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Sample records for fall armyworms spodoptera

  1. Fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) migration pathways in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith; Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) or fall armyworm is an important agricultural pest of a number of crops in the western hemisphere. Two morphologically identical host strains of fall armyworm exist, the rice-strain and corn-strain, with the latter inflicting substantial ec...

  2. Parasitoids of Fall Armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, attacks a wide variety of host plants and is a serious pest of several crops in Florida. Although no one species is a major biological control agent, FAW does have a suite of parasitoids that may affect populations. These species include the braconids Chelonu...

  3. Differential Resistance of Switchgrass Cultivars to Fall Armyworms (Spodoptera frugiperda)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Switchgrass has great potential as a sustainable bioenergy crop. However, prior reports suggest insect damage can interfere with switchgrass establishment and yield. The fall armyworm is a pest of many different grass crops (including maize and rice) and is thus potentially an important pest of sw...

  4. Rearing optimization of two races of the Fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda feeding natural host plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two ecological races of the Fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda were raised under laboratory conditions feeding on natural host plants (corn and bermuda grass). Three rearing containers were used: a plastic container and a vertical cylinder to test fitness when feeding gregariously, and individual ...

  5. FLAVONOIDS OF ZOYSIAGRASS (ZOYSIA SPP) CULTIVARS VARYING IN FALL ARMYWORM (SPODOPTERA FRUGIPERDA)RESISTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous cultivars of zoysiagrass (Zoysia spp) have been developed for the turf industry in the United States. These cultivars have varying degrees of biotic and abiotic stress tolerances. One pest of importance to zoysiagrass is the fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda J.E. Smith). Cultivars suc...

  6. Population variation of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, in the Western Hemisphere

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), the fall armyworm is the most economically important maize pest in the western hemisphere. This research focused on the genetic variability of the maize host strain because there is a lack of information in this area of S. frugiperda rese...

  7. Fall armyworm migration patterns.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), infestations in most of North America arise from annual migrations of populations that overwinter in southern Texas and Florida. Cytochrome Oxidase I haplotype profiles within the fall armyworm corn-strain, the subgroup tha...

  8. Population Variation of the Fall Armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, in the Western Hemisphere

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Pete L.; Molina-Ochoa, Jaime; Martinelli, Samuel; Skoda, Steven R.; Isenhour, David J.; Lee, Donald J.; Krumm, Jeffrey T.; Foster, John E.

    2007-01-01

    Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), the fall armyworm is the most economically important maize pest in the western hemisphere. This research focused on the genetic variability of the maize host strain because there is a lack of information in this area of S. frugiperda research. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) was used to assess the genetic variability of S. frugiperda over a large geographic area. Twenty populations were collected from the maize, one population was collected from princess tree, one population was collected from lemon tree, and one population was collected from bermudagrass. The 23 populations were from Mexico, the continental United States, Puerto Rico, Brazil, and Argentina. The objective of this research was to evaluate whether the majority of genetic variability was within populations or between populations. The AFLP results showed that the majority of the genetic variability is within populations and not between populations, indicating minor gene flow and suggesting that S. frugiperda in the Western Hemisphere are an interbreeding population. PMID:20334595

  9. Population variation of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, in the Western Hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Clark, Pete L; Molina-Ochoa, Jaime; Martinelli, Samuel; Skoda, Steven R; Isenhour, David J; Lee, Donald J; Krumm, Jeffrey T; Foster, John E

    2007-01-01

    Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), the fall armyworm is the most economically important maize pest in the western hemisphere. This research focused on the genetic variability of the maize host strain because there is a lack of information in this area of S. frugiperda research. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) was used to assess the genetic variability of S. frugiperda over a large geographic area. Twenty populations were collected from the maize, one population was collected from princess tree, one population was collected from lemon tree, and one population was collected from bermudagrass. The 23 populations were from Mexico, the continental United States, Puerto Rico, Brazil, and Argentina. The objective of this research was to evaluate whether the majority of genetic variability was within populations or between populations. The AFLP results showed that the majority of the genetic variability is within populations and not between populations, indicating minor gene flow and suggesting that S. frugiperda in the Western Hemisphere are an interbreeding population. PMID:20334595

  10. Inhibition of the responses to sex pheromone of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda.

    PubMed

    Malo, Edi A; Rojas, Julio C; Gago, Rafael; Guerrero, Ángel

    2013-01-01

    Trifluoromethyl ketones reversibly inhibit pheromone-degrading esterases in insect olfactory tissues, affecting pheromone detection and behavior of moth males. In this work, (Z)-9-tetradecenyl trifluoromethyl ketone (Z9-14:TFMK), a closely-related analogue of the pheromone of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), was prepared and tested in electroantennogram and field tests as possible inhibitors of the pheromone action. The electroantennogram parameters, amplitude, and the repolarization time of the antennal responses of S. frugiperda males were affected by Z9-14:TFMK vapors. Exposure of male antennae to a stream of air passing through 100 μg of the ketone produced a significant reduction of the amplitude and an increase of 2/3 repolarization time signals to the pheromone. The effect was reversible and dose-dependent. In the field, the analogue significantly decreased the number of males caught when mixed with the pheromone in 10:1 ratio. The results suggest that Z9-14:TFMK is a mating disruptant of S. frugiperda and may be a good candidate to consider in future strategies to control this pest. PMID:24766416

  11. Inhibition of the Responses to Sex Pheromone of the Fall Armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda

    PubMed Central

    Malo, Edi A.; Rojas, Julio C.; Gago, Rafael; Guerrero, Ángel

    2013-01-01

    Trifluoromethyl ketones reversibly inhibit pheromone-degrading esterases in insect olfactory tissues, affecting pheromone detection and behavior of moth males. In this work, (Z)-9-tetradecenyl trifluoromethyl ketone (Z9-14:TFMK), a closely-related analogue of the pheromone of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), was prepared and tested in electroantennogram and field tests as possible inhibitors of the pheromone action. The electroantennogram parameters, amplitude, and the repolarization time of the antennal responses of S. frugiperda males were affected by Z9-14:TFMK vapors. Exposure of male antennae to a stream of air passing through 100 ìg of the ketone produced a significant reduction of the amplitude and an increase of 2/3 repolarization time signals to the pheromone. The effect was reversible and dose-dependent. In the field, the analogue significantly decreased the number of males caught when mixed with the pheromone in 10:1 ratio. The results suggest that Z9-14:TFMK is a mating disruptant of S. frugiperda and may be a good candidate to consider in future strategies to control this pest. PMID:24766416

  12. Natural Distribution of Parasitoids of Larvae of the Fall Armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Gabriela Murúa, M.; Molina-Ochoa, Jaime; Fidalgo, Patricio

    2009-01-01

    To develop a better understanding of the natural distribution of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), and to update the knowledge of the incidence of its complex of parasitoids. S. frugiperda, samplings in whorl-stage corn were carried out in provinces of Argentina from 1999 to 2003. S. frugiperda larvae were collected from corn in localities of the provinces of Tucumán, Salta, Jujuy, Santiago del Estero, La Rioja, Córdoba, San Luis, Chaco and Misiones. In each locality 30 corn plants were sampled and only larvae located in those plants were collected. The parasitoids that emerged from S. frugiperda larvae were identified and counted. The abundance of the parasitoids and the parasitism rate were estimated. The S. frugiperda parasitoids collected were Campoletis grioti (Blanchard) (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae), Chelonus insularis (Cresson) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), Archytas marmoratus (Townsend) (Diptera Tachinidae) and/or A. incertus (Macquart), Ophion sp. (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae), Euplectrus platyhypenae Howard (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), and Incamyia chilensis (Aldrich) (Diptera Tachinidae). C. grioti was the most abundant and frequent during the five-year survey. Similar diversity of parasitoids was obtained in all the provinces, with the exception of I. chilensis and E. platyhypenae that were recovered only in the province of Salta. In the Northwestern region, in Tucumán, C. grioti and species of Archytas were the most abundant and frequent parasitoids. On the contrary, in Salta and Jujuy Ch. insularis was the parasitoid most abundant and frequently recovered. The parasitism rate obtained in Tucumán, Salta and Jujuy provinces were 21.96%, 17.87% and 6.63% respectively with an average of 18.93%. These results demonstrate that hymenopteran and dipteran parasitoids of S. frugiperda occurred differentially throughout the Argentinian provinces and played an important role on the natural control of the S. frugiperda larval

  13. Migratory patterns of the fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) in the western hemisphere

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm (FAW) is a serious pest of sweet corn in south Florida and a pest of other vegetable, row, and forage crops in the southeastern, mid-Atlantic, and central U.S. It is a migratory pest, moving north each season from overwintering areas in southern Texas and southern Florida. For the la...

  14. Fall Armyworm in the Southeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two separate experiments testing fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) migration patterns were set up in the southeastern U.S. in 2012. Previous results showed that moths from progeny of overwintering populations from south Texas were found west of the Chattahoochee-Flint-Apalachicola river basin, ...

  15. Investigating the Molecular Mechanisms of Organophosphate and Pyrethroid Resistance in the Fall Armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Renato A.; Omoto, Celso; Field, Linda M.; Williamson, Martin S.; Bass, Chris

    2013-01-01

    The fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda is an economically important pest of small grain crops that occurs in all maize growing regions of the Americas. The intensive use of chemical pesticides for its control has led to the selection of resistant populations, however, to date, the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance have not been characterised. In this study the mechanisms involved in the resistance of two S. frugiperda strains collected in Brazil to chlorpyrifos (OP strain) or lambda-cyhalothrin (PYR strain) were investigated using molecular and genomic approaches. To examine the possible role of target-site insensitivity the genes encoding the organophosphate (acetylcholinesterase, AChE) and pyrethroid (voltage-gated sodium channel, VGSC) target-site proteins were PCR amplified. Sequencing of the S. frugiperda ace-1 gene identified several nucleotide changes in the OP strain when compared to a susceptible reference strain (SUS). These result in three amino acid substitutions, A201S, G227A and F290V, that have all been shown previously to confer organophosphate resistance in several other insect species. Sequencing of the gene encoding the VGSC in the PYR strain, identified mutations that result in three amino acid substitutions, T929I, L932F and L1014F, all of which have been shown previously to confer knockdown/super knockdown-type resistance in several arthropod species. To investigate the possible role of metabolic detoxification in the resistant phenotype of the OP and PYR stains all EST sequences available for S. frugiperda were used to design a gene-expression microarray. This was then used to compare gene expression in the resistant strains with the susceptible reference strain. Members of several gene families, previously implicated in metabolic resistance in other insects were found to be overexpressed in the resistant strains including glutathione S-transferases, cytochrome P450s and carboxylesterases. Taken together these results provide

  16. Studies on fall armyworm migration and monitoring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith; Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) or fall armyworm is an important agricultural pest of a number of crops in thewestern hemisphere. Two morphologically identical host strains of fall armyworm exist, the rice-strain and corn-strain, with the latter inflicting substantial eco...

  17. Acetylcholinesterase and insect growth inhibitory activities of Gutierrezia microcephala on fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda J.E. Smith.

    PubMed

    Calderón, J S; Céspedes, C L; Rosas, R; Gómez-Garibay, F; Salazar, J R; Lina, L; Aranda, E; Kubo, I

    2001-01-01

    From the aerial parts of Gutierrezia microcephala (Asteraceae), four oxyflavones were isolated, namely 5,7,2'-trihydroxy-3,6,8,4',5'-pentamethoxyflavone (1); 5,7,4'-trihydroxy-3,6,8-trimethoxyflavone (2); 5,7,2',4'-tetrahydroxy-3,6,8,5'-tetramethoxyflavone (3); 5,2'-dihydroxy-3,6,7,8,4',5'-hexamethoxyflavone (4), and an ent-clerodane, bacchabolivic acid (5). Compounds 1-5, the synthetic methyl ester (6), n-hexane and MeOH extracts were evaluated against the fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda). Gedunin, a known insect growth regulator isolated from Cedrela spp. was used as a positive control. When tested for activity on neonate larvae into the no-choice artificial diet bioassay, flavone (1), clerodane (5), its methyl ester (6), MeOH and n-hexane extracts caused significant larval mortality with MC50 of 3.9, 10.7, 3.46, 7.95 and 7.5 ppm at 7 days, respectively, as well as growth reduction. They also increased the development time of surviving larvae and a significant delay in time to pupation and adult emergence. Acute toxicity against adults of S. frugiperda was also found, 5, 6, gedunin and n-hexane extract had the most potent activity with LD50 value of 6.59, 15.05, 10.78, and 12.79 ppm, respectively. In addition, MeOH, n-hexane extracts, 5, 6 and gedunin caused acetylcholinesterase inhibition with 93.7, 100, 90.2, 62.0 and 100% at 50.0 ppm, respectively; whereas 1-4 exhibited only moderate inhibitory activity. Compounds 1, 5 and 6 showed inhibitory activities comparable with gedunin. These compounds could be responsible of the insect growth inhibitory activity of this plant. PMID:11421454

  18. Modeling seasonal migration of fall armyworm moths

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), is a highly mobile insect pest of a wide range of host crops. However, this pest of tropical origin cannot survive extended periods of freezing temperature, but must repeat a series of northward migratory flights each spring if it is to re-infest ...

  19. Bioenergy Promise Versus a Bug: How Different Cultivars of Switchgrass Fare Against the Fall Armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a North American native plant that is being considered for bioenergy production. A number of different commercial cultivars were evaluated for resistance to the fall armyworm. Differential feeding resistance was detected among the cultivars, but no insect morta...

  20. Review of fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) genetic complexity and migration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) is a significant economic pest in the western hemisphere, causing substantial losses in corn, sorghum, forage and turf grasses (Luginbill 1928, Sparks 1979). Although fall armyworm does not survive severe winters, it infests most of the central...

  1. Growth inhibitory effects on fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda of some limonoids isolated from Cedrela spp. (Meliaceae).

    PubMed

    Céspedes, C L; Calderón, J S; Lina, L; Aranda, E

    2000-05-01

    Dichloromethane extracts of Cedrela salvadorensis and Cedrela dugessi afforded a photogedunin epimeric mixture, gedunin and cedrelanolide. These compounds and the photogedunin epimeric acetates 3 and 4 at the 23-OH position were evaluated against Spodoptera frugiperda. Toosendanin, isolated from Melia azedarach, was used as a positive control. When tested for activity on neonate larvae into the no-choice bioassays, gedunin, photogedunin epimeric mixture, and photogedunin acetates mixture caused significant larval mortality with LC(50) of 39.0, 10.0, and 8.0 ppm at 7 days, respectively, as well as growth reduction. All the compounds tested inhibited larval growth, compared to the control, in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, it was possible to observe significant reduced pupal weights and adult emergence. All the tested compounds except cedrelanolide showed comparable activity to that of toosendanin. PMID:10820113

  2. Susceptibility of Anthonomus grandis (cotton boll weevil) and Spodoptera frugiperda (fall armyworm) to a cry1ia-type toxin from a Brazilian Bacillus thuringiensis strain.

    PubMed

    Grossi-de-Sa, Maria Fatima; Quezado de Magalhaes, Mariana; Silva, Marilia Santos; Silva, Shirley Margareth Buffon; Dias, Simoni Campos; Nakasu, Erich Yukio Tempel; Brunetta, Patricia Sanglard Felipe; Oliveira, Gustavo Ramos; Neto, Osmundo Brilhante de Oliveira; Sampaio de Oliveira, Raquel; Soares, Luis Henrique Barros; Ayub, Marco Antonio Zachia; Siqueira, Herbert Alvaro Abreu; Figueira, Edson L Z

    2007-09-30

    Different isolates of the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis produce multiple crystal (Cry) proteins toxic to a variety of insects, nematodes and protozoans. These insecticidal Cry toxins are known to be active against specific insect orders, being harmless to mammals, birds, amphibians, and reptiles. Due to these characteristics, genes encoding several Cry toxins have been engineered in order to be expressed by a variety of crop plants to control insectpests. The cotton boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis, and the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, are the major economically devastating pests of cotton crop in Brazil, causing severe losses, mainly due to their endophytic habit, which results in damages to the cotton boll and floral bud structures. A cry1Ia-type gene, designated cry1Ia12, was isolated and cloned from the Bt S811 strain. Nucleotide sequencing of the cry1Ia12 gene revealed an open reading frame of 2160 bp, encoding a protein of 719 amino acid residues in length, with a predicted molecular mass of 81 kDa. The amino acid sequence of Cry1Ia12 is 99% identical to the known Cry1Ia proteins and differs from them only in one or two amino acid residues positioned along the three domains involved in the insecticidal activity of the toxin. The recombinant Cry1Ia12 protein, corresponding to the cry1Ia12 gene expressed in Escherichia coli cells, showed moderate toxicity towards first instar larvae of both cotton boll weevil and fall armyworm. The highest concentration of the recombinant Cry1Ia12 tested to achieve the maximum toxicities against cotton boll weevil larvae and fall armyworm larvae were 230 microg/mL and 5 microg/mL, respectively. The herein demonstrated insecticidal activity of the recombinant Cry1Ia12 toxin against cotton boll weevil and fall armyworm larvae opens promising perspectives for the genetic engineering of cotton crop resistant to both these devastating pests in Brazil. PMID:17927912

  3. Cytochrome P450s from the fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda): responses to plant allelochemicals and pesticides.

    PubMed

    Giraudo, M; Hilliou, F; Fricaux, T; Audant, P; Feyereisen, R; Le Goff, G

    2015-02-01

    Spodoptera frugiperda is a polyphagous lepidopteran pest that encounters a wide range of toxic plant metabolites in its diet. The ability of this insect to adapt to its chemical environment might be explained by the action of major detoxification enzymes such as cytochrome P450s (or CYP). Forty-two sequences coding for P450s were identified and most of the transcripts were found to be expressed in the midgut, Malpighian tubules and fat body of S. frugiperda larvae. Relatively few P450s were expressed in the established cell line Sf9. In order to gain information on how these genes respond to different chemical compounds, larvae and Sf9 cells were exposed to plant secondary metabolites (indole, indole-3-carbinol, quercetin, 2-tridecanone and xanthotoxin), insecticides (deltamethrin, fipronil, methoprene, methoxyfenozide) or model inducers (clofibrate and phenobarbital). Several genes were induced by plant chemicals such as P450s from the 6B, 321A and 9A subfamilies. Only a few genes responded to insecticides, belonging principally to the CYP9A family. There was little overlap between the response in vivo measured in the midgut and the response in vitro in Sf9 cells. In addition, regulatory elements were detected in the promoter region of these genes. In conclusion, several P450s were identified that could potentially be involved in the adaptation of S. frugiperda to its chemical environment. PMID:25315858

  4. Parasitoids attacking fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in sweet corn habitats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm larvae, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), were collected from sweet corn plants (Zea mays L.) in fields located in three south Florida counties. Fields were sampled from 2010 – 2015 during the fall and spring seasons. Larvae were brought back to the laboratory to complete developme...

  5. Parasitization of fall armyworm by the eulophid parasitoid Euplectrus platyhypenae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), is attacked by parasitoids from several different families of Hymenoptera and Diptera. One species, Euplectrus platyhypenae Howard (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), has been consistently recovered from larvae in whorl-stage corn and from larvae feeding i...

  6. Genetic mapping of fall armyworm resistance in Zoysiagrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular tools have not identified markers for host plant resistance to fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith)], one of the most damaging insect pests in the southeastern U.S., in turfgrasses. Available QTLs in corn have not been further assessed for utility as comparative markers for ...

  7. Feeding deterrence and inhibitory effects of bee balm (Monarda didyma) leaves on fall armyworm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith)] is a serious pest of many field and horticulture crops. Because of the many advantages for the use of plant-derived pesticides, we tested whether bee balm (Monarda didyma L.) leaves could have feeding deterrence on fall armyworm. When S. frugipe...

  8. Effect of eastern gamagrass on fall armyworm and corn earworm development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) and the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) are two important corn pests in the southern U.S. states. Effect of the leaves from the corn relative, the Eastern gamagrass (Tripsacum dactyloides L.) on fall armyworm and corn earworm development ...

  9. Impact of Fall Armyworm Survival in Bt Crops on Survival and Damage Potential of Subsequent Generations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), colonies were compared to determine whether development on Bt corn or Bt cotton impacted survival and damage potential of subsequent generations on Bt or non-Bt cotton. Late instars of fall armyworm were collected from Bt and non-Bt sweet corn to ...

  10. Modeling seasonal migration of fall armyworm moths.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, J K; Nagoshi, R N; Meagher, R L; Fleischer, S J; Jairam, S

    2016-02-01

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith), is a highly mobile insect pest of a wide range of host crops. However, this pest of tropical origin cannot survive extended periods of freezing temperature but must migrate northward each spring if it is to re-infest cropping areas in temperate regions. The northward limit of the winter-breeding region for North America extends to southern regions of Texas and Florida, but infestations are regularly reported as far north as Québec and Ontario provinces in Canada by the end of summer. Recent genetic analyses have characterized migratory pathways from these winter-breeding regions, but knowledge is lacking on the atmosphere's role in influencing the timing, distance, and direction of migratory flights. The Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model was used to simulate migratory flight of fall armyworm moths from distinct winter-breeding source areas. Model simulations identified regions of dominant immigration from the Florida and Texas source areas and overlapping immigrant populations in the Alabama-Georgia and Pennsylvania-Mid-Atlantic regions. This simulated migratory pattern corroborates a previous migratory map based on the distribution of fall armyworm haplotype profiles. We found a significant regression between the simulated first week of moth immigration and first week of moth capture (for locations which captured ≥ 10 moths), which on average indicated that the model simulated first immigration 2 weeks before first captures in pheromone traps. The results contribute to knowledge of fall armyworm population ecology on a continental scale and will aid in the prediction and interpretation of inter-annual variability of insect migration patterns including those in response to climatic change and adoption rates of transgenic cultivars. PMID:26045330

  11. Modeling seasonal migration of fall armyworm moths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westbrook, J. K.; Nagoshi, R. N.; Meagher, R. L.; Fleischer, S. J.; Jairam, S.

    2016-02-01

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith), is a highly mobile insect pest of a wide range of host crops. However, this pest of tropical origin cannot survive extended periods of freezing temperature but must migrate northward each spring if it is to re-infest cropping areas in temperate regions. The northward limit of the winter-breeding region for North America extends to southern regions of Texas and Florida, but infestations are regularly reported as far north as Québec and Ontario provinces in Canada by the end of summer. Recent genetic analyses have characterized migratory pathways from these winter-breeding regions, but knowledge is lacking on the atmosphere's role in influencing the timing, distance, and direction of migratory flights. The Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model was used to simulate migratory flight of fall armyworm moths from distinct winter-breeding source areas. Model simulations identified regions of dominant immigration from the Florida and Texas source areas and overlapping immigrant populations in the Alabama-Georgia and Pennsylvania-Mid-Atlantic regions. This simulated migratory pattern corroborates a previous migratory map based on the distribution of fall armyworm haplotype profiles. We found a significant regression between the simulated first week of moth immigration and first week of moth capture (for locations which captured ≥10 moths), which on average indicated that the model simulated first immigration 2 weeks before first captures in pheromone traps. The results contribute to knowledge of fall armyworm population ecology on a continental scale and will aid in the prediction and interpretation of inter-annual variability of insect migration patterns including those in response to climatic change and adoption rates of transgenic cultivars.

  12. Cross-Resistance between Cry1 Proteins in Fall Armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) May Affect the Durability of Current Pyramided Bt Maize Hybrids in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Daniel; Salmeron, Eloisa; Horikoshi, Renato Jun; Bernardi, Oderlei; Dourado, Patrick Marques; Carvalho, Renato Assis; Martinelli, Samuel; Head, Graham P.; Omoto, Celso

    2015-01-01

    Genetically modified plants expressing insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) offer valuable options for managing insect pests with considerable environmental and economic benefits. Despite the benefits provided by Bt crops, the continuous expression of these insecticidal proteins imposes strong selection for resistance in target pest populations. Bt maize (Zea mays) hybrids have been successful in controlling fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda), the main maize pest in Brazil since 2008; however, field-evolved resistance to the protein Cry1F has recently been reported. Therefore it is important to assess the possibility of cross-resistance between Cry1F and other Cry proteins expressed in Bt maize hybrids. In this study, an F2 screen followed by subsequent selection on MON 89034 maize was used to select an S. frugiperda strain (RR) able to survive on the Bt maize event MON 89034, which expresses the Cry1A.105 and Cry2Ab2 proteins. Field-collected insects from maize expressing the Cry1F protein (event TC1507) represented most of the positive (resistance allele-containing) (iso)families found. The RR strain showed high levels of resistance to Cry1F, which apparently also conferred high levels of cross resistance to Cry1A.105 and Cry1Ab, but had only low-level (10-fold) resistance to Cry2Ab2. Life history studies to investigate fitness costs associated with the resistance in RR strain revealed only small reductions in reproductive rate when compared to susceptible and heterozygous strains, but the RR strain produced 32.2% and 28.4% fewer females from each female relative to the SS and RS (pooled) strains, respectively. Consistent with the lack of significant resistance to Cry2Ab2, MON 89034 maize in combination with appropriate management practices continues to provide effective control of S. frugiperda in Brazil. Nevertheless, the occurrence of Cry1F resistance in S. frugiperda across Brazil, and the cross-resistance to Cry1Ab and Cry1A.105

  13. Cross-Resistance between Cry1 Proteins in Fall Armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) May Affect the Durability of Current Pyramided Bt Maize Hybrids in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Daniel; Salmeron, Eloisa; Horikoshi, Renato Jun; Bernardi, Oderlei; Dourado, Patrick Marques; Carvalho, Renato Assis; Martinelli, Samuel; Head, Graham P; Omoto, Celso

    2015-01-01

    Genetically modified plants expressing insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) offer valuable options for managing insect pests with considerable environmental and economic benefits. Despite the benefits provided by Bt crops, the continuous expression of these insecticidal proteins imposes strong selection for resistance in target pest populations. Bt maize (Zea mays) hybrids have been successful in controlling fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda), the main maize pest in Brazil since 2008; however, field-evolved resistance to the protein Cry1F has recently been reported. Therefore it is important to assess the possibility of cross-resistance between Cry1F and other Cry proteins expressed in Bt maize hybrids. In this study, an F2 screen followed by subsequent selection on MON 89034 maize was used to select an S. frugiperda strain (RR) able to survive on the Bt maize event MON 89034, which expresses the Cry1A.105 and Cry2Ab2 proteins. Field-collected insects from maize expressing the Cry1F protein (event TC1507) represented most of the positive (resistance allele-containing) (iso)families found. The RR strain showed high levels of resistance to Cry1F, which apparently also conferred high levels of cross resistance to Cry1A.105 and Cry1Ab, but had only low-level (10-fold) resistance to Cry2Ab2. Life history studies to investigate fitness costs associated with the resistance in RR strain revealed only small reductions in reproductive rate when compared to susceptible and heterozygous strains, but the RR strain produced 32.2% and 28.4% fewer females from each female relative to the SS and RS (pooled) strains, respectively. Consistent with the lack of significant resistance to Cry2Ab2, MON 89034 maize in combination with appropriate management practices continues to provide effective control of S. frugiperda in Brazil. Nevertheless, the occurrence of Cry1F resistance in S. frugiperda across Brazil, and the cross-resistance to Cry1Ab and Cry1A.105

  14. Fitness costs of Cry1F resistance in two populations of fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith), collected from Puerto Rico and Florida.

