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Sample records for fallout atom ratios

  1. Resolving Chernobyl vs. global fallout contributions in soils from Poland using Plutonium atom ratios measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ketterer, Michael E; Hafer, Kevin M; Mietelski, Jerzy W

    2004-01-01

    Plutonium in Polish forest soils and the Bór za Lasem peat bog is resolved between Chernobyl and global fallout contributions via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric measurements of 240Pu/230Pu and 241Pu/239Pu atom ratios in previously prepared NdF3 alpha spectrometric sources. Compared to global fallout, Chernobyl Pu exhibits higher abundances of 240Pu and 241Pu. The ratios 240Pu/230Pu and 241Pu/239Pu co-vary and range from 0.186 to 0.348 and 0.0029 to 0.0412, respectively, in forest soils (241Pu/239Pu = 0.2407 x [240Pu/239Pu] - 0.0413; r2 = 0.9924). Two-component mixing models are developed to apportion 239+240Pu and 241Pu activities; various estimates of the percentage of Chernobyl-derived 239+240Pu activity in forest soils range from < 10% to > 90% for the sample set. The 240Pu/230Pu - 241Pu/239Pu atom ratio mixing line extrapolates to estimate 241Pu/239Pu and the 241Pu/239+240Pu activity ratio for the Chernobyl source term (0.123 +/- 0.0007; 83 +/- 5; 1 May 1986). Sample 241Pu activities, calculated using existing alpha spectrometric 239+240Pu activities, and the 240Pu/230Pu and 241Pu/239Pu atom ratios, agree relatively well with previous liquid scintillation spectrometry measurements. Chernobyl Pu is most evident in locations from northeastern Poland. The 241Pu activities and/or the 241Pu/239Pu atom ratios are more sensitive than 240Pu/239Pu or 238Pu/239+240Pu activity ratios at detecting small Chernobyl 239+240Pu inputs, found in southern Poland. The mass spectrometric data show that the 241Pu activity is 40-62% Chernobyl-derived in southern Poland, and 58-96% Chernobyl in northeastern Poland. The Bór za Lasem peat bog (49.42 degrees N, 19.75 degrees E), located in the Orawsko-Nowotarska valley of southern Poland, consists of global fallout Pu. PMID:15023447

  2. Nevada test site fallout atom ratios: /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu and /sup 241/Pu//sup 239/Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, H.G.; Barr, D.W.

    1984-02-01

    The exposure of the population in Utah to external gamma radiation from the fallout from nuclear weapons tests carried out between 1951 and 1958 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) has been reconstructed from recent measurements of /sup 137/Cs and plutonium in soil. The fraction of /sup 137/Cs in the fallout from NTS events was calculated from the total plutonium and the /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu ratios measured in the soil, using the values of 0.180 +- 0.006 and 0.032 +- 0.003 for that ratio in global fallout and NTS fallout, respectively. The total population exposure from NTS events was then calculated on the basis of exposure rates resulting from short-lived radionuclides associated with the /sup 137/Cs at the time of deposition. While the /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu ratio is constant in global fallout, this ratio varies greatly in the fallout from individual events. While the composition of fallout on Utah from NTS events is rather uniform, the Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project is currently reconstructing radiation exposures for locations close to NTS where the fallout may be predominantly from one event. Therefore, the authors compiled the pertinent ratios in order to provide information concerning the exposure resulting from any individual event. The plutonium ratios measured at 30 days postshot were compiled from unpublished values in the archives of the Nuclear Chemistry Division of LLNL and INC-11 of LANL. These ratios are pertinent to fallout data. Dates for each event were taken from a publication by the Nevada Operations Office of the Department of Energy. 3 references.

  3. Identifying Sources of Non-fallout Nuclear Contamination in Hudson River Sediments by Plutonium and Neptunium isotope ratios.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenna, T. C.; Chillrud, S. N.

    2002-12-01

    In an effort to identify and characterize nuclear contaminants released from sources contained within the Hudson River drainage basin, Pu isotopes and 237Np have been measured in a series of sediment cores collected from various locations within the region. During the last several decades, the Hudson River has received input of radioactive contamination from several sources. The first and most significant, has been global fallout, which was a result of atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons primarily by governments of the United States and Former Soviet Union in the 1950s and 1960s. The second, is contamination resulting from reactor releases at the Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant (IPNPP) located on the Hudson River about 35 miles north of New York City. This facility began operation in 1962. A third source of radioactive contamination to the region is contamination resulting from activities at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) located on the Mohawk River, which began operation in 1946. Our research entails identifying different sources of nuclear contamination by measurement of plutonium and neptunium isotopic ratios by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The isotopic composition of a nuclear contaminant is a sensitive indicator of its origin. By comparing the isotopic composition measured in fluvial sediments to mean values reported for global fallout (i.e. 240Pu/239Pu = 0.18 ñ 0.014, 237Np/239Pu = 0.48 ñ 0.07, and 241Pu/239Pu = .00194 ñ 00028) it is possible to identify contaminants as non-fallout in origin. To date, we have analyzed selected samples from 3 sediment cores collected from the following locations: 1) the Mohawk River downstream of KAPL, 2) the Hudson River above its confluence with the Mohawk River, and 3) the lower Hudson River at a location in close proximity to IPNPP. Isotopic analysis of sediments from the Mohawk River indicates contamination that is clearly non-fallout in origin (240Pu/239Pu ranges between 0

  4. Feasibility of using 236U to reconstruct close-in fallout deposition from the Hiroshima atomic bomb.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, A; Kawai, K; Steier, P; Imanaka, T; Hoshi, M; Endo, S; Zhumadilov, K; Yamamoto, M

    2010-10-15

    The first results on the feasibility of using (236)U to reconstruct the level and spatial distribution of close-in fallout deposition from the Hiroshima A-bomb are reported, coupled with the use of global fallout (137)Cs and (239+240)Pu. The results for global fallout (236)U in soil samples (0-30cm) from Ishikawa prefecture showed that the deposition density of (236)U from the global fallout can be accurately evaluated using AMS. All deposited (236)U, (137)Cs and (239+240)Pu appeared to have been recovered using 30-cm cores. It was also noted from the depth profiles for (236)U/(239+240)Pu and (236)U/(137)Cs ratios that the downward behavior of (236)U in the soil was apparently similar to that of (239+240)Pu, while the (137)Cs was liable to be retained in upper layers compared with (236)U and (239+240)Pu. The accumulated levels were 1.78×10(13)atomsm(-2) for (236)U, 4340Bqm(-2) for (137)Cs and 141Bqm(-2) for (239+240)Pu. The ratios of (236)U/(137)Cs and (236)U/(239+240)Pu were (4.10±0.12)×10(9) and (1.26±0.04)×10(11)atomsBq(-1), respectively. Results of (236)U, (137)Cs and (239+240)Pu measurements for the seven soil cores (0-30cm) from Hiroshima were discussed on the basis of ratios of (236)U/(137)Cs and (236)U/(239+240)Pu by comparing with those from the background area in Ishikawa, indicating that the global fallout dominates the current level of (236)U accumulation in soil in the Black-rain area around Hiroshima after the Hiroshima bomb, and the contribution of the close-in fallout (236)U produced by the Hiroshima A-bomb seems difficult to observe. PMID:20797770

  5. Short-term Fallout Radionuclide Ratios and Mass Balance Identify New Suspended Sediments of Channel Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karwan, D. L.; Pizzuto, J. E.; Aalto, R. E.; Marquard, J.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Benthem, A.; Skalak, K.; Levia, D. F., Jr.; Siegert, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Fallout radionuclide ratios, such as the ratio of Beryllium-7 to Lead-210 (7Be/210Pb), are used to determine the age of suspended sediment or fraction of "new" sediment in suspension. In the application of these models new suspended sediment is often assumed to originate from recent landscape surface erosion that is delivered to the stream network. Fallout radionuclide deposition can vary across watersheds and on an event basis in a single watershed due to factors such as storm type, atmospheric height, and storm origin. In the White Clay Creek watershed within the mid-Atlantic USA, single-event deposition of 7Be varies from 15 - 177 Bq m-2 and 210Pb varies from 0 - 10 Bq m-2. 7Be/210Pb ratios vary from 7.9 to 20 in event precipitation and from 0.8 to 12.8 on suspended sediment. "New" sediment varies from 4 - 71% over the course of these events. A computation of the 7Be mass balance during events shows that the majority of 7Be is retained within the catchment. During summer thunderstorms, less than 1% of 7Be deposited on the watershed exits in the stream channel during that event. Therefore, the entirety of the 7Be exiting the watershed on suspended sediment is less than the total activity deposited on the channel in direct precipitation. We attribute this to the new tagging of subaerial fluvial deposits with event precipitation; hence "new" suspended sediment originates from within the channel rather than from surface erosion. During extreme events, such as Hurricane Irene, less of the suspended sediment has been newly tagged by precipitation (4 - 28%) and a larger proportion (3-4%) of the 7Be deposited on the watershed exits during the event. Ongoing work in the Difficult Run watershed in northern Virginia will test the regional applicability of these findings. Water quality efforts to determine the source of sediment using fallout radionuclides must consider the stream channel as well as landscape sources of "new" sediments, particularly during summer

  6. Perturbation in the 240Pu/239Pu global fallout ratio in local sediments following the nuclear accidents at Thule (Greenland) and Palomares (Spain).

    PubMed

    Mitchell, P I; León Vintró, L; Dahlgaard, H; Gascó, C; Sánchez-Cabeza, J A

    1997-08-25

    It is well established that the main source of the plutonium found in marine sediments throughout the Northern Hemisphere is global stratospheric fallout, characterized by a typical 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio of approximately 0.18. Measurement of perturbations in this ratio at various sites which had been subjected to close-in fallout, mainly from surface-based testing (e.g. Bikini Atoll, Nevada test site, Mururoa Atoll), has confirmed the feasibility of using this ratio to distinguish plutonium from different fallout sources. In the present study, the 240Pu/239Pu ratio has been examined in samples of sediment (and soil) collected at Thule (Greenland) and Palomares (Spain), where accidents involving the release and dispersion of plutonium from fractured nuclear weapons occurred in 1968 and 1966, respectively. The 240Pu/239Pu ratio was measured by high-resolution alpha spectrometry and spectral deconvolution, and confirmed in the case of the most active samples by high-resolution X-ray spectrometry. Only samples which displayed plutonium heterogeneities, i.e. hot particles or concentrations well in excess (at least two orders of magnitude) of those expected from global fallout, were selected for analysis. The analytical results showed that at Thule the mean 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio was 0.033 +/- 0.004 (n = 4), while at Palomares the equivalent ratio appeared to be significantly higher at 0.056 +/- 0.003 (n = 4). Both ratios are indicative of low burn-up plutonium and are consistent with those reported for weapons-grade plutonium. It is noteworthy that the mean 238Pu/239Pu activity ratio in the Thule samples, at 0.0150 +/- 0.0017 (n = 4), was also lower than that measured in the Palomares samples, namely, 0.0275 +/- 0.0012 (n = 4). The 241Pu/239Pu ratios were similarly different. Finally, the data show, in contrast to Palomares, that not all of the samples from the Thule accident site were contaminated with plutonium of identical isotopic composition. PMID:9241884

  7. Measurement of the /sup 129/I//sup 131/I ratio in Chernobyl fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Kutschera, W.; Fink, D.; Paul, M.; Hollos, G.; Kaufman, A.

    1986-01-01

    Rainwater collected in the Munich area approximately one week after the Chernobyl reactor accident was investigated for its content of the radioisotopes /sup 129/I (T/sub 1/2/ = 1.6 x 10/sup 7/ y) and /sup 131/I (T/sub 1/2/ = 8.04 d). For the time of release, an isotopic ratio of /sup 129/I//sup 131/I = 19 +- 5 was found. This value was obtained from a gamma-ray activity measurement of /sup 131/I with a GE detector and a concentration measurement of /sup 129/I with accelerator mass spectrometry. From the measured ratio an operating time of the reactor prior to the accident in the vicinity of two years can be estimated, which is in fair agreement with estimates from other long-lived to short-lived radioisotope ratios in the Chernobyl fallout. Some measurements of /sup 131/I activity in thyroids of persons living in the Munich area is also reported.

  8. Fallout from Nuclear Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comar, C. L.

    This booklet, in the series "Understanding the Atom," summarizes the important findings on radioactive fallout for which there is substantial scientific agreement, indicates the areas of disagreement, and lists some answered questions. Sources of fallout, its local and worldwide effects (including movement in the atmosphers), the biological…

  9. Estimation of beta-ray skin dose from exposure to fission fallout from the Hiroshima atomic bomb.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoru; Tanaka, Kenichi; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Imanaka, Tetsuji

    2012-03-01

    Beta-ray skin dose due to the fission fallout from the Hiroshima atomic bomb is potentially related to the epilation in the black rain area. The absorbed dose to the skin from beta-rays emitted by fission fallout has been estimated for an initial ¹³⁷Cs deposition of 1 kBq m⁻² on the ground at 0.5 h after the explosion. The estimated skin dose takes into account both external exposure from fission fallout radionuclides uniformly distributed in 1 mm of soil on the surface of the ground and from a 26 μm thickness of contaminated soil on the skin, using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP-4C. The cumulative skin dose for 1 month after the explosion is taken as the representative value. The estimated skin dose for an initial ¹³⁷Cs deposition of 1 kBq m⁻² was determined to be about 500 mSv. PMID:22042969

  10. Monitoring distant fallout: the role of the Atomic Energy Commission Health and Safety Laboratory during the Pacific tests, with special attention to the events following BRAVO.

    PubMed

    Eisenbud, M

    1997-07-01

    The fallout from test BRAVO in March 1954 has had scientific, political, and social implications that have continued for more than 40 years. The test resulted in serious injury to the people of the Marshall Islands and 23 men on a nearby Japanese fishing boat. Prior to BRAVO there was insufficient appreciation of the dangers of fallout to people living downwind from surface or near-surface explosions of megaton weapons. In the absence of sufficient preplanning for fallout monitoring beyond the test-sites of earlier smaller yield tests, and as a result of the concern of the photographic film manufacturers, the Atomic Energy Commission Health and Safety Laboratory, now the Department of Energy Environmental Measurements Laboratory, was requested to develop a program of fallout surveillance. Beginning with Operation IVY in 1952, these surveys included aerial monitoring of the islands of the mid and western Pacific, as well as establishment of fallout monitoring stations in the United States and abroad. The first evidence of the post-BRAVO fallout was detected by a Atomic Energy Commission Health and Safety Laboratory instrument installed on the atoll of Rongerik, where 28 military personnel were stationed. The results of radiation surveys conducted immediately after BRAVO, as well as the reports of medical investigations, radioecological studies, and dose reconstruction that have been conducted by many laboratories over the years have been available from the beginning in unclassified form. However, from the time of the fallout, and continuing to the present, there have been many unanswered questions about what happened during the hours immediately after the fallout was reported. No formal investigation of the circumstances of the fallout was ever conducted, and there were serious misrepresentations of the facts in the official statements made at the time. PMID:9199215

  11. Survey of plutonium and uranium atom ratios and activity levels in Mortandad Canyon

    SciTech Connect

    Gallaher, B.M.; Efurd, D.W.; Rokop, D.J.; Benjamin, T.M.; Stoker, A.K.

    1997-10-01

    For more than three decades, Mortandad Canyon has been the primary release area of treated liquid radioactive waste from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory). In this survey, six water samples and seven stream sediment samples collected in Mortandad Canyon were analyzed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry to determine the plutonium and uranium activity levels and atom ratios. By measuring the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios, the Laboratory plutonium component was evaluated relative to that from global fallout. Measurements of the relative abundance of {sup 235}U and {sup 236}U were also used to identify non-natural components. The survey results indicate that the Laboratory plutonium and uranium concentrations in waters and sediments decrease relatively rapidly with distance downstream from the major industrial sources. Plutonium concentrations in shallow alluvial groundwater decrease by approximately 1,000-fold along a 3,000-ft distance. At the Laboratory downstream boundary, total plutonium and uranium concentrations were generally within regional background ranges previously reported. Laboratory-derived plutonium is readily distinguished from global fallout in on-site waters and sediments. The isotopic ratio data indicate off-site migration of trace levels of Laboratory plutonium in stream sediments to distances approximately two miles downstream of the Laboratory boundary.

  12. Survey of plutonium and uranium atom ratios and activity levels in Mortandad Canyon

    SciTech Connect

    Gallaher, B.M.; Benjamin, T.M.; Rokop, D.J.; Stoker, A.K.

    1997-09-22

    For more than three decades Mortandad Canyon has been the primary release area of treated liquid radioactive waste from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory). In this survey, six water samples and seven stream sediment samples collected in Mortandad Canyon were analyzed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) to determine the plutonium and uranium activity levels and atom ratios. Be measuring the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios, the Laboratory plutonium component was evaluated relative to that from global fallout. Measurements of the relative abundance of {sup 235}U and {sup 236}U were also used to identify non-natural components. The survey results indicate the Laboratory plutonium and uranium concentrations in waters and sediments decrease relatively rapidly with distance downstream from the major industrial sources. Plutonium concentrations in shallow alluvial groundwater decrease by approximately 1000 fold along a 3000 ft distance. At the Laboratory downstream boundary, total plutonium and uranium concentrations were generally within regional background ranges previously reported. Laboratory derived plutonium is readily distinguished from global fallout in on-site waters and sediments. The isotopic ratio data indicates off-site migration of trace levels of Laboratory plutonium in stream sediments to distances approximately two miles downstream of the Laboratory boundary.

  13. Global fallout Pu recorded in lacustrine sediments in Lake Hongfeng, SW China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian; Wu, Fengchang; Yamada, Masatoshi; Liao, Haiqing; Liu, Congqiang; Wan, Guojiang

    2008-03-01

    Studies on the distribution and isotope compositions of fallout Pu are important for source characterization of possible future non-fallout Pu contamination in aquatic environments, and useful for dating of recent sediments to understand the pollution history of environmental contaminants. We present the historical record of atmospheric Pu fallout reconstructed from a sediment core from Lake Hongfeng, China. The Pu activity profile was in agreement with the 137Cs profile. Inventories were 50.7 Bq m(-2) for 239+240Pu and 1586 Bq m(-2) for 137Cs. The average 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio was 0.185+/-0.009, indicating that Pu originated from global stratospheric fallout rather than from direct tropospheric or close-in fallout from the Chinese nuclear testing conducted in the 1970s. Our data suggested that Lake Hongfeng would be an ideal setting for monitoring atmospheric fallout and environmental changes in this region. PMID:17651874

  14. Pu-239 and Pu-240 inventories and Pu-240/ Pu-239 atom ratios in the water column off Sanriku, Japan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Masatoshi; Zheng, Jian; Aono, Tatsuo

    2013-04-01

    -bottom) was 69.8 Bq/m2. This was significantly higher than the expected cumulative deposition density of atmospheric global fallout. The Pu-240/Pu-239 atom ratios were 0.22 in the surface water and increased gradually with depth reaching 0.26 at the 5000 m depth. The obtained Pu-240/Pu-239 atom ratios were higher than the mean global fallout ratio of 0.18. These high atom ratios proved the existence of close-in tropospheric fallout Pu from the Pacific Proving Grounds in the Marshall Islands.

  15. Short-term Fallout Radionuclide Ratios and Mass Balance Identify New Suspended Sediments of Channel Origin and Importance of Catchment Flowpath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karwan, Diana; Pizzuto, James; Aalto, Rolf; Marquard, Julia; Aufdenkampe, Anthony; Harpold, Adrian; Benthem, Adam; Skalak, Katherine; Levia, Delphis; Siegert, Courtney

    2016-04-01

    Fallout radionuclides and their ratios, such as beryllium-7 (7Be) and lead-210 (210Pb), are used to determine suspended sediment source and age in catchments. The ratio of beryllium-7 to lead-210 (7Be/210Pb) on suspended sediment has been used to estimate the fraction of "new" sediment in suspension. In the application of this model, "new" suspended sediment is often assumed to originate from recent landscape surface erosion that is delivered to the stream network. Fallout radionuclide deposition can vary across watersheds and on an event basis in a single watershed due to factors such as storm type, atmospheric height, and storm origin. In the White Clay Creek watershed within the mid-Atlantic USA, single-event deposition of 7Be varies from 15 - 177 Bq m-2 and 210Pb varies from 0 - 10 Bq m-2. 7Be/210Pb ratios vary from 7.9 to 17 within event precipitation and from 0.8 to 12.8 on suspended sediment. "New" sediment varies from 6 - 100% over the course of these events. 7Be mass balance during events shows that the majority of 7Be is retained within the catchment and not exported on suspended sediment. During summer thunderstorms, less than 1% of 7Be deposited on the watershed exits the stream channel. By comparing this flux with the direct channel interception of 7Be deposition in precipitation and throughfall we can determine the minimum amount of 7Be leaving the watershed that could occur in the absence of surface erosion. For example in summer thunderstorms, the entirety of the 7Be exiting the watershed on suspended sediment is less than the total activity deposited on the channel in direct precipitation. Channel-intercepted fallout radionuclides can exit the catchment by multiple mechanisms including the tagging of subaerial fluvial deposits with event precipitation; hence "new" suspended sediment originates from within the channel rather than from surface erosion. During extreme events, such as Hurricane Irene, less of the suspended sediment has been newly

  16. Radioactive fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, C.S.; Harvey, T.F.; Peterson, K.R.

    1985-12-01

    Potential radiation doses from several scenarios involving nuclear attack on an unsheltered United States population are calculated for local, intermediate time scale and long-term fallout. Dose estimates are made for both a normal atmosphere and an atmosphere perturbed by smoke produced by massive fires. A separate section discusses the additional doses from nuclear fuel facilities, were they to be targeted in an attack. Finally, in an appendix the direct effects of fallout on humans are considered. These include effects of sheltering and biological repair of damage from chronic doses. 21 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Sediment core record of global fallout and Bikini close-in fallout Pu in Sagami Bay, Western Northwest Pacific margin.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2004-07-01

    The total 239-240Pu activity and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio in the sediments in Sagami Bay of the western Northwest Pacific margin were investigated using ICP-MS with a shield torch system. 239+240Pu inventories in the examined sediment cores were found to be much higher than those predicted from atmospheric global fallout (42 MBq/km2) at the same latitude. In addition, elevated 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios ranging from 0.22 to 0.28 were observed in the sediment samples. On the basis of the vertical profiles of 239+240Pu and characterized 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in a sediment core collected in the center of Sagami Bay, we identified two distinct sources of fallout Pu in the bay: the global stratospheric fallout with characteristic 240Pu/239Pu ratio of 0.18 and the transported close-in fallout derived from Bikini and Enewetak surface nuclear weapon test series in the 1950s. We propose that the Pu transportation was mainly due to oceanic processes (for example, through the North Equatorial Current and the Kuroshio Current). Using a two fallout end-member model, we find that the contribution of Bikini close-in fallout Pu ranged from 44 to 59% in Sagami Bay sediments. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that Pu contamination, which originated from Bikini and Enewetak nuclear weapon test series in the 1950s, has extended westwards as far as the Japanese coast. PMID:15296298

  18. Determination of Plutonium Activity Concentrations and 240Pu/239Pu Atom Ratios in Brown Algae (Fucus distichus) Collected from Amchitka Island, Alaska.

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, T F; Brown, T A; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R E; Kehl, S R

    2005-05-02

    Plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) and plutonium-240 ({sup 240}Pu) activity concentrations and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios are reported for Brown Algae (Fucus distichus) collected from the littoral zone of Amchitka Island (Alaska) and at a control site on the Alaskan peninsula. Plutonium isotope measurements were performed in replicate using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). The average {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio observed in dried Fucus d. collected from Amchitka Island was 0.227 {+-} 0.007 (n=5) and compares with the expected {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio in integrated worldwide fallout deposition in the Northern Hemisphere of 0.1805 {+-} 0.0057 (Cooper et al., 2000). In general, the characteristically high {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu content of Fucus d. analyzed in this study appear to indicate the presence of a discernible basin-wide secondary source of plutonium entering the marine environment. Of interest to the study of plutonium source terms within the Pacific basin are reports of elevated {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios in fallout debris from high-yield atmospheric nuclear tests conducted in the Marshall Islands during the 1950s (Diamond et al., 1960), the wide range of {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio values (0.19 to 0.34) observed in sea water, sediments, coral and other environmental media from the North Pacific Ocean (Hirose et al., 1992; Buesseler, 1997) and updated estimates of the relative contributions of close-in and intermediate fallout deposition on oceanic inventories of radionuclidies, especially in the Northern Pacific Ocean (Hamilton, 2004).

  19. THE ATOMIC WEIGHTS COMMISSION AND ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCE RATIO DETERMINATIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2005-08-07

    Following Thomson's discovery of stable isotopes in non-radioactive chemical elements, the derivation of atomic weight values from mass spectrometric measurements of isotopic abundance ratios moved very slowly. Forty years later, only 3 1/2 % of the recommended values were based on mass spectrometric measurements and only 38% in the first half century. It might be noted that two chemical elements (tellurium and mercury) are still based on chemical measurements, where the atomic weight value calculated from the relative isotopic abundance measurement either agrees with the value from the chemical measurement or the atomic weight value calculated from the relative isotopic abundance measurement falls within the uncertainty of the chemical measurement of the atomic weight. Of the 19 chemical elements, whose atomic weight is based on non-corrected relative isotopic abundance measurements, five of these are two isotope systems (indium, iridium, lanthanum, lutetium and tantalum) and one is a three-isotope system (oxygen).

  20. 135Cs activity and 135Cs/137Cs atom ratio in environmental samples before and after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guosheng; Tazoe, Hirofumi; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    (135)Cs/(137)Cs is a potential tracer for radiocesium source identification. However, due to the challenge to measure (135)Cs, there were no (135)Cs data available for Japanese environmental samples before the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident. It was only 3 years after the accident that limited (135)Cs values could be measured in heavily contaminated environmental samples. In the present study, activities of (134)Cs, (135)Cs, and (137)Cs, along with their ratios in 67 soil and plant samples heavily and lightly contaminated by the FDNPP accident were measured by combining γ spectrometry with ICP-MS/MS. The arithmetic means of the (134)Cs/(137)Cs activity ratio (1.033 ± 0.006) and (135)Cs/(137)Cs atom ratio (0.334 ± 0.005) (decay corrected to March 11, 2011), from old leaves of plants collected immediately after the FDNPP accident, were confirmed to represent the FDNPP derived radiocesium signature. Subsequently, for the first time, trace (135)Cs amounts before the FDNPP accident were deduced according to the contribution of global and FDNPP accident-derived fallout. Apart from two soil samples with a tiny global fallout contribution, contributions of global fallout radiocesium in other soil samples were observed to be 0.338%-52.6%. The obtained (135)Cs/(137)Cs database will be useful for its application as a geochemical tracer in the future. PMID:27052481

  1. 135Cs activity and 135Cs/137Cs atom ratio in environmental samples before and after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guosheng; Tazoe, Hirofumi; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    135Cs/137Cs is a potential tracer for radiocesium source identification. However, due to the challenge to measure 135Cs, there were no 135Cs data available for Japanese environmental samples before the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident. It was only 3 years after the accident that limited 135Cs values could be measured in heavily contaminated environmental samples. In the present study, activities of 134Cs, 135Cs, and 137Cs, along with their ratios in 67 soil and plant samples heavily and lightly contaminated by the FDNPP accident were measured by combining γ spectrometry with ICP-MS/MS. The arithmetic means of the 134Cs/137Cs activity ratio (1.033 ± 0.006) and 135Cs/137Cs atom ratio (0.334 ± 0.005) (decay corrected to March 11, 2011), from old leaves of plants collected immediately after the FDNPP accident, were confirmed to represent the FDNPP derived radiocesium signature. Subsequently, for the first time, trace 135Cs amounts before the FDNPP accident were deduced according to the contribution of global and FDNPP accident-derived fallout. Apart from two soil samples with a tiny global fallout contribution, contributions of global fallout radiocesium in other soil samples were observed to be 0.338%–52.6%. The obtained 135Cs/137Cs database will be useful for its application as a geochemical tracer in the future. PMID:27052481

  2. 135Cs activity and 135Cs/137Cs atom ratio in environmental samples before and after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guosheng; Tazoe, Hirofumi; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2016-04-01

    135Cs/137Cs is a potential tracer for radiocesium source identification. However, due to the challenge to measure 135Cs, there were no 135Cs data available for Japanese environmental samples before the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident. It was only 3 years after the accident that limited 135Cs values could be measured in heavily contaminated environmental samples. In the present study, activities of 134Cs, 135Cs, and 137Cs, along with their ratios in 67 soil and plant samples heavily and lightly contaminated by the FDNPP accident were measured by combining γ spectrometry with ICP-MS/MS. The arithmetic means of the 134Cs/137Cs activity ratio (1.033 ± 0.006) and 135Cs/137Cs atom ratio (0.334 ± 0.005) (decay corrected to March 11, 2011), from old leaves of plants collected immediately after the FDNPP accident, were confirmed to represent the FDNPP derived radiocesium signature. Subsequently, for the first time, trace 135Cs amounts before the FDNPP accident were deduced according to the contribution of global and FDNPP accident-derived fallout. Apart from two soil samples with a tiny global fallout contribution, contributions of global fallout radiocesium in other soil samples were observed to be 0.338%–52.6%. The obtained 135Cs/137Cs database will be useful for its application as a geochemical tracer in the future.

  3. Plutonium and Uranium Atom Ratios and Activity Levels in Cochiti Lake Bottom Sediments Provided by Pueblo de Cochiti

    SciTech Connect

    Gallaher, B.M.; Efurd, D.W.; Rokop, D.J.; Benjamin, T.M.

    1999-05-01

    Historical operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory have contaminated stream sediments with plutonium and other radionuclides. A small portion of these contaminated sediments has been carried by floods into the Rio Grande drainage system, eventually to be trapped by Cochiti Lake located on Pueblo de Cochiti lands approximately 8 km downstream of the Laboratory. In this study, lake bottom sediment samples provided by the Pueblo de Cochiti were analyzed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry to determine plutonium and uranium activity levels and isotopic atom ratios. This specialized analytical method allows us to take isotopic fingerprints of radionuclides found in the sediment and to determine how much plutonium and uranium came from the Laboratory and how much was deposited by worldwide fallout or is natural. Two distinct types of samples were processed: segments of a continuous vertical core of the entire accumulated sediment sequence and other samples from across the lake bottom at the water/sediment interface. Based on measurement of the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio, Laboratory-derived plutonium is present in eight of nine samples at the core site. On a depth-weighted basis, approximately one-half of the {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu came from early operations at the Laboratory; the remaining plutonium came from fallout dispersed by above-ground nuclear tests. In contrast to the core site, the samples from the other locations showed little or no evidence of Laboratory-derived plutonium, with more than 90 percent of the plutonium attributable to fallout. The overall amount of plutonium in all the samples is of the same magnitude as other reservoirs in the region. The net increase in plutonium over upstream reservoirs unaffected by Laboratory activities is a maximum of 0.014 pCi/g or 3.5 times. All of the samples reflect natural uranium compositions. Laboratory-derived uranium is not identifiable, presumably because the sediment contains abundant

  4. Valence atom with bohmian quantum potential: the golden ratio approach

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The alternative quantum mechanical description of total energy given by Bohmian theory was merged with the concept of the golden ratio and its appearance as the Heisenberg imbalance to provide a new density-based description of the valence atomic state and reactivity charge with the aim of clarifying their features with respect to the so-called DFT ground state and critical charge, respectively. Results The results, based on the so-called double variational algorithm for chemical spaces of reactivity, are fundamental and, among other issues regarding chemical bonding, solve the existing paradox of using a cubic parabola to describe a quadratic charge dependency. Conclusions Overall, the paper provides a qualitative-quantitative explanation of chemical reactivity based on more than half of an electronic pair in bonding, and provide new, more realistic values for the so-called “universal” electronegativity and chemical hardness of atomic systems engaged in reactivity (analogous to the atoms-in-molecules framework). PMID:23146157

  5. Pu isotopes in soils collected downwind from Lop Nor: regional fallout vs. global fallout

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Wenting; Ni, Youyi; Guo, Qiuju; Zheng, Jian; Uchida, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    For the first time, soil core samples from the Jiuquan region have been analyzed for Pu isotopes for radioactive source identification and radiological assessment. The Jiuquan region is in downwind from the Lop Nor Chinese nuclear test (CNT) site. The high Pu inventories (13 to 546 Bq/m2) in most of the sampling locations revealed that this region was heterogeneously contaminated by the regional fallout Pu from the CNTs. The contributions of the CNTs to the total Pu in soils were estimated to be more than 40% in most cases. The 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in the soils ranged from 0.059 to 0.186 with an inventory-weighted average of 0.158, slightly lower than that of global fallout. This atom ratio could be considered as a mixed fingerprint of Pu from the CNTs. In addition, Pu in soils of Jiuquan region had a faster downward migration rate compared with other investigated places in China. PMID:26184740

  6. Pu isotopes in soils collected downwind from Lop Nor: regional fallout vs. global fallout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Wenting; Ni, Youyi; Guo, Qiuju; Zheng, Jian; Uchida, Shigeo

    2015-07-01

    For the first time, soil core samples from the Jiuquan region have been analyzed for Pu isotopes for radioactive source identification and radiological assessment. The Jiuquan region is in downwind from the Lop Nor Chinese nuclear test (CNT) site. The high Pu inventories (13 to 546 Bq/m2) in most of the sampling locations revealed that this region was heterogeneously contaminated by the regional fallout Pu from the CNTs. The contributions of the CNTs to the total Pu in soils were estimated to be more than 40% in most cases. The 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in the soils ranged from 0.059 to 0.186 with an inventory-weighted average of 0.158, slightly lower than that of global fallout. This atom ratio could be considered as a mixed fingerprint of Pu from the CNTs. In addition, Pu in soils of Jiuquan region had a faster downward migration rate compared with other investigated places in China.

  7. Analysis of actinides in an ombrotrophic peat core - evidence of post-depositional migration of fallout radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinto, Francesca; Hrnecek, Erich; Krachler, Michael; Shotyk, William; Steier, Peter; Winkler, Stephan R.

    2013-04-01

    Plutonium (239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu) and uranium (236U, 238U) isotopes were analyzed in an ombrotrophic peat core from the Black Forest, Germany, representing the last 80 years of atmospheric deposition. The reliable determination of these isotopes at ultra-trace levels was possible using ultra-clean laboratory procedures and accelerator mass spectrometry. The 240Pu/239Pu isotopic ratios are constant along the core with a mean value of 0.19 ±0.02 (N = 32). This result is consistent with the acknowledged average 240Pu/239Pu isotopic ratio from global fallout in the Northern Hemisphere. The global fallout origin of Pu is confirmed by the corresponding 241Pu/239Pu (0.0012 ±0.0005) and 242Pu/239Pu (0.004 ± 0.001) isotopic ratios. The identification of the Pu isotopic composition characteristic for global fallout in peat layers pre-dating the period of atmospheric atom bomb testing (AD 1956 - AD 1980) is a clear evidence of the migration of Pu downwards the peat profile. The maximum of global fallout derived 236U is detected in correspondence to the age/depth layer of maximum stratospheric fallout (AD 1963). This finding demonstrates that the 236U bomb peak can be successfully used as an independent chronological marker complementing the 210Pb dating of peat cores. The profiles of the global fallout derived 236U and 239Pu are compared with those of 137Cs and 241Am. As typical of ombrothrophic peat, the temporal fallout pattern of 137Cs is poorly retained. Similarly like for Pu, post-depositional migration of 241Am in peat layers preceding the era of atmospheric nuclear tests is observed.

  8. Plutonium isotope ratio variations in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Robert E; La Mont, Stephen P; Eisele, William F; Fresquez, Philip R; Mc Naughton, Michael; Whicker, Jeffrey J

    2010-12-14

    Historically, approximately 12,000 TBq of plutonium was distributed throughout the global biosphere by thermo nuclear weapons testing. The resultant global plutonium fallout is a complex mixture whose {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio is a function of the design and yield of the devices tested. The average {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio in global fallout is 0.176 + 014. However, the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio at any location may differ significantly from 0.176. Plutonium has also been released by discharges and accidents associated with the commercial and weapons related nuclear industries. At many locations contributions from this plutonium significantly alters the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios from those observed in global fallout. We have measured the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios in environmental samples collected from many locations in North America. This presentation will summarize the analytical results from these measurements. Special emphasis will be placed on interpretation of the significance of the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios measured in environmental samples collected in the Arctic and in the western portions of the United States.

  9. Application of the ORIGEN Fallout Analysis Tool and the DELFIC Fallout Planning Tool to National Technical Nuclear Forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Jodoin, Vincent J; Lee, Ronald W; Peplow, Douglas E.; Lefebvre, Jordan P

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this project was to provide a robust fallout analysis and planning tool for the National Technical Nuclear Forensics interagency ground sample collection team. Their application called for a fast-running, portable mission-planning tool for use in response to emerging improvised nuclear device (IND) post-detonation situations. The project met those goals by research and development of models to predict the physical, chemical, and radiological properties of fallout debris. ORNL has developed new graphical user interfaces for two existing codes, the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation (ORIGEN) code and the Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC). ORIGEN is a validated, radionuclide production and decay code that has been implemented into the Fallout Analysis Tool to predict the fallout source term nuclide inventory after the detonation of an IND. DELFIC is a validated, physics-based, research reference fallout prediction software package. It has been implemented into the Fallout Planning Tool and is used to predict the fractionated isotope concentrations in fallout, particle sizes, fractionation ratios, dose rate, and integrated dose over the planned collection routes - information vital to ensure quality samples for nuclear forensic analysis while predicting dose to the sample collectors. DELFIC contains a particle activity module, which models the radiochemical fractionation of the elements in a cooling fireball as they condense into and onto particles to predict the fractionated activity size distribution for a given scenario. This provides the most detailed physics-based characterization of the fallout source term phenomenology available in an operational fallout model.

  10. Radioanalytical studies of fallout 63Ni.

    PubMed

    Holm, E; Roos, P; Skwarzec, B

    1992-01-01

    Fallout of Nickel-63 (T1/2 = 100 a) produced in small amounts at nuclear weapon tests following the neutron activation of weapon construction material was investigated by studying carpets of lichen collected during 1961 to 1988 at the Lake Rogen district in central Sweden (62.3 degrees N, 12.4 degrees E). The maximal level of 63Ni in the lichen carpet, which occurred in 1964, was about 0.6 Bq kg-1, dry weight, and decreased to 0.1 Bq kg-1 in 1988. The deposition pattern for 63Ni was similar to other fallout radionuclides such as 137Cs, 90Sr and 239 + 240Pu. The concentrations of stable Ni were relatively constant at 0.5 to 1.0 microgram g-1 throughout the years resulting in, for example, a specific activity (63Ni/stable Ni) of 0.5 Bq mg-1 in 1964 and 0.1 Bq mg-1 in 1988. The total area content of 63Ni was estimated to be 1.0 Bq m-2 and the activity ratio 63Ni/60Co was estimated to be 0.03 in 1966. The Chernobyl accident in April 1986 did not significantly increase the levels of 63Ni. For the measurement of these extremely low-levels of 63Ni, 200 g of dry material (about 1 kg fresh) were ashed and leached with aqua regia after hydroxides had been precipitated with ammonia, leaving Ni in the aqueous phase. Nickel was extracted as a dimethylglyoxime complex by chloroform and back-extracted with HCl. Finally, Ni was electroplated onto copper discs from an ammonium sulfate medium at high pH. The radiochemical yield was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry of stable Ni before and after electrodeposition.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1310303

  11. Estimates of doses from global fallout.

    PubMed

    Bouville, André; Simon, Steven L; Miller, Charles W; Beck, Harold L; Anspaugh, Lynn R; Bennett, Burton G

    2002-05-01

    This paper summarizes information about external and internal doses resulting from global fallout and presents preliminary estimates of doses resulting from intermediate fallout in the contiguous United States. Most of the data on global fallout were extracted from the reports of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, in which the radiation exposures from fallout have been extensively reviewed at regular intervals. United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation estimated the average effective doses received by the world's population before 2000 to be about 0.4 mSv from external irradiation and 0.6 mSv from internal irradiation, the main radionuclide contributing to the effective dose being 137Cs. Effective doses received beyond 2000 result mainly from the environmentally mobile, long-lived 14C and amount to about 2.5 mSv summed over present and future generations. Specific information about the doses from fallout received by the United States population is based on the preliminary results of a study requested by the U.S. Congress and conducted jointly by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute. Separate calculations were made for the tests conducted at the Nevada Test Site and for the high-yield tests conducted mainly by the United States and the former Soviet Union at sites far away from the contiguous United States (global tests). The estimated average doses from external irradiation received by the United States population were about 0.5 mGy for Nevada Test Site fallout and about 0.7 mGy for global fallout. These values vary little from one organ or tissue of the body to another. In contrast, the average doses from internal irradiation vary markedly from one organ or tissue to another; estimated average thyroid doses to children born in 1951 were about 30 mGy from Nevada Test Site fallout and about 2 mGy from global fallout. PMID:12003019

  12. 137Cs, 239+240Pu and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in the surface waters of the western North Pacific Ocean, eastern Indian Ocean and their adjacent seas.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masatoshi; Zheng, Jian; Wang, Zhong-Liang

    2006-07-31

    Surface seawater samples were collected along the track of the R/V Hakuho-Maru cruise (KH-96-5) from Tokyo to the Southern Ocean. The (137)Cs activities were determined for the surface waters in the western North Pacific Ocean, the Sulu and Indonesian Seas, the eastern Indian Ocean, the Bay of Bengal, the Andaman Sea, and the South China Sea. The (137)Cs activities showed a wide variation with values ranging from 1.1 Bq m(-3) in the Antarctic Circumpolar Region of the Southern Ocean to 3 Bq m(-3) in the western North Pacific Ocean and the South China Sea. The latitudinal distributions of (137)Cs activity were not reflective of that of the integrated deposition density of atmospheric global fallout. The removal rates of (137)Cs from the surface waters were roughly estimated from the two data sets of Miyake et al. [Miyake Y, Saruhashi K, Sugimura Y, Kanazawa T, Hirose K. Contents of (137)Cs, plutonium and americium isotopes in the Southern Ocean waters. Pap Meteorol Geophys 1988;39:95-113] and this study to be 0.016 yr(-1) in the Sulu and Indonesian Seas, 0.033 yr(-1) in the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea, and 0.029 yr(-1) in the South China Sea. These values were much lower than that in the coastal surface water of the western Northwest Pacific Ocean. This was likely due to less horizontal and vertical mixing of water masses and less scavenging. (239+240)Pu activities and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios were also determined for the surface waters in the western North Pacific Ocean, the Sulu and Indonesian Seas and the South China Sea. The (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios ranged from 0.199+/-0.026 to 0.248+/-0.027 on average, and were significantly higher than the global stratospheric fallout ratio of 0.18. The contributions of the North Pacific Proving Grounds close-in fallout Pu were estimated to be 20% for the western North Pacific Ocean, 39% for the Sulu and Indonesian Seas and 42% for the South China Sea by using the two end-member mixing model. The higher (240)Pu/(239)Pu

  13. C12/C13-ratio determination in nanodiamonds by atom-probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Josiah B; Isheim, Dieter; Floss, Christine; Seidman, David N

    2015-12-01

    The astrophysical origins of ∼ 3 nm-diameter meteoritic nanodiamonds can be inferred from the ratio of C12/C13. It is essential to achieve high spatial and mass resolving power and minimize all sources of signal loss in order to obtain statistically significant measurements. We conducted atom-probe tomography on meteoritic nanodiamonds embedded between layers of Pt. We describe sample preparation, atom-probe tomography analysis, 3D reconstruction, and bias correction. We present new data from meteoritic nanodiamonds and terrestrial standards and discuss methods to correct isotopic measurements made with the atom-probe tomograph. PMID:26095824

  14. Determination of Elemental Ratio in an Atomic Column by Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Haruta, Mitsutaka; Hosaka, Yoshiteru; Ichikawa, Noriya; Saito, Takashi; Shimakawa, Yuichi; Kurata, Hiroki

    2016-07-26

    Atomic-resolution quantification of the elemental ratio of Fe to Mn at the octahedral and tetrahedral sites in brownmillerite Ca2Fe1.07Mn0.93O5 was determined using electron energy-loss spectroscopy combined with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. The combined techniques revealed that oversampling of the spectral imaging data yielded a spatially resolved area that very nearly reflects atomic resolution (∼1.2 Å radius). The average experimental ratios of Fe to Mn within this region were 17.5:82.5 for the octahedral sites and 81.6:18.4 for the tetrahedral sites. The elemental ratio in an octahedral atomic column was successfully extracted by estimating the mixing of signals from nearest neighbor columns. The results indicated that the ratio of Fe to Mn was 13:87 at the octahedral site, which is in good agreement with the results of neutron diffraction analysis. In addition, the uncertainty of experimental results obtained by using an average 1.2 Å radius was less than 10% at octahedral sites, depending on the sample thickness. In contrast, the experimental error due to dechanneling of incident electrons was larger at the tetrahedral sites. This experimental procedure has wide application for determining the spatially resolved composition ratio of elements in perovskite-like compounds. PMID:27341006

  15. Variations of 129I in the atmospheric fallout of Tokyo, Japan: 1963-2003.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Chiaki; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Uchida, Yuka; Igarashi, Yasuhito; Aoyama, Michio; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2012-11-01

    Atmospheric fallout samples collected from Tokyo between 1963 and 2003 were analyzed using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in order to determine (129)I/(127)I ratios and to examine the deposition rate of (129)I and its secular variation in Tokyo. The (129)I/(127)I ratios in the atmosphere during 1963-1977 ranged from 1 × 10(-8) to 2 × 10(-8). This is roughly 4 orders of magnitude higher than pre-atomic levels, possibly due to atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. The calculated monthly atmospheric deposition rates of (129)I differed from those produced by nuclear fallout of (90)Sr and (137)Cs, indicating that the variations in (129)I deposition are not influenced exclusively by either nuclear bomb testing or by the Chernobyl accident. After 1978, high (129)I depositions (up to 0.13 mBq/m(2)/month) were observed. The (129)I depositions started to increase markedly at the latter half of the 1970s. The secular variation of the estimated annual (129)I deposition in Tokyo showed a close relationship between the annual atmospheric discharge of (129)I from the Tokai Reprocessing plant. Therefore, the atmospheric fallout collected from Tokyo after the late 1970s is influenced primary by the (129)I discharge from the Tokai Reprocessing plant. PMID:22694935

  16. Branching ratios for the decay of n = 3 hydrogen atoms in axial and transverse electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rouze, N.; Havener, C.C.; Westerveld, W.B.; Risley, A.J.S.

    1986-01-01

    The branching ratios for the n = 3 to n = 2 Balmer- decay of hydrogen atoms in axial and transverse electric fields in the range 0--1000 V/cm have been calculated with use of a density-matrix formalism to take into account the time evolution of the atomic states in the presence of an electric field. The branching ratios are useful when the production of 2s hydrogen atoms is measured with the use of an electric field and when it is desired to correct for cascade contributions from the n = 3 level. The total n = 3 to n = 2 branching ratio is found to depend on each of the 14 independent quantities which determine the axially symmetric n = 3 density matrix, thus emphasizing the need to determine the complete density matrix including the off-diagonal coherence terms. If the off-diagonal density-matrix elements are not known, it is preferable to use transverse electric fields since, in this configuration, the contributions to the branching ratios from the off-diagonal terms are less than with axial electric fields. For transverse fields of approximately 200 V/cm, the contribution from the off-diagonal terms are nearly zero.

  17. The ratio of molecular to atomic gas in spiral galaxies as a function of morphological type

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knezek, Patricia M.; Young, Judith S.

    1990-01-01

    In order to gain an understanding of the global processes which influence cloud and star formation in disk galaxies, it is necessary to determine the relative amounts of atomic, molecular, and ionized gas both as a function of position in galaxies and from galaxy to galaxy. With observations of the CO distributions in over 200 galaxies now completed as part of the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory (FCRAO) Extragalactic CO Survey (Young et al. 1989), researchers are finally in a position to determine the type dependence of the molecular content of spiral galaxies, along with the ratio of molecular to atomic gas as a function of type. Do late type spirals really have more gas than early types when the molecular gas content is included. Researchers conclude that there is more than an order of magnitude decrease in the ratio of molecular to atomic gas mass as a function of morphological type from Sa-Sd; an average Sa galaxy has more molecular than atomic gas, and an average Sc has less. Therefore, the total interstellar gas mass to blue luminosity ratio, M sub gas/L sub B, increases by less than a factor of two as a function of type from Sa-Sd. The dominant effect found is that the phase of the gas in the cool interstellar medium (ISM) varies along the Hubble sequence. Researchers suggest that the more massive and centrally concentrated galaxies are able to achieve a molecular-dominated ISM through the collection of more gas in the potential. That gas may then form molecular clouds when a critical density is exceeded. The picture which these observations support is one in which the conversion of atomic gas to molecular gas is a global process which depends on large scale dynamics (cf Wyse 1986). Among interacting and merging systems, researchers find considerable scatter in the M(H2)/M(HI) ratio, with the mean ratio similar to that in the early type galaxies. The high global ratio of molecular to atomic gas could result from the removal of HI gas, the enhanced

  18. Superconductivity, cohesive energy density, and electron-atom ratio in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Lawson, D. D.; Hrubes, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that superconductivity above 8 K occurs in alloys and metallic compounds within relatively narrow regions of cohesive energy density with a sharp peak which includes Nb3Ge, SiV3, Nb3Ga, and NbN. When cross-correlated with the electron-atom ratio, high-temperature superconductivity can be observed in only a few regions. This suggests a search for superconductors with high-transition temperatures and critical fields within these regions.

  19. FALLOUT DOSAGE AND MONITORING

    PubMed Central

    Kinsman, Simon

    1960-01-01

    At present there are a large number of people capable of conducting the task of surface and area radiation monitoring including external monitoring of personnel. Once the extent and the intensity of radioactivity in an area is determined, good use of personnel can be made without too much risk. This is fortunate for the medical profession whose personnel can devote their talents to casualty care during or following nuclear warfare. Most individuals who know how to detect and measure the extent of radioactive contamination are also capable of conducting personnel decontamination operations and would do so if necessary. Consequently the spread of contamination can be minimized by adequate decontamination and the medical personnel can treat casualties who are relatively free of external radioactive contamination. The appropriate use of trained manpower and radiation detection equipment which are available in California combined with sufficient rehearsals prior to a nuclear war will greatly reduce any casualty damage due to radioactive fallout. The chances of survival of individuals can be greatly improved with a little knowledge of protection from radioactive contamination and of salvage of food and water. PMID:14409247

  20. Uranium isotopic ratio measurements of U3O8 reference materials by atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Fahey, Albert J; Perea, Daniel E; Bartrand, Jonah; Arey, Bruce W; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2016-03-01

    We report results of measurements of isotopic ratios obtained with atom probe tomography on U3O8 reference materials certified for their isotopic abundances of uranium. The results show good agreement with the certified values. High backgrounds due to tails from adjacent peaks complicate the measurement of the integrated peak areas as well as the fact that only oxides of uranium appear in the spectrum, the most intense of which is doubly charged. In addition, lack of knowledge of other instrumental parameters, such as the dead time, may bias the results. Isotopic ratio measurements can be performed at the nanometer-scale with the expectation of sensible results. The abundance sensitivity and mass resolving power of the mass spectrometer are not sufficient to compete with magnetic-sector instruments but are not far from measurements made by ToF-SIMS of other isotopic systems. The agreement of the major isotope ratios is more than sufficient to distinguish most anthropogenic compositions from natural. PMID:26774651

  1. Uranium Isotopic Ratio Measurements of U3O8 Reference Materials by Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Fahey, Albert J.; Perea, Daniel E.; Bartrand, Jonah AG; Arey, Bruce W.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2016-01-01

    We report results of measurements of isotopic ratios obtained with atom probe tomography on U3O8 reference materials certified for their isotopic abundances of uranium. The results show good agreement with the certified values. High backgrounds due to tails from adjacent peaks complicate the measurement of the integrated peak areas as well as the fact that only oxides of uranium appear in the spectrum, the most intense of which is doubly charged. In addition, lack of knowledge of other instrumental parameters, such as the dead time, may bias the results. Isotopic ratio measurements can be performed at the nanometer-scale with the expectation of sensible results. The abundance sensitivity and mass resolving power of the mass spectrometer are not sufficient to compete with magnetic-sector instruments but are not far from measurements made by ToF-SIMS of other isotopic systems. The agreement of the major isotope ratios is more than sufficient to distinguish most anthropogenic compositions from natural.

  2. Large-area thermoelectric high-aspect-ratio nanostructures by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruoho, Mikko; Juntunen, Taneli; Tittonen, Ilkka

    2016-09-01

    We report on the thermoelectric properties of large-area high-aspect-ratio nanostructures. We fabricate the structures by atomic layer deposition of conformal ZnO thin films on track-etched polycarbonate substrate. The resulting structure consists of ZnO tubules which continue through the full thickness of the substrate. The electrical and thermal properties of the structures are studied both in-plane and out-of-plane. They exhibit very low out-of-plane thermal conductivity down to 0.15 W m‑1 K‑1 while the in-plane sheet resistance of the films was found to be half that of the same film on glass substrate, allowing material-independent doubling of output power of any planar thin-film thermoelectric generator. The wall thickness of the fabricated nanotubes was varied within a range of up to 100 nm. The samples show polycrystalline nature with (002) preferred crystal orientation.

  3. Estimation of effective atomic number in the Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio using different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurudirek, M.; Büyükyıldız, M.

    2016-06-01

    The Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio (R/C) is a very convenient parameter, which can be utilized in material analysis and estimating effective atomic number (Zeff). In the case for a relatively low scattering angle, for which the energy of the Compton scattered photons is not very much different from that of incident photons, the corrections due to self-absorption for Rayleigh and Compton scattering will be roughly equal. Therefore, it enables a result to be obtained which is almost independent of X-ray attenuation inside the sample and it will depend only on the material under investigation. The most frequently used method for calculation of Zeff available in literature is plotting R/C of elements as a function of atomic number and constituting the best fit curve. From this fit curve, the respective Zeff can be determined using R/C of the material. In the present study, we report Zeff of different materials using different methods such as interpolation and direct methods as possible alternatives to the most common fitting method. The results were compared with the experiments wherever possible. The agreement between interpolation method and the fitting method was found to be very satisfactory as relative changes (%) were always less than 9% while the direct method results with somehow significantly higher values of Zeff when compared to the other methods.

  4. Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Studer, Andrew J.; Manuel, James R.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-12-01

    Effects of basicity, B (CaO:SiO2 ratio) on the thermal range, concentration, and formation mechanisms of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter bonding phases have been investigated using an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction-based methodology with subsequent Rietveld refinement-based quantitative phase analysis. SFCA and SFCA-I phases are the key bonding materials in iron ore sinter, and improved understanding of the effects of processing parameters such as basicity on their formation and decomposition may assist in improving efficiency of industrial iron ore sintering operations. Increasing basicity significantly increased the thermal range of SFCA-I, from 1363 K to 1533 K (1090 °C to 1260 °C) for a mixture with B = 2.48, to ~1339 K to 1535 K (1066 °C to 1262 °C) for a mixture with B = 3.96, and to ~1323 K to 1593 K (1050 °C to 1320 °C) at B = 4.94. Increasing basicity also increased the amount of SFCA-I formed, from 18 wt pct for the mixture with B = 2.48 to 25 wt pct for the B = 4.94 mixture. Higher basicity of the starting sinter mixture will, therefore, increase the amount of SFCA-I, considered to be more desirable of the two phases. Basicity did not appear to significantly influence the formation mechanism of SFCA-I. It did, however, affect the formation mechanism of SFCA, with the decomposition of SFCA-I coinciding with the formation of a significant amount of additional SFCA in the B = 2.48 and 3.96 mixtures but only a minor amount in the highest basicity mixture. In situ neutron diffraction enabled characterization of the behavior of magnetite after melting of SFCA produced a magnetite plus melt phase assemblage.

  5. THE FUELING DIAGRAM: LINKING GALAXY MOLECULAR-TO-ATOMIC GAS RATIOS TO INTERACTIONS AND ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, David V.; Kannappan, Sheila J.; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Wei, Lisa H.; Baker, Andrew J.; Leroy, Adam K.; Vogel, Stuart N.

    2013-05-20

    To assess how external factors such as local interactions and fresh gas accretion influence the global interstellar medium of galaxies, we analyze the relationship between recent enhancements of central star formation and total molecular-to-atomic (H{sub 2}/H I) gas ratios, using a broad sample of field galaxies spanning early-to-late type morphologies, stellar masses of 10{sup 7.2}-10{sup 11.2} M{sub Sun }, and diverse stages of evolution. We find that galaxies occupy several loci in a ''fueling diagram'' that plots H{sub 2}/H I ratio versus mass-corrected blue-centeredness, a metric tracing the degree to which galaxies have bluer centers than the average galaxy at their stellar mass. Spiral galaxies of all stellar masses show a positive correlation between H{sub 2}/H I ratio and mass-corrected blue-centeredness. When combined with previous results linking mass-corrected blue-centeredness to external perturbations, this correlation suggests a systematic link between local galaxy interactions and molecular gas inflow/replenishment. Intriguingly, E/S0 galaxies show a more complex picture: some follow the same correlation, some are quenched, and a distinct population of blue-sequence E/S0 galaxies (with masses below key scales associated with transitions in gas richness) defines a separate loop in the fueling diagram. This population appears to be composed of low-mass merger remnants currently in late- or post-starburst states, in which the burst first consumes the H{sub 2} while the galaxy center keeps getting bluer, then exhausts the H{sub 2}, at which point the burst population reddens as it ages. Multiple lines of evidence suggest connected evolutionary sequences in the fueling diagram. In particular, tracking total gas-to-stellar mass ratios within the fueling diagram provides evidence of fresh gas accretion onto low-mass E/S0s emerging from their central starburst episodes. Drawing on a comprehensive literature search, we suggest that virtually all galaxies

  6. Chernobyl fallout on Alpine glaciers

    SciTech Connect

    Ambach, W.; Rehwald, W.; Blumthaler, M.; Eisner, H.; Brunner, P.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of the gross beta activity of snow samples from four Alpine glaciers contaminated by radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear accident and a gamma-spectrum analysis of selected samples are reported. The results are discussed with respect to possible risks to the population from using meltwater from these glaciers as drinking water.

  7. New Trends in Fallout Protection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Civil Defense (DOD), Washington, DC.

    The objective of the national fallout shelter program is to provide shelter space for all Americans by--(1) locating, marking, and stocking suitable public shelter areas in existing buildings, and (2) having new structures designed and built to maximize protection. This nation's architects and engineers are now knowledgeable in radiation shielding…

  8. Measurement of fallout radionuclides, (239)(,240)Pu and (137)Cs, in soil and creek sediment: Sydney Basin, Australia.

    PubMed

    Smith, B S; Child, D P; Fierro, D; Harrison, J J; Heijnis, H; Hotchkis, M A C; Johansen, M P; Marx, S; Payne, T E; Zawadzki, A

    2016-01-01

    Soil and sediment samples from the Sydney basin were measured to ascertain fallout radionuclide activity concentrations and atom ratios. Caesium-137 ((137)Cs) was measured using gamma spectroscopy, and plutonium isotopes ((239)Pu and (240)Pu) were quantified using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Fallout radionuclide activity concentrations were variable ranging from 0.6 to 26.1 Bq/kg for (137)Cs and 0.02-0.52 Bq/kg for (239+240)Pu. Radionuclides in creek sediment samples were an order of magnitude lower than in soils. (137)Cs and (239+240)Pu activity concentration in soils were well correlated (r(2) = 0.80) although some deviation was observed in samples collected at higher elevations. Soil ratios of (137)Cs/(239+240)Pu (decay corrected to 1/1/2014) ranged from 11.5 to 52.1 (average = 37.0 ± 12.4) and showed more variability than previous studies. (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios ranged from 0.117 to 0.165 with an average of 0.146 (±0.013) and an error weighted mean of 0.138 (±0.001). These ratios are lower than a previously reported ratio for Sydney, and lower than the global average. However, these ratios are similar to those reported for other sites within Australia that are located away from former weapons testing sites and indicate that atom ratio measurements from other parts of the world are unlikely to be applicable to the Australian context. PMID:26344369

  9. High aspect ratio iridescent three-dimensional metal–insulator–metal capacitors using atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Micheal Blake, Alan; Djara, Vladimir; O'Connell, Dan; Povey, Ian M.; Cherkaoui, Karim; Monaghan, Scott; Scully, Jim; Murphy, Richard; Hurley, Paul K.; Pemble, Martyn E.; Quinn, Aidan J.

    2015-01-01

    The authors report on the structural and electrical properties of TiN/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiN metal–insulator–metal (MIM) capacitor structures in submicron three-dimensional (3D) trench geometries with an aspect ratio of ∼30. A simplified process route was employed where the three layers for the MIM stack were deposited using atomic layer deposition (ALD) in a single run at a process temperature of 250 °C. The TiN top and bottom electrodes were deposited via plasma-enhanced ALD using a tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium precursor. 3D trench devices yielded capacitance densities of 36 fF/μm{sup 2} and quality factors >65 at low frequency (200 Hz), with low leakage current densities (<3 nA/cm{sup 2} at 1 V). These devices also show strong optical iridescence which, when combined with the covert embedded capacitance, show potential for system in package (SiP) anticounterfeiting applications.

  10. Large-area thermoelectric high-aspect-ratio nanostructures by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Ruoho, Mikko; Juntunen, Taneli; Tittonen, Ilkka

    2016-09-01

    We report on the thermoelectric properties of large-area high-aspect-ratio nanostructures. We fabricate the structures by atomic layer deposition of conformal ZnO thin films on track-etched polycarbonate substrate. The resulting structure consists of ZnO tubules which continue through the full thickness of the substrate. The electrical and thermal properties of the structures are studied both in-plane and out-of-plane. They exhibit very low out-of-plane thermal conductivity down to 0.15 W m(-1) K(-1) while the in-plane sheet resistance of the films was found to be half that of the same film on glass substrate, allowing material-independent doubling of output power of any planar thin-film thermoelectric generator. The wall thickness of the fabricated nanotubes was varied within a range of up to 100 nm. The samples show polycrystalline nature with (002) preferred crystal orientation. PMID:27454037

  11. Temporal variability of beryllium-7 fallout in southwest UK.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A; Keith-Roach, M J; Iurian, A R; Mabit, L; Blake, W H

    2016-08-01

    Cosmogenic beryllium-7 has been widely employed as a sediment tracing tool and continued development of its use as a soil erosion tracer requires knowledge of fallout temporal dynamics. Data regarding beryllium-7 fallout in the UK are scarce and here the authors provide a record of beryllium-7 fallout in southwest England spanning a two-year period. A monthly fallout record was developed for Plymouth, UK using regular rainfall sampling to determine beryllium-7 rainfall activity concentration (Bq L(-1)) and deposition flux (Bq m(-2)). Data showed a general tendency for higher activity during the spring/summer months and lower activity in the autumn/winter months. Comparison with data for other UK sites (Chilton and Aberporth) for the same period found significant differences in (7)Be activity in rainwater and lower variability in Plymouth than Chilton and Aberporth. Total deposition was largely controlled by rainfall in Plymouth although regression coefficients suggested greater importance of other atmospheric controls at the Chilton and Aberporth sites. Use of a deposition proportion to rainfall proportion ratio identified periods when deposition was influenced by varying (7)Be activity in rainfall. Broad ranges in ratios were found for Chilton and Aberporth and this has implications for sediment tracer studies requiring estimates of (7)Be deposition flux across months or seasons. PMID:27155526

  12. Proton/electron mass ratio and the electron`s atomic mass

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyck, R.S. Jr.; Farnham, D.L.; Schwinberg, P.B.

    1994-12-31

    The heart of the Penning trap mass spectrometer (PTMS) is a well-machined, quadrupole trap with hyperbolic surfaces of revolution formed about a common axis of symmetry. Equally as important from the point of view of precision, a strong magnetic field, aligned along this trap axis, must be highly stable and uniform. For our present solenoid, the long term drift is {approx} 0.1-0.3 ppb/h and short-term fluctuations are < 1 ppb. This type of mass spectrometer has met with considerable success in measuring atomic masses with accuracies better than 1 ppb (and approaching a reliable 0.1 ppb). Thus, it is expected that this device can be used to improve the proton/electron mass ratio; however this task will be a significantly more difficult comparison because of the use of a trap potential of the opposite sign and widely differing magnitudes. The primary limitation in the past was the need for a magnetic bottle (i.e. a second-order term in the magnetic field on the order of 100 G/cm{sup 2}) in order to couple the magnetic states of the electron to the easily observed harmonic oscillation frequency along the axis of symmetry. In our previous determination of m{sub p}/m{sub e}, a systematic shift of {approx} -0.5 ppb/(G/cm{sup 2}) was observed which was believed to be due to the different {rvec E} x {rvec B} drift orbits (called magnetron) which are associated with the electron and its calibration ion. At that time, an uncertainty of 40 G/cm{sup 2} in the actual magnetic bottle led to a 20 ppb uncertainty in m{sub p}/m{sub e}. Our present efforts axe now using a quite uniform magnetic field (with B{sub 2} < 2 G/cm{sub 2}).

  13. Fukushima fallout at Milano, Italy.

    PubMed

    Ioannidou, Alexandra; Manenti, Simone; Gini, Luigi; Groppi, Flavia

    2012-12-01

    The radionuclides (131)I, (137)Cs and (134)Cs were observed in the Milano region (45°) of Italy early after the nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan. Increased atmospheric radioactivity was observed on an air filter taken on 30 March 2011, while the maximum activity of 467 μBq m(-3) for (131)I was recorded at April 3-4, 2011. The first evidence of Fukushima fallout was confirmed with (131)I and (137)Cs measured in precipitation at two sampling sites at Milano on 28 March, 2011, with the concentrations of (131)I and (137)Cs in the rainwater equal to 0.89 Bq L(-1) and 0.12 Bq L(-1), respectively. A sample of dry deposition that was collected 9 days after the first rainfall event of 27-28 March, 2011 showed that the dry deposition was more effective in the case of (137)Cs than it was for (131)I, probably because iodine was mainly in gaseous form whereas caesium was rapidly bound to aerosols and thus highly subject to dry deposition. The relatively high observed values of (137)Cs in grass, soil and fresh goat and cow milk samples were probably from Chernobyl fallout and global fallout from past nuclear tests rather than from the Fukushima accident. Finally, a dose assessment for the region of investigation showed clearly that the detected activities in all environmental samples were very far below levels of concern. PMID:22300481

  14. Atomic Theory and Multiple Combining Proportions: The Search for Whole Number Ratios.

    PubMed

    Usselman, Melvyn C; Brown, Todd A

    2015-04-01

    John Dalton's atomic theory, with its postulate of compound formation through atom-to-atom combination, brought a new perspective to weight relationships in chemical reactions. A presumed one-to-one combination of atoms A and B to form a simple compound AB allowed Dalton to construct his first table of relative atomic weights from literature analyses of appropriate binary compounds. For such simple binary compounds, the atomic theory had little advantages over affinity theory as an explanation of fixed proportions by weight. For ternary compounds of the form AB2, however, atomic theory made quantitative predictions that were not deducible from affinity theory. Atomic theory required that the weight of B in the compound AB2 be exactly twice that in the compound AB. Dalton, Thomas Thomson and William Hyde Wollaston all published within a few years of each other experimental data that claimed to give the predicted results with the required accuracy. There are nonetheless several experimental barriers to obtaining the desired integral multiple proportions. In this paper I will discuss replication experiments which demonstrate that only Wollaston's results are experimentally reliable. It is likely that such replicability explains why Wollaston's experiments were so influential. PMID:26104162

  15. Fallout forecasting: 1945-1962

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, W.R. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    The delayed hazards of fallout from the detonations of nuclear devices in the atmosphere have always been the concern of those involved in the Test Program. Even before the Trinity Shot (TR-2) of July 16, 1945, many very competent, intelligent scientists and others from all fields of expertise tried their hand at the prediction problems. This resume and collection of parts from reports, memoranda, references, etc., endeavor to chronologically outline prediction methods used operationally in the field during Test Operations of nuclear devices fired into the atmosphere.

  16. Influence of ion/atom arrival ratio on structure and optical properties of AlN films by ion beam assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jian-ping; Fu, Zhi-qiang; Liu, Xiao-peng; Yue, Wen; Wang, Cheng-biao

    2014-10-01

    In order to improve the optical properties of AlN films, the influence of the ion/atom arrival ratio on the structure and optical characteristics of AlN films deposited by dual ion beam sputtering was studied by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry and UV-vis spectroscopy. The films prepared at the ion/atom arrival ratio of 1.4 are amorphous while the crystalline quality is improved with the increase of the ion/atom arrival ratio. The films deposited at the ion/atom arrival ratio of no less than 1.8 have an approximately stoichiometric ratio and mainly consist of aluminum nitride with little aluminum oxynitride, while metallic aluminum component appears in the films deposited at the ion/atom arrival ratio of 1.4. When the ion/atom arrival ratio is not less than 1.8, films are smooth, high transmitting and dense. The films prepared with high ion/atom arrival ratio (≥1.8) display the characteristic of a dielectric. The films deposited at the ion/atom arrival ratio of 1.4 are coarse, opaque and show characteristic of cermet.

