Note: This page contains sample records for the topic falls efficacy scale from Science.gov.
While these samples are representative of the content of Science.gov,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of Science.gov
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.
Last update: November 12, 2013.
1

Scales for assessing self-efficacy of nurses and assistants for preventing falls  

PubMed Central

Aim This paper is a report of the development and testing of the Self-Efficacy for Preventing Falls Nurse and Assistant scales. Background Patient falls and fall-related injuries are traumatic ordeals for patients, family members and providers, and carry a toll for hospitals. Self-efficacy is an important factor in determining actions persons take and levels of performance they achieve. Performance of individual caregivers is linked to the overall performance of hospitals. Scales to assess nurses and certified nursing assistants’ self-efficacy to prevent patients from falling would allow for targeting resources to increase SE, resulting in improved individual performance and ultimately decreased numbers of patient falls. Method Four phases of instrument development were carried out to (1) generate individual items from eight focus groups (four each nurse and assistant conducted in October 2007), (2) develop prototype scales, (3) determine content validity during a second series of four nurse and assistant focus groups (January 2008) and (4) conduct item analysis, paired t-tests, Student’s t-tests and internal consistency reliability to refine and confirm the scales. Data were collected during February–December, 2008. Results The 11-item Self-Efficacy for Preventing Falls Nurse had an alpha of 0·89 with all items in the range criterion of 0·3–0·7 for item total correlation. The 8-item Self-Efficacy for Preventing Falls Assistant had an alpha of 0·74 and all items had item total correlations in the 0·3–0·7 range. Conclusions The Self-Efficacy for Preventing Falls Nurse and Self-Efficacy for Preventing Falls Assistant scales demonstrated psychometric adequacy and are recommended to measure bedside staff’s self-efficacy beliefs in preventing patient falls.

Dykes, Patricia C.; Carroll, Diane; McColgan, Kerry; Hurley, Ann C.; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Colombo, Lisa; Zuyev, Lyubov; Middleton, Blackford

2011-01-01

2

Validity and Sensitivity to Change of the Falls Efficacy Scales International to Assess Fear of Falling in Older Adults with and without Cognitive Impairment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Measures of fear of falling have not yet been validated in patients with dementia, leaving a methodological gap that limits research in a population at high risk of falling and fall-related consequences. Objective: The objectives of this study are to determine: (1) the validity of the 7-item Short Falls Efficacy Scale International (Short FES-I) in geriatric patients with and

Klaus A. Hauer; Gertrudis I. J. M. Kempen; Michael Schwenk; Lucy Yardley; Nina Beyer; Chris Todd; Peter Oster; G. A. Rixt Zijlstra

2011-01-01

3

Validation of the Falls Efficacy Scale and Falls Efficacy Scale International in Geriatric Patients with and without Cognitive Impairment: Results of Self-Report and Interview-Based Questionnaires  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Frail, old patients with and without cognitive impairment are at high risk of falls and associated medical and psychosocial issues. The lack of adequate, validated instruments has partly hindered research in this field. So far no questionnaire documenting fall-related self-efficacy\\/fear of falling has been validated for older persons with cognitive impairment or for different administration methods such as self-report

K. Hauer; L. Yardley; N. Beyer; G. Kempen; N. Dias; M. Campbell; C. Becker; C. Todd

2010-01-01

4

Validation and cross-cultural adaptation of the Falls Efficacy Scale in patients with Parkinson's disease in Serbia.  

PubMed

AIM: The aim of the present study was to assess the validity and reliability of the Falls Efficacy Scale (FES) in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients in Serbia. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out at the Clinic for Neurology, between June 2011 and June 2012. A total of 201 consecutive PD outpatients were recruited. The inclusion criteria were: ability to walk independently for at least 10?m, ability to stand for at least 90?s and a Mini-Mental State Examination score >24. The exclusion criteria were: the presence of other major neurological, psychiatric, visual, audio-vestibular and orthopedic disturbances. The 10-item FES was translated according to internationally-accepted methodology. The internal reliability of the Serbian version of the FES was evaluated using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Reproducibility of the FES was evaluated using the Spearman-Brown coefficient. To evaluate construct validity, an exploratory factor analysis (principal component analysis, varimax rotation) was carried out. RESULTS: The internal consistency of the Serbian version of the FES was 0.98. Age, duration of disease, Hoehn and Yahr stage, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor score, history of falls, and the Hamilton depression and anxiety scores were significantly correlated with the total FES score. On factor analysis, all 10 items were compact in a one-factor cluster, with an explained variance of 85%. Spearman-Brown's correlation coefficient between the total scores was 0.99. CONCLUSIONS: The psychometric characteristics of the Serbian version of the FES have excellent reliability and validity as an instrument for measuring the fear of falling in PD patients. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2013; ??: ??-??. PMID:23441828

Gazibara, Tatjana; Stankovic, Iva; Tomic, Aleksandra; Svetel, Marina; Tepavcevic, Darija Kisic; Kostic, Vladimir S; Pekmezovic, Tatjana

2013-02-26

5

Falls and falls efficacy: the role of sustained attention in older adults  

PubMed Central

Background Previous evidence indicates that older people allocate more of their attentional resources toward their gait and that the attention-related changes that occur during aging increase the risk of falls. The aim of this study was to investigate whether performance and variability in sustained attention is associated with falls and falls efficacy in older adults. Methods 458 community-dwelling adults aged ? 60 years underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Mean and variability of reaction time (RT), commission errors and omission errors were recorded during a fixed version of the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART). RT variability was decomposed using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) procedure, to help characterise variability associated with the arousal and vigilance aspects of sustained attention. The number of self-reported falls in the previous twelve months, and falls efficacy (Modified Falls Efficacy Scale) were also recorded. Results Significant increases in the mean and variability of reaction time on the SART were significantly associated with both falls (p < 0.01) and reduced falls efficacy (p < 0.05) in older adults. An increase in omission errors was also associated with falls (p < 0.01) and reduced falls efficacy (p < 0.05). Upon controlling for age and gender affects, logistic regression modelling revealed that increasing variability associated with the vigilance (top-down) aspect of sustained attention was a retrospective predictor of falling (p < 0.01, OR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.03 - 1.26) in the previous year and was weakly correlated with reduced falls efficacy in non-fallers (p = 0.07). Conclusions Greater variability in sustained attention is strongly correlated with retrospective falls and to a lesser degree with reduced falls efficacy. This cognitive measure may provide a novel and valuable biomarker for falls in older adults, potentially allowing for early detection and the implementation of preventative intervention strategies.

2011-01-01

6

Assessment of fall-related self-efficacy and activity avoidance in people with Parkinson's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Fear of falling (FOF) is common in Parkinson's disease (PD), and it is considered a vital aspect of comprehensive balance assessment in PD. FOF can be conceptualized differently. The Falls-Efficacy Scale (FES) assesses fall-related self-efficacy, whereas the Survey of Activities and Fear of Falling in the Elderly (SAFFE) assesses activity avoidance due to the risk of falling. This study

Maria H Nilsson; Anna-Maria Drake; Peter Hagell

2010-01-01

7

Reliability and validity of the Turkish version of the Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I) in community-dwelling older persons.  

PubMed

The FES-I is a questionnaire which was developed to assess fear of falling. The aim of this study was to evaluate validity and reliability of a Turkish language version of the FES-I in Turkish older people. The study sample included 70 volunteers with an age range of 65-81. To assess the test-retest reliability of the Turkish FES-I, questionnaire was applied again 10-15 days after the first interview (interclass correlation: ICC). FES-I was compared with The Modified Barthel Index (MBI), the timed up and go test (TUG), and The Berg Balance Scale (BBS) for construct validity. Cronbach's alpha (?) was used to evaluate the internal consistency. The internal structure of the FES-I was examined by factor analysis. ROC plots were used to define cut-point for the FES-I scales. Cronbach's ? of the Turkish FES-I was 0.94 and the individual item ICC ranged from 0.97 to 0.99. The Turkish FES-I total scores were correlated with TUG positively, and MBI, and BBS negatively. The cut-off score to differentiate between persons with fear of falling and persons without fear of falling was 24 points. It was found that the Turkish version of the FES-I was a reliable and valid measure of fear of falling in Turkish older people. PMID:21831462

Ulus, Yasemin; Durmus, Dilek; Akyol, Yesim; Terzi, Yuksel; Bilgici, Ayhan; Kuru, Omer

2011-08-09

8

Development of a scale to assess concern about falling and applications to treatment programs.  

PubMed

This study used Rasch methodology to pursue three goals. First, we sought to demonstrate the psychometric limitations of the Falls Efficacy Scale (Tinetti, Richman, & Powell, 1990). Second, we addressed these limitations using a simultaneous calibration of the Falls Efficacy Scale and Mobility Efficacy Scale items. Third, we review previous explorations of the self-efficacy construct in relationship to health behaviors and discuss a possible treatment program based on the simultaneous calibrated items and Social Cognitive Theory. Results indicate that responses from the Falls Efficacy Scale fail to assess the higher ends of the self-efficacy continuum. Simultaneous calibration of items improved this lack of scale definition. This initial work in assessing self-efficacy perceptions provides a theoretical framework for planning treatment programs that may be more cost effective than collecting performance measures. PMID:9661714

Lusardi, M M; Smith, E V

1997-01-01

9

Development of a Scale To Assess Concern about Falling and Applications to Treatment Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Rasch methodology, often used in educational research, was used to assess psychometric limitations of a scale designed to measure fear of falling in older persons. Simultaneous calibration of scale items improved its lack of scale definition. Implications for assessment of self-efficacy perceptions and planning treatment programs are discussed.…

Lusardi, Michelle M.; Smith, Everett V., Jr.

1997-01-01

10

Evaluation of the Frails' Fall Efficacy by Comparing Treatments (EFFECT) on reducing fall and fear of fall in moderately frail older adults: study protocol for a randomised control trial  

PubMed Central

Background Falls are common in frail older adults and often result in injuries and hospitalisation. The Nintendo® Wii™ is an easily available exercise modality in the community which has been shown to improve lower limb strength and balance. However, not much is known on the effectiveness of the Nintendo® Wii™ to improve fall efficacy and reduce falls in a moderately frail older adult. Fall efficacy is the measure of fear of falling in performing various daily activities. Fear contributes to avoidance of activities and functional decline. Methods This randomised active-control trial is a comparison between the Nintendo WiiActive programme against standard gym-based rehabilitation of the older population. Eighty subjects aged above 60, fallers and non-fallers, will be recruited from the hospital outpatient clinic. The primary outcome measure is the Modified Falls Efficacy Scale and the secondary outcome measures are self-reported falls, quadriceps strength, walking agility, dynamic balance and quality of life assessments. Discussions The study is the first randomised control trial using the Nintendo Wii as a rehabilitation modality investigating a change in fall efficacy and self-reported falls. Longitudinally, the study will investigate if the interventions can successfully reduce falls and analyse the cost-effectiveness of the programme. Trial registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN12610000576022

2011-01-01

11

Falls efficacy among older adults enrolled in an evidence-based program to reduce fall-related risk: sustainability of individual benefits over time.  

PubMed

Grand-scale community rollouts of evidence-based programs seldom have the capacity to examine long-term sustainability of beneficial effects among older adults. This study examined the effectiveness of A Matter of Balance/Volunteer Lay Leader Model, an evidence-based fall risk reduction program, to sustain fall-related efficacy improvements among 282 older adult participants using data collected at 3 time points: baseline, postintervention, and 6-month follow-up. A linear mixed model and multilevel logistic regression models were used. Falls Efficacy Scale and individual item scores significantly increased from baseline to postintervention. While most efficacy-related scores tapered after postintervention, all changes remained significant at 6-month follow-up. PMID:22617416

Smith, Matthew Lee; Jiang, Luohua; Ory, Marcia G

12

Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Risk Factors for Falls, Fear of Falling, and Falls Efficacy in a Cohort of Middle-Aged African Americans  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to cross-sectionally and longitudinally identify risk factors for falls, fear of falling, and falls efficacy in late-middle-aged African Americans. Design and Methods: We performed in-home assessments on a probability sample of 998 African Americans and conducted two annual follow-up interviews. Multiple…

Anderson, Elena M.; Wolinsky, Fredric D.; Miller, J. Phillip; Wilson, Margaret-Mary G.; Malmstrom, Theodore K.; Miller, Douglas K.

2006-01-01

13

Falls efficacy and self-rated health in older African American adults.  

PubMed

Fear of falling and mobility restrictions have a significant negative impact on the quality of life of older adults. Because older African American adults are at increased risk for various modifiable health problems, understanding potential constraints on their overall health and mobility is critical in this population. The current study investigated this issue by analyzing a dataset of 449 older African American adults (mean age=72.3 years) living in Detroit. We characterized and investigated the relationships among the following falls- and health-related variables: previous falls, falls efficacy, mobility, self-rated health (SRH), and depression and well-being. As a whole, participants reported moderate health and well-being, little depression, few mobility problems (mean=8.4/40), and very high falls efficacy (mean=94.9/100) despite the fact that a quarter of the sample experienced a fall within the past year. Correlation results indicated that previous falls, falls efficacy, mobility, SRH and depression and well-being were all inter-related. Regression analyses revealed that higher falls efficacy was more closely associated with better SRH than was having previously fallen. Findings suggest that improving falls efficacy in older African American adults may be beneficial to their mobility and overall health and well-being. Further, by asking a single-item SRH question, clinicians may be able to quickly identify older African American adults who have low falls efficacy and are at high risk for falling. PMID:24063870

Tiernan, Chad; Lysack, Cathy; Neufeld, Stewart; Goldberg, Allon; Lichtenberg, Peter A

2013-08-23

14

Development of a Career Task Self-Efficacy Scale: The Kuder Task Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study consisted of developing the Kuder Task Self-Efficacy Scale (KTSES). The KTSES is a 30-item scale measuring a person's self-efficacy for tasks corresponding to Kuder's 10 occupational interest areas (Kuder Zytowski, 1991). Responses from the KTSES were compared with responses to the Self-Esteem Inventory (SES; Rosenberg, 1965) and the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale (CDMSE; Taylor Betz, 1983) to

Jennifer L. Lucas; Connie R. Wanberg; Donald G. Zytowski

1997-01-01

15

Development of Physics Self-Efficacy Scale  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this article, we describe development of a Physics Self-Efficacy Scale (PSES) that is a self-administered measure to assess physics self-efficacy beliefs regarding one's ability to successfully perform physics tasks in physics classroom. The scale is initially composed of 56 items prepared following a brief scrutiny of relating literature on self-efficacy. It was initially administered 30 physics teacher candidates and was also examined by 6 experts of physics education, then ambiguous or incomprehensible 6 items were dismissed. This PSES was tested on 558 undergraduate students all completed fundamental physics courses. Cronbach's Alpha reliability coefficient of the PSES was calculated as 0.94. The final version of the PSES contained 30 items with 5 dimensions namely, 1. Self-efficacy towards solving physics problems, 2. Self-efficacy towards physics laboratory, 3. Self-efficacy towards learning physics, 4. Self-efficacy towards application of physics knowledge and 5. Self-efficacy towards memorizing physics knowledge.

Çali?kan, Serap; Selçuk, Gamze S.; Erol, Mustafa

2007-04-01

16

Fear of falling and depressive symptoms in Chinese elderly living in nursing homes: Fall efficacy and activity level as mediator or moderator?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Depression is a common problem for many Hong Kong Chinese elderly, especially those living in nursing homes. This study examines the relationship between fear of falling and depressive symptoms as well as the role of participation in physical activity and fall efficacy in the linkage between the fear of falling and depression. A sample of 100 residents living in nursing

K.-L. Chou; F. K. C. Yeung; E. C. H. Wong

2005-01-01

17

Falls  

Microsoft Academic Search

Falls in older people are very common and for some the consequences can be devastating. The clinical assessment, management and investigation of patients who present with falls can be challenging for the non-specialist, and multiple guidelines and algorithms have been published to aid that process. This article has been prepared as a concise reference that reviews the most recent evidence

Rose A. Kenny; Roman Romero-Ortuno; Lisa Cogan

2009-01-01

18

Evaluation of the Frails' Fall Efficacy by Comparing Treatments (EFFECT) on reducing fall and fear of fall in moderately frail older adults: study protocol for a randomised control trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Falls are common in frail older adults and often result in injuries and hospitalisation. The Nintendo® Wii™ is an easily available exercise modality in the community which has been shown to improve lower limb strength and balance.\\u000a However, not much is known on the effectiveness of the Nintendo® Wii™ to improve fall efficacy and reduce falls in a moderately frail

Boon Chong Kwok; Kaysar Mamun; Manju Chandran; Chek Hooi Wong

2011-01-01

19

Confirmatory factor analysis of the General Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

A confirmatory factor analysis of the factor structure of the adapted General Self-Efficacy Scale, created by Sherer et al. (1982) [Psychological Reports, 51, 663–671], was conducted to assess whether the scale’s purported 3 factors emerged. The results generally supported the 3-factor model, but a model with 3 correlated factors and one higher-order factor (general self-efficacy) proved to fit the data

Rudolf J. Bosscher; Johannes H. Smit

1998-01-01

20

Developing the information literacy self-efficacy scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The main aim of this paper is to describe the development of a scale designed to measure self-efficacy for information literacy. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Cronbach's alpha, item analysis and item discrimination indices, principal component analysis, varimax rotation, and discriminant validity were used to measure reliability and validity of the scale. A 28-item refined version of the scale was found

S. Serap Kurbanoglu; Buket Akkoyunlu; Aysun Umay

2006-01-01

21

Evaluating a Revised Self-efficacy Scale for Preoperative Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nurses conduct preoperative teaching to help patients cope with the adversities of surgery. Self-efficacy can predict an individual's behavior in aversive situations (eg, surgery); therefore, assessing patients' self-efficacy is one way perioperative nurses can plan patient care and help patients through the surgical experience. This study expands on the results of a previous evaluation of a preoperative selfefficacy scale. The

Sharon L. Oetker-Black; Charistine Kauth

1995-01-01

22

Development of the Adelaide Driving Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To describe the development of the Adelaide Driving Self-Efficacy Scale (ADSES) and to report on its reliability and validity.Methods: A set of 12 driving behaviours, developed through literature review, clinical experience and expert review, were rated for self-efficacy using a Likert scale. Internal consistency was investigated using a Cronbach's alpha coefficient and construct validity by comparing ADSES scores of

Stacey George; Michael Clark; Maria Crotty

2007-01-01

23

Principal self-efficacy and work engagement: assessing a Norwegian Principal Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

One purpose of the present study was to develop and test the factor structure of a multidimensional and hierarchical Norwegian\\u000a Principal Self-Efficacy Scale (NPSES). Another purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between principal\\u000a self-efficacy and work engagement. Principal self-efficacy was measured by the 22-item NPSES. Work engagement was measured\\u000a by a modified version of the Utrecht Work

Roger A. Federici; Einar M. Skaalvik

24

Efficacy of Cry1F insecticidal protein in maize and cotton for control of fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Efficacy of maize, Zea mays L., hybrids and cotton, Gossypium hirsutum (L.), varieties expressing Cry1F insecticidal crystal protein of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) var. aizawai Berliner (transformation event TC1507 in corn and event DAS-24236-5 in cotton) was evaluated for control of fall armyworm, ...

25

Validity of the Depression Coping Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine construct validity of the Depression Coping Self-Efficacy Scale (DCSES) among patients receiving inpatient (n = 25) or partial hospital treatment (n = 25) for a depressive disorder. At time of treatment admission and discharge, patients completed the DCSES and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale and researchers completed the Derogatis Psychiatric

Sharon Tucker; Susan Brust; Beverly Richardson

2002-01-01

26

Optimizing Rating Scales for Self-Efficacy (and Other) Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article (a) discusses the assumptions underlying the use of rating scales, (b) describes the use of information available within the context of Rasch measurement that may be useful for optimizing rating scales, and (c) demonstrates the process in two studies. Participants in the first study were 330 fourth- and fifth-grade students. Participants provided responses to the Index of Self-Efficacy

EVERETT V. SMITH Jr.; Melissa B. Wakely; Renée E. L. de Kruif; Carl W. Swartz

2003-01-01

27

The Early Intervention Parenting Self-Efficacy Scale (EIPSES): Scale Construction and Initial Psychometric Evidence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The psychometric properties of an instrument designed to measure parenting efficacy within the context of early intervention, the Early Intervention Parenting Self-Efficacy Scale (EIPSES), were explored. One hundred seventeen caregivers of children receiving early intervention services completed the 20-item EIPSES. The scale was reduced to 16…

Guimond, Amy B.; Wilcox, M. Jeanne; Lamorey, Suzanne G.

2008-01-01

28

The Early Intervention Parenting Self-Efficacy Scale (EIPSES)Scale Construction and Initial Psychometric Evidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The psychometric properties of an instrument designed to measure parenting efficacy within the context of early intervention, the Early Intervention Parenting Self-Efficacy Scale (EIPSES), were explored. One hundred seventeen caregivers of children receiving early intervention services completed the 20-item EIPSES. The scale was reduced to 16 items with an internal reliability coefficient of .80. Preliminary factor analyses revealed a 2-dimensional

Amy B. Guimond; M. Jeanne Wilcox; Suzanne G. Lamorey

2008-01-01

29

A Confirmatory Study of Rating Scale Category Effectiveness for the Coaching Efficacy Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study extended validity evidence for measures of coaching efficacy derived from the Coaching Efficacy Scale (CES) by testing the rating scale categorizations suggested in previous research. Previous research provided evidence for the effectiveness of a four-category (4-CAT) structure for high school and collegiate sports coaches; it also…

Myers, Nicholas D.; Feltz, Deborah L.; Wolfe, Edward W.

2008-01-01

30

A 10-item Rasch modeled memory self-efficacy scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 10-item scale to measure memory self-efficacy was developed from responses to the 33-item Frequency of Forgetting scale of the Memory Functioning Questionnaire (MFQ). Responses to the MFQ from 565 participants in the 1994–1995 wave of the Long Beach Longitudinal Study were analyzed. Rasch scaling procedures were used to select items that discriminated individuals’?scoring patterns and that provided non-redundant information

E. M. Zelinski; M. J. Gilewski

2004-01-01

31

DEVELOPMENT OF A SELF-EFFICACY SCALE FOR ASSESSING SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS' SCIENCE SELF-EFFICACY BELIEFS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper details the development of a self-efficacy scale for assessing secondary school students' science self-efficacy (SSE) beliefs. Differences in the way self-efficacy and self-concept are assessed is discussed in light of the conceptual difference between self-efficacy and other self-percepts. Steps in the formulation of the scale in accordance with theoretical guidelines on how self-efficacy should be assessed and measures

Mary Wong; Siew Lian

32

A Psychometric Evaluation of the Self-Presentational Efficacy Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined the psychometric properties of the Self-Presentational Efficacy Scale (SPES) developed by Gammage, Hall, and Martin Ginis (2004). University students (196 men and 269 women) completed the SPES and measures of social physique anxiety, fear of negative evaluation, and physical activity. Participants also completed the SPES a…

Lamarche, Larkin; Gammage, Kimberley L.; Sullivan, Philip J.; Gabriel, David A.

2013-01-01

33

The Utility of the Research Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Research Self-Efficacy Scale (RSES; Greeley, et al., 1989) was completed by 177 doctoral students from a wide variety of disciplines. Factor analysis of the RSES indicated four primary factors: Conceptualization, Early Tasks, Presenting the Results, and Implementation. Hierarchical regression analyses focused on 136 subjects from the original sample and indicated that three subscales of the RSES (Early Tasks, Conceptualization,

Kathleen J. Bieschke; Rosean M. Bishop; Victoria L. Garcia

1996-01-01

34

Development of the Depression Coping Self-Efficacy Scale (DCSES)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to develop an instrument with which to measure the coping self-efficacy of depressed psychiatric patients. Item development arose from an extensive review of the literature and a survey of nurse experts for identification of coping actions for depressed patients. After pilot testing, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and study scale (DCSES) were given to

Suzanne Perraud

2000-01-01

35

Psychometric Data on the Mathematics Self-Efficacy Scale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studied descriptive measurement reliability and validity of scores from the newly developed Mathematics Self-Efficacy Scale (MSES) for class and test with a sample of 302 Australian high school students. Results provide some evidence for the psychometric properties of the MSES in both contexts, but there is evidence of failure to counterbalance…

Nielsen, Ingrid L.; Moore, Kathleen A.

2003-01-01

36

The Contraceptive Self-Efficacy Scale: Analysis in Four Samples.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The relationship of the Contraceptive Self-Efficacy Scale to contraceptive behavior was explored in four female samples: (1) 258 California adolescents, (2) 259 Chicago (Illinois) adolescents, (3) 231 Montreal (Canada) high school students, and (4) 148 college students. Results are discussed in terms of use in research and clinical settings.…

Levinson, Ruth Andrea; Wan, Choi K.; Beamer, LuAnn J.

1998-01-01

37

Rating scale analysis and psychometric properties of the Caregiver Self-Efficacy Scale for Transfers.  

PubMed

Parents and caregivers faced with the challenges of transferring children with disability are at risk of musculoskeletal injuries and/or emotional stress. The Caregiver Self-Efficacy Scale for Transfers (CSEST) is a 14-item questionnaire that measures self-efficacy for transferring under common conditions. The CSEST yields reliable data and valid inferences; however, its rating scale structure has not been evaluated for utility. The aims of this study were to evaluate the category response structure of the CSEST, test the utility of a revised rating scale structure, and confirm its psychometric properties. The Rasch Measurement Model was used for all analyses. Subjects included 175 adult caregivers recruited from multiple communities. Results confirm that a revised five-category rating scale structure yields reliable data and valid inferences. Given the relationship between self-efficacy and risk of physical and/or emotional stress, measuring parental self-efficacy for transfers is a proactive process in rehabilitation. PMID:22712478

Cipriani, Daniel J; Hensen, Francine E; McPeck, Danielle L; Kubec, Gina L D; Thomas, Julie J

2012-06-19

38

Laboratory toxicity and field efficacy of selected insecticides against fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Notctuidae)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), is an occasional but often serious pest of several southern row crops, including: cotton, field corn, and grain sorghum. The objective of these studies was to generate baseline dose-mortality responses for fall armyworm larvae in laboratory bioas...

39

Efficacy of falls prevention interventions: protocol for a systematic review and network meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Falls are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in older adults. Although numerous trials of falls prevention interventions have been completed, there is extensive variation in their intervention components and clinical context, such that the key elements of an effective falls prevention program remain unclear to patients, clinicians, and policy-makers. Our objective is to identify the most effective interventions and combinations of interventions that prevent falls though a systematic review and meta-analysis, including a network meta-analysis. Methods/Design We will search for published (e.g., MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Ageline) and unpublished (e.g., trial registries, dissertations) randomised clinical trials (RCTs) in all languages examining interventions to prevent falls compared to usual care or other falls prevention interventions among adults aged ?65 years from all settings (e.g., community, acute care, long-term care, and rehabilitation). The primary outcomes are number of injurious falls and number of hospitalizations due to falls. Secondary outcomes include falls rate, number of fallers, number of emergency room visits due to falls, number of physician visits due to falls, number of fractures, costs, and number of intervention-related harms (e.g., muscle soreness related to exercise). We will calibrate our eligibility criteria amongst the team and two independent team members will screen the literature search results in duplicate. Conflicts will be resolved through team discussion. A similar process will be used for data abstraction and quality appraisal with the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Our results will be synthesized descriptively and a random effects meta-analysis will be conducted if the studies are deemed methodologically, clinically, and statistically (e.g., I2<60%) similar. If appropriate, a network meta-analysis will be conducted, which will allow the comparison of interventions that have not been compared in head-to-head RCTs, as well as the effectiveness of interventions. Discussion We will identify the most effective interventions and combinations of interventions that prevent falls in older people. Our results will be used to optimize falls prevention strategies, and our goal is to ultimately improve the health of seniors internationally. Trial registration PROSPERO registry number: CRD42013004151

2013-01-01

40

A 10-item Rasch modeled memory self-efficacy scale.  

PubMed

A 10-item scale to measure memory self-efficacy was developed from responses to the 33-item Frequency of Forgetting scale of the Memory Functioning Questionnaire (MFQ). Responses to the MFQ from 565 participants in the 1994-1995 wave of the Long Beach Longitudinal Study were analyzed. Rasch scaling procedures were used to select items that discriminated individuals' scoring patterns and that provided non-redundant information about responses. A set of 10 items provided a scale that was reliable across items and persons. Female gender, conscientiousness score, depression score, and list recall predicted individual differences in participants' scores on the scale. Age, education, neuroticism, and text recall were also reliably correlated with scores but were suppressed by the other covariates. The shortened test is predicted by the same covariates as the long version, indicating that it has similar construct validity. PMID:15370046

Zelinski, E M; Gilewski, M J

2004-07-01

41

The Scale Structure of Multi-Scale Measures: Application of the Split-Scale Method to the Task Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale and the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study evaluated the internal structure of two translated multiple-scale questionnaires: the Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale (TSOSS; Osipow, Temple, & Rooney, 1993) and the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale (CDMSE; Taylor & Betz, 1983). Data were obtained during a pilot study for testing the Hebrew versions of the TSOSS and the CDMSE. Cluster analysis applied to the split scales was

Itamar Gati; Samuel H. Osipow; Naomi Fassa

1994-01-01

42

Psychometric Data On The Mathematics Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Descriptive measurement reliability and validity data are reported on scores from the Mathematics Self-Efficacy Scale (MSES) in two contexts-class and test-for a sample of 302 Australian high school students. Summated scores on the MSES correlated r = .74, and together these items yielded one component that explained 49% of the variance. MSES scores demonstrated internal reliability for both class and

Ingrid L. Nielsen; Kathleen A. Moore

2003-01-01

43

Development and Validation of the Computer Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 32-item Computer Self-Efficacy Scale (CSE) was developed to measure perceptions of capability regarding specific computer-related knowledge and skills. Data from 414 individuals engaged in learning to use computers in three settings were used to conduct analyses for assessing the reliability and construct validity of the instrument. A principal factor analysis with oblique rotation produced a conceptually meaningful 3-factor solution

Christine A. Murphy; Delphine Coover; Steven V. Owen

1989-01-01

44

Reliability and validity of the continence self-efficacy scale in Turkish women with urinary incontinence.  

PubMed

This study investigated the psychometric properties of the Continence Self-Efficacy Scale. Data was collected from 128 women who had urinary incontinence using the following instruments: the Continence Self-Efficacy Scale, the Broome Pelvic Muscle Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale, the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form, and the Beck Depression Inventory. The validity of the Continence Self-Efficacy Scale was investigated using confirmatory factor analysis and convergent and divergent validity analyses. The reliability of the Continence Self-Efficacy Scale was examined in terms of internal consistency and test-retest correlations. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated a three -factor model that had acceptable goodness-of-fit indices. The convergent validity of the Continence Self-Efficacy Scale was supported by a positive correlation between the Continence Self-Efficacy Scale and the Broome Pelvic Muscle Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale. The divergent validity of the Continence Self-Efficacy Scale was supported by negative relationships between the Continence Self-Efficacy Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory. The Cronbach's alpha values regarding internal consistency were 0.94 for the overall scale and 0.92-0.93 for the subscales. Test-retest correlations were 0.75 for the overall scale and 0.52-0.74 for the subscales. The Continence Self-Efficacy Scale is a valid and reliable instrument for use in Turkish women with urinary incontinence. PMID:22632069

Zengin, Neriman; Pinar, Rukiye

2012-05-27

45

Comparison of the Validity of Four Fall-Related Psychological Measures in a Community-Based Falls Risk Screening  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|We examined the measurement properties of fall-related psychological instruments with a sample of 133 older adults (M age = 74.4 years, SD = 9.4). Measures included the Comprehensive Falls Risk Screening Instrument, Falls-efficacy Scale-International (FES-I), Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC), modified Survey of Activities and Fear of…

Moore, Delilah S.; Ellis, Rebecca; Kosma, Maria; Fabre, Jennifer M.; McCarter, Kevin S.; Wood, Robert H.

2011-01-01

46

Brief Psychometric Analysis of the Self-Efficacy Teacher Report Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study provides preliminary analysis of reliability and validity of scores on the Self-Efficacy Teacher Report Scale, which was designed to assess teacher perceptions of self-efficacy of students aged 8 to 17 years. (Contains 3 tables.)|

Erford, Bradley T.; Duncan, Kelly; Savin-Murphy, Janet

2010-01-01

47

The Factorial Validity of Scores on the Teacher Interpersonal Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined the factorial validity of scores on the Teacher Interpersonal Self-Efficacy Scale across two samples of 416 teachers each. Following self-efficacy theory, which posits that self-efficacy beliefs are linked to specific activities, it was hypothesized that the three Teacher Interpersonal Self-Efficacy subscales comprised three different activities linked to teacher self-efficacy beliefs. Confirmatory factor analysis results from the

André Brouwers; Welko Tomic

2001-01-01

48

Academic and Social Self-Efficacy Scale: Development and Initial Validation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Academic and Social Self-Efficacy Scale (ASSESS) was developed to assess the self-efficacy judgments of students and to predict academic achievement and sociometric status. Self-reported judgments of academic self-efficacy best predicted academic achievement, whereas self-reported social self-efficacy best predicted sociometric status. Teacher- and parent-reported self-efficacy ratings were minimal predictors of achievement and sociometric status. A multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) analysis failed to

Frank M. Gresham; Sally Evans; Stephen N. Elliott

1988-01-01

49

Factorial Validity of a Computer Self-Efficacy Scale and the Impact of Computer Training  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, a 30-item computer self-efficacy scale is validated and used to examine the influence of computer training on computer self-efficacy. The scale was used to collect data from 224 undergraduates at the beginning and at the end of an introductory computer course. A principal factor analysis of the Computer Self-Efficacy Scale produced a conceptually meaningful four-factor solution with

Gholamreza Torkzadeh; Xenophon Koufteros

1994-01-01

50

Knowledge of Extrinsic Fall Risk Factors in Elders 65 Years and Older: The efficacy of an education program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Falls are a serious health problem in people over 65-years-old. It is estimated that one out of every three people in this population fall each year. Furthermore, 85% of falls occur in the home as a result of preventable extrinsic risk factors. Currently, there is limited research evaluating seniors awareness of fall prevention within the home. The purpose of this

Nicole Horst; Jennifer Tuttle; Kristina Walter

2000-01-01

51

The General Self-Efficacy Scale: Multicultural Validation Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

General self-efficacy is the belief in one's competence to cope with a broad range of stressful or challenging demands, whereas specific self-efficacy is constrained to a particular task at hand. Relations between general self-efficacy and social cognitive variables (intention, implementation intentions, outcome expectancies, and self-regulation), behavior-specific self-efficacy, health behaviors, well-being, and coping strategies were examined among 1,933 respondents in 3

Aleksandra Luszczynska; Urte Scholz; Ralf Schwarzer

2005-01-01

52

Isokinetic performance in low back pain patients: The predictive power of the Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Self-Efficacy Scale (SES) has been found to predict isokinetic performance better than anthropometric variables. This study tests the predictive power of SES further against other measures of efficacy expectancies as well as measures of depression and perceived disability. A group of 105 chronic back pain patients was administered Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI), SES, the Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ), and

K. K. Kaivanto; A.-M. Estlander; G. B. Moneta; H. Vanharanta

1995-01-01

53

The Development of the Mathematics Teaching Self Efficacy Scales for Korean Elementary and Secondary Preservice Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Mathematics Teaching Efficacy Beliefs Instrument (MTEBI), developed in the United States, is one of the most popular scales used in the study of mathematics teaching efficacy. However, the MTEBI might not be trustworthy in other cultures. This study described the development of a new instrument measuring mathematics teaching efficacy beliefs…

Ryang, Dohyoung

2010-01-01

54

Psychometric Properties of the Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale within the Greek Educational Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many concerns have been raised about the validity of the existing instruments measuring teachers' efficacy. Recently, a new instrument to measure teachers' perceived efficacy has been presented, namely, the Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale (TSES). The purpose of the present study is to examine the psychometric properties of the TSES in the Greek…

Tsigilis, Nikolaos; Koustelios, Athanasios; Grammatikopoulos, Vasilios

2010-01-01

55

Sources of self-efficacy belief: development and validation of two scales.  

PubMed

Self-efficacy belief has been an instrumental affective factor in predicting student behavior and achievement in academic settings. Although there is abundant literature on efficacy belief per se, the sources of efficacy belief have not been fully researched. Very few instruments exist to quantify the sources of efficacy-beliefs. To fill this void, we developed two scales for the two main sources of self-efficacy belief: past performance and social persuasion. Pilot test data were collected from 255 middle school students. A self-efficacy measure was also administered to the students as a criterion measure. The Rasch rating scale model was used to analyze the data. Information on item fit, item design, content validity, external validity, internal consistency, and person separation reliability was examined. The two scales displayed satisfactory psychometric properties. Applications and limitations of these two scales are also discussed. PMID:20351446

Liu, Ou Lydia; Wilson, Mark

2010-01-01

56

Career Assessment and the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article begins with a brief overview of the theories underlying the development of the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale (CDMSE; Taylor & Betz, 1983), specifically Bandura's self-efficacy (1977, 1986) theory and Crites's career maturity theory (1978). Research on the correlates and consequences of career decision- making self-efficacy is reviewed, especially that showing the strong relationships of career self-efficacy to career

Nancy E. Betz; Darrell Anthony Luzzo

1996-01-01

57

Development and Validation of a Condom Self-Efficacy Scale for College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study proposed to develop and validate a scale for the college population that measures self-efficacy in using condoms. The Condom Use Self-Efficacy Scale (CUSES) was derived from several sources and consisted of 28 items describing an individual's feelings of confidence about being able to purchase condoms, put them on and take them off, and negotiate their use with a

Linda J. Brafford; Kenneth H. Beck

1991-01-01

58

Utility of a Brief Self-Efficacy Scale in Clinical Training Program Evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Self-efficacy is often studied as a predictor of professional practice behaviors or as an outcome of clinical training, using brief scales with little validation. This study examines the utility of a brief self-efficacy scale in the evaluation of a clinical training program. Subjects were 119 registered dietitians who participated in diabetes training. Hypothesized relationships between self-efficacy ratings and indices of

Rodney Lorenz; Rebecca P. Gregory; Dianne L. Davis

2000-01-01

59

Measuring the psychological outcomes of falling: a systematic review.  

PubMed

The objectives were to identify fall-related psychological outcome measures and to undertake a systematic quality assessment of their key measurement properties. A Cochrane review of fall-prevention interventions in older adults was used to identify fall-related psychological measurements. PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO were systematically searched to identify instruments not used in trials and papers reporting the methodological quality of relevant measures. Reference lists of articles were searched for additional literature, and researchers were contacted. Two reviewers undertook quality extraction relating to content, population, reliability, validity, responsiveness, practicality, and feasibility. Twenty-five relevant papers were identified. Twenty-three measures met the inclusion criteria: six single-item questions, Falls Efficacy Scale (FES), revised FES, modified FES, FES-UK, Activities-specific Balance and Confidence Scale (ABC), ABC-UK, Confidence in maintaining Balance Scale, Mobility Efficacy Scale, adapted FES, amended FES, Survey of Activities and Fear of Falling in the Elderly (SAFFE), University of Illinois at Chicago Fear of Falling Measure, Concern about Falling Scale, Falls Handicap Inventory, modified SAFFE, Consequences of Falling Scale, and Concern about the Consequences of Falling Scale. There is limited evidence about the measurement properties of single-item measures. Several multiitem measures obtained acceptable reliability and validity, but there is less evidence regarding responsiveness, practicality, and feasibility. Researchers should select measures based on the constructs they intend to study. Further research is needed to establish and compare the instruments' measurement properties. PMID:15743297

Jørstad, Ellen C; Hauer, Klaus; Becker, Clemens; Lamb, Sarah E

2005-03-01

60

Rasch analysis of the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES) in spinal cord injury (SCI).  