    PubMed

    Dangal, Vikash; Huang, Fangneng

    2015-05-01

    The development of resistance in target pest populations is a threat to the sustainability of transgenic crops expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins. Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith), is a major target pest of Bt maize in North and South America. This insect is the first target pest that has developed field resistance to Bt maize at multiple locations in these regions. The objective of this study was to assess the fitness costs associated with the Cry1F resistance in two populations of S. frugiperda collected from Puerto Rico (RR-PR) and Florida (RR-FL). In the study, fitness costs were evaluated by comparing survival, growth, and developmental time of seven populations of S. frugiperda on (1) non-Bt meridic diet and (2) non-Bt maize leaf tissue and non-Bt diet. The seven populations were RR-PR, RR-FL, a Bt-susceptible strain (Bt-SS), and four F1 populations developed from reciprocal crosses between Bt-SS and the two resistant populations. Biological parameters measured were neonate-to-adult survivorship, neonate-to-adult developmental time, 10day larval weight on non-Bt maize leaf tissue, pupal weight, and sex ratios. Results of the study show that the Cry1F resistance in both RR-PR and RR-FL was associated with considerable fitness costs, especially for the Florida population. Compared to the Bt-susceptible population, RR-PR showed an average of 61.1% reduction in larval weight, 20.4% less in neonate-to-adult survivorship, and 3.7days delay in neonate-to-adult developmental time. These fitness costs for RR-FL were 66.9%, 31.7% and 4.4days, respectively. The fitness costs of RR-PR and RR-FL appeared to be non-recessive. The results indicate that a diversified genetic basis may exist for the Cry1F resistance in S. frugiperda. PMID:25791021

  15. Use of benzimidazole agar plates to assess fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) feeding on excised maize and sorghum leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is an economically significant pest of sorghum and maize. To screen sorghum and maize germplasm for resistance to fall armyworm feeding, field, greenhouse, or lab bioassays are often utilized individually or in combinatio...

  16. Inferring the annual migration patterns of fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in the U.S. from mitochondrial haplotypes.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) or fall armyworm is an important agricultural pest of a number of crops in the Western Hemisphere. In the U.S., infestations in corn acreages extend from the Mexican to the Canadian border. Because fall armyworm does not survive prolonged ground freezing the infe...

  17. Evaluation of whorl damage by fall armyworm (Lepidoptera:Noctuidae) on field and greenhouse grown sweet sorghum plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)] is an economically important pest of sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L) Moench]. However, resistance to fall armyworm in sweet sorghum has not been extensively studied. A collection of primarily sweet sorghum accessions were evaluated in t...

  18. Using haplotypes to monitor the migration of fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) corn-strain populations from Texas and Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith; Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) or fall armyworm is an important agricultural pest of a number of crops in the western hemisphere. Two morphologically identical host strains of fall armyworm exist, the rice-strain and corn-strain, with the latter inflicting substantial eco...

  19. Texas is the overwintering source of fall armyworm in central Pennsylvainia: implications for migration into the northeastern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), infestations in most of North America arise from annual migrations of populations that overwinter in southern Texas and Florida. Cytochrome Oxidase I haplotype profiles within the fall armyworm corn-strain, the subgroup tha...

  20. Genetic variation in neonate behavior of fall armyworm (Lepidoptera:Noctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioassays were developed to test plant selection of fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith)] host strains to corn and stargrass. Neonate larvae from 3 corn strain and 3 rice strain colonies preferentially selected corn sections over stargrass sections in petri dish choice tests. However...

  1. Demonstration using field collections that Argentina fall armyworm populations exhibit strain-specific host plant preference

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spodoptera frugiperda, the fall armyworm, is a major economic pest throughout the Western Hemisphere of corn (maize), cotton, sorghum, and a variety of agricultural grasses and vegetable crops. Studies in the United States, the Caribbean, and Brazil demonstrated the existence of two subpopulations ...

  2. Development and feeding of fall armyworm, on Miscanthus x giganteus and switchgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Observations of fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith)] larvae infesting plots of Miscanthus x giganteus Greef and Deuter ex Hodkinson and Renvoize prompted laboratory-based tests of survival, development and feeding preferences on leaf tissue from M. x giganteus and switchgrass (Panicum ...

  3. Sunn hemp as a ground cover to manage fall armyworm populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda, is a serious pest of sweet corn in south Florida and a pest of other vegetable, row, and forage crops in the southeastern, mid-Atlantic, and central U.S. It is a migratory pest, moving north each season from overwintering areas in southern Texas and south...

  4. Expression of a synthetic Bacillus thuringiensis endotoxin to enhance resistance against fall armyworm in bahiagrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bahiagrass is a low input, drought tolerant and disease resistant warm season turfgrass used for forage and turf in the southeastern U.S. and other subtropical regions of the world. Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) is a destructive migratory pest of many tropical and subtropical g...

  5. Evaluations of Bollgard, Bollgard II, and Widestrike technologies against beet and fall armyworm larvae (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic cottons containing the Bollgard®, Bollgard II® and WideStrike® traits were grown in 2005 and 2007 to examine the efficacy against beet [Spodoptera exigua (Hübner)] and fall armyworms [S. frugiperda (J. E. Smith)]. Results suggest that both dual-gene traits are more efficacious against th...

  6. Antibiosis among selected paspalum taxa to the fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty six accessions of the warm-season perennial grass, Paspalum spp., were evaluated for response to the fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), an important pest of turfgrass. In growth chamber, excised clipping studies, P. vaginatum 03-539-31 and P. vaginatum 03-525-22 were the most ...

  7. Physiological and biochemical bases of fall armyworm resistance in the seedlings of maize inbred lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four CIMMYT maize inbred lines (i.e., CML333, CML335, CML 336, and CML338), and a susceptible (i.e., AB24E) and resistant (i.e., Mp780) control were examined for the mechanisms of fall armyworm (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda (JE Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) resistance. The six inbred lines were ev...

  8. Identification of fall armyworm (Lepidoptera:Noctuidae) host strains using male-derived spermatophores

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laboratory experiments were designed to identify the host strain paternity of fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith)] mated females. In no-choice tests, corn or rice strain females were placed in cages with males of the opposite strain. After 48 h, females were dissected and spermatoph...

  9. Attraction of fall armyworm males (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) to host strain females

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Attraction of wild male fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), was compared in trapping experiments during 2005 – 2009 in Florida. Traps were baited either with a commercial sex pheromone lure or corn and rice strain females obtained from laboratory colonies. Over 7400 male moths were...

  10. Identifying resistance in corn to southwestern corn borer, fall armyworm, and corn earworm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Southwestern corn borer, Diatraea grandiosella Dyar; fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith); and corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea Boddie, are major insect pests of corn, Zea mays L., in the southern United States. Corn germplasm with resistance to leaf feeding by southwestern corn borer a...

  11. Expression of crylFa in bahiagrass enhances resistance to fall armyworm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum var. Flugge) is the predominant forage grass in Florida and in subtropical regions worldwide. To improve pest resistance against fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda J. E. Smith), an optimized cry1Fa gene encoding a '-endotoxin from Bacillus thuringiensis was synthesized...

  12. Survey for hymenopteran and dipteran parasitoids of the fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Chiapas, Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A survey of hymenopteran and dipteran parasitoids of the fall armyworm (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) larvae was conducted to determine their occurrence and parasitism rates in Western Chiapas, Mexico. FAW larvae were collected from whorl-stage cornfields in Chiapas in the region called ...

  13. A cardioactive peptide from the southern armyworm, Spodoptera eridania.

    PubMed

    Furuya, K; Hackett, M; Cirelli, M A; Schegg, K M; Wang, H; Shabanowitz, J; Hunt, D F; Schooley, D A

    1999-01-01

    A cardioactive peptide was isolated from extracts of whole heads of the southern armyworm, Spodoptera eridania. This peptide has the sequence ENFAVGCTPGYQRTADGRCKPTF (Mr = 2516.8), determined from both Edman sequencing and tandem mass spectrometry in combination with off-line micropreparative capillary liquid chromatography. This peptide, termed Spoer-CAP23, has excitatory effects on a semi-isolated heart from larval Manduca sexta, causing an inotropic effect at low concentrations of peptide and chronotropic and inotropic effects at high doses. The threshold concentration for stimulatory effects of the synthetic peptide on the semi-isolated heart was about 1 nM, suggesting a physiological role as a neuropeptide. PMID:10098624

  14. Effect of fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) strain and diet on oviposition and development in the parasitoid Euplectrus platyhypenae (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oviposition tendency and subsequent development of the parasitoid wasp Euplectrus platyhypenae Howard was compared using the corn and rice host strains of Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) fed corn (Zea mays, ‘Truckers Favorite’) or stargrass (Cynodon nlemfuensis Vanderyst var. nlemfuensis, ‘Floro...

  15. Prospecting of popcorn hybrids for resistance to fall armyworm.

    PubMed

    Crubelati-Mulati, N C S; Scapim, C A; Albuquerque, F A; Amaral Junior, A T; Vivas, M; Rodovalho, M A

    2014-01-01

    The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, is the pest that causes the greatest economic losses for both common corn and popcorn crops, and the use of resistant plant genotypes is an important tool for integrated pest management. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the damage caused by S. frugiperda on single-cross popcorn hybrids under field conditions with natural infestation as well as to study the effect of 11 popcorn hybrids on the S. frugiperda life cycle under laboratory conditions. A completely randomized block design with 4 replicates was used for the field experiment, and a completely randomized design with 10 replicates was used for the laboratory experiment. In the field experiment, the damage caused by fall armyworm, grain yield, and popping expansion were quantified, and a diallel analysis was performed to select the best hybrids. For the laboratory experiment, caterpillars were obtained from laboratory cultures kept on an artificial diet and were fed with leaves from the 11 hybrids. Hybrids P7.0 x P9.4, P7.1 x P9.6, P7.2.0 x P9.3, P7.4.0 x P9.1 and P7.4.1 x P9.4 exhibited negative specific combining ability for injury by fall armyworm and positive specific combining ability for yield and popping expansion. In the laboratory experiment, the hybrids influenced the mean larval stage duration, mean larval mass, final larval mass, pupal stage duration, mean pupal mass, and adult longevity. PMID:25177934

  16. Characterization of the Earwig, Doru lineare, as a Predator of Larvae of the Fall Armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda: A Functional Response Study

    PubMed Central

    Sueldo, Mabel Romero; Bruzzone, Octavio A.; Virla, Eduardo G.

    2010-01-01

    Spodoptera frugiperda Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is considered as the most important pest of maize in almost all tropical America. In Argentina, the earwig Doru lineare Eschscholtz (Dermaptera: Forficulidae) has been observed preying on S. frugiperda egg masses in corn crops, but no data about its potential role as a biocontrol agent of this pest have been provided. The predation efficiency of D. lineare on newly emerged S. frugiperda larva was evaluated through a laboratory functional response study. D. lineare showed type II functional response to S. frugiperda larval density, and disc equation estimations of searching efficiency and handling time were (a) = 0.374 and (t) = 182.9 s, respectively. Earwig satiation occurred at 39.4 S. frugiperda larvae. PMID:20575739

  17. Fall Armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Development, Survivorship, and Damage on Cotton Plants Expressing Insecticidal Plant-Incorporated Protectants.

    PubMed

    Hardke, Jarrod T; Jackson, Ryan E; Leonard, B Rogers; Temple, Joshua H

    2015-06-01

    Cotton, Gossypium hirsutum (L.), plants expressing insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Berliner are planted on significant acreage across the southern region of the United States. Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), can be a significant cotton pest in some years, but this species has not been a primary target of Bt cotton technologies. The objective of this study was to quantify fall armyworm larval survivorship and fruiting form injury on transgenic cotton lines expressing Cry1Ac (Bollgard), Cry1Ac+Cry2Ab (Bollgard II), and Cry1Ac+Cry1F (WideStrike) Bt proteins. Larval survivorship and fruiting form damage of fall armyworm on Bollgard, Bollgard II, WideStrike, and non-Bt (control) cotton lines were evaluated in no-choice field studies. Fall armyworm (third instars) were placed on flower buds (squares), white flowers, and bolls, enclosed within a nylon mesh exclusion cage, and evaluated at selected intervals after infestation. Exposure of fall armyworm larvae to Bollgard cotton lines generally resulted in no significant effects on survivorship compared with larvae exposed to the non-Bt cotton line. Survivorship and plant injury by fall armyworm on Bollgard II cotton lines was variable compared with that on non-Bt cotton lines, and significant differences between treatments were inconsistent. Fall armyworm had significantly lower survivorship and caused less plant injury on WideStrike cotton lines than on non-Bt cotton lines across all plant structures. Development and survivorship of fall armyworm larvae on these cotton lines also were evaluated in no-choice laboratory assays by offering the previously described fruiting forms to third instars. Bollgard II and WideStrike cotton lines significantly reduced fall armyworm development and survivorship compared with those larvae offered non-Bt tissue. These results suggest that differences exist among selected Bt cotton technologies in their performance against fall

  18. Fall Armyworm susceptibility to Bollgard I, Bollgard II, and Widestrike cotton as determined by a leaf-dish assay.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith), has received little attention as boll weevil eradication progresses into the second full season in the Rio Grande Valley of South Texas. Cotton varieties containing the endotoxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Cry1Ac = Bollgard®, Cry1Ac + Cry1Ab ...

  19. Using stable isotope analysis to examine the fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) host strains in a cotton habitat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith; Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) or fall armyworm is an important agricultural pest of a number of crops in the western hemisphere, including cotton. Two genetically distinct but morphologically identical strains (R-strain and C-strain) exist that differ physiologically and...

  20. Damage and survivorship of fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: noctuidae) on transgenic field corn expressing Bacillus thuringiensis cry proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field corn, Zea mays L. plants expressing Cry1Ab and Cry1F insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Berliner are planted on considerable acreage across the Southern region of the United States. The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), is an economically impo...

  1. Fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) development survivorship and damage on cotton plants expressing insecticidal plant-incorporated protectants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton, Gossypium hirsutum (L.), plants expressing insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Berliner are planted on significant acreage across the Southern region of the United States. Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), can be a significant cotton pest in ...

  2. Laboratory evaluations of Lepidopteran-active soybean seed treatments on survivorship of fall armyworm (Lepidoptera:Noctuidae) larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two anthranilic diamide insecticides, chlorantraniliprole and cyantraniliprole, were evaluated as soybean, Glycine max L., seed treatments for control of fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith). Bioassays were conducted using 2nd instar larvae and plants from both field and greenhouse gr...

  3. Transgenic Cotton Plants Expressing Cry1Ia12 Toxin Confer Resistance to Fall Armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) and Cotton Boll Weevil (Anthonomus grandis)

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Raquel S.; Oliveira-Neto, Osmundo B.; Moura, Hudson F. N.; de Macedo, Leonardo L. P.; Arraes, Fabrício B. M.; Lucena, Wagner A.; Lourenço-Tessutti, Isabela T.; de Deus Barbosa, Aulus A.; da Silva, Maria C. M.; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria F.

    2016-01-01

    Gossypium hirsutum (commercial cooton) is one of the most economically important fibers sources and a commodity crop highly affected by insect pests and pathogens. Several transgenic approaches have been developed to improve cotton resistance to insect pests, through the transgenic expression of different factors, including Cry toxins, proteinase inhibitors, and toxic peptides, among others. In the present study, we developed transgenic cotton plants by fertilized floral buds injection (through the pollen-tube pathway technique) using an DNA expression cassette harboring the cry1Ia12 gene, driven by CaMV35S promoter. The T0 transgenic cotton plants were initially selected with kanamycin and posteriorly characterized by PCR and Southern blot experiments to confirm the genetic transformation. Western blot and ELISA assays indicated the transgenic cotton plants with higher Cry1Ia12 protein expression levels to be further tested in the control of two major G. hirsutum insect pests. Bioassays with T1 plants revealed the Cry1Ia12 protein toxicity on Spodoptera frugiperda larvae, as evidenced by mortality up to 40% and a significant delay in the development of the target insects compared to untransformed controls (up to 30-fold). Also, an important reduction of Anthonomus grandis emerging adults (up to 60%) was observed when the insect larvae were fed on T1 floral buds. All the larvae and adult insect survivors on the transgenic lines were weaker and significantly smaller compared to the non-transformed plants. Therefore, this study provides GM cotton plant with simultaneous resistance against the Lepidopteran (S. frugiperda), and the Coleopteran (A. grandis) insect orders, and all data suggested that the Cry1Ia12 toxin could effectively enhance the cotton transgenic plants resistance to both insect pests. PMID:26925081

  4. Fall armyworm: pest & bio indicator of climate change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Described ongoing research on the geographical range of fall armyworm subpopulations in the United States and the migratory pathways from the TX and FL overwintering regions. These results provide a foundation for future efforts to develop fall armyworm as a bioindicator for the effects of climate c...

  5. Demonstration Using Field Collections that Argentina Fall Armyworm Populations Exhibit Strain-specific Host Plant Preferences.

    PubMed

    Murúa, M Gabriela; Nagoshi, Rodney N; Dos Santos, Daniel A; Hay-Roe, Mirian M; Meagher, Robert L; Vilardi, J C

    2015-10-01

    Spodoptera frugiperda, the fall armyworm, is a major economic pest throughout the Western Hemisphere of corn (maize), cotton, sorghum, and a variety of agricultural grasses and vegetable crops. Studies in the United States, the Caribbean, and Brazil demonstrated the existence of two subpopulations (previously designated "host strains") that differ in their choice of plant host. Specifically, the corn strain is preferentially found in corn and sorghum, while the rice strain is dominant in rice, turf grass, and alfalfa. However, inconsistent results were reported in surveys of fall armyworm in Argentina, with some indicating that the host plant preferences of the two strains might be compromised or even nonexistent. If correct, this would complicate efforts to control this pest by considerably expanding the range of habitats that would have to be considered as potential sources for fall armyworm infestations in specific crops. A reexamination of Argentine fall armyworm, this time with field collections rather than the laboratory colonies used in previous studies, confirmed the existence of the two strains and their host preferences. Specifically, the corn strain was consistently the majority population infesting corn and was usually so in sorghum, while the rice strain was predominant in pasture/turf grasses and alfalfa. The one outlier was a collection from rice, which had a corn strain majority. Overall, the data were generally consistent with strain behaviors observed in other areas of the Western Hemisphere. PMID:26453719

  6. Suitability of Creeping Bentgrass and Bermudagrass Cultivars for Black Cutworms and Fall Armyworms (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung Cheon; Obear, Glen R; Liesch, Patrick J; Held, David W; Williamson, R Chris

    2015-08-01

    The black cutworm, Agrotis ipsilon Hufnagel, and fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), are common turfgrass pests of golf courses in the southeastern United States. Heat-tolerant bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) cultivars are expanding the range of bentgrass further south, but these cultivars have not been studied for their potential host plant resistance to black cutworm or fall armyworm. The goals of the study were to investigate feeding response of black cutworm and fall armyworm to these newer heat-tolerant creeping bentgrass cultivars, as well as commonly used cultivars of bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (Loppers.)]. Choice and no-choice feeding assays and fecundity tests were conducted in the laboratory and greenhouse to evaluate performance and preference of the two insects. When given a choice, neither black cutworm nor fall armyworm showed a preference for the majority of new cultivars tested. There were no differences in leaf area consumption or insect development for either pest in no-choice feeding assays. Black cutworm females preferred laying eggs in bentgrass compared with bermudagrass, but will oviposit onto bermudagrass, suggesting that both turf species are suitable hosts of this pest. The broad host ranges of generalist caterpillar pests of turfgrass hinder the application of host plant resistance in integrated pest management on golf courses. PMID:26470340

  7. PGE2 induces oenocytoid cell lysis via a G protein-coupled receptor in the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eicosanoids mediate cellular and humoral immune responses in the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, including activation of prophenoloxidase (PPO). PPO activation begins with release of its inactive zymogen, PPO, from oenocytoids in response to prostaglandins (PGs). Based on the biomedical literatur...

  8. Using intron sequence comparisons in the triose-phosphate isomerase gene to study the divergence of the fall armyworm host strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Noctuid moth, Spodoptera frugiperda (the fall armyworm), is endemic to the Western Hemisphere and appears to be undergoing sympatric speciation to produce two subpopulations that differ in their choice of host plants. The diverging “rice strain” and “corn strain” are morphologically indistinguis...

  9. Fall armyworm migrations and implications for NJ farmers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm can be a serious pest to vegetable crops in the northeastern U.S. This species migrates from southern Florida and southern Texas each season, arriving in New Jersey during summer and early fall. Although it was thought that infestations in NJ were from Florida, our research has sugge...

  10. Relationship of Flight and Reproduction in Beet Armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), a Migrant Lacking the Oogenesis-flight Syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, undertakes long-distance migration. We used flight mills to investigate the interaction between flight and reproduction in this species given the apparent absence of the oogenesis-flight syndrome. This syndrome is characterized by a suite of traits common in man...

  11. Nitrogen fertilization rate affects feeding, larval performance, and oviposition preference of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, on cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) is one of the most critical chemical elements for plant and animal growth. Development and oviposition of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) was studied in relation to varying nitrogen levels in cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L. The development of S. exig...

  12. Identification of volatile sex pheromone components released by the southern armyworm,Spodoptera eridania (Cramer).

    PubMed

    Teal, P E; Mitchell, E R; Tumlinson, J H; Heath, R R; Sugie, H

    1985-06-01

    Analysis of sex pheromone gland extracts and volatile pheromone components collected from the calling female southern armyworm,Spodoptera eridania (Cramer), by high-resolution capillary gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy indicated that a number of 14-carbon mono- and diunsaturated acetates and a monounsaturated 16-carbon acetate were produced. Gland extracts also indicated the presence of (Z)-9-tetradecen-1-ol. However, this compound was not found in collections of volatiles. Field trapping studies indicated that the volatile blend composed of (Z)-9-tetradecen-1-ol acetate (60%), (Z)-9-(E)-12-tetradecadien-1-ol acetate (17%), (Z)-9-(Z)-12-tetradecadien-1-ol acetate (15%), (Z)-9-(E)-11-tetradecadien-1-ol acetate (5%), and (Z)-11-hexadecen-1-ol acetate (3 %) was an effective trap bait for males of this species. The addition of (Z)-9-tetradecen-1-ol to the acetate blends tested resulted in the capture of beet armyworm,S. exigua (Hubner), males which provides further evidence that the alcohol is a pheromone component of this species. PMID:24310218

  13. Development and feeding of fall armyworm on Miscanthus x giganteus and switchgrass.

    PubMed

    Prasifka, J R; Bradshaw, J D; Meagher, R L; Nagoshi, R N; Steffey, K L; Gray, M E

    2009-12-01

    Observations of fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), larvae infesting plots of Miscanthus x giganteus Greef and Deuter ex Hodkinson and Renvoize prompted laboratory-based tests of survival, development, and feeding preferences on leaf tissue from M. x giganteus and switchgrass, Panicum virgatum L. Survival from hatch to pupation was >70 and 50% for fall armyworms reared on switchgrass and M. x giganteus, respectively, although survival of the S. frugiperda rice strain was significantly greater than the corn strain on both crops. Developmental times from hatch to pupation or adult emergence showed effects of crop and S. frugiperda host strain, but analysis of an interaction revealed developmental times for the rice strain were similar on both crops, whereas corn strain larvae showed delayed development on M. x giganteus relative to switchgrass. Analysis of larval (10 d) and pupal masses showed a similar pattern, with effects of crop and an interaction (at 10 d), but only the mass of corn strain larvae feeding on M. x giganteus was reduced relative to the other crop and strain combinations. In choice tests, neonates of both corn and rice strains showed a strong preference for feeding on young tissues rather than mature leaves of M. x giganteus or switchgrass, but they also clearly favored corn, Zea mays L., leaves over either of the perennial grasses. Results indicate both plants are potential hosts for S. frugiperda, but additional information is needed to understand under which scenarios and to what degree fall armyworms may damage perennial grasses grown for biofuel production. PMID:20069844

  14. Does secondary plant metabolism provide a mechanism for plant defenses in the tropical soda apple Solanum viarum (Solanales: Solanaceae) against the beet armyworm Spodoptera exigua and southern armyworm S. eridania?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Survival assays were conducted with beet armyworm Spodoptera exigua and southern armyworm S. eridania with tropical soda apple Solanum viarum a relative of tomato. In addition, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) enzyme assays were conducted to determine if secondary plant defense compounds are being produce...

  15. EFFECTS OF DROUGHT STRESSED COTTON, GOSSYPIUM HIRSUTUM L., ON BEET ARMYWORM, SPODOPTERA EXIGUA (HUBNER), OVIPOSITION, AND LARVAL FEEDING PREFERENCES AND GROWTH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hubner), has been reported to oviposit more on drought stressed than on non-stressed cotton plants. Using potted cotton plants in cages, this study demonstrated that beet armyworms deposited 3.3, 4.6, and 2.3 times more (P less than or equal to 0.05) eggs on co...

  16. Using intron sequence comparisons in the triose-phosphate isomerase gene to study the divergence of the fall armyworm host strains.

    PubMed

    Nagoshi, R N; Meagher, R L

    2016-06-01

    The noctuid moth Spodoptera frugiperda (the fall armyworm) is endemic to the Western Hemisphere and appears to be undergoing sympatric speciation to produce two subpopulations that differ in their choice of host plants. The 'rice strain' and 'corn strain' are morphologically indistinguishable, requiring the use of genetic markers for identification. Because fall armyworm is a major pest of corn and several other agricultural crops, characterizing the strains has important economic consequences. In this study, comparisons were made of the intron sequences from the triose-phosphate isomerase (Tpi) gene isolated from 85 fall armyworm specimens collected from two host plants. Sixteen new strain-specific haplotypes based on intron polymorphisms are described that can facilitate the characterization of fall armyworm populations associated with different host plants. Comparisons of genetic diversity within and between the strains provides evidence that the corn strain is undergoing active selection and supports the proposal of directional interstrain mating occurring in the wild. Comparisons of the polymorphisms indicate that each intron undergoes different patterns of mutation that in some cases corresponds to host plant preferences. The results confirm that intron sequence comparisons are an effective approach to study fall armyworm population genetics. PMID:26991678

  17. Susceptibility of field populations of the fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) from Florida and Puerto Rico to purified Cry1F protein and corn leaf tissue containing single and pyramided Bt genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Larval survival of Cry1F-susceptible (FL), -resistant (PR and Cry1F-RR), and -heterozygous (FL x PR and Cry1F-RS) populations of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) to purified Cry1F protein and corn leaf tissue of seven Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) corn hybrids and five non-Bt corn...