  17. A new ground-level fallout record of uranium and plutonium isotopes for northern temperate latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warneke, Thorsten; Croudace, Ian W.; Warwick, Phillip E.; Taylor, Rex N.

    2002-11-01

    Plutonium and uranium isotope ratios can be used to differentiate the sources of nuclear contamination from nuclear weapon establishments (Environ. Sci. Technol. 34 (2000) 4496; Internal Report for AWRE Aldermaston, UK (1961)), weapon fallout (Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 51 (1987) 2623; Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 63 (1983) 202; Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 22 (1974) 111; Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 64 (2000) 989), reprocessing plants, reactor or satellite accidents (Science 105 (1979) 583; Science 238 (1987) 512) and in addition they provide markers for post-1952 geochronology of environmental systems. A good record of plutonium and uranium isotope ratios of the background resulting from atmospheric nuclear testing is essential for source characterisation studies. Using recently developed mass spectrometric techniques (J. Anal. At. Spectrom. 16 (2001) 279) we present here the first complete records between 1952 and the present day of northern temperate latitude 240Pu/ 239Pu and 238U/ 235U atom ratios for atmospheric deposition. Such information was not derived directly during the period of atmospheric testing because suitable mass spectrometric capability was not available. The currently derived records are based on an annual herbage archive and a core from an Alpine glacier. These studies reveal hitherto unseen fluctuations in the 238U/ 235U atmospheric fallout record, some of which are directly related to nuclear testing. In addition, they also provide the first evidence that plutonium contamination originating from Nevada Desert atmospheric weapon tests in 1952 and 1953 extended eastwards as far as northwestern Europe. The results presented here demonstrate that we now have the capability to detect and precisely identify sources of plutonium in the environment with implications for the development of atmospheric transport models, recent geochronology and environmental studies.

  18. Tables of stark level transition probabilities and branching ratios in hydrogen-like atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1980-01-01

    The transition probabilities which are given in terms of n prime k prime and n k are tabulated. No additional summing or averaging is necessary. The electric quantum number k plays the role of the angular momentum quantum number l in the presence of an electric field. The branching ratios between stark levels are also tabulated. Necessary formulas for the transition probabilities and branching ratios are given. Symmetries are discussed and selection rules are given. Some disagreements for some branching ratios are found between the present calculation and the measurement of Mark and Wierl. The transition probability multiplied by the statistical weight of the initial state is called the static intensity J sub S, while the branching ratios are called the dynamic intensity J sub D.

  19. Raman scattering and anomalous Stokes–anti-Stokes ratio in MoTe2 atomic layers

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Thomas; Chen, Shao-Yu; Tong, Jiayue; Xiao, Di; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin; Yan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman scattering are performed on atomic layers of hexagonal molybdenum ditelluride (MoTe2), a prototypical transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) semiconductor. The data reveal all six types of zone center optical phonons, along with their corresponding Davydov splittings, which have been challenging to see in other TMDCs. We discover that the anti-Stokes Raman intensity of the low energy layer-breathing mode becomes more intense than the Stokes peak under certain experimental conditions, and find the effect to be tunable by excitation frequency and number of atomic layers. These observations are interpreted as a result of resonance effects arising from the C excitons in the vicinity of the Brillouin zone center in the photon-electron-phonon interaction process. PMID:27324297

  20. Effect of F/O atomic ratio on photocatalytic activity of BixOyFz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Wenhao; Zhang, Guoliang; Teng, Fei; Teng, Yiran; Zhao, Zhengyang; Fan, Wenzheng

    2016-08-01

    We have, for the first time, prepared BiO0.9F2.35 as a new photocatalyst by a simple hydrothermal method. It is found that at different ratios of fluorine to oxygen (F/O), the BixOyFz samples have the varied internal electric field (IEF) and electrical conductivities, thus showing different photochemistry properties for the degradation of RhB. The bulk IEF and conductivity can be conveniently controlled by the F/O ratio, thus improving the photochemistry properties of layered BixOyFz. This study provides a new strategy to develop efficient photocatalysts.

  1. Observation of anomalous Stokes versus anti-Stokes ratio in MoTe2 atomic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Thomas; Chen, Shao-Yu; Xiao, Di; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin; Yan, Jun

    We grow hexagonal molybdenum ditelluride (MoTe2), a prototypical transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) semiconductor, with chemical vapor transport methods and investigate its atomic layers with Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman scattering. We report observation of all six types of zone center optical phonons. Quite remarkably, the anti-Stokes Raman intensity of the low energy layer-breathing mode becomes more intense than the Stokes peak under certain experimental conditions, creating an illusion of 'negative temperature'. This effect is tunable, and can be switched from anti-Stokes enhancement to suppression by varying the excitation wavelength. We interpret this observation to be a result of resonance effects arising from the C excitons in the vicinity of the Brillouin zone center, which are robust even for multiple layers of MoTe2. The intense anti-Stokes Raman scattering provides a cooling channel for the crystal and opens up opportunities for laser cooling of atomically thin TMDC semiconductor devices. Supported by the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the National Science Foundation Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing (CMMI-1025020) and Office of Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation (EFRI-1433496).

  2. Double-sided F and Cl adsorptions on graphene at various atomic ratios: Geometric, orientation and electronic structure aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widjaja, Hantarto; Jiang, Zhong-Tao; Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Yin, Chun-Yang; Goh, Bee-Min; Mondinos, Nicholas; Amri, Amun; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z.

    2016-06-01

    Elemental adsorption on graphene offers an effective procedure in fine-tuning electronic and mechanical properties of graphene. The effects of dopants depend on adsorption site, the degree of coverage as well as on the configuration of the deployed supercell. In this contribution, the density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to investigate the electronic structures of F and Cl adsorption (double-sided, top site) on graphene in terms of adsorption orientation, atomic ratios, i.e., from C:F/Cl = 18:2 to C:F/Cl = 2:2. Despite being members of the halogens group, F- and Cl-adsorbed on graphene show contrasting trends. F is adsorbed to graphene more strongly than Cl. F favours full and 25% adsorption coverage, while Cl favours 25% coverage. Both F and Cl cases open band gap (at Fermi energy) at certain atomic concentration coverage, but none creates magnetization.

  3. Estimation of boron isotope ratios using high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltsche, Helmar; Prattes, Karl; Zischka, Michael; Knapp, Günter

    2009-04-01

    In the production of 10B enriched steels, the production-recycling process needs to be closely monitored for inadvertent mix-up of materials with different B isotope levels. A quick and simple method for the estimation of boron isotope ratios in high alloyed steels using high resolution continuum source flame AAS (HR-CS-FAAS) was developed. On the 208.9 nm B line the wavelength of the peak absorption of 10B and 11B differs by 2.5 pm. The wavelength of the peak absorption of boron was determined by fitting a Gauss function through spectra simultaneously recorded by HR-CS-FAAS. It was shown that a linear correlation between the wavelength of the peak absorption and the isotope ratio exists and that this correlation is independent of the total boron concentration. Internal spectroscopic standards were used to compensate for monochromator drift and monochromator resolution changes. Accuracy and precision of the analyzed samples were thereby increased by a factor of up to 1.3. Three steel reference materials and one boric acid CRM, each certified for the boron isotope ratio were used to validate the procedure.

  4. Effect of nozzle length-to-diameter ratio on atomization of turbulent liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osta, Anu Ranjan

    Breakup of liquid jets is of considerable interest motivated by its applicability in combustion and propulsion systems (CI and SI engines), and agricultural fertilizer/pesticide sprays, among others. Almost all of the practical liquid injectors introduce some degree of turbulence in the liquid jet leaving the injector passage and an intriguing question is the relative importance of the liquid turbulence, cavitation, and the aerodynamic forces in the breakup processes of fuel injectors. A better design of liquid fuel injector would reduce pollutants and increase the efficiency of liquid fuel combustion processes. An experimental study to investigate the effect of nozzle length to diameter ratio on the surface properties of turbulent liquid jets in gaseous crossflow and still air was carried out. Straight cavitation-free nozzles with length/diameter ratios of 10, 20 and 40 were used to generate turbulent liquid jets in gaseous crossflow. The present study was limited to small Ohnesorge number liquid jets (Oh < 0.01) injected in crossflow within the shear breakup regime (WeG > 110). The diagnostics consisted of pulsed shadowgraphy, pulsed digital holographic microscopy and x-ray diagnostics. The x-ray tests were conducted at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) facility of Argonne National Laboratory. The test matrix was designed to maintain the same aerodynamic forces in order to isolate the effects of jet turbulence on the breakup process. The measurements included liquid jet surface properties, breakup location of the liquid column as a whole, the breakup regime transitions, bubble size inside the jet and seeding particle displacement inside the jet structures. The results include the jet surface characteristics, the liquid column breakup lengths, bubble growth, and phenomenological analysis to explain the observed results. It is observed that for a jet breakup in crossflow the injector passage length does play a role in determining the breakup length as well as

  5. Tables of Transition Probabilities and Branching Ratios for Electric Dipole Transitions Between Arbitrary Levels of Hydrogen-Like Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1980-01-01

    Branching ratios in hydrogen-like atoms due to electric-dipole transitions are tabulated for the initial principal and angular momentum quantum number n, lambda, and final principal and angular momentum quantum numbers n, lambda. In table 1, transition probabilities are given for transitions n, lambda, yields n, where sums have been made with respect to lambda. In this table, 2 or = n' or = 10, o or = lambda' or = n'-1, and 1 or = n or = n'-1. In addition, averages with respect to lambda' and sums with respect to n, and lifetimes are given. In table 2, branching ratios are given for transitions n' lambda' yields ni, where sums have been made with respect to lambda. In these tables, 2 or = n' or = 10, 0 or = lambda', n'-1, and 1 or = n or = n'-1. Averages with respect to lambda' are also given. In table 3, branching ratios are given for transitions n' lambda' yields in lambda, where 1 or = n or = 5, 0 or = lambda or = n-1, n n' or = 15, and 0 or = lambda' or = n(s), where n(s), is the smaller of the two numbers n'-1 and 6. Averages with respect to lambda' are given.

  6. Fallout-particle-trajectory computations and fallout-particle arrival time calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, V.E.; Kennedy, N.C.

    1989-09-01

    This report describes the Weather Service Nuclear Support Office (WSNSO) procedure for deriving estimates of fallout-particle arrival times along a fallout pattern. Analyses of meteorological data are discussed. The equations and calculations used in deriving particle-sedimentation velocities and times in layers are discussed. 17 refs., 21 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Photographs and Pamphlet about Nuclear Fallout. The Constitution Community: Postwar United States (1945 to Early 1970s).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawlor, John M., Jr.

    In August 1945, the United States unleashed an atomic weapon against the Japanese at Hiroshima and Nagasaki and brought an end to World War II. These bombs killed in two ways -- by the blast's magnitude and resulting firestorm, and by nuclear fallout. After the Soviet Union exploded its first atom bomb in 1949, the Cold War waged between the two…

  8. Prediction of spatial variation in global fallout of 137Cs using precipitation.

    PubMed

    Pálsson, S E; Howard, B J; Wright, S M

    2006-08-31

    Deposition from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests (termed global fallout) has been shown to be proportional to the rate of precipitation. Here we describe methods for using precipitation and radionuclide deposition information for a reference site to estimate global fallout at other locations. These methods have been used to estimate global fallout in Iceland, identified during the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) by Wright et al. [Wright, S.M., Howard, B.J., Strand, P., Nylén, T., Sickel, M.A.K., 1999. Prediction of 137Cs deposition from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests within the Arctic. Environ Pollut 104, 131-143.] as one of the Arctic areas which received the highest global fallout, but where measurements of contamination were sparse, and difficult to obtain due to the remote and inaccessible terrain of much of the country. Measurements of global fallout 137Cs deposition have been made in Iceland at sites close to meteorological stations to ensure that precipitation data were of high quality. The AMAP modeling approach, based on measured precipitation and radionuclide deposition data, was applied using a reference monitoring station located close to Reykjavik. The availability of good precipitation data and locally based estimates of time dependent ratios of 137Cs deposition to precipitation during the fallout period gave a better correlation between predicted and measured 137Cs global fallout (r2=0.96) than that achieved using the much more heterogeneous set of data collected by AMAP over the whole of the Arctic. Having obtained satisfactory results with the model for a number of calibration sites alongside meteorological stations we then produced a map of estimated 137Cs deposition based on a model of estimated precipitation. This deposition map was then successfully validated (r2=0.85) for sites where 137Cs deposition was measured; the associated uncertainty in predictions was also estimated. PMID:16545432

  9. Numerical simulation of the double-to-single ionization ratio for the helium atom in strong laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhangjin; Zheng, Yanyan; Yang, Weifeng; Song, Xiaohong; Xu, Junliang; DiMauro, L. F.; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus; Morishita, Toru; Zhao, Song-Feng; Lin, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    We present calculations on the ratio between double and single ionization of helium by a strong laser pulse at a wavelength of 780 nm using the quantitative rescattering (QRS) model. According to this model, the yield for the doubly charged ion He+2 can be obtained by multiplying the returning electron wave packet (RWP) with the total cross sections (TCSs) for electron impact ionization and electron impact excitation of +He in the singlet spin channel. The singlet constraint was imposed since the interaction of the helium atom with the laser and the recollision processes both preserve the total spin of the system. An R -matrix (close-coupling) code is used to obtain accurate TCSs, while the RWPs, according to the QRS, are calculated by the strong-field approximation for high-energy photoelectrons. The laser field, which lowers the required energy for the electron to escape from the nucleus at the time of recollision, is also taken into account. The simulated results are in good agreement with the measured He+2/+He ratio over a broad range of laser intensities. The result demonstrates that the QRS approach based on the rescattering model is fully capable of quantitatively interpreting nonsequential double ionization processes.

  10. Distribution of neptunium and plutonium in New Mexico lichen samples (Usnea arizonica) contaminated by atmospheric fallout

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Oldham, Jr., Warren J.; Hanson, Susan K.; Lavelle, Kevin B.; Miller, Jeffrey L.

    2015-08-30

    In this study, the concentrations of 237Np, 239Pu and 240Pu were determined in lichen samples (Usnea arizonica) that were collected from ten locations in New Mexico between 2011 and 2013 using isotope dilution inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS). The observed isotopic ratios for 237Np/239Pu and 240Pu/239Pu indicate trace contamination from global and regional fallout (e.g. Trinity test and atmospheric testing at the Nevada Test Site). The fact that actinide contamination is detected in recent lichen collections suggests continuous re-suspension of fallout radionuclides even 50 years after ratification of the Limited Test Ban Treaty.

  11. Fallout of lead and uptake by crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, A. C.

    The distribution with depth of lead in cores of peat shows that the annual fallout in the U.K. has not changed greatly since the middle of the last century. Increased fallout of lead from vehicles has been balanced by decreases in other sources. Fallout of lead from vehicles since 1946 has contributed about 3 ppm in country districts and less than 10 ppm in towns to topsoils. This represents a small addition to the amounts naturally present or attributable to dissemination of industrial and domestic waste over the centuries. However, the current rate of fallout can be ascribed mainly to vehicle emissions. Although many surveys and experiments comparing lead in plants and soils have been done, the contribution of root uptake to lead in crops remains uncertain. Contamination of foliage with particles of soil may be more important than uptake by roots in many instances. Foliage near motorways and other sources of airborne lead shows evidence of direct contamination, and extrapolation of the results indicates that foliar uptake accounts for most of the lead in grasses and other plants having high leaf surface area per unit mass. Translocation of lead from outer to inner leaves, and to tubers, fruits and seeds is very slight, and it seems that not more than a few μg per day of lead enters diet by this route. Measurements of the naturally-occurring radioisotope 210Pb in fallout and in diet can be used to calculate an equivalent area, defined as Equivalent area = Amount in average adult diet per day/ Amount falling per unit area of ground per day The equivalent area for 210Pb is 0.18 m 2, and if it is assumed that stable lead in fallout enters diet to the same degree as does 210Pb, it follows that together the various pathways contribute about 13 μg day -1 to the average adult diet.

  12. New isotopic evidence of lead contamination in wheat grain from atmospheric fallout.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Chen, Tongbin; Lei, Mei; Zhou, Xiaoyong; Huang, Qifei; Ma, Chuang; Gu, Runyao; Guo, Guanghui

    2015-10-01

    Crops could accumulate trace metals by soil-root transfer and foliar uptake from atmospheric fallout, and an accurate assessment of pollution sources is a prerequisite for preventing heavy metal pollution in agricultural products. In this study, we examined Pb isotope rates to trace the sources of Pb in wheat grain grown in suburbs. Results showed that, even in zones with scarcely any air pollution spots, atmospheric fallout was still a considerable source of Pb accumulation in wheat. The concentration of Pb in wheat grain has poor correlation with that in farm soil. The Pb concentration in wheat grains with dust in bran coat was significantly higher than that in wheat grains, which indicates that Pb may accumulate by foliar uptake. The Pb isotope rate has obvious differences between the soil and atmospheric fallout, and scatter ratio is significantly closer between the wheat grain and atmospheric fallout. Atmospheric fallout is a more significant source of Pb concentration in wheat grains than in soil. As far as we know, this is the first study on the main sources of lead in grain crop (wheat) samples with isotope. This study aims to improve our understanding of the translocation of foliar-absorbed metals to nonexposed parts of plants. PMID:25982979

  13. Automating the Coupling of ORIGEN with GADRAS via the Fallout Analysis Tool for National Technical Nuclear Forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Monterial, Mateusz; Jodoin, Vincent J; Lefebvre, Jordan P; Peplow, Douglas E.; Hooper, David A

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear forensic teams will be deployed to collect and evaluate fallout samples on the ground in the scenario of a low-yield nuclear detonation in a heavily populated area. Quick non-destructive methods of predicting the quality of the sample before it is analyzed in detail are essential for efficient post-event collections. In this work, the process of exporting Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC) results into Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) has been automated within the Fallout Analysis Tool. This coupling allows for the simulation of detector responses to fallout samples with varying degrees of fractionation. The degree to which the samples are fractionated depends on the location of the samples in the fallout field. In the following study, this phenomenon is examined, as its understanding is important to the investigation of debris distribution. The simulated detector spectra from GADRAS can be used to compare peak ratios of volatile-refractory isotope pairs in order to determine the degree of fractionation. Simulated fractionated fallout samples from DELFIC for a 10 kt, pure 235U fission surface burst were modeled for distances ranging to 256 km out from ground zero, and for times up to 1 week from detonation. The fractionation ratios, also known as r values, from isotope concentrations, photon lines and peak areas of four volatile-refractory pairs were calculated and compared. Fractionation prediction via the peak areas method was evaluated for each pair by comparing the results with the simulated radionuclide inventory.

  14. Ready II damage estimation system: fallout trajectories program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    The Fallout Trajectories Program is designed to provide the Ready II Fallout Effects Program with a file containing weapon fallout trajectories. The program is designed to be run on an Univac 1108 computer in conjunction with the Ready II Damage Estimation System. This program differs from earlier versions in that it allows the attack to cover up to a 2-week period.

  15. Zeeman splitting, its specific features, and gyromagnetic ratios for configurations 1 snf ( n = 4-10) of the helium atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimova, G. P.; Gorbenko, A. P.; Dolmatova, O. A.; Krylov, I. R.; Mashek, I. Ch.; Tsygankova, G. A.

    2016-02-01

    The fine structure parameters of configurations 1 snf ( n = 4-10) with new refined energy values are calculated by the semiempirical method. The emphasis is on the study of the Zeeman structure in order to determine the gyromagnetic ratios of all four the levels of the configuration from the splitting. For this purpose, the matrices of an energy operator with allowance for the interaction between the atom and a magnetic field were diagonalized for all possible values of quantum number M. For each configuration, 17 values of crossing fields of the Zeeman sublevels with Δ M = ±1, ±2 and the regions of anticrossings with Δ M = 0 were determined. It is remarkable that, because the levels are closely spaced, anticrossings are observed for each pair of levels in these systems. The regions of linearity of a magnetic field, which are different for different configurations, and the levels in them are established. The g-factors are calculated from the coefficients of an intermediate coupling scheme in a magnetic field that is guaranteed to be linear. They are compared with the analogous values in the absence of a field.

  16. C/O atomic ratios in micrometer-size crushed grains from Antarctic micrometeorites and two carbonaceous meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perreau, M.; Engrand, C.; Maurette, Michel; Kurat, G.; Presper, TH.

    1993-01-01

    Antarctic micrometeorites (AMM's) have similarities (but also differences) with primitive meteorites, such as unequilibrated mineral assemblages. To further assess such similarities, we have measured the carbon content of micrometeorites and meteorites (Orgueil and Murchison), as determined in a random selection of micrometer-size crushed grain, with an analytical transmission electron microscope. Such analyses yield the C/O atomic ratio, the major and minor elements contents, and the textural features of the grains on a scale of approx. equal to 100 nanometers. An important proportion of micrometeorites from both the 100-400 micron and the 50-100 micron size fractions contains much more carbon than CI chondrite Orgueil. The average C-content of all micrometeorites in these two size fractions amount to approximately 1.8 x CI, and approximately 0.8 x CI, respectively (CI refers to the bulk C-content of Orgueil, of about 3.5 percent by weight). Carbon is usually not homogeneously distributed in the micrometeorite but is concentrated in C-rich grains. So far, most of these grains are amorphous, and seem to be associated with an oxidized Fe-rich phase (possibly a variety of 'dirty' magnetite). About 5 percent of them have the composition of 'COPS', a phase additionally enriched in O, P, and S.

  17. Pt-Al2O3 dual layer atomic layer deposition coating in high aspect ratio nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardon, Gaspard; Gatty, Hithesh K.; Stemme, Göran; van der Wijngaart, Wouter; Roxhed, Niclas

    2013-01-01

    Functional nanoporous materials are promising for a number of applications ranging from selective biofiltration to fuel cell electrodes. This work reports the functionalization of nanoporous membranes using atomic layer deposition (ALD). ALD is used to conformally deposit platinum (Pt) and aluminum oxide (Al2O3) on Pt in nanopores to form a metal-insulator stack inside the nanopore. Deposition of these materials inside nanopores allows the addition of extra functionalities to nanoporous materials such as anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes. Conformal deposition of Pt on such materials enables increased performances for electrochemical sensing applications or fuel cell electrodes. An additional conformal Al2O3 layer on such a Pt film forms a metal-insulator-electrolyte system, enabling field effect control of the nanofluidic properties of the membrane. This opens novel possibilities in electrically controlled biofiltration. In this work, the deposition of these two materials on AAO membranes is investigated theoretically and experimentally. Successful process parameters are proposed for a reliable and cost-effective conformal deposition on high aspect ratio three-dimensional nanostructures. A device consisting of a silicon chip supporting an AAO membrane of 6 mm diameter and 1.3 μm thickness with 80 nm diameter pores is fabricated. The pore diameter is reduced to 40 nm by a conformal deposition of 11 nm Pt and 9 nm Al2O3 using ALD.

  18. Design of Schools to Incorporate Fallout Protection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folley, Milo D.

    Means are suggested by which a school district may incorporate low-cost fallout protection in a school construction program, through construction of an underground shelter beneath the concrete slab foundation. Ways of controlling distribution and filtering air are discussed. The author also suggests consideration of a completely underground…

  19. The selective effect of environment on the atomic and molecular gas-to-dust ratio of nearby galaxies in the Herschel Reference Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, L.; Bekki, K.; Boselli, A.; Catinella, B.; Ciesla, L.; Hughes, T. M.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Boquien, M.; de Looze, I.; Smith, M. W. L.; Spinoglio, L.; Viaene, S.

    2016-04-01

    We combine dust, atomic (HI) and molecular (H2) hydrogen mass measurements for 176 galaxies in the Herschel Reference Survey to investigate the effect of environment on the gas-to-dust mass (Mgas/Mdust) ratio of nearby galaxies. We find that, at fixed stellar mass, the average Mgas/Mdust ratio varies by no more than a factor of ˜2 when moving from field to cluster galaxies, with Virgo galaxies being slightly more dust rich (per unit of gas) than isolated systems. Remarkably, once the molecular and atomic hydrogen phases are investigated separately, we find that HI-deficient galaxies have at the same time lower MHI/Mdust ratio but higher M_H2/M_dust ratio than HI-normal systems. In other words, they are poorer in atomic but richer in molecular hydrogen if normalized to their dust content. By comparing our findings with the predictions of theoretical models, we show that the opposite behavior observed in the MHI/Mdust and M_H2/M_dust ratios is fully consistent with outside-in stripping of the interstellar medium (ISM), and is simply a consequence of the different distribution of dust, HI and H2 across the disk. Our results demonstrate that the small environmental variations in the total Mgas/Mdust ratio, as well as in the gas-phase metallicity, do not automatically imply that environmental mechanisms are not able to affect the dust and metal content of the ISM in galaxies.

  20. Influence of the Ion-to-Atom Ratio on the Structure of CeO2 Buffer Layer by Ion Beam Assisted E-Beam Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Su; Jo, Sung Jin; Kim, Woo Jin; Koo, Won Hoe; Baik, Hong Koo; Lee, Se Jong

    2005-09-01

    Using ion-beam assisted e-beam evaporation with the ion beam directed at 55° to the normal of the film plane, (200) oriented CeO2 films with biaxial texture were deposited on Hastelloy C276 substrates at room temperature. The crystalline quality and in-plane orientation of films was investigated by X-ray diffraction 2θ-scan and Φ-scan, atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was shown that the in-plane and out-of-plane textures of the CeO2 films were controlled by the deposition parameters. The orientation of the films was studied as a function of ion-to-atom ratio and film thickness. The ion-to-atom ratio was varied by independently adjusting the deposition rate and the ion current density. Under optimum condition, (200) textured CeO2 films have been successfully grown on Hastelloy C276.

  1. Deriving effective atomic numbers from DECT based on a parameterization of the ratio of high and low linear attenuation coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Guillaume; Seco, Joao; Gaudreault, Mathieu; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-10-01

    Dual energy computed tomography (DECT) can provide simultaneous estimation of relative electron density ρe and effective atomic number Zeff. The ability to obtain these quantities (ρe, Zeff) has been shown to benefit selected radiotherapy applications where tissue characterization is required. The conventional analysis method (spectral method) relies on knowledge of the CT scanner photon spectra which may be difficult to obtain accurately. Furthermore an approximate empirical attenuation correction of the photon spectrum through the patient is necessary. We present an alternative approach based on a parameterization of the measured ratio of low and high kVp linear attenuation coefficients for deriving Zeff which does not require the estimation of the CT scanner spectra. In a first approach, the tissue substitute method (TSM), the Rutherford parameterization of the linear attenuation coefficients was employed to derive a relation between Zeff and the ratio of the linear attenuation coefficients measured at the low and high kVp of the CT scanner. A phantom containing 16 tissue mimicking inserts was scanned with a dual source DECT scanner at 80 and 140 kVp. The data from the 16 inserts phantom was used to obtain model parameters for the relation between Zeff and \\mu \\big|_{140kVp}^{80kVp}. The accuracy of the method was evaluated with a second phantom containing 4 tissue mimicking inserts. The TSM was compared to a more complex approach, the reference tissue method (RTM), which requires the derivation of stoichiometric fit parameters. These were derived from the 16 inserts phantom scans and used to calculate CT numbers at 80 and 140 kVp for a set of tabulated reference human tissues. Model parameters for the parameterization of \\mu \\big|_{140\\;kVp}^{80\\;kVp} were estimated for this reference tissue dataset and compared to the results of the TSM. Residuals on Zeff for the reference tissue dataset for both TSM and RTM were compared to those obtained from the

  2. Deriving effective atomic numbers from DECT based on a parameterization of the ratio of high and low linear attenuation coefficients.

    PubMed

    Landry, Guillaume; Seco, Joao; Gaudreault, Mathieu; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-10-01

    Dual energy computed tomography (DECT) can provide simultaneous estimation of relative electron density ρe and effective atomic number Zeff. The ability to obtain these quantities (ρe, Zeff) has been shown to benefit selected radiotherapy applications where tissue characterization is required. The conventional analysis method (spectral method) relies on knowledge of the CT scanner photon spectra which may be difficult to obtain accurately. Furthermore an approximate empirical attenuation correction of the photon spectrum through the patient is necessary. We present an alternative approach based on a parameterization of the measured ratio of low and high kVp linear attenuation coefficients for deriving Zeff which does not require the estimation of the CT scanner spectra. In a first approach, the tissue substitute method (TSM), the Rutherford parameterization of the linear attenuation coefficients was employed to derive a relation between Zeff and the ratio of the linear attenuation coefficients measured at the low and high kVp of the CT scanner. A phantom containing 16 tissue mimicking inserts was scanned with a dual source DECT scanner at 80 and 140 kVp. The data from the 16 inserts phantom was used to obtain model parameters for the relation between Zeff and [Formula: see text]. The accuracy of the method was evaluated with a second phantom containing 4 tissue mimicking inserts. The TSM was compared to a more complex approach, the reference tissue method (RTM), which requires the derivation of stoichiometric fit parameters. These were derived from the 16 inserts phantom scans and used to calculate CT numbers at 80 and 140 kVp for a set of tabulated reference human tissues. Model parameters for the parameterization of [Formula: see text] were estimated for this reference tissue dataset and compared to the results of the TSM. Residuals on Zeff for the reference tissue dataset for both TSM and RTM were compared to those obtained from the spectral method. The

  3. The selective effect of environment on the atomic and molecular gas-to-dust ratio of nearby galaxies in the Herschel Reference Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, L.; Bekki, K.; Boselli, A.; Catinella, B.; Ciesla, L.; Hughes, T. M.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Boquien, M.; de Looze, I.; Smith, M. W. L.; Spinoglio, L.; Viaene, S.

    2016-07-01

    We combine dust, atomic (H I) and molecular (H2) hydrogen mass measurements for 176 galaxies in the Herschel Reference Survey to investigate the effect of environment on the gas-to-dust mass (Mgas/Mdust) ratio of nearby galaxies. We find that, at fixed stellar mass, the average Mgas/Mdust ratio varies by no more than a factor of ˜2 when moving from field to cluster galaxies, with Virgo galaxies being slightly more dust rich (per unit of gas) than isolated systems. Remarkably, once the molecular and atomic hydrogen phases are investigated separately, we find that H I-deficient galaxies have at the same time lower M_{H I}/M_dust ratio but higher M_H2/M_dust ratio than H I-normal systems. In other words, they are poorer in atomic but richer in molecular hydrogen if normalized to their dust content. By comparing our findings with the predictions of theoretical models, we show that the opposite behaviour observed in the M_{H I}/M_dust and M_H2/M_dust ratios is fully consistent with outside-in stripping of the interstellar medium (ISM), and is simply a consequence of the different distribution of dust, H I and H2 across the disc. Our results demonstrate that the small environmental variations in the total Mgas/Mdust ratio, as well as in the gas-phase metallicity, do not automatically imply that environmental mechanisms are not able to affect the dust and metal content of the ISM in galaxies.

  4. H/C atomic ratio as a smart linkage between pyrolytic temperatures, aromatic clusters and sorption properties of biochars derived from diverse precursory materials.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xin; Chen, Zaiming; Chen, Baoliang

    2016-01-01

    Biochar is increasingly gaining attention due to multifunctional roles in soil amelioration, pollution mitigation and carbon sequestration. It is a significant challenge to compare the reported results from world-wide labs regarding the structure and sorption of biochars derived from various precursors under different pyrolytic conditions due to a lack of a simple linkage. By combining the published works on various biochars, we established a quantitative relationship between H/C atomic ratio and pyrolytic temperature (T), aromatic structure, and sorption properties for naphthalene and phenanthrene. A reverse sigmoid shape between T and the H/C ratio was observed, which was independent of the precursors of biochars, including the ash contents. Linear correlations of Freundlich parameters (N, log Kf) and sorption amount (log Qe, log QA) with H/C ratios were found. A rectangle-like model was proposed to predict the aromatic cluster sizes of biochars from their H/C ratios, and then a good structure-sorption relationship was derived. These quantitative relationships indicate that the H/C atomic ratio is a universal linkage to predict pyrolytic temperatures, aromatic cluster sizes, and sorption characteristics. This study would guide the global study of biochars toward being comparable, and then the development of the structure-sorption relationships will benefit the structural design and environmental application of biochars. PMID:26940984

  5. H/C atomic ratio as a smart linkage between pyrolytic temperatures, aromatic clusters and sorption properties of biochars derived from diverse precursory materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xin; Chen, Zaiming; Chen, Baoliang

    2016-03-01

    Biochar is increasingly gaining attention due to multifunctional roles in soil amelioration, pollution mitigation and carbon sequestration. It is a significant challenge to compare the reported results from world-wide labs regarding the structure and sorption of biochars derived from various precursors under different pyrolytic conditions due to a lack of a simple linkage. By combining the published works on various biochars, we established a quantitative relationship between H/C atomic ratio and pyrolytic temperature (T), aromatic structure, and sorption properties for naphthalene and phenanthrene. A reverse sigmoid shape between T and the H/C ratio was observed, which was independent of the precursors of biochars, including the ash contents. Linear correlations of Freundlich parameters (N, log Kf) and sorption amount (log Qe, log QA) with H/C ratios were found. A rectangle-like model was proposed to predict the aromatic cluster sizes of biochars from their H/C ratios, and then a good structure-sorption relationship was derived. These quantitative relationships indicate that the H/C atomic ratio is a universal linkage to predict pyrolytic temperatures, aromatic cluster sizes, and sorption characteristics. This study would guide the global study of biochars toward being comparable, and then the development of the structure-sorption relationships will benefit the structural design and environmental application of biochars.

  6. H/C atomic ratio as a smart linkage between pyrolytic temperatures, aromatic clusters and sorption properties of biochars derived from diverse precursory materials

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xin; Chen, Zaiming; Chen, Baoliang

    2016-01-01

    Biochar is increasingly gaining attention due to multifunctional roles in soil amelioration, pollution mitigation and carbon sequestration. It is a significant challenge to compare the reported results from world-wide labs regarding the structure and sorption of biochars derived from various precursors under different pyrolytic conditions due to a lack of a simple linkage. By combining the published works on various biochars, we established a quantitative relationship between H/C atomic ratio and pyrolytic temperature (T), aromatic structure, and sorption properties for naphthalene and phenanthrene. A reverse sigmoid shape between T and the H/C ratio was observed, which was independent of the precursors of biochars, including the ash contents. Linear correlations of Freundlich parameters (N, log Kf) and sorption amount (log Qe, log QA) with H/C ratios were found. A rectangle-like model was proposed to predict the aromatic cluster sizes of biochars from their H/C ratios, and then a good structure-sorption relationship was derived. These quantitative relationships indicate that the H/C atomic ratio is a universal linkage to predict pyrolytic temperatures, aromatic cluster sizes, and sorption characteristics. This study would guide the global study of biochars toward being comparable, and then the development of the structure-sorption relationships will benefit the structural design and environmental application of biochars. PMID:26940984

  7. Reconstruction of local fallout composition and gamma-ray exposure in a village contaminated by the first USSR nuclear test in the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site in Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Imanaka, Tetsuji; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Kawai, Kenta; Sakaguchi, Aya; Hoshi, Masaharu; Chaizhunusova, Nailya; Apsalikov, Kazbek

    2010-11-01

    After the disintegration of the USSR in end of 1991, it became possible for foreign scientists to visit Kazakhstan, in order to investigate the radiological consequences of nuclear explosions that had been conducted at the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site (SNTS). Since the first visit in 1994, our group has been continuing expeditions for soil sampling at various areas around SNTS. The current level of local fallout at SNTS was studied through γ-spectrometry for (137)Cs as well as α-spectrometry for (239,240)Pu. Average values of soil inventory from wide areas around SNTS were 3,500 and 3,700 Bq m(-2) for (137)Cs and (239,240)Pu, respectively, as of January 1, 2000. The average level of (137)Cs is comparable to that in Japan due to global fallout, while the level of (239,240)Pu is several tens of times larger than that in Japan. Areas of strong contamination were found along the trajectories of radioactive fallout, information on which was declassified after the collapse of the USSR. Our recent efforts of soil sampling were concentrated on the area around the Dolon village heavily affected by the radioactive plume from the first USSR atomic bomb test in 1949 and located 110 km east from ground zero of the explosion. Using soil inventory data, retrospective dosimetry was attempted by reconstructing γ-ray exposure from fission product nuclides deposited on the ground. Adopting representative parameters for the initial (137)Cs deposition (13 kBq m(-2)), the refractory/volatile deposition ratio (3.8) and the plume arrival time after explosion (2.5 h), an absorbed dose in air of 600 mGy was obtained for the 1-year cumulative dose in Dolon village, due to the first bomb test in 1949. Considering possible ranges of the parameters, 350 and 910 mGy were estimated for high and low cases of γ-ray dose in air, respectively. It was encouraging that the deduced value was consistent with other estimations using thermal luminescence and archived monitoring data. The present

  8. Normal and excess nitrogen uptake by iron-based Fe-Cr-Al alloys: the role of the Cr/Al atomic ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, K. S.; Schacherl, R. E.; Bischoff, E.; Mittemeijer, E. J.

    2011-06-01

    Upon nitriding ferritic iron-based Fe-Cr-Al alloys, containing a total of 1.50 at. % (Cr + Al) alloying elements with varying Cr/Al atomic ratio (0.21-2.00), excess nitrogen uptake occurred, i.e. more nitrogen was incorporated in the specimens than compatible with only inner nitride formation and equilibrium nitrogen solubility of the unstrained ferrite matrix. The amount of excess nitrogen increased with decreasing Cr/Al atomic ratio. The microstructure of the nitrided zone was investigated by X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis, transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. Metastable, fine platelet-type, mixed Cr1- x Al x N nitride precipitates developed in the nitrided zone for all of the investigated specimens. The degree of coherency of the nitride precipitates with the surrounding ferrite matrix is discussed in view of the anisotropy of the misfit. Analysis of nitrogen-absorption isotherms, recorded after subsequent pre- and de-nitriding treatments, allowed quantitative differentiation of different types of nitrogen taken up. The amounts of the different types of excess nitrogen as function of the Cr/Al atomic ratio are discussed in terms of the nitride/matrix misfit and the different chemical affinities of Cr and Al for N. The strikingly different nitriding behaviors of Fe-Cr-Al and Fe-Cr-Ti alloys could be explained on this basis.

  9. Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to fallout radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Conard, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Particularly important has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

  10. Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to fallout radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Conard, R.A.

    1991-12-31

    This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Particularly important has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

  11. Fallout: The experiences of a medical team in the care of a Marshallese population accidently exposed to fallout radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Conard, R.A.

    1992-09-01

    This report presents an historical account of the experiences of the Brookhaven Medical Team in the examination and treatment of the Marshallese people following their accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. This is the first time that a population has been heavily exposed to radioactive fallout, and even though this was a tragic mishap, the medical findings have provided valuable information for other accidents involving fallout such as the recent reactor accident at Chernobyl. Noteworthy has been the unexpected importance of radioactive iodine in the fallout in producing thyroid abnormalities.

  12. Radioactive Fallout from Terrorist Nuclear Detonations

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R E

    2007-05-03

    Responding correctly during the first hour after a terrorist nuclear detonation is the key to reducing casualties from a low-yield surface burst, and a correct response requires an understanding of the rapidly changing dose rate from fallout. This report provides an empirical formula for dose rate as a function of time and location that can guide the response to an unexpected nuclear detonation. At least one post-detonation radiation measurement is required if the yield and other characteristics of the detonation are unknown.

  13. Assessment of spatial distribution of fallout radionuclides through geostatistics concept.

    PubMed

    Mabit, L; Bernard, C

    2007-01-01

    After introducing geostatistics concept and its utility in environmental science and especially in Fallout Radionuclide (FRN) spatialisation, a case study for cesium-137 ((137)Cs) redistribution at the field scale using geostatistics is presented. On a Canadian agricultural field, geostatistics coupled with a Geographic Information System (GIS) was used to test three different techniques of interpolation [Ordinary Kriging (OK), Inverse Distance Weighting power one (IDW1) and two (IDW2)] to create a (137)Cs map and to establish a radioisotope budget. Following the optimization of variographic parameters, an experimental semivariogram was developed to determine the spatial dependence of (137)Cs. It was adjusted to a spherical isotropic model with a range of 30 m and a very small nugget effect. This (137)Cs semivariogram showed a good autocorrelation (R(2)=0.91) and was well structured ('nugget-to-sill' ratio of 4%). It also revealed that the sampling strategy was adequate to reveal the spatial correlation of (137)Cs. The spatial redistribution of (137)Cs was estimated by Ordinary Kriging and IDW to produce contour maps. A radioisotope budget was established for the 2.16 ha agricultural field under investigation. It was estimated that around 2 x 10(7)Bq of (137)Cs were missing (around 30% of the total initial fallout) and were exported by physical processes (runoff and erosion processes) from the area under investigation. The cross-validation analysis showed that in the case of spatially structured data, OK is a better interpolation method than IDW1 or IDW2 for the assessment of potential radioactive contamination and/or pollution. PMID:17673340

  14. [Comparative analysis of the radionuclide composition in fallout after the Chernobyl and the Fukushima accidents].

    PubMed

    Kotenko, K V; Shinkarev, S M; Abramov, Iu V; Granovskaia, E O; Iatsenko, V N; Gavrilin, Iu I; Margulis, U Ia; Garetskaia, O S; Imanaka, T; Khoshi, M

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear accident occurred at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) (March 11, 2011) similarly to the accident at the Chernobyl NPP (April 26, 1986) is related to the level 7 of the INES. It is of interest to make an analysis of the radionuclide composition of the fallout following the both accidents. The results of the spectrometric measurements were used in that comparative analysis. Two areas following the Chernobyl accident were considered: (1) the near zone of the fallout - the Belarusian part of the central spot extended up to 60 km around the Chernobyl NPS and (2) the far zone of the fallout--the "Gomel-Mogilev" spot centered 200 km to the north-northeast of the damaged reactor. In the case of Fukushima accident the near zone up to about 60 km considered. The comparative analysis has been done with respect to refractory radionuclides (95Zr, 95Nb, 141Ce, 144Ce), as well as to the intermediate and volatile radionuclides 103Ru, 106Ru, 131I, 134Cs, 137Cs, 140La, 140Ba and the results of such a comparison have been discussed. With respect to exposure to the public the most important radionuclides are 131I and 137Cs. For the both accidents the ratios of 131I/137Cs in the considered soil samples are in the similar ranges: (3-50) for the Chernobyl samples and (5-70) for the Fukushima samples. Similarly to the Chernobyl accident a clear tendency that the ratio of 131I/137Cs in the fallout decreases with the increase of the ground deposition density of 137Cs within the trace related to a radioactive cloud has been identified for the Fukushima accident. It looks like this is a universal tendency for the ratio of 131I/137Cs versus the 137Cs ground deposition density in the fallout along the trace of a radioactive cloud as a result of a heavy accident at the NPP with radionuclides releases into the environment. This tendency is important for an objective reconstruction of 131I fallout based on the results of 137Cs measurements of soil samples carried out at

  15. Far field fallout prediction techniques. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, W.S. Jr.

    1983-12-01

    A calculational technique for use in predicting fallout far downwind from nuclear bursts is developed and validated. Possible siting strategies for the next generation of missiles might invite a concentrated attack by thousands of nuclear warheads. The resulting fallout field could consist of the superposition of thousands of single burst patterns. The downwind extent of damaging radiation levels would extend beyond the distances to which calculations are usually performed for single bursts. Numerical models currently available cannot be extended to these large downwind distances because of the artificial pattern break up inherent in their numerical quadrature and because of prohibitive computing requirements. Two approaches to this problem are taken here. First, a numerical smoothing which conserves radioactivity is developed to help prevent pattern break up. This is partially successful in that it extends the predictive range farther downwind, but not far enough. The second approach is to abandon the numerical quadrature -- known as disc tossing -- and adopt a whole cloud smearing approach. The key function needed for the smearing approach, the fractional arrival rate of activity on the ground, is derived directly from physical principles and validated by comparison with an extensive series of numerical (disc tosser) predictions.

  16. Estimation of calcified tissues hardness via calcium and magnesium ionic to atomic line intensity ratio in laser induced breakdown spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Salam, Z. A.; Galmed, A. H.; Tognoni, E.; Harith, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    Calcified tissues representing three different matrices, namely enamel of human teeth, shells and eggshell, have been studied via Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. The experimental CaII/CaI and MgII/MgI ratios have been measured, in view of the expected correlation between the extent of ionization caused by the laser induced shock wave (SW) and the hardness of the target. The ratio CaII/CaI between the ionic calcium line at 373.69 nm and the neutral line at 428.9 nm is obtained for enamel, shells and eggshell spectra, as well as the ratio MgII/MgI between the ionic magnesium line at 280.26 nm and the neutral line at 285.22 nm. The results show that such spectral lines intensities ratio differs for different matrices and is indeed related to the target materials hardness. It is also found that the MgII/MgI ratio is preferable as an indicator of hardness since these lines are less affected by self absorption. The SW front speed has been measured in the three cases and the obtained values confirm the proportionality to the target hardness. The results here obtained suggest the feasibility of the quantitative estimation of hardness for any other calcified tissues.

  17. Laboratory Study of Airborne Fallout Particles and Their Time Distribution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, H. A., Jr.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Samples of filtered airborne particulate, collected daily for the first month after the September 18, 1977 Chinese nuclear detonation, showed fourteen fission products. Fluctuations in the daily fallout activity levels suggested a global fallout orbit time of approximately twenty days. (Author/BB)

  18. Influence of ion-to-atom ratio on the microstructure of evaporated molybdenum thin films grown using low energy argon ions

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Praveen Kumar Nayak, Maheswar; Rai, Sanjay Kumar; Lodha, Gyanendra Singh; Sant, Tushar; Sharma, Surinder Mohan; Mukherjee, Chandrachur

    2014-03-15

    The authors report the effect of argon ion to molybdenum atom ratio (r) on the microstructure of low energy (70 eV) argon ion assisted electron beam evaporated Mo thin films. Surface roughness, morphology, and crystallinity of Mo films are found to strongly depend on “r.” Increase of “r” from 0 to 100 induces gradual loss in crystallinity, reduction in surface roughness and systematic increase in density of the film. For “r” ∼ 100, average atomic density of the film approaches the bulk value (97%) with lowest surface roughness. Further, increasing “r” up to 170 reduces the atomic density, increases roughness, and increase in crystallinity induced by low energy Ar ion beam. The observed surface roughness and grain size determined by x-ray reflectivity and glancing incidence x-ray diffraction correlate well with atomic force microscopy measurements. This study demonstrates that for r = 100 one gets lowest roughness Mo film with highest density and nearly amorphous microstructure. The growth model is discussed by structural zone model.

  19. Plutonium concentration and isotopic ratio in soil samples from central-eastern Japan collected around the 1970s

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jian; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Obtaining Pu background data in the environment is essential for contamination source identification and assessment of environmental impact of Pu released from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident. However, no baseline information on Pu isotopes in Fukushima Prefecture has been reported. Here we analyzed 80 surface soil samples collected from the central-eastern Japan during 1969–1977 for 239+240Pu activity concentration and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio to establish the baseline before the FDNPP accident. We found that 239+240Pu activity concentrations ranged from 0.004 –1.46 mBq g−1, and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios varied narrowly from 0.148 to 0.229 with a mean of 0.186 ± 0.015. We also reconstructed the surface deposition density of 241Pu using the 241Pu/239Pu atom ratio in the Japanese fallout reference material. The obtained results indicated that, for the FDNPP-accident released 241Pu, a similar radiation impact can be estimated as was seen for the global fallout deposited 241Pu in the last decades. PMID:25881009

  20. Plutonium concentration and isotopic ratio in soil samples from central-eastern Japan collected around the 1970s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guosheng; Zheng, Jian; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2015-04-01

    Obtaining Pu background data in the environment is essential for contamination source identification and assessment of environmental impact of Pu released from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident. However, no baseline information on Pu isotopes in Fukushima Prefecture has been reported. Here we analyzed 80 surface soil samples collected from the central-eastern Japan during 1969-1977 for 239+240Pu activity concentration and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio to establish the baseline before the FDNPP accident. We found that 239+240Pu activity concentrations ranged from 0.004 -1.46 mBq g-1, and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios varied narrowly from 0.148 to 0.229 with a mean of 0.186 +/- 0.015. We also reconstructed the surface deposition density of 241Pu using the 241Pu/239Pu atom ratio in the Japanese fallout reference material. The obtained results indicated that, for the FDNPP-accident released 241Pu, a similar radiation impact can be estimated as was seen for the global fallout deposited 241Pu in the last decades.

  1. Plutonium concentration and isotopic ratio in soil samples from central-eastern Japan collected around the 1970s.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guosheng; Zheng, Jian; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Obtaining Pu background data in the environment is essential for contamination source identification and assessment of environmental impact of Pu released from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident. However, no baseline information on Pu isotopes in Fukushima Prefecture has been reported. Here we analyzed 80 surface soil samples collected from the central-eastern Japan during 1969-1977 for (239+240)Pu activity concentration and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio to establish the baseline before the FDNPP accident. We found that (239+240)Pu activity concentrations ranged from 0.004 -1.46 mBq g(-1), and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios varied narrowly from 0.148 to 0.229 with a mean of 0.186 ± 0.015. We also reconstructed the surface deposition density of (241)Pu using the (241)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio in the Japanese fallout reference material. The obtained results indicated that, for the FDNPP-accident released (241)Pu, a similar radiation impact can be estimated as was seen for the global fallout deposited (241)Pu in the last decades. PMID:25881009

  2. Fallout /sup 3/H ingestion in Akita, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Hisamatsu, S.; Takizawa, Y.; Abe, T.; Katsumata, T.

    1987-09-01

    To study fallout /sup 3/H ingestion in Japan, 16 separate food group samples were collected from Akita during 1985. The /sup 3/H concentration in free water and that in a tissue-bound form were determined separately. The average /sup 3/H concentration in the tissue-bound form was 2.2 Bq L-1, 1.7 times higher than in the free water of the food. The ingestions of /sup 3/H in the tissue-bound form and as free water in the diet were 0.60 Bq d-1 and 1.0 Bq d-1, respectively. Cereals represented the food group that contributed the most to the ingestion of tissue-bound /sup 3/H. Total /sup 3/H ingestion was estimated to be 4.1 Bq d-1. The contribution of the tissue-bound form to the total ingestion was 15%, considerably lower than reported for Italian diets. The ratio of /sup 3/H ingestion in the tissue-bound form to the free water form in the diet was similar to the ratio reported for New York City.

  3. Activities of Pu and Am isotopes and isotopic ratios in a soil contaminated by weapons-grade plutonium.

    PubMed

    Lee, M H; Clark, S B

    2005-08-01

    An accident and fire at the former McGuire Air Force Base and Boeing Michigan Aeronautical Research Center (BOMARC) site in New Jersey resulted in dispersion of weapons-grade plutonium in particulate form to the local environment. Soil samples collected at the BOMARC site were measured for their activities and isotopic ratios of Pu and Am isotopes by radioanalytical techniques. The activities of the Pu and Am isotopes in the BOMARC soil were markedly higher than fallout levels, and they decreased nearly exponentially with increasing particle size of the soil. The measured (241)Am activity was compared to calculated values based on decay of (241)Pu. The activity ratios of (238)Pu/(239,240)Pu, (241)Pu/(239,240)Pu, and (241)Am/(239,240)Pu observed in the BOMARC soil were much lower than those attributed to nuclear reprocessing plants and Chernobyl fallout. From the activity ratios of (241)Pu/(239,240)Pu and (241)Am/(239,240)Pu, the origin of the Pu isotopes was identified as weapons-grade and the time since production of the material was estimated. Furthermore, the atomic ratio of (240)Pu/(239)Pu in the BOMARC soil was remarkably lower than the fallout value influenced by nuclear weapons testing and the Chernobyl accident. The atomic ratio of (240)Pu/(239)Pu was very close to the value of the weapons-grade Pu detected from the Thule accident in Greenland. This work demonstrates the utility of radioanalytical measurements and decay calculations for defining characteristics of the source term and discriminating multiple processes that contribute to a source. Such an approach would also be needed to respond to a terrorist event involving an improvised nuclear device or radiological dispersal device. PMID:16124281

  4. Accelerator Mass Spectrometric (AMS) Measurements of Plutonium Activity Concentrations and 240Pu/239Pu Atom Ratios In Soil Extracts Supplied by the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring & Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, T F; Brown, T A; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R E; Kehl, S R

    2005-02-28

    Plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) and plutonium-239+240 ({sup 239+240}Pu) activities concentrations and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios are reported for a series of chemically purified soil extracts received from the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring & Research Center (CEMRC) in New Mexico. Samples were analyzed without further purification at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). This report also includes a brief description of the AMS system and internal laboratory procedures used to ensure the quality and reliability of the measurement data.

  5. Predictive Fallout Composition Modeling: Improvements and Applications of the Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, David A; Jodoin, Vincent J; Lee, Ronald W; Monterial, Mateusz

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines several improvements to the Particle Activity Module of the Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC). The modeling of each phase of the fallout process is discussed within DELFIC to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations with the code for modeling and simulation. Expansion of the DELFIC isotopic library to include actinides and light elements is shown. Several key features of the new library are demonstrated, including compliance with ENDF/B-VII standards, augmentation of hardwired activated soil and actinide decay calculations with exact Bateman calculations, and full physical and chemical fractionation of all material inventories. Improvements to the radionuclide source term are demonstrated, including the ability to specify heterogeneous fission types and the ability to import source terms from irradiation calculations using the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation (ORIGEN) code. Additionally, the dose, kerma, and effective dose conversion factors are revised. Finally, the application of DELFIC for consequence management planning and forensic analysis is presented. For consequence management, DELFIC is shown to provide disaster recovery teams with simulations of real-time events, including the location, composition, time of arrival, activity rates, and dose rates of fallout, accounting for site-specific atmospheric effects. The results from DELFIC are also demonstrated for use by nuclear forensics teams to plan collection routes (including the determination of optimal collection locations), estimate dose rates to collectors, and anticipate the composition of material at collection sites. These capabilities give mission planners the ability to maximize their effectiveness in the field while minimizing risk to their collectors.

  6. The influence of process parameters and pulse ratio of precursors on the characteristics of La1 - x Al x O3 films deposited by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Chenxi; Liu, Hongxia; Wang, Xing; Fan, Xiaojiao

    2015-04-01

    The influence of processing parameters of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and lanthanum oxide (La2O3) gate dielectric is investigated. Trimethylaluminum (TMA) and tris(isopropylcyclopentadienyl) lanthanum [La(iPrCp)3] were used as precursors separately, and H2O was used as oxidant. The ultra-thin La1 - x Al x O3 gate dielectric films are deposited on p-type silicon substrates by atom layer deposition (ALD) for different pulse ratios of precursors. Effects of different La/Al precursor pulse ratios on the physical properties and electrical characteristics of La1 - x Al x O3 films are studied. The preliminary testing results indicate that the increase of La precursor pulse can improve the characteristics of film, which has significant effects on the dielectric constant, equivalent oxide thickness (EOT), electrical properties, and stability of film.

  7. The influence of process parameters and pulse ratio of precursors on the characteristics of La1 - x Al x O3 films deposited by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Fei, Chenxi; Liu, Hongxia; Wang, Xing; Fan, Xiaojiao

    2015-01-01

    The influence of processing parameters of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and lanthanum oxide (La2O3) gate dielectric is investigated. Trimethylaluminum (TMA) and tris(isopropylcyclopentadienyl) lanthanum [La(iPrCp)3] were used as precursors separately, and H2O was used as oxidant. The ultra-thin La1 - x Al x O3 gate dielectric films are deposited on p-type silicon substrates by atom layer deposition (ALD) for different pulse ratios of precursors. Effects of different La/Al precursor pulse ratios on the physical properties and electrical characteristics of La1 - x Al x O3 films are studied. The preliminary testing results indicate that the increase of La precursor pulse can improve the characteristics of film, which has significant effects on the dielectric constant, equivalent oxide thickness (EOT), electrical properties, and stability of film. PMID:25983672

  8. Tracking Radioactive Fallout from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Accident in Arctic Snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterberg, E. C.; Thompson, J.; Landis, J.; Albert, M. R.; Campbell, S. W.; Hawley, R. L.; Virginia, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    The March 11, 2011 magnitude 9.0 Tohoku, Japan earthquake produced a tsunami that inundated the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant and led to the accidental release of radioactive 131I, 132Te, 134Cs, and 137Cs to the atmosphere. The Japanese Nuclear Safety Commission estimates that 12,000 TBq of 137Cs were released to the atmosphere during the incident, which represents ~14% of the total estimated 137Cs emission from the Chernobyl disaster in April 1986. Measurements of airborne radiation collected at the Fukushima plant illustrate that >50% of the total emitted radiation was released on March 15 and 16 associated with explosions and fires at reactor units 1, 2, and 4, and 70% was emitted in the first 5 days of the event. The source of the radiation is thus well constrained in time and space, providing an opportunity to better understand long-range atmospheric transport processes from Asia to the Arctic, while also assessing the magnitude of the fallout in the Arctic. Here we describe the 137Cs and 134Cs fallout flux near Thule, Greenland (1700 m a.s.l.), at Summit (3200 m a.s.l.), Greenland, and within Denali National Park, Alaska (2400-3900 m a.s.l.) based on series of large-volume (5-15 l) snow pit samples collected in June and July, 2011. In addition to assessing the spatial variability of Fukushima fallout in the Arctic, the elevation range of samples allows for an analysis of any vertical heterogeneity in fallout transport and deposition. Major ion concentrations and stable water isotope ratios are used to confirm the seasonal timing of the Fukushima fallout horizon in the snowpack. Radiocesium was concentrated and isolated from the snow pit meltwater using the well-established ammonium phosphomolybdate (AMP) adsorption method, and 134Cs and 137Cs concentrations were measured using gamma spectrometry with a Canberra 3523 well-type intrinsic Ge-detector at the Dartmouth College Short-Lived Isotope Laboratory. NOAA HYPLIT atmospheric forward

  9. Detection limits in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry: an approach to the breakdown of the ratios of detection limits reported for different equipments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boumans, P. W. J. M.; Vrakking, J. J. A. M.

    This paper deals with the differences among detection limits in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) as reported for different experimental facilities. The factor by which such detection limits differ can be split into three factors to account separately for the differences between the sources, the resolving powers of the spectrometers and the noise characteristics of the systems. The approach uses earlier results about the behaviour of the relative standard deviation (RSD) of the background signal and, as a new feature, an experimentally established linear relationship between the ratio of signal-to-background ratios, (SBR) HR/(SBR) MR, and the inverse ratio of the effective line widths, (Δλ eff) MR/(Δλ eff) HR, where "HR" and "MR" refer to high and medium spectral resolution as achieved by applying narrow (60μm) and wide (210μm) slits in a 1.5-m echelle monochromator. The approach is applied to the breakdown of the ratios of detection limits reported by winge et al. ( Appl. Spectrosc.33, 206 (1979)) for a 27-MHz ICP and those found in this work for a 50-MHz ICP. Data for some 100 prominent ICP lines in the wavelength region between about 280 and 325 nm were processed. It is shown that the approach leads to a rational comparison of detection limits.

  10. European roe deer antlers as an environmental archive for fallout (236)U and (239)Pu.

    PubMed

    Froehlich, M B; Steier, P; Wallner, G; Fifield, L K

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic (236)U and (239)Pu were measured in European roe deer antlers hunted between 1955 and 1977 which covers and extends beyond the period of intensive nuclear weapons testing (1954-1962). The antlers were hunting trophies, and hence the hunting area, the year of shooting and the approximate age of each animal is given. Uranium and plutonium are known to deposit in skeletal tissue. Since antler histology is similar to bone, both elements were expected in antlers. Furthermore, roe deer shed their antlers annually, and hence antlers may provide a time-resolved environmental archive for fallout radionuclides. The radiochemical procedure is based on a Pu separation step by anion exchange (Dowex 1 × 8) and a subsequent U purification by extraction chromatography using UTEVA(®). The samples were measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at the VERA facility (University of Vienna). In addition to the (236)U and (239)Pu concentrations, the (240)Pu/(239)Pu isotopic ratios were determined with a mean value of 0.172 ± 0.023 which is in agreement with the ratio of global fallout (∼0.18). Rather high (236)U/(238)U ratios of the order of 10(-6) were observed. These measured ratios, where the (236)U arises only from global fallout, have implications for the use of the (236)U/(238)U ratio as a fingerprint for nuclear accidents or releases from nuclear facilities. Our investigations have shown the potential to use antlers as a temporally resolved archive for the uptake of actinides from the environment. PMID:26119579

  11. Calibrated sulfur isotope abundance ratios of three IAEA sulfur isotope reference materials and V-CDT with a reassessment of the atomic weight of sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, T.; Valkiers, S.; Kipphardt, H.; De Bièvre, P.; Taylor, P. D. P.; Gonfiantini, R.; Krouse, R.

    2001-09-01

    Calibrated values have been obtained for sulfur isotope abundance ratios of sulfur isotope reference materials distributed by the IAEA (Vienna). For the calibration of the measurements, a set of synthetic isotope mixtures were prepared gravimetrically from high purity Ag 2S materials enriched in 32S, 33S, and 34S. All materials were converted into SF 6 gas and subsequently, their sulfur isotope ratios were measured on the SF 5+ species using a special gas source mass spectrometer equipped with a molecular flow inlet system (IRMM's Avogadro II amount comparator). Values for the 32S/ 34S abundance ratios are 22.650 4(20), 22.142 4(20), and 23.393 3(17) for IAEA-S-1, IAEA-S-2, and IAEA-S-3, respectively. The calculated 32S/ 34S abundance ratio for V-CDT is 22.643 6(20), which is very close to the calibrated ratio obtained by Ding et al. (1999). In this way, the zero point of the VCDT scale is anchored firmly to the international system of units SI. The 32S/ 33S abundance ratios are 126.942(47), 125.473(55), 129.072(32), and 126.948(47) for IAEA-S-1, IAEA-S-2, IAEA-S-3, and V-CDT, respectively. In this way, the linearity of the V-CDT scale is improved over this range. The values of the sulfur molar mass for IAEA-S-1 and V-CDT were calculated to be 32.063 877(56) and 32.063 911(56), respectively, the values with the smallest combined uncertainty ever reported for the sulfur molar masses (atomic weights).

  12. Cancer mortality and radioactive fallout in southwestern Utah.

    PubMed

    Machado, S G; Land, C E; McKay, F W

    1987-01-01

    Cancer mortality was compared between a three-county region in southwestern Utah and the remainder of Utah in an investigation of reported excess cancer risks associated with residence in southwestern Utah during the period of above-ground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. Because most of the fallout in southwestern Utah was deposited during 1953-1957, comparisons were limited to persons born before 1958, and deaths from leukemia and bone cancer during 1955-1980 and from other cancers during 1964-1980. There was no excess risk of cancer mortality in southwestern Utah, for single or grouped sites, with the single exception of leukemia which showed statistically significant odds ratios of 1.45 based on 62 deaths at all ages, and 2.84 based on nine deaths at ages 0-14. The finding for childhood leukemia was based on different time periods and geographic comparisons from those of two earlier studies in which no such excess was found. Mortality from all cancer sites combined was significantly lower in southwestern Utah than in the remainder of the state, even after adjustment for the higher proportion of (lower risk) Mormons in southwestern Utah. The present results, including the positive association for leukemia, are inconsistent with the high excess risks reported by Johnson (JAMA 1984;251:230-6) based on an interview survey of cancer incidence among long-term Mormon residents of southwestern Utah. PMID:3788954

  13. 31. Threequarter view of front of building 161, fallout shelter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Three-quarter view of front of building 161, fallout shelter taken from top of water storage mound, looking northwest - Nike Missile Battery MS-40, County Road No. 260, Farmington, Dakota County, MN

  14. 38. Overall view showing building 161, fallout shelter on far ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Overall view showing building 161, fallout shelter on far right, and building 102, officers quarters and enlisted men barracks on far left, looking east - Nike Missile Battery MS-40, County Road No. 260, Farmington, Dakota County, MN

  15. Analysis of meteorological and radiological data for selected fallout episodes

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, V.E. )

    1990-11-01

    The Weather Service Nuclear Support Office has analyzed the meteorological and radiological data collected for the following atmospheric nuclear tests: TRINITY; EASY of the Tumbler-Snapper series; ANNIE, NANCY, BADGER, SIMON, and HARRY of the Upshot-Knothole series; BEE and ZUCCHINI of the Teapot series; BOLTZMANN and SMOKY of the Plumbbob series; and SMALL BOY of the Dominic II series. These tests were chosen as having the greatest impact on nearby downwind populated locations, contributing approximately 80% of the collective estimated exposure. This report describes the methods of analysis used in deriving fallout-pattern contours and estimated fallout arrival times. Inconsistencies in the radiological data and their resolution are discussed. The methods of estimating fallout arrival times from the meteorological data are described. Comparisons of fallout patterns resulting from these analyses with earlier analyses show insignificant differences in the areas covered or people exposed.

  16. Ingestion of Nevada Test Site Fallout: Internal dose estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, F.W.; Kirchner, T.B.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1996-10-01

    This paper summarizes individual and collective dose estimates for the internal organs of hypothetical yet representative residents of selected communities that received measurable fallout from nuclear detonations at the Nevada Test Site. The doses, which resulted from ingestion of local and regional food products contaminated with over 20 radionuclides, were estimated with use of the PATHWAY food-chain-transport model to provide estimates of central tendency and uncertainty. The thyroid gland received much higher doses than other internal organs and tissues. In a avery few cases, infants might have received thyroid doses in excess of 1 Gy, depending on location, diet, and timing of fallout. {sup 131}I was the primary thyroid dose contributor, and fresh milk was the main exposure pathway. With the exception of the thyroid, organ doses from the ingestion pathway were much smaller (<3%) than those from external gamma exposure to deposited fallout. Doses to residents living closest to the Nevada Test Site were contributed mainly by a few fallout events; doses to more distantly located people were generally smaller, but a greater number of events provided measurable contributions. The effectiveness of different fallout events in producing internal organ doses through ingestion varied dramatically with seasonal timing of the test, with maximum dose per unit fallout occurring for early summer depositions when milk cows were on pasture and fresh, local vegetables were used. Within specific communities, internal doses differed by age, sex, and lifestyle. Collective internal dose estimates for specific geographic areas are provided.

  17. Ingestion of Nevada Test Site fallout: internal dose estimates.

    PubMed

    Whicker, F W; Kirchner, T B; Anspaugh, L R; Ng, Y C

    1996-10-01

    This paper summarizes individual and collective dose estimates for the internal organs of hypothetical yet representative residents of selected communities that received measurable fallout from nuclear detonations at the Nevada Test Site. The doses, which resulted from ingestion of local and regional food products contaminated with over 20 radionuclides, were estimated with use of the PATHWAY food-chain-transport model to provide estimates of central tendency and uncertainty. The thyroid gland received much higher doses than other internal organs and tissues. In a very few cases, infants might have received thyroid doses in excess of 1 Gy, depending on location, diet, and timing of fallout. 131I was the primary thyroid dose contributor, and fresh milk was the main exposure pathway. With the exception of the thyroid, organ doses from the ingestion pathway were much smaller (< 3%) than those from external gamma exposure to deposited fallout. Doses to residents living closest to the Nevada Test Site were contributed mainly by a few fallout events; doses to more distantly located people were generally smaller, but a greater number of events provided measurable contributions. The effectiveness of different fallout events in producing internal organ doses through ingestion varied dramatically with seasonal timing of the test, with maximum dose per unit fallout occurring for early summer depositions when milk cows were on pasture and fresh, local vegetables were used. Within specific communities, internal doses differed by age, sex, and lifestyle. Collective internal dose estimates for specific geographic areas are provided. PMID:8830749

  18. A MODEL BUILDING CODE ARTICLE ON FALLOUT SHELTERS WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR INCLUSION OF REQUIREMENTS FOR FALLOUT SHELTER CONSTRUCTION IN FOUR NATIONAL MODEL BUILDING CODES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Inst. of Architects, Washington, DC.

    A MODEL BUILDING CODE FOR FALLOUT SHELTERS WAS DRAWN UP FOR INCLUSION IN FOUR NATIONAL MODEL BUILDING CODES. DISCUSSION IS GIVEN OF FALLOUT SHELTERS WITH RESPECT TO--(1) NUCLEAR RADIATION, (2) NATIONAL POLICIES, AND (3) COMMUNITY PLANNING. FALLOUT SHELTER REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIELDING, SPACE, VENTILATION, CONSTRUCTION, AND SERVICES SUCH AS ELECTRICAL…

  19. Estimation of site occupancy error due to statistical noise for the ratio ALCHEMI method[Atom Location by Channeling Enhanced Microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Y.L.; Yang, R.; Cui, Y.Y.; Li, D.