PubMed

This study examined the psychometric properties of the General Self-Efficacy Scale by applying Rasch analysis to data from 102 persons with spinal cord injury. Our results suggest that the General Self-Efficacy Scale is a psychometrically robust instrument suitable for application in a spinal cord injury population. The General Self-Efficacy Scale shows an overall fit to the Rasch model (?(2) = 15.5, df = 20, p = .75), high reliability (rp = 0.92), ordered response scale structure, and no item bias by gender, age, education, and lesion levels. However, the analyses indicate a ceiling effect and potential to enhance the differentiation of the General Self-Efficacy Scale across self-efficacy levels. PMID:23463793

Peter, Claudio; Cieza, Alarcos; Geyh, Szilvia

2013-03-01

61

Development of Self-Efficacy towards Using Alternative Assessment Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Determining the candidate teachers' opinions regarding self-efficacy towards alternative assessment will be beneficial in that this will improve their competencies while using these approaches in their applications within the classroom. In this article, the development and validation of the "Self-efficacy towards Using Alternative Assessment…

Buldur, Serkan; Tatar, Nilgun

2011-01-01

62

Development of Self-Efficacy towards Using Alternative Assessment Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Determining the candidate teachers' opinions regarding self-efficacy towards alternative assessment will be beneficial in that this will improve their competencies while using these approaches in their applications within the classroom. In this article, the development and validation of the "Self-efficacy towards Using Alternative Assessment…

Buldur, Serkan; Tatar, Nilgun

2011-01-01

63

Development and Validation of the Counselor Activity Self-Efficacy Scales  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Counselor Activity Self-Efficacy Scales were developed to assess self-efficacy for performing helping skills, managing the counseling process, and handling challenging counseling situations. Factor analyses of data from 345 students in undergraduate and graduate counseling courses yielded 6 factors. Factor-derived scale scores produced adequate internal consistency and short-term test-retest reliability estimates. The scale scores were strongly related to scores on

Robert W. Lent; Clara E. Hill; Mary Ann Hoffman

2003-01-01

64

An Examination of the Factor Structures and Concurrent Validities for the Computer Attitude Scale, the Computer Anxiety Rating Scale, and the Computer Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data collected from 693 university personnel were used to evaluate the factor structures and concurrent validity of the Computer Attitude Scale, the Computer Anxiety Rating Scale, and the Computer Self-Efficacy Scale. Principal factor analyses for each of the three scales resulted in interpretable factor solutions with high alpha reliabilities. Intercorrelations among the derived factors demonstrated the concurrent validity of the

Allison W. Harrison; R. Kelly Rainer

1992-01-01

65

Development and validation of a physical self-efficacy scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conducted 6 studies, involving 861 undergraduates, to develop an individual-difference measure of physical self-efficacy with adequate psychometric properties. Factor analysis of 90 test items identified 2 underlying dimensions within a global measure of physical self-efficacy: Perceived Physical Ability and Physical Self-Presentation Confidence. Ss with positive perceptions of their physical competence outperformed Ss with poorer self-regard on 3 tasks involving the

Richard M. Ryckman; Michael A. Robbins; Billy Thornton; Peggy Cantrell

1982-01-01

66

Low admission Norton scale scores are associated with falls long after rehabilitation in the elderly with hip fractures  

PubMed Central

Background In this study, we investigated if low admission Norton scale scores (ANSS) are associated with falls, fractures, hospitalizations, and death, after rehabilitation in the elderly with hip fractures. Methods This prospective historical study followed consecutive elderly patients (?65 years) who were admitted for rehabilitation following hip fracture surgery during 2009 and followed up in January or February 2012. The incidence of falls, number of falls, incidence of fractures, number of hospitalizations, and death rates were compared between patients with low (?14) and high (?15) ANSS. Results The final cohort included 174 patients of mean age 83.6 ± 6.2 years, with 133 (76.4%) being women. Fifty-seven (27.0%) patients died during follow-up. Of the remaining 127 patients, 44 (34.6%) fell at least once and 15 (11.8%) suffered fractures. Overall, 81 (46.6%) patients had a low ANSS. Relative to patients with a high ANSS, they had a higher incidence of falls (odds ratio 3.3, 95% confidence interval 1.5–7.1; P = 0.002) and fell more times (1.2 ± 1.8 versus 0.6 ± 1.7; P = 0.002). Regression analysis showed that ANSS (as a parametric variable) as well as a low ANSS (as a nonparametric variable) were independently associated with falls (P = 0.002 and P = 0.009, respectively). There were no differences between patients with low and high ANSS in terms of incidence of fractures, number of hospitalizations, and death rates. Conclusion The Norton scoring system may be used for predicting falls long after rehabilitation in the elderly with hip fractures.

Halperin, Ehud; Engel, Tal; Sherman, Shany; Justo, Dan

2012-01-01

67

Development and Use of the Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents the rationale for the development of a skill- oriented career self-efficacy scale. It is believed that self-perceptions of these career self-efficacies at a skill-specific level can enable us to better study and understand the role of career self-efficacy beliefs in the career assessment and career development process. The procedures followed in the development of the instrument are

Samuel H. Osipow; Richard D. Temple

1996-01-01

68

Adaptation and validation of an estonian version of the general self-efficacy scale (ESES)  

Microsoft Academic Search

General self-efficacy pertains to the subjective confidence of being able to master stressful demands by means of adaptive action. A strong sense of personal efficacy is related to better health, higher achievement, and more social integration. General self-efficacy is measured with a ten-item scale by Schwarzer and Jerusalem (1995) which has been proven reliable and valid in various field studies.

Halliki Rimm

1999-01-01

69

Development of a cultural self-efficacy scale for adolescents (CSES-A)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We developed a cultural self-efficacy scale for adolescents (CSES-A) and tested its psychometric properties using both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Cultural self-efficacy (CSE) was defined as person's perception of his\\/her own capability to function effectively in situations characterized by cultural diversity. On the basis of Bandura's guideline for the development of a domain-specific self-efficacy measure, we tailored 50 items

Elena Briones; Carmen Tabernero; Carlo Tramontano; Gian Vittorio Caprara; Alicia Arenas

2009-01-01

70

Evaluation of a Short Form of the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study describes the development and evaluation of a short form of the widely used Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale (CDMSE; Taylor & Betz, 1983). The psychometric characteristics and relationship to the Career Decision Scale (CDS; Osipow, 1987) and the Vocational Identity Scale (Holland, Johnston, & Asama, 1993) were examined in a sample of 180 college students. The potential utility of

Nancy E. Betz; Karla L. Klein; Karen M. Taylor

1996-01-01

71

Development of a Drug Use Resistance Self-Efficacy (DURSE) Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objectives: To develop and evaluate psychometric properties of a new instrument, the drug use resistance self-efficacy (DURSE) scale, designed for young adolescents. Methods: Scale construction occurred in 3 phases: (1) initial development, (2) pilot testing of preliminary items, and (3) final scale administration among a sample of seventh…

Carpenter, Carrie M.; Howard, Donna

2009-01-01

72

A Scale to Measure Teachers' Self-Efficacy in Deaf-Blindness Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Introduction: The Teacher Efficacy in Deafblindness Education Scale (TEDE) was developed to expand the construct of self-efficacy to teach children with deaf-blindness. Methods: Eighty-seven special educators in the United States were asked to rate their confidence to perform a variety of tasks that are associated with teaching children who are…

Hartmann, Elizabeth

2012-01-01

73

A Scale to Measure Teachers' Self-Efficacy in Deaf-Blindness Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: The Teacher Efficacy in Deafblindness Education Scale (TEDE) was developed to expand the construct of self-efficacy to teach children with deaf-blindness. Methods: Eighty-seven special educators in the United States were asked to rate their confidence to perform a variety of tasks that are associated with teaching children who are…

Hartmann, Elizabeth

2012-01-01

74

Development and Validation of Scores on a Computer Programming Self-Efficacy Scale and Group Analyses of Novice Programmer Self-Efficacy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 32-item self-efficacy scale for computer programming was developed, primed to the C++ programming language. The scale was administered to 421 students at the beginning and end of an introductory course in C++ programming. There was growth in self-efficacy between two administrations of the scale 12 weeks apart, particularly for students who…

Ramalingam, Vennila; Wiedenbeck, Susan

1998-01-01

75

Development and validation of the Chinese version of the Diabetes Management Self-efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to translate the Diabetes Management Self-Efficacy Scale (DMSES) into Chinese and test the validity and reliability of the instrument within a Taiwanese population.

Shu-Fang Vivienne Wu; Mary Courtney; Helen Edwards; Jan McDowell; Lillie M. Shortridge-Baggett; Pei-Jen Chang

2008-01-01

76

The development and validation of an Eating Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following from Bandura's (1977a) self-efficacy theory, an Eating Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES) was developed and its psychometric properties established. Factor analysis of the 25-item scale yielded two reliable factors—one concerned with eating when experiencing negative affect (NA) and the other with eating during socially acceptable circumstances (SAC). The ESES demonstrated good internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and convergent validity. A clinical study

Shirley M. Glynn; Audrey J. Ruderman

1986-01-01

77

Evaluation of the shortened cholesterol-lowering diet self-efficacy scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Specificity in the self-efficacy construct requires that instruments assess domain-specific behaviors. The objectives of the study were to (1) reexamine and shorten the original 57-item Cholesterol-Lowering Diet Self-Efficacy Scale (CLDSES), (2) estimate reliability and validity of the short form CLDSES (CLDSES-SF), (3) examine the dimensionality of the CLDSES-SF, (4) examine discriminant validity of the scale by its ability to differentiate

Lora E. Burke; Yookyung Kim; Fisun Senuzun; Jina Choo; Susan Sereika; Jacqueline Dunbar-Jacob

2006-01-01

78

Development and Validation of Chemistry Self-Efficacy Scale for College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study described the process of developing and validating the College Chemistry Self-Efficacy Scale (CCSS) that can be\\u000a used to assess college students’ beliefs in their ability to perform essential tasks in chemistry. In the first phase, data\\u000a collected from 363 college students provided evidence for the validity and reliability of the new scale. Three dimensions\\u000a emerged: self-efficacy for cognitive

Esen Uzuntiryaki; Ye?im Çapa Ayd?n

2009-01-01

79

The Career Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale: Instrument Development and Training Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports on 4 studies that addressed the development of the Career Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale (CCSES). The instrument evidenced moderate to high internal consistency across the studies and strong test–retest reliability over a 2-week period. Convergent validity was supported by correlations with years of career counseling experience and several scales of an emotional–social counseling self-efficacy measure. Discriminant validity was

Karen M. OBrien; Mary J. Heppner; Lisa Y. Flores; Lynette Heim Bikos

1997-01-01

80

Large-scale spatial variability of riverbed temperature gradients in Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning areas  

SciTech Connect

In the Snake River basin of the Pacific northwestern United States, hydroelectric dam operations are often based on the predicted emergence timing of salmon fry from the riverbed. The spatial variability and complexity of surface water and riverbed temperature gradients results in emergence timing predictions that are likely to have large errors. The objectives of this study were to quantify the thermal heterogeneity between the river and riverbed in fall Chinook salmon spawning areas and to determine the effects of thermal heterogeneity on fall Chinook salmon emergence timing. This study quantified river and riverbed temperatures at 15 fall Chinook salmon spawning sites distributed in two reaches throughout 160 km of the Snake River in Hells Canyon, Idaho, USA, during three different water years. Temperatures were measured during the fall Chinook salmon incubation period with self-contained data loggers placed in the river and at three different depths below the riverbed surface. At all sites temperature increased with depth into the riverbed, including significant differences (p<0.05) in mean water temperature of up to 3.8°C between the river and the riverbed among all the sites. During each of the three water years studied, river and riverbed temperatures varied significantly among all the study sites, among the study sites within each reach, and between sites located in the two reaches. Considerable variability in riverbed temperatures among the sites resulted in fall Chinook salmon emergence timing estimates that varied by as much as 55 days, depending on the source of temperature data used for the estimate. Monitoring of riverbed temperature gradients at a range of spatial scales throughout the Snake River would provide better information for managing hydroelectric dam operations, and would aid in the design and interpretation of future empirical research into the ecological significance of physical riverine processes.

Hanrahan, Timothy P.

2007-02-01

81

Predictive value of stabilometry and fear of falling on falls in postmenopausal women.  

PubMed

Abstract Objectives Falls are one of the leading causes of fractures and impaired quality of life in the elderly, and they are related to balance deficit and to fear of falls. The purpose of our study is to evaluate predictors of falls in the 50-65-year-old postmenopausal population. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted on 96 postmenopausal women. Fear of falling and postural stability were assessed by using the FES-I (Falls Efficacy Scale-International) and a force platform, respectively. Fall frequency was determined in the 12-month follow-up study period. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify predictive factors of falls. Results Fear of falls, the FES-I scale and four stabilometric parameters, specifically under eyes-closed condition, were significantly higher in the group of fallers. The root mean square amplitude in the medial-lateral direction with eyes closed (RMSXec) (odds ratio 5.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-15.5, p = 0.004) and FES-I (odds ratio 3.4, 95% CI 1.1-10.5, p = 0.026) were the best independent predictive factors of the risk of falling. Conclusions RMSXec > 0.133 was the best predictive factor for falls in our group of 50-65-year-old postmenopausal women studied, and a FES-I score > 20 could predict falls in this population. PMID:23113820

Hita-Contreras, F; Martínez-Amat, A; Lomas-Vega, R; Alvarez, P; Aránega, A; Martínez-López, E; Mendoza, N

2012-11-01

82

Inpatient Falls  

PubMed Central

In this 2 part series, analysis of the risk stratification tools that are available, definition for the scope of the problem, and potential solutions through a review of the literature are presented. A systematic review was used to identify articles for risk stratification and interventions. Three risk stratification systems are discussed, St Thomas’s Risk Assessment Tool in Falling Elderly Inpatients, Morse Fall Scale, and the Hendrich Fall Risk Model. Of these scoring systems, the Hendrich Fall Risk Model is the easiest to use and score. Predominantly, multifactorial interventions are used to prevent patient falls. Education and rehabilitation are common themes in studies with statistically significant results. The second article presents a guide to implementing a quality improvement project around hospital falls. A 10-step approach to Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycles is described. Specific examples of problems and analysis are easily applicable to any institution. Furthermore, the sustainability of interventions and targeting new areas for improvement is discussed. Although specific to falls in the hospitalized patient, the goal is to present a stepwise approach which is broadly applicable to other areas requiring quality improvement.

Cumbler, Ethan U.; Simpson, Jennifer R.; Rosenthal, Laura D.; Likosky, David J.

2013-01-01

83

Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the High School Chemistry Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to develop a scale assessing high school students’ selfefficacy beliefs in chemistry-related tasks and to assess psychometric properties of scores on this scale. A pilot study with a sample of 150 high school students provided initial evidence for two-factor structure of 16-item scale, named High School Chemistry Self-Efficacy Scale (HCSS). The final form of

Ye?im Çapa Ayd?n; Esen Uzuntiryaki

2009-01-01

84

Development of the Web Users Self-Efficacy Scale (WUSE)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this research was to develop a scale that could evaluate an individuals confidence in using the Internet. Web-based resources are becoming increasingly important within higher edu- cation and it is therefore vital that students and staff feel confident and competent in the access, provision, and utilisation of these resources. The scale developed here represents an extension of

Peter Eachus; Simon Cassidy

85

Field Scale Controls of Uranium Bioreduction Efficacy: the Role of Physico-chemical Heterogeneity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It has been demonstrated in laboratory systems that bacteria from natural environments can reduce U(VI) to immobile U(IV), therefore preventing the spreading of U(VI). The ultimate rate and efficacy of bioreduction at the field scale, however, is often challenging to quantify because it depends on the characteristics of field sites. In this work, the field scale efficacy of uranium bioreduction is quantified using an integrated approach. The approach combines field data, inverse and forward hydrological and reactive transport modeling, and upscaling. The approach is used to explore the impact of local scale (tens of centimeters) parameters and processes on field scale (tens of meters) system responses to biostimulation treatments and the controls of physicochemical heterogeneity on bioreduction efficacy. Using the biostimulation experiments at the Department of Energy Old Rifle site as an example, our results show that the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity and solid phase mineral (Fe(III)) play a critical role in determining the field-scale bioreduction efficacy. Due to the dependence on Fe-reducing bacteria, the overall U(VI) bioreduction efficacy was found to be largely controlled by the abundance of Fe(III) minerals at the vicinity of the injection wells. In addition, if there is preferential flow paths that connect injection wells to down gradient Fe(III) abundant areas, uranium bioreduction efficacy can also be enhanced.

Li, L.; Gawande, N.; Kowalsky, M. B.; Steefel, C.; Hubbard, S. S.

2011-12-01

86

Developing the Computer User Self-Efficacy (CUSE) Scale: Investigating the Relationship between Computer Self-Efficacy, Gender and Experience with Computers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes the development and validation of the 30-item Computer User Self-Efficacy (CUSE) Scale, a copy of which is appended. Topics include social cognitive theory; experience and computer self-efficacy; gender differences; and the measurement of computer self-efficacy in student computer users and its relevance to learning in higher education.…

Cassidy, Simon; Eachus, Peter

2002-01-01

87

Development and Validation of the Efficacious Self-Presentation Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new self-report measure of adolescent's self-presentation is described. The self-report scale was administered to 760 16–19-year-old subjects. Results of a factor analysis supported 6 identifiable factors reflecting different concepts, theoretically discussed, related to self-presentation: ability to regulate self-image, social sensitivity, body self-confidence, social self-confidence, social openness, and social desirability. The scale showed good convergent validity and internal consistency. Assertive

Fiorenzo Laghi; Susanna Pallini; Maria D’Alessio; Roberto Baiocco

2011-01-01

88

Co-relation between risk factors of falls down and the Berg balance scale in elderly people (third age).  

PubMed

This study encompassed 77 randomly assigned participants of both sexes and older than 65 of age. Every participant was questioned in his/her own house and completely familiarized with the methodology and the aims of the questionnaire. Out of 27 men, data on falls down were provided by 4 participants (14.81%): one of them lived alone while three of them lived in their families. Out of 50 women, data on falls down were provided by 17 (34%) participants: 9 of them lived in their families and 8 lived alone. Out of all living alone women 44% fell down twice or more during this study in comparison to 20% of living alone men. Regarding the values of the score of risk factors obtained throughout the questionnaire and the Berg balance scale, there are statistically significant differences between men and women (p < 0.005, i.e. p < 0.01), as well as participants that have never fallen down (p < 0.001, i.e. p < 0.01), while regarding the life style (living alone or in the family) there are no statistically significant differences (P > 0.05). Nowadays, the Berg balance scale is the most frequently used questionnaire that is, in total, significantly superior to other ever utilized tests. Average values of results obtained throughout the Berg balance scale in this study are statistically significantly higher in men and those participants who did not provide data on falls down, while regarding the life style there are no statistically significant differences. PMID:16209668

Avdi?, Dijana; Skrbo, Armin

2003-03-01

89

The Firefighter Coping Self-Efficacy Scale: measure development and validation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors evaluated the psychometric properties of the Firefighter Coping Self-Efficacy (FFCSE) Scale, a new measure developed to assess firefighters’ perceived competence in managing stressful and traumatic experiences encountered on the job. Two samples of firefighters completed the FFCSE Scale at two different time points. Exploratory factor analysis yielded a unidimensional structure, which was further supported with confirmatory factor analysis

Jessica E. Lambert; Charles C. Benight; Erica Harrison; Roman Cieslak

2012-01-01

90

The Firefighter Coping Self-Efficacy Scale: measure development and validation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors evaluated the psychometric properties of the Firefighter Coping Self-Efficacy (FFCSE) Scale, a new measure developed to assess firefighters’ perceived competence in managing stressful and traumatic experiences encountered on the job. Two samples of firefighters completed the FFCSE Scale at two different time points. Exploratory factor analysis yielded a unidimensional structure, which was further supported with confirmatory factor analysis

Jessica E. Lambert; Charles C. Benight; Erica Harrison; Roman Cieslak

2011-01-01

91

Efficacy of petal fall and shuck split fungicides for control of scab on peach in middle Georgia, 2012  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fungicides were evaluated for control of scab in a mid-ripening experimental peach block (‘Flameprince’) located at the USDA-ARS Fruit and Tree Nut Research Laboratory (Byron, GA). Chemical formulations were applied at each application date: 3 Apr (petal fall to 1% shuck split), 10 Apr (shuck split ...

92

40Ar/ 39Ar dating links Albuquerque Volcanoes to the Pringle Falls excursion and the Geomagnetic Instability Time Scale  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Incremental heating of basaltic lava groundmass from the Albuquerque Volcanoes, New Mexico, and plagioclase from Ash D at Pringle Falls, Oregon, yield 40Ar/ 39Ar isochron ages of 218 ± 14 and 211 ± 13 ka, respectively. Sediments in which Ash D was deposited and the eight lava flows of the Albuquerque Volcanoes display excursional paleomagnetic data with virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) in the southern hemisphere and together with the statistically indistinguishable 40Ar/ 39Ar dates, establish that both sites record the Pringle Falls excursion. This excursion is also recorded by the 227 ± 8 ka Mamaku Ignimbrite, New Zealand, and by high deposition rate sediments at ODP site 919 in the North Atlantic Ocean that are dated astrochronologically at 209-207 ka. We propose that the names "Albuquerque" and "Jamaica" excursion be abandoned and that a radioisotopic age of 211 ± 13 ka be adopted for the Pringle Falls excursion, which is one of five globally expressed, well-documented excursions in marine sediment cores or dated by 40Ar/ 39Ar methods that took place from 220 to 30 ka. Together with at least five other well-dated excursions between 730 and 520 ka, some ten excursions define the Geomagnetic Instability Time Scale (GITS) for the Bruhnes Chron. Eight of these excursions have been dated using 40Ar/ 39Ar methods. If the temporal clustering of excursions in the GITS is not a sampling artefact, this suggests that the geodynamo is not intrinsically unstable, but rather that instability in the flow pattern of the outer core fluid flow causes the main dipole field to be considerably weakened such that it becomes unstable with a 200 to 300 ka recurrence interval. Excursions are an important part of dynamo behavior over geologic time scales that, in addition to reversals of the main dipole field, need to be fully considered when assessing whether theoretical and numerical simulations of the dynamo produce earth-like results.

Singer, Brad S.; Jicha, Brian R.; Kirby, Benjamin T.; Geissman, John W.; Herrero-Bervera, Emilio

2008-03-01

93

Exploring the validity of a teachers’ self-efficacy scale in five countries  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article was twofold. The first purpose was to test the validity of the Teachers’ Sense of Self-Efficacy Scale (TSES) in five settings—Canada, Cyprus, Korea, Singapore, and the United States. The second purpose was, by extension, to establish the importance of the teacher self-efficacy construct across diverse teaching conditions. Multi-group confirmatory factor analysis was used to better

Robert M. Klassen; Mimi Bong; Ellen L. Usher; Wan Har Chong; Vivien S. Huan; Isabella Y. F. Wong; Tasos Georgiou

2009-01-01

94

Addiction Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale (ACSES): development and initial validation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reports on the development of the Addiction Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale (ACSES) through two studies. Exploratory factor analysis yielded a five-factor solution that accounted for 65% of the variance. The five factors obtained assess various aspects of addiction counselors' perceived self-efficacy for working with clients in the areas of (a) specific addiction counseling skills, (b) assessment, treatment planning, and

Tamera B. Murdock; Alicia M. Wendler; Johanna E. Nilsson

2005-01-01

95

Development and validation of the Efficacious Self-Presentation Scale.  

PubMed

A new self-report measure of adolescent's self-presentation is described. The self-report scale was administered to 760 16-19-year-old subjects. Results of a factor analysis supported 6 identifiable factors reflecting different concepts, theoretically discussed, related to self-presentation: ability to regulate self-image, social sensitivity, body self-confidence, social self-confidence, social openness, and social desirability. The scale showed good convergent validity and internal consistency. Assertive tactics were predicted through ability to regulate self-image, social self-confidence, and social openness, whereas defensive tactics were predicted only through social openness and social sensitivity. The implications of the findings for future theoretical and empirical development of research in this field are discussed. PMID:21675548

Laghi, Fiorenzo; Pallini, Susanna; D'Alessio, Maria; Baiocco, Roberto

96

A Dutch translation of the Self-Efficacy for Rehabilitation Outcome Scale (SER): a first impression on reliability and validity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Self-efficacy is a relevant factor during rehabilitation after total hip or knee arthroplasty. Research was done into the reliability and validity of a Dutch translation of the Self-Efficacy for Rehabilitation Outcome Scale (SER). One hundred and forty-one persons filled in the SER questionnaire and the Self-Efficacy Expectation Scale (SES) as a control scale. Research was done into reliability and into

Martin Stevens; Inge van den Akker-Scheek; Jim R. van Horn

2005-01-01

97

Reliability Generalization: An Examination of the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to explore the variability in reliability scores on a commonly used career scale, the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale (CDMSE). Reliability generalization was employed to identify typical score reliability, variability of score reliability, and variables explaining this variability. Forty-nine pieces of work were examined, and the results revealed that 41% of them reported score

Johanna E. Nilsson; Christa K. Schmidt; William D. Meek

2002-01-01

98

Development and Testing of a Nutrition-Teaching Self-Efficacy Scale for Elementary School Teachers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To develop and validate the Nutrition-Teaching Self-Efficacy Scale (NTSES) and investigate the time spent teaching nutrition and the nutrition-teaching self-effcacy of Maryland elementary school teachers.Design: A questionnaire collected information on teacher demographics. The NTSES was adapted from science- and health-teaching self-effcacy scales, reviewed by experts, and pretested with elementary teachers. Both were converted to an on-line format for distribution

Nancy Brenowitz; Cynthia Reeves Tuttle

2003-01-01

99

The reliability and validity of the arthritis self-efficacy scale in a UK context  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this research was to examine the comprehensibility, reliability and validity of the Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale (ASE), amongst British people with arthritis in the context of community-based Arthritis Self-Management Programmes (ASMP). The ASE scale is designed to measure perceived ability to control various aspects of arthritis. Data were drawn from four studies: Study 1 tested the comprehensibility of

J. H. Barlow; B. Williams; C. C. Wright

1997-01-01

100

Development and psychometric evaluation of the eldercare cultural self-efficacy scale.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to describe the development and psychometric evaluation of the Eldercare Cultural Self-Efficacy Scale (ECSES). Bandura's Theory of Self-Efficacy provided the theoretical framework. The sample consisted of students (N=248) from seven schools of nursing in a northeast state. The psychometric evaluation included: item analysis, principal factor analysis (PFA) with orthogonal rotation, and internal consistency reliability using Cronbach's alpha. Descriptive statistics were used to determine levels of eldercare cultural self-efficacy among the sample. The PFA revealed a four factor structure (Assessing for Lifestyle and Social Patterns, Determining Cultural Health Practices, Determining Cultural Beliefs, and Dealing with Grief and the Losses Associated with Aging) that accounted for 61% of explained variance. The subscales alpha coefficients ranged from .82 to .95. Findings demonstrate the 28 item scale to be a reliable and valid instrument for use in nursing education to examine students' confidence in caring for ethnically diverse elders. PMID:16646952

Shellman, Juliette

2006-02-15

101

Translation and validation of the breastfeeding Self-Efficacy scale into chinese  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this methodological study was to translate the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale (BSES) into Mandarin and determine the psychometric characteristics among a sample of 186 Chinese women. The BSES was translated and pilot-tested with 21 breastfeeding women. Following minor revisions to ensure content and semantic equivalence, the instrument was administered to 186 hospitalized breastfeeding women, who were then contacted

Xiaona Dai; Cindy-Lee Dennis

2003-01-01

102

A Scenario-Based Dieting Self-Efficacy Scale: The DIET-SE  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The article discusses a scenario-based dieting self-efficacy scale, the DIET-SE, developed from dieter's inventory of eating temptations (DIET). The DIET-SE consists of items that describe scenarios of eating temptations for a range of dieting situations, including high-caloric food temptations. Four studies assessed the psychometric properties…

Stich, Christine; Knauper, Barbel; Tint, Ami

2009-01-01

103

Proposed Modifications to the Conceptual Model of Coaching Efficacy and Additional Validity Evidence for the Coaching Efficacy Scale II-High School Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this study was to determine whether theoretically relevant sources of coaching efficacy could predict the measures derived from the Coaching Efficacy Scale II-High School Teams (CES II-HST). Data were collected from head coaches of high school teams in the United States (N = 799). The analytic framework was a multiple-group…

Myers, Nicholas; Feltz, Deborah; Chase, Melissa

2011-01-01

104

Proposed Modifications to the Conceptual Model of Coaching Efficacy and Additional Validity Evidence for the Coaching Efficacy Scale II-High School Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine whether theoretically relevant sources of coaching efficacy could predict the measures derived from the Coaching Efficacy Scale II-High School Teams (CES II-HST). Data were collected from head coaches of high school teams in the United States (N = 799). The analytic framework was a multiple-group…

Myers, Nicholas; Feltz, Deborah; Chase, Melissa

2011-01-01

105

Development and Validation of Chemistry Self-Efficacy Scale for College Students  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study described the process of developing and validating the College Chemistry Self-Efficacy Scale (CCSS) that can be used to assess college students’ beliefs in their ability to perform essential tasks in chemistry. In the first phase, data collected from 363 college students provided evidence for the validity and reliability of the new scale. Three dimensions emerged: self-efficacy for cognitive skills, self-efficacy for psychomotor skills, and self-efficacy for everyday applications. In the second phase, data collected from an independent sample of 353 college students confirmed the factorial structure of the 21-item CCSS. The Cronbach alpha coefficients ranged from 0.82 to 0.92. In addition, each dimension of the CCSS had moderate and significant correlations with student chemistry achievement and differentiated between major and non-major students. Followed by the additional validation studies, the CCSS will serve as a valuable tool for both instructors and researchers in science education to assess college students’ chemistry self-efficacy beliefs.

Uzuntiryaki, Esen; Çapa Ayd?n, Ye?im

2009-08-01

106

Instrument development and validation of Perceived Physical Activity Self-Efficacy Scale for adolescents.  

PubMed

Thorough evaluation and systematic instrumentation about self-efficacy related to physical activity (PA) in adolescents is necessary to determine efficacy and effectiveness of intervention on PA behavior. The purpose of this report was to investigate the psychometric properties of a perceived self-efficacy scale for PA. In the observational cross-sectional cohort design, an 11-item Perceived Physical Activity Self-Efficacy Scale was evaluated in a sample of 206 racially diverse adolescents at a Midwestern U.S. public middle school. Participants: The convenience sample included 105 boys and 101 girls from sixth to eighth grade: 47.1% of the participants were European American, 19.4% were African American, and 18% were "other" races and "multi-racial." The University Institutional Review Board provided approval for conducting the study. The same instruments were delivered to participants on two separate occasions, 2 weeks apart. The results from this study revealed satisfactory internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha coefficient of .86, and test-retest reliability of .61. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) showed a one-factor structure with modest fit. However, the self-efficacy was not related to PA and known-group technique was not supported. The study measure demonstrated satisfactory reliability and construct validity through CFA. PMID:21469540

Wu, Tsu-Yin; Robbins, Lorraine B; Hsieh, Hsing-Fang

2011-01-01

107

Evaluating a modified exercise self-efficacy scale for college-age women.  

PubMed

This pilot study examined test-retest and internal consistency reliabilities of original and modified formats of the Exercise Self-efficacy Scale in college-age women. 30 completed original and modified versions of the scale. Data from both tests, administered 1 wk. apart, were analyzed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) to assess test-retest reliability and Cronbach coefficient alpha for internal consistency. Scores for both versions correlated .96. Cronbach coefficients alpha for the original scale were .96 for Time 1 and .98 for Time 2. Cronbach coefficients alpha for the revised scale were .95 for Time 1 and .98 for Time 2. Test-retest reliability and internal consistency remained consistently high for both versions of the scales within this sample. Implications for use of this scale and recommendations for research are given. PMID:17326499

Ornes, Lynne L; Ransdell, Lynda B; Pett, Marjorie A

2006-12-01

108

Development of a nutrition self-efficacy scale for prospective physicians.  

PubMed

Diet is associated with 5 of the 10 leading causes of death in the U.S., including coronary heart disease, certain types of cancer, atherosclerosis, and type 2 diabetes. Physicians can play a pivotal role in promoting nutritional management of diabetes and other chronic diseases. Therefore, it is important that valid instruments are created so administrators can better assess the educational needs of prospective physicians, their practices, and patient outcomes. Two comparable studies, one year apart, were undertaken to create an instrument that measures nutritional competence and self-efficacy among prospective physicians. This paper: (a) describes the development of a nutrition self-efficacy scale (NSES) and (b) demonstrates reliability and validity of the NSES using Rasch modeling. It concludes with a discussion of potential contributions of this scale for assessing mastery of applied nutrition among prospective physicians. PMID:12029174

Schulman, J A; Wolfe, E W

2000-01-01

109

Revision and validation of the medication adherence self-efficacy scale (MASES) in hypertensive African Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study purpose was to revise and examine the validity of the Medication Adherence Self-Efficacy Scale (MASES) in an independent\\u000a sample of 168 hypertensive African Americans: mean age 54 years (SD = 12.36); 86% female; 76% high school education or greater.\\u000a Participants provided demographic information; completed the MASES, self-report and electronic measures of medication adherence\\u000a at baseline and three months. Confirmatory (CFA), exploratory (EFA)

Senaida Fernandez; William Chaplin; Antoinette M. Schoenthaler; Gbenga Ogedegbe

2008-01-01

110

DEVELOPMENT AND INITIAL VALIDATION OF THE MULTICULTURAL COUNSELING SELF-EFFICACY SCALE—RACIAL DIVERSITY FORM  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drawing upon social–cognitive theory and the multicultural counseling competency literature, the Multicultural Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale—Racial Diversity Form (MCSE-RD) was developed to assess perceived ability to counsel racially diverse clients. Data were collected from 181 graduate students in counseling-related programs, 41 undergraduate psychology students, and 22 graduate students enrolled in a prepracticum course. Results of an exploratory factor analysis retained 37

HUNG-BIN SHEU; ROBERT W. LENT

2007-01-01

111

Toward the Development of a Family Business Self-Efficacy Scale: A Resource-Based Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given the importance of succession planning in family-owned businesses, our research is focused on identifying the key dimensions that could comprise a family business self-efficacy scale. We employed an explorative qualitative research methodology by querying a group of family business presidents to describe the skills critical for success. Using a resource-based perspective and relevant family business succession literature, we organized

Alex DeNoble; Sanford Ehrlich; Gangaram Singh

2007-01-01

112

The Portuguese Version of the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale—Short Form  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to translate and psychometrically assess a Portuguese version of the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale—Short Form (BSES-SF). The original English version of the BSES-SF was translated to Portuguese and tested among a sample of 89 mothers in southern Brazil from the 2nd to 12th postpartum week followed by face-to-face interviews. The mean total score of the

Carlos Zubaran; Katia Foresti; Marina Schumacher; Mariana Rossi Thorell; Aline Amoretti; Lúcia Müller; Cindy Lee Dennis

2010-01-01

113

An Examination of a Counsellor Self-Efficacy Scale (COSE) using an Israeli Sample  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explored the reliability and validity of a counsellor self-efficacy scale (the COSE) with an Israeli sample of\\u000a candidates seeking entry into a university graduate program in school counselling. The COSE measures were compared to measures\\u000a of self-monitoring and evaluation of adaptability to counselling studies that were determined before admission to the program.\\u000a Findings question the reliability of the

Moshe Israelashvili; Peretz Socher

2007-01-01

114

The development and testing of the pelvic floor muscle exercise self-efficacy scale.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to establish a reliable and valid instrument to evaluate women' s confidence in performing pelvic floor muscle exercise (PFME). Based on the researcher' s own experience and with extended literature review, social cognitive theory and a health promotion model were utilized to formulate the 17-item Chen pelvic floor muscle exercise self-efficacy (PFMSE) scale. Data were collected from 106 urinarily incontinent women and the reliability and validity of the scale were tested. The results showed that the scale has a high Cronbach' s alpha of .95 for its internal consistency. Test-retest reliability over 6-30 days was r = .86 (p < .001), showing acceptable stability of the Chen PFMSE scale. Exploratory factor analysis was used to test the initial construct validity, and two factors were extracted, which explained 34.16% and 32.55% of the total variance respectively, with a total of 66.71% . The two factors were named as (1) belief in PFME execution and its benefits, and (2) belief in performing PFME as scheduled and despite barriers. It is also evident that the Chen PFMSE scale satisfies concurrent validity when compared with well-developed and tested instruments such as general self-efficacy ( GSE), perceived PFME benefits, and incontinence impact questionnaire-7 (IIQ-7). The results suggest that the Chen PFMSE scale has solid psychometric properties, and is a useful tool for clinicians to design appropriate interventions and to foster positive PFME self-efficacy during treatment for women with urinary incontinence and undergoing PFME training. PMID:15619176

Chen, Shu-Yueh

2004-12-01

115

Reliability and Validity of the Self-Efficacy Expectations and Outcome Expectations After Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Implantation Scales  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability and validity characteristics of two new scales that measure self-efficacy expectations (Self-Efficacy Expectations After Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Implantation Scale [SE-ICD]) and outcome expectations (Outcome Expectations After ICD Implantation Scale [OE-ICD]) in survivors (N = 168) of sudden cardiac arrest, all of whom received an ICD. Cronbach's ? reliability demonstrated good

Cynthia M. Dougherty; Sandra K. Johnston; Elaine Adams Thompson

2007-01-01

116

Efficacy of a multifaceted podiatry intervention to improve balance and prevent falls in older people: study protocol for a randomised trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Falls in older people are a major public health problem, with at least one in three people aged over 65 years falling each year. There is increasing evidence that foot problems and inappropriate footwear increase the risk of falls, however no studies have been undertaken to determine whether modifying these risk factors decreases the risk of falling. This article

Martin J Spink; Hylton B Menz; Stephen R Lord

2008-01-01

117

Development of a Scale to Measure Pharmacists' Self-Efficacy in Performing Medication Therapy Management Services  

PubMed Central

Background Measuring community pharmacists’ self-efficacy in performing medication therapy management (MTM) services can be useful for tailoring interventions and predicting participation. Objective To identify relevant survey constructs related to the Wisconsin Pharmacy Quality Collaborative (WPQC) MTM program and to evaluate scale validity. Methods The 31-item MTM Self-efficacy Scale was developed using previous research, identifying critical program components, and beta-testing. After administration to pharmacists in the 53 WPQC pilot sites, summary statistics and exploratory factor analysis (EFA) were conducted. Parallel analysis was used to determine the optimal number of factors. Internal consistency reliabilities were calculated. Results Baseline participation rate was 94% (N=76). The 11-point scale (0–10) item means ranged from 2.83±3.05 to 7.82±2.19. Parallel analysis produced a 3-factor solution, accounting for 56% of the variance. Low factor loadings or unacceptably high cross-loadings resulted in 17 item deletions. The final EFA on the remaining 14 items retained the original 3-factor solution and increased the proportion of explained variance (72%). The factors relate to MTM tasks (alpha = 0.92), personal interactions (alpha = 0.86), and goal setting (alpha = 0.84). Overall Cronbach’s alpha = 0.90. Conclusion Constructs for measuring self-efficacy were identified that may aid in future research predicting whether pharmacists engage in and persist in providing MTM services.

Martin, Beth A.; Chui, Michelle A; Thorpe, Joshua M; Mott, David A.; Kreling, David H.

2010-01-01

118

The short version of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale: its validity, reliability, and relationship to balance impairment and falls in older adults.  

PubMed

A shortened version of the ABC 16-item scale (ABC-16), the ABC-6, has been proposed as an alternative balance confidence measure. We investigated whether the ABC-6 is a valid and reliable measure of balance confidence and examined its relationship to balance impairment and falls in older adults. Thirty-five community-dwelling older adults completed the ABC-16, including the 6 questions of the ABC-6. They also completed the following clinical balance tests: unipedal stance time (UST), functional reach (FR), Timed Up and Go (TUG), and maximum step length (MSL). Participants reported 12-month falls history. Balance confidence on the ABC-6 was significantly lower than on the ABC-16, however scores were highly correlated. Fallers reported lower balance confidence than non-fallers as measured by the ABC-6 scale, but confidence did not differ between the groups with the ABC-16. The ABC-6 significantly correlated with all balance tests assessed and number of falls. The ABC-16 significantly correlated with all balance tests assessed, but not with number of falls. Test-retest reliability for the ABC-16 and ABC-6 was good to excellent. The ABC-6 is a valid and reliable measure of balance confidence in community-dwelling older adults, and shows stronger relationships to falls than does the ABC-16. The ABC-6 may be a more useful balance confidence assessment tool than the ABC-16. PMID:19615762

Schepens, Stacey; Goldberg, Allon; Wallace, Melissa

2009-07-16

119

The short version of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale: Its validity, reliability, and relationship to balance impairment and falls in older adults  

PubMed Central

A shortened version of the ABC 16-item scale (ABC-16), the ABC-6, has been proposed as an alternative balance confidence measure. We investigated whether the ABC-6 is a valid and reliable measure of balance confidence and examined its relationship to balance impairment and falls in older adults. Thirty-five community-dwelling older adults completed the ABC-16, including the six questions of the ABC-6. They also completed the following clinical balance tests: unipedal stance time (UST), functional reach (FR), Timed Up and Go (TUG), and maximum step length (MSL). Participants reported twelve-month falls history. Balance confidence on the ABC-6 was significantly lower than on the ABC-16, however scores were highly correlated. Fallers reported lower balance confidence than non-fallers as measured by the ABC-6 scale, but confidence did not differ between the groups with the ABC-16. The ABC-6 significantly correlated with all balance tests assessed and number of falls. The ABC-16 significantly correlated with all balance tests assessed, but not with number of falls. Test-retest reliability for the ABC-16 and ABC-6 was good to excellent. The ABC-6 is a valid and reliable measure of balance confidence in community-dwelling older adults, and shows stronger relationships to falls than does the ABC-16. The ABC-6 may be a more useful balance confidence assessment tool than the ABC-16.

Schepens, Stacey; Goldberg, Allon; Wallace, Melissa

2009-01-01

120

Validation of the condom use self-efficacy scale in Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background The measurement of condom use self-efficacy requires contextually suitable, valid and reliable instruments due to variability of the scale across nations with different cultural and ethnic backgrounds. This study aims to construct a condom use self-efficacy scale suitable to Ethiopia (CUSES-E), based on the original scale developed by Brafford and Beck. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on a random sample of 492 students at Hawassa University. A self-administered questionnaire containing 28 items from the original scale was used to collect the data. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) with Varimax rotation was used to extract factor structures. Cronbach’s alpha and item-total correlations were used to determine the internal consistency of the scale. The convergent and discriminant validity of the scale was verified using a correlation matrix. Results The PCA extracted three factors containing a total of 9-items. The extracted factors were labeled Assertiveness, Fear for partner rejection and Intoxicant Control, with internal consistency coefficients (Cronbach’s alpha) of 0.86, 0.86 and 0.92, respectively. Altogether, the factors explained 77.8% of variance in the items. An evaluation of CUSES-E showed a significantly higher self-efficacy score among students who ever used condoms; P?scale is generalizable and replicable. Conclusion This study of CUSES using an Ethiopian population found a different dimension to emerge, suggesting that the scale should be validated to local contexts before application. The CUSES-E is valid, reliable and replicable. Therefore, health cadres and researchers in Ethiopia can apply this scale to promote condom utilization to Ethiopian school youths. However, future research to develop a suitable scale (highly valid and reliable) in concordance with the local vernacular using a prior qualitative study is needed.