  18. The fall armyworm Triose phosphate isomerase (Tpi) gene as a marker of strain identity and interstrain mating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm is a significant agricultural pest in the United States, affecting most notably sweet corn and turfgrass. Two morphologically identical strains exist that differ physiologically and behaviorally, but are morphologically indistinguishable. Polymorphisms within the fall armyworm triose p...

  19. Identification and comparison of fall armyworm (Lepidoptera:Noctuidae) host strains in Brazil, Texas, and Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm is a major economic pest throughout the western hemisphere. Studies of populations in the southern United States and the Caribbean demonstrated the existence of two morphologically identical but genetically distinct host strains. Fall armyworm populations in Brazil are geographically d...

  20. Antioxidant enzyme level response to prooxidant allelochemicals in larvae of the southern armyworm moth, Spodoptera eridania.

    PubMed

    Pritsos, C A; Ahmad, S; Elliott, A J; Pardini, R S

    1990-01-01

    Larvae of the southern armyworm, Spodoptera eridania, are highly polyphagous feeders which frequently encounter and feed upon plants containing high levels of prooxidant allelochemicals. While ingestion of moderate quantities of prooxidants can be tolerated by these larvae, ingestion of larger quantities can result in toxicity. Studies were conducted to assess the role of the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GR) in the protection of S. eridania against redox active prooxidant plant allelochemicals. Dietary exposure of mid-fifth-instar larvae to either quercetin (a flavonoid) or xanthotoxin (a photoactive furanocoumarin), which generate superoxide radical, and singlet oxygen, respectively, resulted in an increase in SOD levels. CAT levels increased in all groups of S. eridania including control insects. This may have been due to the sudden exposure to food following an extended fast of 18 h (to insure that larvae would not reject the diet because of the prooxidants' bitter taste) with an eventual lowering of CAT values with time. GR activities did not significantly change except for a slight inhibition at the highest prooxidant concentrations used at 12-h post-ingestion. The data from these studies suggest that SOD responds to prooxidant challenges in these insects and together with CAT and GR contributes to the insect's defense against potentially toxic prooxidant compounds. PMID:2161387

  1. Improvements in the identification of strains facilitate population studies of fall armyworm subgroups

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm is a significant agricultural pest in the Western Hemisphere and is becoming animportant system for studying lepidopteran migration and incipient speciation. Critical to these investigations are methods that can differentiate between two morphologically indistinguishable strains that d...

  2. Identification of α-tocopherol and α-tocopheryl acetate from the cuticle of soybean pods armyworm (Spodoptera cosmioides).

    PubMed

    Fronza, Edegar; Migues, Ignacio; Specht, Alexandre; de Barros, Neiva Monteiro; Heinzen, Horacio

    2013-01-01

    The chemical composition of the soybean pods armyworm Spodoptera cosmioides (Walker, 1858) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner, 1818 (Lepidoptera: Erebidae) larval cuticles was evaluated using gas chromatography coupled to a mass detector (GC-MS). Among the usual lipids found in the insect cuticle, α-tocopherol and α-tocopheryl acetate were also isolated from S. cosmioides. On the other hand, no vitamin E derivative was found in A. gemmatalis exuvia. This is the first report of vitamin E occurrence in the insect's cuticle. PMID:23356865

  3. Heritability and correlation among some selected morphological traits and their relationship with fall armyworm damage in sweet corn.

    PubMed

    Rea, Ramón A; Watson, Clarence E; Williams, William P; Davis, Frank M

    2002-01-01

    Fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda J. E. Smith] (FAW) is a serious pest in field corn and sweet corn [Zea mays L.] in many parts of the world. Sweet corn germplasm with effective levels of resistance to damage by the fall armyworm is needed to transfer resistance to commercial hybrids. The objectives of this study were to estimate heritability and to estimate the correlation among some selected morphological traits and their relationship with FAW damage. Seven shrunken-2 (sh2) inbred lines and four commercial sh2 hybrids of sweet corn were crossed to Mp708, a FAW-resistant field corn line. The F2 populations were subdivided with one half being selected for the sh2 trait and the other half was left unselected. Parent, F2, and F3 populations were artificially infested with FAW and evaluated for leaf damage caused by FAW. Heritability estimates for FAW resistance ranged from 0.22 to 0.61 depending on method of estimation used. The highest correlations occurred between silk color and anther color (0.70) and silk color and glume color (0.49). There were no consistent correlations of most morphological traits with FAW damage. A linkage between white silk and shrunken-2 was observed. PMID:12658873

  4. Heritability and correlation among some selected morphological traits and their relationship with fall armyworm damage in sweet corn.

    PubMed

    Rea, Ramón A; Watson, Clarence E; Williams, William P; Davis, Frank M

    2002-01-01

    Fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda J. E. Smith] (FAW) is a serious pest in field corn and sweet corn [Zea mays L.] in many parts of the world. Sweet corn germplasm with effective levels of resistance to damage by the fall armyworm is needed to transfer resistance to commercial hybrids. The objectives of this study were to estimate heritability and to estimate the correlation among some selected morphological traits and their relationship with FAW damage. Seven shrunken-2 (sh2) inbred lines and four commercial sh2 hybrids of sweet corn were crossed to Mp708, a FAW-resistant field corn line. The F2 populations were subdivided with one half being selected for the sh2 trait and the other half was left unselected. Parent, F2, and F3 populations were artificially infested with FAW and evaluated for leaf damage caused by FAW. Heritability estimates for FAW resistance ranged from 0.22 to 0.61 depending on method of estimation used. The highest correlations occurred between silk color and anther color (0.70) and silk color and glume color (0.49). There were no consistent correlations of most morphological traits with FAW damage. A linkage between white silk and shrunken-2 was observed. PMID:12216502

  5. Establishment and characterization of three embryonic cell lines of beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Su, Rui; Zheng, Gui-Ling; Wan, Fang-Hao; Li, Chang-You

    2016-08-01

    Three cell lines (QAU-Se-E-1, -2 and -3, or Se-1, -2 and -3 for short) were established from eggs of beet armyworm (Spodoptera exigua) that have been passaged stably for more than 60 times in TNM-FH medium supplemented with 10 % fetal bovine serum. The cell lines consisted of round and spindle-shaped cells. The round cells accounted for 96.82, 84.34 and 83.16 % of the cells in the three cell lines, respectively, with cell diameters of 16.21 ± 0.72, 15.63 ± 0.58 and 13.06 ± 0.44 μm. Random amplified polymorphic DNA and analysis of the CO I gene showed that the three cell lines were all derived from S. exigua. Growth curves at passage 30 were determined and the results showed that the cell population doubling times were 59.03, 49.08 and 49.91 h, respectively. The three cell lines can be infected by S. exigua multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV). Se-3 was extremely susceptible to the virus with an infection rate of 97.52 % 4 days after the inoculation and produced 2.02 × 10(6) OBs per mL of culture. Flow cytometry analysis showed that some of Se-1 and Se-2 cells had apoptosis after infection, whereas Se-3 cells did not. Bioassays showed that the virulence of the SeMNPV proliferated from Se-3 was similar to that from the insect with LC50 of 5.55 × 10(5) and 2.64 × 10(5) OBs/mL. Therefore, the cell lines can be used to study the SeMNPV-host interactions and mechanisms underlying the interactions. PMID:25999173

  6. Various eicosanoids modulate the cellular and humoral immune responses of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sony; Kim, Yonggyun

    2009-09-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) can catalyze the oxidation of C20 fatty acids to produce certain eicosanoids, which play roles in mediating immune responses in insects. Despite their critical role in insect immunity, there have been few studies of the unique effects of different eicosanoids on immune responses. This study analyzed cellular and humoral immune responses of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, using seven eicosanoids selected from two major eicosanoid subgroups: prostaglandin (PG) and leukotriene (LT), derived from catalytic activities of COX and LOX respectively. Upon bacterial challenge, all seven eicosanoids (PGA(1), PGB(2), PGD(2), PGE(1), PGE(2), PGF(1alpha), and LTB(4)) significantly induced hemocyte nodulation and phagocytosis in the presence of dexamethasone, an eicosanoid biosynthesis inhibitor. However, only PGs induced cell lysis of oenocytoids to release prophenoloxidase, which resulted in an increase in phenoloxidase activity. These seven eicosanoids also induced expression of humoral immune-associated genes, including prophenoloxidase, serpin, dopa decarboxylase, cecropin, and lysozyme, in which PGB(2) and PGE(1) did not induce gene expression of prophenoloxidase. To understand the interactions between different eicosanoids, mixture effects of these eicosanoids were compared with their individual eicosanoid effects on mediating nodule formation in response to bacterial challenge. All six single PGs showed increases in nodule formation in a dose-dependent manner without significant difference among the different types. LTB(4) was more potent than the tested PGs in mediating the cellular immune response. At low doses, all combinations of two eicosanoids showed significant additive effects on nodule formation. These results indicate that immune target cells, such as hemocyte and fat body, of S. exigua can respond to different COX and LOX products to express cellular and humoral immune responses, and their overlapping, additive

  7. Cloning of the heat shock protein 90 and 70 genes from the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, and expression characteristics in relation to thermal stress and development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs) of heat shock protein (HSP) genes (Se-hsp90 and Se-hsp70) were cloned from the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, and their expression was investigated in relation to cold shock, heat shock, and development. The open reading frames of Se-hsp90 and Sehsp70 ar...

  8. Sex pheromones of the southern armyworm moth: isolation, identification, and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, M; Redfern, R E; Jones, W A; Aldridge, M H

    1970-10-30

    Two sex pheromones have been isolated from the female southern armyworm moth, Prodenia eridania (Cramer), and identified as cis-9-tetradecen-1-ol acetate, identical with the sex pheromone of the fall armyworm moth, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), and cis-9,trans-12-tetradecadien-1-ol acetate. PMID:5507205

  9. Purification and characterization of NADPH--cytochrome c reductase from the midgut of the southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania).

    PubMed

    Crankshaw, D L; Hetnarski, K; Wilkinson, C F

    1979-09-01

    1. NADPH-cytochrome c reductase was solubilized with bromelain and purified about 400-fold from sucrose/pyrophosphate-washed microsomal fractions from southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania) larval midguts. 2. The enzyme has a mol.wt. of 70 035 +/- 1300 and contained 2 mol of flavin/mol of enzyme consisting of almost equimolar amounts of FMN and FAD. 3. Aerobic titration of the enzyme with NADPH caused the formation of a stable half-reduced state at 0.5 mol of NADPH/mol of flavin. 4. Kinetic analysis showed that the reduction of cytochrome c proceeded by a Bi Bi Ping Pong mechanism. 5. Apparent Km values for NADPH and cytochrome c and Ki values for NADP+ and 2'-AMP were considerably higher for the insect reductase than for the mammalian liver enzyme. 6. These are discussed in relation to possible differences in the active sites of the enzymes. PMID:117798

  10. Purification and characterization of NADPH--cytochrome c reductase from the midgut of the southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania).

    PubMed Central

    Crankshaw, D L; Hetnarski, K; Wilkinson, C F

    1979-01-01

    1. NADPH-cytochrome c reductase was solubilized with bromelain and purified about 400-fold from sucrose/pyrophosphate-washed microsomal fractions from southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania) larval midguts. 2. The enzyme has a mol.wt. of 70 035 +/- 1300 and contained 2 mol of flavin/mol of enzyme consisting of almost equimolar amounts of FMN and FAD. 3. Aerobic titration of the enzyme with NADPH caused the formation of a stable half-reduced state at 0.5 mol of NADPH/mol of flavin. 4. Kinetic analysis showed that the reduction of cytochrome c proceeded by a Bi Bi Ping Pong mechanism. 5. Apparent Km values for NADPH and cytochrome c and Ki values for NADP+ and 2'-AMP were considerably higher for the insect reductase than for the mammalian liver enzyme. 6. These are discussed in relation to possible differences in the active sites of the enzymes. Images Fig. 3. PMID:117798

  11. Radar observations of the autumn migration of the beet armyworm Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and other moths in northern China.

    PubMed

    Feng, H-Q; Wu, K-M; Cheng, D-F; Guo, Y-Y

    2003-04-01

    The autumn return migration of the beet armyworm Spodoptera exigua Hübner and other insects in northern China was observed with radar and with a simultaneously-operated searchlight trap and ground light-trap at a site in Langfang, near Beijing. The searchlight trap was found to be an efficient tool for trapping migrants and, operated alongside a ground light-trap, could distinguish migrant from locally-flying species. It was confirmed that S. exigua and some other species were high-altitude nocturnal windborne migrants during September and October in northern China. Maximum density of moths typically occurred below 500 m, and strong layering was often observed at about 200 m above ground level in airflows that would carry the moths towards the south. Descent of S. exigua in the vicinity of the radar site in late September was often associated with rain. PMID:12699532

  12. Turnabout Is Fair Play: Herbivory-Induced Plant Chitinases Excreted in Fall Armyworm Frass Suppress Herbivore Defenses in Maize.

    PubMed

    Ray, Swayamjit; Alves, Patrick C M S; Ahmad, Imtiaz; Gaffoor, Iffa; Acevedo, Flor E; Peiffer, Michelle; Jin, Shan; Han, Yang; Shakeel, Samina; Felton, Gary W; Luthe, Dawn S

    2016-05-01

    The perception of herbivory by plants is known to be triggered by the deposition of insect-derived factors such as saliva and oral secretions, oviposition materials, and even feces. Such insect-derived materials harbor chemical cues that may elicit herbivore and/or pathogen-induced defenses in plants. Several insect-derived molecules that trigger herbivore-induced defenses in plants are known; however, insect-derived molecules suppressing them are largely unknown. In this study, we identified two plant chitinases from fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) larval frass that suppress herbivore defenses while simultaneously inducing pathogen defenses in maize (Zea mays). Fall armyworm larvae feed in enclosed whorls of maize plants, where frass accumulates over extended periods of time in close proximity to damaged leaf tissue. Our study shows that maize chitinases, Pr4 and Endochitinase A, are induced during herbivory and subsequently deposited on the host with the feces. These plant chitinases mediate the suppression of herbivore-induced defenses, thereby increasing the performance of the insect on the host. Pr4 and Endochitinase A also trigger the antagonistic pathogen defense pathway in maize and suppress fungal pathogen growth on maize leaves. Frass-induced suppression of herbivore defenses by deposition of the plant-derived chitinases Pr4 and Endochitinase A is a unique way an insect can co-opt the plant's defense proteins for its own benefit. It is also a phenomenon unlike the induction of herbivore defenses by insect oral secretions in most host-herbivore systems. PMID:26979328

  13. Genetic Characterization of Fall Armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Host Strains in Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm is a major economic pest throughout the Western Hemisphere. Previous studies of populations in the southern United States, Brazil, and the Caribbean demonstrated the existence of two morphologically identical but genetically distinct host strains that can only be distinguished using ge...

  14. Host strain attraction of virgin females to wild fall armyworm males

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm contains two host strains that are found in different plant habitats. We were interested if virgin females of these host strains would preferentially attract males of their own strain. Traps baited with virgin females were placed in different habitats in Florida and the host strain o...

  15. Field screening of maize germplasm lines for whorl-feeding fall armyworm resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new set of 13 maize germplasm lines from the Germplasm Enhancement of Maize (GEM) Program was examined with 5 controls that have different degrees of insect resistance. Significant difference in fall armyworm damage ratings was detected among the GEM inbred lines. In addition, the total number of ...

  16. GENETIC BASIS OF RESISTANCE TO FALL ARMYWORM AND SOUTHWESTERN CORN BORER LEAF FEEDING DAMAGE IN MAIZE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To clarify the genetic basis of resistance to leaf feeding damage by fall armyworm and southwestern corn borer a study was undertaken to compare quantitative trait loci involved in two related resistant maize lines, Mp704 and Mp708. Models containing four and seven QTL explaining southwestern corn ...

  17. Assessing the resolution of haplotype distributions to delineate fall armyworm (Lepidoptera:Noctuidae) migratory behaviors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Regions of southern Florida and southern Texas (extending into Mexico) provide the overwintering source populations for virtually all fall armyworm infestations affecting the continental U.S. Understanding how these migratory populations annually disperse is important to predict and control infestat...

  18. Artificial selection for developmental rates in fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and its implications on the design of feeding studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding of fall armyworm biology has frequently suffered from disagreements in the findings from different laboratories. One potential source of error is the assumption that laboratory colonies are sufficiently representative of wild populations that their biological parameters can be generali...

  19. Use of DNA Barcodes to Identify Invasive Armyworm Spodoptera Species in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Nagoshi, Rodney N.; Brambila, Julieta; Meagher, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    A critical component for sustaining adequate food production is the protection of local agriculture from invasive pest insects. Essential to this goal is the ability to accurately distinguish foreign from closely related domestic species, a process that has traditionally required identification using diagnostic morphological “keys” that can be both subtle and labor-intensive. This is the case for the Lepidopteran group of insects represented by Spodoptera, a genus of Noctuidae “armyworm” moths that includes several important agricultural pests. Two of the most destructive species, Spodoptera littoralis (Boisduval) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and S. litura (F.) are not yet established in North America. To facilitate the monitoring for these pests, the feasibility of using DNA barcoding methodology for distinguishing between domestic and foreign Spodoptera species was tested. A DNA barcoding database was derived for a subset of Spodoptera species native to Florida, with an emphasis on those attracted to pheromone blends developed for S. litura or S. littoralis. These were then compared to the barcode sequences of S. litura collected from Taiwan and S. littoralis from Portugal. Consistent discrimination of the different species was obtained with phenetic relationships produced that were generally in agreement with phylogenetic studies using morphological characteristics. The data presented here indicate that DNA barcoding has the potential to be an efficient and accurate supplement to morphological methods for the identification of invasive Spodoptera pests in North America. PMID:22239735

  20. Fall armyworm sensitivity to flavone: Limited role of constitutive and induced detoxifying enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, G S; Slansky, F; Yu, S J

    1993-04-01

    We used inhibition and induction of detoxifying enzymes to determine whether these enzymes allow a generalist species (Spodoptera frugiperda; fall armyworms) to cope with ingestion of the flavonoid, flavone. Flavone induces polysubstrate monooxygenases (PSMO), general esterases (GE), and glutathioneS-transferases (GST) inS. frugiperda, yet this species is affected deleteriously by low dietary concentrations of this allelochemical. First, in a series of experiments, larvae were fed artificial diets containing increasing concentrations of flavone, either alone or with known inhibitors of either PSMO, GE, or GST enzymes. In an additional treatment, flavone and inhibitors of all three enzyme systems were administered in diets simultaneously. PSMO and GE activities were reduced in vivo by their respective inhibitors, whereas that of GST was induced or unchanged. Significant synergism of flavone's growth-reducing activity occurred at the highest concentration tested (0.125% fresh mass, fm) when the PSMO inhibitor, piperonyl butoxide, or the GST inhibitor, diethyl maleate, was added to the diet, and at 0.08% fm flavone, when combined with the GE inhibitor, tri-tolyl phosphate. In many cases, however, the additive effect (i.e., reduction in growth owing to flavone alone + inhibitor alone) was greater than the synergistic effect, and no synergism occurred in the treatment with the three inhibitors combined. In the second approach, caterpillars were preexposed to a concentration of flavone (0.02% fm) that induced these enzymes ca. 1.5- to 2.5-fold, prior to switching larvae to a diet containing a higher (growth-reducing) flavone concentration (0.125% fm). The relative growth rates (RGR) of induced larvae were significantly greater (14%) than those of the uninduced larvae on the 0.125% fm flavone diet. Additionally, in two of the three experiments, relative consumption rate (RCR) was significantly greater (7-24%) in induced compared with uninduced larvae. The variable

  1. Effects of limonoids from Cipadessa fruticosa on fall armyworm.

    PubMed

    Matos, Andreia P; Leite, Ana C; Batista-Pereira, Luciane G; Vieira, Paulo C; Fernandes, Josäo B; da Silva, Maria Fátima das G F

    2009-01-01

    Six mexicanolide limonoids isolated from the dichloromethane extract of the fruits of Cipadessa fruticosa Blume (Meliaceae) were evaluated against Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith). Gedunin was used as a positive control. When incorporated into an artificial diet of neonates at 50.0 mg kg(-1), febrifugin A showed 73.3% mortality. All the compounds showed moderate insecticidal activity, except for ruageanin A, when compared with the control. Febrifugin also showed growth inhibition and antifeedant activities (at 100.0 mg kg(-1)). The correlation between the insecticidal activity of the isolated compounds and their chemical structure was discussed. PMID:19678552

  2. Evaluation of transgenic sweet corn hybrids expressing CryIA (b) toxin for resistance to corn earworm and fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Lynch, R E; Wiseman, B R; Plaisted, D; Warnick, D

    1999-02-01

    Many of the lepidopterous insects which attack sweet corn, Zea mays L., are susceptible to insecticidal proteins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. kurstaki (Berliner) (Btk). Transgenic sweet corn expressing a synthetic cry gene for production of a Btk-insecticidal protein may provide a more environmentally acceptable means of sweet corn production. Eight transgenic sweet corn hybrids containing a synthetic gene for CryIA(b) protein production (BT11 event) were evaluated for resistance to the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), and fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith). Laboratory tests revealed that all Btk sweet corn hybrids were highly resistant to leaf and silk feeding by neonate 3 and 6 d old corn earworm larvae. Ear damage in the field to the Btk sweet corn hybrids caused by corn earworm was negligible. All Btk sweet corn hybrids, except Btk 95-0901, were moderately resistant to leaf and silk feeding by the fall armyworm. Survival and weight gain were reduced when neonates were fed excised whorl leaves of the Btk plants. Weight gain, but not survival, was reduced when 3- and 6-d-old fall armyworm larvae were fed excised whorl leaves of the Btk plants. Btk sweet corn hybrids appear to be ideal candidates for use in integrated pest management (IPM) programs for both the fresh and processing sweet corn markets, and their use should drastically reduce the quantity of insecticides currently used to control these pests in sweet corn. With appropriate cultural practices, it is highly unlikely that Btk sweet corn will contribute to the development of resistance to Btk proteins in these insects because of the high toxicity of the Cry proteins expressed in these sweet corn hybrids and the harvest of sweet corn ears from fields before larvae can complete development. PMID:10036986

  3. New restriction fragment length polymorphisms in the cytochrome oxidase I gene facilitate host strain identification of fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) populations in the southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Nagoshi, Rod N; Meagher, Robert L; Adamczyk, John J; Braman, S Kristine; Brandenburg, Rick L; Nuessly, Gregg

    2006-06-01

    Several restriction sites in the cytochrome oxidase I gene of fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith), were identified by sequence analysis as potentially being specific to one of the two host strains. Strain specificity was demonstrated for populations in Florida, Texas, Mississippi, Georgia, and North Carolina, with an AciI and SacI site specific to the rice (Oryjza spp.)-strain and a BsmI and HinfI site joining an already characterized MspI site as diagnostic of the corn (Zea mays L.)-strain. All four of these sites can be detected by digestion of a single 568-bp polymerase chain reaction-amplified fragment, but the use of two enzymes in separate digests was found to provide accurate and rapid determination of strain identity. The effectiveness of this method was demonstrated by the analysis of almost 200 adult and larval specimens from the Mississippi delta region. The results indicated that the corn-strain is likely to be the primary strain infesting cotton (Gossypium spp.) and that an unexpected outbreak of fall armyworm on the ornamental tree Paulownia tomentosa (Thunb.) Sieb. & Zucc. ex Steud. was due almost entirely to the rice-strain. PMID:16813297

  4. Assessing the resolution of haplotype distributions to delineate fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) migratory behaviors.

    PubMed

    Nagoshi, Rodney N; Meagher, Robert L; Hay-Roe, Mirian

    2014-08-01

    Regions of southern Florida and southern Texas (extending into Mexico) provide the overwintering source populations for virtually all fall armyworm infestations affecting the continental United States. Understanding how these migratory populations annually disperse is important to predict and control infestations by this specific pest and to more generally investigate the environmental factors that influence the long-distance movements of flying insects. The two overwintering locations are associated with differences in the distribution of certain mitochondrial haplotypes that overlap in the region near the border separating the states of Alabama and Georgia. This provided an opportunity to test the resolution of the haplotype method by comparisons between smaller geographical areas and shorter time frames than previously examined. Correspondences were found between trap-capture numbers, fall armyworm strain proportions, and haplotype ratios calculated for individual counties and within season time periods that were generally consistent with expectations, providing confidence that those population movements could be accurately inferred. The comparison of haplotype distributions identified a migratory boundary separating the Texas and Florida populations coincident with the eastern edge of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River basin. Calculations of strain numbers based on genetic markers revealed similarities and differences in strain population dynamics that can be applied to study the migratory behavior of fall armyworm subpopulations. The use of this methodology for the detailed mapping of migratory pathways and the identification of factors that influence the direction and extent of pest migration are discussed. PMID:25195437

  5. Properties of 5-aminolaevulinate synthetase and its relationship to microsomal mixed-function oxidation in the southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania).

    PubMed

    Brattsten, L B; Wilkinson, C F

    1975-07-01

    1. Activity of 5-aminolaevulinate synthetase was measured in the midgut and other tissues of the last larval instar of the southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania Cramer, formerly Prodenia eridania Cramer). 2. Optimum conditions for measuring the activity were established with respect to all variables involved and considerable differences from those reported for mammalian enzyme preparations were found. 3. Maximum activity (20 nmol/h per mg of protein) occurs 18-24 h after the fifth moult and thereafter decreases to trace amounts as the larvae age and approach pupation. 4. Synthetase activity was rapidly induced by oral administration (in the diet) of pentamethylbenzene, phenobarbital, diethyl 1,4-dihydro-2,4,6-trimethylpyridine-3, 5-dicarboxylate, and 2-allyl-2-isopropylacetamide. 5. Puromycin inhibited the induction of synthetase by pentamethylbenzene. 6. Induction of 5-aminolaevulinate synthetase correlated well with the induction of microsomal N-demethylation of p-chloro-N-methylaniline, except for phenobarbital, which induced the microsomal oxidase relatively more than the synthetase. PMID:1004

  6. Properties of 5-aminolaevulinate synthetase and its relationship to microsomal mixed-function oxidation in the southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania).

