Sample records for falls efficacy scale

  1. Scales for assessing self-efficacy of nurses and assistants for preventing falls

    PubMed Central

    Dykes, Patricia C.; Carroll, Diane; McColgan, Kerry; Hurley, Ann C.; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Colombo, Lisa; Zuyev, Lyubov; Middleton, Blackford

    2011-01-01

    Aim This paper is a report of the development and testing of the Self-Efficacy for Preventing Falls Nurse and Assistant scales. Background Patient falls and fall-related injuries are traumatic ordeals for patients, family members and providers, and carry a toll for hospitals. Self-efficacy is an important factor in determining actions persons take and levels of performance they achieve. Performance of individual caregivers is linked to the overall performance of hospitals. Scales to assess nurses and certified nursing assistants’ self-efficacy to prevent patients from falling would allow for targeting resources to increase SE, resulting in improved individual performance and ultimately decreased numbers of patient falls. Method Four phases of instrument development were carried out to (1) generate individual items from eight focus groups (four each nurse and assistant conducted in October 2007), (2) develop prototype scales, (3) determine content validity during a second series of four nurse and assistant focus groups (January 2008) and (4) conduct item analysis, paired t-tests, Student’s t-tests and internal consistency reliability to refine and confirm the scales. Data were collected during February–December, 2008. Results The 11-item Self-Efficacy for Preventing Falls Nurse had an alpha of 0·89 with all items in the range criterion of 0·3–0·7 for item total correlation. The 8-item Self-Efficacy for Preventing Falls Assistant had an alpha of 0·74 and all items had item total correlations in the 0·3–0·7 range. Conclusions The Self-Efficacy for Preventing Falls Nurse and Self-Efficacy for Preventing Falls Assistant scales demonstrated psychometric adequacy and are recommended to measure bedside staff’s self-efficacy beliefs in preventing patient falls. PMID:21073506

  2. Clinical assessment of fear of falling after stroke: validity, reliability and responsiveness of the Persian version of the Fall Efficacy Scale-International

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Akram; Hassani Mehraban, Afsoon; Mehrpour, Masoud; Mohammadi, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fear of falling may be related to falling during stroke onset. The Fall Efficacy ScaleInternational (FES-I) with excellent psychometric properties, is an instrument developed to assess patients’ concerns about fallings. The aim of this study was to determine validation of this scale in Iranian patients with stroke. Methods: The "forward-backward" procedure was applied to translate the FES-I from English to Persian. One hundred-twenty patients who had suffered stroke, aged 40 to 80 years (55% male) completed the Persian FES-I, Geriatric Depression Scale-15 (GDS-15), General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28), Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and Timed up and Go (TUG) questionnaires. The interval time for the test-retest of the Persian scale was 7-14 days. Results: The test-retest and inter-rater reliabilities of the Persian FES-I were excellent (ICC2,1=0.98, p<0.001) and the internal consistency was high (Cronbach’s alpha=0.78). Factor analysis of the 16 items in the Persian scale showed only one significant factor. The total Persian FES-I score had a significantly negative correlation (p<0.001) with the BBS, but it had significantly positive correlation with the TUG, GHQ-28, and GDS-15. The difference in responsiveness scores across fallers and non-fallers yielded a large effect size (0.46), which indicated a good discriminating validity. Conclusion: The Persian FES-I proved to be an effective and valuable measurement tool to assess stroke patients’ fear of falling in practice and research setting. PMID:25694989

  3. The Health Teaching Self-Efficacy Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingery, Paul M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The Health Teaching Self-Efficacy (HTSE) Scale was devised to measure perceived deficits in ability at pretest and changes in self-efficacy in response to intervention. HTSE was tested on 31 school health teachers and was found to be highly reliable and internally consistent. (MDM)

  4. Cross-cultural validation of the Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I) using self-report and interview-based questionnaires among Persian-speaking elderly adults.

    PubMed

    Baharlouei, Hamzeh; Salavati, Mahyar; Akhbari, Behnam; Mosallanezhad, Zahra; Mazaheri, Masood; Negahban, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    FES-I has been designed to assess fear of falling (FoF). The purpose of this study was to establish the Persian-language version of the FES-I and to assess its psychometric properties under different modes of administration: self-report and interview-based. Participants included 191 elderly people aged over 60 who were mostly community dwelling. With an interval of 14 days, 97 volunteers completed the questionnaire in the retest session. To evaluate the construct validity, we assessed the ability of the FES-I to discriminate people based on gender, level of education, number of falls and FoF. The correlation with the Short Form of Health Survey (SF-36), Timed Up and Go (TUG) and Functional Reach Test (FRT) was also determined to test validity. Internal consistency was excellent in both self-report (0.93) and interview (0.92) versions. All intra-class correlations (ICCs) were above 0.70 with the highest reliability obtained for the condition where the interview based FES-I was used in both test and retest sessions. The strength of correlation between the FES-I and TUG varied based on mode of administration: moderate for interview and high for self-report mode. The FES-I had a higher correlation with the SF-36 subscales of physical health than subscales of mental health. The FES-I had the ability to discriminate the participants based on gender, educational level, and number of falls and FoF. In conclusion, both interview and self-report versions of the FES-I demonstrated acceptable measurement properties to assess FoF in Iranian elderly persons. PMID:23830993

  5. The effects of complex exercise on walking ability during direction change and falls efficacy in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun Seung; Kim, Jin Young

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was to assessed the efficacy of a complex exercise program for the elderly, with respect to the effects on walking ability during direction change and on falls efficacy. [Subjects] In total, 40 subjects were selected for this study and assigned randomly to either a complex exercise (n = 20) or a general exercise (n = 20) group. [Methods] The complex exercise consisted of resistance and aerobic exercises. The exercise program was conducted three times a week for eight weeks. We assessed outcome measures of the four square step test, the figure-of-8 walk test, and the falls efficacy scale. [Results] After the intervention, the four step square test, figure-of-8 walk test, and falls efficacy scale values increased significantly in both the complex exercise program and general exercise groups. The complex exercise group showed a more significant improvement than the general exercise group in the figure-of-8 walk test step and falls efficacy scale scores. [Conclusion] Complex exercise improved walking ability during direction change and falls efficacy in elderly individuals.

  6. Developing the "Pedagogical Efficacy Perception Scale" for Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akbaba, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to develop the "Pedagogical Efficacy Perception Scale" for teacher candidates and to compare scale scores. The sample of this survey model study consists of 310 students studying in a faculty of education. The "Pedagogical Efficacy Perception Scale" developed by the author was used for data collection.…

  7. The effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation integration pattern exercise program on the fall efficacy and gait ability of the elders with experienced fall.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Seung; Park, Seong-Doo; Kim, Jin-Young

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of exercising program utilizing proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation integration pattern (PIP), which is effective in improvement of the physical function, on the fall efficacy and gait ability of the elders who experienced injuries from falls. Also, this study aims to investigate he applicability of exercise program as methods for fall reoccurrence prevention and physical functions enhancement. The subjects of the study were 30 elders in the local community with experience of injuries from falls. The period of the study was 4 weeks with 12 exercise sessions. The subjects were randomly allocated to 2 groups where 15 elders were allocated to PIP and the rest 15 elders were allocated to general exercise (GE) group. Fall efficacy scale (FES) and GAITRite were used for the measurements in this study. Paired t-test was used to analyze the differences within the group while independent t-test was used to analyze the difference between two groups. In the comparison of measurements before and after exercise program, FES, velocity, cadence, and stride length were shown to be significantly increased in both PIP group and GE group. Also, in the comparison between two groups after the exercise program, the measurements of FES, cadence, stride length, and step length in PIP group were shown to be significantly increased compared to the GE group. Therefore, the PNF combined pattern is judged to be applicable to as methods for fall reoccurrence prevention and physical functions enhancement of the elders with experience of being fallen. PMID:25210699

  8. The Effects of Augmented Reality-based Otago Exercise on Balance, Gait, and Falls Efficacy of Elderly Women

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ha-na; Chung, EunJung; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of augmented reality-based Otago exercise on balance, gait, and falls efficacy of elderly women. [Subjects] The subjects were 21 elderly women, who were randomly divided into two groups: an augmented reality-based Otago exercise group of 10 subjects and an Otago exercise group of 11 subjects. [Methods] All subjects were evaluated for balance (Berg Balance Scale, BBS), gait parameters (velocity, cadence, step length, and stride length), and falls efficacy. Within 12 weeks, Otago exercise for muscle strengthening and balance training was conducted three times, for a period of 60 minutes each, and subjects in the experimental group performed augmented reality-based Otago exercise. [Results] Following intervention, the augmented reality-based Otago exercise group showed significant increases in BBS, velocity, cadence, step length (right side), stride length (right side and left side) and falls efficacy. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest the feasibility and suitability of this augmented reality-based Otago exercise for elderly women. PMID:24259856

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF A SELF-EFFICACY SCALE FOR ASSESSING SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS' SCIENCE SELF-EFFICACY BELIEFS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Wong; Siew Lian

    This paper details the development of a self-efficacy scale for assessing secondary school students' science self-efficacy (SSE) beliefs. Differences in the way self-efficacy and self-concept are assessed is discussed in light of the conceptual difference between self-efficacy and other self-percepts. Steps in the formulation of the scale in accordance with theoretical guidelines on how self-efficacy should be assessed and measures

  10. Children's Self-Efficacy Scale: Initial Psychometric Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinelli, Selma de Cassia; Bartholomeu, Daniel; Caliatto, Susana Gakyia; Sassi, Adriana de Grecci

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the development of a self-efficacy measure for elementary school children. A sample of 514 children, ages 8 to 11, enrolled in Grades 2 to 4 of public schools in Brazil was investigated. The scale included 78 descriptive items about academic situations, in which the child was required to respond on a 5-point scale, the…

  11. The Early Intervention Parenting Self-Efficacy Scale (EIPSES): Scale Construction and Initial Psychometric Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guimond, Amy B.; Wilcox, M. Jeanne; Lamorey, Suzanne G.

    2008-01-01

    The psychometric properties of an instrument designed to measure parenting efficacy within the context of early intervention, the Early Intervention Parenting Self-Efficacy Scale (EIPSES), were explored. One hundred seventeen caregivers of children receiving early intervention services completed the 20-item EIPSES. The scale was reduced to 16…

  12. A Confirmatory Study of Rating Scale Category Effectiveness for the Coaching Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Nicholas D.; Feltz, Deborah L.; Wolfe, Edward W.

    2008-01-01

    This study extended validity evidence for measures of coaching efficacy derived from the Coaching Efficacy Scale (CES) by testing the rating scale categorizations suggested in previous research. Previous research provided evidence for the effectiveness of a four-category (4-CAT) structure for high school and collegiate sports coaches; it also…

  13. Examination of coaches' self-efficacy: preliminary analysis of the coaching efficacy scale.

    PubMed

    Tsorbatzoudis, Haralambos; Daroglou, Garifallia; Zahariadis, Panayotis; Grouios, George

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Coaching Efficacy Scale, which measures coaches' beliefs about their capacity to affect the learning and performance of their athletes on Game Strategy, Motivation, Teaching Technique, and Character Building. 230 Greek male team coaches (M = 37.6 yr. +/- 6.2) with 5.5 yr. (SD = 4.8) of experience completed the Greek translation of the scale. A first-order confirmatory factor analysis supported the basic factorial structure of the scale. Examination of a higher order model of an overall coaching efficacy factor showed satisfactory fit, using second-order confirmatory factor analysis. Moreover, the scale showed satisfactory Cronbach of of .82 and 30-day test-retest reliability of .73. Significant differences between experienced and less experienced coaches, defined by mean score, were found on Teaching Technique and overall self-efficacy factors, with more experienced coaches having significantly higher scores. Results supported the reliability and validity of the Greek version of the scale. PMID:15002874

  14. Efficacy of Cry1F insecticidal protein in maize and cotton for control of fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efficacy of maize, Zea mays L., hybrids and cotton, Gossypium hirsutum (L.), varieties expressing Cry1F insecticidal crystal protein of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) var. aizawai Berliner (transformation event TC1507 in corn and event DAS-24236-5 in cotton) was evaluated for control of fall armyworm, ...

  15. Isokinetic performance in low back pain patients: The predictive power of the Self-Efficacy Scale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. K. Kaivanto; A.-M. Estlander; G. B. Moneta; H. Vanharanta

    1995-01-01

    The Self-Efficacy Scale (SES) has been found to predict isokinetic performance better than anthropometric variables. This study tests the predictive power of SES further against other measures of efficacy expectancies as well as measures of depression and perceived disability. A group of 105 chronic back pain patients was administered Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI), SES, the Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ), and

  16. Development and Validation of Self-Efficacy and Outcome Expectancy Scales for Job-Related Applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matt L. Riggs; Jette Warka; Bernadette Babasa; Renee Betancourt; Stephenie Hooker

    1994-01-01

    This study describes the development of general scales to measure self-efficacy and outcome expectancy at both the individual and group level. Factor analysis of an initial application of these scales in work settings was used for scale revision. Results from a second work sample provide evidence of the revised scales' factorial validity, reliability, and criterion validity in reference to work

  17. Evaluating the Turkish Version of the Discipline Efficacy Scale (DES): Translation Adequacy and Factor Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurt, Hakan; Ekici, Gulay

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to adapt the discipline efficacy scale to Turkish language, and conduct the validity and reliability analysis of the adapted scale. The scale was applied to 157 teacher candidates. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to reveal the construct validity of the scale. The results of the exploratory…

  18. Development and Validation of Scores on a Computer Programming Self-Efficacy Scale and Group Analyses of Novice Programmer Self-Efficacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramalingam, Vennila; Wiedenbeck, Susan

    1998-01-01

    A 32-item self-efficacy scale for computer programming was developed, primed to the C++ programming language. The scale was administered to 421 students at the beginning and end of an introductory course in C++ programming. There was growth in self-efficacy between two administrations of the scale 12 weeks apart, particularly for students who…

  19. Psychometric evaluations of the efficacy expectations and Outcome Expectations for Exercise Scales in African American women.

    PubMed

    Murrock, Carolyn J; Gary, Faye

    2014-01-01

    This secondary analysis tested the reliability and validity of the Self-Efficacy for Exercise (SEE) and the Outcome Expectations for Exercise (OEE) scales in 126 community dwelling, middle aged African American women. Social Cognitive Theory postulates self-efficacy is behavior age, gender and culture specific. Therefore, it is important to determine ifself-efficacy scales developed and tested in older Caucasian female adults are reliable and valid in middle aged, minority women. Cronbach's alpha and construct validity using hypothesis testing and confirmatory factor analysis supported the reliability and validity of the SEE and OEE scales in community dwelling, middle aged African American women. PMID:25612395

  20. The efficacy of winter cover crops to stabilize soil inorganic nitrogen after fall-applied anhydrous ammonia.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Corey; Armstrong, Shalamar

    2015-03-01

    There is a dearth of knowledge on the ability of cover crops to increase the effectiveness of fall-applied nitrogen (N). The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of two cover crop species to stabilize inorganic soil N after a fall application of N. Fall N was applied at a rate of 200 kg N ha into living stands of cereal rye, tillage radish, and a control (no cover crop) at the Illinois State University Research and Teaching Farm in Lexington, Illinois. Cover crops were sampled to determine N uptake, and soil samples were collected in the spring at four depths to 80 cm to determine the distribution of inorganic N within the soil profile. Tillage radish (131.9-226.8 kg ha) and cereal rye (188.1-249.9 kg ha N) demonstrated the capacity to absorb a minimum of 60 to 80% of the equivalent rate of fall-applied N, respectively. Fall applying N without cover crops resulted in a greater percentage of soil NO-N (40%) in the 50- to 80-cm depth, compared with only 31 and 27% when tillage radish and cereal rye were present at N application. At planting, tillage radish stabilized an average of 91% of the equivalent rate of fall-applied N within the 0- to 20-cm, depth compared with 66 and 57% for the cereal rye and control treatments, respectively. This study has demonstrated that fall applying N into a living cover crop stand has the potential to reduce the vulnerability of soil nitrate and to stabilize a greater concentration of inorganic N within the agronomic depths of soil. PMID:26023963

  1. The Self-Efficacy Scale for Preschool Teachers Regarding Asthma Care: Instrument Development and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gau, Bih-Shya; Hung, Chao-Chia

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of a questionnaire that assesses preschool teachers' self-efficacy in providing asthma care. Methods: A total of 407 teachers from 54 preschools in Taiwan participated in the study by completing the asthma management self-efficacy scale. We assessed…

  2. Reliability and Factor Analyses of a Teacher Efficacy Scale for Nigerian Secondary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faleye, Bamidele Abiodun

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: The suitability of 52 items for measuring Teacher Efficacy was investigated with the aim of developing and validating a Teacher Efficacy Scale (TES) for Nigerian secondary school teachers. Method: The TES was administered on 2400 teachers (mean age = 36.75 years). Data were subjected to factor and reliability analyses. Results:…

  3. A Psychometric Evaluation of the Parent Self-Efficacy in Managing the Transition to School Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giallo, Rebecca; Kienhuis, Mandy; Treyvaud, Karli; Matthews, Jan

    2008-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Parent Self-efficacy in Managing the Transition to School Scale (PSMTSS) were investigated with a sample of 763 mothers whose children were starting primary school in Australia. Exploratory factor analysis identified two factors, Efficacy and Worry, accounting for 56.6% of the total variance in parent…

  4. Laboratory toxicity and field efficacy of selected insecticides against fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Notctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), is an occasional but often serious pest of several southern row crops, including: cotton, field corn, and grain sorghum. The objective of these studies was to generate baseline dose-mortality responses for fall armyworm larvae in laboratory bioas...

  5. Development and validation of a condom self-efficacy scale for college students.

    PubMed

    Brafford, L J; Beck, K H

    1991-03-01

    This study proposed to develop and validate a scale for the college population that measures self-efficacy in using condoms. The Condom Use Self-Efficacy Scale (CUSES) was derived from several sources and consisted of 28 items describing an individual's feelings of confidence about being able to purchase condoms, put them on and take them off, and negotiate their use with a new sexual partner. This scale was administered to a sample of 768 college students. It was found to possess adequate reliability (Cronbach's alpha = .91; test-retest correlation = .81) and correlated well with the Attitude Toward the Condom Scale (r = .51) and the Contraceptive Self-Efficacy Scale for women (r = .55). Our scale also correlated with a measure of intention to use condoms (r = .40) but was unrelated to a measure of social desirability. Students who differed on measures of previous condom use as well as on sexual intercourse experience also showed significant differences on this scale in the expected direction, indicating evidence of this scale's discriminant validity. The potential uses of this scale in a college population are discussed, along with the issues underlying condom usage self-efficacy. PMID:1783705

  6. Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale: The Development and Validation of a Prototype.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rooney, Rebecca A.; Osipow, Samuel H.

    1992-01-01

    A 230-item Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale (OSES) was administered to 113 psychology and 88 journalism undergraduates, and analysis of the scale's psychometric characteristics were performed. Comparison with Betz and Hackett's OSES supported the feasibility and utility of a task-specific measure. (SK)

  7. Assessing and Improving the Factorial Structures of the Computer Self-Efficacy Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moroz, Pauline A.; Nash, John B.

