, we used deep sequencing and molecular methods to create an inventory of the small RNAs in the mangrove species, Avicennia marina. We identified 26 novel mangrove miRNAs and 193 conserved miRNAs belonging to 36 families. We determined that 2 of the novel miRNAs were produced from known miRNA precursors and 4 were likely to be species-specific by the criterion that we found no homologs in other plant species. We used qRT-PCR to analyze the expression of miRNAs and their target genes in different tissue sets and some demonstrated tissue-specific expression. Furthermore, we predicted potential targets of these putative miRNAs based on a sequence homology and experimentally validated through endonucleolytic cleavage assays. Our results suggested that expression profiles of miRNAs and their predicted targets could be useful in exploring the significance of the conservation patterns of plants, particularly in response to abiotic stress. Because of their well-developed abilities in this regard, mangroves and other extremophiles are excellent models for such exploration. PMID:23593307

  2. Identification and analysis of red sea mangrove (Avicennia marina) microRNAs by high-throughput sequencing and their association with stress responses.

    PubMed

    Khraiwesh, Basel; Pugalenthi, Ganesan; Fedoroff, Nina V

    2013-01-01

    Although RNA silencing has been studied primarily in model plants, advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies have enabled profiling of the small RNA components of many more plant species, providing insights into the ubiquity and conservatism of some miRNA-based regulatory mechanisms. Small RNAs of 20 to 24 nucleotides (nt) are important regulators of gene transcript levels by either transcriptional or by posttranscriptional gene silencing, contributing to genome maintenance and controlling a variety of developmental and physiological processes. Here, we used deep sequencing and molecular methods to create an inventory of the small RNAs in the mangrove species, Avicennia marina. We identified 26 novel mangrove miRNAs and 193 conserved miRNAs belonging to 36 families. We determined that 2 of the novel miRNAs were produced from known miRNA precursors and 4 were likely to be species-specific by the criterion that we found no homologs in other plant species. We used qRT-PCR to analyze the expression of miRNAs and their target genes in different tissue sets and some demonstrated tissue-specific expression. Furthermore, we predicted potential targets of these putative miRNAs based on a sequence homology and experimentally validated through endonucleolytic cleavage assays. Our results suggested that expression profiles of miRNAs and their predicted targets could be useful in exploring the significance of the conservation patterns of plants, particularly in response to abiotic stress. Because of their well-developed abilities in this regard, mangroves and other extremophiles are excellent models for such exploration. PMID:23593307

  3. Helium shells and faint emission lines from slitless flash spectra.

    PubMed

    Bazin, Cyril; Koutchmy, Serge

    2013-05-01

    At the time of the two last solar total eclipses of August 1st, 2008 in Siberia and July 11th, 2010 in French Polynesia, high frame rate CCD flash spectra were obtained. These eclipses occurred in quiet Sun period and after. The slitless flash spectra show two helium shells, in the weak Paschen α 4686 Å line of the ionized helium HeII and in the neutral helium HeI line at 4713 Å. The extensions of these helium shells are typically 3 Mm. In prominences, the extension of the interface with the corona is much more extended. The observations and analysis of these lines can properly be done only in eclipse conditions, when the intensity threshold reaches the coronal level, and the parasitic scattered light is virtually zero. Under the layers of 1 Mm above the limb, many faint low FIP lines were also seen in emission. These emission lines are superposed on the continuum containing absorption lines. The solar limb can be defined using the weak continuum appearing between the emission lines at the time of the second and third contact. The variations of the singly ionized iron line, the HeI and HeII lines and the continuum intensity are analyzed. The intensity ratio of ionized to neutral helium is studied for evaluating the ionization rate in low layers up to 2 Mm and also around a prominence. PMID:25685435