    1999-11-19

    The ALCHEMI (acronym for atom location by channeling enhanced microanalysis) method has been widely used to determine crystallographic site distributions of substitutional species within a host crystal. However, the error of site occupancy can not be easily determined for the ratio ALCHEMI method. The purpose of this paper is to present a detailed treatment of error due to statistical noise for the ratio ALCHEMI method, with specific reference to the site occupancy of alloying elements in TiAl. The formulae for calculating the site occupancy of alloying elements in an ordered phase derived by Spence and Taftoe and by Taftoe and Spence are first expressed in different forms. Then the path of error propagation in the calculation is described and the maximum error of site occupancies caused by statistical noise is estimated. Finally, the authors present experimental measurements of site occupancy made with representative elements that were known to occupy exclusively either the Ti or the Al sublattice sites in TiAl in order to test the reliability of the error-analysis method they described. The error due to delocalization interaction for the planar ALCHEMI method will also be discussed for the case of TiAl.

  20. Chernobyl fallout and outcome of pregnancy in Finland.

    PubMed Central

    Auvinen, A; Vahteristo, M; Arvela, H; Suomela, M; Rahola, T; Hakama, M; Rytömaa, T

    2001-01-01

    Possible effects of Chernobyl fallout on outcome of pregnancy in Finland were evaluated in a nationwide follow-up study. The outcomes were the rate of live births and stillbirths, pregnancy loss, and induced abortions by municipality. Exposure was assessed based on nationwide surveys of radiation dose rate from the Chernobyl fallout, from both external and internal exposures. Using these measurements, we estimated the monthly dose rate for each of the 455 Finnish municipalities. On average, the dose rate from Chernobyl fallout reached 50 microSv per month in May 1986--a doubling of the natural background radiation. In the most heavily affected area, 4 times the normal background dose rates were recorded. Given the underlying regional differences in live birth, stillbirth, and abortion rates, we used longitudinal analysis comparing changes over time within municipalities. A temporary decline in the live birth rate had already begun before 1986, with no clear relationship to the level of fallout. A statistically significant increase in spontaneous abortions with dose of radiation was observed. No marked changes in induced abortions or stillbirths were observed. The decrease in the live birth rate is probably not a biological effect of radiation, but more likely related to public concerns of the fallout. The effect on spontaneous abortions should be interpreted with caution, because of potential bias or confounding. Further, there is little support in the epidemiologic literature on effects of very low doses of radiation on pregnancy outcome. PMID:11266330

  1. The influence of the bromine atom Cooper minimum on the photoelectron angular distributions and branching ratios of the four outermost bands of bromobenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powis, I.; Holland, D. M. P.; Antonsson, E.; Patanen, M.; Nicolas, C.; Miron, C.; Schneider, M.; Soshnikov, D. Yu.; Dreuw, A.; Trofimov, A. B.

    2015-10-01

    Angle resolved photoelectron spectra of the X ˜ 2 B 1 , A ˜ 2 A 2 , B ˜ 2 B 2 , and C ˜ 2 B 1 states of bromobenzene have been recorded over the excitation range 20.5-94 eV using linearly polarized synchrotron radiation. The photoelectron anisotropy parameters and electronic branching ratios derived from these spectra have been compared to theoretical predictions obtained with the continuum multiple scattering approach. This comparison shows that ionization from the 8b2 orbital and, to a lesser extent, the 4b1 orbital is influenced by the Cooper minimum associated with the bromine atom. The 8b2 and 4b1 orbitals are nominally bromine lone-pairs, but the latter orbital interacts strongly with the π-orbitals in the benzene ring and this leads to a reduced atomic character. Simulations of the X ˜ 2 B 1 , B ˜ 2 B 2 , and C ˜ 2 B 1 state photoelectron bands have enabled most of the vibrational structures appearing in the experimental spectra to be assigned. Many of the photoelectron peaks exhibit an asymmetric shape with a tail towards low binding energy. This asymmetry has been examined in the simulations of the vibrationally unexcited peak, due mainly to the adiabatic transition, in the X ˜ 2 B 1 state photoelectron band. The simulations show that the asymmetric profile arises from hot-band transitions. The inclusion of transitions originating from thermally populated levels results in a satisfactory agreement between the experimental and simulated peak shapes.

  2. A review of aerial radiological surveys of Nevada Test Site fallout fields 1951 through 1970

    SciTech Connect

    1987-12-01

    Aerial surveys of offsite fallout radiation fields from the Nevada Test Site began in the early 1950s and continued throughout the above-ground testing period. The results of the aerial surveys were used to support ground data in determining the extent of the fallout patterns. For the series of tests conducted in 1953 and 1955, the primary uncertainty of the results was knowing the location of the aircraft. Navigation was made from aeronautical charts of a scale 1:1,000,000, and errors in location of several miles were experienced. Another problem was that exposure rate readings made in the aircraft of 1 milliroentgen per hour or lower were not reliable. Exposure rate measurements above 1 milliroentgen per hour were more accurate, however, and are considered reliable to within a factor of two or three in predicting 3-foot exposure rate levels. For the 1957 series, the aircraft position data were quite accurate. Ground-level exposure rates predicted from aerial data obtained by the United States Geological Survey aircraft for the five-detector array were considered reliable to within +-40% or better for most of the surveys. When the single detector was used, the accuracy decreased to about a factor of two. Relative count rates obtained by the aircraft operated by the Atomic Energy Commission, Raw Materials Division, are probably valid, but quantitative determination of 3-foot exposure rates are not. The Aerial Radiological Monitoring System performed all the aerial surveys in the 1960s. However, the air-to-ground conversion factors used were too low. Using a corrected conversion factor, the predicted 3-foot exposure rates should be valid to +-40% in most fallout fields if all other parameters are considered. 40 refs., 30 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Determining Sources and Transport of Nuclear Contamination in Hudson River Sediments with Plutonium, Neptunium, and Cesium isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenna, T. C.; Chillrud, S. N.; Chaky, D. A.; Simpson, H. J.; McHugh, C. M.; Shuster, E. L.; Bopp, R. F.

    2004-12-01

    Different sources of radioactive contamination contain characteristic and identifiable isotopic signatures, which can be used to study sediment transport. We focus on Pu-239, Pu-240, Np-237 and Cs-137, which are strongly bound to fine grained sediments. The Hudson River drainage basin has received contamination from at least three separate sources: 1) global fallout from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons, which contributed Pu, Np and Cs; 2) contamination resulting from reactor releases at the Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant (IPNPP) located on the Hudson River Estuary ˜70km north of New York Harbor, where records document releases of Cs-137; 3) contamination resulting from activities at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) located on the Mohawk River, where incomplete records document releases of Cs-137 but no mention is made of Pu or Np. Here we report measurements of Pu isotopes, Np-237 and Cs-137 for a series of sediment cores collected from various locations within the drainage basin: 1) Mohawk River downstream of KAPL, 2) Hudson River upstream of its confluence with the Mohawk River, and 3) lower Hudson River at a location in close proximity to IPNPP. In addition, we present data from selected samples from two other lower Hudson River locations: One site located ˜30km downstream of IPNPP and another ˜30km upstream of IPNPP. By comparing the isotopic ratios Pu-240/Pu-239, Np-237/Pu-239, and Cs-137/Pu-239, measured in fluvial sediments to mean global fallout values, it is possible to identify and resolve different sources of non-fallout contamination. To date, isotopic data for sediments indicate non-fallout sources of Pu-239, Pu-240, and Cs-137; Np-237, however, appears to originate from global fallout only. Mohawk River sediments downstream of KAPL exhibit enrichments in Pu-239, Pu-240, and Cs-137 that are 7 to 20 times higher than levels expected from global fallout as indicated from Np-237. The elevated levels, non-fallout isotopic signatures

  4. The Dose Rate Conversion Factors for Nuclear Fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Spriggs, G D

    2009-02-13

    In a previous paper, the composite exposure rate conversion factor (ECF) for nuclear fallout was calculated using a simple theoretical photon-transport model. The theoretical model was used to fill in the gaps in the FGR-12 table generated by ORNL. The FGR-12 table contains the individual conversion factors for approximate 1000 radionuclides. However, in order to calculate the exposure rate during the first 30 minutes following a nuclear detonation, the conversion factors for approximately 2000 radionuclides are needed. From a human-effects standpoint, it is also necessary to have the dose rate conversion factors (DCFs) for all 2000 radionuclides. The DCFs are used to predict the whole-body dose rates that would occur if a human were standing in a radiation field of known exposure rate. As calculated by ORNL, the whole-body dose rate (rem/hr) is approximately 70% of the exposure rate (R/hr) at one meter above the surface. Hence, the individual DCFs could be estimated by multiplying the individual ECFs by 0.7. Although this is a handy rule-of-thumb, a more consistent (and perhaps, more accurate) method of estimating the individual DCFs for the missing radionuclides in the FGR-12 table is to use the linear relationship between DCF and total gamma energy released per decay. This relationship is shown in Figure 1. The DCFs for individual organs in the body can also be estimated from the estimated whole-body DCF. Using the DCFs given FGR-12, the ratio of the organ-specific DCFs to the whole-body DCF were plotted as a function of the whole-body DCF. From these plots, the asymptotic ratios were obtained (see Table 1). Using these asymptotic ratios, the organ-specific DCFs can be estimated using the estimated whole-body DCF for each of the missing radionuclides in the FGR-12 table. Although this procedure for estimating the organ-specific DCFs may over-estimate the value for some low gamma-energy emitters, having a finite value for the organ-specific DCFs in the table is

  5. Hydrothermal atomic force microscopy observations of barite step growth rates as a function of the aqueous barium-to-sulfate ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracco, Jacquelyn N.; Gooijer, Yiscka; Higgins, Steven R.

    2016-06-01

    The rate of growth of ionic minerals from solutions with varying aqueous cation:anion ratios may result in significant errors in mineralization rates predicted by commonly-used affinity-based rate equations. To assess the potential influence of solute stoichiometry on barite growth, step velocities on the barite (0 0 1) surface have been measured at 108 °C using hydrothermal atomic force microscopy (HAFM) at moderate supersaturation and as a function of the aqueous barium:sulfate ratio (r). Barite growth hillocks at r ∼ 1 were bounded by < 1 2 0 > steps, however at r < 1, kink site densities increased, steps followed a direction vicinal to < 1 2 0 > , and the [0 1 0] steps developed. At r > 1, steps roughened and rounded as the kink site density increased. Step velocities peaked at r = 1 and decreased roughly symmetrically as a function of r, indicating the attachment rates of barium and sulfate ions are similar under these conditions. We hypothesize that the differences in our observations at high and low r arise from differences in the attachment rate constants for the obtuse and acute < 1 2 0 > steps. Based on results at low r, the data suggests the attachment rate constant for barium ions is similar for obtuse and acute steps. Based on results at high r, the data suggests the attachment rate constant for sulfate is greater for obtuse steps than acute steps. Utilizing a step growth model developed by Stack and Grantham (2010) the experimental step velocities as a function of r were readily fit while attempts to fit the data using a model developed by Zhang and Nancollas (1998) were less successful.

  6. Seasonal variation of soil-to-plant transfer of K and fallout sup 134,137 Cs in peatland vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Bunzl, K.; Kracke, W. )

    1989-10-01

    For three plants from a peat bog (Trichophorum caespitosum, Molinia coerulea, Calluna vulgaris) the concentration of 137Cs, the ratio 137Cs:134Cs, and stable K was determined in intervals of about 14 d from June to November 1987. The results show that for two grasses, Trichophorum caespitosum and Molinia coerulea (which have only perennial roots but sprout every year while the old leaves wither), the concentration of 137Cs decreased considerably during the growing season (1800-240, respectively, 4000-320 Bq kg-1 dry weight). A remarkably similar behavior was observed for the seasonal variability of K and radiocesium in the two grass species, which resulted in a nearly constant ratio of 137Cs:K during the year. In contrast, for the evergreen plant Calluna vulgaris (heather) which was contaminated surficially by the Chernobyl fallout, the concentrations of K and 137Cs were rather constant during 1987 (leaves about 10,000; stems about 5000 Bq kg-1 dry weight), even though radiocesium was taken up by the leaves and transported within the plant. For the two grasses, the plant:soil concentration ratios (CR) were obtained separately for total 137Cs, 137Cs from the global fallout, and Chernobyl-derived 137Cs. The CR of 137Cs from the global fallout decreased for Trichophorum caespitosum from 1.9 in the spring to 0.08 in the autumn, and for Chernobyl-derived 137Cs from 1.4 to 0.2. For Molinia coerulea, a similar behavior was observed. Possible reasons for the seasonal variability of the CR values and the different behavior of 137Cs from the global fallout and from the Chernobyl debris are discussed.

  7. Childhood leukemia and fallout from the Nevada nuclear tests

    SciTech Connect

    Land, C.E.; McKay, F.W.; Machado, S.G.

    1984-01-13

    Cancer mortality data from the National Center for Health Statistics, covering the period 1950 through 1978, were used to test a reported association between childhood leukemia and exposure to radioactive fallout from nuclear weapons tests in Nevada between 1951 and 1958. No pattern of temporal and geographic variation in risk supportive of the reported association was found. Comparison of these results with those presented in support of an association of risk with fallout suggests that the purported association merely reflects an anomalously low leukemia rate in southern Utah during the period 1944 to 1949. 14 references, 4 figures, 7 tables.

  8. Electrons per atom ratio determination and Hume-Rothery electron concentration rule for P-based polar compounds studied by FLAPW-fourier calculations.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Uichiro; Sato, Hirokazu; Inukai, Manabu; Nishino, Yoichi; Zijlstra, Eeuwe Sieds

    2015-02-01

    The extent to which reliable electrons per atom ratio, e/a, are determined and the validity of the Hume-Rothery stabilization mechanism are ensured upon increasing ionicity are studied by applying first-principles full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW)-Fourier band calculations to as many as 59 binary compounds formed by adding elements from periods 2-6 to phosphorus in group 15 of the Periodic Table. Van Arkel-Ketelaar triangle maps were constructed both by using the Allen electronegativity data and by using an energy difference between the center-of-gravity energies of FLAPW-derived s and p partial densities of states (DOSs) for the equiatomic compounds studied. The determination of e/a and the test of the interference condition, both of which play a key role in the Hume-Rothery stabilization mechanism, were reliably made for all intermetallic compounds, as long as the ionicity is less than 50%. In the A-P (A = Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) compounds with ionicity exceeding 50%, however, e/a determination becomes unstable, as reflected in its P concentration dependence. New Hume-Rothery electron concentration rules were theoretically found in two families of polar compounds: skutterudite compounds TMP(3), TMAs(3), and TMSb(3) (TM = Co, Ni, Rh, and Ir; cI32) with e/a = 4.34 and TM(3)P (TM = Cr, Mn, Fe, and Ni; tI32) with e/a = 2.20. PMID:25531024

  9. Photoelectron spectroscopy of O{sup -} at 266 nm: Ratio of ground- and excited-state atomic oxygen production and channel-resolved photoelectron anisotropy parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Domesle, C.; Jordon-Thaden, B.; Wolf, A.; Lammich, L.; Pedersen, H. B.; Foerstel, M.; Hergenhahn, U.

    2010-09-15

    The photodetachment dynamics of the atomic oxygen anion O{sup -} has been investigated at 266 nm (4.67 eV) by photoelectron detection in a crossed-beam experiment using a magnetic-bottle electron spectrometer. Taking explicit advantage of the Doppler shift imposed by the moving ion beam on the photoelectron energies, we report both the final-state branching ratio and photoelectron angular distributions. After photoabsorption at 266 nm, the formed electron-oxygen scattering state disintegrates, forming either the excited {sup 1}D or the ground {sup 3}P state of oxygen with a partition of {sup 1}D:{sup 3}P=0.32 {+-} 0.06. The detachment leading to the production of O({sup 3}P) shows an angular distribution of photoelectrons characterized by {beta}{sub P}=0.00 {+-} 0.10 mimicking a pure s-wave detachment, while the detachment into excited O({sup 1}D) occurs with {beta}{sub D}=-0.90{+-}0.10, giving direct evidence of interference between the outgoing s and d waves.

  10. Long-range volcanic ash transport and fallout during the 2008 eruption of Chaitén volcano, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durant, Adam J.; Villarosa, Gustavo; Rose, William I.; Delmelle, Pierre; Prata, Alfred J.; Viramonte, José G.

    2012-01-01

    The May 2008 eruption of Chaitén volcano, Chile, provided a rare opportunity to measure the long-range transport of volcanic emissions and characteristics of a widely-dispersed terrestrial ash deposit. Airborne ash mass, quantified using thermal infrared satellite remote sensing, ranged between 0.2 and 0.4 Tg during the period 3-7 May 2008. A high level of spatiotemporal correspondence was observed between cloud trajectories and changes in surface reflectivity, which was inferred to indicate ash deposition. The evolution of the deposit was mapped for the first time using satellite-based observations of surface reflectivity. The distal (>80 km) ash deposit was poorly sorted and fine grained, and mean particle size varied very little beyond a distance >300 km. There were three particle size subpopulations in fallout at distances >300 km which mirror those identified in fallout from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, known to have a high propensity for aggregation. Discrete temporal sampling and characterisation of fallout demonstrated contributions from specific eruptive phases. Samples collected at the time of deposition were compared to bulk samples collected months after deposition and provided some evidence for winnowing. Experimentally-derived ash leachates had near-neutral pH values and charge balance which indicates minimal quantities of adsorbed acids. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed surface enrichments in Ca, Na and Fe and the presence of coatings of mixed Ca-, Na- and Fe-rich salts on ash particles prior to deposition. Low S:Cl ratios in leachates indicate that the eruption had a low S content, and high Cl:F ratios imply gas-ash interaction within a Cl-rich environment. We estimate that ash fallout had potential to scavenge ∼42% of total S released into the atmosphere prior to deposition. XPS analyses also revealed ash particle surfaces were strongly enriched in Fe (in contrast to the results from bulk leachate

  11. Ultrasound-Detected Thyroid Nodule Prevalence and Radiation Dose from Fallout

    PubMed Central

    Land, C. E.; Zhumadilov, Z.; Gusev, B. I.; Hartshorne, M. H.; Wiest, P. W.; Woodward, P. W.; Crooks, L. A.; Luckyanov, N. K.; Fillmore, C. M.; Carr, Z.; Abisheva, G.; Beck, H. L.; Bouville, A.; Langer, J.; Weinstock, R.; Gordeev, K. I.; Shinkarev, S.; Simon, S. L.

    2014-01-01

    Settlements near the Semipalatinsk Test Site (SNTS) in northeastern Kazakhstan were exposed to radioactive fallout during 1949–1962. Thyroid disease prevalence among 2994 residents of eight villages was ascertained by ultrasound screening. Malignancy was determined by cytopathology. Individual thyroid doses from external and internal radiation sources were reconstructed from fallout deposition patterns, residential histories and diet, including childhood milk consumption. Point estimates of individual external and internal dose averaged 0.04 Gy (range 0–0.65) and 0.31 Gy (0–9.6), respectively, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.46. Ultrasound-detected thyroid nodule prevalence was 18% and 39% among males and females, respectively. It was significantly and independently associated with both external and internal dose, the main study finding. The estimated relative biological effectiveness of internal compared to external radiation dose was 0.33, with 95% confidence bounds of 0.09–3.11. Prevalence of papillary cancer was 0.9% and was not significantly associated with radiation dose. In terms of excess relative risk per unit dose, our dose–response findings for nodule prevalence are comparable to those from populations exposed to medical X rays and to acute radiation from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings. PMID:18363427

  12. Gamma-ray thermoluminescence measurements: a record of fallout deposition in Hiroshima?

    PubMed

    Egbert, Stephen D; Kerr, George D

    2012-05-01

    In certain Hiroshima neighborhoods, radiation measurements using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) exceed what can be explained by the initial gamma-ray doses and uncertainties from the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02). This problem was not previously recognized as being isolated to certain parts of that city. The ratio between TLD measurements and DS02 dose calculations for gamma rays appear to grow larger than unity up to more than three with increasing ground range, but closer examination shows the excess TLD dose (0.1, 0.2, or possibly up to 0.8 Gray) is correlated with certain neighborhoods and could be due to radioactive fallout. At Nagasaki, the TLD measurements do not show this same excess, probably because there were no TLD measurements taken more than 800 m downwind (eastward) from the Nagasaki hypocenter, so that any small excess TLD dose was masked by larger initial gamma-ray doses of 25-80 Gray in the few downwind samples. The DS02 Report had noted many measurements lower than the DS02 calculation for several Nagasaki TLD samples, independent of ground range. This was explained as being the result of previously unaccounted urban shielding which was observed from Nagasaki pre-bomb aerial photos. However, the Hiroshima excess TLD dose issue was not resolved. If the excess TLD doses at Hiroshima are an indication of fallout, it may be possible to use additional TLD studies to make better estimates of the locations and radiation doses to survivors from the fallout after the bombings at both cities. PMID:22421931

  13. Distribution of neptunium and plutonium in New Mexico lichen samples (Usnea arizonica) contaminated by atmospheric fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, Jr., Warren J.; Hanson, Susan K.; Lavelle, Kevin B.; Miller, Jeffrey L.

    2015-08-30

    In this study, the concentrations of 237Np, 239Pu and 240Pu were determined in lichen samples (Usnea arizonica) that were collected from ten locations in New Mexico between 2011 and 2013 using isotope dilution inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS). The observed isotopic ratios for 237Np/239Pu and 240Pu/239Pu indicate trace contamination from global and regional fallout (e.g. Trinity test and atmospheric testing at the Nevada Test Site). The fact that actinide contamination is detected in recent lichen collections suggests continuous re-suspension of fallout radionuclides even 50 years after ratification of the Limited Test Ban Treaty.

  14. Rate of neuronal fallout in a transsynaptic cerebellar model.

    PubMed

    Triarhou, L C

    1998-10-01

    Quantitative analyses of transsynaptic granule cell death subsequent to the genetically determined degeneration of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum of pcd/pcd mutant mice show that granule neuron fallout follows a typical mathematical pattern of elemental decay. Biological and theoretical connotations are discussed in light of the empirical observations and a simulation model. PMID:9865853

  15. National Fallout Shelter Design Competition. Community Center. Awards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Civil Defense (DOD), Washington, DC.

    Award winning designs for dual-use fallout shelters are presented, representing contributions by the design professions toward development of the national defense resource. The focus and concept of the competition is described as the basis for judging. The nature of dual-use shelter is discussed, which contributes to understanding of the…

  16. Radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident

    SciTech Connect

    Beiriger, J.M.; Failor, R.A.; Marsh, K.V.; Shaw, G.E.

    1987-08-01

    This report describes the detection of fallout in the United States from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. As part of its environmental surveillance program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory maintained detectors for gamma-emitting radionuclides. Following the reactor accident, additional air filters were set out. Several uncommon isotopes were detected at the time the plume passed into the US. (TEM)

  17. Pituitary tumors following fallout radiation exposure. [Marshall Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, W.H.; Harper, J.A.; Rittmaster, R.S.; Grimson, R.C.

    1984-08-03

    Two pituitary tumors were diagnosed in a small population of Marshallese accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout in 1954. Endocrinologic findings in the exposed population, are reported and the possible relation of the tumors to radiation exposure and thyroid disease is discussed.

  18. Dynamic Monitoring of Cleanroom Fallout Using an Air Particle Counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Radford

    2011-01-01

    The particle fallout limitations and periodic allocations for the James Webb Space Telescope are very stringent. Standard prediction methods are complicated by non-linearity and monitoring methods that are insufficiently responsive. A method for dynamically predicting the particle fallout in a cleanroom using air particle counter data was determined by numerical correlation. This method provides a simple linear correlation to both time and air quality, which can be monitored in real time. The summation of effects provides the program better understanding of the cleanliness and assists in the planning of future activities. Definition of fallout rates within a cleanroom during assembly and integration of contamination-sensitive hardware, such as the James Webb Space Telescope, is essential for budgeting purposes. Balancing the activity levels for assembly and test with the particle accumulation rate is paramount. The current approach to predicting particle fallout in a cleanroom assumes a constant air quality based on the rated class of a cleanroom, with adjustments for projected work or exposure times. Actual cleanroom class can also depend on the number of personnel present and the type of activities. A linear correlation of air quality and normalized particle fallout was determined numerically. An air particle counter (standard cleanroom equipment) can be used to monitor the air quality on a real-time basis and determine the "class" of the cleanroom (per FED-STD-209 or ISO-14644). The correlation function provides an area coverage coefficient per class-hour of exposure. The prediction of particle accumulations provides scheduling inputs for activity levels and cleanroom class requirements.

  19. Childhood Thyroid Radioiodine Exposure and Subsequent Infertility in the Intermountain Fallout Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Mary Bishop; Lyon, Joseph L.; VanDerslice, James A.; Alder, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Above-ground and underground nuclear weapon detonation at the Nevada Test Site (1951–1992) has resulted in radioiodine exposure for nearby populations. Although the long-term effect of environmental radioiodine exposure on thyroid disease has been well studied, little is known regarding the effect of childhood radioiodine exposure on subsequent fertility. Objectives: We investigated early childhood thyroid radiation exposure from nuclear testing fallout (supplied predominantly by radioactive isotopes of iodine) and self-reported lifetime incidence of male or female infertility or sterility. Methods: Participants were members of the 1965 Intermountain Fallout Cohort, schoolchildren at the time of exposure who were reexamined during two subsequent study phases to collect dietary and reproductive histories. Thyroid radiation exposure was calculated via an updated dosimetry model. We used multivariable logistic regression with robust sandwich estimators to estimate odds ratios for infertility, adjusted for potential confounders and (in separate models) for a medically confirmed history of thyroid disease. Results: Of 1,389 participants with dosimetry and known fertility history, 274 were classified as infertile, including 30 classified as sterile. Childhood thyroid radiation dose was possibly associated with infertility [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.17; 95% CI: 0.82, 1.67 and AOR = 1.35; 95% CI: 0.96, 1.90 for the middle and upper tertiles vs. the first tertile of exposure, respectively]. The odds ratios were attenuated (AOR = 1.08; 95% CI: 0.75, 1.55 and AOR = 1.29; 95% CI: 0.91, 1.83 for the middle and upper tertiles, respectively) after adjusting for thyroid disease. There was no association of childhood radiation dose and sterility. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that childhood radioiodine exposure from nuclear testing may be related to subsequent adult infertility. Further research is required to confirm this. PMID:23099433

  20. A survey of radioactive fallout data in Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    DePhillips, M.P.

    1995-10-23

    Considerable attention has been directed by the scientific community to assessing the levels and fate of radionuclides in Arctic ecosystems. The following text and tables present available data and discussion of radionuclide fallout in Alaska. A literature search of 23 on-line databases (Table 1) using Alaska, Strontium (Sr), Cesium (Cs), Plutonium (Pu) and Radionuclide as constraint terms responded with 177 possible citations. After eliminating duplicate citations, 31 articles were available: 17 were relevant to the subject matter; the remainder addressed geologic issues. All of the cited literature addressed {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 239,240}Pu as a result of radionuclide fallout from nuclear testing or accidental release.

  1. Web-Enabled Optoelectronic Particle-Fallout Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lineberger, Lewis P.

    2008-01-01

    A Web-enabled optoelectronic particle- fallout monitor has been developed as a prototype of future such instruments that (l) would be installed in multiple locations for which assurance of cleanliness is required and (2) could be interrogated and controlled in nearly real time by multiple remote users. Like prior particle-fallout monitors, this instrument provides a measure of particles that accumulate on a surface as an indication of the quantity of airborne particulate contaminants. The design of this instrument reflects requirements to: Reduce the cost and complexity of its optoelectronic sensory subsystem relative to those of prior optoelectronic particle fallout monitors while maintaining or improving capabilities; Use existing network and office computers for distributed display and control; Derive electric power for the instrument from a computer network, a wall outlet, or a battery; Provide for Web-based retrieval and analysis of measurement data and of a file containing such ancillary data as a log of command attempts at remote units; and Use the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) for maximum performance and minimal network overhead.

  2. THE DEVELOPMENT OF RADIOACTIVE GLASS SURROGATES FOR FALLOUT DEBRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Martha R. Finck; Leigh R. Martin; Russel R. Lewis; Kevin P. Carney; Christopher A. McGrath

    2014-01-01

    The production of glass that emulates fallout is desired for the nuclear forensics community for training and measurement exercises. The composition of nuclear fallout is complex varying isotopic compositions . As the gaseous cloud traverses from hotter to cooler regions of the atmosphere, the processes of condensation and nucleation entrain environmental materials, vaporized nuclear materials and fission products. The elemental and isotopic composition of the fission products is altered due to chemical fractionation (i.e. the fission product composition that would be expected from fission of the original nuclear material is altered by differences in condensation rates of the elements); the fallout may be enriched or depleted in volatile or refractory fission products. This work describes preliminary results to synthesize, irradiate and fractionate the fission product content of irradiated particulate glass using a thermal distillation two hours after irradiation. The glass was synthesized using a solution-based polymerization of tetraethyl orthosilicate. Uranium was incorporated into the glass particulate at trace concentrations during polymerization. The particulate was subjected to a short thermal neutron irradiation then heated to 1273 K approximately 2 hours after the end of irradiation. Fission products of 133, 134, 135I, 132, 134Te, 135Xe, 138Cs and 91, 92Sr were observed to be distilled from the particulate. The results of these preliminary studies are discussed.

  3. Thyroid neoplasia in Marshall Islanders exposed to nuclear fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, T.E.; van Belle, G.; LoGerfo, J.P.

    1987-08-07

    We studied the risk of thyroid neoplasia in Marshall Islanders exposed to radioiodines in nuclear fallout from the 1954 BRAVO thermonuclear test. We screened 7266 Marshall Islanders for thyroid nodules; the islanders were from 14 atolls, including several southern atolls, which were the source of the best available unexposed comparison group. Using a retrospective cohort design, we determined the prevalence of thyroid nodularity in a subgroup of 2273 persons who were alive in 1954 and who therefore were potentially exposed to fallout from the BRAVO test. For those 12 atolls previously thought to be unexposed to fallout, the prevalence of thyroid nodules ranged from 0.9% to 10.6%. Using the distance of each atoll from the test site as a proxy for the radiation dose to the thyroid gland, a weighted linear regression showed an inverse linear relationship between distance and the age-adjusted prevalence of thyroid nodules. Distance was the strongest single predictor in logistic regression analysis. A new absolute risk estimate was calculated to be 1100 excess cases/Gy/y/1 X 10(6) persons (11.0 excess cases/rad/y/1 million persons), 33% higher than previous estimates. We conclude that an excess of thyroid nodules was not limited only to the two northern atolls but extended throughout the northern atolls; this suggests a linear dose-response relationship.

  4. Hydrogen isotopic substitution of solid methylamine through atomic surface reactions at low temperatures: A potential contribution to the D/H ratio of methylamine in molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Chigai, Takeshi; Osamura, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Naoki; Kouchi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally studied hydrogen (H)-deuterium (D) substitution reactions of solid methylamine (CH3NH2) under astrophysically relevant conditions. We also calculated the potential energy surface for the H-D substitution reactions of methylamine isotopologues using quantum chemical methods. Despite the relatively large energy barrier of more than 18 kJ mol-1, CH3NH2 reacted with D atoms to yield deuterated methylamines at 10 K, suggesting that the H-D substitution reaction proceeds through quantum tunneling. Deuterated methylamines reacted with H atoms as well. On the basis of present results, we propose that methylamine has potential for D enrichment through atomic surface reactions on interstellar grains at very low temperatures in molecular clouds. D enrichment would occur in particular in the methyl group of methylamine.

  5. Development of a method to estimate thyroid dose from fallout radioiodine in a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Simon, S L; Lloyd, R D; Till, J E; Hawthorne, H A; Gren, D C; Rallison, M L; Stevens, W

    1990-11-01

    A cohort of 4831 persons aged 11-18 y in 1965 was identified among students in the schools of Washington County, UT; Lincoln County, NV; and Graham County, AZ. These children who had potentially been exposed to radioiodine from atomic weapons test fallout from the Nevada Test Site during 1951-1962 were selected for participation in a study of thyroid disease. The entire cohort was first examined during 1965-1968 for thyroid abnormalities. A total of 3,085 of these people were again reexamined during 1985-1986 to determine any subsequent occurrence of thyroid disease. In order to determine the relationship of the radiation dose to the thyroid with incidence of thyroid disease, we have developed a suite of models to calculate estimates of the internal dose received by the thyroid from fallout radioiodines. For completeness, the exposure to the thyroid from external radiation is also estimated. Dose estimates are made specific to each individual in the study using individual residential histories, the locality-specific exposure rate and radionuclide deposition, descriptions of dairy management for identified milk producers, and the subjects' sources of foods and intake rates of milk and leafy vegetables determined by interview. Other data such as the relationship of radioiodine deposition to measured exposure rate, environmental transfer parameters, and age-dependent factors for the conversion of radioiodine intake to thyroid dose were taken from work of other investigators. Dairy management information, milk distribution practices, the milk source for each study subject, as well as age-specific intake rates of milk and leafy vegetables, were determined by interview. PMID:2211123

  6. Urinary excretion of radionuclides from Marshallese exposed to fallout from the 1954 Bravo nuclear test.

    PubMed

    Harris, Payne S; Simon, Steven L; Ibrahim, Shawki A

    2010-08-01

    Soon after the Bravo nuclear test at Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands on 1 March 1954, urine samples were collected for analysis of excreted radioactivity from native residents exposed to radioactive fallout on two atolls as well as from U.S. military personnel on a third atoll. The earliest acquired samples, obtained by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), were assayed for various radionuclides and provided the first known measurements of (131)I in urine following exposure to fallout from a nuclear test. Over the course of 1954, many additional samples were collected by the LASL, as well as by the Atomic Energy Commission New York Operations Office's Health and Safety Laboratory and the Naval Radiological Defense Laboratory. Collectively, the groups sampled included Marshallese exposed on Rongelap and Ailinginae Atolls, American military weather observers temporarily resident on Rongerik Atoll, and sailors from the Japanese fishing vessel, the Lucky Dragon. While the bioassay measurement data and individual urine volumes have been crucial to various attempts to assess intakes of radioactivity and the related internal radiation doses among the Marshallese, those data have never been published in any peer-reviewed journal, but have been restricted to agency memoranda, laboratory reports, and summaries in some publications and book chapters. Reconstructions of internal doses to Marshallese in 1954 and in later years have depended on these data and, hence, they have considerable historical importance as well as importance to ongoing health risk projections for Marshallese. This paper presents much of the original data on urine volumes and radioactivity from the various assays of urine for radionuclides, and compares estimates of (131)I intakes made in 1954, 1985, 1987, and 2008. PMID:20622553

  7. URINARY EXCRETION OF RADIONUCLIDES FROM MARSHALLESE EXPOSED TO FALLOUT FROM THE 1954 BRAVO NUCLEAR TEST

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Payne S.; Simon, Steven L.; Ibrahim, Shawki A.

    2014-01-01

    Soon after the Bravo nuclear test at Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands on 1 March 1954, urine samples were collected for analysis of excreted radioactivity from native residents exposed to radioactive fallout on two atolls as well as from U.S. military personnel on a third atoll. The earliest acquired samples, obtained by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), were assayed for various radionuclides and provided the first known measurements of 131I in urine following exposure to fallout from a nuclear test. Over the course of 1954, many additional samples were collected by the LASL, as well as by the Atomic Energy Commission New York Operations Office’s Health and Safety Laboratory and the Naval Radiological Defense Laboratory. Collectively, the groups sampled included Marshallese exposed on Rongelap and Ailinginae Atolls, American military weather observers temporarily resident on Rongerik Atoll, and sailors from the Japanese fishing vessel, the Lucky Dragon. While the bioassay measurement data and individual urine volumes have been crucial to various attempts to assess intakes of radioactivity and the related internal radiation doses among the Marshallese, those data have never been published in any peer-reviewed journal, but have been restricted to agency memoranda, laboratory reports, and summaries in some publications and book chapters. Reconstructions of internal doses to Marshallese in 1954 and in later years have depended on these data and, hence, they have considerable historical importance as well as importance to ongoing health risk projections for Marshallese. This paper presents much of the original data on urine volumes and radioactivity from the various assays of urine for radionuclides, and compares estimates of 131I intakes made in 1954, 1985, 1987, and 2008. PMID:20622553

  8. A simple model to estimate deposition based on a statistical reassessment of global fallout data.

    PubMed

    Pálsson, S E; Howard, B J; Bergan, T D; Paatero, J; Isaksson, M; Nielsen, S P

    2013-07-01

    Atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons began in 1945 and largely ceased in 1963. Monitoring of the resulting global fallout was carried out globally by the Environmental Measurements Laboratory and the UK Atomic Energy Research Establishment as well as at national level by some countries. A correlation was identified between fallout deposition and precipitation and an uneven distribution with latitude. In this study, the available data from 1954 to 1976 for (90)Sr and (137)Cs were reanalysed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and logarithmically transformed values of the monthly deposition density as the response variable. Generalized additive models (GAM) were used to explore the relationship of different variables to the response variable and quantify the explanatory power that could be achieved. The explanatory variables which consistently explained most of the variability were precipitation at each site, latitude and change with time and a simple linear model was produced with similar explanatory power as the GAM. The estimates improved as the temporal resolution of the precipitation data increased. A good log-log fit could be obtained if a bias of about 1-6 mm precipitation per month was added, this could be interpreted as dry deposition which is not otherwise accounted for in the model. The deposition rate could then be explained as a simple non-linear power function of the precipitation rate (r(0.2-0.6) depending on latitude band). A similar non-linear power function relationship has been the outcome of some studies linking wash-out and rain-out coefficients with rain intensity. Our results showed that the precipitation rate was an important parameter, not just the total amount. The simple model presented here allows the recreation of the deposition history at a site, allowing comparison with time series of activity concentrations for different environmental compartments, which is important for model validation. PMID:22476088

  9. Optimization of Al2O3/TiO2 nanolaminate thin films prepared with different oxide ratios, for use in organic light-emitting diode encapsulation, via plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Lae Ho; Jeong, Yong Jin; An, Tae Kyu; Park, Seonuk; Jang, Jin Hyuk; Nam, Sooji; Jang, Jaeyoung; Kim, Se Hyun; Park, Chan Eon

    2016-01-14

    Encapsulation is essential for protecting the air-sensitive components of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), such as the active layers and cathode electrodes. Thin film encapsulation approaches based on an oxide layer are suitable for flexible electronics, including OLEDs, because they provide mechanical flexibility, the layers are thin, and they are easy to prepare. This study examined the effects of the oxide ratio on the water permeation barrier properties of Al2O3/TiO2 nanolaminate films prepared by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition. We found that the Al2O3/TiO2 nanolaminate film exhibited optimal properties for a 1 : 1 atomic ratio of Al2O3/TiO2 with the lowest water vapor transmission rate of 9.16 × 10(-5) g m(-2) day(-1) at 60 °C and 90% RH. OLED devices that incorporated Al2O3/TiO2 nanolaminate films prepared with a 1 : 1 atomic ratio showed the longest shelf-life, in excess of 2000 hours under 60 °C and 90% RH conditions, without forming dark spots or displaying edge shrinkage. PMID:26661064

  10. Simultaneous unbalanced shared local oscillator heterodyne interferometry for high signal-to-noise-ratio, minimally destructive dispersive detection of time-dependent atomic spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locke, Mary; Fertig, Chad

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrate "Simultaneous Unbalanced Shared Local Oscillator Heterodyne Interferometry (SUSHI)," a new method for minimally destructive, high SNR dispersive detection of atomic spins. In SUSHI a dual-frequency probe laser interacts with atoms in one arm of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, then beats against a bright local oscillator beam traversing the other arm, resulting in two simultaneous, independent heterodyne measurements of the atom-induced phase shift. Measurement noise due to mechanical disturbances of beam paths is strongly rejected by the technique of \\emph{active subtraction} in which anti-noise is actively written onto the local oscillator beam via an optical phase-locked-loop. In SUSHI, technical noise due to phase, amplitude, and frequency fluctuations of the various laser fields is strongly rejected (i) for any mean phase bias between the interferometer arms, (ii) without the use of piezo actuated mirrors, and (iii) without signal balancing. We experimentally demonstrate an ultra-low technical noise limited sensitivity of 51 nrad$/\\sqrt{\\R{Hz}}$ over a measurement bandwidth of 60 Hz to 8 kHz using a 230 $\\mu$W probe, and stay within $\\sim$3 dB of the standard quantum limit as probe power is reduced by more than 5 orders of magnitude to as low as 650 pW. SUSHI is therefore well suited to performing QND measurements for preparing spin squeezed states and for high SNR, truly continuous observations of ground-state Rabi flopping in cold atom ensembles.

  11. Multifractal structure of the ¹³⁷Cs fallout at small spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Grubich, A O

    2012-05-01

    Regardless of the surface area of the site, the spatial distribution of radioactive contamination of soils with ¹³⁷Cs for Chernobyl fallout is described by a lognormal distribution. Moreover, the spatial pattern of the radioactive contamination of soil is random geometrical multifractal field. Due to that, any contamination spot, when studied in detail, decomposes into a multitude of small spots decomposing further into a multitude of smaller spots etc. Similar patterns are apparently characteristic for fallout of other radionuclides, the Fukushima fallout, as well as atmospheric fallout of non-radioactive dust and aerosols. PMID:22370652

  12. Anomalous plutonium isotopic ratios in sediments of Lake Qinghai from the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fengchang; Zheng, Jian; Liao, Haiqing; Yamada, Masatoshi; Wan, Guojiang

    2011-11-01

    The vertical profiles of (239+240)Pu and (137)Cs activities and (240)Pu/(239)Pu isotopic ratios are determined for three sediment cores of Lake Qinghai from the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China, and compared with those in sediments of another three lakes (Lakes Bosten, Sugan, and Shuangta), the only existing ones closest to Lop Nor area, China's nuclear weapons test site in the northwestern part of the country. The mean inventory of 47.7 ± 18.7 MBq km(-2) for (239+240)Pu activity in Lake Qinghai is comparable to the average value of global fallout expected at the same latitude, yet the mean inventory of 1112.0 ± 78.0 MBq km(-2) for (137)Cs is slightly lower than that of global fallout. Anomalously low (240)Pu/(239)Pu isotopic ratios (0.038-0.125) were found in the 3-6.5 cm deep sediment layers, indicating the trace Pu input from early nuclear weapons research activities at Atomic City in the lake's watershed during the 1950-60s. Model calculation indicated that the Pu input accounted for approximately 5-16% of the total Pu inventory. The observation of low (240)Pu/(239)Pu ratio in the deep sediment layer provided a new time marker for recent sediment dating in the lake and around the area. The results are of great significance to the further understanding of sources, records, and environmental impacts of global and regional nuclear activities in the environment and provide important chronological information for further studies on the water eutrophication process and climatic change, and reconstruction of pollution history of organic contaminants and heavy metals in the watershed of Lake Qinghai. PMID:21950768

  13. Outcome of Transplant-fallout Patients With Unresectable Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sio, Terence T.; Haddock, Michael G.; Novotny, Paul J.; Gores, Gregory J.; Alberts, Steven R.; Miller, Robert C.; Heimbach, Julie K.; Rosen, Charles B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this was to determine survival after starting neoadjuvant therapy for patients who became ineligible for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Methods and Materials: Since January 1993, 215 patients with unresectable cholangiocarcinoma began treatment with planned OLT. Treatment included external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with fluorouracil, bile duct brachytherapy, and postradiotherapy fluorouracil or capecitabine before OLT. Adverse findings at the staging operation, death, and other factors precluded OLT in 63 patients (29%), of whom 61 completed neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Results: By October 2012, 56 (89%) of the 63 patients unable to undergo OLT had died. Twenty-two patients (35%) became ineligible for OLT before the staging operation, 38 (60%) at the staging operation, and 3 (5%) after staging. From the date of diagnosis, median overall survival was 12.3 months. Survival was 17% at 18 months and 7% at 24 months. Median survival after fallout was 6.8 months. Median survival after the staging operation was 6 months. Two patients lived for 3.7 and 8.7 years before dying of cancer or liver failure caused by persistent biliary stricture at the site of the original cancer, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that time from diagnosis to fallout correlated with overall survival (P=0.04). Conclusions: In highly selected patients initially suitable for OLT, the mortality rate for cholangiocarcinoma was high in patients who became ineligible for OLT. Their survival, however, was comparable to expected survival for patients with locally advanced or metastatic disease treated with nontransplant therapies. The most common reason for patient fallout was adverse findings at the staging operation. PMID:24921218

  14. Radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident

    SciTech Connect

    Beiriger, J.M.; Failor, R.A.; Marsh, K.V.; Shaw, G.E.

    1987-03-23

    Following the accident at the nuclear reactor at Chernobyl, in the Soviet Union on April 26, 1986, we performed a variety of measurements to determine the level of the radioactive fallout on the western United States. We used gamma-spectroscopy to analyze air filters from the areas around Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), California, and Barrow and Fairbanks, Alaska. Milk from California and imported vegetables were also analyzed. The levels of the various fission products detected were far below the maximum permissible concentration levels.

  15. Indication of the radioactive fallout in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia following the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Alkhomashi, N; Almasoud, Fahad I

    2016-02-01

    On March 2011, a severe damage has occurred to Fukushima Di-iachi nuclear reactor complex in Japan following the huge earthquake and the resulting Tsunami. Consequently, vast amounts of radioactive fallout were released into the atmosphere and contaminated the environment in Japan. Soon after the accident, traces of anthropogenic radionuclides were detected in environmental samples collected in many parts in the northern hemisphere even very far away from Japan creating a global concern. There is no information about radioactive contamination in the Arabian Peninsula caused by the Japanese Fukushima nuclear accident. The first evidence of Fukushima radioactive fallout in Riyadh (24° 43' N, 46° 38' E), Saudi Arabia has been confirmed in April 8, 2011. The airborne fission products (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs were measured in air samples. The radionuclide concentrations were determined by identifying their characteristic gamma rays using a germanium detector. Their activity concentrations were studied as a function of time over a period of 20 days at the end of which they had mostly fallen below our limit of detection. The maximum activity concentration of (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs in air of, respectively, 323.7 ± 18.5, 17.2 ± 1.0 and 26.0 ± 1.8 μBq m(-3) were observed on April 10-11, 2011. The (131)I/(137)Cs and (134)Cs/(137)Cs activity ratio values in air were presented and discussed. Finally, the effective doses to the public of Riyadh city from inhalation of (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs due to contribution from Fukushima incident was found far below levels of concern. PMID:26650827

  16. Activity ratios of 137Cs, 90Sr and 239+240Pu in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Bossew, P; Lettner, H; Hubmer, A; Erlinger, C; Gastberger, M

    2007-01-01

    Both global and Chernobyl fallout have resulted in environmental contamination with radionuclides such as 137Cs, 90Sr and 239+240Pu. In environmental samples, 137Cs and 239+240Pu can be divided into the contributions of either source, if also the isotopes 134Cs and 238Pu are measurable, based on the known isotopic ratios in global and Chernobyl fallout. No analogous method is available for 90Sr. The activity ratios of Sr to Cs and Pu, respectively, are known for the actual fallout mainly from air filter measurements; but due to the high mobility of Sr in the environment, compared to Cs and Pu, these ratios generally do not hold for the inventory many years after deposition. In this paper we suggest a method to identify the mean contributions of global and Chernobyl fallout to total Sr in soil, sediment and cryoconite samples from Alpine and pre-Alpine regions of Austria, based on a statistical evaluation of Sr/Cs/Pu radionuclide activity ratios. Results are given for Sr:Cs, Sr:Pu and Cs:Pu ratios. Comparison with fallout data shows a strong depletion of Sr against Cs and Pu. PMID:17407799

  17. Fallout 137Cs in reindeer herders in Arctic Norway.

    PubMed

    Skuterud, Lavrans; Thørring, Håvard

    2015-03-01

    Reindeer herders in the Arctic were among the most heavily exposed populations to the global fallout from nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s and 1960s, due to high transfer of radionuclides in the lichens-reindeer-human food chain. Annual studies of (137)Cs in reindeer herders in Kautokeino, Norway, were initiated in 1965 to monitor radiation doses and follow environmental (137)Cs behavior. The (137)Cs concentrations declined from the peak in 1965 with effective half-times of 6-8 years, only interrupted by a temporary doubling in levels from 1986 to 1987 due to the Chernobyl fallout. During the period of 1950-2010 an average herder received an integrated effective dose from incorporated (137)Cs of about 18 mSv. This dose represents an insignificant increase in the risk for developing cancer. Health studies even show a significantly lower cancer incidence among Sámis and reindeer herders in northern Norway compared to other populations in the same area. PMID:25671344

  18. Individual human odor fallout as detected by trained canines.

    PubMed

    Vyplelová, Petra; Vokálek, Václav; Pinc, Ludvík; Pacáková, Zuzana; Bartoš, Luděk; Santariová, Milena; Čapková, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that if odor fallout (the release of a human's odor onto an untouched object) in human subjects exists, then holding a hand above an absorbent will produce a detectable scent which will be subsequently matched in a detection test by trained canines. Scents were collected from seven males to sterile cotton absorbent squares. The left hand was used to get the control scent and the right hand served as the target scent. Each experimental subject was sitting; his left hand was laid down on a cotton square for 3 min. The right hand was held 5 cm above another cotton square for 3 min. The scent identification was done by two specially trained police German shepherds. These canines had routinely performed scent identification line-ups as part of criminal investigation procedures. Both canines performed 14 line-ups and correctly matched the collected scents of all test subjects. The results suggest the existence of human odor fallout, whereby a human scent trace is left by humans even if they do not touch an object. PMID:24378296

  19. COMIDA: a radionuclide food chain model for acute fallout deposition.

    PubMed

    Abbott, M L; Rood, A S

    1994-01-01

    A dynamic food chain model and computer code, named "COMIDA," has been developed to estimate radionuclide concentrations in agricultural food products following an acute fallout event. COMIDA estimates yearly harvest concentrations for five human crop types (Bq kg-1 crop per Bq m-2 deposited) and integrated concentrations for four animal products (Bq d kg-1 animal product per Bq m-2) for a unit deposition that occurs on any user-specified day of the year. COMIDA is structurally very similar to the PATHWAY model and includes the same seasonal transport processes and discrete events for soil and vegetation compartments. Animal product assimilation is modeled using simpler equilibrium models. Differential transport and ingrowth of up to three radioactive progeny are also evaluated. Benchmark results between COMIDA and PATHWAY for monthly fallout events show very similar seasonal agreement for integrated concentrations in milk and beef. Benchmark results between COMIDA and four international steady-state models show good agreement for deposition events that occur during the middle of the growing season. COMIDA will be implemented in the new Department of Energy version of the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System for evaluation of accidental releases from nuclear power plants. PMID:8253573

  20. Determination of lateral spread of nuclear-fallout patterns. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, D.P.

    1986-03-01

    This report develops an improved method of determining the lateral spread of nuclear fallout. A full physics model of pattern development based on particle mass is analyzed. A rapid, simplified method for the prediction of nuclear-fallout patterns is developed for the case of a 1-Mt weapon based on empirical data from WSEG-10. This model is extended to other weapon sizes.

  1. On the dependence of solar flare X-ray spectral line intensity ratios of highly ionized sulfur, calcium, and iron on electron temperature, differential emission measure, and atomic physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Fludra, A.; Bentley, R. D.; Lang, J.; Phillips, K. J. H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper focuses on what can be learned about the emission measure distribution and certain atomic physics parameters from spectral lines of highly ionized ions of sulfur, calcium, and iron that appear in solar flare spectra. The particular lines chosen for analysis allow the electron temperature to be determined independently of the assumption of ionization equilibrium. An attempt is made to find emission measure models based on selected functional dependences of emission measure on temperature that reproduce the observed temperatures deduced from spectral line ratios as well as the relative intensities of resonance lines of different elements.

  2. The Exposure Rate Conversion Factor for Nuclear Fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Spriggs, G D

    2009-02-11

    Nuclear fallout is comprised of approximately 2000 radionuclides. About 1000 of these radionuclides are either primary fission products or activated fission products that are created during the burn process. The exposure rate one meter above the surface produced by this complex mixture of radionuclides varies rapidly with time since many of the radionuclides are short-lived and decay numerous times before reaching a stable isotope. As a result, the mixture of radionuclides changes rapidly with time. Using a new code developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the mixture of radionuclides at any given point in time can be calculated. The code also calculates the exposure rate conversion factor (ECF) for all 3864 individual isotopes contained in its database based on the total gamma energy released per decay. Based on the combination of isotope mixture and individual ECFs, the time-dependent variation of the composite exposure rate conversion factor for nuclear fallout can be easily calculated. As example of this new capability, a simple test case corresponding to a 10 kt, uranium-plutonium fuel has been calculated. The results for the time-dependent, composite ECF for this test case are shown in Figure 1. For comparison, we also calculated the composite exposure rate conversion factor using the conversion factors found in Federal Guidance Report No.12 (FGR-12) published by ORNL, which contains the conversion factors for approximately 1000 isotopes. As can be noted from Figure 1, the two functions agree reasonably well at times greater than about 30 minutes. However, they do not agree at early times since FGR-12 does not include all of the short-lived isotopes that are produced in nuclear fallout. It should also be noted that the composite ECF at one hour is 19.7 R/hr per Ci/m{sup 2}. This corresponds to 3148 R/hr per 1 kt per square mile, which agrees reasonably well with the value of 3000 R/hr per 1 kt per square mile as quoted by Glasstone. We have

  3. The KFM, A Homemade Yet Accurate and Dependable Fallout Meter

    SciTech Connect

    Kearny, C.H.

    2001-11-20

    The KFM is a homemade fallout meter that can be made using only materials, tools, and skills found in millions of American homes. It is an accurate and dependable electroscope-capacitor. The KFM, in conjunction with its attached table and a watch, is designed for use as a rate meter. Its attached table relates observed differences in the separations of its two leaves (before and after exposures at the listed time intervals) to the dose rates during exposures of these time intervals. In this manner dose rates from 30 mR/hr up to 43 R/hr can be determined with an accuracy of {+-}25%. A KFM can be charged with any one of the three expedient electrostatic charging devices described. Due to the use of anhydrite (made by heating gypsum from wallboard) inside a KFM and the expedient ''dry-bucket'' in which it can be charged when the air is very humid, this instrument always can be charged and used to obtain accurate measurements of gamma radiation no matter how high the relative humidity. The heart of this report is the step-by-step illustrated instructions for making and using a KFM. These instructions have been improved after each successive field test. The majority of the untrained test families, adequately motivated by cash bonuses offered for success and guided only by these written instructions, have succeeded in making and using a KFM. NOTE: ''The KFM, A Homemade Yet Accurate and Dependable Fallout Meter'', was published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory report in1979. Some of the materials originally suggested for suspending the leaves of the Kearny Fallout Meter (KFM) are no longer available. Because of changes in the manufacturing process, other materials (e.g., sewing thread, unwaxed dental floss) may not have the insulating capability to work properly. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has not tested any of the suggestions provided in the preface of the report, but they have been used by other groups. When using these instructions, the builder can verify the

  4. Spatially-Resolved Analyses of Aerodynamic Fallout from a Uranium-Fueled Nuclear Test

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lewis, L. A.; Knight, K. B.; Matzel, J. E.; Prussin, S. G.; Zimmer, M. M.; Kinman, W S; Ryerson, F. J.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2015-07-28

    The fiive silicate fallout glass spherules produced in a uranium-fueled, near-surface nuclear test were characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry, electron probe microanalysis, autoradiography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Several samples display compositional heterogeneity suggestive of incomplete mixing between major elements and natural U (238U/235U = 0.00725) and enriched U. Samples exhibit extreme spatial heterogeneity in U isotopic composition with 0.02 < 235U/238U < 11.84 among all five spherules and 0.02 < 235U/238U < 7.41 within a single spherule. Moreover, in two spherules, the 235U/238U ratio is correlated with changes in major element composition, suggesting the agglomeration ofmore » chemically and isotopically distinct molten precursors. Two samples are nearly homogenous with respect to major element and uranium isotopic composition, suggesting extensive mixing possibly due to experiencing higher temperatures or residing longer in the fireball. Linear correlations between 234U/238U, 235U/238U, and 236U/238U ratios are consistent with a two-component mixing model, which is used to illustrate the extent of mixing between natural and enriched U end members.« less

  5. Spatially-Resolved Analyses of Aerodynamic Fallout from a Uranium-Fueled Nuclear Test

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, L. A.; Knight, K. B.; Matzel, J. E.; Prussin, S. G.; Zimmer, M. M.; Kinman, W S; Ryerson, F. J.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2015-07-28

    The fiive silicate fallout glass spherules produced in a uranium-fueled, near-surface nuclear test were characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry, electron probe microanalysis, autoradiography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Several samples display compositional heterogeneity suggestive of incomplete mixing between major elements and natural U (238U/235U = 0.00725) and enriched U. Samples exhibit extreme spatial heterogeneity in U isotopic composition with 0.02 < 235U/238U < 11.84 among all five spherules and 0.02 < 235U/238U < 7.41 within a single spherule. Moreover, in two spherules, the 235U/238U ratio is correlated with changes in major element composition, suggesting the agglomeration of chemically and isotopically distinct molten precursors. Two samples are nearly homogenous with respect to major element and uranium isotopic composition, suggesting extensive mixing possibly due to experiencing higher temperatures or residing longer in the fireball. Linear correlations between 234U/238U, 235U/238U, and 236U/238U ratios are consistent with a two-component mixing model, which is used to illustrate the extent of mixing between natural and enriched U end members.

  6. Spatially-resolved analyses of aerodynamic fallout from a uranium-fueled nuclear test.

    PubMed

    Lewis, L A; Knight, K B; Matzel, J E; Prussin, S G; Zimmer, M M; Kinman, W S; Ryerson, F J; Hutcheon, I D

    2015-10-01

    Five silicate fallout glass spherules produced in a uranium-fueled, near-surface nuclear test were characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry, electron probe microanalysis, autoradiography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Several samples display compositional heterogeneity suggestive of incomplete mixing between major elements and natural U ((238)U/(235)U = 0.00725) and enriched U. Samples exhibit extreme spatial heterogeneity in U isotopic composition with 0.02 < (235)U/(238)U < 11.84 among all five spherules and 0.02 < (235)U/(238)U < 7.41 within a single spherule. In two spherules, the (235)U/(238)U ratio is correlated with changes in major element composition, suggesting the agglomeration of chemically and isotopically distinct molten precursors. Two samples are nearly homogenous with respect to major element and uranium isotopic composition, suggesting extensive mixing possibly due to experiencing higher temperatures or residing longer in the fireball. Linear correlations between (234)U/(238)U, (235)U/(238)U, and (236)U/(238)U ratios are consistent with a two-component mixing model, which is used to illustrate the extent of mixing between natural and enriched U end members. PMID:26225462

  7. A study of K shell X-ray intensity ratios of NixCr1-x alloys in external magnetic field and determination of effective atomic numbers of these alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perişanoğlu, Ufuk; Demir, Lütfü

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the effect of external magnetic field on the Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios of various alloy compositions of Ni-Cr transition metal alloys has been investigated. The Kα and Kβ emission spectra of Ni, Cr and NixCr1-x (x=0.40; 0.50; 0.60; 0.80) alloys were measured by using a Si (Li) solid-state detector. Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios of Ni, Cr and NixCr1-x alloys without magnetic field and in 0.5 and 1 T external magnetic field have been measured following excitation by 59.5 keV γ-rays from a 200 mCi241Am radioisotope point source. When the experimental data obtained in external magnetic field have been compared with data without external magnetic field, deviations have been observed in Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios for Ni and Cr in different alloy compositions. Thus, results of these measurements have shown that Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios of Ni and Cr in NixCr1-x alloys are dependent on the external magnetic field. Also the total mass attenuation coefficients for pure 3d transition metals and their alloys at different compositions were measured and theoretically estimated using mixture rule for selected photon energy. Later on, total atomic and electronic cross-sections and effective atomic number for alloys are determined experimentally and theoretically using these mass attenuation coefficients. When these parameters are examined depending on the alloy compositions, thereof have been found to vary with the alloy composition.

  8. Experimental investigation of inhomogeneities, nanoscopic phase separation, and magnetism in arc melted Fe-Cu metals with equal atomic ratio of the constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassnain Jaffari, G.; Aftab, M.; Anjum, D. H.; Cha, Dongkyu; Poirier, Gerald; Ismat Shah, S.

    2015-12-01

    Composition gradient and phase separation at the nanoscale have been investigated for arc-melted and solidified with equiatomic Fe-Cu. Diffraction studies revealed that Fe and Cu exhibited phase separation with no trace of any mixing. Microscopy studies revealed that immiscible Fe-Cu form dense bulk nanocomposite. The spatial distribution of Fe and Cu showed existence of two distinct regions, i.e., Fe-rich and Cu-rich regions. Fe-rich regions have Cu precipitates of various sizes and different shapes, with Fe forming meshes or channels greater than 100 nm in size. On the other hand, the matrix of Cu-rich regions formed strips with fine strands of nanosized Fe. Macromagnetic response of the system showed ferromagnetic behavior with a magnetic moment being equal to about 2.13 μB/ Fe atom and a bulk like negligible value of coercivity over the temperature range of 5-300 K. Anisotropy constant has been calculated from various laws of approach to saturation, and its value is extracted to be equal to 1350 J/m3. Inhomogeneous strain within the Cu and Fe crystallites has been calculated for the (unannealed) sample solidified after arc-melting. Annealed sample also exhibited local inhomogeneity with removal of inhomogeneous strain and no appreciable change in magnetic character. However, for the annealed sample phase separated Fe exhibited homogenous strain.

  9. Using fallout plutonium as a probe for erosion assessment.

    PubMed

    Hoo, W T; Fifield, L K; Tims, S G; Fujioka, T; Mueller, N

    2011-10-01

    A study has been carried out to assess the potential of using fallout plutonium (Pu), which originated from atmospheric nuclear-weapons tests, as a tool to investigate recent erosional processes within the lower Cotter water-supply catchment in the Australian Capital Territory. This catchment, which was predominantly pine plantation, was severely affected by a major bush fire in 2003. Accelerator mass spectrometry has been used to measure Pu in soil samples collected from a number of sites across the catchment. The results indicate that less than 1cm of surface soil had been lost since the early 1960s over much of the catchment. Areas of more erodible soil have, however, lost 2-4cm of topsoil, and a loss of ∼6cm of soil was identified at one particular site. PMID:20638160

  10. Chernobyl team seeks aid for fallout cleanup studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-18

    British nuclear experts have begun raising international aid agency interest in financing studies into cleaning up vast areas of the Ukraine still contaminated with fallout from the Chernobyl reactor explosion in April 1986. In a new 11-month investigation of the area outside an 18.6-mile radius of Chernobyl, the experts identified 80 necessary studies estimated to cost $62 million. [open quotes]That's just to get the system up and running. The total cost is much larger, but the authors don't yet know how much,[close quotes] says investigation coordinator Alan Eggleton of AEA Technology Ltd., Harwell, which led the study team. According to the report, radioactivity contaminated 19,000 sq miles of the Ukraine. The government is now spending some 12% of its income on mitigating the contamination, although most spending is for victim compensation and resettlement.

  11. Another look at the calculation of fallout tephra volumes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fierstein, J.; Nathenson, M.

    1992-01-01

    The calculation of volumes of fallout tephra layers is difficult because of the nonlinear dependence of thickness on area and because of the extrapolations required at the vent and in distal regions. Calculation using the trapezoidal rule, straight lines on log-log plots of area versus thickness, straight lines on plots of log thickness versus area1/2, and the crystal-concentration method are reviewed and the problems with each method discussed. The method using straight lines on plots of log thickness versus area1/2 is the most geologically reasonable because most deposits thin exponentially from source and therefore plot as straight lines using these coordinates. Errors and uncertainties in previous derivations for using this method are discussed and more general formulas presented. The method is also used to gain perspective on the "missing" distal volumes calculated by the crystal-concentration method compared to those calculated based only on isopach data. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag.

  12. Fallout from Chernobyl and incidence of childhood leukaemia in Finland, 1976-92.

    PubMed Central

    Auvinen, A.; Hakama, M.; Arvela, H.; Hakulinen, T.; Rahola, T.; Suomela, M.; Söderman, B.; Rytömaa, T.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess effects of fallout from Chernobyl on incidence of childhood leukaemia in Finland. DESIGN--Nationwide cohort study. External exposure measured for 455 Finnish municipalities with instruments driven 19,000 km throughout the country. Values specific to municipalities corrected for shielding due to houses and fallout from A bomb testing. Internal exposure estimated from whole body measurements on a random sample of 81 children. Mean effective dose for two years after incident calculated from these measurements. Data on childhood leukaemia obtained from Finnish cancer registry and verified through hospitals treating childhood cancers. SETTING--Finland, one of the countries most heavily contaminated by the Chernobyl accident; the population was divided into fifths by exposure. SUBJECTS--Children aged 0-14 years in 1976-92. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Standardised incidence ratio of childhood leukaemia and relative excess risk of childhood leukaemia per mSv. From incidence data of Finnish cancer registry for 1976-85, expected numbers specific to sex and age group (0-4, 5-9, and 10-14 years) were calculated for each municipality for three periods (1976-85, 1986-8, and 1989-92) and pooled as exposure fifths. Dose response was estimated as regression slope of standardised incidence ratios on mean doses for fifths for each period. RESULTS--Population weighted mean effective doses for first two years after the accident were 410 microSv for the whole country and 970 microSv for the population fifth with the highest dose. In all Finland the incidence of childhood leukaemia did not increase 1976-92. The relative excess risk 1989-92 was not significantly different from zero (7% per mSv; 95% confidence interval -27% to 41%). CONCLUSIONS--An important increase in childhood leukaemia can be excluded. Any effect is smaller than eight extra cases per million children per year in Finland. The results are consistent with the magnitude of effect expected. PMID:8044092

  13. The surgical management of benign and malignant thyroid neoplasms in Marshall Islanders exposed to hydrogen bomb fallout.

    PubMed

    Dobyns, B M; Hyrmer, B A

    1992-01-01

    On March 1, 1954, a serious fallout accident occurred during the United States atomic testing program at Bikini in the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands. Following the detonation of a large thermonuclear device (known as Bravo) an unexpected shift in winds resulted in deposition of radioactive debris on several inhabited atolls in the Marshall Islands. During the early post-detonation period military, sea, and air surveys traced the hottest portion of the parabolic cloud as it drifted in an ever widening pattern of diminishing concentration eastward and southeast of Bikini. The center of the cloud passed North of the Rongelap Atoll, which was the nearest inhabited atoll. This report concerns the development of thyroid lesions, the special circumstances encountered during thyroid surgery, and the results of the surgical management of benign and malignant lesions that were subsequently encountered in this population. PMID:1290253

  14. Atomic data from the Iron project. XIII. Electron excitation rates and emissivity ratios for forbidden transitions in NI II and Fe II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista, M. A.; Pradhan, A. K.

    1996-02-01

    Electron impact excitation rates and emissivity line ratios are reported for Optical and IR transitions in Ni II and Fe II arising from low-lying even parity levels. A total of 7 LS terms were included for Ni II, which result in 17 fine structure levels and 136 transitions. Coupling effects and resonance structures considered in the present calculations result in significant differences with the earlier distorted wave calculations by Nussbaumer & Storey (1982), although a reasonable agreement is found for the line diagnostics of some strong transitions in Ni II. Whereas an extensive set of collisional data has been presented earlier by Zhang & Pradhan for Fe II in the Iron Project series, in this paper we report collision strengths for some transitions missing from their dataset using an improved eigenfunction expansion for Fe II which includes the lowest 18 LS terms giving 52 fine structure levels and 1326 transitions. The present dataset provides a useful check on several forbidden transitions in Fe II and essentially confirms the diagnostics derived from the earlier work. The present calculations were carried out on the massively parallel processor Cray T3D with a parallelized version of the Iron Project R-matrix codes; to our knowledge these are the first such calculations.

  15. Global weapons' fallout 137Cs in soils and transfer to vegetation in south-central Chile.

    PubMed

    Schuller, P; Voigt, G; Handl, J; Ellies, A; Oliva, L

    2002-01-01

    The contamination and depth distribution of 137Cs in soil due to the fallout from atmospheric weapons' tests were measured at 29 sites in the 9th and 10th administrative regions in Chile located in the 40 degrees latitude in the southern hemisphere. The depth distribution in most of the sites follows no systematic pattern in the upper few centimetres, but below this depth an exponential decline could be deduced. The calculated relaxation depth appears to be a good indicator for estimating the long-term 137Cs distribution in these soil profiles. It ranges from 4.4 +/- 1.9 cm in Palehumults to 8.4 +/- 4.4 and 9.7 +/- 5.1 cm in Hapludands and Psamments, respectively. For these soil types the value for the relaxation depth tends to increase with decreasing clay content and increasing volume of coarse pores. 137Cs activity densities at the selected sites ranged from 450 to 5410 Bq m(-2) and correlate significantly (r = 0.791) with the mean annual rainfall rate of the sampling sites. 137Cs concentration ratios of prairie plants/soil were found to be in the range 0.008-2.3 and could be related to relaxation depths in undisturbed soils. PMID:12171470

  16. SIMS Analyses of Aerodynamic Fallout from a Uranium-Fueled Test

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, L. A.; Knight, K. B.; Matzel, J. E.; Prussin, S. G.; Ryerson, F. J.; Kinman, W. S.; Zimmer, M. M.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2014-09-09

    Five silicate fallout glass spherules produced in a uranium-fueled, near-surface nuclear test were characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry, electron probe microanalysis, autoradiography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x ray spectroscopy. Several samples display distinctive compositional heterogeneity suggestive of incomplete mixing, and exhibit heterogeneity in U isotopes with 0.02 < 235U/ 238U < 11.8 among all five samples and 0.02 < 235U/ 238U < 7.81 within a single sample. In two samples, the 235U/ 238U ratio is correlated with major element composition, consistent with the agglomeration of chemically and isotopically distinct molten precursors. Two samples are quasi-homogeneous with respect to composition and uranium isotopic composition, suggesting extensive mixing possibly due longer residence time in the fireball. Correlated variations between 234U, 235U, 236U and 238U abundances point to mixing of end-members corresponding to uranium derived from the device and natural U ( 238U/ 235U = 0.00725) found in soil.