    PubMed Central

    Brattsten, L B; Wilkinson, C F

    1975-01-01

    1. Activity of 5-aminolaevulinate synthetase was measured in the midgut and other tissues of the last larval instar of the southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania Cramer, formerly Prodenia eridania Cramer). 2. Optimum conditions for measuring the activity were established with respect to all variables involved and considerable differences from those reported for mammalian enzyme preparations were found. 3. Maximum activity (20 nmol/h per mg of protein) occurs 18-24 h after the fifth moult and thereafter decreases to trace amounts as the larvae age and approach pupation. 4. Synthetase activity was rapidly induced by oral administration (in the diet) of pentamethylbenzene, phenobarbital, diethyl 1,4-dihydro-2,4,6-trimethylpyridine-3, 5-dicarboxylate, and 2-allyl-2-isopropylacetamide. 5. Puromycin inhibited the induction of synthetase by pentamethylbenzene. 6. Induction of 5-aminolaevulinate synthetase correlated well with the induction of microsomal N-demethylation of p-chloro-N-methylaniline, except for phenobarbital, which induced the microsomal oxidase relatively more than the synthetase. PMID:1004

  7. Induction by carrot allelochemicals of insecticide-metabolising enzymes in the southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania).

    PubMed

    Brattsten, L B; Evans, C K; Bonetti, S; Zalkow, L H

    1984-01-01

    Carrot foliage monoterpenes induce cytochrome P-450 up to 2.9-fold, NADPH cytochrome c (P-450) reductase up to 1.6-fold, NADPH-oxidation up to 3.8-fold, aldrin epoxidation up to 1.5-fold in southern armyworm larval midgut tissues when incorporated in their diet at 0.2% for 3 days. Stigmasterol and ergosterol did not substantially induce microsomal oxidase activities and significantly inhibited GSH S-aryltransferase activity and sulfotransferase activity. Coumarin did not substantially affect microsomal oxidase and sulfotransferase activity but is the most potent inducer of GSH S-aryltransferase activity, increasing this activity 7-fold. None of the chemicals is acutely toxic to the sixth instar larvae or affect the larval weight gain except coumarin which significantly depressed the maximal body weight attained. PMID:6141878

  8. PGE(2) induces oenocytoid cell lysis via a G protein-coupled receptor in the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sony; Stanley, David; Kim, Yonggyun

    2011-11-01

    Eicosanoids mediate cellular and humoral immune responses in the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, including activation of prophenoloxidase (PPO). PPO activation begins with release of its inactive zymogen, PPO, from oenocytoids in response to prostaglandins (PGs). Based on the biomedical literature, we hypothesized that PGs exert their actions via specific G protein-coupled receptor(s) in S. exigua. This study reports a G protein-coupled receptor (Se-hcPGGPCR1) gene, which is expressed in the hemocytes of S. exigua. The Se-hcPGGPCR1 consists of 420 amino acids and belongs to rhodopsin-type GPCRs. The high content of hydrophobic amino acid residues within the Se-hcPGGPCR1 protein is explained by prediction of seven-transmembrane domains that are characteristic of these GPCRs. Except for the eggs, Se-hcPGGPCR1 was expressed in all life stages. During the larval stage, it was expressed in hemocytes and gut, but not in fat body nor in epidermis. Real time quantitative RT-PCR showed that bacterial challenge induced more than 20-fold increases in its expression level. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that Se-hcPGGPCR1 was expressed in a specific hemocyte type, the oenocytoids. A specific eicosanoid, PGE(2), significantly induced oenocytoid lysis and increased PO activity in the plasma. In contrast, when Se-hcPGGPCR1 expression was suppressed by RNA interference (RNAi), the oenocytoid lysis and the PO activation in response to PGE(2) were not elevated above basal levels. A binding assay using intracellular calcium mobilization showed that the RNAi-treated hemocytes were significantly less responsive to PGE(2) than the control hemocytes. These results support our hypothesis with the specific finding that PGE(2) acts through Se-hcPGGPCR1 to activate PPO by lysing oenocytoids. PMID:21867708

  9. Maize toxin degrades peritrophic matrix proteins and stimulates compensatory transcriptome responses in fall armyworm midgut.

    PubMed

    Fescemyer, Howard W; Sandoya, Germán V; Gill, Torrence A; Ozkan, Seval; Marden, James H; Luthe, Dawn S

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying insect compensatory responses to plant defenses could lead to improved plant resistance to herbivores. The Mp708 inbred line of maize produces the maize insect resistant 1-cysteine protease (Mir1-CP) toxin. Reduced feeding and growth of fall armyworm larvae fed on Mp708 was previously linked to impairment of nutrient utilization and degradation of the midgut (MG) peritrophic matrix (PM) by Mir1-CP. Here we examine the biochemical and transcriptional responses of fall armyworm larvae to Mir1-CP. Insect Intestinal Mucin (IIM) was severely depleted from pure PMs treated in vitro with recombinant Mir1-CP. Larvae fed on Mp708 midwhorls excrete frass largely depleted of IIM. Cracks, fissures and increased porosity previously observed in the PM of larvae fed on Mp708 midwhorls could ensue when Mir1-CP degrades the IIM that cross-links chitin fibrils in the PM. Both targeted and global transcriptome analyses were performed to determine how complete dissolution of the structure and function of the PM is prevented, enabling larvae to continue growing in the presence of Mir1-CP. The MGs from fall armyworm fed on Mp708 upregulate expression of genes encoding proteins involved in PM production as an apparent compensation to replace the disrupted PM structure and restore appropriate counter-current MG gradients. Also, several families of digestive enzymes (endopeptidases, aminopeptidases, lipases, amylase) were more highly expressed in MGs from larvae fed on Mp708 than MGs from larvae fed on diets lacking Mir1-CP (artificial diet, midwhorls from Tx601 or B73 maize). Impaired growth of larvae fed on Mp708 probably results from metabolic costs associated with higher production of PM constituents and digestive enzymes in a compensatory attempt to maintain MG function. PMID:23306018

  10. TTAGG-repeat telomeres and characterization of telomerase in the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Gong, H; Zhu, W; Zhang, J; Li, X; Meng, Q; Zhou, G; Wang, M; Wang, H; Miao, L; Qin, Q; Zhang, H

    2015-06-01

    Telomeres are maintained usually by telomerase, a specialized reverse transcriptase that adds this sequence to chromosome ends. In this study, telomerase activity was detected in the in different somatic tissues, such as midgut and fat bodies, by the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) in Spodoptera exigua. The structure of the telomeres of S. exigua was evaluated by sequence analysis of the TRAP products, revealing that the telomerase synthesized a (TTAGG)n repeat. The presence of a telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) subunit coding gene has been cloned, sequenced and expressed in vitro successively. Notably, the S. exigua telomerase (SpexTERT) gene structure lacks the N-terminal GQ motif. Telomerase contains a large RNA subunit, TER, and a protein catalytic subunit, TERT. Here we report an in vitro system that was reconstructed by all components of the telomerase complex, a purified recombinant SpexTERT without a N-terminal GQ motif and a mutant human telomerase RNA (TER), showed telomerase activity. Together, these results suggest the GQ motif is not essential for telomerase catalysis. PMID:25689229

  11. Identification and functional characterization of sex pheromone receptors in beet armyworm Spodoptera exigua (Hübner).

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengcheng; Liu, Yang; Walker, William B; Dong, Shuanglin; Wang, Guirong

    2013-08-01

    In moths, males can detect a distinct blend of several pheromone components by specialized olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) on the antennae. Four candidate pheromone receptors (PR) with seven transmembrane domains were identified by homology cloning from the antennae of Spodoptera exigua (Sexi). Phylogenetic analyses reveal that all four odorant receptors (OR) belong to pheromone receptor subtypes. Expression patterns revealed that PRs were male-specific in the antenna except for SexiOR11, which was female antenna-biased. Functional analyses of these PRs were conducted using heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes. SexiOR13 and SexiOR16 were all broadly activated by multiple pheromone components. SexiOR13 responded robustly to the critical pheromone component, Z9, E12-14:OAc and the minor pheromone component, Z9-14:OAc at a concentration of 10(-4) M. Dose-response studies indicate that SexiOR13 was approximately 4 times more sensitive to Z9,E12-14:OAc (EC50 = 3.158 × 10(-6) M) compared to Z9-14:OAc (EC50 = 1.203 × 10(-5) M). While, SexiOR16 responded robustly to the secondary pheromone component Z9-14:OH with high sensitivity (EC50 = 9.690 × 10(-7) M). However, similar tests of the five pheromones with SexiOR6 and SexiOR11 failed to elicit any response. These results provide basic knowledge to further advance research on the molecular mechanisms of pheromone reception. PMID:23751753

  12. Turnabout Is Fair Play: Herbivory-Induced Plant Chitinases Excreted in Fall Armyworm Frass Suppress Herbivore Defenses in Maize1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Patrick C.M.S.; Gaffoor, Iffa; Acevedo, Flor E.; Peiffer, Michelle; Jin, Shan; Han, Yang; Shakeel, Samina; Felton, Gary W.

    2016-01-01

    The perception of herbivory by plants is known to be triggered by the deposition of insect-derived factors such as saliva and oral secretions, oviposition materials, and even feces. Such insect-derived materials harbor chemical cues that may elicit herbivore and/or pathogen-induced defenses in plants. Several insect-derived molecules that trigger herbivore-induced defenses in plants are known; however, insect-derived molecules suppressing them are largely unknown. In this study, we identified two plant chitinases from fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) larval frass that suppress herbivore defenses while simultaneously inducing pathogen defenses in maize (Zea mays). Fall armyworm larvae feed in enclosed whorls of maize plants, where frass accumulates over extended periods of time in close proximity to damaged leaf tissue. Our study shows that maize chitinases, Pr4 and Endochitinase A, are induced during herbivory and subsequently deposited on the host with the feces. These plant chitinases mediate the suppression of herbivore-induced defenses, thereby increasing the performance of the insect on the host. Pr4 and Endochitinase A also trigger the antagonistic pathogen defense pathway in maize and suppress fungal pathogen growth on maize leaves. Frass-induced suppression of herbivore defenses by deposition of the plant-derived chitinases Pr4 and Endochitinase A is a unique way an insect can co-opt the plant’s defense proteins for its own benefit. It is also a phenomenon unlike the induction of herbivore defenses by insect oral secretions in most host-herbivore systems. PMID:26979328

  13. Using haplotypes to monitor the migration of fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) corn-strain populations from Texas and Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm infestations in most of North America north of Mexico arise from annual migrations of populations that overwinter in southern Texas and Florida. Mapping the pattern of migration and the relative contributions of the Texas and Florida populations would contribute both to our understandi...

  14. Comparison of haplotype frequencies can differentiate fall armyworm (Lepidoptera:Noctuidae) corn-strain populations from Florida and Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm is a major economic pest throughout the Western Hemisphere. Populations can be subdivided into two morphologically identical but genetically distinct strains (corn-strain and rice-strain) that differ in their host plant preferences. These can be distinguished by using polymorphisms in ...

  15. Efficacy of Cry1F insecticidal protein in maize and cotton for control of fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efficacy of maize, Zea mays L., hybrids and cotton, Gossypium hirsutum (L.), varieties expressing Cry1F insecticidal crystal protein of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) var. aizawai Berliner (transformation event TC1507 in corn and event DAS-24236-5 in cotton) was evaluated for control of fall armyworm, ...

  16. Host effects on fitness in two strains of the fall armyworm (Noctuidae) and a parasitoid of the family Eulophidae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fall armyworm is known to be a pest of many species of the family Poaceae. In this study we compared the effects of two host plants (Zea mays and Cynodon nlemfuensis var. nlemfuensis) on survivorship of two strains of the FAW and the parasitoid Euplectrus platyhypenae....

  17. Inferring the annual migration patterns of fall armyworm(Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in the United States from mitochondrial haplotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1. Regions of southern Florida, USA and southern Texas, USA (extending into Mexico)provide the source populations for virtually all fall armyworm infestations affecting the continental USA. Understanding how these overwintering populations annually disperse is important to efforts to predict and con...

  18. Two different Bacillus thuringiensis toxin genes confer resistance to beet armyworm (Spodoptera exigua Hübner) in transgenic Bt-shallots (Allium cepa L.).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Si-Jun; Henken, Betty; de Maagd, Ruud A; Purwito, Agus; Krens, Frans A; Kik, Chris

    2005-06-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation was applied to produce beet armyworm (Spodoptera exigua Hübner) resistant tropical shallots (Allium cepa L. group Aggregatum). A cry1Ca or a H04 hybrid gene from Bacillus thuringiensis, driven by the chrysanthemum ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit (Rubisco SSU) promoter, along with the hygromycin phosphotransferase gene (hpt) driven by the CaMV 35S promoter, was employed for genetic transformation. An average transformation frequency of 3.68% was obtained from two shallot cultivars, Tropix and Kuning. After transfer of the in vitro plants to the greenhouse 69% of the cry1Ca and 39% of the H04 transgenic shallots survived the first half year. After one year of cultivation in the greenhouse the remaining cry1Ca and H04 transgenic plants grew vigorously and had a normal bulb formation, although the cry1Ca transgenic plants (and controls) had darker green leaves compared to their H04 counterparts. Standard PCR, adaptor ligation PCR and Southern analyses confirmed the integration of T-DNA into the shallot genome. Northern blot and ELISA analyses revealed expression of the cry1Ca or H04 gene in the transgenic plants. The amount of Cry1Ca expressed in transgenic plants was higher than the expression levels of H04 (0.39 vs. 0.16% of the total soluble leaf proteins, respectively). There was a good correlation between protein expression and beet armyworm resistance. Cry1Ca or H04 gene expression of at least 0.22 or 0.08% of the total soluble protein in shallot leaves was sufficient to give a complete resistance against beet armyworm. This confirms earlier observations that the H04 toxin is more toxic to S. exigua than the Cry1Ca toxin. The results from this study suggest that the cry1Ca and H04 transgenic shallots developed could be used for introducing resistance to beet armyworm in (sub) tropical shallot. PMID:16145834

  19. Using satellite multispectral imagery for damage mapping armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) in maize damage at a regional scale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Armyworm, as a destructive insect for maize, causes wide range of damage in both China and U.S. in recent years. To obtain the spatial distribution of damage area and assess the damage severity, a fast and accurate loss assessment method is of great importance for effective management. This study, t...

  20. Genetic variability of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in the Western Hemisphere

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fall armyworm (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) is a migratory and polyphagous pest of both cultivated and uncultivated plant species in the Western Hemisphere. We investigated the genetic diversity of FAW by collecting 31 representative samples from the United States, Argentina, Panama...

  1. Cadherin is involved in the action of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa in the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lin; Hou, Leilei; Zhang, Boyao; Liu, Lang; Li, Bo; Deng, Pan; Ma, Weihua; Wang, Xiaoping; Fabrick, Jeffrey A; Chen, Lizhen; Lei, Chaoliang

    2015-05-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins are effective against some insect pests in sprays and transgenic crops, although the evolution of resistance could threaten the long-term efficacy of such Bt use. One strategy to delay resistance to Bt crops is to "pyramid" two or more Bt proteins that bind to distinct receptor proteins within the insect midgut. The most common Bt pyramid in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) employs Cry1Ac with Cry2Ab to target several key lepidopteran pests, including the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner), which is a serious migratory pest of many vegetable crops and is increasingly important in cotton in China. While cadherin and aminopeptidase-N are key receptors of Cry1 toxins in many lepidopterans including S. exigua, the receptor for Cry2A toxins remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that a heterologous expressed peptide corresponding to cadherin repeat 7 to the membrane proximal extracellular domain (CR7-MPED) in the S. exigua cadherin 1b (SeCad1b) binds Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa. Moreover, SeCad1b transcription was suppressed in S. exigua larvae by oral RNA interference and susceptibility to Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa was significantly reduced. These results indicate that SeCad1b plays important functional roles of both Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa, having major implications for resistance management for S. exigua in Bt crops. PMID:25754522

  2. RNA interference of a heat shock protein, Hsp70, loses its protection role in indirect chilling injury to the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bong-Gee; Hepat, Rahul; Kim, Yonggyun

    2014-02-01

    The beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, is freeze-susceptible, in which glycerol plays a crucial role in depressing supercooling point (SCP) to avoid the freezing injury. This study focused on a non-freezing injury classified into indirect chilling injury of S. exigua after a prolonged exposure to low temperatures much above SCPs. Exposure to 0 and 5°C for longer than 2weeks was lethal to all the immature stages. Among immature stages, eggs were the most susceptible to the low temperature treatments and pupae were the next susceptible. Among larvae, the third instar (L3) appeared to be more tolerant than the fifth instar (L5). The temperature treatment at 15°C allowed both L3 and L5 to exhibit a feeding behavior and induced little non-freezing injury, suggesting a minimal temperature threshold for optimal overwintering conditions of S. exigua. Three heat shock protein genes (Hsp70, Hsp74, Hsp83) were expressed in the larvae at the low temperature treatments. Only Hsp70 was inducible to the low temperatures in both L3 and L5 stages. RNA interference of Hsp70 expression led to significantly lose the survival rates of the treated larvae in the conditions inducing the non-freezing injury. These results suggest that Hsp70 plays a role in protecting S. exigua from the indirect chilling injury. PMID:24309290

  3. Spatial genetic variation among Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) sampled from the United States, Puerto Rico, Panama, and Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fall armyworm (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is a migratory and polyphagous pest of both cultivated and uncultivated plant species in the Western Hemisphere. Understanding the genetic diversity and gene flow of this economically important pest can help to de...

  4. Occurrence of entomopathogenic fungi and parasitic nematodes on Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae collected in Central Chiapas, Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm larvae (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) were collected from whorl-stage cornfields, between the V2 and V4 stages, in 22 localities of Central, Chiapas, México, called "La Frailesca" during late June 2009 to determine the occurrence of native entomopathogens and parasitic nema...

  5. Lyophilization of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae yields high-quality DNA for use in AFLP genetic studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural research in the 21st century has become a collaborative effort. Research on crop pests like Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith), commonly known as the fall armyworm (FAW), can involve international collaboration because it is a pest not only in the southern United States, but also in La...

  6. Cry1F resistance in fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda: single gene versus pyramided Bt maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evolution of insect resistance to transgenic crops containing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) genes is a serious threat to the sustainability of this technology. However, field resistance related to the reduced efficacy of Bt maize has not been documented in any lepidopteran pest in the mainland U.S. af...

  7. Functional response of the tiger beetle Megacephala carolina carolina (Coleoptera: Carabidae) on twolined spittlebug (Hemiptera: Cercopidae) and fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Nachappa, Punya; Braman, S K; Guillebeau, L P; All, J N

    2006-10-01

    The functional response of the tiger beetle Megacephala carolina carolina L. (Coleoptera: Carabidae) was determined on adult twolined spittlebug, Prosapia bicincta (Say) (Hemiptera: Cercopidae), and fourth instars of fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), in single-prey and two-prey systems. In the laboratory, M. carolina carolina demonstrated a type II functional response for P. bicincta and S. frugiperda in both single- and two-prey systems. Search efficiency of M. carolina declined for both prey as the initial number of prey increased. Of the total prey consumed, M. carolina carolina killed significantly more S. frugiperda than P. bicincta in the single-prey system (8.0 and 4.5, respectively) and the two-prey system (5.0 and 2.0, respectively). Estimates of attack coefficient, a, were not significantly different for P. bicincta and S. frugiperda in the single-prey (0.07 and 0.02) and two-prey systems (0.04 and 0.06), respectively. The handling time, T(h), was significantly greater for P. bicincta (5.02 and 10.64 h) than for S. frugiperda (2.66 and 4.41 h) in single- and two-prey systems, respectively. Estimations of attack coefficient and handling time in the single-prey system were used to predict prey preference of M. carolina carolina. No strong prey switching response was observed. M. carolina carolina showed no preference for either prey. However, in the presence of S. frugiperda, the functional response of the predator for P. bicincta was reduced. M. carolina carolina is a potential predator of one or more turfgrass pests and should be considered in conservation efforts. PMID:17066786

  8. Comprehensive Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles of the Beet Armyworm Spodoptera exigua Larvae Challenged with Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Bel, Yolanda; Jakubowska, Agata K.; Costa, Juliana; Herrero, Salvador; Escriche, Baltasar

    2013-01-01

    Host-pathogen interactions result in complex relationship, many aspects of which are not completely understood. Vip proteins, which are Bacillus thuringensis (Bt) insecticidal toxins produced during the vegetative stage, are selectively effective against specific insect pests. This new group of Bt proteins represents an interesting alternative to the classical Bt Cry toxins because current data suggests that they do not share the same mode of action. We have designed and developed a genome-wide microarray for the beet armyworm Spodoptera exigua, a serious lepidopteran pest of many agricultural crops, and used it to better understand how lepidopteran larvae respond to the treatment with the insecticidal protein Vip3Aa. With this approach, the goal of our study was to evaluate the changes in gene expression levels caused by treatment with sublethal doses of Vip3Aa (causing 99% growth inhibition) at 8 and 24 h after feeding. Results indicated that the toxin provoked a wide transcriptional response, with 19% of the microarray unigenes responding significantly to treatment. The number of up- and down-regulated unigenes was very similar. The number of genes whose expression was regulated at 8 h was similar to the number of genes whose expression was regulated after 24 h of treatment. The up-regulated sequences were enriched for genes involved in innate immune response and in pathogen response such as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and repat genes. The down-regulated sequences were mainly unigenes with homology to genes involved in metabolism. Genes related to the mode of action of Bt Cry proteins were found, in general, to be slightly overexpressed. The present study is the first genome-wide analysis of the response of lepidopteran insects to Vip3Aa intoxication. An insight into the molecular mechanisms and components related to Vip intoxication will allow designing of more effective management strategies for pest control. PMID:24312604

  9. The attraction of Spodoptera frugiperda neonates to cowpea seedlings is mediated by volatiles induced by conspecific herbivory and the elicitor inceptin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fall armyworm [FAW; Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith)] often encounters herbivore damage as it disperses as a neonate from an egg mass to an individual feeding site. We investigated orientation responses of dispersing neonates to herbivore damage in cowpea seedings, specifically examining whether ...

  10. F2 screen for resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ab2-maize in field populations of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) from the southern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is a target of transgenic maize and cotton expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins in both North and South America. In 2013 and 2014, a total of 215 F2 two-parent families of S. frugiperda were established usin...

  11. Puerto Rico fall armyworm has only limited interactions with those from Brazil or Texas, but could have substantial exchanges with Florida populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm is not known to diapause and does not survive freezing winters. While this limits where it can become permanently established, its capacity for long-range migration allows at least the potential for widespread seasonal infestations, rapid dispersion and colonization, and interactions w...

  12. Structure and distribution of a strain-biased tandem repeat element in fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) populations in Florida, Texas, and Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm is a major economic pest throughout the Western Hemisphere. There exist two morphologically identical but genetically distinct strains (corn-strain and rice-strain) that differ in their host plant preferences. These can be distinguished by polymorphisms in the mitochondrial Cytochrome ...

  13. Rhizobacteria activates (+)-δ-cadinene synthase genes and induces systemic resistance in cotton against beet armyworm (Spodoptera exigua).

    PubMed

    Zebelo, Simon; Song, Yuanyuan; Kloepper, Joseph W; Fadamiro, Henry

    2016-04-01

    Gossypol is an important allelochemical produced by the subepidermal glands of some cotton varieties and important for their ability to respond to changing biotic stress by exhibiting antibiosis against some cotton pests. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are root-colonizing bacteria that increase plant growth and often elicit defence against plant pathogens and insect pests. Little is known about the effect of PGPR on cotton plant-insect interactions and the potential biochemical and molecular mechanisms by which PGPR enhance cotton plant defence. Here, we report that PGPR (Bacillus spp.) treated cotton plants showed significantly higher levels of gossypol compared with untreated plants. Similarly, the transcript levels of the genes (i.e. (+)-δ-cadinene synthase gene family) involved in the biosynthesis of gossypol were higher in PGPR-treated plants than in untreated plants. Furthermore, the levels of jasmonic acid, an octadecanoid-derived defence-related phytohormone and the transcript level of jasmonic acid responsive genes were higher in PGPR-treated plants than in untreated plants. Most intriguingly, Spodoptera exigua showed reduced larval feeding and development on PGPR-treated plants. These findings demonstrate that treatment of plants with rhizobacteria may induce significant biochemical and molecular changes with potential ramifications for plant-insect interactions. PMID:26715260

  14. Effects of bacillus thuringiensis transgenic corn on corn earworm and fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) densities.

    PubMed

    Chilcutt, Charles F; Odvody, Gary N; Correa, J Carlos; Remmers, Jeff

    2007-04-01

    We examined 17 pairs of near-isogenic hybrids of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) (176, Mon810, and Bt11) and non-Bt corn, Zea mays L., to examine the effects of Bt on larval densities of Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) and Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) during 2 yr. During ear formation, instar densities of H. zea and S. frugiperda were recorded for each hybrid. We found that H. zea first, second, and fifth instar densities were each affected by Mon810 and Bt11 Bt corn but not by 176 corn. Surprisingly, first and second instars were found in higher numbers on ears of Mon810 and Bt11 corn than on non-Bt corn. Densities of third and fourth instars were equal on Bt and non-Bt hybrids, whereas densities of fifth instars were lower on Bt plants. S. frugiperda larval densities were only affected during 1 yr when second, and fourth to sixth instars were lower on ears of Mon810 and Bt11 hybrids compared with their non-Bt counterparts. Two likely explanations for early instar H. zea densities being higher on Bt corn than non-Bt corn are that (1) Bt toxins delay development, creating a greater abundance of early instars that eventually die, and (2) reduced survival of H. zea to later instars on Bt corn decreased the normal asymmetric cannibalism or H. zea-S. frugiperda intraguild predation of late instars on early instars. Either explanation could explain why differences between Bt and non-Bt plants were greater for H. zea than S. frugiperda, because H. zea is more strongly affected by Bt toxins and more cannibalistic. PMID:17461054

  15. Field-Evolved Mode 1 Resistance of the Fall Armyworm to Transgenic Cry1Fa-Expressing Corn Associated with Reduced Cry1Fa Toxin Binding and Midgut Alkaline Phosphatase Expression.