  4. No climate paradox under the faint early Sun.

    PubMed

    Rosing, Minik T; Bird, Dennis K; Sleep, Norman H; Bjerrum, Christian J

    2010-04-01

    Environmental niches in which life first emerged and later evolved on the Earth have undergone dramatic changes in response to evolving tectonic/geochemical cycles and to biologic interventions, as well as increases in the Sun's luminosity of about 25 to 30 per cent over the Earth's history. It has been inferred that the greenhouse effect of atmospheric CO(2) and/or CH(4) compensated for the lower solar luminosity and dictated an Archaean climate in which liquid water was stable in the hydrosphere. Here we demonstrate, however, that the mineralogy of Archaean sediments, particularly the ubiquitous presence of mixed-valence Fe(II-III) oxides (magnetite) in banded iron formations is inconsistent with such high concentrations of greenhouse gases and the metabolic constraints of extant methanogens. Prompted by this, and the absence of geologic evidence for very high greenhouse-gas concentrations, we hypothesize that a lower albedo on the Earth, owing to considerably less continental area and to the lack of biologically induced cloud condensation nuclei, made an important contribution to moderating surface temperature in the Archaean eon. Our model calculations suggest that the lower albedo of the early Earth provided environmental conditions above the freezing point of water, thus alleviating the need for extreme greenhouse-gas concentrations to satisfy the faint early Sun paradox. PMID:20360739

  5. Results of a search for faint galaxies in voids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, B.; Hopp, U.; Elsaesser, H.

    1997-02-01

    We present the results of a search for intrinsically faint galaxies towards three regions with known voids and the Hercules supercluster. The intention was to identify galaxies of low luminosity in order to find possibly a galaxy population in the voids. Within these selected fields we increased the range of observations in comparison with the recent large field surveys which revealed the non-uniform spatial distribution of galaxies. The limiting magnitude was raised by about 5mag, the limiting surface brightness by 2mag/sq.arcsec, and the limiting diameter reduced to less than 1/3. The individual observational data of our sample are published in the previous PaperI (Hopp et al. 1995) which describes our search strategy and contains B and R magnitudes, apparent diameters, redshifts and galaxy types of about 200 newly identified objects. Their luminosity distribution demonstrates a relatively high percentage of dwarfish galaxies. As the essential result of our survey we have to point out that no clear indication of a void-population was found. The majority of our objects lie outside voids in regions where the already known galaxies are concentrated. Some are located in the middle or near the edges of voids. They appear to be rather isolated, their distances to the nearest neighbour are quite large. Only few of our objects seem to be real void galaxies. Even in the three nearest and rather well defined voids we do not find any hitherto unknown galaxy.

  6. Helium shells and faint emission lines from slitless flash spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, Cyril; Koutchmy, Serge

    2013-05-01

    At the time of the two last solar total eclipses of August 1st, 2008 in Siberia and July 11th, 2010 in French Polynesia, high frame rate CCD flash spectra were obtained. These eclipses occurred in quiet Sun period and after. The slitless flash spectra show two helium shells, in the weak Paschen α 4686 Å line of the ionized helium HeII and in the neutral helium HeI line at 4713 Å. The extensions of these helium shells are typically 3 Mm. In prominences, the extension of the interface with the corona is much more extended. The observations and analysis of these lines can properly be done only in eclipse conditions, when the intensity threshold reaches the coronal level, and the parasitic scattered light is virtually zero. Under the layers of 1 Mm above the limb, many faint low FIP lines were also seen in emission. These emission lines are superposed on the continuum containing absorption lines. The solar limb can be defined using the weak continuum appearing between the emission lines at the time of the second and third contact. The variations of the singly ionized iron line, the HeI and HeII lines and the continuum intensity are analyzed. The intensity ratio of ionized to neutral helium is studied for evaluating the ionization rate in low layers up to 2 Mm and also around a prominence.

