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1

Development and validation of a Chinese version of the Falls Efficacy Scale International.  

PubMed

The FES-I is an instrument developed to assess concern about falls. The aim of this study was to develop a Chinese version of the 16-item Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I(Ch)) and evaluate its structure, measurement properties and convergent and predictive validity. The FES-I(Ch) was developed following the recommended 10-step protocol. The FES-I(Ch) was then administered to 399 community-dwelling Chinese older people (61-93 years) in conjunction with a range of other socio-demographic, physical, medical and functional measures. Falls were prospectively monitored over 12 months. Sub-samples were reassessed for determination of the FES-I(Ch)'s test-retest and inter-rater reliability. The overall structure and measurement properties of the FES-I(Ch), as evaluated with factor analysis and item-total correlations, was good. Internal consistency was excellent (Cronbach's ?=0.94), as was test-retest and inter-rater reliability (ICC(3,1)=0.89 and ICC(2,1)=0.95 respectively). FES-I(Ch) scores were significantly higher in participants with poor physical performance, depression, medical conditions associated with falls and disability indicating acceptable congruent validity. FES-I(Ch) scores did not differ between those who did and did not fall in the 12-month follow-up period. We found that the FES-I(Ch) is a valid and reliable measure of concern about falls in Chinese older people. The relatively high level on concern (high FES-I(Ch) scores) as well as relatively few prospective falls may explain the lack of association between FES-I(Ch) scores and falls in this population. Future studies should explore the FES-I(Ch)'s responsiveness to change over time and during intervention studies. PMID:23116978

Kwan, Marcella M S; Tsang, William W N; Close, Jacqueline C T; Lord, Stephen R

2013-01-01

2

Relation of falls efficacy scale (FES) to quality of life among nursing home female residents with comparatively intact cognitive function in Japan.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation of the Falls Efficacy Scale (FES) to quality of life (QOL) among nursing home residents. The subjects were 133 institutionalized women aged 70 years or older. They had comparatively intact cognitive function, with a Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score of 15 or more, and could provide sufficient informed consent for a questionnaire survey. We evaluated their age, height, weight, body-mass index, history of hip fracture, history of fall(s) within the past year, complicating conditions, MMSE, Medical Outcomes Study 8-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-8), FES, and their subscores for Functional Independence Measure (FIM) motor items (self care, sphincter control, transfer, locomotion). There was a significant relationship between the Physical Component Summary (PCS) of SF-8 and FES. In each subscale, FES showed significant relations that were especially close in physical functioning (PF) and role physical (RP), with those relations proving stronger than those of the subscores of transfer and locomotion. In conclusion, the present results suggested that taking account of mental confidence is important for physical QOL, and that falls self-efficacy, including not only physical activity per se but also mental confidence, should be given prominence in the physical QOL of the institutionalized elderly. PMID:18807292

Kato, Chikako; Ida, Kunio; Kawamura, Morio; Nagaya, Masahiro; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Harada, Atsushi

2008-03-01

3

The Effects of Obesity on Fall Efficacy in Elderly People  

PubMed Central

[Purpose] The aim of this study was to identify the effects of obesity on falls as a practical verification of the importance of obesity-targeting interventions as part of future fall prevention programs. [Subjects and Methods] The study involved 351 elderly people (172 men, 179 women) living in rural areas. The dependent variable, fall efficacy, was measured using the Falls Efficacy Scale, while the independent variables, body mass index (BMI) and visceral fat, were measured using the InBody 720. The Faces Pain Scale was used to measure pain. Mobility was measured using the Timed Up and Go Test, and balance ability was measured according to the duration subjects could stand on one foot with their eyes closed. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was performed for the final data analysis. [Results] Investigation of the correlations between the variables revealed a negative correlation between fall efficacy and the other variables. Ultimatley, investigation of the causality of fall efficacy revealed that the BMI, pain, and mobility were influential factors. In other words, fall efficacy tends to be lower when there are higher degrees of obesity, increased pain, and decreased mobility. [Conclusion] To improve the fall efficacy of elderly people living in rural areas, pain management and the maintenance of physical functionality are required. The present study confirms that the elderly need continuous obesity management to lead healthy lives. PMID:24396217

Jeon, Byoung-Jin

2013-01-01

4

Assessment of fall-related self-efficacy and activity avoidance in people with Parkinson's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Fear of falling (FOF) is common in Parkinson's disease (PD), and it is considered a vital aspect of comprehensive balance assessment in PD. FOF can be conceptualized differently. The Falls-Efficacy Scale (FES) assesses fall-related self-efficacy, whereas the Survey of Activities and Fear of Falling in the Elderly (SAFFE) assesses activity avoidance due to the risk of falling. This study

Maria H Nilsson; Anna-Maria Drake; Peter Hagell

2010-01-01

5

The Relationship between Falls Efficacy and Improvement in Fall Risk Factors Following an Exercise Plus Educational Intervention for Older Adults with Hip Osteoarthritis  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Purpose: Older adults with decreased confidence in their ability to prevent a fall may benefit from an exercise programme that includes self-efficacy-enhancing education. The objectives of this study were to explore differences in fall-risk outcomes in older adults with higher vs. lower levels of falls efficacy and to evaluate the relationship between baseline falls-efficacy status and changes in fall risk factors following two interventions. Method: Fifty-four older adults with hip osteoarthritis and at least one risk factor for falls received aquatic exercise twice weekly plus education once weekly (EE) or aquatic exercise only, twice weekly (EO), for 11 weeks. Results: EE participants with low baseline falls efficacy demonstrated significantly (p<0.05) greater improvement in balance and falls efficacy compared to EE participants with high baseline falls efficacy. In the EE group only, baseline falls-efficacy status (low vs. high median split on the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale) was significantly (p<0.05) correlated with positive balance and falls-efficacy change scores (Spearman rank r=0.45 and 0.63 respectively). Conclusions: Individuals with one or more fall-risk factors and low falls efficacy may benefit from receiving an intervention that combines exercise with self-efficacy-enhancing education. Falls-efficacy screening may be important for decisions regarding referral to fall-prevention programmes. PMID:22942514

Faulkner, R.A.; Gyurcsik, N.C.

2011-01-01

6

Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Risk Factors for Falls, Fear of Falling, and Falls Efficacy in a Cohort of Middle-Aged African Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to cross- sectionally and longitudinally identify risk factors for falls, fear of falling, and falls efficacy in late-middle- aged African Americans. Design and Methods: We performed in-home assessments on a probability sample of 998 African Americans and conducted two annual follow-up interviews. Multiple logistic regression modeled the associations with falls (any fall or

Elena M. Andresen; Fredric D. Wolinsky; J. Philip Miller; Margaret-Mary G. Wilson; Theodore K. Malmstrom; Douglas K. Miller

7

Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Risk Factors for Falls, Fear of Falling, and Falls Efficacy in a Cohort of Middle-Aged African Americans  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to cross-sectionally and longitudinally identify risk factors for falls, fear of falling, and falls efficacy in late-middle-aged African Americans. Design and Methods: We performed in-home assessments on a probability sample of 998 African Americans and conducted two annual follow-up interviews. Multiple…

Anderson, Elena M.; Wolinsky, Fredric D.; Miller, J. Phillip; Wilson, Margaret-Mary G.; Malmstrom, Theodore K.; Miller, Douglas K.

2006-01-01

8

Falls efficacy and self-rated health in older African American adults.  

PubMed

Fear of falling and mobility restrictions have a significant negative impact on the quality of life of older adults. Because older African American adults are at increased risk for various modifiable health problems, understanding potential constraints on their overall health and mobility is critical in this population. The current study investigated this issue by analyzing a dataset of 449 older African American adults (mean age=72.3 years) living in Detroit. We characterized and investigated the relationships among the following falls- and health-related variables: previous falls, falls efficacy, mobility, self-rated health (SRH), and depression and well-being. As a whole, participants reported moderate health and well-being, little depression, few mobility problems (mean=8.4/40), and very high falls efficacy (mean=94.9/100) despite the fact that a quarter of the sample experienced a fall within the past year. Correlation results indicated that previous falls, falls efficacy, mobility, SRH and depression and well-being were all inter-related. Regression analyses revealed that higher falls efficacy was more closely associated with better SRH than was having previously fallen. Findings suggest that improving falls efficacy in older African American adults may be beneficial to their mobility and overall health and well-being. Further, by asking a single-item SRH question, clinicians may be able to quickly identify older African American adults who have low falls efficacy and are at high risk for falling. PMID:24063870

Tiernan, Chad; Lysack, Cathy; Neufeld, Stewart; Goldberg, Allon; Lichtenberg, Peter A

2014-01-01

9

Fear of falling, fall-related self-efficacy, anxiety and depression in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine the risk and frequency of falls, prevalence of fear of falling and activity avoidance, the magnitude of fall-related self-efficacy, and anxiety and depression in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.Design and settings: A cross-sectional study in patients with a diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who visited a lung clinic at a university hospital in Sweden.Subjects: Successive

Karin Hellström; Birgit Vahlberg; Charlotte Urell; Margareta Emtner

2009-01-01

10

Development of a Career Task Self-Efficacy Scale: The Kuder Task Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study consisted of developing the Kuder Task Self-Efficacy Scale (KTSES). The KTSES is a 30-item scale measuring a person's self-efficacy for tasks corresponding to Kuder's 10 occupational interest areas (Kuder Zytowski, 1991). Responses from the KTSES were compared with responses to the Self-Esteem Inventory (SES; Rosenberg, 1965) and the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale (CDMSE; Taylor Betz, 1983) to

Jennifer L. Lucas; Connie R. Wanberg; Donald G. Zytowski

1997-01-01

11

Development of Physics Self-Efficacy Scale  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this article, we describe development of a Physics Self-Efficacy Scale (PSES) that is a self-administered measure to assess physics self-efficacy beliefs regarding one's ability to successfully perform physics tasks in physics classroom. The scale is initially composed of 56 items prepared following a brief scrutiny of relating literature on self-efficacy. It was initially administered 30 physics teacher candidates and was also examined by 6 experts of physics education, then ambiguous or incomprehensible 6 items were dismissed. This PSES was tested on 558 undergraduate students all completed fundamental physics courses. Cronbach's Alpha reliability coefficient of the PSES was calculated as 0.94. The final version of the PSES contained 30 items with 5 dimensions namely, 1. Self-efficacy towards solving physics problems, 2. Self-efficacy towards physics laboratory, 3. Self-efficacy towards learning physics, 4. Self-efficacy towards application of physics knowledge and 5. Self-efficacy towards memorizing physics knowledge.

Çali?kan, Serap; Selçuk, Gamze S.; Erol, Mustafa

2007-04-01

12

The effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation integration pattern exercise program on the fall efficacy and gait ability of the elders with experienced fall.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of exercising program utilizing proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation integration pattern (PIP), which is effective in improvement of the physical function, on the fall efficacy and gait ability of the elders who experienced injuries from falls. Also, this study aims to investigate he applicability of exercise program as methods for fall reoccurrence prevention and physical functions enhancement. The subjects of the study were 30 elders in the local community with experience of injuries from falls. The period of the study was 4 weeks with 12 exercise sessions. The subjects were randomly allocated to 2 groups where 15 elders were allocated to PIP and the rest 15 elders were allocated to general exercise (GE) group. Fall efficacy scale (FES) and GAITRite were used for the measurements in this study. Paired t-test was used to analyze the differences within the group while independent t-test was used to analyze the difference between two groups. In the comparison of measurements before and after exercise program, FES, velocity, cadence, and stride length were shown to be significantly increased in both PIP group and GE group. Also, in the comparison between two groups after the exercise program, the measurements of FES, cadence, stride length, and step length in PIP group were shown to be significantly increased compared to the GE group. Therefore, the PNF combined pattern is judged to be applicable to as methods for fall reoccurrence prevention and physical functions enhancement of the elders with experience of being fallen. PMID:25210699

Song, Hyun-Seung; Park, Seong-Doo; Kim, Jin-Young

2014-08-01

13

Clinical relevance of the Humpty Dumpty Falls Scale in a pediatric specialty hospital.  

PubMed

The Joint Commission requires pediatric hospitals to implement fall prevention programs and evaluate the efficacy of such programs. The Humpty Dumpty Falls Scale (HDFS), a seven-item assessment scale used to document age, gender, diagnosis, cognitive impairments, environmental factors, response to surgery/sedation, and medication usage, is one of several instruments developed to assess fall risk in pediatric patients. To determine the specificity and sensitivity of the HDFS in predicting falls in children hospitalized for pediatric specialty care, a team at a pediatric specialty hospital conducted a nonexperimental retrospective study that used a matched case-control design and chart review analysis. The discoveries suggest that the HDFS lacks accuracy in pediatric specialty patients. Using the HDFS cut-off score of 12 and above to indicate a high risk for falls in these children yields a high false-positive rate. Investigators and staff at pediatric specialty hospitals need to continue their pursuit of valid instruments and tools that contribute to fall reduction. PMID:25134228

Pauley, Barbara J; Houston, L Susan; Cheng, Dunlei; Johnston, Darla M

2014-01-01

14

Using Canonical Commonality Analysis to Examine the Predictive Quality of Aging and Falls Efficacy on Balance Functioning in Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: The effects of important variables measuring the psychobiological aspects of falls among older adults were considered to determine their utility in predicting balance functioning among older adults. To partition the effects of aging and falls efficacy on balance and leg strength simultaneously, canonical commonality analysis (CCA) was used. Methods: CCA is a multivariate technique which decomposes squared semipartial correlation

Michael Stellefson; John F. Yannessa; Gregory F. Martel

2012-01-01

15

The Early Intervention Parenting Self-Efficacy Scale (EIPSES): Scale Construction and Initial Psychometric Evidence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The psychometric properties of an instrument designed to measure parenting efficacy within the context of early intervention, the Early Intervention Parenting Self-Efficacy Scale (EIPSES), were explored. One hundred seventeen caregivers of children receiving early intervention services completed the 20-item EIPSES. The scale was reduced to 16…

Guimond, Amy B.; Wilcox, M. Jeanne; Lamorey, Suzanne G.

2008-01-01

16

A Factor Analysis of the Research Self-Efficacy Scale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Counseling professionals' and counseling psychology students' interest in performing research seems to be waning. Identifying the impediments to graduate students' interest and participation in research is important if systematic efforts to engage them in research are to succeed. The Research Self-Efficacy Scale (RSES) was designed to measure…

Bieschke, Kathleen J.; And Others

17

Rating Scale Analysis and Psychometric Properties of the Caregiver Self-Efficacy Scale for Transfers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Parents and caregivers faced with the challenges of transferring children with disability are at risk of musculoskeletal injuries and/or emotional stress. The Caregiver Self-Efficacy Scale for Transfers (CSEST) is a 14-item questionnaire that measures self-efficacy for transferring under common conditions. The CSEST yields reliable data and valid…

Cipriani, Daniel J.; Hensen, Francine E.; McPeck, Danielle L.; Kubec, Gina L. D.; Thomas, Julie J.

2012-01-01

18

Rating scale analysis and psychometric properties of the Caregiver Self-Efficacy Scale for Transfers.  

PubMed

Parents and caregivers faced with the challenges of transferring children with disability are at risk of musculoskeletal injuries and/or emotional stress. The Caregiver Self-Efficacy Scale for Transfers (CSEST) is a 14-item questionnaire that measures self-efficacy for transferring under common conditions. The CSEST yields reliable data and valid inferences; however, its rating scale structure has not been evaluated for utility. The aims of this study were to evaluate the category response structure of the CSEST, test the utility of a revised rating scale structure, and confirm its psychometric properties. The Rasch Measurement Model was used for all analyses. Subjects included 175 adult caregivers recruited from multiple communities. Results confirm that a revised five-category rating scale structure yields reliable data and valid inferences. Given the relationship between self-efficacy and risk of physical and/or emotional stress, measuring parental self-efficacy for transfers is a proactive process in rehabilitation. PMID:22712478

Cipriani, Daniel J; Hensen, Francine E; McPeck, Danielle L; Kubec, Gina L D; Thomas, Julie J

2012-11-01

19

Implementing a Humpty Dumpty FallsScale & Prevention Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

3 afety in hospitals is a continuous focus and concern for healthcare providers. Patients are exposed to multitudes of tests, medications and a new and unfamiliar environment. These new exposures, coupled with the patient's diagnosis and current mental status, provides an arena for multiple safety concerns. Safety issues especially of concern are medical errors and falls risk. Moreover, the Joint

Maria Lina; Deborah Hill-Rodriguez; Dania Vasquez; Deborah Salani; Patricia R. Messmer; Maria E. Soto; Maryann Henry; Cheryl Minick

20

The Scale Structure of Multi-Scale Measures: Application of the Split-Scale Method to the Task Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale and the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study evaluated the internal structure of two translated multiple-scale questionnaires: the Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale (TSOSS; Osipow, Temple, & Rooney, 1993) and the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale (CDMSE; Taylor & Betz, 1983). Data were obtained during a pilot study for testing the Hebrew versions of the TSOSS and the CDMSE. Cluster analysis applied to the split scales was

Itamar Gati; Samuel H. Osipow; Naomi Fassa

1994-01-01

21

Evaluation of falls by inpatients in an acute care hospital in Korea using the Morse Fall Scale.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to determine the cut-off values of the Korean version of the Morse Fall Scale (MFS-K) that would be most useful in identifying hospitalized patients at risk of falls in an acute-care setting in Korea. This study was conducted using the medical records of 66 patients who fell and 100 patients who did not fall (no-fall patients) sampled from inpatients hospitalized at a tertiary acute-care hospital in Seoul during the period from 1 January to 30 November 2009. The optimal cut-off point for the MFS-K was found to be 45 points, which produced an acceptable sensitivity and a fairly good specificity, negative predictive value and accuracy. The highest peak on the receiver operating characteristic curve was a cut-off score of 45 points in the MFS-K. Further research needs to be performed to determine the optimal cut-off score according to subjects' conditions through daily measurement with the MFS in medical or surgical patients who are relatively homogeneous in terms of individual and disease-related factors. PMID:24118515

Sung, Yung Hee; Cho, Myung Sook; Kwon, In Gak; Jung, Yoen Yi; Song, Mi Ra; Kim, Kyunghee; Won, Sungho

2014-10-01

22

Brief Psychometric Analysis of the Self-Efficacy Parent Report Scale (SEPRS)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Self-Efficacy Parent-Report Scale was designed to assess parent perceptions of self-efficacy of their children aged 7 to 17 years. Internal aspects of validity indicated a marginal fit of the data to the unidimensional model. External facets of validity indicated the Self-Efficacy Parent-Report Scale had excellent convergent and discriminant…

Erford, Bradley T.; Gavin, Kate

2013-01-01

23

The Factorial Validity of the Teacher Interpersonal Self-Efficacy Scale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study tested the factorial validity of the Teacher Interpersonal Self-Efficacy Scale, which measures teachers' self-efficacy beliefs regarding the interpersonal domain of their functioning. The scale includes three subscales to assess teacher perceived self-efficacy in (1) managing student behavior in the classroom, (2) eliciting support from…

Brouwers, Andre; Tomic, Welko

24

Brief Psychometric Analysis of the Self-Efficacy Teacher Report Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study provides preliminary analysis of reliability and validity of scores on the Self-Efficacy Teacher Report Scale, which was designed to assess teacher perceptions of self-efficacy of students aged 8 to 17 years. (Contains 3 tables.)

Erford, Bradley T.; Duncan, Kelly; Savin-Murphy, Janet

2010-01-01

25

Efficacy of falls prevention interventions: protocol for a systematic review and network meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Falls are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in older adults. Although numerous trials of falls prevention interventions have been completed, there is extensive variation in their intervention components and clinical context, such that the key elements of an effective falls prevention program remain unclear to patients, clinicians, and policy-makers. Our objective is to identify the most effective interventions and combinations of interventions that prevent falls though a systematic review and meta-analysis, including a network meta-analysis. Methods/Design We will search for published (e.g., MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Ageline) and unpublished (e.g., trial registries, dissertations) randomised clinical trials (RCTs) in all languages examining interventions to prevent falls compared to usual care or other falls prevention interventions among adults aged ?65 years from all settings (e.g., community, acute care, long-term care, and rehabilitation). The primary outcomes are number of injurious falls and number of hospitalizations due to falls. Secondary outcomes include falls rate, number of fallers, number of emergency room visits due to falls, number of physician visits due to falls, number of fractures, costs, and number of intervention-related harms (e.g., muscle soreness related to exercise). We will calibrate our eligibility criteria amongst the team and two independent team members will screen the literature search results in duplicate. Conflicts will be resolved through team discussion. A similar process will be used for data abstraction and quality appraisal with the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Our results will be synthesized descriptively and a random effects meta-analysis will be conducted if the studies are deemed methodologically, clinically, and statistically (e.g., I2<60%) similar. If appropriate, a network meta-analysis will be conducted, which will allow the comparison of interventions that have not been compared in head-to-head RCTs, as well as the effectiveness of interventions. Discussion We will identify the most effective interventions and combinations of interventions that prevent falls in older people. Our results will be used to optimize falls prevention strategies, and our goal is to ultimately improve the health of seniors internationally. Trial registration PROSPERO registry number: CRD42013004151 PMID:23738619

2013-01-01

26

Fall detection and classifications based on time-scale radar signal characteristics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Unattended catastrophic falls result in risk to the lives of elderly. There are growing efforts and rising interest in detecting falls of the aging population, especially those living alone. Radar serves as an effective non-intrusive sensor for detecting human activities. For radar to be effective, it is important to achieve low false alarms, i.e., the system can reliably differentiate between a fall and other human activities. In this paper, we discuss the time-scale based signal analysis of the radar returns from a human target. Reliable features are extracted from the scalogram and are used for fall classifications. The classification results and the advantages of using a wavelet transform are discussed.

Gadde, Ajay; Amin, Moeness G.; Zhang, Yimin D.; Ahmad, Fauzia

2014-05-01

27

Isokinetic performance in low back pain patients: The predictive power of the Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Self-Efficacy Scale (SES) has been found to predict isokinetic performance better than anthropometric variables. This study tests the predictive power of SES further against other measures of efficacy expectancies as well as measures of depression and perceived disability. A group of 105 chronic back pain patients was administered Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI), SES, the Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ), and

K. K. Kaivanto; A.-M. Estlander; G. B. Moneta; H. Vanharanta

1995-01-01

28

RCAH291-01 Creative Workshop: The Music of Southern Appalachia Fall 2011 Professor Chris Scales  

E-print Network

, country, folk and protest music), its connection with American leftist politics in the 20th century music through the memorization of chords, melodies, and lyrics of a wide variety of well-known (and some1 RCAH291-01 Creative Workshop: The Music of Southern Appalachia Fall 2011 Professor Chris Scales M

Liu, Taosheng

29

RCAH192-03 The Anthropology of Music Fall 2012 Professor Chris Scales  

E-print Network

and explain the possible links between musical aesthetics (artistic practice) and social ethics (cultural1 RCAH192-03 The Anthropology of Music Fall 2012 Professor Chris Scales W 12:40 ­ 2:30 pm C320J: Students of this class will learn about the basic musical elements of several musical traditions from

Liu, Taosheng

30

Career Assessment and the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article begins with a brief overview of the theories underlying the development of the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale (CDMSE; Taylor & Betz, 1983), specifically Bandura's self-efficacy (1977, 1986) theory and Crites's career maturity theory (1978). Research on the correlates and consequences of career decision- making self-efficacy is reviewed, especially that showing the strong relationships of career self-efficacy to career

Nancy E. Betz; Darrell Anthony Luzzo

1996-01-01

31

Invited Reaction: Development and Exploratory Validation of an Organizational Efficacy Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents the author's comments on James G. Bohn's article "Development and Exploratory Validation of an Organizational Efficacy Scale". In his article, Bohn has captured a deficiency, as he quotes, of "over two decades" in the human resource development (HRD) field. Since no scale has been designed specifically to measure efficacy at…

Decker, Carol A.

2010-01-01

32

[Morse Fall Scale: translation and transcultural adaptation for the Portuguese language].  

PubMed

The study aimed to translate and adapt the Morse Fall Scale from English into the Portuguese language. This was performed in seven steps: authorization by the author of the scale; translation into Portuguese; evaluation and structuring of the translated scale; reverse translation into English; evaluation and validation of the scale by a committee of experts; evaluation of clarity of items and operational definitions with 45 professionals; evaluation of agreement between raters and the reliability of reproducibility, related to data from the evaluation of 90 patients, performed by four evaluators/judges. The clarity of the scale was considered very satisfactory, with a confidence interval of 73.0% to 100% in the option very clear. For the concordance of responses, the results showed Kappa coefficients of approximately 0.80 or higher. It was concluded that the adaptation of the scale was successful, indicating that its use is appropriate for the population of Brazilian patients. PMID:24601131

de Urbanetto, Janete Souza; Creutzberg, Marion; Franz, Flávia; Ojeda, Beatriz Sebben; da Gustavo, Andreia Silva; Bittencourt, Hélio Radke; Steinmetz, Quézia Lidiane; Farina, Veronica Alacarini

2013-06-01

33

Development and Validation of the Counselor Activity Self-Efficacy Scales  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Counselor Activity Self-Efficacy Scales were developed to assess self-efficacy for performing helping skills, managing the counseling process, and handling challenging counseling situations. Factor analyses of data from 345 students in undergraduate and graduate counseling courses yielded 6 factors. Factor-derived scale scores produced adequate internal consistency and short-term test-retest reliability estimates. The scale scores were strongly related to scores on

Robert W. Lent; Clara E. Hill; Mary Ann Hoffman

2003-01-01

34

Development of a cultural self-efficacy scale for adolescents (CSES-A)  

Microsoft Academic Search

We developed a cultural self-efficacy scale for adolescents (CSES-A) and tested its psychometric properties using both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Cultural self-efficacy (CSE) was defined as person's perception of his\\/her own capability to function effectively in situations characterized by cultural diversity. On the basis of Bandura's guideline for the development of a domain-specific self-efficacy measure, we tailored 50 items

Elena Briones; Carmen Tabernero; Carlo Tramontano; Gian Vittorio Caprara; Alicia Arenas

2009-01-01

35

Development and Use of the Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents the rationale for the development of a skill- oriented career self-efficacy scale. It is believed that self-perceptions of these career self-efficacies at a skill-specific level can enable us to better study and understand the role of career self-efficacy beliefs in the career assessment and career development process. The procedures followed in the development of the instrument are

Samuel H. Osipow; Richard D. Temple

1996-01-01

36

Development and Validation of Scores on a Computer Programming Self-Efficacy Scale and Group Analyses of Novice Programmer Self-Efficacy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 32-item self-efficacy scale for computer programming was developed, primed to the C++ programming language. The scale was administered to 421 students at the beginning and end of an introductory course in C++ programming. There was growth in self-efficacy between two administrations of the scale 12 weeks apart, particularly for students who…

Ramalingam, Vennila; Wiedenbeck, Susan

1998-01-01

37

Development and Use of the Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a rationale for the development of the Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale and studies that have investigated its psychometric attributes. Describes it as a tool for identifying career areas in which individuals see themselves as strong and areas in which self-perception indicates lower self-efficacy beliefs. (SK)

Osipow, Samuel H.; Temple, Richard D.

1996-01-01

38

A Psychometric Evaluation of the Parent Self-Efficacy in Managing the Transition to School Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The psychometric properties of the Parent Self-efficacy in Managing the Transition to School Scale (PSMTSS) were investigated with a sample of 763 mothers whose children were starting primary school in Australia. Exploratory factor analysis identified two factors, Efficacy and Worry, accounting for 56.6% of the total variance in parent…

Giallo, Rebecca; Kienhuis, Mandy; Treyvaud, Karli; Matthews, Jan

2008-01-01

39

Examining the Factor Structure of the Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors examined the factor structure of the long and short forms of the Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale (TSES; M. Tschannen-Moran & A. Woolfolk-Hoy, 2001) for practicing (n = 102) and preservice teachers (n = 270), comparing the responses to both forms of the TSES, and looked for differences in teachers' efficacy with respect to experience…

Fives, Helenrose; Buehl, Michelle M.

2009-01-01

40

Using Mathematics in Teaching Science Self-Efficacy Scale--UMSSS: A Validity and Reliability Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, an instrument, Using Mathematics in Science Self-efficacy Scale (UMSSS), was developed in order to determine preservice science teachers' self-efficacy toward the use of mathematics in their lessons. Data gathered from 250 preservice science teachers were used for Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis…

Can, Bilge Taskin; Gunhan, Berna Canturk; Erdal, Sevinc Ongel

2012-01-01

41

Reliability of a Scale of Work-Related Self-Efficacy for People with Psychiatric Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Work-related self-efficacy at a core task level fits with the social cognitive career theory explaining the career development of people with severe mental illness. The aim of this study was to further investigate the psychometric properties of the "Work-related Self- Efficacy Scale" for use with people with psychiatric disabilities. Sixty…

Harris, Meredith

2010-01-01

42

Development of a Drug Use Resistance Self-Efficacy (DURSE) Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: To develop and evaluate psychometric properties of a new instrument, the drug use resistance self-efficacy (DURSE) scale, designed for young adolescents. Methods: Scale construction occurred in 3 phases: (1) initial development, (2) pilot testing of preliminary items, and (3) final scale administration among a sample of seventh graders…

Carpenter, Carrie M.; Howard, Donna

2009-01-01

43

Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale: A Predictive Validity Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using the social cognitive theory of career and academic behavior as a guide, we conducted a predictive validity study for the Quantitative and Verbal scales of the Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale (TSOSS). The Quantitative and Verbal TSOSS scale scores of a large group of undecided college freshmen were correlated with concurrent quantitative and verbal ability measures (SAT scores) and with

Kevin R. Kelly; Russell C. Nelson

1999-01-01

44

Evaluation of a Short Form of the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study describes the development and evaluation of a short form of the widely used Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale (CDMSE; Taylor & Betz, 1983). The psychometric characteristics and relationship to the Career Decision Scale (CDS; Osipow, 1987) and the Vocational Identity Scale (Holland, Johnston, & Asama, 1993) were examined in a sample of 180 college students. The potential utility of

Nancy E. Betz; Karla L. Klein; Karen M. Taylor

1996-01-01

45

Development and Validation of Chemistry Self-Efficacy Scale for College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study described the process of developing and validating the College Chemistry Self-Efficacy Scale (CCSS) that can be\\u000a used to assess college students’ beliefs in their ability to perform essential tasks in chemistry. In the first phase, data\\u000a collected from 363 college students provided evidence for the validity and reliability of the new scale. Three dimensions\\u000a emerged: self-efficacy for cognitive

Esen Uzuntiryaki; Ye?im Çapa Ayd?n

2009-01-01

46

Assessing and Improving the Factorial Structures of the Computer Self-Efficacy Scale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Computer Self-Efficacy Scale (CSE) developed by C. A. Murphy, D. Coover, and S. V. Owen (1989) is an instrument purported to assess computer-related competencies. Previous research into the factor structure of the CSE has yielded conflicting results. In this study, the scale was used to collect data from 216 graduate education students. A…

Moroz, Pauline A.; Nash, John B.

47

Study of the Validity and Reliability of a Self-Efficacy Scale of Teaching Material Utilization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The main purpose of this study is to develop a scale in order to detect the level of pre-service teachers' utilization from teaching materials based on their perception of self-efficacy. The sample group is composed of 439 students for the first application and 215 students for the second. In order to detect the validity of the scale, exploratory…

Korkmaz, Ozgen

2011-01-01

48

Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale: The Development and Validation of a Prototype.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 230-item Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale (OSES) was administered to 113 psychology and 88 journalism undergraduates, and analysis of the scale's psychometric characteristics were performed. Comparison with Betz and Hackett's OSES supported the feasibility and utility of a task-specific measure. (SK)

Rooney, Rebecca A.; Osipow, Samuel H.

1992-01-01

49

The Firefighter Coping Self-Efficacy Scale: measure development and validation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors evaluated the psychometric properties of the Firefighter Coping Self-Efficacy (FFCSE) Scale, a new measure developed to assess firefighters’ perceived competence in managing stressful and traumatic experiences encountered on the job. Two samples of firefighters completed the FFCSE Scale at two different time points. Exploratory factor analysis yielded a unidimensional structure, which was further supported with confirmatory factor analysis

Jessica E. Lambert; Charles C. Benight; Erica Harrison; Roman Cieslak

2011-01-01

50

The Firefighter Coping Self-Efficacy Scale: measure development and validation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors evaluated the psychometric properties of the Firefighter Coping Self-Efficacy (FFCSE) Scale, a new measure developed to assess firefighters’ perceived competence in managing stressful and traumatic experiences encountered on the job. Two samples of firefighters completed the FFCSE Scale at two different time points. Exploratory factor analysis yielded a unidimensional structure, which was further supported with confirmatory factor analysis

Jessica E. Lambert; Charles C. Benight; Erica Harrison; Roman Cieslak

2012-01-01

51

Development and Validation of the Efficacious Self-Presentation Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new self-report measure of adolescent's self-presentation is described. The self-report scale was administered to 760 16–19-year-old subjects. Results of a factor analysis supported 6 identifiable factors reflecting different concepts, theoretically discussed, related to self-presentation: ability to regulate self-image, social sensitivity, body self-confidence, social self-confidence, social openness, and social desirability. The scale showed good convergent validity and internal consistency. Assertive

Fiorenzo Laghi; Susanna Pallini; Maria D’Alessio; Roberto Baiocco

2011-01-01

52

Measuring the Efficacy of Leaders to Assess Information and Make Decisions in a Crisis: The C-LEAD Scale  

E-print Network

Based on literature and expert interviews, we developed the Crisis Leader Efficacy in Assessing and Deciding scale (C-LEAD) to capture the efficacy of leaders to assess information and make decisions in a public health and ...

Pittinsky, Todd L.

2009-07-01

53

HumanWildlife Interactions 5(2):198203, Fall 2011 Wildlife risk to aviation: a multi-scale  

E-print Network

Human­Wildlife Interactions 5(2):198­203, Fall 2011 Commentary Wildlife risk to aviation: a multi annually in the United States, as well as >200 human lives lost (Allan 2002, Dolbeer et al. 2010). Wildlife-scale issue requires a multi-scale solution JAMES A. MARTIN, Department of Wildlife, Fisheries

54

Development and validation of the Efficacious Self-Presentation Scale.  

PubMed

A new self-report measure of adolescent's self-presentation is described. The self-report scale was administered to 760 16-19-year-old subjects. Results of a factor analysis supported 6 identifiable factors reflecting different concepts, theoretically discussed, related to self-presentation: ability to regulate self-image, social sensitivity, body self-confidence, social self-confidence, social openness, and social desirability. The scale showed good convergent validity and internal consistency. Assertive tactics were predicted through ability to regulate self-image, social self-confidence, and social openness, whereas defensive tactics were predicted only through social openness and social sensitivity. The implications of the findings for future theoretical and empirical development of research in this field are discussed. PMID:21675548

Laghi, Fiorenzo; Pallini, Susanna; D'Alessio, Maria; Baiocco, Roberto

2011-01-01

55

Proposed Modifications to the Conceptual Model of Coaching Efficacy and Additional Validity Evidence for the Coaching Efficacy Scale II-High School Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine whether theoretically relevant sources of coaching efficacy could predict the measures derived from the Coaching Efficacy Scale II-High School Teams (CES II-HST). Data were collected from head coaches of high school teams in the United States (N = 799). The analytic framework was a multiple-group…

Myers, Nicholas; Feltz, Deborah; Chase, Melissa

2011-01-01

56

Similarity scaling of turbulence in a temperate lake during fall cooling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

quantified as the rate of dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy (?), was measured with 1400 temperature-gradient microstructure profiles obtained concurrently with time series measurements of temperature and current profiles, meteorology, and lake-atmosphere fluxes using eddy covariance in a 4 km2 temperate lake during fall cooling. Winds varied from near calm to 5 m s-1 but reached 10 m s-1 during three storm events. Near-surface values of ? were typically on the order of 10-8 to 10-7 m2 s-3 and reached 10-5 m2 s-3 during windy periods. Above a depth equal to |LMO|, the Monin-Obukhov length scale, turbulence was dominated by wind shear and dissipation followed neutral law of the wall scaling augmented by buoyancy flux during cooling. During cooling, ?z = 0.56 u*w3/kz + 0.77 JB0 and during heating ?z = 0.6 u*w3/kz, where u*w is the water friction velocity computed from wind shear stress, k is von Karman's constant, z is depth, and JB0 is surface buoyancy flux. Below a depth equal to |LMO| during cooling, dissipation was uniform with depth and controlled by buoyancy flux. Departures from similarity scaling enabled identification of additional processes that moderate near-surface turbulence including mixed layer deepening at the onset of cooling, high-frequency internal waves when the diurnal thermocline was adjacent to the air-water interface, and horizontal advection caused by differential cooling. The similarity scaling enables prediction of near-surface ? as required for estimating the gas transfer coefficient using the surface renewal model and for understanding controls on scalar transport.

Tedford, Edmund W.; MacIntyre, Sally; Miller, Scott D.; Czikowsky, Matthew J.

2014-08-01

57

The Development and Validation of the School-Based Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to develop and validate the School-Based Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale (SB-SES). Two hundred sixty-five (N = 265) licensed mental health professionals participated in this study. Fifty-eight percent of the participants reported experience working as a school-based counselor with the remaining 42% reporting no…

Boughfman, Erica M.

2010-01-01

58

Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale: A Predictive Validity Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Quantitative and verbal scores on the Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale (TSOSS) for 362 undecided freshmen were correlated with Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) scores and grade point average. Quantitative TSOSS scores correlated with SAT quantitative scores but did not predict quantitative academic performance. Verbal TSOSS scores…

Kelly, Kevin R.; Nelson, Russell C.

1999-01-01

59

Development of the Ethical and Legal Issues in Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors present the development of the Ethical and Legal Issues in Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale (ELICSES). The purpose of this article is threefold: (a) present a rationale for the ELICSES, (b) review statistical analysis procedures used to develop the ELICSES, and (c) offer implications for future research and counselor education.

Mullen, Patrick R.; Lambie, Glenn W.; Conley, Abigail H.

2014-01-01

60

A Scenario-Based Dieting Self-Efficacy Scale: The DIET-SE  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article discusses a scenario-based dieting self-efficacy scale, the DIET-SE, developed from dieter's inventory of eating temptations (DIET). The DIET-SE consists of items that describe scenarios of eating temptations for a range of dieting situations, including high-caloric food temptations. Four studies assessed the psychometric properties of…

Stich, Christine; Knauper, Barbel; Tint, Ami

2009-01-01

61

Translation and validation of the breastfeeding Self-Efficacy scale into chinese  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this methodological study was to translate the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale (BSES) into Mandarin and determine the psychometric characteristics among a sample of 186 Chinese women. The BSES was translated and pilot-tested with 21 breastfeeding women. Following minor revisions to ensure content and semantic equivalence, the instrument was administered to 186 hospitalized breastfeeding women, who were then contacted

Xiaona Dai; Cindy-Lee Dennis

2003-01-01

62

The Psychometric Properties of the Difficult Behavior Self-Efficacy Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study was designed to estimate the psychometric properties of Hastings and Brown's (2002a) Difficult Behavior Self-efficacy Scale. Participants were two samples of physical educators teaching in Korea (n = 229) and the United States (U.S.; n = 139). An initial translation of the questionnaire to Korean and pilot study were conducted along with…

Oh, Hyun-Kyoung; Kozub, Francis M.