    The Computer Self-Efficacy Scale (CSE) developed by C. A. Murphy, D. Coover, and S. V. Owen (1989) is an instrument purported to assess computer-related competencies. Previous research into the factor structure of the CSE has yielded conflicting results. In this study, the scale was used to collect data from 216 graduate education students. A…

  8. Falls

    MedlinePLUS

    ... falling. Getting rid of tripping hazards in your home and wearing nonskid shoes may also help. To reduce the chances of breaking a bone if you do fall, make sure that you get enough calcium and vitamin D. NIH: National Institute on Aging

  9. Comparison of the Validity of Four Fall-Related Psychological Measures in a Community-Based Falls Risk Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Delilah S.; Ellis, Rebecca; Kosma, Maria; Fabre, Jennifer M.; McCarter, Kevin S.; Wood, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the measurement properties of fall-related psychological instruments with a sample of 133 older adults (M age = 74.4 years, SD = 9.4). Measures included the Comprehensive Falls Risk Screening Instrument, Falls-efficacy Scale-International (FES-I), Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC), modified Survey of Activities and Fear of…

  10. Proposed Modifications to the Conceptual Model of Coaching Efficacy and Additional Validity Evidence for the Coaching Efficacy Scale II-High School Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Nicholas; Feltz, Deborah; Chase, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether theoretically relevant sources of coaching efficacy could predict the measures derived from the Coaching Efficacy Scale II-High School Teams (CES II-HST). Data were collected from head coaches of high school teams in the United States (N = 799). The analytic framework was a multiple-group…

  11. Discriminant analysis for predictor of falls in stroke patients by using the Berg Balance Scale

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Noriaki; Urabe, Yukio; Murakami, Masahito; Itotani, Keisuke; Kato, Junichi

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION An observational study was carried out to estimate the strength of the relationships among balance, mobility and falls in hemiplegic stroke inpatients. The objective was to examine factors that may aid in the prediction of the likelihood of falls in stroke patients. METHODS A total of 53 stroke patients (30 male, 23 female) aged 67.0 ± 11.1 years were interviewed regarding their fall history. Physical performance was assessed using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scale. Variables that differed between fallers and non-fallers were identified, and a discriminant function analysis was carried out to determine the combination of variables that effectively predicted fall status. RESULTS Of the 53 stroke patients, 19 were fallers. Compared with the non-fallers, the fallers scored low on the FIM, and differed with respect to age, time from stroke onset, length of hospital stay, Brunnstrom recovery stage and admission BBS score. Discriminant analysis for predicting falls in stroke patients showed that admission BBS score was significantly related to the likelihood of falls. Moreover, discriminant analysis showed that the use of a significant BBS score to classify fallers and non-fallers had an accuracy of 81.1%. The discriminating criterion between the two groups was a score of 31 points on the BBS. CONCLUSION The results of this study suggest that BBS score is a strong predictor of falls in stroke patients. As balance is closely related to the risk of falls in hospitalised stroke patients, BBS might be useful in the prediction of falls. PMID:25678051

  12. The Psychometric Properties of the Difficult Behavior Self-Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Hyun-Kyoung; Kozub, Francis M.

    2010-01-01

    The study was designed to estimate the psychometric properties of Hastings and Brown's (2002a) Difficult Behavior Self-efficacy Scale. Participants were two samples of physical educators teaching in Korea (n = 229) and the United States (U.S.; n = 139). An initial translation of the questionnaire to Korean and pilot study were conducted along with…

  13. Development of a Nutrition Self-Efficacy Scale for Prospective Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulman, Jessica A.; Wolfe, Edward W.

    2000-01-01

    Undertook two studies (n=113 and n=55) a year apart, to create an instrument that measures nutritional competence and self-efficacy among prospective physicians. Results using Rasch modeling demonstrate the reliability and validity of the scale for assessing mastery of applied nutrition among prospective physicians. (SLD)

  14. The Development and Psychometric Properties of the Sources of Lesbian Relationship Self-Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepper, Shanti M.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation consisted of four studies that aimed to develop and explore the psychometric properties of the Sources of Lesbian Relationship Self-Efficacy Scale (SLRSE). Study 1 describes the initial item development of the SLRSE which consisted of focus group research, professional consultation, and a review of literature. The purpose of…

  15. Development and validation of the French-Canadian Chronic Pain Self-efficacy Scale

    PubMed Central

    Lacasse, Anaïs; Bourgault, Patricia; Tousignant-Laflamme, Yannick; Courtemanche-Harel, Roxanne; Choinière, Manon

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perceived self-efficacy is a non-negligible outcome when measuring the impact of self-management interventions for chronic pain patients. However, no validated, chronic pain-specific self-efficacy scales exist for studies conducted with French-speaking populations. OBJECTIVES: To establish the validity of the use of the French-Canadian Chronic Pain Self-efficacy Scale (FC-CPSES) among chronic pain patients. METHODS: The Chronic Disease Self-Efficacy Scale is a validated 33-item self-administered questionnaire that measures perceived self-efficacy to perform self-management behaviours, manage chronic disease in general and achieve outcomes (a six-item version is also available). This scale was adapted to the context of chronic pain patients following cross-cultural adaptation guidelines. The FC-CPSES was administered to 109 fibromyalgia and 34 chronic low back pain patients (n=143) who participated in an evidence-based self-management intervention (the PASSAGE program) offered in 10 health care centres across the province of Quebec. Cronbach’s alpha coefficients (?) were calculated to determine the internal consistency of the 33- and six-item versions of the FC-CPSES. With regard to convergent construct validity, the association between the FC-CPSES baseline scores and related clinical outcomes was examined. With regard to the scale’s sensitivity to change, pre- and postintervention FC-CPSES scores were compared. RESULTS: Internal consistency was high for both versions of the FC-CPSES (?=0.86 to ?=0.96). Higher self-efficacy was significantly associated with higher mental health-related quality of life and lower pain intensity and catastrophizing (P<0.05), supporting convergent validity of the scale. There was a statistically significant increase in FC-CPSES scores between pre- and postintervention measures for both versions of the FC-CPSES (P<0.003), which supports their sensitivity to clinical change during an intervention. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that both versions of the FC-CPSES are reliable and valid for the measurement of pain management self-efficacy among chronic pain patients. PMID:25848845

  16. The reliability of an education-related self-efficacy scale for people with psychiatric disabilities.

    PubMed

    Harris, Meredith; Gladman, Beverley; Hennessy, Nicole; Lloyd, Chris; Mowry, Bryan; Waghorn, Geoffrey

    2011-04-01

    We investigated the reliability of the Education-related Self Efficacy Scale (ESS-40), a measure of self-efficacy at a core task level designed for people with psychiatric disabilities. Sixty community residents with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder participated. The ESS-40 was administered twice via telephone interview. Short cycle test-retest reliability was very good for the total score and most items. The measure demonstrated signs of a coherent internal structure, adequate face validity, good client acceptability, and promising utility. The reliability evidence supports its use in community mental health services and in psychiatric rehabilitation settings. Sensitivity and predictive validity require further investigation. PMID:20140644

  17. SCALE-UP Classroom in 208 Phillips Fall 2010 Summary of Findings

    E-print Network

    Engel, Jonathan

    1 SCALE-UP Classroom in 208 Phillips Fall 2010 Summary of Findings Prepared by Bob Henshaw integrated experience. Classroom activities emphasize team-based problem solving activities. Classroom design is an important aspect of this model, as students must be able to work

  18. Isokinetic performance in low back pain patients: The predictive power of the Self-Efficacy Scale.

    PubMed

    Kaivanto, K K; Estlander, A M; Moneta, G B; Vanharanta, H

    1995-06-01

    The Self-Efficacy Scale (SES) has been found to predict isokinetic performance better than anthropometric variables. This study tests the predictive power of SES further against other measures of efficacy expectancies as well as measures of depression and perceived disability. A group of 105 chronic back pain patients was administered Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI), SES, the Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ), and the Oswestry low back pain disability questionnaire (OSWESTRY). Total isokinetic work done was measured at slow, medium and high speeds, for which multiple regression models were fitted controlling for sex, age, weight and height. The results confirmed SES to be the best overall predictor of isokinetic performance. BDI was not significant as a predictor of isokinetic performance. The models also revealed that SES predicts less well with increases in the test speed, particularly in extension. These results provide further evidence of the diagnostic value of SES relative to OSWESTRY and PSEQ. PMID:24234579

  19. Scale of health: indices of safety and efficacy in the evolving environment of large biological datasets.

    PubMed

    Sayes, Christie M; Staats, Herman; Hickey, Anthony J

    2014-09-01

    The interdependent relationship between pharmacology and toxicology is fundamental to the concepts of efficacy and safety of both drugs and xenobiotics. The traditional concept of establishing efficacious and tolerated doses to define a 'therapeutic window' appears simplistic in the context of an exponentially increasing database on molecular mechanisms and cell biology that inform our understanding of homeostasis. Recent advances in nano medicine illustrate the convergence of efficacy and safety considerations that are central to establishing a clear pathway for regulatory review. The following overview considers biological responses to the administration of nanoparticles and the scale of balanced, within a range that might be considered 'normal', to unbalanced, abnormal responses associated with health and disease. PMID:24919930

  20. Validity of self-efficacy scale scores for a Spanish sample.

    PubMed

    López-Torrecillas, Francisca; García, Juan; Cañadas, Guillermo A; Uclés, Isabel Ramírez; De La Fuente, Emilia I

    2006-04-01

    This study analyzed the validity of the Sherer, et al. Self-efficacy Scale for a Spanish sample of 555 subjects, 257 men and 298 women. 415 were from the general population; 34 schizophrenics and 45 with eating disorders were from a clinic, plus 61 drug addicts from two centers. All met DSM-IV-R criteria. The Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Assertiveness Inventory, and the Self-control Questionnaire were administered. The reliability for total scores, general factor were high even when social self-efficacy was low. A bidimensional factor structure seemed more acceptable. The Self-efficacy scale scores correlated with those on the Self-control Questionnaire and the Assertiveness Inventory. Extraversion scores on the Sincerity dimension of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire correlated with scores on the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Eysenck's Neuroticism and Psychoticism scales. Significant mean differences appeared between the general population group and the three clinical groups. These analyses support the usefulness of the scale for clinical practice and research with Spanish samples. PMID:16796100

  1. The Role of Self-Efficacy in HIV Treatment Adherence: Validation of the HIV Treatment Adherence Self-Efficacy Scale (HIV-ASES)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mallory O. Johnson; Torsten B. Neilands; Samantha E. Dilworth; Stephen F. Morin; Robert H. Remien; Margaret A. Chesney

    2007-01-01

    Adherence to HIV treatment, including adherence to antiretroviral (ART) medication regimens, is paramount in the management\\u000a of HIV. Self-efficacy for treatment adherence has been identified as an important correlate of medication adherence in the\\u000a treatment of HIV and other medical conditions. This paper describes the validation of the HIV Treatment Adherence Self-Efficacy\\u000a Scale (HIV-ASES) with two samples of HIV+ adults

  2. [Morse Fall Scale: translation and transcultural adaptation for the Portuguese language].

    PubMed

    de Urbanetto, Janete Souza; Creutzberg, Marion; Franz, Flávia; Ojeda, Beatriz Sebben; da Gustavo, Andreia Silva; Bittencourt, Hélio Radke; Steinmetz, Quézia Lidiane; Farina, Veronica Alacarini

    2013-06-01

    The study aimed to translate and adapt the Morse Fall Scale from English into the Portuguese language. This was performed in seven steps: authorization by the author of the scale; translation into Portuguese; evaluation and structuring of the translated scale; reverse translation into English; evaluation and validation of the scale by a committee of experts; evaluation of clarity of items and operational definitions with 45 professionals; evaluation of agreement between raters and the reliability of reproducibility, related to data from the evaluation of 90 patients, performed by four evaluators/judges. The clarity of the scale was considered very satisfactory, with a confidence interval of 73.0% to 100% in the option very clear. For the concordance of responses, the results showed Kappa coefficients of approximately 0.80 or higher. It was concluded that the adaptation of the scale was successful, indicating that its use is appropriate for the population of Brazilian patients. PMID:24601131

  3. Rasch Calibration of Physical Activity Self-Efficacy and Social Support Scale for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Miyoung; Peterson, Jana J.; Dixon, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the construct validity of the Self-Efficacy/Social Support for Activity for persons with Intellectual Disability (SE/SS-AID) scales developed by Peterson, Peterson, Lowe, & Nothwehr (2009). A total of 146 participants with intellectual disabilities completed 6 self-efficacy (SE) items and 18 social…

  4. Development and evaluation of the Marijuana Reduction Strategies Self-Efficacy Scale.

    PubMed

    Davis, Alan K; Osborn, Lawrence A; Leith, Jaclyn; Rosenberg, Harold; Ashrafioun, Lisham; Hawley, Anna; Bannon, Erin E; Jesse, Samantha; Kraus, Shane; Kryszak, Elizabeth; Cross, Nicole; Carhart, Victoria; Baik, Kyoung-deok

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate several psychometric properties of a questionnaire designed to assess college students' self-efficacy to employ 21 cognitive-behavioral strategies intended to reduce the amount and/or frequency with which they consume marijuana, we recruited 273 marijuana-using students to rate their confidence that they could employ each of the strategies. Examination of frequency counts for each item, principal components analysis, internal consistency reliability, and mean interitem correlation supported retaining all 21 items in a single scale. In support of criterion validity, marijuana use-reduction self-efficacy scores were significantly positively correlated with cross-situational confidence to abstain from marijuana, and significantly negatively correlated with quantity and frequency of marijuana use and marijuana-related problems. In addition, compared with respondents whose use of marijuana either increased or remained stable, self-efficacy was significantly higher among those who had decreased their use of marijuana over the past year. This relatively short and easily administered questionnaire could be used to identify college students who have low self-efficacy to employ specific marijuana reduction strategies and as an outcome measure to evaluate educational and skill-training interventions. PMID:24955675

  5. RCAH192-03 The Anthropology of Music Fall 2012 Professor Chris Scales

    E-print Network

    Liu, Taosheng

    1 RCAH192-03 The Anthropology of Music Fall 2012 Professor Chris Scales W 12:40 ­ 2:30 pm C320J. #12;2 Angel Online: A collection of course readings will be available on the Angel site for the class. There will also be a number of recorded musical examples that will be posted to the Angel site, and, if requested

  6. A Psychometric Evaluation of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale with Korean Students: A Rasch Model Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nam, Suk Kyung; Yang, Eunjoo; Lee, Sang Min; Lee, Sang Hee; Seol, Hyunsoo

    2011-01-01

    The Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale (CDSE) is one of the most frequently used in the field of career development and counseling. In this study, using the Rasch rating scale model analysis, the CDSE Scale was evaluated by the content, structural, and substantive aspects of validity in a sample of college students from South Korea. Overall, the…

  7. Interrater reliability and clinical efficacy of Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale in an outpatient setting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Guldeniz Yucelen; Ayse Rodopman-Arman; Volkan Topcuoglu; M. Yanki Yazgan; Guler Fisek

    2006-01-01

    ObjectiveTo evaluate the interrater reliability of the Turkish version of the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS) and to measure the clinical efficacy using a linician-rated impression scale in a clinical outpatient setting.

  8. Development and initial validation of the Multicultural Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale--Racial Diversity Form.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Hung-Bin; Lent, Robert W

    2007-03-01

    Drawing upon social-cognitive theory and the multicultural counseling competency literature, the Multicultural Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale-Racial Diversity Form (MCSE-RD) was developed to assess perceived ability to counsel racially diverse clients. Data were collected from 181 graduate students in counseling-related programs, 41 undergraduate psychology students, and 22 graduate students enrolled in a prepracticum course. Results of an exploratory factor analysis retained 37 items and identified three underlying factors: Multicultural Intervention, Multicultural Assessment, and Multicultural Session Management. MCSE-RD subscale and total scores produced adequate internal consistency and test-retest reliability estimates. Initial validity findings indicated theory-consistent relations of MCSE-RD scores with general counseling self-efficacy, multicultural counseling competency, social desirability, therapist demographics, and educational/training variables. Participation in prepracticum was associated with positive change in MCSE-RD scores. Implications for training and future research are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:22122166

  9. Reliability of a scale of work-related self-efficacy for people with psychiatric disabilities.

    PubMed

    Harris, Meredith; Gladman, Beverley; Hennessy, Nicole; Lloyd, Chris; Mowry, Bryan; Waghorn, Geoffrey

    2010-06-01

    Work-related self-efficacy at a core task level fits with the social cognitive career theory explaining the career development of people with severe mental illness. The aim of this study was to further investigate the psychometric properties of the 'Work-related Self-Efficacy Scale' for use with people with psychiatric disabilities. Sixty individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder participated in repeated telephone interviews conducted 2-5 days apart. Short-cycle test-retest reliability and internal structure were assessed. Face validity, consumer and clinician acceptability and utility were examined qualitatively. Short-cycle test-retest reliability was found to be very good at item and total score levels. The internal structure was consistent with previous investigations. Although face validity, acceptability and utility were adequate, use of face-to-face interviews is preferred over telephone interviews. The construct validity evidence supports wider use for research purposes in community mental health service, supported employment and other psychiatric rehabilitation settings. PMID:19561512

  10. Measuring Self-Efficacy: Multi-Trait Multi-Method Comparison of Scaling Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bong, Mimi; Hocevar, Dennis

    Convergent and discriminant validity of various self-efficacy measures was examined across two studies. In Study 1, U.S. high school students (n=358) rated their self-efficacy in 6 school subjects with reference to specific problems or general self-efficacy statements on the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) (P. Pintrich and…

  11. A Psychometric Evaluation of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form among French University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudron, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the reliability and the factor structure of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (CDSES-SF) among French university students. Based on a sample of 650 respondents, the alpha coefficients indicated high reliability for total scores but not for the subscale scores with values of 0.70 and…

  12. The Dimensionality of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form among Chinese Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Leili; Ye, Shengquan; Watkins, David

    2012-01-01

    The factorial structure of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (CDSES-SF) was examined in a sample of 796 Chinese graduate students recruited from five universities in Beijing. A single-factor model is recommended on the basis of two of this study's findings. First, confirmatory factor analyses revealed that the parsimonious…

  13. Self-Efficacy for Managing Work-Family Conflict: Validating the English Language Version of a Hebrew Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennessy, Kelly D.; Lent, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    The Self-Efficacy for Work-Family Conflict Management Scale (SE-WFC), developed in Israel, was designed to assess beliefs regarding one's ability to manage conflict between work and family roles. This study examined the factor structure, reliability, and validity of an English language version of the SE-WFC in a sample of 159 working mothers in…

  14. The Iranian Version of the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES): Factor Structure, Internal Consistency and Construct Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noroozi, Azita; Ghofranipour, Fazlollah; Heydarnia, Ali Reza; Nabipour, Iraj; Tahmasebi, Rahim; Tavafian, Sedighe Sadat

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The exercise self-efficacy scale (ESES) is largely used among diabetic patients to enhance exercise behaviour. However, the Iranian version of ESES was not available. The aim of this study was to validate ESES in this country. Method: Data were collected from 348 women who referred to a diabetes institute in Iran through convenience…

  15. The Teacher Sense of Efficacy Scale: Validation Evidence and Behavioral Prediction. WCER Working Paper No. 2006-7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heneman, Herbert G., III; Kimball, Steven; Milanowski, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    The present study contributes to knowledge of the construct validity of the short form of the Teacher Sense of Efficacy Scale (and by extension, given their similar content and psychometric properties, to the long form). The authors' research involves: (1) examining the psychometric properties of the TSES on a large sample of elementary, middle,…

  16. Efficacy of a Biomonitoring (Moss Bag) Technique for Determining Element Deposition Trends on a Mid-Range (375 Km) Scale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. M. Makholm; David J. Mladenoff

    2005-01-01

    National networks detect multi-state trends in element deposition using direct measurement methods. Biomonitoring techniques have been used to examine deposition in local areas and around point sources. We sought to determine the efficacy of a moss bag technique to detect element deposition trends on a mid-range (state) scale, and to compare these results with those of the National Acid Deposition