2013-01-01

121

Development and psychometric testing of a breast cancer survivor self-efficacy scale.  

PubMed

Purpose/Objectives: To describe the development of a self-efficacy instrument that measures perceived ability to manage symptoms and quality-of-life problems resulting from the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer.Design: Items were developed and content validity assessed. A 14-item scale was psychometrically evaluated using internal consistency reliability and several types of construct validity.Sample: 1,127 female breast cancer survivors (BCSs).Methods: Written consents were mailed to the research office. Data were collected via mail and telephone.Main Research Variables: Demographics, symptom bother, communication with healthcare provider, attention function, fear of recurrence, depression, marital satisfaction, fatigue, sexual functioning, trait and state anxiety, and overall well-being.Findings: Data demonstrated that the breast cancer self-efficacy scale (BCSES) was reliable, with an alpha coefficient of 0.89, inter-item correlations ranging from 0.3-0.6, and item-total correlation coefficients ranging from 0.5-0.73. Three of 14 items were deleted because of redundancy as identified through high (> 0.7) inter-item correlations. Factor analysis revealed that the scale was unidimensional. Predictive validity was supported through testing associations between self-efficacy and theoretically supported quality-of-life variables, including physical, psychological, and social dimensions, as well as overall well-being.Conclusions: The BCSES demonstrated high internal consistency reliability, unidimensionality, and excellent content and construct validity. This scale should be integrated into interventions that target self-efficacy for managing symptoms in BCSs.Implications for Nursing: Nurses working with BCSs may use this tool to assess areas in which survivors might need to build confidence to adequately cope with their specific survivorship concerns.Knowledge Translation: The use of the BCSES can inform nurse researchers about the impact of an intervention on self-efficacy in the context of breast cancer survivorship, improving the ability to deliver effective interventions. The scale is brief and easy to administer. Results of this study demonstrate clear psychometric reliability and validity, suggesting that the BCSES should be put to use immediately in interventions targeting the quality of life of BCSs. PMID:24161644

Champion, Victoria L; Ziner, Kim W; Monahan, Patrick O; Stump, Timothy E; Cella, David; Smith, Lisa G; Bell, Cynthia J; Von Ah, Diane; Sledge, George W

2013-11-01

122

The Role of Self-Efficacy in HIV Treatment Adherence: Validation of the HIV Treatment Adherence Self-Efficacy Scale (HIV-ASES)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adherence to HIV treatment, including adherence to antiretroviral (ART) medication regimens, is paramount in the management\\u000a of HIV. Self-efficacy for treatment adherence has been identified as an important correlate of medication adherence in the\\u000a treatment of HIV and other medical conditions. This paper describes the validation of the HIV Treatment Adherence Self-Efficacy\\u000a Scale (HIV-ASES) with two samples of HIV+ adults

Mallory O. Johnson; Torsten B. Neilands; Samantha E. Dilworth; Stephen F. Morin; Robert H. Remien; Margaret A. Chesney

2007-01-01

123

Development and validation of a self-efficacy scale for use in British patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RASE)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. Current arthritis self-efficacy scales have attracted some criticism. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop and validate a measure of self-efficacy for use in British rheumatoid arthritis patients wRheumatoid Arthritis Self-efficacy (RASE) scalex. Methods. Phase I: item generation of self-management strategies by rheumatology professionals and patients to create a pilot RASE. Phase II: examination of the internal

S. Hewlett; Z. Cockshott; J. Kirwan; J. Barrett; J. Stamp; I. Haslock

2001-01-01

124

Evaluation of the Validity of the Condom Use Self-Efficacy Scale (CUSES) in Young Men Using Two Behavioral Simulations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Assessment of behavioral skills remains critical to the evaluation of HIV prevention interventions; however, investigators often rely upon participant reports of self-efficacy to estimate such skills. We evaluated the relationship between self-efficacy beliefs for condom use and behavioral performance. Forty-three men completed the Condom Use Self-Efficacy Scale (CUSES) and participated in 2 behavioral assessments. Regression analyses indicated that the CUSES

Andrew D. Forsyth; Michael P. Carey; R. Wayne Fuqua

1997-01-01

125

Development and validation of a self-efficacy measure for people with multiple sclerosis: the Multiple Sclerosis Self-efficacy Scale.  

PubMed

The aim of this study is to develop and validate a brief measure of self-efficacy specifically for use with people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Self-efficacy is the subjective belief that one can overcome challenges that one is faced with. In order to incorporate the subjective experiences of individuals with MS, a 'patient-focused' methodology has been adopted. Open-ended interviews were used to generate potential scale items. Items were piloted on an initial sample of individuals with MS and reduced to 14 items on the basis of their perceived relevance to this patient group. The final 14-item scale was then used with a further 142 individuals in order to assess its psychometric properties. The scale demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.81) and test-retest reliability (r = 0.81, P < 0.001) and acceptable validity. Issues concerning the assessment of validity are discussed in terms of the scale's relevancy to individuals with MS and the theoretical issues around the construct of self-efficacy. The scale has shown sensitivity to detect change following a brief therapeutic intervention, with an effect size of 0.502. This MS Self-efficacy Scale could, therefore, be a useful tool in the assessment of psychological adjustment and quality-of-life of individuals with MS. PMID:12617272

Rigby, S A; Domenech, C; Thornton, E W; Tedman, S; Young, C A

2003-02-01

126

Validation of the Business Computer Self-Efficacy Scale: Assessment of the Computer Literacy of Incoming Business Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The business computer self-efficacy (BCSE) scale is potentially an important tool for researchers studying business students and professionals, but it needs to be validated for use. Content validity was established by Stephens and Shotick (2002). This research analyzes the scale under both criterion-related and construct validation. The scale is…

Stephens, Paul

2006-01-01

127

The Validity and Reliability Study of the Turkish Version of the Online Technologies Self-Efficacy Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of the present study is to adapt a scale of self-efficacy towards online technologies which was developed by Miltiadou and Yu (2000) to Turkish. In order to adapt the scale, first, the scale items were translated to Turkish by the researchers. Then, a translation form was further developed by consulting eight specialists. These English and…

Horzum, Mehmet Baris; Cakir, Ozlem

2009-01-01

128

Preliminary Psychometric Evaluation of a New Self-Efficacy Scale and Its Relationship to Treatment Outcome in Social Anxiety Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept of self-efficacy as applied to individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD) represents a person's confidence in being able to convey a favorable impression to oth- ers. The current study investigated the psychometric properties and clinical usefulness of a new measure called the Self-Efficacy for Social Situations (SESS) Scale. Results provide preliminary evidence for the reliability and validity of

Brandon A. Gaudiano; James D. Herbert

2003-01-01

129

Preliminary Psychometric Evaluation of a New Self-Efficacy Scale and Its Relationship to Treatment Outcome in Social Anxiety Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept of self-efficacy as applied to individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD) represents a person's confidence in being able to convey a favorable impression to others. The current study investigated the psychometric properties and clinical usefulness of a new measure called the Self-Efficacy for Social Situations (SESS) Scale. Results provide preliminary evidence for the reliability and validity of the

Brandon A. Gaudiano; James D. Herbert

2003-01-01

130

Assessing fear of falling: Can a short version of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale be useful?  

PubMed

We present the process of further validation of the 16-item Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale (ABC-16) and a short version (ABC-6) derived by us, to assess balance confidence and fear of falling (FOF). The ABC-16 was administrated to three groups who were anticipated to have a range of balance confidence: 70 patients with higher level gait disorders (HLGDs), 68 healthy controls, and 19 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Item reduction was based on identifying items with the lowest scores (high FOF) among the patients. Internal consistency and discriminative validity were assessed using Cronbach's alpha and logistic regression, respectively. The intraclass correlation (ICC) between the short and long versions was assessed using a mixed model approach, accounting for the difference between the scores of the two versions. Six items were found to reflect the most frightening conditions, especially in the patient groups, and to form the short version (ABC-6). Internal consistency of the ABC-16 and ABC-6 were high in the three groups: Cronbach's alpha was between 0.83 and 0.91 and 0.81 and 0.90, respectively. Compared to the control group, the sensitivity of the ABC-16 was 96% for identification of patients with HLGDs (greatest FOF) and 58% for identification of PDs (moderate FOF), based only on the ABC scores. Similar values were obtained for the short version, i.e., 91% for HLGDs and 53% for PDs. ICCs between the short and the long versions was 0.88 (HLGDs), 0.83 (PDs), and 0.78 (Controls). To conclude, the short version of the ABC has properties analogous to the parent questionnaire and is apparently useful in assessing FOF. PMID:16991140

Peretz, Chava; Herman, Talia; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M; Giladi, Nir

2006-12-01

131

Development of a scale to measure core beliefs and perceived self efficacy in adults with epilepsy.  

PubMed

A scale based on underlying core beliefs generated by the experience of epilepsy was developed. The scale, with measures of coping, adaptability, and knowledge, was used to examine the commonly-reported differences in emotional adjustment between patients (EP) and a non-epileptic population (NEP). The EP had significantly lower perceived self efficacy and was more depressed and anxious than the NEP controls. The NEP showed greater knowledge of medical aspects of epilepsy than the EP. Positive correlations between scale values and measures of mastery, self esteem, affect balance, felt stigma and impact of epilepsy were found. Factor analysis produced a three factor solution of emotion, knowledge and anxiety which explained 61.6% of the variance in scores. Results are discussed in terms of Bandura's theory of self efficacy as the motivating and sustaining force in the ability to change behaviour. Core beliefs are central to both the development and maintenance of anxiety and depression in epilepsy patients and need to be addressed in any attempts at remedial intervention. PMID:7582658

Tedman, S; Thornton, E; Baker, G

1995-09-01

132

Breastfeeding and Aboriginal women: validation of the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form.  

PubMed

The purpose of this methodological investigation, part of a prospective cohort study, was to test the reliability and validity of the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (BSES-SF) among Aboriginal women.The sample comprised 130 breastfeeding Aboriginal women from the postpartum ward of an urban tertiary care hospital or a rural community hospital.The women provided baseline information while in hospital and were telephoned at 4 and 8 weeks postpartum for assessment of their method of infant feeding. The BSES-SF was found to be a valid and reliable tool for assessing breastfeeding self-efficacy among Aboriginal women. Significant differences were found in BSES-SF in-hospital scores among women who at 4 weeks postpartum were exclusively breastfeeding, combination feeding, or solely feeding formula (F(2) = 7.31, p = 0.001).The authors conclude that Aboriginal women with low breastfeeding self-efficacy in the early postpartum period may be at risk for early cessation and could benefit from additional breastfeeding support. PMID:23923727

McQueen, Karen A; Montelpare, William J; Dennis, Cindy-Lee

2013-06-01

133

How Do Things Fall?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Learners engage in close observation of falling objects. They determine it is the amount of air resistance, not the weight of an object, which determines how quickly an object falls. This demonstration and activity can be combined with other activities to create a larger lesson. Resource contains vocabulary definitions and suggestions for assessment, extensions, and scaling for different levels of learners.

Zamora-Thompson, Xochitl; Heavner, Ben; Zarske, Malinda S.; Carlson, Denise

2004-01-01

134

The firefighter coping self-efficacy scale: measure development and validation.  

PubMed

The authors evaluated the psychometric properties of the Firefighter Coping Self-Efficacy (FFCSE) Scale, a new measure developed to assess firefighters' perceived competence in managing stressful and traumatic experiences encountered on the job. Two samples of firefighters completed the FFCSE Scale at two different time points. Exploratory factor analysis yielded a unidimensional structure, which was further supported with confirmatory factor analysis using a second sample. Internal consistency of the measure was excellent. Analysis of cross-sectional data indicated FFCSE was positively associated with measures of psychological well-being and social support, and negatively associated with work-related stress and psychological distress. FFCSE also uniquely contributed to the variance in psychological distress, over and above variables previously shown to be associated with distress among this population. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:21476153

Lambert, Jessica E; Benight, Charles C; Harrison, Erica; Cieslak, Roman

2011-05-24

135

The short version of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale: Its validity, reliability, and relationship to balance impairment and falls in older adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

A shortened version of the ABC 16-item scale (ABC-16), the ABC-6, has been proposed as an alternative balance confidence measure. We investigated whether the ABC-6 is a valid and reliable measure of balance confidence and examined its relationship to balance impairment and falls in older adults. Thirty-five community-dwelling older adults completed the ABC-16, including the 6 questions of the ABC-6.

Stacey Schepens; Allon Goldberg; Melissa Wallace

2010-01-01

136

Racer efficacy study, Fall 2007  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Weed control is a serious concern for commercial vegetable producers because of the limited number of herbicides available for this group of minor crops and the potential for crop injury. Organic producers of vegetables have an even bigger challenge since their weed control tools are limited to cul...

137

Parenting Behavior, Mothers' Self-Efficacy Beliefs, and Toddler Performance on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Examined parenting self-efficacy as a potential mediator of effect of competence-promoting and inhibiting parenting on toddlers' scores on mental scale of the Bayley Scales. Found that effect of competence-inhibiting composite (forceful redirection of child's attention, ignoring and reinforcing misbehavior, potentially distracting self- conscious…

Coleman, Priscilla K.; Trent, Alacia; Bryan, Sarah; King, Barbara; Rogers, Nikel; Nazir, Mahvash

2002-01-01

138

The Evaluation Self-Efficacy Scale for Assessing Progress toward CSWE Accreditation-Related Objectives: A Replication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: The Evaluation Self-Efficacy Scale (ESE) is being developed as an outcomes assessment instrument for social work courses focusing on evaluation. Method: This scale, based on social cognitive theory, was pretested, revised, and then used with a final sample of 85 master's-level students in the original study. Using a single-group,…

Holden, Gary; Barker, Kathleen; Rosenberg, Gary; Onghena, Patrick

2008-01-01

139

A Psychometric Evaluation of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale With Korean Students: A Rasch Model Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale (CDSE) is one of the most frequently used in the field of career development and counseling. In this study, using the Rasch rating scale model analysis, the CDSE Scale was evaluated by the content, structural, and substantive aspects of validity in a sample of college students from South Korea. Overall, the 5-point Likert-type format response

Suk Kyung Nam; Eunjoo Yang; Sang Min Lee; Sang Hee Lee; Hyunsoo Seol

2011-01-01

140

Validation of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Global Improvement Scale: An Integrated Symptom End Point for Assessing Treatment Efficacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Global Improvement Scale (GIS) assesses multiple irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms using a patient-defined 7-point Likert scale ranging from symptoms substantially worse to substantially improved. To evaluate the scale as an efficacy end point, data were collected from two 12-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of female nonconstipated IBS patients. GIS responders were defined as having substantial or moderate improvement

Susan Gordon; Vanessa Ameen; Barbara Bagby; Britt Shahan; Priti Jhingran; Eric Carter

2003-01-01

141

The efficacy of a specific balance-strategy training programme for preventing falls among older people: a pilot randomised controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: older people participate in exercise programmes to reduce the risk of falls but no study has investigated a speciWc balance strategy training intervention presented in a workstation format for small groups. Objective: to determine whether a speciWc balance strategy training programmeme delivered in a workstation format was superior to a community based exercise class programme for reducing falls. Design:

JENNIFER C. NITZ; NANCY LOW CHOY

142

Translation and Validation of the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale Into Spanish: Data From a Puerto Rican Population  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many new mothers discontinue breastfeeding prematurely due to difficulties encountered rather than maternal choice. Research has shown that a significant predictor of breastfeeding duration is maternal confidence. Using self-efficacy theory as a conceptual framework to measure breastfeeding confidence, the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale (BSES) was developed and psychometrically tested among English-speaking mothers. The purpose of this methodological study was to translate

Marcelina Molina Torres; René R. Dávila Torres; Ana M. Parrilla Rodríguez; Cindy-Lee Dennis

2003-01-01

143

Development and evaluation of a medication adherence self-efficacy scale in hypertensive African-American patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Self-efficacy, a known predictor of a wide range of health behaviors, has not been investigated in studies of adherence to antihypertensive medications. A medication adherence self-efficacy scale was developed and evaluated in ambulatory hypertensive African-American patients in two sequential phases. For the item-generation phase, open-ended interviews with 106 patients were used to elicit their experiences with taking antihypertensive medications. Using

Gbenga Ogedegbe; Carol A Mancuso; John P Allegrante; Mary E Charlson

2003-01-01

144

Development and validation of the Communication and Attitudinal Self-Efficacy scale for cancer (CASE-cancer)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We sought to develop a reliable and valid measure of patient self-efficacy within the context of productive communication and positive attitude for cancer patients. A set of 19 potential items for the Communication and Attitudinal Self-Efficacy scale for cancer (CASE-cancer) was pilot tested with 50 cancer patients. Based on the pilot test, item valence was made consistent (i.e., all items

Michael S. Wolf; Chih-Hung Chang; Terry Davis; Gregory Makoul

2005-01-01

145

Psychometric Properties of the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale Short Form in an Ethnically Diverse U.K. Sample  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To psychometrically assess the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (BSES-SF) among a multicultural U.K. sample and to examine the relationship between breastfeeding self-efficacy and maternal demographic variables. Design: A cohort study where breastfeeding women completed questionnaires in-hospital and at 4 weeks postpartum. Sample: 165 breastfeeding women at the maternity ward in Birmingham Women's Hospital inpatient department. Measurements: BSES-SF. Results: The

Anna Gregory; Kate Penrose; Claire Morrison; Cindy-Lee Dennis; Christine MacArthur

2008-01-01

146

Rasch calibration of physical activity self-efficacy and social support scale for persons with intellectual disabilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to investigate the construct validity of the Self-Efficacy\\/Social Support for Activity for persons with Intellectual Disability (SE\\/SS-AID) scales developed by Peterson, Peterson, Lowe, & Nothwehr (2009). A total of 146 participants with intellectual disabilities completed 6 self-efficacy (SE) items and 18 social support (SS) items. After applying the Rasch rating model, all SE items

Miyoung Lee; Jana J. Peterson; Alicia Dixon

2010-01-01

147

Assessing medication adherence self-efficacy among low-literacy patients: development of a pictographic visual analogue scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health behavior interventions are often groundedin SocialCognitive Theory,butinstru- ments used to assess self-efficacy rely on verbal skills and yield scores that are highly positively skewed. Based on a review of the research literature and qualitative research with key informants, a pictographic medication adher- ence self-efficacy scale was developed. Two studies were conducted to test the pictographic and color visual analogue

Seth C. Kalichman; Demetria Cain; Andrea Fuhrel; Lisa Eaton; Kari Di Fonzo; Thom Ertl

2004-01-01

148

Development and initial validation of a scale to measure self-efficacy beliefs in patients with chronic pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study describes the development of the Chronic Pain Self-Efficacy Scale (CPSS), a 22-item questionnaire designed to measure chronic pain patients' perceived self-efficacy to cope with the consequences of chronic pain. The CPSS and other measures of psychosocial functioning were administered to 141 consecutive patients who were referred to an outpatient multidisciplinary pain treatment program. An exploratory factor analysis

Karen O. Anderson; Barbara Noel Dowds; Robyn E. Pelletz; W. Thomas Edwards; Christine Peeters-Asdourian

1995-01-01

149

Development and initial validation of the Multicultural Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale--Racial Diversity Form.  

PubMed

Drawing upon social-cognitive theory and the multicultural counseling competency literature, the Multicultural Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale-Racial Diversity Form (MCSE-RD) was developed to assess perceived ability to counsel racially diverse clients. Data were collected from 181 graduate students in counseling-related programs, 41 undergraduate psychology students, and 22 graduate students enrolled in a prepracticum course. Results of an exploratory factor analysis retained 37 items and identified three underlying factors: Multicultural Intervention, Multicultural Assessment, and Multicultural Session Management. MCSE-RD subscale and total scores produced adequate internal consistency and test-retest reliability estimates. Initial validity findings indicated theory-consistent relations of MCSE-RD scores with general counseling self-efficacy, multicultural counseling competency, social desirability, therapist demographics, and educational/training variables. Participation in prepracticum was associated with positive change in MCSE-RD scores. Implications for training and future research are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:22122166

Sheu, Hung-Bin; Lent, Robert W

2007-03-01

150

Development and Validation of a Computer Science Self-Efficacy Scale for CS0 Courses and the Group Analysis of CS0 Student Self-Efficacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 21-item self-efficacy scale was developed to measure perceptions of capability associated with success in CS0 students. Data from 377 subjects enrolled in CS0 breadth-first courses over three years were used to assess the reliability and construct validity of the instrument. A principal factor analysis, with Varimax rotation, produced a six factor solution that closely aligned with the constructs of

Ann M. Quade

2003-01-01

151

Psychometric properties of the Danish versions of Headache-Specific Locus of Control Scale and Headache Management Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the study is to test the cross-cultural adaptation and psychometric properties of a Danish version of the Headache-Specific\\u000a Locus of Control Scale (HSLC) and the Headache Management Self-Efficacy Scale (HMSE) in a tertiary headache centre. HSLC and\\u000a HMSE are headache-specific measures of locus of control (LOC) and SE. The Danish versions of the HSLC and the HMSE

Jacob Sander Hansen; Lars Bendtsen; Rigmor Jensen

2009-01-01

152

Efficacy of Carisolv as an adjunctive therapy to scaling and root planing on subgingival calculus removal.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of subgingival application of Carisolv gel as an adjunctive therapy to scaling and root planing (SRP) on calculus removal compared to conventional instrumentation. Forty-five teeth requiring extraction due to severe periodontal disease were randomized to the following treatments: 1) SRP alone; 2) placebo gel + SRP; 3) Carisolv gel + SRP. Either test or placebo gel was applied subgingivally for 1 min and then the root were instrumented until a smooth and calculus-free surface was achieved. Instrumentation time and the number of strokes required were recorded. After extraction, the efficacy of root surface instrumentation was measured by percentage of remaining calculus. There was no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) between the treatment groups regarding either time required for instrumentation or the percentage of residual calculus. The subgingival application of Carisolv gel prior to SRP did not provide any additional benefit to root instrumentation compared to scaling and root planing alone. PMID:17262127

Grisi, Daniela C; Salvador, Sérgio Luiz de Souza; Marcantonio, Rosemary Adriana Chiérici

2006-01-01

153

Self-efficacy in pathological gambling treatment outcome: development of a gambling abstinence self-efficacy scale (GASS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 21-item measure of gambling abstinence self-efficacy (GASS) was developed. A principal component analysis of 101 pathological gamblers supported the use of a total score that showed good internal (?=.93) and retest reliability (ICC (n=35)=.86) as well as four subscales: 1) winning\\/external situations (6 items, ?=.91); 2) negative emotions (9 items, ?=.87); 3) positive mood\\/testing\\/urges (3 items, ?=.70); 4) social

David C. Hodgins; Nicole Peden; Karyn Makarchuk

2004-01-01

154

Volcaniclastic debris-flow occurrences in the Campania region (Southern Italy) and their relation to Holocene Late Pleistocene pyroclastic fall deposits: implications for large-scale hazard mapping  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Campania Region (southern Italy) is characterized by the frequent occurrence of volcaniclastic debris flows that damage property and loss of life (more than 170 deaths between 1996 and 1999). Historical investigation allowed the identification of more than 500 events during the last four centuries; in particular, more than half of these occurred in the last 100 years, causing hundreds of deaths. The aim of this paper is to quantify debris-flow hazard potential in the Campania Region. To this end, we compared several elements such as the thickness distribution of pyroclastic fall deposits from the last 18 ka of the Vesuvius and Phlegrean Fields volcanoes, the slopes of relieves, and the historical record of volcaniclastic debris flows from A.D. 1500 to the present. Results show that flow occurrence is not only a function of the cumulative thickness of past pyroclastic fall deposits but also depends on the age of emplacement. Deposits younger than 10 ka (Holocene eruptions) apparently increase the risk of debris flows, while those older than 10 ka (Late Pleistocene eruptions) seem to play a less prominent role, which is probably due to different climatic conditions, and therefore different rates of erosion of pyroclastic falls between the Holocene and the Late Pleistocene. Based on the above considerations, we compiled a large-scale debris-flow hazard map of the study area in which five main hazard zones are identified: very low, low, moderate, high, and very high.

Bisson, M.; Pareschi, M. T.; Zanchetta, G.; Sulpizio, R.; Santacroce, R.

2007-11-01

155

Psychometric Properties of a Symptom Management Self-Efficacy Scale for Women Living with HIV/AIDS  

PubMed Central

Context Many people with HIV/AIDS find it difficult to manage the symptoms of the disease, but by adopting effective symptom management behavior, they increase the potential of alleviating the burden of those symptoms. Self-efficacy is a recognized mediator of successful behavior change and is utilized by many researchers and clinicians when developing symptom management interventions. Despite this, an instrument measuring the self-efficacy of symptom management behavior specifically for people living with HIV/AIDS has not yet been made available. Objective To introduce and test the psychometric properties of the HIV Symptom Management Self-Efficacy for Women Scale (HSM-SEWS) for women with HIV/AIDS. This scale, a new 9-item measurement instrument, was modified from the Chronic Disease Self-Efficacy Scale. Methods In this study, psychometric testing focused on the reliability and validity of the HSM-SEWS instrument. Reliability was assessed using Cronbach’s alpha. Exploratory factor analysis with oblique promax rotation was used to examine validity and test hypothetical associations. Results Eighty-nine HIV-positive women were recruited and asked to complete the scale every four weeks for a total of 16 weeks. Factor analysis supported a one-factor solution explaining 93% of the variance among items. Internal consistency of the nine items was found to range from 0.83–0.93, with an overall Cronbach’s alpha of 0.92. Conclusions Psychometric analyses suggest that the HIV Symptom Management Self-Efficacy for Women Scale is a reliable and valid instrument that measures the self-efficacy of symptom management behavior in women with HIV/AIDS and can be used during interventions and in research targeting this area of health care research.

Webel, Allison R.; Okonsky, Jennifer

2010-01-01

156

The study skills self-efficacy scale for use with Chinese students.  

PubMed

Silver, Smith and Greene (2001) examined the dimensionality of responses to the Study Skills Self-Efficacy Scale (SSSES) using exploratory principal factor analysis (PFA) and Rasch measurement techniques based on a sample of social science students from a community college in the United States. They found that responses defined three related dimensions. In the present study, Messick's (1995) conceptualization of validity was used to organize the exploration of the psychometric properties of data from a Chinese version of the SSSES. Evidence related to the content aspect of validity was obtained via item fit evaluation; the substantive aspect of validity was addressed by examining the functioning of the rating scales; the structural aspect of validity was explored with exploratory PFA and Rasch item fit statistics; and support for the generalizability aspect of validity was investigate via differential item functioning and internal consistency reliability estimates for both items and persons. The exploratory PFA and Rasch analysis of responses to the Chinese version of the SSSES were conducted with a sample of 494 Hong Kong high school students. Four factors emerged including Study Routines, Resource Use, Text-Based Critical Thinking, and Self-Modification. The fit of the data to the Rasch rating scale model for each dimension generally supported the unidimensionality of the four constructs. The ordered average measures and thresholds from the four Rasch analyses supported the continued use of the six-point response format. Item and person reliability were found to be adequate. Differential item functioning across gender and language taught in was minimal. PMID:19671989

Yuen, Mantak; Smith, Everett V; Dobria, Lidia; Fu, Qiong

2009-01-01

157

Parenting Behavior, Mothers' Self-Efficacy Beliefs, and Toddler Performance on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary objective of this study was to examine parenting self-efficacy as a potential mediator of the effects of competence promoting and inhibiting parenting behavior on toddlers' scores on the Mental Scale of the Bayley. Sixty-eight predominantly middle-class mother-toddler pairs completed self-report questionnaires and toddlers were administered the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID-II). Parental behaviors likely to have a

Priscilla K. Coleman; Alacia Trent; Sarah Bryan; Barbara King; Nikel Rogers; Mahvash Nazir

2002-01-01

158

Measuring the impact of multiple sclerosis on psychosocial functioning: the development of a new self-efficacy scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To develop a scale to measure self-efficacy in neurologically impaired patients with multiple sclerosis and to assess the scale' s psychometric properties.Design: Cross-sectional questionnaire study in a clinical setting, the retest questionnaire returned by mail after completion at home.Setting: Regional multiple sclerosis (MS) outpatient clinic or the Clinical Trials Unit (CTU) at a large neuroscience centre in the UK.Subjects:

J. Airlie; G. A. Baker; S. J. Smith; C. A. Young

2001-01-01

159

Combined Use of Self-Efficacy Scale for Oral Health Behaviour and Oral Health Questionnaire: A Pilot Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To examine whether the combined use of a task-specific self-efficacy scale for oral health behaviour (SEOH) and an oral health questionnaire (OHQ) would be useful for evaluating subjects' behaviours and cognitions. Design: Questionnaires. Methods: One hundred and eighty-five students completed the SEOH and OHQ. The 30-item OHQ uses a…

Soutome, Sakiko; Kajiwara, Kazumi; Oho, Takahiko

2012-01-01

160

The Reliability and Validity of the Greek Version of the Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The present study examined the reliability and validity of the Greek version of the Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale in a sample of 170 high school students. Drawing on current social cognitive career theory, the validity of the TSOSS is supported by the expected gender differences on the TSOSS factors, and their high correlations…

Koumoundourou, Georgia A.

2004-01-01

161

Combined Use of Self-Efficacy Scale for Oral Health Behaviour and Oral Health Questionnaire: A Pilot Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: To examine whether the combined use of a task-specific self-efficacy scale for oral health behaviour (SEOH) and an oral health questionnaire (OHQ) would be useful for evaluating subjects' behaviours and cognitions. Design: Questionnaires. Methods: One hundred and eighty-five students completed the SEOH and OHQ. The 30-item OHQ uses a…

Soutome, Sakiko; Kajiwara, Kazumi; Oho, Takahiko

2012-01-01

162

Relationships between Computer Self-Efficacy, Technology, Attitudes and Anxiety: Development of the Computer Technology Use Scale (CTUS)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Two studies are reported which describe the development and evaluation of a new instrument, the Computer Technology Use Scale (CTUS), comprising three domains: computer self-efficacy, attitudes to technology, and technology related anxiety. Study 1 describes the development of the instrument and explores its factor structure. Study 2 used…

Conrad, Agatha M.; Munro, Don

2008-01-01

163

The Reliability and Validity of the Greek Version of the Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study examined the reliability and validity of the Greek version of the Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale in a sample of 170 high school students. Drawing on current social cognitive career theory, the validity of the TSOSS is supported by the expected gender differences on the TSOSS factors, and their high correlations…

Koumoundourou, Georgia A.

2004-01-01

164

Pilot Scale Bioremediation of Creosote-Contaminated Soil—Efficacy of Enhanced Natural Attenuation and Bioaugmentation Strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, the efficacy of bioremediation strategies (enhanced natural attenuation with nitrate and phosphate addition [ENA] and bioaugmentation) for the remediation of creosote-contaminated soil (7767 ± 1286 mg kg of the 16 EPA priority PAHs) was investigated at pilot scale. Bioaugmentation of creosote-contaminated soil with freshly grown or freeze dried Mycobacterium sp. strain 1B (a PAH degrading microorganism) was

Albert L. Juhasz; Natasha Waller; Chris Lease; Richard Bentham; Richard Stewart

2005-01-01

165

A Validation and Reliability Study of the Physical Activity and Healthy Food Efficacy Scale for Children (PAHFE)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this study was to obtain validity evidence for the Physical Activity and Healthy Food Efficacy Scale for Children (PAHFE). Construct validity evidence identifies four subscales: Goal-Setting for Physical Activity, Goal-Setting for Healthy Food Choices, Decision-Making for Physical Activity, and Decision-Making for Healthy Food…

Perry, Christina M.; De Ayala, R. J.; Lebow, Ryan; Hayden, Emily

2008-01-01

166

Promoting Leisure Physical Activity Participation among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Validation of Self-Efficacy and Social Support Scales  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Many individuals with intellectual disabilities are not sufficiently active for availing health benefits. Little is known about correlates of physical activity among this population on which to build health promotion interventions. Materials and Methods: We developed scales for measurement of self-efficacy and social support for…

Peterson, Jana J.; Peterson, N. Andrew; Lowe, John B.; Nothwehr, Faryle K.

2009-01-01

167

A Validation and Reliability Study of the Physical Activity and Healthy Food Efficacy Scale for Children (PAHFE)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to obtain validity evidence for the Physical Activity and Healthy Food Efficacy Scale for Children (PAHFE). Construct validity evidence identifies four subscales: Goal-Setting for Physical Activity, Goal-Setting for Healthy Food Choices, Decision-Making for Physical Activity, and Decision-Making for Healthy Food…

Perry, Christina M.; De Ayala, R. J.; Lebow, Ryan; Hayden, Emily

2008-01-01

168

The Reliability and Factor Structure of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-SF With African Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study, based on a sample of 220 African American college students, sought to examine the utility of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale (CDSE) for African Americans. Values of coefficient alpha indicated reliability similar to that found in predominantly White samples. A four-factor structure best represented the data, with a large first factor emphasizing information gathering and decision making.

Demetris Chaney; Marie S. Hammond; Nancy E. Betz; Karen D. Multon

2007-01-01

169

Free Fall  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students investigate the acceleration of falling objects by observing objects of different masses and surface areas as they fall. They build a computer model to represent the relationships they observe, and they use the model to test various hypotheses.

Trout, Charlotte

170

The five-times-sit-to-stand-test (FTSST), the short version of the activities-specific balance confidence (ABC) scale, and fear of falling predict step execution time (SET) in older adults.  

PubMed

Rapid stepping is a common strategy employed by older adults to avoid falls. The relative contributions of dynamic balance, balance confidence and fear of falling to SET, was investigated in older adults. Thirty-three community-dwelling older adults completed tests of SET as well as the FTSST, a test of motor performance associated with dynamic balance. Psychological indicators of balance-related confidence assessed were the ABC 6-item scale (ABC-6) and fear of falling. Mean SET was significantly slower in the fear of falling group than in the no fear of falling group (p<0.001). Correlational analysis indicated that poorer performance on the FTSST and lower balance confidence, were associated with slower time to execute a rapid step. A stepwise multiple regression model including the FTSST, ABC-6 score, and fear of falling as predictor variables, explained 58% of the variance in SET (p<0.001). The FTSST explained the largest proportion of the variance in SET (36%), followed by fear of falling (15%) and ABC-6 score (7%). These data show that the FTSST, ABC-6 score and fear of falling are significant and independent predictors of SET in older adults. Dynamic balance, balance confidence and fear of falling, may play important roles in executing rapid steps in older adults. Motor performance and psychological indicators of balance-related confidence appear to have crucial roles in SET in older adults. PMID:21763011

Goldberg, Allon

2011-07-16

171

Falling Feather  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this physics activity, learners recreate Galileo's famous experiment, in which he dropped a heavy weight and a light weight from the top of the Leaning Tower of Pisa to show that both weights fall at the same acceleration. Learners prove that Galileo was correct by comparing how fast a feather and coin fall in a tube attached to a vacuum. Use this activity to help learners explore acceleration and terminal velocity as well as how air resistance plays a role in how fast things fall.

Exploratorium, The

2012-07-12

172

Initial Development of Scales to Assess Self-Efficacy for Disclosing HIV Status and Negotiating Safer Sex in HIV-Positive Persons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two studies were conducted to develop scales for assessing self-efficacy to disclose HIV status to sex partners and negotiate safer sex practices among people living with HIV\\/AIDS. Elicitation research was used to derive 4 sets of scenarios with graduated situational demands that serve as stimulus materials in assessing self-efficacy. Two studies demonstrated that the self-efficacy scales for effective disclosure and

Seth C. Kalichman; David Rompa; Kari DiFonzo; Dolores Simpson; Florence Kyomugisha; James Austin; Webster Luke

2001-01-01

173

Development and preliminary validation of an emotional self-efficacy scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Building on research in the areas of emotional intelligence and self-efficacy, a measure of emotional self-efficacy was developed and validated. Two hundred and seven participants rated their self-efficacy for adaptive emotional functioning as operationalized by the facets of Mayer and Salovey’s (1997) and Mayer, Salovey and Caruso’s (2004) model of emotional intelligence and completed measures of constructs expected to be

Beverley A. Kirk; Nicola S. Schutte; Donald W. Hine

2008-01-01

174

Falling Asteroids  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The goal of this game is to protect four cities from falling asteroids. To do this you must shoot them as they fall, either by clicking on the screen or by using a detonator (hitting the space bar) to destroy them all. You receive ten points for every surviving city at the end of each level. Cities are replaced every fifth level, but if all of your cities are destroyed, the game is over!

2010-01-01

175

Evaluating the reliability of multi-item scales: A non-parametric approach to the ordered categorical structure of data collected with the Swedish version of the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia and the Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To compare the ability of a rank-invariant non- parametric method with that of kappa statistics to evaluate the reliability of the Swedish version of the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia and the Self-Efficacy Scale by identifying systematic and random disagreement. The aim was, further, to compare 2 different statistical approaches to obtain a global value from multi-item scales. Design: A

Lina Bunketorp; Jane Carlsson; Jan Kowalski; Elisabet Stener-victorin

2005-01-01

176

Falls and gait disturbances in Huntington's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Falls are common in patients with Huntington's disease, but the incidence, falling circumstances and contributing factors have never been examined. We recorded falls in 45 early to midstage Huntington's disease patients, both retrospectively (12 months) and prospectively (3 months). Fall rates were related to relevant baseline measures, including the Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS) and quantitative measures of balance

Yvette A. M. Grimbergen; Mirjam J. Knol; Bastiaan R. Bloem; Berry P. H. Kremer; Raymund A. C. Roos; Marten Munneke

2008-01-01

177

Development and testing of the Cholesterol-Lowering Diet Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cornerstone of treatment for hypercholesterolemia is dietary therapy. However, maintaining adherence to the therapeutic diet has been difficult for patients. There is evidence that self-efficacy is a predictor of positive behavior change like that involved in or necessary for initiating or maintaining recommended diet therapy for cholesterol reduction. This paper reports on two studies guided by Bandura's self-efficacy theory.

Lora E Burke; Jacqueline Dunbar-Jacob; Susan Sereika; Craig K Ewart

2003-01-01

178

[Fall risk and fracture. Vitamin D and falls/fractures].  

PubMed

Vitamin D affects both bone and muscle. Recent meta-analyses of high-quality trials showed that both native vitamin D and active forms of vitamin D3 significantly reduced the risk of vertebral and non-vertebral fractures. These anti-fracture efficacies of vitamin D are considered to be mainly exerted through direct effects on mineral metabolism. In addition, recent evidence suggests that vitamin D significantly prevents falls, to indirectly reduce fall-related fractures. The preventive effect on falls by vitamin D is considered to be exerted through effects on muscle, at least in part. Eldecalcitol, a new active vitamin D3 analogue, increases bone mineral density and shows greater evident anti-fracture efficacy than alfacalcidol. However, its effects in preventing falls remain unclear and warrant clarification. PMID:23628682

Miyakoshi, Naohisa

2013-05-01

179

Efficacy of Cry1Ac:Cry1F proteins in cotton leaf tissue against fall armyworm, beet armyworm, and soybean looper (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).  

PubMed

Cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., plants expressing Cry1Ac and Cry1F insecticidal crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bt) were evaluated against selected lepidopteran pests including fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner), and soybean looper, Pseudoplusia includens (Walker). Studies were conducted in a range of environments, challenging various cotton tissue types from several varieties containing a combination of Cry1Ac and Cry1F proteins. In fresh tissue bioassays of mature leaves and squares (flower buds) and in artificial field infestations of white flowers, plants containing Cry1Ac:Cry1F significantly reduced levels of damage (leaf defoliation, bract feeding, penetrated squares and bolls, and boll abscission) and induced significantly greater mortality (90-100%) of fall armyworm compared with that on non-Bt cotton plants. Plants containing Cry1Ac:Cry1F conferred high levels (100%) of soybean looper mortality and low levels (0.2%) of leaf defoliation compared with non-Bt cotton. Beet armyworm was relatively less sensitive to Cry1Ac:Cry1F cotton plants compared with fall armyworm and soybean looper. However, beet armyworm larval development was delayed 21 d after infestation (DAI), and ingestion of plant tissue was inhibited (14 and 21 DAI) on the Cry1Ac:Cry1F plants compared with that on non-Bt cotton plants. These results show Cry1Ac:Cry1F cotton varieties can be an effective component in a management program for these lepidopteran pest species. Differential susceptibility of fall armyworm, beet armyworm, and soybean looper larvae to Cry1Ac:Cry1F cotton reinforces the need to sample during plant development and respond with a foliar insecticide if local action thresholds are exceeded. PMID:19736762

Tindall, K V; Siebert, M Willrich; Leonard, B R; All, J; Haile, F J

2009-08-01

180

Reliability and Validity of Five-Level Response Continua for the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study, based on three samples of college students totaling 1,832 participants, resulted in the conclusion that a 5-level response continuum for the short form of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale (CDSE)1 proved at least as reliable and valid as the 10-level continua used in normative studies. Values of coefficient alpha ranged from .78 to .87 for the 5-level

Nancy E. Betz; Marie S. Hammond; Karen D. Multon

2005-01-01

181

Reliability and validity of the Turkish adaptation of medication adherence self-efficacy scale in hypertensive patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract:Background: Despite a lot of study related to medication adherence in hypertension, a major problem in research is the measurement of adherence. Aim: To evaluate the reliability and validity of the Turkish version of the Medication Adherence Self-Efficacy Scale (MASES) among hypertensive patients in an outpatient setting in Turkey. Methods: One hundred-forty adult patients, who are receiving medication for hypertension

Sebahat Gozum; Rabia Hacihasanoglu

2009-01-01

182

A Psychometric Evaluation of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form in Chinese High School Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explores the reliability and validity of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (CDSES-SF) in Chinese high school students. One hundred and eighty-three high school students from a city in northeastern China participated in the study. The results indicate that scores on the CDSES-SF are reliable (internal consistency reliability = .93) with this sample of Chinese high school students.