2010-01-01

63

The Development of a Scale to Measure the Self-Efficacy of School Library Media Specialists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the development and field-testing of an instrument for measuring the way school library media specialists view themselves in relation to their roles and responsibilities, based on guidelines in "Information Power." Locus of control is discussed, and further revisions of the self-efficacy scale based on field-testing are explained. (16…

Carson, C. Herbert

1993-01-01

64

Reliability Generalization: An Examination of the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to explore the variability in reliability scores on a commonly used career scale, the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale (CDMSE). Reliability generalization was employed to identify typical score reliability, variability of score reliability, and variables explaining this variability. Forty-nine pieces of work were examined, and the results revealed that 41% of them reported score

Johanna E. Nilsson; Christa K. Schmidt; William D. Meek

2002-01-01

65

Self-Efficacy Scale for Weight Loss among Multi-Ethnic Women of Lower Income: A Psychometric Evaluation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This study examined test-retest reliability, internal consistency, and construct and predictive validity of the Physical Activity and Nutrition Self-Efficacy (PANSE) scale, an 11-item instrument to assess weight-loss self-efficacy among postpartum women of lower income. Methods: Seventy-one women completed the PANSE scale and…

Latimer, Lara; Walker, Lorraine O.; Kim, Sunghun; Pasch, Keryn E.; Sterling, Bobbie Sue

2011-01-01

66

A novel Medical Achievement Self-efficacy Scale (MASS): a valid and reliable tool.  

PubMed

In search for an instrument to measure overall curriculum impact, we developed a Medical Achievement Self-efficacy Scale (MASS) and presented it to medical students enrolled in the different years of the integrated Ghent curriculum. The research aim was to study the validity and reliability of this new scale. MASS items were constructed based on the end terms of the Ghent curriculum, as it is related to the general competency frameworks of CanMEDs and the Five-star Doctor. The scale includes at least two items for each CanMEDS competency domain. Items were examined by seven experts in view of content and face validity. This resulted in an MASS version, containing 18 items, to be rated on a five-point Likert scale. This version was piloted on 94 undergraduate medical students enrolled at the Catholic University of Leuven. The final version was presented to 1066 undergraduate medical students enrolled at Ghent University. Reliability of the MASS scale was high (?=0.89). As expected, self-efficacy scores increased significantly over the years (F=39.11, p<0.001). In view of determining predictive validity, regression analysis was carried out to predict students' academic achievement from self-efficacy scores. As expected, MASS scores significantly predicted Maastricht Progress Test scores (F=108.18, p<0.001). PMID:23701248

Turan, Sevgi; Valcke, Martin; De Maeseneer, Jan; Aper, Leen; Koole, Sebastiaan; De Wispelaere, Christine; Deketelaere, Ann; Derese, Anselme

2013-07-01

67

Development of, and initial validity evidence for, the referee self-efficacy scale: a multistudy report.  

PubMed

The purpose of this multistudy report was to develop, and then to provide initial validity evidence for measures derived from, the Referee Self-Efficacy Scale. Data were collected from referees (N = 1609) in the United States (n = 978) and Spain (n = 631). In Study 1 (n = 512), a single-group exploratory structural equation model provided evidence for four factors: game knowledge, decision making, pressure, and communication. In Study 2 (n = 1153), multiple-group confirmatory factor analytic models provided evidence for partial factorial invariance by country, level of competition, team gender, and sport refereed. In Study 3 (n = 456), potential sources of referee self-efficacy information combined to account for a moderate or large amount of variance in each dimension of referee self-efficacy with years of referee experience, highest level refereed, physical/mental preparation, and environmental comfort, each exerting at least two statistically significant direct effects. PMID:23204357

Myers, Nicholas D; Feltz, Deborah L; Guillén, Félix; Dithurbide, Lori

2012-12-01

68

Scale of health: indices of safety and efficacy in the evolving environment of large biological datasets.  

PubMed

The interdependent relationship between pharmacology and toxicology is fundamental to the concepts of efficacy and safety of both drugs and xenobiotics. The traditional concept of establishing efficacious and tolerated doses to define a 'therapeutic window' appears simplistic in the context of an exponentially increasing database on molecular mechanisms and cell biology that inform our understanding of homeostasis. Recent advances in nano medicine illustrate the convergence of efficacy and safety considerations that are central to establishing a clear pathway for regulatory review. The following overview considers biological responses to the administration of nanoparticles and the scale of balanced, within a range that might be considered 'normal', to unbalanced, abnormal responses associated with health and disease. PMID:24919930

Sayes, Christie M; Staats, Herman; Hickey, Anthony J

2014-09-01

69

An Examination of a Counsellor Self-Efficacy Scale (COSE) using an Israeli Sample  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explored the reliability and validity of a counsellor self-efficacy scale (the COSE) with an Israeli sample of\\u000a candidates seeking entry into a university graduate program in school counselling. The COSE measures were compared to measures\\u000a of self-monitoring and evaluation of adaptability to counselling studies that were determined before admission to the program.\\u000a Findings question the reliability of the

Moshe Israelashvili; Peretz Socher

2007-01-01

70

The Role of Self-Efficacy in HIV Treatment Adherence: Validation of the HIV Treatment Adherence Self-Efficacy Scale (HIV-ASES)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adherence to HIV treatment, including adherence to antiretroviral (ART) medication regimens, is paramount in the management\\u000a of HIV. Self-efficacy for treatment adherence has been identified as an important correlate of medication adherence in the\\u000a treatment of HIV and other medical conditions. This paper describes the validation of the HIV Treatment Adherence Self-Efficacy\\u000a Scale (HIV-ASES) with two samples of HIV+ adults

Mallory O. Johnson; Torsten B. Neilands; Samantha E. Dilworth; Stephen F. Morin; Robert H. Remien; Margaret A. Chesney

2007-01-01

71

A Job-Seeking Self-Efficacy Scale for People with Physical Disabilities: Preliminary Development and Psychometric Testing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Study sought to develop and conduct preliminary testing of the psychometric properties of a job-seeking self-efficacy (JSS) scale that reflected the experiences of people with physical disabilities. Greater job seeking self-efficacy and perceived ability to manage disability at interview were associated with more positive psychological well-being.…

Barlow, Julie; Wright, Chris; Cullen, Lesley

2002-01-01

72

Rasch Calibration of Physical Activity Self-Efficacy and Social Support Scale for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate the construct validity of the Self-Efficacy/Social Support for Activity for persons with Intellectual Disability (SE/SS-AID) scales developed by Peterson, Peterson, Lowe, & Nothwehr (2009). A total of 146 participants with intellectual disabilities completed 6 self-efficacy (SE) items and 18 social…

Lee, Miyoung; Peterson, Jana J.; Dixon, Alicia

2010-01-01

73

Item-level factor analysis of the Self-Efficacy Scale.  

PubMed

This study explores the internal structure of the Self-Efficacy Scale (SES) using item response analysis. The SES was previously translated into Swedish and modified to encompass all types of pain, not exclusively back pain. Data on perceived self-efficacy in 47 patients with subacute whiplash-associated disorders were derived from a previously conducted randomized-controlled trial. The item-level factor analysis was carried out using a six-step procedure. To further study the item inter-relationships and to determine the underlying structure empirically, the 20 items of the SES were also subjected to principal component analysis with varimax rotation. The analyses showed two underlying factors, named 'social activities' and 'physical activities', with seven items loading on each factor. The remaining six items of the SES appeared to measure somewhat different constructs and need to be analysed further. PMID:23995830

Bunketorp Käll, Lina

2014-03-01

74

A Psychometric Evaluation of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale with Korean Students: A Rasch Model Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale (CDSE) is one of the most frequently used in the field of career development and counseling. In this study, using the Rasch rating scale model analysis, the CDSE Scale was evaluated by the content, structural, and substantive aspects of validity in a sample of college students from South Korea. Overall, the…

Nam, Suk Kyung; Yang, Eunjoo; Lee, Sang Min; Lee, Sang Hee; Seol, Hyunsoo

2011-01-01

75

Preliminary Study of the Autism Self-Efficacy Scale for Teachers (ASSET)  

PubMed Central

The purpose of the current study was to evaluate a new measure, the Autism Self-Efficacy Scale for Teachers (ASSET) for its dimensionality, internal consistency, and construct validity derived in a sample of special education teachers (N = 44) of students with autism. Results indicate that all items reflect one dominant factor, teachers’ responses to items were internally consistent within the sample, and compared to a 100-point scale, a 6-point response scale is adequate. ASSET scores were found to be negatively correlated with scores on two subscale measures of teacher stress (i.e., self-doubt/need for support and disruption of the teaching process) but uncorrelated with teacher burnout scores. The ASSET is a promising tool that requires replication with larger samples. PMID:23976899

Ruble, Lisa A.; Toland, Michael D.; Birdwhistell, Jessica L.; McGrew, John H.; Usher, Ellen L.

2013-01-01

76

Return-to-Work Self-Efficacy: Development and Validation of a Scale in Claimants with Musculoskeletal Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction We report on the development and validation of a 10-item scale assessing self-efficacy within the return-to-work context,\\u000a the Return-to-Work Self-Efficacy (RTWSE) scale. Methods Lost-time claimants completed a telephone survey 1 month (n = 632) and 6 months (n = 446) after a work-related musculoskeletal injury. Exploratory (Varimax and Promax rotation) and confirmatory factor analyses\\u000a of self-efficacy items were conducted with two separate subsamples at both

Sandra Brouwer; Renée-Louise Franche; Sheilah Hogg-Johnson; Hyunmi Lee; Niklas Krause; William S. Shaw

2011-01-01

77

Inpatient Falls  

PubMed Central

In this 2 part series, analysis of the risk stratification tools that are available, definition for the scope of the problem, and potential solutions through a review of the literature are presented. A systematic review was used to identify articles for risk stratification and interventions. Three risk stratification systems are discussed, St Thomas’s Risk Assessment Tool in Falling Elderly Inpatients, Morse Fall Scale, and the Hendrich Fall Risk Model. Of these scoring systems, the Hendrich Fall Risk Model is the easiest to use and score. Predominantly, multifactorial interventions are used to prevent patient falls. Education and rehabilitation are common themes in studies with statistically significant results. The second article presents a guide to implementing a quality improvement project around hospital falls. A 10-step approach to Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycles is described. Specific examples of problems and analysis are easily applicable to any institution. Furthermore, the sustainability of interventions and targeting new areas for improvement is discussed. Although specific to falls in the hospitalized patient, the goal is to present a stepwise approach which is broadly applicable to other areas requiring quality improvement. PMID:24167647

Cumbler, Ethan U.; Simpson, Jennifer R.; Rosenthal, Laura D.; Likosky, David J.

2013-01-01

78

Efficacy of a multifaceted podiatry intervention to improve balance and prevent falls in older people: study protocol for a randomised trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Falls in older people are a major public health problem, with at least one in three people aged over 65 years falling each year. There is increasing evidence that foot problems and inappropriate footwear increase the risk of falls, however no studies have been undertaken to determine whether modifying these risk factors decreases the risk of falling. This article

Martin J Spink; Hylton B Menz; Stephen R Lord

2008-01-01

79

Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Teacher Efficacy Scale for Prospective Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Research on teacher self-efficacy has revealed substantive problems concerning the validity of instruments used to measure teacher self-efficacy beliefs. Although claims about the influence of teachers' self-efficacy beliefs on student achievement, success with curriculum innovation, and so on, may be true statements, one cannot make…

Denzine, Gypsy M.; Cooney, John B.; McKenzie, Rita

2005-01-01

80

The Role of Self-Efficacy in HIV Treatment Adherence: Validation of the HIV Treatment Adherence Self-Efficacy Scale (HIV-ASES)  

PubMed Central

Adherence to HIV treatment, including adherence to antiretroviral (ART) medication regimens, is paramount in the management of HIV. Self-efficacy for treatment adherence has been identified as an important correlate of medication adherence in the treatment of HIV and other medical conditions. This paper describes the validation of the HIV Treatment Adherence Self-Efficacy Scale (HIV-ASES) with two samples of HIV+ adults on ART. Factor analyses support subscales measuring Adherence Integration (eigenvalue = 6.12) and Adherence Perseverance (eigenvalue = 1.16), accounting for 61% of the variance in scale items. The HIV-ASES demonstrates robust internal consistency (?s > .90) and 3-month (rs > .70) and 15-month (rs > .40) test-retest reliability. Concurrent validity analyses revealed relationships with psychosocial measures, ART adherence, clinical status, and healthcare utilization. Findings support the use of the HIV-ASES and provide guidance for further investigation of adherence self-efficacy in the context of treatment for HIV and other diseases. PMID:17588200

Johnson, Mallory O.; Neilands, Torsten B.; Dilworth, Samantha; Morin, Stephen F.; Remien, Robert H.; Chesney, Margaret A.

2008-01-01

81

Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering Fall 2011 Small Scale Anaerobic Digestion by PENERGY Solutions  

E-print Network

as a model for potential use on small farms to benefit food production, both on plants and animals. This would provide a means for owners of small-scale and hobby farms to produce valuable food products: A mechanical anaerobic digester to handle organic farm waste. A complete biogas collection system with hook

Demirel, Melik C.

82

Translation and validation of the Hong Kong Chinese version of the breastfeeding self-efficacy scale-short form.  

PubMed

Healthcare providers do not have a validated instrument to measure breastfeeding self-efficacy among Hong Kong Chinese. In this study, we sought to translate the breastfeeding self-efficacy scale-short form (BSES-SF) into Hong Kong Chinese and to examine the psychometric properties in a sample of 185 breastfeeding mothers. The construct validity of the translated scale was supported by confirmatory factor analysis and known group analysis. The receiver operating characteristics analysis indicated that the total score of the translated scale at 48-72? hours after delivery could be a useful diagnostic tool for identifying mothers likely to discontinue breastfeeding prematurely, before 6 months postpartum. Further research to cross-validate the suggested cut-off value of the scale is recommended. PMID:22693037

Ip, Wan-Yim; Yeung, Lai-Shan; Choi, Kai-Chow; Chair, Sek-Ying; Dennis, Cindy-Lee

2012-10-01

83

The Reliability and Validity of the Greek Version of the Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study examined the reliability and validity of the Greek version of the Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale in a sample of 170 high school students. Drawing on current social cognitive career theory, the validity of the TSOSS is supported by the expected gender differences on the TSOSS factors, and their high correlations…

Koumoundourou, Georgia A.

2004-01-01

84

An Examination of the Structure of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale (Short Form) among Italian High School Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aims to evaluate the factor structure of Career Decision Self-Efficacy scale-short form in a sample of Italian high school adolescents. confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to test the degree to which a one-factor structure and a five-factor structure provided the best fit. In view of available research the five-factor structure…

Presti, Alessandro Lo; Pace, Francesco; Mondo, Marina; Nota, Laura; Casarubia, Provvidenza; Ferrari, Lea; Betz, Nancy E.

2013-01-01

85

A Small-Scale Randomized Efficacy Trial of Carescapes: Enhancing Children's Social Development in Child Care Homes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The quality of the child care environment and caregiver practices can potentially have significant, lasting impact on children's social development. This study involves the development and a small-scale efficacy trial of the Carescapes program, a video-based training program that focuses on promoting positive social development in young children…

Rusby, Julie C.; Smolkowski, Keith; Marquez, Brion; Taylor, Ted K.

2008-01-01

86

The Reliability and Factor Structure of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-SF with African Americans  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study, based on a sample of 220 African American college students, sought to examine the utility of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale (CDSE) for African Americans. Values of coefficient alpha indicated reliability similar to that found in predominantly White samples. A four-factor structure best represented the data, with a large…

Chaney, Demetris; Hammond, Marie S.; Betz, Nancy E.; Multon, Karen D.

2007-01-01

87

The Reliability and Factor Structure of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-SF With African Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study, based on a sample of 220 African American college students, sought to examine the utility of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale (CDSE) for African Americans. Values of coefficient alpha indicated reliability similar to that found in predominantly White samples. A four-factor structure best represented the data, with a large first factor emphasizing information gathering and decision making.

Demetris Chaney; Marie S. Hammond; Nancy E. Betz; Karen D. Multon

2007-01-01

88

The Dimensionality of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form among Chinese Graduate Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The factorial structure of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (CDSES-SF) was examined in a sample of 796 Chinese graduate students recruited from five universities in Beijing. A single-factor model is recommended on the basis of two of this study's findings. First, confirmatory factor analyses revealed that the parsimonious…

Jin, Leili; Ye, Shengquan; Watkins, David

2012-01-01

89

A Validation and Reliability Study of the Physical Activity and Healthy Food Efficacy Scale for Children (PAHFE)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to obtain validity evidence for the Physical Activity and Healthy Food Efficacy Scale for Children (PAHFE). Construct validity evidence identifies four subscales: Goal-Setting for Physical Activity, Goal-Setting for Healthy Food Choices, Decision-Making for Physical Activity, and Decision-Making for Healthy Food…

Perry, Christina M.; De Ayala, R. J.; Lebow, Ryan; Hayden, Emily

2008-01-01

90

Elementary Student Self Efficacy Scale Development and Validation Focused on Student Learning, Peer Relations, and Resisting Drug Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of a child self efficacy scale for learning, peer interactions, and resisting pressure to use drugs, to use in an elementary school drug prevention education program based on social cognitive theory. A diverse cohort of 392 4th and 5th grade students completed the 20-item…

Fertman, Carl I.; Primack, Brian A.

2009-01-01

91

From Efficacy Research to Large-Scale Impact on Undernutrition: The Role of Organizational Cultures12  

PubMed Central

Undernutrition in low-income countries is receiving unprecedented attention at global and national levels due to the convergence of many forces, including strong evidence concerning its magnitude, consequences, and potential solutions and effective advocacy by many organizations. The translation of this attention into large-scale reductions in undernutrition at the country level requires the alignment and support of many organizations in the development and implementation of a coherent policy agenda for nutrition, including the strengthening of operational and strategic capacities and a supportive research agenda. However, many countries experience difficulties achieving such alignment. This article uses the concept of organizational culture to better understand some of the reasons for these difficulties. This concept is applied to the constellation of organizations that make up the “National Nutrition Network” in a given country and some of the individual organizations within that network, including academic institutions that conduct research on undernutrition. We illustrate this concept through a case study involving a middle-income country. We conclude that efforts to align organizations in support of coherent nutrition agendas should do the following: 1) make intentional and sustained efforts to foster common understanding, shared learning, and socialization of new members and other elements of a shared culture among partners; 2) seek a way to frame problems and solutions in a fashion that enables individual organizations to secure some of their particular interests by joining the effort; and 3) not only advocate on the importance of nutrition but also insist that high-level officials hold organizations accountable for aligning in support of common-interest solutions (through some elements of a common culture) that can be effective and appropriate in the national context. We further conclude that a culture change is needed within academic departments if the discipline of nutrition is to play a central role in translating the findings from efficacy trials into large-scale reductions in undernutrition. PMID:24228200

Pelletier, David; Pelto, Gretel

2013-01-01

92

Community falls prevention for people who call an emergency ambulance after a fall: randomised controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate whether a service to prevent falls in the community would help reduce the rate of falls in older people who call an emergency ambulance when they fall but are not taken to hospital. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Community covered by four primary care trusts, England. Participants 204 adults aged more than 60 living at home or in residential care who had fallen and called an emergency ambulance but were not taken to hospital. Interventions Referral to community fall prevention services or standard medical and social care. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was the rate of falls over 12 months, ascertained from monthly diaries. Secondary outcomes were scores on the Barthel index, Nottingham extended activities of daily living scale, and falls efficacy scale at baseline and by postal questionnaire at 12 months. Analysis was by intention to treat. Results 102 people were allocated to each group. 99 (97%) participants in the intervention group received the intervention. Falls diaries were analysed for 88.6 person years in the intervention group and 84.5 person years in the control group. The incidence rates of falls per year were 3.46 in the intervention group and 7.68 in the control group (incidence rate ratio 0.45, 95% confidence interval 0.35 to 0.58, P<0.001). The intervention group achieved higher scores on the Barthel index and Nottingham extended activities of daily living and lower scores on the falls efficacy scale (all P<0.05) at the 12 month follow-up. The number of times an emergency ambulance was called because of a fall was significantly different during follow-up (incidence rate ratio 0.60, 95% confidence interval 0.40 to 0.92, P=0.018). Conclusion A service to prevent falls in the community reduced the fall rate and improved clinical outcome in the high risk group of older people who call an emergency ambulance after a fall but are not taken to hospital. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN67535605. PMID:20460331

2010-01-01

93

The Relationship between Specific Cognitive Domains, Fear of Falling, and Falls in People with Multiple Sclerosis  

PubMed Central

The primary aim was to examine the relationship between seven definite aspects of cognition measured by a computerized cognitive testing tool on the history falls in people with mild to moderate MS (PwMS). Secondary aims focused on whether cognition performance is correlated to fear of falling, walking velocity, and a patient-rated measure of walking ability. One hundred and one PwMS were included in the study analysis. Fifty-two had a history of at least one fall during the past year. Outcome measures included a computerized cognitive test battery designed to evaluate multiple cognitive domains, gait speed, and self-reported questionnaires; 12-item MS walking scale (MSWS-12); and Falls Efficacy Scale International. Significant differences between fallers and nonfallers were exhibited in attention and verbal function, scoring 7.5% (P = 0.013) and 6.2% (P = 0.05), respectively, below the parallel scores of the nonfallers. Attention was the only cognitive component significantly correlated with the MSWS-12 self-reported questionnaire. Fear of falling was significantly correlated with 6 (out of 7) definite cognitive variables. The present findings support the concept that when evaluating and attempting to reduce fall risk, emphasis should be placed not only on traditional fall risk factors like muscle strength and motor function, but also on cognitive function. PMID:25165694

2014-01-01

94

The relationship between specific cognitive domains, fear of falling, and falls in people with multiple sclerosis.  

PubMed

The primary aim was to examine the relationship between seven definite aspects of cognition measured by a computerized cognitive testing tool on the history falls in people with mild to moderate MS (PwMS). Secondary aims focused on whether cognition performance is correlated to fear of falling, walking velocity, and a patient-rated measure of walking ability. One hundred and one PwMS were included in the study analysis. Fifty-two had a history of at least one fall during the past year. Outcome measures included a computerized cognitive test battery designed to evaluate multiple cognitive domains, gait speed, and self-reported questionnaires; 12-item MS walking scale (MSWS-12); and Falls Efficacy Scale International. Significant differences between fallers and nonfallers were exhibited in attention and verbal function, scoring 7.5% (P = 0.013) and 6.2% (P = 0.05), respectively, below the parallel scores of the nonfallers. Attention was the only cognitive component significantly correlated with the MSWS-12 self-reported questionnaire. Fear of falling was significantly correlated with 6 (out of 7) definite cognitive variables. The present findings support the concept that when evaluating and attempting to reduce fall risk, emphasis should be placed not only on traditional fall risk factors like muscle strength and motor function, but also on cognitive function. PMID:25165694

Kalron, Alon

2014-01-01

95

Multicultural Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale – Racial Diversity Form: Factor structure and test of a social cognitive model  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was conducted to gather evidence on the factor structure and concurrent criterion validity of the Multicultural Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale – Racial Diversity Form (MCSE-RD; Sheu & Lent, 2007). The MCSE-RD was designed to assess therapists' perceived capabilities in performing culturally relevant in-session behaviors in cross-racial counseling. Participants were 209 students in counseling-related graduate programs in the USA. Confirmatory

Hung-Bin Sheu; Marybeth Rigali-Oiler; Robert W. Lent

2012-01-01

96

The reliability and validity of the Greek version of the task-specific occupational self-efficacy scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined the reliability and validity of the Greek version of the Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale in a sample of 170 high school students. Drawing on current social cognitive career theory, the validity of the TSOSS is supported by the expected gender differences on the TSOSS factors, and their high correlations with Self-Directed Search summary scores, and vocational

Georgia A. Koumoundourou

2004-01-01

97

A small-scale randomized efficacy trial of Carescapes: Enhancing children’s social development in child care homes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The quality of the child care environment and caregiver practices can potentially have significant, lasting impact on children’s social development. This study involves the development and a small-scale efficacy trial of the Carescapes program, a video-based training program that focuses on promoting positive social development in young children attending family child care. Fifty-seven caregivers who provided child care in their

Julie C. Rusby; Keith Smolkowski; Brion Marquez; Ted K. Taylor

2008-01-01

98

A Psychometric Evaluation of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form in Chinese High School Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explores the reliability and validity of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (CDSES-SF) in Chinese high school students. One hundred and eighty-three high school students from a city in northeastern China participated in the study. The results indicate that scores on the CDSES-SF are reliable (internal consistency reliability = .93) with this sample of Chinese high school students.

Nan Zhang Hampton

2006-01-01

99

Testing for the Structure of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form Among Chinese College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the factor structure of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (CDSES-SF) among Chinese college students. Two samples of college students from China were used. The original 25-item CDSES-SF was not supported by the data derived from a sample of 256 Chinese college students (Sample 1). However, a modified 13-item, three-factor model of the CDSES-SF fit the data

Nan Zhang Hampton

2005-01-01

100

A Validation and Reliability Study of the Physical Activity and Healthy Food Efficacy Scale for Children (PAHFE)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to obtain validity evidence for the Physical Activity and Healthy Food Efficacy Scale for Children (PAHFE). Construct validity evidence identifies four subscales: Goal-Setting for Physical Activity, Goal-Setting for Healthy Food Choices, Decision-Making for Physical Activity, and Decision-Making for Healthy Food Choices. The scores on each of these subscales show a moderate to high degree

Christina M. Perry; R. J. De Ayala; Ryan Lebow; Emily Hayden

2008-01-01

101

A Scale to Measure Pharmacy Students' Self-Efficacy in Performing Medication Therapy Management Services  

PubMed Central

Objective. To determine whether a college of pharmacy curriculum creates a sense of self-efficacy among students with respect to providing medication therapy management (MTM) services. Methods. An electronic survey instrument was sent to all pharmacy students to elicit information on their perceived confidence in providing MTM services, and the results were reviewed. Results. Of the 1,160 students targeted, 464 (40%) completed the survey instrument. Responses indicated that overall self-efficacy increased with each successive year of the curriculum that students completed. Fourth-year students completing an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) in medication therapy management (MTM) had significantly higher self-efficacy than did other fourth-year students, whose self-efficacy was similar to that of third-year students. Conclusion. In this study population, students’ self-efficacy increased with each successive year in pharmacy school, with those who completed an APPE in MTM exhibiting the highest level of self-efficacy. These students may be more likely to pursue MTM opportunities in future careers. PMID:24249853

Dahl, Jaela R.

2013-01-01

102

Talent Development, Work Habits, and Career Exploration of Chinese Middle-School Adolescents: Development of the Career and Talent Development Self-Efficacy Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the development of an instrument--the "Career and Talent Development Self-Efficacy Scale (CTD-SES)"--for assessing students' self-efficacy in applying life skills essential for personal talent development, acquisition of positive work habits, and career exploration. In Study 1, data were obtained from a large sample of…

Yuen, Mantak; Gysbers, Norman C.; Chan, Raymond M. C.; Lau, Patrick S. Y.; Shea, Peter M. K.

2010-01-01

103

Rasch analysis of the General Self-Efficacy Scale in a sample of persons with morbid obesity  

PubMed Central

Background Self-efficacy is needed for effectuating lifestyle changes, and it is therefore an important target related to health. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE) using Rasch analysis in a sample of adults with morbid obesity. Methods A convenience sample of adults with morbid obesity was recruited from patient education courses. A total of 141 participants completed the GSE and a demographic questionnaire at the beginning of the course. The statistical approach included analysis of rating scale function, item fit to the Rasch partial credit model, unidimensionality, aspects of person-response validity, person-separation reliability, and differential item function. A version omitting items with poor fit to the Rasch model was also evaluated. Results The rating scale did not advance monotonically for item #2 in the original 10-item version, and the first three GSE items did not demonstrate acceptable goodness-of-fit to the Rasch model. In a 7-item version omitting these three items, the rating scale functioned well for all items, and all items demonstrated good fit to the Rasch model. Both the 10-item and 7-item versions of the GSE partially met the criteria for unidimensionality. Neither version met the criterion for person response validity, although the results were slightly better for the 7-item than for the 10-item version. Both versions of the GSE demonstrated the ability to separate the respondents into three distinct levels of general self-efficacy. Several items had differential item function in relation to age, education or work status, but there were fewer in the 7-item version. Conclusions For adults with morbid obesity, a 7-item version of the GSE seems to have better psychometric properties than the original 10-item version. PMID:24268204

2013-01-01

104

Preventing Falls  

MedlinePLUS

... there are simple ways you can prevent most falls. Stay physically active. Regular exercise makes you stronger. ... that may result from falling. Here are some fall prevention tips from Go4Life : l Have your eyes ...

105

Development and Initial Validation of the Online Learning Value and Self-Efficacy Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recently, several scholars have suggested that academic self-regulation may be particularly important for students participating in online learning. The purpose of the present study was to develop a quantitative self-report measure of perceived task value and self-efficacy for learning within the context of self-paced, online training, and to…

Artino, Anthony R., Jr.; McCoach, D. Betsy

2008-01-01

106

The Short Form of the Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Occupationally relevant skills were selected from the 66 GOE Categories of the Selected Characteristics of Occupations Defined in the Dictionary of Occupational Titles (U.S. Department of Labor, 1981). These skills were then translated into items and reduced to 230 self-efficacy statements. Subjects were asked to respond to each item in terms of their confidence in their ability to perform the

Samuel H. Osipow; Richard D. Temple; Rebecca A. Rooney

1993-01-01

107

Coping with Late-Life Challenges: Development and Validation of the Care-Receiver Efficacy Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Measures are lacking that address the challenges that people think they face in their roles as elderly care receivers. However, the development of a sense of efficacy in this role by mentally competent care receivers is critical to successful partnerships between caregivers and care receivers. The purpose of this article is to report the…

Cox, Enid O.; Green, Kathy E.; Seo, Honglan; Inaba, Miyuki; Quillen, Alicia Alyla

2006-01-01

108

Thompson: Fruits and Vegetables (FV) Norms Self-efficacy School Lunch Scales  

Cancer.gov

FV Norms-self-efficacy – school lunch 1. My friends eat a serving of fruit at school lunch when I am with them. ?Never ?Sometimes ?Often ?Always 1. My friends eat a serving of cooked vegetables at school lunch when I am with them. ?Never

109

The short version of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale: Its validity, reliability, and relationship to balance impairment and falls in older adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

A shortened version of the ABC 16-item scale (ABC-16), the ABC-6, has been proposed as an alternative balance confidence measure. We investigated whether the ABC-6 is a valid and reliable measure of balance confidence and examined its relationship to balance impairment and falls in older adults. Thirty-five community-dwelling older adults completed the ABC-16, including the 6 questions of the ABC-6.

Stacey Schepens; Allon Goldberg; Melissa Wallace

2010-01-01

110

Body-Efficacy Expectation: Assessment of Beliefs concerning Bodily Coping Capabilities with a Five-Item Scale  

PubMed Central

Background. Expectancies regarding a treatment play an important role in recovery as has been shown in placebo research. The role of expectations regarding the bodily capability to overcome illness is less investigated although in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) such capability is the target of interventions. We introduced a new construct, body-efficacy expectation, defined as the conviction that one's body is able to deal with health-threatening factors by itself, and developed and validated a scale for its measurement. Methods. The scale was developed following expert recommendations. Using online survey data from 1054 participants an exploratory factor analysis was conducted and psychometric properties of the scale were examined (item characteristics, reliability, and validity). Results. The exploratory factor analysis yielded a one-factor solution explaining 51.96% of total variance (Cronbach's ? = 0.77). One of the originally six items was removed due to poor item characteristics. Correlations with several validation measures were in line with the theoretical background of the construct. Most importantly, participants with better general health showed higher body-efficacy expectation than participants with poorer health status. Conclusions. Further studies confirming the factor structure and using clinical samples are recommended. Also, the relations with the appraisal of CAM and CAM use warrant further research. PMID:24312132

Schutzler, Lena; Witt, Claudia M.

2013-01-01

111

How Do Things Fall?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Learners engage in close observation of falling objects. They determine it is the amount of air resistance, not the weight of an object, which determines how quickly an object falls. This demonstration and activity can be combined with other activities to create a larger lesson. Resource contains vocabulary definitions and suggestions for assessment, extensions, and scaling for different levels of learners.

Zamora-Thompson, Xochitl; Heavner, Ben; Zarske, Malinda S.; Carlson, Denise

2004-01-01

112

Return-to-work self-efficacy: development and validation of a scale in claimants with musculoskeletal disorders.  

PubMed

INTRODUCTION We report on the development and validation of a 10-item scale assessing self-efficacy within the return-to-work context, the Return-to-Work Self-Efficacy (RTWSE) scale. METHODS Lost-time claimants completed a telephone survey 1 month (n = 632) and 6 months (n = 446) after a work-related musculoskeletal injury. Exploratory (Varimax and Promax rotation) and confirmatory factor analyses of self-efficacy items were conducted with two separate subsamples at both time points. Construct validity was examined by comparing scale measurements and theoretically derived constructs, and the phase specificity of RTWSE was studied by examining changes in strength of relationships between the RTWSE Subscales and the other constructs at both time measures. RESULTS Factor analyses supported three underlying factors: (1) Obtaining help from supervisor, (2) Coping with pain (3) Obtaining help from co-workers. Internal consistency (alpha) for the three subscales ranged from 0.66 to 0.93. The total variance explained was 68% at 1-month follow-up and 76% at 6-month follow-up. Confirmatory factor analyses had satisfactory fit indices to confirm the initial model. With regard to construct validity: relationships of RTWSE with depressive symptoms, fear-avoidance, pain, and general health, were generally in the hypothesized direction. However, the hypothesis that less advanced stages of change on the Readiness for RTW scale would be associated with lower RTWSE could not be completely confirmed: on all RTWSE subscales, RTWSE decreased significantly for a subset of participants who started working again. Moreover, only Pain RTWSE was significantly associated with RTW status and duration of work disability. With regard to the phase specificity, the strength of association between RTWSE and other constructs was stronger at 6 months post-injury compared to 1 month post-injury. CONCLUSIONS A final 10-item version of the RTWSE has adequate internal consistency and validity to assess the confidence of injured workers to obtain help from supervisor and co-workers and to cope with pain. With regard to phase specificity, stronger associations between RTWSE and other constructs at 6-month follow-up suggest that the association between these psychological constructs consolidates over time after the disruptive event of the injury. PMID:20865445

Brouwer, Sandra; Franche, Renée-Louise; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Lee, Hyunmi; Krause, Niklas; Shaw, William S

2011-06-01

113

Adaptation and Psychometric Properties of the Self-Efficacy/Social Support for Activity for Persons with Intellectual Disability Scale (SE/SS-AID) in a Spanish Sample  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: In this study we aimed to develop a Spanish version of the Self-Efficacy/Social Support Scales for Activity for persons with Intellectual Disability (SE/SS-AID). Method: A cross-sectional study was carried out in a sample of 117 individuals with intellectual disability (ID). The SE/SS-AID scales were translated into Spanish and their…

Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio Ignacio; Paz-Lourido, Berta; Lee, Miyoung; Peterson-Besse, Jana J.

2013-01-01

114

Fall 2013 945 277 Fall 2013 190 115 Fall 2012 957 150 Fall 2012 158 41  

E-print Network

Fall 2012 957 150 Fall 2012 158 41 Fall 2011 1,133 183 1,316 Fall 2011 231 53 Fall 2010 1,065 144 Fall 2010 232 28 Fall 2009 1,066 178 Fall 2009 226 65 Fall 2008 1,078 146 Fall 2008 200 32 Fall 2007 1,296 154 Fall 2007 215 38 Fall 2006 1,325 141 Fall 2006 184 28 Fall 2005 1,404 131 Fall 2005 161 21 Fall

Mohaghegh, Shahab

115

Psychometric qualities of the Short Form of the Self-efficacy for Parenting Tasks Index-Toddler Scale.  

PubMed

Parental self-efficacy (PSE; parental self-perceived competence in parenting) is known to have considerable impact on parenting quality. Although PSE is particularly under pressure during the turbulent period of toddlerhood, most studies so far have focused on PSE in parents of older children. The current study presents the psychometric qualities of the Short Form of the Self-Efficacy for Parenting Tasks Index-Toddler Scale (SEPTI-TS). Parents from a normal (n = 282) and clinical sample (n = 27) of children filled in the SEPTI-TS, and other questionnaires concerning PSE, general self-evaluation, and psychological problems. Factor analysis resulted in a 26-item instrument, representing four domains of PSE with a strong factor structure and high reliability: nurturance, discipline, play, and routine. For this new Short Form of the SEPTI-TS, good face, discriminative, concurrent, and divergent validity were found. Cut-offs for normal PSE were provided. The Short Form SEPTI-TS enables identifying problematic PSE in specific domains of parenting during toddlerhood. PMID:24186305

van Rijen, E H M; Gasanova, N; Boonstra, A M; Huijding, J

2014-08-01

116

Pilot-scale evaluation of UV reactors' efficacy against in vitro infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts.  

PubMed

An experimental protocol was developed to assess the efficacy of two UV reactors (medium-pressure UVaster), and a low-pressure reactor) on the infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts under conditions mimicking small- or medium-size water distribution units. The protocol included purification of large amounts of viable oocysts from experimentally infected calf feces, pilot spiking, sample concentration and purification after UV radiation, oocyst quantification and in vitro evaluation of oocyst infectivity on HCT-8 cells. Water samples were collected at intervals upstream and downstream from the UV reactor after spiking. Oocysts were concentrated by centrifugation, purified by immunomagnetic capture and quantified using laser-scanning cytometry. An enhanced in vitro infectivity test on HCT-8 cells was developed, where oocysts were pretreated in order to obtain maximized in vitro infectivity, and infectious foci were enumerated after immunofluorescence staining after 3 days of culture. This method was superior to viability measured by excystation for assessing oocyst infectivity. The infectivity rate of untreated oocysts ranged between 9% and 30% in replicate experiments. The method allowed us to determine inactivation rates >4.92 (log) with UVaster and >4.82 with the LP reactor after exposition of oocysts to an effective dose of 400 J m(-2) at flow rates of 15 and 42 m(3) h(-1), respectively. PMID:17941833

Entrala, Emilio; Garin, Yves J F; Meneceur, Pascale; Hayat, Maud; Scherpereel, Guillaume; Savin, Cyril; Féliers, Cédric; Derouin, Francis

2007-12-01

117

Analysis of measurement tools of fear of falling for high-risk, community-dwelling older adults.  

PubMed

Fear of falling has many health consequences among older adults and may lead to curtailment of activities, immobility, functional dependence, falls, and serious injury. The lack of clarity as to how to best measure fear of falling among high-risk, community-dwelling older adults defined as those who are nursing home eligible, functionally dependent, and vulnerable is further complicated by the multiple definitions used throughout the science. Fear of falling is important to measure effectively if we are to develop and test interventions to promote safe aging in place and prevent injury and institutionalization. This integrative review, 1982 to the present, leads to the conclusion that the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I) long form stands out as the most appropriate measurement tool to best assess fear of falling in this unique, understudied, and underserved population. PMID:22373731

Greenberg, Sherry A

2012-02-01

118

Suitability criteria analyzed at the spatial scale of redd clusters improved estimates of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawning habitat use in the Hanford Reach, Columbia River  

SciTech Connect

We improved our predictions of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) habitat use by analyzing spawning habitat at the spatial scale of redd clusters. Spatial point pattern analyses indicated that redd clusters in the Hanford Reach, Columbia River, were consistent in their location from 1994 to 1995. Redd densities were 16.1 and 8.9 redds?ha-1 in 1994 and 1995, respectively, and individual redds within clusters were usually less than 30 m apart. Pattern analysis also showed strong evidence that redds were uniformly distributed within the clusters where inter-redd distances ranged from 2 to 5 m. Redd clusters were found to occur predominantly where water velocity was between 1.4 to 2 m?s-1, water depth was 2 to 4 m, and lateral slope of the riverbed was less than 4%. This habitat use represented a narrower range of use than previously reported for adult fall chinook salmon. Logistic regression analysis determined that water velocity and lateral slope were the most significant predictors of redd cluster location over a range of river discharges. Over-estimates of available spawning habitat lead to non-achievable goals for protecting and restoring critical salmonid habitat. Better predictions of spawning habitat may be possible if cluster-specific characteristics are used.