  17. Promoting Leisure Physical Activity Participation among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Validation of Self-Efficacy and Social Support Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Jana J.; Peterson, N. Andrew; Lowe, John B.; Nothwehr, Faryle K.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Many individuals with intellectual disabilities are not sufficiently active for availing health benefits. Little is known about correlates of physical activity among this population on which to build health promotion interventions. Materials and Methods: We developed scales for measurement of self-efficacy and social support for…

  18. Elementary Student Self Efficacy Scale Development and Validation Focused on Student Learning, Peer Relations, and Resisting Drug Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fertman, Carl I.; Primack, Brian A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of a child self efficacy scale for learning, peer interactions, and resisting pressure to use drugs, to use in an elementary school drug prevention education program based on social cognitive theory. A diverse cohort of 392 4th and 5th grade students completed the 20-item…

  19. Effects of a multifactorial fall prevention program on balance, gait, and fear of falling in post-stroke inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Younuk; Lee, Kyeongbong; Shin, Seonhae; Lee, Wanhee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of a multifactorial fall prevention program on balance, gait, and fear of falling in stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-five stroke patients were divided randomly into multifactorial fall prevention program group (n=15) and control treadmill group (n=10). [Methods] All interventions were applied for 30?min, five times per week, for five weeks. The fall prevention program included interventions based on the “Step Up to Stop Falls” initiative and educational interventions based on the Department of Health guidelines. For those in the treadmill group, the speed was increased gradually. The Korean falls efficacy scale and Korean activities-specific balance confidence scale were used to assess fear of falling. To assess balance and walking ability, the Korean performance-oriented mobility assessment scale and the 10-m and 6-minute walk tests were used. [Results] The fall prevention program interventions were found to be very effective at improving gait, balance, and fear of falling compared with the treadmill intervention and therefore seem appropriate for stroke patients. [Conclusion] A multifactorial fall prevention program is effective at improving balance, gait ability, and fear of falling. It is a more specific and broad intervention for reducing falls among inpatients in facilities and hospitals. PMID:26180337

  20. From Efficacy Research to Large-Scale Impact on Undernutrition: The Role of Organizational Cultures12

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, David; Pelto, Gretel

    2013-01-01

    Undernutrition in low-income countries is receiving unprecedented attention at global and national levels due to the convergence of many forces, including strong evidence concerning its magnitude, consequences, and potential solutions and effective advocacy by many organizations. The translation of this attention into large-scale reductions in undernutrition at the country level requires the alignment and support of many organizations in the development and implementation of a coherent policy agenda for nutrition, including the strengthening of operational and strategic capacities and a supportive research agenda. However, many countries experience difficulties achieving such alignment. This article uses the concept of organizational culture to better understand some of the reasons for these difficulties. This concept is applied to the constellation of organizations that make up the “National Nutrition Network” in a given country and some of the individual organizations within that network, including academic institutions that conduct research on undernutrition. We illustrate this concept through a case study involving a middle-income country. We conclude that efforts to align organizations in support of coherent nutrition agendas should do the following: 1) make intentional and sustained efforts to foster common understanding, shared learning, and socialization of new members and other elements of a shared culture among partners; 2) seek a way to frame problems and solutions in a fashion that enables individual organizations to secure some of their particular interests by joining the effort; and 3) not only advocate on the importance of nutrition but also insist that high-level officials hold organizations accountable for aligning in support of common-interest solutions (through some elements of a common culture) that can be effective and appropriate in the national context. We further conclude that a culture change is needed within academic departments if the discipline of nutrition is to play a central role in translating the findings from efficacy trials into large-scale reductions in undernutrition. PMID:24228200

  1. Bicultural Self-Efficacy Among College Students: Initial Scale Development and Mental Health Correlates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. J. R. David; Sumie Okazaki; Anne Saw

    2009-01-01

    Theory and empirical research suggest that perceived self-efficacy, or one’s perceived ability to perform personally significant tasks, is related to individuals’ psychological well-being and mental health. Thus, the authors hypothesized that bicultural individuals’ perceived ability to function competently in 2 cultures, or perceived bicultural self-efficacy, would be related positively to their psychological well-being and mental health. Three studies were conducted

  2. Talent Development, Work Habits, and Career Exploration of Chinese Middle-School Adolescents: Development of the Career and Talent Development Self-Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuen, Mantak; Gysbers, Norman C.; Chan, Raymond M. C.; Lau, Patrick S. Y.; Shea, Peter M. K.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the development of an instrument--the "Career and Talent Development Self-Efficacy Scale (CTD-SES)"--for assessing students' self-efficacy in applying life skills essential for personal talent development, acquisition of positive work habits, and career exploration. In Study 1, data were obtained from a large sample of…

  3. Dynamics of Teacher Self-Efficacy: Middle School Reading and Language Arts Teacher Responses on a Teacher Sense of Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Kimberly Ann

    2010-01-01

    Efficacy is created early in a career and not easily influenced over time yet states and school districts loose tremendous amounts of money annually educating and training teachers who elect to leave the profession as a result of low self-efficacy. The purpose of this study was to examine the perceived levels of self-efficacy of middle school…

  4. Evaluating Treatment Efficacy in Commercial Food Facilities: Insights Gained from Small-Scale Simulated Warehouse Experiments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although critical to a successful IPM program, it is challenging to evaluate treatment efficacy in commercial food facilities because of the inability to obtain absolute estimates of insect population levels. These populations are spatially fragmented and occupy cryptic habitats, such as equipment,...

  5. Thompson: Fruits and Vegetables (FV) Norms Self-efficacy School Lunch Scales

    Cancer.gov

    FV Norms-self-efficacy – school lunch 1. My friends eat a serving of fruit at school lunch when I am with them. ?Never ?Sometimes ?Often ?Always 1. My friends eat a serving of cooked vegetables at school lunch when I am with them. ?Never

  6. Body-Efficacy Expectation: Assessment of Beliefs concerning Bodily Coping Capabilities with a Five-Item Scale

    PubMed Central

    Schützler, Lena; Witt, Claudia M.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Expectancies regarding a treatment play an important role in recovery as has been shown in placebo research. The role of expectations regarding the bodily capability to overcome illness is less investigated although in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) such capability is the target of interventions. We introduced a new construct, body-efficacy expectation, defined as the conviction that one's body is able to deal with health-threatening factors by itself, and developed and validated a scale for its measurement. Methods. The scale was developed following expert recommendations. Using online survey data from 1054 participants an exploratory factor analysis was conducted and psychometric properties of the scale were examined (item characteristics, reliability, and validity). Results. The exploratory factor analysis yielded a one-factor solution explaining 51.96% of total variance (Cronbach's ? = 0.77). One of the originally six items was removed due to poor item characteristics. Correlations with several validation measures were in line with the theoretical background of the construct. Most importantly, participants with better general health showed higher body-efficacy expectation than participants with poorer health status. Conclusions. Further studies confirming the factor structure and using clinical samples are recommended. Also, the relations with the appraisal of CAM and CAM use warrant further research. PMID:24312132

  7. Large-scale spatial variability of riverbed temperature gradients in Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning areas

    SciTech Connect

    Hanrahan, Timothy P.

    2007-02-01

    In the Snake River basin of the Pacific northwestern United States, hydroelectric dam operations are often based on the predicted emergence timing of salmon fry from the riverbed. The spatial variability and complexity of surface water and riverbed temperature gradients results in emergence timing predictions that are likely to have large errors. The objectives of this study were to quantify the thermal heterogeneity between the river and riverbed in fall Chinook salmon spawning areas and to determine the effects of thermal heterogeneity on fall Chinook salmon emergence timing. This study quantified river and riverbed temperatures at 15 fall Chinook salmon spawning sites distributed in two reaches throughout 160 km of the Snake River in Hells Canyon, Idaho, USA, during three different water years. Temperatures were measured during the fall Chinook salmon incubation period with self-contained data loggers placed in the river and at three different depths below the riverbed surface. At all sites temperature increased with depth into the riverbed, including significant differences (p<0.05) in mean water temperature of up to 3.8°C between the river and the riverbed among all the sites. During each of the three water years studied, river and riverbed temperatures varied significantly among all the study sites, among the study sites within each reach, and between sites located in the two reaches. Considerable variability in riverbed temperatures among the sites resulted in fall Chinook salmon emergence timing estimates that varied by as much as 55 days, depending on the source of temperature data used for the estimate. Monitoring of riverbed temperature gradients at a range of spatial scales throughout the Snake River would provide better information for managing hydroelectric dam operations, and would aid in the design and interpretation of future empirical research into the ecological significance of physical riverine processes.

  8. Multicultural counseling self-efficacy scale-racial diversity form: factor structure and test of a social cognitive model.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Hung-Bin; Rigali-Oiler, Marybeth; Lent, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to gather evidence on the factor structure and concurrent criterion validity of the multicultural counseling self-efficacy scale-racial diversity form (MCSE-RD; Sheu & Lent, 2007). The MCSE-RD was designed to assess therapists' perceived capabilities in performing culturally relevant in-session behaviors in cross-racial counseling. Participants were 209 students in counseling-related graduate programs in the USA. Confirmatory factor analyses identified a bifactor structure in which responses to MCSE-RD items could be explained by one generic and three multicultural-specific counseling self-efficacy factors. Support was also found for a social cognitive model in which self-efficacy and interests in multicultural counseling mediated the effects of prior cross-racial client contacts and perceptions of multicultural training environments on intent to perform multicultural counseling in the future. Additionally, outcome expectations were predictive of multicultural counseling interests and choice goals. Implications for multicultural training and directions for future research are highlighted. PMID:22574664

  9. Psychometric Validation of the Self-Efficacy for Restricting Dietary Salt in Hemodialysis Scale

    PubMed Central

    Clark-Cutaia, Maya N.; Ren, Dianxu; Hoffman, Leslie A.; Snetselaar, Linda; Sevick, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    The development and progression of left ventricular hypertrophy is a consequence of multiple comorbid conditions associated with end-stage renal disease and large variations in interdialytic weight gains. The literature suggests that dietary sodium restriction alone significantly reduces interdialytic weight gains. A total of 124 hemodialysis participants in an ongoing randomized control trial participated in the validation in which psychometric properties of a self-efficacy survey were a secondary analysis. We evaluated the internal consistency, construct validity, and convergent validity of the instrument. The overall Cronbach ? was 0.93. Three factors extracted explain 67.8% of the variance of the white and African American participants. The Self-Efficacy Survey has adequate internal consistency and construct and convergent validity. Future research is needed to evaluate the stability and discriminant validity of the instrument.

  10. Risk factors related to falling in stroke patients: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kihun; Yu, Jaeho; Rhee, Hyeonsook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate a comprehensive understanding of the factors associated with falls in poststroke patients. [Subjects] Forty-eight stroke patients (22 males and 26 females; age 63.79?years) participated in this study. [Methods] This study applied a cross-sectional design. Fear of falling [Falls Efficacy Scale (FES)], balance function [Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and Modified Rivermead Mobility Index (MRMI)], ADL performance level [Modified Barthel Index (MBI)] and cognitive function [Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment for Geriatric Populations (LOTCA-G)] were assessed. [Results] Falls efficacy was moderately correlated with ADL performance, balance, and cognition. In addition, stepwise linear regression analysis revealed that ADL performance was the explanatory variable closely associated with falls efficacy in stroke patients. [Conclusion] ADL performance was the primary explanatory variable of falls efficacy according to regression analysis. Thus, we suggest that these results may be used as basic data for developing rehabilitation programs for prevention of falls in stroke patients.

  11. Adaptation and Psychometric Properties of the Self-Efficacy/Social Support for Activity for Persons with Intellectual Disability Scale (SE/SS-AID) in a Spanish Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio Ignacio; Paz-Lourido, Berta; Lee, Miyoung; Peterson-Besse, Jana J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In this study we aimed to develop a Spanish version of the Self-Efficacy/Social Support Scales for Activity for persons with Intellectual Disability (SE/SS-AID). Method: A cross-sectional study was carried out in a sample of 117 individuals with intellectual disability (ID). The SE/SS-AID scales were translated into Spanish and their…

  12. Talent development, work habits, and career exploration of Chinese middle?school adolescents: development of the Career and Talent Development Self?Efficacy Scale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mantak Yuen; Norman C. Gysbers; Raymond M. C. Chan; Patrick S. Y. Lau; Peter M. K. Shea

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the development of an instrument – the Career and Talent Development Self?Efficacy Scale (CTD?SES) – for assessing students’ self?efficacy in applying life skills essential for personal talent development, acquisition of positive work habits, and career exploration. In Study 1, data were obtained from a large sample of Chinese middle?school students (N=15,113) in Grades 7–9 in Hong Kong.

  13. Racer efficacy study, Fall 2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research in 2007 demonstrated the effectiveness of Racer (ammonium nonanoate) for burn-down control of several weed species. Racer has been labeled by EPA in the past year for burn-down weed control in food crops and is close to receiving approval for use by organic producers. The objective of thi...

  14. Inpatient Falls

    PubMed Central

    Cumbler, Ethan U.; Simpson, Jennifer R.; Rosenthal, Laura D.; Likosky, David J.

    2013-01-01

    In this 2 part series, analysis of the risk stratification tools that are available, definition for the scope of the problem, and potential solutions through a review of the literature are presented. A systematic review was used to identify articles for risk stratification and interventions. Three risk stratification systems are discussed, St Thomas’s Risk Assessment Tool in Falling Elderly Inpatients, Morse Fall Scale, and the Hendrich Fall Risk Model. Of these scoring systems, the Hendrich Fall Risk Model is the easiest to use and score. Predominantly, multifactorial interventions are used to prevent patient falls. Education and rehabilitation are common themes in studies with statistically significant results. The second article presents a guide to implementing a quality improvement project around hospital falls. A 10-step approach to Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycles is described. Specific examples of problems and analysis are easily applicable to any institution. Furthermore, the sustainability of interventions and targeting new areas for improvement is discussed. Although specific to falls in the hospitalized patient, the goal is to present a stepwise approach which is broadly applicable to other areas requiring quality improvement. PMID:24167647

  15. The first large-scale clinical trial to demonstrate the efficacy of mammography was Health Insurance Plan (HIP) in New York,17

    E-print Network

    The first large-scale clinical trial to demonstrate the efficacy of mammography was Health disease.24 After an initial period of controversy, mammography gained general acceptance.23­29 Some doubts that mammography does not save lives: instead, it exposes women to unnecessary diagnostic and surgical procedures

  16. Validity and Reliability Study of the Self-Efficacy Scale in Rendering Piano Education to Children of 6-12 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekinci, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to develop a valid and reliable scale that can be used in measuring self-efficacy of candidate music teachers in rendering piano education to children of 6-12 years. To this end, a pool of 51 items was created by using the literature, and taking the opinions of piano professors and piano instructors working with…

  17. Self-efficacy is independently associated with brain volume in older women

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Jennifer C.; Nagamatsu, Lindsay S.; Hsu, Chun Liang; Beattie, B. Lynn; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Background Aging is highly associated with neurodegeneration and atrophy of the brain. Evidence suggests that personality variables are risk factors for reduced brain volume. We examine whether falls-related self-efficacy is independently associated with brain volume. Method A cross-sectional analysis of whether falls-related self-efficacy is independently associated with brain volumes (total, grey, and white matter). Three multivariate regression models were constructed. Covariates included in the models were age, global cognition, systolic blood pressure, functional comorbidity index, and current physical activity level. MRI scans were acquired from 79 community-dwelling senior women aged 65 to 75 years old. Falls-related self-efficacy was assessed by the Activities Specific Balance Confidence (ABC) Scale. Results After accounting for covariates, falls-related self-efficacy was independently associated with both total brain volume and total grey matter volume. The final model for total brain volume accounted for 17% of the variance, with the ABC score accounting for 8%. For total grey matter volume, the final model accounted for 24% of the variance, with the ABC score accounting for 10%. Conclusion We provide novel evidence that falls-related self-efficacy, a modifiable risk factor for healthy aging, is positively associated with total brain volume and total grey matter volume. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00426881. PMID:22436405

  18. Functional Restriction for the Fear of Falling In Family Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jing; Hu, Fangke; Liu, Fucun; Tong, Peijian

    2015-07-01

    Hip fractures often result from falls, and most family caregivers fear another fall. This study aimed to assess this fear in family caregivers and analyze its influence on functional recovery.This study was retrospectively performed by interview at the clinic or through telephone contact. The Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I) was used to assess fall-related feelings of patients and their family caregivers.Of the 539 patients studied, hip fracture was caused by a fall in 467 (86.6%). The mean FES-I value of the family caregivers was significantly lower than that of the patients (85.39 versus 99.02, P?fall and recurrent fall-related fractures both reduced caregiver FES-I scores. The difference between patient and caregiver FES-I scores showed a significant positive correlation with the FRS (P?falls than were patients. Furthermore, a greater difference in the fall-related reaction between caregivers and patients was associated with greater adverse effects on rehabilitation. PMID:26166092

  19. The short version of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale: Its validity, reliability, and relationship to balance impairment and falls in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Schepens, Stacey; Goldberg, Allon; Wallace, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    A shortened version of the ABC 16-item scale (ABC-16), the ABC-6, has been proposed as an alternative balance confidence measure. We investigated whether the ABC-6 is a valid and reliable measure of balance confidence and examined its relationship to balance impairment and falls in older adults. Thirty-five community-dwelling older adults completed the ABC-16, including the six questions of the ABC-6. They also completed the following clinical balance tests: unipedal stance time (UST), functional reach (FR), Timed Up and Go (TUG), and maximum step length (MSL). Participants reported twelve-month falls history. Balance confidence on the ABC-6 was significantly lower than on the ABC-16, however scores were highly correlated. Fallers reported lower balance confidence than non-fallers as measured by the ABC-6 scale, but confidence did not differ between the groups with the ABC-16. The ABC-6 significantly correlated with all balance tests assessed and number of falls. The ABC-16 significantly correlated with all balance tests assessed, but not with number of falls. Test-retest reliability for the ABC-16 and ABC-6 was good to excellent. The ABC-6 is a valid and reliable measure of balance confidence in community-dwelling older adults, and shows stronger relationships to falls than does the ABC-16. The ABC-6 may be a more useful balance confidence assessment tool than the ABC-16. PMID:19615762

  20. Efficacy of a biomonitoring (moss bag) technique for determining element deposition trends on a mid-range (375 km) scale.

    PubMed

    Makholm, M M; Mladenoff, David J

    2005-05-01

    National networks detect multi-state trends in element deposition using direct measurement methods. Biomonitoring techniques have been used to examine deposition in local areas and around point sources. We sought to determine the efficacy of a moss bag technique to detect element deposition trends on a mid-range (state) scale, and to compare these results with those of the National Acid Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN, 1999). We sampled heavy metals, sulfur, and nitrogen deposition (21 elements) using mesh bags containing Sphagnum russowii at nine sites, over a 375 km transect crossing southern Wisconsin (upper Midwest, USA). We found statistically significant trends of decreasing deposition in a northwesterly direction for 13 elements: Al, B, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, S, and Zn. Six of these have moderate to large changes in concentration (14-37%). The trends for Ca, Mg, and S are consistent with regional deposition patterns in 1998 isopleth maps from the NADP/NTN (1999) which are derived from a sampling array far less dense than the transect sites. This national network indicates that Ca and Mg increase to the southeast, beyond Wisconsin borders. The fact that the present study demonstrates strong correlations between both of these elements (Ca and Mg) and Al, B, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Zn (mean r for all correlations = 0.75, p < 0.02) implies that these correlated elements also increase to the southeast in neighboring states. PMID:15931974

  1. Methylphenidate Efficacy: Immediate versus Extended Release at Short Term in Mexican Children with ADHD Assessed by Conners Scale and EEG.