Nan Zhang Hampton

2006-01-01

183

Testing for the Structure of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form Among Chinese College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the factor structure of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (CDSES-SF) among Chinese college students. Two samples of college students from China were used. The original 25-item CDSES-SF was not supported by the data derived from a sample of 256 Chinese college students (Sample 1). However, a modified 13-item, three-factor model of the CDSES-SF fit the data

Nan Zhang Hampton

2005-01-01

184

Multicultural Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale – Racial Diversity Form: Factor structure and test of a social cognitive model  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was conducted to gather evidence on the factor structure and concurrent criterion validity of the Multicultural Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale – Racial Diversity Form (MCSE-RD; Sheu & Lent, 2007). The MCSE-RD was designed to assess therapists' perceived capabilities in performing culturally relevant in-session behaviors in cross-racial counseling. Participants were 209 students in counseling-related graduate programs in the USA. Confirmatory

Hung-Bin Sheu; Marybeth Rigali-Oiler; Robert W. Lent

2012-01-01

185

The Modified Gait Efficacy Scale: Establishing the Psychometric Properties in Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Background Perceived ability or confidence plays an important role in determining function and behavior. The modified Gait Efficacy Scale (mGES) is a 10-item self-report measure used to assess walking confidence under challenging everyday circumstances. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability, internal consistency, and validity of the mGES as a measure of gait in older adults. Design This was a cross-sectional study. Methods Participants were 102 community-dwelling older adults (mean [±SD] age=78.6±6.1 years) who were independent in ambulation with or without an assistive device. Participants were assessed using the mGES and measures of confidence and fear, measures of function and disability, and performance-based measures of mobility. In a subsample (n=26), the mGES was administered twice within a 1-month period to establish test-retest reliability through the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC [2,1]). The standard error of measure (SEM) was determined from the ICC and standard deviation. The Cronbach ? value was calculated to determine internal consistency. To establish the validity of the mGES, the Spearman rank order correlation coefficient was used to examine the association with measures of confidence, fear, gait, and physical function and disability. Results The mGES demonstrated test-retest reliability within the 1-month period (ICC=.93, 95% confidence interval=.85, .97). The SEM of the mGES was 5.23. The mGES was internally consistent across the 10 items (Cronbach ?=.94). The mGES was related to measures of confidence and fear (r=.54–.88), function and disability (Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument, r=.32–.88), and performance-based mobility (r=.38–.64). Limitations This study examined only community-dwelling older adults. The results, therefore, should not be generalized to other patient populations. Conclusion The mGES is a reliable and valid measure of confidence in walking among community-dwelling older adults.

Newell, Alaina M.; VanSwearingen, Jessie M.; Hile, Elizabeth

2012-01-01

186

Falling Faster  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity about gravity (page 6 of the PDF), learners will come to understand how all objects will fall at the same rate, but that air will slow things down. This is a simple activity (it uses only two pieces of paper) that provides an excellent "Wow!" moment.

Cosi

2009-01-01

187

Students fall for Fall Meeting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

From Boston to Beijing, thousands of students traveled to San Francisco for the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting. Of those who participated, 183 students were able to attend thanks to AGU's student travel grant program, which assists students with travel costs and seeks to enrich the meeting through ethnic and gender diversity. Students at Fall Meeting enjoyed a variety of programs and activities designed to help them better network with their peers, learn about new fields, and disseminate their research to the interested public. More than 800 students attended AGU's first annual student mixer, sharing drinks and ideas with fellow student members and future colleagues as well as forging new friendships and intellectual relationships.

Smedley, Kara

2012-02-01

188

Talent Development, Work Habits, and Career Exploration of Chinese Middle-School Adolescents: Development of the Career and Talent Development Self-Efficacy Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article describes the development of an instrument--the "Career and Talent Development Self-Efficacy Scale (CTD-SES)"--for assessing students' self-efficacy in applying life skills essential for personal talent development, acquisition of positive work habits, and career exploration. In Study 1, data were obtained from a large sample of…

Yuen, Mantak; Gysbers, Norman C.; Chan, Raymond M. C.; Lau, Patrick S. Y.; Shea, Peter M. K.

2010-01-01

189

Talent Development, Work Habits, and Career Exploration of Chinese Middle-School Adolescents: Development of the Career and Talent Development Self-Efficacy Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the development of an instrument--the "Career and Talent Development Self-Efficacy Scale (CTD-SES)"--for assessing students' self-efficacy in applying life skills essential for personal talent development, acquisition of positive work habits, and career exploration. In Study 1, data were obtained from a large sample of…

Yuen, Mantak; Gysbers, Norman C.; Chan, Raymond M. C.; Lau, Patrick S. Y.; Shea, Peter M. K.

2010-01-01

190

Constructing and validating a global student-centered nursing curriculum learning efficacy scale: A confirmatory factor analysis.  

PubMed

Previous evidence-based studies have lacked a comprehensive student-centered scale to measure the learning efficacy of pre-registered nursing students. This study developed and validated a global scale for measuring learning efficacy among pre-registered nurses in Taiwan. Evaluated nursing courses included fundamental nursing, medical-surgical nursing, maternal-newborn nursing, pediatric nursing, psychiatric nursing, and community health nursing. All participants had previously completed the nursing professional curricula. This study comprised four phases, which were design of the initial study questionnaire, testing of the validity of the responses of experts to the questionnaire, exploratory factor analysis based on random sampling, and confirmatory factor analysis based on a large-scale investigation. The content validity index for the questionnaire was .89. Item analysis results yielded a Cronbach's ? coefficient of between .90 and .92. Item-total correlation coefficients ranged from .51 to .76. The critical ratio, obtained from t-test results, ranged from 6.07 to 9.96. Exploratory factor analysis revealed that factor loadings for individual items ranged from .46 to .96, and eigenvalues ranged from 1.43 to 8.19. The three factors "learning preparation," "advancement of competency," and "learning evaluation" explained 63.5% of total factor loading. In the confirmatory factor analysis, the overall internal consistency reliability coefficient was .95; convergent reliability was .96, and convergent validity was .59. Evaluation scales demonstrated well construct validity and goodness-of-fit for the model. The comprehensive student-centered evaluation scale revealed rigorous construct validity. This scale can serve as an index of learning effectiveness in professional nursing curricula. PMID:23260622

Chang, Shu-Fang

2012-12-20

191

The Development and Validation of the Students' Self-efficacy for Statistical Literacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Statistical literacy is a comparatively new concept in mathematics and while there is some consensus about how it is defined, there has been limited research on how the concept is measured within a school context. This paper, reports on the development and validation of an instrument to measure middle school students' self-efficacy for statistical literacy. The items were developed from

Colin Carmichael; Ian Hay

2009-01-01

192

The Development of a Peer Aggression Coping Self-Efficacy Scale for Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study presents findings regarding the reliability and validity of a newly developed measure designed to assess children's self-efficacy for coping with peer aggression. The sample consisted of 2,161 participants (1,071 females and 1,090 males, who ranged in age from 10 to 15 years; 63% White, 17% Middle-Eastern, 10% Asian, and 10% from other…

Singh, Puneet; Bussey, Kay

2009-01-01

193

Coping with Late-Life Challenges: Development and Validation of the Care-Receiver Efficacy Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: Measures are lacking that address the challenges that people think they face in their roles as elderly care receivers. However, the development of a sense of efficacy in this role by mentally competent care receivers is critical to successful partnerships between caregivers and care receivers. The purpose of this article is to report the…

Cox, Enid O.; Green, Kathy E.; Seo, Honglan; Inaba, Miyuki; Quillen, Alicia Alyla

2006-01-01

194

Falling Water  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students drop water from different heights to demonstrate the conversion of waterâs potential energy to kinetic energy. They see how varying the height from which water is dropped affects the splash size. They follow good experiment protocol, take measurements, calculate averages and graph results. In seeing how falling water can be used to do work, they also learn how this energy transformation figures into the engineering design and construction of hydroelectric power plants, dams and reservoirs.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

195

Evaluating the properties of a stage-specific self-efficacy scale for physical activity using classical test theory, confirmatory factor analysis and item response modeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the psychometric properties of a stage-specific self- efficacy scale for physical activity with classical test theory (CTT), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and item response modeling (IRM). Women who enrolled in the Women On The Move study completed a 20-item stage-specific self-efficacy scale developed for this study (n 5 226, 51.1% African-American and

Louise C. Masse; Kristiann C. Heesch; Karen E. Eason; Mark Wilson

2006-01-01

196

Rasch calibration of physical activity self-efficacy and social support scale for persons with intellectual disabilities.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to investigate the construct validity of the Self-Efficacy/Social Support for Activity for persons with Intellectual Disability (SE/SS-AID) scales developed by Peterson, Peterson, Lowe, & Nothwehr (2009). A total of 146 participants with intellectual disabilities completed 6 self-efficacy (SE) items and 18 social support (SS) items. After applying the Rasch rating model, all SE items and 17 SS items fit the model and measured a single-construct. Thus, it was able to determine the item difficulty and person's level of SE and SS for physical activity by calculated logit scores. No items showed evidence for differential functioning by the level of intellectual disability. Model fit of SS subscales (e.g., staff, family, and peer) showed good-fit as well. In conclusion, SE and SS scales for physical activity can be measured more accurately for persons with intellectual disabilities by using the modified scales validated in this study. PMID:20363109

Lee, Miyoung; Peterson, Jana J; Dixon, Alicia

2010-04-02

197

Small-scale hydroelectric power demonstration project: Broad River Electric Cooperative, Inc. , Cherokee Falls Hydroelectric Project: Final technical and construction cost report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to fulfill part of the requirement of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement Number FC07-80ID12125 of the Small Scale Hydropower Program and is submitted on behalf of the Broad River Electric Cooperative, Inc. of Gaffney, South Carolina. The project was initially studied in 1978 with construction commencing in January, 1984. The primary work elements of the project consisted of the renovation of an existing dam and a new powerhouse. The dam was rehabilitated and flashboards were installed along the top of the structure. The powerhouse was supplied with a single open pit turbine and a new substation was constructed. The project generated power in December of 1985 but has been plagued with numerous problems compounded by a flood in March, 1987 causing extensive damages. The flood of March, 1987 resulted in filing of litigative action by the developers against their project managers and engineers which has yet to reach settlement and will possibly culminate in court sometime during the fall of 1988.

Not Available

1988-06-01

198

Adolescents' self-efficacy to overcome barriers to Physical Activity Scale.  

PubMed

This paper describes a revised measure of self-efficacy to overcome barriers to moderate and vigorous physical activity in a sample of 484 high school students in Toronto, Ontario. The students had a mean age of 15.3 years. Principal axis factoring with oblique rotation yielded five factors: self-efficacy to overcome internal, harassment, physical environment, social environment, and responsibilities barriers. Two problematic items were removed, which resulted in a 22-item measure. Subsequent analyses were conducted on responses to this shortened measure. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the five-factor model and demonstrated age- and sex-invariance. The subscales had good internal consistency reliability. Structural regressions demonstrated a strong relationship between the resulting factors and a physical activity measure (energy expenditure), showing predictive validity. PMID:23367813

Dwyer, John J M; Chulak, Tala; Maitland, Scott; Allison, Kenneth R; Lysy, Daria C; Faulkner, Guy E J; Sheeshka, Judy

2012-12-01

199

Dynamics of Teacher Self-Efficacy: Middle School Reading and Language Arts Teacher Responses on a Teacher Sense of Efficacy Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Efficacy is created early in a career and not easily influenced over time yet states and school districts loose tremendous amounts of money annually educating and training teachers who elect to leave the profession as a result of low self-efficacy. The purpose of this study was to examine the perceived levels of self-efficacy of middle school…

Schwartz, Kimberly Ann

2010-01-01

200

Dynamics of Teacher Self-Efficacy: Middle School Reading and Language Arts Teacher Responses on a Teacher Sense of Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Efficacy is created early in a career and not easily influenced over time yet states and school districts loose tremendous amounts of money annually educating and training teachers who elect to leave the profession as a result of low self-efficacy. The purpose of this study was to examine the perceived levels of self-efficacy of middle school Language Arts and reading

Kimberly Ann Schwartz

2010-01-01

201

Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Demonstration Project: Broad River Electric Cooperative, Inc., Cherokee Falls, South Carolina. Final Operations and Maintenance Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this report is to give a final accounting of the costs and benefits derived from the first two years of operation of the Cherokee Falls, Broad River Hydroelectric Demonstration Project which was built at Cherokee Falls, South Carolina. Prio...

1988-01-01

202

Tailored Prevention of Inpatient Falls  

PubMed Central

Patient falls and fall-related injuries are serious problems in hospitals. The Fall TIPS application aims to prevent patient falls by translating routine nursing fall risk assessment into a decision support intervention that communicates fall risk status and creates a tailored evidence-based plan of care that is accessible to the care team, patients, and family members. In our design and implementation of the Fall TIPS toolkit, we used the Spiral Software Development Life Cycle model. Three output tools available to be generated from the toolkit are bed poster, plan of care, and patient education handout. A preliminary design of the application was based on initial requirements defined by project leaders and informed by focus groups with end users. Preliminary design partially simulated the paper version of the Morse Fall Scale currently used in hospitals involved in the research study. Strengths and weaknesses of the first prototype were identified by heuristic evaluation. Usability testing was performed at sites where research study is implemented. Suggestions mentioned by end users participating in usability studies were either directly incorporated into the toolkit and output tools, were slightly modified, or will be addressed during training. The next step is implementation of the fall prevention toolkit on the pilot testing units.

ZUYEV, LYUBOV; BENOIT, ANGELA N.; CHANG, FRANK Y.; DYKES, PATRICIA C.

2011-01-01

203

The Efficacy of the Waterloo-Stanford Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility: Form C  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explored whether the Waterloo-Stanford Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility Form: C (WSGC) approximates the predictive power of the individually administered Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale: Form C (SHSS: C). Seventy-one undergraduates were administered the WSGC in a group setting and then tested individually on the SHSS:C. The participants were then hypnotized and tested on four types of targeted hypnotic

Tracy E. Moran; Richard M. Kurtz; Michael J. Strube

2002-01-01

204

Fall detection sensor for fall protection airbag  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fall detection sensor for fall protection airbag was investigated to evaluate the airbag system. There are several methods to detect the fall: contact to the ground and detection of free fall. The problems with both methods are discussed. Since the usability of the latter come into practical use, tests in the future standard of airbag are discussed.

K. Fukaya

2002-01-01

205

Talent development, work habits, and career exploration of Chinese middle?school adolescents: development of the Career and Talent Development Self?Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes the development of an instrument – the Career and Talent Development Self?Efficacy Scale (CTD?SES) – for assessing students’ self?efficacy in applying life skills essential for personal talent development, acquisition of positive work habits, and career exploration. In Study 1, data were obtained from a large sample of Chinese middle?school students (N=15,113) in Grades 7–9 in Hong Kong.

Mantak Yuen; Norman C. Gysbers; Raymond M. C. Chan; Patrick S. Y. Lau; Peter M. K. Shea

2010-01-01

206

An exercise program to improve fall-related outcomes in elderly nursing home residents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study tested a 3-month ankle-strengthening and walking program designed to improve or maintain the fall-related outcomes of balance, ankle strength, walking speed, risk of falling, fear of falling, and confidence to perform daily activities without falling (falls efficacy) in elderly nursing home residents. Nursing home residents (N = 81) between the ages of 64 and 100 years participated in

Deborah Perry Schoenfelder; Linda M Rubenstein

2004-01-01

207

Effectiveness of simple balancing training program in elderly patients with history of frequent falls  

PubMed Central

Objective: To study the effectiveness of simply-performed balancing exercises in fall prevention. Design: Pre- and post-trial. Setting: University hospital from January 2009 to May 2010. Participants: Elderly with falls in the previous year. Intervention: Simple balancing exercise was performed at home every day and was recorded in the booklet. Measurements: New falling events and a battery of balancing abilities including the Timed Up and Go Test (TUGT), chair stand, functional reach, and Berg balance scale-short form were evaluated at baseline, 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month periods. Fear of falling and quality of life scores were assessed at baseline and 12-month periods. Results: 146 subjects were recruited, 116 female (79.5%) with a mean age of 67.1 years. At the end of the study, 49% of participants had not fallen. All of the balancing abilities were compared between frequent and infrequent fallers and were significantly improved (P < 0.001) except for functional reach in the frequent fall group. Most subjects (72%–79%) complied well with the exercise program. However, compliance had no effect on balancing abilities. About 36.4% of participants had adverse events from exercise, of which knee pain was the top ranked. The quality of life and the fall efficacy scores increased significantly at the end of the study. Factors affecting falling were compliance with exercise (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 2.55, 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 1.04, 6.30) and a history of falling ?3 times in the previous year (adjusted OR: 3.76, 95% CI: 1.18, 11.98). Conclusion: Performing simply-designed balancing exercises, at least 3 days per week, can increase balancing abilities, and decrease fall rates in the elderly with a history of previous falls. However, strategies to encourage elderly compliance may prevent falling.

Kuptniratsaikul, Vilai; Praditsuwan, Rungnirand; Assantachai, Prasert; Ploypetch, Teerada; Udompunturak, Suthipol; Pooliam, Julaporn

2011-01-01

208

Comparative efficacy of a self-report scale and physiological measures in dental anxiety of children.  

PubMed

AIM: To determine and correlate dental anxiety in children, using psychometric and physiological measures. METHODS: One hundred children (51 boys and 49 girls) were selected and anxiety was assessed using psychometric (Modified Child Dental Anxiety Scale) and physiological measures (pulse rate and oxygen saturation levels), for local anesthetic administration. Statistical analysis was carried out with SPSS software version 11.0. Metric continuous data are presented as mean ± standard deviation. Analysis between groups was carried out by using one way anova. Categorical variables were analyzed with "Fisher's exact test". For statistical significance, the probability value of < 0.05 was considered. The correlation among psychometric and physiological measures was assessed using the Spearman rank correlation. RESULTS: A very weak negative correlation between pulse rate and MCDAS(f) values was observed. The oxygen saturation level did not show significant variations and was not a reliable indicator of anxiety. CONCLUSION: Both psychometric and physiological measures have their own merits and are important clinically. Even behavioral measures, although having observer bias, can be used as an adjuvant along with these measures. It is essential to take two or more measures into consideration rather than just one to assess dental anxiety. PMID:23766146

Manepalli, Swapna; Nuvvula, Sivakumar; Kamatham, Rekhalakshmi; Nirmala, Sunkara

2013-06-14

209

Psychometric Properties of the Exercise Self-efficacy Scale in Dutch Primary Care Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND: Excercise self-efficacy is believed to influence physical activity bahavior. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to assess the psychometric aspects of the Exercise Self-efficacy Scale (ESS) in a type 2 diabetes Dutch Primary care sample. METHOD: Type 2 diabetes patients (n?=?322; <80 years old) filled in the ESS and the short questionnaire to assess health enhancing physical activity (SQUASH). The structural validity of the ESS was assessed by means of principal axis factor analyses and confirmatory factor analysis. In addition, reliability and concurrent validity with the SQUASH outcomes "total" and "leisure time minutes/week of moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity" were evaluated. T tests and ANOVAs were used to examine ESS scores in subgroups. In addition, a 13-item version of the ESS was developed. RESULTS: Analyses were performed on complete cases (n?=?255). Exploratory factor analysis suggested one underlying factor (total explained variance 54 %), with good internal consistency (??=?0.95). Confirmatory factor analysis showed a poor fit, as did a three-factor model suggested in an earlier research. Therefore, a 13-item ESS was developed with one underlying factor (total explained variance 59 %) and good internal consistency (??=?0.95). Both the 18-item and 13-item ESS correlated significantly with total and leisure time physical activity. ESS scores differed significantly between categories of education level and physical activity level. CONCLUSION: The 13-item ESS had sound psychometric properties in a large sample of primary care type 2 diabetes patients. The 13-item ESS could be useful in (intervention) research on physical activity in type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:23550033

van der Heijden, M M P; Pouwer, F; Pop, V J M

2013-04-01

210

Pilot Scale Production of Highly Efficacious and Stable Enterovirus 71 Vaccine Candidates  

PubMed Central

Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71) has caused several epidemics of hand, foot and mouth diseases (HFMD) in Asia and now is being recognized as an important neurotropic virus. Effective medications and prophylactic vaccine against EV71 infection are urgently needed. Based on the success of inactivated poliovirus vaccine, a prototype chemically inactivated EV71 vaccine candidate has been developed and currently in human phase 1 clinical trial. Principal Finding In this report, we present the development of a serum-free cell-based EV71 vaccine. The optimization at each step of the manufacturing process was investigated, characterized and quantified. In the up-stream process development, different commercially available cell culture media either containing serum or serum-free was screened for cell growth and virus yield using the roller-bottle technology. VP-SFM serum-free medium was selected based on the Vero cell growth profile and EV71 virus production. After the up-stream processes (virus harvest, diafiltration and concentration), a combination of gel-filtration liquid chromatography and/or sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation down-stream purification processes were investigated at a pilot scale of 40 liters each. Although the combination of chromatography and sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation produced extremely pure EV71 infectious virus particles, the overall yield of vaccine was 7–10% as determined by a VP2-based quantitative ELISA. Using chromatography as the downstream purification, the virus yield was 30–43%. To retain the integrity of virus neutralization epitopes and the stability of the vaccine product, the best virus inactivation was found to be 0.025% formalin-treatment at 37°C for 3 to 6 days. Furthermore, the formalin-inactivated virion vaccine candidate was found to be stable for >18 months at 4°C and a microgram of viral proteins formulated with alum adjuvant could induce strong virus-neutralizing antibody responses in mice, rats, rabbits, and non-human primates. Conclusion These results provide valuable information supporting the current cell-based serum-free EV71 vaccine candidate going into human Phase I clinical trials.

Chang, Cheng-Peng; Guo, Meng-Shin; Hsieh, Shih-Yang; Yang, Wen-Hsueh; Chao, Hsin-Ju; Wu, Chien-Long; Huang, Ju-Lan; Lee, Min-Shi; Hu, Alan Yung-Chi; Lin, Sue-Chen; Huang, Yu-Yun; Hu, Mei-Hua; Chow, Yen-Hung; Chiang, Jen-Ron; Chang, Jui-Yuan; Chong, Pele

2012-01-01

211

Development and Validation of a Cervical Cancer Screening Self-Efficacy Scale for Low-Income Mexican American Women  

PubMed Central

While self-efficacy (SE), a construct from Social Cognitive Theory, has been shown to influence other screening behaviors, few measures currently exist for measuring Pap test SE. This paper describes the development and psychometric testing of such a measure for Mexican-American women. Data from two separate samples of Mexican-American women 50 years or older, obtained as part of a study to develop and evaluate a breast and cervical cancer screening educational program, were used in the current study. Exploratory factor analysis indicated a single factor solution and all item loadings were > .73. Confirmatory analysis confirmed a single factor structure with all standardized loadings greater than .40 as hypothesized. The eight item SE scale demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = .95). As hypothesized, SE was correlated with knowledge, prior experience, and screening intention. Logistic regression supported the theoretical relationship that women with higher SE were more likely to have had a recent Pap test. Findings showed a significant increase in SE following the intervention, indicating the measure has good sensitivity to change over time.

Fernandez, Maria E.; Diamond, Pamela M.; Rakowski, William; Gonzales, Alicia; Tortolero-Luna, Guillermo; Williams, Janet; Morales-Campos, Daisy Y.

2011-01-01

212

Falls prevention advice and visual feedback to those at risk of falling: study protocol for a pilot randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Studies have shown that functional strength and balance exercises can reduce the risk of falling in older people if they are done on a regular basis. However, the repetitive nature of these exercises; combined with the inherent lack of feedback of progress may discourage seniors from exercising in the home, thereby rendering such an intervention ineffective. This study hypothesizes that the use of visual feedback and multimodal games will be more effective in encouraging adherence to home rehabilitation than standard care; thereby promoting independence and improving the quality of life in older adults at risk of falling. Methods A pllel-group pilot randomized controlled trial with 3 groups of participants will be conducted in the home for 12 weeks. Participants will include older adults who have been identified as at risk of falling (n?=?48), over the age of 65, living in the community, and suitable for a home exercise intervention. The primary outcome is adherence to exercise. Secondary outcomes include: variability in stride length, stride time and double support time (DST); walking speed; Timed up and go test (TUG); Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I); CONFbal scale; Romberg’s test; and quality of life measures (SF-12 and EuroQol EQ-5D). Qualitative assessments on personal experiences with rehabilitation tools will be done before and after the trial. Discussion This study will investigate the use of visual feedback and engaging multimodal activities to address the problem of non-compliance to home exercises for falls rehabilitation. One of the unique qualities of this study is the adaptation of special participatory design methods through which the end users (fallers) will be involved in the design of the proposed rehabilitation tools at various stages of the design process. Trial registration ISRCTN79967470

2013-01-01

213

A Short Version of the Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale: Structural and Construct Validity Across Five Countries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Occupational self-efficacy is an important resource for individuals in organizations. To be able to compare the occupational self-efficacy of employees across different countries, equivalent versions of the standard instruments need to be made available in different languages. In this article, the authors report on the structural and construct validity of an instrument that assesses occupational self-efficacy across five countries (Germany,

Thomas Rigotti; Birgit Schyns; Gisela Mohr

2008-01-01

214

Falls, aging, and disability.  

PubMed

Falls are a major public health problem, contributing to significant morbidity and mortality among older adults in the United States. This article summarizes and compares (1) fall prevalence rates, (2) fall risk factors, (3) consequences of falls, and (4) current knowledge about fall prevention interventions between community-dwelling older adults and people aging with physical disability. In this latter group, the article focuses on individuals with multiple sclerosis, late-effects of polio, muscular dystrophies, and spinal cord injuries. PMID:20494282

Finlayson, Marcia L; Peterson, Elizabeth W

2010-05-01

215

The Fall and Fall of Gary Hart.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The fall of Gary Hart, brought about because of his indiscretions during the 1988 presidential campaign, should not be treated exclusively as a consequence of Hart's moral failings. Rather, the fall of Hart can be traced to a complex of factors including bad judgment, the near total control that the press exercises over the political agenda, and…

Rowland, Robert C.

216

Translation and psychometric assessment of the Breast-feeding Self-Efficacy Scale—Short Form among pregnant and postnatal women in Turkey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Backgroundmost women stop breast feeding before the recommended 6 months post partum. If health professionals are to improve low breast-feeding duration and exclusivity rates, they need to assess high-risk women reliably and identify predisposing factors amenable to intervention. One possible modifiable variable is breast-feeding confidence. The Breast-feeding Self-Efficacy Scale—Short Form (BSES-SF) is a 14-item measure designed to assess a mother's

Merlinda Alu? Tokat; Hülya Okumu?; Cindy-Lee Dennis

2010-01-01

217

Cross-Cultural Equivalence of the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form: An Australian and South African Comparison  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined the reliability, content and construct validity, and cultural equivalence of the short form of the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (CDMSE-SF). In response to calls to conduct studies using the measure with high school-age samples, data were gathered from two samples of high school students, one from Australia and one from South Africa. The findings were

Peter A. Creed; Wendy Patton; Mark B. Watson

2002-01-01

218

The reliability and validity of the Polish version of the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form: Translation and psychometric assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThe majority of women discontinue breastfeeding before the recommended 6 months postpartum. If health professionals are to improve low breastfeeding duration and exclusivity rates, they need to reliably assess high-risk women and identify predisposing factors that are amenable to intervention. One possible modifiable variable is breastfeeding confidence. The Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale Short Form (BSES-SF) is a 14-item measure designed to

Karolina Wutke; Cindy-Lee Dennis

2007-01-01

219

Falls in Nursing Homes  

MedlinePLUS

... Lives & Protecting People Home & Recreational Safety Motor Vehicle Safety Traumatic ... serious are these falls? Why do falls occur more often in nursing homes? What are the most common causes of ...

220

It takes a village to prevent falls: reconceptualizing fall prevention and management for older adults.  

PubMed

Systematic evidence reviews support the efficacy of physical activity programs and multifactorial strategies for fall prevention. However, community settings in which fall prevention programs occur often differ substantially from the research settings in which efficacy was first demonstrated. Because of these differences, alternative approaches are needed to judge the adequacy of fall prevention activities occurring as part of standard medical care or community efforts. This paper uses the World Health Organization Innovative Care for Chronic Conditions (ICCC) framework to rethink how fall prevention programs might be implemented routinely in both medical and community settings. Examples of innovative programs and policies that provide fall prevention strategies consistent with the ICCC framework are highlighted, and evidence where available is provided on the effects of these strategies on processes and outcomes of care. Finally, a "no wrong door" approach to fall prevention and management is proposed, in which older adults who are found to be at risk of falls in either a medical or community setting are linked to a standard fall risk evaluation across three domains (physical activity, medical risks, and home safety). PMID:18676787

Ganz, D A; Alkema, G E; Wu, S

2008-08-01

221

Preliminary validation of a self-efficacy scale for child functioning despite chronic pain (child and parent versions)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite frequent targeting of health beliefs in pediatric chronic pain treatment interventions, there are currently no reliable and valid self-efficacy measures for children with chronic pain and their parents. The current study examined the psychometric properties of parent and child versions of a self-efficacy measure related to the child functioning normally when in pain. Pediatric pain patients, 9–18 years of

Brenda Bursch; Jennie C. I. Tsao; Marcia Meldrum; Lonnie K. Zeltzer

2006-01-01

222

The use of pain scales in assessing the efficacy of analgesics in post-operative dental pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two 10 cm visual analogue scales were compared with a 0–10 point numerical rating scale and a four-point verbal descriptive scale, in assessing pain severity in twelve patients with post-operative pain following removal of an impacted lower third molar. High correlations were shown between the pain scores from the two visual analogue scales and the numerical scale, but a lower

R. A. Seymour

1982-01-01

223

Heavy episodic drinking in college females: an exploration of expectancies, consequences, and self-efficacy.  

PubMed

Differences on expectancies and self-efficacy between college females who engage in heavy episodic drinking (HED) and non-HED were examined. Students (N = 95) from Southern California filled out the Comprehensive Effects of Alcohol, Cognitive Appraisal of Risky Events, and Drinking Context Convivial Drinking scales as well as self-efficacy, alcohol use, and demographic items in the fall semester of 2008. Logistic and linear regression showed that greater positive expectancies and lower self-efficacy were predictive of categorization as HED and greater convivial drinking. Implications, limitations, and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:23050593

Lienemann, Brianna A; Lamb, Christopher S

2012-10-11

224

Minnesota Hospital Association Statewide Project: SAFE from FALLS.  

PubMed

Since 2007, the Minnesota Hospital Association (MHA) has developed, managed, and promoted a statewide fall and injury reduction program to reduce inpatient falls and injuries, SAFE from FALLS. Because of statewide success in reducing falls from 2007-2010, the MHA set the goal in 2010 to eliminate serious fall-related injuries, especially head injuries. The outcomes that large-scale, multifacility health care organizations can have in reducing hospital-based falls resulting in serious injury (25% reduction) are presented, along with lessons learned. PMID:22569409

Apold, Julie; Quigley, Patricia A

225

Fall Prevention in Acute Care Hospitals  

PubMed Central

Context Falls cause injury and death for persons of all ages, but risk of falls increases markedly with age. Hospitalization further increases risk, yet no evidence exists to support short-stay hospital-based fall prevention strategies to reduce patient falls. Objective To investigate whether a fall prevention tool kit (FPTK) using health information technology (HIT) decreases patient falls in hospitals. Design, Setting, and Patients Cluster randomized study conducted January 1, 2009, through June 30, 2009, comparing patient fall rates in 4 urban US hospitals in units that received usual care (4 units and 5104 patients) or the intervention (4 units and 5160 patients). Intervention The FPTK integrated existing communication and workflow patterns into the HIT application. Based on a valid fall risk assessment scale completed by a nurse, the FPTK software tailored fall prevention interventions to address patients’ specific determinants of fall risk. The FPTK produced bed posters composed of brief text with an accompanying icon, patient education handouts, and plans of care, all communicating patient-specific alerts to key stakeholders. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was patient falls per 1000 patient-days adjusted for site and patient care unit. A secondary outcome was fall-related injuries. Results During the 6-month intervention period, the number of patients with falls differed between control (n=87) and intervention (n=67) units (P=.02). Site-adjusted fall rates were significantly higher in control units (4.18 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 3.45-5.06] per 1000 patient-days) than in intervention units (3.15 [95% CI, 2.54-3.90] per 1000 patient-days; P=.04). The FPTK was found to be particularly effective with patients aged 65 years or older (adjusted rate difference, 2.08 [95% CI, 0.61-3.56] per 1000 patient-days; P=.003). No significant effect was noted in fall-related injuries. Conclusion The use of a fall prevention tool kit in hospital units compared with usual care significantly reduced rate of falls.

Dykes, Patricia C.; Carroll, Diane L.; Hurley, Ann; Lipsitz, Stuart; Benoit, Angela; Chang, Frank; Meltzer, Seth; Tsurikova, Ruslana; Zuyov, Lyubov; Middleton, Blackford

2011-01-01

226

Assessment of Fall-Arrest Systems for Scissor Lift Operators: Computer Modeling and Manikin Drop Testing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The current study is intended to evaluate the stability of a scissor lift and the performance of various fall-arrest harnesses\\/lanyards during drop\\/fall-arrest conditions and to quantify the dynamic loading to the head\\/neck caused by fall-arrest forces.Background: No data exist that establish the efficacy of fall-arrest systems for use on scissor lifts or the injury potential from the fall incidents

Christopher S. Pan; John R. Powers; Jared J. Hartsell; James R. Harris; Bryan M. Wimer; Renguang G. Dong; John Z. Wu

2012-01-01

227

An illustration of how a self-report diagnostic screening scale could improve the internal validity of antidepressant efficacy trials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: During the past 20 years semi-structured diagnostic interviews have been the standard for diagnostic evaluations in research relying on reliable and valid psychiatric assessment and diagnosis; however, only a minority of antidepressant efficacy trials (AETs) employ these interviews. This might be important insofar as several studies have found that clinicians conducting unstructured clinical interviews underrecognize diagnostic comorbidity. Because of

Mark Zimmerman; Iwona Chelminski; Michael Posternak

2004-01-01

228

The Interdisciplinary Nature of Unintended Fall Prevention among Older Adults: Renewed Emphasis Needed on Underlying Psychological Constructs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prevention of unintended falls among adults is a major public health focus. Previous researchers have indicated the importance of addressing the physiological issues impacting fall risk, as well as the inclusion of activities designed to improve self efficacy regarding the completion of activities of daily living. However, less published research has examined the impact of psychological variables impacting falls efficacy.

John F. Yannessa

229

The Patient Who Falls  

PubMed Central

Falls are common health events that cause discomfort and disability for older adults and stress for caregivers. Using the case of an older man who has experienced multiple falls and a hip fracture, this article, which focuses on community-living older adults, addresses the consequences and etiology of falls; summarizes the evidence on predisposing factors and effective interventions; and discusses how to translate this evidence into patient care. Previous falls; strength, gait, and balance impairments; and medications are the strongest risk factors for falling. Effective single interventions include exercise and physical therapy, cataract surgery, and medication reduction. Evidence suggests that the most effective strategy for reducing the rate of falling in community-living older adults may be intervening on multiple risk factors. Vitamin D has the strongest clinical trial evidence of benefit for preventing fractures among older men at risk. Issues involved in incorporating these evidence-based fall prevention interventions into outpatient practice are discussed, as are the trade-offs inherent in managing older patients at risk of falling. While challenges and barriers exist, fall prevention strategies can be incorporated into clinical practice.

Tinetti, Mary E.; Kumar, Chandrika

2013-01-01

230

The interplay between gait, falls and cognition: can cognitive therapy reduce fall risk?  

PubMed Central

In this article, we briefly summarize the incidence and significant consequences of falls among older adults, the insufficient effectiveness of commonly used multifactorial interventions and the evidence linking falls and cognitive function. Recent pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic studies that evaluated the effects of cognitive therapy on fall risk are reviewed. The results of this article illustrate the potential utility of multiple, diverse forms of cognitive therapy for reducing fall risk. The article also indicates that large-scale, randomized controlled trials are warranted and that additional research is needed to better understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the interplay between human mobility, fall risk and cognitive function. Nonetheless, we suggest that multimodality interventions that combine motor and cognitive therapy should, eventually, be incorporated into clinical practice to enable older adults and patients to move safer and with a reduced fall risk.

Segev-Jacubovski, Orit; Herman, Talia; Yogev-Seligmann, Galit; Mirelman, Anat; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

2011-01-01

231

Comparison of the efficacy of free residual chlorine and monochloramine against biofilms in model and full scale cooling towers.  

PubMed

The presence of microbial cells on surfaces results in the formation of biofilms, which may also give rise to microbiologically influenced corrosion. Biofilms accumulate on all submerged industrial and environmental surfaces. The efficacy of disinfectants is usually evaluated using planktonic cultures, which often leads to an underestimate of the concentration required to control a biofilm. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of monochloramine on biofilms developed in a cooling tower. The disinfectants selected for the study were commercial formulations recommended for controlling microbial growth in cooling towers. A cooling tower and a laboratory model recirculating water system were used as biofilm reactors. Although previous studies have evaluated the efficacy of free chlorine and monochloramine for controlling biofilm growth, there is a lack of published data concerning the use monochloramine in cooling towers. Stainless steel coupons were inserted in each tower basin for a period of 30 d before removal. Monochloramine and free chlorine were tested under identical conditions on mixed biofilms which had been allowed to grow on coupons. Monochloramine was found to be significantly more effective than free chlorine against cooling tower biofilms. PMID:15203961

Türetgen, Irfan

2004-04-01

232

Veterans' fall risk profile: a prevalence study  

PubMed Central

The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) serves the health care needs of an adult, predominantly male, and aging population. The aging profile of VHA patients is 25% greater than the civilian sector (DVA 2001). Aged patients are at higher risk for falls. In February 2002, 6 VHA medical centers profiled their inpatients’ fall risk profile as one aspect of program initiatives targeted at reducing veterans’ fall risk and fall-related injuries, participating in a one-day collection of fall risk measurement using the Morse Fall Scale (MFS) for all inpatients (n=1819), acute and long-term care units. Data results are reported for age, MFS score, and the relationship between age and score, and by type of ward/unit, ie, predominately acute and critical care or long-term care. The results of this prevalence study documented that the veteran inpatient population are at high-risk for anticipated physiological falls. This Veteran Integrated Services Network-wide Deployment of an Evidence-based Program to Prevent Patient Falls study was completed as part of a nationally funded clinical initiative, National Program Initiative 20-006-1.

Quigley, Patricia A; Palacios, Polly; Spehar, Andrea M

2006-01-01

233

Prevention of fall incidents in patients with a high risk of falling: design of a randomised controlled trial with an economic evaluation of the effect of multidisciplinary transmural care  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Annually, about 30% of the persons of 65 years and older falls at least once and 15% falls at least twice. Falls often result in serious injuries, such as fractures. Therefore, the prevention of accidental falls is necessary. The aim is to describe the design of a study that evaluates the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a multidisciplinary assessment and

Geeske MEE Peeters; Oscar J de Vries; Petra JM Elders; Saskia MF Pluijm; Lex M Bouter; Paul Lips

2007-01-01

234

[Fear of falling and the relationship with the measure of functional independence and quality of life in post-Cerebral Vascular Accident (Stroke) victims].  

PubMed

The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the fear of falling of 52 chronic post-stroke individuals and to assess its relationship with measures of functional independence and quality of life (QOL). Fear of falling was assessed by the Brazilian version of Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I-BRAZIL) and functional independence by the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and QOL by the Stroke Specific Quality of Life (SSQOL) scale. Spearman's correlation coefficients were calculated to verify the associations between FES-I-BRAZIL and the other instruments, and the Mann-Whitney U test to compare groups with low and high fall concerns. There was a predominance of individuals with high concerns regarding falling, higher QOL, and independence. FES-I-BRAZIL was statistically associated with FIM and SSQOL. Significant relationships were also found between FES-I-Brazil with FIM transfer and locomotion sub-scales, as well as with the following SSQOL energy, family role, language, mobility, mood, self-care, and upper extremity function domains. Thus, fear of falling may contribute to reduced functional independence and QOL in post-stroke individuals and should be included in the evaluation process of these patients to ensure greater benefits during rehabilitation. PMID:23827906

Monteiro, Raquel Buarque Caminha; Laurentino, Glória Elizabeth Carneiro; Melo, Priscilla Gonçalves de; Cabral, Dinalva Lacerda; Correa, João Carlos Ferrari; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci Fuscaldi

2013-07-01

235

Experiments in Free Fall  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A model lift containing a figure of Albert Einstein is released from the side of a tall building and its free fall is arrested by elastic ropes. This arrangement allows four simple experiments to be conducted in the lift to demonstrate the effects of free fall and show how they can lead to the concept of the equivalence of inertial and…

Art, Albert

2006-01-01

236

Flow Slide Fall  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Flash animation displays in quick sequence four different mass wasting events: earthflow, translational slump, rotational slump, and rock fall. Images are attractive but there is little in the way of causative factors involved in mass wasting. To access the animation Click on the "Flow Slide Fall" link.