  17. Further study on fallout sup 3 H ingestion in Akita, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Hisamatsu, S.; Takizawa, Y.; Katsumata, T.; Itoh, M.; Ueno, K.; Sakanoue, M. )

    1989-10-01

    To study fallout {sup 3}H ingestion in Japan, 16 separate food-group samples were collected from Akita City in northern Japan during early summer and late autumn in 1986. Furthermore, total diet samples which are duplicate composite food samples consumed by five or six persons for a period of 1 d were also obtained in Akita City. The {sup 3}H concentration in free water and that in a tissue-bound form were determined separately. Seasonal changes of {sup 3}H concentration in the food samples and the total diet samples were not found clearly. The average {sup 3}H concentration in the free water including tap water was 1.6 Bq L-1. The mean ratio of specific activity of tissue-bound {sup 3}H to that of {sup 3}H in free water was found to be 1.2. The average total {sup 3}H ingestion was estimated to be 4.0 Bq d-1, while the proportion of tissue-bound form {sup 3}H ingestion to total {sup 3}H ingestion was 11%. Cereal was the greatest contributing food group to ingestion of tissue-bound {sup 3}H. These findings were consistent with our previous results for food samples collected in 1985.

  18. Standard KDF0C4 Fallout Calculations for Buried Nuclear Detonations

    SciTech Connect

    Serduke, F J D

    2001-09-14

    The collateral damage caused by fallout from shallow-buried nuclear devices is of considerable interest. In this paper, we present results for ''standard'' calculations using the KDFOC4 fallout computer code. Results are presented for a parametric range of yields from 0.1 kt to 1 Mt in equally-spaced logarithmic increments and for emplacement depths of 5 meters in hard, dry rock and 20 meters in moist soil. We will see that for low yields, this emplacement depth has a marked influence on the shape of the fallout patterns but for the highest yields, the fallout patterns are insensitive to the emplacement medium and depth. We look at two categories of doses: (1) Those for which health effects begin to be serious and range upward to lethal, and (2) Doses that are politically very sensitive but for which any deleterious health effects are difficult to prove.

  19. Redistribution of fallout radionuclides in Enewetak Atoll lagoon sediments by callianassid bioturbation.

    PubMed

    McMurtry, G M; Schneider, R C; Colin, P L; Buddemeier, R W; Suchanek, T H

    The lagoon sediments of Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands contain a large selection of fallout radionuclides as a result of 43 nuclear weapon tests conducted there between 1948 and 1958. Studies of the burial of fallout radionuclides have been conducted on the islands and in several of the large craters, but studies of their vertical distribution have been limited to about the upper 20 cm of the lagoon sediments. We have found elevated fallout radionuclide concentrations buried more deeply in the lagoon sediments and evidence of burrowing into the sediment by several species of callianassid ghost shrimp (Crustacea: Thalassinidea) which has displaced highly radioactive sediment. The burrowing activities of callianassids, which are ubiquitous on the lagoon floor, facilitate radionuclide redistribution and complicate the fallout radionuclide inventory of the lagoon. PMID:3974699

  20. Tephra fallout hazards at Quito International Airport (Ecuador)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volentik, Alain C. M.; Houghton, Bruce F.

    2015-06-01

    Tephra fallout is the most widespread hazard posed by explosive volcanic eruptions. The 2010 explosive eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland significantly exposed the vulnerability of aviation operations to volcanic ash. The presence of fine ash in the atmosphere forced authorities to close most of European airspace for almost a week. A worldwide study of airport operations disrupted by volcanic eruptions (Guffanti et al., Nat Hazards 51:287-302, 2009) showed significant past exposure to tephra fall of the old international airport (OUIO) in Quito, Ecuador. A new international airport, Mariscal Sucre International Airport (UIO), located 15 km due east to OUIO, started operations on February 20, 2013. Given its location close to the old airport, UIO is also at risk for tephra fallout in the future. We identified five volcanoes capable of producing tephra hazard at UIO. Three (Guagua Pichincha, Reventador, and Tungurahua) are currently active and have recently disrupted aviation operations in Ecuador. The other two (Cotopaxi and Pululagua) are not currently active, but any future eruption from these two volcanoes would probably be explosive, hence capable of producing tephra hazard to UIO. As eruption parameters and wind profiles cannot be forecast in advance, we used a probabilistic approach to quantify the probability of tephra accumulation exceeding 1 mm and 1 cm (regarded as non-conservative and conservative bounds for airport disruption) following an explosive eruption from each volcano. Each eruptive parameter was randomly sampled within a predefined distribution, and wind profiles are randomly sampled within a 5-year dataset. The probability of tephra accumulation reaching 1 mm and 1 cm at UIO is 14.3-19.9 and 2.5-5.8 %, respectively, for Cotopaxi; 17.5-19.9 and 7-7.7 %, respectively, for Guagua Pichincha; and 44.3-44.8 and 18.8-24.9 %, respectively, for Pululagua. According to our results, Reventador and Tungurahua are not likely to yield tephra

  1. Implementation of a new atomic basis for the He I equilibrium line ratio technique for electron temperature and density diagnostic in the SOL for H-mode plasmas in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz Burgos, J. M.; Schmitz, O.; Unterberg, E. A.; Loch, S. D.; Ballance, C. P.

    2011-08-01

    Evaluating the ratio of selected helium lines allows for measurement of electron densities and temperatures. This technique is applied for L-mode plasmas at TEXTOR (O. Schmitz et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 (2008) 115004). We report our first efforts to extend it to H-mode plasma diagnostics in DIII-D. This technique depends on the accuracy of the atomic data used in the collisional radiative model (CRM). We present predictions for the electron temperatures and densities by using recently calculated R-Matrix With Pseudostates (RMPS) and Convergent Close-Coupling (CCC) electron-impact excitation and ionization data. We include contributions from higher Rydberg states by means of the projection matrix. These effects become significant for high electron density conditions, which are typical in H-mode. We apply a non-equilibrium model for the time propagation of the ionization balance to predict line emission profiles from experimental H-mode data from DIII-D.

  2. When the dust settles: stable xenon isotope constraints on the formation of nuclear fallout.

    PubMed

    Cassata, W S; Prussin, S G; Knight, K B; Hutcheon, I D; Isselhardt, B H; Renne, P R

    2014-11-01

    Nuclear weapons represent one of the most immediate threats of mass destruction. In the event that a procured or developed nuclear weapon is detonated in a populated metropolitan area, timely and accurate nuclear forensic analysis and fallout modeling would be needed to support attribution efforts and hazard assessments. Here we demonstrate that fissiogenic xenon isotopes retained in radioactive fallout generated by a nuclear explosion provide unique constraints on (1) the timescale of fallout formation, (2) chemical fractionation that occurs when fission products and nuclear fuel are incorporated into fallout, and (3) the speciation of fission products in the fireball. Our data suggest that, in near surface nuclear tests, the presence of a significant quantity of metal in a device assembly, combined with a short time allowed for mixing with the ambient atmosphere (seconds), may prevent complete oxidation of fission products prior to their incorporation into fallout. Xenon isotopes thus provide a window into the chemical composition of the fireball in the seconds that follow a nuclear explosion, thereby improving our understanding of the physical and thermo-chemical conditions under which fallout forms. PMID:25014883

  3. Alimentary Tract Absorption (f1 Values) for Radionuclides in Local and Regional Fallout from Nuclear Tests

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Shawki; Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents gastrointestinal absorption fractions (f1 values) for estimating internal doses from local and regional fallout radionuclides due to nuclear tests. The choice of f1 values are based on specific circumstances of weapons test conditions and a review of reported f1 values for elements in different physical and chemical states. Special attention is given to fallout from nuclear tests conducted at the Marshall Islands. We make a distinction between the f1 values for intakes of radioactive materials immediately after deposition (acute intakes) and intakes that occur in the course of months and years after deposition, following incorporation into terrestrial and aquatic foodstuffs (chronic intakes). Multiple f1 values for different circumstances where persons are exposed to radioactive fallout (e.g. local vs. regional fallout and coral vs. continental tests) are presented when supportive information is available. In some cases, our selected f1 values are similar to those adopted by the ICRP (e.g. iodine and most actinides). However, f1 values for cesium and strontium derived from urine bioassay data of the Marshallese population are notably lower than the generic f1 values recommended by ICRP, particularly for acute intakes from local fallout (0.4 and 0.05 for Cs and Sr, respectively. The f1 values presented here form the first complete set of values relevant to realistic dose assessments for exposure to local or regional radioactive fallout. PMID:20622554

  4. Alimentary tract absorption (f1 values) for radionuclides in local and regional fallout from nuclear tests.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Shawki A; Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold L

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents gastrointestinal absorption fractions (f1 values) for estimating internal doses from local and regional fallout radionuclides due to nuclear tests. The choice of f1 values are based on specific circumstances of weapons test conditions and a review of reported f1 values for elements in different physical and chemical states. Special attention is given to fallout from nuclear tests conducted at the Marshall Islands. We make a distinction between the f1 values for intakes of radioactive materials immediately after deposition (acute intakes) and intakes that occur in the course of months and years after deposition, following incorporation into terrestrial and aquatic foodstuffs (chronic intakes). Multiple f1 values for different circumstances where persons are exposed to radioactive fallout (e.g., local vs. regional fallout and coral vs. continental tests) are presented when supportive information is available. In some cases, our selected f1 values are similar to those adopted by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) (e.g., iodine and most actinides). However, f1 values for cesium and strontium derived from urine bioassay data of the Marshallese population are notably lower than the generic f1 values recommended by ICRP, particularly for acute intakes from local fallout (0.4 and 0.05 for Cs and Sr, respectively). The f1 values presented here form the first complete set of values relevant to realistic dose assessments for exposure to local or regional radioactive fallout. PMID:20622554

  5. Effects of gas to melt ratio on the microstructure of an Al–10.83Zn–3.39Mg–1.22Cu alloy produced by spray atomization and deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, S.; Ning, Z.L.; Zhang, M.X.; Cao, F.Y.; Sun, J.F.

    2014-01-15

    Various gas to melt ratios (GMR) that govern the cooling rate of spray forming can be achieved through controlling the atomizer form and the atomization pressure. The effect of the GMR on microstructures of an Al–10.83Zn–3.39Mg–1.22Cu alloy produced through spray forming has been studied using electron microscopy. When the GMR is high at 3.5, dendritic structure and quasi-crystalline i-Mg{sub 32}(AlZn){sub 49} particles inherited from the original powders can be observed. Spray forming at medium GMR of 2.3 produces equiaxed α-Al grains and MgZn{sub 2} phase that discontinuously distributes along the grain boundaries and within the grains as small particles. The low GMR of 1.4 corresponds to low cooling rate. Coarse and equiaxed α-Al grains together with eutectic structure consisting of b.c.c.-Mg{sub 32}(AlZn){sub 49} and α-Al phases along the grain boundaries are obtained. - Highlights: • At high GMR, the broken fragments and i-Mg{sub 32}(AlZn){sub 49} quasicrystal are observed. • At medium GMR, microstructure consists of α-Al equiaxed grains and MgZn{sub 2} phase. • At low GMR, the coarsened α-Al grains and bcc-Mg{sub 32}(AlZn){sub 49} eutectic appear.

  6. Beyond eruptive scenarios: assessing tephra fallout hazard from Neapolitan volcanoes

    PubMed Central

    Sandri, Laura; Costa, Antonio; Selva, Jacopo; Tonini, Roberto; Macedonio, Giovanni; Folch, Arnau; Sulpizio, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of volcanic hazards is necessary for risk mitigation. Typically, hazard assessment is based on one or a few, subjectively chosen representative eruptive scenarios, which use a specific combination of eruptive sizes and intensities to represent a particular size class of eruption. While such eruptive scenarios use a range of representative members to capture a range of eruptive sizes and intensities in order to reflect a wider size class, a scenario approach neglects to account for the intrinsic variability of volcanic eruptions, and implicitly assumes that inter-class size variability (i.e. size difference between different eruptive size classes) dominates over intra-class size variability (i.e. size difference within an eruptive size class), the latter of which is treated as negligible. So far, no quantitative study has been undertaken to verify such an assumption. Here, we adopt a novel Probabilistic Volcanic Hazard Analysis (PVHA) strategy, which accounts for intrinsic eruptive variabilities, to quantify the tephra fallout hazard in the Campania area. We compare the results of the new probabilistic approach with the classical scenario approach. The results allow for determining whether a simplified scenario approach can be considered valid, and for quantifying the bias which arises when full variability is not accounted for. PMID:27067389

  7. Global risk of radioactive fallout after nuclear reactor accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunkel, D.; Lelieveld, J.; Lawrence, M. G.

    2012-04-01

    Reactor core meltdowns of nuclear power plants are rare, yet the consequences are catastrophic. But what is meant by "rare"? And what can be learned from the Chernobyl and Fukushima incidents? Here we assess the risk of exposure to radioactivity due to atmospheric dispersion of gases and particles following severe nuclear accidents, using particulate 137Cs and gaseous 131I as proxies for the fallout. It appears that previously the occurrence of major accidents and the risks of radioactive contamination have been underestimated. Using a global model of the atmosphere we compute that on average, in the event of a core melt of any nuclear power plant worldwide, more than 90 % of emitted 137Cs would be transported beyond 50 km and about 50 % beyond 1000 km distance. This corroborates that such accidents have large-scale and trans-boundary impacts. Although the emission strengths and atmospheric removal processes of 137Cs and 131I are quite different, the radioactive contamination patterns over land and the human deposition exposure are computed to be similar. High human exposure risks occur around reactors in densely populated regions, notably in southern Asia where a core melt can subject 55 million people to radioactive contamination. The recent decision by Germany to phase out its nuclear reactors will reduce the national risk, though a large risk will still remain from the reactors in neighbouring countries.

  8. Global risk of radioactive fallout after nuclear reactor accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelieveld, J.; Kunkel, D.; Lawrence, M. G.

    2011-11-01

    Reactor core meltdowns of nuclear power plants are rare, yet the consequences are catastrophic. But what is meant by "rare"? And what can be learned from the Chernobyl and Fukushima incidents? Here we assess the risk of exposure to radioactivity due to atmospheric dispersion of gases and particles following severe nuclear accidents, using particulate 137Cs and gaseous 131I as proxies for the fallout. It appears that previously the occurrence of major accidents and the risks of radioactive contamination have been underestimated. Using a global model of the atmosphere we compute that on average, in the event of a core melt of any nuclear power plant worldwide, more than 90% of emitted 137Cs would be transported beyond 50km and about 50% beyond 1000 km distance. This corroborates that such accidents have large-scale and trans-boundary impacts. Although the emission strengths and atmospheric removal processes of 137Cs and 131I are quite different, the radioactive contamination patterns over land and the human deposition exposure are computed to be similar. High human exposure risks occur around reactors in densely populated regions, notably in southern Asia where a core melt can subject 55 million people to radioactive contamination. The recent decision by Germany to phase out its nuclear reactors will reduce the national risk, though a large risk will still remain from the reactors in neighbouring countries.

  9. Radiocaesium fallout behaviour in volcanic soils in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Sigurgeirsson, M A; Arnalds, O; Palsson, S E; Howard, B J; Gudnason, K

    2005-01-01

    The retention of 137Cs in various types of Andosols in Iceland was investigated. Soils were sampled at 29 sites with varying precipitation and environmental conditions. Samples were obtained from 0 to 5, 5 to 10, and 10 to 15 cm depths. The amount of radiocaesium present was quite variable, ranging between 300 and 4800 Bq m(-2) and correlated closely to total annual precipitation (r2=0.71). The majority of 137Cs, 82.7% on average, was retained in the uppermost 5 cm of the soil. The greatest penetration of 137Cs was observed for organic Histosols (76.3% in top 5 cm). The Icelandic Vitrisols (barren, poorly developed Andosols) are coarse grained with only 2-5% clay content and contain little organic matter (<1%). Yet these soils retained 74% of 137Cs in the top 5 cm. The results indicate that radiocaesium fallout is strongly retained by colloidal materials characteristic of Andosols, such as allophane and ferrihydrite. Most soils in Iceland are subject to severe and prolonged freezing and waterlogging; despite this, 137Cs is retained in the upper soil horizons and vertical migration is negligible in Icelandic Andosols. However, erosion and aeolian activity can markedly influence the amount and vertical distribution of radiocaesium in Icelandic soils. PMID:15571875

  10. The distribution of fallout {sup 137}Cs in Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, A.; Mora, P.

    1996-08-01

    Baseline levels of {sup 137}Cs on different sites throughout the Costa Rican territory are presented in this study from local and undisturbed soils. They are believed to represent the fallout input to the land surface. Seventy samples were collected from September 1991 to December 1993, and analyzed by gamma spectroscopy. The territory was divided in three regions, Caribbean, Pacific, and Central, based on meteorological and geographical conditions to study spatial distribution of cesium. The results show a higher activity in the Caribbean region perhaps due to the wind influence and higher rain precipitation throughout the year. No relevant time variation of the activity levels of reach location was found. The highest value of 17.6 Bq kg{sup {minus}1} of {sup 137}Cs is compared with it generalized derived limit, being only 1.97% of the generalized derived limit value. The mean country activity value ranges from 0.4 to 17.8 Bq kg{sup {minus}1} with an average of 3.7 Bq kg{sup {minus}1}. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Beyond eruptive scenarios: assessing tephra fallout hazard from Neapolitan volcanoes.

    PubMed

    Sandri, Laura; Costa, Antonio; Selva, Jacopo; Tonini, Roberto; Macedonio, Giovanni; Folch, Arnau; Sulpizio, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of volcanic hazards is necessary for risk mitigation. Typically, hazard assessment is based on one or a few, subjectively chosen representative eruptive scenarios, which use a specific combination of eruptive sizes and intensities to represent a particular size class of eruption. While such eruptive scenarios use a range of representative members to capture a range of eruptive sizes and intensities in order to reflect a wider size class, a scenario approach neglects to account for the intrinsic variability of volcanic eruptions, and implicitly assumes that inter-class size variability (i.e. size difference between different eruptive size classes) dominates over intra-class size variability (i.e. size difference within an eruptive size class), the latter of which is treated as negligible. So far, no quantitative study has been undertaken to verify such an assumption. Here, we adopt a novel Probabilistic Volcanic Hazard Analysis (PVHA) strategy, which accounts for intrinsic eruptive variabilities, to quantify the tephra fallout hazard in the Campania area. We compare the results of the new probabilistic approach with the classical scenario approach. The results allow for determining whether a simplified scenario approach can be considered valid, and for quantifying the bias which arises when full variability is not accounted for. PMID:27067389

  12. Dispersal and fallout simulations for urban consequences management (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Grinstein, Fernando F; Wachtor, Adam J; Nelson, Matt; Brown, Michael; Bos, Randy; Patnik, Gopal

    2010-01-01

    Hazardous chemical, biological, or radioactive releases from leaks, spills, fires, or blasts, may occur (intentionally or accidentally) in urban environments during warfare or as part of terrorist attacks on military bases or other facilities. The associated contaminant dispersion is complex and semi-chaotic. Urban predictive simulation capabilities can have direct impact in many threat-reduction areas of interest, including, urban sensor placement and threat analysis, contaminant transport (CT) effects on surrounding civilian population (dosages, evacuation, shelter-in-place), education and training of rescue teams and services. Detailed simulations for the various processes involved are in principle possible, but generally not fast. Predicting urban airflow accompanied by CT presents extremely challenging requirements. Crucial technical issues include, simulating turbulent fluid and particulate transport, initial and boundary condition modeling incorporating a consistent stratified urban boundary layer with realistic wind fluctuations, and post-processing of the simulation results for practical consequences management. Relevant fluid dynamic processes to be simulated include, detailed energetic and contaminant sources, complex building vortex shedding and flows in recirculation zones, and modeling of particle distributions, including particulate fallout, as well as deposition, re-suspension and evaporation. Other issues include, modeling building damage effects due to eventual blasts, addressing appropriate regional and atmospheric data reduction.

  13. Fallout plutonium in two oxic-anoxic environments

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, A.L.; Murray, J.W.; Schell, W.R.; Miller, L.G.

    1986-09-01

    The profiles of soluble fallout plutonium in two partially anoxic waters revealed minimum concentrations at the O/sub 2/-H/sub 2/S interface, indicating Pu removal onto particulate phases of Fe and other oxidized species that form during the redox cycle. In Saanich Inlet, an intermittently anoxic fjord in Vancouver Island, Canada, the concentration of soluble Pu in the anoxic zone was slightly less than in the oxygenated surface layer. In Soap Lake, a saline meromictic lake in eastern Washington State, Pu concentrations i the permanently anoxic zone were at least an order of magnitude higher than at the surface. Differences in the chemical characteristics of these two waters suggest important chemical species that influenced the observed Pu distribution. In the permanently anoxic zone of Soap Lake, high values of total alkalinity ranging from 940 to 1500 meq liter/sup -1/, sulfide species from 38 to 128 ..mu..M, dissolved organic carbon from 163 to 237 mg liter/sup -1/, and total dissolved solids from 80 to 140 ppt, all correlated with the observed high concentration of Pu. In Saanich Inlet, where total alkalinity ranged from 2.1 to 2.4 meq liter/sup -1/ and salinity from 25 to 32 per thousand and H/sub 2/S concentration in May 1981 showed a maximum of 8..mu..M, the observed Pu concentrations were significantly lower than for the Soap Lake monimolimnion.

  14. Dust fallout in Kuwait city: deposition and characterization.

    PubMed

    Al-Awadhi, Jasem M; Alshuaibi, Arafat A

    2013-09-01

    Dust fallouts in Kuwait city was monitored on monthly basis during the period from March 2011 to February 2012 at 10 locations. The results of this study reveal that: (1) monthly dust deposition rates ranged from 0.002 to 0.32 kg/m(2) with average deposition rate of 0.053 kg/m(2) and annual average deposition rate of 0.59 kg/m(2), ranking the first out of 56 dust deposition rates observed throughout the world; (2) on average, about 55.9% of the settled dust have fine to very fine sand fraction sizes, while silt and clay comprise an average of 37.4 and 1.4% of the total sample, respectively; (3) the concentrations for Zn and Mo out of 15 other elements analyzed from the dust were up to 11 times higher than their soil background values in Kuwait, while Pb and Ni were about seven times higher; (4) Mo, Ni, Pb and Zn show maximum enrichment relative to the upper continental crustal component (Mn); (5) Sr, Zr and Zn show highest concretions among all collected samples; and (6) quartz and calcite were the dominant minerals in the dust samples. The distribution of the heavy metals in dust seems to be controlled mainly by the land uses and the volume of traffic emissions. PMID:23722090

  15. Beyond eruptive scenarios: assessing tephra fallout hazard from Neapolitan volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandri, Laura; Costa, Antonio; Selva, Jacopo; Tonini, Roberto; Macedonio, Giovanni; Folch, Arnau; Sulpizio, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    Assessment of volcanic hazards is necessary for risk mitigation. Typically, hazard assessment is based on one or a few, subjectively chosen representative eruptive scenarios, which use a specific combination of eruptive sizes and intensities to represent a particular size class of eruption. While such eruptive scenarios use a range of representative members to capture a range of eruptive sizes and intensities in order to reflect a wider size class, a scenario approach neglects to account for the intrinsic variability of volcanic eruptions, and implicitly assumes that inter-class size variability (i.e. size difference between different eruptive size classes) dominates over intra-class size variability (i.e. size difference within an eruptive size class), the latter of which is treated as negligible. So far, no quantitative study has been undertaken to verify such an assumption. Here, we adopt a novel Probabilistic Volcanic Hazard Analysis (PVHA) strategy, which accounts for intrinsic eruptive variabilities, to quantify the tephra fallout hazard in the Campania area. We compare the results of the new probabilistic approach with the classical scenario approach. The results allow for determining whether a simplified scenario approach can be considered valid, and for quantifying the bias which arises when full variability is not accounted for.

  16. Evidence of the radioactive fallout in France due to the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Evrard, Olivier; Van Beek, Pieter; Gateuille, David; Pont, Véronique; Lefèvre, Irène; Lansard, Bruno; Bonté, Philippe

    2012-12-01

    Radioactive fallout due to the Fukushima reactor explosion in Japan was detected in environmental samples collected in France. The presence of (131)I in aerosols (200±6 μBq m(-3)) collected at the Pic du Midi observatory, located at 2877 m altitude in the French Pyrénées, indicated that the Japanese radioactive cloud reached France between 22 and 29 March, i.e. less than two weeks after the initial emissions, as suggested by a (137)Cs/(134)Cs ratio of 1.4. Cesium radioisotopes ((134)Cs and (137)Cs) were not detected in this sample but they were present in the aerosol sample collected the next week, i.e. between 29 March and 05 April (about 10 μBq m(-3)). We also report (131)I activities measured in grass (1.1-11 Bq kg(-1); fresh weight) and soil samples (0.4 Bq kg(-1)) collected in the Seine River basin between 30 March and 10 April. The (134)Cs from the damaged Fukushima power plant was also detected in grass collected in the Seine River basin between 31 March and 10 April (0.2-1.6 Bq kg(-1) fresh weight, with a (137)Cs/(134)Cs ratio close to 1, which is consistent with Fukushima radioactive release). Despite the installation of a network of nested stations to collect suspended matter in the upstream part of the Seine River basin, (131)I was only detected in suspended matter (4.5-60 Bq kg(-1)) collected at the most upstream stations between 30 March and 12 April. Neither (131)I nor (134)Cs has been detected in environmental samples since the end of April 2011, because of the rapid decay of (131)I and the very low activities of (134)Cs (about 400 times lower than after Chernobyl accident). PMID:22348995

  17. Estimates of exposure rates and fallout arrival times near the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.B. )

    1990-11-01

    One of the tasks of the Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project (ORERP) was to estimate doses to individuals resulting from exposure to fallout from nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Dose estimates are based on estimates of the exposure rate 12 h post-detonation (H + 12) and the time of fallout arrival from events producing discernible fallout at locations off the NTS. These estimates are derived from both published fallout patterns and survey meter readings taken by monitors in the field. Each fallout pattern is digitized, and kriging is used to interpolate estimates of exposure rate and arrival time onto a 10-km grid covering the contours of the pattern. These grid values are then used to calculate estimates at any location of interest within the pattern. Exposure rate is also estimated from the survey meter readings for a particular nuclear event by decay-correcting the measurements near a selected location to H + 12 and then aggregating them into one estimate. Estimates of discernible exposure rate and time of fallout arrival from 74 nuclear events at the NTS are contained in the Town Data Base. Estimates are given for 352 locations in Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah. Each record in the data base contains estimates for a specified event and location. The distribution of exposure rate is represented by a geometric mean and standard deviation; the distribution of fallout arrival time is represented by an arithmetic mean and standard deviation. A more extensive description and a listing of the Town Data Base are included in a separate report.

  18. Fallout plume of submerged oil from Deepwater Horizon

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, David L.; Fisher, G. Burch; Bagby, Sarah C.; Nelson, Robert K.; Reddy, Christopher M.; Sylva, Sean P.; Woo, Mary A.

    2014-01-01

    The sinking of the Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico led to uncontrolled emission of oil to the ocean, with an official government estimate of ∼5.0 million barrels released. Among the pressing uncertainties surrounding this event is the fate of ∼2 million barrels of submerged oil thought to have been trapped in deep-ocean intrusion layers at depths of ∼1,000–1,300 m. Here we use chemical distributions of hydrocarbons in >3,000 sediment samples from 534 locations to describe a footprint of oil deposited on the deep-ocean floor. Using a recalcitrant biomarker of crude oil, 17α(H),21β(H)-hopane (hopane), we have identified a 3,200-km2 region around the Macondo Well contaminated by ∼1.8 ± 1.0 × 106 g of excess hopane. Based on spatial, chemical, oceanographic, and mass balance considerations, we calculate that this contamination represents 4–31% of the oil sequestered in the deep ocean. The pattern of contamination points to deep-ocean intrusion layers as the source and is most consistent with dual modes of deposition: a “bathtub ring” formed from an oil-rich layer of water impinging laterally upon the continental slope (at a depth of ∼900–1,300 m) and a higher-flux “fallout plume” where suspended oil particles sank to underlying sediment (at a depth of ∼1,300–1,700 m). We also suggest that a significant quantity of oil was deposited on the ocean floor outside this area but so far has evaded detection because of its heterogeneous spatial distribution. PMID:25349409

  19. Global risk of radioactive fallout after major nuclear reactor accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelieveld, J.; Kunkel, D.; Lawrence, M. G.

    2012-05-01

    Major reactor accidents of nuclear power plants are rare, yet the consequences are catastrophic. But what is meant by "rare"? And what can be learned from the Chernobyl and Fukushima incidents? Here we assess the cumulative, global risk of exposure to radioactivity due to atmospheric dispersion of gases and particles following severe nuclear accidents (the most severe ones on the International Nuclear Event Scale, INES 7), using particulate 137Cs and gaseous 131I as proxies for the fallout. Our results indicate that previously the occurrence of INES 7 major accidents and the risks of radioactive contamination have been underestimated. Using a global model of the atmosphere we compute that on average, in the event of a major reactor accident of any nuclear power plant worldwide, more than 90% of emitted 137Cs would be transported beyond 50 km and about 50% beyond 1000 km distance before being deposited. This corroborates that such accidents have large-scale and trans-boundary impacts. Although the emission strengths and atmospheric removal processes of 137Cs and 131I are quite different, the radioactive contamination patterns over land and the human exposure due to deposition are computed to be similar. High human exposure risks occur around reactors in densely populated regions, notably in West Europe and South Asia, where a major reactor accident can subject around 30 million people to radioactive contamination. The recent decision by Germany to phase out its nuclear reactors will reduce the national risk, though a large risk will still remain from the reactors in neighbouring countries.

  20. Fallout plume of submerged oil from Deepwater Horizon.

    PubMed

    Valentine, David L; Fisher, G Burch; Bagby, Sarah C; Nelson, Robert K; Reddy, Christopher M; Sylva, Sean P; Woo, Mary A

    2014-11-11

    The sinking of the Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico led to uncontrolled emission of oil to the ocean, with an official government estimate of ∼ 5.0 million barrels released. Among the pressing uncertainties surrounding this event is the fate of ∼ 2 million barrels of submerged oil thought to have been trapped in deep-ocean intrusion layers at depths of ∼ 1,000-1,300 m. Here we use chemical distributions of hydrocarbons in >3,000 sediment samples from 534 locations to describe a footprint of oil deposited on the deep-ocean floor. Using a recalcitrant biomarker of crude oil, 17α(H),21β(H)-hopane (hopane), we have identified a 3,200-km(2) region around the Macondo Well contaminated by ∼ 1.8 ± 1.0 × 10(6) g of excess hopane. Based on spatial, chemical, oceanographic, and mass balance considerations, we calculate that this contamination represents 4-31% of the oil sequestered in the deep ocean. The pattern of contamination points to deep-ocean intrusion layers as the source and is most consistent with dual modes of deposition: a "bathtub ring" formed from an oil-rich layer of water impinging laterally upon the continental slope (at a depth of ∼ 900-1,300 m) and a higher-flux "fallout plume" where suspended oil particles sank to underlying sediment (at a depth of ∼ 1,300-1,700 m). We also suggest that a significant quantity of oil was deposited on the ocean floor outside this area but so far has evaded detection because of its heterogeneous spatial distribution. PMID:25349409

  1. Ratios of internal conversion coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.; Ertugrul, M.; Nestor, C.W. . E-mail: CNestorjr@aol.com; Trzhaskovskaya, M.B.

    2006-03-15

    We present here a database of available experimental ratios of internal conversion coefficients for different atomic subshells measured with an accuracy of 10% or better for a number of elements in the range 26 {<=} Z {<=} 100. The experimental set involves 414 ratios for pure and 1096 ratios for mixed-multipolarity nuclear transitions in the transition energy range from 2 to 2300 keV. We give relevant theoretical ratios calculated in the framework of the Dirac-Fock method with and without regard for the hole in the atomic subshell after conversion. For comparison, the ratios obtained within the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater approximation are also presented. In cases where several ratios were measured for the same transition in a given isotope in which two multipolarities were involved, we present the mixing ratio {delta} {sup 2} obtained by a least squares fit.

  2. Influence of copper to indium atomic ratio on the properties of Cu-In-Te based thin-film solar cells prepared by low-temperature co-evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Mise, Takahiro; Nakada, Tokio

    2012-09-15

    The influence of copper to indium atomic ratio (Cu/In) on the properties of Cu-In-Te based thin films and solar cells was investigated. The films (Cu/In = 0.38-1.17) were grown on both bare and Mo-coated soda-lime glass substrates at 250 Degree-Sign C by single-step co-evaporation using a molecular beam epitaxy system. Highly (112)-oriented CuInTe{sub 2} films were obtained at Cu/In ratios of 0.84-0.99. However, stoichiometric and Cu-rich films showed a poor film structure with high surface roughness. The films consist of polyhedron-shaped grains, which are related to the coexistence of a Cu{sub 2-x}Te phase, and significant evidence for the coexistence of the Cu{sub 2-x}Te phase in the stoichiometric and Cu-rich films is presented. KCN treatment was performed for the films in order to remove the Cu{sub 2-x}Te phase. The stoichiometric CuInTe{sub 2} thin films exhibited a high mobility above 50 cm{sup 2}/V s at room temperature after the KCN treatment. A preliminary solar cell fabricated using a 1.4-{mu}m-thick Cu-poor CuInTe{sub 2} thin film (Cu/In = 0.84, E{sub g} = 0.988 eV) yielded a total-area efficiency of 2.10%. The photovoltaic performance of the cell was improved after long-term ambient aging in dark conditions.

  3. A high resolution record of chlorine-36 nuclear-weapons-tests fallout from Central Asia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, J.R.; Cecil, L.D.; Synal, H.-A.; Santos, J.; Kreutz, K.J.; Wake, C.P.

    2004-01-01

    The Inilchek Glacier, located in the Tien Shan Mountains, central Asia, is unique among mid-latitude glaciers because of its relatively large average annual accumulation. In July 2000, two ice cores of 162 and 167 meters (m) in length were collected from the Inilchek Glacier for (chlorine-36) 36Cl analysis a part of a collaborative international effort to study the environmental changes archived in mid-latitude glaciers worldwide. The average annual precipitation at the collection site was calculated to be 1.6 m. In contrast, the reported average annual accumulations at the high-latitude Dye-3 glacial site, Greenland, the mid-latitude Guliya Ice Cap, China, and the mid-latitude Upper Fremont Glacier, Wyoming, USA, were 0.52, 0.16 and 0.76 m, respectively. The resolution of the 36Cl record in one of the Inilchek ice cores was from 2 to 10 times higher than the resolution of the records at these other sites and could provide an opportunity for detailed study of environmental changes that have occurred over the past 150 years. Despite the differences in accumulation among these various glacial sites, the 36Cl profile and peak concentrations for the Inilchek ice core were remarkably similar in shape and magnitude to those for ice cores from these other sites. The 36Cl peak concentration from 1958, the year during the mid-1900s nuclear-weapons-tests period when 36Cl fallout was largest, was preserved in the Inilchek core at a depth of 90.56 m below the surface of the glacier (74.14-m-depth water equivalent) at a concentration of 7.7 ?? 105 atoms of 36Cl/gram (g) of ice. Peak 36Cl concentrations from Dye-3, Guliya and the Upper Fremont glacial sites were 7.1 ?? 105, 5.4 ?? 105 and 0.7 ?? 105 atoms of 36Cl/g of ice, respectively. Measurements of 36Cl preserved in ice cores improve estimates of historical worldwide atmospheric deposition of this isotope and allow the sources of 36Cl in ground water to be better identified. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Sources of fine-grained sediment to streams using fallout radionuclides in the Midwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellis, A.; Fuller, C. C.; Van Metre, P. C.

    2014-12-01

    Fluvial sediment is a major factor in aquatic habitat degradation. Understanding the sources of this sediment is a necessary component of management plans and policies aimed at reducing sediment inputs. Because of the time intensive framework of most sediment-source studies, spatial interpretations are often limited to the study watershed. To address sediment sources on a larger scale, the U.S. Geological Survey- National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program as part of the Midwest Stream Quality Assessment, used fallout radioisotopes (excess lead-210, cesium-137, and beryllium-7) to determine the source ((upland (surface runoff) or channel derived)) of fine-grained (<0.063 mm) bed sediment in the Cornbelt Ecoregion. The study area encompassed parts of 11 states in the Midwestern United States covering 648,239 km2 of the United States. Sampling occurred in July and August of 2013, in conjunction with water chemistry, aquatic-habitat and ecological community assessments. Ninety-nine watersheds were sampled, the majority of which were predominately agricultural, with contributing areas ranging between 6.7 to 5,893 km2. Using the ratio of beryllium-7 to excess lead-210, the percent of upland to channel-derived sediment was estimated. Results indicate that sediment sources vary among the 99 watersheds. Channel sediment is an important source presumably from bank erosion. Upland sediment was not the dominant source of sediment in many of these agricultural watersheds. Suspended-sediment samples collected over an 8-week period for 3 watersheds also show that the percent of upland versus channel sediment varies spatially and temporally.

  5. Time-averaged fluxes of lead and fallout radionuclides to sediments in Florida Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, J.A.; Holmes, C.; Halley, R.; Bothner, M.; Shinn, E.; Graney, J.; Keeler, G.; TenBrink, M.; Orlandini, K.A.; Rudnick, D.

    2000-01-01

    Recent, unmixed sediments from mud banks of central Florida Bay were dated using 210Pb/226Ra, and chronologies were verified by comparing sediment lead temporal records with Pb/Ca ratios in annual layers of coral (Montastrea annularis) located on the ocean side of the Florida Keys. Dates of sediment lead peaks (1978 ?? 2) accord with prior observations of a 6 year lag between the occurrence of maximum atmospheric lead in 1972 and peak coral lead in 1978. Smaller lags of 1-2 years occur between the maximum atmospheric radionuclide fallout and peaks in sediment temporal records of 137Cs and Pu. Such lags are consequences of system time averaging (STA) in which atmospherically delivered particle-associated constituents accumulate and mix in a (sedimentary?) reservoir before transferring to permanent sediments and coral. STA model calculations, using time-dependent atmospheric inputs, produced optimized profiles in excellent accord with measured sediment 137Cs, Pu, lead, and coral lead distributions. Derived residence times of these particle tracers (16 ?? 1, 15.7 ?? 0.7, 19 ?? 3, and 16 ?? 2 years, respectively) are comparable despite differences in sampling locations, in accumulating media, and in element loading histories and geochemical properties. For a 16 year weighted mean residence time, STA generates the observed 6 year lead peak lag. Evidently, significant levels of nondegradable, particle-associated contaminants can persist in Florida Bay for many decades following elimination of external inputs. Present results, in combination with STA model analysis of previously reported radionuclide profiles, suggest that decade-scale time averaging may occur widely in recent coastal marine sedimentary environments. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Implementation of a new atomic basis for the He I equilibrium line ratio technique for electron temperature and density diagnostic in the SOL for H-mode plasmas in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Burgos, JMM; Schmitz, O.; Unterberg, Ezekial A; Loch, S. D.; Ballance, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating the ratio of selected helium lines allows for measurement of electron densities and temperatures. This technique is applied for L-mode plasmas at TEXTOR (O. Schmitz et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 (2008) 115004). We report our first efforts to extend it to H-mode plasma diagnostics in DIII-D. This technique depends on the accuracy of the atomic data used in the collisional radiative model (CRM). We present predictions for the electron temperatures and densities by using recently calculated R-Matrix With Pseudostates (RMPS) and Convergent Close-Coupling (CCC) electron-impact excitation and ionization data. We include contributions from higher Rydberg states by means of the projection matrix. These effects become significant for high electron density conditions, which are typical in H-mode. We apply a non-equilibrium model for the time propagation of the ionization balance to predict line emission profiles from experimental H-mode data from DIII-D. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Fallout deposition in the Marshall Islands from Bikini and Enewetak nuclear weapons tests.

    PubMed

    Beck, Harold L; Bouville, André; Moroz, Brian E; Simon, Steven L

    2010-08-01

    Deposition densities (Bq m(-2)) of all important dose-contributing radionuclides occurring in nuclear weapons testing fallout from tests conducted at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls (1946-1958) have been estimated on a test-specific basis for 32 atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. A complete review of various historical and contemporary data, as well as meteorological analysis, was used to make judgments regarding which tests deposited fallout in the Marshall Islands and to estimate fallout deposition density. Our analysis suggested that only 20 of the 66 nuclear tests conducted in or near the Marshall Islands resulted in substantial fallout deposition on any of the 23 inhabited atolls. This analysis was confirmed by the fact that the sum of our estimates of 137Cs deposition from these 20 tests at each atoll is in good agreement with the total 137Cs deposited as estimated from contemporary soil sample analyses. The monitoring data and meteorological analyses were used to quantitatively estimate the deposition density of 63 activation and fission products for each nuclear test, plus the cumulative deposition of 239+240Pu at each atoll. Estimates of the degree of fractionation of fallout from each test at each atoll, as well as of the fallout transit times from the test sites to the atolls were used in this analysis. The estimates of radionuclide deposition density, fractionation, and transit times reported here are the most complete available anywhere and are suitable for estimations of both external and internal dose to representative persons as described in companion papers. PMID:20622548

  8. Fallout Deposition in the Marshall Islands from Bikini and Enewetak Nuclear Weapons Tests

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Harold L.; Bouville, André; Moroz, Brian E.; Simon, Steven L.

    2009-01-01

    Deposition densities (Bq m-2) of all important dose-contributing radionuclides occurring in nuclear weapons testing fallout from tests conducted at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls (1946-1958) have been estimated on a test-specific basis for all the 31 atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. A complete review of various historical and contemporary data, as well as meteorological analysis, was used to make judgments regarding which tests deposited fallout in the Marshall Islands and to estimate fallout deposition density. Our analysis suggested that only 20 of the 66 nuclear tests conducted in or near the Marshall Islands resulted in substantial fallout deposition on any of the 25 inhabited atolls. This analysis was confirmed by the fact that the sum of our estimates of 137Cs deposition from these 20 tests at each atoll is in good agreement with the total 137Cs deposited as estimated from contemporary soil sample analyses. The monitoring data and meteorological analyses were used to quantitatively estimate the deposition density of 63 activation and fission products for each nuclear test, plus the cumulative deposition of 239+240Pu at each atoll. Estimates of the degree of fractionation of fallout from each test at each atoll, as well as of the fallout transit times from the test sites to the atolls were used in this analysis. The estimates of radionuclide deposition density, fractionation, and transit times reported here are the most complete available anywhere and are suitable for estimations of both external and internal dose to representative persons as described in companion papers. PMID:20622548

  9. Historical overview of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing and estimates of fallout in the continental United States.

    PubMed

    Beck, Harold L; Bennett, Burton G

    2002-05-01

    From 1945 to 1980, over 500 weapons tests were conducted in the atmosphere at a number of locations around the world. These tests resulted in the release of substantial quantities of radioactive debris to the environment. Local, intermediate, and global fallout deposition densities downwind from test sites depended on the heights of bursts, the yields, and the half-lives and volatilities of the particular fission or activation products, as well as on the meteorological conditions. A number of national and international monitoring programs were established to trace the fallout through the atmosphere and biosphere. These programs included continuous monitoring of ground-level air, exposure rates, and deposition as well as periodic sampling of food, bone, water, soil, and stratospheric air. Although data for specific high-yield tests are still classified, the fission and fusion yields of the various tests and test series have been estimated and from this information the quantities of specific fission and activation products released into the atmosphere have been determined. The geographic and temporal variations in the fallout deposition of specific radionuclides based on both actual measurements and model calculations are discussed in this paper. A feasibility study to estimate the deposition density (deposition per unit area) of particular radionuclides from both Nevada Test Site and "global" fallout on a county-by-county scale for the continental United States is described. These deposition estimates provide a basis for reconstructing population exposure and dose. They support the feasibility of a more detailed evaluation of the population doses that resulted from fallout from atmospheric tests to document the experience fully and to report results more systematically and completely to the world community. The impact of weapons fallout will continue to be felt for years to come since a contaminant baseline has been imposed on the ambient radiation environment that

  10. Fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear disaster and congenital malformations in Europe.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, W

    2001-01-01

    Investigators estimate that the population exposure that resulted from the Chernobyl fallout is in the range of natural background radiation for most European countries. Given current radiobiologic knowledge, health effects-if any-would not be measurable with epidemiologic tools. In several independent reports, however, researchers have described isolated peaks in the prevalence of congenital malformations in the cohort conceived immediately after onset of the fallout. The consistency of the time pattern and the specific types of malformation raise concern about their significance. In this study, the author summarizes findings from Turkey, Belarus, Croatia, Finland, Germany, and other countries, and implications for radiation protection and public health issues are discussed. PMID:11958546

  11. Development and validation of a new fallout transport method using variable spectral winds. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, A.T.

    1984-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop and validate a fallout prediction method using variable transport calculations. The new method uses National Meteorological Center (NMC) spectral coefficients to compute wind vectors along the space- and time-varying trajectories of falling particles. The method was validated by comparing computed and actual cloud trajectories from a Mount St. Helens volcanic eruption and a high dust cloud. In summary, this research demonstrated the feasibility of using spectral coefficients for fallout transport calculations, developed a two-step smearing model to treat variable winds, and showed that uncertainties in spectral winds do not contribute significantly to the error in computed dose rate.

  12. Organizational and social-psychological issues relevant to fallout-shelter evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Wernette, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a preliminary review of the literature on organizational and social-psychological issues relevant to fallout-shelter evaluation. Fallout-shelter options are evaluated along two dimensions: shelter size, and extent of shelteree participation in the shelter construction. Four functional criteria are used in the evaluation: decision-making, member coordination, social control, and maintaining morale. Smaller shelters requiring shelteree participation in construction appear preferable as measured in most of these criteria. Additional factors mentioned include demographic characteristics of the shelter population, degree and type of ventilation system, and availability of medical equipment and personnel. 10 references.

  13. Radiological survey and evaluation of the fallout area from the Trinity test: Chupadera Mesa and White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, W.R.; Rodgers, J.C.

    1985-06-01

    Current radiological conditions were evaluated for the site of the first nuclear weapons test, the Trinity test, and the associated fallout zone. The test, located on White Sands Missile Range, was conducted as part of the research with nuclear materials for the World War II Manhattan Engineer District atomic bomb project. Some residual radioactivity attributable to the test was found in the soils of Ground Zero on White Sands Missile Range and the areas that received fallout from the test. The study considered relevant information including historical records, environmental data extending back to the 1940s, and new data acquired by field sampling and measurements. Potential exposures to radiation were evaluated for current land uses. Maximum estimated doses on Chupadera Mesa and other uncontrolled areas are less than 3% of the DOE Radiation Protection Standards (RPSs). Radiation exposures during visits to the US Army-controlled Ground Zero area are less than 1 mrem per annual visit or less than 0.2% of the RPS for a member of the public. Detailed data and interpretations are provided in appendixes. 14 figs., 45 tabs.

  14. Determination of 240Pu/239Pu isotopic ratios in human tissues collected from areas around the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site by sector-field high resolution ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, M; Oikawa, S; Sakaguchi, A; Tomita, J; Hoshi, M; Apsalikov, K N

    2008-09-01

    Information on the 240Pu/239Pu isotope ratios in human tissues for people living around the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) was deduced from 9 sets of soft tissues and bones, and 23 other bone samples obtained by autopsy. Plutonium was radiochemically separated and purified, and plutonium isotopes (239Pu and 240Pu) were determined by sector-field high resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. For most of the tissue samples from the former nine subjects, low 240Pu/239Pu isotope ratios were determined: bone, 0.125 +/- 0.018 (0.113-0.145, n = 4); lungs, 0.063 +/- 0.010 (0.051-0.078, n = 5); and liver, 0.148 +/- 0.026 (0.104-0.189, n = 9). Only 239Pu was detected in the kidney samples; the amount of 240Pu was too small to be measured, probably due to the small size of samples analyzed. The mean 240Pu/239Pu isotope ratio for bone samples from the latter 23 subjects was 0.152 +/- 0.034, ranging from 0.088 to 0.207. A significant difference (a two-tailed Student's t test; 95% significant level, alpha = 0.05) between mean 240Pu/239Pu isotope ratios for the tissue samples and for the global fallout value (0.178 +/- 0.014) indicated that weapons-grade plutonium from the atomic bombs has been incorporated into the human tissues, especially lungs, in the residents living around the SNTS. The present 239,240Pu concentrations in bone, lung, and liver samples were, however, not much different from ranges found for human tissues from other countries that were due solely to global fallout during the 1970's-1980's. PMID:18695410

  15. Growth kinetics of step edges on celestite (0 0 1) surfaces as a function of temperature, saturation state, ionic strength, and aqueous strontium:sulfate ratio: An in-situ atomic force microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracco, Jacquelyn N.; Gooijer, Yiscka; Higgins, Steven R.

    2016-02-01

    Step velocities on the celestite (0 0 1) surface have been measured as a function of temperature (23-45 °C), saturation state (S = 1.1-2.2), ionic strength (I = 0.01, 0.06, and 0.1 M), and aqueous strontium:sulfate ratio (r = 0.01-100) using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Celestite growth hillocks were flanked by [0 1 0]-aligned step edges, which are polar, and step edges vicinal to <1 2 0>, which are non-polar. [0 1 0] step velocities increased with temperature and saturation state, however step velocities did not vary significantly with ionic strength. Step velocities were non-linear with saturation state, suggesting a change in mechanism at high S as compared with low S. At constant S, the step velocities were maximized at r = 1 and decreased significantly at extreme r, demonstrating the governing role of solute stoichiometry. We successfully fit the step velocity data as a function of r using the Stack and Grantham (2010) nucleation and propagation model. Based on the results as a function of ionic strength and r, the mechanism at low S is likely ion-by-ion attachment to the step with an activation energy of 75 (±10) kJ mol-1. At high S the mechanism is a combination of the one at low S and possibly attachment of a neutral species such as an ion pair with an activation energy of 43 (±9) kJ mol-1.

  16. Growth kinetics of step edges on celestite (0 0 1) surfaces as a function of temperature, saturation state, ionic strength, and aqueous strontium:sulface ratio: An in-situ atomic force microscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Bracco, Jacquelyn N.; Gooijer, Yiscka; Higgins, Steven R.

    2015-12-12

    Step velocities on the celestite (0 0 1) surface have been measured as a function of temperature (23–45 °C), saturation state (S = 1.1–2.2), ionic strength (I = 0.01, 0.06, and 0.1 M), and aqueous strontium:sulfate ratio (r = 0.01–100) using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Celestite growth hillocks were flanked by [0 1 0]-aligned step edges, which are polar, and step edges vicinal to <1 2 0>, which are non-polar. [0 1 0] step velocities increased with temperature and saturation state, however step velocities did not vary significantly with ionic strength. Step velocities were non-linear with saturation state, suggesting a change in mechanism at high S as compared with low S. At constant S, the step velocities were maximized at r = 1 and decreased significantly at extreme r, demonstrating the governing role of solute stoichiometry. We successfully fit the step velocity data as a function of r using the Stack and Grantham (2010) nucleation and propagation model. Based on the results as a function of ionic strength and r, the mechanism at low S is likely ion-by-ion attachment to the step with an activation energy of 75 (±10) kJ mol–1. In conclusion, at high S the mechanism is a combination of the one at low S and possibly attachment of a neutral species such as an ion pair with an activation energy of 43 (±9) kJ mol–1.

  17. Growth kinetics of step edges on celestite (0 0 1) surfaces as a function of temperature, saturation state, ionic strength, and aqueous strontium:sulface ratio: An in-situ atomic force microscopy study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bracco, Jacquelyn N.; Gooijer, Yiscka; Higgins, Steven R.

    2015-12-12

    Step velocities on the celestite (0 0 1) surface have been measured as a function of temperature (23–45 °C), saturation state (S = 1.1–2.2), ionic strength (I = 0.01, 0.06, and 0.1 M), and aqueous strontium:sulfate ratio (r = 0.01–100) using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Celestite growth hillocks were flanked by [0 1 0]-aligned step edges, which are polar, and step edges vicinal to <1 2 0>, which are non-polar. [0 1 0] step velocities increased with temperature and saturation state, however step velocities did not vary significantly with ionic strength. Step velocities were non-linear with saturation state, suggesting amore » change in mechanism at high S as compared with low S. At constant S, the step velocities were maximized at r = 1 and decreased significantly at extreme r, demonstrating the governing role of solute stoichiometry. We successfully fit the step velocity data as a function of r using the Stack and Grantham (2010) nucleation and propagation model. Based on the results as a function of ionic strength and r, the mechanism at low S is likely ion-by-ion attachment to the step with an activation energy of 75 (±10) kJ mol–1. In conclusion, at high S the mechanism is a combination of the one at low S and possibly attachment of a neutral species such as an ion pair with an activation energy of 43 (±9) kJ mol–1.« less

  18. Using Radioactive Fallout Cesium (137Cs) to Distinguish Sediment Sources in an Agricultural Watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Radioactive fallout Cesium (Cs-137) has been used for quantifying sources of accumulating sediment in water bodies and to determine the rates and pattern of soil erosion. The objectives of this research are to use Cs-137 as a tracer to determine patterns of soil erosion and deposition of eroding soi...

  19. Graphic presentation of quarterly /sup 90/Sr fallout data, 1954-1982

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    This report graphically presents all of the precipitation and /sup 90/Sr deposition data for all stations operated as part of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory's (EML) global fallout program since the initiation of the program in 1954. 3 references, 179 figures.

  20. VULNERABILITY OF HEADWATER CATCHMENT RESOURCES TO INCIDENCES OF 210PB EXCESS AND 137CS RADIONUCLIDE FALLOUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent identification of elevated excess 210Pb (≤302.6 mBq L-1) and 137Cs (≤ 111.3 mBq L-1) activity in drinking water wells up to 20 m depth indicates some transport of airborne radionuclide fallout beyond soils in the Shaker Village c...

  1. New insights on using fallout radionuclides to estimate soil redistribution rates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fallout radionuclides such as 137Cs have been widely accepted and used in the past 40 years to provide quantitative soil redistribution estimates at a point scale. Recently their usefulness has been questioned by a few researchers challenging the validity of the key assumption that the spatial ...

  2. Using Fallout Cesium-137 to understand soil redistribution over agricultural landscapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While it is recognized that soil erosion is highly variable in space and time, studies of the redistribution of soil and soil organic carbon (SOC) within a field or watershed are limited. Our studies focus on the use of fallout Cesium-137 to understand pattern of soil and SOC movement on the landsca...

  3. Using fallout Cesium-137 to understand soil redistribution over agricultural landscapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While it is recognized that soil erosion is highly variable in space and time, studies of the redistribution of soil within a field or watershed are limited. Our studies focus on the use of fallout Cesium-137 to understand pattern of soil movement on the landscape. It is often assumed that eroding...

  4. Preliminary evaluation of crisis-relocation fallout-shelter options. Volume 2. Detailed analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Santini, D.J.; Clinch, J.M.; Davis, F.H.; Hill, L.G.; Lynch, E.P.; Tanzman, E.A.; Wernette, D.R.

    1982-12-01

    This report presents a preliminary, detailed evaluation of various shelter options for use if the President orders crisis relocation of the US urban population because of strong expectation of a nuclear war. The availability of livable shelter space at 40 ft/sup 2/ per person (congregate-care space) by state is evaluated. Options are evaluated for construction of fallout shelters allowing 10 ft/sup 2/ per person - such shelters are designed to provide 100% survival at projected levels of radioactive fallout. The FEMA concept of upgrading existing buildings to act as fallout shelters can, in principle, provide adequate shelter throughout most of the US. Exceptions are noted and remedies proposed. In terms of upgrading existing buildings to fallout shelter status, great benefits are possible by turning away from a standard national approach and adopting a more site-specific approach. Existing FEMA research provides a solid foundation for successful crisis relocation planning, but the program can be refined by making suitable modifications in its locational, engineering, and institutionally specific elements.

  5. Individual external exposures from Nevada Test Site fallout for Utah leukemia cases and controls.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, R D; Gren, D C; Simon, S L; Wrenn, M E; Hawthorne, H A; Lotz, T M; Stevens, W; Till, J E

    1990-11-01

    External gamma-ray exposures from fallout originating at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) have been assigned to 6,507 individual subjects (1,177 leukemia cases and 5,330 control subjects) who died as Utah residents between 1952 and 1981. Leukemia cases were identified, confirmed, and classified by cell type from the Utah Cancer Registry, Utah State vital records, and medical records. Residential histories were obtained from the Deceased Membership File (DMF) of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS), supplemented by information from the LDS Church Census Records that were taken in 1950, 1955, and 1960-62. Control subjects were selected randomly within age strata from the DMF and were frequency-matched to the cases by age at death and for sex. Individual radiation exposures were assigned as a function of residence location and time interval for each residence during the fallout period (1951-1958) using geographic exposure data taken from the literature. Temporal distribution of exposure for subjects who resided in more than one locality or who were born or died during the fallout period was determined from data of other investigators. Calculated gamma-ray exposures for each place of residence were summed for each subject to yield the exposure to fallout from the NTS. PMID:2211126

  6. In Utero Exposure to Iodine-131 from Chernobyl Fallout and Anthropometric Characteristics in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Neta, Gila; Hatch, Maureen; Kitahara, Cari M.; Ostroumova, Evgenia; Bolshova, Elena V.; Tereschenko, Valery P.; Tronko, Mykola D.; Brenner, Alina V.

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to external radiation has been linked to growth retardation among atomic bomb survivors in adolescence. It is unclear from previous studies whether in utero exposure to internal radiation such as iodine-131 (I-131), which concentrates in the thyroid gland, has an effect on physical growth. We examined the associations between estimated thyroid gland dose from prenatal exposure to I-131 and self-reported height and weight in a cohort of 2,460 individuals exposed to radioactive fallout from the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident [mean I-131 dose = 72 (mGy)] and screened for thyroid diseases in adolescence. Using multivariable linear regression models, we estimated the mean differences in height, weight and body mass index (BMI) per unit increase in dose (100 mGy) in models adjusted for gender, age at examination, type of residence (rural/urban) and presence of thyroid disease diagnosed at screening. All of the adjustment factors as well as the trimester of exposure were evaluated as potential modifiers of the dose response. Overall, no significant dose response was found for height (P = 0.29), weight (P = 0.14) or BMI (P = 0.16). We found significant modification of the dose response for weight and BMI by presence/absence of thyroid disease (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03, respectively), but not for other factors. In individuals without thyroid disease (n = 1,856), there was a weak, significant association between I-131 thyroid dose and higher weight (210 g per 100 mGy, P = 0.02) or BMI (70 g/m2 per 100 mGy, P = 0.02) that depended on individuals (n = 52) exposed to ≥500 mGy. In individuals with thyroid disease (n = 579, 67.4% with simple diffuse goiter) no significant association with I-131 for weight (P = 0.14) or BMI (P = 0.14) was found. These results do not support the hypothesis that in utero exposure to I-131 at levels experienced by a majority of study subjects may be associated with meaningful differences in adolescent anthropometry. However

  7. New technologies to improve the monitoring of tephra fallouts from Etna: the collaborative system Tefranet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronico, Daniele; Ferrari, Ferruccio; Merenda, Riccardo; Reitano, Danilo; Scollo, Simona; Cristaldi, Antonio; Lodato, Luigi; Mangiagli, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    During early December 2015, Mt. Etna (Italy) produced 4 paroxysmal events from the Voragine crater in just 3 days. This activity caused ash and lapilli fallout over a wide area extending from the volcanic slopes up to ~100 km from the volcano, affecting numerous villages and the cities of Messina and Reggio Calabria. Monitoring this kind of volcanic activity in order to know the dispersal of tephra fallout in quasi-real time can prove challenging, especially when several paroxysmal events follow each other as during these latest eruptions in December. To tackle similar recurring periods of frequent activity, which have occurred a number of times at Etna over recent years, we devised a collaborative system named Tefranet. The system is easy to use but at the same time designed to rapidly retrieve useful georeferenced information on tephra fallouts from Etna's explosive activity. Tefranet includes a mobile application and a web site, with particular attention to an administration backend tool, making owners of smartphones or other mobile devices participants. The system aims to involve citizens living not only in eastern Sicily (i.e. the area most affected by fallout based on the prevailing winds blowing on Etna), but also those resident at some distance, in areas potentially covered by tephra (more than 60-80 km from the volcano) and that are difficult to reach before the original amounts of tephra on the ground may become altered by anthropic (e.g. car traffic) and atmospheric (wind and rain) factors. The Tefranet community will be informed by the INGV specialists via mobile device in case explosive activity resumes, with users able to visualize all the tephra signals on a map in real time. All kinds of information concerning start/end of the tephra fallout, estimation of the clast dimensions, thickness of the deposit, level of tephra cover on the ground, will be welcomed, especially if accompanied by photos of the deposit and of the eruption plume. Here, we

  8. Quantifying Atmospheric Fallout of Fukushima-derived Radioactive Isotopes in the Hawaiian Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Trista; Dulai, Henrietta

    2016-04-01

    On March 11, 2011, several reactors at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant suffered damage and released the radioisotopes iodine-131, cesium-134, and cesium-137 into the atmosphere. A week later, these isotopes were detected in aerosols over the state of Hawaii and in milk samples analyzed from the Big Island. Because the detected levels were significantly below levels of health concern, the state did not attempt to quantify the deposition of these nuclides on the islands. This study estimated the magnitude of atmospheric fallout of cesium and iodine, and examined the patterns of cesium wet deposition with precipitation observed in March 2011. Mushroom and soil samples were collected along precipitation gradients on Oahu and the island of Hawaii and analyzed for cesium isotopes using gamma spectrometry. Fukushima-derived fallout was differentiated from historic nuclear weapons testing fallout by the presence of Cs-134, which has a shorter half-life of 2.06 years and the fact that Cs-134 and 137 were released from the severed power plant nearly in parity. We found that Fukushima-derived cesium was present in both mushrooms and soil and the soil inventories ranged 2.2-60.9 Bq/m2 for Cs-137 and 16.1-445.8 Bq/m2 for I-131. Additionally, we found that Fukushima-derived cesium inventories in soils were correlated with precipitation gradients. This research confirmed and quantified the presence of Fukushima-derived fallout in Hawaii, however the activities detected were orders of magnitude lower than fallout associated with the nuclear weapons testing in the Pacific.

  9. Application of fallout radionuclides as indicators of eco-geomorphic adjustments to dams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magilligan, F. J.; Kaste, J. M.; Renshaw, C. E.; Fisher, G. B.; Nislow, K. H.

    2008-12-01

    Because of the profound effects of dams on flow variability and sediment transport dynamics, extensive research by both geomorphologists and ecologists has attempted to document the array of bio-physical changes associated with dams. Yet specifically linking ecological responses to geomorphic processes has proven difficult and thus is often lacking in eco-geomorphic assessments, indicating the need for a broader array of efficient methodological approaches. This research investigates new approaches for assessing bio- physical changes occurring both in-channel and across the broader riparian zone as a consequence of reduced flows downstream of flood control structures in the Upper Connecticut River watershed. In particular, we seek to ascertain the role of tributaries in either exacerbating or attenuating the effects of dammed mainstems. Our approach takes advantage of the naturally occurring short-lived fallout radionuclides 7-Be and 210-Pb by documenting changes in radionuclide activities and inventories as a functions of in-channel sediment residence time and floodplain overbank inundation histories. As most streams in the Upper Connecticut River watershed have limited fines, we ran controlled exposure experiments to establish whether the more common sand-sized grains can sorb radionuclides and be used as tracers. Results indicate that even profiles containing well sorted 2-4 mm grains develop a classic exponential decay in 7-Be activity with depth, with surface samples (0-2 mm depth) having very high 7-Be content >20 Bq/kg) that can be modeled to approach equilibrium with the atmosphere. To capture compositional effects we compared the grain surface area normalized 7-Be activity to the ratio of 7-Be to excess 210-Pb and to the ratio of 7-Be to total 210-Pb. We find that the ratio of 7-Be to total 210-Pb has the strongest relationship with grain surface area normalized 7-Be activity (r = 0.90; p < 0.01). Analyses of 7-Be activity of transitional bed load sediment

  10. Fallout radionuclide-based techniques for assessing the impact of soil conservation measures on erosion control and soil quality: an overview of the main lessons learnt under an FAO/IAEA Coordinated Research Project.

    PubMed

    Dercon, G; Mabit, L; Hancock, G; Nguyen, M L; Dornhofer, P; Bacchi, O O S; Benmansour, M; Bernard, C; Froehlich, W; Golosov, V N; Haciyakupoglu, S; Hai, P S; Klik, A; Li, Y; Lobb, D A; Onda, Y; Popa, N; Rafiq, M; Ritchie, J C; Schuller, P; Shakhashiro, A; Wallbrink, P; Walling, D E; Zapata, F; Zhang, X

    2012-05-01

    This paper summarizes key findings and identifies the main lessons learnt from a 5-year (2002-2008) coordinated research project (CRP) on "Assessing the effectiveness of soil conservation measures for sustainable watershed management and crop production using fallout radionuclides" (D1.50.08), organized and funded by the International Atomic Energy Agency through the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. The project brought together nineteen participants, from Australia, Austria, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Japan, Morocco, Pakistan, Poland, Romania, Russian Federation, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States of America and Vietnam, involved in the use of nuclear techniques and, more particularly, fallout radionuclides (FRN) to assess the relative impacts of different soil conservation measures on soil erosion and land productivity. The overall objective of the CRP was to develop improved land use and management strategies for sustainable watershed management through effective soil erosion control practices, by the use of ¹³⁷Cs (half-life of 30.2 years), ²¹⁰Pb(ex) (half-life of 22.3 years) and ⁷Be (half-life of 53.4 days) for measuring soil erosion over several spatial and temporal scales. The environmental conditions under which the different research teams applied the tools based on the use of fallout radionuclides varied considerably--a variety of climates, soils, topographies and land uses. Nevertheless, the achievements of the CRP, as reflected in this overview paper, demonstrate that fallout radionuclide-based techniques are powerful tools to assess soil erosion/deposition at several spatial and temporal scales in a wide range of environments, and offer potential to monitor soil quality. The success of the CRP has stimulated an interest in many IAEA Member States in the use of these methodologies to identify factors and practices that can enhance sustainable agriculture and minimize land degradation. PMID:22336567

  11. Dual-core mass-balance approach for evaluating mercury and210Pb atmospheric fallout and focusing to lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, P.C.; Fuller, C.C.

    2009-01-01

    Determining atmospheric deposition rates of mercury and other contaminants using lake sediment cores requires a quantitative understanding of sediment focusing. Here we present a novel approach that solves mass-balance equations for two cores algebraically to estimate contaminant contributions to sediment from direct atmospheric fallout and from watershed and in-lake focusing. The model is applied to excess 210Pb and Hg in cores from Hobbs Lake, a high-altitude lake in Wyoming. Model results for excess 210Pb are consistent with estimates of fallout and focusing factors computed using excess 210Pb burdens in lake cores and soil cores from the watershed and model results for Hg fallout are consistent with fallout estimated using the soil-core-based 210Pb focusing factors. The lake cores indicate small increases in mercury deposition beginning in the late 1800s and large increases after 1940, with the maximum at the tops of the cores of 16-20 ??g/m 2year. These results suggest that global Hg emissions and possibly regional emissions in the western United States are affecting the north-central Rocky Mountains. Hg fallout estimates are generally consistent with fallout reported from an ice core from the nearby Upper Fremont Glacier, but with several notable differences. The model might not work for lakes with complex geometries and multiple sediment inputs, but for lakes with simple geometries, like Hobbs, it can provide a quantitative approach for evaluating sediment focusing and estimating contaminant fallout.

  12. Fallout sup 3 H in human tissue at Akita, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Hisamatsu, S.; Takizawa, Y.; Itoh, M.; Ueno, K.; Katsumata, T.; Sakanoue, M. )

    1989-10-01

    The {sup 3}H concentration in Japanese human tissue samples is reported in this paper. Four brain, 10 liver, and nine lung samples from 11 cases were collected from Akita Prefecture in northern Japan from January to July 1986. The median of free-water {sup 3}H concentration was similar in these tissues and agreed well with the concentrations in the diet, including tap water. The median specific activity ratio of tissue-bound {sup 3}H to free-water {sup 3}H was 1.1 and was slightly lower than that in the diet. The specific activity ratio was also lower than that reported in the United States and significantly lower than in Italy.