Geist, David R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Jones, Julia (Oregon State University); Murray, Christopher J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Dauble, Dennis D. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

1999-12-01

119

The CALFED Bay-Delta Program: Lessons from the Rise and Fall of a Large-Scale Ecosystem Management Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ecosystem management, especially at the large\\/regional scale, typifies the public sector organizational environment of interconnectedness. Networks as complex organizational models can have significant advantages for intricate joint planning and management. There are, however, considerable challenges to establishing and sustaining such organizations in an institutional environment. The complex case study of CALFED, formed to integrate water management for the hub of

Susan D. Lurie

2011-01-01

120

Preventing falls  

MedlinePLUS

... or keep your balance are a common cause of falls. Balance problems can also cause falls. When you walk, avoid sudden movements or changes in your position. Wear shoes with low heels that fit well. Rubber soles will help keep you from slipping. Stay away ...

121

A Short Version of the Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale: Structural and Construct Validity Across Five Countries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Occupational self-efficacy is an important resource for individuals in organizations. To be able to compare the occupational self-efficacy of employees across different countries, equivalent versions of the standard instruments need to be made available in different languages. In this article, the authors report on the structural and construct validity of an instrument that assesses occupational self-efficacy across five countries (Germany,

Thomas Rigotti; Birgit Schyns; Gisela Mohr

2008-01-01

122

Summer/Fall Summer/Fall  

E-print Network

NU graduate school programs are excluded. Marketing Program Profile Admissions Selectivity Average 2012 Fall 2013 Fall 2008 Fall 2009 Fall 2010 Fall 2011 Fall 2012 Fall 2013 Gender Female * 50% 60% 80% 0% 0% 0% 0% Marketing Program Profile Enrollment and Demographics New Enrollment* Total Enrollment

Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

123

Falling Feather  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this physics activity, learners recreate Galileo's famous experiment, in which he dropped a heavy weight and a light weight from the top of the Leaning Tower of Pisa to show that both weights fall at the same acceleration. Learners prove that Galileo was correct by comparing how fast a feather and coin fall in a tube attached to a vacuum. Use this activity to help learners explore acceleration and terminal velocity as well as how air resistance plays a role in how fast things fall.

Exploratorium, The

2012-07-12

124

Full-Scale Direct Numerical Simulation of Two- and Three-Dimensional Instabilities and Rivulet Formulation in Heated Falling Films  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A thin film draining on an inclined plate has been studied numerically using finite element method. Three-dimensional governing equations of continuity, momentum and energy with a moving boundary are integrated in an arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian frame of reference. Kinematic equation is solved to precisely update interface location. Rivulet formation based on instability mechanism has been simulated using full-scale computation. Comparisons with long-wave theory are made to validate the numerical scheme. Detailed analysis of two- and three-dimensional nonlinear wave formation and spontaneous rupture forming rivulets under the influence of combined thermocapillary and surface-wave instabilities is performed.

Krishnamoorthy, S.; Ramaswamy, B.; Joo, S. W.

1995-01-01

125

Politicization, Political Efficacy, and Belligerence: A Comparison of American High School and College Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The theoretical model upon which this study is based indicates that a person's degree of politication and political efficacy depend upon: a) each other; b) where that person falls on socioeconomic and education scales; c) sex; and, d) race. A person's degree of belligerance (extent of reliance on force, threats, power, etc.) depends similarly on…

Evans, James W.

126

Prevalence and correlates of fear of falling among elderly population in urban area of Karnataka, India  

PubMed Central

Context: Falls are a major public health problem in the elderly population. Fear of falling (FOF) among elderly persons can compromise quality of life by limiting mobility, diminished sense of well-being and reduced social interactions. India is undergoing a demographic transitional phase with urban elderly population of 6.72% in 2001. The major challenge would be on the prevention of falls among them. Hence there is a need to highlight the problems related to fall faced by the elderly in India. Objective: To study the prevalence of FOF and its correlates among the elderly population in urban area. Materials and Methods: 250 elderly subjects above 60 years were randomly selected from urban area and interviewed for FOF using Short Fall Efficacy Scale-I (FES-I), history of falls and risk factors. Results: The prevalence of FOF among the elderly was 33.2%. The significant correlates of FOF were educational status, family type, associated health problems, history of fall in past 6 months, worried of fall again among fallers, fearfulness of fall again among fallers, restriction of daily activities and depression among them. The insignificant correlates were gender and socio-economic status. Conclusion: FOF is a health problem among the elderly living in urban India needs urgent attention. It represents a significant threat to socialization, independence and morbidity or mortality. Knowledge of correlates of FOF may be useful in developing multidimensional strategies to reduce it among elderly. PMID:25317002

Mane, Abhay B.; Sanjana, T; Patil, Prabhakar R.; Sriniwas, T.

2014-01-01

127

A Short Version of the Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale: Structural and Construct Validity across Five Countries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Occupational self-efficacy is an important resource for individuals in organizations. To be able to compare the occupational self-efficacy of employees across different countries, equivalent versions of the standard instruments need to be made available in different languages. In this article, the authors report on the structural and construct…

Rigotti, Thomas; Schyns, Birgit; Mohr, Gisela

2008-01-01

128

Fall Risk Assessment Measures: An Analytic Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Clinicians are often unaware of the many existing scales for identifying fall risk and are uncertain about how to select an appropriate one. Our purpose was to summarize existing fall risk assessment scales to enable more informed choices regarding their use. Methods. After a systematic literature search, 21 articles published from 1984 through 2000 describing 20 fall risk assessments

Karen L. Perell; Audrey Nelson; Ronald L. Goldman; Stephen L. Luther; Nicole Prieto-Lewis; Laurence Z. Rubenstein

2001-01-01

129

Free Fall  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The animation simulates an object in free-fall near the surface of the earth. Use the links to view a projectile released from rest and a projectile initially projected upward. Air resistance is neglected in the simulation.

Christian, Wolfgang; Belloni, Mario

2008-02-19

130

Evaluation of efficacy of tetracycline fibers in conjunction with scaling and root planing in patients with chronic periodontitis  

PubMed Central

Aim: The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of scaling and root planing (SRP) alone versus tetracycline fiber therapy used adjunctively with SRP in the treatment of chronic periodontitis sites in maintenance patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 patients with a diagnosis of chronic periodontitis (60 localized chronic periodontitis sites) in the age group of 35 to 55 were selected. None of these patients had received any surgical or non-surgical periodontal therapy and had sites of periodontal pockets measuring 4—7 mm clinically and demonstrated radiographic evidence of moderate bone loss. Two non-adjacent sites in separate quadrants were selected in each patient for monitoring based on criteria that the sites had localized chronic periodontitis. Plaque index (PI) (sillness and loe) and Gingival-bleeding index (GI) (loe and sillness) were measured at baseline and 15th, 30th, 60th, and 90thday. Clinical pocket depth (PD) and microbial analysis (MA) were analyzed at baseline and 90th day. Results: At 0 and 3 months adjunctive tetracycline fiber therapy was significantly better in reducing PI, GBI, (P<0.001) than S and RP alone. In comparison, the reduction in the PD was non-significant at 0 and 3 months (P<0.001). The microbial analysis showed significant reduction in Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia though there was no significant reduction in the Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Conclusion: Overall, these results indicate that fiber therapy significantly enhanced the effectiveness of SRP in the management of chronic periodontitis. PMID:23162335

Sadaf, Nishat; Anoop, Bhushan; Dakshina, Bisht; Shweta, Bali

2012-01-01

131

Cross-Cultural Equivalence of the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form: An Australian and South African Comparison  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined the reliability, content and construct validity, and cultural equivalence of the short form of the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (CDMSE-SF). In response to calls to conduct studies using the measure with high school-age samples, data were gathered from two samples of high school students, one from Australia and one from South Africa. The findings were

Peter A. Creed; Wendy Patton; Mark B. Watson

2002-01-01

132

Initial Validation of a Scale Measuring Self-Efficacy of Breast Self-Examination among Low-Income Mexican American Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the initial validation of a bilingual (English\\/Spanish) scale designed to assess intensity of perceived self-efficacy for breast self-examination (BSE) among low-income Mexican American women. The validation and reliability analysis included the use of Cronbach's alpha, factor analysis, and correlations of the measure with knowledge of correct BSE procedure, current level of breast self-examination, and English language proficiency.

Judith T. Gonzalez; Virginia M. Gonzalez

1990-01-01

133

Summer/Fall Summer/Fall  

E-print Network

graduate school programs are excluded. Marketing Program Profile Admissions Selectivity Average = 11% Yield Fall 2007 Fall 2008 Fall 2009 Fall 2010 Fall 2011 Fall 2012 Gender Female 20% * 50% 60% 80% 60% 38% 36% Marketing Program Profile Enrollment and Demographics New Enrollment* Total Enrollment * If there are 3

Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

134

Summer/Fall Summer/Fall  

E-print Network

graduate school programs are excluded. Marketing Program Profile Admissions Selectivity Average = 11% Yield 2011 Fall 2006 Fall 2007 Fall 2008 Fall 2009 Fall 2010 Fall 2011 Gender Female 25% 20% * 50% 60% 80% 50% 0% 0% 0% Not Specified 0% 0% * 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% Marketing Program Profile Enrollment

Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

135

The Efficacy of Paroxetine and Placebo in Treating Anxiety and Depression: A Meta-Analysis of Change on the Hamilton Rating Scales  

PubMed Central

Background Previous meta-analyses of published and unpublished trials indicate that antidepressants provide modest benefits compared to placebo in the treatment of depression; some have argued that these benefits are not clinically significant. However, these meta-analyses were based only on trials submitted for the initial FDA approval of the medication and were limited to those aimed at treating depression. Here, for the first time, we assess the efficacy of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) in the treatment of both anxiety and depression, using a complete data set of all published and unpublished trials sponsored by the manufacturer. Methods and Findings GlaxoSmithKline has been required to post the results for all sponsored clinical trials online, providing an opportunity to assess the efficacy of an SSRI (paroxetine) with a complete data set of all trials conducted. We examined the data from all placebo-controlled, double-blind trials of paroxetine that included change scores on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HRSA) and/or the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD). For the treatment of anxiety (k?=?12), the efficacy difference between paroxetine and placebo was modest (d?=?0.27), and independent of baseline severity of anxiety. Overall change in placebo-treated individuals replicated 79% of the magnitude of paroxetine response. Efficacy was superior for the treatment of panic disorder (d?=?0.36) than for generalized anxiety disorder (d?=?0.20). Published trials showed significantly larger drug-placebo differences than unpublished trials (d’s?=?0.32 and 0.17, respectively). In depression trials (k?=?27), the benefit of paroxetine over placebo was consistent with previous meta-analyses of antidepressant efficacy (d?=?0.32). Conclusions The available empirical evidence indicates that paroxetine provides only a modest advantage over placebo in treatment of anxiety and depression. Treatment implications are discussed. PMID:25162656

Sugarman, Michael A.; Loree, Amy M.; Baltes, Boris B.; Grekin, Emily R.; Kirsch, Irving

2014-01-01

136

Free Fall  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this quick activity (page 1 of PDF), learners will use a simple physics of motion and gravity demonstration to test their predicting skills. Learners predict which quarter will hit the floor first during this free fall experiment. This activity not only requires learners to observe carefully, but also listen carefully! Relates to the linked video, DragonflyTV: Hockey.

Twin Cities Public Television, Inc.

2005-01-01

137

Falling Faster  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity about gravity (page 6 of the PDF), learners will come to understand how all objects will fall at the same rate, but that air will slow things down. This is a simple activity (it uses only two pieces of paper) that provides an excellent "Wow!" moment.

Cosi

2009-01-01

138

Relationships of Career Self-Efficacy Expectations to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and the Personal Styles Scales.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated the relationships of self-efficacy (via the Holland themes) to dimensions of personal style and personality. Examined correlations (1) Skills Confidence Inventory (SCI); (2) Myers-Briggs Type Indicator; and (3) Strong Interest Inventory. Findings support the validity of the SCI and, therefore, of all three instruments. (Author/EMK)

Tuel, Beverly D.; Betz, Nancy E.

1998-01-01

139

Falling Piston  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page contains two Physlets that are able to share data using the common superclass or all Physlets, SApplet. The temperature of an ensemble will increase if it compressed in an insulating container due to the work, P DV that is done on the gas. The data graph shows the volume and the temperature, i.e., , of the ensemble as the piston free-falls under the action of a constant force.

Christian, Wolfgang; Belloni, Mario

2008-02-09

140

Falling Water  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students drop water from different heights to demonstrate the conversion of water's potential energy to kinetic energy. They see how varying the height from which water is dropped affects the splash size. They follow good experiment protocol, take measurements, calculate averages and graph results. In seeing how falling water can be used to do work, they also learn how this energy transformation figures into the engineering design and construction of hydroelectric power plants, dams and reservoirs.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

141

Efficacy of Guanfacine Extended Release Assessed During the Morning, Afternoon, and Evening Using a Modified Conners' Parent Rating Scale-Revised: Short Form  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of once-daily guanfacine extended release (GXR) monotherapy administered either in the morning or evening, using a modified Conners' Parent Rating Scale–Revised: Short Form (CPRS–R:S) assessed three times/day in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods: This multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled study randomized children 6–12 years of age with ADHD into three groups: GXR a.m. (GXR in the morning and placebo in the evening), GXR p.m. (placebo in the morning and GXR in the evening), or twice-daily placebo. The CPRS–R:S, administered in the morning, afternoon, and evening prior to each study visit, was a secondary measure of efficacy. Results: A total of 333 subjects were included in the analysis population (GXR a.m., n=107; GXR p.m., n=114; placebo, n=112). At visit 10, last observation carried forward (LOCF), subjects receiving GXR demonstrated significantly greater improvement from baseline in the daily mean CPRS–R:S total score, as well as in each of the morning, afternoon, and evening CPRS–R:S assessments, compared with placebo, regardless of the time of GXR administration (p<0.001 vs. placebo for GXR a.m. and GXR p.m.). In addition, subjects receiving GXR showed significantly greater improvements from baseline in each subscale score (oppositional, cognitive problems/inattention, hyperactivity, and ADHD index) compared with those receiving placebo, regardless of time of administration (p<0.003 vs. placebo across all subscales for GXR a.m. and GXR p.m.). Conclusions: These results provide further support for the demonstrated efficacy of once-daily GXR in reducing ADHD symptoms, and demonstrate that response is consistent throughout the day regardless of the time of administration, with improvement seen in ratings of oppositional as well as of ADHD symptoms. PMID:25286026

Rugino, Thomas; Dammerman, Ryan; Lyne, Andrew; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.

2014-01-01

142

Fall 2013 1,144 516 Fall 2013 339 229 Fall 2012 1,279 502 Fall 2012 433 296  

E-print Network

Term WV Resident Non- Resident Term WV Resident Non- Resident Fall 2013 1,144 516 Fall 2013 339 229 Fall 2012 1,279 502 Fall 2012 433 296 Fall 2011 1,333 467 Fall 2011 435 285 Fall 2010 1,385 451 Fall 2010 462 248 Fall 2009 1,379 431 Fall 2009 460 263 Fall 2008 1,173 409 Fall 2008 397 242 Fall 2007 1

Mohaghegh, Shahab

143

Fall Fall Fall FallSpring Spring Spring Spring Freshman Sophomore Junior Senior  

E-print Network

5.2011 Fall Fall Fall FallSpring Spring Spring Spring Freshman Sophomore Junior Senior Chemistry Total cr 17 - 18 16 17 15 14 - 17 13 - 16 Free Elective6 14 - 17 Free Elective9 B.S. with Chemistry Major CHEM Multi Disciplinary3 Team Princ. CHM 194 1 15 - 16 **Fall only class; ^ Spring only class

Kihara, Daisuke

144

^ Physical II Fall Fall Fall FallSpring Spring Spring Spring  

E-print Network

4.11 BC ^ Physical II CHM 37400 3 Fall Fall Fall FallSpring Spring Spring Spring Freshman Sophomore Thesis and a GPA of 3.4 or higher. **Fall only class; ^ Spring only class Gen Ed must be a sequence See Building CHM 194 or SCI 130 Technical Writing/ Presentation COM 21700 Free Elective3 Free Elective3 Free

Kihara, Daisuke

145

^Physical II Fall Fall Fall FallSpring Spring Spring Spring  

E-print Network

4.09 BC ^Physical II CHM 37400 3 Fall Fall Fall FallSpring Spring Spring Spring Freshman Sophomore Thesis and a GPA of 3.4 or higher. **Fall only class; ^ Spring only class Gen Ed must be a sequence (i 58100 1 Research* CHM 49900 3 ^Inorg. I CHM 24100 4 Team Building CHM 194 or SCI 130 Free Elective4

Kihara, Daisuke

146

Teacher Efficacy in Classroom Management and Discipline  

Microsoft Academic Search

A scale for measuring teacher efficacy in classroom management and discipline is presented, along with results from a factor analysis of intercorrelations of items from the scale and items from two other teacher efficacy scales. Data sources included 119 preservice teacher education students and 42 student teachers. Results are presented indicating that classroom management\\/discipline efficacy is distinct from other types

Edmund T. Emmer; Julia Hickman

1991-01-01

147

[Fall and fracture risk].  

PubMed

Falls and fall-related fractures are a major problem among older adults. These injuries often cause continuous pain, functional impairments, and mortality. While the majority of falls do not result in fractures, most fractures are due to falls. Especially, almost all hip fractures (95%) result from falls. And so, it is very important to analyze falls and risk factors for falls. A history of falls is the major independent predictor of future fall risk. To date, several strategies have been provided to control risk factors for fall. To prevent falls and fall-induced injuries and fractures, multicomponent exercise, home hazard assessment and modification and use of hip protectors have proven efficient. PMID:20808042

Koike, Tatsuya

2010-09-01

148

Disparity in the Fear of Falling Between Urban and Rural Residents in Relation With Socio-economic Variables, Health Issues, and Functional Independency  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate disparities in the fear of falling between urban and rural communities in relation to socio-demographics, health status, and functional level. Methods A total of 974 subjects aged 40 years or older participated in this study (335 urban residents and 639 rural). They completed a questionnaire about socio-demographics, health-related variables, and experience with falls. We employed both direct questioning and the Korean version of Falls Efficacy Scale-International (KFES-I) to investigate fear of falling in terms of perceptive fear and higher level of concern over falling during daily activities. The Korean version of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living was used to assess functional independency. Results Aging, female gender, fall history, and the presence of chronic medical problems were independently associated with higher prevalence for the fear of falling. Both perceptive fear of falling and a higher level of concern over falling were more prevalent in the rural senior population compared with those in the urban population when they had the following characteristics: lower income or educational background, physical laborer or unemployed, no chronic medical morbidity, or functional independency in daily activities. Conclusion The disparity in the fear of falling between the two areas is thought to be related to age structure, and it may also exist in healthy or functionally independent senior populations under the influence of socio-environmental factors. A senior population with lower socio-economic status residing in a rural area might be related with a greater vulnerability to the fear of falling. We should consider regional characteristics when we design fall-related studies or develop fall-prevention programs at the community level. PMID:24466520

Cho, Hyungpil; Seol, Seung Jun; Yoon, Do Hyun; Kim, Mi Jung; Choi, Bo Youl

2013-01-01

149

Fall Proofing Your Home  

MedlinePLUS

... Proofing Your Home Six out of every 10 falls happen at home, where we spend much of ... without thinking about our safety. Many of these falls could be prevented by making simple changes. Go4Life ...

150

Preventing Construction Falls  

MedlinePLUS

... I worked construction for 10 years before my fall. It shattered my body and my livelihood. Work safely. Use the right equipment. Safety Pays. Falls Cost. www.osha.gov/stopfalls/ disconnect from the ...

151

How Do Things Fall?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students learn that it is incorrect to believe that heavier objects fall faster than lighter objects. By close observation of falling objects, they see that it is the amount of air resistance, not the weight of an object, which determines how quickly an object falls.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

152

Linking Preservice Teachers' Mathematics Self-Efficacy and Mathematics Teaching Efficacy to Their Mathematical Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined preservice teachers' mathematics self-efficacy and mathematics teaching efficacy and compared them to their mathematical performance. Participants included 89 early childhood preservice teachers at a Midwestern university. Instruments included the Mathematics Self-Efficacy Scale (MSES), Mathematics Teaching Efficacy Beliefs…

Bates, Alan B.; Latham, Nancy; Kim, Jin-ah

2011-01-01

153

Efficacy or inefficacy, that's the question: Burnout and work engagement, and their relationships with efficacy beliefs  

Microsoft Academic Search

We challenge traditional view that lack of efficacy — measured with the corresponding reversed efficacy scale (Maslach Burnout Inventory, MBI) — is a burnout dimension. Instead, we claim that in addition to exhaustion and cynicism, inefficacy — measured with a newly developed scale — characterizes burnout. MBI-efficacy is apparently related to work engagement, considered as the positive antithesis of burnout.

Wilmar B. Schaufeli; Marisa Salanova

2007-01-01

154

The interplay between gait, falls and cognition: can cognitive therapy reduce fall risk?  

PubMed Central

In this article, we briefly summarize the incidence and significant consequences of falls among older adults, the insufficient effectiveness of commonly used multifactorial interventions and the evidence linking falls and cognitive function. Recent pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic studies that evaluated the effects of cognitive therapy on fall risk are reviewed. The results of this article illustrate the potential utility of multiple, diverse forms of cognitive therapy for reducing fall risk. The article also indicates that large-scale, randomized controlled trials are warranted and that additional research is needed to better understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the interplay between human mobility, fall risk and cognitive function. Nonetheless, we suggest that multimodality interventions that combine motor and cognitive therapy should, eventually, be incorporated into clinical practice to enable older adults and patients to move safer and with a reduced fall risk. PMID:21721921

Segev-Jacubovski, Orit; Herman, Talia; Yogev-Seligmann, Galit; Mirelman, Anat; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

2011-01-01

155

Relationships among Measures of Career Self-Efficacy, Generalized Self-Efficacy, and Global Self-Esteem.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

College students (n=200) completed the Career Decision Making Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (CDMSE-SF) and Skills Confidence Inventory; 147 completed the CDMSE-SF and Occupational and Mathematical Self-Efficacy Scales. Career decision-making self-efficacy was more highly correlated with generalized self-efficacy than global self-esteem,…

Betz, Nancy E.; Klein, Karla L.

1996-01-01

156

Volcanic Ash Fall  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This United States Geological Survey (USGS) on-line publication discusses volcanic ash fall in terms of composition and effects. This report discusses the negative effects of volcanic ash fall on machinery, human health, weather and man-made structures, using the Mount Saint Helens eruption of 1980 as an example. The composition of volcanic ash is discussed, as well as ancient and modern ash falls that have occurred in the United States.

Kenedi, Christopher; Brantley, Steven; Stauffer, Peter; Hendley Ii., James

157

Scales  

ScienceCinema

Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain ? a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

Murray Gibson

2010-01-08

158

Falls following discharge after an in-hospital fall  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Falls are among the most common adverse events reported in hospitalized patients. While there is a growing body of literature on fall prevention in the hospital, the data examining the fall rate and risk factors for falls in the immediate post-hospitalization period has not been well described. The objectives of the present study were to determine the fall rate

Rick D Davenport; Georgeta D Vaidean; Carol B Jones; A Michelle Chandler; Lori A Kessler; Lorraine C Mion; Ronald I Shorr

2009-01-01

159

Fall Leaf Portraits  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author describes how students can create a stunning as well as economical mosaic utilizing fall's brilliantly colored leaves, preserved at their peak in color. Start by choosing a beautiful fall day to take students on a nature walk to collect a variety of leaves in different shapes, sizes, and colors. Focus on collecting a…

O'Hara, Cristina

2012-01-01

160

Fall Enrollment Report 2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report summarizes fall enrollment in Iowa's community colleges. Every year Iowa's 15 community college districts submit data on students enrolled on the 10th day of the fall semester. Highlights include: (1) Enrollment grew at its fastest pace since 1975 to a record high of 100,736 students; (2) Year-to-year growth was 14.3 percent, which is…

Iowa Department of Education, 2009

2009-01-01

161

Experiments in Free Fall  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A model lift containing a figure of Albert Einstein is released from the side of a tall building and its free fall is arrested by elastic ropes. This arrangement allows four simple experiments to be conducted in the lift to demonstrate the effects of free fall and show how they can lead to the concept of the equivalence of inertial and…

Art, Albert

2006-01-01

162

Patient Education to Prevent Falls Among Older Hospital Inpatients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Falls are a common adverse event during hospitalization of older adults, and few interventions have been shown to prevent hem.\\u000aMethods: This study was a 3-group randomized trial to evaluate the efficacy of 2 forms of multimedia patient education compared with usual care for the prevention of in-hospital falls. Older hospital patients (n = 1206) admitted to a mixture

Terry P Haines; Anne-Marie Hill; Keith D Hill; Steven McPhail; David Oliver; Sandra Brauer; Tammy Hoffmann; Christopher Beer

2011-01-01

163

A Report of the Responses of Botswana Junior Secondary School Teachers on the Three Subscales of the Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale (TSES)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The focus of this paper is to present the findings of the study on teacher efficacy and classroom management. To collect data a survey was administered to 1006 Botswana participants. Out of 1006 participants only 6 did not complete the survey. Pearson-product moment correlation was computed to analyze the data using Statistical Package of Social…

Dibapile, Waitshega Tefo Smitta

2012-01-01

164

Fall prevention conceptual framework.  

PubMed

Falls can have lasting psychological and physical consequences, particularly fractures and slow-healing processes, and patients may also lose confidence in walking. Injuries from falls lead to functional decline, institutionalization, higher health care costs, and decreased quality of life. The process related to the problem of patient falls in the hospital, using the nursing model developed by the theorist, Ida Jean Orlando, is explained in this article. The useful tool that provides guidance to marketers in this endeavor is Maslow's hierarchy of needs. During acute illness, individuals are greatly in need of satisfying their physiological needs. If these needs are not met, patients leave the hospital lacking a positive experience. Initial fall risk assessment is critical to plan intervention and individualize care plan. Interventions depend on the severity of fall risk factors. PMID:21537141

Abraham, Sam

2011-01-01

165

Falling Slinky Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Falling Slinky model approximates a slinky using twenty masses connected with light springs. The slinky is suspended from one end and released. Two actions will occur simultaneously when it is released hanging at rest from its equilibrium position - it will fall and it will collapse. What happens to the bottom when it begins its fall? The bottom end will move up initially. The bottom end will move down initially. The bottom end will remain at the same point for a short time before it begins to move. The Falling Slinky model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (Ejs) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double click the ejs_mech_newton_FallingSlinky.jar file to run the program if Java is installed.

Christian, Wolfgang

2009-09-01

166

Effects of a randomized controlled recurrent fall prevention program on risk factors for falls in frail elderly living at home in rural communities.  

PubMed

Background Falling can lead to severe health issues in the elderly and importantly contributes to morbidity, death, immobility, hospitalization, and early entry to long-term care facilities. The aim of this study was to devise a recurrent fall prevention program for elderly women in rural areas. Material and Methods This study adopted an assessor-blinded, randomized, controlled trial methodology. Subjects were enrolled in a 12-week recurrent fall prevention program, which comprised strength training, balance training, and patient education. Muscle strength and endurance of the ankles and the lower extremities, static balance, dynamic balance, depression, compliance with preventive behavior related to falls, fear of falling, and fall self-efficacy at baseline and immediately after the program were assessed. Sixty-two subjects (mean age 69.2±4.3 years old) completed the program - 31 subjects in the experimental group and 31 subjects in the control group. Results When the results of the program in the 2 groups were compared, significant differences were found in ankle heel rise test, lower extremity heel rise test, dynamic balance, depression, compliance with fall preventative behavior, fear of falling, and fall self-efficacy (p<0.05), but no significant difference was found in static balance. Conclusions This study shows that the fall prevention program described effectively improves muscle strength and endurance, balance, and psychological aspects in elderly women with a fall history. PMID:25394805

Jeon, Mi Yang; Jeong, HyeonCheol; Lee, Haneul; Petrofsky, Jerrold; Yim, JongEun

2014-01-01

167

Effects of a Randomized Controlled Recurrent Fall Prevention Program on Risk Factors for Falls in Frail Elderly Living at Home in Rural Communities  

PubMed Central

Background Falling can lead to severe health issues in the elderly and importantly contributes to morbidity, death, immobility, hospitalization, and early entry to long-term care facilities. The aim of this study was to devise a recurrent fall prevention program for elderly women in rural areas. Material/Methods This study adopted an assessor-blinded, randomized, controlled trial methodology. Subjects were enrolled in a 12-week recurrent fall prevention program, which comprised strength training, balance training, and patient education. Muscle strength and endurance of the ankles and the lower extremities, static balance, dynamic balance, depression, compliance with preventive behavior related to falls, fear of falling, and fall self-efficacy at baseline and immediately after the program were assessed. Sixty-two subjects (mean age 69.2±4.3 years old) completed the program – 31 subjects in the experimental group and 31 subjects in the control group. Results When the results of the program in the 2 groups were compared, significant differences were found in ankle heel rise test, lower extremity heel rise test, dynamic balance, depression, compliance with fall preventative behavior, fear of falling, and fall self-efficacy (p<0.05), but no significant difference was found in static balance. Conclusions This study shows that the fall prevention program described effectively improves muscle strength and endurance, balance, and psychological aspects in elderly women with a fall history. PMID:25394805

Jeon, Mi Yang; Jeong, HyeonCheol; Petrofsky, Jerrold; Lee, Haneul; Yim, JongEun

2014-01-01

168

Fall 2014 Transfer Supplemental  

E-print Network

Fall 2014 Transfer Supplemental Applica2on Tutorial #12;t Accessing Your Supplemental Applica2on Click here to access your Supplemental Applica2on. The Supplemental Applica2on must be completed by SDSU upper division transfer applicants

Gallo, Linda C.

169

Falling Loop Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The EJS Falling Loop Model shows a conducting loop falling out of a uniform magnetic field. Users can change the size and orientation of the loop. If Ejs is installed, right-clicking within the plot and selecting âOpen Ejs Modelâ from the pop-up menu item allows for editing of the model. The Falling Loop model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (Ejs) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_em_FallingLoop.jar file will run the program if Java is installed. Ejs is a part of the Open Source Physics Project and is designed to make it easier to access, modify, and generate computer models. Additional Ejs models are available. They can be found by searching ComPADRE for Open Source Physics, OSP, or Ejs.

Cox, Anne

2009-09-24

170

First Aid: Falls  

MedlinePLUS

... First Aid & Safety > Printable Safety Guides > First Aid: Falls Print A A A Text Size What's in this article? What to Do Seek Medical Care Think Prevention! With all the running, climbing, and exploring kids ...

171

Welcome Fall 2007  

E-print Network

Keith Diaz Moore, Chair of the University of Kansas School of Architecture, introduces the new KU Archcast, welcomes students for the fall 2007 semester and announces some accomplishments of faculty and students as well as important dates...

Diaz Moore, Keith

2007-08-15

172

The five-times-sit-to-stand-test (FTSST), the short version of the activities-specific balance confidence (ABC) scale, and fear of falling predict step execution time (SET) in older adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rapid stepping is a common strategy employed by older adults to avoid falls. The relative contributions of dynamic balance, balance confidence and fear of falling to SET, was investigated in older adults. Thirty-three community-dwelling older adults completed tests of SET as well as the FTSST, a test of motor performance associated with dynamic balance. Psychological indicators of balance-related confidence assessed

Allon Goldberg

173

Continuous equilibrium scores: factoring in the time before a fall.  

PubMed

The equilibrium (EQ) score commonly used in computerized dynamic posturography is normalized between 0 and 100, with falls assigned a score of 0. The resulting mixed discrete-continuous distribution limits certain statistical analyses and treats all trials with falls equally. We propose a simple modification of the formula in which peak-to-peak sway data from trials with falls is scaled according the percent of the trial completed to derive a continuous equilibrium (cEQ) score. The cEQ scores for trials without falls remain unchanged from the original methodology. The cEQ factors in the time before a fall and results in a continuous variable retaining the central tendencies of the original EQ distribution. A random set of 5315 Sensory Organization Test trials were pooled that included 81 falls. A comparison of the original and cEQ distributions and their rank ordering demonstrated that trials with falls continue to constitute the lower range of scores with the cEQ methodology. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.997) demonstrates that the cEQ retained near-perfect discrimination between trials with and without falls. We conclude that the cEQ score provides the ability to discriminate between ballistic falls from falls that occur later in the trial. This approach of incorporating time and sway magnitude can be easily extended to enhance other balance tests that include fall data or incomplete trials. PMID:22640866

Wood, Scott J; Reschke, Millard F; Owen Black, F

2012-07-01

174

Person-Environment Congruence and Career Self-Efficacy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Female students (n=200) completed the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy (CDMSE) Scale and Career Search Efficacy Scale. Undecided women had lower CDMSE and search self-efficacy than those who had chosen a college major, regardless of whether the major was congruent with their personality type. (Contains 25 references.) (SK)

Srsic, Colby Sandoval; Walsh, W. Bruce

2001-01-01

175

“Lest anyone should fall”: A middle knowledge perspective on perseverance and apostolic warnings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adherents of the doctrine of the perseverance of the saints typically maintain that, once a person is truly regenerate, not merely will he not fall away, but that he literally cannot fall away from grace and be lost. Usually this conclusion is thought to follow from the irresistible character and intrinsic efficacy of God's grace: a person who has been

1991-01-01

176

2005 Fall Meeting Cite abstracts as Author(s) (2005), Title, Eos Trans. AGU, 86(52), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract xxxxx-xx  

E-print Network

2005 Fall Meeting Cite abstracts as Author(s) (2005), Title, Eos Trans. AGU, 86(52), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract xxxxx-xx HR: 11:25h AN: T52A-05 TI: Identification of a large-scale, N-S extensional (0905) DE: 8175 Tectonics and landscape evolution DE: 9320 Asia SC: Tectonophysics [T] MN: Fall Meeting

Kidd, William S. F.

177

Fear of Falling and Related Activity Restriction Among Middle-Aged African Americans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. The prevalence of fear of falling and related activity restriction, and their joint distribution with falls and falls efficacy, have been inadequately addressed in population-based studies of middle-aged and African-American groups. Methods. The African American Health project is a population-based panel study of 998 African Americans born in 1936-1950 from two areas of metropolitan St. Louis (an impoverished inner-city

Margaret-Mary G. Wilson; Douglas K. Miller; Elena M. Andresen; Theodore K. Malmstrom; J. Philip Miller; Fredric D. Wolinsky

2005-01-01

178

[Efficacy studies].  

PubMed

Pravafenix(®) is a fixed-dose combination of 40mg of pravastatin and 160 mg of fenofibrate. The rationale behind the use of Pravafenix(®) is based on the increased residual cardiovascular risk observed in high risk patients with hypertriglyceridemia and/or low HDL cholesterol levels despite treatment with statins in monotherapy. In this article, we review the available evidence on the clinical efficacy of Pravafenix(®), which shows complementary benefits in the overall lipid profile of high risk patients with mixed dyslipidemia not controlled with 40-mg pravastatin or 20-mg simvastatin. PMID:25043542

Pedro-Botet, Juan; Flores-Le Roux, Juana A

2014-07-01

179

Free Fall Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This simulation allows students to examine the motion of an object in free fall. Download below. The user can control the initial height (0-20m), set an initial velocity from -20 to 20 m/s, and change the rate of gravitational acceleration from zero to 20 m/s/s (Earth's gravitational constant is ~9.8 m/s/s). Students can also launch the ball upward from any point on the line of motion. The free fall is displayed as a motion diagram, while graphs are simultaneously displayed showing position vs. time, velocity vs. time, and acceleration vs. time. See Annotations for an editor-recommended tutorial that further explains how graphs are used to represent free fall motion. This item was created with Easy Java Simulations (EJS), a modeling tool that allows users without formal programming experience to generate computer models and simulations. To run the simulation, simply click the Java Archive file below.

Duffy, Andrew

2014-06-06

180

Transfer effects of fall training on balance performance and spatiotemporal gait parameters in healthy community-dwelling older adults: a pilot study.  

PubMed

This study examined transfer effects of fall training on fear of falling (Falls Efficacy Scale-International [FES-I]), balance performance, and spatiotemporal gait characteristics in older adults. Eighteen community-dwelling older adults (ages 65-85) were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. The intervention group completed 12 training sessions (60 min, 6 weeks). During pre- and posttesting, we measured FES-I, balance performance (double limb, closed eyes; single limb, open eyes; double limb, open eyes with motor-interfered task), and gait parameters (e.g., velocity; cadence; stride time, stride width, and stride length; variability of stride time and stride length) under single- and motor-interfered tasks. Dual tasks were applied to appraise improvements of cognitive processing during balance and gait. FES-I (p = .33) and postural sway did not significantly change (0.36 < p < .79). Trends toward significant interaction effects were found for step width during normal walking and stride length variability during the motor dual task (p = .05, ?p 2 = .22). Fall training did not sufficiently improve fear of falling, balance, or gait performance under single- or dual-task conditions in healthy older adults. PMID:23881433

Donath, Lars; Faude, Oliver; Bridenbaugh, Stephanie A; Roth, Ralf; Soltermann, Martin; Kressig, Reto W; Zahner, Lukas

2014-07-01

181

Teacher Sense of Efficacy for Literacy Instruction and Student Reading Achievement in Grades Three through Eight  

E-print Network

& Gibson, 1986), a global measure of teacher efficacy was used for data collection. Bandura (2001) highlighted the need for a context specific measure when measuring efficacy, "Scales of perceived self-efficacy must be tailored to the particular domains...

Poggio, Jennifer Marie

2012-05-31

182

Can sit-to-stand lower limb muscle power predict fall status?  

PubMed

Sit-to-stand (STS) movements are essential for daily activities. Failure to perform STS movements efficiently and smoothly may lead to falls. In this study, we developed a forceplate to analyze vertical ground reaction force (VGRF), STS duration and generated muscle power to investigate which parameters were fall status predictors. A total of 105 participants were included in this study and were grouped into those (1) aged between 20 and 30 years (Young), (2) aged above 65 years without a history of falling (Non-fallers) and (3) aged above 65 with a history of falling in the past 12 months (Fallers). The results indicated a significantly higher maximal lower limb muscle power (MP) for the Young (9.05 ± 3.66 W/kg), followed by Non-fallers (5.50 ± 2.02W/kg) and Fallers (3.66 ± 1.45 W/kg) as well as higher modified falls efficacy scale (MFES) scores for the Young (Young: 9.88 ± 0.10; Non-fallers: 6.27 ± 1.40; Fallers: 4.83 ± 0.89) and shorter times for the five times sit-to-stand test (FSTST) for the young (Young: 6.09 ± 2.20 s; Non-fallers: 15.65 ± 3.30s; Fallers: 19.82 ± 4.46 s). There was a significant difference between the Young group and the Non-fallers in the maximal vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) (138.79 ± 24.20 N/BW in Young, 117.51 ± 8.57 N/BW in old Non-fallers, p < 0.01), and there was a significant difference between the Non-fallers and the Fallers in the duration of the STS movement (2.74 ± 0.87 s for the Non-fallers, 4.27 ± 2.56 s for the Fallers, p < 0.01). The regression analysis results further indicated that only MP and the STS stabilization phase could differentiate individuals who had past fall events. Therefore, the equipment we developed could potentially be useful in the assessment and monitoring of balance and the risk of falling in older people. PMID:24974126

Cheng, Yuan-Yang; Wei, Shun-Hwa; Chen, Po-Yin; Tsai, Mei-Wun; Cheng, I-Chung; Liu, Ding-Hao; Kao, Chung-Lan

2014-07-01

183

CHEM 6482 Fall SYLLABUS  

E-print Network

will be based on graded class assignments and participation (25%), a short proposal (20%), a written midterm adjustments as the course evolves. Class participation is expected, so the schedule will conform somewhatCHEM 6482 Fall SYLLABUS Kinetics and Reaction Dynamics Class

Sherrill, David

184

Refinery Outages: Fall 2014  

EIA Publications

This report examines refinery outages planned for Fall 2014 and the potential implications for available refinery capacity, petroleum product markets and supply of gasoline and middle distillate fuel oil (diesel, jet fuel, and heating oil). EIA believes that dissemination of such analyses can be beneficial to market participants who may otherwise be unable to access such information.