Mcgraw-Hill

237

[When children fall].  

PubMed

Second only to traffic accidents, accidental falling is the most significant cause of death in children. Included in this category is a special group of accidents--falling from a height--where preventative measures would give good results. Cases of child abuse have also been found in this group. From 1989 to 1994 64 children, 19 girls and 45 boys, were treated in our surgical department after accidental falls. There were 99 injuries in all, most of them caused by falls from heights less than 2.5 m. Only two children suffered penetrating injuries. Two of the 64 children died from cerebral injuries after falling from great heights. One child died from heart tamponade, caused by rupture of the right auricle after falling down a steep staircase. One child survived a fall from a great height despite multiple injuries. In such cases, treatment is dependent on a multiple trauma team being available on a 24-hour basis. Measures to prevent falls in the home, as well as in children's playgrounds and in kindergartens are not only very important, but also easy to apply. Suspicion of child abuse must be raised where unusual injuries are observed in children who have reportedly fallen from low heights. PMID:9667124

Solheim, K

1998-06-20

238

Falling Slinky Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Falling Slinky model approximates a slinky using twenty masses connected with light springs. The slinky is suspended from one end and released. Two actions will occur simultaneously when it is released hanging at rest from its equilibrium position - it will fall and it will collapse. What happens to the bottom when it begins its fall? The bottom end will move up initially. The bottom end will move down initially. The bottom end will remain at the same point for a short time before it begins to move. The Falling Slinky model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (Ejs) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double click the ejs_mech_newton_FallingSlinky.jar file to run the program if Java is installed.

Christian, Wolfgang

2009-09-01

239

Falls in the elderly  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To provide family physicians with a practical, evidence-based approach to fall prevention in the elderly. Sources of information MEDLINE was searched using terms relevant to falls among the elderly in the community and in institutions. Relevant English-language papers published from 1980 to July 2010 were reviewed. Relevant geriatric society guidelines were reviewed as well. Main message Falls are a common and serious health problem with devastating consequences. Several risk factors have been identified in the literature. Falls can be prevented through several evidence-based interventions, which can be either single or multicomponent interventions. Identifying at-risk patients is the most important part of management, as applying preventive measures in this vulnerable population can have a profound effect on public health. Conclusion Family physicians have a pivotal role in screening older patients for risk of falls, and applying preventive strategies for patients at risk.

Al-Aama, Tareef

2011-01-01

240

Neurologic aspects and falls  

PubMed Central

Summary Falls are widely recognized as a social problem due to the related economic burden on public health budgets. Following the growing body of evidences on the physiopathology of postural control in humans, many factors leading to falls are already well established in the literature. Given the high prevalence of falls among elderly people, the present review focuses on parkinsonism and those “mild parkinsonian signs” frequently presented by elderly subjects. Parkinsonism is a good paradigm for the understanding of the pathophysiology of falling. Specifically, parkinsonian patients display specific features related to falls, such as axial motor symptoms, the impairment of executive functions and of the interplay between motion and cognition, as revealed by the disruption of automaticity.

Fasano, Alfonso; Plotnik, Meir

2012-01-01

241

Intrapersonal and interpersonal dimensions of cancer perception: a confirmatory factor analysis of the cancer experience and efficacy scale (CEES)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Sociocultural factors influence psychological adjustment to cancer in Asian patients in two major ways: prioritization of\\u000a relationships over individual orientations and belief in the efficacy of interpersonal cooperation. We derived and validated\\u000a among Chinese colorectal cancer (CRC) patients an instrument assessing cancer perceptions to enable the study of the sociocultural\\u000a processes.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Patients and methods  Qualitative interviews (n?=?16) derived 15 items addressing

Wai Kai Hou

2010-01-01

242

Efficacy of solar power units for small-scale businesses in a remote rural area, South Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

Much work has considered the practicalities and affordability of solar systems for domestic energy supplies in remote rural areas. There is less understanding of its utility for small-scale business enterprises in such areas. We examined the patterns of use of two 12V and one 24V systems for small-scale enterprises housed in transportable containers. Monitoring of load shed and top of

A. Hajat; D. Banks; R. Aiken; C. M. Shackleton

2009-01-01

243

A Randomized Trial of a Multifaceted Intervention to Reduce Falls among Community-Dwelling Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Using a randomized controlled trial, we tested the efficacy of a fall prevention intervention to reduce falls among adults in a community-based health promotion program. Adults aged 65 and older within two counties were recruited (control n = 257; intervention n = 286). After 12 months, there was a significant decrease in the number of falls in…

Fox, Patrick J.; Vazquez, Laurie; Tonner, Chris; Stevens, Judy A.; Fineman, Norman; Ross, Leslie K.

2010-01-01

244

A Randomized Trial of a Multifaceted Intervention to Reduce Falls among Community-Dwelling Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using a randomized controlled trial, we tested the efficacy of a fall prevention intervention to reduce falls among adults in a community-based health promotion program. Adults aged 65 and older within two counties were recruited (control n = 257; intervention n = 286). After 12 months, there was a significant decrease in the number of falls in…

Fox, Patrick J.; Vazquez, Laurie; Tonner, Chris; Stevens, Judy A.; Fineman, Norman; Ross, Leslie K.

2010-01-01

245

Migrational Behavior and Seaward Movement of Wild Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River  

Microsoft Academic Search

Flow augmentation increases flow and decreases temperature in reservoirs in the lower Snake River during the seaward migration of wild subyearling fall chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. A study of the migrational behavior and seaward movement of wild subyearling fall chinook salmon in the Snake River was necessary to help understand the efficacy of flow augmentation. We studied fall chinook salmon

William P. Connor; R. Kirk Steinhorst; Howard L. Burge

2003-01-01

246

Injuries sustained by falls.  

PubMed Central

During a recent 4-year period, 381 patients were admitted with injuries sustained from falls. Equal numbers of patients were less than and greater than 50 years of age and included 53 children (less than or equal to 16 years) and 214 elderly (greater than or equal to 55 years). Falls from heights occurred predominantly in young males (mean age 34.2 years), were most commonly job or recreation related and resulted in higher injury severity scores (ISS). Falls in the elderly occurred more commonly in women, typically on a flat surface, and were less severe. Despite lower mean ISS, fall victims over 55 years of age had longer hospitalizations (11.4 vs. 4.5 days) and incurred higher hospital charges compared to younger patients. There were 35 deaths (9.2%). In patients under 55 years, deaths resulted from fall-related central nervous system (CNS) injury and/or multisystem trauma. In patients over 55 years, fatalities were most commonly related to pre-existent medical conditions. Based on a review of this experience, we conclude that: (1) unlike other causes of blunt and penetrating trauma, both sexes are equally at risk from fall-related injuries but sex incidence is age related; (2) falls from heights are more common in men; (3) advanced age and pre-existing medical conditions account for the increased morbidity and mortality following falls and; (4) cost containment measures for fall-related trauma must consider not only injury severity, but the age and pre-existent medical conditions of the patient.

Rozycki, G S; Maull, K I

1991-01-01

247

Cross-cultural adaptation of the diabetes management self-efficacy scale for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: Scale development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: As a profession, nurses are particularly concerned with cross-cultural influences that affect the health practices of populations. Although the international literature describes questionnaires and specific scales in health and disease behaviours, adequate Turkish-language instruments are scarce. Therefore, suitable Turkish-language instruments need to be developed or adapted for the Turkish population.Objectives: Study aim was to adapt a Dutch\\/English version of

Magfiret Kara; Jaap J. van der Bijl; Lillie M. Shortridge-Baggett; Turkinaz Ast?; Seher Erguney

2006-01-01

248

Falls and Fractures  

MedlinePLUS

... to the local senior center helps you stay healthy. The good news is that there are simple ways you can prevent most falls. Take The Right Steps If you take care of your overall health, you may be able ...

249

Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy evaluation of efficacy of scaling and root planing using magnification: A randomized controlled clinical study  

PubMed Central

Aim: A randomized controlled clinical study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of scaling and root planing (SRP) by using Magnifying Loupes (ML) and dental operating microscope (DOM). Materials and Methods: A total of 90 human teeth scheduled for extraction from 18 patients aged between 25 and 65 years suffering from generalized chronic severe periodontitis were randomly assigned to three treatment groups. Group 1 consisted SRP performed without using magnification (unaided), Group 2-SRP with ML and Group 3-SRP with DOM. Following extractions, samples were prepared for (i) evaluation of surface topography by atomic force microscopy, (ii) presence of smear layer, debris by scanning electron microscopy (iii) elemental analysis by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Data was subjected to statistical analysis using analysis of variance, post-hoc (Tukey-HSD) and Chi-square test. Results: Statistically significant (P < 0.001) difference was found among the different treatment groups. Group 3 was the best while Group 1 was the least effective technique for SRP. Order of efficacy in terms of the surface was found to be - Palatal < Lingual < Distal ? Mesial < Buccal. Efficiency in mandibular to maxillary teeth was found to be significant (P < 0.05), also anterior to posterior teeth (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Magnification tools significantly enhance the efficacy of supragingival and subgingival SRP.

Mohan, Ranjana; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Gundappa, Mohan

2013-01-01

250

Fall Detection with Wearable Sensors--Safe (Smart Fall Detection)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The high rate of falls incidence among the elderly calls for the development of reliable and robust fall detection systems. A number of such systems have been proposed, with claims of fall detection accuracy of over 90% based on ac- celerometers and gyroscopes. However, most such fall detection algorithms have been developed based on observational analysis of the data gathered,

Olukunle Ojetola; Elena I. Gaura; James Brusey

2011-01-01

251

Patient Education to Prevent Falls Among Older Hospital Inpatients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Falls are a common adverse event during hospitalization of older adults, and few interventions have been shown to prevent hem.\\u000aMethods: This study was a 3-group randomized trial to evaluate the efficacy of 2 forms of multimedia patient education compared with usual care for the prevention of in-hospital falls. Older hospital patients (n = 1206) admitted to a mixture

Terry P Haines; Anne-Marie Hill; Keith D Hill; Steven McPhail; David Oliver; Sandra Brauer; Tammy Hoffmann; Christopher Beer

2011-01-01

252

Postural control and fear of falling in persons with low-level paraplegia.  

PubMed

Falls are prevalent reasons for spinal cord injury (SCI). Postinjury fear of falling (FOF) can affect rehabilitation potential. We quantified FOF in 15 men with paraplegia (ambulatory with bilateral knee-ankle-foot orthoses [KAFOs] and elbow crutches) in correlation with their postural control at the center for long-term SCI rehabilitation of a tertiary-care teaching hospital. Our outcome measures comprised the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale, the Modified Falls Efficacy Scale (MFES), postural sway measurements in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions; and walking speed, cadence, and endurance. We assessed FOF with the MFES followed by measuring postural sway with a force platform. We measured gait parameters by asking the participant to ambulate on an indoor pathway. The mean postural sway was 314.13 +/- 184.05 mm (mean +/- standard deviation) in the anteroposterior direction and 222.16 +/- 112.34 mm in the mediolateral direction. The MFES score was 41.29 +/- 12.77, which showed a statistically significant negative correlation with postural control. The self-perception of confidence as measured by MFES might not really represent the actual postural stability in individuals with low-level paraplegia. FOF can adversely affect the postural control of individuals with low-level paraplegia. Clinicians should consider FOF as an influential factor in postural control during rehabilitation. PMID:20803393

John, Ligie T; Cherian, Binu; Babu, Andrew

2010-01-01

253

Photocatalytic degradation efficacy of Bi4Ti3O12 micro-scale platelets over methylene blue under visible light  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

<001> textured Bi4Ti3O12 platelets with micro scale size were synthesized by a facile molten salt method. The photocatalytic activities of the as-prepared samples were measured with the photodegradation of methylene blue at room temperature under visible light irradiation. The Bi4Ti3O12 with the aspect ratio of 35 exhibited good absorption in the visible light region and the photodegradation against methylene blue was higher than that of anatase TiO2 reference, showing that the high degree of preferred {001} facets on the plate surface benefits the electronic transmission. In addition, the layer-pervoskite structure facilitates the mobility of the photogenerated carriers and hampers their recombination. The above results indicated that the large specific surface area of the as-prepared samples could attribute to the presence of a number of oxygen vacancies and then lead to the good photo-electric property. This work proposed an alternative way to tailor the structure of micro-sized platelets to get excellent properties comparable to the nano materials.

Zhao, Wei; Jia, Zhen; Lei, E.; Wang, Liguo; Li, Zhaoyang; Dai, Yejing

2013-11-01

254

Continuous equilibrium scores: factoring in the time before a fall.  

PubMed

The equilibrium (EQ) score commonly used in computerized dynamic posturography is normalized between 0 and 100, with falls assigned a score of 0. The resulting mixed discrete-continuous distribution limits certain statistical analyses and treats all trials with falls equally. We propose a simple modification of the formula in which peak-to-peak sway data from trials with falls is scaled according the percent of the trial completed to derive a continuous equilibrium (cEQ) score. The cEQ scores for trials without falls remain unchanged from the original methodology. The cEQ factors in the time before a fall and results in a continuous variable retaining the central tendencies of the original EQ distribution. A random set of 5315 Sensory Organization Test trials were pooled that included 81 falls. A comparison of the original and cEQ distributions and their rank ordering demonstrated that trials with falls continue to constitute the lower range of scores with the cEQ methodology. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.997) demonstrates that the cEQ retained near-perfect discrimination between trials with and without falls. We conclude that the cEQ score provides the ability to discriminate between ballistic falls from falls that occur later in the trial. This approach of incorporating time and sway magnitude can be easily extended to enhance other balance tests that include fall data or incomplete trials. PMID:22640866

Wood, Scott J; Reschke, Millard F; Owen Black, F

2012-05-27

255

Editors' Fall Picks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Library Journal's" review editors select fall titles readers won't want to miss--"Waiting on a Train: The Embattled Future of Passenger Rail Service" (James McCommons); "Happy" (Alex Lemon); "Free for All: Joe Papp, the Public, and the Greatest Theater Story Ever Told" (Kenneth Turan & Joseph Papp); "In My Father's Shadow: A Daughter Remembers…

Heilbrun, Margaret; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Kuzyk, Raya; Roncevic, Mirela; Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara

2009-01-01

256

Fall Meeting Fun Run  

Microsoft Academic Search

This letter has two purposes: (1) to thank the committee in charge of last year's Fall AGU Fun Run for a well organized and most enjoyable race, and (2) to issue a challenge that will assure that the event is run again this year, and, hopefully becomes a recurring annual AGU institution.Last year's race at Lake Merced, on the Sunday

Myrl A. Beck Jr.; Russell F. Burmester; Robert Butler; Richard J. Blakely; Peter N. Shive

1979-01-01

257

Annual Fall Conference  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Our two-day fall conference focuses on training science faculty to teach with case studies and to write their own cases. It features a track for beginners and a track for more experienced case teachers as well as a third track on Saturday for high school teachers.

2010-01-01

258

Editors' Fall Picks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|"Library Journal's" review editors select fall titles readers won't want to miss--"Waiting on a Train: The Embattled Future of Passenger Rail Service" (James McCommons); "Happy" (Alex Lemon); "Free for All: Joe Papp, the Public, and the Greatest Theater Story Ever Told" (Kenneth Turan & Joseph Papp); "In My Father's Shadow: A Daughter Remembers…

Heilbrun, Margaret; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Kuzyk, Raya; Roncevic, Mirela; Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara

2009-01-01

259

Opening Fall Enrollment, 1998.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report presents tables detailing enrollment data for fall 1998 at Maryland's public and independent colleges and universities. Highlights include: (1) total headcount enrollment increased by 3,000 to 264,802, which was the greatest one-year increase since 1990; (2) nearly all the increase was due to a sharp rise in number of full-time…

Maryland State Higher Education Commission, Annapolis.

260

Datacore: Fall 1988.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This databook was compiled by New York City Technical College of the City University of New York to reflect fall 1988 data on admissions, enrollment, graduation, personnel, and other statistics. The databook is divided into five major sections. The first presents admissions statistics, including data on registration by curricula for first-time…

Niles, Wallace M.

261

The News, Fall 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This fall 2002 newsletter from the Community College League of California contains several articles, news stories, and the brochure from the 2002 Annual Convention, "Celebrating the Way California LEARNS." Articles include: (1) "Nursing Shortage Poses Dilemma for Colleges: Access vs. Efficiency," a discussion of the debate over how to increase…

Giles, Ray, Ed.

2002-01-01

262

Fall Enrollment Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report provides opening fall headcount enrollment data for Colorado public postsecondary institutions, independent (private nonprofit) institutions, proprietary institutions, and the U.S. Air Force Academy from 1985 through 1994. The report also provides full-time equivalent (FTE) enrollment data for public institutions. The bulk of the…

Colorado Commission on Higher Education, Denver.

263

The five-times-sit-to-stand-test (FTSST), the short version of the activities-specific balance confidence (ABC) scale, and fear of falling predict step execution time (SET) in older adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rapid stepping is a common strategy employed by older adults to avoid falls. The relative contributions of dynamic balance, balance confidence and fear of falling to SET, was investigated in older adults. Thirty-three community-dwelling older adults completed tests of SET as well as the FTSST, a test of motor performance associated with dynamic balance. Psychological indicators of balance-related confidence assessed

Allon Goldberg

264

A Fall and Near-Fall Assessment and Evaluation System  

PubMed Central

The FANFARE (Falls And Near Falls Assessment Research and Evaluation) project has developed a system to fulfill the need for a wearable device to collect data for fall and near-falls analysis. The system consists of a computer and a wireless sensor network to measure, display, and store fall related parameters such as postural activities and heart rate variability. Ease of use and low power are considered in the design. The system was built and tested successfully. Different machine learning algorithms were applied to the stored data for fall and near-fall evaluation. Results indicate that the Naïve Bayes algorithm is the best choice, due to its fast model building and high accuracy in fall detection.

Dinh, Anh; Shi, Yang; Teng, Daniel; Ralhan, Amitoz; Chen, Li; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina; Basran, Jenny; Ko, Seok-Bum; McCrowsky, Carl

2009-01-01

265

Falling off the couch.  

PubMed

The patient's therapeutic regression intensifies certain unconscious meanings of the analytic couch. In addition to representing the analysis or the analyst in general, the couch can represent the unconscious, or it may take on the symbolic significance of the analyst's or mother's arms, lap, breasts, or womb. When the genetic roots of the patient's transference include substantial experiences of disappointment, narcissistic injury, and mistrust, the theme of falling from the couch may emerge as a dream, an association, or even an enactment. This theme usually implies the presence of a deepening but mistrustful transference, based on earlier disappointments by the patient's primary objects. Falling off the couch may be associated with being dropped as an infant, rolling out of bed as a child, birth, miscarriage, castration, death, termination, defending against passive wishes, punishment for sexual or aggressive transgressions, escaping an attack, descending into the unconscious, or wanting to be picked up and comforted. PMID:2447146

Waugaman, R M

1987-01-01

266

Fall business meeting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As an alternative to the usual luncheon and business meeting, AGU sections had wine and cheese parties at the 1987 Fall Meeting. The Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism (GP) Section preceded this informal gathering with its annual fall business meeting on Thursday, December 12. It was attended by some 60 people.The first order of business was a comment by Richard Blakely (U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, Calif.) thanking all those who assisted with and wrote articles for the GP section o f the U.S. National Report to the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG). Then Subir Banerjee (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) announced that the final report of the Asilomar Workshop on Rock Magnetism was available. Copies were passed out at the meeting; additional copies may be obtained from Banerjee or from AGU Headquarters.

267

Ejs Free Fall Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Ejs Free Fall model displays the dynamics of a ball dropped near the surface of Earth onto a platform. The initial conditions for the ball are zero initial velocities in the x and y directions. The coefficient of restitution for the ballâs collision with the platform is less than one. The initial height of the ball can be changed by dragging it when the simulation is paused. You can modify this simulation if you have Ejs installed by right-clicking within the plot and selecting âOpen Ejs Modelâ from the pop-up menu item. Ejs Free Fall model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (Ejs) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_newton_FreeFall.jar file will run the program if Java is installed. Ejs is a part of the Open Source Physics Project and is designed to make it easier to access, modify, and generate computer models. Additional Ejs models for Newtonian mechanics are available. They can be found by searching ComPADRE for Open Source Physics, OSP, or Ejs.

Christian, Wolfgang

2008-06-03

268

Factors influencing the efficacy of two organophosphate insecticides in controlling California red scale, Aonidiella aurantii (Maskell). A basis for reducing spray application volume in Mediterranean conditions.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND: Because society is seeking ways to lessen the environmental impact of agricultural activity, dose adjustment has become a key issue in current plant protection treatments with high spray application volumes, such as on citrus plants. This work investigates, in field conditions, the factors affecting the efficacy of organophosphate insecticides against California red scale (CRS), Aonidiella aurantii (Maskell), when the delivery rate is decreased. Insecticide rate changes were induced by modifying the spray application volumes of two commercial organophosphate pesticides based on chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-methyl. RESULTS: Results showed that, with increase in the spray volume, the coverage and the uniformity of deposition on the canopy increased, but final infestation depended neither on the spray application volume nor on the coverage. Furthermore, final infestation significantly depended on the pest pressure in the plot and the spray volume applied per unit volume of canopy (L m(-3) canopy). Moreover, it was found that the final infestation was influenced by the efficiency of deposition in the applications that were carried out against the second-generation of CRS. CONCLUSION: Because the spray application volume did not affect the final infestation, this research introduces the possibility that reducing the doses of current citrus organophosphate treatments may still allow effective plant protection in Mediterranean conditions. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:23404841

Garcerá, Cruz; Moltó, Enrique; Chueca, Patricia

2013-02-13

269

Stick balancing, falls and Dragon-Kings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The extent to which the occurrence of falls, the dominant feature of human attempts to balance a stick at their fingertip, can be predicted is examined in the context of the "Dragon-King" hypothesis. For skilled stick balancers, fluctuations in the controlled variable, namely the vertical displacement angle ?, exhibit power law behaviors. When stick balancing is made less stable by either decreasing the length of the stick or by requiring the subject to balance the stick on the surface of a table tennis racket, systematic departures from the power law behaviors are observed in the range of large ?. This observation raises the possibility that the presence of departures from the power law in the large length scale region, possibly Dragon-Kings, may identify situations in which the occurrence of a fall is more imminent. However, whether or not Dragon-Kings are observed, there is a Weibull-type survival function for stick falling. The possibility that increased risk of falling can, at least to some extent, be predicted from fluctuations in the controlled variable before the event occurs has important implications for the development of preventative strategies for the management of phenomena ranging from earthquakes to epileptic seizures to falls in the elderly.

Cabrera, J. L.; Milton, J. G.

2012-05-01

270

Falls in frequent neurological diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence of falls among neurological patients is unknown, although disturbances of gait and posture are common. Falls may lead to burdens for the patient, the caregivers and the health system. We designed a prospective study and investigated all patients for a history of falls admitted to a neurological hospital during a 100-day period. Clinical investigation was carried out and

Henning Stolze; Stephan Klebe; Christiane Zechlin; Christoph Baecker; Lars Friege; Günther Deuschl

2004-01-01

271

Long-distance free fall  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an analysis of a situation described in Milton's epic poem ``Paradise Lost'' in which we calculate the distance required for a nine-day free-fall from rest to the Earth. The resulting method is completely general, and can be applied to free-fall toward other bodies and to near-Earth free-fall as well.

Gallant, Joseph; Carlson, James

1999-03-01

272

Fall detection - Principles and Methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fall detection of the elderly is a major public health problem. Thus it has generated a wide range of applied research and prompted the development of telemonitoring systems to enable the early diagnosis of fall conditions. This article is a survey of systems, algorithms and sensors, for the automatic early detection of the fall of elderly persons. It points out

N. Noury; A. Fleury; P. Rumeau; A. K. Bourke; G. O. Laighin; V. Rialle; J. E. Lundy

2007-01-01

273

Teacher efficacy: A construct validation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Developed an instrument to measure teacher efficacy and examined the relationship between teacher efficacy and observable teacher behaviors. Factor analysis of responses from 208 elementary school teachers to a 30-item Teacher Efficacy Scale yielded 2 substantial factors that corresponded to A. Bandura's 2-factor theoretical model of self-efficacy. A multitrait–multimethod analysis that supported both convergent and discriminant validity analyzed data from

Sherri Gibson; Myron H. Dembo

1984-01-01

274

The Way Things Fall  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web page provides an introduction to the motion of objects due to gravity. Topics covered include free fall and acceleration due to gravity, with or without an initial velocity, and the effects of air resistance. Simple equations are integrated along with a short experiment related to Galileo's classic ramp experiment. A lesson plan for teachers is provided. This item is part of an extensive collection, "From Stargazers to Starships" that uses space exploration and space science to introduce concepts in physics and astronomy. Translations in Spanish and French are available.

Stern, David

2005-09-22

275

Focused supervision of high-risk fall dementia patients: a simple method to reduce fall incidence and severity.  

PubMed

Dementia units in nursing homes have a disproportionately high number of demographic risk factors for falls. Many residents have a previous history of falls, the inability to call for assistance, and the inability to remember safety instructions. For interdisciplinary falls review committees, this population may be the most difficult to manage. The Virginia Veterans Care Center (VVCC) Dementia Unit Interdisciplinary Fall Team instituted a novel practice for reducing the number and severity of falls among the highest risk group of dementia patients. Certified nursing assistants (CNAs) were assigned to high-risk residents for focused supervision. The patients received consistent supervision by selected CNAs during the day and evening shifts. Eight residents identified as high risk who continued to have falls despite multiple interventions were selected for the study. A comparison of four months of intervention with the four months prior to the intervention revealed a significant (p = 0. 024) fall reduction during the intervention months. Individually, seven of the eight participants had reduced falls during the intervention period. A 5-point scale for fall severity demonstrated an overall reduction in fall severity during that period. Individually, five of the eight patients had a decreased fall severity, and one had no change. Two patients experienced an increase in fall severity due to ongoing medical problems. While the small number of patients in the study limits the power of the results, this novel intervention of using designated CNAs to supervise high-risk fall residents with dementia may prove helpful for staff in other nursing facilities. PMID:15844756

Detweiler, Mark B; Kim, Kye Y; Taylor, Brenda Y

276

A pilot plant scale evaluation of a new process aid for enhancing chlorine efficacy against pathogen survival and cross-contamination during produce wash.  

PubMed

Developing food safety intervention technology that can be readily adopted by the industry often requires test conditions that match as closely as possible to those of commercial food processing operations; yet biosafety risks inherent in pathogen studies constrain most experiments to laboratory settings. In this study, we report the first semi-commercial pilot-scale evaluation of a new process aid, T128, for its impact on enhancing the antimicrobial efficacy of chlorinated wash water against pathogen survival and cross-contamination. A non-pathogenic, BSL-1, strain of Escherichia coli O157:H7 was inoculated onto freshly harvested baby spinach leaves and washed with large amounts of freshly cut un-inoculated iceberg lettuce shreds in wash water with free chlorine periodically replenished, in the presence or absence of T128. Changes in water quality and pathogen survival and cross-contamination were monitored at every 2 min intervals for up to 36 min for each treatment during the wash operation. Results indicated that the use of T128 did not significantly (P>0.05) influence the rate of wash water deterioration, nor the pathogen populations remaining on the inoculated spinach leaves. However, in the absence of T128 (control), survival of E. coli O157:H7 in wash water and cross-contamination of un-inoculated lettuce frequently occurred when free chlorine in solution dropped below 1mg/l during the wash process. In contrast, the use of T128 significantly reduced the occurrence of E. coli O157:H7 surviving in wash water and of cross-contamination to un-inoculated shredded iceberg lettuce under the same operational conditions, suggesting that the application of T128 in a chlorine-based fresh produce sanitization system could increase the safety margin of process control on fresh-cut operations. PMID:22857846

Luo, Yaguang; Nou, Xiangwu; Millner, Patricia; Zhou, Bin; Shen, Cangliang; Yang, Yang; Wu, Yunpeng; Wang, Qin; Feng, Hao; Shelton, Dan

2012-07-16

277

Toward improving food safety in the domestic environment: a multi-item Rasch scale for the measurement of the safety efficacy of domestic food-handling practices.  

PubMed

To reduce consumer health risks from foodborne diseases that result from improper domestic food handling, consumers need to know how to safely handle food. To realize improvements in public health, it is necessary to develop interventions that match the needs of individual consumers. Successful intervention strategies are therefore contingent on identifying not only the practices that are important for consumer protection, but also barriers that prevent consumers from responding to these interventions. A measure of food safety behavior is needed to assess the effectiveness of different intervention strategies across different groups of consumers. A nationally representative survey was conducted in the Netherlands to determine which practices are likely conducted by which consumers. Participants reported their behaviors with respect to 55 different food-handling practices. The Rasch modeling technique was used to determine a general measure for the likelihood of an average consumer performing each food-handling behavior. Simultaneously, an average performance measure was estimated for each consumer. These two measures can be combined to predict the likelihood that an individual consumer engages in a specific food-handling behavior. A single "food safety" dimension was shown to underlie all items. Some potentially safe practices (e.g., use of meat thermometers) were reported as very difficult, while other safe practices were conducted by respondents more frequently (e.g., washing of fresh fruit and vegetables). A cluster analysis was applied to the resulting data set, and five segments of consumers were identified. Different behaviors may have different effects on microbial growth in food, and thus have different consequences for human health. Once the microbial relevance of the different consumer behaviors has been confirmed by experiments and modeling, the scale developed in the research reported here can be used to develop risk communication targeted to the needs of different consumer groups, as well as to measure the efficacy of different interventions. PMID:17054534

Fischer, Arnout R H; Frewer, Lynn J; Nauta, Maarten J

2006-10-01

278

Acute care patient falls: evaluation of a revised fall prevention program following comparative analysis of psychiatric and medical patient falls.  

PubMed

Eliminating falls and fall-associated injuries are priorities in health care. This study examined the impact of revised fall prevention interventions on psychiatric and medical patient falls. After policy revisions were well established, psychiatric falls diminished and medical falls increased. A contributing factor to the medical population finding was policy intervention noncompliance. PMID:20974102

Yates, Kimberly M; Creech Tart, Rebecca

2010-08-04

279

Development of a common outcome data set for fall injury prevention trials: the Prevention of Falls Network Europe consensus.  

PubMed

The prevention of injury associated with falls in older people is a public health target in many countries around the world. Although there is good evidence that interventions such as multifactorial fall prevention and individually prescribed exercise are effective in reducing falls, the effect on serious injury rates is unclear. Historically, trials have not been adequately powered to detect injury endpoints, and variations in case definition across trials have hindered meta-analysis. It is possible that fall-prevention strategies have limited effect on falls that result in injuries or are ineffective in populations who are at a higher risk of injury. Further research is required to determine whether fall-prevention interventions can reduce serious injuries. Prevention of Falls Network Europe (ProFaNE) is a collaborative project to reduce the burden of fall injury in older people through excellence in research and promotion of best practice (www.profane.eu.org). The European Commission funds the network, which links clinicians, members of the public, and researchers worldwide. The aims are to identify major gaps in knowledge in fall injury prevention and to facilitate the collaboration necessary for large-scale clinical research activity, including clinical trials, comparative research, and prospective meta-analysis. Work is being undertaken in a 4-year program. As a first step, the development of a common set of outcome definitions and measures for future trials or meta-analysis was considered. PMID:16137297

Lamb, Sarah E; Jørstad-Stein, Ellen C; Hauer, Klaus; Becker, Clemens

2005-09-01

280

Impact of fall-related behaviors as risk factors for falls among the elderly patients with dementia in a geriatric facility in Japan.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to clarify potential fall-related behaviors as fall risk factors that may predict the potential for falls among the elderly patients with dementia at a geriatric facility in Japan. This study was conducted from April 2008 to May 2009. A baseline study was conducted in April 2008 to evaluate Mini-Mental State Examination, Physical Self-Maintenance Scale, fall-related behaviors, and other factors. For statistical analysis, paired t test and logistic analysis were used to compare each item between fallers and nonfallers. A total of 135 participants were followed up for 1 year; 50 participants (37.04%) fell during that period. Results of multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the total score for fall-related behaviors was significantly related to falls. It was suggested that 11 fall-related behaviors may be effective indicators to predict falls among the elderly patients with dementia. PMID:22871908

Suzuki, Mizue; Kurata, Sadami; Yamamoto, Emiko; Makino, Kumiko; Kanamori, Masao

2012-08-07

281

A short form of the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE-6): Development, psychometric properties and validity in an intercultural non-clinical sample and a sample of patients at risk for heart failure  

PubMed Central

Objective: General self-efficacy has been found to be an influential variable related to the adaptation to stress and chronic illness, with the General Self-Efficacy (GSE) Scale by Jerusalem and Schwarzer being a reliable and valid instrument to assess this disposition. The aim of this study was to construct and test a short form of this scale to allow for a more economical assessment of the construct. Methods: The item characteristics of the original scale were assessed using an intercultural non-clinical sample (n=19,719). Six items with the highest coefficient of variation and good discrimination along the range of the trait were selected to build a short form of the instrument (GSE-6). Subsequently, the psychometric properties and the concurrent and predictive validity of the GSE-6 were tested in a longitudinal design with three measurements using a sample of patients with risk factors for heart failure (n=1,460). Results: Cronbach’s alpha for the GSE-6 was between .79 and .88. We found negative associations with symptoms of depression (–.35 and –.45), anxiety (–.35), and vital exhaustion (–.38) and positive associations with social support (.30), and mental health (.36). In addition, the GSE-6 score was positively associated with active problem-focused coping (.26) and distraction/self-encouragement (.25) and negatively associated with depressive coping (–.34). The baseline GSE-6 score predicted mental health and physical health after 28 months, even after controlling for the respective baseline score. The relative stability over twelve and 28 months was r=.50 and r=.60, respectively, while the mean self-efficacy score did not change over time. Conclusions: The six item short form of the GSE scale is a reliable and valid instrument that is useful for the economical assessment of general self-efficacy in large multivariate studies and for screening purposes.

Romppel, Matthias; Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph; Wachter, Rolf; Edelmann, Frank; Dungen, Hans-Dirk; Pieske, Burkert; Grande, Gesine

2013-01-01

282

A short form of the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE-6): Development, psychometric properties and validity in an intercultural non-clinical sample and a sample of patients at risk for heart failure.  

PubMed

Objective: General self-efficacy has been found to be an influential variable related to the adaptation to stress and chronic illness, with the General Self-Efficacy (GSE) Scale by Jerusalem and Schwarzer being a reliable and valid instrument to assess this disposition. The aim of this study was to construct and test a short form of this scale to allow for a more economical assessment of the construct.Methods: The item characteristics of the original scale were assessed using an intercultural non-clinical sample (n=19,719). Six items with the highest coefficient of variation and good discrimination along the range of the trait were selected to build a short form of the instrument (GSE-6). Subsequently, the psychometric properties and the concurrent and predictive validity of the GSE-6 were tested in a longitudinal design with three measurements using a sample of patients with risk factors for heart failure (n=1,460).Results: Cronbach's alpha for the GSE-6 was between .79 and .88. We found negative associations with symptoms of depression (-.35 and -.45), anxiety (-.35), and vital exhaustion (-.38) and positive associations with social support (.30), and mental health (.36). In addition, the GSE-6 score was positively associated with active problem-focused coping (.26) and distraction/self-encouragement (.25) and negatively associated with depressive coping (-.34). The baseline GSE-6 score predicted mental health and physical health after 28 months, even after controlling for the respective baseline score. The relative stability over twelve and 28 months was r=.50 and r=.60, respectively, while the mean self-efficacy score did not change over time.Conclusions: The six item short form of the GSE scale is a reliable and valid instrument that is useful for the economical assessment of general self-efficacy in large multivariate studies and for screening purposes. PMID:23429426

Romppel, Matthias; Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph; Wachter, Rolf; Edelmann, Frank; Düngen, Hans-Dirk; Pieske, Burkert; Grande, Gesine

2013-02-20

283

1991 Fall Meeting Report  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The AGU 1991 Fall Meeting, held in San Francisco December 9-13, was the largest national AGU meeting ever held. Meeting participation continued the steady growth trend set throughout the previous decade. A total of 4,037 papers and posters were presented, and by Friday noon of the meeting over 5,500 members had registered.Several special events were scheduled to inform and engage members on societal and programmatic aspects of our science. AGU's Committee on Education and Human Resources sponsored an open forum that addressed opportunities and problems associated with dual-career couples. A discussion of NASA's strategic plan by Berrien Moore and Joseph Alexander drew a large audience, and a special session on societal aspects of the Mt. Pinatubo eruption drew an overflow crowd. Two special lectures— “Plumes, Plates, and Deep Earth Structure” by Don L. Anderson and “New Frontiers in Aeronomy: Effects of Global Atmospheric Change” by P. M. Banks-also drew overflow crowds.

Chapman, David S.

284

The Fall of Enron  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The very mention of Enron is enough to make some people rather upset, and in some circles, it is probably best not to bring up the name of this corporation at all. But, with an eye towards informing the public, the Houston Chronicle has taken on this thorny topic by creating this rather comprehensive and intelligent look at the fall of this once-mighty corporation. On the site, visitors can learn about the events leading up to the companyÂs downfall through a timeline of events and past news stories created by staff members at the newspaper. The site also contains a tremendous amount of material on the current trial of Enron executives Kenneth Lay and Jeff Skilling. Coverage includes blogs containing observations from noted attorneys, transcripts of court documents and testimony, as well as photo galleries.

2006-01-01

285

A Piece of Paper Falling Faster than Free Fall  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|We report a simple experiment that clearly demonstrates a common error in the explanation of the classic experiment where a small piece of paper is put over a book and the system is let fall. This classic demonstration is used in introductory physics courses to show that after eliminating the friction force with the air, the piece of paper falls

Vera, F.; Rivera, R.

2011-01-01

286

A piece of paper falling faster than free fall  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report a simple experiment that clearly demonstrates a common error in the explanation of the classic experiment where a small piece of paper is put over a book and the system is let fall. This classic demonstration is used in introductory physics courses to show that after eliminating the friction force with the air, the piece of paper falls with acceleration g. To test if the paper falls behind the book in a nearly free fall motion or if it is dragged by the book, we designed a version of this experiment that includes a ball and a piece of paper over a book that is forced to fall using elastic cords. We recorded a video of our experiment using a high-speed video camera at 300 frames per second that shows that the book and the paper fall faster than the ball, which falls well behind the book with an acceleration approximately equal to g. Our experiment shows that the piece of paper is dragged behind the book and therefore the paper and book demonstration should not be used to show that all objects fall with acceleration g independently of their mass.

Vera, F.; Rivera, R.

2011-09-01

287

A Piece of Paper Falling Faster than Free Fall  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We report a simple experiment that clearly demonstrates a common error in the explanation of the classic experiment where a small piece of paper is put over a book and the system is let fall. This classic demonstration is used in introductory physics courses to show that after eliminating the friction force with the air, the piece of paper falls

Vera, F.; Rivera, R.

2011-01-01

288

Fall Safety for Kids: How to Prevent Falls  

MedlinePLUS

... smart investment Marketing and Mickey — A change in food marketing to children Head lice prevention: What works, what doesn't? ... page. Fall safety for kids: How to prevent falls ... Mayo Clinic Store Check out these best-sellers ...

289

Klamath Falls geothermal field, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Klamath Falls, Oregon, is located in a Known Geothermal Resource Area which has been used by residents, principally to obtain geothermal fluids for space heating, at least since the turn of the century. Over 500 shallow-depth wells ranging from 90 to 2,000 ft (27 to 610 m) in depth are used to heat (35 MWt) over 600 structures. This utilization includes the heating of homes, apartments, schools, commercial buildings, hospital, county jail, YMCA, and swimming pools by individual wells and three district heating systems. Geothermal well temperatures range from 100 to 230{degree}F (38 to 110{degree}C) and the most common practice is to use downhole heat exchangers with city water as the circulating fluid. Larger facilities and district heating systems use lineshaft vertical turbine pumps and plate heat exchangers. Well water chemistry indicates approximately 800 ppM dissolved solids, with sodium sulfate having the highest concentration. Some scaling and corrosion does occur on the downhole heat exchangers (black iron pipe) and on heating systems where the geo-fluid is used directly. 73 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

1989-09-01

290

Mobility, Balance and Falls in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis  

PubMed Central

Background There is a lack of information concerning the relation between objective measures of gait and balance and fall history in persons with MS (PwMS). This investigation assessed the relation between demographic, clinical, mobility and balance metrics and falls history in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods 52 ambulatory persons with MS (PwMS) participated in the investigation. All persons provided demographic information including fall history over the last 12 months. Disease status was assessed with Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Walking speed, coordination, endurance and postural control were quantified with a multidimensional mobility battery. Results Over 51% of the participants fell in the previous year with 79% of these people being suffering recurrent falls. Overall, fallers were older, had a greater prevalence of assistive devices use, worse disability, decreased walking endurance, and greater postural sway velocity with eyes closed compared to non-fallers. Additionally, fallers had greater impairment in cerebellar, sensory, pyramidal, and bladder/bowel subscales of the EDSS. Conclusions The current observations suggest that PwMS who are older, more disabled, utilize an assistive device, have decreased walking coordination and endurance and have diminished balance have fallen in the previous year. This suggests that individuals who meet these criteria need to be carefully monitored for future falls. Future research is needed to determine a prospective model of falls specific to PwMS. Additionally, the utility of interventions aimed at reducing falls and fall risk in PwMS needs to be established.

Sosnoff, Jacob J.; Socie, Michael J.; Boes, Morgan K.; Sandroff, Brian M.; Pula, John H.; Suh, Yoojin; Weikert, Madeline; Balantrapu, Swathi; Morrison, Steven; Motl, Robert W.