  13. Rapid determination of ¹³⁵Cs and precise ¹³⁵Cs/¹³⁷Cs atomic ratio in environmental samples by single-column chromatography coupled to triple-quadrupole inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guosheng; Tazoe, Hirofumi; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2016-02-18

    For source identification, measurement of (135)Cs/(137)Cs atomic ratio not only provides information apart from the detection of (134)Cs and (137)Cs, but it can also overcome the application limit that measurement of the (134)Cs/(137)Cs ratio has due to the short half-life of (134)Cs (2.06 y). With the recent advancement of ICP-MS, it is necessary to improve the corresponding separation method for rapid and precise (135)Cs/(137)Cs atomic ratio analysis. A novel separation and purification technique was developed for the new generation of triple-quadrupole inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS/MS). The simple chemical separation, incorporating ammonium molybdophosphate selective adsorption of Cs and subsequent single cation-exchange chromatography, removes the majority of isobaric and polyatomic interference elements. Subsequently, the ICP-MS/MS removes residual interference elements and eliminates the peak tailing effect of stable (133)Cs, at m/z 134, 135, and 137. The developed analytical method was successfully applied to measure (135)Cs/(137)Cs atomic ratios and (135)Cs activities in environmental samples (soil and sediment) for radiocesium source identification. PMID:26826700

  14. A calibration of the production rate ratio P-21/P-26 by low energy secondry neutrons: Identification of Ne spallation components at the 10(exp 6) atoms/g level in terrestrial samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, TH.; Niedermann, S.; Marti, K.

    1993-01-01

    The spallation ratio (Ne-22/Ne-21)(sub c) from Si was determined as 1.243 plus or minus 0.022 in a terrestrial quartz sample. We carried out a calibration of the in-situ production rate ratio P-21/P-26 in quartz samples for which Be-10 and Al-26 production rates were previously measured. A ratio P-21/P-26 of 0.67 plus or minus 0.12 is obtained.

  15. Multifractal analysis of the 137Cs fallout pattern in Austria resulting from the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Pausch, G; Bossew, P; Hofmann, W; Steger, F

    1998-06-01

    The cumulative deposition of the 137Cs fallout in Austria resulting from the passage of the Chernobyl cloud has been investigated by applying correlation dimension and hyperbolic frequency distribution methods. For the analysis, a total of 1,881 deposition values were used, which were collected by the Federal Environmental Agency of Austria and the Federal Ministry of Health, representing all available measurements of 137Cs in soil made in Austria after the Chernobyl accident. From these data a hyperbolic exponent for the frequency distribution of 4.0 and a set of fractal correlation dimensions, which decrease from 1.426 +/- 0.022 (for the whole network) to 0.706 +/- 0.047 (for 137Cs values > or = 100 kBq m(-2)), were derived, thus confirming that the fallout pattern can be described as a multifractal. PMID:9600299

  16. Atmospheric lead fallout over the last century recorded in Gulf of Lions sediments (Mediterranean Sea).

    PubMed

    Miralles, J; Véron, A J; Radakovitch, O; Deschamps, P; Tremblay, T; Hamelin, B

    2006-11-01

    Six marine sediment cores from the Gulf of Lions continental slope (700-1700 m water depth) were analyzed for stable lead isotopes and (210)Pb geochronology in order to reconstruct lead atmospheric fallout pattern during the last century. The detrital lead contribution is 25 microg g(-1) and the mean sediment anthropogenic inventory is 110+/-7 microg cm(-2), a little bit higher than atmospheric deposition estimate. Anthropogenic lead accumulation in sediments peaked in early 1970s (1973+/-2) in agreement with lead emissions features. For the period 1986-1997, the sediment signal also reflect the decrease of atmospheric lead described by independent atmospheric fallout investigations. The anthropogenic Pb deposition in the late 1990s was similar to the 1950s deposition, attesting thus of the output of European environmental policies. PMID:16790252

  17. Serologic markers for hepatitis B among Marshallese accidentally exposed to fallout radiation in 1954

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, W.H.; Fields, H.A.; Engle, J.R.; Hadler, S.C.

    1986-10-01

    At least one serologic marker of prior hepatitis B infection (hepatitis B surface antigen, antibody to surface antigen, or antibody to core antigen) was found in 91.7% of 314 Marshallese tested. The prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigenemia (3.3%) in a subpopulation that had resided on Rongelap Atoll at the time of accidental exposure to radioactive fallout from a thermonuclear test in 1954 did not differ significantly from the prevalence in a selected unexposed population (10.5%).

  18. Lichens as bioindicators of aerial fallout of heavy metals in Zaria, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Kapu, M.M. Ahmadu Bello Univ., Zaria ); Ipaye, M.M.; Ega, R.A.I.; Balarabe, M.L. ); Akanya, H.O. ); Schaeffer, D.J. )

    1991-09-01

    Lichens and other epiphytic cryptogams possess efficient ion-exchange mechanisms which enable many species to accumulate airborne metals and which probably contribute to their tolerating metals at concentrations high enough to cause death to other plant species. A direct relationship between the distribution pattern of lichens and the trace metal content of the surrounding air has been demonstrated. The present study used lichens to assess the aerial fallout of heavy metals from traffic in Zaria, northern Nigeria.

  19. Transfer of fallout radionuclides by Fukushima NPP accident from tree crown to forest ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onda, Y.; Kato, H.; Wakahara, T.; Kawamori, A.; Tsujimura, M.

    2011-12-01

    Radioactive contamination has been detected in Fukushima and the neighboring prefectures due to the nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) following the earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011. The total deposition of radioactive materials in fallout samples for 137Cs ranged from 0.02to >10 M Bq/m2 for Cs-137. Experimental catchments have been established in Yamakiya district, Kawamata Town, Fukushima prefecture, located about 35 km from Fukushima power plant, and designated as the evacuated zone. Approximate Cs-137 fallout in this area is 200-600k Bq/m2. We established 3 forest sites: broad leaf tree forest and two Japanese cedar forest plantation (young and mature). In each site we installed towers of 8-12 meters. Using these towers, we sampled tree leaves, and measure Cs-137 and Cs-134 in the laboratory, and also we have measure Cs-137, Cs-134 content at various height in each forest using a portable High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector (Ortech; Detective-EX). We also measured the throughfall, stem flow and litter fall inside of the forest. In each site, we establish the 20 m x 20 m plot to monitor the changes of fallout radionuclides through time with the portable HPGe detector. The monitoring is now ongoing but we found significant amount of Cs-134 and Cs-137 has been trapped by cedar forest plantations especially young trees, but not so much in broad leaf trees. The trapped Cs-137 and Cs-134 is then washed by rainfall and found into throughfall. Therefore, in forest ecosystems, the fallout has been still ongoing, and and effective remediation method in forested area (especially cedar plantation) can be removing the trees.

  20. A Dynamic Approach to Monitoring Particle Fallout in a Cleanroom Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Radford L., III

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation discusses a mathematical model to monitor particle fallout in a cleanroom. "Cleanliness levels" do not lead to increases with regards to cleanroom type or time because the levels are not linear. Activity level, impacts the cleanroom class. The numerical method presented leads to a simple Class-hour formulation, that allows for dynamic monitoring of the particle using a standard air particle counter.

  1. "A Is for Atom, B Is for Bomb": Civil Defense in American Public Education, 1948-1963.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, JoAnne

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the development of civil defense education following World War II. Examines its effects on the public as atomic bomb drills became commonplace in schools which also served as fallout shelters. Concludes that inadequate portrayal of the horrors of nuclear war produced anger, fear, and disillusionment as the postwar generation matured.…

  2. Review of methods of dose estimation for epidemiological studies of the radiological impact of nevada test site and global fallout.

    PubMed

    Beck, Harold L; Anspaugh, Lynn R; Bouville, André; Simon, Steven L

    2006-07-01

    Methods to assess radiation doses from nuclear weapons test fallout have been used to estimate doses to populations and individuals in a number of studies. However, only a few epidemiology studies have relied on fallout dose estimates. Though the methods for assessing doses from local and regional compared to global fallout are similar, there are significant differences in predicted doses and contributing radionuclides depending on the source of the fallout, e.g. whether the nuclear debris originated in Nevada at the U.S. nuclear test site or whether it originated at other locations worldwide. The sparse historical measurement data available are generally sufficient to estimate external exposure doses reasonably well. However, reconstruction of doses to body organs from ingestion and inhalation of radionuclides is significantly more complex and is almost always more uncertain than are external dose estimates. Internal dose estimates are generally based on estimates of the ground deposition per unit area of specific radionuclides and subsequent transport of radionuclides through the food chain. A number of technical challenges to correctly modeling deposition of fallout under wet and dry atmospheric conditions still remain, particularly at close-in locations where sizes of deposited particles vary significantly over modest changes in distance. This paper summarizes the various methods of dose estimation from weapons test fallout and the most important dose assessment and epidemiology studies that have relied on those methods. PMID:16808609

  3. Comments on Strontium-90 in surface air in relation to stratospheric fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan, C.; Eapen, C.D.

    1984-08-15

    The time variation of the spring peak of stratospheric fallout is examined with surface air data of Cs-137 concentrations from about 30 stations in the zone 9 to 75/sup 0/N and 80/sup 0/W to 115/sup 0/E. This study is likely to be more realistic than one derived from data confined to a particular meridian, such as the United States 80th meridian fallout sampling network. It is seen from an examination of the data that the spring peak of stratospheric fallout is progressively delayed with increasing latitude from 9 to 50/sup 0/N. At latitudes beyond 50/sup 0/N, no clear trend can be postulated due to limited data. The reason for this progressive delay in the appearance of the spring peak is likely to be due to changes in the circulation pattern, rather than variations in precipitation scavenging, as regions with different distribution of rainfall have the same progressive delay in the spring peak.

  4. Ash fallout scenarios at Vesuvius: Numerical simulations and implications for hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedonio, G.; Costa, A.; Folch, A.

    2008-12-01

    Volcanic ash fallout subsequent to a possible renewal of the Vesuvius activity represents a serious threat to the highly urbanized area around the volcano. In order to assess the relative hazard we consider three different possible scenarios such as those following Plinian, Sub-Plinian, and violent Strombolian eruptions. Reference eruptions for each scenario are similar to the 79 AD (Pompeii), the 1631 AD (or 472 AD) and the 1944 AD Vesuvius events, respectively. Fallout deposits for the first two scenarios are modeled using HAZMAP, a model based on a semi-analytical solution of the 2D advection-diffusion-sedimentation equation. In contrast, fallout following a violent Strombolian event is modeled by means of FALL3D, a numerical model based on the solution of the full 3D advection-diffusion-sedimentation equation which is valid also within the atmospheric boundary layer. Inputs for models are total erupted mass, eruption column height, bulk grain-size, bulk component distribution, and a statistical set of wind profiles obtained by the NCEP/NCAR re-analysis. We computed ground load probability maps for different ash loadings. In the case of a Sub-Plinian scenario, the most representative tephra loading maps in 16 cardinal directions were also calculated. The probability maps obtained for the different scenarios are aimed to give support to the risk mitigation strategies.

  5. Synthetic fibers in atmospheric fallout: A source of microplastics in the environment?

    PubMed

    Dris, Rachid; Gasperi, Johnny; Saad, Mohamed; Mirande, Cécile; Tassin, Bruno

    2016-03-15

    Sources, pathways and reservoirs of microplastics, plastic particles smaller than 5mm, remain poorly documented in an urban context. While some studies pointed out wastewater treatment plants as a potential pathway of microplastics, none have focused on the atmospheric compartment. In this work, the atmospheric fallout of microplastics was investigated in two different urban and sub-urban sites. Microplastics were collected continuously with a stainless steel funnel. Samples were then filtered and observed with a stereomicroscope. Fibers accounted for almost all the microplastics collected. An atmospheric fallout between 2 and 355particles/m(2)/day was highlighted. Registered fluxes were systematically higher at the urban than at the sub-urban site. Chemical characterization allowed to estimate at 29% the proportion of these fibers being all synthetic (made with petrochemicals), or a mixture of natural and synthetic material. Extrapolation using weight and volume estimates of the collected fibers, allowed a rough estimation showing that between 3 and 10 tons of fibers are deposited by atmospheric fallout at the scale of the Parisian agglomeration every year (2500km(2)). These results could serve the scientific community working on the different sources of microplastic in both continental and marine environments. PMID:26787549

  6. Modeling transfer of 137Cs fallout in a large Finnish watercourse.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, R

    1990-10-01

    In the Finnish environment, lakes provide very important transfer pathways for various pollutants. In this study, a large watercourse was modeled using the dynamic compartment model DETRA. The model includes a fish model for roach, nonpredatory and predatory perches, and pike. Transfer of 137Cs fallout deposited onto the Kymijoki drainage area after the Chernobyl accident was calculated using the model. In the model, fallout was assumed to consist of a soluble and insoluble component, behaving differently in the environment. Model predictions were compared with measured concentrations. Lake Päijänne, the largest lake of the watercourse, was studied most extensively. Calculated concentrations in lake water were consistent with measured concentrations. However, calculated concentrations in fish were lower than measured concentrations. To test the model by using additional experimental data, transfer of nuclear weapons testing fallout was also calculated. The processes that cause the rather rapid removal of 137Cs from lake water need to be studied further using more detailed data. In the long term, runoff and resuspension of sedimentary material were considered to be important in causing concentrations in lake water. PMID:2398012

  7. Observations of fallout from the Fukushima reactor accident in Cienfuegos, Cuba.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Hernandez, Carlos M; Guillen-Arruebarrena, Aniel; Cartas-Aguila, Hector; Morera-Gomez, Yasser; Diaz-Asencio, Misael

    2012-05-01

    Following the recent accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, radioactive contamination was observed near the reactor site. As a contribution towards the understanding of the worldwide impact of the accident, we collected fallout samples in Cienfuegos, Cuba, and examined them for the presence of above normal amounts of radioactivity. Gamma ray spectra measured from these samples showed clear evidence of fission products (131)I and (137)Cs. However, the fallout levels measured for these isotopes (135 ± 4.78 mBq m(-2) day(-1) for (131)I and 10.7 ± 0.38 mBq m(-2) day(-1)for (137)Cs) were very low and posed no health risk to the public. The doses received as consequence to the Fukushima fallout by the Cienfuegos population's (0.002 mSv per year) don't overcome the limit of dose (1 mSv per year) fixed for the public in Cuba. PMID:22310844

  8. Development and validation of a new fallout transport method using variable spectral winds

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, A.T.

    1984-01-01

    A new method was developed to incorporate variable winds into fallout transport calculations. The method uses spectral coefficients derived by the National Meteorological Center. Wind vector components are computed with the coefficients along the trajectories of falling particles. Spectral winds are used in the two-step method to compute dose rate on the ground, downwind of a nuclear cloud. First, the hotline is located by computing trajectories of particles from an initial, stabilized cloud, through spectral winds to the ground. The connection of particle landing points is the hotline. Second, dose rate on and around the hotline is computed by analytically smearing the falling cloud's activity along the ground. The feasibility of using spectral winds for fallout particle transport was validated by computing Mount St. Helens ashfall locations and comparing calculations to fallout data. In addition, an ashfall equation was derived for computing volcanic ash mass/area on the ground. Ashfall data and the ashfall equation were used to back-calculate an aggregated particle size distribution for the Mount St. Helens eruption cloud.

  9. Scoria Fallout Modeling and the 3 March 2015 VEI-2 Eruption of Villarica Volcano, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J.; Johnson, J. B.; Bowman, D. C.; Ronan, T.; Brand, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    In March 2015, Villarrica volcano erupted a spectacular 1.5 km lava fountain and 6-8 km plume, depositing a thin (several mm or cm) layer of scoria tens of km toward the east and southeast. We show results of numeric models (the advection-diffusion equation solver Tephra2, and particle-tracking models) informed by NOMADS atmospheric data used to model this fallout. Models show strong winds (up to 25 m/s) toward the east and southeast concentrating the narrow deposit in those directions, and the vertical variation of wind direction predicts particle sorting along the wind-transverse direction. Both of these were observed in the field. We discuss the challenges faced by fallout models of scoria: because of its irregular shapes, high and variable porosity, and propensity to break apart on impact, aerodynamic properties are difficult to assess by physical observations. This introduces ambiguity when comparing models to observations. Finally, we demonstrate how short-term hazard predictions can benefit from the integration of fallout models with weather forecasts up to several days in advance, and how hazard communication to the public can benefit from snapshots and animations showing zones subject to tephra fall and time delays from eruption to impact.

  10. Effect of origin of radiocaesium on the transfer from fallout to reindeer meat.

    PubMed

    Ahman, B; Wright, S M; Howard, B J

    2001-10-20

    Data on radiocaesium contamination of reindeer from five regions in Sweden have been used, together with interpolated radiocaesium deposition data, to quantify spatial variation in transfer to reindeer meat and to consider how it changes with time in different areas. Since the regions were contaminated to different extents by global and Chernobyl fallout, it was also possible to determine the influence of the origin or age of radiocaesium fallout on the transfer to reindeer meat. The regions differed significantly with regard to transfer of radiocaesium to reindeer meat. In two regions in the North of Sweden, where there was less Chernobyl 137Cs, aggregated transfer coefficients (Tag), estimated for the main slaughter period in the first year after the Chernobyl fallout, were low (0.15 and 0.36 m2 kg(-1) in January-April). Average Tag values calculated for the winter period (January-April) in two regions in the middle of Sweden, where deposition from Chernobyl dominated (83 and 94%, respectively, of the total deposition), were 0.78 and 0.84 m2 kg(-1), respectively with a maximum Tag for an individual reindeer of 1.87 m2 kg(-1). There was a threefold increase in Tag values from early autumn to late winter reflecting the change in the reindeer diet from less contaminated vascular plants to more contaminated lichens. The decline of 137Cs in reindeer meat from 1986 to 2000 differed between regions with longer effective half-lives (Tef) in the northerly regions (11.0 and 7.1 years, respectively) with less Chernobyl fallout, and shorter half-lives in the other three regions (3.5-3.8 years). This observation, together with a lack of a decline in early autumn in the region with least Chernobyl fallout, supports the theory of a gradual, but reversible, fixation of radiocaesium in the soil over the mid-long term. The results suggest that both the extent of transfer of 137Cs to reindeer meat, and its subsequent decline with time, are affected by the differing origins of

  11. Projected lifetime cancer risks from exposure to regional radioactive fallout in the Marshall Islands.

    PubMed

    Land, Charles E; Bouville, André; Apostoaei, Iulian; Simon, Steven L

    2010-08-01

    Radioactive fallout from nuclear test detonations during 1946-1958 at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls in the Marshall Islands (MI) exposed populations living elsewhere in the MI archipelago. A comprehensive analysis, presented in seven companion papers, has produced estimates of tissue-specific radiation absorbed dose to MI residents at all historically inhabited atolls from internal (ingested) and external irradiation resulting from exposure to radioactive fallout, by calendar year, and by age of the population at time of exposure. The present report deals, for the first time, with the implications of these doses for cancer risk among exposed members of the MI population. Radiation doses differed by geographic location and year of birth, and radiation-related cancer risk depends upon age at exposure and age at observation for risk. Using dose-response models based on committee reports published by the National Research Council and the National Institutes of Health, we project that, during the lifetimes of members of the MI population potentially exposed to ionizing radiation from weapons test fallout deposited during the testing period (1948-1958) and from residual radioactive sources during the subsequent 12 y (1959-1970), perhaps 1.6% (with 90% uncertainty range 0.4% to 3.4%) of all cancers might be attributable to fallout-related radiation exposures. By sub-population, the projected proportion of cancers attributable to radiation from fallout from all nuclear tests conducted in the Marshall Islands is 55% (28% to 69%) among 82 persons exposed in 1954 on Rongelap and Ailinginae, 10% (2.4% to 22%) for 157 persons exposed on Utrik, and 2.2% (0.5% to 4.8%) and 0.8% (0.2% to 1.8%), respectively, for the much larger populations exposed in mid-latitude locations including Kwajalein and in southern locations including Majuro. By cancer type, point estimates of attributable risk varied, by location, between 12% and 95% for thyroid cancer, between 2% and 78% for leukemia, and

  12. PROJECTED LIFETIME CANCER RISKS FROM EXPOSURE TO REGIONAL RADIOACTIVE FALLOUT IN THE MARSHALL ISLANDS

    PubMed Central

    Land, Charles E.; Bouville, Andre; Apostoaei, Iulian; Simon, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive fallout from nuclear test detonations during 1946–1958 at Bikini and Enewetak atolls in the Marshall Islands (MI) exposed populations living elsewhere in the archipelago. A comprehensive analysis, presented in seven companion papers, has produced estimates of tissue-specific radiation absorbed dose to MI residents at all historically inhabited atolls from internal (ingested) and external radioactive components of fallout, by calendar year, and by age of the population at time of exposure. The present report deals, for the first time, with the implications of these doses on cancer risk among exposed members of the MI population. Radiation doses differed by geographic location and year of birth, and radiation-related cancer risk depends upon age at exposure and age at observation for risk. Using dose-response models based on committee reports published by the National Research Council and the National Institutes of Health, we project that, during the lifetimes of members of the MI population potentially exposed to ionizing radiation from weapons test fallout deposited during the testing period (1948–1958) and from residual radioactive sources during the subsequent 12 years (1959–1970), perhaps 1.6% (with 90% uncertainty range 0.4% and 3.4%) of all cancers might be attributable to fallout-related radiation exposures. The projected proportion of cancers attributable to radiation from fallout from all nuclear tests conducted in the Marshall Islands is 55% (28%–69%) among 82 persons exposed in 1954 on Rongelap and Ailinginae, 10% (2%–22%) for 157 persons exposed on Utrik, and 2% (0.5%–5%) and 1% (0.2%–2%), respectively, for the much larger populations exposed in mid-latitude locations including Kwajalein and in southern locations including Majuro. By cancer type, point estimates of attributable risk varied by location, between 12% and 95% for thyroid cancer, between 2% and 78% for leukemia, and between 1% and 55% for all cancers combined. The

  13. Radiation measurements in the Chiba Metropolitan Area and radiological aspects of fallout from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plants accident.

    PubMed

    Amano, Hikaru; Akiyama, Masakazu; Chunlei, Bi; Kawamura, Takao; Kishimoto, Takeshi; Kuroda, Tomotaka; Muroi, Takahiko; Odaira, Tomoaki; Ohta, Yuji; Takeda, Kenji; Watanabe, Yushu; Morimoto, Takao

    2012-09-01

    Large amounts of radioactive substances were released into the environment from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plants in eastern Japan as a consequence of the great earthquake (M 9.0) and tsunami of 11 March 2011. Radioactive substances discharged into the atmosphere first reached the Chiba Metropolitan Area on 15 March. We collected daily samples of air, fallout deposition, and tap water starting directly after the incident and measured their radioactivity. During the first two months maximum daily concentrations of airborne radionuclides observed at the Japan Chemical Analysis Center in the Chiba Metropolitan Area were as follows: 4.7 × 10(1) Bq m(-3) of (131)I, 7.5 Bq m(-3) of (137)Cs, and 6.1 Bq m(-3) of (134)Cs. The ratio of gaseous iodine to total iodine ranged from 5.2 × 10(-1) to 7.1 × 10(-1). Observed deposition rate maxima were as follows: 1.7 × 10(4) Bq m(-2) d(-1) of (131)I, 2.9 × 10(3) Bq m(-2) d(-1) of (137)Cs, and 2.9 × 10(3) Bq m(-2) d(-1) of (134)Cs. The deposition velocities (ratio of deposition rate to concentration) of cesium radionuclides and (131)I were detectably different. Radioactivity in tap water caused by the accident was detected several days after detection of radioactivity in fallout in the area. Radiation doses were estimated from external radiation and internal radiation by inhalation and ingestion of tap water for people living outdoor in the Chiba Metropolitan Area following the Fukushima accident. PMID:22119284

  14. A Screening Study of Thyroid Cancer and Other Thyroid Diseases among Individuals Exposed in Utero to Iodine-131 from Chernobyl Fallout

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, M.; Brenner, A.; Bogdanova, T.; Derevyanko, A.; Kuptsova, N.; Likhtarev, I.; Bouville, A.; Tereshchenko, V.; Kovgan, L.; Shpak, V.; Ostroumova, E.; Greenebaum, E.; Zablotska, L.; Ron, E.; Tronko, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Like stable iodine, radioiodines concentrate in the thyroid gland, increasing thyroid cancer risk in exposed children. Data on exposure to the embryonic/fetal thyroid are rare, raising questions about use of iodine 131 (I-131) in pregnant women. We present here estimated risks of thyroid disease from exposure in utero to I-131 fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional thyroid screening study (palpation, ultrasound, thyroid hormones, and, if indicated, fine needle aspiration) from 2003 to 2006. Participants were 2582 mother-child pairs from Ukraine in which the mother had been pregnant at the time of the accident on April 26, 1986, or 2 months after the time during which I-131 fallout was still present (1494 from contaminated areas, 1088 in the comparison group). Individual cumulative in utero thyroid dose estimates were derived from estimated I-131 activity in the mother’s thyroid (mean 72 mGy; range 0–3230 mGy). Results: There were seven cases of thyroid carcinoma and one case of Hurthle cell neoplasm identified as a result of the screening. Whereas the estimated excess odds ratio per gray for thyroid carcinoma was elevated (excess odds ratio per gray 11.66), it was not statistically significant (P = 0.12). No radiation risks were identified for other thyroid diseases. Conclusion: Our results suggest that in utero exposure to radioiodines may have increased the risk of thyroid carcinoma approximately 20 yr after the Chernobyl accident, supporting a conservative approach to medical uses of I-131 during pregnancy. PMID:19106267

  15. Use of plutonium isotope activity ratios in dating recent sediments. [/sup 238/Pu//sup 239/Pu + /sup 240/Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Beasley, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    The majority of plutonium presently in the biosphere has come from the testing of nuclear devices. In the early 1950s, the Pu-238/239+240 activity ratio of fallout debris was > 0.04; in the more extensive test series of 1961 to 1962, the Pu-238/239+240 activity ratios were quite consistent at 0.02 to 0.03 and maximum fallout delivery occurred in mid-1963. A significant perturbation in Pu isotope activity ratios occurred in mid-1966 with the deposition of Pu-238 from the SNAP-9A reentry and burn-up. Recently deposited sediments have recorded these events and where accumulation rates are rapid (> 1 cm/y), changes in Pu isotope activity ratios can be used as a geochronological tool.

  16. Measurement of (233)U/(234)U ratios in contaminated groundwater using alpha spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jennifer J; Payne, Timothy E; Wilsher, Kerry L; Thiruvoth, Sangeeth; Child, David P; Johansen, Mathew P; Hotchkis, Michael A C

    2016-01-01

    The uranium isotope (233)U is not usually observed in alpha spectra from environmental samples due to its low natural and fallout abundance. It may be present in samples from sites in the vicinity of nuclear operations such as reactors or fuel reprocessing facilities, radioactive waste disposal sites or sites affected by clandestine nuclear operations. On an alpha spectrum, the two most abundant alpha emissions of (233)U (4.784 MeV, 13.2%; and 4.824 MeV, 84.3%) will overlap with the (234)U doublet peak (4.722 MeV, 28.4%; and 4.775 MeV, 71.4%), if present, resulting in a combined (233+234)U multiplet. A technique for quantifying both (233)U and (234)U from alpha spectra was investigated. A series of groundwater samples were measured both by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to determine (233)U/(234)U atom and activity ratios and by alpha spectrometry in order to establish a reliable (233)U estimation technique using alpha spectra. The Genie™ 2000 Alpha Analysis and Interactive Peak Fitting (IPF) software packages were used and it was found that IPF with identification of three peaks ((234)U minor, combined (234)U major and (233)U minor, and (233)U major) followed by interference correction on the combined peak and a weighted average activity calculation gave satisfactory agreement with the AMS data across the (233)U/(234)U activity ratio range (0.1-20) and (233)U activity range (2-300 mBq) investigated. Correlation between the AMS (233)U and alpha spectrometry (233)U was r(2) = 0.996 (n = 10). PMID:26359847

  17. Predictions of dispersion and deposition of fallout from nuclear testing using the NOAA-HYSPLIT meteorological model.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Brian E; Beck, Harold L; Bouville, André; Simon, Steven L

    2010-08-01

    The NOAA Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model (HYSPLIT) was evaluated as a research tool to simulate the dispersion and deposition of radioactive fallout from nuclear tests. Model-based estimates of fallout can be valuable for use in the reconstruction of past exposures from nuclear testing, particularly where little historical fallout monitoring data are available. The ability to make reliable predictions about fallout deposition could also have significant importance for nuclear events in the future. We evaluated the accuracy of the HYSPLIT-predicted geographic patterns of deposition by comparing those predictions against known deposition patterns following specific nuclear tests with an emphasis on nuclear weapons tests conducted in the Marshall Islands. We evaluated the ability of the computer code to quantitatively predict the proportion of fallout particles of specific sizes deposited at specific locations as well as their time of transport. In our simulations of fallout from past nuclear tests, historical meteorological data were used from a reanalysis conducted jointly by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). We used a systematic approach in testing the HYSPLIT model by simulating the release of a range of particle sizes from a range of altitudes and evaluating the number and location of particles deposited. Our findings suggest that the quantity and quality of meteorological data are the most important factors for accurate fallout predictions and that, when satisfactory meteorological input data are used, HYSPLIT can produce relatively accurate deposition patterns and fallout arrival times. Furthermore, when no other measurement data are available, HYSPLIT can be used to indicate whether or not fallout might have occurred at a given location and provide, at minimum, crude quantitative estimates of the magnitude of the deposited activity. A variety of

  18. PREDICTIONS OF DISPERSION AND DEPOSITION OF FALLOUT FROM NUCLEAR TESTING USING THE NOAA-HYSPLIT METEOROLOGICAL MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Moroz, Brian E.; Beck, Harold L.; Bouville, André; Simon, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    The NOAA Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model (HYSPLIT) was evaluated as a research tool to simulate the dispersion and deposition of radioactive fallout from nuclear tests. Model-based estimates of fallout can be valuable for use in the reconstruction of past exposures from nuclear testing, particularly, where little historical fallout monitoring data is available. The ability to make reliable predictions about fallout deposition could also have significant importance for nuclear events in the future. We evaluated the accuracy of the HYSPLIT-predicted geographic patterns of deposition by comparing those predictions against known deposition patterns following specific nuclear tests with an emphasis on nuclear weapons tests conducted in the Marshall Islands. We evaluated the ability of the computer code to quantitatively predict the proportion of fallout particles of specific sizes deposited at specific locations as well as their time of transport. In our simulations of fallout from past nuclear tests, historical meteorological data were used from a reanalysis conducted jointly by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). We used a systematic approach in testing the HYSPLIT model by simulating the release of a range of particles sizes from a range of altitudes and evaluating the number and location of particles deposited. Our findings suggest that the quantity and quality of meteorological data are the most important factors for accurate fallout predictions and that when satisfactory meteorological input data are used, HYSPLIT can produce relatively accurate deposition patterns and fallout arrival times. Furthermore, when no other measurement data are available, HYSPLIT can be used to indicate whether or not fallout might have occurred at a given location and provide, at minimum, crude quantitative estimates of the magnitude of the deposited activity. A variety of

  19. Long-Term Consequences of Radioactive Fallout From Conflicts Involving Nuclear Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, S. L.; Bouville, A.

    2006-12-01

    This presentation will summarize past exposures of the public to radioactive fallout from nuclear testing and extrapolate to the possible fallout-related consequences from detonation of multiple warheads that might accompany international conflicts. Long-term consequences could be of three distinct types: (1) the abandonment of living areas that might be heavily contaminated; (2) the necessity to curtail use of particular agricultural products and foods, and (3) life-shortening due to increased rates of cancer and possibly some non-cancer diseases among the exposed populations. While the actual health and economic impact on the surviving public after such conflicts could vary tremendously depending on the number and sizes of explosions (fission yields), height of detonations, and the public's proximity to explosion sites, it is clear that multiple detonations would disperse radioactive products over large geographic areas. Our understanding of radioactive fallout is based on studies carried out for more than five decades on weapons testing fallout that originated from sites worldwide including Nevada, the Soviet Union, four locations in the Pacific, and elsewhere. Those studies have led to an understanding of the composition of radioactive fallout, of its radioactive qualities, and of its capacity to contaminate ground and agricultural products, as well as dwellings and workplaces located from a few km to tens of thousands of km from the explosion site. Though the most severe individual health consequences from exposure to fallout would most likely develop relatively close to the detonation sites (within a few hundred km), wide geographic distribution of fallout, well beyond the borders of the nations involved in the conflict, would affect much larger populations and would likely cause elevated cancer rates and cancer-related deaths among them for many decades following. While acute radiation symptoms (and even death) can result from very high short-term exposures

  20. Liquid atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayvel, L.; Orzechowski, Z.

    The present text defines the physical processes of liquid atomization, the primary types of atomizers and their design, and ways of measuring spray characteristics; it also presents experimental investigation results on atomizers and illustrative applications for them. Attention is given to the macrostructural and microstructural parameters of atomized liquids; swirl, pneumatic, and rotary atomizers; and optical drop sizing methods, with emphasis on nonintrusive optical methods.

  1. Atomic Oxygen Textured Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Hunt, Jason D.; Drobotij, Erin; Cales, Michael R.; Cantrell, Gidget

    1995-01-01

    Atomic oxygen can be used to microscopically alter the surface morphology of polymeric materials in space or in ground laboratory facilities. For polymeric materials whose sole oxidation products are volatile species, directed atomic oxygen reactions produce surfaces of microscopic cones. However, isotropic atomic oxygen exposure results in polymer surfaces covered with lower aspect ratio sharp-edged craters. Isotropic atomic oxygen plasma exposure of polymers typically causes a significant decrease in water contact angle as well as altered coefficient of static friction. Such surface alterations may be of benefit for industrial and biomedical applications. The results of atomic oxygen plasma exposure of thirty-three (33) different polymers are presented, including typical morphology changes, effects on water contact angle, and coefficient of static friction.

  2. Estimates of fallout from Nevada weapons testing in the western United States based on gummed-film monitoring data

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, H.L.

    1984-10-01

    Estimates of /sup 137/Cs depositions from Nevada atmospheric nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site are presented for 25 sites in Nevada, Utah, California, Arizona, New Mexico, Idaho, Colorado, and Wyoming. These estimates are based primarily on a reappraisal of total beta deposition measured with gummed-film directly after the tests. Maps of the estimated /sup 137/Cs deposition at the gummed-film and other sites in the study region are presented to indicate the approximate fallout pattern for each test. The data presented provide reasonable estimates of the relative fallout at a given site from test to test, as well as the relative fallout from site to site for a given test. Absolute deposition estimates, although less certain, are nevertheless in excellent agreement with estimates from other sources. The data are intended for use in documenting which Nevada Test Site shots produced the observed fallout in a given area, thus allowing more accurate population dose estimates to be made from the results of an ongoing program of retrospective soil analyses. The data also provide valuable benchmarks for verifying meteorological model predictions of nuclear debris transport and deposition from individual tests, as well as an additional independent source of information on the general pattern and intensity of Nevada Test Site fallout in the western US. 43 references, 5 figures, 9 tables.

  3. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch.

    PubMed

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Pedersen, Andreas; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2016-01-13

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore's law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or, at most, a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ratio of 9.2 dB and operation at room temperature up to MHz with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of an integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the atomic level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully integrated and highly scalable chip platform, a platform where optics, electronics, and memory may be controlled at the single-atom level. PMID:26670551

  4. Unexpected hazards from tephra fallouts at Mt Etna: The 23 November 2013 lava fountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronico, Daniele; Scollo, Simona; Cristaldi, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Hundreds of paroxysmal episodes and a few long-lasting ash-emissions eruptions make Mt. Etna, in Italy, one of the most productive basaltic volcanoes in the world over recent years. This frequent explosive activity certainly gives volcanologists plenty of stimulating scientific material for study. Volcanic hazard from tephra fallout associated with lava fountains is still an issue that has not been fully assessed, albeit having to face this scenario several times in 2013. The 23 November 2013 lava fountain was exceptionally intense despite the short duration of the paroxysmal phase (< 1 h). Abundant decimetric-sized bombs fell within the first 5-6 km from the vent, and a macroscopically thicker and coarser tephra deposit than usual formed between 5 and 25 km; in addition, ash was reported to fall up to distances of 400 km. The analysis of fallout deposit provided a total erupted mass of 1.3 ± 1.1 × 109 kg (for a mass eruption rate of 4.5 ± 3.6 × 105 kg/s), in agreement with the value of 2.4 × 109 kg estimated by modeling. Grain-size distribution of samples shows poor sorting at least up to 25 km from the vent. By comparing dispersal, sedimentological features and physical parameters of the fallout deposit with other lava fountains of Etna, the 23 November 2013 episode may well be one of the largest events of the 21st Century in terms of eruption column height, total erupted mass and mass eruption rate. Furthermore, the impact of tephra on the territory was so high as to make it opportune to introduce a distinction, within the class of lava fountains, between small- and large-scale episodes. This classification can be a starting point for hazard assessment and help prevent the hazards from large-scale lava fountains at Etna in the future.

  5. Estimation of the Adriatic Sea water turnover time using fallout 90Sr as a radioactive tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franić, Zdenko

    2005-08-01

    Systematic, long-term measurements, starting in 1963, of 90Sr activity concentrations in sea water have been performed at four locations (cities of Rovinj, Rijeka, Split and Dubrovnik) along the Croatian coast of the Adriatic Sea. In addition, fallout samples were collected in the city of Zadar. 90Sr activity concentrations are in good correlation with the fallout activity, the coefficient of correlation being 0.72. After the nuclear moratorium on atmospheric nuclear bomb tests in 1960s, 90Sr activity concentrations in sea water exponentially dropped from 14.8 ± 2.4 Bq m -3 in 1963 to 2.0 ± 0.3 Bq m -3 in 2003. In the same period, the total annual 90Sr land surface deposit in Zadar fell by three orders of magnitude, from 713.3 Bq m -2 in 1963 to 0.4 Bq m -2 in 2003. Using strontium sea water and fallout data, a mathematical model was developed to describe the rate of change of 90Sr activity concentrations in the Adriatic Sea water and estimate its mean residence time in the Adriatic. By fitting the experimental data to a theoretically predicted curve, the mean residence time of 90Sr in the Adriatic Sea water was estimated to be approximately 3.4 ± 0.4 years, standard deviation being calculated by Monte Carlo simulations. As in physical oceanography 90Sr can be used as effective radioactive tracer of water mass transport, this value also reflects the upper limit for turnover time of the Adriatic Sea water. The turnover time of 3.4 years for the Adriatic Sea water is in reasonable agreement with the value which was estimated, by studying water flows through the Strait of Otranto, to be on the order of 1 year.

  6. Sediment connectivity in a small catchment with badlands: Testing connectivity indices using fallout radionuclide tracers at the Vallcebre Research Catchments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallart, Francesc; Latron, Jérôme; Vuolo, Diego; Martínez-Carreras, Núria; Pérez-Gallego, Nuria; Estrany, Joan; Ferrer, Laura

    2015-04-01

    At the Vallcebre Research Catchments (South Eastern Pyrenees), results obtained during over 20 years showed that badlands are the primary sources of sediments to the drainage network. Parent lutitic rocks are weathered during winter producing regoliths, which are eroded from badland surfaces mainly during summer intense rainstorms. Even if the produced sediments are mainly fine, due to the ephemeral nature of summer runoff events most of them are deposited on the stream beds, where may remain during some time (months to years). Within the MEDhyCON project, a fallout radionuclides (FRNs) tracing experiment (i.e., excess lead 210 (Pbx-210) and beryllium 7 (Be-7)) is being carried out in order to investigate sediment connectivity. A simplified Pbx-210 balance model on badland surfaces suggested a seasonal sawtooth-like activity pattern: FRN would be accumulated in regoliths from October to June and depleted in summer. Early summer erosion events would produce the sediments with the highest activity whereas late summer events would produce sediments with the least activity coming from the deeper regolith horizons. These findings lead us to intend two sediment connectivity indices analysing respectively the temporal and spatial variability of the Pb-210 activities within the fine sediments: (1) The temporal variability of activities in suspended sediments at the gauging stations, being a measure of sediment transfer, ergo connectivity; a high variability mimicking regolith activity temporal pattern would represent high connectivity, whereas a low variability would involve that the sediments were pooled in a large and slowly moving stock. (2) The ratio between fine sediment activities at the sources and fine stream sediment activities downstream; fine stream sediment activities higher than those at their sources and increasing downstream (ratio lower than the unity) may indicate long-term permanence (low connectivity) of sediments in the stream beds, because once

  7. Relationships between soil properties and contents in trace elements in a landscape impacted by atmospheric fallouts in Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liénard, Amandine; Colinet, Gilles

    2013-04-01

    Examples of sites contaminated by atmospheric fallouts are numerous across former industrial areas, among which the valleys of Sambre and Meuse in Wallonia hosted metal ore treatment factories. Trace contaminants that fell on soil surface can migrate in the landscape under soluble or particle forms through various processes such as erosion, lixiviation, biological transportation, aso. We first investigated the spatial distribution of some metallic trace elements in soils around a former zinc-ore treatment plant to a distance of 3km. In a second stage, we studied the relationships between trace contents and soil properties, in order to evaluate the risks of mobility. The sampling strategy aimed at (i) verifying that the main source of trace elements was the plant chimney, (ii) assessing the impact of the wind directions on fallout dispersion and (iii) evaluating whether there were differences of contents according to soil types and to soil occupation. Two hundred and fifty topsoil samples were collected according to a stratified design dealing with distance to the chimney, direction of dominant winds, soil type (loamy soil with good drainage, loamy soil with poor drainage and loamy-stony soils with gravels), and land use (crop, grassland and forest). Pseudo-total and available contents in trace and major elements, pH, TOC, and N were determined in the laboratory. Besides classical statistical analysis, (i) correlations between different parameters of soil, (ii) ANOVA (two or three way), (iii) ANCOVA (three-way ANOVA with the distance as a co-variate), (iv) regressions and (v) Principal Component Analysis were also performed. First results show that (i) contaminants (Cd, Pb, Zn and Cu) contents are closely correlated to each other and (ii) Cd, Pb and Zn are negatively correlated with the distance (R2 > 0.5; p-value < 0.001). So, the geographical location explained by the "distance" factor is the main driving factor of trace elements contents in soils. Moreover, the

  8. Transfer of 137Cs from Chernobyl debris and nuclear weapons fallout to different Swedish population groups.

    PubMed

    Rääf, C L; Hubbard, L; Falk, R; Agren, G; Vesanen, R

    2006-08-15

    Data from measurements on the body burden of (134)Cs, (137)Cs and (40)K in various Swedish populations between 1959 and 2001 has been compiled into a national database. The compilation is a co-operation between the Departments of Radiation Physics in Malmö and Göteborg, the National Radiation Protection Authority (SSI) and the Swedish Defense Research Agency (FOI). In a previous study the effective ecological half time and the associated effective dose to various Swedish populations due to internal contamination of (134)Cs and (137)Cs have been assessed using the database. In this study values of human body burden have been combined with data on the local and regional ground deposition of fallout from nuclear weapons tests (only (137)Cs) and Chernobyl debris (both (134)Cs and (137)Cs), which have enabled estimates of the radioecological transfer in the studied populations. The assessment of the database shows that the transfer of radiocesium from Chernobyl fallout to humans varies considerably between various populations in Sweden. In terms of committed effective dose over a 70 y period from internal contamination per unit activity deposition, the general (predominantly urban) Swedish population obtains 20-30 microSv/kBq m(-2). Four categories of populations exhibit higher radioecological transfer than the general population; i.) reindeer herders ( approximately 700 microSv/kBq m(-2)), ii.) hunters in the counties dominated by forest vegetation ( approximately 100 microSv/kBq m(-2)), iii.) rural non-farming populations living in sub-arctic areas (40-150 microSv/kBq m(-2)), and iv.) farmers ( approximately 50 microSv/kBq m(-2)). Two important factors determine the aggregate transfer from ground deposition to man; i.) dietary habits (intakes of foodstuff originating from natural and semi-natural ecosystems), and ii.) inclination to follow the recommended food restriction by the authorities. The transfer to the general population is considerably lower

  9. Toxoplasma antibodies and retinochoroiditis in the Marshall Islands and their association with exposure to radioactive fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, W.H.; Kindermann, W.R.; Walls, K.W.; Heotis, P.M.

    1987-03-01

    Nearly universal serologic evidence of Toxoplasma gondii infection was found to have occurred by adulthood in 517 Marshallese tested in 1981-1982. The prevalence and incidence of retinal lesions compatible with toxoplasmosis were 3.9% and 273 cases/year/100,000 seropositive persons, respectively, thus indicating a significant public health problem. Seronegativity was significantly more common in a subgroup of Marshallese that had received 110-190 rads of total-body gamma radiation as a consequence of accidental exposure to radioactive fallout in 1954. Despite this finding there was no evidence of an increase in clinically significant lesions in exposed persons.

  10. The medical effects of radioactive fall-out: role of stable end-products?

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, B. A.; Cardarelli, J. C.; Boling, E. A.; Sinex, F. M.

    1981-01-01

    To summarize, from preliminary observations on the possible effects of radioactive fall-out, it may be inferred that in addition to the secondary products of ionizing irradiation per se, the stable end-products of the transmutation of certain radionuclides may adversely influence cellular metabolism, including mutagenesis. The discussion of the possible role of intracellular barium as an end-product of 137Cs decay is offered as an example of an unpredictable number of broad ecological, as well as the more limited medical, effects that may be of both clinical and climatological significance. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7281411

  11. Atomic polarizabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, M. S.; Mitroy, J.; Clark, Charles W.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  12. Fluoride distribution and biological availability in the fallout from Mount St. Helens, 18 to 21 May 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Taves, D.R.

    1980-12-19

    Concentrations of fluoride in the ash fallout in central Washington from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens varied severalfold, but none are high enough to constitute any immediate hazard to animal life. The heaviest fallout (Moses Lake) contained 113 parts per million (ppm) of acid-labile fluoride, but of this only 11 ppm was water-soluble and 20 ppm was available to rats. The fluoride concentrations in the urine of cattle feeding for 4 days on hay contaminated with this ash were essentially normal. Samples of ash from other areas generally had higher concentrations of acid-labile fluoride but lower concentrations of water-soluble fluoride. The concentrations of water-soluble fluoride was inversely correlated with the coarseness of the fallout. 8 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  13. Mean Atomic Weight of Chelyabinsk and Olivenza LL5 Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szurgot, M.

    2015-07-01

    Mean atomic weights (Amean) of Chelyabinsk and Olivenza LL5 chondrites have been determined and analysed. Relationship between Fe/Si atomic ratio and mean atomic weight of ordinary chondrites has been established which enables one to predict Amean values.

  14. Isotopic Ratio, Isotonic Ratio, Isobaric Ratio and Shannon Information Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Wei, Hui-Ling

    2014-11-01

    The isoscaling and the isobaric yield ratio difference (IBD) probes, both of which are constructed by yield ratio of fragment, provide cancelation of parameters. The information entropy theory is introduced to explain the physical meaning of the isoscaling and IBD probes. The similarity between the isoscaling and IBD results is found, i.e., the information uncertainty determined by the IBD method equals to β - α determined by the isoscaling (α (β) is the parameter fitted from the isotopic (isotonic) yield ratio).

  15. A numerical model for the analysis and evaluation of global 137Cs fallout.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Y; Morisawa, S; Inoue, Y

    1996-02-01

    Fallout 137Cs from atmospheric nuclear detonation tests has been monitored worldwide since the late 1950's. The deviation and the correlation among these monitoring data were analyzed, and their surface deposition characteristics were estimated by the compartment model developed in this research. In the analysis, the scale of space (i.e., size of each compartment) and the degree of detail (i.e., number of compartments) were statistically determined using the global distribution data of 137Cs. The mathematical model was evaluated by comparing the numerically stimulated results with the fallout monitoring data including the 137Cs concentration in sea water. The major findings obtained in this research include that the deposition pattern of 137Cs is dependent on the latitude zone but not on the longitude, the mathematical model is promising for evaluating the dynamic performance of 137Cs in global atmospheric environment and its surface deposition, 137Cs is accumulated more in both the surface and deep ocean water of the North Pacific Ocean and the North Atlantic Ocean than that of other oceans, the 137Cs inventory is decreasing after the peak time in 1965, and the 137Cs inventory in the deep ocean water is decreasing more slowly than that in the surface ocean water. PMID:8567283

  16. A numerical model for the analysis and evaluation of global {sup 137}Cs fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Y.; Morisawa, S.; Inoue, Y.

    1996-02-01

    Fallout {sup 137}Cs from atmospheric nuclear detonation test have been monitored worldwide since the late 1950`s. The deviation and the correlation among these monitoring data were analyzed, and their surface deposition characteristics were estimated by the compartment model developed in this research. In the analysis, the scale of space (i.e., size of each compartment) and the degree of detail (i.e., number of compartments) were statistically determined using the global distribution data of {sup 137}Cs. The mathematical model was evaluated by comparing the numerically simulated results with the fallout monitoring data including the {sup 137}Cs concentration in sea water. The major findings obtained in this research include that the deposition pattern of {sup 137}Cs is dependent on the latitude zone but not on the longitude, the mathematical model is promising for evaluating the dynamic performance of {sup 137}Cs in global atmospheric environment and its surface deposition, {sup 137}Cs is accumulated more in both the surface and deep ocean water of the North Pacific Ocean and the North Atlantic ocean than that of other oceans, the {sup 137}Cs inventory is decreasing after the peak time in 1965, and the {sup 137}Cs inventory in the deep ocean water is decreasing more slowly than that in the surface ocean water. 26 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Medical status of Marshallese accidentally exposed to 1954 Bravo fallout radiation: January 1980-December 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, W.H.; Harper, J.A.; Rittmaster, R.S.; Heotis, P.M.; Scott, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    This report updates, for 1980 through 1982, the results of continuing medical surveillance of a Marshallese population accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout in March 1954. The originally exposed Marshallese population comprised 64 persons on Rongelap Atoll who each received, on the average, an estimated 190 rads of absorbed external gamma radiation, 18 on Ailingnae Atoll who received 110 rads, and 159 on Utirik who received 11 rads. There were, in addition, 3 persons in utero on Rongelap, 1 person in utero on Ailingnae, and 8 persons in utero on Utirik who are considered exposed. The recipients of primary medical care include exposed and comparison populations as well as a rather large number of additional beneficiaries who are seen on a humanitarian basis of practical need and resource availability. In recent years, about 1400 people have been seen annually. This report, however, deals with four clearly defined groups: the remaining individuals who were exposed to radioactive fallout on Rongelap, Ailingnae, and Utirik in 1954 (including those in utero), and a comparison population of individuals from Rongelap who were unexposed. The number of persons now in each exposure category are 51, 12, 116, and 137, respectively. 100 references, 4 figures, 5 tables. (ACR)

  18. Self-shielding of fallout gamma rays by terrain roughness. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Herte, M.S.

    1991-02-28

    The study presents a first order calculation of the self-shielding of nuclear weapon fission fragment gamma rays by surface roughness (microscopic terrain irregularities). To simulate fallout particles, polymer microspheres were deposited on slides containing samples of soil, concrete and asphalt roofing shingles. Scanning electron microscopy was used to photographically map the surfaces. The thickness of surface irregularities at various angles was measured by converting the photographs to digital images. Measurements showed a dependence upon the surface type, but not upon particle size. Average values of the measurements were modelled using a homogeneous buried source. With this geometry, dose rates were calculated using the Monte Carlo transport code, MORSE. The MORSE calculations showed self-shielding due to roughness of not more than five percent for the soil samples and eight percent for the shingles. The 30 percent self-shielding used in The Effects of Nuclear Weapons for level terrain is six times as great. It is postulated the large attenuation formerly attributed to roughness may actually be an artifact of an incorrect global/local fallout partition.

  19. Fallout beryllium-7 as a soil and sediment tracer in river basins: current status and needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Alex; Blake, Will H.; Smith, Hugh G.; Mabit, Lionel; Keith-Roach, Miranda J.

    2013-04-01

    Beryllium-7 is a cosmogenic radionuclide formed in the upper atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation of nitrogen and oxygen. Its constant natural production and fallout via precipitation coupled with its ability to bind to soil particles have underpinned its application as a sediment tracer. The short half-life of beryllium-7 (53.3 days) lends itself to tracing sediment dynamics over short time periods, thus, enabling assessment of the effect of land use change upon soil redistribution. Although beryllium-7 has been widely applied as a tracer to date, there remain crucial gaps in understanding relating to the assumptions for its use. To further support the application of beryllium-7 as a tracer across a range of environments requires consideration of both the current strengths and shortcomings of the technique to direct research needs. Here we review research surrounding the assumptions underpinning beryllium-7 use as a tracer and identify key knowledge gaps relating to i) the effects of rain shadowing and vegetation interception upon beryllium-7 fallout uniformity at the hillslope-scale; ii) the effect of preferential flow pathways upon beryllium-7 depth distribution in soil and overland flow upon beryllium-7 inventory uniformity and iii) the potential for beryllium-7 desorption in saline and reducing environments. To provide continued support for the use of beryllium-7 as a hillslope and catchment-scale tracer, there is an urgent need to undertake further research to quantify the effect of these factors upon tracer estimates.

  20. Estimation of dose to human tissues from ingestion of foods exposed to fallout from nuclear weapons tests in Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, F.W. ); Kirchner, T.B. . Natural Resources Ecology Lab.)

    1991-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the methodology developed to estimate the transport of radionuclides through agricultural ecosystems to persons of various ages, lifestyles, and geographic locations. The methodology, embodied in the computer code PATHWAY, was used to convert estimates of fallout deposition to time-dependent concentrations of radionuclides in food products, total intakes by people, and organ-specific doses from 21 radionuclides in fallout from 86 nuclear test events. A summary of model prediction uncertainties, an assessment of predictive accuracy, and a discussion of the relative importance of different exposure pathways is also provided. 14 refs.

  1. Fallout Protection in School Construction. Proceedings, Association of School Business Officials of the United States and Canada (49th, Denver, Colorado, November 3-8, 1963).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roembke, James E.

    Discussion of the effects of nuclear weapons and consequent radiation fallout precedes justification of the need for fallout shelters. Competition for the design of an elementary school with a population of 300-500 and an emergency population of 600-1000 is then described. Criteria and requirements are detailed. The winning entries illustrate…

  2. Designing Shelter in New Buildings. A Manual for Architects on the Preliminary Designing of Shielding from Fallout Gamma Radiation in Normally Functioning Spaces in New Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knott, Albert

    Analysis of radiation fallout prevention factors in new construction is presented with emphasis on architectural shielding principles. Numerous diagrams and charts illustrate--(1) radiation and fallout properties, (2) building protection principles, (3) details and planning suggestions, and (4) tabular data interpretation. A series of charts is…

  3. Atom Tunneling in Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Meisner, Jan; Kästner, Johannes

    2016-04-25

    Quantum mechanical tunneling of atoms is increasingly found to play an important role in many chemical transformations. Experimentally, atom tunneling can be indirectly detected by temperature-independent rate constants at low temperature or by enhanced kinetic isotope effects. In contrast, the influence of tunneling on the reaction rates can be monitored directly through computational investigations. The tunnel effect, for example, changes reaction paths and branching ratios, enables chemical reactions in an astrochemical environment that would be impossible by thermal transition, and influences biochemical processes. PMID:26990917

  4. Atomic supersymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostelecky, V. Alan

    1993-01-01

    Atomic supersymmetry is a quantum-mechanical supersymmetry connecting the properties of different atoms and ions. A short description of some established results in the subject are provided and a few recent developments are discussed including the extension to parabolic coordinates and the calculation of Stark maps using supersymmetry-based models.

  5. Atomic Calligraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imboden, Matthias; Pardo, Flavio; Bolle, Cristian; Han, Han; Tareen, Ammar; Chang, Jackson; Christopher, Jason; Corman, Benjamin; Bishop, David

    2013-03-01

    Here we present a MEMS based method to fabricate devices with a small number of atoms. In standard semiconductor fabrication, a large amount of material is deposited, after which etching removes what is not wanted. This technique breaks down for structures that approach the single atom limit, as it is inconceivable to etch away all but one atom. What is needed is a bottom up method with single or near single atom precision. We demonstrate a MEMS device that enables nanometer position controlled deposition of gold atoms. A digitally driven plate is swept as a flux of gold atoms passes through an aperture. Appling voltages on four comb capacitors connected to the central plate by tethers enable nanometer lateral precision in the xy plane over 15x15 sq. microns. Typical MEMS structures have manufacturing resolutions on the order of a micron. Using a FIB it is possible to mill apertures as small as 10 nm in diameter. Assuming a low incident atomic flux, as well as an integrated MEMS based shutter with microsecond response time, it becomes possible to deposit single atoms. Due to their small size and low power consumption, such nano-printers can be mounted directly in a cryogenic system at ultrahigh vacuum to deposit clean quench condensed metallic structures.

  6. Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident fallout: Measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1994-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Citations discuss radioactive monitoring, health hazards, and radiation dosimetry. Radiation contamination in the air, soil, vegetation, and food is examined. (Contains a minimum of 210 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  7. Chernobyl Nuclear Reactor accident fallout: Measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Citations discuss radioactive monitoring, health hazards, and radiation dosimetry. Radiation contamination in the air, soil, vegetation, and food is examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  8. Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident fallout: Measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Citations discuss radioactive monitoring, health hazards, and radiation dosimetry. Radiation contamination in the air, soil, vegetation, and food is examined. (Contains a minimum of 208 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  9. Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident fallout: Measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Citations discuss radioactive monitoring, health hazards, and radiation dosimetry. Radiation contamination in the air, soil, vegetation, and food is examined. (Contains a minimum of 247 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident fallout: Measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Citations discuss radioactive monitoring, health hazards, and radiation dosimetry. Radiation contamination in the air, soil, vegetation, and food is examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  11. Liquid atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Walzel, P. )

    1993-01-01

    A systematic review of different liquid atomizers is presented, accompanied by a discussion of various mechanisms of droplet formation in a gas atmosphere as a function of the liquid flow-regime and the geometry of the atomizer. Equations are presented for the calculation of the mean droplet-diameter. In many applications, details of the droplet size distribution are, also, important, e.g., approximate values of the breadth of the droplet formation are given. The efficiency of utilization of mechanical energy in droplet formation is indicated for the different types of atomizers. Atomization is used, in particular, for the following purposes: (1) atomization of fuels; (2) making granular products; (3) carrying out mass-transfer operations; and (4) coating of surfaces.

  12. Understanding Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon transfers at the catchment scale combining chemical and fallout radionuclide analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gateuille, D.; Evrard, O.; Lefevre, I.; Moreau-Guigon, E.; Alliot, F.; Chevreuil, M.; Mouchel, J.-M.

    2012-04-01

    Reducing environmental contamination constitutes a major challenge for industrialized countries. Furthermore, in the European Union, Water Framework Directive (WFD; Directive 2000/60/EC) requires that the member state water bodies reach good ecological and chemical status by 2015. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of persistent organic pollutants considered as priority pollutants because of their mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. They are mostly emitted by human activities such as household heating or road traffic. Although emissions have decreased during the last decades, a large amount of PAHs have been released into the atmosphere for the last two centuries. In recent years, studies dealing with PAHs have grown in number but most of them were restricted to the measurement of PAHs concentrations in the different compartments of the environment (air, soil, sediment, water, etc.). In this context, there remains a lack of knowledge about the transfers and, consequently, about the persistence of these compounds in the environment. This question is particularly acute in the Seine River basin where very high concentrations in PAHs are reported in sediment, thereby compromising the achievement of the good chemical status required by WFD. Our study aims to quantify PAHs transfers at the catchment scale by combining chemical analysis with gamma spectrometry. Atmospheric fallout, soil, river water and sediment samples were collected in two upstream sub-catchments of the Seine River basin during one year. Chemical analyses, restricted to 15 of the 16 PAHs selected by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), were carried out to determine PAHs concentrations in all samples. Contamination spectra were used to outline the potential origin of pollution. Measurement of fallout radionuclides (Beryllium-7, Lead-210, Caesium-137) in both rainfall and river sediment provided a way to discriminate between freshly eroded sediment vs. material that

  13. Comparative assessment of natural radioactivity in fallout samples from Patras and Megalopolis, Greece.

    PubMed

    Papaefthymiou, H; Kritidis, P; Anousis, J; Sarafidou, J

    2005-01-01

    Bulk deposition samples were collected simultaneously from two Greek cities, Patras and Megalopolis, with different emission sources of natural radioactivity, on a monthly basis, during a whole year. Gross beta-activity and 238U- and 232Th-activities were determined in a total of 95 samples of deposited dust. The results were statistically analyzed in order to determine the natural radioactivity levels and their variations in the above cities. No significant difference was found in deposited dust amount between the two cities, while the values of gross beta-, 238U- and 232Th-activities were about 3, 71 and 4 times higher in Megalopolis than in Patras, respectively. This was attributed to the operation of lignite power plants A and B in the vicinity of the city of Megalopolis, while natural radioactivity concentrations in Patras' fallout samples were of natural sources. PMID:15511562

  14. Analysis of the radiation fallout tests at ETBS, France (Fall 1996)

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, J.M.; Santoro, R.T.

    2000-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out at the Etablissement Technique de Bourges (ETBS), France to measure protection factors for the Russian T72M tank during exposure to gamma radiation emanating from the ground. The purpose of these measurements was to determine the reduction in the dose rate to the tank occupants when the vehicle traverses terrain that has been contaminated as the result of fallout from a nuclear weapon or when the ground has been contaminated by the distribution of radioactive material by terrorists. This report summarizes results of calculations that replicate the measurements. Comparisons of measured and calculated protection factors are reported for a series of nested iron cylinders and the T72M tank. The cylinder measurements were performed to compare protection factors measured at Bourges with those obtained previously at the US Army Aberdeen Test Center.

  15. The influence of forest shelterbelts on 137Cs fallout in Chernobyl affected areas (Tula region, Russia).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Maxim; Shamshurina, Eugeniya; Tatyana, Paramonova; Vladimir, Belyaev; Angelina, Gavruchenkova; Nikolai, Lugovoy; Konstantinov, Pavel

    2015-04-01

    The radioactive fallout after Chernobyl accident caused serious contamination by 137Cs along extensive area of East-European plain.Cs137 fall down on earth surface in two ways: gravitational - "dry" and rainfall - "wet" way. "Dry" fallout is a result of direct deposition of radionuclides from atmosphere with average speed of about 0.1-1 mm/sec. The fate of "dry fall"is far less than rainfall mechanism. Erupted water steam of reactor zone full of radioactive material enriched precipitation with 137Cs. Therefore, the derived spatial structure of contamination was under control of rainfall pattern in May-June 1986. On the areas affected by rainfall fallout was the Southern part of Tula region in Middle Russia. It got name as "Plava hot spot" by the town in the center of this area. Tula is a traditional rural region, the vast areas covered by chernozem soils are cultivated for centuries. During cultivation forest cover was reduced that urged growth of wind erosion and loss of soil fertility. Hence, in the middle of 20 the century large arrangements for creation of forest shelterbelts were conducted. High efficiency of shelterbelts made them a widely provided part of new human-transformed landscape. Usually shelterbelts are set as a regular network across main direction of winds in particular region. Such organization help to reduce speed of air steam in the lowest 20-30 m layer of atmosphere. In addition, shelterbelts are very good collectors of snow in winter time which increase total moisture of soil and its fertility. Represented investigation is conducted to find out any correlation between shelterbelts and fallout of radionuclides. If such correlation is significant, it has to be taken into account for further environmental surveys. Two shelterbelts on the interfluve positions were chosen for detailed examination. Both selected objects emerged before 1986 but have different width, floristic composition, orientation and type of construction. One of shelterbelts is

  16. The chernobyl fallout in Greece and its effects on the dating of archaeological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liritzis, Y.

    1987-10-01

    The effects of the fallout from the nuclear reactor accident at Chernobyl have been monitored at various sites in Greece. Here we present the first estimates of gamma dose rates, an essential parameter in the dating of archaeological materials by thermoluminescence (TL) and ESR methods. The dose rates are derived from the long-lived radionuclides of 137Cs, 134Cs, 106Ru and 144Ce (with t {1}/{2} ⩾ 1 yr). The present dose rates vary between 30 and 60 mrad/yr, but maximum values of around 811 mrad/yr have also been recorded, for ground-surface exposures. These dose rate values must be regarded as very significant to TL and ESR dating of samples from now on and a correction factor should be applied.

  17. Measurement of fallout {sup 239}Pu levels in urine samples by fission track analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Moorthy, A.R.; Doty, R.M.

    1996-11-01

    A Fission Track Analysis (FTA) method for assessing 239Pu in urine samples was first developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in 1988; it then had a detection limit of 100 aCi (3.7 {micro}Bq). Since that time, several steps were introduced that increased chemical recovery and lowered the detection limit to less than 1O aCi per sample. These improvements include a process of micro-column separation of plutonium in the final stages. The improved FTA method was applied to 22 urine samples from male staff at BNL. The results showed that 239Pu from fallout excreted in urine was 33 +/- 11 aCi (1.2 {micro}Bq) per day.

  18. Effect of ash fallout on water quality in western Montana. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Juday, R.E.; Keller, E.J.

    1984-01-01

    Subsequent to the eruption of Mount St. Helens in 1980, a water-quality study was conducted on lakes and streams of the Clearwater drainage of Western Montana and several oligotrophic high mountain lakes in Idaho. Field studies indicated that the fallout, although containing appreciable amounts of water-soluble nutrients, had virtually no effect on productivity of oligotrophic lakes. Appreciable increases in algal productivity were noted in the mesotrophic study lakes in 1980, although they were no larger than might be expected from climatological changes or from local logging activity. Laboratory studies showed that, imitating natural conditions, appreciable amounts of nutrients could be extracted from the ash, and that the extracts increased algal productivity in incubated lake samples.

  19. Medical status of Marshallese accidentally exposed to 1954 Bravo fallout radiation, January 1983-December 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, W.H.; Engle, J.R.; Harper, J.A.; Heotis, P.M.; Scott, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    March 1, 1984, was the 30th anniversary of the Bravo thermonuclear test that resulted in the accidental exposure of the populations of Rongelap and Utirik atolls to radioactive fallout. The chronicling of the medical events resulting from that exposure is continued in this report, which covers the period from January 1983 through December 1984. An updated listing of all relevant publications from the Medical Department Brookhaven National Laboratory, is presented in the Reference Section. Thirty years of observation continue to show no detectable increase in mortality in the exposed population as a result of that exposure. The survival curves of the high-exposure Rongelap group, the low-exposure Utirik population, and an unexposed group of Rongelap people matched by age and sex to the exposed Rongelap group in 1957 continue to be similar. 89 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Neogene Fallout Tuffs from the Yellowstone Hotspot in the Columbia Plateau Region, Oregon, Washington and Idaho, USA

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Barbara P.; Perkins, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Sedimentary sequences in the Columbia Plateau region of the Pacific Northwest ranging in age from 16–4 Ma contain fallout tuffs whose origins lie in volcanic centers of the Yellowstone hotspot in northwestern Nevada, eastern Oregon and the Snake River Plain in Idaho. Silicic volcanism began in the region contemporaneously with early eruptions of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG), and the abundance of widespread fallout tuffs provides the opportunity to establish a tephrostratigrahic framework for the region. Sedimentary basins with volcaniclastic deposits also contain diverse assemblages of fauna and flora that were preserved during the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum, including Sucker Creek, Mascall, Latah, Virgin Valley and Trout Creek. Correlation of ashfall units establish that the lower Bully Creek Formation in eastern Oregon is contemporaneous with the Virgin Valley Formation, the Sucker Creek Formation, Oregon and Idaho, Trout Creek Formation, Oregon, and the Latah Formation in the Clearwater Embayment in Washington and Idaho. In addition, it can be established that the Trout Creek flora are younger than the Mascall and Latah flora. A tentative correlation of a fallout tuff from the Clarkia fossil beds, Idaho, with a pumice bed in the Bully Creek Formation places the remarkably well preserved Clarkia flora assemblage between the Mascall and Trout Creek flora. Large-volume supereruptions that originated between 11.8 and 10.1 Ma from the Bruneau-Jarbidge and Twin Falls volcanic centers of the Yellowstone hotspot in the central Snake River Plain deposited voluminous fallout tuffs in the Ellensberg Formation which forms sedimentary interbeds in the CRBG. These occurrences extend the known distribution of these fallout tuffs 500 km to the northwest of their source in the Snake River Plain. Heretofore, the distal products of these large eruptions had only been recognized to the east of their sources in the High Plains of Nebraska and Kansas. PMID:23071494

  1. Meteorological modeling of arrival and deposition of fallout at intermediate distances downwind of the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Cederwall, R.T.; Peterson, K.R. )

    1990-11-01

    A three-dimensional atmospheric transport and diffusion model is used to calculate the arrival and deposition of fallout from 13 selected nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in the 1950s. Results are used to extend NTS fallout patterns to intermediate downwind distances (300 to 1200 km). The radioactive cloud is represented in the model by a population of Lagrangian marker particles, with concentrations calculated on an Eulerian grid. Use of marker particles, with fall velocities dependent on particle size, provides a realistic simulation of fallout as the debris cloud travels downwind. The three-dimensional wind field is derived from observed data, adjusted for mass consistency. Terrain is represented in the grid, which extends up to 1200 km downwind of NTS and has 32-km horizontal resolution and 1-km vertical resolution. Ground deposition is calculated by a deposition-velocity approach. Source terms and relationships between deposition and exposure rate are based on work by Hicks. Uncertainty in particle size and vertical distributions within the debris cloud (and stem) allow for some model tuning to better match measured ground-deposition values. Particle trajectories representing different sizes and starting heights above ground zero are used to guide source specification. An hourly time history of the modeled fallout pattern as the debris cloud moves downwind provides estimates of fallout arrival times. Results for event HARRY illustrate the methodology. The composite deposition pattern for all 13 tests is characterized by two lobes extending out to the north-northeast and east-northeast, respectively, at intermediate distances from NTS. Arrival estimates, along with modeled deposition values, augment measured deposition data in the development of data bases at the county level.