2014-01-01

185

Editors' Fall Picks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Library Journal's" review editors select fall titles readers won't want to miss--"Waiting on a Train: The Embattled Future of Passenger Rail Service" (James McCommons); "Happy" (Alex Lemon); "Free for All: Joe Papp, the Public, and the Greatest Theater Story Ever Told" (Kenneth Turan & Joseph Papp); "In My Father's Shadow: A Daughter Remembers…

Heilbrun, Margaret; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Kuzyk, Raya; Roncevic, Mirela; Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara

2009-01-01

186

Stick balancing, falls and Dragon-Kings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The extent to which the occurrence of falls, the dominant feature of human attempts to balance a stick at their fingertip, can be predicted is examined in the context of the "Dragon-King" hypothesis. For skilled stick balancers, fluctuations in the controlled variable, namely the vertical displacement angle ?, exhibit power law behaviors. When stick balancing is made less stable by either decreasing the length of the stick or by requiring the subject to balance the stick on the surface of a table tennis racket, systematic departures from the power law behaviors are observed in the range of large ?. This observation raises the possibility that the presence of departures from the power law in the large length scale region, possibly Dragon-Kings, may identify situations in which the occurrence of a fall is more imminent. However, whether or not Dragon-Kings are observed, there is a Weibull-type survival function for stick falling. The possibility that increased risk of falling can, at least to some extent, be predicted from fluctuations in the controlled variable before the event occurs has important implications for the development of preventative strategies for the management of phenomena ranging from earthquakes to epileptic seizures to falls in the elderly.

Cabrera, J. L.; Milton, J. G.

2012-05-01

187

MUD and Self Efficacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Applying Bandura's social learning theory, this paper proposes a theoretical framework for analysing the effect of MUD playing on users' self efficacy. Three types of self efficacy – computer self efficacy (CSE), social self efficacy (SSE) and generalized self efficacy (GSE) – are introduced. A possible hypothesis – successful performance, vicarious experience, hearing positive verbal persuasion and massive exposure during

Kwan Min Lee

2000-01-01

188

Fall business meeting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As an alternative to the usual luncheon and business meeting, AGU sections had wine and cheese parties at the 1987 Fall Meeting. The Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism (GP) Section preceded this informal gathering with its annual fall business meeting on Thursday, December 12. It was attended by some 60 people.The first order of business was a comment by Richard Blakely (U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, Calif.) thanking all those who assisted with and wrote articles for the GP section o f the U.S. National Report to the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG). Then Subir Banerjee (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) announced that the final report of the Asilomar Workshop on Rock Magnetism was available. Copies were passed out at the meeting; additional copies may be obtained from Banerjee or from AGU Headquarters.

189

Ejs Free Fall Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Ejs Free Fall model displays the dynamics of a ball dropped near the surface of Earth onto a platform. The initial conditions for the ball are zero initial velocities in the x and y directions. The coefficient of restitution for the ballâs collision with the platform is less than one. The initial height of the ball can be changed by dragging it when the simulation is paused. You can modify this simulation if you have Ejs installed by right-clicking within the plot and selecting âOpen Ejs Modelâ from the pop-up menu item. Ejs Free Fall model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (Ejs) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_newton_FreeFall.jar file will run the program if Java is installed. Ejs is a part of the Open Source Physics Project and is designed to make it easier to access, modify, and generate computer models. Additional Ejs models for Newtonian mechanics are available. They can be found by searching ComPADRE for Open Source Physics, OSP, or Ejs.

Christian, Wolfgang

2008-06-03

190

Measurement of Self-Efficacy for Diet-Related Behaviors among Elementary School Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the development of the Child Dietary Self-Efficacy Scale (CDSS) to measure self-efficacy for selecting and consuming healthful food. Third and fourth graders completed the CDSS, and results revealed acceptable estimates of internal consistency for the dietary self-efficacy scale. Self-efficacy strongly related to students' usual food…

Parcel, Guy S.; And Others

1995-01-01

191

BA General FAU Dept. of Theatre and Dance Created Fall 2009, Modified, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013  

E-print Network

Movement for Actors 3 TPA 4601 Stage Management 3 And one of the courses below DAA 2100 Modern Dance I 3BA General FAU Dept. of Theatre and Dance Created Fall 2009, Modified, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall DAA 2200 Ballet I 3 DAA 2520 Tap I 3 TPP 3251 Musical Theatre Techniques 3 Total 21 Credit Hours

Fernandez, Eduardo

192

Long-distance free fall  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an analysis of a situation described in Milton's epic poem "Paradise Lost" in which we calculate the distance required for a nine-day free-fall from rest to the Earth. The resulting method is completely general, and can be applied to free-fall toward other bodies and to near-Earth free-fall as well.

Gallant, Joseph; Carlson, James

1999-03-01

193

2005 Fall Meeting Search Results  

E-print Network

2005 Fall Meeting Search Results Cite abstracts as Author(s) (2005), Title, Eos Trans. AGU, 86(52), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract xxxxx-xx Your query was: de boer HR: 16:30h AN: A34B-03 TI: Observational/radiation interaction DE: 0394 Instruments and techniques SC: Atmospheric Sciences [A] MN: Fall Meeting 2005 New Search

Eloranta, Edwin W.

194

2007 Fall Meeting Search Results  

E-print Network

2007 Fall Meeting Search Results Cite abstracts as Author(s) (2007), Title, Eos Trans. AGU, 88(52), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract xxxxx-xx Your query was: ildefonse HR: 1340h AN: T53B-1306 TI (0450, 1034, 3017, 3616, 4832, 8135) SC: Tectonophysics [T] MN: 2007 Fall Meeting New Search #12;

Demouchy, Sylvie

195

2006 Fall Meeting Search Results  

E-print Network

2006 Fall Meeting Search Results Cite abstracts as Author(s) (2006), Title, Eos Trans. AGU, 87(52), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract xxxxx-xx Your query was: "T11A-0425" The selected databases contain one and weathering DE: 5475 Tectonics (8149) SC: Tectonophysics [T] MN: 2006 Fall Meeting #12;

Zreda, Marek

196

[Fall risk and fracture. Aging and fall/fracture].  

PubMed

Fall deteriorates QOL and ADL of elderly people, especially when they suffer from hip and vertebral fractures. It is not easy to identify the cause of falling, because falling usually result from multiple factors. Among various potential causes, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, medication of hypnotic drugs, and environmental factors are important, because they are frequent and can be modifiable. When evaluating fall risks, grasping power, one-leg standing time, timed up&go test, are useful. On the other hand, fall risk index, 22-item self-assessment test, is easy and even better in predicting future falls. In the Cochrane systematic review article 2009, exercise such as Tai-Chi, withdrawal of hypnotic drugs, and vitamin D supplementation are shown to prevent falls in community-dwelling elderly. PMID:23628677

Kozaki, Koichi

2013-05-01

197

Hospital falls: a persistent problem.  

PubMed

During a 22-month period in 1981-82, 250 falls were recorded at a 152-bed acute care specialty hospital in a United States metropolitan area. Rates were highest for patients age 65 years and older and for patients admitted with mental disorders. Patients who had fallen once had a subsequent fall rate of 91.7 per 1,000 patients compared to an overall rate of 18.7 for first falls. Half the falls occurred in or enroute to the private bathroom attached to each room. Only three falls resulted in injury sufficient to prolong hospital stay. PMID:4003655

Morgan, V R; Mathison, J H; Rice, J C; Clemmer, D I

1985-07-01

198

Preventing falls with vitamin D.  

PubMed

Falls are the number one cause for injury-related morbidity and mortality in West Virginia's seniors. Multiple independent variables contribute to the risk of a fall: previous falls, alterations in balance and vision, impairments in gait and strength, and medications most highly correlate with the risk for a fall. Vitamin D supplementation is emerging as an easy, safe and well-tolerated fall reduction/prevention strategy due to the beneficial effects on the musculoskeletal system with improvements in strength, function and navigational abilities. From meta-analysis data, maximal fall reduction benefit in seniors is achieved when correcting vitamin D deficiency and when using adjunctive calcium supplementation. It is therefore recommended that practitioners in our state screen for fall risks and consider the addition of supplementation protocols that provide sufficient vitamin D and calcium to our seniors. PMID:24984399

Shuler, Franklin D; Schlierf, Thomas; Wingate, Matthew

2014-01-01

199

The Way Things Fall  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web page, authored and curated by David P. Stern, provides an introduction to the motion of objects due to gravity. Topics covered include free fall and acceleration due to gravity, with or without an initial velocity, and the effects of air resistance. Simple equations are integrated along with a short experiments related to Galileo's classic ramp experiment. A lesson plan for teachers is provided. This item is part of an extensive collection, "From Stargazers to Starships" that uses space exploration and space science to introduce concepts in physics and astronomy. Translations in Spanish and French are available.

Stern, David P. (David Peter), 1931-

2009-04-29

200

`In free fall'  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Physicists in the lead of a fiction book or a play, that's a rare event! Writers in general do not understand physics, while physicists seldom have the talent of writing for a large audience. So when it happens, we should rejoice. The up-and-coming German author Juli Zeh [1] (1974), who studied law, has succeeded in combining beautiful prose, psychological drama, crime and physics in a challenging book `In free fall' [2]. A good friend of hers, Bettina Bruinier, has put the core message of the book into a compelling play in the `Volkstheater' in Munich [1]. Yes, it can be done.

Beijerinck, Herman C. W.

2014-01-01

201

The Sky is Falling  

E-print Network

such solution. Cloud-seeding introduces foreign particles into an unproductive cloud, enhancing the formation of water droplets. In simpler terms, it is a way to produce rain by increasing the size of water droplets in a cloud that otherwise aren't heavy... into the core of the cloud where tiny water droplets, which can cre- ate rain, are abundant. Wing-tipped generators The Sky is Falling Using cloud-seeding technology to produce rain containing acetone and seeding material can also outfit the aircraft...

Crawford, Amanda

2005-01-01

202

ASSESSMENT: Coaching Efficacy As Indicators Of Coach Education Program Needs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the study was to identify the level of coaching efficacy among a group of high school coaches so as to gain an insight for planning future coach preparation programs. In this study, the Coaching Efficacy Scale was used to assess the efficacy of high school coaches in four dimensions: Motivating Athletes, Strategy Use, Coaching Techniques, and Character

Lena Fung

2003-01-01

203

Reducing falls and fall-related injuries in mental health: a 1-year multihospital falls collaborative.  

PubMed

Despite much research on falls occurring on medical-surgical units and in long-term care settings, falls on inpatient psychiatry units are understudied. On the basis of fall injury program characteristics across multiple inpatient psychiatry units, we developed and implemented an operational strategic plan to address each falls prevention program element and enhance program infrastructure and capacity. Expert faculty provided lectures, coaching, and mentoring through biweekly conference calls and collaborative e-mail exchange. Findings support continued efforts to integrate measures to reduce serious fall-related injuries. PMID:24149183

Quigley, Patricia A; Barnett, Scott D; Bulat, Tatjana; Friedman, Yvonne

2014-01-01

204

Thermal scale modeling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Complex system study data indicate that factors associated with multilayer insulation pose major problem in scale modeling, that numerical analysis aids correction for known compromises of scaling criteria, and that probable errors in scale modeling experiments fall within range predicted by statistical analysis.

Mac Gregor, R. K.

1971-01-01

205

Preventing falls and fall-related injuries in hospitals.  

PubMed

Falls are a widespread concern in hospitals settings, with whole hospital rates of between 3 and 5 falls per 1000 bed-days representing around a million inpatient falls occurring in the United States each year. Between 1% and 3% of falls in hospitals result in fracture, but even minor injuries can cause distress and delay rehabilitation. Risk factors most consistently found in the inpatient population include a history of falling, muscle weakness, agitation and confusion, urinary incontinence or frequency, sedative medication, and postural hypotension. Based on systematic reviews, recent research, and clinical and ethical considerations, the most appropriate approach to fall prevention in the hospital environment includes multifactorial interventions with multiprofessional input. There is also some evidence that delirium avoidance programs, reducing sedative and hypnotic medication, in-depth patient education, and sustained exercise programs may reduce falls as single interventions. There is no convincing evidence that hip protectors, movement alarms, or low-low beds reduce falls or injury in the hospital setting. International approaches to developing and maintaining a fall prevention program suggest that commitment of management and a range of clinical and support staff is crucial to success. PMID:20934615

Oliver, David; Healey, Frances; Haines, Terry P

2010-11-01

206

The 6PACK programme to decrease fall-related injuries in acute hospitals: protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and aimsIn-hospital fall-related injuries are a source of personal harm, preventable hospitalisation costs, and access block through increased length of stay. Despite increased fall prevention awareness and activity over the last decade, rates of reported fall-related fractures in hospitals appear not to have decreased. This cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT) aims to determine the efficacy of the 6-PACK programme

Anna Barker; Caroline Brand; Terry Haines; Keith Hill; Sandy Brauer; Damien Jolley; Mari Botti; Robert Cumming; Patricia M Livingston; Cathie Sherrington; Silva Zavarsek; Renata Morello; Jeannette Kamar

2011-01-01

207

Falls prevention in persons with intellectual disabilities: development, implementation, and process evaluation of a tailored multifactorial fall risk assessment and intervention strategy.  

PubMed

In the general elderly population, multifactorial screening of fall risks has been shown to be effective. Although persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) fall more often, there appears to be no targeted screening for them. The aim of this study was to develop, implement, and evaluate a falls clinic for persons with ID. Based on guidelines, literature, and expert meetings, a falls clinic for persons with ID was developed. In total, 26 persons with ID and a fall history participated in the study. Process evaluation was conducted with evaluation forms and focus groups. Fifty interventions (0-8 per person) were prescribed. The (para)medical experts, clients, and caregivers described the falls clinic as useful. Advice for improvement included minor changes to clinic content. Logistics were the largest challenge for the falls clinic, for example organizing meetings, completing questionnaires prior to meetings, and ensuring that a personal caregiver accompanied the person with ID. Furthermore, the need for a screening tool to determine whether a person would benefit from the falls clinic was reported. In conclusion, the falls clinic for persons with ID was considered feasible and useful. Some minor content changes are necessary and there is a need for a screening tool. However, logistics concerning the falls clinic need improvement. More attention and time for multifactorial and multidisciplinary treatment of persons with ID is necessary. Implementation on a larger scale would also make it possible to investigate the effectiveness of the falls clinic with regard to the prevention of falls in this population. PMID:23792376

Smulders, Ellen; Enkelaar, Lotte; Schoon, Yvonne; Geurts, Alexander C; van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Henny; Weerdesteyn, Vivian

2013-09-01

208

The Fall of Enron  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The very mention of Enron is enough to make some people rather upset, and in some circles, it is probably best not to bring up the name of this corporation at all. But, with an eye towards informing the public, the Houston Chronicle has taken on this thorny topic by creating this rather comprehensive and intelligent look at the fall of this once-mighty corporation. On the site, visitors can learn about the events leading up to the companyâÂÂs downfall through a timeline of events and past news stories created by staff members at the newspaper. The site also contains a tremendous amount of material on the current trial of Enron executives Kenneth Lay and Jeff Skilling. Coverage includes blogs containing observations from noted attorneys, transcripts of court documents and testimony, as well as photo galleries.

2006-01-01

209

Coins falling in water  

E-print Network

When a coin falls in water, its trajectory is one of four types determined by its dimensionless moment of inertia $I^\\ast$ and Reynolds number Re: (A) steady; (B) fluttering; (C) chaotic; or (D) tumbling. The dynamics induced by the interaction of the water with the surface of the coin, however, makes the exact landing site difficult to predict a priori. Here, we describe a carefully designed experiment in which a coin is dropped repeatedly in water, so that we can determine the probability density functions (pdf) associated with the landing positions for each of the four trajectory types, all of which are radially symmetric about the center-drop line. In the case of the steady mode, the pdf is approximately Gaussian distributed, with variances that are small, indicating that the coin is most likely to land at the center, right below the point it is dropped from. For the other falling modes, the center is one of the least likely landing sites. Indeed, the pdf's of the fluttering, chaotic and tumbling modes are characterized by a "dip" around the center. For the tumbling mode, the pdf is a ring configuration about the center-line, with a ring width that depends on the dimensionless parameters $I^\\ast$ and Re and height from which the coin is dropped. For the chaotic mode, the pdf is generally a broadband distribution spread out radially symmetrically about the center-line. For the steady and fluttering modes, the coin never flips, so the coin lands with the same side up as was dropped. For the chaotic mode, the probability of heads or tails is close to 0.5. In the case of the tumbling mode, the probability of heads or tails based on the height of the drop which determines whether the coin flips an even or odd number of times during descent.

Luke Heisinger; Paul K Newton; Eva Kanso

2013-12-08

210

Assessing Regulatory Emotional Self-Efficacy in Three Countries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Regulatory Emotional Self-Efficacy (RESE) scale was developed to assess perceived self-efficacy in managing negative (NEG) and in expressing positive (POS) affect (G. V. Caprara & M. Gerbino, 2001). In this study of young adults, the factorial structure of the RESE scale was found to be similar in Italy, the United States, and Bolivia: In…

Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Giunta, Laura Di; Eisenberg, Nancy; Gerbino, Maria; Pastorelli, Concetta; Tramontano, Carlo

2008-01-01

211

High-altitude free fall  

Microsoft Academic Search

The problem of an object falling from high altitudes where the variation of atmospheric pressure cannot be neglected is investigated. The equation of motion for the variation of the velocity of the object as a function of altitude is solved exactly. The results show that, unlike an object falling in a uniform atmosphere whose speed monotonically increases and approaches the

Pirooz Mohazzabi; James H. Shea

1996-01-01

212

Persistence. Snapshot Report, Fall 2011  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Today's college student is not your '60s drop-out. In 2010, college students tended to stay enrolled (i.e., persist), even if it was in a different school, according to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. For a student enrolled in the fall, persistence is defined as either continued enrollment during the next term after the fall or…

National Student Clearinghouse, 2011

2011-01-01

213

Fall velocity indicator\\/viewer  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fall velocity indicator\\/viewer having a sampling compartment, a camera system, and an elongated tunnel for interconnecting the camera system to the sampling compartment is described. The camera system includes a video camera for continuously monitoring snowflakes as they naturally fall through a viewing area in the sampling compartment. The snowflakes are illuminated by a pair of strobe lights directly

R. O. Berthel; V. G. Plank; S. H. Jones; A. J. Matthews

1985-01-01

214

Relationship of Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Urban Public School Students to Performance on a High-Stakes Mathematics Test  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of "self-efficacy" for "Enlisting Social Resources, Self-Regulatory Efficacy, self-efficacy" for "Self-Regulated Learning," and "self-efficacy" for "Academic Achievement" (Bandura's Children's "Self-Efficacy Scale," 2006) of urban public school students to performance on the high stakes…

Afolabi, Kolajo A.

2010-01-01

215

Fall prevention in the elderly.  

PubMed

Falls are frequent in the elderly and affect mortality, morbidity, loss of functional capacity and institutionalization. In the older patient the incidence of falls can sometimes be underestimated, even in the absence of a clear cognitive impairment, because it is often difficult to reconstruct the dynamics. It is quite common that forms due to syncope are associated with retrograde amnesia and in 40 to 60% of the cases falls happen in the absence of witnesses. The pathogenesis of falls is often multifactorial, due to physiological age-related changes or more properly pathological factors, or due to the environment. The identification of risk factors is essential in the planning of preventive measures. Syncope is one of major causes of falls. About 20% of cardiovascular syncope in patients older than 70 appears as a fall and more than 20% of older people with Carotid Sinus Syndrome complain of falls as well as syncope. These data clearly state that older patients with history of falls should undergo a cardiovascular and neuroautonomic assessment besides the survey of other risk factors. Multifactorial assessment requires a synergy of various specialists. The geriatrician coordinates the multidisciplinary intervention in order to make the most effective evaluation of the risk of falling, searching for all predisposing factors, aiming towards a program of prevention. In clear pathological conditions it is possible to enact a specific treatment. Particular attention must indeed be paid to the re-evaluation of drug therapy, with dose adjustments or withdrawal especially for antihypertensive, diuretics and benzodiazepines. The Guidelines of the American Geriatrics Society recommend modification of environmental hazards, training paths, hip protectors and appropriate use of support tools (sticks, walkers), which can be effective elements of a multifactorial intervention program. Balance exercises are also recommended. In conclusion, an initial assessment, supported by a comprehensive cardiovascular and neuroautonomic evaluation, allows for reaching a final diagnosis in most cases, demonstrating a key role in the real identification of the etiology of the fall and implementing the treatment measures. PMID:24133524

Ungar, Andrea; Rafanelli, Martina; Iacomelli, Iacopo; Brunetti, Maria Angela; Ceccofiglio, Alice; Tesi, Francesca; Marchionni, Niccolò

2013-05-01

216

The effects of high frequency subthalamic stimulation on balance performance and fear of falling in patients with Parkinson's disease  

PubMed Central

Background Balance impairment is one of the most distressing symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) even with pharmacological treatment (levodopa). A complementary treatment is high frequency stimulation in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Whether STN stimulation improves postural control is under debate. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of STN stimulation alone on balance performance as assessed with clinical performance tests, subjective ratings of fear of falling and posturography. Methods Ten patients (median age 66, range 59–69 years) with bilateral STN stimulation for a minimum of one year, had their anti-PD medications withdrawn overnight. Assessments were done both with the STN stimulation turned OFF and ON (start randomized). In both test conditions, the following were assessed: motor symptoms (descriptive purposes), clinical performance tests, fear of falling ratings, and posturography with and without vibratory proprioceptive disturbance. Results STN stimulation alone significantly (p = 0.002) increased the scores of the Berg balance scale, and the median increase was 6 points. The results of all timed performance tests, except for sharpened Romberg, were significantly (p ? 0.016) improved. The patients rated their fear of falling as less severe, and the total score of the Falls-Efficacy Scale(S) increased (p = 0.002) in median with 54 points. All patients completed posturography when the STN stimulation was turned ON, but three patients were unable to do so when it was turned OFF. The seven patients with complete data showed no statistical significant difference (p values ? 0.109) in torque variance values when comparing the two test situations. This applied both during quiet stance and during the periods with vibratory stimulation, and it was irrespective of visual input and sway direction. Conclusion In this sample, STN stimulation alone significantly improved the results of the clinical performance tests that mimic activities in daily living. This improvement was further supported by the patients' ratings of fear of falling, which were less severe with the STN stimulation turned ON. Posturography could not be performed by three out of the ten patients when the stimulation was turned OFF. The posturography results of the seven patients with complete data showed no significant differences due to STN stimulation. PMID:19405954

Nilsson, Maria H; Fransson, Per-Anders; Jarnlo, Gun-Britt; Magnusson, Måns; Rehncrona, Stig

2009-01-01

217

Efficacy of climate forcings  

Microsoft Academic Search

We use a global climate model to compare the effectiveness of many climate forcing agents for producing climate change. We find a substantial range in the “efficacy” of different forcings, where the efficacy is the global temperature response per unit forcing relative to the response to CO2 forcing. Anthropogenic CH4 has efficacy ?110%, which increases to ?145% when its indirect

J. Hansen; M. Sato; R. Ruedy; L. Nazarenko; A. Lacis; G. A. Schmidt; G. Russell; I. Aleinov; M. Bauer; S. Bauer; N. Bell; B. Cairns; V. Canuto; M. Chandler; Y. Cheng; A. Del Genio; G. Faluvegi; E. Fleming; A. Friend; T. Hall; C. Jackman; M. Kelley; N. Kiang; D. Koch; J. Lean; J. Lerner; K. Lo; S. Menon; R. Miller; P. Minnis; T. Novakov; V. Oinas; Ja. Perlwitz; Ju. Perlwitz; D. Rind; A. Romanou; D. Shindell; P. Stone; S. Sun; N. Tausnev; D. Thresher; B. Wielicki; T. Wong; M. Yao; S. Zhang

2005-01-01

218

Efficacy of climate forcings  

Microsoft Academic Search

We use a global climate model to compare the effectiveness of many climate forcing agents for producing climate change. We find a substantial range in the ``efficacy'' of different forcings, where the efficacy is the global temperature response per unit forcing relative to the response to CO2 forcing. Anthropogenic CH4 has efficacy ~110%, which increases to ~145% when its indirect

J. Hansen; M. Sato; R. Ruedy; L. Nazarenko; A. Lacis; G. A. Schmidt; G. Russell; I. Aleinov; M. Bauer; S. Bauer; N. Bell; B. Cairns; V. Canuto; M. Chandler; Y. Cheng; A. Del Genio; G. Faluvegi; E. Fleming; A. Friend; T. Hall; C. Jackman; M. Kelley; N. Kiang; D. Koch; J. Lean; J. Lerner; K. Lo; S. Menon; R. Miller; P. Minnis; T. Novakov; V. Oinas; Ja. Perlwitz; Ju. Perlwitz; D. Rind; A. Romanou; D. Shindell; P. Stone; S. Sun; N. Tausnev; D. Thresher; B. Wielicki; T. Wong; M. Yao; S. Zhang

2005-01-01

219

Applications of Self-Efficacy Theory to the Career Assessment of Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summarizes Bandura's self-efficacy theory. Reviews occupational, scientific-technical, and mathematics self-efficacy, Holland's hexagonal model, the Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale, and the relationship of self-efficacy to vocational interests. Considers the applicability of these concepts to women's career development and assessment. (SK)

Betz, Nancy E.; Hackett, Gail

1997-01-01

220

A best practice fall prevention exercise program to improve balance, strength / power, and psychosocial health in older adults: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background With increasing age neuromuscular deficits (e.g., sarcopenia) may result in impaired physical performance and an increased risk for falls. Prominent intrinsic fall-risk factors are age-related decreases in balance and strength / power performance as well as cognitive decline. Additional studies are needed to develop specifically tailored exercise programs for older adults that can easily be implemented into clinical practice. Thus, the objective of the present trial is to assess the effects of a fall prevention program that was developed by an interdisciplinary expert panel on measures of balance, strength / power, body composition, cognition, psychosocial well-being, and falls self-efficacy in healthy older adults. Additionally, the time-related effects of detraining are tested. Methods/Design Healthy old people (n?=?54) between the age of 65 to 80 years will participate in this trial. The testing protocol comprises tests for the assessment of static / dynamic steady-state balance (i.e., Sharpened Romberg Test, instrumented gait analysis), proactive balance (i.e., Functional Reach Test; Timed Up and Go Test), reactive balance (i.e., perturbation test during bipedal stance; Push and Release Test), strength (i.e., hand grip strength test; Chair Stand Test), and power (i.e., Stair Climb Power Test; countermovement jump). Further, body composition will be analysed using a bioelectrical impedance analysis system. In addition, questionnaires for the assessment of psychosocial (i.e., World Health Organisation Quality of Life Assessment-Bref), cognitive (i.e., Mini Mental State Examination), and fall risk determinants (i.e., Fall Efficacy Scale – International) will be included in the study protocol. Participants will be randomized into two intervention groups or the control / waiting group. After baseline measures, participants in the intervention groups will conduct a 12-week balance and strength / power exercise intervention 3 times per week, with each training session lasting 30 min. (actual training time). One intervention group will complete an extensive supervised training program, while the other intervention group will complete a short version ('3 times 3’) that is home-based and controlled by weekly phone calls. Post-tests will be conducted right after the intervention period. Additionally, detraining effects will be measured 12 weeks after program cessation. The control group / waiting group will not participate in any specific intervention during the experimental period, but will receive the extensive supervised program after the experimental period. Discussion It is expected that particularly the supervised combination of balance and strength / power training will improve performance in variables of balance, strength / power, body composition, cognitive function, psychosocial well-being, and falls self-efficacy of older adults. In addition, information regarding fall risk assessment, dose–response-relations, detraining effects, and supervision of training will be provided. Further, training-induced health-relevant changes, such as improved performance in activities of daily living, cognitive function, and quality of life, as well as a reduced risk for falls may help to lower costs in the health care system. Finally, practitioners, therapists, and instructors will be provided with a scientifically evaluated feasible, safe, and easy-to-administer exercise program for fall prevention. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01906034 PMID:24106864

2013-01-01

221

Search Results Cite abstracts as Author(s) (2010), Title, Abstract xxxxx-xxxx presented at 2010 Fall  

E-print Network

2010 Fall Meeting Search Results Cite abstracts as Author(s) (2010), Title, Abstract xxxxx-xxxx presented at 2010 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 13-17 Dec. Your query was: "Ng, C" HR: 0800h AN (SH) MN: 2010 Fall Meeting New Search AGU Home High-Lundquist Number Scaling Analysis on the Parker

Ng, Chung-Sang

222

Falls in elderly hemodialysis patients.  

PubMed

The elderly, (age ? 65 years) hemodialysis (HD) patient population is growing rapidly across the world. The risk of accidental falls is very high in this patient population due to multiple factors which include aging, underlying renal disease and adverse events associated with HD treatments. Falls, the most common cause of fatal injury among elderly, not only increase morbidity and mortality, but also increase costs to the health system. Prediction of falls and interventions to prevent or minimize fall risk and associated complications will be a major step in helping these patients as well as decreasing financial and social burdens. Thus, it is vital to learn how to approach this important problem. In this review, we will summarize the epidemiology, risk factors, pathophysiology and complications of falls in elderly HD patients. We will also focus on available methods to assess and predict the patients at higher risk of falling and will provide recommendations for interventions to reduce the occurrence of falls in this population. PMID:21750022

Abdel-Rahman, E M; Turgut, F; Turkmen, K; Balogun, R A

2011-10-01

223

After a fall in the hospital  

MedlinePLUS

Falls can be a serious problem in the hospital. Factors that increase the risk of falls include: ... from illness or surgery Being in new surroundings Hospital staff often do not see patients fall. But ...

224

Validation of a U.S. Adult Social Self-Efficacy Inventory in Chinese Populations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors report a series of efforts to validate a U.S. adult social self-efficacy inventory, the Perceived Social Self-Efficacy scale (PSSE), in Chinese populations. They argue that the construct underlying the PSSE scale constitutes an important component of Chinese adult social self-efficacy, which was confirmed in focus group discussions.…

Fan, Jinyan; Meng, Hui; Gao, Xiangping; Lopez, Felix J.; Liu, Cong

2010-01-01

225

Coaching Efficacy as a Predictor of Leadership Style in Intercollegiate Athletics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present research examined the relationship between the efficacy of intercollegiate coaches and their leadership style. Specific predictions between the multidimensional nature of efficacy and leadership were made. An international sample of 224 coaches (165 male, 58 female) completed Feltz et al.'s Coaching Efficacy Scale, and the Leadership Scale for Sports (Chelladurai & Saleh, 1980). Two of the three regression

Philip J. Sullivan; Aubrey Kent

2003-01-01

226

Field Theory as Free Fall  

E-print Network

It is shown that the classical field equations pertaining to gravity coupled to other bosonic fields are equivalent to a single geodesic equation, describing the free fall of a point particle in superspace. Some implications for quantum gravity are discussed.

J. Greensite

1995-08-14

227

Offered Fall Semester: Biological Physics  

E-print Network

, random walks, diffusion, Einstein relations, entropic forces, stretching and melting of biopolymersOffered Fall Semester: Biological Physics Physics 466 / Physics 566 (conjoint) provides biology. Graduate (566) students carry out calculational and/or literature research projects on topics

Collins, Gary S.

228

Effective Fall 2011 HIGHER EDUCATION  

E-print Network

1 Effective Fall 2011 HIGHER EDUCATION DOCTORATE PROGRAMS INTERNSHIP HANDBOOK.D.) Doctorate of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Higher Education Administration College of Education Program of Higher Education Texas Tech University Box 41071 Lubbock, TX 794091071 (806) 7421997 Fax (806

Rock, Chris

229

Falls: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)  

MedlinePLUS

... objects such as furniture, cords and rugs Poor lighting, particularly areas with dark/light variability Poorly fitting ... a fall, such as loose carpets or poor lighting Treat any cardiovascular disorders, such as heart-rhythm ...

230

Magnet Falling Through Ring Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Magnet Falling Through Ring model shows the dynamics and the induced current when a magnet falls through a conducting ring. The current in the ring is computed by electromagnetic induction using to Faradayâs law and the induced emf is proportional to the negative of the rate of change of magnetic flux ?. The direction of the induced current is determined by Lenzâs law, the induced current produces magnetic field which tends to oppose the change in magnetic flux that induces such currents. The Magnet Falling Through Ring model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (Ejs) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_mosem2_em_MagnetFallingThroughRing.jar file will run the program if Java is installed.

Franciscouembre

2010-09-03

231

Information Technology Innovation Survey: Fall 2001  

NSF Publications Database

... Information Technology Innovation Survey: Fall 2001 Detailed Statistical Tables Hypertext Format ... Technology Innovation Survey: Fall 2001 Portable Document Format (.pdf) Information Technology ...

232

Ecosystem Scale Acoustic Sensing Reveals Humpback Whale Behavior Synchronous with Herring Spawning Processes and Re-Evaluation Finds No Effect of Sonar on Humpback Song Occurrence in the Gulf of Maine in Fall 2006  

PubMed Central

We show that humpback-whale vocalization behavior is synchronous with peak annual Atlantic herring spawning processes in the Gulf of Maine. With a passive, wide-aperture, densely-sampled, coherent hydrophone array towed north of Georges Bank in a Fall 2006 Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing (OAWRS) experiment, vocalizing whales could be instantaneously detected and localized over most of the Gulf of Maine ecosystem in a roughly 400-km diameter area by introducing array gain, of 18 dB, orders of magnitude higher than previously available in acoustic whale sensing. With humpback-whale vocalizations consistently recorded at roughly 2000/day, we show that vocalizing humpbacks (i) were overwhelmingly distributed along the northern flank of Georges Bank, coinciding with the peak spawning time and location of Atlantic herring, and (ii) their overall vocalization behavior was strongly diurnal, synchronous with the formation of large nocturnal herring shoals, with a call rate roughly ten-times higher at night than during the day. Humpback-whale vocalizations were comprised of (1) highly diurnal non-song calls, suited to hunting and feeding behavior, and (2) songs, which had constant occurrence rate over a diurnal cycle, invariant to diurnal herring shoaling. Before and during OAWRS survey transmissions: (a) no vocalizing whales were found at Stellwagen Bank, which had negligible herring populations, and (b) a constant humpback-whale song occurrence rate indicates the transmissions had no effect on humpback song. These measurements contradict the conclusions of Risch et al. Our analysis indicates that (a) the song occurrence variation reported in Risch et al. is consistent with natural causes other than sonar, (b) the reducing change in song reported in Risch et al. occurred days before the sonar survey began, and (c) the Risch et al. method lacks the statistical significance to draw the conclusions of Risch et al. because it has a 98–100% false-positive rate and lacks any true-positive confirmation. PMID:25289938

Gong, Zheng; Jain, Ankita D.; Tran, Duong; Yi, Dong Hoon; Wu, Fan; Zorn, Alexander; Ratilal, Purnima; Makris, Nicholas C.

2014-01-01

233

Free Fall Air Resistance Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This simulation allows students to compare the motion of free falling objects with and without the influence of air resistance. Air resistance is the result of collisions of the object's leading surface with air molecules. On Earth, objects falling through the air usually encounter some sort of air resistance, though the amount is dependent upon several factors. In this model, a blue ball falls under the influence of gravity alone. A falling red ball is subject to both gravity and air resistance. Students can adjust the amount of air resistance with a slider. When the simulation is played, graphs are simultaneously plotted that show position vs. time, velocity vs. time, and acceleration vs. time for both falling balls. See Annotations for an editor-recommended, interactive tutorial that further explains free fall and air resistance. This item was created with Easy Java Simulations (EJS), a modeling tool that allows users without formal programming experience to generate computer models and simulations. To run the simulation, simply click the Java Archive file below. To modify or customize the model, See Related Materials for detailed instructions on installing and running the EJS Modeling and Authoring Tool.

Duffy, Andrew

2014-06-06

234

Self-Efficacy for Self-Regulated Learning, Academic Self-Efficacy, and Internet Self-Efficacy in Web-based Instruction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a study of junior high school students in Seoul, Korea that examined the effects of student motivation on performance in Web-based instruction. Tested the applicability of the self-efficacy theory in Web-based contexts through motivational surveys, path analyses, written tests, and search tests. Internet self-efficacy scale and sample…

Joo, Young-Ju; Bong, Mimi; Choi, Ha-Jeen

2000-01-01

235

Fall prevention in the elderly  

PubMed Central

Summary Falls are frequent in the elderly and affect mortality, morbidity, loss of functional capacity and institutionalization. In the older patient the incidence of falls can sometimes be underestimated, even in the absence of a clear cognitive impairment, because it is often difficult to reconstruct the dynamics. It is quite common that forms due to syncope are associated with retrograde amnesia and in 40 to 60% of the cases falls happen in the absence of witnesses. The pathogenesis of falls is often multifactorial, due to physiological age-related changes or more properly pathological factors, or due to the environment. The identification of risk factors is essential in the planning of preventive measures. Syncope is one of major causes of falls. About 20% of cardiovascular syncope in patients older than 70 appears as a fall and more than 20% of older people with Carotid Sinus Syndrome complain of falls as well as syncope. These data clearly state that older patients with history of falls should undergo a cardiovascular and neuroautonomic assessment besides the survey of other risk factors. Multifactorial assessment requires a synergy of various specialists. The geriatrician coordinates the multidisciplinary intervention in order to make the most effective evaluation of the risk of falling, searching for all predisposing factors, aiming towards a program of prevention. In clear pathological conditions it is possible to enact a specific treatment. Particular attention must indeed be paid to the re-evaluation of drug therapy, with dose adjustments or withdrawal especially for antihypertensive, diuretics and benzodiazepines. The Guidelines of the American Geriatrics Society recommend modification of environmental hazards, training paths, hip protectors and appropriate use of support tools (sticks, walkers), which can be effective elements of a multifactorial intervention program. Balance exercises are also recommended. In conclusion, an initial assessment, supported by a comprehensive cardiovascular and neuroautonomic evaluation, allows for reaching a final diagnosis in most cases, demonstrating a key role in the real identification of the etiology of the fall and implementing the treatment measures. PMID:24133524

Ungar, Andrea; Rafanelli, Martina; Iacomelli, Iacopo; Brunetti, Maria Angela; Ceccofiglio, Alice; Tesi, Francesca; Marchionni, Niccolo

2013-01-01

236

The effectiveness of a multidisciplinary QI activity for accidental fall prevention: Staff compliance is critical  

PubMed Central

Background Accidental falls among inpatients are a substantial cause of hospital injury. A number of successful experimental studies on fall prevention have shown the importance and efficacy of multifactorial intervention, though success rates vary. However, the importance of staff compliance with these effective, but often time-consuming, multifactorial interventions has not been fully investigated in a routine clinical setting. The purpose of this observational study was to describe the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary quality improvement (QI) activity for accidental fall prevention, with particular focus on staff compliance in a non-experimental clinical setting. Methods This observational study was conducted from July 2004 through December 2010 at St. Luke’s International Hospital in Tokyo, Japan. The QI activity for in-patient falls prevention consisted of: 1) the fall risk assessment tool, 2) an intervention protocol to prevent in-patient falls, 3) specific environmental safety interventions, 4) staff education, and 5) multidisciplinary healthcare staff compliance monitoring and feedback mechanisms. Results The overall fall rate was 2.13 falls per 1000 patient days (350/164331) in 2004 versus 1.53 falls per 1000 patient days (263/172325) in 2010, representing a significant decrease (p?=?0.039). In the first 6?months, compliance with use of the falling risk assessment tool at admission was 91.5% in 2007 (3998/4368), increasing to 97.6% in 2010 (10564/10828). The staff compliance rate of implementing an appropriate intervention plan was 85.9% in 2007, increasing to 95.3% in 2010. Conclusion In our study we observed a substantial decrease in patient fall rates and an increase of staff compliance with a newly implemented falls prevention program. A systematized QI approach that closely involves, encourages, and educates healthcare staff at multiple levels is effective. PMID:22788785

2012-01-01

237

Intensive physical training in geriatric patients after severe falls and hip surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: intensive exercise training can lead to improvement in strength and functional performance in older people living at home and nursing home residents. There is little information whether intensive physical exercise may be applicable and effective in elderly patients suffering from the acute sequelae of injurious falls or hip surgery. Objective: to assess the feasibility, safety and efficacy of intensive,

KLAUS HAUER; N ORBERT SPECHT; M ATTHIAS SCHULER; P ETER BARTSCH; P ETER OSTER

2002-01-01

238

Implementing a Community-Based Falls-Prevention Program: From Drawing Board to Reality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Several studies have demonstrated the efficacy of falls-prevention programs designed for community-dwelling seniors using randomized designs. However, little is known about the feasibility of implementing these programs under natural conditions and about the success of these programs when delivered under such conditions. The objectives of this…

Filiatrault, Johanne; Parisien, Manon; Laforest, Sophie; Genest, Carole; Gauvin, Lise; Fournier, Michel; Trickey, Francine; Robitaille, Yvonne

2007-01-01

239

External Validity of Physical Activity Interventions for Community-Dwelling Older Adults with Fall Risk: A Quantitative Systematic Literature Review  

PubMed Central

Aim To appraise the external validity of physical activity interventions designed to reduce falls among community-dwelling older adults, using the reach, efficacy/effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance framework. Background Falls are a globally common, significant, and preventable problem. The efficacy of physical activity interventions to reduce falls among older adults is well established. Translation of this research into practice is slow as evidenced by persistently low proportions of older adults who engage in physical activities and the rising incidence of falls. Data Sources Four electronic databases were searched for relevant studies published between 2000 and 2010. Studies that examined the effects of physical activity interventions designed to reduce falls among community dwelling older adults were included in this review (n = 46). Review Methods This was a quantitative systematic review with narrative synthesis. The reach, efficacy/effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance framework guided the identification, appraisal, and synthesis of indicators representing study validity. Results The majority of studies in this review described indicators representing internal validity. Details about indicators representing external validity were reported infrequently, limiting the generalizability of fall-preventive physical activity interventions in diverse cultures and social contexts over time. Conclusions To foster translational research in real world settings, additional programmatic intervention research is needed that: (a) targets diverse populations; (b) incorporates theories of behavioural change; (c) describes and operationalizes critical content that enables replication and translation; (d) tests innovative measures of fall risk and physical activity; and (e) evaluates feasibility and acceptability. PMID:22416905

McMahon, Siobhan; Fleury, Julie

2012-01-01

240

The Relationships Among Occupational and Task-Specific Measures of Career Self-Efficacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Short Form of the Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale (TSOSS; Osipow, Temple, & Rooney, 1993) and a measure of self-efficacy with respect to 20 occupational titles (Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale [OSES; Betz & Hackett, 1981]) were administered to 111 male and 159 female college students. Results indicated significant gender and order of administration effects for both task- specific and occupational self-efficacy,

Theodore W. Williams; Nancy E. Betz

1994-01-01

241

A care bundle approach to falls prevention.  