  7. THE PRIMEVAL POPULATIONS OF THE ULTRA-FAINT DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Thomas M.; Tumlinson, Jason; Kalirai, Jason S.; Avila, Roberto J.; Ferguson, Henry C. E-mail: tumlinson@stsci.edu E-mail: avila@stsci.edu; and others

    2012-07-01

    We present new constraints on the star formation histories of the ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies, using deep photometry obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). A galaxy class recently discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the UFDs appear to be an extension of the classical dwarf spheroidals to low luminosities, offering a new front in efforts to understand the missing satellite problem. They are the least luminous, most dark-matter-dominated, and least chemically evolved galaxies known. Our HST survey of six UFDs seeks to determine if these galaxies are true fossils from the early universe. We present here the preliminary analysis of three UFD galaxies: Hercules, Leo IV, and Ursa Major I. Classical dwarf spheroidals of the Local Group exhibit extended star formation histories, but these three Milky Way satellites are at least as old as the ancient globular cluster M92, with no evidence for intermediate-age populations. Their ages also appear to be synchronized to within {approx}1 Gyr of each other, as might be expected if their star formation was truncated by a global event, such as reionization.

  8. ARE THE ULTRA-FAINT DWARF GALAXIES JUST CUSPS?

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotov, Adi; Hogg, David W.; Willman, Beth

    2011-01-20

    We develop a technique to investigate the possibility that some of the recently discovered ultra-faint dwarf satellites of the Milky Way might be cusp caustics rather than gravitationally self-bound systems. Such cusps can form when a stream of stars folds, creating a region where the projected two-dimensional surface density is enhanced. In this work, we construct a Poisson maximum likelihood test to compare the cusp and exponential models of any substructure on an equal footing. We apply the test to the Hercules dwarf (d {approx} 113 kpc, M{sub V} {approx} -6.2, e {approx} 0.67). The flattened exponential model is strongly favored over the cusp model in the case of Hercules, ruling out at high confidence that Hercules is a cusp catastrophe. This test can be applied to any of the Milky Way dwarfs, and more generally to the entire stellar halo population, to search for the cusp catastrophes that might be expected in an accreted stellar halo.

  9. Helium shells and faint emission lines from slitless flash spectra

    PubMed Central

    Bazin, Cyril; Koutchmy, Serge

    2013-01-01

    At the time of the two last solar total eclipses of August 1st, 2008 in Siberia and July 11th, 2010 in French Polynesia, high frame rate CCD flash spectra were obtained. These eclipses occurred in quiet Sun period and after. The slitless flash spectra show two helium shells, in the weak Paschen α 4686 Å line of the ionized helium HeII and in the neutral helium HeI line at 4713 Å. The extensions of these helium shells are typically 3 Mm. In prominences, the extension of the interface with the corona is much more extended. The observations and analysis of these lines can properly be done only in eclipse conditions, when the intensity threshold reaches the coronal level, and the parasitic scattered light is virtually zero. Under the layers of 1 Mm above the limb, many faint low FIP lines were also seen in emission. These emission lines are superposed on the continuum containing absorption lines. The solar limb can be defined using the weak continuum appearing between the emission lines at the time of the second and third contact. The variations of the singly ionized iron line, the HeI and HeII lines and the continuum intensity are analyzed. The intensity ratio of ionized to neutral helium is studied for evaluating the ionization rate in low layers up to 2 Mm and also around a prominence. PMID:25685435

  10. Luminosity Function of Faint Globular Clusters in M87

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Christopher Z.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Lauer, Tod R.; Baltz, Edward A.; Silk, Joseph; /Oxford U.

    2006-07-14

    We present the luminosity function to very faint magnitudes for the globular clusters in M87, based on a 30 orbit Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 imaging program. The very deep images and corresponding improved false source rejection allow us to probe the mass function further beyond the turnover than has been done before. We compare our luminosity function to those that have been observed in the past, and confirm the similarity of the turnover luminosity between M87 and the Milky Way. We also find with high statistical significance that the M87 luminosity function is broader than that of the Milky Way. We discuss how determining the mass function of the cluster system to low masses can constrain theoretical models of the dynamical evolution of globular cluster systems. Our mass function is consistent with the dependence of mass loss on the initial cluster mass given by classical evaporation, and somewhat inconsistent with newer proposals that have a shallower mass dependence. In addition, the rate of mass loss is consistent with standard evaporation models, and not with the much higher rates proposed by some recent studies of very young cluster systems. We also find that the mass-size relation has very little slope, indicating that there is almost no increase in the size of a cluster with increasing mass.