    PubMed

    Durand-Rivera, Alfredo; Alatorre-Miguel, Efren; Zambrano-Sánchez, Elizabeth; Reyes-Legorreta, Celia

    2015-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affects 5-6% of school aged children worldwide. Pharmacological therapy is considered the first-line treatment and methylphenidate (MPH) is considered the first-choice medication. There are two formulations: immediate release (IR) MPH and long-acting (or extended release) formulation (MPH-ER). In this work, we measure the efficacy of treatment for both presentations in one month with Conners' scales and electroencephalography (EEG). Results. for IR group, in parents and teachers Conners test, all items showed significant differences, towards improvement, except for teachers in perfectionism and emotional instability. For ER group in parent's Conners test, the items in which there were no significant differences are psychosomatic and emotional instability. For teachers, there were no significant differences in: hyperactivity and perfectionism. Comparing the Conners questionnaires (parents versus teachers) we find significant differences before and after treatment in hyperactivity, perfectionism, psychosomatics, DSM-IV hyperactive-impulsive, and DSM-IV total. In the EEG the Wilcoxon test showed a significant difference (P < 0.0001). As we can see, both presentations are suitable for managing the ADHD and have the same effect on the symptomatology and in the EEG. PMID:25838946

  2. A Pilot Study of an Intervention Designed to Promote Walking, Balance, and Self-Efficacy in Older Adults with Fear of Falling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dattilo, John; Martire, Lynn; Gottschall, Jinger; Weybright, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to provide interventions that are of interest to older adults who are not inclined to participate in conventional exercise programs and that can improve balance and fear of falling. One purpose of this pilot study was to assess feasibility and acceptability of an eight-week (3x/wk, 90-minute sessions) multifaceted, small group,…

  3. Evaluation of the psychometric properties of self-efficacy and adherence scales for caregivers of patients with a left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Casida, Jesus; Wu, Horng-Shiuann; Harden, Janet; Carie, Austen; Chern, Joy

    2015-06-01

    Context-No published instrument has been designed to measure caregivers' self-efficacy for and adherence to the complex home-care regimen of patients with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Objective-To evaluate the psychometric properties of 2 newly developed instruments: the LVAD Caregiver Self-Efficacy Scale (LCSS) and the LVAD Caregiver Home Management Adherence Scale (LCAS). Methods-A multistage design was employed for this instrumentation study. Of the 125 LVAD caregivers recruited from online support groups, 98 (78.4%) provided complete data. Participants were predominantly female (80%), aged 18 to 79 years, from 4 regions of the United States. They completed the following instruments: LCSS, LCAS, General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE), and the confidence and maintenance subscales of the Caregiver Contribution to Self-Care of Heart Failure Index (CC-SCHFI). Item analyses, factorial construct validity, convergent validity, and internal consistency reliability of the scales were evaluated. Results-The analysis of the LCSS (21 items) revealed a 2-factor solution, which consisted of a 17-item routine factor and a 4-item anticipatory factor. Convergent validity of the LCSS was supported by moderate correlations among LCSS, GSE, and CC-SCHFI-confidence. The analysis of LCAS (17 items) revealed a 1-factor solution. Its convergent validity was supported by moderate correlation between LCAS and CC-SCHFI-maintenance. Internal consistency reliability coefficients of the LCSS and LCAS were ? = 0.93 and ? = 0.96, respectively. These data suggest that the 2 instruments are adequately valid and reliable measures of self-efficacy and adherence in the context of LVAD patient care managed by home caregivers. Further research is needed to support the applicability of these instruments in other research and practice settings. PMID:26107271

  4. The Relationship Between Balance Measured With a Modified Bathroom Scale and Falls and Disability in Older Adults: A 6-Month Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background There are indications that older adults who suffer from poor balance have an increased risk for adverse health outcomes, such as falls and disability. Monitoring the development of balance over time enables early detection of balance decline, which can identify older adults who could benefit from interventions aimed at prevention of these adverse outcomes. An innovative and easy-to-use device that can be used by older adults for home-based monitoring of balance is a modified bathroom scale. Objective The objective of this paper is to study the relationship between balance scores obtained with a modified bathroom scale and falls and disability in a sample of older adults. Methods For this 6-month follow-up study, participants were recruited via physiotherapists working in a nursing home, geriatricians, exercise classes, and at an event about health for older adults. Inclusion criteria were being aged 65 years or older, being able to stand on a bathroom scale independently, and able to provide informed consent. A total of 41 nursing home patients and 139 community-dwelling older adults stepped onto the modified bathroom scale three consecutive times at baseline to measure their balance. Their mean balance scores on a scale from 0 to 16 were calculated—higher scores indicated better balance. Questionnaires were used to study falls and disability at baseline and after 6 months of follow-up. The cross-sectional relationship between balance and falls and disability at baseline was studied using t tests and Spearman rank correlations. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to study the relationship between balance measured at baseline and falls and disability development after 6 months of follow-up. Results A total of 128 participants with complete datasets—25.8% (33/128) male—and a mean age of 75.33 years (SD 6.26) were included in the analyses of this study. Balance scores of participants who reported at baseline that they had fallen at least once in the past 6 months were lower compared to nonfallers—8.9 and 11.2, respectively (P<.001). The correlation between mean balance score and disability sum-score at baseline was -.51 (P<.001). No significant associations were found between balance at baseline and falls after 6 months of follow-up. Baseline balance scores were significantly associated with the development of disability after 6 months of follow-up in the univariate analysis—odds ratio (OR) 0.86 (95% CI 0.76-0.98)—but not in the multivariate analysis when correcting for age, gender, baseline disability, and falls at follow-up—OR 0.94 (95% CI 0.79-1.11). Conclusions There is a cross-sectional relationship between balance measured by a modified bathroom scale and falls and disability in older adults. Despite this cross-sectional relationship, longitudinal data showed that balance scores have no predictive value for falls and might only have limited predictive value for disability development after 6 months of follow-up. PMID:26018423

  5. Efficacy of Cry1Ac:Cry1F proteins in cotton leaf tissue against fall armyworm, beet armyworm, and soybean looper (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Tindall, K V; Siebert, M Willrich; Leonard, B R; All, J; Haile, F J

    2009-08-01

    Cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., plants expressing Cry1Ac and Cry1F insecticidal crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bt) were evaluated against selected lepidopteran pests including fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner), and soybean looper, Pseudoplusia includens (Walker). Studies were conducted in a range of environments, challenging various cotton tissue types from several varieties containing a combination of Cry1Ac and Cry1F proteins. In fresh tissue bioassays of mature leaves and squares (flower buds) and in artificial field infestations of white flowers, plants containing Cry1Ac:Cry1F significantly reduced levels of damage (leaf defoliation, bract feeding, penetrated squares and bolls, and boll abscission) and induced significantly greater mortality (90-100%) of fall armyworm compared with that on non-Bt cotton plants. Plants containing Cry1Ac:Cry1F conferred high levels (100%) of soybean looper mortality and low levels (0.2%) of leaf defoliation compared with non-Bt cotton. Beet armyworm was relatively less sensitive to Cry1Ac:Cry1F cotton plants compared with fall armyworm and soybean looper. However, beet armyworm larval development was delayed 21 d after infestation (DAI), and ingestion of plant tissue was inhibited (14 and 21 DAI) on the Cry1Ac:Cry1F plants compared with that on non-Bt cotton plants. These results show Cry1Ac:Cry1F cotton varieties can be an effective component in a management program for these lepidopteran pest species. Differential susceptibility of fall armyworm, beet armyworm, and soybean looper larvae to Cry1Ac:Cry1F cotton reinforces the need to sample during plant development and respond with a foliar insecticide if local action thresholds are exceeded. PMID:19736762

  6. Development and initial evaluation of the psychometric properties of self-efficacy and adherence scales for patients with a left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Casida, Jesus; Wu, Horng-Shiuann; Harden, Janet; Chern, Joy; Carie, Austen

    2015-06-01

    Context-No tools exist to measure patients' self-efficacy for and adherence to the complex home-care regimen after having a left ventricular device (LVAD) implanted. Objective-To develop 2 new instruments, the LVAD Patient Self-Efficacy Scale (LPSES) and the LVAD Patient Home Management Adherence Scale (LPHMAS), and evaluate their psychometric properties. Methods-This multistage instrumentation study recruited 102 patients (77.5% men and 22.5% women) aged 20 to 82 years, predominantly from the Midwest (34.3%) and the Northeast (26.5%) regions of the United States. Main indications for LVAD were bridge-to-transplant (69.6%) and destination therapy (21.6%), with mean implant duration of 19.9 (SD, 15.5) months. Study participants completed the following instruments: LPSES, LPHMAS, General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES), Medical Outcomes Study General Adherence (MOSGA), and Self-Care Heart Failure Index (SCHFI) confidence and maintenance subscales. Item analyses, psychometric properties including factorial and convergent validities, and internal consistency reliability were tested. Results-Factor analyses showed that the variances for the 20-item LPSES and 9-item LPHMAS were 60.2% and 53.6%, respectively. Convergent validity of the newly developed instruments was supported by the following correlations: LPSES and GSES (r = 0.34); LPSES and SCHFI-confidence (r = 0.60); LPHMAS and MOSGA (r = 0.33); LPHMAS and SCHFI-maintenance (r = 0.40). Internal consistency reliability coefficients were 0.94 (LPSES) and 0.84 (LPHMAS). Based on these data, the LPSES and LPHMAS are valid and reliable measures of self-efficacy and adherence specific for LVAD patients. Confirmatory testing is needed to further support the validity of these instruments for use in research and clinical practice. PMID:26107270

  7. How Do Things Fall?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Xochitl Zamora-Thompson

    2004-01-01

    Learners engage in close observation of falling objects. They determine it is the amount of air resistance, not the weight of an object, which determines how quickly an object falls. This demonstration and activity can be combined with other activities to create a larger lesson. Resource contains vocabulary definitions and suggestions for assessment, extensions, and scaling for different levels of learners.

  8. Recurrent Falls in People with Parkinson's Disease without Cognitive Impairment: Focusing on Modifiable Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Lorena R. S.; Valença, Guilherme T.; Negreiros, Nádja N.; Pinto, Elen B.

    2014-01-01

    Falls can be considered a disabling feature in Parkinson's disease. We aimed to identify risk factors for falling, testing simultaneously the ability of disease-specific and balance-related measures. We evaluated 171 patients, collecting demographic and clinical data, including standardized assessments with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), activities of daily living (ADL) and motor sections, modified Hoehn and Yahr Scale, Schwab and England, eight-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire, Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I), Berg Balance Scale, Dynamic Gait Index, Functional Reach, and Timed Up and Go. ROC curves were constructed to determine the cutoff scores for all measures. Variables with P < 0.1 entered a logistic regression model. The prevalence of recurrent falls was 30% (95% CI 24%–38%). In multivariate analysis, independent risk factors for recurrent falls were (P < 0.05) levodopa equivalent dose (OR = 1.283 per 100?mg increase; 95% CI = 1.092–1.507), UPDRS-ADL > 16 points (OR = 10.0; 95% CI = 3.6–28.3), FES-I > 30 points (OR = 6.0; 95% CI = 1.6–22.6), and Berg ? 48 points (OR = 3.9; 95% CI = 1.2–12.7).We encourage the utilization of these modifiable risk factors in the screening of fall risk. PMID:25506466

  9. The REFORM study protocol: a cohort randomised controlled trial of a multifaceted podiatry intervention for the prevention of falls in older people

    PubMed Central

    Cockayne, Sarah; Adamson, Joy; Corbacho Martin, Belen; Fairhurst, Caroline; Hewitt, Catherine; Hicks, Kate; Hull, Robin; Keenan, Anne Maree; Lamb, Sarah E; Loughrey, Lorraine; McIntosh, Caroline; Menz, Hylton B; Redmond, Anthony C; Rodgers, Sara; Vernon, Wesley; Watson, Judith; Torgerson, David

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Falls and fall-related injuries are a serious cause of morbidity and cost to society. Foot problems and inappropriate footwear may increase the risk of falls; therefore podiatric interventions may play a role in reducing falls. Two Cochrane systematic reviews identified only one study of a podiatry intervention aimed to reduce falls, which was undertaken in Australia. The REFORM trial aims to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a multifaceted podiatry intervention in reducing falls in people aged 65?years and over in a UK and Irish setting. Methods and analysis This multicentre, cohort randomised controlled trial will recruit 2600 participants from routine podiatry clinics in the UK and Ireland to the REFORM cohort. In order to detect a 10% point reduction in falls from 50% to 40%, with 80% power 890 participants will be randomised to receive routine podiatry care and a falls prevention leaflet or routine podiatry care, a falls prevention leaflet and a multifaceted podiatry intervention. The primary outcome is rate of falls (falls/person/time) over 12?months assessed by patient self-report falls diary. Secondary self-report outcome measures include: the proportion of single and multiple fallers and time to first fall over a 12-month period; Short Falls Efficacy Scale—International; fear of falling in the past 4?weeks; Frenchay Activities Index; fracture rate; Geriatric Depression Scale; EuroQoL-five dimensional scale 3-L; health service utilisation at 6 and 12?months. A qualitative study will examine the acceptability of the package of care to participants and podiatrists. Ethics and dissemination The trial has received a favourable opinion from the East of England—Cambridge East Research Ethics Committee and Galway Research Ethics Committee. The trial results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and at conference presentations. Trial registration number Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN68240461assigned 01/07/2011. PMID:25518875

  10. Autogenic attainment of large-scale alluvial grade with steady sea-level fall: An analog tank-flume experiment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tetsuji Muto; John B. Swenson

    2006-01-01

    A graded river conveys its sediment load without net deposition or erosion. The graded state is thought to represent the long-term response of alluvial rivers to steady external forcing. We show here that alluvial rivers building deltas can be in grade as an autogenic response to steady sea-level fall. Consider an antecedent graded river profile, the upstream end of which

  11. HumanWildlife Interactions 5(2):198203, Fall 2011 Wildlife risk to aviation: a multi-scale

    E-print Network

    Human­Wildlife Interactions 5(2):198­203, Fall 2011 Commentary Wildlife risk to aviation: a multi concerns to the aviation industry worldwide. Recent events such as the ditching of US Airways Flight 1549). However, wildlife biologists and aviation personnel have been aware of these issues for decades (Solman

  12. Teacher efficacy: A construct validation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sherri Gibson; Myron H. Dembo

    1984-01-01

    Developed an instrument to measure teacher efficacy and examined the relationship between teacher efficacy and observable teacher behaviors. Factor analysis of responses from 208 elementary school teachers to a 30-item Teacher Efficacy Scale yielded 2 substantial factors that corresponded to A. Bandura's 2-factor theoretical model of self-efficacy. A multitrait–multimethod analysis that supported both convergent and discriminant validity analyzed data from

  13. Sensitivity of the individual items of the Hamilton depression rating scale to response and its consequences for the assessment of efficacy.

    PubMed

    Santen, Gijs; Gomeni, Roberto; Danhof, Meindert; Della Pasqua, Oscar

    2008-10-01

    The Hamilton depression rating scale (HAM-D(17)) has been the gold standard in depression trials since its introduction in 1960 by Max Hamilton. However, several authors have shown that the HAM-D(17) is multi-dimensional and that subscales of the HAM-D(17) outperform the total scale. In the current study, we assess the sensitivity of the individual HAM-D(17) items in differentiating responders from non-responders over the typical treatment period used in clinical efficacy trials. Based on data from randomised, placebo-controlled trials with paroxetine, a graphical analysis and a statistical analysis were performed to identify the items that are most sensitive to the rate and extent of response irrespective of treatment. From these analyses, two subscales consisting of seven items each were derived and compared to the Bech and Maier and Philip subscales using a linear mixed-effects modelling approach for repeated measures. The evaluation of two clinical trials revealed endpoint sensitivity comparable to the existing subscales. Using a bootstrap technique, we show that the subscales consistently yield higher statistical power compared to the HAM-D(17), although no subscale consistently outperforms the others. In conclusion, this study provides further evidence that not all items of the HAM-D(17) scale are equally sensitive to detect responding patients in a clinical trial. A HAM-D(7) subscale with higher sensitivity to drug effect is proposed consisting of the HAM-D(6) and the suicide item. This response-based subscale increases signal-to-noise ratio and could reduce failure rate in efficacy trials with antidepressant drugs. PMID:18206909

  14. Efficacy of Guanfacine Extended Release Assessed During the Morning, Afternoon, and Evening Using a Modified Conners' Parent Rating Scale–Revised: Short Form

    PubMed Central

    Rugino, Thomas; Dammerman, Ryan; Lyne, Andrew; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of once-daily guanfacine extended release (GXR) monotherapy administered either in the morning or evening, using a modified Conners' Parent Rating Scale–Revised: Short Form (CPRS–R:S) assessed three times/day in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods: This multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled study randomized children 6–12 years of age with ADHD into three groups: GXR a.m. (GXR in the morning and placebo in the evening), GXR p.m. (placebo in the morning and GXR in the evening), or twice-daily placebo. The CPRS–R:S, administered in the morning, afternoon, and evening prior to each study visit, was a secondary measure of efficacy. Results: A total of 333 subjects were included in the analysis population (GXR a.m., n=107; GXR p.m., n=114; placebo, n=112). At visit 10, last observation carried forward (LOCF), subjects receiving GXR demonstrated significantly greater improvement from baseline in the daily mean CPRS–R:S total score, as well as in each of the morning, afternoon, and evening CPRS–R:S assessments, compared with placebo, regardless of the time of GXR administration (p<0.001 vs. placebo for GXR a.m. and GXR p.m.). In addition, subjects receiving GXR showed significantly greater improvements from baseline in each subscale score (oppositional, cognitive problems/inattention, hyperactivity, and ADHD index) compared with those receiving placebo, regardless of time of administration (p<0.003 vs. placebo across all subscales for GXR a.m. and GXR p.m.). Conclusions: These results provide further support for the demonstrated efficacy of once-daily GXR in reducing ADHD symptoms, and demonstrate that response is consistent throughout the day regardless of the time of administration, with improvement seen in ratings of oppositional as well as of ADHD symptoms. PMID:25286026

  15. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy evaluation of efficacy of scaling and root planing using magnification: A randomized controlled clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Ranjana; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Gundappa, Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Aim: A randomized controlled clinical study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of scaling and root planing (SRP) by using Magnifying Loupes (ML) and dental operating microscope (DOM). Materials and Methods: A total of 90 human teeth scheduled for extraction from 18 patients aged between 25 and 65 years suffering from generalized chronic severe periodontitis were randomly assigned to three treatment groups. Group 1 consisted SRP performed without using magnification (unaided), Group 2-SRP with ML and Group 3-SRP with DOM. Following extractions, samples were prepared for (i) evaluation of surface topography by atomic force microscopy, (ii) presence of smear layer, debris by scanning electron microscopy (iii) elemental analysis by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Data was subjected to statistical analysis using analysis of variance, post-hoc (Tukey-HSD) and Chi-square test. Results: Statistically significant (P < 0.001) difference was found among the different treatment groups. Group 3 was the best while Group 1 was the least effective technique for SRP. Order of efficacy in terms of the surface was found to be - Palatal < Lingual < Distal ? Mesial < Buccal. Efficiency in mandibular to maxillary teeth was found to be significant (P < 0.05), also anterior to posterior teeth (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Magnification tools significantly enhance the efficacy of supragingival and subgingival SRP. PMID:24124292

  16. Research Training Environment, Attitudes toward Research, and Research Self-Efficacy: The Revised Research Training Environment Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelso, Charles J.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Determines the relationship of research training environment to variables theorized to be either related or unrelated to that environment. Subjects were graduate students (n=171) who responded to the Research Training Environment Scale (RTES). The RTES was unrelated to participants' interest in the practitioner's role and minimally related to…

  17. Fall Risk Assessment Measures: An Analytic Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen L. Perell; Audrey Nelson; Ronald L. Goldman; Stephen L. Luther; Nicole Prieto-Lewis; Laurence Z. Rubenstein

    2001-01-01

    Background. Clinicians are often unaware of the many existing scales for identifying fall risk and are uncertain about how to select an appropriate one. Our purpose was to summarize existing fall risk assessment scales to enable more informed choices regarding their use. Methods. After a systematic literature search, 21 articles published from 1984 through 2000 describing 20 fall risk assessments

  18. Falling chains

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chun Wa Wong; Kosuke Yasui

    2005-01-01

    The one-dimensional fall of a folded chain with one end suspended from a rigid support and a chain falling from a resting heap on a table is studied. Because their Lagrangians contain no explicit time dependence, the falling chains are conservative systems. Their equations of motion are shown to contain a term that enforces energy conservation when masses are transferred

  19. Psychometric Properties of the Diabetes Management Self-Efficacy Scale in Korean Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shortridge-Baggett, Lillie M.; Han, Seung Jin; Moon, Seung Hei

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The aims of this study were to perform a cultural translation of the DMSES and evaluate the psychometric properties of the translated scale in a Korean population with type 2 diabetics. Methods. This study was conducted in patients with diabetes recruited from university hospitals. The first stage of this study involved translating the DMSES into Korean using a forward- and backward-translation technique. The content validity was assessed by an expert group. In the second stage, the psychometric properties of the Korean version of the DMSES (K-DMSES) were evaluated. Results. The content validity of the K-DMSES was satisfactory. Sixteen-items clustered into four-subscales were extracted by exploratory factor analysis, and supported by confirmatory factor analysis. The construct validity of the K-DMSES with the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities scale was satisfactory (r = 0.50, P<0.001). The Cronbach's alpha and intraclass correlation coefficient were 0.92 and 0.85 (P<0.001; 95% CI = 0.75–0.91), respectively, which indicate excellent internal consistency reliability and test-retest reliability. Conclusions. The K-DMSES is a brief instrument that has demonstrated good psychometric properties. It is therefore feasible to use in practice, and is ready for use in clinical research involving Korean patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26089892

  20. Racer efficacy study – Lane, Fall 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Racer (ammonium nonanoate) is labeled for non-food use and efforts are currently underway to label it as a bio-herbicide for organically grown food crops. The main component of Racer is ammonium nonanoate which occurs in nature and is primarily formed from biodegradation of higher fatty acids. The...