    PubMed

    Jakka, Siva R K; Gong, Liang; Hasler, James; Banerjee, Rahul; Sheets, Joel J; Narva, Kenneth; Blanco, Carlos A; Jurat-Fuentes, Juan L

    2016-02-01

    Insecticidal protein genes from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are expressed by transgenic Bt crops (Bt crops) for effective and environmentally safe pest control. The development of resistance to these insecticidal proteins is considered the most serious threat to the sustainability of Bt crops. Resistance in fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) populations from Puerto Rico to transgenic corn producing the Cry1Fa insecticidal protein resulted, for the first time in the United States, in practical resistance, and Bt corn was withdrawn from the local market. In this study, we used a field-collected Cry1Fa corn-resistant strain (456) of S. frugiperda to identify the mechanism responsible for field-evolved resistance. Binding assays detected reduced Cry1Fa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac but not Cry1Ca toxin binding to midgut brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from the larvae of strain 456 compared to that from the larvae of a susceptible (Ben) strain. This binding phenotype is descriptive of the mode 1 type of resistance to Bt toxins. A comparison of the transcript levels for putative Cry1 toxin receptor genes identified a significant downregulation (>90%) of a membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase (ALP), which translated to reduced ALP protein levels and a 75% reduction in ALP activity in BBMV from 456 compared to that of Ben larvae. We cloned and heterologously expressed this ALP from susceptible S. frugiperda larvae and demonstrated that it specifically binds with Cry1Fa toxin. This study provides a thorough mechanistic description of field-evolved resistance to a transgenic Bt crop and supports an association between resistance and reduced Cry1Fa toxin binding and levels of a putative Cry1Fa toxin receptor, ALP, in the midguts of S. frugiperda larvae. PMID:26637593

  16. Physiological, nutritional and biochemical bases of corn resistance to foliage-feeding fall armyworm (Lepidoptera:noctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three corn (Zea mays) germplasm lines, Ab24E (susceptible control), Mp708 (resistant control), and a locally selected partial inbred line FAW7050 (resistant), were examined for Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) resistance. Nutritional [i.e., total protein, amino acids, gl...

  17. Biological activities of Solanum pseudocapsicum (Solanaceae) against cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera Hübner and armyworm, Spodoptera litura Fabricius (Lepidotera: Noctuidae)

    PubMed Central

    Jeyasankar, Alagarmalai; Premalatha, Selvaraj; Elumalai, Kuppusamy

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the antifeedant, insecticidal and growth inhibition activities of Solanum pseudocapsicum (S. pseudocapsicum) seed extracts against Spodoptera litura (S. litura) and Helicoverpa armigera (H. armigera). Methods Hexane, diethyl ether, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate seed extracts were prepared and tested for antifeedant, insecticidal and growth inhibitory activities against fourth instar larvae of S. litura and H. armigera. Results Ethyl acetate extract showed promising antifeedant and insecticidal activities against S. litura and H. armigera. Percentage of deformed larvae, pupae and adults were maximum in treatment of ethyl acetate extract. Percentage of successful adult emergence was deteriorated by seeds on extract treated larvae. Conclusions Ethyl acetate extracts of S. pseudocapsicum, showed higher efficiency of antifeedant, insecticidal and growth inhibition activities. Hence, it can be used to controll agricultural insect pests, S. litura and H. armigera. PMID:23593579

  18. Regulation of hemolymph trehalose level by an insulin-like peptide through diel feeding rhythm of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yonggyun; Hong, Youkyeong

    2015-06-01

    Like vertebrate insulins, some insect insulin-like peptides (ILPs) play crucial roles in controlling immature growth, adult lifespan, and hemolymph sugar level. An ILP gene (SeILP1) was predicted from a transcriptome database of Spodoptera exigua. SeILP1 encodes 95 amino acid sequence and shares sequence homologies (33-83%) with other insect ILPs, in which six conserved cysteine residues are found in the predicted B-A chains. SeILP1 was expressed in all developmental stages of S. exigua. However, SeILP1 expression was tissue-specific because the transcript was detected in fat body and epidermis, but not in hemocytes and gut. Its expression increased with feeding activity. Hemolymph trehalose levels of the fifth instar larvae maintained a relatively constant level at 2.31±0.62mM. However, starvation induced a significant increase of the hemolymph trehalose level by more than twofold in 48h, at which few SeILP1 was transcribed. RNA interference of SeILP1 using its specific double-stranded RNA induced a significant increase of hemolymph trehalose level. Interestingly, a bovine insulin decreased hemolymph trehalose level in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that SeILP1 plays a role in suppressing hemolymph trehalose level in S. exigua. PMID:25703302

  19. SeGSTo, a novel glutathione S-transferase from the beet armyworm (Spodoptera exigua), involved in detoxification and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pengfei; Han, Ningning; Kang, Tinghao; Zhan, Sha; Lee, Kwang Sik; Jin, Byung Rae; Li, Jianhong; Wan, Hu

    2016-09-01

    Members of the glutathione S-transferase superfamily can protect organisms against oxidative stress. In this study, we characterized an omega glutathione S-transferase from Spodoptera exigua (SeGSTo). The SeGSTo gene contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 744 nucleotides encoding a 248-amino acid polypeptide. The predicted molecular mass and isoelectric point of SeGSTo are 29007 Da and 7.74, respectively. Multiple amino acid sequence alignment analysis shows that the SeGSTo sequence is closely related to the class 4 GSTo of Bombyx mori BmGSTo4 (77 % protein sequence similarity). Homologous modeling and molecular docking reveal that Cys35 may play an essential role in the catalytic process. Additionally, the phylogenetic tree indicates that SeGSTo belongs to the omega group of the GST superfamily. During S. exigua development, SeGSTo is expressed in the midgut of the fifth instar larval stage, but not in the epidermis or fat body. Identification of recombinant SeGSTo via SDS-PAGE and Western blot shows that its molecular mass is 30 kDa. The recombinant SeGSTo was able to protect super-coiled DNA from damage in a metal-catalyzed oxidation (MCO) system and catalyze the 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), but not 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB), 4-nitrophenethyl bromide (4-NPB), or 4-nitrobenzyl chloride (4-NBC). The optimal reaction pH and temperature were 8 and 50 °C, respectively, in the catalysis of CDNB by recombinant SeGSTo. The mRNA expression of SeGSTo was up-regulated by various oxidative stresses, such as CdCl2, CuSO4, and isoprocarb, and the catalytic activity of recombinant SeGSTo was noticeably inhibited by heavy metals (Cu(2+) and Cd(2+)) and various pesticides. Taken together, these results indicate that SeGSTo plays an important role in the antioxidation and detoxification of pesticides. PMID:27230212

  20. Mortality Dynamics of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Immatures in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Varella, Andrea Corrêa; Menezes-Netto, Alexandre Carlos; Alonso, Juliana Duarte de Souza; Caixeta, Daniel Ferreira; Peterson, Robert K. D.; Fernandes, Odair Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the dynamics of mortality factors affecting immature developmental stages of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Multiple decrement life tables for egg and early larval stages of S. frugiperda in maize (Zea mays L.) fields were developed with and without augmentative releases of Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) from 2009 to 2011. Total egg mortality ranged from 73 to 81% and the greatest egg mortality was due to inviability, dislodgement, and predation. Parasitoids did not cause significant mortality in egg or early larval stages and the releases of T. remus did not increase egg mortality. Greater than 95% of early larvae died from predation, drowning, and dislodgment by rainfall. Total mortality due to these factors was largely irreplaceable. Results indicate that a greater effect in reducing generational survival may be achieved by adding mortality to the early larval stage of S. frugiperda. PMID:26098422

  1. Mortality Dynamics of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Immatures in Maize.

    PubMed

    Varella, Andrea Corrêa; Menezes-Netto, Alexandre Carlos; Alonso, Juliana Duarte de Souza; Caixeta, Daniel Ferreira; Peterson, Robert K D; Fernandes, Odair Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the dynamics of mortality factors affecting immature developmental stages of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Multiple decrement life tables for egg and early larval stages of S. frugiperda in maize (Zea mays L.) fields were developed with and without augmentative releases of Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) from 2009 to 2011. Total egg mortality ranged from 73 to 81% and the greatest egg mortality was due to inviability, dislodgement, and predation. Parasitoids did not cause significant mortality in egg or early larval stages and the releases of T. remus did not increase egg mortality. Greater than 95% of early larvae died from predation, drowning, and dislodgment by rainfall. Total mortality due to these factors was largely irreplaceable. Results indicate that a greater effect in reducing generational survival may be achieved by adding mortality to the early larval stage of S. frugiperda. PMID:26098422

  2. Field screening of maize germplasm lines for fall armyworm resistance using visual damage rating and predator abundance survey

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of our long-term research effort on developing new maize germplasm lines conferring multiple insect resistance at different growth stages, 10 newly-developed maize germplasm lines from the Germplasm Enhancement of Maize (GEM) Program were evaluated in 2010 and 2011 for whorl-feeding fall arm...

  3. Plant Phenolics as Radiation Protectants For The Beet Armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Nucleopolyhedrovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirteen phenolics were tested as ultraviolet (UV) protectants for the nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV) of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner). After 30 minute exposure to UVB/UVB radiation, eleven SeMNPV/phenolic combinations provided good to excellent UV protection when used at a concentra...

  4. Comparative infectivity of homologous and heterologous nucleopolyhedroviruses against beet armyworm larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Homologous and heterologous nucleopolyhedroviruses (NPVs) were assayed to determine the most effective NPV against beet armyworm larvae, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)(SeMNPV). Included were three isolates from S. exigua, one isolate each from S. littoralis Boisduval, S. litura...

  5. Black Tea and Lignin as Ultraviolet Protectants for the Beet Armyworm Nucleopolyhedrovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of major constraints to use baculoviruses for biocontrol of insect pests in field conditions is their sensitivity to breakdown by sunlight. In this study, we evaluated black tea and lignin (Reax 85A) as potential ultraviolet (UV) protectants for beet armyworm (BAW) Spodoptera exigua (Hübner) (L...

  6. Life-History Traits of Spodoptera frugiperda Populations Exposed to Low-Dose Bt Maize

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Fernanda F.; Mendes, Simone M.; Santos-Amaya, Oscar F.; Araújo, Octávio G.; Oliveira, Eugenio E.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins in low- and moderate-dose transgenic crops may induce sublethal effects and increase the rate of Bt resistance evolution, potentially compromising control efficacy against target pests. We tested this hypothesis using the fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda, a major polyphagous lepidopteran pest relatively tolerant to Bt notorious for evolving field-relevant resistance to single-gene Bt maize. Late-instar larvae were collected from Bt Cry1Ab and non-Bt maize fields in five locations in Brazil, and their offspring was compared for survival, development, and population growth in rearing environment without and with Cry1Ab throughout larval development. Larval survival on Cry1Ab maize leaves varied from 20 to 80% among the populations. Larvae reared on Cry1Ab maize had seven-day delay in development time in relation to control larvae, and such delay was shorter in offspring of armyworms from Cry1Ab maize. Population growth rates were 50–70% lower for insects continuously exposed to Cry1Ab maize relative to controls, showing the population-level effect of Cry1Ab, which varied among the populations and prior exposure to Cry1Ab maize in the field. In three out of five populations, armyworms derived from Bt maize reared on Cry1Ab maize showed higher larval weight, faster larval development and better reproductive performance than the armyworms derived from non-Bt maize, and one of these populations showed better performance on both Cry1Ab and control diets, indicating no fitness cost of the resistance trait. Altogether, these results indicate that offspring of armyworms that developed on field-grown, single-gene Bt Cry1Ab maize had reduced performance on Cry1Ab maize foliage in two populations studied, but in other three populations, these offspring had better overall performance on the Bt maize foliage than that of the armyworms from non-Bt maize fields, possibly because of Cry1Ab resistance alleles in these populations

  7. Toxicity of selected tremorgenic mycotoxins and related compounds to Spodoptera frugiperda and Heliothis zea.

    PubMed

    Dowd, P F; Cole, R J; Vesonder, R F

    1988-12-01

    A series of tremorgenic mycotoxins and related compounds were tested for oral toxicity to the fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) and corn earworm (Heliothis zea) by incorporation of materials into artificial diets and examining mortality and weights after 7 days. Significant mortality to both insect species was caused with dihydroxyaflavinine and roseotoxin B, while significant mortality to H. zea was also caused by penitrem A at 25 ppm. After 7 days, weighs of larvae treated with 25 ppm penitrem A, roseotoxin B, and verruculogen were less than 50% of controls for both insect species. Weights of H. zea larvae treated with 25 ppb of penitrem A were less than 50% those of control larvae. Relative toxicities of the tremorgens and related compounds to insects compared to vertebrates are discussed. PMID:3209479

  8. Dietary effects of cotton tissue expressing germin like protein on beet armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) growth, survival and pupation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic cotton lines that ectopically express a cotton germin-like protein (ABP) were screened for resistance/tolerance factors to the beet armyworm (BAW) Spodoptera exigua (Hubner) via feeding assays. The number of BAW eggs that successfully hatched was not statistically different at 72 h observ...

  9. Increased long-flight activity triggered in beet armyworm by larval feeding on diet containing Cry1Ac protoxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evaluating ecological safety and conducting pest risk analysis for transgenic crops are vitally important before their commercial planting. The beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, is not a direct target of transgenic cotton in China but nevertheless recently has become an important pest. In laboratory...

  10. Field Evaluation of a Kudzu/Cottonseed Oil Formulation on the Persistence of the Beet Armyworm Nucleopolyhedrovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A plant extract (kudzu) was tested as a UV protectant for SeMNPV, with and without the addition of an oil/emulsifier (cottonseed oil/lecithin) formulation. Aqueous and oil emulsion formulations of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner), nucleopolyhedrovirus SeMNPV were applied to collards an...

  11. Assessing beet armyworm damage on Bt and non-Bt cottons by visual observations and remote sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated damage, survival, and yield of beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hubner), populations on Bollgard II (ST 4357 BGII/RRF and AMX 1532RGII/RR), WideStrike™ (Phy 485 WRF), Bollgard® (DPL 444 BRRR), and non-Bt cottons (AMX 262R, Phy 425 RF) in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) of Texas. Ex...

  12. Artificial infestations of transgenic cotton with beet armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and evaluation of insect mortality and damage under field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic cottons containing Bollgard(R), Bollgard II(R), and Widestrike(TM) traits along with nonBt cotton were grown during 2005-2009, to examine efficacy against beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hubner), and (BAW) in field performance using natural and artificial infestations. Damage and morta...

  13. Resistance to dual-gene Bt maize in Spodoptera frugiperda: selection, inheritance, and cross-resistance to other transgenic events

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Amaya, Oscar F.; Rodrigues, João V. C.; Souza, Thadeu C.; Tavares, Clébson S.; Campos, Silverio O.; Guedes, Raul N.C.; Pereira, Eliseu J.G.

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic crop “pyramids” producing two or more Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins active against the same pest are used to delay evolution of resistance in insect pest populations. Laboratory and greenhouse experiments were performed with fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, to characterize resistance to Bt maize producing Cry1A.105 and Cry2Ab and test some assumptions of the “pyramid” resistance management strategy. Selection of a field-derived strain of S. frugiperda already resistant to Cry1F maize with Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab maize for ten generations produced resistance that allowed the larvae to colonize and complete the life cycle on these Bt maize plants. Greenhouse experiments revealed that the resistance was completely recessive (Dx = 0), incomplete, autosomal, and without maternal effects or cross-resistance to the Vip3Aa20 toxin produced in other Bt maize events. This profile of resistance supports some of the assumptions of the pyramid strategy for resistance management. However, laboratory experiments with purified Bt toxin and plant leaf tissue showed that resistance to Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab2 maize further increased resistance to Cry1Fa, which indicates that populations of fall armyworm have high potential for developing resistance to some currently available pyramided maize used against this pest, especially where resistance to Cry1Fa was reported in the field. PMID:26675246

  14. Resistance to dual-gene Bt maize in Spodoptera frugiperda: selection, inheritance, and cross-resistance to other transgenic events.

    PubMed

    Santos-Amaya, Oscar F; Rodrigues, João V C; Souza, Thadeu C; Tavares, Clébson S; Campos, Silverio O; Guedes, Raul N C; Pereira, Eliseu J G

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic crop "pyramids" producing two or more Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins active against the same pest are used to delay evolution of resistance in insect pest populations. Laboratory and greenhouse experiments were performed with fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, to characterize resistance to Bt maize producing Cry1A.105 and Cry2Ab and test some assumptions of the "pyramid" resistance management strategy. Selection of a field-derived strain of S. frugiperda already resistant to Cry1F maize with Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab maize for ten generations produced resistance that allowed the larvae to colonize and complete the life cycle on these Bt maize plants. Greenhouse experiments revealed that the resistance was completely recessive (Dx = 0), incomplete, autosomal, and without maternal effects or cross-resistance to the Vip3Aa20 toxin produced in other Bt maize events. This profile of resistance supports some of the assumptions of the pyramid strategy for resistance management. However, laboratory experiments with purified Bt toxin and plant leaf tissue showed that resistance to Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab2 maize further increased resistance to Cry1Fa, which indicates that populations of fall armyworm have high potential for developing resistance to some currently available pyramided maize used against this pest, especially where resistance to Cry1Fa was reported in the field. PMID:26675246

  15. Effect of triterpenoids and limonoids isolated from Cabralea canjerana and Carapa guianensis (Meliaceae) against Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith).

    PubMed

    Sarria, André L F; Soares, Márcio S; Matos, Andréia P; Fernandes, João B; Vieira, Paulo C; da Silva, M Fátima das G F

    2011-01-01

    The activities of two triterpenoids, ocotillone and cabraleadiol, and four limonoids, methyl angolensate, 3-beta-deacetylfissinolide, 7-deacetoxy-7-oxogedunin, and beta-photogedunin, isolated from arillus of Carapa guianensis and fruits and seeds of Cabralea canjerana (Meliaceae), were evaluated against the fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda. Gedunin was used as a positive control. 7-Deacetoxy-7-oxogedunin and beta-photogedunin reduced the pupal weight as occurred with gedunin. Cabraleadiol, 3-beta-deacetylfissinolide, and 7-deacetoxy-7-oxogedunin prolonged the larval phase similar to the control (gedunin) of approximately 1.2 days at 50.0 mg kg(-1). The highest insecticidal activity was obtained for beta-photogedunin. PMID:21812341

  16. A Z-linked sterility locus causes sexual abstinence in hybrid females and facilitates speciation in Spodoptera frugiperda.

    PubMed

    Kost, Silvia; Heckel, David G; Yoshido, Atsuo; Marec, František; Groot, Astrid T

    2016-06-01

    In the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae), two sympatric strains have been recognized that have been termed corn strain (C) and rice strain (R), referring to their most common host plants. Both strains are reproductively isolated via a distinct prezygotic barrier as well as via an intriguing postzygotic phenomenon: when R females have mated with C males, the resulting RC hybrid females exhibit dramatically reduced fertility independent of their mating partner. Here, we demonstrate that the reduced fertility is caused by the fact that these females refrain from mating, that is, females are behaviorally sterile. We identified a Z-chromosomally linked sterility locus that is most likely incompatible with yet to be identified autosomal (or cytoplasmic) factors, leading to the observed sexual abstinence. Within-chromosome mapping revealed the sterility locus to be located in an area of strongly reduced interstrain recombination. PMID:27149933

  17. Redescription of Campoletis sonorensis (Cameron, 1886) (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae, Campopleginae), parasitoid of Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith, 1797) (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Camargo, L F; Brito, R A; Penteado-Dias, A M

    2015-11-01

    The fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera; Noctuidae) is a voracious pest of numerous crops of economic importance throughout the New World. In Brazil, its larvae are attacked by several species of parasitoid wasps, making them potential candidate as biological control agents against this pest. A survey of the parasitoid fauna on S. frugiperda in maize crops throughout Brazil reveals two species of Campoletis, which are morphologicaly very similar species. In this paper we combine these data with pictures from the type material of C. sonorensis and C. flavicincta, as well as their descriptions to provide a redescription to Campoletis sonorensis (Cameron, 1886) using for this both morphological characters and DNA Barcoding (Hebert et al., 2003) information, in an attempt to help with the correct identification of the taxa to improve biological control studies. PMID:26675917

  18. Tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum) mediated competition via induced resistance: Interaction between Gratiana boliviana, Spodoptera exigua and Frankliniella occidentalis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Survival assays were conducted with beet armyworm (BAW) Spodoptera exigua (Hübner), a tortoise beetle Gratiana bolivana Spaeth and western flower thrips (WFT) Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) on tropical soda apple (TSA) Solanum viarum Dunal, a relative of tomato. Both S. exigua and G. bolivia...

  19. Falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems with circulation, thyroid or nervous systems. Some medicines make people dizzy. Eye problems or alcohol can be factors. Any of these things can make a fall more likely. Babies and young children are also at risk of falling - off ...

  20. SUBMITTED TO NEW JOURNAL (12/06/2002): EFFECT OF PEANUT PLANT FUNGAL INFECTION ON OVIPOSITION PREFERENCE BY SPODOPTERA EXIGUA AND ON HOST SEARCHING BEHAVIOR BY COTESIA MARGINIVENTRIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    (1.) In the present study we tested the effect of peanut, Arachis hypogaea L. (Leguminosae), stem infection by the white mold fungus, Sclerotium rolfsii Saccodes (Basidiomycetes), on the oviposition preference of beet armyworms (BAW), Spodoptera exigua Hübner (Lepidoptera:Noctuidae) and on the host...

  1. Identification and Characterization of Pathogen-Response Genes (repat) in Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Machado, Vilmar; Serrano, Jose; Galián, Jose

    2016-01-01

    The fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda, Noctuidae, Lepidoptera) is one of the most important crop pests in the Americas, causing significant damage to maize, rice and sorghum. The mechanisms that determine its defences against pathogens are particularly relevant for the development of management and control strategies. We used an in silico approach to identify and characterize pathogen response genes (repat) present in different tissue libraries of S. fugiperda. The analyses revealed complete cDNA for nine repat genes; of these, repat15 and repat39 were found in libraries from a specific tissue--the midgut of larvae fed with xenobiotic substances. High expression levels of some genes were found in different libraries: 39 hits in repat30 in challenged hemocytes, 16 hits in repat31 in fat body, 10 hits in repat32 in fat body and 10 in challenged hemocytes, and 10 hits in repat38 in midgut of non-treated larvae and midgut of larvae fed with natural and xenobiotic substances. The genes corresponded to two ontology categories, stress response and immune response, and their phylogenetic relationships, nucleotide similarity, number of amino acid residues and molecular weights agree with what has been described for repat genes. It is noteworthy that proteins encoded by the repat genes of S. frugiperda have important defence functions in other tissues beyond midgut and that their functional categories are likely diverse, as they are related to cell envelope structure, energy metabolism, transport and binding. PMID:27172709

  2. Host plant resistance in romaine lettuce affects feeding behavior and biology of Trichoplusia ni and Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Sethi, Amit; McAuslane, Heather J; Nagata, Russell T; Nuessly, Gregg S

    2006-12-01

    Lettuce quality and yield can be reduced by feeding of several lepidopterous pests, particularly cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni (Hübner), and beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Host plant resistance to these insects is an environmentally sound adjunct to conventional chemical control. In this study we compared the survival, development, and feeding behavior of cabbage looper and beet armyworm on two romaine lettuce cultivars, resistant 'Valmaine' and susceptible 'Tall Guzmaine'. Larval mortality of both species was significantly higher on resistant Valmaine than on susceptible Tall Guzmaine. The average weight per larva after feeding for 1 wk on Tall Guzmaine plants was 6 times (beet armyworm) and 2 times (cabbage looper) greater than that of larvae feeding on Valmaine plants. Significant reduction in larval growth on Valmaine compared with that on Tall Guzmaine resulted in a 5.9- (beet armyworm) and 2.6-d (cabbage looper) increase in larval duration and almost a 1-d increase in pupal duration. Average pupal and adult weights and successful pupation of cabbage looper and beet armyworm were reduced on Valmaine compared with Tall Guzmaine. The sex ratio of progeny did not deviate from 1:1 when larvae were reared on either Valmaine or Tall Guzmaine. The fecundity of cabbage looper and beet armyworm adults that developed from larvae reared on Valmaine was about one-third that of adults from Tall Guzmaine, but adult longevity did not significantly differ on the two lettuce cultivars. The two insect species showed different feeding preferences for leaves of different age groups on Valmaine and Tall Guzmaine. Cabbage loopers cut narrow trenches on the leaf before actual feeding to block the flow of latex to the intended site of feeding. In contrast, beet armyworms did not trench. The different feeding behavior of the two species on Valmaine may explain the superior performance of cabbage looper compared with beet armyworm. PMID:17195688

  3. Larval and pupal stage of Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in sweet and field corn genotypes.

    PubMed

    Santos, L M; Redaelli, L R; Diefenbach, L M G; Efrom, C F S

    2003-11-01

    Spodoptera frugiperda, the fall armyworm, is a very significant polyphagous pest due to the damages it causes, and control difficulties. Lack of information about its impact on sweet corn motivated a comparison of its biology, with respect to the larval and pupal stages, among the genotypes ELISA, BR 400 (sweet corns), and BR PAMPA (field corn). In laboratory conditions (25 +/- 1 masculine C; 70 +/- 10% RH; photophase 12 hours), 35 caterpillars were individualized and fed daily with 3.14 cm(2) sections of corn leaves from the referred-to genotypes, cultivated in plots in the experimental area of the Departament of Fitossanidade, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS from October to November 2000. The caterpillars were weighed daily; after each molt, the cephalic capsules were collected and measured (in width), to establish growth rate; pupae were weighed and sexed when 24 hours old. The duration of the larval instars, the pupal sex ratio, and the mortality of larvae and pupae were evaluated. In the first three instars there were no differences registered in capsule width. In the fourth and fifth instars, capsules of caterpillars kept in BR 400 were smaller. The weight of caterpillars and pupae, instar duration and sex ratio did not differ among the genotypes. Pupal phase duration was less in females kept in BR 400. Mortality was greater in the larval phase in ELISA and in the pupal phase in BR PAMPA. PMID:15029373

  4. Susceptibility and aversion of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) to Cry1F Bt maize and considerations for insect resistance management.