  2. Neogene fallout tuffs from the Yellowstone hotspot in the Columbia Plateau region, Oregon, Washington and Idaho, USA.

    PubMed

    Nash, Barbara P; Perkins, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Sedimentary sequences in the Columbia Plateau region of the Pacific Northwest ranging in age from 16-4 Ma contain fallout tuffs whose origins lie in volcanic centers of the Yellowstone hotspot in northwestern Nevada, eastern Oregon and the Snake River Plain in Idaho. Silicic volcanism began in the region contemporaneously with early eruptions of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG), and the abundance of widespread fallout tuffs provides the opportunity to establish a tephrostratigrahic framework for the region. Sedimentary basins with volcaniclastic deposits also contain diverse assemblages of fauna and flora that were preserved during the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum, including Sucker Creek, Mascall, Latah, Virgin Valley and Trout Creek. Correlation of ashfall units establish that the lower Bully Creek Formation in eastern Oregon is contemporaneous with the Virgin Valley Formation, the Sucker Creek Formation, Oregon and Idaho, Trout Creek Formation, Oregon, and the Latah Formation in the Clearwater Embayment in Washington and Idaho. In addition, it can be established that the Trout Creek flora are younger than the Mascall and Latah flora. A tentative correlation of a fallout tuff from the Clarkia fossil beds, Idaho, with a pumice bed in the Bully Creek Formation places the remarkably well preserved Clarkia flora assemblage between the Mascall and Trout Creek flora. Large-volume supereruptions that originated between 11.8 and 10.1 Ma from the Bruneau-Jarbidge and Twin Falls volcanic centers of the Yellowstone hotspot in the central Snake River Plain deposited voluminous fallout tuffs in the Ellensberg Formation which forms sedimentary interbeds in the CRBG. These occurrences extend the known distribution of these fallout tuffs 500 km to the northwest of their source in the Snake River Plain. Heretofore, the distal products of these large eruptions had only been recognized to the east of their sources in the High Plains of Nebraska and Kansas. PMID:23071494

  3. Development of the town data base: Estimates of exposure rates and times of fallout arrival near the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.B.; McArthur, R.D.; Hutchinson, S.W.

    1994-09-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project, the time of fallout arrival and the H+12 exposure rate were estimated for populated locations in Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah that were affected by fallout from one or more nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. Estimates of exposure rate were derived from measured values recorded before and after each test by fallout monitors in the field. The estimate for a given location was obtained by retrieving from a data base all measurements made in the vicinity, decay-correcting them to H+12, and calculating an average. Estimates were also derived from maps produced after most events that show isopleths of exposure rate and time of fallout arrival. Both sets of isopleths on these maps were digitized, and kriging was used to interpolate values at the nodes of a 10-km grid covering the pattern. The values at any location within the grid were then estimated from the values at the surrounding grid nodes. Estimates of dispersion (standard deviation) were also calculated. The Town Data Base contains the estimates for all combinations of location and nuclear event for which the estimated mean H+12 exposure rate was greater than three times background. A listing of the data base is included as an appendix. The information was used by other project task groups to estimate the radiation dose that off-site populations and individuals may have received as a result of exposure to fallout from Nevada nuclear tests.

  4. Meteorological modeling of arrival and deposition of fallout at intermediate distances downwind of the Nevada Test Site.

    PubMed

    Cederwall, R T; Peterson, K R

    1990-11-01

    A three-dimensional atmospheric transport and diffusion model is used to calculate the arrival and deposition of fallout from 13 selected nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in the 1950s. Results are used to extend NTS fallout patterns to intermediate downwind distances (300 to 1200 km). The radioactive cloud is represented in the model by a population of Lagrangian marker particles, with concentrations calculated on an Eulerian grid. Use of marker particles, with fall velocities dependent on particle size, provides a realistic simulation of fallout as the debris cloud travels downwind. The three-dimensional wind field is derived from observed data, adjusted for mass consistency. Terrain is represented in the grid, which extends up to 1200 km downwind of NTS and has 32-km horizontal resolution and 1-km vertical resolution. Ground deposition is calculated by a deposition-velocity approach. Source terms and relationships between deposition and exposure rate are based on work by Hicks. Uncertainty in particle size and vertical distributions within the debris cloud (and stem) allow for some model "tuning" to better match measured ground-deposition values. Particle trajectories representing different sizes and starting heights above ground zero are used to guide source specification. An hourly time history of the modeled fallout pattern as the debris cloud moves downwind provides estimates of fallout arrival times. Results for event HARRY illustrate the methodology. The composite deposition pattern for all 13 tests is characterized by two lobes extending out to the north-northeast and east-northeast, respectively, at intermediate distances from NTS. Arrival estimates, along with modeled deposition values, augment measured deposition data in the development of data bases at the county level; these data bases are used for estimating radiation exposure at intermediate distances downwind of NTS. Results from a study of event TRINITY are also presented. PMID:2211118

  5. Relating suspended sediment to its original soil depth using fallout radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Wallbrink, P.J.; Olley, J.M.; Murray, A.S.

    1999-03-01

    The authors present and test a new method for determining the original soil depth of suspended sediment through analysis of fallout radionuclide properties. They propose that combining the different depth distributions of fallout {sup 7}Be, {sup 210}Pb, and {sup 137}Cs in soils with one another provides reference curves that can be used as a framework for interpreting the tracer concentrations of sediments derived from them. If it is assumed that the soil depth sources of the sediment are from the surface and the subsurface, the tracer concentrations from these two sources can be used to calculate the actual soil depth(s) from which the sediment originated. The proportion of sediment from each depth can also be calculated. The authors tested this method by generating sediment from a hillslope with treatments simulating: (T1) surface erosion, (T2) shallow rills to 10 mm, (T3) deep rills to 100 mm, and (T4) small gullies to 250 mm. The tracer-based calculations of sediment source matched the known incision depths of these features. Material was predicted to be from 1 {+-} 2 mm and 4 {+-} 4 mm soil depth for T1 and T2 respectively. In T3, the material was predicted to be from 1.25 {+-} 0.5 mm at the surface and >78 {+-} 6 mm depth from the deep rills. In T4, the sediment was predicted to be from <2.5 {+-} 1.5 mm at the soil surface and >86 {+-} 6 mm from the small gullies. The subsoil contribution to sediments increased from {approx}50% (T3) to 75% (T4) as rill and dully depths and widths increased.

  6. Dose assessment for sheep exposed to fallout from nuclear test Nancy

    SciTech Connect

    Sasser, L.B.; Soldat, J.K.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Murphy, D.W.

    1982-10-01

    Radiation doses were estimated for sheep wintering on Nevada ranges during the testing at the Nevada Test Site of the nuclear weapon Nancy on March 24, 1953. Exposure pathways considered were inhalation of radionuclides from both cloud passage and resuspension, external exposure of the total body and skin, and ingestion of contaminated forage and soil. Physiological, metabolic, and dosimetric data needed for these calculations were obtained from data appropriate for the sheep. Dose rate and radionuclide deposition values for shot Nancy were used. Radionuclide deposition and retention on the desert vegetation were obtained from data collected during several nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. Existing dosimetric computer programs, whose libraries were modified to include the sheep data, and specially developed models were used to estimate the dose commitment for the sheep. The total-body dose for reference sheep located within the 40-mR/hr (H+12) isopleth from all modes of exposure was estimated to be 2.6 rad. Ingestion of fallout on edible vegetation contributed the majority of the dose, whereas inhalation of radionuclides and consumption of contaminated soil from the ground contributed little to the internal doses. The dose to the thyroid of ewes from radioiodine and other radionuclides reaching the thyroid was approximately 400 rad. The calculated uniform dose to the reticulo-rumen was 4 rad; however, if fallout particles were assumed to concentrate in the ventral rumen, a localized dose of 200 rad could have been received by the rumen wall. Estimated dose to the bare skin of ewes was 120 rad. The dose to the fetal thyroid from radioiodine ingested by a pregnant ewe grazing at a location where the dose rate was 40 mR/hr (H+12) was estimated to be 700 rad, or approximately twice the dose to the maternal thyroid.

  7. Tephra-fallout hazard of Violent Strombolian eruptions at Vesuvius: insights from the 1906 event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsotti, Sara; D'Oriano, Claudia; Neri, Augusto; Cioni, Raffaello; Mulas, Maurizio

    2013-04-01

    Mt. Vesuvius is one of the most studied volcano in the world and its vicinity to an extremely populated area makes it also one of the most threatening. Violent Strombolians (VS) events have occurred in the most recent history of the volcano and are likely to occur in case of its reactivation in the future. In order to assess the regional hazard of this eruptive category we performed new field work and adopted a dispersal code to simulate the associated tephra dispersal and fallout. Attention was specifically focused on the 1906 event. Based on field analyses and historical observations, we reconstructed the temporal evolution of the eruptive source conditions during the event. We assumed a 5-day long scenario characterized by two distinct phases: a former short and intense phase of lava fountaining followed by a prolonged weaker phase of ash emission. Grain-size distributions adopted, for the two phases, as input to the model were derived from deposit records accounting also for the presence of sub-micron particles. Based on simplified reconstructions of wind field directions, we simulated the 1906 event and compared it with field data in order to evaluate the validity of the event characterization as well as the model performance. In particular, model outcomes were compared to refined field measurements and deposit distributions. In addition, several hypothetical scenarios with the same source conditions were simulated by adopting realistic meteorological data. Results are shown for specific cases in terms of hazard assessment on the ground (ash deposition and ash concentration in the air). The model clearly highlighted the remarkable effect of the variable local meteorology on ash dispersal and the key role of wind shear on the final cumulative ground deposit. In particular, the prevailing zonal wind, present at this latitude, demonstrated how ash fallout on the city of Naples is a possible scenario to be considered. Lastly, the effect of wet deposition and

  8. Quantifying sources of fine sediment supplied to post-fire debris flows using fallout radionuclide tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Hugh; Sheridan, Gary; Nyman, Petter; Child, David; Lane, Patrick; Hotchkis, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The supply of fine sediment and ash has been identified as an important factor contributing to the initiation of runoff-generated debris flows after fire. However, despite the significance of fines for post-fire debris flow generation, no investigations have sought to quantify sources of this material in debris flow affected catchments. In this study, we employ fallout radionuclides (Cs-137, excess Pb-210 and Pu-239,240) as tracers to measure proportional contributions of fine sediment (<10 μm) from hillslope surface and channel bank sources to levee and terminal fan deposits formed by post-fire debris flows in two forest catchments in southeastern Australia. While Cs-137 and excess Pb-210 have been widely used in sediment tracing studies, application of Pu as a tracer represents a recent development and was limited to only one catchment. The estimated range in hillslope surface contributions of fine sediment to individual debris flow deposits in each catchment was 22-69% and 32-74%, respectively. No systematic change in the source contributions to debris flow deposits was observed with distance downstream from channel initiation points. Instead, spatial variability in source contributions was largely influenced by the pattern of debris flow surges forming the deposits. Linking the sediment tracing with interpretation of depositional evidence allowed reconstruction of temporal sequences in sediment source contributions to debris flow surges. Hillslope source inputs dominated most elevated channel deposits such as marginal levees that were formed under peak flow conditions. This indicated the importance of hillslope runoff and sediment supply for debris flow generation in both catchments. In contrast, material stored within channels that was deposited during subsequent surges was predominantly channel-derived. The results demonstrate that fallout radionuclide tracers may provide unique information on the changing source contributions of fine sediment during debris

  9. Quantifying sources of fine sediment supplied to post-fire debris flows using fallout radionuclide tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Hugh G.; Sheridan, Gary J.; Nyman, Petter; Child, David P.; Lane, Patrick N. J.; Hotchkis, Michael A. C.; Jacobsen, Geraldine E.

    2012-02-01

    Fine sediment supply has been identified as an important factor contributing to the initiation of runoff-generated debris flows after fire. However, despite the significance of fines for post-fire debris flow generation, no investigations have sought to quantify sources of this material in debris flow affected catchments. In this study, we employ fallout radionuclides ( 137Cs, 210Pb ex and 239,240Pu) as tracers to measure proportional contributions of fine sediment (< 10 μm) from hillslope surface and channel bank sources to levee and terminal fan deposits formed by post-fire debris flows in two forest catchments in southeastern Australia. While 137Cs and 210Pb ex have been widely used in sediment tracing studies, application of Pu as a tracer represents a recent development and was limited to only one catchment. The ranges in estimated proportional hillslope surface contributions of fine sediment to individual debris flow deposits in each catchment were 22-69% and 32-74%. The greater susceptibility of 210Pb ex to apparent reductions in the ash content of channel deposits relative to hillslope sources resulted in its exclusion from the final analysis. No systematic change in the proportional source contributions to debris flow deposits was observed with distance downstream from channel initiation points. Instead, spatial variability in source contributions was largely influenced by the pattern of debris flow surges forming the deposits. Linking the tracing analysis with interpretation of depositional evidence allowed reconstruction of temporal sequences in sediment source contributions to debris flow surges. Hillslope source inputs dominated most elevated channel deposits such as marginal levees that were formed under peak flow conditions. This indicated the importance of hillslope runoff and fine sediment supply for debris flow generation in both catchments. In contrast, material stored within channels that was deposited during subsequent surges was predominantly

  10. Thyroid hypofunction after exposure to fallout from a hydrogen bomb explosion.

    PubMed

    Larsen, P R; Conard, R A; Knudsen, K D; Robbins, J; Wolff, J; Rall, J E; Nicoloff, J T; Dobyns, B M

    1982-03-19

    Thyroid function was evaluated in the Marshallese who were accidentally exposed to fallout-containing radioiodine isotopes in 1954. Measurements of thyrotrophin (TSH, thyroid-stimulating hormone) levels and free thyroxine (T4) index (FT4I) have revealed that, among 86 persons exposed on Rongelap and Ailingnae atolls, 14 have shown evidence of thyroid hypofunction. This was first noted in some individuals about ten years after exposure. Only two of these showed clinical evidence of hypothyroidism. The most marked TSH elevations were noted in nine persons exposed when younger than 6 years, with estimated doses to the thyroid from 390 to 2,100 rad. Most of this group subsequently had surgery for removal of thyroid nodules. The remaining five cases have been noted more recently among 36 surviving adults exposed at an older age who showed no other detectable thyroid abnormalities. This group had received estimated thyroid doses ranging from 135 to 335 rad and showed modest elevation of serum TSH levels (6 to 9 microU/mL) and a slightly subnormal FT4I. No abnormalities were found in persons on Utirik who received substantially less radiation, and hypothyroidism was present in less than 1% of the control, unexposed Marshallese. The high prevalence of a thyroid hypofunction in these persons indicates that this condition, as well as thyroid nodularity, can be a delayed complication of exposure to early fallout from a nuclear explosion. The fact that a significant fraction of the radiation to the thyroid was from short-lived radioiodine isotopes (132I, 133I, 135I), as opposed to 131I, may account for the severity of the thyroid damage. PMID:7062458

  11. Quantifying sources of fine sediment supplied to post-fire debris flows using fallout radionuclide tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. G.; Sheridan, G. J.; Nyman, P.; Child, D.; Lane, P. N.; Hotchkis, M.

    2011-12-01

    The supply of fine sediment and ash has been identified as an important factor contributing to the initiation of runoff-generated debris flows after fire. However, despite the significance of fines for post-fire debris flow generation, no investigations have sought to quantify sources of this material in debris flow affected catchments. In this study, we employ fallout radionuclides (Cs-137, excess Pb-210 and Pu-239,240) as tracers to measure proportional contributions of fine sediment (<10 μm) from hillslope surface and channel bank sources to levee and terminal fan deposits formed by post-fire debris flows in two forest catchments in southeastern Australia. While Cs-137 and excess Pb-210 have been widely used in sediment tracing studies, application of Pu as a tracer represents a recent development and was limited to only one catchment. The estimated range in proportional hillslope surface contributions of fine sediment to individual debris flow deposits in each catchment was 22-69% and 32-74%. No systematic change in the proportional source contributions to debris flow deposits was observed with distance downstream from channel initiation points. Instead, spatial variability in source contributions was largely influenced by the pattern of debris flow surges forming the deposits. Linking the tracing analysis with interpretation of depositional evidence allowed reconstruction of temporal sequences in sediment source contributions to debris flow surges. Hillslope source inputs dominated most elevated channel deposits such as marginal levees that were formed under peak flow conditions. This indicated the importance of hillslope runoff and fine sediment supply for debris flow generation in both catchments. In contrast, material stored within channels that was deposited during subsequent surges was predominantly channel-derived. The results demonstrate that fallout radionuclide tracers may provide unique information on the changing source contributions of fine

  12. The influence of the post-Chernobyl fallout on birth defects and abortion rates in Austria.

    PubMed

    Haeusler, M C; Berghold, A; Schoell, W; Hofer, P; Schaffer, M

    1992-10-01

    Researchers analyzed data on 66,743 births which occurred between 1985-1989 in the Styria region in southern Austria to determine whether radioactive fallout from the meltdown of the nuclear reaction at Chernobyl in the Ukraine, USSR in may 1986 affected the birth defect and abortion rates in this area of Austria. There were 1695 birth defect cases. Of the birth defects which occurred during embryogenesis, most occurred 14-49 days postconception (group 2; n=630). The researchers did not note a short-term effect of the fallout in group 2 or the other groups (relative risk= 0.75, 0.73 for group 1, and 0.93 for group 2). Baseline birth defect rates (per 1000 births) for groups 1, 2, and 3 were 2.5, 8.5, and 1,8 respectively. The only sizable increase occurred in group 2 at years 2 and 3 (10.6 and 10.3, respectively). More reported minor congenital defect cases accounted for this increase due to the newly established data base in the Department of Pediatric Cardiology at the University of Graz. Thus the increase was an artifact and not a true increase. Abortion rates varied from 10% to 14% and did not increase significantly after Chernobyl. Counseling frequency at abortion clinics fluctuated greatly (117-205) both before and after Chernobyl and the changes were not significant. These results indicated that the low dosage of radiation did not have a detectable biologic effect in terms of birth defects and abortions. The researchers addressed the difficulties with measuring teratologic potential of low dose radiation. They also highlighted the need for accurate categorizing of birth defects, adequate baseline data, and very reliable registries. Future research on possible environmental disasters which affect Austria can use these data as baseline data. PMID:1415387

  13. Rainfall erosivity in catchments contaminated with fallout from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laceby, J. Patrick; Chartin, Caroline; Evrard, Olivier; Onda, Yuichi; Garcia-Sanchez, Laurent; Cerdan, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident in March 2011 resulted in the fallout of significant quantities of radiocesium over the Fukushima region. After reaching the soil surface, radiocesium is quickly bound to fine soil particles. Thereafter, rainfall and snowmelt run-off events transfer particle-bound radiocesium downstream. Characterizing the precipitation regime of the fallout-impacted region is thus important for understanding post-deposition radiocesium dynamics. Accordingly, 10 min (1995-2015) and daily precipitation data (1977-2015) from 42 meteorological stations within a 100 km radius of the FDNPP were analyzed. Monthly rainfall erosivity maps were developed to depict the spatial heterogeneity of rainfall erosivity for catchments entirely contained within this radius. The mean average precipitation in the region surrounding the FDNPP is 1420 mm yr-1 (SD 235) with a mean rainfall erosivity of 3696 MJ mm ha-1 h-1 yr-1 (SD 1327). Tropical cyclones contribute 22 % of the precipitation (422 mm yr-1) and 40 % of the rainfall erosivity (1462 MJ mm ha-1 h-1 yr-1 (SD 637)). The majority of precipitation (60 %) and rainfall erosivity (82 %) occurs between June and October. At a regional scale, rainfall erosivity increases from the north to the south during July and August, the most erosive months. For the remainder of the year, this gradient occurs mostly from northwest to southeast. Relief features strongly influence the spatial distribution of rainfall erosivity at a smaller scale, with the coastal plains and coastal mountain range having greater rainfall erosivity than the inland Abukuma River valley. Understanding these patterns, particularly their spatial and temporal (both inter- and intraannual) variation, is important for contextualizing soil and particle-bound radiocesium transfers in the Fukushima region. Moreover, understanding the impact of tropical cyclones will be important for managing sediment and sediment-bound contaminant

  14. Cesium Isotope Ratios as Indicators of Nuclear Power Plant Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Darin Snyder; James Delmore; Troy Tranter; Nick Mann; Michael Abbott; John Olson

    2011-11-01

    There are multiple paths by which radioactive cesium can reach the effluent from reactor operations. The radioactive 135Cs/137Cs ratios are controlled by these paths. In an effort to better understand the origin of this radiation, these 135Cs/137Cs ratios in effluents from three power reactor sites have been measured in offsite samples. These ratios are different from global fallout by up to six fold and as such cannot have a significant component from this source. A cesium ratio for a sample collected outside of the plant boundary provides integration over the operating life of the reactor. A sample collected inside the plant at any given time can be much different from this lifetime ratio. The measured cesium ratios vary significantly for the three reactors and indicate that the multiple paths have widely varying levels of contributions. There are too many ways these isotopes can fractionate to be useful for quantitative evaluations of operating parameters in an offsite sample, although it may be possible to obtain limited qualitative information for an onsite sample.

  15. Cesium isotope ratios as indicators of nuclear power plant operations.

    PubMed

    Delmore, James E; Snyder, Darin C; Tranter, Troy; Mann, Nick R

    2011-11-01

    There are multiple paths by which radioactive cesium can reach the effluent from reactor operations. The radioactive (135)Cs/(137)Cs ratios are controlled by these paths. In an effort to better understand the origin of this radiation, these (135)Cs/(137)Cs ratios in effluents from three power reactor sites have been measured in offsite samples. These ratios are different from global fallout by up to six fold and as such cannot have a significant component from this source. A cesium ratio for a sample collected outside of the plant boundary provides integration over the operating life of the reactor. A sample collected inside the plant at any given time can be much different from this lifetime ratio. The measured cesium ratios vary significantly for the three reactors and indicate that the multiple paths have widely varying levels of contributions. There are too many ways these isotopes can fractionate to be useful for quantitative evaluations of operating parameters in an offsite sample, although it may be possible to obtain limited qualitative information for an onsite sample. PMID:21816522

  16. Acting Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Susan Archie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a fun game in which students act as electrons, protons, and neutrons. This activity is designed to help students develop a concrete understanding of the abstract concept of atomic structure. (DKM)

  17. Kinetic Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David B.

    1981-01-01

    Surveys the research of scientists like Joule, Kelvin, Maxwell, Clausius, and Boltzmann as it comments on the basic conceptual issues involved in the development of a more precise kinetic theory and the idea of a kinetic atom. (Author/SK)

  18. Newton's Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaney, Andrea; Espinosa, James; Espinosa, James

    2006-10-01

    At the turn of the twentieth century, physicists and chemists were developing atomic models. Some of the phenomena that they had to explain were the periodic table, the stability of the atom, and the emission spectra. Niels Bohr is known as making the first modern picture that accounted for these. Unknown to much of the physics community is the work of Walter Ritz. His model explained more emission spectra and predates Bohr's work. We will fit several spectra using Ritz's magnetic model for the atom. The problems of stability and chemical periodicity will be shown to be challenges that this model has difficulty solving, but we will present some potentially useful adaptations to the Ritzian atom that can account for them.

  19. Cold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellac, Michel Le

    2014-11-01

    This chapter and the following one address collective effects of quantum particles, that is, the effects which are observed when we put together a large number of identical particles, for example, electrons, helium-4 or rubidium-85 atoms. We shall see that quantum particles can be classified into two categories, bosons and fermions, whose collective behavior is radically different. Bosons have a tendency to pile up in the same quantum state, while fermions have a tendency to avoid each other. We say that bosons and fermions obey two different quantum statistics, the Bose-Einstein and the Fermi-Dirac statistics, respectively. Temperature is a collective effect, and in Section 5.1 we shall explain the concept of absolute temperature and its relation to the average kinetic energy of molecules. We shall describe in Section 5.2 how we can cool atoms down thanks to the Doppler effect, and explain how cold atoms can be used to improve the accuracy of atomic clocks by a factor of about 100. The effects of quantum statistics are prominent at low temperatures, and atom cooling will be used to obtain Bose-Einstein condensates at low enough temperatures, when the atoms are bosons.

  20. Atomic research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Connatser, Robert; Cothren, Bobby; Johnson, R. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work performed by the University of Alabama in Huntsville's (UAH) Center for Applied Optics (CAO) entitled Atomic Research is documented. Atomic oxygen (AO) effects on materials have long been a critical concern in designing spacecraft to withstand exposure to the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. The objective of this research effort was to provide technical expertise in the design of instrumentation and experimental techniques for analyzing materials exposed to atomic oxygen in accelerated testing at NASA/MSFC. Such testing was required to answer fundamental questions concerning Space Station Freedom (SSF) candidate materials and materials exposed to atomic oxygen aboard the Long-Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The primary UAH task was to provide technical design, review, and analysis to MSFC in the development of a state-of-the-art 5eV atomic oxygen beam facility required to simulate the RAM-induced low earth orbit (LEO) AO environment. This development was to be accomplished primarily at NASA/MSFC. In support of this task, contamination effects and ultraviolet (UV) simulation testing was also to be carried out using NASA/MSFC facilities. Any materials analysis of LDEF samples was to be accomplished at UAH.

  1. Actuated atomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, Charles (Inventor); Weiler, Jeff (Inventor); Palmer, Randall (Inventor); Appel, Philip (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An actuated atomizer is adapted for spray cooling or other applications wherein a well-developed, homogeneous and generally conical spray mist is required. The actuated atomizer includes an outer shell formed by an inner ring; an outer ring; an actuator insert and a cap. A nozzle framework is positioned within the actuator insert. A base of the nozzle framework defines swirl inlets, a swirl chamber and a swirl chamber. A nozzle insert defines a center inlet and feed ports. A spool is positioned within the coil housing, and carries the coil windings having a number of turns calculated to result in a magnetic field of sufficient strength to overcome the bias of the spring. A plunger moves in response to the magnetic field of the windings. A stop prevents the pintle from being withdrawn excessively. A pintle, positioned by the plunger, moves between first and second positions. In the first position, the head of the pintle blocks the discharge passage of the nozzle framework, thereby preventing the atomizer from discharging fluid. In the second position, the pintle is withdrawn from the swirl chamber, allowing the atomizer to release atomized fluid. A spring biases the pintle to block the discharge passage. The strength of the spring is overcome, however, by the magnetic field created by the windings positioned on the spool, which withdraws the plunger into the spool and further compresses the spring.

  2. Postglacial eruptive history of Laguna del Maule volcanic field in Chile, from fallout stratigraphy in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierstein, J.; Sruoga, P.; Amigo, A.; Elissondo, M.; Rosas, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field, which surrounds the 54-km2 lake of that name, covers ~500 km2 of rugged glaciated terrain with Quaternary lavas and tuffs that extend for 40 km westward from the Argentine frontier and 30 km N-S from the Rio Campanario to Laguna Fea in the Southern Volcanic Zone of Chile. Geologic mapping (Hildreth et al., 2010) shows that at least 130 separate vents are part of the LdM field, from which >350 km3 of products have erupted since 1.5 Ma. These include a ring of 36 postglacial rhyolite and rhyodacite coulees and domes that erupted from 24 separate vents and encircle the lake, suggesting a continued large magma reservoir. Because the units are young, glassy, and do not overlap, only a few ages had been determined and the sequence of most of the postglacial eruptions had not previously been established. However, most of these postglacial silicic eruptions were accompanied by explosive eruptions of pumice and ash. Recent investigations downwind in Argentina are combining stratigraphy, grain-size analysis, chemistry, and radiocarbon dating to correlate the tephra with eruptive units mapped in Chile, assess fallout distribution, and establish a time-stratigraphic framework for the postglacial eruptions at Laguna del Maule. Two austral summer field seasons with a tri-country collaboration among the geological surveys of the U.S., Chile, and Argentina, have now established that a wide area east of the volcanic field was blanketed by at least 3 large explosive eruptions from LdM sources, and by at least 3 more modest, but still significant, eruptions. In addition, an ignimbrite from the LdM Barrancas vent complex on the border in the SE corner of the lake traveled at least 15 km from source and now makes up a pyroclastic mesa that is at least 40 m thick. This ignimbrite (72-75% SiO2) preceded a series of fall deposits that are correlated with eruption of several lava flows that built the Barrancas complex. Recent 14C dates suggest

  3. Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kasevich, Mark

    2008-05-08

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton's constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gyroscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be used to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  4. Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Kasevich

    2008-05-07

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton’s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  5. Atom Interferometry

    ScienceCinema

    Mark Kasevich

    2010-01-08

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton?s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  6. The Golden Ratio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Hartley

    2004-01-01

    The Golden Ratio is sometimes called the "Golden Section" or the "Divine Proportion", in which three points: A, B, and C, divide a line in this proportion if AC/AB = AB/BC. "Donald in Mathmagicland" includes a section about the Golden Ratio and the ratios within a five-pointed star or pentagram. This article presents two computing exercises that…

  7. The new conversion model MODERN to derive erosion rates from inventories of fallout radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arata, Laura; Meusburger, Katrin; Frenkel, Elena; A'Campo-Neuen, Annette; Iurian, Andra-Rada; Ketterer, Michael E.; Mabit, Lionel; Alewell, Christine

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of fallout radionuclides (FRNs) has become one of the most commonly used methods to quantify soil erosion and depositional processes. FRNs include anthropogenic radionuclides (e.g. 137Cs, 239+240Pu) released into the atmosphere during nuclear bomb tests and power plant accidents (e.g Chernobyl, Fukushima-Daiichi), as well as natural radiotracers such as 210Pbex and 7Be. FRNs reach the land surface by dry and wet fallouts from the atmosphere. Once deposited, FRNs are tightly adsorbed by fine soil particles and their subsequent redistribution is mostly associated with soil erosion processes. FRNs methods are based on a qualitative comparison: the inventory (total radionuclide activity per unit area) at a given sampling site is compared to that of a so called reference site. The conversion of FRN inventories into soil erosion and deposition rates is done with a variety of models, which suitability is dependent on the selected FRN, soil cultivation (ploughed or unploughed) and movement (erosion or deposition). The authors propose a new conversion model, which can be easily and comprehensively used for different FRNs, land uses and soil redistribution processes. This new model i.e. MODERN (MOdelling Deposition and Erosion rates with RadioNuclides) considers the precise depth distribution of a given FRN at a reference site, and allows adapting it for any specific site conditions. MODERN adaptability and performance has been tested on two published case studies: (i) a 137Cs study in an alpine and unploughed area in the Aosta valley (Italy) and (ii) a 210Pbex study on a ploughed area located in Romania. The results show a good agreement and a significant correlation (r= 0.91, p<0.0001) between the results of MODERN and the published models currently used by the FRN scientific community (i.e. the Profile Distribution Model and the Mass Balance Model). The open access code and the cost free accessibility of MODERN will ensure the promotion of a wider

  8. Demonstration of a cold atom beam splitter on atom chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaojun; Li, Xiaolin; Zhang, Haichao; Wang, Yuzhu

    2016-08-01

    We report an experimental demonstration of a new scheme to split cold atoms on an atom chip. The atom chip consists of a U-wire and a Z-wire. The cold atom cloud is initially loaded and prepared in the Z-trap, which is split into two separate parts by switching on the current of the U-wire. The two separate atom clouds have a distance more than one millimeter apart from each other and show almost symmetrical profiles, corresponding to about a 50/50 splitting ratio. Project supported by the State Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB921504) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91536107).

  9. Sr-Nd isotopic variations in the 4,965 yr BP "Ochre Pumice" plinian fallout of Popocatépetl: Preliminary results and interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsi, G.; Arana-Salinas, L.; Civetta, L.; Siebe, C.

    2013-05-01

    becomes more silicic towards the top (SiO2 = 63 wt.%). Pumice clasts have a crystallinity index that ranges between 10 and 25 Vol.% and display a seriate texture. Phenocrysts of plagioclase are the most abundant phase and typically display labradoritic cores (An54-59) and andesine rims (An41-46). Augites (En40-44 Wo41-45) and hypersthenes (En66-40) are less common, occur either isolated or in clusters with plagioclase and/or olivine. Ol-crystals are slightly zoned with forsteritic core compositions (Fo65-Fo84). Apatite and opaques occur subordinately. This study aims to determine systematically the Sr-Nd isotopic ratios in the different layers that compose the plinian "Ochre pumice" fallout sequence in order to make inferences regarding magmatic processes (mafic injection, mixing, mingling, etc.) prior to eruption. Preliminary results and interpretations will be presented.

  10. Non-destructive measurements of cosmogenic Al-26, natural K-40 and fallout Cs-137 in Antarctic meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komura, K.; Tsukamoto, M.; Sakanoue, M.

    1982-12-01

    Non-destructive gamma-ray measurements have been made to determine cosmogenic Al-26, natural K-40 and fallout Cs-137 activities in 15 Antarctic meteorites (14 from Yamato Mountains and 1 from Allan Hills). The Al-26 activities range from 72 to 29 dpm/kg. If it is assumed that the saturation activity of Al-26 in chondrites is 60, about 1/3 of the measured meteorites show the contents close to this value; however, the rest show lower values. A simple graphical method was applied to estimate the exposure and terrestrial ages based on Al-26 and Mn-53 data, and these ages are compared with exposure ages obtained by Ne-21 measurements. The results are generally consistent with the Ne-21 data. It must be noted that the Antarctic meteorites are highly contaminated with fallout Cs-137 derived from nuclear test explosions.

  11. An estimate by two methods of thyroid absorbed doses due to BRAVO fallout in several northern Marshall Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Musolino, S.V.; Hull, A.P.; Greenhouse, N.A.

    1997-10-01

    Estimates of the thyroid absorbed doses due to fallout originating from the 1 March 1954 BRAVO thermonuclear test on Bikini Atoll have been made for several inhabited locations in the Northern Marshall Islands. Rongelap, Utirik, Rongerik and Ailinginae Atolls were also inhabited on 1 March 1954, where retrospective thyroid absorbed doses have previously been reconstructed. Current estimates are based primarily on external exposure data, which were recorded shortly after each nuclear test in the Castle Series, and secondarily on soil concentrations of {sup 137}Cs in samples collected in 1978 and 1988, along with aerial monitoring done in 1978. External exposures and {sup 137}Cs Soil concentrations were representative of the atmospheric transport and deposition patterns of the entire Castle Series tests and show that the BRAVO test was the major contributor to fallout exposure during the Castle series and other test series which were carried out in the Marshall Islands. These data have been used as surrogates for fission product radioiodines and telluriums in order to estimate the range of thyroid absorbed doses that may have occurred throughout the Marshall Islands. Dosimetry based on these two sets of estimates agreed within a factor of 4 at the locations where BRAVO was the dominant contributor to the total exposure and deposition. Both methods indicate that thyroid absorbed doses in the range of 1 Gy (100 rad) may have been incurred in some of the northern locations, whereas the doses at southern locations did not significantly exceed levels comparable to those from worldwide fallout. The results of these estimates indicate that a systematic medical survey for thyroid disease should be conducted, and that a more definitive dose reconstruction should be made for all the populated atolls and islands in the Northern Marshall Islands beyond Rongelap, Utirik, Rongerik and Ailinginae, which were significantly contaminated by BRAVO fallout. 30 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs.

  12. An estimate by two methods of thyroid absorbed doses due to BRAVO fallout in several Northern Marshall Islands.

    PubMed

    Musolino, S V; Greenhouse, N A; Hull, A P

    1997-10-01

    Estimates of the thyroid absorbed doses due to fallout originating from the 1 March 1954 BRAVO thermonuclear test on Bikini Atoll have been made for several inhabited locations in the Northern Marshall Islands. Rongelap, Utirik, Rongerik and Ailinginae Atolls were also inhabited on 1 March 1954, where retrospective thyroid absorbed doses have previously been reconstructed. The current estimates are based primarily on external exposure data, which were recorded shortly after each nuclear test in the Castle Series, and secondarily on soil concentrations of 137Cs in samples collected in 1978 and 1988, along with aerial monitoring done in 1978. The external exposures and 137Cs soil concentrations were representative of the atmospheric transport and deposition patterns of the entire Castle Series tests and show that the BRAVO test was the major contributor to fallout exposure during the Castle series and other test series which were carried out in the Marshall Islands. These data have been used as surrogates for fission product radioiodines and telluriums in order to estimate the range of thyroid absorbed doses that may have occurred throughout the Marshall Islands. Dosimetry based on these two sets of estimates agreed within a factor of 4 at the locations where BRAVO was the dominant contributor to the total exposure and deposition. Both methods indicate that thyroid absorbed doses in the range of 1 Gy (100 rad) may have been incurred in some of the northern locations, whereas the doses at southern locations did not significantly exceed levels comparable to those from worldwide fallout. The results of these estimates indicate that a systematic medical survey for thyroid disease should be conducted, and that a more definitive dose reconstruction should be made for all the populated atolls and islands in the Northern Marshall Islands beyond Rongelap, Utirik, Rongerik and Ailinginae, which were significantly contaminated by BRAVO fallout. PMID:9314227

  13. The effect of wind and eruption source parameter variations on tephra fallout hazard assessment: an example from Vesuvio (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedonio, Giovanni; Costa, Antonio; Scollo, Simona; Neri, Augusto

    2015-04-01

    Uncertainty in the tephra fallout hazard assessment may depend on different meteorological datasets and eruptive source parameters used in the modelling. We present a statistical study to analyze this uncertainty in the case of a sub-Plinian eruption of Vesuvius of VEI = 4, column height of 18 km and total erupted mass of 5 × 1011 kg. The hazard assessment for tephra fallout is performed using the advection-diffusion model Hazmap. Firstly, we analyze statistically different meteorological datasets: i) from the daily atmospheric soundings of the stations located in Brindisi (Italy) between 1962 and 1976 and between 1996 and 2012, and in Pratica di Mare (Rome, Italy) between 1996 and 2012; ii) from numerical weather prediction models of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Furthermore, we modify the total mass, the total grain-size distribution, the eruption column height, and the diffusion coefficient. Then, we quantify the impact that different datasets and model input parameters have on the probability maps. Results shows that the parameter that mostly affects the tephra fallout probability maps, keeping constant the total mass, is the particle terminal settling velocity, which is a function of the total grain-size distribution, particle density and shape. Differently, the evaluation of the hazard assessment weakly depends on the use of different meteorological datasets, column height and diffusion coefficient.

  14. Combining microscopy with spectroscopic and chemical methods for tracing the origin of atmospheric fallouts from mining sites.

    PubMed

    Navel, Aline; Uzu, Gaëlle; Spadini, Lorenzo; Sobanska, Sophie; Martins, Jean M F

    2015-12-30

    Populations living close to mining sites are often exposed to important heavy metal concentrations, especially through atmospheric fallouts. Identifying the main sources of metal-rich particles remains a challenge because of the similarity of the particle signatures from the polluted sites. This work provides an original combination of physical and chemical methods to determine the main sources of airborne particles impacting inhabited zones. Raman microspectrometry (RMS), X-ray diffraction (DRX), morphology analyses by microscopy and chemical composition were assessed. Geochemical analysis allowed the identification of target and source areas; XRD and RMS analysis identified the main mineral phases in association with their metal content and speciation. The characterization of the dominant minerals was combined with particle morphology analysis to identify fallout sources. The complete description of dust morphologies permitted the successful determination of a fingerprint of each source site. The analysis of these chemical and morphological fingerprints allowed identification of the mine area as the main contributor of metal-rich particles impacting the inhabited zone. In addition to the identification of the main sources of airborne particles, this study will also permit to better define the extent of polluted zones requiring remediation or protection from eolian erosion inducing metal-rich atmospheric fallouts. PMID:26253233

  15. S V line ratios in the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufton, P. L.; Hibbert, A.; Keenan, F. P.; Kingston, A. E.; Doschek, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    In the present prediction of level populations and emission line intensity ratios for electron densities and temperatures appropriate to the sun, on the basis of new atomic data for S V, the electron impact collision rates for spin-forbidden transitions, and the intercombination transition spontaneous radiative rate, are noted to be substantially larger than previously ascertained. The S V intensity ratio is shown to be a useful electron density diagnostic for log N(e) greater than 11.5 ratios deduced from observations obtained with a slit spectrograph aboard Skylab generally agree with the theoretical values presented.

  16. 'Do-it-yourself' fallout/blast shelter evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, P.T.; Baker, W.E.; Esparza, E.D.; Westine, P.S.; Blaylock, N.W.

    1984-03-01

    Expedient fallout shelters recommended to the general public were evaluated for their potential to provide safety to occupants during nuclear blast. The blast threat was in the 2 to 50 psi overpressure range from a 1 megaton (MT) yield weapon. Research included a literature search for expedient shelter designs and evaluations of the designs to certify their ability to protect occupants. Shelters were evaluated systematically by first analyzing each design for expected failure loads. Next, scale model tests were planned and conducted in the Fort Cronkhite shock tunnel. Structural responses and blast pressures were recorded in a series of twelve experiments involving 96 structural response models. Two rigid models were included in each test to measure internal blast pressure leakage. Probabilities of survival were determined for each of the shelters tested. Expected failure mechanisms were identified for each of the eight U.S. shelters. One shelter, tilt-up doors and earth, was eliminated from consideration because of uncertainties for the associated permanent structure. Failure loads of the remaining seven shelters were determined through analysis. Analyses included failure by overturning/translation, trench collapse, or roof collapse. A car-over-trench shelter was evaluated solely through analysis. The threshold for human tolerance to blast pressures (lung damage) was calculated as 8 psi with a 99 percent survival rate at 28 psi. Thresholds for trench wall stability were calculated based on material strengths and shelter geometries.

  17. Genetic consequences of radioactive contamination by the Chernobyl fallout to agricultural crops.

    PubMed

    Geraskin, S A; Dikarev, V G; Zyablitskaya, Ye Ya; Oudalova, A A; Spirin, Ye V; Alexakhin, R M

    2003-01-01

    The genetic consequences of radioactive contamination by the fallout to agricultural crops after the accident at the Chernobyl NPP in 1986 have been studied. In the first, acute, period of this accident, when the absorbed dose was primarily due to external beta- and gamma-irradiation, the radiation injury of agricultural crops, according to the basic cytogenetic tests, resembled the effect produced by acute gamma-irradiation at comparable doses. The yield of cytogenetic damage in leaf meristem of plants grown in the 10-km zone of the ChNPP in 1987-1989 (the period of chronic, lower level radiation exposure) was shown to be enhanced and dependent on the level of radioactive contamination. The rate of decline with time in cytogenetic damage induced by chronic exposure lagged considerably behind that of the radiation exposure. Analysis of genetic variability in three sequential generations of rye and wheat revealed increased cytogenetic damage in plants exposed to chronic irradiation during the 2nd and 3rd years. PMID:12590075

  18. Radioactivity in persons exposed to fallout from the Chernobyl reactor accident

    SciTech Connect

    Schlenker, R.A.; Oltman, B.G.; Lucas, H.F.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of fallout radioactivity were made in the thyroid region, abdomen, whole body, or urine of 96 persons who were in eastern Europe at the time of the Chernobyl reactor accident or who went there shortly afterward. The most frequently encountered radionuclides were /sup 131/I, sup 134,137/Cs, and /sup 103/Ru//sup 103/Rh. The median /sup 131/I activity in the thyroids of 42 subjects in whom radioiodine was detected and who were in Europe when the accident began was projected as 42 nCi the day the accident began. The median total body activity of /sup 134/Cs in 40 subjects in which it was detected was 1.7 nCi upon arrival in the US. For 51 subjects with detectable /sup 137/Cs burdens, the total body activity was 4.6 nCi. The risk of fatal thyroid cancer is less than 3 x 10/sup -6/ for nearly all subjects in this series. The risk of fatal cancer from /sup 134,137/Cs for subjects with cesium exposures similar to the ones observed by us, but who remained in Europe, is estimated as 1.4 x 10/sup -6/ to 4.2 x 10/sup -5/ with 95% of the risk attributable to /sup 137/Cs. 5 refs., 4 tabs.

  19. Concentration of fallout plutonium in tissues of Japanese who died during 1980-1984

    SciTech Connect

    Takizawa, Y.; Hisamatsu, S.; Abe, T.

    1987-02-01

    The concentrations of fallout 239 + 240Pu in various body tissues of subjects who were born before 1941 and who died in Akita and Niigata Prefectures in Japan during 1980-1984 are reported. The median concentrations in vertebrae, sternum, liver, lung, spleen, and kidney were 0.21, 0.08, 0.62, 0.11, 0.08, 0.03 pCi/kg wet weight, respectively. The concentration levels in vertebrae were approximately three times higher than in the sternum. No significant correlation between the concentration in the various tissues and age at the time of death was observed. No differences in the concentration levels in liver and lung were observed between the sexes. Correlation between the concentration in liver and that in lung was not significant. The concentration in liver was similar to that estimated from the ICRP 30 model. However, the concentration in lung was considerably higher than the estimated value. This difference may be caused by the pulmonary lymph nodes contained in the present lung samples. To obtain the average concentration of plutonium in the entire skeleton, further information regarding the macrodistribution of plutonium is required.

  20. Atomic rivals

    SciTech Connect

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a memoir of rivalries among the Allies over the bomb, by a participant and observer. Nuclear proliferation began in the uneasy wartime collaboration of the United States, England, Canada, and Free France to produce the atom bomb. Through the changes of history, a young French chemist had a role in almost every act of this international drama. This memoir is based on Goldschmidt's own recollections, interviews with other leading figures, and 3,000 pages of newly declassified documents in Allied archives. From his own start as Marie Curie's lab assistant, Goldschmidt's career was closely intertwined with Frances complicated rise to membership in the nuclear club. As a refugee from the Nazis, he became part of the wartime nuclear energy project in Canada and found himself the only French scientist to work (although briefly) on the American atom bomb project.

  1. Atomic arias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    The American composer John Adams uses opera to dramatize controversial current events. His 1987 work Nixon in China was about the landmark meeting in 1972 between US President Richard Nixon and Chairman Mao Zedong of China; The Death of Klinghoffer (1991) was a musical re-enactment of an incident in 1985 when Palestinian terrorists kidnapped and murdered a wheelchair-bound Jewish tourist on a cruise ship. Adams's latest opera, Doctor Atomic, is also tied to a controversial event: the first atomic-bomb test in Alamogordo, New Mexico, on 16 June 1945. The opera premièred in San Francisco in 2005, had a highly publicized debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York in 2008, and will have another debut on 25 February - with essentially the same cast - at the English National Opera in London.

  2. Assessing the long-term probabilistic volcanic hazard for tephra fallout in Reykjavik, Iceland: a preliminary multi-source analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonini, Roberto; Barsotti, Sara; Sandri, Laura; Tumi Guðmundsson, Magnús

    2015-04-01

    Icelandic volcanism is largely dominated by basaltic magma. Nevertheless the presence of glaciers over many Icelandic volcanic systems results in frequent phreatomagmatic eruptions and associated tephra production, making explosive eruptions the most common type of volcanic activity. Jökulhlaups are commonly considered as major volcanic hazard in Iceland for their high frequency and potentially very devastating local impact. Tephra fallout is also frequent and can impact larger areas. It is driven by the wind direction that can change with both altitude and season, making impossible to predict a priori where the tephra will be deposited during the next eruptions. Most of the volcanic activity in Iceland occurs in the central eastern part, over 100 km to the east of the main population centre around the capital Reykjavík. Therefore, the hazard from tephra fallout in Reykjavík is expected to be smaller than for communities settled near the main volcanic systems. However, within the framework of quantitative hazard and risk analyses, less frequent and/or less intense phenomena should not be neglected, since their risk evaluation depends on the effects suffered by the selected target. This is particularly true if the target is highly vulnerable, as large urban areas or important infrastructures. In this work we present the preliminary analysis aiming to perform a Probabilistic Volcanic Hazard Assessment (PVHA) for tephra fallout focused on the target area which includes the municipality of Reykjavík and the Keflavík international airport. This approach reverts the more common perspective where the hazard analysis is focused on the source (the volcanic system) and it follows a multi-source approach: indeed, the idea is to quantify, homogeneously, the hazard due to the main hazardous volcanoes that could pose a tephra fallout threat for the municipality of Reykjavík and the Keflavík airport. PVHA for each volcanic system is calculated independently and the results

  3. Atomic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, A.E.; Kukla, K.; Cheng, S.

    1995-08-01

    In a collaboration with the Atomic Physics group at Argonne and the University of Toledo, the Atomic Physics group at the University of Notre Dame is measuring the fine structure transition energies in highly-charged lithium-like and helium-like ions using beam-foil spectroscopy. Precise measurements of 2s-2p transition energies in simple (few-electron) atomic systems provide stringent tests of several classes of current atomic- structure calculations. Analyses of measurements in helium-like Ar{sup 16+} have been completed, and the results submitted for publication. A current goal is to measure the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} - 1s2p{sup 3}P{sub 0} transition wavelength in helium-like Ni{sup 26+}. Measurements of the 1s2s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} - 1s2p{sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2} transition wavelengths in lithium-like Kr{sup 33+} is planned. Wavelength and lifetime measurements in copper-like U{sup 63+} are also expected to be initiated. The group is also participating in measurements of forbidden transitions in helium-like ions. A measurement of the lifetime of the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} state in Kr{sup 34+} was published recently. In a collaboration including P. Mokler of GSI, Darmstadt, measurements have been made of the spectral distribution of the 2E1 decay continuum in helium-like Kr{sup 34+}. Initial results have been reported and further measurements are planned.

  4. Atomic cascade of muonic and pionic helium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Landua, R.; Klempt, E.

    1982-06-21

    The cascade of muonic and pionic helium atoms in targets of arbitrary density is investigated. The calculation does not use any free parameters except for strong interaction effects. All measured x-ray intensities are reproduced, in particular also the K/sub ..beta..//K/sub ..cap alpha../ intensity ratios in pionic helium.

  5. Detecting isotopic ratio outliers

    SciTech Connect

    Bayne, C.K.; Smith, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    An alternative method is proposed for improving isotopic ratio estimates. This method mathematically models pulse-count data and uses iterative reweighted Poisson regression to estimate model parameters to calculate the isotopic ratios. This computer-oriented approach provides theoretically better methods than conventional techniques to establish error limits and to identify outliers. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Atomization and mixing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrenberg, A.; Jaqua, V. W.

    1983-01-01

    The state of the art in atomization and mixing for triplet, pentad, and coaxial injectors is described. Injectors that are applicable for LOX/hydrocarbon propellants and main chamber and fuel rich preburner/gas generator mixture ratios are of special interest. Various applicable correlating equations and parameters as well as test data found in the literature are presented. The validity, utility, and important aspects of these data and correlations are discussed and the measurement techniques used are evaluated. Propellant mixing tests performed are described and summarized, results are reported, and tentative conclusions are included.

  7. Towards prediction of redistribution of fallout radiocesium on forested area discharged from Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Satoru; Aoyama, Michio; Ito, Eriko; Shichi, Koji; Takata, Daisuke; Masaya, Masumori; Sekiya, Nobuhito; Kobayashi, Natsuko; Takano, Naoto; Kaneko, Shinji; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Tomoko

    2015-04-01

    Redistribution of fallout 137Cs on forested area discharged from Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) is an issue of major concern for the people in Fukushima and its surrounding areas. To approach this question we investigated global fallout 137Cs (137Cs-GFO) from nuclear weapon tests in the atmosphere in the 1950s and 60s, and 137Cs distribution derived from FNPP (137Cs-FK) within the whole trees contaminated directly. We examined concentrations and amounts of 137Cs-GFO in surface soils (0-5, 5-15 and 15-30 cm in depth) of 3470 samples at 316 sites all over Japan, which were collected just before the accident of FNPP. We determined 137Cs-GFO activities by NaI well-type scintillation counter with its accuracy verified using measurements by a germanium detector. We divided 316 sampling sites into 10 groups separated by one longitudinal line and four transversal lines on the terrain of Japan islands, then analyzed rainfall and geomorphological effects on 137Cs-GFO inventories. In addition to this dataset, we collected three whole tree samples of 26 year-old Quercus serrata at a contaminated area by FNPP accident in April, 2014 and examined concentrations of 137Cs-FK of above- and belowground tree parts by a germanium detector. We estimated an average of 137Cs-GFO inventories of forest soils in Japan to be 1.7 ± 1.4 kBq m-2 as of 2008. 137Cs-GFO inventories varied largely from 0-7.9 kBq m-2 among the country and accumulated greater in the north-western part along the Sea of Japan side. We detected rainfall effect on 137Cs-GFO inventories, which were greater where winter rainfall was large. As for vertical distribution of 137Cs-GFO, 44% of 137Cs-GFO remained within the uppermost 5 cm of soil profiles whereas the rest of 56% existed in 5-30 cm in depth. This indicated that considerable downward migration of 137Cs-GFO has happened during these fifty years in forest soils in Japan. However, multiple linear regression analysis by geomorphological factors related to soil

  8. Processing of analogues of plume fallout in cold regions of Enceladus by energetic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergantini, A.; Pilling, S.; Nair, B. G.; Mason, N. J.; Fraser, H. J.

    2014-10-01

    Context. Enceladus, a small icy moon of Saturn, is one of the most remarkable bodies in the solar system. This moon is a geologically active object, and despite the lower temperatures on most of its surface, the geothermally heated south polar region presents geysers that spouts a plume made of water (~90%), carbon dioxide, methane, ammonia, and methanol, among other molecules. Most of the upward-moving particles do not have the velocity to escape from the gravitational influence of the moon and fall back to the surface. The molecules in the ice are continuously exposed to ionizing radiation, such as UV and X-rays photons, cosmic rays, and electrons. Over time, the ionizing radiation promotes molecular bond rupture, destroying and also forming molecules, radicals, and fragments. Aims: We analyse the processing of an ice mixture analogue to the Enceladus fallout ice in cold resurfaced areas (north pole) by 1 keV electrons. The main goal is to search for complex species that have not yet been detected in this moon, and to determine relevant physico-chemical parameters, such as destruction and formation cross-sections and the half-life of the studied molecules in the ice. Methods: The experiment consisted of the electron irradiation of an Enceladus-like ice mixture (H2O:CO2:CH4:NH3:CH3OH) in an ultra-high vacuum chamber at 20 K. The analysis was made by infrared spectrometry in the mid-infrared region (4000-800 cm-1 or 2.5-12.5 μm). Results: The absolute dissociation cross-sections of the parent molecules, the formation cross-section of daughter species, and the half-life of the parental species in a simulated Enceladus irradiation scenario were determined. Among the produced species, CO (carbon monoxide), OCN- (cyanate anion), HCONH2 (formamide), and H2CO (formaldehyde) were tentatively detected.

  9. Soil redistribution model for undisturbed and cultivated sites based on Chernobyl-derived cesium-137 fallout.

    PubMed

    Hrachowitz, Markus; Maringer, Franz-Josef; Steineder, Christian; Gerzabek, Martin H

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of 137Cs fallout have been used in combination with a range of conversion models for the investigation of soil relocation mechanisms and sediment budgets in many countries for more than 20 yr. The objective of this paper is to develop a conversion model for quantifying soil redistribution, based on Chernobyl-derived 137Cs. The model is applicable on uncultivated as well as on cultivated sites, taking into account temporal changes in the 137Cs depth distribution pattern as well as tillage-induced 137Cs dilution effects. The main idea of the new model is the combination of a modified exponential model describing uncultivated soil with a Chapman distribution based model describing cultivated soil. The compound model subsequently allows a dynamic description of the Chernobyl derived 137Cs situation in the soil and its change, specifically migration and soil transport processes over the course of time. Using the suggested model at the sampling site in Pettenbach, in the Austrian province of Oberösterreich 137Cs depth distributions were simulated with a correlation coefficient of 0.97 compared with the measured 137Cs depth profile. The simulated rates of soil distribution at different positions at the sampling site were found to be between 27 and 60 Mg ha(-1) yr(-1). It was shown that the model can be used to describe the temporal changes of 137Cs depth distributions in cultivated as well as uncultivated soils. Additionally, the model allows to quantify soil redistribution in good correspondence with already existing models. PMID:15998852

  10. Territory contamination with the radionuclides representing the fuel component of Chernobyl fallout.

    PubMed

    Kashparov, V A; Lundin, S M; Zvarych, S I; Yoshchenko, V I; Levchuk, S E; Khomutinin, Y V; Maloshtan, I M; Protsak, V P

    2003-12-30

    The data obtained through a series of experiments were used to specify the correlation of activities of the fuel component radionuclides of Chernobyl fallout and to create the maps of the 30-km Chernobyl zone terrestrial density of contamination with 154Eu, 238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Am (on 01.01.2000). In the year 2000, total inventories of the fuel component radionuclides in the upper 30-cm soil layer of the 30-km Chernobyl zone in Ukraine (outside the ChNPP industrial site, excluding the activity located in the radioactive waste storages and in the cooling pond) were estimated as: 90Sr--7.7 x 10(14) Bq; 137Cs--2.8 x 10(15) Bq; 154Eu--1.4 x 10(13) Bq; 238Pu--7.2 x 10(12) Bq; 239+240Pu--1.5 x 10(13) Bq; 241Am--1.8 x 10(13) Bq. These values correspond to 0.4-0.5% of their amounts in the ChNPP unit 4 at the moment of the accident. The current estimate is 3 times lower than the previous widely-cited estimates. Inventories of the fuel component radionuclides were also estimated in other objects within the 30-km zone and outside it. This allowed more accurate data to be obtained on the magnitude of a relative release of radionuclides in the fuel particles (FP) matrix during the Chernobyl accident outside the ChNPP industrial site. It amounts to 1.5+/-0.5% of these radionuclides in the reactor, which is 2 times lower than the previous estimates. Two-thirds of the radionuclides release in the FP was deposited on the territory of Ukraine. PMID:14630415

  11. Medical status of Marshallese accidentally exposed to 1954 Bravo fallout radiation: January 1988 through December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, J.E.; Heotis, P.M.; Scott, W.A.; Adams, W.H.

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to disseminate information concerning the medical status of 253 Marshallese exposed to fallout radiation in 1954. This report discusses the medical care provided and the medical findings for the years 1988-1991. Details of the BRAVO thermonuclear accident that caused the exposure have been published, and a 1955 article in the Journal of the American Medical Association describing the acute medical effects in the exposed population remains a definitive and relevant description of events. Participation in the Marshall Islands Medical Program by the exposed Marshallese is voluntary. In the spring and fall of each year, medical surveillance is provided to exposed and unexposed cohorts. Examinations performed include: a cancer-related examination as defined by the American Society, an annual thyroid examination and thyroid function testing, serum prolactin testing looking for pituitary tumors, annual blood counts to include platelets, and evaluation for paraneoplastic evidence of neoplasms. This report details the medical program, medical findings, and thyroid surgery findings. Deaths (4 exposed and 10 nonexposed) that occurred during the reporting period are discussed. There is a mild but relatively consistent depression of neutrophil, lymphocyte, and platelet concentrations in the blood of the exposed population. This depression appears to be of no clinical significance. Thyroid hypofunction, either clinical or biochemical, has been documented as a consequence of radiation exposure in 14 exposed individuals. Previously, one other exposed person was diagnosed with basal cell carcinoma. During this reporting period, a thyroid nodule was identified in an individual who was in utero during the exposure. Upon pathologic review, the nodule was diagnosed as occult papillary carcinoma.

  12. Modeling the fallout from stabilized nuclear clouds using the HYSPLIT atmospheric dispersion model.

    PubMed

    Rolph, G D; Ngan, F; Draxler, R R

    2014-10-01

    The Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model, developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Air Resources Laboratory, has been configured to simulate the dispersion and deposition of nuclear materials from a surface-based nuclear detonation using publicly available information on nuclear explosions. Much of the information was obtained from "The Effects of Nuclear Weapons" by Glasstone and Dolan (1977). The model was evaluated against the measurements of nuclear fallout from six nuclear tests conducted between 1951 and 1957 at the Nevada Test Site using the global NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis Project (NNRP) and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) meteorological data as input. The model was able to reproduce the general direction and deposition patterns using the coarse NNRP data with Figure of Merit in Space (FMS - the percent overlap between predicted and measured deposition patterns) scores in excess of 50% for four of six simulations for the smallest dose rate contour, with FMS scores declining for higher dose rate contours. When WRF meteorological data were used the FMS scores were 5-20% higher in five of the six simulations, especially at the higher dose rate contours. The one WRF simulation where the scores declined slightly (10-30%) was also the best scoring simulation when using the NNRP data. When compared with measurements of dose rate and time of arrival from the Town Data Base (Thompson et al., 1994), similar results were found with the WRF simulations providing better results for four of six simulations. The overall result was that the different plume simulations using WRF data had more consistent performance than the plume simulations using NNRP data fields. PMID:24878719

  13. Radioactive fallout cesium in sewage sludge ash produced after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Kozai, Naofumi; Suzuki, Shinichi; Aoyagi, Noboru; Sakamoto, Fuminori; Ohnuki, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    The radioactive fallout cesium (¹³⁷Cs) in the sewage sludge ashes (SSAs) produced in Japan after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident was tested. Five samples of SSAs produced in 2011 and 2012 were tested. Two of the samples contained ¹³⁷Cs (23 and 9.6 kBq/kg, respectively) above the radioactivity criterion (8 kBq of radioactive Cs/kg of solid) for controlled landfill disposal in Japan. The mineral components of SSA are roughly divided into two groups: an HCl-soluble phase mainly composed of phosphates and oxides; and silicates, including quartz, feldspar, and clay. Both phases contained ¹³⁷Cs. The majority (up to 90%) of ¹³⁷Cs was contained in the HCl-soluble phase. Among the HCl-soluble subphases, Fe-bearing phases that were probably iron oxides were mainly responsible for ¹³⁷Cs retention. No positive evidence was obtained that showed that phosphate-bearing phases, which were included most in SSAs along with the silicate phase, retained ¹³⁷Cs. Pre-pulverizing SSAs and heating them at 95 °C in a 6 M or a concentrated aqueous HCl was the most effective method of dissolving the HCl-soluble phase. The radioactivity concentrations of ¹³⁷Cs in all the HCl-treatment residues were below the radioactivity criterion. This residue was mostly composed of silicates. After static leaching tests of the residue at 60 °C for 28 days, no ¹³⁷Cs was detected in simulated environmental water leachates (pure water and synthetic seawater), demonstrating that 137Cs in the residue is very stably immobilized in the silicates. PMID:25462767

  14. Temporal trends in childhood leukaemia incidence following exposure to radioactive fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing.

    PubMed

    Wakeford, Richard; Darby, Sarah C; Murphy, Michael F G

    2010-05-01

    Notably raised rates of childhood leukaemia incidence have been found near some nuclear installations, in particular Sellafield and Dounreay in the United Kingdom, but risk assessments have concluded that the radiation doses estimated to have been received by children or in utero as a result of operations at these installations are much too small to account for the reported increases in incidence. This has led to speculation that the risk of childhood leukaemia arising from internal exposure to radiation following the intake of radioactive material released from nuclear facilities has been substantially underestimated. The radionuclides discharged from many nuclear installations are similar to those released into the global environment by atmospheric nuclear weapons testing, which was at its height in the late-1950s and early-1960s. Measurements of anthropogenic radionuclides in members of the general public resident in the vicinity of Sellafield and Dounreay have found levels that do not differ greatly from those in persons living remote from nuclear installations that are due to ubiquitous exposure to the radioactive debris of nuclear weapons testing. Therefore, if the leukaemia risk to children resulting from deposition within the body of radioactive material discharged from nuclear facilities has been grossly underestimated, then a pronounced excess of childhood leukaemia would have been expected as a consequence of the short period of intense atmospheric weapons testing. We have examined childhood leukaemia incidence in 11 large-scale cancer registries in three continents for which data were available at least as early as 1962. We found no evidence of a wave of excess cases corresponding to the peak of radioactive fallout from atmospheric weapons testing. The absence of a discernible increase in the incidence of childhood leukaemia following the period of maximum exposure to the radioactive debris of this testing weighs heavily against the suggestion that

  15. Distribution of global fallouts cesium-137 in taiga and tundra catenae at the Ob River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenkov, I. N.; Usacheva, A. A.; Miroshnikov, A. Yu.

    2015-03-01

    The classification of soil catenae at the Ob River basin is developed and applied. This classification reflects the diverse geochemical conditions that led to the formation of certain soil bodies, their combinations and the migration fields of chemical elements. The soil and geochemical diversity of the Ob River basin catenae was analyzed. The vertical and lateral distribution of global fallouts cesium-137 was studied using the example of the four most common catenae types in Western Siberia tundra and taiga. In landscapes of dwarf birches and dark coniferous forests on gleysols, cryosols, podzols, and cryic-stagnosols, the highest 137Cs activity density and specific activity are characteristic of the upper soil layer of over 30% ash, while the moss-grass-shrub cover is characterized by low 137Cs activity density and specific activity. In landscapes of dwarf birches and pine woods on podzols, the maximum specific activity of cesium-137 is typical for moss-grass-shrub cover, while the maximum reserves are concentrated in the upper soil layer of over 30% ash. Bog landscapes and moss-grass-shrub cover are characterized by a minimum activity of 137Cs, and its reserves in soil generally decrease exponentially with depth. The cesium-137 penetration depth increases in oligotrophic histosols from northern to middle taiga landscapes from 10-15 to 40 cm. 137Cs is accumulated in oligotrophic histosols for increases in pH from 3.3 to 4.0 and in concretionary interlayers of pisoplinthic-cryic-histic-stagnosols. Cryogenic movement, on the one hand, leads to burying organic layers enriched in 137Cs and, on the other hand, to deducing specific activity when mixed with low-active material from lower soil layers.

  16. Estimation of radionuclide ingestion: Lessons from dose reconstruction for fallout from the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Breshears, D.D.; Whicker, F.W.; Kirchner, T.B.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1994-09-01

    The United States conducted atmospheric testing of nuclear devices at the Nevada Test Site from 1951 through 1963. In 1979 the U.S. Department of Energy established the Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project to compile a data base related to health effects from nuclear testing and to reconstruct doses to public residing off of the Nevada Test Site. This project is the most comprehensive dose reconstruction project to date, and, since similar assessments are currently underway at several other locations within and outside the U.S., lessons from ORERP can be valuable. A major component of dose reconstruction is estimation of dose from radionuclide ingestion. The PATHWAY food-chain model was developed to estimate the amount of radionuclides ingested. For agricultural components of the human diet, PATHWAY predicts radionuclide concentrations and quantities ingested. To improve accuracy and model credibility, four components of model analysis were conducted: estimation of uncertainty in model predictions, estimation of sensitivity of model predictions to input parameters, and testing of model predictions against independent data (validation), and comparing predictions from PATHWAY with those from other models. These results identified strengths and weaknesses in the model and aided in establishing the confidence associated with model prediction, which is a critical component risk assessment and dose reconstruction. For fallout from the Nevada Test Site, by far, the largest internal doses were received by the thyroid. However, the predicted number of fatal cancers from ingestion dose was generally much smaller than the number predicted from external dose. The number of fatal cancers predicted from ingestion dose was also orders of magnitude below the normal projected cancer rate. Several lessons were learned during the study that are relevant to other dose reconstruction efforts.

  17. Atomic Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynands, Robert

    Time is a strange thing. On the one hand it is arguably the most inaccessible physical phenomenon of all: both in that it is impossible to manipulate or modify—for all we know—and in that even after thousands of years mankind's philosophers still have not found a fully satisfying way to understand it. On the other hand, no other quantity can be measured with greater precision. Today's atomic clocks allow us to reproduce the length of the second as the SI unit of time with an uncertainty of a few parts in 1016—orders of magnitude better than any other quantity. In a sense, one can say [1

  18. Testing fine sediment connectivity hypotheses using fallout radionuclide tracers in a small catchment with badlands. Vallcebre Research Catchments (NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallart, Francesc; Latron, Jérôme; Vuolo, Diego; Martínez-Carreras, Núria; Pérez-Gallego, Nuria; Ferrer, Laura; Estrany, Joan

    2016-04-01

    In the Vallcebre Research Catchments (NE Spain), results obtained during over 20 years showed that badlands are the primary sources of sediments to the drainage network. Parent lutitic rocks are weathered during winter producing regoliths, which are eroded from badland surfaces mainly during summer intense rainstorms. Even if the produced sediments are mainly fine, due to the ephemeral nature of summer runoff events most of them are deposited on the stream beds, where they may remain during some time (months to years). Within the MEDhyCON project, a fallout radionuclides (FRNs) tracing experiment (i.e., excess lead 210 (Pbx-210) and beryllium 7 (Be-7)) is being carried out in order to investigate sediment connectivity. A simplified Pbx-210 balance model on badland surfaces suggested a seasonal sawtooth-like activity pattern: FRN being accumulated in regoliths from October to June and depleted in summer. Early summer erosion events would produce the sediments with the highest activity whereas late summer events would produce sediments with the lowest activity coming from the deeper regolith horizons. These findings lead us to launch two sediment transfer connectivity hypotheses analysing respectively the temporal and spatial variability of the Pb-210 activities within the fine sediments at the small catchment scale: (1) The temporal variability of suspended sediment activities at the gauging stations is a measure of sediment transfer immediacy, ergo connectivity. Hence, a high variability in suspended sediment activities, mimicking regolith activity temporal pattern would indicate high connectivity, whereas a low variability, meaning that sediments are mostly pooled in a large and slowly moving stock, would indicate low connectivity. (2) In a drainage system where fine sediments temporarily remain on the dry stream bed, the ratio between fine sediment activities at the sources and fine in-stream sediment activities downstream is a measure of sediment connectivity

  19. Atom chips on direct bonded copper substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, Matthew B.; Stickney, James A.; Carlson, Evan J.; Baker, Paul M.; Buchwald, Walter R.; Wentzell, Sandra; Miller, Steven M.