  1. Photocatalytic degradation efficacy of Bi4Ti3O12 micro-scale platelets over methylene blue under visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Jia, Zhen; Lei, E.; Wang, Liguo; Li, Zhaoyang; Dai, Yejing

    2013-11-01

    <001> textured Bi4Ti3O12 platelets with micro scale size were synthesized by a facile molten salt method. The photocatalytic activities of the as-prepared samples were measured with the photodegradation of methylene blue at room temperature under visible light irradiation. The Bi4Ti3O12 with the aspect ratio of 35 exhibited good absorption in the visible light region and the photodegradation against methylene blue was higher than that of anatase TiO2 reference, showing that the high degree of preferred {001} facets on the plate surface benefits the electronic transmission. In addition, the layer-pervoskite structure facilitates the mobility of the photogenerated carriers and hampers their recombination. The above results indicated that the large specific surface area of the as-prepared samples could attribute to the presence of a number of oxygen vacancies and then lead to the good photo-electric property. This work proposed an alternative way to tailor the structure of micro-sized platelets to get excellent properties comparable to the nano materials.

  2. Full-Scale Direct Numerical Simulation of Two- and Three-Dimensional Instabilities and Rivulet Formulation in Heated Falling Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamoorthy, S.; Ramaswamy, B.; Joo, S. W.

    1995-01-01

    A thin film draining on an inclined plate has been studied numerically using finite element method. Three-dimensional governing equations of continuity, momentum and energy with a moving boundary are integrated in an arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian frame of reference. Kinematic equation is solved to precisely update interface location. Rivulet formation based on instability mechanism has been simulated using full-scale computation. Comparisons with long-wave theory are made to validate the numerical scheme. Detailed analysis of two- and three-dimensional nonlinear wave formation and spontaneous rupture forming rivulets under the influence of combined thermocapillary and surface-wave instabilities is performed.

  3. 5-Year Planning Document for CEE Course Offerings Course Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    5-Year Planning Document for CEE Course Offerings Course Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring CEE 001 Cooperative Education Program Archambault Archambault Archambault Archambault Course Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring Fall Spring 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014

  4. Falling chains

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chun Wa Wong; Kosuke Yasui

    2006-01-01

    The one-dimensional fall of a folded chain with one end suspended from a\\u000arigid support and a chain falling from a resting heap on a table is studied.\\u000aBecause their Lagrangians contain no explicit time dependence, the falling\\u000achains are conservative systems. Their equations of motion are shown to contain\\u000aa term that enforces energy conservation when masses are transferred

  5. Determining a Cut-Off Point for Scores of the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale–Short Form: Secondary Data Analysis of an Intervention Study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nanishi, Keiko; Green, Joseph; Taguri, Masataka; Jimba, Masamine

    2015-01-01

    Background Breastfeeding self-efficacy can be measured with the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (BSES-SF). Mothers with low BSES-SF scores stop exclusive breastfeeding prematurely, but specific interventions can prevent that undesirable outcome. Because those interventions can be expensive, often one must decide which mothers will receive them. For that purpose, a cut-off BSES-SF score would be useful, but none is available. Therefore, we aimed to assess the overall accuracy of BSES-SF scores as predictors of not practicing post-discharge exclusive breastfeeding, and to choose an appropriate cut-off score for making that prediction. Methods This is a secondary data analysis of an intervention study. Data from 378 women in two non-Baby-Friendly Hospitals were analyzed. Participants were women in their third trimester who were 16 years of age or older, were able to read and write Japanese, were expected to have a singleton birth, and had completed the BSES-SF before discharge. BSES-SF scores were measured before discharge. Breastfeeding status was assessed 4 weeks and 12 weeks postpartum. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves were used to assess the predictive ability of the BSES-SF and to inform the choice of a cut-off point. Results For both of the ROC curves (4 and 12 weeks postpartum) the area under the curve was 0.74. To obtain a high sensitivity, a cut-off score of 50 was chosen. With that cut-off score the sensitivity was 79% and the specificity was 52% 4 weeks postpartum, and they were 77% and 52%, respectively, 12 weeks postpartum. Conclusion In conclusion, the BSES-SF has moderate overall accuracy to distinguish women who will not practice exclusive breastfeeding after discharge from those who will. At non-Baby-Friendly hospitals in Japan, interventions to support exclusive breastfeeding might be considered for new mothers who have BSES-SF scores that are less than or equal to 50. PMID:26107382

  6. The Effectiveness of a Participatory Program on Fall Prevention in Oncology Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Li-Chi; Ma, Wei-Fen; Li, Tsai-Chung; Liang, Yia-Wun; Tsai, Li-Yun; Chang, Fy-Uan

    2015-01-01

    Falls are known to be one of the most common in patient adverse events. A high incidence of falls was reported on patients with cancer. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a participatory program on patient's knowledge and self-efficacy of fall prevention and fall incidence in an oncology ward. In this quasi-experimental study,…

  7. Influences on Modern Multifactorial Falls Prevention Interventions and Fear of Falling in Non-Frail Older Adults: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Svantesson, Ulla; Babagbemi, Buki; Foster, Lakicia; Alricsson, Marie

    2014-01-01

    This review explores underlying features that may influence fear of falling and the effectiveness of multifactorial falls prevention programs in community dwelling non-frail adults aged 65 and older. It also examines the interrelationship between fear of falling and multifactorial falls prevention interventions. A literature search of medical databases was conducted to identify articles that address the fear of falling and multifactorial programs as either a primary or secondary component of their findings. Multifactorial interventions were assessed in terms of their program content, design, demographics, implementation techniques, and cost-effectiveness. Falls are a common, but preventable, cause of morbidity and injury in older adults 65 and over. In addition to physiological variables, fear of falling and self-efficacy are psychosocial factors that impact the incidence of falls in this population. Addressing fear of falling in addition to physiological parameters may influence the success of multifactorial falls prevention programs for adults 65 and over. PMID:25110534

  8. Falls in Nursing Homes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... physical restraints help prevent falls? References Falls in Nursing Homes Nursing home residents fall frequently. About 1, ... 5 Why do falls occur more often in nursing homes? Falling can be a sign of other ...

  9. Falling Feather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-07-12

    In this physics activity, learners recreate Galileo's famous experiment, in which he dropped a heavy weight and a light weight from the top of the Leaning Tower of Pisa to show that both weights fall at the same acceleration. Learners prove that Galileo was correct by comparing how fast a feather and coin fall in a tube attached to a vacuum. Use this activity to help learners explore acceleration and terminal velocity as well as how air resistance plays a role in how fast things fall.

  10. Bridalveil Fall

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this image, Bridalveil Fall can be seen from Tunnel View in Yosemite National Park. The waterfall is 617 ft (188 m) in height and is one of the most well-known of Yosemite National Park's waterfalls....

  11. Preventing falls

    MedlinePLUS

    Gillespie LD, Robertson MC, Gillespie WJ, Lamb SE, Gates S, Cumming RG, Rowe BH. Interventions for preventing falls in older people living in the community. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2009, Issue ...

  12. Falling Asteroids

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this game is to protect four cities from falling asteroids. To do this you must shoot them as they fall, either by clicking on the screen or by using a detonator (hitting the space bar) to destroy them all. You receive ten points for every surviving city at the end of each level. Cities are replaced every fifth level, but if all of your cities are destroyed, the game is over!

  13. 160. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    160. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Field Book #361 #86, page 1). SCALE DRAWING, CANAL HEADGATES AND CANAL SURVEY, 'A' LINE. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  14. Efficacy of radioiodine urinalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Broga, D.W.; Berk, H.W.; Sharpe, A.R. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    Little exists in the literature to support the efficacy of urinalysis for demonstrating thyroid uptake of radioiodine. A review was made of a variety of kinetic models. Computer analysis and graphics were used to assess the variables in the two models chosen for this study. The applicability of each model was tested by using data obtained from a group of euthyroid subjects. The results indicate that using an integral urine-sampling method and a three-component model yields minimum detectable thyroid uptakes which fall well below required reporting limits. Furthermore, the results show that integral urine samples obtained in the first few hours post exposure may be used to predict major thyroid uptakes in time for effective thyroid blocking.

  15. Comparison of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment strategies in promotion of infertility self-efficacy scale in infertile women: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Pasha, Hajar; Faramarzi, Mahbobeh; Esmailzadeh, Seddigheh; Kheirkhah, Farzan; Salmalian, Hajar

    2013-01-01

    Background: The infertility is associated with psychological consequence including depression, and lack of self-efficacy. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacological and no pharmacological strategies in promotion of self-efficacy of infertile women. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 89 infertile women who were recruited from Fatemeh Zahra Infertility and Reproductive Health Research Center and were randomized into three groups; cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), antidepressant therapy with flouxetine 20 mg daily for 3 month, and a control group. All participants completed Infertility Self-efficacy Inventory (ISE) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) at the beginning and end of the study. Results: The means ISE scores among the CBT, fluoxetine, and control groups at the beginning and end of the study were 6.1±1.6 vs. 7.2±0.9, 6.4±1.4 vs. 6.9±1.3 and 6.1±1.1 vs. 5.9±1.4 respectively. Both CBT and fluoxetine increased the mean of ISE scores more than control group after intervention (p<0.0001, p=0.033; respectively), but increase in the CBT group was significantly greater than flouxetine group. Finally, there was evidence of high infertility self-efficacy for women exposed to the intervention compared with those in the control group. Also, there was an improvement in depression. Both fluoxetine and CBT decreased significantly the mean of BDI scores more than the control group; decrease in the CBT group was significantly more than that in the fluoxetine group. Conclusion: CBT can serve as an effective psychosocial intervention for promoting self-efficacy of infertile women. Registration ID in IRCT: IRCT2012061710048N1 PMID:24639784

  16. Fall _________ Spring ________

    E-print Network

    Dyer, Bill

    ) _____________________________________________________________ Required Safety and Security Information (All applicants must complete this section.) 1. Have you ever been an institution of higher education on the basis of conduct or behavior.) 4. Have you ever been requiredTerm: Year Fall _________ Spring ________ A_____ B_____ NSE- MSU APPLICATION Personal Information

  17. Fall Webworm 

    E-print Network

    Ree, Bill

    2004-10-08

    they produce. Heavy infestations are rarely fatal, but if they occur repeatedly over several years they can stress trees and make them more suscepti- ble to drought, disease or other insect pests. The feeding preferences of fall webworms vary from one place...

  18. Introduction to Fall & Spring

    E-print Network

    Acton, Scott

    Stat I Introduction to Statistics EDLF 7310 Fall & Spring Foundations of Educational Research EDLF 7300 Fall Qualitative I EDLF 7404 Fall & Spring Stat II Experimental Design EDLF 8300 Fall & Spring Stat III Regression EDLF 8310 Fall & Spring Data Management EDLF 5500 Fall Qualitative II EDLF

  19. A Randomized Trial of a Multifaceted Intervention to Reduce Falls among Community-Dwelling Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Patrick J.; Vazquez, Laurie; Tonner, Chris; Stevens, Judy A.; Fineman, Norman; Ross, Leslie K.

    2010-01-01

    Using a randomized controlled trial, we tested the efficacy of a fall prevention intervention to reduce falls among adults in a community-based health promotion program. Adults aged 65 and older within two counties were recruited (control n = 257; intervention n = 286). After 12 months, there was a significant decrease in the number of falls in…

  20. Measuring Teacher Efficacy to Implement Inclusive Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Umesh; Loreman, Tim; Forlin, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an instrument to measure perceived teacher efficacy to teach in inclusive classrooms. An 18-item scale was developed on a sample of 607 pre-service teachers selected from four countries (Canada, Australia, Hong Kong and India). Factor analysis of responses from the sample revealed three factors: efficacy in…

  1. Fall detection sensor for fall protection airbag

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Fukaya

    2002-01-01

    The fall detection sensor for fall protection airbag was investigated to evaluate the airbag system. There are several methods to detect the fall: contact to the ground and detection of free fall. The problems with both methods are discussed. Since the usability of the latter come into practical use, tests in the future standard of airbag are discussed.

  2. Prevalence and cost of imaging in inpatient falls: the rising cost of falling

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Jessica; Alturkistani, Tahani; Kumar, Neal; Kanuri, Arjun; Salem, Deeb N; Munn, Samson; Blazey-Martin, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Objective To quantify the type, prevalence, and cost of imaging following inpatient falls, identify factors associated with post-fall imaging, and determine correlates of positive versus negative imaging. Design Single-center retrospective cohort study of inpatient falls. Data were collected from the hospital’s adverse event reporting system, DrQuality. Age, sex, date, time, and location of fall, clinical service, Morse Fall Scale/fall protocol, admitting diagnosis, and fall-related imaging studies were reviewed. Cost included professional and facilities fees for each study. Setting Four hundred and fifteen bed urban academic hospital over 3 years (2008–2010). Patients All adult inpatient falls during the study period were included. Falls experienced by patients aged <18 years, outpatient and emergency patients, visitors to the hospital, and staff were excluded. Measurements and main results Five hundred and thirty inpatient falls occurred during the study period, average patient age 60.7 years (range 20–98). More than half of falls were men (55%) and patients considered at risk of falls (56%). Falls were evenly distributed across morning (33%), evening (34%), and night (33%) shifts. Of 530 falls, 178 (34%) patients were imaged with 262 studies. Twenty percent of patients imaged had at least one positive imaging study attributed to the fall and 82% of studies were negative. Total cost of imaging was $160,897, 63% ($100,700) from head computed tomography (CT). Conclusion Inpatient falls affect patients of both sexes, all ages, occur at any time of day and lead to expensive imaging, mainly from head CTs. Further study should be targeted toward clarifying the indications for head CT after inpatient falls and validating risk models for positive and negative imaging, in order to decrease unnecessary imaging and thereby limit unnecessary cost and radiation exposure.

  3. Situating Pre-Service Reading Teachers as Tutors: Implications of Teacher Self-Efficacy on Tutoring Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haverback, Heather Rogers

    2009-01-01

    This research examined the impact of high teacher efficacy on tutoring elementary students in reading. The Teacher Sense of Efficacy Scale (TSES) was adapted to create a reading-specific teacher efficacy scale, which is referred to as the RTSES. This scale was used to investigate whether tutors with high efficacy used more reading strategies while…

  4. Self-Efficacy as a Function of Attributional Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jain, Sachin; Bruce, Mary Alice; Stellern, John; Srivastava, Namita

    2007-01-01

    The researchers investigated the effect of attributional feedback on self efficacy judgments among a sample of 192 eighth grade students. Self efficacy judgments were measured by the scale developed by Bandura and Schunk (1981). The results showed that improvement in self efficacy judgments was significantly more for attributional feedback…

  5. Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  6. Efficacy of activated sludge\\/powdered activated carbon for removal of organic constituents in wastewater from commercial-scale, high-Btu coal gasification plant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Harrison; D. L. Ford

    1980-01-01

    Bench-scale, activated-sludge (AS) treatability studies indicate that approximately 98 percent of total organic constituents can be removed from wastewater generated by HYGAS and slagging-type, high-Btu coal gasification pilot plants. This suggests that the most important unit of a wastewater treatment system for organics removal in commercial-scale versions of such plants will be the AS unit, augmented by powdered activated carbon

  7. Functional capacity and fear of falling in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Niederer, Daniel; Schmidt, Katharina; Vogt, Lutz; Egen, Janis; Klingler, Julia; Hübscher, Markus; Thiel, Christian; Bernhörster, Marcus; Banzer, Winfried

    2014-03-01

    Cancer patients, particularly during chemotherapy, often encounter functional status limitations. This study examines fear of falling, balance, gait and lower limb strength in cancer patients during ongoing or recently completed (?12 months) chemotherapeutic treatment in comparison to age-matched and senior controls (?65 years). Data were obtained from 69 subjects; 21 cancer patients (51±7 years) with histological confirmed diagnosis and two control groups (2×n=24): one age-matched (53±7 years) and one senior group (70±3 years). Fear of falling (FoF) was evaluated using the Falls Efficacy Scale-International Version. Motor function measurement included postural sway (centre of pressure) in upright stance with eyes covered, gait speed (comfortable fluid walking) and maximum voluntary isometric quadriceps strength (MIVF). One-way ANOVA followed by corrected post hoc paired-sample t-test revealed inferior values in cancer patients than in age-matched healthy regarding all parameters. Gait speed and MIVF of cancer patients were higher than in the senior control group (p<.05), whereas their FoF and postural sway were comparable (p>.05). Physical performance parameters of cancer patients were found to be lower in comparison to healthy age-matched subjects. Cancer patients show physical impairments which may limit independence and may increase fall risk. The present findings call for routine screening of physical function in cancer patients, and further stress the relevance of exercise interventions during and after chemotherapy. PMID:24360638

  8. Falls and Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Falls and Older Adults: About Falls In This Topic About Falls Causes and Risk Factors Making Personal ... for More Information National Institute on Aging Related Topics Balance Problems Osteoporosis The information in this topic ...