PubMed

Falls cause harm and distress to NHS inpatients every year. One hospital's implementation of a regional FallSafe project has increased the use of evidence-based measures to prevent falls. The project relied on a network of falls champions, who were nurses or healthcare assistants who taught and inspired their colleagues to implement care bundles. PMID:24915673

Sutton, Debbie; Windsor, Julie; Husk, Janet

242

Effects of communal exercise with visual and auditory feedback provided by a smart application on gait ability and fear of falling in Parkinson’s disease patients  

PubMed Central

Parkinson’s disease is a chronically developing neurodegenerative disease showing typical motor symptoms of the following triad: resting tremor, freezing of gait, and bradykinesia-hypokinesia. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a communal exercise program, using the visual and auditory feedback provided by a smart application, to assess gait ability, fear of falling, and fall efficacy in Parkinson’s disease patients. Subjects consisted of 29 Parkinson’s disease patients who were non-demented individuals. The subjects were randomly divided into three groups: the control group (n= 9, CG), the communal exercise group using the smart application (n= 10, CCEG), and the individual exercise group using the smart application (n= 10, ICEG). The communal exercise program consisted of a warm up (10 min) followed by communal exercise using the smart application (40 min), and a cool down (10 min) for 3 days per week over 10 weeks. The results presented here show that velocity and cadence were significantly increased among groups. Step and stride length were significantly increased among times. Fear of falling and fall efficacy were significantly different among groups and times. In particular, fear of falling was lower and fall efficacy was higher in the CCEG than in the ICEG and CG. These findings indicate that 10 weeks of the communal exercise program using the smart application can be effective in improving gait ability, fear of falling, and fall efficacy in Parkinson’s disease patients.

Park, Yun-Jin

2014-01-01

243

ECON331, Fall 2010 ECON 331: ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS (Fall 2010)  

E-print Network

of the code, for example, cheating on exams, will be prosecuted as specified in the Code. 1 #12;ECON331, Fall.K., and R.N. Stavins, 1996b. Is There A Role for Benefit-Cost Analysis in Environmental, Health, and Safety. An Economic Analysis of Aspects of Petroleum and Military Security in the Persian Gulf. Contemporary Economic

Suzuki, Masatsugu

244

BURDEN FALLS ROADLESS AREA, ILLINOIS.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Burden Falls Roadless Area lies in the Shawnee National Forest of southern Illinois, about 5 mi west of the western edge of the Illinois-Kentucky fluorspar district. Geologic mapping and geochemical surveys indicate that the area has little promise for the occurrence of fluorspar and associated minerals; other special studies also indicate little promise for oil and gas and construction materials. Traces of gold and silver were detected in some geochemical samples but follow-up studies indicate little promise for the occurrence of resources of these metals within the Burden Falls Roadless Area.

Klasner, John, S.; Thompson, Robert, M.

1984-01-01

245

Free-Fall Bottles & Tubes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this physics activity, learners conduct two experiments to explore free-falling. In the first experiment, water-filled plastic bottles with holes in them spurt water under normal conditions, but don't leak while in free-fall. In the second experiment, a ping-pong ball in a water-filled plastic tube floats upward under normal conditions, but remains motionless when the tube is dropped or thrown. Educators can use pre-assembled materials for group demonstration purposes. Note: this activity will get the floor wet, so consider doing this outside.

Rathjen, Don

2011-08-20

246

Dynamics of falling liquid films.  

PubMed

Falling liquid films are examples of open flows which undergo a sequence of supercritical instabilities giving way to a spatio-temporal weak disorder organized around interfacial waves in interaction. The long-wave nature of the waves and the laminar state of the flow enable to derive reduced sets of equations or models that are amenable to thorough analytic investigations. This paper reviews the phenomenology of falling film flows and discusses recent low-dimensional modeling attempts. Some open questions and perspectives are also considered. PMID:24771235

Ruyer-Quil, Christian; Kofman, Nicolas; Chasseur, Didier; Mergui, Sophie

2014-04-01

247

The Self-Directed Search and Career Self-Efficacy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

High school students (n=237) completed the Self-Directed Search (SDS) and Task Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale. A significant relationship between responses to the two instruments supports the validity of the SDS in predicting career self-efficacy. (SK)

Feehan, Patrick F.; Johnston, Joseph A.

1999-01-01

248

Attributional Style and Self-Efficacy in Singaporean Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This investigation examined the relationship between adolescent students' attributional style and their perceived academic self-efficacy using the Children's Attributional Style Questionnaire (CASQ) (Seligman et al., 1984) and Multidimensional Scales of Perceived Self Efficacy (Bandura, 1989). Attributional style, defined as the way in which…

Yeo, Lay See; Tan, Kayce

2012-01-01

249

Free fall and projectile motion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This EJS simulation allows the user to simulate free fall relative to two inertial frames. The simulation was created using the Easy Java Simulations (Ejs) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_ntnu_fkh_projectileNfreefall.jar file will run the program if Java is installed.

Hwang, Fu-Kwun

2010-06-22

250

Fall ceremonv Kain, Nemetz honored  

E-print Network

's Ballerina Karen Kain and retiring B.C. Chief fall ceremonyto welcome new andreturning students, Thursday acclaimed as Canada's finest prima ballerina. Born in Hamilton, Ont., she entered the National Ballet School International Ballet Festival in 1973,she garnered a silver medal in the women soloist division and she

Farrell, Anthony P.

251

Daytona Beach Fall 2012 Dates  

E-print Network

Highlights Daytona Beach Fall 2012 Dates Birthdays Manners TheELIWeekly Daytona Beach Fun in the sun! Join us for a day of surf, sun, and sand at Daytona Beach. We will be going to the beach to Gainesville around 10:30pm. Transportation: Bus passes for Daytona Beach are now sold out! If you bought

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

252

FAll 2008 / Vol. 6, No.  

E-print Network

] Dreams r e a l i z e d #12;2 / INdIANA INFormAtIcs Alumni Spotlight #12;FAll 2008 / Indiana Informatics no. [FEATURED] Building a legacy Informatics opens doors to a state-of-the-art facility. He's living the dream. 13 · Faculty members recognized for teaching excellence 14 · HCI program

Zhou, Yaoqi

253

Fall 2012 College of engineering  

E-print Network

� Fall � � 2012 � College of engineering Eranda Nikolla Turning greenhouse gases into fuels thatcan be used in automobiles #12;Green Energy A powerhouse in green technologies............................................2 College professors conducting green research ..............................3 EcoCAR 2 team revs up

Berdichevsky, Victor

254

Fall Orientation Schedule Kresge College  

E-print Network

#12;6 Porter/Kresge Dining Hall Hours 7:15 am - 7 pm Porter College Bring your ID/temporary meal card1 2011 Fall Orientation Schedule Kresge College University of California Santa Cruz September 16 - 26 60 05 1 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 Kresge College our time is now #12;#12;3 1 Orientation Week Planner

California at Santa Cruz, University of

255

"Fall" Forum Our College is....  

E-print Network

Welcome Everyone #12;"Fall" Forum #12;Our College is.... ....helping animals be responsible #12;Collaboration · Across College & Campus · Shared Facilities · Combined Programs · SAU;Challenges to the Veterinary Profession: · New Veterinary Schools · Tuition/Debt/Loans #12;Vaughn

256

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Updated Fall 2013  

E-print Network

participating students: ACADEMICS In order to be eligible for application to the co-op program you must. Should his/her grade average fall below that level, a student will be placed on co-op probation. Students be enrolled as a full-time student at The University of Alabama with a minimum 2.2/4.0 GPA. Prior to beginning

Carver, Jeffrey C.

257

[A study on fall accident].  

PubMed

The study was conducted from November 1995 to May 1996 at the one general hospital in Seoul. The total subjects of this study were 412 patients who have the experience of fall accident, among them 31 was who have fallen during hospitalization and 381 was who visited emergency room and out patient clinic. The purposes of this study were to determine the characteristics, risk factors and results of fall accident and to suggest the nursing strategies for prevention of fall. Data were collected by reviewing the medical records and interviewing with the fallers and their family members. For data analysis spss/pc+ program was utilized for descriptive statistics, adjusted standardized X2-test. The results of this study were as follows: 1) Total subjects were 412 fallers, of which 245 (59.5%) were men and 167 (40.5%) were women. Age were 0-14 years 79 (19.2%), 15-44 years 125 (30.4%), 45-64 years 104 (25.2%), over 65 years 104 (25.2%). 2) There was significant association between age and the sexes (X2 = 39.17, P = 0.00). 3) There was significant association between age and history of falls (X2 = 44.41, P = .00). And history of falls in the elderly was significantly associated with falls. 4) There was significant association with age and medical diagnosis (X2 = 140.66, P = .00), chief medical diagnosis were hypertension (34), diabetes mellitus (22), arthritis (11), stroke (8), fracture (7), pulmonary tuberculosis (6), dementia (5) and cataract (5). 5) There was significant association between age and intrinsic factors: cognitive impairment, mobility impairment, insomnia, emotional problems, urinary difficulty, visual impairments, hearing impairments, use of drugs (sedatives, antihypertensive drugs, diuretics, antidepressants) (P < 0.05). But there was no significant association between age and dizziness (X2 = 2.87, P = .41). 6) 15.3% of total fallers were drunken state when they were fallen. 7) Environmental factors of fall accident were unusual posture (50.9%), slips (35.2%), trips (9.5%) and collision (4.4%). 8) Most of falls occurred during the day time, peak frequencies of falls occurred from 1 pm to 6 pm and 7 am to 12 am. 9) The places of fall accident were roads (22.6%), house-stairs (16.7%), rooms, floors, kitchen (11.2%), the roof-top, veranda, windows (10.9%), hospital (7.5%), ice or snowy ways (5.8%), bathroom (4.9%), playground, park (4.9%), subway-stairs (4.4%) and public-bathrooms (2.2%). 10) Activities at the time of fall accident were walking (37.6%), turning around or reaching for something (20.9%), going up or down stairs (19.2%), exercise, working (17.4%), up or down from a bed (2.7%), using wheelchair or walking aids, standing up or down from a chair (2.2%) and standing still (2.2%). 11) Anatomical locations of injuries by falls were head, face, neck (31.3%), lower extremities (29.9%), upper extremities (20.6%), spine, thorax, abdomen or pelvic contents (11.4%) and unspecified (2.9%). 12) Types of injures were fracture (47.6%), bruises (13.8%), laceration (13.3%), sprains (9.0%), headache (6.6%), abrasions (2.9%), intracranial hemorhage (2.4%) and burns (0.5%). 13) 41.5% of the fallers were hospitalized and average of hospitalization was 22.3 days. 14) The six fallers (1.46%) died from fall injuries. The two fallers died from intracranial hemorhage and the four fallers died of secondary infection; pneumonia (2), sepsis (1) and cellulitis (1). It is suggested that 1) Further study is needed with larger sample size to identify the fall risk factors. 2) After the fall accident, comprehensive nursing care and regular physical exercise should be emphasized for the elderly person. 3) Safety education and safety facilities of the public place and home is necessary for fall prevention. PMID:10437605

Lee, H S; Kim, M J

1997-01-01

258

Intrinsic factors associated with pregnancy falls.  

PubMed

Approximately 25% to 27% of women sustain a fall during pregnancy, and falls are associated with serious injuries and can affect pregnancy outcomes. The objective of the current study was to identify intrinsic factors associated with pregnancy that may contribute to women's increased risk of falls. A literature search (Medline and Pubmed) identified articles published between January 1980 and June 2013 that measured associations between pregnancy and fall risks, using an existing fall accident investigation framework. The results indicated that physiological, biomechanical, and psychological changes associated with pregnancy may influence the initiation, detection, and recovery phases of falls and increase the risk of falls in this population. Considering the logistic difficulties and ethnic concerns in recruiting pregnant women to participate in this investigation of fall risk factors, identification of these factors could establish effective fall prevention and intervention programs for pregnant women and improve birth outcomes. [Workplace Health Saf 2014;62(10):403-408.]. PMID:25207589

Wu, Xuefang; Yeoh, Han T

2014-10-01

259

Association between Physical Functionality and Falls Risk in Community-Living Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Ageing-related declines in physiological attributes, such as muscle strength, can bring with them an increased risk of falls and subsequently greater risk of losing independence. These declines have substantial impact on an individual's functional ability. However, the precise relationship between falls risk and physical functionality has not been evaluated. The aims of this study were to determine the association between falls risk and physical functionality using objective measures and to create an appropriate model to explain variance in falls risk. Thirty-two independently living adults aged 65–92 years completed the FallScreen, the Continuous-Scale Physical Functional Performance 10 (CS-PFP10) tests, and the 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12). The relationships between falls risk, physical functionality, and age were investigated using correlational and multiple hierarchical regression analyses. Overall, total physical functionality accounted for 24% of variance in an individual's falls risk while age explained a further 13%. The oldest-old age group had significantly greater falls risk and significantly lower physical functional performance. Mean scores for all measures showed that there were substantial (but not significant) differences between males and females. While increasing age is the strongest single predictor of increasing falls risk, poorer physical functionality was strongly, independently related to greater falls risk. PMID:23304137

Smee, Disa J.; Anson, Judith M.; Waddington, Gordon S.; Berry, Helen L.

2012-01-01

260

Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Social Studies Candidate Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to determine the self efficacy beliefs of pre-service social studies teachers. For this purpose, the scales developed in various areas were examined, the opinions of experts were taken and a final scale was created to be used for this study. The validity and reliability of the scale were checked. The validity coefficient…

Simsek, Nihat

2011-01-01

261

School Counselors' Multicultural Self-Efficacy: A Preliminary Investigation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores the factor structure of the School Counselor Multicultural Self-Efficacy Scale (SCMES). For this study, a total of 181 usable scales were returned by members of the American School Counselor Association. Exploratory factor analysis on the 90-item scale suggested a six-factor structure. The six factors or subscales that…

Holcomb-McCoy, Cheryl; Harris, Paul; Hines, Erik M.; Johnston, Georgina

2008-01-01

262

Social Self-Efficacy, Academic Locus of Control, and Internet Addiction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship of internet addiction, social self-efficacy, and academic locus of control. Participants were 311 university students who completed a questionnaire package that included the Online Cognition Scale, the Academic Locus of Control Scale, and the Perceived Social Self-efficacy Scale. The…

Iskender, Murat; Akin, Ahmet

2010-01-01

263

Safe Fall: Humanoid robot fall direction change through intelligent stepping and inertia shaping  

E-print Network

Although fall is a rare event in the life of a humanoid robot, we must be prepared for it because its consequences are serious. In this paper we present a fall strategy which rapidly modifies the robot's fall direction in ...

Yun, Seung-kook

264

Predictive Power of the Sources of Primary School Students' Self-Efficacy Beliefs on Their Self-Efficacy Beliefs for Learning and Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to reveal the extent to which the sources of 6th- 8th grade students' self-efficacy beliefs predict their self-efficacy beliefs for learning and performance. The study is correlational and was conducted on a total of 1049 students during the fall term of the educational year 2010-2011. The data of the study were…

Arslan, Ali

2012-01-01

265

Writing essays: does self-efficacy matter? The relationship between self-efficacy in reading and in writing and undergraduate students’ performance in essay writing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Self-efficacy beliefs have been identified as associated with students’ academic performance. The present research assessed the relationship between two new self-efficacy scales (self-efficacy in reading [SER] and self-efficacy in writing [SEW]) and students’ writing performance on a piece of assessed written coursework. Using data from first and second year undergraduate psychology students at a UK university (N?=?145), the results showed

Merce Prat-Sala; Paul Redford

2012-01-01

266

Writing essays: does self-efficacy matter? The relationship between self-efficacy in reading and in writing and undergraduate students’ performance in essay writing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Self-efficacy beliefs have been identified as associated with students’ academic performance. The present research assessed the relationship between two new self-efficacy scales (self-efficacy in reading [SER] and self-efficacy in writing [SEW]) and students’ writing performance on a piece of assessed written coursework. Using data from first and second year undergraduate psychology students at a UK university (N?=?145), the results showed

Merce Prat-Sala; Paul Redford

2011-01-01

267

Osteoarthritis and falls in the older person.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis and falls are common conditions affecting older individuals which are associated with disability and escalating health expenditure. It has been widely assumed that osteoarthritis is an established risk factor for falls in older people. The relationship between osteoarthritis and falls has, quite surprisingly, not been adequately elucidated, and published reports have been conflicting. Our review of the existing literature has found limited evidence supporting the current assumption that the presence of osteoarthritis is associated with increased risk of falls with suggestions that osteoarthritis may actually be protective against falls related fractures. In addition, joint arthroplasty appears to increase the risk of falls in individuals with osteoarthritis. PMID:23864423

Ng, Chin Teck; Tan, Maw Pin

2013-09-01

268

Great Falls Corporation, Auburn, Maine.  

PubMed

On November 1, 1984, Androscoggin Home Health Services restructured itself into three separate entities corporately linked via a holding company and with overlapping governance among the parent and its two subsidiaries. AHHS the parent and its two subsidiaries. AHHS remains the Medicare-certified agency with additional grant-funded programs. Great Falls Homecare Corporation is the private-pay personal care services subsidiary. As third subsidiary, Great Falls Management Corporation, has recently been organized for more effective and responsive management services. If asked whether corporate restructuring appears at this time to ensure survival over the long haul, a resounding "yes" would be heard from management and directors alike. Restructuring isn't easy, but it is insurance worth purchasing for the future. PMID:10272158

Perry, B

1985-07-01

269

Falling Magnets and Electromagnetic Braking  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The slow fall of a rare earth magnet through a copper pipe is a striking example of electromagnetic braking; this remarkable phenomenon has been the subject of a number of scientific paper s [1, 2]. In a pipe having radius R and wall thickness D, the terminal velocity of the falling magnet is proportional to (R?4)/D. It is interesting to ask what happens in the limit as D becomes very large. We report our experimental observations and theoretical predictions of the dependence of the terminal velocity on pipe radius R for large D. [1] Y. Levin, F.L. da Silveira, and F.B. Rizzato, ``Electromagnetic braking: A simple quantitative model''. American Journal of Physics, 74(9): p. 815-817 (2006). [2] J.A. Pelesko, M. Cesky, and S. Huertas, Lenz's law and dimensional analysis. American Journal of Physics, 3(1): p. 37-39. 2005.

Culbreath, Christopher; Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

2009-03-01

270

Falls  

MedlinePLUS

... Head injuries that cause confusion or loss of consciousness or that cause sleepiness, dizziness, balance problems, nausea ... appears to recover spontaneously. Confusion or loss of consciousness is the first symptom of a concussion. During ...

271

FALL CONCENTRATIONS OF BUTEOS NEAR  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTICT.--Since 1974, we have counted raptors at Henry's Lake, Idaho, just south of the continental divide. Counts were made in late summer and early fall. Three species, red-tailed hawk (Buteojamaicensis), ferruginous hawk (Buteo regalis), and Swainson's hawks (Buteo swainsoni) were the most plentiful. None of these hawks showed any strong increasing or decreasing trend in numbers over the 20-yr survey

ARNOLD T. GERSTELL; CHARLES H. TROST

272

(Accipiter striatus) DURING FALL MIGRATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTP, ACT.--Packed cell volume (%), total solids (g\\/dl), white blood cell count (cells\\/tl), differential and absolute white blood cell counts, and prevalence of hemoparasites were determined for 85 healthy sharp- shinned hawks (Accipiter striatus) during the 1991 fall migration. The packed cell volume (47.6 + 6.73%), total solids (2.83 _+ 0.58 g\\/dl) and white blood cell count (12 900 +

LAUREN V. POWERS; MARK POKRAS; KIM RIO; CATHY VIVERETTE; LAURIE GOODRICH

273

An Investigation of Factors Related to Self-Efficacy for Java Programming among Engineering Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the factors related to self-efficacy for Java programming among first year engineering students. An instrument assessing Java programming self-efficacy was developed from the computer programming self-efficacy scale of Ramalingam & Wiedenbeck. The instrument was administered at the beginning of the course…

Askar, Petek; Davenport, David

2009-01-01

274

The Interactive Effects of Race and and Teacher Self Efficacy on the Achievement Gap in School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article investigated the interactive effects of race and teacher self efficacy on the achievement gap in math scores for one middle school. A modified teacher self efficacy scale was used to measure the teaching self efficacy of the students' teachers. Two Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) procedures showed a main effect for the teacher self…

Hines, Mack T., III

2008-01-01

275

Exploring Baccalaureate Social Work Students' Self-Efficacy: Did It Change over Time?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored baccalaureate social work students' self-efficacy at a rural southern university. Bandura's concept of self-efficacy is used as a theoretical base for the study. Students (N = 43) in introductory social work courses and in the field practicum course completed the Foundation Practice Self Efficacy Scale. Following The Council on…

Ahn, Bonnie; Boykin, Lolita; Hebert, Corie; Kulkin, Heidi

2012-01-01

276

Foot Disorders and Falls in Older Persons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Fall rates are high among older people even in the healthy population. An aging foot may affect ambulatory function and increase the risk of fall(s). Objective: To study foot musculoskeletal disorders, falls and associated factors in healthy elderly subjects. Methods: Healthy volunteers aged 60–80 years who were independent in self-care and walking were recruited from urban Bangkok. Trained physicians

Dootchai Chaiwanichsiri; Siriporn Janchai; Natthiya Tantisiriwat

2009-01-01

277

Ejs Free Fall Cartesian Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Ejs Free Fall Cartesian model displays the dynamics of a ball dropped near the surface of Earth onto a platform. The initial conditions for the ball are an initial positive velocity in the x direction and zero initial velocity in the y direction. The coefficient of restitution for the ballâs collision with the platform is less than one. You can modify this simulation if you have Ejs installed by right-clicking within the plot and selecting âOpen Ejs Modelâ from the pop-up menu item. Ejs Free Fall Cartesian model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (Ejs) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_newton_FreeFallCartesian.jar file will run the program if Java is installed. Ejs is a part of the Open Source Physics Project and is designed to make it easier to access, modify, and generate computer models. Additional Ejs models for Newtonian mechanics are available. They can be found by searching ComPADRE for Open Source Physics, OSP, or Ejs.

Christian, Wolfgang

2008-06-03

278

Ejs Free Fall Polar Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Ejs Free Fall Polar model displays the dynamics in polar coordinates of a ball launched near the surface of Earth onto a platform. The initial conditions for the ball are a negative initial velocity in the radial direction and a positive initial velocity in the theta direction (or positive initial velocities in both the x and y directions). The coefficient of restitution for the ballâs collision with the platform is less than one. You can modify this simulation if you have Ejs installed by right-clicking within the plot and selecting âOpen Ejs Modelâ from the pop-up menu item. Ejs Free Fall Polar model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (Ejs) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_newton_FreeFallPolar.jar file will run the program if Java is installed. Ejs is a part of the Open Source Physics Project and is designed to make it easier to access, modify, and generate computer models. Additional Ejs models for Newtonian mechanics are available. They can be found by searching ComPADRE for Open Source Physics, OSP, or Ejs.

Christian, Wolfgang

2008-06-03

279

Free Fall 3D Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Ejs Free Fall 3D model displays the three-dimensional dynamics of a ball dropped near the surface of Earth onto a platform. The initial conditions for the ball are zero initial velocities in the x, y, and z directions. The coefficient of restitution for the ballâs collision with the platform is less than one. The initial height of the ball can be changed by dragging it when the simulation is paused. You can modify this simulation if you have Ejs installed by right-clicking within the plot and selecting âOpen Ejs Modelâ from the pop-up menu item. Ejs Free Fall 3D model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (Ejs) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_newton_FreeFall3D.jar file will run the program if Java is installed. Ejs is a part of the Open Source Physics Project and is designed to make it easier to access, modify, and generate computer models. Additional Ejs models for Newtonian mechanics are available. They can be found by searching ComPADRE for Open Source Physics, OSP, or Ejs.

Christian, Wolfgang

2008-06-03

280

Imager displays free fall in stop action  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Microprocessor-controlled imaging system displays sequence of "frozen" images of free-falling object, using video cameras positioned along fall. Strobe lights flash as object passes each camera's viewfield. Sequence stored on video disk and displayed on television monitor is stop-action record of fall dynamics. With modification, system monitiors other high speed phenomena.

Frazer, R. E.

1981-01-01

281

Yair Amir 1 Fall 00 / Lecture 8  

E-print Network

­ 3pm Maryland 214 Yair Amir 4 Fall 00 / Lecture 8 Free Space Management . Bit map. -- Every bit; Yair Amir 5 Fall 00 / Lecture 8 Free Space Management (cont.) . Link List. -- Keeping a pointer, the free space is managed as one file. Yair Amir 6 Fall 00 / Lecture 8 Free Space Management (cont

Amir, Yair

282

TOWARDS ROBUST FALL DETECTION Violeta Mirchevska1  

E-print Network

elderly user in real-time. It encompasses detection of falls as well as changes in behavior and injury danger which prevent collection of large amounts of data by healthy persons simulating falls. NonTOWARDS ROBUST FALL DETECTION Violeta Mirchevska1 , Mitja Lustrek2 , Matjaz Gams2 1 Result d

LuÂ?trek, Mitja

283

Prevention of falls in the elderly  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of these symposium presentations was to examine the role of physical activity as a means of preventing hip fractures through the prevention of falls. Risk factor identification is necessary to develop preventive strategies. Risk factors related to physical activity and other risk factors for falls were identified. Intervention studies aimed at reducing, preventing or delaying falls were identified

A. H. Myers; Y. Young; J. A. Langlois

1996-01-01

284

Falls Amongst Institutionalised PsychoGeriatric Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Falls are common among the elderly patients in the psycho-geriatric wards and yet they have been understudied. A fall is a multi-factorial syndrome involving the patient and the environment. Psycho- geriatric patients who fall may suffer serious physical injuries that result in morbidity, further institu- tionalisation or even mortality. This study aims to examine the contributing factors to, and morbidity

K D Lim; K C Ng; S K Ng; L L Ng

285

Epidemiology of Falls in Older Age  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Worldwide, falls among older people are a public health concern because of their frequency and adverse consequences in terms of morbidity, mortality, and quality of life, as well as their impact on health system services and costs. This epidemiological review outlines the public health burden of falls and fall-related injuries and the impact of…

Peel, Nancye May

2011-01-01

286

Automatic Detection of Human Fall in Video  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we present an approach for human fall de- tection, which has an important application in the fleld of safety and security. The proposed approach consists of two part: object detection and fall model. We use an adaptive background subtraction method to detect moving object and mark it with minimum-bounding box. Fall model uses a set of extracted

Vinay Vishwakarma; Chittaranjan A. Mandal; Shamik Sural

2007-01-01

287

29 CFR 1917.41 - House falls.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false House falls. 1917.41 Section 1917.41...Handling Gear and Equipment § 1917.41 House falls. (a) Span beams shall be secured...shall be provided for employees working with house fall blocks. (c) Designated...

2010-07-01

288

Depth-Based Human Fall Detection via Shape Features and Improved Extreme Learning Machine.  

PubMed

Falls are one of the major causes leading to injury of elderly people. Using wearable devices for fall detection has a high cost and may cause inconvenience to the daily lives of the elderly. In this paper, we present an automated fall detection approach that requires only a low-cost depth camera. Our approach combines two computer vision techniques-shape-based fall characterization and a learning-based classifier to distinguish falls from other daily actions. Given a fall video clip, we extract curvature scale space (CSS) features of human silhouettes at each frame and represent the action by a bag of CSS words (BoCSS). Then, we utilize the extreme learning machine (ELM) classifier to identify the BoCSS representation of a fall from those of other actions. In order to eliminate the sensitivity of ELM to its hyperparameters, we present a variable-length particle swarm optimization algorithm to optimize the number of hidden neurons, corresponding input weights, and biases of ELM. Using a low-cost Kinect depth camera, we build an action dataset that consists of six types of actions (falling, bending, sitting, squatting, walking, and lying) from ten subjects. Experimenting with the dataset shows that our approach can achieve up to 91.15% sensitivity, 77.14% specificity, and 86.83% accuracy. On a public dataset, our approach performs comparably to state-of-the-art fall detection methods that need multiple cameras. PMID:25375688

Ma, Xin; Wang, Haibo; Xue, Bingxia; Zhou, Mingang; Ji, Bing; Li, Yibin

2014-11-01

289

Analysis of rock-fall and rock-fall avalanche seismograms in the French Alps  

E-print Network

/or rolling, with a very rapid to extremely rapid movement. After a free fall with a vertical drop Hf from1 Analysis of rock-fall and rock-fall avalanche seismograms in the French Alps J. Deparis, D reviews seismograms from 10 rock-fall events recorded between 1992 and 2001 by the permanent seismological

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

290

Capillarylike Fluctuations at the Interface of Falling Granular Jets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the interface fluctuations of a granular jet falling under gravity and show that for small scales they are the analog of the thermally induced capillary waves. Experimental results from radial height and velocity fluctuations, static correlation functions and capillary ripple velocities allow us to estimate a granular surface tension. The ultralow interfacial tensions measured (of the order of 100?N/m) can be rationalized using a simple model.

Amarouchene, Yacine; Boudet, Jean-François; Kellay, Hamid

2008-05-01

291

Capillarylike fluctuations at the interface of falling granular jets.  

PubMed

We study the interface fluctuations of a granular jet falling under gravity and show that for small scales they are the analog of the thermally induced capillary waves. Experimental results from radial height and velocity fluctuations, static correlation functions and capillary ripple velocities allow us to estimate a granular surface tension. The ultralow interfacial tensions measured (of the order of 100 microN/m) can be rationalized using a simple model. PMID:18518637

Amarouchene, Yacine; Boudet, Jean-François; Kellay, Hamid

2008-05-30

292

Multidimensional Perfectionism and Self-Reported Self-Efficacy in College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between perfectionism and self-efficacy in college students. A multivari-ate analysis of variance including subscales of the Self-Efficacy Scale revealed significant differences between adaptive perfectionists, mal-adaptive perfectionists, and non-perfectionists. Follow-up tests showed that adaptive perfectionists scored significantly higher than both mal-adaptive perfectionists and non-perfectionists on General Self-Efficacy and Social Self-Efficacy. The

Kenneth A. Locicero; Jeffrey S. Ashby

2000-01-01

293

Changes in preservice elementary teachers' personal science teaching efficacy and science teaching outcome expectancies: The influence of context  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study was to investigate how retrospective-test/post-test perceptions of science teaching self-efficacy differ according to personal science expectancy and science teaching outcome expectancy among preservice elementary teachers when exposed to a science teaching methods course. Preservice elementary teacher candidates (N=69) enrolled in Spring and Fall 2007 sessions of an elementary science methods class were asked to assess their science teaching self-efficacy using the Science Teaching Expectancy Belief Instrument (STEBI-B). The survey was administered three times using pre-test, post-test and retrospective-test methodology. The 23-item instrument contains a Likert-scale with a 1 to 5 range of "strongly disagree" to "strongly agree". A higher score indicated a stronger sense science teaching self-efficacy. The dependent variable was change in self-efficacy. Science teaching self-efficacy comprises two subcomponents: (1) personal science teaching efficacy (PSTE); and (2) science teaching outcome expectancy (STOE). Both components were represented as subscales on the STEBI-B. The independent variables were: (1) number of postsecondary science content courses taken; (2) perceptions of prior science experiences; and (3) a science methods course. Research questions sought to investigate main effects and interaction effects of independent variables on each of the PSTE and STOE subscales. A 2X2 ANOVA was used to statistically analyze the data with a Type I error rate of 0.05 as the judgment criteria for statistical significance. The findings revealed that whether preservice elementary teachers met or exceeded the number of postsecondary science courses required to graduate, and their positive or negative perceptions of prior school science experiences had a statistically significant main effect on the change in PSTE but not STOE. There was no evidence to suggest significant interaction effects of number of postsecondary science courses taken and perception of school science experiences on the change in both PSTE and STOE. Practical significance of the results is also discussed. The results will guide reforming teacher preparation to strengthen science teaching self-efficacy of preservice elementary teacher candidates throughout their programs of study leading out into the teaching profession. The implications of this study have bearing on current and future organization, structure, and dynamics of elementary science teacher preparation.

Hechter, Richard P.

294

Falls in People with Multiple Sclerosis Compared with Falls in Healthy Controls  

PubMed Central

Objective To compare the risk, circumstances, consequences and causes of prospectively recorded falls between people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) and healthy controls of similar age and gender. Methods 58 PwMS and 58 healthy controls, who are community-dwelling, were recruited in this 6-month prospective cohort study. 90% of PwMS and 84% of healthy controls completed the study. Participants counted falls prospectively using fall calendars and noted fall location, fall-related injuries, and the cause of the falls. Kaplan Meier survival analysis and log-rank tests were performed to compare the distributions of survival without falling between PwMS and healthy controls. Results 40.8% of controls and 71.2% of PwMS fell at least once. 48.1% of PwMS and 18.4% of healthy controls fell at least twice. 42.3% of PwMS and 20.4% of health controls sustained a fall-related injury. After adjusting for age and gender, the time to first fall (HR: 1.87, p?=?0.033) and the time to recurrent falls (HR: 2.87, p?=?0.0082) were significantly different between PwMS and healthy controls. PwMS reported an almost equal number of falls inside and outside, 86% of the falls in healthy controls were outside. Healthy controls were more likely to fall due to slipping on a slippery surface (39.5% vs 10.4%). PwMS more often attributed falls to distraction (31% vs 7%) and uniquely attributed falls to fatigue or heat. Conclusions Fall risk, circumstances, consequences, and causes are different for PwMS than for healthy people of the same age and gender. PwMS fall more, are more likely to be injured by a fall, and often fall indoors. PwMS, but not healthy controls, frequently fall because they are distracted, fatigued or hot. PMID:25254633

Mazumder, Rajarshi; Murchison, Charles; Bourdette, Dennis; Cameron, Michelle

2014-01-01

295

Origin of diversity in falling snow  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a systematic way to examine the origin of variety in falling snow. First, we define shape diversity as the logarithm of the number of possible distinguishable crystal forms for a given resolution and set of conditions, and then we examine three sources of diversity. Two sources are the range of initial-crystal sizes and variations in the trajectory variables. For a given set of variables, diversity is estimated using a model of a crystal falling in an updraft. The third source is temperature-updraft heterogeneities along each trajectory. To examine this source, centimeter-scale data on cloud temperature and updraft speed are used to estimate the spatial frequency (m-1) of crystal feature changes. For air-temperature heterogeneity, this frequency decays as p-0.66, where p is a measure of the temperature-deviation size. For updraft-speed heterogeneity, the decay is p-0.50. By using these frequencies, the fallpath needed per feature change is found to range from ~0.8 m, for crystals near -15°C, to ~8 m near -19°C lengths much less than total fallpath lengths. As a result, the third source dominates the diversity, with updraft heterogeneity contributing more than temperature heterogeneity. Plotted against the crystal's initial temperature (-11 to -19°C), the diversity curve is "mitten shaped", having a broad peak near -15.4°C and a sharp subpeak at -14.4°C, both peaks arising from peaks in growth-rate sensitivity. The diversity is much less than previous estimates, yet large enough to explain observations. For example, of all snow crystals ever formed, those that began near -15°C are predicted to all appear unique to 1-?m resolution, but those that began near -11°C are not.

Nelson, J.

2008-09-01

296

Efficacy of climate forcings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use a global climate model to compare the effectiveness of many climate forcing agents for producing climate change. We find a substantial range in the "efficacy" of different forcings, where the efficacy is the global temperature response per unit forcing relative to the response to CO2 forcing. Anthropogenic CH4 has efficacy ˜110%, which increases to ˜145% when its indirect effects on stratospheric H2O and tropospheric O3 are included, yielding an effective climate forcing of ˜0.8 W/m2 for the period 1750-2000 and making CH4 the largest anthropogenic climate forcing other than CO2. Black carbon (BC) aerosols from biomass burning have a calculated efficacy ˜58%, while fossil fuel BC has an efficacy ˜78%. Accounting for forcing efficacies and for indirect effects via snow albedo and cloud changes, we find that fossil fuel soot, defined as BC + OC (organic carbon), has a net positive forcing while biomass burning BC + OC has a negative forcing. We show that replacement of the traditional instantaneous and adjusted forcings, Fi and Fa, with an easily computed alternative, Fs, yields a better predictor of climate change, i.e., its efficacies are closer to unity. Fs is inferred from flux and temperature changes in a fixed-ocean model run. There is remarkable congruence in the spatial distribution of climate change, normalized to the same forcing Fs, for most climate forcing agents, suggesting that the global forcing has more relevance to regional climate change than may have been anticipated. Increasing greenhouse gases intensify the Hadley circulation in our model, increasing rainfall in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), Eastern United States, and East Asia, while intensifying dry conditions in the subtropics including the Southwest United States, the Mediterranean region, the Middle East, and an expanding Sahel. These features survive in model simulations that use all estimated forcings for the period 1880-2000. Responses to localized forcings, such as land use change and heavy regional concentrations of BC aerosols, include more specific regional characteristics. We suggest that anthropogenic tropospheric O3 and the BC snow albedo effect contribute substantially to rapid warming and sea ice loss in the Arctic. As a complement to a priori forcings, such as Fi, Fa, and Fs, we tabulate the a posteriori effective forcing, Fe, which is the product of the forcing and its efficacy. Fe requires calculation of the climate response and introduces greater model dependence, but once it is calculated for a given amount of a forcing agent it provides a good prediction of the response to other forcing amounts.