    PubMed

    Binning, Rachel R; Coats, Joel; Kong, Xiaoxiao; Hellmich, Richard L

    2014-02-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) maize was developed primarily for North American pests such as European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner)). However, most Bt maize products are also cultivated outside of North America, where the primary pests may be different and may have lower susceptibility to Bt toxins. Fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda JE Smith) is an important pest and primary target of Bt maize in Central and South America. S. frugiperda susceptibility to Cry1F (expressed in event TC1507) is an example of a pest-by-toxin interaction that does not meet the high-dose definition. In this study, the behavioral and toxic response of S. frugiperda to Cry1F maize was investigated by measuring the percentage of time naive third instars spent feeding during a 3-min exposure. S. frugiperda also were exposed as third instars to Cry1F maize for 14 d to measure weight gain and survival. S. frugiperda demonstrated an initial, postingestive aversive response to Cry1F maize, and few larvae survived the 14 d exposure. The role of susceptibility and avoidance are discussed in the context of global IRM refuge strategy development for Bt products. PMID:24665722

  5. Frequency of Cry1F Non-Recessive Resistance Alleles in North Carolina Field Populations of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Li, Guoping; Reisig, Dominic; Miao, Jin; Gould, Fred; Huang, Fangneng; Feng, Hongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is a target species of transgenic corn (Zea mays L.) that expresses single and pyramided Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin. In 2014, S. frugiperda were collected from a light trap in North Carolina, and a total of 212 F1/F2 isofemale lines of S. frugiperda were screened for resistance to Bt and non-Bt corn. All of the 212 isolines were susceptible to corn tissue expressing Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab, Cry1F + Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab, and Cry1F + Cry1Ab + Vip3Aa20. Growth rate bioassays were performed to isolate non-recessive Bt resistance alleles. Seven individuals out of the 212 isofemale lines carried major non-recessive alleles conferring resistance to Cry1F. A pooled colony was created from the seven individuals. This colony was 151.21 times more resistant to Cry1F than a known-susceptible population and was also resistant to Cry1A.105, but was not resistant to Cry2Ab and Vip3Aa20. The results demonstrate that field populations of S. frugiperda collected from North Carolina are generally susceptible to Cry1F, but that some individuals carry resistant alleles. The data generated in this study can be used as baseline data for resistance monitoring. PMID:27119741

  6. Frequency of Cry1F Non-Recessive Resistance Alleles in North Carolina Field Populations of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guoping; Reisig, Dominic; Miao, Jin; Gould, Fred; Huang, Fangneng; Feng, Hongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is a target species of transgenic corn (Zea mays L.) that expresses single and pyramided Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin. In 2014, S. frugiperda were collected from a light trap in North Carolina, and a total of 212 F1/F2 isofemale lines of S. frugiperda were screened for resistance to Bt and non-Bt corn. All of the 212 isolines were susceptible to corn tissue expressing Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab, Cry1F + Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab, and Cry1F + Cry1Ab + Vip3Aa20. Growth rate bioassays were performed to isolate non-recessive Bt resistance alleles. Seven individuals out of the 212 isofemale lines carried major non-recessive alleles conferring resistance to Cry1F. A pooled colony was created from the seven individuals. This colony was 151.21 times more resistant to Cry1F than a known-susceptible population and was also resistant to Cry1A.105, but was not resistant to Cry2Ab and Vip3Aa20. The results demonstrate that field populations of S. frugiperda collected from North Carolina are generally susceptible to Cry1F, but that some individuals carry resistant alleles. The data generated in this study can be used as baseline data for resistance monitoring. PMID:27119741

  7. Virulence of Entomopathogenic Fungi Metarhizium anisopliae and Paecilomyces fumosoroseus for the Microbial Control of Spodoptera exigua

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ji Hee; Jin, Byung Rae; Lee, Sang Yeob

    2014-01-01

    The beet armyworm Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is difficult to control using chemical insecticides because of the development of insecticide resistance. Several pest control agents are used to control the beet armyworm. Entomopathogenic fungi are one of the candidates for eco-friendly pest control instead of chemical control agents. In this study, among various entomopathogenic fungal strains isolated from soil two isolates were selected as high virulence pathogens against larva of beet armyworm. Control efficacy of fungal conidia was influenced by conidia concentration, temperature, and relative humidity (RH). The isolates Metarhizium anisopliae FT83 showed 100% cumulative mortality against second instar larvae of S. exigua 3 days after treatment at 1 × 107 conidia/mL and Paecilomyces fumosoroseus FG340 caused 100% mortality 6 days after treatment at 1 × 104 conidia/mL. Both M. anisopliae FT83 and P. fumosoroseus FG340 effectively controlled the moth at 20~30℃. M. anisopliae FT83 was significantly affected mortality by RH: mortality was 86.7% at 85% RH and 13.4% at 45% RH. P. fumosoroseus FG340 showed high mortality as 90% at 45% RH and 100% at 75% RH 6 days after conidia treatments. These results suggest that P. fumosoroseus FG340 and M. anisopliae FT83 have high potential to develop as a biocontrol agent against the beet armyworm. PMID:25606011

  8. Population genetic structure of two primary parasitoids of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera), Chelonus insularis and Campoletis sonorensis (Hymenoptera): to what extent is the host plant important?

    PubMed

    Jourdie, Violaine; Alvarez, Nadir; Molina-Ochoa, Jaime; Williams, Trevor; Bergvinson, David; Benrey, Betty; Turlings, Ted C J; Franck, Pierre

    2010-05-01

    Plant chemistry can strongly influence interactions between herbivores and their natural enemies, either by providing volatile compounds that serve as foraging cues for parasitoids or predators, or by affecting the quality of herbivores as hosts or prey. Through these effects plants may influence parasitoid population genetic structure. We tested for a possible specialization on specific crop plants in Chelonus insularis and Campoletis sonorensis, two primary parasitoids of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda. Throughout Mexico, S. frugiperda larvae were collected from their main host plants, maize and sorghum and parasitoids that emerged from the larvae were used for subsequent comparison by molecular analysis. Genetic variation at eight and 11 microsatellites were respectively assayed for C. insularis and C. sonorensis to examine isolation by distance, host plant and regional effects. Kinship analyses were also performed to assess female migration among host-plants. The analyses showed considerable within population variation and revealed a significant regional effect. No effect of host plant on population structure of either of the two parasitoid species was found. Isolation by distance was observed at the individual level, but not at the population level. Kinship analyses revealed significantly more genetically related--or kin--individuals on the same plant species than on different plant species, suggesting that locally, mothers preferentially stay on the same plant species. Although the standard population genetics parameters showed no effect of plant species on population structure, the kinship analyses revealed that mothers exhibit plant species fidelity, which may speed up divergence if adaptation were to occur. PMID:20406384

  9. Characterization of an Sf-rhabdovirus-negative Spodoptera frugiperda cell line as an alternative host for recombinant protein production in the baculovirus-insect cell system.

    PubMed

    Maghodia, Ajay B; Geisler, Christoph; Jarvis, Donald L

    2016-06-01

    Cell lines derived from the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf), are widely used as hosts for recombinant protein production in the baculovirus-insect cell system (BICS). However, it was recently discovered that these cell lines are contaminated with a virus, now known as Sf-rhabdovirus [1]. The detection of this adventitious agent raised a potential safety issue that could adversely impact the BICS as a commercial recombinant protein production platform. Thus, we examined the properties of Sf-RVN, an Sf-rhabdovirus-negative Sf cell line, as a potential alternative host. Nested RT-PCR assays showed Sf-RVN cells had no detectable Sf-rhabdovirus over the course of 60 passages in continuous culture. The general properties of Sf-RVN cells, including their average growth rates, diameters, morphologies, and viabilities after baculovirus infection, were virtually identical to those of Sf9 cells. Baculovirus-infected Sf-RVN and Sf9 cells produced equivalent levels of three recombinant proteins, including an intracellular prokaryotic protein and two secreted eukaryotic glycoproteins, and provided similar N-glycosylation patterns. In fact, except for the absence of Sf-rhabdovirus, the only difference between Sf-RVN and Sf9 cells was SF-RVN produced higher levels of infectious baculovirus progeny. These results show Sf-RVN cells can be used as improved, alternative hosts to circumvent the potential safety hazard associated with the use of Sf-rhabdovirus-contaminated Sf cells for recombinant protein manufacturing with the BICS. PMID:26923062

  10. Molecular characterization of host strains of Spodoptera frugiperda(Lepidoptera:Noctuidae)in southern Brazil :

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm infestations in most of North America north of Mexico arise from annual migrations of populations that overwinter in southern Texas and Florida. Mapping the pattern of migration and the relative contributions of the Texas and Florida populations would contribute both to our understandi...

  11. Effect of the red imported fire ant on cotton aphid population density and predation of bollworm and beet armyworm eggs.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Rodrigo; Knutson, Allen; Bernal, Julio S

    2004-04-01

    The effects of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), on cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover, populations and its predation of bollworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), and beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner), (both Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) eggs were evaluated in cotton under field conditions during 2001 and 2002 in central and northern Texas. In central Texas, cotton aphid populations were approximately 5.5 times greater and predation of sentinel bollworm eggs 2 times greater in the presence of S. invicta versus in its absence, although aphid populations did not reach economic levels. Most predation of beet armyworm egg masses, measured via direct nocturnal observations, was due to S. invicta (68%) and cotton fleahopper, Pseudatomoscelis seriatus (Reuter) (21%), where S. invicta was present, and by the mite Abrolophus sp. (52%), spiders (13%), and minute pirate bug (Orius sp.) (13%) where S. invicta was absent. Predation of sentinel bollworm eggs and beet armyworm egg masses was approximately 1.5 and 4.1 times greater, respectively, in the presence of S. invicta versus in their absence. In the presence of S. invicta, the relative frequencies of minute pirate bug and cotton fleahopper were higher, and of S. invicta and native ants lower in beat bucket samples compared with their relative frequencies in nocturnal observations of predation upon beet armyworm egg masses. In the absence of S. invicta seven of eight predators sampled were similarly represented in beat bucket samples and nocturnal observations of beet armyworm egg mass predation, whereas minute pirate bug occurred at a higher frequency in beat bucket samples relative to nocturnal observations. These observations suggested that the relative frequencies of minute pirate bug, cotton fleahopper, S. invicta and native ants in beat bucket samples do not closely reflect the frequency with which these predators prey on noctuid eggs. Overall, the results of this study show

  12. Proteomics of the 26S proteasome in Spodoptera frugiperda cells infected with the nucleopolyhedrovirus, AcMNPV.

    PubMed

    Lyupina, Yulia V; Zatsepina, Olga G; Serebryakova, Marina V; Erokhov, Pavel A; Abaturova, Svetlana B; Kravchuk, Oksana I; Orlova, Olga V; Beljelarskaya, Svetlana N; Lavrov, Andrey I; Sokolova, Olga S; Mikhailov, Victor S

    2016-06-01

    Baculoviruses are large DNA viruses that infect insect species such as Lepidoptera and are used in biotechnology for protein production and in agriculture as insecticides against crop pests. Baculoviruses require activity of host proteasomes for efficient reproduction, but how they control the cellular proteome and interact with the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) of infected cells remains unknown. In this report, we analyzed possible changes in the subunit composition of 26S proteasomes of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9), cells in the course of infection with the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). 26S proteasomes were purified from Sf9 cells by an immune affinity method and subjected to 2D gel electrophoresis followed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and Mascot search in bioinformatics databases. A total of 34 homologues of 26S proteasome subunits of eukaryotic species were identified including 14 subunits of the 20S core particle (7 α and 7 β subunits) and 20 subunits of the 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP contained homologues of 11 of RPN-type and 6 of RPT-type subunits, 2 deubiquitinating enzymes (UCH-14/UBP6 and UCH-L5/UCH37), and thioredoxin. Similar 2D-gel maps of 26S proteasomes purified from uninfected and AcMNPV-infected cells at 48hpi confirmed the structural integrity of the 26S proteasome in insect cells during baculovirus infection. However, subtle changes in minor forms of some proteasome subunits were detected. A portion of the α5(zeta) cellular pool that presumably was not associated with the proteasome underwent partial proteolysis at a late stage in infection. PMID:26945516

  13. Insect growth regulatory effects of some extracts and sterols from Myrtillocactus geometrizans (Cactaceae) against Spodoptera frugiperda and Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, Carlos L; Salazar, J Rodrigo; Martínez, Mariano; Aranda, Eduardo

    2005-10-01

    A methanol extract from the roots and aerial parts of Myrtillocactus geometrizans (Cactaceae) yielded peniocerol 1, macdougallin 2, and chichipegenin 3. The natural products 1, 2 their mixtures, MeOH and CH(2)Cl(2) extracts showed insecticidal and insect growth regulatory activity against fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda J. E. Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)], an important insect pest of corn, and [Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera)], a pest of stored grains in Mexico. The most active compounds were 1, 2, and a mixture (M(2)) of 1 and 2 (6:4). All these extracts, compounds and the mixture had insect growth regulating (IGR) activity between 5.0 and 50.0 ppm and insecticidal effects between 50 and 300 ppm in diets. The extracts were insecticidal to larvae, with lethal doses between 100 and 200 ppm. These compounds appear to have selective effects on the pre-emergence metabolism of Coleoptera, because in all treatments of the larvae of T. molitor, pupation were shortened and this process show precociousness in relation to controls. In contrast to S. frugiperda larvae, onset of pupation was noticeably delayed. Emergence in both cases was drastically diminished. In both pupae and in the few adults that were able to emerge, many deformations were observed. The results of these assays indicated that the compounds were more active than other known natural insect growth inhibitors such as gedunin and methanol extracts of Cedrela salvadorensis and Yucca periculosa. Peniocerol, macdougallin and chichipegenin, as well as mixtures of these substances, may be useful as natural insecticidal agents. PMID:16122768

  14. Comparative Effectiveness of Potential Elicitors of Plant Resistance against Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Four Crop Plants

    PubMed Central

    Gordy, John W.; Leonard, B. Rogers; Blouin, David; Davis, Jeffrey A.; Stout, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Feeding by insect herbivores activates plant signaling pathways, resulting in the enhanced production of secondary metabolites and other resistance-related traits by injured plants. These traits can reduce insect fitness, deter feeding, and attract beneficial insects. Organic and inorganic chemicals applied as a foliar spray, seed treatment, or soil drench can activate these plant responses. Azelaic acid (AA), benzothiadiazole (BTH), gibberellic acid (GA), harpin, and jasmonic acid (JA) are thought to directly mediate plant responses to pathogens and herbivores or to mimic compounds that do. The effects of these potential elicitors on the induction of plant defenses were determined by measuring the weight gains of fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (FAW) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae on four crop plants, cotton, corn, rice, and soybean, treated with the compounds under greenhouse conditions. Treatment with JA consistently reduced growth of FAW reared on treated cotton and soybean. In contrast, FAW fed BTH- and harpin-treated cotton and soybean tissue gained more weight than those fed control leaf tissue, consistent with negative crosstalk between the salicylic acid and JA signaling pathways. No induction or inconsistent induction of resistance was observed in corn and rice. Follow-up experiments showed that the co-application of adjuvants with JA failed to increase the effectiveness of induction by JA and that soybean looper [Chrysodeixis includens (Walker)], a relative specialist on legumes, was less affected by JA-induced responses in soybean than was the polyphagous FAW. Overall, the results of these experiments demonstrate that the effectiveness of elicitors as a management tactic will depend strongly on the identities of the crop, the pest, and the elicitor involved. PMID:26332833

  15. Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Responses to Sorghum bicolor (Poales: Poaceae) Tissues From Lowered Lignin Lines.

    PubMed

    Dowd, Patrick F; Sattler, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    The presence of lignin within biomass impedes the production of liquid fuels. Plants with altered lignin content and composition are more amenable to lignocellulosic conversion to ethanol and other biofuels but may be more susceptible to insect damage where lignin is an important resistance factor. However, reduced lignin lines of switchgrasses still retained insect resistance in prior studies. Therefore, we hypothesized that sorghum lines with lowered lignin content will also retain insect resistance. Sorghum excised leaves and stalk pith Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench (Poales: Poaceae) from near isogenic brown midrib (bmr) 6 and 12 mutants lines, which have lowered lignin content and increased lignocellulosic ethanol conversion efficiency, were examined for insect resistance relative to wild-type (normal BTx623). Greenhouse and growth chamber grown plant tissues were fed to first-instar larvae of corn earworms, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) and fall armyworms Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), two sorghum major pests. Younger bmr leaves had significantly greater feeding damage in some assays than wild-type leaves, but older bmr6 leaves generally had significantly less damage than wild-type leaves. Caterpillars feeding on the bmr6 leaves often weighed significantly less than those feeding on wild-type leaves, especially in the S. frugiperda assays. Larvae fed the pith from bmr stalks had significantly higher mortality compared with those larvae fed on wild-type pith, which suggested that bmr pith was more toxic. Thus, reducing lignin content or changing subunit composition of bioenergy grasses does not necessarily increase their susceptibility to insects and may result in increased resistance, which would contribute to sustainable production. PMID:25601946

  16. Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Responses to Sorghum bicolor (Poales: Poaceae) Tissues From Lowered Lignin Lines

    PubMed Central

    Dowd, Patrick F.; Sattler, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of lignin within biomass impedes the production of liquid fuels. Plants with altered lignin content and composition are more amenable to lignocellulosic conversion to ethanol and other biofuels but may be more susceptible to insect damage where lignin is an important resistance factor. However, reduced lignin lines of switchgrasses still retained insect resistance in prior studies. Therefore, we hypothesized that sorghum lines with lowered lignin content will also retain insect resistance. Sorghum excised leaves and stalk pith Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench (Poales: Poaceae) from near isogenic brown midrib (bmr) 6 and 12 mutants lines, which have lowered lignin content and increased lignocellulosic ethanol conversion efficiency, were examined for insect resistance relative to wild-type (normal BTx623). Greenhouse and growth chamber grown plant tissues were fed to first-instar larvae of corn earworms, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) and fall armyworms Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), two sorghum major pests. Younger bmr leaves had significantly greater feeding damage in some assays than wild-type leaves, but older bmr6 leaves generally had significantly less damage than wild-type leaves. Caterpillars feeding on the bmr6 leaves often weighed significantly less than those feeding on wild-type leaves, especially in the S. frugiperda assays. Larvae fed the pith from bmr stalks had significantly higher mortality compared with those larvae fed on wild-type pith, which suggested that bmr pith was more toxic. Thus, reducing lignin content or changing subunit composition of bioenergy grasses does not necessarily increase their susceptibility to insects and may result in increased resistance, which would contribute to sustainable production. PMID:25601946

  17. Development and validation of real-time PCR tests for the identification of four Spodoptera species: Spodoptera eridania, Spodoptera frugiperda, Spodoptera littoralis, and Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Van de Vossenberg, B T L H; Van der Straten, M J

    2014-08-01

    The genus Spodoptera comprises 31 species, 4 of which are listed as quarantine pests for the European Union: Spodoptera eridania (Cramer), Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith), Spodoptera littoralis (Boisduval), and Spodoptera litura (F.). In international trade, the earlier life stages (eggs and larvae) are being intercepted at point of inspection most frequently, challenging the possibilities of morphological identification. To realize a rapid and reliable identification for all stages, we developed and validated four simplex real-time polymerase chain reaction identification tests based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene using dual-labeled hydrolysis probes. Method validation on dilutions of extracted DNA of the target organisms showed that low levels of template (up to 0.2-100 pg) can reliably be identified. No cross-reactivity was observed with 14 nontarget Spodoptera and 5 non-Spodoptera species in the specific Spodoptera tests. The tests showed to be repeatable, reproducible (both 100%), and robust. The new Spodoptera tests have proven to be suitable tools for routine identification of all life stages of S. eridania, S. frugiperda, S. littoralis, and S. litura. PMID:25195458

  18. Effectiveness of transgenic Bt cottons against noctuids in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evaluations of the comparative efficacy of Bacillus thuringiensis Bollgard, Bollgard II and non-Bt traits expressing cottons for control of the noctuid complex composed of bollworms, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), fall armyworms, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith), beet armyworms, Spodoptera exigua (Hübn...

  19. Consumption and utilization of experimentally altered corn by southern armyworm: Iron, nitrogen, and cyclic hydroxamates.

    PubMed

    Manuwoto, S; Scriber, J M

    1985-11-01

    The effects of differential leaf water, leaf nitrogen and cyclic hydroxamate (DIMBOA) concentrations in corn seedlings were analyzed for a polyphagous insect, the southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania Cram.). Six different combinations of nutrients and allelochemicals [DIMBOA = 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy(2H)-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one] were generated using two corn genotypes (WF9 and CI3IA) and three fertility regimes (complete nutrient, Fe-deficient, and N-deficient solutions) in the University Biotron. Poorest larval growth was observed in the low-nitrogen treatments (1.2% and 1.7% leaf N) and was the result of both low consumption rates and high metabolic costs (low efficiency of conversion of digested food, ECD). Fastest growth rates were observed forthe larvae fed leaves from the high-nitrogen treatments (4.6% and 4.4% leaf N). It is noteworthy that these treatments also contained the highest concentration of cyclic hydroxamates, which are generally believed to be the primary defensive chemicals mediating resistance against the European corn borer,Ostrinia nubilalis (Hubner). If these hydroxamates do have any deleterious or costly effects (perhaps accounting for a large portion of metabolic expenditures), the high digestibility of the leaf tissue and the increased consumption rates more than compensate, resulting in rapid growth (growth rate = consumption rate × approximate digestibility × efficiency of conversion of the digested food). These studies illustrate that variation in key nutrients and allelochemicals within a single plant species (Zea mays L.) may have significantly different effects upon various potential leaf-chewing caterpillars, such as these armyworms versus corn borers (which cannot handle the cyclic hydroxamates, even if provided with young nutritious leaf tissues). PMID:24311240

  20. Resistance to Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Euxesta stigmatias (Diptera: Ulidiidae) in sweet corn derived from exogenous and endogenous genetic systems.

    PubMed

    Nuessly, G S; Scully, B T; Hentz, M G; Beiriger, R; Snook, M E; Widstrom, N W

    2007-12-01

    Field trials using Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Euxesta stigmatias Loew (Diptera: Ulidiidae) were conducted to evaluate resistance and potential damage interactions between these two primary corn, Zea mays L., pests against Lepidoptera-resistant corn varieties derived from both endogenous and exogenous sources. The endogenous source of resistance was maysin, a C-glycosyl flavone produced in high concentrations in varieties 'Zapalote Chico 2451' and 'Zapalote Chico sh2'. The exogenous resistance source was the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)11 gene that expresses Cry1A(b) insecticidal protein found in 'Attribute GSS-0966'. Damage by the two pests was compared among these resistant varieties and the susceptible 'Primetime'. Single-species tests determined that the Zapalote Chico varieties and GSS-0966 effectively reduced S. frugiperda larval damage compared with Primetime. E. stigmatias larval damage was less in the Zapalote Chico varieties than the other varieties in single-species tests. E. stigmatias damage was greater on S. frugiperda-infested versus S. frugiperda-excluded ears. Ears with S. frugiperda damage to husk, silk and kernels had greater E. stigmatias damage than ears with less S. frugiperda damage. Reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of nonpollinated corn silk collected from field plots determined that isoorientin, maysin, and apimaysin plus 3'-methoxymaysin concentrations followed the order Zapalote Chico sh2 > Zapalote Chico 2451 > Attribute GSS-0966 = Primetime. Chlorogenic acid concentrations were greatest in Zapalote Chico 2451. The two high maysin Zapalote Chico varieties did as well against fall armyworm as the Bt-enhanced GSS-0966, and they outperformed GSS-0966 against E. stigmatias. PMID:18232407

  1. Performance and cross-crop resistance of Cry1F-maize selected Spodoptera frugiperda on transgenic Bt cotton: implications for resistance management

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fei; Kerns, David L.; Brown, Sebe; Kurtz, Ryan; Dennehy, Tim; Braxton, Bo; Head, Graham; Huang, Fangneng

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic crops producing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins have become a primary tool in pest management. Due to the intensive use of Bt crops, resistance of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, to Cry1F maize has occurred in Puerto Rico, Brazil, and some areas of the southeastern U.S. The sustainability of Bt crops faces a great challenge because the Cry1F-maize resistant S. frugiperda may also infest other Bt crops in multiple cropping ecosystems. Here we examined the survival and plant injury of a S. frugiperda population selected with Cry1F maize on three single-gene and five pyramided Bt cotton products. Larvae of Cry1F-susceptible (SS), -heterozygous (RS), and -resistant (RR) genotypes of S. frugiperda were all susceptible to the pyramided cotton containing Cry1Ac/Cry2Ab, Cry1Ac/Cry1F/Vip3A, Cry1Ab/Cry2Ae, or Cry1Ab/Cry2Ae/Vip3A, and the single-gene Cry2Ae cotton. Pyramided cotton containing Cry1Ac/Cry1F was effective against SS and RS, but not for RR. These findings show that the Cry1F-maize selected S. frugiperda can cause cross-crop resistance to other Bt crops expressing similar insecticidal proteins. Resistance management and pest management programs that utilize diversify mortality factors must be implemented to ensure the sustainability of Bt crops. This is especially important in areas where resistance to single-gene Bt crops is already widespread. PMID:27301612

  2. Performance and cross-crop resistance of Cry1F-maize selected Spodoptera frugiperda on transgenic Bt cotton: implications for resistance management.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fei; Kerns, David L; Brown, Sebe; Kurtz, Ryan; Dennehy, Tim; Braxton, Bo; Head, Graham; Huang, Fangneng

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic crops producing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins have become a primary tool in pest management. Due to the intensive use of Bt crops, resistance of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, to Cry1F maize has occurred in Puerto Rico, Brazil, and some areas of the southeastern U.S. The sustainability of Bt crops faces a great challenge because the Cry1F-maize resistant S. frugiperda may also infest other Bt crops in multiple cropping ecosystems. Here we examined the survival and plant injury of a S. frugiperda population selected with Cry1F maize on three single-gene and five pyramided Bt cotton products. Larvae of Cry1F-susceptible (SS), -heterozygous (RS), and -resistant (RR) genotypes of S. frugiperda were all susceptible to the pyramided cotton containing Cry1Ac/Cry2Ab, Cry1Ac/Cry1F/Vip3A, Cry1Ab/Cry2Ae, or Cry1Ab/Cry2Ae/Vip3A, and the single-gene Cry2Ae cotton. Pyramided cotton containing Cry1Ac/Cry1F was effective against SS and RS, but not for RR. These findings show that the Cry1F-maize selected S. frugiperda can cause cross-crop resistance to other Bt crops expressing similar insecticidal proteins. Resistance management and pest management programs that utilize diversify mortality factors must be implemented to ensure the sustainability of Bt crops. This is especially important in areas where resistance to single-gene Bt crops is already widespread. PMID:27301612

  3. F2 screen for resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ab2-maize in field populations of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) from the southern United States.