  9. Spring 2012 Fall 2012 Spring 2013 Fall 2013 Spring 2014 Fall 2014 Spring 2015 Fall 2015 Spring 2016 Fall 2016 College of Applied Sciences

    E-print Network

    Su, Xiao

    Spring 2012 Fall 2012 Spring 2013 Fall 2013 Spring 2014 Fall 2014 Spring 2015 Fall 2015 Spring 2016 242 SCWK 242 SCWK 242 SCWK 242 SCWK 242 College of Business Spring 2012 Fall 2012 Spring 2013 Fall 2013 Spring 2014 Fall 2014 Spring 2015 Fall 2015 Spring 2016 Fall 2016 Accountancy BUS 220J BUS 220J

  10. The relationship between fear of falling to spatiotemporal gait parameters measured by an instrumented treadmill in people with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kalron, Alon; Achiron, Anat

    2014-02-01

    People with multiple sclerosis (MS) identify mobility limitations as one of the greatest challenges of this disease. Continued loss of mobility and falls are among their greatest concerns for the future. Our objective was to determine if fear of falling is associated with spatial and temporal gait parameters in persons with MS, when measured by an instrumented treadmill. This observational case control study was performed at the MS Center, Center of Advanced Technologies in Rehabilitation, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel. Sixty-eight relapsing-remitting patients diagnosed with MS, 38 women, aged 40.9 (S.D. = 11.9), participated in this investigation. Twenty-five healthy subjects, 14 women, aged 39.5 (S.D. = 9.4) served as controls gait controls. Gait spatiotemporal parameters were obtained using the Zebris FDM-T Treadmill (Zebris(®) Medical GmbH, Germany). The Falls Efficacy Scale International was used to assess the level of concern relating to falls. Forty-one people with MS were classified as highly fearful of falling. Twenty-seven patients were slightly concerned. Highly fearful of falling patients walked slower had a shorter step length, a wider base of support and prolonged double support phase compared to slightly concerned patients. Fearful patients also demonstrated elevated variability of the center of pressure (CoP) trajectory compared to slightly concerned MS patients. Fear of falling and spatiotemporal gait alterations in people with MS are linked. Additionally, variability of the CoP during walking appears to be connected with the level of concern. PMID:24200869

  11. Upper Yosemite Falls

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this image, Upper Yosemite Falls may be seen. Upper Yosemite Falls is the highest of the three sectiosn of Yosemite Falls. It is about 1,430 ft (440 m) high. Yosemite Falls is one of the most famous waterfalls within Yosemite National Park....

  12. Lower Yosemite Falls

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this image, Lower Yosemite Falls may be seen. Lower Yosemite Falls is the lowest of the three sectiosn of Yosemite Falls. It is about 320 ft (98 m) high. Yosemite Falls is one of the most famous waterfalls within Yosemite National Park....

  13. The effectiveness of a participatory program on fall prevention in oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Chi; Ma, Wei-Fen; Li, Tsai-Chung; Liang, Yia-Wun; Tsai, Li-Yun; Chang, Fy-Uan

    2015-04-01

    Falls are known to be one of the most common in patient adverse events. A high incidence of falls was reported on patients with cancer. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a participatory program on patient's knowledge and self-efficacy of fall prevention and fall incidence in an oncology ward. In this quasi-experimental study, 68 participants were recruited at a medical centre in Taiwan. A 20-min fall prevention program was given to patients. A questionnaire was used to evaluate the effectiveness of program after on day 3 of intervention. The data of fall incidence rates were collected from hospital record. Fall incidences with and without the program were used to compare the effectiveness of intervention. The patients' knowledge and self-efficacy of fall prevention are better than after intervention. A statistically significant difference in fall incidence rate was observed with (0.0%) and without (19.3%) the program. Our findings suggest that the fact of the bedside is that the most risk for falling in hospital must be communicated to the hospitalized patients. Educating patients about fall prevention and activities associated with falling increases their awareness of the potential of falling and promoting patient safety. PMID:25492057

  14. Teacher Efficacy of Turkish Physical Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gencay, Okkes Alpaslan

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to determine the validity and reliability of the Teacher Efficacy Scale in Physical Education (TESPE) in Turkey's conditions, and to test if there are any differences in gender and teaching experience of Turkish PE teachers. Turkish version of the scale was administered to 257 physical education teachers (184…

  15. Evaluation of fall and fall recovery in a simulated seismic environment: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Abu-Faraj, Ziad O; Akar, Hassan A; Assaf, Elie H; Al-Qadiri, Mohamad N; Youssef, Elssy G

    2010-01-01

    Fall-related injuries, disabilities, and fatalities are known to seriously affect the healthcare and industry sectors. Nevertheless, an abled individual, as well as a trained senior citizen, is believed to be capable of withstanding and overcoming unusual environmental variations in terms of postural stability and balance. Understanding the biomechanics of fall and fall recovery through quantitative measurements could provide academic and methodical means to maintain human postural stability, of various ages, in such environments. This study assesses human performance and endurance in the most hazardous environment of a simulated violent seismic activity of a magnitude of 6.5 degrees on the Richter's scale. The objective is to evaluate fall and fall recovery in young abled adults using dynamic plantar pressure measurements. The obtained results support the hypothesis that falls in young adults could be prevented via exercise intervention programs. Further investigation is done by our research group to validate the same concept for senior citizens. PMID:21097092

  16. Efficacy of climate forcings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Hansen; M. Sato; R. Ruedy; L. Nazarenko; A. Lacis; G. A. Schmidt; G. Russell; I. Aleinov; M. Bauer; S. Bauer; N. Bell; B. Cairns; V. Canuto; M. Chandler; Y. Cheng; A. Del Genio; G. Faluvegi; E. Fleming; A. Friend; T. Hall; C. Jackman; M. Kelley; N. Kiang; D. Koch; J. Lean; J. Lerner; K. Lo; S. Menon; R. Miller; P. Minnis; T. Novakov; V. Oinas; Ja. Perlwitz; Ju. Perlwitz; D. Rind; A. Romanou; D. Shindell; P. Stone; S. Sun; N. Tausnev; D. Thresher; B. Wielicki; T. Wong; M. Yao; S. Zhang

    2005-01-01

    We use a global climate model to compare the effectiveness of many climate forcing agents for producing climate change. We find a substantial range in the “efficacy” of different forcings, where the efficacy is the global temperature response per unit forcing relative to the response to CO2 forcing. Anthropogenic CH4 has efficacy ?110%, which increases to ?145% when its indirect

  17. Efficacy and well-being in rural north India: The role of social identification with a large-scale community identity

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sammyh S; Hopkins, Nick; Tewari, Shruti; Srinivasan, Narayanan; Reicher, Stephen David; Ozakinci, Gozde

    2014-01-01

    Identifying with a group can contribute to a sense of well-being. The mechanisms involved are diverse: social identification with a group can impact individuals' beliefs about issues such as their connections with others, the availability of social support, the meaningfulness of existence, and the continuity of their identity. Yet, there seems to be a common theme to these mechanisms: identification with a group encourages the belief that one can cope with the stressors one faces (which is associated with better well-being). Our research investigated the relationship between identification, beliefs about coping, and well-being in a survey (N = 792) administered in rural North India. Using structural equation modelling, we found that social identification as a Hindu had positive and indirect associations with three measures of well-being through the belief that one can cope with everyday stressors. We also found residual associations between participants' social identification as a Hindu and two measures of well-being in which higher identification was associated with poorer well-being. We discuss these findings and their implication for understanding the relationship between social identification (especially with large-scale group memberships) and well-being. We also discuss the application of social psychological theory developed in the urban West to rural north India. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Social Psychology published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Pre-School Norms for the AAMD Adaptive Behavior Scale Public School Version. Field Study of the Efficacy of the AAMD Adaptive Behavior Scale-Public School Version. Substudy 4 of 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Nadine M.

    Six school districts in California provided data on the Public School Version of the Adaptive Behavior Scale for 373 children, ages three through six, who were enrolled in regular and trainable mentally retarded (TMR) preschool programs. The results of the study are reported as means and standard deviations of the domain scores for Part One and…

  19. Relationships between Personality Type and Teaching Efficacy of Student Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, T. Grady; Mowen, Diana L.; Edgar, Don W.; Harlin, Julie F.; Briers, Gary E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if relationships exist between teaching efficacy and personality type of student teachers. The population of interest was all agricultural science student teachers at Texas A&M University. The sampling frame included all student teachers during the spring and fall semesters of 2005 (n= 72). Teaching…

  20. Veterans' fall risk profile: a prevalence study.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Patricia A; Palacios, Polly; Spehar, Andrea M

    2006-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) serves the health care needs of an adult, predominantly male, and aging population. The aging profile of VHA patients is 25% greater than the civilian sector (DVA 2001). Aged patients are at higher risk for falls. In February 2002, 6 VHA medical centers profiled their inpatients' fall risk profile as one aspect of program initiatives targeted at reducing veterans' fall risk and fall-related injuries, participating in a one-day collection of fall risk measurement using the Morse Fall Scale (MFS) for all inpatients (n = 1819), acute and long-term care units. Data results are reported for age, MFS score, and the relationship between age and score, and by type of ward/unit, ie, predominately acute and critical care or long-term care. The results of this prevalence study documented that the veteran inpatient population are at high-risk for anticipated physiological falls. This Veteran Integrated Services Network-wide Deployment of an Evidence-based Program to Prevent Patient Falls study was completed as part of a nationally funded clinical initiative, National Program Initiative 20-006-1. PMID:18044113

  1. Veterans’ fall risk profile: a prevalence study

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, Patricia A; Palacios, Polly; Spehar, Andrea M

    2006-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) serves the health care needs of an adult, predominantly male, and aging population. The aging profile of VHA patients is 25% greater than the civilian sector (DVA 2001). Aged patients are at higher risk for falls. In February 2002, 6 VHA medical centers profiled their inpatients’ fall risk profile as one aspect of program initiatives targeted at reducing veterans’ fall risk and fall-related injuries, participating in a one-day collection of fall risk measurement using the Morse Fall Scale (MFS) for all inpatients (n=1819), acute and long-term care units. Data results are reported for age, MFS score, and the relationship between age and score, and by type of ward/unit, ie, predominately acute and critical care or long-term care. The results of this prevalence study documented that the veteran inpatient population are at high-risk for anticipated physiological falls. This Veteran Integrated Services Network-wide Deployment of an Evidence-based Program to Prevent Patient Falls study was completed as part of a nationally funded clinical initiative, National Program Initiative 20-006-1. PMID:18044113

  2. Transfer effects of fall training on balance performance and spatiotemporal gait parameters in healthy community-dwelling older adults: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Donath, Lars; Faude, Oliver; Bridenbaugh, Stephanie A; Roth, Ralf; Soltermann, Martin; Kressig, Reto W; Zahner, Lukas

    2014-07-01

    This study examined transfer effects of fall training on fear of falling (Falls Efficacy Scale-International [FES-I]), balance performance, and spatiotemporal gait characteristics in older adults. Eighteen community-dwelling older adults (ages 65-85) were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. The intervention group completed 12 training sessions (60 min, 6 weeks). During pre- and posttesting, we measured FES-I, balance performance (double limb, closed eyes; single limb, open eyes; double limb, open eyes with motor-interfered task), and gait parameters (e.g., velocity; cadence; stride time, stride width, and stride length; variability of stride time and stride length) under single- and motor-interfered tasks. Dual tasks were applied to appraise improvements of cognitive processing during balance and gait. FES-I (p = .33) and postural sway did not significantly change (0.36 < p < .79). Trends toward significant interaction effects were found for step width during normal walking and stride length variability during the motor dual task (p = .05, ?p 2 = .22). Fall training did not sufficiently improve fear of falling, balance, or gait performance under single- or dual-task conditions in healthy older adults. PMID:23881433

  3. The Fall and Fall of Gary Hart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Robert C.

    The fall of Gary Hart, brought about because of his indiscretions during the 1988 presidential campaign, should not be treated exclusively as a consequence of Hart's moral failings. Rather, the fall of Hart can be traced to a complex of factors including bad judgment, the near total control that the press exercises over the political agenda, and…

  4. Base of Yosemite Falls

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this image, Yosemite Falls may be seen from its base. Yosemite Falls is the tallest waterfall in North America. It is about 2,425 ft (739 m) high. Yosemite Falls is one of the most famous waterfalls within Yosemite National Park....

  5. Tailored prevention of inpatient falls: development and usability testing of the fall TIPS toolkit.

    PubMed

    Zuyev, Lyubov; Benoit, Angela N; Chang, Frank Y; Dykes, Patricia C

    2011-02-01

    Patient falls and fall-related injuries are serious problems in hospitals. The Fall TIPS application aims to prevent patient falls by translating routine nursing fall risk assessment into a decision support intervention that communicates fall risk status and creates a tailored evidence-based plan of care that is accessible to the care team, patients, and family members. In our design and implementation of the Fall TIPS toolkit, we used the Spiral Software Development Life Cycle model. Three output tools available to be generated from the toolkit are bed poster, plan of care, and patient education handout. A preliminary design of the application was based on initial requirements defined by project leaders and informed by focus groups with end users. Preliminary design partially simulated the paper version of the Morse Fall Scale currently used in hospitals involved in the research study. Strengths and weaknesses of the first prototype were identified by heuristic evaluation. Usability testing was performed at sites where research study is implemented. Suggestions mentioned by end users participating in usability studies were either directly incorporated into the toolkit and output tools, were slightly modified, or will be addressed during training. The next step is implementation of the fall prevention toolkit on the pilot testing units. PMID:20975543

  6. Occlusions contribute to scaling in natural images

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rosario M. Balboa; Christopher W. Tyler; Norberto M. Grzywacz

    2001-01-01

    Spatial power spectra from natural images fall approximately as the square of spatial frequency, a property also called scale invariance (scaling). Various theories for visual receptive fields consider scale invariance key. Two hypotheses have been advanced in the literature for why natural images obey scale invariance. The first is that these images have luminance edges, whose spectra fall as frequency

  7. [A comparative evaluation of the efficacy of valdoxan (agomelatine) in recurrent depression and bipolar affective disorder].

    PubMed

    Tiuvina, N A; Smirnova, V N

    2012-01-01

    Authors compared the efficacy and safety of valdoxan in the treatment of depression in 22 patients with recurrent depressive disorder (RD) and 23 patients with bipolar affective disorder (BAD). Valdoxan was used on the night in dosage 25-50 mg during 8 weeks. Efficacy was assessed with psychometric scales HAM-D-17, CGI-S, CGI-I and visual analogous scales for falling asleep, night sleep quality, morning status and day activity. The antidepressant effect of the drug and the normalization of circadian rhythms were seen in the first week of treatment. To the end of treatment, there were 90.9% responders in the group with BAD and 91.3% in patients with RD. Percentages of patients with remission were 65.2% and 54.5%, respectively. It has been concluded that valdoxan does not cause unwanted side-effects as well as the risk of the inversion of a phase and/or the development of transitory hypomania in BAD. PMID:23257757

  8. College English writing affect: Self-efficacy and anxiety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lindy Woodrow

    This article describes a research project into the self-efficacy and anxiety of college English students at four universities in China. A total of 738 participants completed a questionnaire measuring self-efficacy and anxiety in writing in English. This was immediately followed by a writing task. The questionnaire used a seven point Likert type scale to measure self-efficacy and anxiety in writing.

  9. Decreasing fall risk in spinocerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Santos de Oliveira, Laura Alice; Martins, Camilla Polonini; Horsczaruk, Carlos Henrique Ramos; Lima da Silva, Débora Cristina; Martins, José Vicente Pereira; Vasconcelos, Luiz Felipe Rocha; Rodrigues, Erika de Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Spinocerebellar ataxia consists of a group of autosomal dominant disorders that cause progressive degeneration, mainly in the cerebellum and its connections. Falls, which are a significant concern of this condition, reduce patients’ mobility, deteriorate their health and have physical and social consequences. The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of a modified protocol for improving balance and diminishing the fall risk of spinocerebellar ataxia patients exclusively. [Subjects and Methods] Exercises aiming to improve static and dynamic balance, whole body movements, measures to prevent falls and falling strategies were performed twice per week for four weeks by 11 spinocerebellar ataxia patients. Balance was evaluated using the Berg Balance Scale. [Results] The results show that there was a significant increase in Berg Balance Scale scores after the interventions (Wilcoxon p=0.0034). [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that the modified protocol is effective at reducing the fall risk of spinocerebellar ataxia patients. This protocol may be a useful option for appropriately coping with falls caused by spinocerebellar ataxia. PMID:25995594

  10. The large-scale distribution and internal geometry of the fall 2000 Po River flood deposit: Evidence from digital X-radiography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheatcroft, R.A.; Stevens, A.W.; Hunt, L.M.; Milligan, T.G.

    2006-01-01

    Event-response coring on the Po River prodelta (northern Adriatic Sea) coupled with shipboard digital X-radiography, resistivity profiling, and grain-size analyses permitted documentation of the initial distribution and physical properties of the October 2000 flood deposit. The digital X-radiography system comprises a constant-potential X-ray source and an amorphous silicon imager with an active area of 29??42 cm and 12-bit depth resolution. Objective image segmentation algorithms based on bulk density (brightness), layer contacts (edge detection) and small-scale texture (fabric) were used to identify the flood deposit. Results indicate that the deposit formed in water depths of 6-29 m immediately adjacent to the three main distributary mouths of the Po (Pila, Tolle and Gnocca/Goro). Maximal thickness was 36 cm at a 20-m site off the main mouth (Pila), but many other sites hadthicknesses >20 cm. The Po flood deposit has a complex internal stratigraphy, with multiple layers, a diverse suite of physical sedimentary structures (e.g., laminations, ripple cross bedding, lenticular bedding, soft-sediment deformation structures), and dramatic changes in grain size that imply rapid deposition and fluctuations in energy during emplacement. Based on the flood deposit volume and well-constrained measurements of deposit bulk density the mass of the flood deposit was estimated to be 16??109 kg, which is about two-thirds of the estimated suspended sediment load delivered by the river during the event. The locus of deposition, overall thickness, and stratigraphic complexity of the flood deposit can best be explained by the relatively long sediment throughput times of the Po River, whereby sediment is delivered to the ocean during a range of conditions (i.e., the storm responsible for the precipitation is long gone), the majority of which are reflective of the fair-weather condition. Sediment is therefore deposited proximal to the river mouths, where it can form thick, but stratigraphically complex deposits. In contrast, floods of small rivers such as the Eel (northern California) are coupled to storm conditions, which lead to high levels of sediment dispersion. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. High Efficacy and the Preservice Reading Teacher: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haverback, Heather Rogers; Parault, Susan J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the differential impact of two field experiences, tutoring and observing, on preservice teachers' reading self-efficacy and content knowledge. Participants completed an adapted, reading version of The Teacher Sense of Efficacy Scale (TSES). Results showed that both groups reported growth in reading…

  12. Career Decision Self-Efficacy among Turkish Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isik, Erkan

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate the career decision-making self-efficacy in a sample of 356 Turkish undergraduate students. Method: With this purpose, 356 (138 females; 218 males) Turkish undergraduate students aged 17-24 completed a Turkish-translated version of Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (CDSE-SF) to…

  13. Teachers Sense of Collective Efficacy: An International View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schechter, Chen; Tschannen-Moran, Megan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study explores the notion of collective teacher efficacy, a characteristic of schools that has emerged as a significant factor in school productivity. More specifically, this paper examines the construct validity and reliability of the Israeli Collective Teacher Efficacy Scale and explores variables that may influence teachers' sense…

  14. Gelling medical knowledge: innovative pharmaceuticals, experience, and perceptions of efficacy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eirik J. Saethre; Jonathan Stadler

    2010-01-01

    As new pharmaceutical products to combat the acquisition of HIV are produced, their clinical efficacy is determined through large-scale clinical trials. Trial participants, however, also independently evaluate the effectiveness of these technologies. During a phase III microbicide clinical trial in Johannesburg, South Africa, female participants acknowledged that although the gel had not yet been clinically proven to be efficacious, they

  15. Music Teachers' Computer Anxiety and Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiliç, Deniz Beste Çevik

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the computer anxiety and self-efficacy of music teachers in terms of different variables. The research is implemented on 124 music teachers. A personal information form and scales of Computer Anxiety and Self Efficacy are implemented on 124 music teachers. Data are analyzed with one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and…

  16. 149. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL DIVERSION, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    149. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL DIVERSION, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER DAM; CLOSE-UP OF MAIN CANAL GATES, SOUTH VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  17. 97. POINT SPILL, TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    97. POINT SPILL, TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY NORTHWEST OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; OVERALL WEST VIEW FROM CANAL SIDE. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  18. The Relationships between University Students' Chemistry Laboratory Anxiety, Attitudes, and Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurbanoglu, N. Izzet; Akin, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationships between chemistry laboratory anxiety, chemistry attitudes, and self-efficacy. Participants were 395 university students. Participants completed the Chemistry Laboratory Anxiety Scale, the Chemistry Attitudes Scale, and the Self-efficacy Scale. Results showed that chemistry laboratory anxiety…

  19. Social Self-Efficacy, Academic Locus of Control, and Internet Addiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iskender, Murat; Akin, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship of internet addiction, social self-efficacy, and academic locus of control. Participants were 311 university students who completed a questionnaire package that included the Online Cognition Scale, the Academic Locus of Control Scale, and the Perceived Social Self-efficacy Scale. The…

  20. Volcanic Ash Fall

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Christopher Kenedi

    This United States Geological Survey (USGS) on-line publication discusses volcanic ash fall in terms of composition and effects. This report discusses the negative effects of volcanic ash fall on machinery, human health, weather and man-made structures, using the Mount Saint Helens eruption of 1980 as an example. The composition of volcanic ash is discussed, as well as ancient and modern ash falls that have occurred in the United States.