2011-01-01

291

Evaluations of Bollgard, Bollgard II, and Widestrike technologies against beet and fall armyworm larvae (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Transgenic cottons containing the Bollgard®, Bollgard II® and WideStrike® traits were grown in 2005 and 2007 to examine the efficacy against beet [Spodoptera exigua (Hübner)] and fall armyworms [S. frugiperda (J. E. Smith)]. Results suggest that both dual-gene traits are more efficacious against th...

292

Mobility and falls in people with Huntington’s disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective:The aim of this study was to estimate the frequency of falls in people with Huntington’s disease (HD) and make a preliminary assessment of tools appropriate for assessing the risk of falling.Design:Observational study.Setting:Hospital clinic.Subjects:24 people with HD.Main measures:Balance was assessed using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and Timed “Up & Go” (TUG) test. Walking speed over 10 m was recorded.

M E Busse; C M Wiles; A E Rosser

2009-01-01

293

Not Just a Fall Tree  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Trees burst with color in the northern states. Autumn leaves dust the ground. Painting the fall landscape is nothing new. Teachers have been doing it in classrooms for decades. The approach, however, can make the difference between whether the fall landscape is simply painting for fun, or a real learning experience. Students learn best when they…

Miller-Hewes, Kathy A.

2004-01-01

294

NOVA Fall 1999 Teacher's Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This teacher's guide complements five programs that aired on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) in the fall of 1999. Programs include: (1) "Fall of the Leaning Tower"; (2) "Everest: The Mystery of Mallory and Irvine"; (3) "Time Travel, Decoding Nazi Secrets"; (3) "Voyage of Doom"; and (5) "Barely Breathing". It provides activity set-ups related…

French, Wayne; Karlan, James W.; Ransick, Kristina; Rosene, Dale; Sammons, Fran Lyons; Sammons, James

295

Are Reading Standards Falling?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Finds that the Reading-for-Meaning Scale (first standardized in 1979) shows no drop in reading standards among 7- to 12-year-olds, but shows a widening performance gap between middle-class and low-income schools. Attributes this gap to segregation of schools based on socioeconomic status. Suggests that primary teachers do as good a job as they…

Hunter-Grundin, Elizabeth

1997-01-01

296

Fall prevention in the elderly  

PubMed Central

Summary Falls are frequent in the elderly and affect mortality, morbidity, loss of functional capacity and institutionalization. In the older patient the incidence of falls can sometimes be underestimated, even in the absence of a clear cognitive impairment, because it is often difficult to reconstruct the dynamics. It is quite common that forms due to syncope are associated with retrograde amnesia and in 40 to 60% of the cases falls happen in the absence of witnesses. The pathogenesis of falls is often multifactorial, due to physiological age-related changes or more properly pathological factors, or due to the environment. The identification of risk factors is essential in the planning of preventive measures. Syncope is one of major causes of falls. About 20% of cardiovascular syncope in patients older than 70 appears as a fall and more than 20% of older people with Carotid Sinus Syndrome complain of falls as well as syncope. These data clearly state that older patients with history of falls should undergo a cardiovascular and neuroautonomic assessment besides the survey of other risk factors. Multifactorial assessment requires a synergy of various specialists. The geriatrician coordinates the multidisciplinary intervention in order to make the most effective evaluation of the risk of falling, searching for all predisposing factors, aiming towards a program of prevention. In clear pathological conditions it is possible to enact a specific treatment. Particular attention must indeed be paid to the re-evaluation of drug therapy, with dose adjustments or withdrawal especially for antihypertensive, diuretics and benzodiazepines. The Guidelines of the American Geriatrics Society recommend modification of environmental hazards, training paths, hip protectors and appropriate use of support tools (sticks, walkers), which can be effective elements of a multifactorial intervention program. Balance exercises are also recommended. In conclusion, an initial assessment, supported by a comprehensive cardiovascular and neuroautonomic evaluation, allows for reaching a final diagnosis in most cases, demonstrating a key role in the real identification of the etiology of the fall and implementing the treatment measures.

Ungar, Andrea; Rafanelli, Martina; Iacomelli, Iacopo; Brunetti, Maria Angela; Ceccofiglio, Alice; Tesi, Francesca; Marchionni, Niccolo

2013-01-01

297

Occupational therapy in fall prevention: current evidence and future directions.  

PubMed

Falls are a serious public health concern among older adults in the United States. Although many fall prevention recommendations exist, such as those published by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and the British Geriatrics Society (BGS) in 2010, the specific role of occupational therapy in these efforts is unclear. This article presents a scoping review of current published research documenting the role of occupational therapy in fall prevention interventions among community-dwelling older adults, structured by the AGS and BGS guidelines. We identified evidence for occupational therapy practitioner involvement in fall prevention in environmental modifications, exercise, and multifactorial and multicomponent interventions. Although research documenting the efficacy of occupational therapy interventions is identified as part of the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain and Process (2nd ed.; American Occupational Therapy Association, 2008), we identified little or no such research examining interventions to modify behaviors (e.g., fear of falling), manage postural hypotension, recommend appropriate footwear, and manage medications. Although occupational therapy is represented in the fall prevention research, the evidence for the profession's role in many areas is still lacking. PMID:22394524

Leland, Natalie E; Elliott, Sharon J; O'Malley, Lisa; Murphy, Susan L

298

Effects of a complex intervention on fall risk in the general practitioner setting: a cluster randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Purpose To study the feasibility of first, reaching functionally declined, but still independent older persons at risk of falls through their general practitioner (GP) and second, to reduce their physiological and psychological fall risk factors with a complex exercise intervention. We investigated the effects of a 16-week exercise intervention on physiological (function, strength, and balance) and psychological (fear of falling) outcomes in community-dwelling older persons in comparison with usual care. In addition, we obtained data on adherence of the participants to the exercise program. Methods Tests on physical and psychological fall risk were conducted at study inclusion, and after the 16-week intervention period in the GP office setting. The 16-week intervention included progressive and challenging balance, gait, and strength exercise as well as changes to behavioral aspects. To account for the hierarchical structure in the chosen study design, with patients nested in GPs and measurements nested in patients, a three-level linear mixed effects model was determined for analysis. Results In total, 33 GPs recruited 378 participants (75.4% females). The mean age of the participants was 78.1 years (standard deviation 5.9 years). Patients in the intervention group showed an improvement in the Timed-Up-and-Go-test (TUG) that was 1.5 seconds greater than that showed by the control group, equivalent to a small to moderate effect. For balance, a relative improvement of 0.8 seconds was accomplished, and anxiety about falls was reduced by 3.7 points in the Falls Efficacy Scale–International (FES-I), in the intervention group relative to control group. In total, 76.6% (N = 170) of the intervention group participated in more than 75% the supervised group sessions. Conclusion The strategy to address older persons at high risk of falling in the GP setting with a complex exercise intervention was successful. In functionally declined, community-dwelling, older persons a complex intervention for reducing fall risks was effective compared with usual care.

Freiberger, Ellen; Blank, Wolfgang A; Salb, Johannes; Geilhof, Barbara; Hentschke, Christian; Landendoerfer, Peter; Halle, Martin; Siegrist, Monika

2013-01-01

299

Linking Preservice Teachers' Mathematics Self-Efficacy and Mathematics Teaching Efficacy to Their Mathematical Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined preservice teachers' mathematics self-efficacy and mathematics teaching efficacy and compared them to their mathematical performance. Participants included 89 early childhood preservice teachers at a Midwestern university. Instruments included the Mathematics Self-Efficacy Scale (MSES), Mathematics Teaching Efficacy Beliefs…

Bates, Alan B.; Latham, Nancy; Kim, Jin-ah

2011-01-01

300

Linking Preservice Teachers' Mathematics Self-Efficacy and Mathematics Teaching Efficacy to Their Mathematical Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined preservice teachers' mathematics self-efficacy and mathematics teaching efficacy and compared them to their mathematical performance. Participants included 89 early childhood preservice teachers at a Midwestern university. Instruments included the Mathematics Self-Efficacy Scale (MSES), Mathematics Teaching Efficacy Beliefs…

Bates, Alan B.; Latham, Nancy; Kim, Jin-ah

2011-01-01

301

A Report of the Responses of Botswana Junior Secondary School Teachers on the Three Subscales of the Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale (TSES)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The focus of this paper is to present the findings of the study on teacher efficacy and classroom management. To collect data a survey was administered to 1006 Botswana participants. Out of 1006 participants only 6 did not complete the survey. Pearson-product moment correlation was computed to analyze the data using Statistical Package of Social…

Dibapile, Waitshega Tefo Smitta

2012-01-01

302

Cowlitz Falls Fish Passage.  

SciTech Connect

The upper Cowlitz was once home to native salmon and steelhead. But the combined impacts of overharvest, farming, logging and road building hammered fish runs. And in the 1960s, a pair of hydroelectric dams blocked the migration path of ocean-returning and ocean-going fish. The lower Cowlitz still supports hatchery runs of chinook, coho and steelhead. But some 200 river miles in the upper river basin--much of it prime spawning and rearing habitat--have been virtually cut off from the ocean for over 26 years. Now the idea is to trap-and-haul salmon and steelhead both ways and bypass previously impassable obstacles in the path of anadromous fish. The plan can be summarized, for the sake of explanation, in three steps: (1) trap and haul adult fish--collect ocean-returning adult fish at the lowermost Cowlitz dam, and truck them upstream; (2) reseed--release the ripe adults above the uppermost dam, and let them spawn naturally, at the same time, supplement these runs with hatchery born fry that are reared and imprinted in ponds and net pens in the watershed; (3) trap and haul smolts--collection the new generation of young fish as they arrive at the uppermost Cowlitz dam, truck them past the three dams, and release them to continue their downstream migration to the sea. The critical part of any fish-collection system is the method of fish attraction. Scientists have to find the best combination of attraction system and screens that will guide young fish to the right spot, away from the turbine intakes. In the spring of 1994 a test was made of a prototype system of baffles and slots on the upriver face of the Cowlitz Falls Dam. The prototype worked at 90% efficiency in early tests, and it worked without the kind of expensive screening devices that have been installed on other dams. Now that the success of the attraction system has been verified, Harza engineers and consultants will design and build the appropriate collection part of the system.

NONE

1995-09-01

303

The incidence and risk factors of falls in Parkinson disease: prospective study.  

PubMed

Background and purpose: Although Parkinson disease (PD) patients suffer falls more frequently than other old people, only a few studies have focused on identifying the specific risk factors for falls in PD patients. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence and risk factors of falls in a prospective study in comparison to a control group. Material and methods: One hundred patients with PD were recruited to the study along with 55 gender- and age-matched healthy controls. Both groups were examined twice; the second examination took place one year after the first one. Examination of the PD group included: medical history including falls, neurological examination, assessment of the severity of parkinsonism [Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Schwab and England scale (S and E), Hoehn and Yahr scale (H and Y), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE)], Hamilton scale and quality of life scales (SF-36, EQ-5D) and Freezing of Gait Questionnaire (FOG-Q). In both groups falls were recorded over the 12 months. Frequent fallers are defined as having more than 3 falls a year. Results: Over the year falls occurred in 54% of PD patients and 18% of controls. In a prospective study 28% of PD patients fell more frequently than in retrospective analysis. Frequent fallers were found in 20% of patients and in 7% of controls. Fallers showed higher scores in UPDRS, H and Y, S and E, MMSE, and Hamilton scale than non-fallers. Independent risk factors for falls were: age, previously reported falls and higher score in the FOG-Q. Conclusions: Falls in PD patients occurred three times more frequently than in controls. Independent risk factors for falls were: high score in FOG-Q, older age and presence of falls in medical history. PMID:24166564

Rudzi?ska, M; Bukowczan, S; Sto?ek, J; Zajdel, K; Mirek, E; Chwa?a, W; Wójcik-P?dziwiatr, M; Banaszkiewicz, K; Szczudlik, A

304

Fall Detection Unit for Elderly  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fall in case of an elderly person can result in quite serious injuries because of his\\/her fragile bone structure. In-fact,\\u000a in one of the recent medical studies on “The Presentation of Elderly People at an Emergency Department in Singapore”, published\\u000a in the Singapore Medical Journal, falls were found to be the second most common cause. Our team has designed

Arun Kumar; Fazlur Rahman; Tracey Lee

305

The effects of a walking exercise program on fall-related fitness, bone metabolism, and fall-related psychological factors in elderly women.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 3-month walking exercise program with ankle weights on fall-related fitness, bone metabolism, and fall-related psychological factors. Fall-related fitness was determined from strength, balance, agility, aerobic endurance, muscle mass, and fat mass measures. Bone metabolism was measured using bone density, hormones, and biochemical markers. Fall-related psychological factors included fear of falling and falls efficacy. A 2 × 2 factorial with repeated measures design was used. All subjects were community-dwelling elderly women who volunteered to participate, and randomly were assigned to either an exercise group (n = 11) or a control group (n = 10). Results revealed significant changes in upper body strength, leg strength, aerobic endurance, and body composition. Additionally, hormones and biochemical markers changed significantly over time. Trunk fat and fear of falling changed differently among the two groups. In conclusion, this study suggests that a 3-month walking exercise program with ankle weights may have positive effects on fall-related fitness, bone metabolism, and fall-related psychological factors. PMID:21058209

Yoo, Eun Jung; Jun, Tae Won; Hawkins, Steven A

2010-10-01

306

Information Technology Innovation Survey: Fall 2001  

NSF Publications Database

... Information Technology Innovation Survey: Fall 2001 Detailed Statistical Tables Hypertext Format ... Technology Innovation Survey: Fall 2001 Portable Document Format (.pdf) Information Technology ...

307

Poor Adherence to Medications May Be Associated with Falls  

PubMed Central

Background. Poor medication adherence is associated with negative health outcomes. We investigated whether poor medication adherence increases the rate of falls as part of Maintenance of Balance, Independent Living, Intellect, and Zest in the Elderly of Boston (MOBILIZE Boston), a prospective, community-based cohort recruited for the purpose of studying novel risk factors for falls. Methods. A total of 246 men and 408 women (mean age, 78 years) were followed for the occurrence of falls (median follow-up, 1.8 years). Adherence was assessed by the Morisky scale based on the following four questions: whether an individual ever forgets, is careless at times, stops taking medications when feels better, or stops taking medications when feels worse. Low adherence was defined as a “yes” answer to one or more questions. High adherence was defined as a “no” answer to every question. Results. Forty-eight percent of subjects were classified as having low medication adherence. The rate of falls in the low adherence group was 1.1 falls/person-year (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0–1.3) compared with 0.7 falls/person-year (95% CI: 0.6–0.8) in the high adherence group. After adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, alcohol use, cognitive measures, functional status, depression, and number of medications, low medication adherence was associated with a 50% increased rate of falls compared with high medication adherence (rate ratio = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.2–1.9; p < .001). Conclusions. Low medication adherence may be associated with an increased rate of falls among older adults. Future studies should confirm this association and explore whether interventions to improve medication adherence might decrease the frequency of falls and other serious health-related outcomes.

Quach, Lien; Procter-Gray, Elizabeth; Kiel, Douglas P.; Samelson, Elizabeth J.; Lipsitz, Lewis A.; Kelsey, Jennifer L.

2010-01-01

308

Fall prevention in hospitals: an integrative review.  

PubMed

This article summarizes research and draws overall conclusions from the body of literature on fall prevention interventions to provide nurse administrators with a basis for developing evidence-based fall prevention programs in the hospital setting. Data are obtained from published studies. Thirteen articles are retrieved that focused on fall interventions in the hospital setting. An analysis is performed based on levels of evidence using an integrative review process. Multifactoral fall prevention intervention programs that included fall-risk assessments, door/bed/patient fall-risk alerts, environmental and equipment modifications, staff and patient safety education, medication management targeted to specific types, and additional assistance with transfer and toileting demonstrate reduction in both falls and fall injuries in hospitalized patients. Hospitals need to reduce falls by using multifactoral fall prevention programs using evidence-based interventions to reduce falls and injuries. PMID:21862700

Spoelstra, Sandra L; Given, Barbara A; Given, Charles W

2011-08-23

309

Sensitivity of the individual items of the Hamilton depression rating scale to response and its consequences for the assessment of efficacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Hamilton depression rating scale (HAM-D17) has been the gold standard in depression trials since its introduction in 1960 by Max Hamilton. However, several authors have shown that the HAM-D17 is multi-dimensional and that subscales of the HAM-D17 outperform the total scale.In the current study, we assess the sensitivity of the individual HAM-D17 items in differentiating responders from non-responders over

Gijs Santen; Roberto Gomeni; Meindert Danhof; Oscar Della Pasqua

2008-01-01

310

Self-efficacy expectations with regard to different tasks in smoking cessation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Self-efficacy expectations are important psychological determinants of smoking cessation. The present study aimed at exploring different sorts of self-efficacy. The following self-efficacy scales were composed: Emotional self-efficacy, Social self-efficacy, Skill self-efficacy, Relapse self-efficacy and Try self-efficacy. In a sample of 752 smokers with low motivation to quit, two subsequent self-report measurements of self-efficacy were conducted. Firstly, we investigated to what

Arie Dijkstra; Hein De Vries

2000-01-01

311

Predicting accidental falls in people with multiple sclerosis — a longitudinal study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To investigate accidental falls and near fall incidents in people with multiple sclerosis with respect to clinical variables and the predictive values of four tests.Design: A longitudinal, multi-centred cohort study with prospectively collected falls.Procedures: Self-reported incidents during the three months following a standardized test procedure.Subjects: Seventy-six people with multiple sclerosis and an Expanded Disability Status Scale score between 3.5

Y. Nilsagård; Cecilia Lundholm; E. Denison; L. G. Gunnarsson

2009-01-01

312

SAFE PACE 2: Syncope and Falls in the Elderly — Pacing and Carotid Sinus Evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

SAFE PACE is a multicentre randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of dual-chamber pacing in older patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity and recurrent un-explained falls. Patients are eligible if they have had two or more unexplained falls (± up to one syncope) and if they have a cardio-inhibitory response (>3s asystole) to carotid sinus massage. Patients will be randomized

R. A. Kenny

1999-01-01

313

Free-Fall Bottles & Tubes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this physics activity, learners conduct two experiments to explore free-falling. In the first experiment, water-filled plastic bottles with holes in them spurt water under normal conditions, but don't leak while in free-fall. In the second experiment, a ping-pong ball in a water-filled plastic tube floats upward under normal conditions, but remains motionless when the tube is dropped or thrown. Educators can use pre-assembled materials for group demonstration purposes. Note: this activity will get the floor wet, so consider doing this outside.

Rathjen, Don

2011-08-20

314

Fibromyalgia is Associated with Impaired Balance and Falls  

PubMed Central

Background/Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether FM patients differ from matched healthy controls in clinical tests of balance ability and fall frequency. Methods 34 FM patients and 32 age matched controls were administered the Balance Evaluation-Systems Test (BESTest), rated their balance confidence with the Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC) and reported the number of falls in the last 6 months. The Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) was used to assess FM severity. Results FM patients had significantly impaired balance in all components of the BESTest compared to controls. They also scored more poorly on balance confidence. Overall fibromyalgia severity (FIQ) correlated significantly with the BESTest, and the ABC scale. The BESTest and ABC correlated significantly with 6 commonly reported FM symptoms (excluding pain). FM patients reported a total of 37 falls over the last six-months compared to 6 falls in healthy controls. Conclusion Fibromyalgia is associated with balance problems and increased fall frequency. Patients were aware of their balance problems. These results suggest that FM may affect peripheral and/or central mechanisms of postural control. Further objective study is needed to identify the relative contributions of neural and musculoskeletal impairments to postural stability in FM, thus providing clinicians with exercise prescriptions that maximize postural stability.

Jones, Kim D.; Horak, Fay B.; Winters, Kerri Stone; Morea, Jessica M.; Bennett, Robert M.

2010-01-01

315

Free fall and projectile motion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This EJS simulation allows the user to simulate free fall relative to two inertial frames. The simulation was created using the Easy Java Simulations (Ejs) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_ntnu_fkh_projectileNfreefall.jar file will run the program if Java is installed.

Hwang, Fu-Kwun

2010-06-22

316

Stick Falling from Table Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Stick Falling from Table Model shows the translational and rotational motion of a stick falling from a table.  The normal and gravitational force vectors and the center of mass trajectory are shown.  Users can vary the initial velocity of the stick and height of the table. The stick's motion occurs in three phases.  In first phase, the stick slides along the tabletop without rotating until the CM reaches the tabletop edge.  In the second phase, the gravitational force acts at the CM and a normal force acts at the edge to produce both linear and angular accelerations.  In the final phase, the stick is no longer in contact with the table and free-falls with constant angular velocity and constant CM acceleration. The model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (EJS) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_newton_StickFallingFromTable.jar file will run the program if Java is installed.

Christian, Wolfgang

2012-01-11

317

Fall 1972 University Racial Census.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document reports the results of the fall 1972 racial census at the University of Maryland. Only new freshmen, transfer students, and readmitted students filled out the racial census cards. All returning students constituted the data base of the student body. By adding new and deleting old racial census cards, counts could be made. Results of…

Brooks, Glenwood C., Jr.; Sedlacek, William E.

318

Fall Armyworm in the Southeast  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Two separate experiments testing fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) migration patterns were set up in the southeastern U.S. in 2012. Previous results showed that moths from progeny of overwintering populations from south Texas were found west of the Chattahoochee-Flint-Apalachicola river basin, ...

319

Preventing Falls in the Hospital  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

English - Preventing Falls in the Hospital 2 min 45 sec To Listen to the Audio or Read/Print/Save the Handout, Click on a Picture Below To Download These Files, Right Click the Mouse and Choose "Save link as...." Audio Mobile ...

320

New Student Survey, Fall 1998.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Fall 1998 annual survey of new Johnson County Community College (JCCC) students was designed to determine new students' educational objectives and what factors influence new students' decisions to attend JCCC. Surveys mailed to 3874 students identified by the Admissions Office resulted in 713 usable returned surveys. This evaluation reports…

Weglarz, Shirley

321

Fall Risk Assessment for Older Adults: The Hendrich II Fall Risk Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

symptoms of dizziness, and known categories of medications increasing risk.10 This tool screens for primary prevention of falls and is integral in a post-fall assessment for the secondary prevention of falls. TARGET POPULATION: The Hendrich II Fall Risk Model is intended to be used in the acute care setting to identify adults at risk for falls. The Model is being

Deanna Gray-Miceli; Sherry A. Greenberg

322

Fall Risk Increasing Drugs: The Effect on Injuries of the Frail Elderly Estimated from Administrative Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Society benefits on a large scale from improved medical care and pharmaceuticals. The prescription of pharmaceuticals, however, also carries risks such as the possibility of an increased risk of falls, which may lead to severe injuries and increased health expenditures associated with these injuries. This study investigates the influence of several fall risk increasing drugs (FRIDs) on the number of

Thomas K. Bauer; Katharina Lindenbaum; Magdalena Stroka; Susanne Ahrens; Frank Verheyen

2011-01-01

323

Falls: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Relationship to Fracture  

PubMed Central

Falls are common in the elderly, and frequently result in injury, disability, and institutionalization. Although the causes of falls are complex, most falls result from an interaction between individual characteristics that increase an individual's propensity to fall and acute mediating risk factors that provide the opportunity to fall. Predisposing risk factors include age-associated changes in strength and balance, age-associated comorbidities such as osteoarthritis, visual impairment and dementia, psychotropic medications, and certain footwear. Fewer studies have focused on acute precipitating factors, but environmental and situational factors are clearly important to the risk of falls. Approximately 30% of falls result in an injury that requires medical attention and with fractures occurring in approximately 10% of falls. Fractures associated with falls are multi-factorial in origin. In addition to the traditional risk factors for falls, the fall descent, fall impact, and bone strength are all important determinants of whether a fracture will occur as a result of an event. In recent years, numerous studies have been directed toward the development of effective fall and fall-related fracture prevention interventions.

Berry, Sarah D.; Miller, Ram

2009-01-01

324

The effectiveness of a multidisciplinary QI activity for accidental fall prevention: Staff compliance is critical  

PubMed Central

Background Accidental falls among inpatients are a substantial cause of hospital injury. A number of successful experimental studies on fall prevention have shown the importance and efficacy of multifactorial intervention, though success rates vary. However, the importance of staff compliance with these effective, but often time-consuming, multifactorial interventions has not been fully investigated in a routine clinical setting. The purpose of this observational study was to describe the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary quality improvement (QI) activity for accidental fall prevention, with particular focus on staff compliance in a non-experimental clinical setting. Methods This observational study was conducted from July 2004 through December 2010 at St. Luke’s International Hospital in Tokyo, Japan. The QI activity for in-patient falls prevention consisted of: 1) the fall risk assessment tool, 2) an intervention protocol to prevent in-patient falls, 3) specific environmental safety interventions, 4) staff education, and 5) multidisciplinary healthcare staff compliance monitoring and feedback mechanisms. Results The overall fall rate was 2.13 falls per 1000 patient days (350/164331) in 2004 versus 1.53 falls per 1000 patient days (263/172325) in 2010, representing a significant decrease (p?=?0.039). In the first 6?months, compliance with use of the falling risk assessment tool at admission was 91.5% in 2007 (3998/4368), increasing to 97.6% in 2010 (10564/10828). The staff compliance rate of implementing an appropriate intervention plan was 85.9% in 2007, increasing to 95.3% in 2010. Conclusion In our study we observed a substantial decrease in patient fall rates and an increase of staff compliance with a newly implemented falls prevention program. A systematized QI approach that closely involves, encourages, and educates healthcare staff at multiple levels is effective.

2012-01-01

325

Falls  

MedlinePLUS

... Head injuries that cause confusion or loss of consciousness or that cause sleepiness, dizziness, balance problems, nausea ... appears to recover spontaneously. Confusion or loss of consciousness is the first symptom of a concussion. During ...

326

Characteristics of Hospitalized Cancer Patients Who Fall.  

PubMed

Fall prevention for hospitalized patients is an important nursing quality indicator. Current studies do not describe characteristics of hospitalized patients with cancer who fall, although these patients have been noted to have higher fall and injury rates. This descriptive study represents an initial attempt to identify characteristics of patients hospitalized with cancer who fall compared with adult medical-surgical hospitalized patients who fall. We found that many characteristics of our sample were similar to those of other patients who had experienced a fall during their hospitalization. PMID:20177392

Capone, Luann J; Albert, Nancy M; Bena, James F; Morrison, Shannon M

2010-02-19

327

Characteristics of hospitalized cancer patients who fall.  

PubMed

Fall prevention for hospitalized patients is an important nursing quality indicator. Current studies do not describe characteristics of hospitalized patients with cancer who fall, although these patients have been noted to have higher fall and injury rates. This descriptive study represents an initial attempt to identify characteristics of patients hospitalized with cancer who fall compared with adult medical-surgical hospitalized patients who fall. We found that many characteristics of our sample were similar to those of other patients who had experienced a fall during their hospitalization. PMID:20516815

Capone, Luann J; Albert, Nancy M; Bena, James F; Morrison, Shannon M

328

A wearable airbag to prevent fall injuries.  

PubMed

We have developed a wearable airbag that incorporates a fall-detection system that uses both acceleration and angular velocity signals to trigger inflation of the airbag. The fall-detection algorithm was devised using a thresholding technique with an accelerometer and gyro sensor. Sixteen subjects mimicked falls, and their acceleration waveforms were monitored. Then, we developed a fall-detection algorithm that could detect signals 300 ms before the fall. This signal was used as a trigger to inflate the airbag to a capacity of 2.4 L. Although the proposed system can help to prevent fall-related injuries, further development is needed to miniaturize the inflation system. PMID:19846379

Tamura, Toshiyo; Yoshimura, Takumi; Sekine, Masaki; Uchida, Mitsuo; Tanaka, Osamu

2009-10-20

329

Anode-fall and cathode-fall voltages of air arc in atmosphere between silver electrodes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method for estimating an anode-fall and a cathode-fall voltages of an arc discharge was proposed. By using this method, the separate estimation of the anode-fall and the cathode-fall voltages was performed for an air arc in atmosphere burning between silver electrodes. The derived anode-fall and cathode-fall voltages proved to be about 4.5 V and 14 V, respectively. It was

Rei Hemmi; Yasunobu Yokomizu; Toshiro Matsumura

2003-01-01

330

Daytime Sleepiness is Associated with Falls in Parkinson's Disease.  

PubMed

Falls are frequent in Parkinson's disease (PD), and may be influenced by daytime sleepiness. We reviewed the records of 120 men with PD. Mean Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) values were significantly different between non-fallers and fallers (6.0 vs. 9.7, p < 0.01). In multivariate analysis, ESS remained significantly associated with falls (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.1-1.4, p = 0.02), along with cognitive impairment (OR 4.4 95% CI 1.0-18.7, p = 0.04) and postural instability/gait dysfunction (OR 1.6 95% CI 1.0-2.4, p = 0.03) in non-depressed patients. In conclusion, non-depressed PD patients are 20% more likely to fall for every one unit increase in the ESS measure of sleepiness. PMID:23948992

Spindler, Meredith; Gooneratne, Nalaka S; Siderowf, Andrew; Duda, John E; Cantor, Charles; Dahodwala, Nabila

2013-01-01

331

Daytime sleepiness is associated with falls in Parkinson's disease  

PubMed Central

Falls are frequent in Parkinson’s disease (PD), and may be influenced by daytime sleepiness. We reviewed the records of 120 men with PD. Mean Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) values were significantly different between non-fallers and fallers (6.0 vs. 9.7, p<0.01). In multivariate analysis, ESS remained significantly associated with falls (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.1–1.4, p=0.02), along with cognitive impairment (OR 4.4 95% CI 1.0–18.7, p=0.04) and postural instability/gait dysfunction (OR 1.6 95% CI 1.0–2.4, p=0.03) in non-depressed patients. In conclusion, non-depressed PD patients are 20% more likely to fall for every one unit increase in the ESS measure of sleepiness.

Spindler, Meredith; Gooneratne, Nalaka S.; Siderowf, Andrew; Duda, John E.; Cantor, Charles; Dahodwala, Nabila

2013-01-01

332

Falling Magnets and Electromagnetic Braking  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The slow fall of a rare earth magnet through a copper pipe is a striking example of electromagnetic braking; this remarkable phenomenon has been the subject of a number of scientific paper s [1, 2]. In a pipe having radius R and wall thickness D, the terminal velocity of the falling magnet is proportional to (R?4)/D. It is interesting to ask what happens in the limit as D becomes very large. We report our experimental observations and theoretical predictions of the dependence of the terminal velocity on pipe radius R for large D. [1] Y. Levin, F.L. da Silveira, and F.B. Rizzato, ``Electromagnetic braking: A simple quantitative model''. American Journal of Physics, 74(9): p. 815-817 (2006). [2] J.A. Pelesko, M. Cesky, and S. Huertas, Lenz's law and dimensional analysis. American Journal of Physics, 3(1): p. 37-39. 2005.

Culbreath, Christopher; Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

2009-03-01

333

Supplement to the Manual for the Public School Version of the AAMD Adaptive Behavior Scale 1974 Revision. Field Study of the Efficacy of the AAMD Adaptive Behavior Scale-Public School Version. Substudy 1 of 5.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Adaptive behavior is defined as the degree to which individuals are able to function and maintain themselves independently, and meet the culturally imposed demands of personal an social responsibility. In 1969, the American Association on Mental Deficiency sponsored the development of the Adaptive Behavior Scale to provide a comprehensive…

Lambert, Nadine M.

334

Does Fall History Influence Residential Adjustments?  

PubMed Central

Purpose of the study:?To determine whether reported falls at baseline are associated with an older adult’s decision to make a residential adjustment (RA) and the type of adjustment made in the subsequent 2 years.?Design and Methods:?Observations (n = 25,036) were from the Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative sample of community-living older adults, 65 years of age and older. At baseline, fall history (no fall, 1 fall no injury, 2 or more falls no injury, or 1 or more falls with an injury) and factors potentially associated with RA were used to predict the initiation of an RA (i.e., moving, home modifications, increased use of adaptive equipment, family support, or personal care assistance) during the subsequent 2 years.?Results:?Compared with those with no history of falls, individuals with a history of falls had higher odds of making any RA. Among those making an RA, individuals with an injurious fall were more likely than those with no history of a fall to start using adaptive equipment or increase their use of personal care assistance.?Implications:?The higher initiation of RAs among fallers may indicate proactive steps to prevent future falls and may be influenced by interactions with the health care system. To optimize fall prevention efforts, older adults would benefit from education and interventions addressing optimal use of RAs before falls occur.

Leland, Natalie; Porell, Frank; Murphy, Susan L.

2011-01-01

335

Examining Dimensions of Self-Efficacy for Writing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A multifactor perspective on writing self-efficacy was examined in 2 studies. Three factors were proposed--self-efficacy for writing ideation, writing conventions, and writing self-regulation--and a scale constructed to reflect these factors. In Study 1, middle school students (N = 697) completed the Self-Efficacy for Writing Scale (SEWS), along…

Bruning, Roger; Dempsey, Michael; Kauffman, Douglas F.; McKim, Courtney; Zumbrunn, Sharon

2013-01-01

336

Fall prediction with wearable sensors - an empirical study on expert opinions.  

PubMed

Falls represent a considerable problem for many developed societies with a large growth in the elderly population, and they inflict a sizable personal and social cost. Assessment of an individual's risk of falling, facilitated by advanced movement sensing technologies, has been heralded as a potential means to target fall prevention interventions to those most at need. This paper presents the summary of a questionnaire-based survey of expert opinions collected from three major international conference meetings on the topic of fall risk assessment and fall prediction. Specifically, current problems are discussed, both in terms of technology as well as in study design, in order to harmonize and guide future research activities. The analysis of this survey confirms that sensor-based fall prediction is both relevant and promising, and that large-scale prospective studies are needed as well as further harmonization of research methods. PMID:23823402

Marschollek, Michael; Schulze, Mareike; Gietzelt, Matthias; Lovel, Nigel; Redmond, Stephen J

2013-01-01

337

Ejs Free Fall Cartesian Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Ejs Free Fall Cartesian model displays the dynamics of a ball dropped near the surface of Earth onto a platform. The initial conditions for the ball are an initial positive velocity in the x direction and zero initial velocity in the y direction. The coefficient of restitution for the ballâs collision with the platform is less than one. You can modify this simulation if you have Ejs installed by right-clicking within the plot and selecting âOpen Ejs Modelâ from the pop-up menu item. Ejs Free Fall Cartesian model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (Ejs) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_newton_FreeFallCartesian.jar file will run the program if Java is installed. Ejs is a part of the Open Source Physics Project and is designed to make it easier to access, modify, and generate computer models. Additional Ejs models for Newtonian mechanics are available. They can be found by searching ComPADRE for Open Source Physics, OSP, or Ejs.

Christian, Wolfgang

2008-06-03

338

Ejs Free Fall Polar Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Ejs Free Fall Polar model displays the dynamics in polar coordinates of a ball launched near the surface of Earth onto a platform. The initial conditions for the ball are a negative initial velocity in the radial direction and a positive initial velocity in the theta direction (or positive initial velocities in both the x and y directions). The coefficient of restitution for the ballâs collision with the platform is less than one. You can modify this simulation if you have Ejs installed by right-clicking within the plot and selecting âOpen Ejs Modelâ from the pop-up menu item. Ejs Free Fall Polar model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (Ejs) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_newton_FreeFallPolar.jar file will run the program if Java is installed. Ejs is a part of the Open Source Physics Project and is designed to make it easier to access, modify, and generate computer models. Additional Ejs models for Newtonian mechanics are available. They can be found by searching ComPADRE for Open Source Physics, OSP, or Ejs.

Christian, Wolfgang

2008-06-03

339

Free Fall 3D Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Ejs Free Fall 3D model displays the three-dimensional dynamics of a ball dropped near the surface of Earth onto a platform. The initial conditions for the ball are zero initial velocities in the x, y, and z directions. The coefficient of restitution for the ballâs collision with the platform is less than one. The initial height of the ball can be changed by dragging it when the simulation is paused. You can modify this simulation if you have Ejs installed by right-clicking within the plot and selecting âOpen Ejs Modelâ from the pop-up menu item. Ejs Free Fall 3D model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (Ejs) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_newton_FreeFall3D.jar file will run the program if Java is installed. Ejs is a part of the Open Source Physics Project and is designed to make it easier to access, modify, and generate computer models. Additional Ejs models for Newtonian mechanics are available. They can be found by searching ComPADRE for Open Source Physics, OSP, or Ejs.

Christian, Wolfgang

2008-06-03

340

Attrition and Student Progress at Bronx Community College for Entering Classes: Fall 1972 to Fall 1976 (Progress to Fall 1978).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Data tables summarize the semester-by-semester persistence of each class of regularly matriculated students entering Bronx Community College (BCC) between Fall 1972 and Fall 1976 in terms of graduation and retention rates. For each entering class, the tables provide progress analyses up to Fall 1978 by curriculum group and high school grade…

Eagle, Norman

341

Fall TIP: Validation of Icons to Communicate Fall Risk Status and Tailored Interventions to Prevent Patient Falls  

PubMed Central

This paper reports on the development and validation of a set of icons designed to communicate fall risk status and tailored interventions to prevent patient falls in hospitals. The icons will populate a fall prevention toolkit to provide actionable alerts to nurses, nursing assistants, and other interdisciplinary health care team members and educational materials for patients and families in acute hospital settings.

Hurley, Ann C.; Dykes, Patricia C.; Carroll, Diane L.; Dykes, John S.; Middleton, Blackford

2011-01-01

342

Fall Risk Assessment in Geriatric-Psychiatric Inpatients to Lower Events (FRAGILE).  

PubMed

The objectives of this retrospective case-control study were to identify risk factors of falls in geriatric-psychiatric inpatients and develop a screening tool to accurately predict falls. The study sample consisted of 225 geriatric-psychiatric inpatients at a Midwestern referral facility. The sample included 136 inpatients who fell and a random stratified sample of 89 inpatients who did not fall. Data collected included age, gender, activities of daily living, and nursing parameters such as bathing assistance, bed height, use of bed rails, one-on-one observation, fall warning system, Conley Scale fall risk assessment, medical diagnosis, and medications. History of falls, impaired judgment, impaired gait, dizziness, delusions, delirium, chronic use of sedative or antipsychotic agents, and anticholinergic urinary bladder medications significantly increased fall risk. Alzheimer's disease, acute use of sedative or anti-psychotic agents, and depression reduced fall risk. A falls risk tool, Fall Risk Assessment in Geriatric-psychiatric Inpatients to Lower Events (FRAGILE), was developed for assessment and risk stratification with new diagnoses or medications. PMID:20795598

Nanda, Sudip; Dey, Tanujit; Gulstrand, Rudolph E; Cudnik, Daniel; Haller, Harold S

2010-08-23

343

Association between Physical Functionality and Falls Risk in Community-Living Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Ageing-related declines in physiological attributes, such as muscle strength, can bring with them an increased risk of falls and subsequently greater risk of losing independence. These declines have substantial impact on an individual's functional ability. However, the precise relationship between falls risk and physical functionality has not been evaluated. The aims of this study were to determine the association between falls risk and physical functionality using objective measures and to create an appropriate model to explain variance in falls risk. Thirty-two independently living adults aged 65–92 years completed the FallScreen, the Continuous-Scale Physical Functional Performance 10 (CS-PFP10) tests, and the 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12). The relationships between falls risk, physical functionality, and age were investigated using correlational and multiple hierarchical regression analyses. Overall, total physical functionality accounted for 24% of variance in an individual's falls risk while age explained a further 13%. The oldest-old age group had significantly greater falls risk and significantly lower physical functional performance. Mean scores for all measures showed that there were substantial (but not significant) differences between males and females. While increasing age is the strongest single predictor of increasing falls risk, poorer physical functionality was strongly, independently related to greater falls risk.

Smee, Disa J.; Anson, Judith M.; Waddington, Gordon S.; Berry, Helen L.

2012-01-01

344

After a fall in the hospital  

MedlinePLUS

Falls can be a serious problem in the hospital. They may be caused by: Poor lighting, slippery ... illness or surgery and being in new surroundings Hospital staff often do not see patients fall. But ...