    PubMed

    Niu, Ying; Qureshi, Jawwad A; Ni, Xinzhi; Head, Graham P; Price, Paula A; Meagher, Robert L; Kerns, David; Levy, Ronnie; Yang, Xiangbing; Huang, Fangneng

    2016-07-01

    The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is a target pest of transgenic maize and cotton expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins in both North and South America. In 2013 and 2014, a total of 215 F2 two-parent families of S. frugiperda were established using single-pair mating of field individuals collected from seven locations in four states of the southern U.S.: Texas, Louisiana, Georgia, and Florida. The objective of the investigation was to detect resistance alleles in field populations to Cry2Ab2, a common Bt protein produced in transgenic maize and cotton. For each F2 family, 128 F2 neonates were screened on leaf tissue of Cry2Ab2 maize plants in the laboratory. A conservative estimate of the frequency of major Cry2Ab2 resistance alleles in S. frugiperda from the four states was 0.0023 with a 95% credibility interval of 0.0003-0.0064. In addition, six families were considered to likely possess minor resistance alleles at a frequency of 0.0082 with a 95% credibility interval of 0.0033-0.0152. One F2 family from Georgia (GA-15) was confirmed to possess a major resistance allele to the Cry2Ab2 protein. Larvae from this family survived well on whole maize plants expressing Cry2Ab2 protein and demonstrated a significant level (>15-fold) of resistance when fed with the same protein incorporated in a meridic diet. The detection of the major resistance allele along with the relatively abundant minor resistance alleles revealed in this study may have important implications for resistance management. PMID:27311896

  4. Toxicity assessment of wild bean seed protein--arcelin on Asian armyworm, Spodoptera litura (Fabricius).

    PubMed

    Malaikozhundan, B; Suresh, P; Seshadri, S; Janarthanan, S

    2003-12-01

    Arcelin, an anti-metabolic protein was purified from the seeds of wild bean, Lablab purpureus. The feeding assay containing arcelin at 5, 10 and 15 microg concentrations revealed no antifeedant effect against fifth instar larvae of S. litura. However, the enhanced activity of alpha- and beta-naphthyl esterases in the mid-gut samples of S. litura treated with arcelin suggests countermeasure against the toxic effect of arcelin. PMID:15320504

  5. Use of DNA barcodes to identify invasive armyworm Spodoptera species in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A critical component for sustaining adequate food production is the protection of local agriculture from invasive pest insects. Essential to this goal is the ability to accurately distinguish foreign from closely related domestic species, a process that has traditionally required identification of d...

  6. RNAi Screening in Spodoptera frugiperda.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subhanita; Singh, Gatikrushna; Sachdev, Bindiya; Kumar, Ajit; Malhotra, Pawan; Mukherjee, Sunil K; Bhatnagar, Raj K

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference is a potent and precise reverse genetic approach to carryout large-scale functional genomic studies in a given organism. During the past decade, RNAi has also emerged as an important investigative tool to understand the process of viral pathogenesis. Our laboratory has successfully generated transgenic reporter and RNAi sensor line of Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf21) cells and developed a reversal of silencing assay via siRNA or shRNA guided screening to investigate RNAi factors or viral pathogenic factors with extraordinary fidelity. Here we describe empirical approaches and conceptual understanding to execute successful RNAi screening in Spodoptera frugiperda 21-cell line. PMID:27581295

  7. Isolation and identification of a cardioactive peptide from Tenebrio molitor and Spodoptera eridania.

    PubMed

    Furuya, K; Liao, S; Reynolds, S E; Ota, R B; Hackett, M; Schooley, D A

    1993-12-01

    We isolated several cardioactive peptides from extracts of whole heads of the mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, and the southern armyworm, Spodoptera eridania, using a semi-isolated heart of Manduca sexta for bioassay. We have now isolated from each species the peptide with the strongest effect on rate of contraction of the heart. The peptides were identified using micro Edman sequencing and mass spectrometric methods. This cardioactive peptide has the same primary structure from both species: Pro-Phe-Cys-Asn-Ala-Phe-Thr-Gly-Cys-NH2, a cyclic nonapeptide which is identical to crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) originally isolated from the shore crab, Carcinus maenas, and subsequently isolated from Locusta migratoria and Manduca sexta. This is additional evidence that CCAP has widespread occurrence in arthropoda. PMID:8129851

  8. Mitomycin C induced alterations in antioxidant enzyme levels in a model insect species, Spodoptera eridania.

    PubMed

    Batcabe, J P; MacGill, R S; Zaman, K; Ahmad, S; Pardini, R S

    1994-05-01

    1. An insect species, the southern armyworm Spodoptera eridania, was used as an in vivo model to examine mitomycin C's (MMC) pro-oxidant effect reflected in alterations of antioxidant enzymes. 2. Following a 2-day exposure to 0.01 and 0.05% w/w dietary concentrations, MMC only induced superoxide dismutase activity. All other enzyme activities were not affected, indicating oxidative stress was mild. 3. Following a 5-day exposure to 0.05% w/w dietary MMC, the activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione-S-transferase and its peroxidase activity and DT-diaphorase were induced. GR activity was not altered. The high constitutive catalase activity was also not affected. These responses of S. eridania's antioxidant enzymes are analogous to those of mammalian systems in alleviating MMC-induced oxidative stress. 4. S. eridania emerges as an appropriate non-mammalian model for initial and cost-effective screening of drug-induced oxidative stress. PMID:7926607

  9. Antibiosis in Soybean Genotypes and the Resistance Levels to Spodoptera eridania (Cramer) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Souza, B H S; Silva, A G; Janini, J C; Boica Júnior, A L

    2014-12-01

    The southern armyworm (SAW) Spodoptera eridania (Cramer) is one of the most common armyworm species defoliating soybeans. Preliminary screening trials have indicated that some soybean genotypes exhibit resistance to SAW. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the development of SAW larvae fed on ten soybean genotypes in order to identify genotypes with antibiosis-type resistance. Neonate SAW larvae were daily fed with young leaves collected from plants at the vegetative growth stages V4-V5. Larval development and survival were recorded. Genotypes PI 227687 and PI 227682 delayed larval, pupal, and larva-adult development and yielded larvae with the lowest weight and survival and pupae with the lowest weight. Genotypes IAC 100 and DM 339 also negatively affected larval and pupal development and larval survival but at a lower level. Based on our results, the soybean lines PI 227687 and PI 227682 could be used as sources of genes for soybean breeding programs aiming to develop high yield, SAW-resistant cultivars. Moreover, further trials must be carried out under field conditions to validate if the commercial cultivars IAC 100 and DM 339, which expressed moderate levels of antibiosis-type resistance in the laboratory, are effective in suppressing SAW larvae populations. PMID:27194067

  10. SEARCHING FOR EXOTIC SPODOPTERA SPECIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used sex pheromone-baited traps to collect native and exotic Spodoptera spp. moths at an orchid nursery in Lake County, FL. Lures for S. eridania, exempta, exigua, frugiperda, littoralis, litura, praefica, and Pseudaletia unipuncta were placed in bucket traps that surrounded the greenhouses of t...

  11. A synthetic cryIC gene, encoding a Bacillus thuringiensis δ-endotoxin, confers Spodoptera resistance in alfalfa and tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Strizhov, Nicolai; Keller, Menachem; Mathur, Jaideep; Koncz-Kálmán, Zsuzsanna; Bosch, Dirk; Prudovsky, Evgenia; Schell, Jeff; Sneh, Baruch; Koncz, Csaba; Zilberstein, Aviah

    1996-01-01

    Spodoptera species, representing widespread polyphagous insect pests, are resistant to Bacillus thuringiensis δ-endotoxins used thus far as insecticides in transgenic plants. Here we describe the chemical synthesis of a cryIC gene by a novel template directed ligation–PCR method. This simple and economical method to construct large synthetic genes can be used when routine resynthesis of genes is required. Chemically phosphorylated adjacent oligonucleotides of the gene to be synthesized are assembled and ligated on a single-stranded, partially homologous template derived from a wild-type gene (cryIC in our case) by a thermostable Pfu DNA ligase using repeated cycles of melting, annealing, and ligation. The resulting synthetic DNA strands are selectively amplified by PCR with short specific flanking primers that are complementary only to the new synthetic DNA. Optimized expression of the synthetic cryIC gene in alfalfa and tobacco results in the production of 0.01–0.2% of total soluble proteins as CryIC toxin and provides protection against the Egyptian cotton leafworm (Spodoptera littoralis) and the beet armyworm (Spodoptera exigua). To facilitate selection and breeding of Spodoptera-resistant plants, the cryIC gene was linked to a pat gene, conferring resistance to the herbicide BASTA. PMID:8986755

  12. Differential activity of multiple saponins against omnivorous insects with varying feeding preferences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variety of saponin glycosides and aglycones from seven different plant families (Aquifoliaceae, Asparagaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Dioscoreaceae, Leguminosae, Rosaceae, Sapindaceae) were tested against the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea, and the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda. The corn earworm fe...

  13. Influence ofAmaranthus hybridus L. allelochemics on oviposition behavior ofSpodoptera exigua andS. eridania (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Mitchell, E R; Heath, R R

    1985-05-01

    Common pigweed,Amaranthus hybridus L., is a favorite host of the beet army worm (BAW),Spodoptera exigua L. Chemicals extracted from homogenized pigweed with distilled water, ethanol, or dichloromethane and sprayed back on pigweed deterred oviposition by the BAW. Similarly, water extracts of frass from conspecific larvae or southern armyworm (SAW) larvae,S. eridania (Cramer), fed pigweed leaves and sprayed back on pigweed plants also deterred BAW oviposition, thus confirming that deterrence was due to plant allelochemics rather than specific compounds associated with the metabolic or excretory products of the larvae. Confirmation of the presence of oviposition-deterring chemicals in pigweed was used to explain a previously observed seasonal displacement of BAW by SAW on pigweed in the field. PMID:24310126

  14. Haplotype profile comparisons between Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera:Noctuidae) populations from Mexico with those from Puerto Rico, South America, and the United States and their implications for migratory behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm is a major economic pest throughout the Western Hemisphere of maize, cotton, sorghum, and a variety of agricultural grasses and vegetable crops. Previous studies demonstrated extensive annual migrations occurring as far north as Canada from overwintering locations in southern Florida a...

  15. Dichlone-induced oxidative stress in a model insect species, Spodoptera eridania.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, S; Zaman, K; MacGill, R S; Batcabe, J P; Pardini, R S

    1995-11-01

    Southern armyworm, Spodoptera eridania, larvae were provided ad libitum 0.002-0.25% w/w dichlone, 2,3-dichloro-1,4-naphthoquinone (CNQ). Larval mortality occurred in a time-and-dose dependent manner, with an LC17 of 0.01% and an LC50 of 0.26% CNQ at day-5. Extracts of larvae fed control, 0.01, and 0.25% CNQ diets for 5 days were assayed for antioxidant enzymes. While 0.01% CNQ had a mild effect, 0.25% CNQ profoundly increased levels of all antioxidant enzymes that were examined. The increases as compared to control were: 5.3-, 1.9-, 3.2-, 2.6-, 2.8-, and 3.5-fold higher for superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione transferase and its peroxidase activity, glutathione reductase and DT-diaphorase, respectively. At 0.01% CNQ, the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were similar to the control group. However, despite the induction from 0.25% CNQ of all enzymes examined, the lipid peroxidation was not attenuated; the TBARS were 29.7% over the control value. High mortalities and CNQ-induced pathologies reflected in retarded growth, wasting syndrome, and diuresis clearly indicated that the insect sustained severe oxidant-induced injuries before appropriate defenses were fully mobilized. Thus, this quinone causes an oxidative stress in a model insect species analogous to that observed in mammalian species. PMID:7574883

  16. Immature stages of Spodoptera eridania (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae): developmental parameters and host plants.

    PubMed

    Montezano, Débora Goulart; Specht, Alexandre; Sosa-Gómez, Daniel Ricardo; Roque-Specht, Vânia Ferreira; de Barros, Neiva Monteiro

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to detail the temporal and morphological parameters of the immature stages of southern armyworm Spodoptera eridania (Stoll, 1782) with larvae feed on artificial diet, under controlled conditions (25 ± 1°C, 70 ± 10% relative humidity and 14-h photophase) and gather information about their larval host plants. The viability of the egg, larval, pupal, and prepupal stages was 97.82, 93.62, 96.42, and 97.03%, respectively. The average duration of the egg, larval, pupal, and pre-pupal stages was 4.00, 16.18, 1.58, and 9.17 d, respectively. During the larval stage, 43.44% of females passed through seven instars, observing that the female's development was significant slower than males. The female larvae that developed through six and seven instars exhibited a mean growth rate of 1.52 and 1.44, respectively. Female pupae were significantly larger, exhibiting faster development than males. The rearing method proved to be adequate, providing more detailed observations of the biological cycle, especially at the larval stage, and resulting in an overall survival of almost 85%. Two hundred two plant species belonging to 58 families are listed as natural hosts for S. eridania, mainly including Asteraceae, Fabaceae, Solanaceae, Poaceae, Amaranthaceae, and Malvaceae. PMID:25525103

  17. Roles of Peroxinectin in PGE2-Mediated Cellular Immunity in Spodoptera exigua

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jiyeong; Stanley, David; Kim, Yonggyun

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostaglandins (PGs) mediate insect immune responses to infections and invasions. Although the presence of PGs has been confirmed in several insect species, their biosynthesis in insects remains a conundrum because orthologs of the mammalian cyclooxygenases (COXs) have not been found in the known insect genomes. PG-mediated immune reactions have been documented in the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua. The purpose of this research is to identify the source of PGs in S. exigua. Principal Findings Peroxidases (POXs) are a sister group of COX genes. Ten putative POXs (SePOX-A ∼ SePOX-J) were expressed in S. exigua. Expressions of SePOX-F and -H were induced by bacterial challenge and expressed in the hemocytes and the fat body. RNAi of each POX was performed by hemocoelic injection of their specific double-stranded RNAs. dsPOX-F or, separately, dsPOX-H, but not the other eight dsRNA constructs, specifically suppressed hemocyte-spreading behavior and nodule formation; these two reactions were also inhibited by aspirin, a COX inhibitor. PGE2, but not arachidonic acid, treatment rescued the immunosuppression. Sequence analysis indicated that both POX genes were clustered with peroxinectin (Pxt) and their cognate proteins shared some conserved domains corresponding to the Pxt of Drosophila melanogaster. Conclusions SePOX-F and -H are Pxt-like genes associated with PG biosynthesis in S. exigua. PMID:25191834

  18. Synthetic pheromones and plant volatiles alter the expression of chemosensory genes in Spodoptera exigua.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xinlong; Qian, Kai; Du, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    Pheromone and plant odorants are important for insect mating, foraging food sources and oviposition. To understand the molecular mechanisms regulating pheromone and odorant signaling, we employed qRT-PCR to study the circadian rhythms of ABP, OBP, PBP, and OR gene expression in the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua and their responses after a pre-exposure to sex pheromone compounds or plant volatiles. The neuronal responses of male S. exigua to 20 chemical compounds were recorded at three specific time periods using the electroantennogram. The results showed a circadian rhythm in the expression profiles of some chemosensory genes in the antennae similar to their behavioral rhythm. The expression profiles of OR3, OR6, OR11, OR13, OR16, OR18, Orco, ABP2, OBP1, OBP7, and PBP1, and EAG responses to chemical compounds, as well as their circadian rhythm were significantly affected after exposure to synthetic sex pheromones and plant volatiles. These findings provide the first evidence that the gene expression of chemosensory genes and olfactory sensitivity to sex pheromones are affected by pre-exposing insects to pheromone compounds and plant volatiles. It helps to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying pheromone activity, and the application of sex pheromones and plant volatiles in mating disruption or mass trapping. PMID:26611815

  19. Synthetic pheromones and plant volatiles alter the expression of chemosensory genes in Spodoptera exigua

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xinlong; Qian, Kai; Du, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    Pheromone and plant odorants are important for insect mating, foraging food sources and oviposition. To understand the molecular mechanisms regulating pheromone and odorant signaling, we employed qRT-PCR to study the circadian rhythms of ABP, OBP, PBP, and OR gene expression in the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua and their responses after a pre-exposure to sex pheromone compounds or plant volatiles. The neuronal responses of male S. exigua to 20 chemical compounds were recorded at three specific time periods using the electroantennogram. The results showed a circadian rhythm in the expression profiles of some chemosensory genes in the antennae similar to their behavioral rhythm. The expression profiles of OR3, OR6, OR11, OR13, OR16, OR18, Orco, ABP2, OBP1, OBP7, and PBP1, and EAG responses to chemical compounds, as well as their circadian rhythm were significantly affected after exposure to synthetic sex pheromones and plant volatiles. These findings provide the first evidence that the gene expression of chemosensory genes and olfactory sensitivity to sex pheromones are affected by pre-exposing insects to pheromone compounds and plant volatiles. It helps to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying pheromone activity, and the application of sex pheromones and plant volatiles in mating disruption or mass trapping. PMID:26611815

  20. Cryopreservation of the late stage embryos of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Luo, Li; Pang, Yi; Chen, Qijin; Li, Guanghong

    2006-01-01

    Genetic devolution, genetic drift and contamination are all threats to maintain germplasm stability during mass rearing of many insects. Cryopreservation of beet armworm (Spodoptera exigua) embryos was studied to provide information to improve mass rearing. A series of experiments was conducted on late-stage embryos (45-48 h at 27 degree C) of the beet armyworm, which included evaluation of cryoprotectants (CPAs), their toxicity and glass-forming tendency and optimization of experimental procedures. The results showed that ethylene glycol (EG) was the best CPA with comparatively low toxicity compared to the other six CPAs tested (methanol, 1,3-propanediol, glycerol, 2-amino-1-ethanol, 3-amino-1-propanol 3-methoxy-1 and 2-propanediol). The highest hatching rate of 8.8 degree was attained after freezing with a 3-step loading procedure and a 1-step unloading procedure, but the hatched larvae from frozen-thawed embryos did not actively feed and could not develop to a later stage. This was attributed to injuries from freezing in late stage embryos of S. exigua which had formed midguts. PMID:17256068

  1. Rac1 mediates cytokine-stimulated hemocyte spreading via prostaglandin biosynthesis in the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cell spreading is an integral component of insect hemocytic immune reactions to infections and invasions. Cell spreading is accomplished by cytoskeleton rearrangement, which is activated by three major immune mediators, biogenic monoamines, plasmatocyte-spreading peptide (PSP), and eicosanoids, part...

  2. Cadherin is a functional receptor of bacillus thuringiensis toxin Cry2Aa in the beet armyworm, spodoptera exigua

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins are effective against some insect pests in sprays and transgenic crops, although the evolution of resistance could threaten the long-term efficacy of such Bt use. One strategy to delay resistance to Bt crops is to “pyramid” two or more ...

  3. Characterization of DNA Topoisomerase-1 in Spodoptera exigua for Toxicity Evaluation of Camptothecin and Hydoxy-Camptothecin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanning; He, Weizhi; Yang, Jingjing; Li, Chuanren; Jiang, Hongyun

    2013-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT), a plant alkaloid originally isolated from the native Chinese tree, Camptotheca acuminate, exerts the toxic effect by targeting eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase 1 (DNA Topo1). Besides as potent anti-cancer agents, CPT and its derivatives are now being explored as potential pesticides for insect control. In this study, we assessed their toxicity to an insect homolog, the Topo1 protein from beet armyworms (Spodoptera exigua Hübner), a worldwide pest of many important crops. The S. exigua Topo1 gene contains an ORF of 2790 base pairs that is predicted to encode a polypeptide of 930 amino acids. The deduced polypeptide exhibits polymorphism at residue sites V420, L530, A653 and T729 (numbered according to human Topo1) among insect species, which are predicted to confer sensitivity to CPT. The DNA relaxation activity of this protein was subsequently examined using a truncated form that contained the residues 337–930 and was expressed in bacteria BL21 cells. The purified protein retained the ability to relax double-stranded DNA and was susceptible to CPT and its derivative hydroxy-camptothecin (HCPT) in a dose-dependent manner. The same inhibitory effect was also found on the native Topo1 extracted from IOZCAS-Spex-II cells, a cell line established from beet armyworms. Additionally, CPT and HCPT treatment reduced the steady accumulation of Topo1 protein despite the increased mRNA expression in response to the treatment. Our studies provide information of the S. exigua Topo1 gene and its amino acid polymorphism in insects and uncover some clues about potential mechanisms of CPT toxicity against insect pests. These results also are useful for development of more effective Topo1-targeted CPT insecticides in the future. PMID:23451051

  4. Increased Long-Flight Activity Triggered in Beet Armyworm by Larval Feeding on Diet Containing Cry1Ac Protoxin

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xing Fu; Chen, Jian; Zhang, Lei; Sappington, Thomas W.; Luo, Li Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Evaluating ecological safety and conducting pest risk analysis for transgenic crops are vitally important before their commercial planting. The beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, a long-distance migratory insect pest, is not a direct target of transgenic Cry1Ac-expressing cotton in China, but nevertheless it has recently become an important pest. Migrants leaving their natal field arrive in other appropriate habitat far away in a short time, often followed by larval outbreaks. S. exigua has low susceptibility to Cry1Ac. However, our results from laboratory experiments identified (i) sublethal effects of Cry1Ac protoxin on larval development rate, larval and pupal weight, and adult lifetime fecundity, and (ii) increased long-flight behavior triggered by Cry1Ac which may contribute to larval outbreaks elsewhere. No significant differences in larval mortality, pupation rate, adult emergence rate, longevity, pre-oviposition period, or oviposition period were observed between controls and larvae fed on artificial diet incorporating a low concentration of Cry1Ac protoxin. The negative sublethal effects on some developmental and reproductive traits and lack of effect on others suggest they do not contribute to the observed severity of S. exigua outbreaks after feeding on Cry1Ac cotton. Interestingly, the percentage of long fliers increased significantly when larvae were reared on diet containing either of two low-dose treatments of Cry1Ac, suggesting a possible increased propensity to disperse long distances triggered by Cry1Ac. We hypothesize that negative effects on development and reproduction caused by Cry1Ac in the diet are offset by increased flight propensity triggered by the poor food conditions, thereby improving the chances of escaping adverse local conditions before oviposition. Increased long-flight propensity in turn may amplify the area damaged by outbreak populations. This phenomenon might be common in other migratory insect pests receiving sublethal doses

  5. Differential immunosuppression by Campoletis chlorideae eggs and ichnovirus in larvae of Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera exigua.

    PubMed

    Han, Li-Bin; Yin, Li-Hong; Huang, Ling-Qiao; Wang, Chen-Zhu

    2015-09-01

    The ichneumonid wasp, Campoletis chlorideae Uchida, successfully develops in the cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner), but rarely survives in the beet armyworm Spodoptera exigua (Hübner) due to the encapsulation by host immunity. In this study, we investigated the role of C. chlorideae ichnovirus (CcIV) and eggs in the evasion of the host immune system. Washed eggs of different types, immature, mature, newly laid, or pretreated with protease K, were injected alone or with the calyx fluid containing CcIV into the larvae of H. armigera and S. exigua. In H. armigera, when injected with washed eggs alone, only 9.5% of the mature eggs were encapsulated at 24h post-injection. This is much lower than that of the immature eggs (100%), mature eggs pretreated with protease K (100%) and newly laid eggs (54.4%). No encapsulation was observed when the washed eggs were co-injected with calyx fluid at 24h post-injection. Conversely, the eggs in all treatments were encapsulated in S. exigua. Electron microscopic observations of parasitoid eggs showed structural differences between the surfaces of the mature and other kinds of eggs. The injected CcIV decreased the numbers of host hemocytes and suppressed the spreading ability of plasmatocytes and granulocytes in H. armigera, but had little effect on the hemocytes from S. exigua. In conclusion, the C. chlorideae egg provides a passive protection against encapsulation by itself, and CcIV supplies an active protection through disrupting host immune responses. These coordinated protections are host-specific, implying their role in host range determination. PMID:26183795

  6. Cross-resistance and Inheritance of Resistance to Emamectin Benzoate in Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Che, Wunan; Huang, Jianlei; Guan, Fang; Wu, Yidong; Yang, Yihua

    2015-08-01

    Beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner), is a worldwide pest of many crops. Chemical insecticides are heavily used for its control in China, and serious resistance has been evolved in the field to a variety of insecticides including emamectin benzoate. Through repeated backcrossing to a susceptible strain (WH-S) and selection with emamectin benzoate, the trait conferring resistance to emamectin benzoate in a field-collected population of S. exigua (moderately resistant to emamectin benzoate and strongly resistant to pyrethroids and indoxacarb) was introgressed into WH-S to generate a near-isogenic resistant strain (WH-EB). Compared with WH-S, the WH-EB strain developed a 1,110-fold resistance to emamectin benzoate and a high level of cross-resistance to abamectin (202-fold), with low levels of cross-resistance to cypermethrin (10-fold) and chlorfluazuron (7-fold), but no cross-resistance to representatives of another six different classes of insecticides (chlorantraniliprole, chlorfenapyr, indoxacarb, spinosad, tebufenozide, and chlorpyrifos). Resistance to emamectin benzoate in WH-EB was autosomal, incompletely dominant, and polygenic. Limited cross-resistance in WH-EB indicates that emamectin benzoate can be rotated with other classes of insecticides to which it does not show cross-resistance to delay the evolution of resistance in S. exigua. The incompletely dominant nature of resistance in S. exigua may explain the rapid evolution of resistance to emamectin benzoate in the field, and careful deployment of this chemical within a resistance management program should be considered. PMID:26470348

  7. Testing the joint effects hypothesis of elemental defense using Spodoptera exigua.

    PubMed

    Cheruiyot, Dorothy J; Boyd, Robert S; Moar, William

    2015-02-01

    Metal hyperaccumulation may be an elemental defense, in which high concentrations of a metal in plant tissues decrease herbivore survival or growth rate. The Joint Effects Hypothesis suggests that a combination of metals, or a combination of a metal with an organic compound, may have an enhanced defensive effect. The enhancement may be additive or synergistic: in either case the concentration of a particular metal necessary to provide a defensive benefit for the plant is lowered. We tested the Joint Effects Hypothesis using Spodoptera exigua (beet armyworm) neonates fed artificial diets. Metal + metal experiments utilized diets amended with metal pairs, using four metals commonly hyperaccumulated by plants (Co, Cu, Ni, and Zn). We also conducted metal + organic compound experiments, pairing each metal with nicotine, mustard seed powder, or tannic acid. We tested for joint effects using both lethal (LC20 levels) and sublethal concentrations (10-25 % reduced larval weight) of the chemicals tested. For all experiments, either additive or synergistic effects were found. Of the metal + metal pairs tested, three (Co + Cu, Cu + Zn, and Ni + Zn) were synergistic in lethal concentration tests and only Co + Cu was synergistic in sublethal tests. For metal + organic combination lethal tests, synergism occurred for all combinations except for Co or Ni + nicotine, Ni + mustard seed powder, and Zn + nicotine. For sublethal tests, Zn + all three organic chemicals, Co + mustard seed powder or tannic acid, and Cu + nicotine, were synergistic. These results support the Joint Effects Hypothesis, suggesting that metals combined with other metals or organic compounds may be more effective against herbivores than individual metals. PMID:25712748

  8. Assessment of electron beam-induced abnormal development and DNA damage in Spodoptera litura (F.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Seon-Woo; Koo, Hyun-Na; Kim, Gil-Hah

    2014-03-01

    The armyworm, Spodoptera litura (F.) is a polyphagous and important agricultural pest worldwide. In this study, we examined the effect of electron beam irradiation on developmental stages, reproduction, and DNA damage of S. litura. Eggs (0-24 h old), larvae (3rd instar), pupae (3 days old after pupation), and adults (24 h after emergence) were irradiated with electron beam irradiation of six levels between 30 and 250 Gy. When eggs were irradiated with 100 Gy, egg hatching was completely inhibited. When the larvae were irradiated, the larval period was significantly delayed, depending on the doses applied. At 150 Gy, the fecundity of adults that developed from irradiated pupae was entirely inhibited. However, electron beam irradiation did not induce the instantaneous death of S. litura adults. Reciprocal crosses between irradiated and unirradiated moths demonstrated that females were more radiosensitive than males. We also conducted the comet assay immediately after irradiation and over the following 5 days period. Severe DNA fragmentation in S. litura cells was observed just after irradiation and the damage was repaired during the post-irradiation period in a time-dependent manner. However, at more than 100 Gy, DNA damage was not fully recovered.