Hansen, J.; Sato, M.; Ruedy, R.; Nazarenko, L.; Lacis, A.; Schmidt, G. A.; Russell, G.; Aleinov, I.; Bauer, M.; Bauer, S.; Bell, N.; Cairns, B.; Canuto, V.; Chandler, M.; Cheng, Y.; Del Genio, A.; Faluvegi, G.; Fleming, E.; Friend, A.; Hall, T.; Jackman, C.; Kelley, M.; Kiang, N.; Koch, D.; Lean, J.; Lerner, J.; Lo, K.; Menon, S.; Miller, R.; Minnis, P.; Novakov, T.; Oinas, V.; Perlwitz, Ja.; Perlwitz, Ju.; Rind, D.; Romanou, A.; Shindell, D.; Stone, P.; Sun, S.; Tausnev, N.; Thresher, D.; Wielicki, B.; Wong, T.; Yao, M.; Zhang, S.

2005-09-01

297

A fully relativistic radial fall  

E-print Network

Radial fall has historically played a momentous role. It is one of the most classical problems, the solutions of which represent the level of understanding of gravitation in a given epoch. A {\\it gedankenexperiment} in a modern frame is given by a small body, like a compact star or a solar mass black hole, captured by a supermassive black hole. The mass of the small body itself and the emission of gravitational radiation cause the departure from the geodesic path due to the back-action, that is the self-force. For radial fall, as any other non-adiabatic motion, the instantaneous identity of the radiated energy and the loss of orbital energy cannot be imposed and provide the perturbed trajectory. In the first part of this letter, we present the effects due to the self-force computed on the geodesic trajectory in the background field. Compared to the latter trajectory, in the Regge-Wheeler, harmonic and all others smoothly related gauges, a far observer concludes that the self-force pushes inward (not outward) the falling body, with a strength proportional to the mass of the small body for a given large mass; further, the same observer notes an higher value of the maximal coordinate velocity, this value being reached earlier on during infall. In the second part of this letter, we implement a self-consistent approach for which the trajectory is iteratively corrected by the self-force, this time computed on osculating geodesics. Finally, we compare the motion driven by the self-force without and with self-consistent orbital evolution. Subtle differences are noticeable, even if self-force effects have hardly the time to accumulate in such a short orbit.

Alessandro D. A. M. Spallicci; Patxi Ritter

2014-07-21

298

What Are Ways to Prevent Falls and Related Fractures?  

MedlinePLUS

... What Are Ways to Prevent Falls and Related Fractures? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ... 122 KB) Español Related Resources Preventing Falls and Fractures Osteoporosis and Falls Osteoporosis and Falls (??) Partner ...

299

1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF LITTLE FALLS DAM POWERPLANT AND NORTHWEST ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF LITTLE FALLS DAM POWERPLANT AND NORTHWEST END OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE. LOOKING WEST - Little Falls Tie Line Towers, Near Little Dam Falls on Spokane River, Wellpinit, Stevens County, WA

300

1. Photocopy of a photographca. 1920 VIEW OF AMERICAN FALLS ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. Photocopy of a photograph--ca. 1920 VIEW OF AMERICAN FALLS PRIOR TO CONSTRUCTION OF HYDROELECTRIC PLANTS - American Falls Water, Power & Light Company, Island Power Plant, Snake River, below American Falls Dam, American Falls, Power County, ID

301

Preventing Falls | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine  

MedlinePLUS

... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Falls and Older Adults Preventing Falls Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of ... departments for fall-related injuries each year. Among older adults, falls are the leading cause of fractures, hospital ...

302

Self-Efficacy and Research Methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study investigated self-efficacy to use research methods skills in samples of sport students. Two studies were conducted. Study 1 was a quantitative study that investigated the extent to which self-esteem influenced changes in self-effica cy following the receipt of grades for an assignment from a research methods module. Ninety-seven Level 2 students completed a self-esteem scale and a

Tracey J. Devonport

2004-01-01

303

Simulated Fall Detection via Accelerometers Justin Boyle, Mohan Karunanithi  

E-print Network

falls experienced by elderly patients failed to provide a statistically significant number of fall of actual falls recorded in an elderly population. Nineteen different fall types were represented on young volunteers or fall simulations, due to the conflicting ethical issue of wishing to prevent falls

Chen, Zhuo

304

150. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

150. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Surveyor's Book #363, Page 42, entitled, 'Diversion Tunnels', located in Twin Falls Canal Company office, Twin Falls, Idaho). PLAN OF DIVERSION TUNNELS, MILNER DAM. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

305

Teacher Efficacy: How Teachers Rate Themselves and How Students Rate Their Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this investigation was to compare how teachers rate themselves with how students rate their teachers on the Teacher Efficacy the External Influences Scale, a scale designed to assess teachers' efficacy in the area of classroom organization and discipline. The participants in this study were seventh- and eighth-grade teachers and…

Bordelon, Thomas D.; Phillips, Iris; Parkison, Paul T.; Thomas, Jeff; Howell, Corinne

2012-01-01

306

Teaching Efficacy and Teaching Performance Among Student Teachers in a Jordanian Childhood Education Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aimed to investigate the teaching efficacy of student teachers in the Childhood Education Program at the University of Jordan. The sample consisted of (106) female student teachers. The Teacher Efficacy Scale and the Effective Teaching Behaviors Scale were used to collect the data of this study. Results showed that a third of the student teachers had an internal

Hani A. Weshah

2012-01-01

307

Self-Efficacy for Self-Regulated Learning: A Validation Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The psychometric properties and multigroup measurement invariance of scores on the Self-Efficacy for Self-Regulated Learning Scale taken from Bandura's Children's Self-Efficacy Scale were assessed in a sample of 3,760 students from Grades 4 to 11. Latent means differences were also examined by gender and school level. Results reveal a…

Usher, Ellen L.; Pajares, Frank

2008-01-01

308

Perceived Racism and Career Self-Efficacy in African American Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

African American adolescents' perceptions of racism and career self-efficacy relationships are examined. Participants in a southwestern urban high school completed the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure, Racism and Life Experiences Scale-Personal and -Group, and career decision and career task self-efficacy scales. Results indicate that…

Rollins, Vanessa B.; Valdez, Jesse N.

2006-01-01

309

Making a Post-Eurocentric Humanity: Tragedy, Realism, and Things Fall Apart  

Microsoft Academic Search

: This essay defends the proposition that in tragedy and realism Achebe finds the efficacious aesthetic means to remake the African person and world—as represented by Okonkwo and Umuofia in Things Fall Apart—to humanist measure. In invoking the two aesthetic forms, Achebe is to be seen delivering a literary rebuke to Joseph Conrad and Joyce Cary. Conrad’s use of impressionism

Kwaku Larbi Korang

2011-01-01

310

Making a Post-Eurocentric Humanity: Tragedy, Realism, and Things Fall Apart  

Microsoft Academic Search

This essay defends the proposition that in tragedy and realism Achebe finds the efficacious aesthetic means to remake the African person and world—as represented by Okonkwo and Umuofia in Things Fall Apart—to humanist measure. In invoking the two aesthetic forms, Achebe is to be seen delivering a literary rebuke to Joseph Conrad and Joyce Cary. Conrad’s use of impressionism in

Kwaku Larbi Korang

2011-01-01

311

Three-dimensional vortex simulation for particulate jet generated by free falling particles  

Microsoft Academic Search

The particulate jet generated by solid particles falling from a circular orifice into an unbounded quiescent air is simulated. The three-dimensional vortex method, proposed for the analysis of particle-laden free turbulent flow in a prior study, is employed for the simulation. It is found that the falling particles induce complicated three-dimensional unsteady air flow involving large-scale eddies. The air takes

Tomomi Uchiyama; Masaaki Naruse

2006-01-01

312

IDENTIFYING ROOF FALL PREDICTORS USING FUZZY CLASSIFICATION  

SciTech Connect

Microseismic monitoring involves placing geophones on the rock surfaces of a mine to record seismic activity. Classification of microseismic mine data can be used to predict seismic events in a mine to mitigate mining hazards, such as roof falls, where properly bolting and bracing the roof is often an insufficient method of preventing weak roofs from destabilizing. In this study, six months of recorded acoustic waveforms from microseismic monitoring in a Pennsylvania limestone mine were analyzed using classification techniques to predict roof falls. Fuzzy classification using features selected for computational ease was applied on the mine data. Both large roof fall events could be predicted using a Roof Fall Index (RFI) metric calculated from the results of the fuzzy classification. RFI was successfully used to resolve the two significant roof fall events and predicted both events by at least 15 hours before visual signs of the roof falls were evident.

Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K. [NDE Lab, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, 23187-8795 (United States)

2010-02-22

313

WFU Physics Demo Video: Simultaneous Fall Apparatus  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This video demonstrates two balls being dropped simultaneously. One is given a horizontal velocity while the other simply falls. The experiment shows that only the vertical component determines the fall time, hence they fall with the same acceleration and simultaneously impact the table or the ground. This video may be viewed in steps, which is recommended for close examination of the process. This item is part of a collection of lecture demonstration videos compiled by the physics department at Wake Forest University.

G. Eric Matthews, Professor

2008-07-19

314

Explorations in Fall Year 1 Spring  

E-print Network

-2013 Fall Year 4 SpringFall Year 3 SpringFall Year 2 Spring Free Elective(3) CS2321(3) Data Structures CS Elective(3) HASS (3000 or higher) Elective(3) Technical Elective(3/4)** CS3141(3) Team Software Project(3/4)** CS3000(2) Ethical and Social Aspects of Comp. CS4xxx (3/4)** CS 3141 Lab Science (4/5) Lab

315

Prediction of clinical drug efficacy by classification of drug-induced genomic expression profiles in vitro  

Microsoft Academic Search

Assays of drug action typically evaluate biochemical activity. However, accurately matching therapeutic efficacy with biochemical activity is a challenge. High-content cellular assays seek to bridge this gap by capturing broad information about the cellular physiology of drug action. Here, we present a method of predicting the general therapeutic classes into which various psychoactive drugs fall, based on high-content statistical categorization

Erik C. Gunther; David J. Stone; Robert W. Gerwien; Patricia Bento; Melvyn P. Heyes

2003-01-01

316

Collapse: Why do Civilizations Fall?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Collapse: Why do Civilizations Fall? is an educational exhibit recently added to the Annenberg/CPB Projects Learner Online site (described in the September 12, 1997 Scout Report). The exhibit explores the decline of ancient civilizations in four regions of the world: the Maya of Copan, the Anasazi of the Chaco Canyon, the Mashkan-shapir of Mesopotamia, and the empires of Mali and Songhai of Timbuktu. The site presents the theories and investigative methods employed by archaeologists to study the decline of these great societies. In addition, special features allow visitors to study excavation clues from the ancient city of Copan and to examine the revealing science of "garbage-ology." Web links relevant to the online exhibition, along with a short bibliography, provide material for further investigation into the downfall of ancient civilizations.

317

Automated fall detection with quality improvement "rewind" to reduce falls in hospital rooms.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to test the implementation of a fall detection and "rewind" privacy-protecting technique using the Microsoft® Kinect™ to not only detect but prevent falls from occurring in hospitalized patients. Kinect sensors were placed in six hospital rooms in a step-down unit and data were continuously logged. Prior to implementation with patients, three researchers performed a total of 18 falls (walking and then falling down or falling from the bed) and 17 non-fall events (crouching down, stooping down to tie shoe laces, and lying on the floor). All falls and non-falls were correctly identified using automated algorithms to process Kinect sensor data. During the first 8 months of data collection, processing methods were perfected to manage data and provide a "rewind" method to view events that led to falls for post-fall quality improvement process analyses. Preliminary data from this feasibility study show that using the Microsoft Kinect sensors provides detection of falls, fall risks, and facilitates quality improvement after falls in real hospital environments unobtrusively, while taking into account patient privacy. PMID:24296567

Rantz, Marilyn J; Banerjee, Tanvi S; Cattoor, Erin; Scott, Susan D; Skubic, Marjorie; Popescu, Mihail

2014-01-01

318

Automated Fall Detection With Quality Improvement "Rewind" to Reduce Falls in Hospital Rooms  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to test the implementation of a fall detection and “rewind” privacy-protecting technique using the Microsoft® Kinect™ to not only detect but prevent falls from occurring in hospitalized patients. Kinect sensors were placed in six hospital rooms in a step-down unit and data were continuously logged. Prior to implementation with patients, three researchers performed a total of 18 falls (walking and then falling down or falling from the bed) and 17 non-fall events (crouching down, stooping down to tie shoe laces, and lying on the floor). All falls and non-falls were correctly identified using automated algorithms to process Kinect sensor data. During the first 8 months of data collection, processing methods were perfected to manage data and provide a “rewind” method to view events that led to falls for post-fall quality improvement process analyses. Preliminary data from this feasibility study show that using the Microsoft Kinect sensors provides detection of falls, fall risks, and facilitates quality improvement after falls in real hospital environments unobtrusively, while taking into account patient privacy. PMID:24296567

Rantz, Marilyn J.; Banerjee, Tanvi S.; Cattoor, Erin; Scott, Susan D.; Skubic, Marjorie; Popescu, Mihail

2014-01-01

319

From Fall to Spring, or Spring to Fall? Seasonal Cholera Transmission Cycles and Implications for Climate Change  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cholera remains a major public health threat in many developing countries around the world. The striking seasonality and the annual recurrence of this infectious disease in endemic areas continues to be of considerable interest to scientists and public health workers. Despite major advances in the ecological, and microbiological understanding of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent, the role of underlying macro-scale hydroclimatic processes in propagating the disease in different seasons and years is not well understood. The incidence of cholera in the Bengal Delta region, the ‘native homeland’ of cholera, shows distinct biannual peaks in the southern floodplains, as opposed to single annual peaks in coastal areas and the northern parts of Bangladesh, as well as other cholera-endemic regions in the world. A coupled analysis of the regional hydroclimate and cholera incidence reveals a strong association of the spatio-temporal variability of incidence peaks with seasonal processes and extreme events. At a seasonal scale, the cycles indicate a spring-fall transmission pattern, contrary to the prevalent notion of a fall-spring transmission cycle. We show that the asymmetric seasonal hydroclimatology affects regional cholera dynamics by providing a coastal growth environment for bacteria in spring, while propagating transmission to fall by flooding. This seasonal interpretation of the progression of cholera has important implications, for formulating effective cholera intervention and mitigation efforts through improved water management and understanding the impacts of changing climate patterns on seasonal cholera transmission. (Water Environental Research Education Actionable Solutions Network)

Akanda, A. S.; Jutla, A. S.; Huq, A.; Colwell, R.; Islam, S.; WE Reason

2010-12-01

320

Articulation Report: Report for the Florida Community College System, Data for Fall 1995, Fall 1996, Fall 1997.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This articulation report presents descriptive headcount statistics for undergraduates in Florida's State University System (SUS) institutions who, prior to enrolling in the university, were enrolled in a Florida public community college. In fall 1997, there were 66,299 such students, a decrease of 0.7 percent from fall 1995 in which there were…

Florida State Board of Community Colleges, Tallahassee.

321

Efficacy of OTC analgesics.  

PubMed

For many 'over-the-counter' (OTC) analgesics, there is little information available about their relative efficacy. We have examined information available in a series of Cochrane reviews of single doses of analgesic drugs in acute pain and migraine for its relevance for analgesic products commonly available without prescription, at doses generally equivalent to two tablets. Pain following third molar extraction was used as a homogeneous acute pain model; with the outcome of at least 50% maximum pain relief over 6 h. For many OTC drugs, there was no information available. For some OTC drugs, there was at least some information available either for the marketed product itself, or from studies that used the same doses of drug or drugs. For acute pain, data from third molar extraction studies showed that several OTC products were highly efficacious, principally non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ibuprofen, naproxen, diclofenac) and combination products based on ibuprofen; aspirin and paracetamol-based products were less efficacious. Fixed-dose combinations, especially those with ibuprofen, provided high levels of analgesia. For migraine headache, the outcome used was pain initially moderate or severe becoming no worse than mild pain (no pain, mild pain) at 2 h. Single-dose ibuprofen 400 mg was better than aspirin and paracetamol. PMID:23163544

Moore, R A; Derry, C

2013-01-01

322

Frequencies of falls in Swiss hospitals: Concordance between nurses’ estimates and fall incident reports  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundPatient falls are frequent incidents in hospitals, and various measurement methods are described in the literature to assess in-patient fall rates. However, the literature includes no validation of nurses’ estimates of fall frequencies, which are the preferred assessment method in multi-centre surveys.

Barbara Cina-Tschumi; Maria Schubert; Reto W. Kressig; Sabina De Geest; René Schwendimann

2009-01-01

323

Falls and consequent injuries in hospitalized patients: effects of an interdisciplinary falls prevention program  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Patient falls in hospitals are common and may lead to negative outcomes such as injuries, prolonged hospitalization and legal liability. Consequently, various hospital falls prevention programs have been implemented in the last decades. However, most of the programs had no sustained effects on falls reduction over extended periods of time. METHODS: This study used a serial survey design to

René Schwendimann; Hugo Bühler; Sabina De Geest; Koen Milisen

2006-01-01

324

Martial arts fall techniques decrease the impact forces at the hip during sideways falling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Falls to the side and those with impact on the hip are risky for hip fractures in the elderly. A previous study has indicated that martial arts (MA) fall techniques can reduce hip impact force, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Furthermore, the high impact forces at the hand used to break the fall have raised concerns because of the

B. E. Groen; V. G. M. Weerdesteijn; J. E. J. Duysens

2007-01-01

325

Falling and fall risk factors in adults with haemophilia: an exploratory study.  

PubMed

Falls are a particular risk in persons with haemophilia (PWH) because of damaged joints, high risk of bleeding, possible impact on the musculoskeletal system and functioning and costs associated with treatment for these fall-related injuries. In addition, fall risk increases with age and PWH are increasingly entering the over 65 age group. The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of falls during the past year and to explore which fall risk factors are present in community-dwelling PWH. Dutch speaking community-dwelling adults were included from the age of 40 years with severe or moderate haemophilia A or B, independent in their mobility and registered at the University Hospitals Leuven. They were asked to come to the haemophilia centre; otherwise a telephone survey was conducted. Demographic and social variables, medical variables, fall evaluation and clinical variables were queried. From the 89 PWH, 74 (83.1%) participated in the study. Twenty-four (32.4%) fell in the past year, and 10 of them (41.7%) more than once with an average of four falls. Living conditions, physical activity, avoidance of winter sports due to fear of falling, orthopaedic status, urinary incontinence and mobility impairments are potential fall risk factors in adult PWH. This exploratory study indicates that PWH are attentive to falling since they are at higher risk for falls and because of the serious consequences it might have. Screening and fall prevention should be stimulated in the daily practice of haemophilia care. PMID:25354771

Sammels, M; Vandesande, J; Vlaeyen, E; Peerlinck, K; Milisen, K

2014-11-01

326

Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #1 Fall 2003 Fall 2003 Biology 111 Exam #1 -Cellular Communications  

E-print Network

). #12;Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #1 ­ Fall 2003 4 6 pts. 8) Explain the concepts of voltage and currentDr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #1 ­ Fall 2003 1 Fall 2003 Biology 111 Exam #1 - Cellular Communications There is no time limit on this test, though I have tried to design one that you should be able to complete within 2

Campbell, A. Malcolm

327

The Continued Development of the Athletic Self-Appraisal Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study represents the continued development of the Athletic Self-Appraisal Scale (ASAS), formerly titled the General Sports Self-Efficacy Scale. Based on Bandura’s theory of self-efficacy and the resulting suggestions for appropriate scale construction, the authors present a measure that highlights the interdependent role of self-efficacy sources, known as self-appraisal. This measure includes item content specifically adhering to athletics in

J. Alex Cramptom

2010-01-01

328

Quantitative falls risk assessment using the timed up and go test.  

PubMed

Falls are a major problem in older adults worldwide with an estimated 30% of elderly adults over 65 years of age falling each year. The direct and indirect societal costs associated with falls are enormous. A system that could provide an accurate automated assessment of falls risk prior to falling would allow timely intervention and ease the burden on overstretched healthcare systems worldwide. An objective method for assessing falls risk using body-worn kinematic sensors is reported. The gait and balance of 349 community-dwelling elderly adults was assessed using body-worn sensors while each patient performed the "timed up and go" (TUG) test. Patients were also evaluated using the Berg balance scale (BBS). Of the 44 reported parameters derived from body-worn kinematic sensors, 29 provided significant discrimination between patients with a history of falls and those without. Cross-validated estimates of retrospective falls prediction performance using logistic regression models yielded a mean sensitivity of 77.3% and a mean specificity of 75.9%. This compares favorably to the cross-validated performance of logistic regression models based on the time taken to complete the TUG test (manually timed TUG) and the Berg balance score. These models yielded mean sensitivities of 58.0% and 57.8%, respectively, and mean specificities of 64.8% and 64.2%, respectively. Results suggest that this method offers an improvement over two standard falls risk assessments (TUG and BBS) and may have potential for use in supervised assessment of falls risk as part of a longitudinal monitoring protocol. PMID:20923729

Greene, Barry R; O'Donovan, Alan; Romero-Ortuno, Roman; Cogan, Lisa; Scanaill, Cliodhna Ni; Kenny, Rose A

2010-12-01

329

Impact loads of falling rocks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Depending on the chosen protection system the planning engineer has to proceed differently. If the impact energies stay below 3'000 - 5'000 kJ solutions using flexible protection systems are recommended in many cases being the most efficient solution. Since 2001, such systems are type tested in Switzerland. The results are published on the internet (www.umwelt-schweiz.ch/typenpruefung). Therefore, the engineers can concentrate on the design of the anchorage and do not need to consider the brake down process of the falling rock because its details including the acting forces within the barrier are given. This is different to the design of rockfall protection earth dams. Here, the evidence of the structural safety is the major task and questions like the following ones have to be answered: What magnitude are the forces that have to be carried for a certain kinetic energy? How are the forces influenced by mass or impact velocity? What is the influence of the soil properties such as strength, density and friction angle? How deep does the rock penetrate? Previous research on the impact loads on the cushion layer of protection galleries were performed by EPFL in the mid-nineties and led to a Swiss Guideline (ASTRA/SBB 1998) to calculate an equivalent static load for the structure underneath. This approach also delivers a function to predict the penetration depth. This contribution now checks whether above approach can also be used to design earth dams or how it can be modified. For that, the results of previous experiments performed by different institutions were analysed and, if possible, compared to the guideline. This could confirm above mentioned function to predict the penetration depth. In addition, an experimental series with different bodies (800 kg, 4000 kg) falling from different heights (2 - 15 m) on differently conditioned soils were performed. Measurements were taken through accelerometers attached to the blocks and measuring the vertical deceleration. The penetration into the ground was obtained by using digital high-speed video recording during the experiments and surveyor's optical level before and afterwards. The combination of accelerometers and digital high-speed video recordings additionally allows for a check of the function of the single systems. The rock's velocity can be obtained on the one hand through integration of the accelerations and on the other hand by differentiation of the video data; both values should differ not too much. Finally, the analyses of the test series enabled a calibration of an improved individual load model for the impact of falling bodies into more or less compacted soil and revealed that the loads resulting from the previous guideline can be reduced by 20%. However, because the maximum impact energy was 600 kJ further experiments are recommended to enable a prediction of the performance for energies higher than 5'000 kJ - an energy sector dams are normally used for.

Gerber, W.

2009-04-01

330

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Fall Term Spring Term  

E-print Network

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM FALL 2010 Fall Term Spring Term EGGG 101 Introduction to Chemical Engineering 3 MATH 242 Analytic Geometry & Calculus B 4 MATH 243 Analytic Geometry & Calculus C 4 Critical Reading and Writing 3 Breadth Requirement Elective 1 3 15 17 CHEG 231 Chemical Engineering

Lee, Kelvin H.

331

Music BM Performance Fall--First Year  

E-print Network

Music ­ BM Performance Fall--First Year · MUSI 130: Music Analysis I · MUSI 132: Aural Skills in Music I · MUSI 279: Concert and Recital Atten. · MUSI 153: Keyboard Skills I · MUSI xxx: Major Program (LSP) coursework Fall--Second Year · MUSI 230: Music Analysis III · MUSI 232: Aural Skills

Gering, Jon C.

332

Bellevue Community College Student Profile, Fall 1995.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intended for the college community and various campus constituencies working with the college, this report provides data on students enrolled at Bellevue Community College (BCC), in Washington, as of fall 1995. Following an executive summary and introduction, data are presented for 1990-95 and specifically for fall 1995 on student age, gender,…

Hodge, Valerie L.

333

Fall 2011 RIO Funding Application INFORMATION Packet  

E-print Network

Fall 2011 RIO Funding Application INFORMATION Packet *Please keep for your records. Page 1 of 5 1. Application Deadline Application deadline for Fall 2011 funding: September 16, 2011 by 4:00 P.M. Incomplete. Eligibility A copy of ASUH Senate Rules Part XII: RIO Funding Procedures, which details the eligibility

Dong, Yingfei

334

Ice Fall Doctors 2, Ang Kami  

E-print Network

Ice Fall Doctor Ang Kami explains how his climbing background. Then he and Ang Nima being explaining how the history of the Ice Fall doctors. These recordings were made on a trek in the spring of 2011 up to Mount Everest Base Camp. The recordings...

Loomis, Molly

335

Risk of falls for hospitalized patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

The incidence rate of falls is often used as an indicator of nursing care outcome. Comparing outcome between different settings should, however, make allowance for case mix. To measure the incidence of falls, describe their circumstances and develop a prediction model based on routinely collected data to allow comparison between hospital settings with different case mix. A dynamic population of

Patricia Halfon; Yves Eggli; Guy Van Melle; André Vagnair

2001-01-01

336

Preclinical Alzheimer disease and risk of falls  

PubMed Central

Objective: We determined the rate of falls among cognitively normal, community-dwelling older adults, some of whom had presumptive preclinical Alzheimer disease (AD) as detected by in vivo imaging of fibrillar amyloid plaques using Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) and PET and/or by assays of CSF to identify A?42, tau, and phosphorylated tau. Methods: We conducted a 12-month prospective cohort study to examine the cumulative incidence of falls. Participants were evaluated clinically and underwent PiB PET imaging and lumbar puncture. Falls were reported monthly using an individualized calendar journal returned by mail. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to test whether time to first fall was associated with each biomarker and the ratio of CSF tau/A?42 and CSF phosphorylated tau/A?42, after adjustment for common fall risk factors. Results: The sample (n = 125) was predominately female (62.4%) and white (96%) with a mean age of 74.4 years. When controlled for ability to perform activities of daily living, higher levels of PiB retention (hazard ratio = 2.95 [95% confidence interval 1.01–6.45], p = 0.05) and of CSF biomarker ratios (p < 0.001) were associated with a faster time to first fall. Conclusions: Presumptive preclinical AD is a risk factor for falls in older adults. This study suggests that subtle noncognitive changes that predispose older adults to falls are associated with AD and may precede detectable cognitive changes. PMID:23803314

Roe, Catherine M.; Grant, Elizabeth A.; Hollingsworth, Holly; Benzinger, Tammie L.; Fagan, Anne M.; Buckles, Virginia D.; Morris, John C.

2013-01-01

337

Fall 2013 Edition Editor-in-Chief  

E-print Network

always occurred to me that TJ could fall apart at any moment. His arms were already feeling a bit loose Musings of Brescia Fall 2013 Edition Editor-in-Chief Alicia Moore Editor Shelly Harder #12 By Jessica Jackson The best thing my mother ever did for me was to thrust a scraggly panda in my face. She

Lennard, William N.

338

PREDICTING SPRING LAKE CHEMISTRY FROM FALL SAMPLES  

EPA Science Inventory

The relationship between fall and spring lake chemistry was investigated for five chemical variables of 103 lakes in seven regions of the United States. Strong linear relationships were found between preceding springs and fall values for acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), pH, sulf...

339

Why Does My Foot Fall Asleep?  

MedlinePLUS

... Page The Pink Locker Society Why Does My Foot Fall Asleep? KidsHealth > Kids > Q&A > Q & A > Why Does My Foot Fall Asleep? Print A A A Text Size ... while you might have lost feeling in your foot, it might have felt heavy, or you might ...

340

Certificated Personnel and Related Information, Fall 1996.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information used to prepare this publication about certificated school personnel in Colorado was gathered from the state's public schools and Boards of Cooperative Services during fall 1995. Tables describe teacher salaries and characteristics, including educational background and ethnicity. The fall 1996 average salary for Colorado's 36,397.9…

Wamboldt, Martina

341

Preventing falls among older adults: No \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Physical activity (exercise) serves primary, second- ary, and tertiary roles in the prevention of falls among older adults. In its primary role, physical activity can prevent the onset of pathology and system impairments that lead to disabil- ity and increased risk for falls. Slowing the progression of dis- ease and system impairments is its secondary role, while its tertiary role

Debra J. Rose

2008-01-01

342

ECONOMIC EMERGENCY PROGRAM International Falls Plant Shutdown  

E-print Network

, machine shops, dental laboratories manufacturing, and sporting and athletic goods manufacturing. In many. announced plans to shut down two of the four paper machines at its International Falls paper mill Falls. An additional 35 jobs within the corporate structure will also be affected. As the community

Amin, S. Massoud

343

Geologic History Field Investigation - Minnehaha Falls  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is an inquiry-based field investigation of the geologic history of the Minnehaha Falls and St. Anthony Falls areas of Minneapolis. Students will be introduced to rocks and the stories rocks tell in a genuine geologic context, rather than as samples in the classroom.

Kevin Swanson and Justin Larson, Chippewa Middle School, North Oaks, MN

344

The Latino Experience in Central Falls  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Central Falls is, by far, the poorest community in Rhode Island. More than 40 percent of the children under 18 live in poverty, and 40 percent of that group live in severe poverty. At Central Falls High School, low-income Latino students have fallen behind their white counterparts, with shockingly low graduation, poor literacy, and low…

Holland, William R.

2011-01-01

345

Junior High School Students Internet Usage and Self-Efficacy: A Re-Examination of the Gender Gap  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper investigated the gender differences in junior high school students' Internet self-efficacy and their use of the Internet. A total of 1080 eighth graders were randomly selected from all junior high school students in Taiwan. The Internet Self-Efficacy Scale (ISES) was developed and used to examine students' Internet self-efficacy in two…

Tsai, Meng-Jung; Tsai, Chin-Chung

2010-01-01

346

The Use of the "Teaching as Inquiry Model" to Develop Students' Self-Efficacy in Literature Response Essay Writing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a project conducted with Year 12 English students. It was based on the model of "Teaching as Inquiry" (Ministry of Education, 2007) and aimed to develop students' self-efficacy in relation to their literature-response essay writing. Self-efficacy was measured using Bandura's (2006) self-efficacy scale and an intervention was…

Featonby, Amy

2012-01-01

347

Elementary Students' Self-Efficacy Beliefs in Science: Role of Grade Level, Gender, and Socio-Economic Status  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined grade level and gender difference with respect to elementary students' science and technology self-efficacy. Additionally, relationship between socio-economic status (SES) and self-efficacy was examined. A total of 145 elementary students participated in the study. Self efficacy towards Science and Technology Scale was used to…

Karaarslan, Guliz; Sungur, Semra

2011-01-01

348

Gender Differences in School Children's Self-Efficacy Beliefs: Students' and Teachers' Perspectives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This small scale study examined gender differences in self-efficacy. 24 girls and 28 boys aged between 10 and 12 years completed self-efficacy questionnaires and attainment tests. The study was conducted in two primary school classrooms in England and the results indicated that gender differences in self-efficacy were significant with boys holding…

Webb-Williams, Jane

2014-01-01

349

Characteristics of Hospital Inpatient Falls across Clinical Departments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Hospital inpatient falls are common and may lead to injuries and prolonged hospitalization. Although hospital studies have reported overall fall rates and injuries associated with falls, few have addressed population characteristics and circumstances of falls across clinical departments within a hospital setting. Objective: To determine inpatient fall rates in an urban public hospital and to explore associated characteristics across

René Schwendimann; Hugo Bühler; Sabina De Geest; Koen Milisen

2008-01-01

350

158. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

158. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Transit Book #404T, Page 3, #46, Division One). START OF MAIN CANAL SURVEY, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

351

154. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

154. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Surveyor's Transit Book #405T, Page 2, #46 Division One). STATEMENT OF SIGHT-SETTING FOR 1903 SURVEY TO ALIGN SOUTH SIDE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

352

155. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

155. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Surveyor's Transit Book #405T, Page 1, #46 Division One). STATEMENT RE: SURVEY ALIGNMENT 3/03, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

353

151. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

151. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Surveyor's Transit Book #363, Page 20). SURVEY PRINT SHOWING POINT SPILLWAY AND FIELD NOTES, TWIN FALLS COUNTY NORTHWEST OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

354

152. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

152. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Surveyor's Transit Book #363, Page 1). 1912 CONDITION REPORT OF MILNER DAM AREA, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

355

153. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

153. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Field Book #360, Page 74, entitled, 'Clay-Seam Cut-Off.' Cross-Reference: ID-15-157). MILNER DAM SURVEY, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

356

Inpatient falls: defining the problem and identifying possible solutions. Part I: an evidence-based review.  

PubMed

In this 2 part series, analysis of the risk stratification tools that are available, definition for the scope of the problem, and potential solutions through a review of the literature are presented. A systematic review was used to identify articles for risk stratification and interventions. Three risk stratification systems are discussed, St Thomas's Risk Assessment Tool in Falling Elderly Inpatients, Morse Fall Scale, and the Hendrich Fall Risk Model. Of these scoring systems, the Hendrich Fall Risk Model is the easiest to use and score. Predominantly, multifactorial interventions are used to prevent patient falls. Education and rehabilitation are common themes in studies with statistically significant results. The second article presents a guide to implementing a quality improvement project around hospital falls. A 10-step approach to Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycles is described. Specific examples of problems and analysis are easily applicable to any institution. Furthermore, the sustainability of interventions and targeting new areas for improvement is discussed. Although specific to falls in the hospitalized patient, the goal is to present a stepwise approach which is broadly applicable to other areas requiring quality improvement. PMID:24167647

Cumbler, Ethan U; Simpson, Jennifer R; Rosenthal, Laura D; Likosky, David J

2013-07-01

357

Challenges and conundrums in the validation of Pediatric Fall Risk Assessment tools.  

PubMed

The 10-item Pediatric Fall Risk Assessment (PFRA) was developed to evaluate patients at low- or high-risk for falling. To avoid the unnecessary use of resources for children not likely to fall, children evaluated as high-risk are targeted for more intensive fall prevention interventions. In a retrospective, case-control design, the precision, accuracy, and error rate of the PFRA with patients ages 1 month to 24 years were evaluated. Cases included children who fell (n = 326), and controls (n = 326) were children from the same cohort who did not fall. Inter-rater agreement (precision) on PFRA cut-off scores was 95.1%, but accuracy was unacceptably low due to 60% false-positive and 58.5% false-negative risk ratings. Neither the PFRA nor three other widely used pediatric fall risk scales have sufficient precision or accuracy to justify implementing or withholding a high-risk fall prevention protocol. Several logistic and methodological challenges must be addressed before further development of these tools. PMID:22908460

Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A; Kimchi-Woods, Judy; Erbaugh, Melanie A; LaFollette, Lauren; Lathrop, Janet

2012-01-01

358

Keep Up or Fall Behind  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the race to enable information access and collaboration, institutions are taking advantage of new tools to drive content management innovation. New content management systems (CMS) features and functions are driving true innovation in content management, and enabling information access, sharing, collaboration, and tracking on a scale heretofore…

Ramaswami, Rama

2007-01-01

359

Efficacy of a Brief Alcohol Consumption Reintervention for Adolescents  

PubMed Central

This article reports the efficacy of a brief substance use preventive reintervention for suburban high school students funded by NIAAA. Participants were randomly assigned to receive a brief consultation or control brochure in Fall 2002. Significant positive effects at the 3- and 12-month follow-up have been reported elsewhere. A total of 346 10th- and 12th-grade students were recruited from the original sample for the reintervention study in Fall 2003. Students remained in their originally assigned group and received a brief iterative consultation or control brochure. The same survey was used to collect information on ATOD use and risk/protective factors at all data points. MANCOVAs revealed no group differences 18 months after the initial study baseline. Analysis examining interactions between substance users and nonusers by treatment group indicated significant positive effects for substance-using adolescents who received reintervention. Study limitations, implications, and suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:19938941

MOORE, MICHELE JOHNSON; WERCH, CHUDLEY (CHAD)

2010-01-01

360

Ampicillin: Rise Fall and Resurgence  

PubMed Central

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global problem. AMR has posed new challenges in treatment of infectious diseases. Antimicrobials are losing efficacy due to development of resistant pathogens. It has lead to re-emergence of certain infectious diseases. Treatment of such diseases has undergone changes with use of alternative antimicrobials and drug combinations. Pathogens are likely to develop resistance to alternative antimicrobials also and risk of infections with nonexistent treatment is real. Salmonella showed widespread resistant to ampicillin which resulted in use of alternative antimicrobials like fluroquinolones and cephalosporins in the treatment of enteric fever in last two decades. Unfortunately there are growing reports of resistance to these antimicrobials. Interestingly there are numerous reports of ampicillin regaining activity against Salmonella. Speculatively lack of exposure of Salmonella to ampicillin for long time resulted in the loss of plasmid mediated resistance in the pathogen. There may have been emergence of de novo ampicillin susceptible strains. This is assuring in the era where problem of AMR is compounded by the scarcity of new antimicrobial development. PMID:24995206

Kaushik, Dwarikadhish; Mohan, Mudit; Borade, Dhammraj M

2014-01-01

361

Ampicillin: rise fall and resurgence.  