  1. Validation of an instrument for mathematics enhancement teaching efficacy of Pacific Northwest agricultural educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Daniel J.

    Teacher efficacy continues to be an important area of study in educational research. This study tested an instrument designed to assess the perceived efficacy of agricultural education teachers when engaged in lessons involving mathematics instruction. The study population of Oregon and Washington agricultural educators utilized in the validation of the instrument revealed important demographic findings and specific results related to teacher efficacy for the study population. An instrument was developed from the assimilation of three scales previously used and validated in efficacy research. Participants' mathematics teaching efficacy was assessed using a portion of the Mathematics Teaching Efficacy Beliefs Instrument (MTEBI), and personal mathematics efficacy was evaluated by the mathematics self-belief instrument which was derived from the Betz and Hackett's Mathematics Self-Efficacy Scale. The final scale, the Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale (TSES) created by Tschannen-Moran and Woolfolk Hoy, examined perceived personal teaching efficacy. Structural equation modeling was used as the statistical analyses tool to validate the instrument and examine correlations between efficacy constructs used to determine potential professional development needs of the survey population. As part of the data required for validation of the Mathematics Enhancement Teaching Efficacy instrument, demographic information defining the population of Oregon and Washington agricultural educators was obtained and reported. A hypothetical model derived from teacher efficacy literature was found to be an acceptable model to verify construct validity and determine strength of correlations between the scales that defined the instrument. The instrument produced an alpha coefficient of .905 for reliability. Both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to verify construct and discriminate validity. Specifics results related to the survey population of agricultural educators concluded that personal mathematics efficacy has a stronger correlation with mathematics teaching efficacy than personal teaching efficacy of teachers for this population. The implications of such findings suggest that professional development and pre-service preparation should be more focused on mathematics content knowledge rather than pedagogical knowledge when the objective is to enhance mathematics in interdisciplinary lessons.

  2. An Investigation of Factors Related to Self-Efficacy for Java Programming among Engineering Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askar, Petek; Davenport, David

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the factors related to self-efficacy for Java programming among first year engineering students. An instrument assessing Java programming self-efficacy was developed from the computer programming self-efficacy scale of Ramalingam & Wiedenbeck. The instrument was administered at the beginning of the course…

  3. The Correlation between Teacher Self-Efficacy among Seminaries and Institutes Seminary Teachers and Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangum, James Irvin, III

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the correlation between teacher self-efficacy and student outcomes. Teacher self-efficacy was measured in 99 Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Seminaries and Institutes seminary teachers using Tschannen-Moran and Hoy's Teachers Sense of Efficacy Scale (2001). Student outcomes included academic grades, conduct…

  4. Exploring Baccalaureate Social Work Students' Self-Efficacy: Did It Change over Time?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahn, Bonnie; Boykin, Lolita; Hebert, Corie; Kulkin, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    This study explored baccalaureate social work students' self-efficacy at a rural southern university. Bandura's concept of self-efficacy is used as a theoretical base for the study. Students (N = 43) in introductory social work courses and in the field practicum course completed the Foundation Practice Self Efficacy Scale. Following The Council on…

  5. Self-Efficacy for Social Situations in Adolescents with Generalized Social Anxiety Disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brandon A. Gaudiano; James D. Herbert

    2007-01-01

    Self-efficacy is a potentially useful concept when applied to Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD). The aims of the current study were to examine the psychometric properties of the Self- Efficacy for Social Situations Scale (SESS; Gaudiano and Herbert, 2003) and to investigate the relationship between self-efficacy and anxiety in an adolescent sample with generalized SAD. Results replicated those found in a

  6. Flow Slide Fall

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    McGraw-Hill

    This Flash animation displays in quick sequence four different mass wasting events: earthflow, translational slump, rotational slump, and rock fall. Images are attractive but there is little in the way of causative factors involved in mass wasting. To access the animation Click on the "Flow Slide Fall" link.

  7. First Aid: Falls

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Aid: What to Do Pregnant? What to Expect Sports: Keeping Kids Safe Concussions: What to Know First Aid: Falls KidsHealth > Parents > ... Bones A to Z: Head Injury Preventing Children's Sports Injuries Broken Bones Concussions Household Safety: Preventing Injuries From Falling, Climbing, and ...

  8. Experiments in free fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Art, Albert

    2006-09-01

    A model lift containing a figure of Albert Einstein is released from the side of a tall building and its free fall is arrested by elastic ropes. This arrangement allows four simple experiments to be conducted in the lift to demonstrate the effects of free fall and show how they can lead to the concept of the equivalence of inertial and gravitational masses.

  9. Fall Proofing Your Home

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Proofing Your Home Six out of every 10 falls happen at home, where we spend much of our time and tend to move around without thinking about our safety. Many of these falls could be prevented by making simple changes. Go4Life ...

  10. Fall prevention conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Sam

    2011-01-01

    Falls can have lasting psychological and physical consequences, particularly fractures and slow-healing processes, and patients may also lose confidence in walking. Injuries from falls lead to functional decline, institutionalization, higher health care costs, and decreased quality of life. The process related to the problem of patient falls in the hospital, using the nursing model developed by the theorist, Ida Jean Orlando, is explained in this article. The useful tool that provides guidance to marketers in this endeavor is Maslow's hierarchy of needs. During acute illness, individuals are greatly in need of satisfying their physiological needs. If these needs are not met, patients leave the hospital lacking a positive experience. Initial fall risk assessment is critical to plan intervention and individualize care plan. Interventions depend on the severity of fall risk factors. PMID:21537141

  11. Summer/Fall Summer/Fall

    E-print Network

    Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    % Yield Average = 50% Plant Biology & Conserv Program Profile Admissions 9% 16% 13% 14% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% White * 100% 100% 88% Multi (Non-URM) - 0% 0% 0% Multi-Race (URM) - 0% 0% 0% Not Specified * 0% 0% 0% Total Fall '09 - '12 20% Enrollment and Demographics Plant Biology & Conserv Program Profile New

  12. Summer/Fall Summer/Fall

    E-print Network

    Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    . Selectivity Average = 13% Yield Average = 47% Plant Biology & Conserv Program Profile Admissions 9% 16% 13% 14% 88% 80% Multi (Non-URM) - - 0% 0% 0% Multi-Race (URM) - - 0% 0% 0% Not Specified * 0% 0% 0% 0% Plant Biology & Conserv Program Profile Enrollment and Demographics New Enrollment* Total Fall '09 - '13 Total

  13. Injuries sustained by falls.

    PubMed Central

    Rozycki, G S; Maull, K I

    1991-01-01

    During a recent 4-year period, 381 patients were admitted with injuries sustained from falls. Equal numbers of patients were less than and greater than 50 years of age and included 53 children (less than or equal to 16 years) and 214 elderly (greater than or equal to 55 years). Falls from heights occurred predominantly in young males (mean age 34.2 years), were most commonly job or recreation related and resulted in higher injury severity scores (ISS). Falls in the elderly occurred more commonly in women, typically on a flat surface, and were less severe. Despite lower mean ISS, fall victims over 55 years of age had longer hospitalizations (11.4 vs. 4.5 days) and incurred higher hospital charges compared to younger patients. There were 35 deaths (9.2%). In patients under 55 years, deaths resulted from fall-related central nervous system (CNS) injury and/or multisystem trauma. In patients over 55 years, fatalities were most commonly related to pre-existent medical conditions. Based on a review of this experience, we conclude that: (1) unlike other causes of blunt and penetrating trauma, both sexes are equally at risk from fall-related injuries but sex incidence is age related; (2) falls from heights are more common in men; (3) advanced age and pre-existing medical conditions account for the increased morbidity and mortality following falls and; (4) cost containment measures for fall-related trauma must consider not only injury severity, but the age and pre-existent medical conditions of the patient. PMID:1772536

  14. Fall Detection with Wearable Sensors--Safe (Smart Fall Detection)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olukunle Ojetola; Elena I. Gaura; James Brusey

    2011-01-01

    The high rate of falls incidence among the elderly calls for the development of reliable and robust fall detection systems. A number of such systems have been proposed, with claims of fall detection accuracy of over 90% based on ac- celerometers and gyroscopes. However, most such fall detection algorithms have been developed based on observational analysis of the data gathered,

  15. Examining Elementary School–Aged Children’s Self-Efficacy and Proxy Efficacy for Fruit and Vegetable Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Geller, Karly S.; Dzewaltowski, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Children’s self-efficacy for fruit and vegetable consumption (FVC) and proxy efficacy to influence others to make fruit and vegetables (FV) available may influence their FVC. A previous investigation has demonstrated that self-efficacy for fruit consumption, self-efficacy for vegetable consumption, proxy efficacy to influence parents to make FV available, and proxy efficacy to influence after-school staff to make FV available can be measured with four independent but related scales. The purpose of the present investigation is to confirm this factor structure and determine if the scales were invariant across gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status (SES) subgroups of children attending after-school programs. Results provide further validity evidence for the four correlated scales. In addition, results confirm measurement invariance across gender, SES, and ethnicity, confirming the unbiased generalizability of the current measure to these demographic groups. Lastly, tests of population heterogeneity reveal no meaningful differences in self- and proxy efficacy among gender, SES, and ethnicity subgroups. PMID:19858314

  16. Base of Bridalveil Fall

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this image, Bridalveil Fall can be seen from its base in Yosemite National Park. The waterfall is 617 ft (188 m) in height and is one of the most well-known of Yosemite National Park's waterfalls....

  17. Fall 2011 Chemistry 676

    E-print Network

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Fall 2011 Chemistry 676 "Introduction to organic synthesis: Methodology" T chemistry, olefination reactions, cross coupling chemistry, and modern transition metal are due by 1200 (noon) in my office (CST 3-008) or my mailbox in the chemistry

  18. Efficacy of climate forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Sato, M.; Ruedy, R.; Nazarenko, L.; Lacis, A.; Schmidt, G. A.; Russell, G.; Aleinov, I.; Bauer, M.; Bauer, S.; Bell, N.; Cairns, B.; Canuto, V.; Chandler, M.; Cheng, Y.; Del Genio, A.; Faluvegi, G.; Fleming, E.; Friend, A.; Hall, T.; Jackman, C.; Kelley, M.; Kiang, N.; Koch, D.; Lean, J.; Lerner, J.; Lo, K.; Menon, S.; Miller, R.; Minnis, P.; Novakov, T.; Oinas, V.; Perlwitz, Ja.; Perlwitz, Ju.; Rind, D.; Romanou, A.; Shindell, D.; Stone, P.; Sun, S.; Tausnev, N.; Thresher, D.; Wielicki, B.; Wong, T.; Yao, M.; Zhang, S.

    2005-09-01

    We use a global climate model to compare the effectiveness of many climate forcing agents for producing climate change. We find a substantial range in the "efficacy" of different forcings, where the efficacy is the global temperature response per unit forcing relative to the response to CO2 forcing. Anthropogenic CH4 has efficacy ˜110%, which increases to ˜145% when its indirect effects on stratospheric H2O and tropospheric O3 are included, yielding an effective climate forcing of ˜0.8 W/m2 for the period 1750-2000 and making CH4 the largest anthropogenic climate forcing other than CO2. Black carbon (BC) aerosols from biomass burning have a calculated efficacy ˜58%, while fossil fuel BC has an efficacy ˜78%. Accounting for forcing efficacies and for indirect effects via snow albedo and cloud changes, we find that fossil fuel soot, defined as BC + OC (organic carbon), has a net positive forcing while biomass burning BC + OC has a negative forcing. We show that replacement of the traditional instantaneous and adjusted forcings, Fi and Fa, with an easily computed alternative, Fs, yields a better predictor of climate change, i.e., its efficacies are closer to unity. Fs is inferred from flux and temperature changes in a fixed-ocean model run. There is remarkable congruence in the spatial distribution of climate change, normalized to the same forcing Fs, for most climate forcing agents, suggesting that the global forcing has more relevance to regional climate change than may have been anticipated. Increasing greenhouse gases intensify the Hadley circulation in our model, increasing rainfall in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), Eastern United States, and East Asia, while intensifying dry conditions in the subtropics including the Southwest United States, the Mediterranean region, the Middle East, and an expanding Sahel. These features survive in model simulations that use all estimated forcings for the period 1880-2000. Responses to localized forcings, such as land use change and heavy regional concentrations of BC aerosols, include more specific regional characteristics. We suggest that anthropogenic tropospheric O3 and the BC snow albedo effect contribute substantially to rapid warming and sea ice loss in the Arctic. As a complement to a priori forcings, such as Fi, Fa, and Fs, we tabulate the a posteriori effective forcing, Fe, which is the product of the forcing and its efficacy. Fe requires calculation of the climate response and introduces greater model dependence, but once it is calculated for a given amount of a forcing agent it provides a good prediction of the response to other forcing amounts.

  19. Ideal Teacher Behaviors: Student Motivation and Self-Efficacy Predict Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komarraju, Meera

    2013-01-01

    Differences in students' academic self-efficacy and motivation were examined in predicting preferred teacher traits. Undergraduates (261) completed the Teaching Behavior Checklist, Academic Self-Concept scale, and Academic Motivation scale. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that academic self-efficacy and extrinsic motivation explained…

  20. Teacher Efficacy: How Teachers Rate Themselves and How Students Rate Their Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordelon, Thomas D.; Phillips, Iris; Parkison, Paul T.; Thomas, Jeff; Howell, Corinne

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare how teachers rate themselves with how students rate their teachers on the Teacher Efficacy the External Influences Scale, a scale designed to assess teachers' efficacy in the area of classroom organization and discipline. The participants in this study were seventh- and eighth-grade teachers and…

  1. Relation between Assertiveness, Academic Self-Efficacy, and Psychosocial Adjustment among International Graduate Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poyrazli, Senel; Arbona, Consuelo; Nora, Amaury; McPherson, Robert; Pisecco, Stewart

    2002-01-01

    Rathus Assertiveness Schedule, Academic Self-Efficacy Scale, The Inventory for Student Adjustment Strain, and UCLA Loneliness Scale were used to examine a total of 122 graduate international students. Findings indicate that English proficiency, assertiveness, and academic self-efficacy contributed uniquely to the variance in students' general…

  2. Beijing In-Service Teachers' Self-Efficacy and Attitudes towards Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malinen, Olli-Pekka; Savolainen, Hannu; Xu, Jiacheng

    2012-01-01

    Four-hundred-and-fifty-one in-service teachers from the Beijing municipality filled in a questionnaire containing a Teacher Efficacy for Inclusive Practices (TEIP) scale. The aim was to examine the factor structure of the TEIP scale among mainland Chinese in-service teachers, and to investigate the relationship between self-efficacy for inclusive…

  3. Sequential High-Impact, Free-Fall Loading and Zoledronic Acid as a Novel Pre-Treatment for Disuse-Induced Bone Loss

    E-print Network

    Boudreaux, Ramon

    2014-03-31

    The purpose of our investigation was to evaluate the efficacy of prophylactic interventions consisting of simulated exercise (high-impact, free-fall loading) and/or a bisphosphonate (zoledronic acid), to counter disuse-induced bone loss of adult...

  4. A Fall and Near-Fall Assessment and Evaluation System

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Anh; Shi, Yang; Teng, Daniel; Ralhan, Amitoz; Chen, Li; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina; Basran, Jenny; Ko, Seok-Bum; McCrowsky, Carl

    2009-01-01

    The FANFARE (Falls And Near Falls Assessment Research and Evaluation) project has developed a system to fulfill the need for a wearable device to collect data for fall and near-falls analysis. The system consists of a computer and a wireless sensor network to measure, display, and store fall related parameters such as postural activities and heart rate variability. Ease of use and low power are considered in the design. The system was built and tested successfully. Different machine learning algorithms were applied to the stored data for fall and near-fall evaluation. Results indicate that the Naïve Bayes algorithm is the best choice, due to its fast model building and high accuracy in fall detection. PMID:19662151

  5. [Efficacy--appropriateness].

    PubMed

    Baldasseroni, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    I discuss the meaning and differences between the Appropriateness and Efficacy in the prevention of occupational risks and damage. It is argued that to be "appropriate" an intervention should be suitable, keeping with the circumstances, while the intervention that achieves the goal is "effective". In practice, the appropriateness is very used in the field of clinical medicine, with reference to the treatment, while in the prevention it is usual to use with greater frequency the term of effectiveness. PMID:25558725

  6. Long-Term Efficacy of Three Contraceptive Approaches for Population Control of Wild Horses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary Killian; Nancy K. Diehl; Lowell Miller; Jack Rhyan

    Controlling fertility of feral horses through the use of long-acting contraceptives or sterilization approaches has been championed as a reasonable and humane solution for addressing overpopulation problems in several western states. However, methods to accomplish long-term contraceptive efficacy of horses following a single treatment have been lacking. In fall 2002 and spring 2003, we initiated a study to compare the

  7. Elementary Students' Self-Efficacy Beliefs in Science: Role of Grade Level, Gender, and Socio-Economic Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karaarslan, Guliz; Sungur, Semra

    2011-01-01

    This study examined grade level and gender difference with respect to elementary students' science and technology self-efficacy. Additionally, relationship between socio-economic status (SES) and self-efficacy was examined. A total of 145 elementary students participated in the study. Self efficacy towards Science and Technology Scale was used to…

  8. Junior High School Students Internet Usage and Self-Efficacy: A Re-Examination of the Gender Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Meng-Jung; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigated the gender differences in junior high school students' Internet self-efficacy and their use of the Internet. A total of 1080 eighth graders were randomly selected from all junior high school students in Taiwan. The Internet Self-Efficacy Scale (ISES) was developed and used to examine students' Internet self-efficacy in two…

  9. IS 315 2013 Fall1 2013 Fall Syllabus

    E-print Network

    Carter, John

    IS 315 2013 Fall1 2013 Fall Syllabus IS 315-04: Information Systems in Business Instructor: James J. Successful business model requires a combined effort of #12;IS 315 2013 Fall2 both management and information will be accepted. All grades will be posted to Angel and it is your responsibility to check all of your grades

  10. Yosemite Falls behind Illilouette Ridge

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Uppder Yosemite Falls is visible on the right side of this image, taken behind Illilouette Ridge. Upper Yosemite Falls is 1,430 ft (440 m) tall. It is one of the most famous waterfalls in Yosemite National Park....