  9. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration affects interactions between Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae and two host plant species outdoors

    SciTech Connect

    Caulfield, F.; Bunce, J.A. )

    1994-08-01

    Beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Huebner), larvae were placed on sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) and pigweed (Amaranthus hybridus L.) plants in outdoor chambers in which the plants were growing at either the ambient ([approximately] 350 [mu]l liter[sup [minus]1]) or ambient plus 350 [mu]l liter[sup [minus]1] ([approximately] 700 [mu]l liter[sup [minus]1]) carbon dioxide concentration. A series of experiments was performed to determine if larvae reduced plant growth differently at the two carbon dioxide concentrations in either species and if the insect growth or survival differed with carbon dioxide concentration. Leaf nitrogen, water, starch, and soluble carbohydrate contents were measured to assess carbon dioxide concentration effects on leaf quality. Insect feeding significantly reduced plant growth in sugarbeet plants at 350 [mu]l liter[sup [minus]1] but not at 700 [mu]l liter[sup [minus]1] nor in pigweed at either carbon dioxide concentration. Larval survival was greater on sugarbeet plants at the elevated carbon dioxide concentration. Increased survival occurred only if the insects were at the elevated carbon dioxide concentration and consumed leaf material grown at the elevated concentration. Leaf quality was only marginally affected by growth at elevated carbon dioxide concentration in these experiments. The results indicate that in designing experiments to predict effects of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations on plant-insect interactions, both plants and insects should be exposed to the experimental carbon dioxide concentrations, as well as to as realistic environmental conditions as possible.

  10. Identification of microRNAs by small RNA deep sequencing for synthetic microRNA mimics to control Spodoptera exigua.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu Liang; Huang, Qi Xing; Yin, Guo Hua; Lee, Samantha; Jia, Rui Zong; Liu, Zhi Xin; Yu, Nai Tong; Pennerman, Kayla K; Chen, Xin; Guo, An Ping

    2015-02-25

    Beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, is a major pest of cotton around the world. With the increase of resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin in transgenic cotton plants, there is a need to develop an alternative control approach that can be used in combination with Bt transgenic crops as part of resistance management strategies. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a non-coding small RNA family (18-25 nt), play crucial roles in various biological processes and over-expression of miRNAs has been shown to interfere with the normal development of insects. In this study, we identified 127 conserved miRNAs in S. exigua by using small RNA deep sequencing technology. From this, we tested the effects of 11 miRNAs on larval development. We found three miRNAs, Sex-miR-10-1a, Sex-miR-4924, and Sex-miR-9, to be differentially expressed during larval stages of S. exigua. Oral feeding experiments using synthetic miRNA mimics of Sex-miR-10-1a, Sex-miR-4924, and Sex-miR-9 resulted in suppressed growth of S. exigua and mortality. Over-expression of Sex-miR-4924 caused a significant reduction in the expression level of chitinase 1 and caused abortive molting in the insects. Therefore, we demonstrated a novel approach of using miRNA mimics to control S. exigua development. PMID:25528266

  11. Expression of SNMP1 and SNMP2 genes in antennal sensilla of Spodoptera exigua (Hübner).

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengcheng; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Yang; Wang, Guirong; Dong, Shuanglin

    2014-02-01

    Sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs) are olfactory-specific, two-transmembrane proteins. Previous publications reported that SNMP1 is expressed on the dendrite membrane of pheromone-sensitive neurons in Heliothis virescens and is an essential cofactor for pheromone detection in Drosophila. In this study, we cloned two SNMP genes (GenBank accession nos. JX469106 and JX469107) from the antenna of the beet armyworm moth Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Hübner). These SNMP genes are classified into two highly conserved subclades, indicating their importance in physiological activity of lepidopteran insects. SexiSNMP1 is antenna-specific in male and female adults, while SexiSNMP2 is antenna-abundant but also expressed in other chemosensory tissues, particularly proboscises and maxillary palps of adults both sexes. In situ hybridization revealed that both SNMPs are broadly expressed in long and short trichoid and basiconic sensilla. We infer that SNMP1 and SNMP2 act in the detection of the sex pheromone and general odorants. PMID:24436214

  12. GENETIC MAPPING OF FALL ARMYWORM RESISTANCE AND SALINITY TOLERANCE IN ZOYSIAGRASS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zoysiagrass (Zoysia matrella L.) is a highly drought- and salt-tolerant grass that is grown extensively across the central and southern United States as a turf grass. Zoysiagrass is a tetraploid (2n=4x=40), has a protogynous flowering behavior, and is highly cross-pollinated. In recent years, bree...

  13. Physiological, nutritional and biochemical bases of corn resistance to foliage-feeding fall armyworm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutritional (i.e., total proteins, amino acids, glucose, total non-structural carbohydrates [TNC], amino acids to TNC ratio) and biochemical (i.e., peroxidases and lipoxygenases) properties of 3 corn (Zea mays) germplasm (i.e., inbred lines AB24E and Mp708, and a local selected population FAW7050) w...

  14. Aflatoxin Accumulation in Corn Hybrids in Relation to Whorl Damage by the Fall Armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxin is produced by Aspergillus flavus Link ex Fries and is one of the most potent toxins found in nature. Contamination of corn grain with aflatoxin causes significant losses to farmers each year and is a major impediment to corn production in the southern U.S. Infection of corn grain by A. f...

  15. Baculovirus infection of the armyworm (Lepidoptera:Noctuidae) feeding on spiny- or smooth-edged grass (Festuca spp.) leaf blades

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Susceptibility of the armyworm, Mythimna unipuncta (Haworth), to infection by a baculovirus isolated from a Kentucky armyworm population was compared on two suspected progenitors of tall fescue, Festuca mairei and Festuca arundinacea subsp. fenas, with spiny leaf margins intact or removed to test wh...

  16. Population dynamics and associated factors of cereal aphids and armyworms under global change.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leyun; Hui, Cang; Sandhu, Hardev S; Li, Zhihong; Zhao, Zihua

    2015-01-01

    Studying the impacts of global change, which comprises largely climate and landscape changes, on agricultural pests is crucial for developing sustainable pest management. This research is focused on understanding the factors associated with population dynamics of cereal aphids and armyworms feeding on wheat in Henan province in China from 1987 to 2010. Association between changes in climate (temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity) and agricultural characteristics (wheat proportion, crop diversity, fertilizer input, and wheat yield per unit area) and damage from cereal aphids and armyworms were examined. Cereal aphid damage has been rising, while armyworm damage had no obvious trends, but with strong year-to-year fluctuations. The analysis indicates that the factors most strongly associated with the population dynamics of cereal aphids are fertilizer input and mean temperature in February, while the population dynamics of armyworms is significantly related to precipitation in May. By comparing the characteristics of these two agricultural pests, we identify possible reasons for the disparity between their associated factors, which are related to the differences in their foraging behaviour, host range, migration capacity, and life history. These results may contribute to developing ecologically based pest management for cereal aphids and armyworms under global change. PMID:26689373

  17. Population dynamics and associated factors of cereal aphids and armyworms under global change

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Leyun; Hui, Cang; Sandhu, Hardev S.; Li, Zhihong; Zhao, Zihua

    2015-01-01

    Studying the impacts of global change, which comprises largely climate and landscape changes, on agricultural pests is crucial for developing sustainable pest management. This research is focused on understanding the factors associated with population dynamics of cereal aphids and armyworms feeding on wheat in Henan province in China from 1987 to 2010. Association between changes in climate (temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity) and agricultural characteristics (wheat proportion, crop diversity, fertilizer input, and wheat yield per unit area) and damage from cereal aphids and armyworms were examined. Cereal aphid damage has been rising, while armyworm damage had no obvious trends, but with strong year-to-year fluctuations. The analysis indicates that the factors most strongly associated with the population dynamics of cereal aphids are fertilizer input and mean temperature in February, while the population dynamics of armyworms is significantly related to precipitation in May. By comparing the characteristics of these two agricultural pests, we identify possible reasons for the disparity between their associated factors, which are related to the differences in their foraging behaviour, host range, migration capacity, and life history. These results may contribute to developing ecologically based pest management for cereal aphids and armyworms under global change. PMID:26689373

  18. Preventing falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... worsened. Improving your vision will help reduce falls. Images ... for preventing falls in older people living in the community. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2009, Issue 2. Art. No.: ...

  19. Preventing Falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... from osteoporosis. Lower-body strength exercises and balance exercises can help you prevent falls and avoid the disability that may result from falling. Here are some fall prevention tips from Go4Life : l Have your eyes and hearing tested often. Always wear your glasses when you ...

  20. Tea, coffee, and cocoa as ultraviolet radiation protectants for beet armyworm nucleopolyhedrovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The addition of 1% (wt/v) aqueous extracts of cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) (Malvales: Malvaceae), coffee (Coffea arabica L.) (Gentianales: Rubiaceae), green, and black tea (Camellia sinensis L.) (Ericales: Theaceae) provided excellent ultraviolet (UV) radiation protection for the beet armyworm, Spodo...

  1. Wheat Head Armyworm. True or False: A Tale from the Pacific Northwest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2007 and 2008 large numbers of caterpillars were found that were tentatively identified as wheathead armyworm moths, Faronta diffusa. In 2009, traps baited with a sex attractant, traps with a feeding attractant, and light traps were used to determine the relative abundance and distribution of th...

  2. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ca-resistant Spodoptera exigua lacks expression of one of four Aminopeptidase N genes

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Salvador; Gechev, Tsanko; Bakker, Petra L; Moar, William J; de Maagd, Ruud A

    2005-01-01

    Background Insecticidal toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis bind to receptors on midgut epithelial cells of susceptible insect larvae. Aminopeptidases N (APNs) from several insect species have been shown to be putative receptors for these toxins. Here we report the cloning and expression analysis of four APN cDNAs from Spodoptera exigua. Results Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) was used to construct cDNA libraries of genes that are up-and down-regulated in the midgut of last instar larvae of beet armyworm, S. exigua exposed to B. thuringiensis Cry1Ca toxin. Among the clones from the SSH libraries, cDNA fragments coding for two different APNs were obtained (APN2 and APN4). A similar procedure was employed to compare mRNA differences between susceptible and Cry1Ca resistant S. exigua. Among the clones from this last comparison, cDNA fragments belonging to a third APN (APN1) were detected. Using sequences obtained from the three APN cDNA fragments and degenerate primers for a fourth APN (APN3), the full length sequences of four S. exigua APN cDNAs were obtained. Northern blot analysis of expression of the four APNs showed complete absence of APN1 expression in the resistant insects, while the other three APNs showed similar expression levels in the resistant and susceptible insects. Conclusion We have cloned and characterized four different midgut APN cDNAs from S. exigua. Expression analysis revealed the lack of expression of one of these APNs in the larvae of a Cry1Ca-resistant colony. Combined with previous evidence that shows the importance of APN in the mode of action of B. thuringiensis toxins, these results suggest that the lack of APN1 expression plays a role in the resistance to Cry1Ca in this S. exigua colony. PMID:15978131

  3. Performance of Spodoptera litura Fabricius on different host plants: influence of nitrogen and total phenolics of plants and mid-gut esterase activity of the insect.

    PubMed

    Ghumare, S S; Mukherjee, S N

    2003-08-01

    Five host plants [castor, Ricinus communis (Carolus Linnaeus); cotton, Gossypium hirsutm (Carolus Linnaeus); tomato, Lycopersicum esculentum (Philip Miller); mint, Mentha arvensis (Carolus Linnaeus) and cabbage, Brassica oleracea (Carolus Linnaeus)] belonging to different families were used to study the performance of the Asian armyworm, Spodoptera litura larvae. Highest consumption of food and dry weight gain was observed in larvae fed on castor. Mint did not support optimum larval growth because of low digestibility and low efficiency of conversion of digested food to body matter. Dry weight gain ranged from 26.64 mg on mint to 86.80 mg in castor. These differences tend to be related to nitrogen and total phenolics content of the leaf tissues; however, the most clear-cut correlation is an inverse one between the host plant preference and the ratio of total phenolics to nitrogen in the leaf tissues. Mid-gut esterase activity in larvae showed an increasing trend with the increase in total phenolics: nitrogen ratio in the test plants and the order of mid-gut esterase activity in larvae was mint > cabbage > cotton > tomato > castor. PMID:15248492

  4. Expression and purification of recombinant nattokinase in Spodoptera frugiperda cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxiang; Wang, Xiaoli; Xiong, Shaoling; Zhang, Jing; Cai, Litao; Yang, Yanyan

    2007-10-01

    A recombinant baculovirus, rv-egfp-NK, containing a reporter gene encoding the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), was used to express nattokinase (NK), a fibrinolytic enzyme, in Spodoptera frugiperda (SF-9) cells. The recombinant protein also included a histidine tag for purification using Ni(2+) resins. The recombinant NK, approximately 30 kDa, retained fibrinolytic activity (60 U/ml). The integration of the EGFP expression cassette in the Bac-to-Bac system is thus an effective method for the expression and purification of recombinant NK protein in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. PMID:17581705

  5. Monitoring for exotic Spodoptera species (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trapping studies were conducted in two Florida locations to determine if three Old World Spodoptera Guenée species were present. Commercially-produced lures for S. exempta (Walker), S. littoralis (Boisduval), and S. litura (F.), plus a S. litura lure made by the USDA-APHIS-CPHST laboratory at Otis ...

  6. Pheromonal divergence between two strains of Spodoptera frugiperda

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract- Spodoptera frugiperda consists of two genetically and behaviorally different strains, the corn- and the rice-strain, which seem to be in the process of sympatric speciation. We investigated the role of strain-specific sexual communication as a prezygotic mating barrier between both strains...

  7. Genetics of migratory and invasive pests in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Overview of genetic research on migratory and invasive pests being performed at CMAVE. Emphasis will be on efforts to monitor the movements of fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith)(Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) during its annual migration, model the behavior in order to predict the effect of r...

  8. Efficacy of silk channel injections with insecticides for management of Lepidopteran pests of sweet corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary Lepidopteran pests of sweet corn in Georgia are the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), and the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith). Control of these pests typically requires multiple insecticide applications from first silking until harvest, with commercial growers fre...

  9. Impact of transgenic sweet corn silks to two noctuid pests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eight Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) transgenic sweet corn hybrids were evaluated (with two controls) for their efficacy against two ear-feeding insects; the corn earworm [Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)], and the fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuid...

  10. Cowpea chloroplastic ATP synthase is the source of multiple plant defense elicitors during insect herbivory

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant responses to damage vary dependant upon the nature of the biotic and abiotic stresses. We recently described an elicitor, from Fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) oral secretions (OS) termed inceptin, derived from chloroplastic ATP synthase '-subunit (cATPC) proteins that activate phytohormo...

  11. Field screening of sweet sorghum inbred lines for pest resistance and biomass production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sweet sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] is one of the favorable biofuel feedstocks for ethanol production. Fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)] is one of the most serious foliar-feeding insect pests in sorghum production in the southeastern US states. Sev...

  12. Eliminating host-mediated effects demonstrates Bt maize producing Cry1F has no adverse effects on the parasitoid Cotesia marginiventris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, is an important pest of maize in the United States and many tropical areas in the western hemisphere. In 2001, Herculex I ® (Cry1F) maize was commercially planted in the United States to control Lepidoptera, including S. frugiperda. In 2006, a population of ...

  13. Supplemental control of lepidopterous pests on BT transgenic sweet corn with biologically based spray treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biologically based spray treatments, including nucleopolyhedroviruses, neem, and spinosad, were evaluated as supplemental controls for the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), and corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), on transgenic sweet corn, Zea mays (L.), expressing a Cry1Ab toxi...

  14. Spatial patterns of aflatoxin levels in relation to ear-feeding insect damage in pre-harvest corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Key impediments to increased corn yield and quality in the southeastern US coastal plain region are damage by ear-feeding insects and aflatoxin contamination caused by infection of Aspergillus flavus. Key ear-feeding insects are corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea, fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, m...

  15. Students fall for Fall Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedley, Kara

    2012-02-01

    From Boston to Beijing, thousands of students traveled to San Francisco for the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting. Of those who participated, 183 students were able to attend thanks to AGU's student travel grant program, which assists students with travel costs and seeks to enrich the meeting through ethnic and gender diversity. Students at Fall Meeting enjoyed a variety of programs and activities designed to help them better network with their peers, learn about new fields, and disseminate their research to the interested public. More than 800 students attended AGU's first annual student mixer, sharing drinks and ideas with fellow student members and future colleagues as well as forging new friendships and intellectual relationships.

  16. Synthesis and Antifeedant Activities of Rosin-Based Esters Against Armyworm.

    PubMed

    Li, Liu; Xinyan, Yan; Yanqing, Gao; Xiao-Ping, Rao

    2016-01-01

    A series of rosin based esters have been synthesized from dehydroabietic acid and maleopimaric acid, respectively. Their structures were confirmed by FT-IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Their antifeedant activities against armyworm were examined by leaf plate method. Methyl ester of dehydroabietic acid and maleopimaric acid were crystallized in orthorhombic system with cell dimensions of a = 26.352 [5] Å, b = 6.1020 [12] Å, c = 11.812 [2] Å and a = 7.9216 [11] Å, b = 11.9912 [16] Å, c = 23.425 [3] Å, respectively. They contained classic tricyclic hydrophenanthrene skeleton. The antifeedant results indicated that most rosin-based esters exhibited significant antifeedant activities at a concentration of 0.01 g mL(-1). Their feeding deterrence values were above 70% after 24h. The antifeedant activities for rosin-based esters increased with the growth of chain length of alcohol except (Ia). Some armyworm were found dead during the antifeedant activity test, by which we speculated that these synthetic rosinbased esters had stomach poison activities against armyworm. PMID:26791346

  17. [Characterization of the damage of Spodoptera eridania (Cramer) and Spodoptera cosmioides (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) to structures of cotton plants].

    PubMed

    Santos, Karen B Dos; Meneguim, Ana M; Santos, Walter J Dos; Neves, Pedro M O J; Santos, Rachel B Dos

    2010-01-01

    The cotton plant, Gossypium hirsutum, hosts various pests that damage different structures. Among these pests, Spodoptera cosmioides (Walker) and Spodoptera eridania (Cramer) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) are considered important. The objectives of this study were to characterize and to quantify the potential damage of S. eridania and S. cosmioides feeding on different structures of cotton plants. For this purpose, newly-hatched larvae were reared on the following plant parts: leaf and flower bud; leaf and boll; flower bud or boll; and leaf, flower bud and boll. The survival of S. cosmioides and S. eridania was greater than 80% and 70% for larvae fed on cotton plant parts offered separately or together, respectively. One larva of S. eridania damaged 1.7 flower buds, but did not damage bolls, while one larva of S. cosmioides damaged 5.2 flower buds and 3.0 cotton bolls. Spodoptera eridania and S. cosmioides can be considered species with potential to cause economic damage to cotton plants because they can occur throughout cotton developmental stages causing defoliation and losses of reproductive structures. Therefore, the results validate field observations that these two species of Spodoptera are potential pests for cotton. PMID:20878002

  18. Determination and analysis of the genome sequence of Spodoptera littoralis multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Spodoptera littoralis multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (SpliMNPV), a pathogen of the Egyptian cotton leaf worm Spodoptera littoralis, was subjected to sequencing of its entire DNA genome and bioassay analysis comparing its virulence to that of other baculoviruses. The annotated SpliMNPV genome of...

  19. Fall armyworm and corn earworm resistance in the breeding crosses of maize inbreds with high levels of phytoalexins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to develop maize germplasm with resistance to multiple insect pests and aflatoxin accumulation, a set of reciprocal breeding crosses was made using maize inbred lines with high levels of kauralexins or zealexins. The evaluation of the breeding crosses for insect resistance utilized the rand...

  20. Effects of overexpressing individual lignin biosynthetic enzymes on feeding and growth of corn earworms and fall armyworms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lignin is an important insect resistance component of plants. Enhancing or disrupting the lignin biosynthetic pathway for different bioenergy uses may alter pest resistance. The lignin biosynthetic pathway is complex, and a number of pathway compounds are also involved in the biosynthesis of simpler...

  1. Biocontrol of the oriental armyworm, Mythimna separata, by the tachinid fly, Exorista civilis, is synergized by Cry1Ab protoxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tritrophic interactions between the oriental armyworm Mythimna separata, its larval tachinid parasite, Exorista civilis, and the Cry1Ab protoxin of Bacillus thrunginenis, were examined using a laboratory-based system. Although M. separata sixth (last) instar mortality increased with increasing Cry1A...

  2. A cadherin-like protein influences Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab toxicity in the oriental armyworm, Mythimna separata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A cadherin-like gene associated with larval midgut tissues was cloned from oriental armyworm, Mythimna separata (Walker). The full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) (named Ms-CAD, GenBank accession no. JF951432) was 5642 base pairs (bp) long, with an open reading frame encoding a 1757 amino acid polyp...

  3. 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulphate synthesis and involvement in sulphotransferase reactions in the insect, Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, R E; Phua, K K; Rees, H H

    1982-01-01

    1. Synthesis of 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulphate from ATP and 35SO4(-2) was demonstrated by homogenates of gut. Malpighian tubules and fat body of Spodoptera littoralis. 2. The enzyme system was most active in the gut tissue, and was primarily located in the cytosol fraction of the cell. Gut cytosol preparations were used as a source of the 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulphate generating system for more detailed studies. 3. Maximum synthesis required an incubation mixture containing Tris/HCl buffer (pH 7.5), ATP (20 mM), MgCl2 (13.0 mM) and K2SO4 (3 mM). 4. The specific activity of 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulphate synthesizing activity in gut cytosol increased during development of the sixth instar larva, reaching a peak at day 4. A sudden fall in specific activity was observed in the prepupal stage. 5. 3'-Phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulphate formation is the rate limiting process in the overall sulphation of p-nitrophenol in the gut cytosol preparations from S. littoralis. 6. It is concluded that the properties of the sulphate-activating system in this insect are similar to those reported for vertebrates. PMID:6956335

  4. SPODOBASE : an EST database for the lepidopteran crop pest Spodoptera

    PubMed Central

    Nègre, Vincent; Hôtelier, Thierry; Volkoff, Anne-Nathalie; Gimenez, Sylvie; Cousserans, François; Mita, Kazuei; Sabau, Xavier; Rocher, Janick; López-Ferber, Miguel; d'Alençon, Emmanuelle; Audant, Pascaline; Sabourault, Cécile; Bidegainberry, Vincent; Hilliou, Frédérique; Fournier, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Background The Lepidoptera Spodoptera frugiperda is a pest which causes widespread economic damage on a variety of crop plants. It is also well known through its famous Sf9 cell line which is used for numerous heterologous protein productions. Species of the Spodoptera genus are used as model for pesticide resistance and to study virus host interactions. A genomic approach is now a critical step for further new developments in biology and pathology of these insects, and the results of ESTs sequencing efforts need to be structured into databases providing an integrated set of tools and informations. Description The ESTs from five independent cDNA libraries, prepared from three different S. frugiperda tissues (hemocytes, midgut and fat body) and from the Sf9 cell line, are deposited in the database. These tissues were chosen because of their importance in biological processes such as immune response, development and plant/insect interaction. So far, the SPODOBASE contains 29,325 ESTs, which are cleaned and clustered into non-redundant sets (2294 clusters and 6103 singletons). The SPODOBASE is constructed in such a way that other ESTs from S. frugiperda or other species may be added. User can retrieve information using text searches, pre-formatted queries, query assistant or blast searches. Annotation is provided against NCBI, UNIPROT or Bombyx mori ESTs databases, and with GO-Slim vocabulary. Conclusion The SPODOBASE database provides integrated access to expressed sequence tags (EST) from the lepidopteran insect Spodoptera frugiperda. It is a publicly available structured database with insect pest sequences which will allow identification of a number of genes and comprehensive cloning of gene families of interest for scientific community. SPODOBASE is available from URL: PMID:16796757

  5. Falls and Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... rises with age. Click for more information Falls Lead to Fractures, Trauma Each year, more than 1. ... and injury deaths. Fractures caused by falls can lead to hospital stays and disability. Most often, fall- ...

  6. Home Improvements Prevent Falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Feature: Falls and Older Adults Home Improvements Prevent Falls Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of Contents ... or home modification programs to help older people prevent falls. Check with your local health department, senior ...

  7. Falls in Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... for health care providers. Learn More Falls in Nursing Homes Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... 5 Why do falls occur more often in nursing homes? Falling can be a sign of other ...

  8. A noda-like virus isolated from the sweetpotato pest spodoptera eridania (Cramer) (Lep.; noctuidae)

    PubMed

    Zeddam; Rodriguez; Ravallec; Lagnaoui

    1999-11-01

    A small isometric virus has been isolated from larvae of the sweetpotato pest Spodoptera eridania (Cramer) collected near Pariacoto, Ancash province, Peru. It is designated the Pariacoto virus (PaV). In addition to its high pathogenicity on its natural host Spodoptera eridania, PaV was found to replicate in Spodoptera ochrea (Hampson) larvae but not in Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith) larvae. The size of the viral particle was estimated to be about 30 nm in diameter. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a protein of approximately 40.5 kDa. After agarose gel electrophoresis, the viral genome appeared to be bipartite RNA. Gel immunodiffusion tests showed no serological relationship between PaV and Nodamura virus, the type species for insect nodaviruses. Electron microscopy confirmed that viral replication occurs in the cytoplasm. These properties are similar to those of other members of family Nodaviridae, to which the virus is currently assigned. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10534414

  9. ANALYSIS OF THE 'SPODOPTERA FRUGIPERDA' NUCLEAR POLYHEDROSIS VIRUS GENOME BY RESTRICTION ENDONUCLEASES AND ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Restriction endonuclease analysis was used to differentiate between four strains of Spodoptera frugiperda nuclear polyhedrosis virus from different geographical areas. In addition, partial denaturation was performed, and a partial denaturation map was constructed for the Ohio str...

  10. First microsatellites from Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and their potential use for population genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is the first report of sequence-specific microsatellite markers (SSRs) of Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), an economically important pest of the American continent. We developed 178 microsatellite markers using pyrosequencing, and screened 15 individuals from 8 isofamili...