PubMed

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global problem. AMR has posed new challenges in treatment of infectious diseases. Antimicrobials are losing efficacy due to development of resistant pathogens. It has lead to re-emergence of certain infectious diseases. Treatment of such diseases has undergone changes with use of alternative antimicrobials and drug combinations. Pathogens are likely to develop resistance to alternative antimicrobials also and risk of infections with nonexistent treatment is real. Salmonella showed widespread resistant to ampicillin which resulted in use of alternative antimicrobials like fluroquinolones and cephalosporins in the treatment of enteric fever in last two decades. Unfortunately there are growing reports of resistance to these antimicrobials. Interestingly there are numerous reports of ampicillin regaining activity against Salmonella. Speculatively lack of exposure of Salmonella to ampicillin for long time resulted in the loss of plasmid mediated resistance in the pathogen. There may have been emergence of de novo ampicillin susceptible strains. This is assuring in the era where problem of AMR is compounded by the scarcity of new antimicrobial development. PMID:24995206

Kaushik, Dwarikadhish; Mohan, Mudit; Borade, Dhammraj M; Swami, Onkar C

2014-05-01

362

Evidence-based clinical practice in falls prevention: a randomised controlled trial of a falls prevention service  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims: Evidence-based guidelines recommend a range of treatments for falls and injury prevention. We undertook a randomised trial of a falls prevention service to screen for falls risk factors and recommend to GPs an evidenced base prescription for falls prevention. Methods: All patients who presented with a fall to the Emergency Department at Flinders Medical Centre over a 22-week period

Craig Whitehead; Rachel Wundke; Maria Crotty; Paul Finucane

2003-01-01

363

Cerebrovascular hemodynamics, gait, and falls in an elderly population  

PubMed Central

Objective: To determine whether alterations in cerebral blood flow regulation are associated with slow gait speed and falls in community-dwelling elderly individuals. Methods: The study sample consisted of 419 individuals from the MOBILIZE Boston Study (MBS) who had transcranial Doppler ultrasound measures of cerebral blood flow velocity. The MBS is a prospective cohort study of a unique set of risk factors for falls in seniors in the Boston area. We measured beat-to-beat blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery in response to 1) changes in end-tidal CO2 (cerebral vasoreactivity) and 2) blood pressure changes during a sit-to-stand protocol (cerebral autoregulation). Gait speed was measured during a 4-meter walk. Falls were tracked by monthly calendars, and demographic and clinical characteristics were assessed at baseline. Results: A multivariate linear regression analysis showed that cerebral vasoreactivity was cross-sectionally related to gait speed (p = 0.039). Individuals in the lowest quintile of vasoreactivity had lower gait speeds as compared to those in the highest quintile (p = 0.047). In a negative binomial regression analysis adjusted for relevant covariates, the relationship between cerebral vasoreactivity and fall rate did not reach significance. However, when comparing individuals in the lowest to highest quintile of cerebral vasoreactivity, those in the lowest quintile had a higher fall rate (p = 0.029). Conclusions: Impaired cerebral blood flow regulation, as measured by cerebral vasoreactivity to CO2, is associated with slow gait speed and may lead to the development of falls in elderly people. GLOSSARY ACEI = angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors; ADL = activities of daily living; ABP = arterial pressure monitoring; BFV = blood flow velocity; CES-D = Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale; CVR = cerebrovascular resistance; HR = heart rate; HVLT-R = Hopkins Verbal Learning Test–Revised; l-NMMA = l-NG-monomethyl arginine; MBS = MOBILIZE Boston Study; MCA = middle cerebral artery; SPPB = Short Physical Performance Battery; VR = vasoreactivity; WMSA = signal abnormalities in cerebral white matter. PMID:20479362

Sorond, F.A.; Galica, A.; Serrador, J.M.; Kiely, D.K.; Iloputaife, I.; Cupples, L.A.; Lipsitz, L.A.

2010-01-01

364

Effects of a Stress Management workshop on perceived stress, state anxiety, and self-efficacy in counselors-in-training  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the effects of a Stress Management workshop on perceived stress, state anxiety, and self-efficacy in counselors-in-training. It was hypothesized the stress management workshop with verbal persuasion e-mail messages would have a positive effect on decreasing perceived stress and state anxiety, while enhancing self-efficacy in counselors-in-training. The study participants were the practicum students from Spring\\/Summer and Fall, 2008

Vida Ann-Nicholas Fiorentino

2009-01-01

365

Planning for 2012 AGU Fall Meeting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Fall Meeting is AGU's flagship meeting and is the largest Earth and space sciences meeting in the world. The high quality of this meeting is due to the joint efforts of the Fall Meeting Program Committee, the professional AGU meetings staff, AGU members who serve as session chairs, and AGU members who submit abstracts and attend the meeting. The 2011 Fall Meeting was attended by more than 21,000 people, including 30% from outside the United States. To maintain the high quality of AGU science and the reputation of AGU for excellence in meetings, the AGU Meetings Committee has finalized the 2012 schedule.

Bates, John J.

2012-04-01

366

4. VIEW OF SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. VIEW OF SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE TOWER NO. 41, OSPREY NEST ON TOWER TOP. LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Little Falls Tie Line Towers, Near Little Dam Falls on Spokane River, Wellpinit, Stevens County, WA

367

5. VIEW OF NORTHWEST ELEVATIONS OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. VIEW OF NORTHWEST ELEVATIONS OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE TOWERS NO. 59 AND NO. 60, EXAMPLE OF TRANSPOSITION TOWERS. LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Little Falls Tie Line Towers, Near Little Dam Falls on Spokane River, Wellpinit, Stevens County, WA

368

3. VIEW OF NORTHWEST CORNER OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. VIEW OF NORTHWEST CORNER OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE TOWER NO. 23, STANDARD PEAK TOWER. LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Little Falls Tie Line Towers, Near Little Dam Falls on Spokane River, Wellpinit, Stevens County, WA

369

2. VIEW OF WEST ELEVATION OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. VIEW OF WEST ELEVATION OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE TOWER NO. 23, OSPREY NEST ON TOWER TOP. LOOKING EAST - Little Falls Tie Line Towers, Near Little Dam Falls on Spokane River, Wellpinit, Stevens County, WA

370

Adolescents' physical activities and peer norms: the mediating role of self-efficacy.  

PubMed

The purpose of the present study was to examine the relations among adolescents' self-efficacy and social norms, and physical activity and whether self-efficacy mediated the relationship between social norms and physical activity. 400 junior high school students (202 boys, 198 girls, 2 not identified; M age = 15.3yr., SD = 0.6) completed a demographic questionnaire, the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), the Perceived Self-Efficacy in Physical Activity Scale, and the Physical Activity Social Norms Scale. Regression analyses indicated that both self-efficacy and social norms predicted physical activity. Self-efficacy fully mediated the relationship between peer norms and physical activity for boys but partially mediated the relationship for girls. An application of the results may be to foster self-efficacy and peer norms as a motivational strategy for supporting increased physical activity. PMID:24897873

Lu, Frank J H; Lin, Ju-Han; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Chou, Chien-Chih; Wang, Erica T W; Yeh, Li-Chin

2014-04-01

371

History of falls, balance performance, and quality of life in older cancer survivors.  

PubMed

Older cancer survivors may be predisposed to falls because of the sequalae associated with cancer and its treatments. This study examined the association between the fall history, balance performance, and health-related quality of life (QoL) in older, community-dwelling cancer survivors who had completed primary cancer treatments. Forty-one cancer survivors (age = 67.9 ± 8.8 years) participated in the study. Balance performance was examined using the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC) and the Balance Evaluation Systems Test (BESTest). Scores from the Physical Component Summary (PCS) and Mental Component Summary (MCS) of the SF-36v2 were obtained to assess the QoL. The demographics and health status were comparable between the fallers and non-fallers. While 54% of the participants had experienced at least one fall in the past 12 months, 30% had experienced two or more falls. Spearman's correlation analysis revealed a significant relationship between the outcomes from the ABC and the PCS (p < 0.001), and between the BESTest and the PCS (p < 0.001). Only the PCS significantly differentiated fallers from non-fallers (p < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis estimated that a one-unit increase in the PCS score significantly reduced the odds of falling by 13% (p < 0.01). The results demonstrate that in older cancer survivors, falls are a significant problem and balance control is a determinant of perceived physical function and well-being. Older cancer survivors reporting a poor QoL in the physical health domain may have higher risks of falling. Future studies are needed to examine the risk factor profiles of falls and the interventions to prevent falls in older cancer survivors. PMID:24931110

Huang, Min H; Lytle, Tracy; Miller, Kara A; Smith, Kristin; Fredrickson, Kayle

2014-07-01

372

/6582 Biophysical Chemistry Fall Biophysical Chemistry  

E-print Network

/6582 Biophysical Chemistry Fall 1 CHEM /6582 Biophysical Chemistry Course meeting place concepts in biophysical chemistry. You will develop an understanding of how thermodynamics, kinetics literature concerning the application of biophysical techniques to characterize biological molecules

Sherrill, David

373

FALL 2014 Kinesiology Undergraduate Graduation Application Guidelines  

E-print Network

FALL 2014 Kinesiology Undergraduate Graduation Application Guidelines: 1. Friday, September 26(s). 3. Complete a Kinesiology Department Exit Survey, (even if you previously applied and completed a department exit survey). Kinesiology Department Exit Survey is online at https

374

DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICS FALL 2013 COURSES  

E-print Network

to the era of Constantine, with an emphasis on the Augustan age. CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY DrDEPARTMENT OF CLASSICS FALL 2013 COURSES INTRODUCTION TO ROMAN CIVILIZATION Dr in Classics. Images of Women in Classical Antiquity (Express II) Dr. Allison Sterrett

Kunkle, Tom

375

Ice Fall Doctors 1, Ang Gylzen Sherpa  

E-print Network

Ang Gylzen Sherpa talks about his life as an Ice Fall doctor on Mount Everest. He discusses safety, religious practices, group dynamics, organization and the effects of climate change. (The tape pickes up speed and gets more interesting once Ang...

Loomis, Molly

376

American Chemical Society Fall National Meeting  

Cancer.gov

August 16, 2009 12:00 AM - August 20, 2009 12:00 AM Washington, DC + Add to Outlook Calendar Probe Development in Molecular Imaging and Therapy Print This Page American Chemical Society Fall National Meeting News & Events

377

WARNER CNR GRADUATION SURVEY RESULTS Fall, 2005  

E-print Network

(Avg Salary: $27,500) · USDA Forest Service 13% are employed or attending grad school vs. 20% in Fall & Tourism: (19 completed surveys) 4 are looking for work 3 are taking time off 1 has been accepted

378

Featured Scientific Meetings - OCCAM Newsletter fall 2011  

Cancer.gov

Fall 2011, Vol. 6 Issue 2 Skip navigation Home Feature A Conversation with News from the Field Funding Opportunities Research Resources Research Highlights CAM Information Meetings Featured Scientific Meetings Back to OCCAM Featured Scientific Meetings Date Meeting Location OCCAM

379

Siena, 1794: History's Most Consequential Meteorite Fall  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the mythos of meteoritics, the fall of stones at L'Aigle in Normandy at 1 p. m. on April 26, 1803, is commonly regarded as the event that turned skeptics into believers and opened the way for the new science. A strong case can be made, however, that the fall of stones at Siena at 7:00 p.m. on June 16, 1794, established the authenticity of meteorite falls and set in motion the reexaminations of entrenched beliefs that led to the founding of the new science. The Siena fall was heralded by the appearance of an extraordinarily high, dark cloud emitting smoke, sparks like rockets, and bolts of unusually slow-moving red lightning. With a tremendous explosion a shower of stones, ranging in weight from a few milligrams to 3 kg, fell southeast of Siena. This was the first meteorite fall to occur in the vicinity of a sizeable European city and the first to be witnessed by so many people, including English visitors, that the fall of the stones from the sky could not be denied. It also was the first fall to be seriously investigated by scholars, at several universities in Italy, who collected eye-witness reports and specimens and formulated hypotheses of origin. Their task was greatly complicated by the timing of the fall which occurred 18 hours after Mt. Vesuvius sprang into full eruption. Some believed that the two events were entirely coincidental; others thought that the stones either were ejecta from the volcano (which lay about 320 km to the southeast of Siena) or had consolidated in the fiery masses of dust and ash expelled by the mountain. No explanations seemed entirely satisfactory, but, in an age when the very possibility of falling stones had been decisively ruled out by savants of the Enlightenment, the well-observed fall at Siena opened a new dialog on this subject. The Siena fall occurred only two months after the publication in Riga and Leipzig of Ernst F. F. Chladni's book On the Origin of Ironmasses in which he concluded from historical records that fragments of iron and stone fall do, indeed, fall from sky. News traveled so slowly in the 18th century that Chladni's book received negative reviews in Germany throughout 1794 and much of 1795 before the first notice of the Siena fall appeared in a Berlin paper in 1796. The same amount of time passed before Chladni's book reached England, but the groundwork for a more tolerant reception of it in that country was laid by travelers returning from Italy in 1794 with their descriptions and their specimens from Siena (including bogus "fallen stones" fabricated for the tourist market). Widespread interest was aroused in 1795 when the Royal Society published an account of the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius by Sir William Hamilton, the English Ambassador at Naples, who included a short discussion of the Siena stones and their possible link with the volcano. Hamilton's article carried the story of the Siena fall to France and Germany. The case for fallen stones was further strengthened when a 56-pound stone fell at 3:30 p.m. on December 13th, 1795, at Wold Cottage in Yorkshire. Early in 1796, Edward King, a Fellow of the Royal Society, published the first book in English on fallen stones. In it, he focused primarily on the Siena event but just as he was finishing his text he received a copy of Chladni's book and quoted from it extensively. King's 36-page book was widely read. It received some bad reviews in England but it immediately prompted one reader to report the fall of a stone [apparently a genuine meteorite] at Pettiswood, Ireland. He had withheld his story for 17 years for fear of ridicule. Now, the climate of opinion had changed and meteoritics already was becoming a new branch of science.

Marvin, U. B.

1995-09-01

380

Corrosion of retractable type fall arresters.  

PubMed

Retractable type fall arresters constitute a most effective group of components used in personal protection systems protecting against falls from a height. They are designed primarily for outdoor use, which results in exposure to atmospheric factors associated with risk of corrosion of metal elements. This paper presents the results of a study, in which retractable type fall arresters were exposed to a simulated corrosive environment, a neutral salt spray. It discusses the development of corrosion processes depending on the duration of exposure to corrosive conditions. Tests demonstrated that corrosion of elements decreased their strength and impaired the functioning of mobile parts. The article presents methods of testing the correct functioning of devices, necessary for assessing their resistance to corrosion, which have been developed for this purpose. It also analyzes the correlation between corrosion-related damage of retractable type fall arresters and potential hazards for their users. PMID:19744368

Baszczy?ski, Krzysztof; Jachowicz, Marcin

2009-01-01

381

Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration Fall 2013 Biomaterials  

E-print Network

Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration ­ Fall 2013 Biomaterials BIOMATERIALS: BIOMEDE Biomedical Engineering Seminar (1) (I,II) BIOMEDE 550 Ethics and Enterprise (1) (I) BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH) STATISTICS (select one course): BIOMEDE 503 Statistical Methods for Biomedical Engineering (3) (II) BIOSTAT

Eustice, Ryan

382

Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration Fall 2014 Biotechnology  

E-print Network

Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration � Fall 2014 Biotechnology Advisor: Michael Mayer, Ph) (II) GENERAL (both courses are required): BIOMEDE 500 Biomedical Engineering Seminar (1) (I Statistical Methods for Biomedical Engineering (3) (II) BIOSTAT 602 Biostatistical Inference (4) (II) BIOSTAT

Eustice, Ryan

383

Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration Fall 2013 Biomechanics  

E-print Network

Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration ­ Fall 2013 Biomechanics BIOMECHANICS (select one courses are required): BIOMEDE 500 Biomedical Engineering Seminar (1) (I,II) BIOMEDE 550 Ethics (3) (I) STATISTICS (select one course): BIOMEDE 503 Statistical Methods for Biomedical Engineering (3

Eustice, Ryan

384

Coming This Fall: Common Chinese Medicinal Plants  

E-print Network

medicinal plants and their products. 2. Learn the methods of Chinese herbal classification;2 2. To introduce students the philosophy of Traditional Chinese Medicine and herbal uses. 3Coming This Fall: Common Chinese Medicinal Plants Identification, Classification and Application

Weiblen, George D

385

Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration Fall 2014 Biomaterials  

E-print Network

Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration � Fall 2014 Biomaterials Advisor: David Kohn, Ph.D. BIOMATERIALS: BIOMEDE 410 Design and Applications of Biomaterials (3) (I) GENERAL (both courses are required

Eustice, Ryan

386

Self-Efficacy in Service-Learning Community Action Research: Theory, Research, and Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article is threefold: In the first section, an overview of research and theory on the self-efficacy construct\\u000a is provided, and the central role of self-efficacy in service-learning community action research is demonstrated. The second\\u000a section reviews over 10 years of research validating the Community Service Self-Efficacy Scale (CSSES), which measures the individual’s confidence in his or her

Roger N. ReebSusan; Susan F. Folger; Stacey Langsner; Courtney Ryan; Jake Crouse

2010-01-01

387

Emotional intelligence and teacher efficacy: a study of Turkish EFL pre-service teachers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the relationship between emotional intelligence and teacher efficacy among 90 English language pre-service teachers from a university in Turkey. Data sources included Tschannen-Moran and Woolfolk-Hoy’s Teachers’ Sense of Efficacy Scale and Reuven Bar-On’s Emotional Quotient Inventory. The findings indicated that Turkish EFL pre-service teachers felt more efficacious in managing the class rather than in making the class

Zeynep Koço?lu

2011-01-01

388

An Empirical Examination of the Impact Organizational Culture Has on Employees' Computer Self-Efficacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

IT-based business initiatives, such as ERP and BPR, require high computer self-efficacy among employees because such changes require large-scale use of computers. Computer self-efficacy is affected by many internal and external factors; for instance, personality or organizational culture. While extensive literature exists on how psychological and sociological factors affect a person's self-efficacy, almost no research has been done on how

Yihua Sheng; J. Michael Pearson

389

Evaluation of Accelerometer-Based Fall Detection Algorithms on Real-World Falls  

PubMed Central

Despite extensive preventive efforts, falls continue to be a major source of morbidity and mortality among elderly. Real-time detection of falls and their urgent communication to a telecare center may enable rapid medical assistance, thus increasing the sense of security of the elderly and reducing some of the negative consequences of falls. Many different approaches have been explored to automatically detect a fall using inertial sensors. Although previously published algorithms report high sensitivity (SE) and high specificity (SP), they have usually been tested on simulated falls performed by healthy volunteers. We recently collected acceleration data during a number of real-world falls among a patient population with a high-fall-risk as part of the SensAction-AAL European project. The aim of the present study is to benchmark the performance of thirteen published fall-detection algorithms when they are applied to the database of 29 real-world falls. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first systematic comparison of fall detection algorithms tested on real-world falls. We found that the SP average of the thirteen algorithms, was (mean±std) 83.0%±30.3% (maximum value?=?98%). The SE was considerably lower (SE?=?57.0%±27.3%, maximum value?=?82.8%), much lower than the values obtained on simulated falls. The number of false alarms generated by the algorithms during 1-day monitoring of three representative fallers ranged from 3 to 85. The factors that affect the performance of the published algorithms, when they are applied to the real-world falls, are also discussed. These findings indicate the importance of testing fall-detection algorithms in real-life conditions in order to produce more effective automated alarm systems with higher acceptance. Further, the present results support the idea that a large, shared real-world fall database could, potentially, provide an enhanced understanding of the fall process and the information needed to design and evaluate a high-performance fall detector. PMID:22615890

Bagala, Fabio; Becker, Clemens; Cappello, Angelo; Chiari, Lorenzo; Aminian, Kamiar; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Klenk, Jochen

2012-01-01

390

Efficacy of a local-drug delivery gel containing extracts of Quercus brantii and Coriandrum sativum as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in moderate chronic periodontitis patients  

PubMed Central

Objective: Recent advances in the field of alternative medicine introduced various herbal products for the treatment of periodontitis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of combined extracts from Quercus brantii and Coriandrum sativum on periodontal indices in adult periodontitis patients. Methods: In this randomized, double-blinded clinical trial, performed in Isfahan Dental School in 2012, a new herbal medicament containing combined extracts from Q. brantii and C. sativum was formulated in the gel form for subgingival application. Following scaling and root planing (SRP), both herbal and placebo gels were delivered at the experimental and control sites, respectively. Periodontal pocket depth, clinical attachment level, papilla bleeding index, and plaque index were measured at baseline, 1 month and 3 months later. Both intra-and inter-groups changes were registered. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS software, using repeated measure analysis of variance, paired t-test, Mann-Whitney, Friedman, and Wilcoxon tests. Differences with P < 0.05 were considered to be significant. Findings: Both groups indicated statistically significant improvements in the periodontal indices (P < 0.05), but there were no significant differences between two study groups with this regard. Conclusion: The herbal gel does not have considerable advantages over SRP alone as an adjunct in periodontal treatment. PMID:25114940

Yaghini, Jaber; Shahabooei, Mohammad; Aslani, Abolfazl; Zadeh, Mozhgan Reza; Kiani, Sima; Naghsh, Narges

2014-01-01

391

Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 1996  

NSF Publications Database

... 1996 Hypertext Format Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 1996 ... Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 1996 This report is available in hypertext (.htm ...

392

Rapid eutectic growth during free fall  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rapid eutectic growth of Sb-24%Cu alloy is realized in the drop tube during the free fall under the containerless condition.\\u000a Based on the analysis of crystal nucleation and eutectic growth in the free fall condition, it is indicated that, with the\\u000a increase of undercooling, microstructural transition of Sb-24%Cu eutectic alloy proceeds from lamellar to anomalous eutectic\\u000a structure. Undercoolings of 0

Wenjing Yao; Xiujun Han; Bingbo Wei

2002-01-01

393

Quantifying Temperature Effects on Fall Chinook Salmon  

SciTech Connect

The motivation for this study was to recommend relationships for use in a model of San Joaquin fall Chinook salmon. This report reviews literature pertaining to relationships between water temperature and fall Chinook salmon. The report is organized into three sections that deal with temperature effects on development and timing of freshwater life stages, temperature effects on incubation survival for eggs and alevin, and temperature effects on juvenile survival. Recommendations are made for modeling temperature influences for all three life stages.

Jager, Yetta [ORNL

2011-11-01

394

Falls in an Inpatient Geriatric Psychiatric Population  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND:Falls are a major health care concern for older adults in hospital settings. The incidence of falls on psychiatric units tends to be higher than that on general acute care hospital units, with estimated rates of 13.1 to 25 per 1,000 inpatient days compared to 3 to 5 per 1,000 inpatient days, respectively.OBJECTIVE:The purposes of this study were to quantify

Ellen Blair; Cynthia Gruman

2005-01-01

395

BA: Art History Fall--First Year  

E-print Network

BA: Art History Fall--First Year · ART 127 New Major Seminar · ART 222 Caves to Cathedrals · ART 3/4xx (Art History) · Elective(s) (advisor approval) and/or LSP coursework Fall--Fourth Year · ART 3/4xx (Art History) · ART 436 Senior Thesis I OR ART 495 Art History Capstone: Praxis · Elective

Gering, Jon C.

396

Get connected: New Fall Meeting technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Kick off your 2012 Fall Meeting experience today by joining the Fall Meeting Community, an interactive Web-based community. Whether you are attending this year's Fall Meeting or are just interested in learning more, this site can help you connect with colleagues, learn about the groundbreaking research and amazing programming being presented in San Francisco, and plan your trip to the largest Earth and space science conference of the year. Available through the Fall Meeting Web site (http://fallmeeting.agu.org), the Community allows you to share your Fall Meeting experience like never before. You can join groups based on your interests, and each group includes a message board that allows you to ask questions, post comments, discuss presentations, and make plans with colleagues. You can also create your own groups and use the Community's robust search engine to find and connect with friends. And because the Fall Meeting Web site was improved for 2012 to allow for nearly seamless functionality on mobile devices, you can access much of the same Community functionality on the go.

Moscovitch, Mirelle

2012-11-01

397

HumanWildlife Interactions 6(2):222236, Fall 2012 Efficacy, effort, and cost comparisons of  

E-print Network

to other island ecosystems, considerable effort is being invested in snake control and containment pro to estimate snake abundance on plots 12 days before and 12 days after treatment. We also monitored bait snakes on 6, 6-ha plots during a 51-day period. Snake populations on plots ranged from 41 to 107 prior

398

Evaluation of the efficacy of green tea catechins as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in the management of chronic periodontitis using PCR analysis: A clinical and microbiological study  

PubMed Central

Background: Increased knowledge of anaerobic bacteria in the development of periodontal diseases has led to new treatment strategies aiming primarily at suppression or elimination of specific periodontal pathogens. Over the last few decades, green tea has been subjected to many scientific and medical studies. Aim: The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of green tea catechins on the red complex organisms using Polymerase Chain Reaction for microbiological analysis. Materials and Methods: A split mouth study was conducted, in which a total of 20 subjects were included. Green tea catechin as local drug delivery was placed at study sites. Clinical parameters namely probing pocket depth (PPD), gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI) were recorded. Sub-gingival plaque samples were collected, and red complex micro-organisms were studied using PCR. Clinical and microbiological parameters were recorded at baseline, 1st, and 5th week after treatment. Results: The results showed statistically significant difference in PPD, GI, and PI and significant reduction of red complex organisms from baseline to 1st week and baseline to 5th week in both study and control groups (P < 0.001). Intergroup comparison between study and control group was statistically insignificant for PPD, PI, and GI. A significantly greater reduction in Tannerella forsythus (Tf) at 1st week and 5th week and Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) at 1st week was observed in study group when compared to control group. Conclusion: Green tea catechin can be used as an effective local drug delivery along with scaling and root planing in treatment of chronic periodontitis. PMID:23869127

Hattarki, Sanjeevini A.; Pushpa, S. P.; Bhat, Kishore

2013-01-01

399

Biodynamics: Why the Wirewalker Doesn't Fall  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

You can never step in the same river twice, goes the old adage of philosophy. An observation on the transitory nature of fluids in motion, this saying also describes the endless variations researchers face when studying human movement. Understanding these biodynamics-why the wirewalker doesn't fall-requires a grasp of the constant fluctuations and fine tunings which maintain balance in the complex, fluid system of human locomotion. Taking a comprehensive approach to the phenomenon of locomotion, Biodynamics: Why the Wirewalker Doesn't Fall integrates physical laws and principles with concepts of fractals, chaos, and randomness. In so doing, it formulates a description of both the large-scale, smooth aspects of locomotion and the more minute, randomized mechanisms of this physiological process. Ideal for beginners in this subject, Biodynamics provides an elegant explanation without assuming the reader's understanding of complex physical principles or mathematical equations. Chapter topics include: * Dimensions, measurement, and scaling * Mechanics and dynamics * Biometrics * Conservation of momentum * Biomechanics * Bioelectricity * Bioenergetics * Fluid mechanics and dynamics * Data analysis * Biostatistics Packed with problem sets, examples, and original line drawings, Biodynamics is an invaluable text for advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and instructors in medicine, biology, physiology, biophysics, and bioengineering.

West, Bruce J.; Griffin, Lori A.

2003-11-01

400

The Utility of Measures of Self-Efficacy for the Holland Themes in African American and European American College Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Results of the Self-Confidence Inventory, Self-Efficacy Questionnaire, and Self-Efficacy Rating Scale for 399 students indicated the subscales were reliable for both African-Americans and European-Americans. There were few racial but significant gender differences regarding Holland's occupational themes. The scales had different degrees of…

Betz, Nancy E.; Gwilliam, Laurie R.

2002-01-01

401

Prediction of Research Self-Efficacy and Future Research Involvement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although graduate programs hope that their students will be committed to research in their careers, most students express ambivalence towards research. Identifying the variables that predict involvement in research thus seems crucial. In this study 136 doctoral students from a wide range of disciplines completed the Research Self-Efficacy Scale

Bishop, Rosean M.; And Others

402

The Relationship between Computer Anxiety and Computer Self-Efficacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the relationship between computer anxiety and computer self-efficacy of students and teachers in elementary and secondary schools. The sample included a total of 845 subjects from two private school systems in Turkey. The Oetting's Computer Anxiety Scale was used to measure computer anxiety whereas the Murphy's Computer…

Simsek, Ali

2011-01-01

403

Self-Efficacy and Prior Experiences as Predictors of Prospective Teachers' Teaching Anxiety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aimed to explain prospective teachers' anxiety about teaching in relation to their teaching efficacy beliefs and prior teaching experiences. Participants included 27 preservice teachers. Three instruments were used: Student Teacher Anxiety Scale (STAS), Prior Experiences in Teaching Questionnaire (PETQ), and Teachers' Sense of Efficacy

Yetkin, I. Elif

404

Further Validation of a U.S. Adult Social Self-Efficacy Inventory in Chinese Populations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors report further validity evidence for the Chinese version of a U.S. adult social self-efficacy inventory, the "Perceived Social Self-Efficacy" (PSSE) scale in Chinese populations. Study 1 participants were 323 new graduate students enrolled at a large university in an east coast city of the People's Republic of China. Differential item…

Fan, Jinyan; Meng, Hui; Zhao, Bihua; Patel, Trishna

2012-01-01

405

Comparative Analysis of Expectancies of Efficacy in In-Service and Prospective Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the beliefs about effective teaching in student teachers and inservice teachers. We constructed a measurement composed of an adaptation in Spanish of the Gibson and Dembo's (1984. Teacher efficacy: A construct validation. "Journal of Educational Psychology", 76, 569-582). Teacher Efficacy Scale and of the items included in…

de la Torre Cruz, Manuel J.; Casanova Arias, Pedro F.

2007-01-01

406

Emotional Intelligence and Teacher Efficacy: A Study of Turkish EFL Pre-Service Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the relationship between emotional intelligence and teacher efficacy among 90 English language pre-service teachers from a university in Turkey. Data sources included Tschannen-Moran and Woolfolk-Hoy's Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale and Reuven Bar-On's Emotional Quotient Inventory. The findings indicated that Turkish EFL…

Kocoglu, Zeynep

2011-01-01

407

Implementing Cooperative Learning, Teacher Collaboration and Teachers’ Sense of Efficacy in Heterogeneous Junior High Schools  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four scales were employed to assess the effects on teachers’ sense of efficacy of a year-long inservice teacher training program on cooperative learning methods. One hundred twenty-one teachers from nine junior high schools in one town in Israel responded to the teacher efficacy questionnaire, as well as to a questionnaire assessing the extent to which teachers collaborated with one another.

Hanna Shachar; Haddas Shmuelevitz

1997-01-01

408

Tobacco Control Policy Advocacy Attitudes and Self-Efficacy among Ethnically Diverse High School Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study applied self-efficacy theory to assess empowerment to advocate on behalf of tobacco control policies. The Youth Tobacco Survey with added policy advocacy self-efficacy, attitudes, and outcome expectations scales was given to 9,177 high school students in Texas. Asians showed the lowest prevalence of experimentation and current smoking,…

Ramirez, Amelie G.; Velez, Luis F.; Chalela, Patricia; Grussendorf, Jeannie; McAlister, Alfred L.

2006-01-01

409

Basic Confidence Predictors of Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The extent to which Basic Confidence Scales predicted career decision-making self-efficacy was studied in a sample of 627 undergraduate students. Six confidence variables accounted for 49% of the variance in career decision-making self-efficacy. Leadership confidence was the most important, but confidence in science, mathematics, writing, using…

Paulsen, Alisa M.; Betz, Nancy E.

2004-01-01

410

Self-efficacy, perceived training needs and coaching competences: The case of Portuguese handball  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to analyse handball coaches’ perceptions of self-efficacy and recognition of training needs related to coaching competences according to their coaching experience, coach certification level and academic education. Two hundred and seven Portuguese handball coaches answered questionnaires that included a scale of self-efficacy and another of recognition of training needs. Data analysis started with an

Isabel Mesquita; Mário Borges; António Rosado; Paula Maria Batista

2012-01-01

411

Self-efficacy, perceived training needs and coaching competences: The case of Portuguese handball  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to analyse handball coaches’ perceptions of self-efficacy and recognition of training needs related to coaching competences according to their coaching experience, coach certification level and academic education. Two hundred and seven Portuguese handball coaches answered questionnaires that included a scale of self-efficacy and another of recognition of training needs. Data analysis started with an

Isabel Mesquita; Mário Borges; António Rosado; Paula Maria Batista

2011-01-01

412

The Effect of Self-Efficacy and Psychosocial Development on Major-Changing Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, we sought to determine whether psychosocial development and self-efficacy of major changers differ from those classified as relatively stable. Participants completed the "Life-Skills Inventory-College" (Picklesimer, 1991) form to measure psychosocial development and the "General Self-efficacy" (Schwarzer & Jerusalem, 1995) scale to…

Cunningham, Karen E.; Smothers, Anthony W.

2010-01-01

413

Determination of Self-Efficacy Beliefs of High School Students towards Math Literacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to determine the high school students' self-efficacy beliefs about math literacy, and examine this beliefs in terms of some variables. The research was conducted on 712 high school students. A questionnaire and Math Literacy Self-Efficacy Scale were used for data collection. The data were analyzed in terms of t-test,…

Ozgen, Kemal; Bindaka, Recep

2011-01-01

414

Self-efficacy and outcome expectations as predictors of controlled smoking status  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two studies were conducted to develop and evaluate the usefulness of self-efficacy and outcome expectation measures in predicting smoking status. Subjects were chronic smokers participating in controlled smoking treatment programs. In Study 1, Self-Efficacy and Outcome Expectancy Scales were developed and used to concurrently predict nicotine content, amount of each cigarette smoked, number of cigarettes smoked, and carbon monoxide levels.

Phillip R. Godding; Russell E. Glasgow

1985-01-01

415

The Equivalence Principle Comes to School--Falling Objects and Other Middle School Investigations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Comparing two objects falling together is a small-scale version of Galileo's classical experiment, demonstrating the equivalence between gravitational and inertial mass. We present here investigations by a group of ten-year-olds, who used iPads to record the drops. The movie recordings were essential in the follow-up discussions, enabling the…

Pendrill, Ann-Marie; Ekström, Peter; Hansson, Lena; Mars, Patrik; Ouattara, Lassana; Ryan, Ulrika

2014-01-01

416

Interior cavern conditions and salt fall potential  

SciTech Connect

A relatively large number of salt caverns are used for fluid hydrocarbon storage, including an extensive set of facilities in the Gulf Coast salt domes for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Program. Attention is focused on the SPR caverns because of available histories that detail events involving loss and damage of the hanging string casing. The total number of events is limited, making the database statistically sparse. The occurrence of the events is not evenly distributed, with some facilities, and some caverns, more susceptible than others. While not all of these events could be attributed to impacts from salt falls, many did show the evidence of such impacts. As a result, a study has been completed to analyze the potential for salt falls in the SPR storage caverns. In this process, it was also possible to deduce some of the cavern interior conditions. Storage caverns are very large systems in which many factors could possibly play a part in casing damage. In this study, all of the potentially important factors such as salt dome geology, operational details, and material characteristics were considered, with all being logically evaluated and most being determined as secondary in nature. As a result of the study, it appears that a principal factor in determining a propensity for casing damage from salt falls is the creep and fracture characteristics of salt in individual caverns. In addition the fracture depends strongly upon the concentration of impurity particles in the salt. Although direct observation of cavern conditions is not possible, the average impurity concentration and the accumulation of salt fall material can be determined. When this is done, there is a reasonable correlation between the propensity for a cavern to show casing damage events and accumulation of salt fall material. The accumulation volumes of salt fall material can be extremely large, indicating that only a few of the salt falls are large enough to cause impact damage.

Munson, D.E.; Molecke, M.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Myers, R.E. [Strategic Petroleum Reserve, New Orleans, LA (United States)

1998-03-01

417

Investigation of Relationship between Sources of Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Secondary School Students and Some Variables  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between students' opinions about the sources of self-efficacy belief and their gender, academic achievement, the grade level, Socio-Economic Status (SES), and learning style. The study was conducted on 984 secondary school students in the fall semester of the 2011-2012 academic…

Arslan, Ali

2013-01-01

418

Prevention of Falls and Fall-Related Injuries in Community-Dwelling Seniors  

PubMed Central

Executive Summary In early August 2007, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began work on the Aging in the Community project, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding healthy aging in the community. The Health System Strategy Division at the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care subsequently asked the secretariat to provide an evidentiary platform for the ministry’s newly released Aging at Home Strategy. After a broad literature review and consultation with experts, the secretariat identified 4 key areas that strongly predict an elderly person’s transition from independent community living to a long-term care home. Evidence-based analyses have been prepared for each of these 4 areas: falls and fall-related injuries, urinary incontinence, dementia, and social isolation. For the first area, falls and fall-related injuries, an economic model is described in a separate report. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/mas_about.html, to review these titles within the Aging in the Community series. Aging in the Community: Summary of Evidence-Based Analyses Prevention of Falls and Fall-Related Injuries in Community-Dwelling Seniors: An Evidence-Based Analysis Behavioural Interventions for Urinary Incontinence in Community-Dwelling Seniors: An Evidence-Based Analysis Caregiver- and Patient-Directed Interventions for Dementia: An Evidence-Based Analysis Social Isolation in Community-Dwelling Seniors: An Evidence-Based Analysis The Falls/Fractures Economic Model in Ontario Residents Aged 65 Years and Over (FEMOR) Objective To identify interventions that may be effective in reducing the probability of an elderly person’s falling and/or sustaining a fall-related injury. Background Although estimates of fall rates vary widely based on the location, age, and living arrangements of the elderly population, it is estimated that each year approximately 30% of community-dwelling individuals aged 65 and older, and 50% of those aged 85 and older will fall. Of those individuals who fall, 12% to 42% will have a fall-related injury. Several meta-analyses and cohort studies have identified falls and fall-related injuries as a strong predictor of admission to a long-term care (LTC) home. It has been shown that the risk of LTC home admission is over 5 times higher in seniors who experienced 2 or more falls without injury, and over 10 times higher in seniors who experienced a fall causing serious injury. Falls result from the interaction of a variety of risk factors that can be both intrinsic and extrinsic. Intrinsic factors are those that pertain to the physical, demographic, and health status of the individual, while extrinsic factors relate to the physical and socio-economic environment. Intrinsic risk factors can be further grouped into psychosocial/demographic risks, medical risks, risks associated with activity level and dependence, and medication risks. Commonly described extrinsic risks are tripping hazards, balance and slip hazards, and vision hazards. Note: It is recognized that the terms “senior” and “elderly” carry a range of meanings for different audiences; this report generally uses the former, but the terms are treated here as essentially interchangeable. Evidence-Based Analysis of Effectiveness Research Question Since many risk factors for falls are modifiable, what interventions (devices, systems, programs) exist that reduce the risk of falls and/or fall-related injuries for community-dwelling seniors? Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria Inclusion Criteria English language; published between January 2000 and September 2007; population of community-dwelling seniors (majority aged 65+); and randomized controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-experimental trials, systematic reviews, or meta-analyses. Exclusion Criteria special populations (e.g., stroke or osteoporosis; however, studies restricted only to women were included); studies only reporting surrogate outcomes; or studies whose outcome cannot be extracted fo

2008-01-01

419

Danielle Hernandez,M.S.and Debra J.Rose,PhD. Fall Prevention Center of Excellence California State University Fullerton  

E-print Network

changes in balance abilities and capable of identifying older adults at different levels of fall risk that are specifically designed to challenge the balance abilities of independently functioning older adults. Purpose (FAB) Scale Introduction Falls are a major concern for the aging population. One in three older adults

de Lijser, Peter

420

9/10/2002 Internet/Grid Computing -Fall 2002 1 What is Performance for Internet/Grid Computation?  

E-print Network

9/10/2002 Internet/Grid Computing - Fall 2002 1 What is Performance for Internet/Grid Computation? Goals for Internet/Grid Computation? Do things you cannot otherwise do because of: Lack of Capacity Large scale computations Cost SETI Scale/Scope of communication Internet searches All of the above #12

Browne, James C.

421

Wearable Assistive System Design for Fall Prevention Wenyao Xu12  

E-print Network

}ee.ucla.edu Abstract: Fall is the prevalent issue among the elderly, and fall risk assessment and prevention are very for the discussion about fall prevention technology. 1. Introduction Many elder people over 65 are at a high risk technology. Therefore, falls among the elderly have become a growing concern, and preventative measures

He, Lei

422

197. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls, Canal Company, date unknown. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

197. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls, Canal Company, date unknown. GATE STEMS AND LIFTING DEVICES, NO COUNTY; BLUEPRINT SKETCHES. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

423

Development and Implementation of a Pharmacy Fall Prevention Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: Describe the development, implementation, and outcomes of a pharmacy fall prevention program (PFPP) that incorporates medication profile review and a medication fall risk score to identify high-risk patients. Summary: Falls are a common cause of morbidity and mortality among el- derly patients in the United States. Injury-related falls may contribute to frequent visits to emergency departments (EDs) and hospitals,

Burl Beasley; Edna Patatanian

2009-01-01

424

Pupil Membership and Related Information--Fall 1990.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Seven tables and two bar graphs present data concerning pupil membership in Colorado public school districts as of fall 1990. The tables include: state trends in pupil membership from fall 1986 through fall 1990; summary of selected school district data (number of schools, staff, students, pupil/teacher ratios, and dropout rate); fall membership…

Keith, Jo Ann; MacKenzie, Stella

425

156. Photocopy of written record (taken from Twin Falls Canal ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

156. Photocopy of written record (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company, Low Line Book #1, pp.2,3). LOW LINE CONTRACTORS AND BORROW RECORD. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

426

Accidents due to falls from roof slabs.  