    2011-02-01

    We present the use of direct bonded copper (DBC) for the straightforward fabrication of high power atom chips. Atom chips using DBC have several benefits: excellent copper/substrate adhesion, high purity, thick (>100 μm) copper layers, high substrate thermal conductivity, high aspect ratio wires, the potential for rapid (<8 h) fabrication, and three-dimensional atom chip structures. Two mask options for DBC atom chip fabrication are presented, as well as two methods for etching wire patterns into the copper layer. A test chip, able to support 100 A of current for 2 s without failing, is used to determine the thermal impedance of the DBC. An assembly using two DBC atom chips is used to magnetically trap laser cooled 87Rb atoms. The wire aspect ratio that optimizes the magnetic field gradient as a function of power dissipation is determined to be 0.84:1 (height:width).

  20. Atom chips on direct bonded copper substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Squires, Matthew B.; Stickney, James A.; Carlson, Evan J.; Baker, Paul M.; Buchwald, Walter R.; Wentzell, Sandra; Miller, Steven M.

    2011-02-15

    We present the use of direct bonded copper (DBC) for the straightforward fabrication of high power atom chips. Atom chips using DBC have several benefits: excellent copper/substrate adhesion, high purity, thick (>100 {mu}m) copper layers, high substrate thermal conductivity, high aspect ratio wires, the potential for rapid (<8 h) fabrication, and three-dimensional atom chip structures. Two mask options for DBC atom chip fabrication are presented, as well as two methods for etching wire patterns into the copper layer. A test chip, able to support 100 A of current for 2 s without failing, is used to determine the thermal impedance of the DBC. An assembly using two DBC atom chips is used to magnetically trap laser cooled {sup 87}Rb atoms. The wire aspect ratio that optimizes the magnetic field gradient as a function of power dissipation is determined to be 0.84:1 (height:width).

  1. Deterrence and arrest ratios.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Stephanie E; Piquero, Alex R

    2006-02-01

    In the limited research on the origins of sanction threat perceptions, researchers have focused on either the effects of actively engaging in crime or the effects of formal sanctioning but rarely on both (i.e., the arrest ratio or the number of arrests relative to the number of crimes committed). This article extends this line of research by using a sample of Colorado inmates and measures arrest ratios and sanction perceptions for eight different crime types. Analyses reveal that the offenders report both significant experiential and arrest ratio effects. Theoretical and policy implications, limitations, and directions for future research are outlined. PMID:16397123

  2. Scaling relations in hyperfine shifts of impurity atoms in rare gas crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Bucher, M. )

    1991-06-15

    The hf interaction of impurity atoms in rare gas crystals is investiga The ratio of the orbital moments of the impurity atom and the rare gas atom serveas a measure of each constituent's contribution to the net interaction energy. (AIP)

  3. The risk of leukaemia in young children from exposure to tritium and carbon-14 in the discharges of German nuclear power stations and in the fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing.

    PubMed

    Wakeford, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Towards the end of 2007, the results were published from a case-control study (the "KiKK Study") of cancer in young children, diagnosed <5 years of age during 1980-2003 while resident near nuclear power stations in western Germany. The study found a tendency for cases of leukaemia to live closer to the nearest nuclear power station than their matched controls, producing an odds ratio that was raised to a statistically significant extent for residence within 5 km of a nuclear power station. The findings of the study received much publicity, but a detailed radiological risk assessment demonstrated that the radiation doses received by young children from discharges of radioactive material from the nuclear reactors were much lower than those received from natural background radiation and far too small to be responsible for the statistical association reported in the KiKK Study. This has led to speculation that conventional radiological risk assessments have grossly underestimated the risk of leukaemia in young children posed by exposure to man-made radionuclides, and particular attention has been drawn to the possible role of tritium and carbon-14 discharges in this supposedly severe underestimation of risk. Both (3)H and (14)C are generated naturally in the upper atmosphere, and substantial increases in these radionuclides in the environment occurred as a result of their production by atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons during the late 1950s and early 1960s. If the leukaemogenic effect of these radionuclides has been seriously underestimated to the degree necessary to explain the KiKK Study findings, then a pronounced increase in the worldwide incidence of leukaemia among young children should have followed the notably elevated exposure to (3)H and (14)C from nuclear weapons testing fallout. To investigate this hypothesis, the time series of incidence rates of leukaemia among young children <5 years of age at diagnosis has been examined from ten cancer registries

  4. Simplifying Likelihood Ratios

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Steven

    2002-01-01

    Likelihood ratios are one of the best measures of diagnostic accuracy, although they are seldom used, because interpreting them requires a calculator to convert back and forth between “probability” and “odds” of disease. This article describes a simpler method of interpreting likelihood ratios, one that avoids calculators, nomograms, and conversions to “odds” of disease. Several examples illustrate how the clinician can use this method to refine diagnostic decisions at the bedside.

  5. High Aspect Ratio Wrinkles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Crosby, Alfred

    2015-03-01

    Buckling-induced surface undulations are widely found in living creatures, for instance, gut villi and the surface of flower petal cells. These undulations provide unique functionalities with their extremely high aspect ratios. For the synthetic systems, sinusoidal wrinkles that are induced by buckling a thin film attached on a soft substrate have been proposed to many applications. However, the impact of the synthetic wrinkles have been restricted by limited aspect ratios, ranging from 0 to 0.35. Within this range, wrinkle aspect ratio is known to increase with increasing compressive strain until a critical strain is reached, at which point wrinkles transition to localizations, such as folds or period doublings. Inspired by the living creatures, we propose that wrinkles can be stabilized in high aspect ratio by manipulating the strain energy in the substrate. We experimentally demonstrate this idea by forming a secondary crosslinking network in the wrinkled surface and successfully achieve aspect ratio as large as 0.8. This work not only provides insights for the mechanism of high aspect ratio structures seen in living creatures, but also demonstrates significant promise for future wrinkle-based applications.

  6. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  7. Viewing minerals, atom by atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    With state-of-the-art technology supported by scissors and bungy cords, Earth scientists are beginning to look at mineral surfaces and mineral-fluid interactions on an atomic scale.The instrument that can provide such a detailed view is the scanning tunneling microscope (STM), which made a great theoretical and practical splash when it was introduced in 1981 by Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer, physicists at IBM's laboratory in Zurich. They won a Nobel Prize in Physics for their work 5 years later.

  8. Can 239 + 240Pu replace 137Cs as an erosion tracer in agricultural landscapes contaminated with Chernobyl fallout?

    PubMed

    Schimmack, W; Auerswald, K; Bunzl, K

    2001-01-01

    Erosion studies often use 137Cs from the global fallout (main period: 1953-1964) as a tracer in the soil. In many European countries, where 137Cs was deposited in considerable amounts also by the Chernobyl fallout in 1986, the global fallout fraction (GF-Cs) has to be separated from the Chernobyl fraction by means of the isotope 134Cs. In a few years, this will no longer be possible due to the short half-life of 134Cs (2 yr). Because GF-Cs in the soil can then no longer be determined, the potential of using 239 + 240Pu as a tracer is evaluated. This radionuclide originates in most European countries essentially only from the global fallout. The activities and spatial distributions of Pu and GF-Cs were compared in the soil of a steep field (inclination about 20%, area ca. 3 ha, main soil type Dystric Eutrochrept), sampled at 48 nodes of a 25 x 25 m2 grid. The reference values were determined at 12 points adjacent to the field. Their validity was assured by an inventory study of radiocaesium in a 70 ha area surrounding the field sampling 275 nodes of a 50 x 50 m2 grid. In the field studied, the activity concentrations of GF-Cs and Pu in the Ap horizon were not correlated (Spearman correlation coefficient R = 0.20, p > 0.05), and the activity balance of Pu differed from that of GF-Cs. Whereas no net loss of GF-Cs from the field was observed as compared to the reference site, Pu was more mobile with an average loss of ca. 11% per unit area. In addition, the spatial pattern of GF-Cs and Pu in the field differed significantly. The reason may be that due to their different associations with soil constituents, Pu and Cs represent different fractions of the soil, exhibiting different properties with respect to erosion/deposition processes. This indicates that both radionuclides or one of them may not be appropriate to quantity past erosion. When tracer losses are used to calibrate or verify erosion prediction models, systematic deviations may not only stem from model

  9. Estimate of whole body doses for Lynette Tew and Becky Farnsworth from Nevada Test Site local fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Ng, Y.C.

    1985-02-27

    Lynette Tew and Becky Farnsworth are decendents whose relatives are litigants in Timothy vs US. The litigants allege that the decendents were harmed by radiation doses received as a result of local fallout from the testing of nuclear weapons at the Nevada Test Site. We have calculated a best estimate of the whole body dose received by each decendent from external exposure and the ingestion of radionuclides with food. In each case the dose via ingestion is trivial compared to the external dose. For Lynette Tew the dose estimate is 0.28 rads. For Becky Farnsworth it is 0.0035 rads. 23 references, 4 tables.

  10. Estimate of thyroid doses for David A. Timothy and June Carrell from Nevada Test Site local fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Ng, Y.C.

    1985-10-28

    David A. Timothy and June Rogers Carrell are litigants in Timothy vs US. They allege that their thyroid cancers have resulted from harm from radiation doses received as a result of local fallout from the testing of nuclear weapons at the Nevada Test Site. We have calculated a best estimate of the thyroid dose received by each litigant from external exposure and the ingestion of radionuclides with food. For David Timothy, the dose estimate is 7.8 rads. For June Carrell, it is 2.6 rads. 22 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. Use of Lasers to Study the Impact of Fractionation and Condensation on the Toxicity of Nuclear Weapon Fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Vidnovic III, T; Bradley, K S; Debonnel, C S; Dipeso, G; Fournier, K; Karpenko, V P; Tobin, M

    2005-04-01

    An experimental concept has been developed to collect data to aid in the refinement of simulation programs designed to predict the fallout effects arising from surface and shallowly buried nuclear weapon detonations. These experiments, called the Condensation Debris Experiments (CDE), are intended to study the condensation/fractionation of material that is liberated following an initial deposition of laser energy onto a small, characterized target. The CDE effort also encompasses target development and material studies as well as supporting computational efforts studying radiation hydrodynamics, computational fluid dynamics, and relevant neutron activation processes (not discussed here).

  12. Distribution and Ratios of 137Cs and K in Control and K-treated Coconut Trees at Bikini Island where Nuclear Test Fallout Occurred: Effects and Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, W L; Brown, P H; Stone, E L; Hamilton, T F; Conrado, C L; Kehl, S R

    2008-05-19

    Coconut trees growing on atolls of the Bikini Islands are on the margin of K deficiency because the concentration of exchangeable K in coral soil is very low ranging from only 20 to 80 mg kg{sup -1}. When provided with additional K, coconut trees absorb large quantities of K and this uptake of K significantly alters the patterns of distribution of {sup 137}Cs within the plant. Following a single K fertilization event, mean total K in trunks of K-treated trees is 5.6 times greater than in trunks of control trees. In contrast, {sup 137}Cs concentration in trunks of K-treated and control trees is statistically the same while {sup 137}Cs is significantly lower in edible fruits of K treated trees. Within one year after fertilization (one rainy season), K concentration in soil is back to naturally, low concentrations, however, the tissue concentrations of K in treated trees stays very high internally in the trees for years while {sup 137}Cs concentration in treated trees remains very low in all tree compartments except for the trunk. Potassium fertilization did not change soil Cs availability. Mass balance calculations suggest that the fertilization event increased above ground plant K content by at least a factor of 5 or 2.2 kg. Potassium concentrations and content were higher in all organs of K fertilized trees with the greatest increases seen in organs that receive a portion of tissue K through xylem transport (trunk, fronds and fruit husks) and lowest in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). {sup 137}Cesium concentrations and contents were dramatically lower in all organs of K treated trees with greatest proportional reductions observed in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). All trees remobilize both K and {sup 137}Cs from fronds as they proceed toward senescence. In control trees the reduction in concentration of K and {sup 137}Cs in fronds as they age is logarithmic but K remobilization is linear in K-treated trees where K concentration is high. As a result of K treatment the {sup 137}Cs concentration in K-treated fronds is extremely low and constant with frond age. Fronds of K treated trees contain a greater amount of K than control tree fronds. As they fall to the ground and decay they provide a small continuing pool of K that is about 3% of the natural K in soil under the tree canopy. Results of K and {sup 137}Cs concentration and distribution in control and K-treated coconut trees suggest that the application of K reduces {sup 137}Cs uptake both in the short term immediately following K fertilization and in the long term, after soil K levels have returned to normal but while plant K stores remain high. These results suggests that high internal K concentration and not high soil K is primarily responsible for long-term reduction of {sup 137}Cs in edible fruits, and plays a significant role in limiting further uptake of {sup 137}Cs by roots, and affects allocation of {sup 137}Cs to edible fruits for years. Coconut trees are capable of luxury K accumulation when provided with excess K and in this example the additional K can effectively provide the K requirements of the plant for in excess of 10 years. The reduction of {sup 137}Cs uptake lasts for at least 10 y after K is last applied and greatly reduces the estimated radiation dose to people consuming local tree foods. Effectiveness and duration of K treatment provides important assurances that reduction in {sup 137}Cs is long term and the radiation dose from consuming local plant foods will remain low.

  13. Distribution and ratios of 137Cs and K in control and K-treated coconut trees at Bikini Island where nuclear test fallout occurred: effects and implications.

    PubMed

    Robison, William L; Brown, Patrick H; Stone, Earl L; Hamilton, Terry F; Conrado, Cynthia L; Kehl, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Coconut trees growing on atolls of the Bikini Islands are on the margin of K deficiency because the concentration of exchangeable K in coral soil is very low, ranging from only 20 to 80mgkg(-1). When provided with additional K, coconut trees absorb large quantities of K and this uptake of K significantly alters the patterns of distribution of 137Cs within the plant. Following a single K fertilization event, mean total K in trunks of K-treated trees is 5.6 times greater than in trunks of control trees. In contrast, 137Cs concentration in trunks of K-treated and control trees is statistically the same while 137Cs is significantly lower in edible fruits of K-treated trees. Within one year after fertilization (one rainy season), K concentration in soil is back to naturally low concentrations. However, the tissue concentrations of K in treated trees stays very high internally in the trees for years while 137Cs concentration in treated trees remains very low in all tree compartments except for the trunk. Potassium fertilization did not change soil Cs availability. Mass balance calculations suggest that the fertilization event increased above ground plant K content by at least a factor of 5 (2.2kg). Potassium concentrations and content were higher in all organs of K-fertilized trees with the greatest increases seen in organs that receive a portion of tissue K through xylem transport (trunk, fronds and fruit husks) and lowest in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). The 137Cesium concentrations and contents were dramatically lower in all organs of K-treated trees with greatest proportional reductions observed in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). All trees remobilize both K and 137Cs from fronds as they proceed toward senescence. In control trees the reduction in concentration of K and 137Cs in fronds as they age is logarithmic, but K remobilization is linear in K-treated trees where K concentration is high. As a result of K treatment the 137Cs concentration in K-treated fronds is extremely low and constant with frond age. Fronds of K-treated trees contain a greater amount of K than control tree fronds. As they fall to the ground and decay they provide a small continuing pool of K that is about 3% of the natural K in soil under the tree canopy. Results of K and 137Cs concentration and distribution in control and K-treated coconut trees suggest that the application of K reduces 137Cs uptake both in the short term immediately following K fertilization and in the long term, after soil K levels have returned to normal but while plant K stores remain high. These results suggest that high internal K concentration and not high soil K is primarily responsible for long-term reduction of 137Cs in edible fruits, play a significant role in limiting further uptake of 137Cs by roots, and affects allocation of 137Cs to edible fruits for years. Coconut trees are capable of luxury K accumulation when provided with excess K and in this example the additional K can effectively provide the K requirements of the plant for in excess of 10y. The reduction of 137Cs uptake lasts for at least 10y after K is last applied and greatly reduces the estimated radiation dose to people consuming local tree foods. Effectiveness and duration of K treatment provide important assurances that reduction in 137Cs is long term and the radiation dose from consuming local plant foods will remain low. PMID:19064306

  14. Large extinction ratio optical electrowetting shutter.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Ryan D; Underwood, Kenneth; Terrab, Soraya; Watson, Alexander M; Bright, Victor M; Gopinath, Juliet T

    2016-05-01

    A large extinction ratio optical shutter has been demonstrated using electrowetting liquids. The device is based on switching between a liquid-liquid interface curvature that produces total internal reflection and one that does not. The interface radius of curvature can be tuned continuously from 9 mm at 0 V to -45 mm at 26 V. Extinction ratios from 55.8 to 66.5 dB were measured. The device shows promise for ultracold chip-scale atomic clocks. PMID:27137579

  15. Atomic magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Schwindt, Peter; Johnson, Cort N.

    2012-07-03

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

  16. Measuring fallout radionuclides to constrain the origin and the dynamics of suspended sediment in an agricultural drained catchment (Loire River basin, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gall, Marion; Evrard, Olivier; Foucher, Anthony; Laceby, J. Patrick; Salvador-Blanes, Sébastien; Lefèvre, Irène; Cerdan, Olivier; Ayrault, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    Soil erosion reaches problematic levels in agricultural areas of Northwestern Europe where tile drains may accelerate sediment transfer to rivers. This supply of large quantities of fine sediment to the river network leads to the degradation of water quality by increasing water turbidity, filling reservoirs and transporting contaminants. Agricultural patterns and landscapes features have been largely modified by human activities during the last century. To investigate erosion and sediment transport in lowland drained areas, a small catchment, the Louroux (24 km²), located in the French Loire River basin was selected. In this catchment, channels have been reshaped and more than 220 tile drains outlets have been installed after World War II. As a result, soil erosion and sediment fluxes strongly increased. Sediment supply needs to be better understood by quantifying the contribution of sources and the residence times of particles within the catchment. To this end, a network of river monitoring stations was installed, and fallout radionuclides (Cs-137, excess Pb-210 and Be-7) were measured in rainwater (n=3), drain tile outlets (n=4), suspended sediment (n=15), soil surface (n=30) and channel bank samples (n=15) between January 2013 and February 2014. Cs-137 concentrations were used to quantify the contribution of surface vs. subsurface sources of sediment. Results show a clear dominance of particles originating from surface sources (99 ± 1%). Be-7 and excess Pb-210 concentrations and calculation of Be-7/excess Pb-210 ratios in rainfall and suspended sediment samples were used to estimate percentages of recently eroded sediment in rivers. The first erosive winter storm mainly exported sediment depleted in Be-7 that likely deposited on the riverbed during the previous months. Then, during the subsequent floods, sediment was directly eroded and exported to the catchment outlet. Our results show the added value of combining spatial and temporal tracers to characterize

  17. Understanding Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon transfers at the catchment scale combining chemical and fallout radionuclides analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gateuille, David; Evrard, Olivier; Lefevre, Irène; Moreau-Guigon, Elodie; Alliot, fabrice; Chevreuil, Marc; Mouchel, Jean-Marie

    2013-04-01

    Contamination of river water and sediment constitutes a major environmental issue for industrialized countries. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of persistent organic pollutants characterized by two or more fused rings. In recent years, studies dealing with PAHs have grown in number. Some PAHs present indeed a high risk for environment and human health because of their carcinogenic and mutagenic properties. However, most of these studies focused on measuring PAH concentration in the different compartments of the environment (air, soil, sediment, water, etc.) In this context, there remains a lack of understanding regarding the various processes responsible for PAH transfers from one environmental compartment to another. Our study aims to quantify PAHs transfers at the catchment scale by combining chemical analysis with gamma spectrometry. Air, soil, river water and sediment samples (n=820) were collected in two upstream sub-catchments of the Seine River basin (France) during one year. Chemical analyses were carried out to determine PAHs concentrations in all samples. Furthermore, measurement of fallout radionuclides (Beryllium-7, Lead-210, Caesium-137) in both rainfall and river sediment provided a way to discriminate between freshly eroded sediment vs. resuspension of older material that previously deposited on the riverbed. This information is crucial to estimate PAH residence time and transfer velocities in the Seine River basin. The results show that the PAH behaviour varies from one subcatchment to the next. PAH transfers depend indeed on both the characteristics of the catchment (e.g. topography, presence of drained cropland in catchments) and the local anthropogenic pressures. A significant increase in atmospheric deposition of PAHs is observed during winter due to a larger number of sources (household heating). The 14-month study has also highlighted the seasonal variations of PAH fluxes, which are mainly related to the hydrological

  18. Sediment dynamics during the rainy season in tropical highland catchments of central Mexico using fallout radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, Olivier; Némery, Julien; Gratiot, Nicolas; Duvert, Clément; Ayrault, Sophie; Lefèvre, Irène; Poulenard, Jérôme; Prat, Christian; Bonté, Philippe; Esteves, Michel

    2010-12-01

    Tropical regions are affected by intense soil erosion associated with deforestation, overgrazing, and cropping intensification. This land degradation leads to important on-site (e.g., decrease in soil fertility) and off-site (e.g., reservoir siltation and water pollution) impacts. This study determined the mean soil particle and sediment residence times in soils and rivers of three subcatchments (3-12 km 2) with contrasted land uses (i.e., cropland, forests, and rangelands) draining to a reservoir located in highlands of the transvolcanic Mexican belt. Calculations were based on rainfall amount and river discharges as well as on fallout radionuclide measurements (Be-7, Cs-137, and Pb-210) conducted on rainfall precipitated samples, soil sampled in the catchments, and suspended sediment collected by automatic samplers in the river during most storms recorded throughout the 2009 rainy season. Calculations using a radionuclide two-box balance model showed that the mean residence time of particles in soils ranged between 5000 ± 1500 and 23,300 ± 7000 years. In contrast, sediment residence time in rivers was much shorter, fluctuating between 50 ± 30 and 200 ± 70 days. The shortest mean residence times were measured in a hilly catchment dominated by cropland and rangelands, whereas they were the longest in an undulating catchment dominated by forests and cropland. Calculation of the Be-7/excess-Pb-210 in both rainfall and sediment allowed gaining insight on sediment dynamics throughout the rainy season. The first heavy storms of the year exported the bulk of the sediment stock accumulated in the river channel during the previous year. Then, during the rainy season, the two steeper catchments dominated by cropland and rangelands reacted strongly to rainfall. Sediment was indeed eroded and exported from both catchments during single heavy storms on several occasions in 2009. In contrast, the agro-forested catchment with gentler slopes exported sediment at a constant

  19. Transfer factor of 131I from the fallout to human thyroid dose equivalent after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Beno, M; Mikulecký, M; Hrabina, J

    1992-01-01

    A similar pattern of variation with time in observed maxima of daily dose equivalent rates in human thyroids (TD - microSv.d-1) and of daily fallout radioactivities (FR - kBq.m-2) has been found after the Chernobyl accident. An estimate of the time-lag between the maxima in TD lines and the preceding FR peaks was made of about seven days for adult and nine days for juveniles. Applying this time-lag it was possible to estimate transfer factors from the fallout to thyroid dose equivalent: the highest estimated values were 221 microSv/kBq.m-2 for adult and 641 microSv/kBq.m-2 for juvenile thyroids. These values differ from those published by UNSCEAR (United Nations 1988), which have been calculated for various regions of Czechoslovakia, from ingestion and inhalation intake estimates. A broad variation of transfer factor values could be expected to result from such transfer calculations using ingestion and inhalation estimates. The findings also support the concept of a need for prolonged iodine prophylaxy after emissions of radioiodine into the environment. PMID:1609058

  20. Weathering and the fallout plume of heavy oil from strong petroleum seeps near Coal Oil Point, CA.

    PubMed

    Farwell, Christopher; Reddy, Christopher M; Peacock, Emily; Nelson, Robert K; Washburn, Libe; Valentine, David L

    2009-05-15

    The Coal Oil Point (COP) seeps offshore Goleta, CA, are estimated to release 20-25 tons of oil daily, providing an ideal natural laboratory to investigate the fate of oil in the coastal ocean. To address the long-term fate of COP oil, we collected 15 sediment samples down current from the seeps and quantified petroleum content and individual biomarkers using traditional and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography. Similarities in the distributions of hopane biomarkers link the oil in the sediments to fresh seep oil (n=5) and underlying reservoirs (n=3), although sediment oil is heavily weathered. The spatial distribution of oil forms a plume along the continental shelf that we suggest represents a chronic fallout pattern for heavy oil from the persistent surface slicks; average surface currents appear to modulate the distribution of the fallout over a period of 0.4-5 days. The extent of hydrocarbon loss is consistent for all sediments, indicating a common limit to oil weathering with contributions from evaporation, biodegradation, and dissolution. Considering the amount of oil and quantity of sediment impacted, we estimate a sediment oil burden of 0.3 x 10(12) to 3 x 10(12) g in the study area, equivalent to 8-80 spills of the Exxon Valdez accident of 1989. PMID:19544852

  1. Modeling the early-phase redistribution of radiocesium fallouts in an evergreen coniferous forest after Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents.

    PubMed

    Calmon, P; Gonze, M-A; Mourlon, Ch

    2015-10-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident, the scientific community gained numerous data on the transfer of radiocesium in European forest ecosystems, including information regarding the short-term redistribution of atmospheric fallout onto forest canopies. In the course of international programs, the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) developed a forest model, named TREE4 (Transfer of Radionuclides and External Exposure in FORest systems), 15 years ago. Recently published papers on a Japanese evergreen coniferous forest contaminated by Fukushima radiocesium fallout provide interesting and quantitative data on radioactive mass fluxes measured within the forest in the months following the accident. The present study determined whether the approach adopted in the TREE4 model provides satisfactory results for Japanese forests or whether it requires adjustments. This study focused on the interception of airborne radiocesium by forest canopy, and the subsequent transfer to the forest floor through processes such as litterfall, throughfall, and stemflow, in the months following the accident. We demonstrated that TREE4 quite satisfactorily predicted the interception fraction (20%) and the canopy-to-soil transfer (70% of the total deposit in 5 months) in the Tochigi forest. This dynamics was similar to that observed in the Höglwald spruce forest. However, the unexpectedly high contribution of litterfall (31% in 5 months) in the Tochigi forest could not be reproduced in our simulations (2.5%). Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed; and sensitivity of the results to uncertainty in deposition conditions was analyzed. PMID:26005747

  2. An evaluation of the Kearny Fallout Meter (KFM), a radiation detector constructed from commonly available household materials.

    PubMed

    McDonald, J T; West, W G; Kearfott, K J

    2004-11-01

    A radiation detector constructed of common household materials was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by Cresson H. Kearny and has been referred to as the Kearny Fallout Meter (KFM). Developed during the height of the Cold War, the KFM was intended to place a radiation meter capable of measuring fallout from nuclear weapons in the hands of every U.S. citizen. Instructions for the construction of the meter, as well as information about radiation health effects, were developed in the form of multi-page newspaper insert. Subsequently, the sensitivity of the meter was refined by a high school teacher, Dr. Paul S. Lombardi, for use in demonstrations about radiation. The meter is currently being marketed for survivalists in light of potential radiation terrorist concerns. The KFM and Lombardi's variation of it are constructed and evaluated for this work. Calibrated tests of the response and variations in response are reported. A critique of the multi-page manual is made. In addition, the suitability of using such a detector, in terms of actual ease of construction and practical sensitivity, is discussed for its use in demonstrations and introductory classes on nuclear topics. PMID:15551780

  3. Fallout plutonium and natural radionuclides in annual bands of the coral Montastrea annularis, St. Croix, U. S. Virgin Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Benninger, L.K.; Dodge, R.E.

    1986-12-01

    The authors have investigated the banded coral Montastrea annularis as a recorder of the history of fallout Pu in surface seawater. To aid the Pu interpretation Ca, Mg, Sr, Na and natural radionuclides (/sup 238/U, /sup 228/Ra, /sup 232/Th and /sup 210/Pb) were also determined in the annual bands. In small samples (0.5 g) Ca, Mg and Na show correlated variations which could be due to seasonal variability in uptake. The /sup 238/U and /sup 228/Ra records were generally consistent with uptake, at constant discrimination, from surface-water reservoirs of nearly constant concentration, although one sample showed probable diagenetic addition of U. /sup 232/Th was not detected with certainty; this implies that terrigenous particles were not consistently entrapped within the coral skeleton. Interpretation of /sup 210/Pb was difficult because /sup 226/Ra was not measured. Montastrea annularis preserves a record of fallout Pu. To make this record useful it must be considered in the broadest possible geochemical context.

  4. A Recipe for Ratio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffett, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Many learners still struggled to appreciate, and understand the difference between, the concepts of fractions and ratio. This is not just a UK phenomenon, which is demonstrated here by the use of a resource developed by the Wisconsin Centre for Education, in association with the Freudenthal Institute of the University of Utrecht, with a group of…

  5. Constraining sediment dynamics during flood events using fallout radionuclides (Be-7 and Pb-210(xs)): a pilot study in a tropical catchment of SE Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourdin, Elian; Evrard, Olivier; Huon, Sylvain; Lefèvre, Irène; Ayrault, Sophie; Ribolzi, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    Soil erosion is particularly intense in mountainous subtropical regions where heavy storms result in the production of large quantities of suspended sediment, leading to both on-site and off-site siltation problems and conveying contaminants and biological compounds along streams. To implement efficient controls on sediment transfer, it is necessary to monitor suspended matter loads and determine whether sediments are directly exported from the catchment during a given flood or re-suspended from deposits left by previous floods. Determination of sediment residence time in catchments can be performed combining fallout radionuclides (Be-7, Pb-210 and Cs-137) measurements in both rainfall and suspended sediments, but prerequisites for their use as tracers during flood events are still required. We conducted experiments along a network of nested catchments with area increasing from 0.12 to 6.15 km², and sampled rainfall and suspended sediment loads during a flood that occurred at the beginning of the rainy season in May 2012. The experiment was carried out in the Houay Xon catchment, part of the MSEC (Multi-Scale Environmental Changes, http://msec3.net/portal/) project in the Northern Luang Prabang province of Laos. This catchment, under shifting cultivation since the end of the 1960s for a large part of its surface, is characterized by a steep topography (slopes ranging from 3% to 350% with a mean slope of 56%) and a land use evolution prone to gully erosion. The seasonal distribution of rainfall controls the Be-7 and Pb-210(xs) activities of soils in the catchment. With a half-life of 53 days, the fallout Be-7 activity of the previous wet season should have sufficiently decayed during the 6-months dry period to be neglected compared to new supply by early rains of the following wet season. Atmospheric deposition of Be-7 and Pb-210(xs) was measured after flocculation of rainfall samples by aluminum chloride hexahydrate and after dehydration of 75 suspended sediment

  6. Using atmospheric fallout to date organic horizon layers and quantify metal dynamics during decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaste, James M.; Bostick, Benjamin C.; Heimsath, Arjun M.; Steinnes, Eiliv; Friedland, Andrew J.

    2011-03-01

    High concentrations of metals in organic matter can inhibit decomposition and limit nutrient availability in ecosystems, but the long-term fate of metals bound to forest litter is poorly understood. Controlled experiments indicate that during the first few years of litter decay, Al, Fe, Pb, and other metals that form stable complexes with organic matter are naturally enriched by several hundred percent as carbon is oxidized. The transformation of fresh litter to humus takes decades, however, such that current datasets describing the accumulation and release of metals in decomposing organic matter are timescale limited. Here we use atmospheric 210Pb to quantify the fate of metals in canopy-derived litter during burial and decay in coniferous forests in New England and Norway where decomposition rates are slow and physical soil mixing is minimal. We measure 210Pb inventories in the O horizon and mineral soil and calculate a 60-630 year timescale for the production of mobile organo-metallic colloids from the decomposition of fresh forest detritus. This production rate is slowest at our highest elevation (˜1000 m) and highest latitude sites (>63°N) where decomposition rates are expected to be low. We calculate soil layer ages by assuming a constant supply of atmospheric 210Pb and find that they are consistent with the distribution of geochemical tracers from weapons fallout, air pollution, and a direct 207Pb application at one site. By quantifying a gradient of organic matter ages with depth in the O horizon, we describe the accumulation and loss of metals in the soil profile as organic matter transforms from fresh litter to humus. While decomposition experiments predict that Al and Fe concentrations increase during the initial few years of decay, we show here that these metals continue to accumulate in humus for decades, and that enrichment occurs at a rate higher than can be explained by quantitative retention during decomposition alone. Acid extractable Al and Fe

  7. "Bohr's Atomic Model."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willden, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    "Bohr's Atomic Model" is a small interactive multimedia program that introduces the viewer to a simplified model of the atom. This interactive simulation lets students build an atom using an atomic construction set. The underlying design methodology for "Bohr's Atomic Model" is model-centered instruction, which means the central model of the…

  8. Long-term transfer of global fallout ¹³⁷Cs to cow's milk in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Pálsson, S E; Howard, B J; Gudnason, K; Sigurgeirsson, M A

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to provide improved information on the long-term transfer of global nuclear weapons (137)Cs fallout to cow's milk in Iceland many years after deposition. The spatial variation in deposition was confirmed to be explained by precipitation. Soil samples showed a significant difference in (137)Cs deposition density between the main agricultural areas, with the South having the highest values, then the West and North and the lowest in the Northeast. There was no significant difference between the effective half-lives in (137)Cs activity concentrations in milk and milk powder from the main dairies in Iceland based on data for milk from 1990 to 2007 and for milk powder from 1986 to 2007. There was, however, a significant difference between the effective half-lives obtained for these two regions, 13.5 years for the Northern and 10.5 years for the Southern regions. These half-lives for global fallout are longer than those previously reported for similar time periods in other Arctic areas. The transfer of (137)Cs to cow's milk was quantified for different agricultural regions using aggregated transfer coefficients (T (ag)) for the period of peak global fallout soil inventory in 1965-1967. The values ranged from 2.8 × 10(-3) to 10.6 × 10(-3) m(2) kg(-1). By 2001-2004, the T (ag) values had only declined, in the main agricultural areas, to 0.6 × 10(-3)-1.0 × 10(-3) m(2) kg(-1). Long-term transfer rates to milk many years after deposition were high in Iceland compared with most other reported data. The transfer is potentially relevant for some of the contaminated areas around the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant after the accident in March 2011 since limited information is available on uptake from Andosols and associated effective half-lives. PMID:22270587

  9. Atomic Energy Basics, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atomic Energy Commission, Oak Ridge, TN. Div. of Technical Information.

    This booklet is part of the "Understanding the Atom Series," though it is a later edition and not included in the original set of 51 booklets. A basic survey of the principles of nuclear energy and most important applications are provided. These major topics are examined: matter has molecules and atoms, the atom has electrons, the nucleus,…

  10. Ecological half-time and effective dose from chernobyl debris and from nuclear weapons fallout of 137Cs as measured in different Swedish populations.

    PubMed

    Rääf, C L; Hubbard, L; Falk, R; Agren, G; Vesanen, R

    2006-05-01

    The fallout in Sweden of radiocesium from nuclear weapons tests during the 1960's (137Cs) and from the Chernobyl accident in 1986 (134Cs and 137Cs) has transferred to humans through different ecological pathways. Data from whole-body burden measurements of 134Cs, 137Cs, and 40K in various Swedish populations between 1964 and 2002 have been compiled. This database enables an evaluation of the temporal and geographical dependence of the transfer of radiocesium from ground deposition to humans and the associated absorbed dose. The body burdens of 137Cs gradually decrease after the peak values reached in 1965 from nuclear weapons fallout and in 1987 from the Chernobyl fallout, but at a varying rate depending on the population. Assuming a dual exponential decrease, a short-term component of typically 1-2 y and a long-term component of 5-10 y are found in urban populations in Sweden. Among reindeer herders and hunters the effective ecological half-time is mono-exponential with a half-time of 5-7 y. The estimated time-integrated effective dose to an individual during a period of 50 y from the Chernobyl fallout is, on average, approximately 10 mSv for reindeer herders, which is 10-100 times higher than the estimated dose received by urban populations in the three major Swedish urban areas (Malmö, Göteborg, and Stockholm). PMID:16607176

  11. Thermoluminescence measurements of gamma-ray doses attributable to fallout from the Nevada test site using building bricks as natural dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Haskell, E.H.; Kenner, G.H.; Bailiff, I.K.

    1994-04-01

    During the 1950`s, the U.S. Government conducted an intensive atmospheric nuclear testing program in Nevada. Fallout from these atmospheric tests was measured throughout the U.S. with some of the heaviest concentrations to populated areas falling east of the test site in Washington County, UT. External exposures from 6.5 x 10{sup -4} C kg{sup -1} to 26 x 10{sup -4} C kg{sup -1} (2.5-5.0 R) were reported for this region. This study provides an independent measurement of fallout radiation doses to selected communities in Utah using a thermoluminescence technique originally developed for the dating of ancient pottery. The application of the predose thermoluminescence technique to fallout dosimetry is described. A mean dose of 38 {+-} 15 mGy (4.4 {+-} 1.7 R), attributed to fallout radiation, was measured in quartz grains extracted from the outer centimeter of bricks removed from six communities in Washington and Kane Counties in Utah. 48 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Directional gear ratio transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafever, A. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Epicyclic gear transmissions which transmit output at a gear ratio dependent only upon the input's direction are considered. A transmission housing envelops two epicyclic gear assemblies, and has shafts extending from it. One shaft is attached to a sun gear within the first epicyclic gear assembly. Planet gears are held symmetrically about the sun gear by a planet gear carrier and are in mesh with both the sun gear and a ring gear. Two unidirectional clutches restrict rotation of the first planet gear carrier and ring gear to one direction. A connecting shaft drives a second sun gear at the same speed and direction as the first planet gear carrier while a connecting portion drives a second planet gear carrier at the same speed and direction as the first ring gear. The transmission's output is then transmitted by the second ring gear to the second shaft. Input is transmitted at a higher gear ratio and lower speed for all inputs in the first direction than in the opposite direction.

  13. Bomb fall-out 236U as a global oceanic tracer using an annually resolved coral core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Stephan R.; Steier, Peter; Carilli, Jessica

    2012-12-01

    Anthropogenic 236U (t½=23.4 My) is an emerging isotopic ocean tracer with interesting oceanographic properties, but only with recent advances in accelerator mass spectrometry techniques is it now possible to detect the levels from global fall-out of nuclear weapons testing across the water column. To make full use of this tracer, an assessment of its input into the ocean over the past decades is required. We captured the bomb-pulse of 236U in an annually resolved coral core record from the Caribbean Sea. We thereby establish a concept which gives 236U great advantage - the presence of reliable, well-resolved chronological archives. This allows studies of not only the present distribution pattern, but gives access to the temporal evolution of 236U in ocean waters over the past decades.

  14. Bomb fall-out (236)U as a global oceanic tracer using an annually resolved coral core.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Stephan R; Steier, Peter; Carilli, Jessica

    2012-12-15

    Anthropogenic (236)U (t ½=23.4 My) is an emerging isotopic ocean tracer with interesting oceanographic properties, but only with recent advances in accelerator mass spectrometry techniques is it now possible to detect the levels from global fall-out of nuclear weapons testing across the water column. To make full use of this tracer, an assessment of its input into the ocean over the past decades is required. We captured the bomb-pulse of (236)U in an annually resolved coral core record from the Caribbean Sea. We thereby establish a concept which gives (236)U great advantage - the presence of reliable, well-resolved chronological archives. This allows studies of not only the present distribution pattern, but gives access to the temporal evolution of (236)U in ocean waters over the past decades. PMID:23564966

  15. Bomb fall-out 236U as a global oceanic tracer using an annually resolved coral core

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Stephan R.; Steier, Peter; Carilli, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic 236U (t½=23.4 My) is an emerging isotopic ocean tracer with interesting oceanographic properties, but only with recent advances in accelerator mass spectrometry techniques is it now possible to detect the levels from global fall-out of nuclear weapons testing across the water column. To make full use of this tracer, an assessment of its input into the ocean over the past decades is required. We captured the bomb-pulse of 236U in an annually resolved coral core record from the Caribbean Sea. We thereby establish a concept which gives 236U great advantage – the presence of reliable, well-resolved chronological archives. This allows studies of not only the present distribution pattern, but gives access to the temporal evolution of 236U in ocean waters over the past decades. PMID:23564966

  16. [The role of vegetation cover in regulation of fluxes of the technogenic radionuclides at the different stages after radioactive fallout].

    PubMed

    Tsvetnova, O B; Shcheglov, A I

    2009-01-01

    In remote period after the radioactive fallout the biological cycle of 137Cs in pine forests of northern forest-steppe zone and Bryanskoe Polissye become different. In pine forests (northern forest-steppe zone) with dark grey forest soil 137Cs flux to the soil with litterfall exceeds its influx to the vegetation by a factor of 5. Thus biological cycle of 137Cs differs from the cycle of stable K and till now its main characteristic feature is domination of 137Cs flux to the soil with litterfall. In pine forests (Bryanskoe Polissye zone) with podzolic illuvialiron sandy soil annual 137Cs influx to above-ground vegetation via root uptake exceeds its return to the soil with litterfall. Under these conditions biological cycle of 137Cs approaches it to the biological cycle of stable K. PMID:19507683

  17. Trends in childhood leukaemia in the Nordic countries in relation to fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing.

    PubMed Central

    Darby, S. C.; Olsen, J. H.; Doll, R.; Thakrar, B.; Brown, P. D.; Storm, H. H.; Barlow, L.; Langmark, F.; Teppo, L.; Tulinius, H.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To obtain further information about the risks of childhood leukaemia after exposure to ionising radiation at low doses and low dose rates before or after birth or to the father's testes shortly before conception. DESIGN--Observational study of trends in incidence of childhood leukaemia in relation to estimated radiation exposures due to fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing during the 1950s and 1960s. SETTING--Nordic countries. SUBJECTS--Children aged under 15 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Incidence rates of leukaemia by age at diagnosis, sex, country, and calendar year of diagnosis or year of birth; exposure category; relation between leukaemia and exposure for children aged 0-14 and 0-4 separately. RESULTS--During the high fallout period the average estimated dose equivalent to the fetal red bone marrow was around 140 mu Sv and the average annual testicular dose 140 mu Sv. There was little evidence of increased incidence of leukaemia among children born in these years. Doses to the red bone marrow of a child after birth were higher, and during the high exposure period children would have been subjected to an additional dose equivalent of around 1500 mu Sv, similar to doses received by children in several parts of central and eastern Europe owing to the Chernobyl accident and about 50% greater than the annual dose equivalent to the red bone marrow of a child from natural radiation. leukaemia incidence and red marrow dose was not related overall, but rates of leukaemia in the high exposure period were slightly higher than in the surrounding medium exposure period (relative risk for ages 0-14: 1.07, 95% confidence interval 1.00 to 1.14; for ages 0-4: 1.11, 1.00 to 1.24). CONCLUSIONS--Current predicted risks of childhood leukaemia after exposure to radiation are not greatly underestimated for low dose rate exposures. PMID:1586779

  18. Modelling (137)Cs concentrations in moose (1986-2012) from areas highly contaminated by the Chernobyl fallout.

    PubMed

    Weimer, Robert N; Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve; Sonesten, Lars; Wikenros, Camilla; Rosén, Klas

    2016-08-01

    Data from long term annual monitoring of (137)Cs concentrations in harvested moose (Alces alces) were empirically modelled by applying multivariate data analysis that is able to from relatively raw datasets show how the many various impact variables are related (Principal component analysis, PCA). In the later stage regression modelling (Partial least squares, PLS) was applied to analyse which environmental and physiological factors were significant (i.e. of predictive value) based on the measured (X) activity concentrations in moose meat. The data sets originate from two different forest dominated areas in Sweden. One area is located inland (Heby municipality) and the other borders to the Baltic Sea (Gävle municipality). In inland with 20% farmland, GIS-software was used to calculate the proportion of different habitat types and (137)Cs deposition around individual killing spots. This model reveals that the proportions of farmland and forest around the killing spot were significant parameters, second to deposition and years since fallout. Significance was also obtained for the proportions of mire and water bodies, the amount of rain in summer and the age of the moose. In the other model based on data from the coastal area with only about 4% farmland, the coordinates of the moose killing spots were not recorded in the data sets. In the resulting model the temperature in July was the most important parameter, second to years since fallout. Significance was also found for the following parameters: temperature and rainfall in several summer months, the approximate north- and eastward location of the killing spot and to which age category (adult/calf) the harvested moose belonged. PMID:27162195

  19. Short term soil erosion dynamics in alpine grasslands - Results from a Fallout Radionuclide repeated-sampling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arata, Laura; Meusburger, Katrin; Zehringer, Markus; Ketterer, Michael E.; Mabit, Lionel; Alewell, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Improper land management and climate change has resulted in accelerated soil erosion rates in Alpine grasslands. To efficiently mitigate and control soil erosion and reduce its environmental impact in Alpine grasslands, reliable and validated methods for comprehensive data generation on its magnitude and spatial extent are mandatory. The use of conventional techniques (e.g. sediment traps, erosion pins or rainfall simulations) may be hindered by the extreme topographic and climatic conditions of the Alps. However, the application of the Fallout Radionuclides (FRNs) as soil tracers has already showed promising results in these specific agro-ecosystems. Once deposited on the ground, FRNs strongly bind to fine particles at the surface soil and move across the landscape primarily through physical processes. As such, they provide an effective track of soil and sediment redistribution. So far, applications of FRN in the Alps include 137Cs (half-life: 30.2 years) and 239+240Pu (239Pu [half-life = 24110 years] and 240Pu [half-life = 6561 years]). To investigate short term (4-5 years) erosion dynamics in the Swiss Alps, the authors applied a FRNs repeated sampling approach. Two study areas in the central Swiss Alps have been investigated: the Urseren Valley (Canton Uri), where significant land use changes occurred in the last centuries, and the Piora Valley (Canton Ticino), where land use change plays a minor role. Soil samples have been collected at potentially erosive sites along the valleys over a period of 4-5 years and measured for 137Cs and 239+240Pu activity. The inventory change between the sampling years indicates high erosion and deposition dynamics at both valleys. High spatial variability of 137Cs activities at all sites has been observed, reflecting the heterogeneous distribution of 137Cs fallout after the Chernobyl power plant accident in 1986. Finally, a new modelling technique to convert the inventory changes to quantitative estimates of soil erosion has

  20. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, R.D.

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  1. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Robert D.

    1985-01-01

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  2. Ultracold-Atom Accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed class of accelerometers and related motion sensors based on use of ultracold atoms as inertial components of motion transducers. Ultracold atoms supplant spring-and-mass components of older accelerometers. As used here, "ultracold atoms" means atoms with kinetic energies equivalent to temperatures equal to or less than 20 mK. Acclerometers essentially frictionless. Primary advantage high sensitivity.

  3. Ductile Titanium Alloy with Low Poisson's Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Y. L.; Li, S. J.; Sun, B. B.; Sui, M. L.; Yang, R.

    2007-05-25

    We report a ductile {beta}-type titanium alloy with body-centered cubic (bcc) crystal structure having a low Poisson's ratio of 0.14. The almost identical ultralow bulk and shear moduli of {approx}24 GPa combined with an ultrahigh strength of {approx}0.9 GPa contribute to easy crystal distortion due to much-weakened chemical bonding of atoms in the crystal, leading to significant elastic softening in tension and elastic hardening in compression. The peculiar elastic and plastic deformation behaviors of the alloy are interpreted as a result of approaching the elastic limit of the bcc crystal under applied stress.

  4. Distribution pattern of artificial radionuclides in the Baltic Sea in the special event of the Chernobyl fallout.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Dietmar

    2011-09-01

    Extensive investigations on radioactive contamination and on its spatial and temporal changes in the Baltic Sea have been carried out by the National Board for Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection since 1986. The results were compared with data obtained in the years prior to the Chernobyl accident. Due to the composition of the accidental releases and the physical half-life of the released radionuclides, special emphasis was laid on Cs-134 and Cs-137. Other radionuclides, such as H-3, Sr-90, Ru-103 and Ru-106 turned out to be insignificant compared with the caesium isotopes. The radionuclides Cs-134 and Cs-137 accounting for the highest percentage of the released long-lived radionuclides were deposited on the sea surface with an initial ratio of 0.5. Their distribution pattern on the sea surface was affected by the meteorological conditions prevailing during the release period. The horizontal dislocation of higher contaminated water masses and the vertical penetration of radioactive caesium resulted in a prolonged uniformity of the contamination level of the Baltic Sea. PMID:21809941

  5. Variable compression ratio control

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.A.

    1988-04-19

    In a four cycle engine that includes a crankshaft having a plural number of main shaft sections defining the crankshaft rotational axis and a plural number of crank arms defining orbital shaft sections, a plural number of combustion cylinders, a movable piston within each cylinder, each cylinder and its associated piston defining a combustion chamber, a connecting rod connecting each piston to an orbital shaft section of the crankshaft, and a plural number of stationary support walls spaced along the crankshaft axis for absorbing crankshaft forces: the improvement is described comprising means for adjustably supporting the crankshaft on the stationary walls such that the crankshaft rotational axis is adjustable along the piston-cylinder axis for the purpose of varying a resulting engine compression ratio; the adjustable support means comprising a circular cavity in each stationary wall. A circular disk swivably is seated in each cavity, each circular disk having a circular opening therethrough eccentric to the disk center. The crankshaft is arranged so that respective ones of its main shaft sections are located within respective ones of the circular openings; means for rotating each circular disk around its center so that the main shaft sections of the crankshaft are adjusted toward and away from the combustion chamber; a pinion gear on an output end of the crankshaft in axial alignment with and positioned beyond the respective ones of the main shaft sections, and a rotary output gear located about and engaged with teeth extending from the pinion gear.

  6. Neutral atom traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  7. Magneto-optical trap for thulium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sukachev, D.; Sokolov, A.; Chebakov, K.; Akimov, A.; Kanorsky, S.; Kolachevsky, N.; Sorokin, V.

    2010-07-15

    Thulium atoms are trapped in a magneto-optical trap using a strong transition at 410 nm with a small branching ratio. We trap up to 7x10{sup 4} atoms at a temperature of 0.8(2) mK after deceleration in a 40-cm-long Zeeman slower. Optical leaks from the cooling cycle influence the lifetime of atoms in the magneto-optical trap which varies between 0.3 and 1.5 s in our experiments. The lower limit for the leaking rate from the upper cooling level is measured to be 22(6) s{sup -1}. The repumping laser transferring the atomic population out of the F=3 hyperfine ground-state sublevel gives a 30% increase for the lifetime and the number of atoms in the trap.

  8. Atomic carbon in the atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    The densities of atomic carbon in the Venusian thermosphere are computed for a model which includes both chemistry and transport. The maximum density of C is 2.8 x 10 to the 7th per cu cm near 150 km for an assumed O2 mixing ratio of 0.0001. Photoionization of atomic carbon is found to be the major source of C(+) above 200 km, and resonance scattering of sunlight by atomic carbon may be the major source of the C I emissions at 1561 A, 1657 A, and 1931 A. The computed C(+) densities are found to be in substantial agreement with those measured by Pioneer Venus.

  9. Flame-in-gas-shield and miniature diffusion flame hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: optimization and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschner, Karel; Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří

    2015-07-01

    A detailed optimization of relevant experimental parameters of two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: flame-in-gas-shield atomizer with a two-channel shielding unit and a standard atomizer for atomic fluorescence spectrometry, miniature diffusion flame, was performed. Arsine, generated by the reaction with NaBH4 in a flow injection arrangement, was chosen as the model hydride. Analytical characteristics of both the atomizers (sensitivity, noise, limits of detection) were compared. Under optimum conditions sensitivity obtained with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer was approximately twice higher than with miniature diffusion flame. The additional advantage of flame-in-gas-shield atomizer is significantly lower flame emission resulting in a better signal to noise ratio. The resulting arsenic limits of detection for miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were 3.8 ng l- 1 and 1.0 ng l- 1, respectively.

  10. Comparative analysis of Pu body burdens, induced by releases from atomic enterprises and global fallouts. Cancer risk, connected with plutonium accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Khokhryakov, V.F.; Suslova, C.G.; Skryabin, A.M.

    1993-12-31

    The paper presents: results of the analysis of dynamics of body burdens of Pu in adult inhabitants of Chelyabinsk-65 (not occupationally exposed) and of the Gomel region for 1990-1991. The data are based on radiochemical analysis of Pu in human organs and tissues. Comparison with the publicated data on global Pu and our date for five human autopsies revealed, that values of Pu body burdens in Chelyabinsk-65 residents were 30 times higher than global levels and depended on the period of residence in the town. The Pu body content in the Gomel region in 4-5 years after Chernobyl is, on average, 3-4 times as much as global levels. Activity of PU-238 in various organs is 4,7-26.0% (on the average 13.5{+-}5.0%) of alpha-activity of Pu-238+Pu-239,240. Expected number of cancer induced by incorporated plutonium is approximately the same for two population groups, despite of their difference in number and doesn`t differ of global level more than one order.

  11. Atomic Fuel, Understanding the Atom Series. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogerton, John F.

    This publication is part of the "Understanding the Atom" series. Complete sets of the series are available free to teachers, schools, and public librarians who can make them available for reference or use by groups. Among the topics discussed are: What Atomic Fuel Is; The Odyssey of Uranium; Production of Uranium; Fabrication of Reactor Fuel…

  12. Atomic Fisher information versus atomic number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Á.; Sen, K. D.

    2006-12-01

    It is shown that the Thomas Fermi Fisher information is negative. A slightly more sophisticated model proposed by Gáspár provides a qualitatively correct expression for the Fisher information: Gáspár's Fisher information is proportional to the two-third power of the atomic number. Accurate numerical calculations show an almost linear dependence on the atomic number.

  13. Atomic Particle Detection, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the booklets in the "Understanding the Atom Series" published by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission for high school science teachers and their students. The instruments used to detect both particles and electromagnetic radiation that emerge from the nucleus are described. The counters reviewed include ionization chambers,…

  14. Atomic alchemy: Weak decays of muonic and pionic atoms into other atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Greub, C.; Wyler, D.; Brodsky, S.J.; Munger, C.T.

    1995-10-01

    The rates of weak transitions between electromagnetic bound states, for example, ({pi}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}}){r_arrow}({mu}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}}){nu}{sub {mu}}, and the exclusive weak decay of a muonic atom into an electronic atom, ({ital Z}{mu}{sup {minus}}){r_arrow}({ital Ze}{sup {minus}}){nu}{sub {mu}}{bar {nu}}{sub {ital e}}, are calculated. For {ital Z}=80, relativistic effects are shown to increase the latter rate by a factor of 50 compared to the results of a nonrelativistic calculation. It is argued that the conditions for producing the muonic decay in neon gas ({ital Z}=10), where the branching ratio for the decay per captured muon is 1.7{times}10{sup {minus}9}, can be realized using cyclotron traps, though the prospect for a practical experiment seems remote. In lead the same ratio would be approximately {similar_to}1{times}10{sup {minus}6}. In addition to providing detailed information on the high momentum tail of the wave functions in atomic physics, these decays of QED bound states provide a simple toy model for investigating kinematically analogous situations in exclusive heavy hadronic decays in quantum chromodynamics, such as {ital B}{r_arrow}{ital K}{sup *}{gamma} or {ital B}{r_arrow}{pi}{ital e}{nu}.

  15. Combined use of fallout radionuclides and stable isotopes for investigating soil erosion processes in a Moroccan watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmansour, Moncef; Mabit, Lionel; Zouagui, Anis; Amenzou, Nouredinne; Sabir, Mohamed; Nouira, Asmae; Brandt, Christian; Rasche, Frank; Naimi, Mustapha; Chikhaoui, Mohamed; Marah, Hamid; Benkdad, Azzouz; Taous, Fouad

    2015-04-01

    On-site and off-site impacts associated with land degradation by soil erosion are a major concern in Morocco. This study aimed to use fallout radionuclides (FRNs): Caesium-137 (137Cs), excess Lead-210 (210Pbex) and Beryllium-7 (7Be) in combination with carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes (i.e. Carbon-13 (13C) and Nitrogen-15 (15N)) in estimating soil loss in the "My Bouchta" watershed and the origin of sediment deposits in a downstream water reservoir (i.e. "Talembout"). Using 137Cs, the net soil erosion rate, for the "My Bouchta" watershed over a period of 50 years, was estimated at 23 t/ha/yr with a main sediment contribution (> 90{%}) from the agricultural fields, the forest and shrub fields contributing to less than 10{%} of the overall sediment production. This result indicates clearly the role and the effectiveness of the forest plantations and vegetation cover to protect soil resource against erosion processes. The use of the 210Pb^ex technique in three different fields further highlighted that soil erosion rates over a period of 100 years were lower than those obtained by 137Cs reflecting the increase of soil loss during the last decades. Tests of fallout 7Be associated with short rainfall events in four fields confirmed the results obtained with 137Cs, that areas under natural vegetation were protected against erosion. Sedimentation rates were assessed for the "Talembout" water reservoir and the mean values obtained for two sediment cores using 210Pbex and the Constant Rate of Supply (CRS) model were about 0.51-0.58 g/cm^2/yr. The obtained results showed also a significant yearly increase of the sedimentation rate. The results derived from the stable isotopes depth profiles indicated similar behavior for forest and shrub fields. Furthermore, strong correlation between δ13C and total C was observed for this type of land use while for the agricultural fields, the correlation was not significant. In addition, the sediment profile of N-15 indicated an

  16. Collaborative Cyber-infrastructures for the Management of the UNESCO-IGCP Research Project "Forecast of tephra fallout"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folch, A.; Costa, A.; Cordoba, G.

    2009-04-01

    Tephra fallout following explosive volcanic eruptions produces several hazardous effects on inhabitants, infrastructure, and property and represents a serious threat for communities located around active volcanoes. In order to mitigate the effects on the surrounding areas, scientists and civil decision-making authorities need reliable short-term forecasts during episodes of eruptive crisis and long-term probabilistic maps to plan territorial policies and land use. Modelling, together with field studies and volcano monitoring, constitutes an indispensable tool to achieve these objectives. The UNESCO-IGCP research project proposal "Forecast of tephra fallout" has the aim to produce a series of tools capable to elaborate both short-term forecasts and long-term hazard assessments using the cutting-edge models for tephra transport and sedimentation. A special project website will be designed to supply a set of models, procedures and expertise to several Latino-American Institutes based in countries seriously threatened by this geo-hazard (Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, and Nicaragua). This will proportionate to the final users a tool to elaborate short-term forecasts of tephra deposition on the ground, and determine airborne ash concentrations (a quantity of special relevance for aerial navigation safety) during eruptions and emergencies. The project web-site will have a public section and a password-protected area to exchange information and data among participants and, eventually, to allow remote execution of high-resolution mesoscale meteorological forecasts at the BSC facilities. The public website section will be updated periodically and will include sections describing the project objectives and achievements as well as the hazard maps for the investigated volcanoes, and will be linked to other relevant websites such as IAVCEI, IGCP, IUGS and UNESCO homepages. A part of the public section of the website will be devoted to disseminate achieved

  17. Cover-up of the effects of internal exposure by residual radiation from the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Shoji

    2007-01-01

    The criteria certifying atomic bomb disease adopted by the Japanese government are very different from the actual state of the survivors. The criteria are based on epidemiological research by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, the successor to the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC). The ABCC studied only the effects of primary radiation from the atomic bombing on the survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and ignored the damage from residual radiation. Analysis of the incidence of acute radiation disease, the rate of chromosomal aberrations, and the relative risks of chronic disease among the survivors, shows that the effects of residual radiation from fallout exceeds that of primary radiation in the area more than 1.5-1.7 km distant from the hypocentre of the Hiroshima bombing. The effects of internal exposure due to intake of tiny radioactive particles are more severe than those of external exposure, explaining the difference between the official criteria and the actual state of the survivors. PMID:17370859

  18. Development of the county database: Estimates of exposure rates and times of arrival of fallout in the ORERP Phase-2 area

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, H.L. ); Anspaugh, L.R. )

    1991-12-01

    Estimates of exposure rates and fallout-arrival times have been made for each of 142 counties or county segments for 55 nuclear events producing significant deposition downwind from the Nevada Test Site. All sources of available data were examined to provide the best possible estimates for each event. The cumulative fallout deposited per unit area in each county based on these estimates is compared with estimates of cumulative deposition density based on analyses of contemporary and historical soil samples. The good agreement between the two sets of cumulative deposition estimates gives credence to the individual event estimates and suggests that no major sources of fission-product deposition were overlooked. This county database is being used as primary input data in a number of on-going dose-reconstruction studies.

  19. Ratio estimation in SIMS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogliore, R. C.; Huss, G. R.; Nagashima, K.

    2011-09-01

    The determination of an isotope ratio by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) traditionally involves averaging a number of ratios collected over the course of a measurement. We show that this method leads to an additive positive bias in the expectation value of the estimated ratio that is approximately equal to the true ratio divided by the counts of the denominator isotope of an individual ratio. This bias does not decrease as the number of ratios used in the average increases. By summing all counts in the numerator isotope, then dividing by the sum of counts in the denominator isotope, the estimated ratio is less biased: the bias is approximately equal to the ratio divided by the summed counts of the denominator isotope over the entire measurement. We propose a third ratio estimator (Beale's estimator) that can be used when the bias from the summed counts is unacceptably large for the hypothesis being tested. We derive expressions for the variance of these ratio estimators as well as the conditions under which they are normally distributed. Finally, we investigate a SIMS dataset showing the effects of ratio bias, and discuss proper ratio estimation for SIMS analysis.

  20. Chernobyl fallout in the uppermost (0-3 cm) humus layer of forest soil in Finland, North East Russia and the Baltic countries in 2000--2003.

    PubMed

    Ylipieti, J; Rissanen, K; Kostiainen, E; Salminen, R; Tomilina, O; Täht, K; Gilucis, A; Gregorauskiene, V

    2008-12-15

    The situation resulting from the Chernobyl fallout in 1987 was compared to that in 2000--2001 in Finland and NW Russia and that in 2003 in the Baltic countries. 786 humus (0-3 cm layer) samples were collected during 2000--2001 in the Barents Ecogeochemistry Project, and 177 samples in the Baltic countries in 2003. Nuclides emitting gamma-radiation in the 0-3 cm humus layer were measured by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority-STUK in Finland. In 1987 the project area was classified by the European Commission into four different fallout classes. 137Cs inventory Bg/m2 levels measured in 2000--2003 were compared to the EU's class ranges. Fitting over the whole project area was implemented by generalizing the results for samples from the Baltic countries, for which Bq/m2 inventories could be calculated. A rough estimation was made by comparing the mass of organic matter and humus with 137Cs concentrations in these two areas. Changes in 137Cs concentration levels are illustrated in both thematic maps and tables. Radionuclide 137Cs concentrations (Bq/kg d.w.) were detected in the humus layer at all the 988 sampling sites. 134Cs was still present in 198 sites 15 years after the nuclear accident in Chernobyl. No other anthropogenic nuclides emitting gamma-radiation were detected, but low levels of 60Co, 125Sb and 154Eu isotopes were found in 14 sites. Fifteen years after the Chernobyl accident, the radioactive nuclide 137Cs was and still is the most significant fallout radionuclide in the environment and in food chains. The results show that the fallout can still be detected in the uppermost humus layer in North East Europe. PMID:18845315

  1. Presenting the Bohr Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haendler, Blanca L.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching the Bohr atom at both freshman and advanced levels. Focuses on the development of Bohr's ideas, derivation of the energies of the stationary states, and the Bohr atom in the chemistry curriculum. (SK)

  2. The atomic strain tensor

    SciTech Connect

    Mott, P.H.; Argon, A.S. ); Suter, U.W. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA )

    1992-07-01

    A definition of the local atomic strain increments in three dimensions and an algorithm for computing them is presented. An arbitrary arrangement of atoms is tessellated in to Delaunay tetrahedra, identifying interstices, and Voronoi polyhedra, identifying atomic domains. The deformation gradient increment tensor for interstitial space is obtained from the displacement increments of the corner atoms of Delaunay tetrahedra. The atomic site strain increment tensor is then obtained by finding the intersection of the Delaunay tetrahedra with the Voronoi polyhedra, accumulating the individual deformation gradient contributions of the intersected Delaunay tetrahedra into the Voronoi polyhedra. An example application is discussed, showing how the atomic strain clarifies the relative local atomic movement for a polymeric glass treated at the atomic level. 6 refs. 10 figs.

  3. Hyperthermal atomic oxygen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, Govind S.; Wu, Dongchuan

    1990-01-01

    Characterization of the transport properties of oxygen through silver was continued. Specifically, experiments measuring the transport through Ag(111), Ag(110), Ag(100) single crystals and through Ag0.05 Zr alloy were completed. In addition, experiments using glow discharge excitation of oxygen to assist in the transport were completed. It was found that the permeability through the different orientations of single crystal Ag was the same, but significant differences existed in the diffusivity. The experimental ratio of diffusivities, however, was in reasonable agreement with theoretical estimates. Since the solubilities of orientations must be the same, this suggests some problems with the assumption K = DS. The glow discharge experiments show that there is a substantial increase in transport (factor of six) when the upstream pressure is dissociated to some fraction of atoms (which have a much higher sticking coefficient). These results indicate that there is a significant surface limitation because of dissociative adsorption of the molecules. Experiments with the Ag0.05 Zr alloy and its high-grain boundary and defect density show a permeability of greater than a factor of two over ordinary polycrystalline Ag, but it is unclear as to whether this is because of enhanced transport through these defects or whether the Zr and defects on the surface increased the sticking coefficient and therefore the transport.

  4. Modeling the spatial distribution of AD 79 pumice fallout and pyroclastic density current and derived deposits of Somma-Vesuvius (Campania, Italy) integrating primary deposition and secondary redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Sebastian; Märker, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The spatial distributions of primary deposits and related reworked ones from Plinian fallout and from pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) of the AD 79 eruption of Somma-Vesuvius were independently modeled for the Sarno River plain (Campania, Italy). The simulation takes into consideration both primary deposition of the volcanic products and their secondary redistribution by geomorphic processes of erosion, transport, and redeposition. We hypothesize that the pre-eruption topography controlled both the intial volcanic deposition of PDCs and the subsequent processes redistributing material of the pumice fallout and PDC deposits, and thus significantly controlled the thickness of the final volcaniclastic deposits. The methodology applied is based on a reconstructed pre-AD 79 digital elevation model of the Sarno River plain, an extensive tephrostratigraphic dataset from about 1,200 core drillings and a predictive modeling technique. The two models produce contrasting spatial distribution patterns for both the AD 79 deposits from fallout plus their derivates, versus from PDCs and their derivatives. The contrast allows determination of the most important factors controlling the thickness of the AD 79 volcaniclastic deposits. This provides new insights into the process dynamics during and immediately after the AD 79 Plinian eruption including primary deposition, erosion, and redistribution.

  5. Atoms in Action

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    This movie produced with Berkeley Lab's TEAM 0.5 microscope shows the growth of a hole and the atomic edge reconstruction in a graphene sheet. An electron beam focused to a spot on the sheet blows out the exposed carbon atoms to make the hole. The carbon atoms then reposition themselves to find a stable configuration. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2009/03/26/atoms-in-action/

  6. Atomizing nozzle and process

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Figliola, Richard S.; Molnar, Holly M.

    1993-07-20

    High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

  7. Atomizing nozzle and process

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Figliola, Richard S.; Molnar, Holly M.

    1992-06-30

    High pressure atomizing nozzle includes a high pressure gas manifold having a divergent expansion chamber between a gas inlet and arcuate manifold segment to minimize standing shock wave patterns in the manifold and thereby improve filling of the manifold with high pressure gas for improved melt atomization. The atomizing nozzle is especially useful in atomizing rare earth-transition metal alloys to form fine powder particles wherein a majority of the powder particles exhibit particle sizes having near-optimum magnetic properties.

  8. Adaptive atom-optics in atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marable, M. L.; Savard, T. A.; Thomas, J. E.

    1997-02-01

    We suggest a general technique for creating virtual atom-optical elements which are adaptive. The shape and position of these elements is determined by the frequency distribution for optical fields which induce transitions in a high gradient potential. This adaptive method is demonstrated in an all-optical atom interferometer, by creating either a variable optical slit or a variable optical grating which is scanned across the atomic spatial patterns to measure the fringes. This method renders mechanical motion of the interferometer elements unnecessary.