345

Falls, faints, fits and funny turns  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this practically oriented review, we will outline the clinical approach of patients with falls due to an impairment or\\u000a loss of consciousness. Following a set of definitions, we describe the salient clinical features of disorders leading to such\\u000a falls. Among falls caused by true loss of consciousness, we separate the clinical characteristics of syncopal falls (due to reflex syncope,

Roland D. Thijs; Bastiaan R. Bloem; J. Gert van Dijk

2009-01-01

346

Falls: Epidemiology, pathophysiology, and relationship to fracture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Falls are common in the elderly, and frequently result in injury and disability. Most falls result from an interaction between\\u000a individual characteristics that increase an individual’s propensity to fall and acute mediating risk factors that provide\\u000a the opportunity to fall. Predisposing risk factors include age-associated changes in strength and balance, comorbidities such\\u000a as osteoarthritis, visual impairment and dementia, psychotropic medications,

Sarah D. Berry; Ram R. Miller

2008-01-01

347

Mobile phone-based pervasive fall detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Falls are a major health risk that diminishes the quality of life among the elderly people. The importance of fall detection\\u000a increases as the elderly population surges, especially with aging “baby boomers”. However, existing commercial products and\\u000a academic solutions all fall short of pervasive fall detection. In this paper, we propose utilizing mobile phones as a platform for developing pervasive

Jiangpeng Dai; Xiaole Bai; Zhimin Yang; Zhaohui Shen; Dong Xuan

2010-01-01

348

Falls in outpatients with Parkinson's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Falls are one of the most serious complications of gait disturbances in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Among previous\\u000a reports, the percentage of patients with PD who fall varies between 38% to 68%. We sought to determine the frequency of falls\\u000a and the factors associated with falls in a group of patients with idiopathic PD who attended an outpatient, tertiary

Yacov Balash; C. Peretz; G. Leibovich; T. Herman; J. M. Hausdorff; N. Giladi

2005-01-01

349

Perceptions of Barriers to Employment, Coping Efficacy, and Career Search Efficacy in People with Mental Illness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Barriers to Employment and Coping Efficacy Scale (BECES) and the Career Search Efficacy Scale (CSES) were designed to assist people in their work integration process. The BECES was specifically developed for people with mental illness. Although the CSES was not specifically designed for people with mental illness, its items appear relevant…

Corbiere, Marc; Mercier, Celine; Lesage, Alain

2004-01-01

350

Falls of Elderly Rural Home Health Clients  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined factors related to falls among elderly home health clients living in rural southern Illinois. Forty-five clients who fell were demographically matched with 45 controls. Logistic regression analysis revealed that previous falls, frailty, physical inactivity, balance problems, absence of handrails, and uneven floors were related to a fall in this sample. Medications commonly taken by clients were not

Fred Isberner; Dale Ritzel; Paul Sarvela; Kristine Brown; Ping Hu; Debbie Newbolds

1998-01-01

351

Epidemiology of Falls in Older Age  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Worldwide, falls among older people are a public health concern because of their frequency and adverse consequences in terms of morbidity, mortality, and quality of life, as well as their impact on health system services and costs. This epidemiological review outlines the public health burden of falls and fall-related injuries and the impact of…

Peel, Nancye May

2011-01-01

352

Pupil Membership and Related Information, Fall 1995.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information used to prepare this publication was collected from Colorado's school districts. In fall 1995 there were 656,279 students in Colorado's 176 school districts, an increase of 2.5% over the fall membership of the previous year. Beginning with fall 1990, each year's membership has surpassed that of the previous peak of 1972. Membership…

Wamboldt, Martina

353

Portable Preimpact Fall Detector With Inertial Sensors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Falls and the resulting hip fractures in the elderly are a major health and economic problem. The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a portable preimpact fall detector in detecting impending falls before the body impacts on the ground. It was hypothesized that a single sensor with the appropriate kinematics measurements and detection algorithms, located near

Ge Wu; Shuwan Xue

2008-01-01

354

Automated detection of near falls: algorithm development and preliminary results  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Falls are a major source of morbidity and mortality among older adults. Unfortunately, self-report is, to a large degree, the gold-standard method for characterizing and quantifying fall frequency. A number of studies have demonstrated that near falls predict falls and that near falls may occur more frequently than falls. These studies suggest that near falls might be an appropriate

Aner Weiss; Ilan Shimkin; Nir Giladi; Jeffrey M Hausdorff

2010-01-01

355

Intensive physical training in geriatric patients after severe falls and hip surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: intensive exercise training can lead to improvement in strength and functional performance in older people living at home and nursing home residents. There is little information whether intensive physical exercise may be applicable and effective in elderly patients suffering from the acute sequelae of injurious falls or hip surgery. Objective: to assess the feasibility, safety and efficacy of intensive,

KLAUS HAUER; N ORBERT SPECHT; M ATTHIAS SCHULER; P ETER BARTSCH; P ETER OSTER

2002-01-01

356

Evaluation of Fungicides for Control of Rapid Blight of Poa trivialis in fall 2006  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rapid blight is a new disease of cool season turf grasses caused by Labyrinthula terrestris, an organism in a group referred to as the marine slime molds. A trial was conducted in fall 2006-winter 2007 to repeat an evaluation of efficacy of different rates and intervals of Insignia fungicide and elemental sulfur, both of which gave acceptable control in trials

M. W. Olsen; G. Towers; J. Gilbert

357

Metronidazole dental gel as an alternative to scaling and root planing in the treatment of localized adult periodontitis. Is its efficacy proved?  

PubMed

Eight randomized clinical trials, comparing the application of 25% metronidazole dental gel (Elzylol dental gel) once a week for two weeks with scaling and root planing in the "split-mouth" design for treating adult periodontitis, were evaluated and scored according to ANTCZAK et al. (1986) and BEGG et al. (1996). The aim of this investigation was to determine whether both treatment methods are of equal value. With a maximum of 1.0 in each case, the scores determined were (M +/- SD) 0.107 +/- 0.033 (range 0.072-0.168) for reporting the study protocol and 0.285 +/- 0.084 (range 0.120-0.400) for the data analysis, presentation and discussion. Though the study results show that both treatment modalities are of equal value, the quality of the trials does not allow a comparative therapy assessment at present. The state of the data is inadequate for applying local metronidazole dental gel as an alternative to mechanical instrumentation in adult periodontitis. PMID:10625099

Knoll-Köhler, E

1999-12-01

358

External Validity of Physical Activity Interventions for Community-Dwelling Older Adults with Fall Risk: A Quantitative Systematic Literature Review  

PubMed Central

Aim To appraise the external validity of physical activity interventions designed to reduce falls among community-dwelling older adults, using the reach, efficacy/effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance framework. Background Falls are a globally common, significant, and preventable problem. The efficacy of physical activity interventions to reduce falls among older adults is well established. Translation of this research into practice is slow as evidenced by persistently low proportions of older adults who engage in physical activities and the rising incidence of falls. Data Sources Four electronic databases were searched for relevant studies published between 2000 and 2010. Studies that examined the effects of physical activity interventions designed to reduce falls among community dwelling older adults were included in this review (n = 46). Review Methods This was a quantitative systematic review with narrative synthesis. The reach, efficacy/effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance framework guided the identification, appraisal, and synthesis of indicators representing study validity. Results The majority of studies in this review described indicators representing internal validity. Details about indicators representing external validity were reported infrequently, limiting the generalizability of fall-preventive physical activity interventions in diverse cultures and social contexts over time. Conclusions To foster translational research in real world settings, additional programmatic intervention research is needed that: (a) targets diverse populations; (b) incorporates theories of behavioural change; (c) describes and operationalizes critical content that enables replication and translation; (d) tests innovative measures of fall risk and physical activity; and (e) evaluates feasibility and acceptability.

McMahon, Siobhan; Fleury, Julie

2012-01-01

359

Estimation of the kinetic energy dissipation in fall-arrest system and manikin during fall impact  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fall-arrest systems (FASs) have been widely applied to provide a safe stop during fall incidents for occupational activities. The mechanical interaction and kinetic energy exchange between the human body and the fall-arrest system during fall impact is one of the most important factors in FAS ergonomic design. In the current study, we developed a systematic approach to evaluate the energy

John Z. Wu; John R. Powers; James R. Harris; Christopher S. Pan

2011-01-01

360

PerFallD: A pervasive fall detection system using mobile phones  

Microsoft Academic Search

Falls are a major health risk that diminish the quality of life among elderly people. With the elderly population surging, especially with aging ¿baby boomers¿, fall detection becomes increasingly important. However, existing commercial products and academic solutions struggle to achieve pervasive fall detection. In this paper, we propose utilizing mobile phones as a platform for pervasive fall detection system development.

Jiangpeng Dai; Xiaole Bai; Zhimin Yang; Zhaohui Shen; Dong Xuan

2010-01-01

361

Preventing Falls: How to Develop Community-Based Fall Prevention Programs for Older Adults.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Falls are a major threat to the health and independence of older adults, people aged 65 and older. Each year in the United States, nearly one-third of older adults experience a fall. Falls can be devastating. About one out of ten falls among older adults ...

D. Wallace H. Falk I. Arias J. L. Gerberding M. Ballesteros

2008-01-01

362

Wrist impact velocities are smaller in forward falls than backward falls from standing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The wrist is a common fracture site for both young and older adults. The purpose of this study was to compare wrist kinematics in backward and forward falls with different fall protective responses. We carried out within-subject comparison of impact velocities and maximum velocities during descent of the distal radius among three different fall configurations: (a) backward falls with knees

Juay-Seng Tan; Janice J. Eng; Stephen N. Robinovitch; Brady Warnick

2006-01-01

363

Reducing falls among older people in hospital.  

PubMed

Thousands of patients fall on hospital wards each year, leading to potentially devastating consequences for them and their families. Falls among inpatients usually arise from a complex combination of risk factors, including dementia, delirium, incontinence and medication. This article discusses the FallSafe project that aimed to reduce falls in inpatient settings. The results suggested a 25 per cent reduction in falls on average across the wards involved. The project also had a positive effect on patients and staff. A case study of a staff nurse involved in leading the project on her ward and the care bundle that comprised the project intervention are explored. PMID:22792696

Dean, Erin

2012-06-01

364

Fall-Induced Deaths Among Elderly People  

PubMed Central

Falls and fall-induced injuries in older people are a major public health problem in modern societies with aging populations. Injury is the fifth leading cause of death in older adults, and most of these fatal injuries are related to falls. We have assessed the nationwide trends in fall-induced deaths of older people in Finland for more than 3 decades (1971–2002), and the results showed that the number of fall-induced deaths among elderly Finns is clearly increasing, especially among men.

Kannus, Pekka; Parkkari, Jari; Niemi, Seppo; Palvanen, Mika

2005-01-01

365

Gastric ischaemia following a fall  

PubMed Central

A previously well 73-year-old gentleman presented 5 days after a fall from 6 feet from a ladder with abdominal pain and vomiting. X-rays demonstrated evidence of bowel perforation. On arrival, the patient was peritonitic and displayed a severely septic picture. He was subsequently taken for emergency laparotomy. A 5 mm perforation was found in the small bowel which was repaired but unusually a large segment in the fundus and greater curvature of the stomach was found to be necrotic. A partial gastrectomy was performed and histology confirmed ischaemia likely to be secondary to trauma. The patient has now been successfully discharged home.

Dunne, Michael John; Ferreira, Irina; Thorpe, Ben; Ajeel, Ala; Ali, Haythem; Bailey, Charles

2011-01-01

366

Falling palm fronds structure amazonian rainforest sapling communities.  

PubMed

The senescence and loss of photosynthetic and support structures is a nearly universal aspect of tree life history, and can be a major source of disturbance in forest understoreys, but the ability of falling canopy debris in determining the stature and composition of understorey communities seems not to have been documented. In this study, we show that senescent fronds of the palm Iriartea deltoidea cause substantial disturbance in tropical forest sapling communities. This disturbance influences the species composition of the canopy and subcanopy by acting as an ecological filter, favouring sapling species with characteristics conducive to recovery after physical damage. The scale of this dominance suggests that falling I. deltoidea debris may be influencing sapling community structure and species composition in Amazonian rainforests over very large spatial scales. PMID:15504020

Peters, Halton A; Pauw, Anton; Silman, Miles R; Terborgh, John W

2004-08-01

367

Fall TIPS: Strategies to Promote Adoption and Use of a Fall Prevention Toolkit  

PubMed Central

Patient falls are serious problems in hospitals. Risk factors for falls are well understood and nurses routinely assess for fall risk on all hospitalized patients. However, the link from nursing assessment of fall risk, to identification and communication of tailored interventions to prevent falls is yet to be established. The Fall TIPS (Tailoring Interventions for Patient Safety) Toolkit was developed to leverage existing practices and workflows and to employ information technology to improve fall prevention practices. The purpose of this paper is to describe the Fall TIPS Toolkit and to report on strategies used to drive adoption of the Toolkit in four acute care hospitals. Using the IHI “Framework for Spread” as a conceptual model, the research team describes the “spread” of the Fall TIPS Toolkit as means to integrate effective fall prevention practices into the workflow of interdisciplinary caregivers, patients and family members.

Dykes, Patricia C.; Carroll, Diane L.; Hurley, Ann; Gersh-Zaremski, Ronna; Kennedy, Ann; Kurowski, Jan; Tierney, Kim; Benoit, Angela; Chang, Frank; Lipsitz, Stuart; Pang, Justine; Tsurkova, Ruslana; Zuyov, Lyubov; Middleton, Blackford

2009-01-01

368

Patients' falls and injuries during hospitalization as quality indicators of work in hospitals.  

PubMed

The number of patients' falls and injuries happening during their hospital treatment is a good quality indicator of safety of in-patients. A fall is of multifactorial etiology, and its causes are usually classified into intrinsic and extrinsic factors. According to Jenise Morse there are three categories of falls among inpatients: accidental, non-anticipated physiologic and anticipated physiologic fall. Fall induced injuries in clinical and hospital settings are mostly categorized into five groups: no injury, minor injury, moderate injury, severe injury and lethal injury. The number of in-patient falls can be reduced by implementing a prevention programme in order to improve the quality of the specific health care and health care in general. The key preventive strategies aimed at safe and efficient health care include: a regular assessment of the risk for falls using predictive scales, visual identification of patients at high risk for falls, communication with patients and education of patients, their family members and staff about fall prevention interventions. PMID:19650562

Milutinovi?, Dragana; Martinov-Cvejin, Mirjana; Simi?, Svetlana

369

Self-Efficacy for Creative Productivity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Efficacy Scale for Creative Productivity (ESCreP) was developed to measure students' convictions that they could be creative producers. Self-efficacy, an individual's estimation of ability to perform a behavior, is based upon performance accomplishments, vicarious experiences, verbal persuasion, and emotional or physiological arousal. Three…

Schack, Gina

370

Estrogens and falling sperm counts.  

PubMed

Extravagant claims have been made repeatedly in recent years that human sperm counts are falling and that global exposure to environmental estrogens are responsible. The basis for these two distinct claims is reviewed. The claims of falling human sperm output, reviving an old debate, are prompted by a paper by Carlsen et al. (1992). This meta-analysis, however, is marred by numerous flaws that invalidate its claims. Major defects include severe heterogeneity of component studies, rendering them unsuitable for aggregation, and defective data analysis based on arithmetic mean rather than median, which showed no significant changes over time. This debate is likely to remain unresolved until valid, representative population-based studies of human sperm output can be achieved. None have been reported, or seem feasible in the near future, and so alternative strategies, based on surrogate variables for human male fertility not requiring sperm counts, need to be developed and validated. The plausible hypothesis that prenatal estrogen exposure might influence development of the human testis through effects on Sertoli cell replication and sperm carrying capacity has, however, been conclusively refuted by studies of boys born to women exposed to high doses of oral diethylstilbestrol during pregnancy. Neither fertility nor sperm output were adversely influenced by massive maternal estrogen exposure during pregnancy, although minor urogenital malformations did occur. The still wider claims of deteriorating male reproductive health, notably changes in prevalence or incidence of hypospadias or cryptorchidism, also lack convincing population-based evidence, although cancer registry data indicate a gradual increase in testis cancer in some countries. In summary, the available evidence does not support claims of falling sperm counts or any general deterioration in male reproductive health. Population-based studies of valid surrogate variables for male fertility not requiring semen analysis are needed. If population-based evidence regarding male fertility or sperm output could be generated, it is highly unlikely that prenatal estrogen exposure could be a valid explanation of any deterioration as massive maternal exposure to oral estrogen has negligible effects on male fertility or sperm output. PMID:11800170

Handelsman, D J

2001-01-01

371

What Are Ways to Prevent Falls and Related Fractures?  

MedlinePLUS

... What Are Ways to Prevent Falls and Related Fractures? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ... 122 KB) Español Related Resources Preventing Falls and Fractures Osteoporosis and Falls Osteoporosis and Falls (??) Partner ...

372

1. Photocopy of a photographca. 1920 VIEW OF AMERICAN FALLS ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. Photocopy of a photograph--ca. 1920 VIEW OF AMERICAN FALLS PRIOR TO CONSTRUCTION OF HYDROELECTRIC PLANTS - American Falls Water, Power & Light Company, Island Power Plant, Snake River, below American Falls Dam, American Falls, Power County, ID

373

Falls and fear of falling among elderly persons living in the community: occupational therapy interventions.  

PubMed

Each year, about one third of the population over 65 years of age experiences at least one fall (Perry, 1982). Assessment of the incidence of falls and the prevalence, intensity, and covariates of fear of falling among community-based elderly persons was conducted through interviews of 115 residents in a housing development (mean age = 78 years). Fifty-three percent reported having fallen in recent years, 32% in the last year. Fear of falling ranked first when compared with other common fears. In a logistic regression model predicting limitation of activity independent of risk factors for falling, fear of falling was marginally significant (p = .06). The results of the study show that falls are frequent and fear of falling prevalent among the community-based elderly. A comprehensive program designed to reduce the risk of falls is presented. PMID:2035588

Walker, J E; Howland, J

1991-02-01

374

New technologies transform Fall Meeting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 2011 Fall Meeting was transformed by the introduction of nine new technologies, most notably, a mobile app and the AGU ePoster system. With more than 11,000 downloads and 250,000 page views, the mobile app quickly replaced the program books for many attendees. Peter Petley of Durham University and blogger for the Landslide Blog said, “I have found that one of the challenges of attending AGU is being able to identify all of the sessions that are of interest, and then creating a schedule without carrying reams of paper.” He continued, “I found that the mobile app has transformed my conference experience, providing a simple means to collate all of the sessions and to plan my day. As a result, I have found the meeting to be much more enjoyable and fulfilling.”

O'Brien, Michael

2012-02-01

375

Falling plumes in bacterial bioconvection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experiments by Kessler on bioconvection in laboratory suspensions of bacteria (Bacillus subtilis), contained in a deep chamber, reveal the development of a thin upper boundary layer of cell-rich fluid which becomes unstable, leading to the formation of falling plumes. We use the continuum description of such a suspension developed by Hillesdon et al. (1995) as the basis for a theoretical model of the boundary layer and an axisymmetric plume. If the boundary layer has dimensionless thickness [lambda] [double less-than sign] 1, the plume has width [lambda]1/2. A similarity solution is found for the plume in which the cell flux and volume flux can be matched to those in the boundary layer and in the bulk of the suspension outside both regions. The corresponding model for a two-dimensional plume fails to give a self-consistent solution.

Metcalfe, Aisling M.; Pedley, T. J.

2001-10-01

376

Falling films on flexible substrates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Falling films have a long history and modern advances in the theory have led to accurate modelling for flows down rigid inclines. We now consider the possible effects that can be introduced by flexible substrates. In this work, we derive Benney-like coupled equations for the film thickness and substrate deflection using long-wave theory. Weakly nonlinear equations are also derived, which, in the limit of small substrate deflections, reduce to the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation. We also use boundary-layer theory in conjunction with the Karman-Polhausen approximation to derive three strongly coupled evolution equations for the film thickness, substrate deflection and film volumetric flow rate. Inertial, gravtiational, capillary, viscous, substrate tension and damping effects are elucidated via numerical solutions of the above systems of equations.

Matar, Omar; Craster, Richard; Kumar, Satish

2007-11-01

377

Translating a multifactorial fall prevention intervention into practice: a controlled evaluation of a fall prevention clinic.  

PubMed

Although multifactorial fall prevention interventions have been shown to reduce falls and injurious falls, their translation into clinical settings has been limited. This article describes a hospital-based fall prevention clinic established to increase availability of preventive care for falls. Outcomes for 43 adults aged 65 and older seen during the clinic's first 6 months of operation were compared with outcomes for 86 age-, sex-, and race-matched controls; all persons included in analyses received primary care at the hospital's geriatrics clinic. Nonsignificant differences in falls, injurious falls, and fall-related healthcare use according to study group in multivariate adjusted models were observed, probably because of the small, fixed sample size. The percentage experiencing any injurious falls during the follow-up period was comparable for fall clinic visitors and controls (14% vs 13%), despite a dramatic difference at baseline (42% of clinic visitors vs 15% of controls). Fall-related healthcare use was higher for clinic visitors during the baseline period (21%, vs 12% for controls) and decreased slightly (to 19%) during follow-up; differences in fall-related healthcare use according to study group from baseline to follow-up were nonsignificant. These findings, although preliminary because of the small sample size and the baseline difference between the groups in fall rates, suggest that being seen in a fall prevention clinic may reduce injurious falls. Additional studies will be necessary to conclusively determine the effects of multifactorial fall risk assessment and management delivered by midlevel providers working in real-world clinical practice settings on key outcomes, including injurious falls, downstream fall-related healthcare use, and costs. PMID:20370859

Moore, Meghann; Williams, Barbara; Ragsdale, Sally; Logerfo, James P; Goss, J Richard; Schreuder, Astrid B; Phelan, Elizabeth A

2010-02-01

378

Translating a Multifactorial Fall Prevention Intervention into Practice: A Controlled Evaluation of a Fall Prevention Clinic  

PubMed Central

Although multifactorial fall prevention interventions have been shown to reduce falls and injurious falls, their translation into clinical settings has been limited. We describe a hospital-based, fall prevention clinic established to increase availability of preventive care for falls. Outcomes for forty-three adults aged 65+ seen during the clinic’s first six months of operation were compared to outcomes for 86 age-, gender-, and race-matched controls; all persons included in analyses received primary care at the hospital’s geriatrics clinic. Non-significant differences in falls, injurious falls, and fall-related healthcare use by study group in multivariate adjusted models were observed, likely due to the small, fixed sample size. The percent experiencing any injurious falls during the follow-up period was comparable for fall clinic visitors and controls (14% vs. 13%), despite a dramatic difference at baseline (42% of clinic visitors vs. 15% of controls). Fall-related healthcare use was higher for clinic visitors during the baseline period (21%, vs. 12% for controls) and decreased slightly (to 19%) during follow-up; differences in fall-related healthcare use by study group from baseline to follow-up were non-significant. These findings, although preliminary due both to the small sample size and the baseline difference between the groups in fall rates, suggest that being seen in a fall prevention clinic may reduce injurious falls. Additional studies will be necessary to conclusively determine the effects of multifactorial fall risk assessment and management delivered by mid-level providers working in real-world, clinical practice settings on key outcomes, including injurious falls, downstream fall-related healthcare use, and costs.

Moore, Meghann; Williams, Barbara; Ragsdale, Sally; LoGerfo, James P.; Goss, J. Richard; Schreuder, Astrid B.; Phelan, Elizabeth A.

2010-01-01

379

Identifying Roof Fall Predictors Using Fuzzy Classification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microseismic monitoring involves placing geophones on the rock surfaces of a mine to record seismic activity. Classification of microseismic mine data can be used to predict seismic events in a mine to mitigate mining hazards, such as roof falls, where properly bolting and bracing the roof is often an insufficient method of preventing weak roofs from destabilizing. In this study, six months of recorded acoustic waveforms from microseismic monitoring in a Pennsylvania limestone mine were analyzed using classification techniques to predict roof falls. Fuzzy classification using features selected for computational ease was applied on the mine data. Both large roof fall events could be predicted using a Roof Fall Index (RFI) metric calculated from the results of the fuzzy classification. RFI was successfully used to resolve the two significant roof fall events and predicted both events by at least 15 hours before visual signs of the roof falls were evident.

Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

2010-02-01

380

Preventing falls in your elderly patients.  

PubMed

An elderly patient who falls is at significant risk for disability or death. In this article, Dr Costa explains how a carefully taken history, detailed physical examination, and appropriate laboratory studies can help to discern the cause of a fall. He also describes a multifaceted approach to preventing falls in elderly patients that involves a partnership of the physician, the patient, and the family. PMID:1985306

Costa, A J

1991-01-01

381

The Role of Falls in Fracture Prediction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Close to 75% of hip and non-hip fractures occur among seniors age 65 years and older. Notably, the primary risk factor for\\u000a a hip fracture is a fall, and over 90% of all fractures occur after a fall. Thus, critical for the understanding and prevention\\u000a of fractures at later age is their close relationship with muscle weakness and falling. In fact,

Heike A. Bischoff-Ferrari

382

Prevention of falls in older patients.  

PubMed

Falls are one of the most common geriatric syndromes threatening the independence of older persons. Between 30 and 40 percent of community-dwelling adults older than 65 years fall each year, and the rates are higher for nursing home residents. Falls are associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and nursing home placement. Most falls have multiple causes. Risk factors for falls include muscle weakness, a history of falls, use of four or more prescription medications, use of an assistive device, arthritis, depression, age older than 80 years, and impairments in gait, balance, cognition, vision, and activities of daily living. Physicians caring for older patients should ask about any falls that have occurred in the past year. Assessment should include evaluating the circumstances of the fall and a complete history and physical examination, looking for potential risk factors. The most effective fall prevention strategies are multifactorial interventions targeting identified risk factors, exercises for muscle strengthening combined with balance training, and withdrawal of psychotropic medication. Home hazard assessment and modification by a health professional also is helpful. PMID:16035686

Rao, Shobha S

2005-07-01

383

Prevention of fall incidents in patients with a high risk of falling: design of a randomised controlled trial with an economic evaluation of the effect of multidisciplinary transmural care  

PubMed Central

Background Annually, about 30% of the persons of 65 years and older falls at least once and 15% falls at least twice. Falls often result in serious injuries, such as fractures. Therefore, the prevention of accidental falls is necessary. The aim is to describe the design of a study that evaluates the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a multidisciplinary assessment and treatment of multiple fall risk factors in independently living older persons with a high risk of falling. Methods/Design The study is designed as a randomised controlled trial (RCT) with an economic evaluation. Independently living persons of 65 years and older who recently experienced a fall are interviewed in their homes and screened for risk of recurrent falling using a validated fall risk profile. Persons at low risk of recurrent falling are excluded from the RCT. Persons who have a high risk of recurrent falling are blindly randomised into an intervention (n = 100) or usual care (n = 100) group. The intervention consists of a multidisciplinary assessment and treatment of multifactorial fall risk factors. The transmural multidisciplinary appraoch entails close cooperation between geriatrician, primary care physician, physical therapist and occupational therapist and can be extended with other specialists if relevant. A fall calendar is used to record falls during one year of follow-up. Primary outcomes are time to first and second falls. Three, six and twelve months after the home visit, questionnaires for economic evaluation are completed. After one year, during a second home visit, the secondary outcome measures are reassessed and the adherence to the interventions is evaluated. Data will be analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle and also an on-treatment analysis will be performed. Discussion Strengths of this study are the selection of persons at high risk of recurrent falling followed by a multidisciplinary intervention, its transmural character and the evaluation of adherence. If proven effective, implementation of our multidisciplinary assessment followed by treatment of fall risk factors will reduce the incidence of falls. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN11546541.

Peeters, Geeske MEE; de Vries, Oscar J; Elders, Petra JM; Pluijm, Saskia MF; Bouter, Lex M; Lips, Paul

2007-01-01

384

Impact loads of falling rocks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Depending on the chosen protection system the planning engineer has to proceed differently. If the impact energies stay below 3'000 - 5'000 kJ solutions using flexible protection systems are recommended in many cases being the most efficient solution. Since 2001, such systems are type tested in Switzerland. The results are published on the internet (www.umwelt-schweiz.ch/typenpruefung). Therefore, the engineers can concentrate on the design of the anchorage and do not need to consider the brake down process of the falling rock because its details including the acting forces within the barrier are given. This is different to the design of rockfall protection earth dams. Here, the evidence of the structural safety is the major task and questions like the following ones have to be answered: What magnitude are the forces that have to be carried for a certain kinetic energy? How are the forces influenced by mass or impact velocity? What is the influence of the soil properties such as strength, density and friction angle? How deep does the rock penetrate? Previous research on the impact loads on the cushion layer of protection galleries were performed by EPFL in the mid-nineties and led to a Swiss Guideline (ASTRA/SBB 1998) to calculate an equivalent static load for the structure underneath. This approach also delivers a function to predict the penetration depth. This contribution now checks whether above approach can also be used to design earth dams or how it can be modified. For that, the results of previous experiments performed by different institutions were analysed and, if possible, compared to the guideline. This could confirm above mentioned function to predict the penetration depth. In addition, an experimental series with different bodies (800 kg, 4000 kg) falling from different heights (2 - 15 m) on differently conditioned soils were performed. Measurements were taken through accelerometers attached to the blocks and measuring the vertical deceleration. The penetration into the ground was obtained by using digital high-speed video recording during the experiments and surveyor's optical level before and afterwards. The combination of accelerometers and digital high-speed video recordings additionally allows for a check of the function of the single systems. The rock's velocity can be obtained on the one hand through integration of the accelerations and on the other hand by differentiation of the video data; both values should differ not too much. Finally, the analyses of the test series enabled a calibration of an improved individual load model for the impact of falling bodies into more or less compacted soil and revealed that the loads resulting from the previous guideline can be reduced by 20%. However, because the maximum impact energy was 600 kJ further experiments are recommended to enable a prediction of the performance for energies higher than 5'000 kJ - an energy sector dams are normally used for.

Gerber, W.

2009-04-01

385

Falling plumes of point particles in viscous fluid  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The growth of radial bulges on the conduit of a falling viscous plume of particles, reported by Pignatel et al. for a finite starting plume [F. Pignatel, M. Nicolas, É. Guazzelli, and D. Saintillan, ``Falling jets of particles in viscous fluids,'' Phys. Fluids 21, 123303 (2009)], is investigated both numerically and analytically. As a model for the plume conduit, an infinite vertical cylinder of identical non-Brownian point particles falling under gravity in Stokes flow is considered. Numerically, this is implemented with periodic boundary conditions of a large, but finite, period. The quasi-periodic numerical simulations exhibit qualitatively similar behaviour to that previously observed for the finite plume, demonstrating that neither the plume head nor the plume source play a role in the growth of the radial bulges. This growth is instead shown to be due to fluctuations in the average number density of particles along the plume about its mean value n, which leads to an initial growth rate proportional to n-1/2. The typical length scale of the bulges, which is of the order of 10 plume radii, results from the particle plume responding most strongly to density fluctuations in the axial direction on this scale. Large radial bulges undergo a nonlinear wave-breaking mechanism, which entrains ambient fluid and reduces the magnitude of perturbations on the plume surface. This contributes towards an outwards diffusion of the plume in which the increase in radius, at sufficiently large times, is proportional to t2/3.

Crosby, Andrew; Lister, John R.

2012-12-01

386

Depression after low-energy fracture in older women predicts future falls: a prospective observational study  

PubMed Central

Background Falls are one of the main causes of fractures in elderly people and after a recent fracture, the risk of another fall is increased, resulting in subsequent fracture. Therefore, risk factors for future falls should be determined. We prospectively investigated the relationship between depression and the incidence of falls in post-menopausal women after a low-energy fracture. Methods At baseline, 181 women aged 60 years and older who presented with a recent low-energy fracture were evaluated at the fracture and osteoporosis outpatient clinics of two hospitals. As well as clinical evaluation and bone mineral density tests, the presence of depression (measured using the Edinburgh Depression Scale, EDS, depression cut-off > 11) and risk factors for falling were assessed. During two years of follow-up, the incidence of falls was registered annually by means of detailed questionnaires and interviews. Results Seventy-nine (44%) of the women sustained at least one fall during follow-up. Of these, 28% (n = 22) suffered from depression at baseline compared to 10% (n = 10) of the 102 women who did not sustain a fall during follow-up (?2 = 8.76, df = 1, p = .003). Multiple logistic regression showed that the presence of depression and co-morbidity at baseline were independently related to falls (OR = 4.13, 95% CI = 1.58-10.80; OR = 2.25, 95% CI = 1.11-4.56, respectively) during follow-up. Conclusions The presence of depression in women aged 60 years and older with recent low-energy fractures is an important risk factor for future falls. We propose that clinicians treating patients with recent low-energy fractures should anticipate not only on skeletal-related risk factors for fractures, but also on fall-related risk factors including depression.

2011-01-01

387

Historical rock falls in Yosemite National Park, California (1857–2011)  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Inventories of rock falls and other types of landslides are valuable tools for improving understanding of these events. For example, detailed information on rock falls is critical for identifying mechanisms that trigger rock falls, for quantifying the susceptibility of different cliffs to rock falls, and for developing magnitude-frequency relations. Further, inventories can assist in quantifying the relative hazard and risk posed by these events over both short and long time scales. This report describes and presents the accompanying rock fall inventory database for Yosemite National Park, California. The inventory database documents 925 events spanning the period 1857–2011. Rock falls, rock slides, and other forms of slope movement represent a serious natural hazard in Yosemite National Park. Rock-fall hazard and risk are particularly relevant in Yosemite Valley, where glacially steepened granitic cliffs approach 1 km in height and where the majority of the approximately 4 million yearly visitors to the park congregate. In addition to damaging roads, trails, and other facilities, rock falls and other slope movement events have killed 15 people and injured at least 85 people in the park since the first documented rock fall in 1857. The accompanying report describes each of the organizational categories in the database, including event location, type of slope movement, date, volume, relative size, probable trigger, impact to humans, narrative description, references, and environmental conditions. The inventory database itself is contained in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet (Yosemite_rock_fall_database_1857-2011.xlsx). Narrative descriptions of events are contained in the database, but are also provided in a more readable Adobe portable document format (pdf) file (Yosemite_rock_fall_database_narratives_1857-2011.pdf) available for download separate from the database.

Stock, Greg M.; Collins, Brian D.; Santaniello, David J.; Zimmer, Valerie L.; Wieczorek, Gerald F.; Snyder, James B.

2013-01-01

388

Validation of a quality of life questionnaire measuring the subjective fear of falling in nursing home residents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary A quality of life scale was developed to measure the subjective fear of falling in nursing home residents. We assessed the dimensions fear of falling, daily living and social life within a randomized controlled trial of hip protector use. The Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) was used for validation. Statistical analysis covered factor analysis, internal consistency of subscales, construct and

A. Warnke; G. Meyer; U. Bott; I. Mühlhauser

2004-01-01

389

Greenhouse Gas-ette Fall 1988, Spring, Fall 1989, Winter, Spring, Fall 1990.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This newsletter is for educators interested in developing lessons related to global climate change. The newsletter contains sample lessons, news items involving global climate change on an international scale, and background information on issues related to global climate change. (CW)|

Greenhouse Gas-ette, 1990

1990-01-01

390

Falling films on flexible inclines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The nonlinear stability and dynamic behavior of falling fluid films is studied for flow over a flexible substrate. We use asymptotic methods to deduce governing equations valid in various limits. Long-wave theory is used to derive Benney-like coupled equations for the film thickness and substrate deflection. Weakly nonlinear equations are then derived from these equations that, in the limit of large wall damping and/or large wall tension, reduce to the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation. These models break down when inertia becomes more significant, so we also use a long-wave approximation in conjunction with integral theory to derive three strongly coupled nonlinear evolution equations for the film thickness, substrate deflection, and film volumetric flow rate valid at higher Reynolds numbers. These equations, accounting for inertia, capillary, viscous, wall tension, and damping effects, are solved over a wide range of parameters. Our results suggest that decreasing wall damping and/or wall tension can promote the development of chaos in the weakly nonlinear regime and lead to severe substrate deformations in the strongly nonlinear regime; these can give rise to situations in which the free surface and underlying substrate come into contact in finite time.

Matar, O. K.; Craster, R. V.; Kumar, S.

2007-11-01

391

Falling films on flexible inclines.  

PubMed

The nonlinear stability and dynamic behavior of falling fluid films is studied for flow over a flexible substrate. We use asymptotic methods to deduce governing equations valid in various limits. Long-wave theory is used to derive Benney-like coupled equations for the film thickness and substrate deflection. Weakly nonlinear equations are then derived from these equations that, in the limit of large wall damping and/or large wall tension, reduce to the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation. These models break down when inertia becomes more significant, so we also use a long-wave approximation in conjunction with integral theory to derive three strongly coupled nonlinear evolution equations for the film thickness, substrate deflection, and film volumetric flow rate valid at higher Reynolds numbers. These equations, accounting for inertia, capillary, viscous, wall tension, and damping effects, are solved over a wide range of parameters. Our results suggest that decreasing wall damping and/or wall tension can promote the development of chaos in the weakly nonlinear regime and lead to severe substrate deformations in the strongly nonlinear regime; these can give rise to situations in which the free surface and underlying substrate come into contact in finite time. PMID:18233750

Matar, O K; Craster, R V; Kumar, S

2007-11-08

392

The process of falling asleep.  

PubMed

The process of falling asleep can best be measured by considering a convergence of behavioural, EEG, physiological and subjective information. Doing so allows one to see sleep processes as they unfold, but relying on any single sleep index can bias the description of this complex process. The studies reviewed do not support the idea that sleep begins "in a moment", but rather that entry into sleep is a continuous, interwoven series of changes which begin in relaxed drowsiness and continue through stage 1, often into the first minutes of stage 2. The transition from waking brain to sleeping brain is traced accurately by Hori's nine-stage EEG system. Event-related potential (ERP) studies map complex changes in information processing as sleep begins, while quantitative EEG investigations have identified important spatiotemporal re-organisations of primary EEG frequencies which take place as one moves from waking to sleeping mode. To consider evidence from multiple levels of analysis, a three step electrophysiological model of central nervous system (CNS) regulation during sleep onset is proposed: initial processes appear to be alpha-related; intermediate processes, poorly studied to date, parallel the development of theta and vertex sharp wave activity, while the processes which terminate wakefulness are sigma sleep spindle-related. Clinical investigations of the sleep onset period in people with narcolepsy, insomnia, depression or sleep apnoea appear to indicate the presence of relatively unique electrophysiological signatures which may be of clinical significance. 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd PMID:12530990

Ogilvie, Robert D.

2001-06-01

393

Geologic History Field Investigation - Minnehaha Falls  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is an inquiry-based field investigation of the geologic history of the Minnehaha Falls and St. Anthony Falls areas of Minneapolis. Students will be introduced to rocks and the stories rocks tell in a genuine geologic context, rather than as samples in the classroom.

Kevin Swanson and Justin Larson, Chippewa Middle School, North Oaks, MN

394

PLCO News, Fall/Winter 1998  

Cancer.gov

PLCO News, Fall/Winter 1998 Volume 1, Number 2 ----- Fall/Winter 1998 TABLE OF CONTENTS Notes from theNCI's PLCO Project Office Meet John GohaganMeet Phil Prorok From Lab to Life Possible prostate cancer prevention with vitamin E and selenium

395

Study of Falling-Jet Flash Evaporators.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Experimental results of flash evaporation from sheets of water, 3.2 mm and 6.3 mm thick and 27.9 cm wide, falling freely in the presence of their own vapor, are reported. With no flashing the jets fall in coherent sheets, but with flashing the jets were o...

D. Bharathan D. A. Olson F. Kreith H. J. Green

1982-01-01

396

29 CFR 1926.760 - Fall protection.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.760 Fall protection...this section, each employee engaged in a steel erection activity who is on a walking...protection. Fall protection provided by the steel erector shall remain in the area...

2013-07-01

397

Agitation and Falls in Institutionalized Elderly Persons  

Microsoft Academic Search

The occurrence of falls and the manifestations of three dimensions of agitation (aggressive behaviors, physically nonaggressive behaviors, verbal behaviors) were recorded in 408 nursing home residents during each of the three nursing shifts. Falls occurred most frequently during the busiest shift (the day shift) and least frequently during the night shift when most residents were sleeping and nursing staff were

Marcia S. Marx; Jiska Cohen-Mansfield; Perla Werner

1990-01-01

398

Analysis of Fall 1994 Course Grades.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report provides data on withdrawal and success rates and grades earned in fall 1994 at the five campuses of Pima Community College (PCC), in Arizona. Following a literature review on national course grades, descriptions are provided of the following: (1) grades and withdrawals for fall 1979, 1984, 1989, and 1994, indicating that the number…

Pima Community Coll., Tucson, AZ. Office of Research and Planning.

399

Risk of falls for hospitalized patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

The incidence rate of falls is often used as an indicator of nursing care outcome. Comparing outcome between different settings should, however, make allowance for case mix. To measure the incidence of falls, describe their circumstances and develop a prediction model based on routinely collected data to allow comparison between hospital settings with different case mix. A dynamic population of

Patricia Halfon; Yves Eggli; Guy Van Melle; André Vagnair

2001-01-01

400

Compton Community College Information Notebook, Fall 1995.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This notebook serves the purpose of informing the Compton Community College District about the student body population, faculty and classified employees in reference to gender, race/ethnicity and age. Findings from an analysis of the period from fall 1991 to fall 1995 included the following: (1) over the period, the enrollment of Black students…

Camacho, Julian S.

401

The Lorton, Virginia, USA, Meteorite Fall  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This abstract describes the recently approved Lorton, VA, USA, meteorite and the conditions surrounding its fall and recovery. We also examine the use of Doppler weather radar to detect falling debris and how these data may predict a meteorite strewn field for this event.

Corrigan, C. M.; Fries, M. D.; Welzenbach, L. C.; McCoy, T. J.; Fries, J.

2011-03-01

402

PLCO News, Fall/Winter 1998  

Cancer.gov

PLCO News, Fall/Winter 1998 Volume 1, Number 2 ----- Fall/Winter 1998 Cancer Information Center If you have a question about cancer you can call and speak with a trained specialist at NCI's Cancer Information Service (CIS). The CIS operates a toll-free,

403

PLCO News, Fall/Winter 1998  

Cancer.gov

PLCO News, Fall/Winter 1998 Volume 1, Number 2 ----- Fall/Winter 1998 Trial Update Enrollment goal: 148,000 Total enrollment (as of September 30, 1998): 111,515 Men enrolled: 58,283 Women enrolled: 53,232 Number of people enrolled

404

Falling in Love as a Therapeutic Moment-Therapy as a Moment of Falling in Love  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author compares falling in love in ordinary life with falling in love in therapy. This way, he offers a wider understanding of these phenomena, regarding in particular to transferring processes. The result is a model, inside the frame of reference of Gestalt Therapy, to work through the positive sources of falling in love process-in ordinary life and in therapy.