PubMed

CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE Falls from the roof slabs of houses are accidents of high potential severity that occur in large Brazilian cities and often affect children and adolescents. The aims of this study were to characterize the factors that predispose towards this type of fall involving children and adolescents, quantify the severity of associated lesions and suggest preventive measures. DESIGN AND SETTING Descriptive observational prospective longitudinal study in two hospitals in the metropolitan region of São Paulo. METHODS Data were collected from 29 cases of falls from roof slabs involving children and adolescents between October 2008 and October 2009. RESULTS Cases involving males were more prevalent, accounting for 84%. The predominant age group was schoolchildren (7 to 12 years old; 44%). Leisure activities were most frequently being practiced on the roof slab at the time of the fall (86%), and flying a kite was the most prevalent game (37.9%). In 72% of the cases, the children were unaccompanied by an adult responsible for them. Severe conditions such as multiple trauma and traumatic brain injuries resulted from 79% of the accidents. CONCLUSION Falls from roof slabs are accidents of high potential severity, and preventive measures aimed towards informing parents and guardians about the dangers and risk factors associated with this type of accident are needed, along with physical protective measures, such as low walls around the slab and gates with locks to restrict free access to these places. PMID:23903263

Rudelli, Bruno Alves; Silva, Marcelo Valerio Alabarce da; Akkari, Miguel; Santili, Claudio

2013-01-01

427

Falling clothes irons rarely cause burns.  

PubMed

Children's Hospital of Michigan's Burn Center treats approximately three pediatric contact burns annually related to clothes irons, which involve the face, torso, and extremities. These burns leave well-demarcated burn patterns, including the steam holes from the heat plate of the iron. The average age of these children is 15 months. The history given by the parent is that the child pulled the cord of an iron that was on an ironing board or high shelf. It seemed unlikely to the investigators that a falling iron would produce such demarcated burns. A free-standing shelf unit was built with shelf heights of 36, 60, and 72 inches (the height of an ironing board and shelves at home). Three irons of different weights were put in three different positions on each shelf, with the cord dangling. A doll the approximate size of a 15-month old was positioned in front of the shelf. The dangling cord was pulled, and the falling iron was videotaped. The video was edited in freeze frame at the point at which the iron hit the doll. Two hundred seventy falls were recorded. The flat heat plate of the iron never hit the doll. The linear edge of the heat plate hit the doll on only seven falls. This study demonstrates that it is very unlikely for the flat heat plate of a falling iron to contact a toddler-sized doll. Children who allegedly sustain demarcated burns in this manner need to be investigated for nonaccidental injury. PMID:24476991

Allasio, David; Shanti, Christina

2014-01-01

428

Data Comparison: Satellite and Falling Sphere Temperatures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Small meteorological rocketsondes providing temperature data have beam used for comparison with, and validation of measurements from satellite-borne instruments. A significant number of rocket-borne falling spheres were launched in conjunction with the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) for validation of the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE), High Resolution Doppler Interferometer (HRDI), and the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instruments. Upper stratosphere and mesosphere temperatures measured with these instruments on UARS are compared with inflatable spheres launched from Wallops Island (1992-1999), Brazil (1994), Hawaii (1992), Norway (1992), and Sweden (1993 and 1996). Time and space differences varied between the satellite measurement and the rocketsonde launch, for example HALOE overpasses occurred within 5 days and in some cases there were spatial differences of up to 30 degrees longitude. Validation measurements of the HRDI instrument occurred at Wallops Island when it passed within 20 minutes and 330 kilometers of the launch site. Because of discontinuity in the falling sphere drag coefficients when fall speed neared MACH 1 falling sphere temperatures near 70 kilometers attitude are biased toward lower temperatures. Availability of improved software and a new atmospheric model have helped to reduce this bias. The validated remote instrument measurements permit a new perspective of atmospheric structure to be formed, not always possible with the limited number of falling sphere measurements. Features of the remote measurement temperature profiles and their possible use to extend the climatological data base at the rocketsonde sites will be discussed.

Schmidlin, Francis J.; Schauer, Allison G.; Remsberg, Ellis E.; Gerlach, John C. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

429

Falling U-shaped Chain Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Falling U-shaped Chain model simulates the dynamics of a discrete falling chain with total length L and n links. Each link is acted on by the force of gravity mg and by the link-link interaction. A freely falling object is released near the last link for comparison. The surprise is that the acceleration of the last link can be larger than g.   Links in the model are assumed to be uniform rigid rods with mass m and length L/n connected by ideal joints. The first link is attached to a fixed point and the last link is releases a distance D from the fixed point. A small damping coefficient b is included to allow the chain to equilibrate to its hanging position below the fixed point. The Falling U-shaped Chain model is a supplemental simulation for the article "A chain that speeds up, rather than slows, due to collisions: How compression can cause tension " by Anoop Grewal, Phillip Johnson, and Andy Ruina in the American Journal of Physics 79(7), 723-729 (2011) and has been approved by the authors and the American Journal of Physics (AJP) editor. The simulation was developed using the Easy Java Simulations (EJS) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double click the ejs_mech_lagrangian_FallingUShapedChain.jar file to run the program if Java is installed.

Christian, Wolfgang

2011-03-25

430

Case Study on Possible Falling Patterns of a Fatal Fall from Stairs  

PubMed Central

Considering a fatal case of an aged individual, who died due to falling down stairs, the cause of the fatal fall was investigated through experiments. A witness, who was with the victim, when the fatal accident occurred, stated that the aged individual had miss-footed, lost balance at the top of the stairs, and fell accidently from an upper floor to a lower floor. It was very questionable whether or not this witness’s statements were true. The true cause of the fatal fall was unclear, because of the witness’s inconsistent statements, which showed discrepancies between the initial and later statements. The cause of a fatal fall can be presumed from external and internal damages to the body and other circumstantial evidences. But it was difficult to prove the true cause of a fatal fall only from the results of the autopsy and investigation of circumstantial evidences. The author was officially requested to conduct experiments to elucidate possible falling patterns. Judging from the experimental results, deep questions about the witness’s statements arose. These experimental methods and analyses in this paper could be applied to elucidate possible falling patterns of fatal falls from stairs where the fatal causes are controversial. PMID:25088990

NAGATA, Hisao

2014-01-01

431

Seniors Falls Investigative Methodology (SFIM): A Systems Approach to the Study of Falls in Seniors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An in-depth understanding of human factors and human error is lacking in current research on seniors' falls. Additional knowledge is needed to understand why seniors are falling. The purpose of this article is to describe the adapting of the Integrated Safety Investigation Methodology (ISIM) (used for investigating transportation and industrial…

Zecevic, Aleksandra A.; Salmoni, Alan W.; Lewko, John H.; Vandervoort, Anthony A.

2007-01-01

432

China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18%  

E-print Network

China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% 11/08/2009 - 09:05 According to China's latest Customs statistics, foreign trade of China's forest products in the first five months showed a year-on-year general downturn. The total value of foreign trade of China

433

Fall 2011 and Fall 2012 Snapshots of New Upper Division Transfer Students  

E-print Network

Fall 2011 and Fall 2012 Snapshots of New Upper Division Transfer Students Institutional Research,315 % from a college in Orange County: 78% % from a college in Orange County: 70% % from a college in Los Angeles County: 11% % from a college in Los Angeles County: 16% Special Admit: 0% Special Admit: 0

de Lijser, Peter

434

Fall 2005 and Fall 2006 Snapshots of New Upper Division Transfer Students  

E-print Network

Fall 2005 and Fall 2006 Snapshots of New Upper Division Transfer Students Institutional Research,879 % from a college in Orange County: 59% % from a college in Orange County: 58% % from a college in Los Angeles County: 23% % from a college in Los Angeles County: 24% Special Admit: 0% Special Admit: 0

de Lijser, Peter

435

Fall 2008 and Fall 2009 Snapshots of New Upper Division Transfer Students  

E-print Network

Fall 2008 and Fall 2009 Snapshots of New Upper Division Transfer Students Institutional Research,758 % from a college in Orange County: 62% % from a college in Orange County: 58% % from a college in Los Angeles County: 23% % from a college in Los Angeles County: 23% Special Admit: 0% Special Admit: 0

de Lijser, Peter

436

Fall 2010 and Fall 2011 Snapshots of New Upper Division Transfer Students  

E-print Network

Fall 2010 and Fall 2011 Snapshots of New Upper Division Transfer Students Institutional Research,473 % from a college in Orange County: 90% % from a college in Orange County: 78% % from a college in Los Angeles County: 5% % from a college in Los Angeles County: 11% Special Admit: 0% Special Admit: 0% Average

de Lijser, Peter

437

Fall 2004 and Fall 2005 Snapshots of New Upper Division Transfer Students  

E-print Network

Fall 2004 and Fall 2005 Snapshots of New Upper Division Transfer Students Institutional Research,622 % from a college in Orange County: 58% % from a college in Orange County: 59% % from a college in Los Angeles County: 25% % from a college in Los Angeles County: 23% Special Admit: 0% Special Admit: 0

de Lijser, Peter

438

Fall 2006 and Fall 2007 Snapshots of New Upper Division Transfer Students  

E-print Network

Fall 2006 and Fall 2007 Snapshots of New Upper Division Transfer Students Institutional Research,991 % from a college in Orange County: 58% % from a college in Orange County: 58% % from a college in Los Angeles County: 24% % from a college in Los Angeles County: 23% Special Admit: 0% Special Admit: 0

de Lijser, Peter

439

Fall 2009 and Fall 2010 Snapshots of New Upper Division Transfer Students  

E-print Network

Fall 2009 and Fall 2010 Snapshots of New Upper Division Transfer Students Institutional Research,137 % from a college in Orange County: 58% % from a college in Orange County: 90% % from a college in Los Angeles County: 23% % from a college in Los Angeles County: 5% Special Admit: 0% Special Admit: 0% Average

de Lijser, Peter

440

Fall 2007 and Fall 2008 Snapshots of New Upper Division Transfer Students  

E-print Network

Fall 2007 and Fall 2008 Snapshots of New Upper Division Transfer Students Institutional Research,057 % from a college in Orange County: 58% % from a college in Orange County: 62% % from a college in Los Angeles County: 23% % from a college in Los Angeles County: 23% Special Admit: 0% Special Admit: 0

de Lijser, Peter

441

Preventing falls and fall injuries in hospital: a major risk management challenge  

Microsoft Academic Search

Accidental falls are the commonest patient safety incident in hospital and are especially common in older patients. They are associated with physical and psychological harm, functional impairment, pro- longed hospital stay, cost and opportunity cost. Falls often cause concern and anger from patients' rel- atives, are a frequent cause of complaints and inquests, and may lead to claims in clinical

David Oliver

2007-01-01

442

Enrollment Trends at Public Four-Year Colleges and Universities, Fall 1990 to Fall 1997.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report provides enrollment trend information for public four-year colleges and universities for the period fall 1990 through fall 1997. Several trends are highlighted: during this period, total enrollment fell 0.5 percent to 5.77 million students; enrollment of racial/ethnic minorities rose 24.5 percent; white enrollment fell 10.8 percent.…

National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges, Washington, DC.

443

Fall 2003 Harvard College Alcohol Study Sanction Thematic Evaluations Harvard Study Review Sanction Evaluation Fall 2003  

E-print Network

review focused on secondary effects of alcohol abuse in study. 28 14 0 0 B. Responsibility 1. StudentFall 2003 Harvard College Alcohol Study Sanction Thematic Evaluations Harvard Study Review Sanction requirements. 1 41 0 0 42 Sanctions Evaluated Responses #12;Fall 2003 Harvard College Alcohol Study Sanction

Gering, Jon C.

444

UCLA BIOCHEMISTRY MAJOR FALL 2011 For students who declare the major Fall 2011 and thereafter  

E-print Network

UCLA BIOCHEMISTRY MAJOR FALL 2011 For students who declare the major Fall 2011 and thereafter BIOCHEMISTRY MAJOR (B.S.): This major is designed primarily for students who are interested in attending graduate school in Biochemistry or related areas. It also satisfies many of the requirements of pre

Levine, Alex J.

445

Findings & Trends, Fall 1990--Fall 2000. AASCU/NASULGC Enrollment Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Findings from a study of institutions that are members of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) or the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges (NASULGC) show that enrollment at public four-year institutions increased 3.4% from fall 1990 to fall 2000, going from 5.91 million students to 6.11…

American Association of State Colleges and Universities, Washington, DC.

446

Androgens and doping tests: genetic variation and pit-falls  

PubMed Central

The large variation in disposition known for most drugs is also true for anabolic androgenic steroids. Genetic factors are probably the single most important cause of this variation. Further, there are reasons to believe that there is a corresponding variation in efficacy of doping agents. Doped individuals employ a large variety of doping strategies in respect of choice of substance, dose, dose interval, duration of treatment and use of other drugs for enforcement of effects or correction of side effects. Metabolic steps up-stream and down-stream of testosterone are genetically variable and contribute substantially to the variation in disposition of testosterone, the most common doping agent in sports and in society. Large inter- and intra-ethnic variation in testosterone glucuronidation and excretion is described as well as the pit-falls in evaluation of testosterone doping test results. The hydrolysis and bioactivation of testosterone enanthate is also genetically variable yielding a 2–3 fold variation in excretion rate and serum concentration, thereby implicating a substantial variation in ‘efficacy’ of testosterone. Given this situation it is logical to adopt the new findings in the doping control programme. The population based cut-off level for the testosterone : epitestosterone ratio should be replaced by a Bayesian interpretation of consecutive tests in the same individual. When combined with the above genetic information the sensitivity of the test is considerably improved. The combination of the three approaches should reduce the rate of falsely negative or positive results and the number of expensive follow-up tests, stipulated by the World Anti-Doping Agency. PMID:22506612

Rane, Anders; Ekstrom, Lena

2012-01-01

447

Characteristics and circumstances of falls in a hospital setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiology of hospital inpatient falls, including characteristics of patients who fall, circumstances of\\u000a falls, and fall-related injuries.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a DESIGN: Prospective descriptive study of inpatient falls. Data on patient characteristics, fall circumstances, and injury were collected\\u000a through interviews with patients and\\/or nurses and review of adverse event reports and medical records. Fall rates and nurse\\u000a staffing levels were

Eileen B. Hitcho; Melissa J. Krauss; Stanley Birge; William Claiborne Dunagan; Irene Fischer; Shirley Johnson; Patricia A. Nast; Eileen Costantinou; Victoria J. Fraser

2004-01-01

448

The Relationship Between Task-Specific Self-Efficacy Egalitarianism and Career Indecision for Females  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between task-specific self-efficacy as measured by the Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale (Osipow & Rooney, 1989) and career indecision as measured by the Career Decision Scale—3rd Rev. (Osipow, Carney, Winer, Yanico, & Koschier, 1976) for females classified as possessing high or low egalitarian sex-role attitudes. Subjects were 168 female college students

Richard D. Temple; Samuel H. Osipow

1994-01-01

449

Physics Classroom: Free Fall and Air Resistance  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This webpage contains detailed discussions and information on free fall and the factors affecting it. This is one of the sections of the tutorial on Newton's Second Law. In addition to acceleration due to gravity, the effect of air resistance on free fall is also discussed in detail. The topic is explained through the use of an example. The factors affecting free fall such as mass and force on the object are also explained through the example. The discussions aim to develop a basic understanding of the acceleration due to gravity. Similar examples are used to illustrate the effect of air resistance as well as the factors affecting it. The discussions are aided by free body diagrams, WolframAlpha widgets and animations. This item is part of The Physics Classroom, a comprehensive set of tutorials and multimedia resources for high school physics.

Henderson, Tom

2012-01-18

450

A collaborative approach to fall prevention.  

PubMed

Collaboration among health-care providers has emerged as a key factor in improving client care. The authors describe the Geriatric Emergency Management-Falls Intervention Team (GEM-FIT) project, a nurse-led research initiative to improve fall prevention in older adults through interdisciplinary collaboration. Public health nurses and occupational therapists assessed participants before and after fall-prevention interventions and fou modest improvements in participant outcomes and reductions in modifiable risk factors. The project resulted in successful collaboration, interdisciplinary teamwork and improved service delivery to participants. Among the challenges were delayed timelines, complex issues outside the project protocol and communication difficulties. The authors, who served on the project team, make recommendations for health-care professionals interested in initiating similar projects. PMID:22128708

Merrett, Angela; Thomas, Patricia; Stephens, Anne; Moghabghab, Rola; Gruneir, Marilyn

2011-10-01

451

Assessing the impact of vicarious experiences on preservice elementary science teacher efficacy and preservice elementary teacher efficacy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scope and method of study. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of vicarious experiences (preservice teacher field experiences) on perceived preservice science teacher efficacy and perceived preservice teacher efficacy. The participants for the study were 46 preservice elementary education students who were enrolled in CIED 3430 (Early Lab and Clinical Experience in Elementary Education II) at a large Midwestern state university and 20 classroom inservice teachers. A pretest was administered early in the spring 2007 semester, before the preservice teachers did their field experience and consisted of demographic questions and the STEBI-B. A posttest was administered at the end of the spring 2007 semester, after the preservice teachers had completed their field experiences, and consisted of demographic questions, a rating of the teachers they observed during their educational field experience, the STEBI-B and the TES. The field experience classroom inservice teachers provided personal, professional, and classroom data in the middle of the spring 2007 semester. All data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Findings and conclusions. Factors of gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status and preservice teacher program placement were found to be significant predictors of preservice teachers' efficacy scores. Even though, in some cases, these factors negatively impacted preservice teacher efficacy, preservice teachers should be placed in these environments when support is most available. The Teacher Efficacy Scale (Gibson & Dembo, 1984) is invalid. Even the construct of a general teacher efficacy is questionable.

Wagler, Ronald Robert

452

Last day to apply to transfer to Engineering and Applied Science for the Fall or Fall-Winter Session  

E-print Network

April 2013 5 Last day to apply to transfer to Engineering and Applied Science for the Fall or Fall Spring Convocation for Engineering and Applied Science students (3 ceremonies) May 2013 1 Last day to apply to transfer to Engineering and Applied Science for the Fall or Fall- Winter Session 3 Last day

Abolmaesumi, Purang

453

An Alternative Explanation for the Rise and Fall of MySpace  

E-print Network

The rise and fall of online social networks has recently generated an enormous amount of interest among people, both inside and outside of academia. Gillette [Businessweek magazine, 2011] did a detailed analysis of MySpace, which started losing its popularity since 2008. Recently, Cannarella and Spechler [arXiv:1401.4208] used a model of disease spread to explain this rise and fall of MySpace. In this paper, we give an alternative explanation for the same. Our explanation is based on the well-known Barabasi-Albert model of generating random scale-free networks using preferential attachment mechanism.

Chhabra, Simrat Singh; Shannigrahi, Saswata

2014-01-01

454

Obesity and hormonal contraceptive efficacy  

PubMed Central

Obesity is a major public health concern affecting an increasing proportion of reproductive-aged women. Avoiding unintended pregnancy is of major importance, given the increased risks associated with pregnancy, but obesity may affect the efficacy of hormonal contraceptives by altering how these drugs are absorbed, distributed, metabolized or eliminated. Limited data suggest that long-acting, reversible contraceptives maintain excellent efficacy in obese women. Some studies demonstrating altered pharmacokinetic parameters and increased failure rates with combined oral contraceptives, the contraceptive patch and emergency contraceptive pills suggest decreased efficacy of these methods. It is unclear whether bariatric surgery affects hormonal contraceptive efficacy. Obese women should be offered the full range of contraceptive options, with counseling that balances the risks and benefits of each method, including the risk of unintended pregnancy. PMID:24007251

Robinson, Jennifer A; Burke, Anne E

2014-01-01

455

Public events at Fall Meeting 2012  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Three much-anticipated events at Fall Meeting are AGU's family science programs, which take place the Sunday before Fall Meeting begins. Beginning at noon on 2 December, the public lecture will be given by Michael Meyer, John Grotzinger, and Rebecca Williams. These three NASA scientists are working with the rover Curiosity, which is currently exploring Mars. They will engage the public in a discussion of Mars exploration and the latest activities of the most sophisticated explorer ever sent to another planet. The panelists will discuss the hopes and excitement of exploring Mars through a robot's eyes, nose, taste, and touch.

Holm Adamec, Bethany

2012-11-01

456

"The balancing act"-- Licensed practical nurse experiences of falls and fall prevention: a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background Falls are common in old age and may have serious consequences. There are many strategies to predict and prevent falls from occurring in long-term care and hospitals. The aim of this study was to describe licensed practical nurse experiences of predicting and preventing further falls when working with patients who had experienced a fall-related fracture. Licensed practical nurses are the main caretakers that work most closely with the patients. Methods A qualitative study of focus groups interviews and field observations was done. 15 licensed practical nurses from a rehabilitation ward and an acute ward in a hospital in northern Sweden were interviewed. Content was analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results The result of the licensed practical nurse thoughts and experiences about risk of falling and fall prevention work is represented in one theme, “the balancing act”. The theme includes three categories: “the right to decide”, “the constant watch”, and “the ongoing negotiation” as well as nine subcategories. The analysis showed similarities and differences between rehabilitation and acute wards. At both wards it was a core strategy in the licensed practical nurse work to always be ready and to pay attention to patients’ appearance and behavior. At the rehabilitation ward, it was an explicit working task to judge the patients’ risk of falling and to be active to prevent falls. At the acute ward, the words “risk of falling” were not used and fall prevention were not discussed; instead the licensed practical nurses used for example “dizzy and pale”. The results also indicated differences in components that facilitate workplace learning and knowledge transfer. Conclusions Differences between the wards are most probably rooted in organizational differences. When it is expected by the leadership, licensed practical nurses can express patient risk of falling, share their observations with others, and take actions to prevent falls. The climate and the structure of the ward are essential if licensed practical nurses are to be encouraged to routinely consider risk of falling and implement risk reduction strategies. PMID:23062203

2012-01-01

457

Reducing fall risk in the elderly: risk factors and fall prevention, a systematic review.  

PubMed

Falls in the elderly are a major source of injury resulting in disability and hospitalization. They have a significant impact on individual basis (loss of quality of live, nursing home admissions) and social basis (healthcare costs). Even though falls in the elderly are common there are some well studied risk factors. Special emphasis should be put on sarcopenia/frailty, polypharmacy, multimorbidity, vitamin D status and home hazards. There are several well evaluated fall prevention approaches that either target a single fall risk factor or focus on multiple riks factors. It has to be kept in mind that not all fall prevention strategies are useful for all patients as for example dietary substitution of vitamin D is only recommended in people with increased riks for a vitamin D deficiency. Home hazard reduction strategies are more effective when combined with other fall prevention approaches such as for example exercise programs. In conclusion elderly patients should routinely be screened for relevant risk factors and if need an indiviudally targeted fall prevention program compiled. PMID:24867188

Pfortmueller, C A; Lindner, G; Exadaktylos, A K

2014-08-01

458

The Relationship Between Imagery Type and Collective Efficacy in Elite and Non Elite Athletes  

PubMed Central

This study investigated the relationship between imagery function and individual perceptions of collective efficacy as a function of skill level. Elite (n = 70) and non elite (n = 71) athletes from a number of interactive team sports completed the Sport Imagery Questionnaire (SIQ) and the Collective Efficacy Inventory (CEI). Multiple hierarchical regression analysis was then used to examine which SIQ sub-scales predicted individual perceptions of collective efficacy. For the elite sample, Motivational General-Mastery (MG-M) imagery accounted for approximately 17% of the variance in collective efficacy scores. No significant predictions were observed in the non elite sample. The findings suggest MG-M imagery as a potential technique to improve levels of collective efficacy although competitive level may moderate the effectiveness of such interventions. Key pointsAs imagery is an individual intervention, an examination of individual perceptions of collective efficacy was most appropriate.Elite athletes who use more MG-M imagery also have higher individual perceptions of collective efficacy.For non-elite athletes, none of the imagery functions tested predicted individual perceptions of collective efficacy.Performance accomplishments provided by MG-M imagery may increase individual perceptions of collective efficacy.Future research should investigate further the effects of imagery intervention programmes on collective efficacy beliefs. PMID:24149327

Shearer, David A.; Thomson, Rob; Mellalieu, Stephen D.; Shearer, Catherine R

2007-01-01

459

Fall-Back Disks in Long and Short GRBS  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present numerical time-dependent calculations for fall-back disks relevant for GRBs in which the disk of material surrounding the black hole (BH) powering the GRB jet modulates the mass flow, and hence the strength of the jet. Given the initial existence of a small mass appr oximately less than 10(exp -4) M(solar) near the progenitor with a circularization radius approximately 10(exp 10) - 10(exp 11) cm, an una voidable consequence will be the formation of an "external disk" whose outer edge continually moves to larger radii due to angular momentum transport and lack of a confining torque. For long GRBs, if the mass distribution in the initial fall-back disk traces the progenitor envelope, then a radius approximates 10(exp 11) cm gives a time scale app roximately 10(exp 4) s for the X-ray plateau. For late times t > 10(exp 7) s a steepening due to a cooling front in the disk may have obser vational support in GRB 060729. For short GRBs, one expects most of t he mass initially to lie at small radii < 10(exp 8) cm; however the presence of even a trace amount approximately 10(exp -9) M(solar) of hi gh angular material can give a brief plateau in the light curve.

Cannizo, John K.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.

2011-01-01

460

Integrating the Curriculum: Faux Fall Repousse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When introducing a new unit, art teachers know that sometimes a little "bling" can really grab students' attention. The author received "ooohs" and "aaahs" from her fourth-graders when they learned they would be creating "Faux Fall Repousse." The dazzling shine of the aluminum foil and the beautiful array of autumnal colors were impossible for…

Kernan, Christine

2012-01-01

461

The Rise and Fall of Energy Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the rise and fall of energy education, justifies the commitment to achieve the goals of energy education, and suggests some strategies for accomplishing this objective. The rise of energy education is first discussed. Energy is not a newcomer to the K-12 school instructional program. Energy sources, forms, states, and uses…

Petrock, Edith M.

462

Psychology 456, Fall 2010 Death and Bereavement  

E-print Network

Psychology 456, Fall 2010 Death and Bereavement Instructor: Barbara A. McDonald, Ph.D. (bamcdonald: This course will provide an overview of topics related to death, dying and bereavement. We will study will study overall attitudes toward death, cultural aspects of death and bereavement, information about how

Gallo, Linda C.

463

Programming ENG3E03,Fall  

E-print Network

SE3E03, 2006 1 Design and Selection of Programming Languages SFWR ENG3E03,Fall 2006 WOLFRAM KAHL Department of Computing and Software Faculty of Engineering McMaster University SE3E03, 2006 1.8 10 What Logic Prolog Mercury SE3E03, 2006 1.16 18 Why Study Programming Languages? . Understand the purpose

Carette, Jacques

464

PMAT 2320 { Fall 2001 Discrete Mathematics  

E-print Network

PMAT 2320 { Fall 2001 Discrete Mathematics Instructor #15; Name: Dr. David Pike #15; OÃ?ce or MATH 2050. #15; Textbook: \\Discrete Mathematics with Graph Theory" by Goodaire and Parmenter, second with a Math degree, then here are some resources that you can look at: #15; \\101 Careers in Mathematics

deYoung, Brad

465

SYLLABUS: PHYSICS 8120 PLASMA PHYSICS FALL 2007  

E-print Network

SYLLABUS: PHYSICS 8120 PLASMA PHYSICS FALL 2007 Instructor: Prof. Paul J. Wiita Class Timings time. Required Text: Russell M. Kulsrud, Plasma Physics for Astrophysics (Princeton University Press A. Sturrock, Plasma Physics 3) Nicholas A. Krall & Alvin W. Trivelpiece, Principles of Plasma

Wiita, Paul J.

466

SYLLABUS: PHYSICS 8120 PLASMA PHYSICS FALL 2007  

E-print Network

SYLLABUS: PHYSICS 8120 PLASMA PHYSICS FALL 2007 Instructor: Prof. Paul J. Wiita Class Timings to see me at some other time. Required Text: Russell M. Kulsrud, Plasma Physics for Astrophysics and Fluids 2) Peter A. Sturrock, Plasma Physics 3) Nicholas A. Krall & Alvin W. Trivelpiece, Principles

Wiita, Paul J.

467

Enrollment Trends and Student Characteristics, Fall 1989.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Comprised principally of tables and bar graphs, this report provides data on enrollment trends and student characteristics at College of the Canyons (CC) in Valencia, California, for each fall term year from 1985 through 1989. Information is included on student enrollment totals in credit courses; high schools last attended by new freshmen;…

College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA.

468

Anth 410 / 510 Fall 2012 Bioarchaeology  

E-print Network

Either: Anth 366: Human Osteology OR a one year, college-level Biology course in human anatomy. Course. The fundamentals of human skeletal and muscular anatomy are NOT covered here; they should be familiar to you fromAnth 410 / 510 Fall 2012 Bioarchaeology Reconstructing Past Behavior from Human Remains Instructor

469

e University of Min nthony Falls La  

E-print Network

to improve bulk power extracted in a wind farm. In this study, we study the interaction between the tip. The turbine was placed in a water flume at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory at the University of Minnesota under subcritical conditions. A circular cylinder was placed upstream of the turbine to induce

Minnesota, University of

470

Anthropology 410, Fall 2010 SOCIAL CONTRACTS  

E-print Network

1 Anthropology 410, Fall 2010 SOCIAL CONTRACTS Tuesday-Thursday, 8:30-9:50am, Condon 260 Dr social contract theory within anthropological research, and how it has influenced analyses provided you attend class. #12;Anthropology 410: Social Contracts 2 Class Topics and Readings September

471

OATYC Journal, Fall 1990-Spring 1991.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Published by the Ohio Association of Two-Year Colleges, the "OATYC Journal" is designed to provide a medium for sharing concepts, methods, and findings relevant to the classroom, and an open forum for the discussion and review of problems. This 16th volume of the journal, consisting of the fall 1990 and spring 1991 issues, contains the following…

Fullen, Jim, Ed.

1991-01-01

472

Fall 2013 BOSTONIA and how the language  

E-print Network

they've lived here, whether they watch TV in Spanish or English, whether they speak Spanish million by 2050, he says, "so I think that something that linguists can do is help understand howFall 2013 BOSTONIA and how the language may be changing. His subjects--40 in all for the pilot

Spence, Harlan Ernest

473

FINANCE DEPARTMENT Office Hours Fall 2014  

E-print Network

FINANCE DEPARTMENT Office Hours Fall 2014 NAME OFFICE HOURS COURSE # COURSE TITLE DAY TIME ROOM-1515 and by appointment FIN 323.8 FIN 323.9 FIN 323.11 FIN 326.1 Fundamentals of Finance Fundamentals of Finance Fundamentals of Finance Financial Institution Mgt TTH TTH TH TTH 0930-1045 1100-1215 1600-1840 1230-1345 GMCS

Gallo, Linda C.

474

E24: VLSI Design Syllabus -Fall 2011  

E-print Network

estimation · Circuit simulation · Combinational and sequential circuit design · Static and dynamic CMOS gatesE24: VLSI Design Syllabus - Fall 2011 T Th 8:30-9:45, Hicks 211 Course Website: http · Memory system design · Design methodology and tools Please check the course website for an updated course

Moreshet, Tali

475

E77: VLSI Design Syllabus -Fall 2007  

E-print Network

· Circuit simulation · Combinational and sequential circuit design · Static and dynamic CMOS gates · MemoryE77: VLSI Design Syllabus - Fall 2007 MWF 9:30-10:20, Hicks 211 Course Website: http system design · Design methodology and tools Please check the course website for an updated course

Moreshet, Tali

476

Anode Fall Formation in a Hall Thruster  

SciTech Connect

As was reported in our previous work, accurate, nondisturbing near-anode measurements of the plasma density, electron temperature, and plasma potential performed with biased and emissive probes allowed the first experimental identification of both electron-repelling (negative anode fall) and electron-attracting (positive anode fall) anode sheaths in Hall thrusters. An interesting new phenomenon revealed by the probe measurements is that the anode fall changes from positive to negative upon removal of the dielectric coating, which appears on the anode surface during the course of Hall thruster operation. As reported in the present work, energy dispersion spectroscopy analysis of the chemical composition of the anode dielectric coating indicates that the coating layer consists essentially of an oxide of the anode material (stainless steel). However, it is still unclear how oxygen gets into the thruster channel. Most importantly, possible mechanisms of anode fall formation in a Hall thruster with a clean and a coated anodes are analyzed in this work; practical implication of understanding the general structure of the electron-attracting anode sheath in the case of a coated anode is also discussed.

Leonid A. Dorf; Yevgeny F. Raitses; Artem N. Smirnov; Nathaniel J. Fisch

2004-06-29

477

Experimental Foods 709:489 Fall 2012  

E-print Network

#11 Emulsions & fat replacers F 11/30 Food Colors T 12/4 Flavors & seasonings F 12/7 Genetically modified foods Reserve reading Research paper due 12/7 T 12/11 EXAM #12;Experimental Foods 709:489 Fall 2012 Lecture: Tuesday & Friday 9:30- 10:25 AM 106 HSB Lab sections

Chen, Kuang-Yu

478

Department of Psychology Fall 2014 Colloquium Schedule  

E-print Network

Department of Psychology Fall 2014 Colloquium Schedule 9/4 Michael Wierzbicki, Ph.D. Professor Marquette University, Department of Psychology Clinic Policies and Procedures; Ethical and Legal Matters 9/18 James Hoelzle, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Marquette University, Department of Psychology Preparing

Sanders, Matthew

479

Math 110 Fall 2007 Basic Calculus I  

E-print Network

mathematically as A = kB where k is called the constant of proportionality. In Chemistry, Boyle's Law states in the space below: 1 #12;Math 110 Class 31 Fall 2007 Newton's Law of Cooling Newton's Law of Cooling states's Law of Cooling says: C If the coffee is at a temperature C which is larger than A, will the coffee

Buckmire, Ron

480

Environmental Design Curriculum Fall Semester Spring Semester  

E-print Network

Environmental Design Curriculum 1 1st Year Fall Semester Spring Semester Course Credits Instructor Course Credits Instructor General Education courses (recommended gen ed: EnvirDes 140) 3 Adjunct/M acDonald EnvirDes 205 Dynamics of Human Habitation 4 Pader General Education courses 10-12 Total credits 14

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

481

DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICS FALL 2013 COURSES  

E-print Network

period to the era of Constantine, with an emphasis on the Augustan age. CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY Dr. TimDEPARTMENT OF CLASSICS FALL 2013 COURSES INTRODUCTION TO ROMAN CIVILIZATION Dr. Noelle Carmichael requirement in Humanities or count towards a major or minor in Classics. Images of Women in Classical

Kunkle, Tom

482

DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICS FALL 2012 COURSES  

E-print Network

of Constantine, with an emphasis on the Augustan age. CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY Dr. Kristen Gentile MWF 10DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICS FALL 2012 COURSES INTRODUCTION TO ROMAN CIVILIZATION Dr. Joann Gulizio TR 01 or count towards a major or minor in Classics. THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF ATHENS Dr. Jim Newhard MWF 09

Young, Paul Thomas

483

ENTR 406: SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP Syllabus Fall, 2013  

E-print Network

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course explores issues in not-for-profit entrepreneurship such as ways social to explore these and related issues. TEXT: Bornstein, David and Susan Davis (2010), Social EntrepreneurshipENTR 406: SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP Syllabus ­ Fall, 2013 Class meets: MWF: 11:00-11:50; BCTR 212

Young, Paul Thomas

484

Early Childhood: Fall Harvest and Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides instructional strategies for using fall fruits/vegetables in science lessons, including activities related to melons, pumpkins, grapes, pears, squash, and yams. Suggests extending the activities over a month or more to allow children time to explore and investigate. (JN)

Science and Children, 1982

1982-01-01

485

Astr 620 Fall 2009 Galaxies Sylvain Veilleux  

E-print Network

points) In the standard picture of galaxy formation, elliptical galaxies form early through rapidAstr 620 Fall 2009 Galaxies Sylvain Veilleux December 15, 2009 1:30 - 3:30 pm, CSS 0201 FINAL EXAM approximation" in disk galaxies. Draw a figure of the typical effective gravitational potential in such a galaxy

Veilleux, Sylvain

486

CS281 Fall 2013 Binary Bomb Lab  

E-print Network

CS281 Fall 2013 Binary Bomb Lab 1 Introduction The nefarious Dr. Evil has planted a slew of "binary bombs" on our class machines. A binary bomb is a program that consists of a sequence of phases. Each is defused and the bomb proceeds to the next phase. Otherwise, the bomb explodes by printing "BOOM

Kretchmar, R. Matthew

487

SUMMER/FALL 2010 Lighting Up Cells,  

E-print Network

The magazine for alumni, faculty, students, friends and supporters of Albert Einstein College of MedicineSUMMER/FALL 2010 Lighting Up Cells, Curing Diseases The Magazine for Alumni and Friends of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University EINSTEIN #12;On the cover: Research Fellow Timothée

Yates, Andrew

488

Fall Meeting Abstracts Set New Record  

Microsoft Academic Search

When the dust had settled after the Fall Meeting abstract deadline on September 10, a new record was set: 4,604 abstracts had been received for the San Francisco meeting. This is a 12% increase over last year, making the 1992 meeting the largest AGU meeting ever held!This follows the success of the AGU Spring Meeting in Montreal, which also broke

Brenda Weaver

1992-01-01

489

Avoid the Fall Sports Injury Trap  

MedlinePLUS

... this page, please enable JavaScript. Avoid the Fall Sports Injury Trap Most common injuries come from overuse, experts say (*this news ... for Sports Medicine. "Overuse injuries are the most common types of sports-related injuries," Dr. Michael George, a spokesman for the AAOS, ...

490

MICROBIAL PATHOGENESIS JOURNAL CLUB Fall 2013 Schedule  

E-print Network

MICROBIAL PATHOGENESIS JOURNAL CLUB Fall 2013 Schedule DATE PRESENTER JOURNAL ARTICLE TIME LOCATION the Bacterium's Own F1Fo ATP Synthase. Cell. 2013; 154:146­156. 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Dental School Room 7105:00 PM - 1:00 PM Dental School Room 7105 September 26th Becca Pelc Interplay Between Clathrin and Rab5

Weber, David J.

491

Pupil Membership and Related Information, Fall 1994.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information about enrollment, graduation, and other characteristics of Colorado schools was collected from the state's public school districts. In fall 1994, there were 640,521 students in the state's public schools, an increase of 15,459 (2.5%) over the previous year. Enrollment in Colorado schools has risen steadily since 1983 in both elementary…

MacKenzie, Stella

492

American Geophysical Union: Fall 2003 Conference  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reports on the Annual Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union held in December 2003 in San Francisco. Outlines some of the topics covered, including an update on Total Mapping Ozone Spectrometer technology which investigates destruction of the ozone layer and a poster session on alternative careers for geoscientists.

April M. Love

2004-01-01

493

HONORS INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY Sociology 2002, Fall 2012  

E-print Network

HONORS INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY Sociology 2002, Fall 2012 Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:30-2:50 117 ______________________________________________________________________________ COURSE DESCRIPTION Honors Introductory Sociology is intended to provide you with a broad overview of the major subject areas and principles of sociology, the scientific study of human society and social

Stephens, Jacqueline

494

Does Fall History Influence Residential Adjustments?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose of the study: To determine whether reported falls at baseline are associated with an older adult's decision to make a residential adjustment (RA) and the type of adjustment made in the subsequent 2 years. Design and Methods: Observations (n = 25,036) were from the Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative sample of…

Leland, Natalie; Porell, Frank; Murphy, Susan L.

2011-01-01

495

Ice Fall Doctors 4, Ang Nima 2  

E-print Network

Ang Nima explains how he became an ice fall doctor, starting with working on Sir Chris Bonington’s Everest expedition in the 1970s. These recordings were made on a trek in the spring of 2011 up to Mount Everest Base Camp. The recordings span a wide...

Loomis, Molly

496