  9. Atom Interferometry Measurements of Static and Dynamic Polarizability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trubko, Raisa; Holmgren, Will; Hromada, Ivan; Ronan, Joe; Cronin, Alex

    2011-10-01

    We report progress towards new measurements of static and dynamic polarizabilities for several atomic species. We use a nanograting Mach-Zehnder atom interferometer with an electric field gradient to observe atomic de Broglie wave phase shifts that are proportional to the electric polarizability. These measurements provide tests of atomic structure calculations that are needed to improve the precision of atomic clocks. We explain the progress and challenges of measuring the dynamic polarizability of potassium, the static polarizability of strontium and ytterbium, and several polarizability ratios (e.g. αNa/αLi) with one part per thousand accuracy.

  10. Roles of additives and surface control in slurry atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.C.

    1990-07-10

    Airblast atomization of micronized coal water slurry is carried out using twin-fluid jet atomizers of various distributor designs. Drop size and size distribution are measured using the laser diffraction technique. We found that the atomized drop sizes of micronized coal water slurries substantially decrease as the atomizing air pressure exceeds a threshold value. We also found that the atomized drop size, represented by the mass median diameter (MMD) can be described by the wave mechanism-based models in terms of three non-dimensional groups, namely, slurry-to-air mass ratio, the Weber number, and the Ohnesorge number. 11 refs.

  11. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  12. Images of Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Tony

    2003-01-01

    Recommends using a simple image, such as the fuzzy atom ball to help students develop a useful understanding of the molecular world. Explains that the image helps students easily grasp ideas about atoms and molecules and leads naturally to more advanced ideas of atomic structure, chemical bonding, and quantum physics. (Author/NB)

  13. The Nature of Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Alan

    This monograph was written for the purpose of presenting physics to college students who are not preparing for careers in physics. It deals with the nature of atoms, and treats the following topics: (1) the atomic hypothesis, (2) the chemical elements, (3) models of an atom, (4) a particle in a one-dimensional well, (5) a particle in a central…

  14. Tracing the sources of fine sediment in a nickel mining catchment using fallout and geogenic radionuclides (Thio River, New Caledonia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, Olivier; Navratil, Oldrich; Lefèvre, Irène; Laceby, J. Patrick; Allenbach, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion and subsequent sediment transfer in rivers are exacerbated in tropical regions exposed to heavy rainfall. In New Caledonia, an island located in the southwestern part of the Southern Pacific Ocean, a significant fraction of this sediment is likely originating from tributaries draining nickel mining sites that are known to increase the terrigenous inputs to the rivers and, potentially to UNESCO World Heritage listed coastal lagoons. However, downstream contributions from these tributaries remain to be quantified. A pilot sediment tracing study has therefore been conducted in the 400-km² Thio River catchment. Fallout and geogenic radionuclides have been measured in sediment deposits collected in potential sources, i.e. (i) tributaries draining mines, (ii) tributaries draining 'natural' areas affected by landslides, and (iii) the main stem of the Thio River. Thorium-228 and Caesium-137 provide the best discrimination between sediment originating from the two tributaries. A distribution modelling approach was used to quantify the relative sediment contributions from these tributaries to the Thio River main stem. Results demonstrate that tributaries draining mining sites supply the majority of sediment (67-84%) to the main river. In the future, the validity of these results obtained on sediment deposits collected in April and May 2015 should be verified over a longer time period by applying a similar approach to sediment cores collected in the Thio river deltaic plain. Once validated, this method will be applicable to other catchments draining mines in New Caledonia to design appropriate measures to limit sediment supply to the lagoon.

  15. Historical events associated with fallout from Bravo Shot--Operation Castle and 25 Y of medical findings.

    PubMed

    Cronkite, E P; Conard, R A; Bond, V P

    1997-07-01

    The events prior to Bravo Shot-Operation Castle that led to a decision not to evacuate the Marshallese prior to testing the thermonuclear bombs are presented as are the actions taken after the fallout incident in evacuating the exposed Marshallese and the military personnel. The initial medical effects (findings during first 6 wk after exposure) are briefly described and are followed by description of long term effects, namely, induction of one case of fatal acute myeloid leukemia and a large number of thyroid tumors (benign and malignant) in addition to hypothyroidism in adults and children and two cases of cretinism. The hypothyroidism and cretinism responded well to administration of oral thyroxine. During the first 25 y, there was also much unrest and political agitation initiated by exposed and unexposed Marshallese who were very unhappy as a result of relocation and inability to return to their homelands and feeling that all illness and deaths were due to the mysterious radiation, which they understandably did not understand. The difficulties in part were ameliorated by financial aid from the U.S. Congress. In view of one of us (EPC), no one agency or person in the U.S. Government was willing to take the responsibility for care of the Marshallese and its financing. The exposed and nonexposed Marshallese had their lifestyle changed, some of their homelands made uninhabitable for several years and could aptly be called "nuclear nomads," an expression coined by others. PMID:9199227

  16. Tephra fallout hazard assessment at Vesuvius: the effect of uncertainties on the wind and the eruption source parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedonio, Giovanni; Costa, Antonio; Scollo, Simona; Neri, Augusto

    2016-04-01

    In this study we investigate the effect of using different meteorological datasets and eruption source parameters on tephra fallout hazard assessment for a sub-Plinian eruption of Vesuvius, which is considered as a reference case for hazard assessment analysis of Vesuvius. We analyze the effect of using different meteorological data, from: i) radio-sounding carried out at the meteorological station of Brindisi (Italy) between 1962 and 1976 and between 1996 and 2012 and at Pratica di Mare (Rome, Italy) between 1995 and 2013; ii) meteorological models of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). Furthermore, we consider the effects of perturbing reference eruptive source parameters. In particular, we vary the total mass, the total grain-size distribution, the column height, and the effective atmospheric diffusion coefficient to evaluate how these parameters affect the hazard probability maps. Moreover, the effect of the seasonal variation of the wind field and the effect of the rain on the deposit loading are considered. Results show that the parameter that mostly affects hazard maps is, as expected, the total erupted mass; furthermore, keeping constant the erupted mass, the most important control on hazard is due to the particle terminal settling velocity distribution which is a function of the total grain-size distribution, particle density and shape. Within the considered range variations, the hazard depends less on the use of different meteorological datasets, column height and effective diffusion coefficient.

  17. Biomonitoring fallout 137Cs in resident and migratory fishes collected along the southern coast of India and assessment of dose.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohan Feroz; Wesley, Samuel Godwin

    2012-05-01

    The globally distributed fallout radionuclide (137)Cs was monitored in 25 resident and 22 migratory fish species collected from some regions of west and east coast of southern India to establish a baseline data. The samples were collected during June 2008 to June 2009. Higher level of (137)Cs was noted in planktivorous fishes and lower level in herbivores. A significant variation in (137)Cs was observed between fishes with different feeding habits and different migratory pattern. Oceanodromic migratory fishes displayed higher cesium levels than other migratory types. Similarly, migratory fishes displayed higher (137)Cs concentration compared to resident fishes. The overall range of (137)Cs varied from 0.06 to 0.3 Bq/kg in fishes. The biological concentration varied from 55 to 250. The average external dose rate to fishes was calculated to be 2.7 × 10(-7) μGy/h, while the internal dose rate varied from 8.50 × 10(-6) to 5.27 × 10(-5) μGy/h. The hazard quotient for fishes was found to be less than 1. The average intake of (137)Cs via fishes to the public was calculated to be 3.5 Bq/year and subsequently the committed effective dose was 0.05 μSv/year. The data obtained were less than global average and comparable to those of many regions. PMID:21743988

  18. Review of medical findings in a Marshallese population twenty-six years after accidental exposure to radioactive fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Conard, R.A.; Paglia, D.E.; Larsen, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    In March 1954, radioactive debris from a thermonuclear weapon test at Bikini Atoll deviated from predicted trajectories and contaminated several atolls in the northern Marshall Islands. As a result, 239 native inhabitants of these islands along with 28 American servicemen and 23 Japanese fishermen received variably severe exposures to diverse ionizing radiations. Fallout material consisted largely of mixed fission products with small amounts of neutron-induced radionuclides and minimal amounts of fissionable elements, producing a complex spectrum of electromagnetic and particulate radiation. Individuals were exposed to deeply penetrating, whole-body gamma irradiation, to internal radiation emitters assimilated either by inhalation or by ingestion of contaminated water and food, and to direct radiation from material accumulating on body surfaces. That accident initiated a cascade of events, medical, social and political, which continue in varying forms to this day. Most of these have been discussed in the open medical literature and in periodic reports issued by the medical team headquartered at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This report attempts to summarize some of the principal findings of medical significnce that have been observed during the subsequent 26 years with particular emphasis on the last six years.

  19. Probabilistic evaluation of the physical impact of future tephra fallout events for the Island of Vulcano, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biass, Sebastien; Bonadonna, Costanza; di Traglia, Federico; Pistolesi, Marco; Rosi, Mauro; Lestuzzi, Pierino

    2016-05-01

    A first probabilistic scenario-based hazard assessment for tephra fallout is presented for La Fossa volcano (Vulcano Island, Italy) and subsequently used to assess the impact on the built environment. Eruption scenarios are based upon the stratigraphy produced by the last 1000 years of activity at Vulcano and include long-lasting Vulcanian and sub-Plinian eruptions. A new method is proposed to quantify the evolution through time of the hazard associated with pulsatory Vulcanian eruptions lasting from weeks to years, and the increase in hazard related to typical rainfall events around Sicily is also accounted for. The impact assessment on the roofs is performed by combining a field characterization of the buildings with the composite European vulnerability curves for typical roofing stocks. Results show that a sub-Plinian eruption of VEI 2 is not likely to affect buildings, whereas a sub-Plinian eruption of VEI 3 results in 90 % of the building stock having a ≥12 % probability of collapse. The hazard related to long-lasting Vulcanian eruptions evolves through time, and our analysis shows that the town of Il Piano, located downwind of the preferential wind patterns, is likely to reach critical tephra accumulations for roof collapse 5-9 months after the onset of the eruption. If no cleaning measures are taken, half of the building stock has a probability >20 % of suffering roof collapse.

  20. Model testing using Chernobyl data: III. Atmospheric resuspension of radionuclides in Ukrainian regions impacted by Chernobyl fallout

    SciTech Connect

    Garger, E.K.; Hoffman, F.O.; Miller, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    The {open_quotes}Resuspension{close_quotes} scenario is designed to test models for atmospheric resuspension of radionuclides from contaminated soils. Resuspension can be a secondary source of contamination after a release has stopped, as well as a source of contamination for people and areas not exposed to the original release. The test scenario describes three exposure situations: (1) locations within the highly contaminated 30-km zone at Chernobyl, where exposures to resuspended material are probably dominated by local processes; (2) an urban area (Kiev) outside the 30-km zone, where local processes include extensive vehicular traffic; and (3) a location 40 to 60 km west of the Chernobyl reactor, where upwind sources of contamination are important. Input data include characteristics of the {sup 137}Cs ground contamination around specific sites, climatological data for the sites, characteristics of the terrain and topography, and locations of the sampling sites. Predictions are requested for average air concentrations of {sup 137}Cs at specified locations due to resuspension of Chernobyl fallout and for specified resuspension factors and rates. Test data (field measurements) are available for all endpoints. 9 refs., 4 figs., 11 tabs.

  1. Historical events associated with fallout from Bravo Shot-Operation castle and 25 y of medical findings

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkite, E.P.; Conard, R.A.; Bond, V.P.

    1997-07-01

    The events prior to Bravo Shot-Operation Castle that led to a decision not to evacuate the Marshallese prior to testing the thermonuclear bombs are presented as are the actions taken after the fallout incident in evacuating the exposed Marshallese and the military personnel. The initial medical effects (findings during first 6 wk after exposure) are briefly described and are followed by description of long term effects, namely, induction of one case or fatal acute myeloid leukemia and a large number of thyroid tumors (benign and malignant) in addition to hypothyroidism in adults and children and two cases of cretinism. The hypothyroidism and cretinism responded well to administration of oral thyroxine. During the first 25 y, there was also much unrest and political agitation initiated by exposed and unexposed Marshallese who were very unhappy as a result of relocation and inability to return to their homelands and feeling that all illness and deaths were due to the mysterious radiation, which they understandably did not understand. The difficulties in part were ameliorated by financial aid from the U.S. Congress. In view of one of us (EPC), no one agency or person in the U.S. Government was willing to take the responsibility for care of the Marshallese and its financing. The exposed and non-exposed Marshallese had their lifestyle changed, some of their homelands made uninhabitable for several years and could aptly be called {open_quotes}nuclear nomads,{close_quotes} an expression coined by others. 14 refs., 3 tabs.

  2. Heavy metals and trace elements in atmospheric fall-out: their relationship with topsoil and wheat element composition.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, Gonzalo M A; Jasan, Raquel; Plá, Rita; Pignata, María L

    2012-04-30

    The objectives of this study were to determine the average concentrations and deposition rates of 28 elements in atmospheric bulk deposition and to elucidate associations among topsoil, bulk deposition and wheat element composition. The fluxes of arsenic (As), copper (Cu), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) deposition in Córdoba were higher than in other agro-ecosystems, which reflects both natural (geochemistry and topsoil removal) and anthropogenic sources. High lanthanide, uranium (U) and thorium (Th) concentrations revealed the impact of an open cast uranium mine. The highest enrichment factors (EF) were those of Cu, Pb, Zn and nickel (Ni), with calcium (Ca) being the most prominent in the surroundings of a cement plant. Industries and the transport of airborne urban pollutants were the main anthropogenic sources for Ca, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, cadmium (Cd), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) and antimony (Sb). The concentrations of metals in wheat grain were predicted using the topsoil and atmospheric fall-out composition with R(2)=0.90, with the latter being the best explanatory variable. The present study highlights the potential health hazards of wheat consumption (Environmental Protection Agency) by the assessment of heavy metals in bulk atmospheric deposition. PMID:22390956

  3. Characterization of the composition of dust fallout and identification of dust sources in arid and semiarid North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xunming; Dong, Zhibao; Zhang, Caixia; Qian, Guangqiang; Luo, Wanyin

    2009-11-01

    A source analysis to characterize the composition of dust fallout in arid and semiarid North China, an important source area of dust for East Asia, was performed. Monthly samples were obtained from April 2001 to March 2002 at 29 sites in sandy and gobi deserts, steppes, and loess areas, and the following elements were analyzed: Ce, Co, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, Lu, Nd, Rb, Sc, Ta, Tb, Th, As, La, Na, Sb, Sm, U, Yb, Al, Ca, Mg, Mn, Ti, and V. Although the dust compositions differed, it was difficult to determine the potential dust source areas based solely on the elemental fingerprints of the dust. Principal components analysis showed that at most sites Sm, Sc, La, Ce, Eu, and Th were most strongly correlated ( r > 0.7) with other elements, whereas crustal elements such as Al, Fe, and Ti were only strongly correlated with the other elements at a few sites. Of the 26 elements that we analyzed, maybe only Sb was representative of anthropogenic pollution, but pollutant sources were unclear because at most sites, in different months, the crustal-derived elements and those derived from anthropogenic pollutants always appeared synchronously, creating difficulties and high uncertainties in source identification.

  4. Comments on D/H ratios in chondritic organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. W.; Rigby, D.

    1981-06-01

    D/H ratios in chondritic organic matter are investigated. Demineralized organic residues obtained from previous experiments were dried in a quartz reaction vessel under vacuum for 60 minutes at 250-300 C and then combusted in oxygen for 20 minutes at 850 C. The apparatus is described and the results of the experiments such as D/H ratios in water and measurements on total carbon dioxide are given. Atomic H/C ratios calculated directly from the quantities of carbon dioxide and water recovered, are reported according to Standard Mean Ocean Water and Pee Dee Belemnite, using the customary notation.

  5. New atomic data for Fe/+19/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Mason, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    New atomic data are tabulated for Fe(+19). The electron collision strengths are calculated using the 'distorted wave' approximation and results are presented for several energies of the exciting electron. The populations of the ground levels are calculated as a function of electron density under conditions appropriate to solar flares and tokamak plasmas. Theoretical intensity ratios are tabulated for the UV lines.

  6. GAS-ATOMIZED SPRAY SCRUBBER EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of fine particle collection efficiency measurements of a gas-atomized spray scrubber, cleaning effluent gas from a No. 7 gray iron cupola. Tests were made at several levels of pressure drop and liquid/gas ratio. Particle size measurements on inlet and out...

  7. Single atom electrochemical and atomic analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Rama

    In the past decade, advances in electron and scanning-probe based microscopies have led to a wealth of imaging and spectroscopic data with atomic resolution, yielding substantial insight into local physics and chemistry in a diverse range of systems such as oxide catalysts, multiferroics, manganites, and 2D materials. However, typical analysis of atomically resolved images is limited, despite the fact that image intensities and distortions of the atoms from their idealized positions contain unique information on the physical and chemical properties inherent to the system. Here, we present approaches to data mine atomically resolved images in oxides, specifically in the hole-doped manganite La5/8Ca3/8MnO3, on epitaxial films studied by in-situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). Through application of bias to the STM tip, atomic-scale electrochemistry is demonstrated on the manganite surface. STM images are then further analyzed through a suite of algorithms including 2D autocorrelations, sliding window Fourier transforms, and others, and can be combined with basic thermodynamic modelling to reveal relevant physical and chemical descriptors including segregation energies, existence and strength of atomic-scale diffusion barriers, surface energies and sub-surface chemical species identification. These approaches promise to provide tremendous insights from atomically resolved functional imaging, can provide relevant thermodynamic parameters, and auger well for use with first-principles calculations to yield quantitative atomic-level chemical identification and structure-property relations. This research was sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, BES, DOE. Research was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which also provided support and is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  8. Conservation laws and laser cooling of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Giuseppe

    2015-11-01

    The straightforward application of energy and linear momentum conservation to the absorption/emission of photons by atoms allows us to establish the essential features of laser cooling of two level atoms at low laser intensities. The lowest attainable average kinetic energy of the atoms depends on the ratio {{Γ }}/{E}{{R}} between the natural linewidth and the recoil energy and tends to ER as {{Γ }}/{E}{{R}} tends to zero (in one dimension). This treatment, like the quantum mechanical ones, is valid for any value of the ratio {{Γ }}/{E}{{R}} and contains the semiclassical theory of laser cooling as the limiting case in which {E}{{R}}\\ll {{Γ }}.

  9. Radiocesium in Swedish reindeer after the Chernobyl fallout: Seasonal variations and long-term decline

    SciTech Connect

    Ahman, B.; Ahman, G.

    1994-05-01

    Data about {sup 137}Cs activity concentrations in reindeer muscle were collected from different parts of Sweden during 1986-1992. The data were used to evaluate seasonal and geographical variations and long-term decline of {sup 137}Cs in reindeer. The seasonal variation is shown in an example from one of the most contaminated areas, the Saami community Vilhelmina Norra, where {sup 137}Cs activity concentrations in reindeer during winter exceed those found during summer by about 20 times. Activity concentrations of {sup 137}Cs in reindeer were fairly well correlated to ground deposition. The ratio between {sup 137}Cs in reindeer (kBq kg{sup -1} wet weight) and ground deposition (kBq m{sup -2}) was calculated to be 0.76 m{sup 2} kg{sup -1} for the winter period, January-April, in 1987. Activity concentrations of {sup 137}Cs in reindeer decreased significantly during the years 1986-1992. The decline was generally more rapid during September, November, and December [corresponding to an effective ecological half-life (T{sub Eff}) of 3.2 y] than during January-April when T{sub Eff} was calculated to 4.2 y. There was a general trend toward a slower decrease during the last of the observed years. 42 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Radiocesium fluxes in rivers across the Fukushima fallout region to 2015 and their controlling factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onda, Yuichi; Taniguchi, Keisuke; Smith, Hugh; Blake, William; Yoshimura, Kazuya

    2016-04-01

    Due to Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, radioactive materials including Cs-134 and Cs-137 were widely distributed in surrounded area. The radiocesiums have been transported in river networks. The monitoring started at 6 sites from June 2011. Subsequently, additional 24 monitoring sites were installed between October 2012 and January 2013. Flow and turbidity were measured at each site in ten minite intervals, and suspended sediments and river water were collected every one or half month to measure Cs-134 and Cs-137 activity concentrations by gamma spectrometry. Fluxes of suspended sediment and radiocesium for the period up to October 2014 are summarised for both the longer-term monitoring stations. Fluxes were computed for monthly intervals. Small gaps in flow data were filled based on linear correlations with monthly data from nearby monitoring stations. Gaps in the suspended sediment load record were filled using L-Q (Load-Discharge) equations derived for each monitoring site based on monthly measurements between November 2012 and March 2015. Monthly L-Q equations were used in place of linear rating curves based on SSC-Q data collected at 10 minute intervals. The total measured flux to the ocean of radiocesium from the Abukuma River at Iwanuma was 14 TBq for the period from August 2011 to October 2014. The transfer of radiocesium with suspended sediment declining until March 2015 and had high correlation with land cover ratio by different land use of the catchments. Also we found positive correlation with radiocesium flux and catchment landuses.

  11. Lidar ratio and depolarization ratio for cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Nai; Chiang, Chih-Wei; Nee, Jan-Bai

    2002-10-20

    We report on studies of the lidar and the depolarization ratios for cirrus clouds. The optical depth and effective lidar ratio are derived from the transmission of clouds, which is determined by comparing the backscattering signals at the cloud base and cloud top. The lidar signals were fitted to a background atmospheric density profile outside the cloud region to warrant the linear response of the return signals with the scattering media. An average lidar ratio, 29 +/- 12 sr, has been found for all clouds measured in 1999 and 2000. The height and temperature dependences ofthe lidar ratio, the optical depth, and the depolarization ratio were investigated and compared with results of LITE and PROBE. Cirrus clouds detected near the tropopause are usually optically thin and mostly subvisual. Clouds with the largest optical depths were found near 12 km with a temperature of approximately -55 degrees C. The multiple-scattering effect is considered for clouds with high optical depths, and this effect lowers the lidar ratios compared with a single-scattering condition. Lidar ratios are in the 20-40 range for clouds at heights of 12.5-15 km and are smaller than approximately 30 in height above 15 km. Clouds are usually optically thin for temperatures below approximately -65 degrees C, and in this region the optical depth tends to decrease with height. The depolarization ratio is found to increase with a height at 11-15 km and smaller than 0.3 above 16 km. The variation in the depolarization ratio with the lidar ratio was also reported. The lidar and depolarization ratios were discussed in terms of the types of hexagonal ice crystals. PMID:12396200

  12. Multilevel Atomic Coherent States and Atomic Holomorphic Representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Chang-Qi; Haake, Fritz

    1996-01-01

    The notion of atomic coherent states is extended to the case of multilevel atom collective. Based on atomic coherent states, a holomorphic representation for atom collective states and operators is defined. An example is given to illustrate its application.

  13. The 12-13 January 2011 lava fountain of Mt. Etna volcano: total mass and grain-size evaluation of the fallout deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronico, Daniele; Cristaldi, Antonio; Lo Castro, Maria Deborah; Scollo, Simona

    2013-04-01

    South-East Crater (SEC) of Mt Etna, Italy, is renowned for its sequences of paroxysms, otherwise called episodic eruptions, which produced more than 150 events since 1998. Each episode typically gives rise to eruption columns and fallout deposits over distances of up to several tens of km from the vent. The last sequence consisted of twenty-five lava fountains occurred between 12 January 2011 and 24 April 2012. The 2011-12 sequence began from a pit-vent located on the eastern flank of the cone; with time, the intense and recurrent paroxysmal activity was able to build a new cone above the SEC, renamed New South-East Crater. The first episode was preceded by the resumption of Strombolian activity on 11 January 2011; late in the afternoon of 12 January, the increasing of explosion intensity and frequency led to the formation of powerful magma jets and a dense eruption column which moved toward SSW. The paroxysmal activity lasted about 1 hour and half; afterward it almost abruptly stopped early on 13 January, thus causing also the end of the eruption plume. Based on prevalent winds blowing in the Etnean area, most of the fallout deposits from Etna disperse their tephra fallout eastward toward the Valle del Bove depression, difficulty accessible in the upper part, then reaching the Ionian Sea. These peculiar conditions usually prevent direct observation of the deposit within 5 km from and 15 km beyond the eruptive vent. The 12-13 January lava fountain fallout, conversely, was dispersed over the South of Etna, exceeding the southern coastline of Sicily and thus giving the chance to map, sample and describe for more than 100 km the tephra fallout, passing from a black scoria deposit to ash deposit (90 % of which formed by sideromelane particles). In particular, the proximal deposit (up to 5 km of distance from SEC) was composed of a continuous to almost continuous tephra blanket containing decimetric-sized scoriae to coarse lapilli, while the most distal sites were

  14. Americium, plutonium and uranium contamination and speciation in well waters, streams and atomic lakes in the Sarzhal region of the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site, Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    León Vintró, L; Mitchell, P I; Omarova, A; Burkitbayev, M; Jiménez Nápoles, H; Priest, N D

    2009-04-01

    New data are reported on the concentrations, isotopic composition and speciation of americium, plutonium and uranium in surface and ground waters in the Sarzhal region of the Semipalatinsk Test Site, and an adjacent area including the settlement of Sarzhal. The data relate to filtered water and suspended particulate from (a) streams originating in the Degelen Mountains, (b) the Tel'kem 1 and Tel'kem 2 atomic craters, and (c) wells on farms located within the study area and at Sarzhal. The measurements show that (241)Am, (239,240)Pu and (238)U concentrations in well waters within the study area are in the range 0.04-87mBq dm(-3), 0.7-99mBq dm(-3), and 74-213mBq dm(-3), respectively, and for (241)Am and (239,240)Pu are elevated above the levels expected solely on the basis of global fallout. Concentrations in streams sourced in the Degelen Mountains are similar, while concentrations in the two water-filled atomic craters are somewhat higher. Suspended particulate concentrations in well waters vary considerably, though median values are very low, at 0.01mBq dm(-3), 0.08mBq dm(-3) and 0.32mBq dm(-3) for (241)Am, (239,240)Pu and (238)U, respectively. The (235)U/(238)U isotopic ratio in almost all well and stream waters is slightly elevated above the 'best estimate' value for natural uranium worldwide, suggesting that some of the uranium in these waters is of test-site provenance. Redox analysis shows that on average most of the plutonium present in the microfiltered fraction of these waters is in a chemically reduced form (mean 69%; 95% confidence interval 53-85%). In the case of the atomic craters, the proportion is even higher. As expected, all of the americium present appears to be in a reduced form. Calculations suggest that annual committed effective doses to individual adults arising from the daily ingestion of these well waters are in the range 11-42microSv (mean 21microSv). Presently, the ground water feeding these wells would not appear to be contaminated with

  15. Poisson’s ratio of individual metal nanowires

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Eoin K.; Bellew, Allen T.; Sader, John E.; Boland, John J.

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of Poisson’s ratio of nanomaterials is extremely challenging. Here we report a lateral atomic force microscope experimental method to electromechanically measure the Poisson’s ratio and gauge factor of individual nanowires. Under elastic loading conditions we monitor the four-point resistance of individual metallic nanowires as a function of strain and different levels of electrical stress. We determine the gauge factor of individual wires and directly measure the Poisson’s ratio using a model that is independently validated for macroscopic wires. For macroscopic wires and nickel nanowires we find Poisson’s ratios that closely correspond to bulk values, whereas for silver nanowires significant deviations from the bulk silver value are observed. Moreover, repeated measurements on individual silver nanowires at different levels of mechanical and electrical stress yield a small spread in Poisson ratio, with a range of mean values for different wires, all of which are distinct from the bulk value. PMID:25000139

  16. Effect of primary-zone equivalence ratio on pollutant formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    Test were conducted to determine the effect of primary-zone equivalence ratio on the formation of smoke and other gaseous pollutants in an experimental can combustor. Several fuel injection techniques were examined at primary-zone equivalence ratios from 0.8 to 2.0. The main emphasis was on reducing fuel-rich-combustion smoke levels. Two of the four fuel injection configurations studied produced smoke levels below a smoke number of 20 at a primary-zone equivalence ratio of about 1.7. As the fuel mixing and atomization were recorded at primary-zone equivalence ratios as high as 2.0. The gaseous emissions of unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and oxides of nitrogen were quite sensitive to the fuel injection configuration as well as to the primary-zone equilvalence ratio.

  17. Polymeric Materials Resistant to Erosion by Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Richard L.; Thibeault, Sheila A.

    2004-01-01

    Polymer-matrix composites are ideally suited for space vehicles because of high strength to weight ratios. The principal component of the low earth orbit (LEO) is atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen causes surface erosion to polymeric materials. Polymer films with an organometallic additive showed greater resistance to atomic oxygen than the pure polymer in laboratory experiments and in the OPM/MIR experiment. In MISSE, the film with the organometallic additive was still intact after the pure film had completely eroded.

  18. Air/fuel ratio controller

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, M.M.; Simko, A.O.

    1980-12-23

    An internal combustion engine has a fuel injection pump and an air/fuel ratio controller. The controller has a lever that is connected to the pump lever. An aneroid moves the controller lever as a function of changes in intake manifold vacuum to maintain a constant air/fuel ratio to the mixture charge. A fuel enrichment linkage is provided that modifies the movement of the fuel flow control lever by the aneroid in response to changes in manifold gas temperature levels and exhaust gas recirculation to maintain the constant air/fuel ratio. A manual override is provided to obtain a richer air/fuel ratio for maximum acceleration.

  19. Atomic simulation of cracks under mixed mode loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, M.

    1984-01-01

    A discrete atomic model of a crack tip in iron under mixed mode loads is examined. The results indicate that the behavior of the crack at the atomic scale as a function of the ratio of mode I to mode II component of load is quite complex. In general, crack tip plasticity appears to increase as the mode II component of load increases.

  20. Cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of Yb atoms with a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus.

    PubMed

    Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun

    2013-02-01

    We present a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus for cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of the dipole-forbidden transition (6s(2)(1)S0↔ 6s7s (1)S0) of Yb atoms. An ohmic-heating effusive oven is designed to have a reservoir volume of 1.6 cm(3) and a high degree of atomic beam collimation angle of 30 mrad. The new atomic beam apparatus allows us to detect the spontaneously cascaded two-photons from the 6s7s(1)S0 state via the intercombination 6s6p(3)P1 state with a high signal-to-noise ratio even at the temperature of 340 °C. This is made possible in our apparatus because of the enhanced atomic beam flux and superior detection solid angle. PMID:23464193

  1. Laser spectroscopic measurement of helium isotope ratios.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.-B.; Mueller, P.; Holt, R. J.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Sano, Y.; Sturchio, N.; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Tokyo; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2003-06-13

    A sensitive laser spectroscopic method has been applied to the quantitative determination of the isotope ratio of helium at the level of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He = 10{sup -7}--10{sup -5}. The resonant absorption of 1083 nm laser light by the metastable {sup 3}He atoms in a discharge cell was measured with the frequency modulation saturation spectroscopy technique while the abundance of {sup 4}He was measured by a direct absorption technique. The results on three different samples extracted from the atmosphere and commercial helium gas were in good agreement with values obtained with mass spectrometry. The achieved 3{sigma} detection limit of {sup 3}He in helium is 4 x 10{sup -9}. This demonstration required a 200 {mu}L STP sample of He. The sensitivity can be further improved, and the required sample size reduced, by several orders of magnitude with the addition of cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  2. The sex ratio at birth.

    PubMed

    Rubin, E

    1967-10-01

    Several aspects of the disparity in birth ratio of males over females are discussed including variations among different races, variations by order of birth, by age of the parent, and in multiple births. Avenues of statistical exploration are suggested in an attempt to indicate certain peculiarities in nature. The Negro population in the United States has a sex ratio of 102 males to 100 females as opposed to 105:100 for whites, a highly significant difference. Inferences from these statistics are suggested for study of the sex ratios of mixed unions. The group classified as Mulatto show a lower sex ratio and further analysis of this was suggested including examination of slave records. For the white population sex ratio declines from 106.2 to 102.9 between 1st order and 7th order births. This is highly significant. However, nonwhite determinations were more irregular. Data limitations on sex ratio by age of parent prevented conclusive results. Multiple births among whites show a decline from 105.3 for single live births to 103.2 for twins and 86.1 for all other plural deliveries. Among nonwhites these ratios are 102.3, 99.7, and 102.6 respectively. Further information should be developed using the multiple facts relating to the sex ratio at birth. PMID:12275623

  3. Morphological abnormalities in gall-forming aphids in a radiation-contaminated area near Fukushima Daiichi: selective impact of fallout?

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Shin-Ichi

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the impact of fallout from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident on organisms, this study compared the morphology and viability of gall-forming aphids between the Fukushima population and control populations from noncontaminated areas. This study, in particular, focused on the morphology of first-instar gall formers derived from the first sexual reproduction after the accident. Of 164 first instars from Tetraneura sorini galls collected 32 km from Fukushima Daiichi in spring 2012, 13.2% exhibited morphological abnormalities, including four conspicuously malformed individuals (2.4%). In contrast, in seven control areas, first instars with abnormal morphology accounted for 0.0-5.1% (on average, 3.8%). The proportions of abnormalities and mortality were significantly higher in Fukushima than in the control areas. Similarly, of 134 first instars from T. nigriabdominalis galls, 5.9% exhibited morphological abnormalities, with one highly malformed individual. However, of 543 second-generation larvae produced in T. sorini galls, only 0.37% had abnormalities, suggesting that abnormalities found in the first generation were not inherited by the next generation. Although investigation is limited to one study site, this result suggests that radioactive contamination had deleterious effects on embryogenesis in eggs deposited on the bark surface, but a negligible influence on the second generation produced in closed galls. Furthermore, analysis of both species samples collected in spring 2013 indicated that the viability and healthiness of the aphids were significantly improved compared to those in the 2012 samples. Thus, the results of this study suggest the possibility that a reduced level of radiation and/or selection for radiation tolerance may have led to the improved viability and healthiness of the Fukushima population. PMID:24634721

  4. Morphological abnormalities in gall-forming aphids in a radiation-contaminated area near Fukushima Daiichi: selective impact of fallout?

    PubMed Central

    Akimoto, Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of fallout from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident on organisms, this study compared the morphology and viability of gall-forming aphids between the Fukushima population and control populations from noncontaminated areas. This study, in particular, focused on the morphology of first-instar gall formers derived from the first sexual reproduction after the accident. Of 164 first instars from Tetraneura sorini galls collected 32 km from Fukushima Daiichi in spring 2012, 13.2% exhibited morphological abnormalities, including four conspicuously malformed individuals (2.4%). In contrast, in seven control areas, first instars with abnormal morphology accounted for 0.0–5.1% (on average, 3.8%). The proportions of abnormalities and mortality were significantly higher in Fukushima than in the control areas. Similarly, of 134 first instars from T. nigriabdominalis galls, 5.9% exhibited morphological abnormalities, with one highly malformed individual. However, of 543 second-generation larvae produced in T. sorini galls, only 0.37% had abnormalities, suggesting that abnormalities found in the first generation were not inherited by the next generation. Although investigation is limited to one study site, this result suggests that radioactive contamination had deleterious effects on embryogenesis in eggs deposited on the bark surface, but a negligible influence on the second generation produced in closed galls. Furthermore, analysis of both species samples collected in spring 2013 indicated that the viability and healthiness of the aphids were significantly improved compared to those in the 2012 samples. Thus, the results of this study suggest the possibility that a reduced level of radiation and/or selection for radiation tolerance may have led to the improved viability and healthiness of the Fukushima population. PMID:24634721

  5. Challenges and opportunities for use of natural fallout 7Be as a soil erosion tracer in agricultural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Will; Taylor, Alex; Mabit, Lionel

    2015-04-01

    High resolution measurement of soil erosion amounts is difficult to achieve using conventional methodologies without interfering with agricultural practice and hence compromising the representativeness of results. Tracer technologies, both natural and tag-and-trace, offer opportunity to derive soil erosion data under 'real-world' conditions, providing a valuable complement to experimental and modelled data. Beryllium-7 (7Be) is a naturally-occurring cosmogenic fallout radionuclide formed in the upper atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation of nitrogen and oxygen. Its constant production and delivery to the surface via precipitation coupled with its affinity for soil and sediment particles has underpinned its application as a conservative soil and sediment tracer wherein its short half-life (53.3 days) lends itself to tracing soil redistribution dynamics over short time periods. While the radionuclide budget approach to deriving soil redistribution amounts and patterns is conceptually straightforward, important aspects of the tracer's environmental behaviour, especially linked to its physical and geochemical distribution within the soil, remain poorly understood. These contribute to uncertainty in conversion of radionuclide inventory to soil erosion amounts and there is a need to develop a rigorous harmonised approach to application of the tracer, with opportunity to share experience with the tag-and-trace community. Drawing on past studies and recent experimental work within a validation plot experiment, this contribution offers an evaluation of the approach as applied to date and explores the challenges and opportunities for effective use of 7Be as a tracer to support soil conservation and management strategies in the future.

  6. Metal and metalloid foliar uptake by various plant species exposed to atmospheric industrial fallout: mechanisms involved for lead.

    PubMed

    Schreck, E; Foucault, Y; Sarret, G; Sobanska, S; Cécillon, L; Castrec-Rouelle, M; Uzu, G; Dumat, C

    2012-06-15

    Fine and ultrafine metallic particulate matters (PMs) are emitted from metallurgic activities in peri-urban zones into the atmosphere and can be deposited in terrestrial ecosystems. The foliar transfer of metals and metalloids and their fate in plant leaves remain unclear, although this way of penetration may be a major contributor to the transfer of metals into plants. This study focused on the foliar uptake of various metals and metalloids from enriched PM (Cu, Zn, Cd, Sn, Sb, As, and especially lead (Pb)) resulting from the emissions of a battery-recycling factory. Metal and metalloid foliar uptake by various vegetable species, exhibiting different morphologies, use (food or fodder) and life-cycle (lettuce, parsley and rye-grass) were studied. The mechanisms involved in foliar metal transfer from atmospheric particulate matter fallout, using lead (Pb) as a model element was also investigated. Several complementary techniques (micro-X-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry) were used to investigate the localization and the speciation of lead in their edible parts, i.e. leaves. The results showed lead-enriched PM on the surface of plant leaves. Biogeochemical transformations occurred on the leaf surfaces with the formation of lead secondary species (PbCO(3) and organic Pb). Some compounds were internalized in their primary form (PbSO(4)) underneath an organic layer. Internalization through the cuticle or penetration through stomata openings are proposed as two major mechanisms involved in foliar uptake of particulate matter. PMID:22560244

  7. Ten years of elemental atmospheric metal fallout and Pb isotopic composition monitoring using lichens in north-eastern France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloquet, Christophe; Estrade, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    We report on the chemical and Pb isotopic compositions of epiphytic lichens collected from small tree branches in the urban area of the city of Metz (NE France). Lichens were collected in five different years between 2001 and 2009. The data are first compared year to year in order to document any temporal changes and trends in metal atmospheric fallout. The area studied was then subdivided into different zones on the basis of land-use (urban, suburban, rural and industrial) in order to determine potential spatial gradients. The median concentrations and enrichment factors (EF, normalized to Al) of Pb and other metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Ni, Cr, Hg, Fe) in lichens from the urban, suburban, and rural zones show no systematic variation between 2001 and 2008. However, the metal EFs show spatial variation and are generally highest in the urban area and lowest in the rural area. Lichens within the industrial zone (collected in 2009), which is dominated by steel industries, are richest in Al, Fe, Cr, Pb, and Zn. Although the Al concentration is high in these lichens, the EFs for the cited metals are several times higher than those measured in lichens from the other three zones. No significant differences were noted for Hg, Cd, Cu and or Ni. Lead isotopic compositions measured in lichens may be highly variable from year to year and from zone to zone. The variation is primarily interpreted to result from mixing between: (i) Pb added to gasoline (and recycled through re-emission of road dust in the atmosphere); (ii) regional industrial Pb from long-range transportation and/or mixed with urban Pb; and (iii) local industrial Pb. The median isotopic compositions of individual zones are distinct, suggesting variable mixing of these three sources. The annual variations show that 2001 was most affected by gasoline Pb, whereas 2003 and 2006 were more affected by the local steel industry.

  8. Sediment transfer in coastal catchments exposed to typhoons: lessons learnt from catchments contaminated with Fukushima radioactive fallout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, Olivier; Laceby, J. Patrick; Onda, Yuichi; Lefèvre, Irène

    2016-04-01

    Several coastal catchments located in Northeastern Japan received significant radioactive fallout following the Fukushima nuclear accident in March 2011, with initial 137Cs activities exceeding 100 kBq m-2. Although radiocesium poses a considerable health risk for local populations, it also provides a relatively straightforward tracer to investigate sediment transfers in catchments exposed to spring floods and heavy typhoons in late summer and early fall. This study focused on two catchments (the Niida and Mano Rivers) covering a surface area of 450 km² that drain the main radioactive plume. A database of radiocesium activities measured in potential source samples (n=260) was used to model radiocesium dilution in 342 sediment deposit samples collected at 38 locations during 9 different sampling campaigns conducted every 6 months from Nov. 2011 to Nov. 2015. The dilution of the initial radiocesium contamination in sediment was individually calculated for each of the 342 samples using a distribution model. Results show that the proportion of heavily contaminated sediment increased from 27% to 39% after the occurrence of typhoons in 2013 (with rainfall amount exceeding 100 mm in 48 hours) and from 29% to 45% after the 2015 spring floods, illustrating the occurrence of soil erosion and resuspension of contaminated material stored in the river channel. In contrast, the occurrence of a very strong typhoon in September 2015 (up to 450 mm in 48h) led to the dilution and the flush of the contamination to the Pacific Ocean, with the proportion of heavily contaminated material decreasing from 45 to 21%. This case study in catchments impacted by the Fukushima accident illustrates their high reactivity to both human activities and rainfall. These results will improve our understanding of sediment transfers in similar coastal mountainous environments frequently exposed to heavy rainfall.

  9. Ten years of elemental atmospheric metal fallout and Pb isotopic composition monitoring using lichens in northeastern France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloquet, Christophe; Estrade, Nicolas; Carignan, Jean

    2015-09-01

    We report on the chemical and Pb isotopic compositions of epiphytic lichens collected from small tree branches in the urban area of the city of Metz (NE France). Lichens were collected in five different years between 2001 and 2009. The data are first compared year to year in order to document any temporal change and trend in metal atmospheric fallout. The area studied was then subdivided into different zones on the basis of land use (urban, suburban, rural and industrial) in order to determine potential spatial gradients. The median concentrations and enrichment factors (EF, normalized to Al) of Pb and other metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Ni, Cr, Hg, Fe) in lichens from the urban, suburban, and rural zones show no systematic variation between 2001 and 2008. However, the metal EFs show spatial variation and are generally highest in the urban area and lowest in the rural area. Lichens within the industrial zone (collected in 2009), which is dominated by steel industries, are richest in Al, Fe, Cr, Pb, and Zn. Although the Al concentration is high in these lichens, the EFs for the cited metals are several times higher than those measured in lichens from the other three zones. No significant differences were noted for Hg, Cd, Cu and or Ni. Pb isotopic compositions measured in lichens may be highly variable from year to year and from zone to zone. The variation is primarily interpreted to result from mixing between: (i) Pb added to gasoline (and recycled through re-emission of road dust in the atmosphere); (ii) regional industrial Pb from long-range transportation and/or mixed with urban Pb; and (iii) local industrial Pb. The median isotopic compositions of individual zones are distinct, suggesting variable mixing of these three sources. The annual variations show that 2001 was most affected by gasoline Pb, whereas 2003 and 2006 were more affected by the local steel industry.

  10. Graphite filter atomizer in atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katskov, Dmitri A.

    2007-09-01

    Graphite filter atomizers (GFA) for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) show substantial advantages over commonly employed electrothermal vaporizers and atomizers, tube and platform furnaces, for direct determination of high and medium volatility elements in matrices associated with strong spectral and chemical interferences. Two factors provide lower limits of detection and shorter determination cycles with the GFA: the vaporization area in the GFA is separated from the absorption volume by a porous graphite partition; the sample is distributed over a large surface of a collector in the vaporization area. These factors convert the GFA into an efficient chemical reactor. The research concerning the GFA concept, technique and analytical methodology, carried out mainly in the author's laboratory in Russia and South Africa, is reviewed. Examples of analytical applications of the GFA in AAS for analysis of organic liquids and slurries, bio-samples and food products are given. Future prospects for the GFA are discussed in connection with analyses by fast multi-element AAS.

  11. Advances in atomic physics

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherbini, Tharwat M.

    2013-01-01

    In this review article, important developments in the field of atomic physics are highlighted and linked to research works the author was involved in himself as a leader of the Cairo University – Atomic Physics Group. Starting from the late 1960s – when the author first engaged in research – an overview is provided of the milestones in the fascinating landscape of atomic physics. PMID:26425356

  12. Atomic Oxygen Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sharon K. R.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic oxygen, which is the most predominant species in low Earth orbit, is highly reactive and can break chemical bonds on the surface of a wide variety of materials leading to volatilization or surface oxidation which can result in failure of spacecraft materials and components. This presentation will give an overview of how atomic oxygen reacts with spacecraft materials, results of space exposure testing of a variety of materials, and examples of failures caused by atomic oxygen.

  13. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides.

  14. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

  15. Solar Spectroscopy: Atomic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, H.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A Greek philosopher called DEMOCRITUS (c. 460-370 BC) first introduced the concept of atoms (which means indivisible). His atoms do not precisely correspond to our atoms of today, which are not indivisible, but made up of a nucleus (protons with positive charge and neutrons which have no charge) and orbiting electrons (with negative charge). Indeed, in the solar atmosphere, the temperature is suc...

  16. Spatial and temporal dynamics of sediment in contrasted mountainous watersheds (Mexican transvolcanic belt and French Southern Alps) combining river gauging, elemental geochemistry and fallout radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, O.; Navratil, O.; Gratiot, N.; Némery, J.; Duvert, C.; Ayrault, S.; Lefèvre, I.; Legout, C.; Bonté, P.; Esteves, M.

    2009-12-01

    In mountainous environments, an excessive fine sediment supply to the rivers typically leads to an increase in water turbidity, contaminant transport and a rapid filling of reservoirs. This situation is particularly problematic in regions where water reservoirs are used to provide drinking water to large cities (e.g. in central Mexico) or where stream water is used to run hydroelectric power plants (e.g. in the French Southern Alps). In such areas, sediment source areas first need to be delineated and sediment fluxes between hillslopes and the river system must be better understood before implementing efficient erosion control measures. In this context, the STREAMS (« Sediment Transport and Erosion Across MountainS ») project funded by the French National Research Agency (ANR) aims at understanding the spatial and temporal dynamics of sediment at the scale of mountainous watersheds (between 500 - 1000 km2) located in contrasted environments. This 3-years study is carried out simultaneously in a volcanic watershed located in the Mexican transvolcanic belt undergoing a subhumid tropical climate, as well as in a sedimentary watershed of the French Southern Alps undergoing a transitional climate with Mediterranean and continental influences. One of the main specificities of this project consists in combining traditional monitoring techniques (i.e. installation of river gauges, turbidimeters and sediment samplers in several sub-catchments) and sediment fingerprinting using elemental geochemistry (measured by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis - INAA - and Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry - ICP-MS) and fallout radionuclides (measured by gamma spectrometry). In the French watershed, geochemical analysis allows outlining different sediment sources (e.g. the contribution of calcareous vs. marl-covered sub-watersheds). Radionuclide ratios (e.g.Be-7/Cs-137) allow identifying the dominant erosion processes occurring within the watershed. Areas mostly

  17. Optimization of neutral atom imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Balsamo, E.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Hughes, P.; Keller, J.; Ogilvie, K.

    2008-12-01

    : The interactions between plasma structures and neutral atom populations in interplanetary space can be effectively studied with energetic neutral atom imagers. For neutral atoms with energies less than 1 keV, the most efficient detection method that preserves direction and energy information is conversion to negative ions on surfaces. We have examined a variety of surface materials and conversion geometries in order to identify the factors that determine conversion efficiency. For chemically and physically stable surfaces smoothness is of primary importance while properties such as work function have no obvious correlation to conversion efficiency. For the noble metals, tungsten, silicon, and graphite with comparable smoothness, conversion efficiency varies by a factor of two to three. We have also examined the way in which surface conversion efficiency varies with the angle of incidence of the neutral atom and have found that the highest efficiencies are obtained at angles of incidence greater then 80°. The conversion efficiency of silicon, tungsten and graphite were examined most closely and the energy dependent variation of conversion efficiency measured over a range of incident angles. We have also developed methods for micromachining silicon in order to reduce the volume to surface area over that of a single flat surface and have been able to reduce volume to surface area ratios by up to a factor of 60. With smooth micro-machined surfaces of the optimum geometry, conversion efficiencies can be increased by an order of magnitude over instruments like LENA on the IMAGE spacecraft without increase the instruments mass or volume. Work was supported by grant ACT-05-40 from the ESTO office of NASA

  18. Optimization of Neutral Atom Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Balsamo, E.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Hughes, P.; Keller, J.; Ogilvie, K.; Williams, E.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions between plasma structures and neutral atom populations in interplanetary space can be effectively studied with energetic neutral atom imagers. For neutral atoms with energies less than 1 keV, the most efficient detection method that preserves direction and energy information is conversion to negative ions on surfaces. We have examined a variety of surface materials and conversion geometries in order to identify the factors that determine conversion efficiency. For chemically and physically stable surfaces smoothness is of primary importance while properties such as work function have no obvious correlation to conversion efficiency. For the noble metals, tungsten, silicon, and graphite with comparable smoothness, conversion efficiency varies by a factor of two to three. We have also examined the way in which surface conversion efficiency varies with the angle of incidence of the neutral atom and have found that the highest efficiencies are obtained at angles of incidence greater then 80deg. The conversion efficiency of silicon, tungsten and graphite were examined most closely and the energy dependent variation of conversion efficiency measured over a range of incident angles. We have also developed methods for micromachining silicon in order to reduce the volume to surface area over that of a single flat surface and have been able to reduce volume to surface area ratios by up to a factor of 60. With smooth micro-machined surfaces of the optimum geometry, conversion efficiencies can be increased by an order of magnitude over instruments like LENA on the IMAGE spacecraft without increase the instruments mass or volume.

  19. Visualization of atom's orbits.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byungwhan

    2014-02-01

    High-resolution imaging techniques have been used to obtain views of internal shapes of single atoms or columns of atoms. This review article focuses on the visualization of internal atomic structures such as the configurations of electron orbits confined to atoms. This is accomplished by applying visualization techniques to the reported images of atoms or molecules as well as static and dynamic ions in a plasma. It was found that the photon and electron energies provide macroscopic and microscopic views of the orbit structures of atoms, respectively. The laser-imaged atoms showed a rugged orbit structure, containing alternating dark and bright orbits believed to be the pathways for an externally supplied laser energy and internally excited electron energy, respectively. By contrast, the atoms taken by the electron microscopy provided a structure of fine electron orbits, systematically formed in increasing order of grayscale representing the energy state of an orbit. This structure was identical to those of the plasma ions. The visualized electronic structures played a critical role in clarifying vague postulates made in the Bohr model. Main features proposed in the atomic model are the dynamic orbits absorbing an externally supplied electromagnetic energy, electron emission from them while accompanying light radiation, and frequency of electron waves not light. The light-accompanying electrons and ionic speckles induced by laser light signify that light is composed of electrons and ions. PMID:24749452

  20. Improved graphite furnace atomizer

    DOEpatents

    Siemer, D.D.

    1983-05-18

    A graphite furnace atomizer for use in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy is described wherein the heating elements are affixed near the optical path and away from the point of sample deposition, so that when the sample is volatilized the spectroscopic temperature at the optical path is at least that of the volatilization temperature, whereby analyteconcomitant complex formation is advantageously reduced. The atomizer may be elongated along its axis to increase the distance between the optical path and the sample deposition point. Also, the atomizer may be elongated along the axis of the optical path, whereby its analytical sensitivity is greatly increased.

  1. Poisson's Ratio and the Densification of Glass under High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Rouxel, T.; Ji, H.; Hammouda, T.; Moreac, A.

    2008-06-06

    Because of a relatively low atomic packing density, (C{sub g}) glasses experience significant densification under high hydrostatic pressure. Poisson's ratio ({nu}) is correlated to C{sub g} and typically varies from 0.15 for glasses with low C{sub g} such as amorphous silica to 0.38 for close-packed atomic networks such as in bulk metallic glasses. Pressure experiments were conducted up to 25 GPa at 293 K on silica, soda-lime-silica, chalcogenide, and bulk metallic glasses. We show from these high-pressure data that there is a direct correlation between {nu} and the maximum post-decompression density change.

  2. Atmospheric residence time of (210)Pb determined from the activity ratios with its daughter radionuclides (210)Bi and (210)Po.

    PubMed

    Semertzidou, P; Piliposian, G T; Appleby, P G

    2016-08-01

    The residence time of (210)Pb created in the atmosphere by the decay of gaseous (222)Rn is a key parameter controlling its distribution and fallout onto the landscape. These in turn are key parameters governing the use of this natural radionuclide for dating and interpreting environmental records stored in natural archives such as lake sediments. One of the principal methods for estimating the atmospheric residence time is through measurements of the activities of the daughter radionuclides (210)Bi and (210)Po, and in particular the (210)Bi/(210)Pb and (210)Po/(210)Pb activity ratios. Calculations used in early empirical studies assumed that these were governed by a simple series of equilibrium equations. This approach does however have two failings; it takes no account of the effect of global circulation on spatial variations in the activity ratios, and no allowance is made for the impact of transport processes across the tropopause. This paper presents a simple model for calculating the distributions of (210)Pb, (210)Bi and (210)Po at northern mid-latitudes (30°-65°N), a region containing almost all the available empirical data. By comparing modelled (210)Bi/(210)Pb activity ratios with empirical data a best estimate for the tropospheric residence time of around 10 days is obtained. This is significantly longer than earlier estimates of between 4 and 7 days. The process whereby (210)Pb is transported into the stratosphere when tropospheric concentrations are high and returned from it when they are low, significantly increases the effective residence time in the atmosphere as a whole. The effect of this is to significantly enhance the long range transport of (210)Pb from its source locations. The impact is illustrated by calculations showing the distribution of (210)Pb fallout versus longitude at northern mid-latitudes. PMID:27132252

  3. Experimental studies on effervescent atomizers with wide spray angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlow, J. D.; Lefebvre, A. H.; Rollbuhler, R. J.

    1993-09-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to examine the operating and spray characteristics of two internal-mixing twin-fluid atomizers that were designed to produce effervescent atomization at low air/liquid mass ratios (ALR's). These two experimental atomizers ejected the two phase flow so as to produce a wide spray angle. One atomizer was a plain orifice design that used a four-hole exit orifice which divided and turned the two phase flow just prior to ejection. The other atomizer, called the conical sheet atomizer, ejected the two phase flow through an annular passage in such a way as to form a hollow cone spray. The atomizer operating parameters varied during this investigation were the air/liquid mass ratio, atomizer operating pressure, and, in the case of the conical sheet atomizer, the exit gap width. Studies of spray characteristics included measurements of the spray Sauter mean diameter (SMD), drop size distribution, and, for the conical sheet atomizer, circumferential distribution of the liquid mass within the spray. For both atomizers it was found that SMD decreases with an increase in either ALR or operating pressure. The effect of ALR on SMD diminishes as the value of ALR increases. For the conical sheet atomizer, when operating at low values of pressure and ALR, SMD increases with increase in gap width, but the influence of gap width on SMD diminishes with an increase in either pressure or ALR. At the highest operating pressure of the conical sheet atomizer (552 kPa), SMD is independent of gap width at all ALR's. For both atomizers, changes in operating pressure and ALR have little effect on the distribution of drop sizes in the spray.

  4. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, John F.

    1989-01-01

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor.

  5. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1989-08-22

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor. 10 figs.

  6. Atomic Oxygen Fluence Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    This innovation enables a means for actively measuring atomic oxygen fluence (accumulated atoms of atomic oxygen per area) that has impinged upon spacecraft surfaces. Telemetered data from the device provides spacecraft designers, researchers, and mission managers with real-time measurement of atomic oxygen fluence, which is useful for prediction of the durability of spacecraft materials and components. The innovation is a compact fluence measuring device that allows in-space measurement and transmittance of measured atomic oxygen fluence as a function of time based on atomic oxygen erosion yields (the erosion yield of a material is the volume of material that is oxidized per incident oxygen atom) of materials that have been measured in low Earth orbit. It has a linear electrical response to atomic oxygen fluence, and is capable of measuring high atomic oxygen fluences (up to >10(exp 22) atoms/sq cm), which are representative of multi-year low-Earth orbital missions (such as the International Space Station). The durability or remaining structural lifetime of solar arrays that consist of polymer blankets on which the solar cells are attached can be predicted if one knows the atomic oxygen fluence that the solar array blanket has been exposed to. In addition, numerous organizations that launch space experiments into low-Earth orbit want to know the accumulated atomic oxygen fluence that their materials or components have been exposed to. The device is based on the erosion yield of pyrolytic graphite. It uses two 12deg inclined wedges of graphite that are over a grit-blasted fused silica window covering a photodiode. As the wedges erode, a greater area of solar illumination reaches the photodiode. A reference photodiode is also used that receives unobstructed solar illumination and is oriented in the same direction as the pyrolytic graphite covered photodiode. The short-circuit current from the photodiodes is measured and either sent to an onboard data logger, or

  7. Evanescent Wave Atomic Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezali, S.; Taleb, A.

    2008-09-01

    A research project at the "Laboratoire d'électronique quantique" consists in a theoretical study of the reflection and diffraction phenomena via an atomic mirror. This poster presents the principle of an atomic mirror. Many groups in the world have constructed this type of atom optics experiments such as in Paris-Orsay-Villetaneuse (France), Stanford-Gaithersburg (USA), Munich-Heidelberg (Germany), etc. A laser beam goes into a prism with an incidence bigger than the critical incidence. It undergoes a total reflection on the plane face of the prism and then exits. The transmitted resulting wave out of the prism is evanescent and repulsive as the frequency detuning of the laser beam compared to the atomic transition δ = ωL-ω0 is positive. The cold atomic sample interacts with this evanescent wave and undergoes one or more elastic bounces by passing into backward points in its trajectory because the atoms' kinetic energy (of the order of the μeV) is less than the maximum of the dipolar potential barrier ℏΩ2/Δ where Ω is the Rabi frequency [1]. In fact, the atoms are cooled and captured in a magneto-optical trap placed at a distance of the order of the cm above the prism surface. The dipolar potential with which interact the slow atoms is obtained for a two level atom in a case of a dipolar electric transition (D2 Rubidium transition at a wavelength of 780nm delivered by a Titane-Saphir laser between a fundamental state Jf = l/2 and an excited state Je = 3/2). This potential is corrected by an attractive Van der Waals term which varies as 1/z3 in the Lennard-Jones approximation (typical atomic distance of the order of λ0/2π where λ0 is the laser wavelength) and in 1/z4 if the distance between the atom and its image in the dielectric is big in front of λ0/2π. This last case is obtained in a quantum electrodynamic calculation by taking into account an orthornormal base [2]. We'll examine the role of spontaneous emission for which the rate is inversely

  8. Atom Probe Tomography of Geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parman, S. W.; Diercks, D.; Gorman, B.; Cooper, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    From the electron microprobe to the secondary ion microprobe to laser-ablation ICP-MS, steady improvements in the spatial resolution and detection limits of geochemical micro-analysis have been central to generating new discoveries. Atom probe tomography (APT) is a relatively new technology that promises nm-scale spatial resolution (in three dimensions) with ppm level detection limits. The method is substantially different from traditional beam-based (electron, ion, laser) methods. In APT, the sample is shaped (usually with a dual-beam FIB) into a needle with typical dimensions of 1-2 μm height and 100-200 nm diameter. Within the atom probe, the needle is evaporated one atom (ideally) at a time by a high electric field (ten's of V per square nm at the needle tip). A femtosecond laser (12 ps pulse width) is used to assist in evaporating non-conducting samples. The two-dimensional detector locates where the atom was released from the needle's surface and so can reconstruct the positions of all detected atoms in three dimensions. It also records the time of flight of the ion, which is used to calculate the mass/charge ratio of the ion. We will discuss our results analyzing a range of geologic materials. In one case, naturally occurring platinum group alloys (PGA) from the Josephine Ophiolite have been imaged. Such alloys are of interest as recorders of the Os heterogeneity of the mantle [1,2]. Optimal ablation was achieved with a laser power of 120-240 pJ and laser pulse rates 500 kHz. Runs were stopped after 10 million atoms were imaged. An example analysis is: Pt 61(1), Fe 26.1(9), Rh 1.20(4), Ir 7.0(7), Ni 2.65(8), Ru 0.20(9), Cu 1.22(8), Co 0.00029(5). Values are in atomic %; values in parentheses are one-sigma standard deviations on five separate needles from the same FIB lift-out, which was 30 μm long. Assuming the sample is homogenous over the 30 μm from which the needle was extracted, the analyses suggest relative errors for major elements below 5% and for

  9. Re-suspension of the radioactive fallout after the Fukushima accident: risk of internal dose during the first week and the first two months

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, M.; Takeda, M.; Makino, M.; Owada, T.

    2012-04-01

    The nuclear accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant in March 2011 contaminated an area of more than 100 km in diameter by radioactive material with amount of about 10-20% of that by the Chernobyl accident. According to the Chernobyl experience, a part of fallout radionuclide is expected to be re-suspended by wind, causing possible risk of internal dose. However, this re-suspension process and its amounts have not been studied very much due to the difficulty of direct measurement of low-density dusts. To estimate forms and periods of the re-suspension of the radioactive fallout, we used both the radiation dose rate data and vertical (downward) component of the DC electric field near the ground, or potential gradient (PG) at Kakioka, 150 km away from the accident site. The data indicates: (1) During 14-15 March, the radioactive dust is most likely suspended in the air near the ground. (2) During 2-7 UT on 16 March, the radioactive dust is most likely blown up from the surface by the strong wind from the non-contaminated area. (3) During 16-20 March, the radioactive dust most likely stayed re-suspended. (4) After the wet contamination on 20 March until late April, the radioactive fallout on the ground are re-suspended during daytime by daily convection due to sunshine, and transported to downwind direction. (5) At more than 30 km distance from the accident site, the re-suspension most likely ceased by the end of April. However, no data is available within 20 km distance from the accident site. Yamauchi, et al. (2012): Settlement process of radioactive dust to the ground inferred from the atmospheric electric field measurement, Ann. Geophys., 30, 49-56, doi:10.5194/angeo-30-49-2012. Yamauchi (2012): Secondary wind transport of radioactive materials after the Fukushima accident, Earth Planet Space, accepted for publication.

  10. Variability of water content and of depth profiles of global fallout 137Cs in grassland soils and the resulting external gamma-dose rates.

    PubMed

    Schimmack, W; Steindl, H; Bunzl, K

    1998-04-01

    137Cs from global fallout of nuclear weapon testings in the 1950s and 1960s was determined in successive layers (0-30 cm) of eight undisturbed grassland soils in Bavaria, Germany. The maximum activity concentration was found in soil layers between 4 and 15 cm below the surface. Using the vertical distribution of the cesium activity, which varied considerably from site to site, the mean residence half-time of 137Cs from global fallout in each soil layer was evaluated with a compartment model. These values ranged from 1.0 to 6.3 years/cm. The mean residence half-time averaged over all soil layers and all sites was 2.7 +/- 1.4 years/cm and, thus, about twice the corresponding residence half-time of the Chernobyl-derived 137Cs as determined in the same soil layers (also in 1993). The dose rate of the external gamma-radiation due to 137Cs from global fallout in the soil determined from the depth distributions varied between 0.34 and 0.57 (mean: 0.45 +/- 0.07) nGy/h per kBq/m2. The effect of soil water content on the dose rate was studied by considering four states of the soil, from water content zero to complete water saturation of the total pore volume. It was shown that the difference between the dose rates at the permanent wilting point and the field capacity, which both represent the most relevant water contents of soils, was only 10% of the dose rate at the permanent wilting point for all sites. PMID:9615340

  11. The long-term decrease of 90Sr availability in the environment and its transfer to man after a nuclear fallout.

    PubMed

    Mück, K; Sinojmeri, M; Whilidal, H; Steger, F

    2001-01-01

    Due to its long physical half-life, and the fact that its long-term mobility in the environment as well as its radiotoxicity is higher than that of 137Cs, the long-term bio-availability of 90Sr in the environment is of importance with regard to the long-term population exposure after fallout from nuclear weapons detonations or a severe reactor accident. It will also substantially influence the time-span required until re-utilisation of highly contaminated territory is possible again. An assessment of the long-term decrease of the activity concentration in all foodstuffs relevant for internal exposure after severe 90Sr fallout was performed. The observed effective half-lives were approximately 1.8-2.1 years in the first 2-3 years after the end of fallout and 8-10 years in the following three decades. This is equivalent to a biological half-life of about 13.2 years and results in a total 50 year dose of 6.2 times the first year exposure. Due to this decline in 90Sr-availability, the average annual activity intake of 90Sr in Austria has decreased from 840 Bq at the climax of the nuclear weapons tests to about 42 Bq in 1997 for adults, and from 500 Bq to about 35 Bq for 1 year old infants. This is equivalent to a 90Sr ingestion dose of 1.2 microSv for adults and 2.5 microSv for 1 year old infants in 1997 or less than 0.4% of the ingestion dose by natural radionuclides in the diet. PMID:11487808

  12. Oxygen Isotope Ratios in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brittain, Sean; Najita, Joan; Carr, John; Doppmann, Greg

    2009-08-01

    Meteorites provide important clues about the environment from which our solar system formed. Their mineralogical and isotopic composition provides important insight into the thermal, chemical and dynamical history of the protoplanetary disk. One of the most intriguing discoveries to come from the study of meteorites is the depletion of the ^18O/^16O and ^17O/^16O ratios in the oldest components of meteorites relative to Earth. These measurements suggest that the gas from which the sun condensed was more ^16O-rich than the material from which planets formed. The leading explanation for this isotopic anomaly is the selective dissociation of CO in the outer protoplanetary disk or envelope. The basic premise is that the freed ^17,18O atoms in the outer disk formed water that then enriched the ^17,18O abundance in rocky material. Thus, bodies that formed later (such as planets) were increasingly enriched in ^17,18O. To test this scenario, we will probe the efficiency of selective dissociation of CO in nearby protoplanetary disk systems. We will measure the isotopic ratio of C^17O/C^18O/C^16O by acquiring high-resolution absorption spectra of ro-vibrational CO lines from edge-on disks and envelopes.

  13. Updated thinking on positivity ratios.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, Barbara L

    2013-12-01

    This article presents my response to the article by Brown, Sokal, and Friedman (2013), which critically examined Losada's conceptual and mathematical work (as presented in Losada, 1999; Losada & Heaphy, 2004; and Fredrickson & Losada; 2005) and concluded that mathematical claims for a critical tipping point positivity ratio are unfounded. In the present article, I draw recent empirical evidence together to support the continued value of computing and seeking to elevate positivity ratios. I also underscore the necessity of modeling nonlinear effects of positivity ratios and, more generally, the value of systems science approaches within affective science and positive psychology. Even when scrubbed of Losada's now-questioned mathematical modeling, ample evidence continues to support the conclusion that, within bounds, higher positivity ratios are predictive of flourishing mental health and other beneficial outcomes. PMID:23855895

  14. Modified Embedded Atom Method

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-08-01

    Interatomic force and energy calculation subroutine to be used with the molecular dynamics simulation code LAMMPS (Ref a.). The code evaluated the total energy and atomic forces (energy gradient) according to a cubic spline-based variant (Ref b.) of the Modified Embedded Atom Method (MEAM) with a additional Stillinger-Weber (SW) contribution.

  15. Greek Atomic Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roller, Duane H. D.

    1981-01-01

    Focusing on history of physics, which began about 600 B.C. with the Ionian Greeks and reaching full development within three centuries, suggests that the creation of the concept of the atom is understandable within the context of Greek physical theory; so is the rejection of the atomic theory by the Greek physicists. (Author/SK)

  16. Atomic and Molecular Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Anand K.

    2005-01-01

    A symposium on atomic and molecular physics was held on November 18, 2005 at Goddard Space Flight Center. There were a number of talks through the day on various topics such as threshold law of ionization, scattering of electrons from atoms and molecules, muonic physics, positron physics, Rydberg states etc. The conference was attended by a number of physicists from all over the world.

  17. When Atoms Want

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry students and teachers often explain the chemical reactivity of atoms, molecules, and chemical substances in terms of purposes or needs (e.g., atoms want or need to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to become more stable). These teleological explanations seem to have pedagogical value as they help students understand and use…

  18. Neutrino-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouzakov, Konstantin A.; Studenikin, Alexander I.

    2016-05-01

    Neutrino-atom scattering provides a sensitive tool for probing nonstandard interactions of massive neutrinos in laboratory measurements. The ionization channel of this collision process plays an important role in experiments searching for neutrino magnetic moments. We discuss some theoretical aspects of atomic ionization by massive neutrinos. We also outline possible manifestations of neutrino electromagnetic properties in coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  19. Greek atomic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roller, Duane H. D.

    1981-03-01

    Physics began about 600 B.C. with the Ionian Greeks and reached full development within three centuries. The creation of the concept of the atom is understandable within the context of Greek physical theory; so is the rejection of the atomic theory by the Greek physicists.

  20. Atomic Power Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogerton, John F.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by The United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: What is Atomic Power?; What Does Safety Depend On?; Control of Radioactive Material During Operation; Accident Prevention; Containment in the Event of an Accident; Licensing and…