Giovanni Salonia

1991-01-01

405

Frequencies of falls in Swiss hospitals: Concordance between nurses’ estimates and fall incident reports  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundPatient falls are frequent incidents in hospitals, and various measurement methods are described in the literature to assess in-patient fall rates. However, the literature includes no validation of nurses’ estimates of fall frequencies, which are the preferred assessment method in multi-centre surveys.

Barbara Cina-Tschumi; Maria Schubert; Reto W. Kressig; Sabina De Geest; René Schwendimann

2009-01-01

406

A Shifting Paradigm: Preservice Teachers' Multicultural Attitudes and Efficacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Effective teaching in multicultural settings requires the awareness and ability to adapt to diverse needs and viewpoints. Teachers' multicultural efficacy may be gained from coursework or interactions within diverse communities. In this study the authors determined preservice teachers' multicultural efficacy using the Multicultural Efficacy Scale

Nadelson, Louis S.; Boham, Mikaela D.; Conlon-Khan, Lori; Fuentealba, Molly J.; Hall, Cynthia J.; Hoetker, Gregory A.; Hooley, Diana S.; Jang, Bong Seok; Luckey, Kristina L.; Moneymaker, Kelley J.; Shapiro, Matthew A.; Zenkert, A. J.

2012-01-01

407

Beginning teacher efficacy and the practicum in an EFL context  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over recent decades, there has been compelling evidence describing the powerful effects of teachers’ sense of efficacy on their instructional activities as well as student outcomes. The present study explored the change of efficacy of prospective teachers over the student teaching period and the factors that might contribute to the change. Data collected through the Teachers’ Sense of Efficacy Scale

Derin Atay

2007-01-01

408

Second Order Model of Self-Efficacy Measures.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Assumptions underlying the multifaceted, hierarchical structure of self-efficacy previously hypothesized by R. Shavelson, J. Hubner, and G. Stanton (1976) for the construct of self-concept were tested. The self-efficacy interpretation of the Science Self-Efficacy Scale (H. Kennedy, 1996), a relatively new measure, was studied with 331 (151 female…

Kennedy, Helen L.

409

Asthma management efficacy of school nurses in Taiwan  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the key health care providers in school settings, the school nurses’ asthma management efficacy is crucial to children's health and their continued participation in school learning activities. This article describes the psychometric testing of the asthma management efficacy scale (AMES) for use with school nurses. A cross-sectional survey design was used to assess the asthma management efficacy of 60

B. S Gau; S. D Horner; S. C Chang; Y. C Chen

2002-01-01

410

[Psychological factors in falls in elderly patients].  

PubMed

This article recognizes the high incidence and prevalence of falls in the elderly. Psychological factors can play a definite role as part of the etiology. The fall can be a depressive signal or a cry for help from a demoralized elderly patient. The authors stress the importance of recognizing the depressive syndrome of the elderly. Psychological consequences of the falls are reviewed at three different levels. For the elderly, the consequences are frequently a fear that can lead to a sharp decrease in functional capacity. For the family, the fall can lead to the institutionalization of the elderly or a very restrictive surveillance. For the family physician, the fall is frequently perceived as an emergency that leads to immediate unwarranted admission. A rational approach, with education and guidelines, is proposed and can render this traumatic experience less dramatic at these three different levels. PMID:2706610

Albarède, J L; Lemieux, A; Vellas, B; Groulx, B

1989-03-01

411

Keep Up or Fall Behind  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In the race to enable information access and collaboration, institutions are taking advantage of new tools to drive content management innovation. New content management systems (CMS) features and functions are driving true innovation in content management, and enabling information access, sharing, collaboration, and tracking on a scale

Ramaswami, Rama

2007-01-01

412

Dimensions of Teacher Self-Efficacy and Relations with Strain Factors, Perceived Collective Teacher Efficacy, and Teacher Burnout  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this study, the authors developed and factor analyzed the Norwegian Teacher Self-Efficacy Scale. They also examined relations among teacher self-efficacy, perceived collective teacher efficacy, external control (teachers' general beliefs about limitations to what can be achieved through education), strain factors, and teacher burnout.…

Skaalvik, Einar M.; Skaalvik, Sidsel

2007-01-01

413

Effect of Stroke on Fall Rate, Location and Predictors: A Prospective Comparison of Older Adults with and without Stroke  

PubMed Central

Background The literature suggests that stroke is a major risk factor for falls, but there is a lack of prospective, controlled studies which quantify fall-risk after stroke. The purpose of this study was to compare the rates, location and predictors among individuals recently discharged home from stroke rehabilitation to age and sex matched controls. Methodology/Principal Findings A sample of 80 people with stroke and 90 controls received baseline assessments of balance, mobility and balance confidence. Falls were recorded prospectively over 13 months for both groups. Group differences in fall rates and contribution of clinical measures to falls were determined using negative binomial regression. Fall location was compared between groups using ?2 statistics. The rate of falls for individuals with stroke was 1.77 times the rate for the control group. People with stroke were more likely to fall at home. Poorer balance (Berg Balance Scale) was associated with greater falls for both stroke and control groups (incidence rate ratio [IRR]: 0.908 and IRR: 0.877 respectively). A faster Timed Up and Go Test was associated with greater falls for the stroke group (IRR: 0.955) while better walking endurance (Six Minute Walk Test) was associated with greater falls for the controls (IRR: 1.004). Balance confidence was not an independent predictor in either group. Conclusions Individuals recently discharged home are at greater risk of falling than individuals without stroke. Attention to home environment is warranted. Balance function can predict falls for both people with stroke and age and sex matched controls. Increased mobility may increase exposure to fall opportunities.

Simpson, Lisa A.; Miller, William C.; Eng, Janice J.

2011-01-01

414

Integration of balance and strength training into daily life activity to reduce rate of falls in older people (the LiFE study): randomised parallel trial  

PubMed Central

Objectives To determine whether a lifestyle integrated approach to balance and strength training is effective in reducing the rate of falls in older, high risk people living at home. Design Three arm, randomised parallel trial; assessments at baseline and after six and 12 months. Randomisation done by computer generated random blocks, stratified by sex and fall history and concealed by an independent secure website. Setting Residents in metropolitan Sydney, Australia. Participants Participants aged 70 years or older who had two or more falls or one injurious fall in past 12 months, recruited from Veteran’s Affairs databases and general practice databases. Exclusion criteria were moderate to severe cognitive problems, inability to ambulate independently, neurological conditions that severely influenced gait and mobility, resident in a nursing home or hostel, or any unstable or terminal illness that would affect ability to do exercises. Interventions Three home based interventions: Lifestyle integrated Functional Exercise (LiFE) approach (n=107; taught principles of balance and strength training and integrated selected activities into everyday routines), structured programme (n=105; exercises for balance and lower limb strength, done three times a week), sham control programme (n=105; gentle exercise). LiFE and structured groups received five sessions with two booster visits and two phone calls; controls received three home visits and six phone calls. Assessments made at baseline and after six and 12 months. Main outcome measures Primary measure: rate of falls over 12 months, collected by self report. Secondary measures: static and dynamic balance; ankle, knee and hip strength; balance self efficacy; daily living activities; participation; habitual physical activity; quality of life; energy expenditure; body mass index; and fat free mass. Results After 12 months’ follow-up, we recorded 172, 193, and 224 falls in the LiFE, structured exercise, and control groups, respectively. The overall incidence of falls in the LiFE programme was 1.66 per person years, compared with 1.90 in the structured programme and 2.28 in the control group. We saw a significant reduction of 31% in the rate of falls for the LiFE programme compared with controls (incidence rate ratio 0.69 (95% confidence interval 0.48 to 0.99)); the corresponding difference between the structured group and controls was non-significant (0.81 (0.56 to 1.17)). Static balance on an eight level hierarchy scale, ankle strength, function, and participation were significantly better in the LiFE group than in controls. LiFE and structured groups had a significant and moderate improvement in dynamic balance, compared with controls. Conclusions The LiFE programme provides an alternative to traditional exercise to consider for fall prevention. Functional based exercise should be a focus for interventions to protect older, high risk people from falling and to improve and maintain functional capacity. Trial registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry 12606000025538.

2012-01-01

415

Risk of falls after withdrawal of fall-risk-increasing drugs: a prospective cohort study  

PubMed Central

What is already known about this subject In observational studies, several drugs have been associated with an increased fall risk. A meta-analysis in 1999 found a significant association for neuroleptics, antidepressants, sedatives, diuretics, type IA antiarrhythmics, and digoxin. Nevertheless, knowledge on the effect of withdrawal of these drugs on fall risk is scarce. Only one randomized controlled trial has been carried out in 1999, showing a significantly lowered fall risk after withdrawal of sedatives and antidepressants in community-dwelling older persons. What this study adds This study indicates that withdrawal of all fall-risk-increasing drugs, including both cardiovascular and psychotropic drugs, is an effective intervention for lowering of falls incidence. This effect appears to be highest for withdrawal of cardiovascular drugs. Aims Falling in older persons is a frequent and serious clinical problem. Several drugs have been associated with increased fall risk. The objective of this study was to identify differences in the incidence of falls after withdrawal (discontinuation or dose reduction) of fall-risk-increasing drugs as a single intervention in older fallers. Methods In a prospective cohort study of geriatric outpatients, we included 139 patients presenting with one or more falls during the previous year. Fall-risk-increasing drugs were withdrawn, if possible. The incidence of falls was assessed within 2 months of follow-up after a set 1 month period of drug withdrawal. Multivariate adjustment for potential confounders was performed with a Cox proportional hazards model. Results In 67 patients, we were able to discontinue a fall-risk-increasing drug, and in eight patients to reduce its dose. The total number of fall incidents during follow-up was significantly lower in these 75 patients, than in those who continued treatment (mean number of falls: 0.3 vs. 3.6; P value 0.025). The hazard ratio of a fall during follow-up was 0.48 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.23, 0.99) for overall drug withdrawal, 0.35 (95% CI 0.15, 0.82) for cardiovascular drug withdrawal and 0.56 (95% CI 0.23, 1.38) for psychotropic drug withdrawal, after adjustment for age, gender, use of fall-risk-increasing drugs, baseline falls frequency, comorbidity, Mini-Mental State Examination score, and reason for referral. Conclusions Withdrawal of fall-risk-increasing drugs appears to be effective as a single intervention for falls prevention in a geriatric outpatient setting. The effect was greatest for withdrawal of cardiovascular drugs.

van der Velde, Nathalie; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Pols, Huib A P; van der Cammen, Tischa J M

2007-01-01

416

[Fall risk and fracture. Falls and fractures in patients with neurological disorders].  

PubMed

Neurological disorders are frequently associated with risk factors for falls, such as gait and balance disorders, deficits of lower extremity strength, sensation and coordination, in addition to cognitive impairments. Patients with various kinds of neurological disorders, including Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's syndrome, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, peripheral neuropathy, stroke, etc, easily suffer from falls. To prevent falls among such patients, treatments of the underlying neurological diseases and assessments risk factors for falls are most important to cope effectively with these patients. In general, maintenance of the appropriate environment, consideration of the injury prevention, rehabilitation for increasing muscular strength, etc, are useful for the prevention of falls in patients with neurological disorders. PMID:23628680

Tamaoka, Akira

2013-05-01

417

Rock falls landslides in Abruzzo (Central Italy) after recent earthquakes: morphostructural control  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent earthquakes show that damages due to collateral effects could, in some cases exceed the economic and social losses directly connected to the seismic shaking. The earthquake heavily damaged urban areas and villages and induced several coseismic deformations and geomorphologic effects, including different types of instability such as: rock falls, debris falls, sink holes, ground collapses, liquefaction, etc. Among the effects induced by the seismic energy release, landslides are one of the most significant in terms of hazard and related risk, owing to the occurrence of exposed elements. This work analyzes the geomorphological effects, and particularly the rock falls, which occurred in the L'Aquila area during and immediately after the April 2009 earthquake. The analysis is focused mainly on the rock fall distribution related to the local morphostructural setting. Rock falls occurred mostly on calcareous bedrock slopes or on scarps developed on conglomerates and breccias of Quaternary continental deposits. Geological and geomorphological surveys have outlined different types of rock falls on different morpho-structural settings, which can be summarized as follow: 1)rock falls on calcareous faulted homoclinal ridges; 2)rock falls on calcareous rock slopes of karst landforms; 3)rock falls on structural scarps on conglomerates and breccias of Quaternary continental deposits. The first type of rockfall occurred particularly along main gorges carved on calcareous rocks and characterised by very steep fault slopes and structural slopes (i.e. San Venanzio Gorges, along the Aterno river). In these cases already unstable slopes due to lithological and structural control were triggered as rockfalls also at high distance from the epicentre area. These elements provide useful indications both at local scale, for seismic microzonation studies and seismic risk prevention, and at regional scale, for updating studies and inventory of landslides.

Piacentini, T.; Miccadei, E.; Di Michele, R.; Esposito, G.

2012-04-01

418

Quantitative rock-fall hazard and risk assessment for Yosemite Valley, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rock falls are a considerable hazard in Yosemite Valley, California with more than 835 rock falls and other slope movements documented since 1857. Thus, rock falls pose potentially significant risk to the nearly four million annual visitors to Yosemite National Park. Building on earlier hazard assessment work by the U.S. Geological Survey, we performed a quantitative rock-fall hazard and risk assessment for Yosemite Valley. This work was aided by several new data sets, including precise Geographic Information System (GIS) maps of rock-fall deposits, airborne and terrestrial LiDAR-based point cloud data and digital elevation models, and numerical ages of talus deposits. Using Global Position Systems (GPS), we mapped the positions of over 500 boulders on the valley floor and measured their distance relative to the mapped base of talus. Statistical analyses of these data yielded an initial hazard zone that is based on the 90th percentile distance of rock-fall boulders beyond the talus edge. This distance was subsequently scaled (either inward or outward from the 90th percentile line) based on rock-fall frequency information derived from a combination of cosmogenic beryllium-10 exposure dating of boulders beyond the edge of the talus, and computer model simulations of rock-fall runout. The scaled distances provide the basis for a new hazard zone on the floor of Yosemite Valley. Once this zone was delineated, we assembled visitor, employee, and resident use data for each structure within the hazard zone to quantitatively assess risk exposure. Our results identify areas within the new hazard zone that may warrant more detailed study, for example rock-fall susceptibility, which can be assessed through examination of high-resolution photographs, structural measurements on the cliffs, and empirical calculations derived from LiDAR point cloud data. This hazard and risk information is used to inform placement of existing and potential future infrastructure in Yosemite Valley.

Stock, G. M.; Luco, N.; Collins, B. D.; Harp, E.; Reichenbach, P.; Frankel, K. L.

2011-12-01

419

Writing Essays: Does Self-Efficacy Matter? The Relationship between Self-Efficacy in Reading and in Writing and Undergraduate Students' Performance in Essay Writing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Self-efficacy beliefs have been identified as associated with students' academic performance. The present research assessed the relationship between two new self-efficacy scales (self-efficacy in reading [SER] and self-efficacy in writing [SEW]) and students' writing performance on a piece of assessed written coursework. Using data from first and…

Prat-Sala, Merce; Redford, Paul

2012-01-01

420

Relationships between Personality Type and Teaching Efficacy of Student Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this study was to determine if relationships exist between teaching efficacy and personality type of student teachers. The population of interest was all agricultural science student teachers at Texas A&M University. The sampling frame included all student teachers during the spring and fall semesters of 2005 (n= 72). Teaching…

Roberts, T. Grady; Mowen, Diana L.; Edgar, Don W.; Harlin, Julie F.; Briers, Gary E.

2007-01-01

421

Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients).  

PubMed

To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82 ± 7 years, range 65-101). Falls were defined "accidental" (fall explained by a definite accidental cause), "medical" (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease), "dementia-related" (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia), and "unexplained" (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause). According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury. PMID:23533394

Chiara, Mussi; Gianluigi, Galizia; Pasquale, Abete; Alessandro, Morrione; Alice, Maraviglia; Gabriele, Noro; Paolo, Cavagnaro; Loredana, Ghirelli; Giovanni, Tava; Franco, Rengo; Giulio, Masotti; Gianfranco, Salvioli; Niccolò, Marchionni; Andrea, Ungar

2013-02-25

422

Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients)  

PubMed Central

To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82 ± 7 years, range 65–101). Falls were defined “accidental” (fall explained by a definite accidental cause), “medical” (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease), “dementia-related” (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia), and “unexplained” (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause). According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury.

Chiara, Mussi; Gianluigi, Galizia; Pasquale, Abete; Alessandro, Morrione; Alice, Maraviglia; Gabriele, Noro; Paolo, Cavagnaro; Loredana, Ghirelli; Giovanni, Tava; Franco, Rengo; Giulio, Masotti; Gianfranco, Salvioli; Niccolo, Marchionni; Andrea, Ungar

2013-01-01

423

Characteristics of Hospital Inpatient Falls across Clinical Departments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Hospital inpatient falls are common and may lead to injuries and prolonged hospitalization. Although hospital studies have reported overall fall rates and injuries associated with falls, few have addressed population characteristics and circumstances of falls across clinical departments within a hospital setting. Objective: To determine inpatient fall rates in an urban public hospital and to explore associated characteristics across

René Schwendimann; Hugo Bühler; Sabina De Geest; Koen Milisen

2008-01-01

424

187. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

187. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. TOPOGRAPHICAL MAP OF MILNER DAM LOCATION, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; BLUEPRINT MAP. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

425

192. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

192. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. TOPOGRAPHICAL MAP (DAM DRAWN IN), MILNER SITE, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; RIGHT SIDE OF MAP (LEFT ON ID-15-183). - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

426

183. Photocopy of map (Twin Falls Canal Company). TOPOGRAPHICAL MAP ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

183. Photocopy of map (Twin Falls Canal Company). TOPOGRAPHICAL MAP OF MILNER DAM SITE, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; MAP, LEFT SIDE ONLY. CROSS REFERENCE: ID-15-192. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

427

Barometric Pressure and Triaxial Accelerometry-Based Falls Event Detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Falls and fall related injuries are a significant cause of morbidity, disability, and health care utilization, particularly among the age group of 65 years and over. The ability to detect falls events in an unsupervised manner would lead to improved prognoses for falls victims. Several wearable accelerometry and gyroscope-based falls detection devices have been described in the literature; however, they

Federico Bianchi; Stephen J. Redmond; Michael R. Narayanan; Sergio Cerutti; Nigel H. Lovell

2010-01-01

428

Socio-demographic, health-related and psychosocial correlates of fear of falling and avoidance of activity in community-living older persons who avoid activity due to fear of falling  

PubMed Central

Background Fear of falling and avoidance of activity are common in old age and are suggested to be (public) health problems of equal importance to falls. Earlier studies of correlates of fear of falling and avoidance of activity did hardly differentiate between severe and mild levels of fear of falling and avoidance of activity which may be relevant from clinical point of view. Furthermore, most studies focused only on socio-demographics and/or health-related variables and hardly incorporated an extensive range of potential correlates of fear of falling including psychosocial variables. This study analyzes the univariate and multivariate associations between five socio-demographic, seven health-related and six psychosocial variables and levels of fear of falling and avoidance of activity in older persons who avoid activity due to fear of falling. Methods Cross-sectional study in 540 community-living older people aged ? 70 years with at least mild fear of falling and avoidance of activity. Chi-squares, t-tests and logistics regression analyses were performed to study the associations between the selected correlates and both outcomes. Results Old age, female sex, limitations in activity of daily living, impaired vision, poor perceived health, chronic morbidity, falls, low general self-efficacy, low mastery, loneliness, feelings of anxiety and symptoms of depression were identified as univariate correlates of severe fear of falling and avoidance of activity. Female sex, limitations in activity of daily living and one or more falls in the previous six months correlated independently with severe fear of falling. Higher age and limitations in activity of daily living correlated independently with severe avoidance of activity. Conclusion Psychosocial variables did not contribute independently to the difference between mild and severe fear of falling and to the difference between mild and severe avoidance of activity due to fear of falling. Although knowledge about the unique associations of specific variables with levels of severe fear of falling and avoidance of activity is of interest for theoretical reasons, knowledge of univariate association may also help to specify the concepts for developing interventions and programmes to reduce fear of falling and avoidance of activity in old age, particularly in their early stages of development.

Kempen, Gertrudis IJM; van Haastregt, Jolanda CM; McKee, Kevin J; Delbaere, Kim; Zijlstra, GA Rixt

2009-01-01

429

Assessing Regulatory Emotional Self-Efficacy in Three Countries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Regulatory Emotional Self-Efficacy (RESE) scale was developed to assess perceived self-efficacy in managing negative (NEG) and in expressing positive (POS) affect (G. V. Caprara & M. Gerbino, 2001). In this study of young adults, the factorial structure of the RESE scale was found to be similar in Italy, the United States, and Bolivia: In…

Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Giunta, Laura Di; Eisenberg, Nancy; Gerbino, Maria; Pastorelli, Concetta; Tramontano, Carlo

2008-01-01

430

Wireless slips and falls prediction system.  

PubMed

Accidental slips and falls due to decreased strength and stability are a concern for the elderly. A method to detect and ideally predict these falls can reduce their occurrence and allow these individuals to regain a degree of independence. This paper presents the design and assessment of a wireless, wearable device that continuously samples accelerometer and gyroscope data with a goal to detect and predict falls. Lyapunov-based analyses of these time series data indicate that wearer instability can be detected and predicted in real time, implying the ability to predict impending incidents. PMID:23366815

Krenzel, Devon; Warren, Steve; Li, Kejia; Natarajan, Bala; Singh, Gurdip

2012-01-01

431

Dimensions of Teacher Self-Efficacy and Relations With Strain Factors, Perceived Collective Teacher Efficacy, and Teacher Burnout  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, the authors developed and factor analyzed the Norwegian Teacher Self-Efficacy Scale. They also examined relations among teacher self-efficacy, perceived collective teacher efficacy, external control (teachers' general beliefs about limitations to what can be achieved through education), strain factors, and teacher burnout. Participants were 244 elementary and middle school teachers. The analysis supported the conceptualization of teacher self-efficacy

Einar M. Skaalvik; Sidsel Skaalvik

2007-01-01

432

Imaging Fall Chinook Salmon Redds in the Columbia River with a Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar  

Microsoft Academic Search

We tested the efficacy of a dual-frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) for imaging and enu- meration of fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshaw- ytscha redds in a spawning area below Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River. The DIDSON uses sound to form near-video-quality images and has the advantages of im- aging in zero-visibility water and possessing a greater detection range and field

KENNETH F. T IFFAN; DENNIS W. R ONDORF; JOSEPH J. SKALICKY

433

Imaging Fall Chinook Salmon Redds in the Columbia River with a Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar  

Microsoft Academic Search

We tested the efficacy of a dual-frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) for imaging and enumeration of fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds in a spawning area below Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River. The DIDSON uses sound to form near-video-quality images and has the advantages of imaging in zero-visibility water and possessing a greater detection range and field of view than

Kenneth F. Tiffan; Dennis W. Rondorf; Joseph J. Skalicky

2004-01-01

434

Evidence-based clinical practice in falls prevention: a randomised controlled trial of a falls prevention service  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims: Evidence-based guidelines recommend a range of treatments for falls and injury prevention. We undertook a randomised trial of a falls prevention service to screen for falls risk factors and recommend to GPs an evidenced base prescription for falls prevention. Methods: All patients who presented with a fall to the Emergency Department at Flinders Medical Centre over a 22-week period

Craig Whitehead; Rachel Wundke; Maria Crotty; Paul Finucane

2003-01-01

435

Challenges and conundrums in the validation of Pediatric Fall Risk Assessment tools.  

PubMed

The 10-item Pediatric Fall Risk Assessment (PFRA) was developed to evaluate patients at low- or high-risk for falling. To avoid the unnecessary use of resources for children not likely to fall, children evaluated as high-risk are targeted for more intensive fall prevention interventions. In a retrospective, case-control design, the precision, accuracy, and error rate of the PFRA with patients ages 1 month to 24 years were evaluated. Cases included children who fell (n = 326), and controls (n = 326) were children from the same cohort who did not fall. Inter-rater agreement (precision) on PFRA cut-off scores was 95.1%, but accuracy was unacceptably low due to 60% false-positive and 58.5% false-negative risk ratings. Neither the PFRA nor three other widely used pediatric fall risk scales have sufficient precision or accuracy to justify implementing or withholding a high-risk fall prevention protocol. Several logistic and methodological challenges must be addressed before further development of these tools. PMID:22908460

Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A; Kimchi-Woods, Judy; Erbaugh, Melanie A; LaFollette, Lauren; Lathrop, Janet

436

Metolachlor dissipation following fall and spring application to eroded and rehabilitated landscapes of the US Corn Belt  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of landscape position and soil properties on the rate of metolachlor dissipation and weed control efficacy of fall- and spring-applied metolachlor in eroded and rehabilitated landforms in the midwestern United States. Soil-landscape rehabilitation result...

437

Randomised controlled trial of prevention of falls in people aged >=75 with severe visual impairment: the VIP trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives To assess the efficacy and cost effectiveness of a home safety programme and a home exercise programme to reduce falls and injuries in older people with low vision. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Dunedin and Auckland, New Zealand. Participants 391 women and men aged ? 75 with visual acuity of 6\\/24 or worse who were living in the community;

A John Campbell; M Clare Robertson; Steven J La Grow; Ngaire M Kerse; Gordon F Sanderson; Robert J Jacobs; Dianne M Sharp; Leigh A Hale

2005-01-01

438

Classical Free-fall Atomic Model.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Gryzinski's free-fall atomic model is tested by being used in classical calculations on electron capture in fast collisions between protons and hydrogen atoms. It is found to be unsatisfactory. (Author)

D. R. Bates R. Snyder

1973-01-01

439

Science and Engineering State Profiles, Fall 1997  

NSF Publications Database

... State Profiles,Fall 1996 Hypertext Format Science and Engineering State Profiles Portable Document ... Format (.pdf) Science and Engineering State Profiles This page was last updated on June 26 ...

440

Klamath Falls community energy planning project  

SciTech Connect

The Klamath Falls community energy planning project has been an investigation of how energy can be conserved and renewable resources promoted using land-use planning and community development regulations.

Not Available

1984-10-01

441

Do all raindrops fall at terminal speed?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A unique relation between raindrop size and fall speed v t (D) is assumed throughout atmospheric science. Yet, our speed versus size measurements of millions of drops during natural rainfall events show that many intermediate sized raindrops fall up to an order of magnitude faster than expected. Furthermore, images of drop clusters reveal that these “super-terminal drops” are differently sized fragments of a recent break-up, moving with the speed of the parent drop and relaxing towards v t (D). Additional evidence of the break-up conjecture includes: (i) positive skewness in the distribution of fall speed deviations, (ii) strong size dependence of fall speed deviations and their maximum values and, (iii) preponderance of super-terminal drops in the presence of large raindrops (i.e., during periods of high rainfall rates).

Montero-Martínez, Guillermo; Kostinski, Alexander B.; Shaw, Raymond A.; García-García, Fernando

2009-06-01

442

Enrollment in Higher Education, Fall 1989.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report presents findings from the 'Fall Enrollment' survey which is part of the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) survey administered by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). IPEDS provides comprehensive and consist...

N. B. Schantz M. J. Pluta

1991-01-01

443

Forensic Physics 101: Falls from a height  

Microsoft Academic Search

The physics of falling from a height, a topic that could be included in a course on forensic physics or in an undergraduate class as an example of Newton's laws, is applied to a common forensic problem.

Rod Cross

2008-01-01

444

Forensic Physics 101: Falls from a height  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The physics of falling from a height, a topic that could be included in a course on forensic physics or in an undergraduate class as an example of Newton's laws, is applied to a common forensic problem.

Cross, Rod

2008-09-01

445

Siena, 1794: History's Most Consequential Meteorite Fall  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the mythos of meteoritics, the fall of stones at L'Aigle in Normandy at 1 p. m. on April 26, 1803, is commonly regarded as the event that turned skeptics into believers and opened the way for the new science. A strong case can be made, however, that the fall of stones at Siena at 7:00 p.m. on June 16, 1794, established the authenticity of meteorite falls and set in motion the reexaminations of entrenched beliefs that led to the founding of the new science. The Siena fall was heralded by the appearance of an extraordinarily high, dark cloud emitting smoke, sparks like rockets, and bolts of unusually slow-moving red lightning. With a tremendous explosion a shower of stones, ranging in weight from a few milligrams to 3 kg, fell southeast of Siena. This was the first meteorite fall to occur in the vicinity of a sizeable European city and the first to be witnessed by so many people, including English visitors, that the fall of the stones from the sky could not be denied. It also was the first fall to be seriously investigated by scholars, at several universities in Italy, who collected eye-witness reports and specimens and formulated hypotheses of origin. Their task was greatly complicated by the timing of the fall which occurred 18 hours after Mt. Vesuvius sprang into full eruption. Some believed that the two events were entirely coincidental; others thought that the stones either were ejecta from the volcano (which lay about 320 km to the southeast of Siena) or had consolidated in the fiery masses of dust and ash expelled by the mountain. No explanations seemed entirely satisfactory, but, in an age when the very possibility of falling stones had been decisively ruled out by savants of the Enlightenment, the well-observed fall at Siena opened a new dialog on this subject. The Siena fall occurred only two months after the publication in Riga and Leipzig of Ernst F. F. Chladni's book On the Origin of Ironmasses in which he concluded from historical records that fragments of iron and stone fall do, indeed, fall from sky. News traveled so slowly in the 18th century that Chladni's book received negative reviews in Germany throughout 1794 and much of 1795 before the first notice of the Siena fall appeared in a Berlin paper in 1796. The same amount of time passed before Chladni's book reached England, but the groundwork for a more tolerant reception of it in that country was laid by travelers returning from Italy in 1794 with their descriptions and their specimens from Siena (including bogus "fallen stones" fabricated for the tourist market). Widespread interest was aroused in 1795 when the Royal Society published an account of the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius by Sir William Hamilton, the English Ambassador at Naples, who included a short discussion of the Siena stones and their possible link with the volcano. Hamilton's article carried the story of the Siena fall to France and Germany. The case for fallen stones was further strengthened when a 56-pound stone fell at 3:30 p.m. on December 13th, 1795, at Wold Cottage in Yorkshire. Early in 1796, Edward King, a Fellow of the Royal Society, published the first book in English on fallen stones. In it, he focused primarily on the Siena event but just as he was finishing his text he received a copy of Chladni's book and quoted from it extensively. King's 36-page book was widely read. It received some bad reviews in England but it immediately prompted one reader to report the fall of a stone [apparently a genuine meteorite] at Pettiswood, Ireland. He had withheld his story for 17 years for fear of ridicule. Now, the climate of opinion had changed and meteoritics already was becoming a new branch of science.

Marvin, U. B.

1995-09-01

446

Fall from Grace: The Decline of America  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Asks whether the United States is about to join the Roman Empire as a historical lesson of inevitable rise and fall. The government, economic and industrial leaders, and social scientists are examined. (Editor/RK)|

Schnepper, Jeff A.; Schnepper, Barbara

1976-01-01

447

Falling into a Black Hole: Movie Index  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website gives multiple gif animations related to black holes ranging from falling into a black hole to Hawking radiation. These animations are intended for students taking an advanced astronomy course who have previously studied black holes.

Hamilton, Andrew

2004-07-16

448

Falls from Shopping Carts Cause Serious Head Injuries to Children  

MedlinePLUS

... www.cpsc.gov • www.SaferProducts.gov Falls from Shopping Carts Cause Serious Head Injuries to Children Every ... in U.S. hospital emergency rooms for falls from shopping carts. Falls from shopping carts are among the ...

449

3. VIEW OF NORTHWEST CORNER OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. VIEW OF NORTHWEST CORNER OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE TOWER NO. 23, STANDARD PEAK TOWER. LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Little Falls Tie Line Towers, Near Little Dam Falls on Spokane River, Wellpinit, Stevens County, WA

450

2. VIEW OF WEST ELEVATION OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. VIEW OF WEST ELEVATION OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE TOWER NO. 23, OSPREY NEST ON TOWER TOP. LOOKING EAST - Little Falls Tie Line Towers, Near Little Dam Falls on Spokane River, Wellpinit, Stevens County, WA

451

4. VIEW OF SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. VIEW OF SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE TOWER NO. 41, OSPREY NEST ON TOWER TOP. LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Little Falls Tie Line Towers, Near Little Dam Falls on Spokane River, Wellpinit, Stevens County, WA

452

46 CFR 185.704 - Maintenance of falls.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Maintenance of falls. 185.704 Section 185...OPERATIONS Operational Readiness, Maintenance, and Inspection of Lifesaving Equipment § 185.704 Maintenance of falls. (a) Each fall...

2012-10-01

453

46 CFR 122.704 - Maintenance of falls.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Maintenance of falls. 122.704 Section 122...OPERATIONS Operational Readiness, Maintenance, and Inspection of Lifesaving Equipment § 122.704 Maintenance of falls. (a) Each fall...

2012-10-01

454

46 CFR 185.704 - Maintenance of falls.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Maintenance of falls. 185.704 Section 185...OPERATIONS Operational Readiness, Maintenance, and Inspection of Lifesaving Equipment § 185.704 Maintenance of falls. (a) Each fall...

2011-10-01

455

Information Technology Services Newsletter: Fall 2005  

Microsoft Academic Search

Information Technology Services Newsletter: Fall 2005\\u000aMary Jo Orzech, Editor\\u000aContents:\\u000aMultimedia Upgrades 1 McAfee Virus Protection CDs Available 1 Davenport Hatch Grants 1 Edwards Instruction Sounds Better 2 Instructional Technology Equipment 2 Fall Lab Upgrades 2 New hours for early risers 2 Dailey Classroom Schedule Online 3 New laptops in CELT 3 A-Team Training in August 3 ResNet Connects!

Mary Jo Orzech

2005-01-01

456

Evaluation of Accelerometer-Based Fall Detection Algorithms on Real-World Falls  

PubMed Central

Despite extensive preventive efforts, falls continue to be a major source of morbidity and mortality among elderly. Real-time detection of falls and their urgent communication to a telecare center may enable rapid medical assistance, thus increasing the sense of security of the elderly and reducing some of the negative consequences of falls. Many different approaches have been explored to automatically detect a fall using inertial sensors. Although previously published algorithms report high sensitivity (SE) and high specificity (SP), they have usually been tested on simulated falls performed by healthy volunteers. We recently collected acceleration data during a number of real-world falls among a patient population with a high-fall-risk as part of the SensAction-AAL European project. The aim of the present study is to benchmark the performance of thirteen published fall-detection algorithms when they are applied to the database of 29 real-world falls. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first systematic comparison of fall detection algorithms tested on real-world falls. We found that the SP average of the thirteen algorithms, was (mean±std) 83.0%±30.3% (maximum value?=?98%). The SE was considerably lower (SE?=?57.0%±27.3%, maximum value?=?82.8%), much lower than the values obtained on simulated falls. The number of false alarms generated by the algorithms during 1-day monitoring of three representative fallers ranged from 3 to 85. The factors that affect the performance of the published algorithms, when they are applied to the real-world falls, are also discussed. These findings indicate the importance of testing fall-detection algorithms in real-life conditions in order to produce more effective automated alarm systems with higher acceptance. Further, the present results support the idea that a large, shared real-world fall database could, potentially, provide an enhanced understanding of the fall process and the information needed to design and evaluate a high-performance fall detector.

Bagala, Fabio; Becker, Clemens; Cappello, Angelo; Chiari, Lorenzo; Aminian, Kamiar; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Klenk, Jochen

2012-01-01

457

Get connected: New Fall Meeting technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Kick off your 2012 Fall Meeting experience today by joining the Fall Meeting Community, an interactive Web-based community. Whether you are attending this year's Fall Meeting or are just interested in learning more, this site can help you connect with colleagues, learn about the groundbreaking research and amazing programming being presented in San Francisco, and plan your trip to the largest Earth and space science conference of the year. Available through the Fall Meeting Web site (http://fallmeeting.agu.org), the Community allows you to share your Fall Meeting experience like never before. You can join groups based on your interests, and each group includes a message board that allows you to ask questions, post comments, discuss presentations, and make plans with colleagues. You can also create your own groups and use the Community's robust search engine to find and connect with friends. And because the Fall Meeting Web site was improved for 2012 to allow for nearly seamless functionality on mobile devices, you can access much of the same Community functionality on the go.

Moscovitch, Mirelle

2012-11-01

458

Analyzing the problem of falls among older people  

PubMed Central

Falls are a serious problem facing the elderly. The prevention of falls that contribute to disability, mainly in elderly people, is an important issue. Ensuring the greatest possible functionality for elderly people is an important element in the prevention of disability. This paper analyzes the importance of falls, risk factors for falls, and interventions to prevent falls. Recent publications as well as research regarding the prevention and rehabilitation for falls are reviewed.

Dionyssiotis, Yannis

2012-01-01

459

Falls in Spinocerebellar Ataxias: Results of the EuroSCA Fall Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

To investigate the frequency, details, and consequences of falls in patients with autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias\\u000a (SCAs) and to derive specific disease-related risk factors that are associated with an increased fall frequency. Two hundred\\u000a twenty-eight patients with SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, or SCA6, recruited from the EuroSCA natural history study, completed a fall questionnaire\\u000a that assessed the frequency, consequences, and several

Ella M. R. Fonteyn; Tanja Schmitz-Hübsch; Carla C. Verstappen; Laslo Baliko; Bastiaan R. Bloem; Silvia Boesch; Lisa Bunn; Perrine Charles; Alexandra Dürr; Allesandro Filla; Paola Giunti; Christoph Globas; Thomas Klockgether; Bela Melegh; Massimo Pandolfo; Anna De Rosa; Ludger Schöls; Dagmar Timmann; Marten Munneke; Berry P. H. Kremer

2010-01-01

460

Diagnostic Accuracy of Fall Risk Assessment Tools in People With Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy  

PubMed Central

Background Diabetic peripheral neuropathy affects nearly half of individuals with diabetes and leads to increased fall risk. Evidence addressing fall risk assessment for these individuals is lacking. Objective The purpose of this study was to identify which of 4 functional mobility fall risk assessment tools best discriminates, in people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, between recurrent “fallers” and those who are not recurrent fallers. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted. Setting The study was conducted in a medical research university setting. Participants The participants were a convenience sample of 36 individuals between 40 and 65 years of age with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Measurements Fall history was assessed retrospectively and was the criterion standard. Fall risk was assessed using the Functional Reach Test, the Timed “Up & Go” Test, the Berg Balance Scale, and the Dynamic Gait Index. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios, and overall diagnostic accuracy were calculated for each fall risk assessment tool. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to estimate modified cutoff scores for each fall risk assessment tool; indexes then were recalculated. Results Ten of the 36 participants were classified as recurrent fallers. When traditional cutoff scores were used, the Dynamic Gait Index and Functional Reach Test demonstrated the highest sensitivity at only 30%; the Dynamic Gait Index also demonstrated the highest overall diagnostic accuracy. When modified cutoff scores were used, all tools demonstrated improved sensitivity (80% or 90%). Overall diagnostic accuracy improved for all tests except the Functional Reach Test; the Timed “Up & Go” Test demonstrated the highest diagnostic accuracy at 88.9%. Limitations The small sample size and retrospective fall history assessment were limitations of the study. Conclusions Modified cutoff scores improved diagnostic accuracy for 3 of 4 fall risk assessment tools when testing people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

Pohl, Patricia S.; Mahnken, Jonathan D.; Kluding, Patricia M.

2012-01-01

461

Improving internal medicine residents' falls assessment and evaluation: an interdisciplinary, multistrategy program.  

PubMed

Falls are a major problem in older adults, and physicians receive inadequate training in falls evaluation. A multicomponent program (lecture, academic detailing, and case studies) was implemented to enhance medical residents' knowledge, skills, decisions, and interventions made about falls as part of a larger project to improve assessment and care of older adults. Electronic medical record (EMR) template modifications provided cues and reminders, decision support, and documentation into the visit note. Nursing staff and the EMR prompted residents to evaluate patients with a history of falls. Knowledge and confidence were assessed using a pre- and postintervention questionnaire, and an attending physician assessed skills by direct observation of the Timed Up and Go Test (TUG). Effect on clinical actions was assessed using the EMR database. Participation in training of faculty and staff was high. Over the 3-month intervention period, an attending physician reviewed the detailing sheet outlining important points of the training with 86% of residents, and 64% demonstrated a TUG to an attending physician. Of 895 older adults seen, 15% (134) had a positive screen for falls, of whom 92% (123) had an EMR falls template completed, and 42% (56) had a TUG performed. Of the patients evaluated with the TUG, 53% (29) failed. A review of charts for patients who failed the screen or TUG revealed that the majority had special circumstances limiting their participation, even after a physical therapy evaluation. Education and system changes facilitated improvements in resident knowledge, skill, self-efficacy, and clinical action in screening, evaluating, and managing falls in older adults. PMID:21883104

Caton, Cathryn; Wiley, M Kathleen; Zhao, Yumin; Moran, William P; Zapka, Jane

2011-08-24

462

[Cautious gait and fear of falling in the elderly].  

PubMed

Falls are common in the elderly, and fear of falling is widely prevalent. This review emphasizes some of the defensive adaptations that occur in relation to concern about balance, and the phenomenon of cautious gait and fear of falling. Fear of falling affects those who never fall as well as those who do. Anxiety and fear can profoundly influence motor performance, resulting in a timid gait. However, fear of falling can take a more pathological turn and negate its survival value. Comorbid conditions associated with fear of falling appear to be similar to those responsible for falls. A fall evaluation should always include an assessment of fear of falling. All these conditions should be viewed as reversible causes of gait failure in the elderly. A number of interventions can help alleviate fear of falling and improve confidence. PMID:11759389

Aizen, E

2001-11-01

463