  11. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project

    E-print Network

    from the Albeni Falls Hydroelectric Project #12;Biological Objective 1 Protect 900 acres of wetland hydroelectric project. · 1988 publication of the Final Report Albeni Falls Wildlife Protection, Mitigation effects on wildlife resulting from hydroelectric development. 2. Select target wildlife species

  12. Bridalveil Fall in Fog

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this image, Bridalveil Fall can be seen shrouded in fog from Tunnel View in Yosemite National Park. The waterfall is 617 ft (188 m) in height and is one of the most well-known of Yosemite National Park's waterfalls....

  13. Fall Spring Spring Spring SpringFallFallFall Freshman Sophomore Junior Senior

    E-print Network

    . December 15, Sa Semester ends. Spring Semester 2008 January 14, M Instruction begins. January 21, M Martin­F Spring vacation. No classes. May 2, F Instruction ends. May 5­9, M­F Final examinations. May 10, Sa Instruction ends. July 17­18, Th­F Final examinations. July 19, Sa Summer Session ends. Fall Semester 2008

  14. Cohens Group Fall Meetings

    E-print Network

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Welcome! Cohen´s Group Fall Meetings #12;General Chemical Higiene Training A lab fume hood must not use a fume hood for storage of large equipment unless the hood is dedicated to this use. Never make office. Fume hoods are surveyed annually. If a fume hood fails either of two specific tests, it may

  15. Illilouette Falls Detail

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this image, Illilouettea Falls, a tributary of the Merced River can be seen just upstream of Happy Isles and the USGS Benchmark Streamgage in Yosemite National Park. The Merced River is a 145 mile (233 km) long tributary of the San Joaquin River. It drains a large section of the Sierra Nevad...

  16. Freshmen Survey. Fall 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodyear, Don

    In 1985, College of the Sequoias (COS) was asked by the Cooperative Institutional Research Program (conducted jointly by the American Council on Education and the University of California, Los Angeles) to participate in a survey of incoming freshmen for the fall 1985 semester. During the summer counseling session, 259 new COS freshmen were…

  17. [The psychological dimensions of falls].

    PubMed

    Schoenenburg, Sylvie; Beghin, Vinciane; Pardessus, Vinciane; Puiseux, François

    2015-01-01

    Falls in the elderly can have serious consequences both functional and psychological. In addition to the severe post-fall syndrome, other psychological consequences require adapted care. This article intends to highlight the multiple dimensions of the psychological impact of falls, through testimony. Loss of control of her body, awakening of fear of death, narcissistic injury...; the elderly talk about their felt. PMID:25966526

  18. International Student Enrollment Fall 2013

    E-print Network

    Jacobs, Lucia

    % Near East 2% South and Central Asia 10% Western Hemisphere 12% Region of Origin Grad Degree- seeking://internationaloffice.berkeley.edu #12;Country Fall 2012 Fall 2013 Fall 2013 % of Total % Change 1 China 1228 1568 27.78% 27.69% 2 Korea 8 School of Information 47 9 Goldman Graduate School of Public Policy 30 10 School Public Health 26

  19. High School Decision-Making at Henry Lord Middle School in Fall River

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronhard, Aimee A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate how students at Henry Lord Middle School in Fall River take into consideration their initial college and career aspirations when making their decision for high school. Self-efficacy theory, critical theory, and a literature review related to high school decision-making inform the analysis of…

  20. Evaluation of Fungicides for Control of Rapid Blight of Poa trivialis in fall 2006

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. W. Olsen; G. Towers; J. Gilbert

    Rapid blight is a new disease of cool season turf grasses caused by Labyrinthula terrestris, an organism in a group referred to as the marine slime molds. A trial was conducted in fall 2006-winter 2007 to repeat an evaluation of efficacy of different rates and intervals of Insignia fungicide and elemental sulfur, both of which gave acceptable control in trials

  1. A case study: Self-efficacy beliefs of teacher candidates regarding developing educational software

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adem Uzun; Rüçhan Özk?l?ç; Aysan ?entürk

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the self-efficacy beliefs of the teacher candidates towards developing educational software by some variables such as gender and grade and to investigate the correlation between self-efficacy beliefs and academic achievement. Sixty students participated to this study. Education Software Development Self-Efficacy Perception Scale was used as instrument. No significant difference was found between

  2. Self-efficacy instruments for patients with chronic diseases suffer from methodological limitations - a systematic review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anja Frei; Anna Svarin; Claudia Steurer-Stey; Milo A Puhan

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Measurement of self-efficacy requires carefully developed and validated instruments. It is currently unclear whether available self-efficacy instruments for chronic diseases fulfill these requirements. Our aim was to systematically identify all existing self-efficacy scales for five major chronic diseases and to assess their development and validation process. METHODS: We conducted a systematic literature search in electronic databases (MEDLINE, PSYCHINFO, and

  3. Effects of a Stress Management workshop on perceived stress, state anxiety, and self-efficacy in counselors-in-training

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vida Ann-Nicholas Fiorentino

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a Stress Management workshop on perceived stress, state anxiety, and self-efficacy in counselors-in-training. It was hypothesized the stress management workshop with verbal persuasion e-mail messages would have a positive effect on decreasing perceived stress and state anxiety, while enhancing self-efficacy in counselors-in-training. The study participants were the practicum students from Spring\\/Summer and Fall, 2008

  4. Free Fall Model

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Andrew Duffy

    2014-06-06

    This simulation allows students to examine the motion of an object in free fall. Download below. The user can control the initial height (0-20m), set an initial velocity from -20 to 20 m/s, and change the rate of gravitational acceleration from zero to 20 m/s/s (Earth's gravitational constant is ~9.8 m/s/s). Students can also launch the ball upward from any point on the line of motion. The free fall is displayed as a motion diagram, while graphs are simultaneously displayed showing position vs. time, velocity vs. time, and acceleration vs. time. See Annotations for an editor-recommended tutorial that further explains how graphs are used to represent free fall motion. This item was created with Easy Java Simulations (EJS), a modeling tool that allows users without formal programming experience to generate computer models and simulations. To run the simulation, simply click the Java Archive file below.

  5. Predicting Mathematics Achievement by Motivation and Self-Efficacy across Gender and Achievement Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartawi, AbdelAziz; Alsawaie, Othman N.; Dodeen, Hamzeh; Tibi, Sana; Alghazo, Iman M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which self-efficacy and motivation served as a predictor for mathematics achievement of fifth grade students in United Arab Emirates (UAE) across gender and achievement levels. Self-efficacy was measured by two scales, which differed in levels of specificity--Category Specific and Task Specific. Motivation was…

  6. Relationships among Preservice Science Teachers' Epistemological Beliefs, Epistemological World Views, and Self-efficacy Beliefs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ozgul Yilmaz-Tuzun; Mustafa Sami Topcu

    2008-01-01

    This study discusses preservice elementary science teachers’ (PSTs) epistemological beliefs and the relationships among their epistemological beliefs, epistemological world views, and self?efficacy beliefs. Four hundred and twenty?nine PSTs who were enrolled in five large universities completed the Schommer Epistemological Questionnaire (SEQ), the Epistemological World Views Scale, andthe Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument. Factor analysis results revealed four factors for the

  7. The Roles of Teacher Efficacy in Instructional Innovation: Its Predictive Relations to Constructivist and Didactic Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nie, Youyan; Tan, Gim Hoon; Liau, Albert Kienfie; Lau, Shun; Chua, Bee Leng

    2013-01-01

    Constructivist instruction has been implemented in the current instructional innovation in Singapore. Large scale survey study was conducted to examine the roles of teacher efficacy in implementing the innovative constructivist instruction. The results showed that the positive correlation between teacher efficacy and constructivist instruction was…

  8. Further Validation of a U.S. Adult Social Self-Efficacy Inventory in Chinese Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Jinyan; Meng, Hui; Zhao, Bihua; Patel, Trishna

    2012-01-01

    The authors report further validity evidence for the Chinese version of a U.S. adult social self-efficacy inventory, the "Perceived Social Self-Efficacy" (PSSE) scale in Chinese populations. Study 1 participants were 323 new graduate students enrolled at a large university in an east coast city of the People's Republic of China. Differential item…

  9. Efficacy and tolerability of pregabalin in patients with difficult-to-treat epilepsy and intellectual disability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernd Huber; Michelina Bocchicchio; Elisabeth Feuerbaum; Theodor May; Thomas Meinert; Enrique Robertson; Heide Schorlemmer; Wolfgang Wagner; Elisabeth Wilking; Michael Seidel

    2008-01-01

    In a retrospective evaluation of 32 inpatients with therapy-resistant epilepsy and intellectual disability, the efficacy of pregabalin (PGB) treatment was assessed after 6 and 12 months. The combined efficacy measure included the percentage reduction in seizure frequency, as well as the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scale. Tolerability was assessed using a list of the 10 adverse effects most frequently observed

  10. Teacher Efficacy Ratings by African American and European American Preservice Teachers at a Historically Black University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mccray Sorrells, Audrey; Schaller, James; Kueifen Yang, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factor structures of a modified form of Gibson and Dembos Teacher Efficacy Scale with a combined total of 123 African American and European American preservice teachers at a historically Black university, test for differences between participants on teacher efficacy, and examine relationships among…

  11. Item Response Modeling: An Evaluation of the Children's Fruit and Vegetable Self-Efficacy Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Kathy; Baranowski, Tom; Thompson, Debbe

    2006-01-01

    Perceived self-efficacy (SE) for eating fruit and vegetables (FV) is a key variable mediating FV change in interventions. This study applies item response modeling (IRM) to a fruit, juice and vegetable self-efficacy questionnaire (FVSEQ) previously validated with classical test theory (CTT) procedures. The 24-item (five-point Likert scale) FVSEQ…

  12. The Effects of School Administration Self-Efficacy on School Climate and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if there are significant relationships between the efficacies of the school principal, the climate of the school, and student achievement. Five schools within a small rural school district participated in this study. The principals completed the Principal Sense of Efficacy Scale, while the teachers at the…

  13. Buffering or Strengthening: The Moderating Effect of Self-Efficacy on Stressor-Strain Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xie, Dong

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the moderating effect of self-efficacy on stressor-strain relationship among 30 telephone interviewers in an academic survey research center. Participants filled out measures of the Skills Confidence Inventory and the Scale of Perceived Social Self-Efficacy. They reported their state anxiety and recorded the number of…

  14. Changes in Self-Efficacy of Prospective Special and General Education Teachers: Implication for Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyser, Yona; Zeiger, Tali; Romi, Shlomo

    2011-01-01

    The impact of three variables on the self-efficacy of 992 general and special education preservice teachers was examined. These variables were years of preservice education, experience with children with special educational needs, and training in inclusion or exceptional education. All participants responded to a teacher self-efficacy scale that…

  15. Determination of Self-Efficacy Beliefs of High School Students towards Math Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozgen, Kemal; Bindaka, Recep

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the high school students' self-efficacy beliefs about math literacy, and examine this beliefs in terms of some variables. The research was conducted on 712 high school students. A questionnaire and Math Literacy Self-Efficacy Scale were used for data collection. The data were analyzed in terms of t-test,…

  16. Instructional Leadership Influence on Collective Teacher Efficacy to Improve School Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fancera, Samuel F.; Bliss, James R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether instructional leadership functions, as defined in Hallinger's Principal Instructional Management Rating Scale, positively influence collective teacher efficacy to improve school achievement. Teachers from sample schools provided data for measures of collective teacher efficacy and instructional…

  17. Self-efficacy and outcome expectations as predictors of controlled smoking status

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Phillip R. Godding; Russell E. Glasgow

    1985-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to develop and evaluate the usefulness of self-efficacy and outcome expectation measures in predicting smoking status. Subjects were chronic smokers participating in controlled smoking treatment programs. In Study 1, Self-Efficacy and Outcome Expectancy Scales were developed and used to concurrently predict nicotine content, amount of each cigarette smoked, number of cigarettes smoked, and carbon monoxide levels.

  18. Epistemological Beliefs and Teacher Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Griffin W.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the strength of teachers' epistemological beliefs predicted variance in teachers' sense of efficacy. Specifically, the study sought to determine the extent to which beliefs in Certain Knowledge and Omniscient Authority accounted for variability in general teaching efficacy, over and above that…

  19. Clinical prediction of fall risk and white matter abnormalities: a diffusion tensor imaging study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Tinetti scale is a simple clinical tool designed to predict risk of falling by focusing on gait and stance impairment in elderly persons. Gait impairment is also associated with white matter (WM) abnormalities. Objective: To test the hypothesis that elderly subjects at risk for falling, as deter...

  20. Falls, fractures, and hip pads.

    PubMed

    Sinaki, Mehrsheed

    2004-12-01

    Improvement of balance along with bone-enhancing pharmacotherapy can improve the level of an individual's physical activity and mobility. Balance can be improved with enhancement of postural proprioception and muscular strength. Postural deformities have been shown to impair quality of life of osteoporotic individuals. Kyphotic posture has been demonstrated to contribute to propensity to fall in osteoporotic individuals. Kyphotic posturing and gait disorders can be managed through proprioceptive training, use of a weighted kypho-orthosis, muscle re-education, and safe resistance exercises. Proprioceptive balance training can reduce falls and fracture. Sarcopenia and osteoporotic fractures create musculoskeletal challenges that cannot be met with pharmacotherapy alone. Bone loss, imbalance, and gait disorder along with cognitive concerns can increase with aging. Even in healthy persons, predisposition to falls increases with age-related neuromuscular changes. Muscle strength decreases approximately 50% from age 30 to 80. Furthermore, the amount of body sway increases with reduction of proprioception. Therefore, measures that can decrease imbalance can reduce the risk for falls and fracture. In normal balance, ankle strategies are recruited rather than hip strategies. Strengthening of the lower extremity muscles reduces the risk for falls. Gait aids can also decrease the risk for falls. During a fall, the risk for hip fracture increases 30-fold if there is direct impact to the hip. The use of hip protectors can decrease the risk for hip fracture during a sideways fall. Training in effective safe-landing strategies should be included in fall prevention programs. PMID:16036094

  1. The Sky is Falling 

    E-print Network

    Crawford, Amanda

    2005-01-01

    such solution. Cloud-seeding introduces foreign particles into an unproductive cloud, enhancing the formation of water droplets. In simpler terms, it is a way to produce rain by increasing the size of water droplets in a cloud that otherwise aren't heavy... into the core of the cloud where tiny water droplets, which can cre- ate rain, are abundant. Wing-tipped generators The Sky is Falling Using cloud-seeding technology to produce rain containing acetone and seeding material can also outfit the aircraft...

  2. The Way Things Fall

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stern, David P. (David Peter), 1931-

    This web page, authored and curated by David P. Stern, provides an introduction to the motion of objects due to gravity. Topics covered include free fall and acceleration due to gravity, with or without an initial velocity, and the effects of air resistance. Simple equations are integrated along with a short experiments related to Galileo's classic ramp experiment. A lesson plan for teachers is provided. This item is part of an extensive collection, "From Stargazers to Starships" that uses space exploration and space science to introduce concepts in physics and astronomy. Translations in Spanish and French are available.

  3. Community College Estimated Growth: Fall 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillippe, Kent; Mullin, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    A survey from the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) found that enrollment growth in fall 2010 slowed its pace at community colleges, increasing 3.2% from the previous year. This contrasts with more dramatic increases in recent years: more than 11% between fall 2008 and fall 2009, and nearly 17% between fall 2007 and fall 2009,…

  4. A program to support self-efficacy among athletes.

    PubMed

    Zagórska, A; Guszkowska, M

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a proprietary program for increasing self-efficacy among track and field athletes through vicarious experience and successful control over excitation and to determine the changes in the cognitive dimensions related to self-efficacy: dispositional optimism, hope of success and locus of control. An experimental two-group design with a pre-test and a post-test in the experimental and control groups was used. Forty-two athletes (29 women and 13 men) aged 17 to 24 years randomly assigned to the intervention and control groups took part in the study. The General Scale of Self-Efficacy, Hope for Success Questionnaire, Life Orientation Test Revised, and Internal-External Locus of Control Scale were used. The study's results indicate that the program was effective. Participants in the intervention group demonstrated a substantial increase in self-efficacy (P = 0.001). This was not observed in the control group (P = 0.732). After the completion of the program, athletes in the intervention group had significantly higher levels of self-efficacy (P = 0.001) and optimism (P = 0.017). They also had more internal locus of control compared to the control group (P = 0.001). Contrary to expectations, athletes in the intervention group demonstrated a substantially lower level of propensity in pathways (P = 0.001) as well as in agency (P = 0.001) (both components of the hope for success). PMID:24118561

  5. Outcome Rating Scale and Session Rating Scale in Psychological Practice: Clinical Utility of Ultra-Brief Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Alistair; Hemsley, Samantha

    2009-01-01

    The validity and reliability of the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS) and the Session Rating Scale (SRS) were evaluated against existing longer measures, including the Outcome Questionnaire-45, Working Alliance Inventory, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21, Quality of Life Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and General Self-efficacy Scale. The measures…

  6. Design, delivery, and outcomes from an interprofessional fall prevention course.

    PubMed

    Dauenhauer, Jason A; Glose, Susan; Watt, Celia

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the development, delivery, and outcomes from an interprofessional evidence-based falls management course for undergraduate and graduate students. The 3-credit elective course was developed by a gerontological social work and nursing faculty member in partnership with community-based housing and case management organizations. Creation of the course was in response to a mandate by the Health Resources and Services Administration, funding source for federal Geriatric Education Centers, to train interprofessional students using an evidence-based approach while tying the outcomes to improved health measures in the target population. Therefore, this article describes student competencies pre- and postcourse completion and outcomes of community-dwelling older adults completing a Matter of Balance (MOB) program delivered by these students. A total of 16 students completed the course which included delivery of the MOB program to 41 older adults. Results indicate statistically significant improvements in student outcomes from a pre/post falls knowledge test. For older adult participants, many screened positively for fall risk factors pre-post MOB participation showed statistically significant improvements in falls efficacy, control, management, and overall mobility. Opportunities and challenges associated with course delivery are also described. PMID:25941927

  7. FallIntramural2012-2013 Fall Team Sports*

    E-print Network

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    FallIntramural2012- 2013 Fall Team Sports* Registration accepted for teams or"free agent with 2 games per week. Sport Registration Dates Season Dates Co-Ed Softball Aug. 29 - Sept. 9 Sept. 10 of tournament style competition. Sport Registration Dates Initial Tournament Dates Badminton (Doubles) Sept. 5

  8. Enrollment Report Fall 2010 Fall 2013 Division Type College

    E-print Network

    Jackman, Todd

    Colleges Fall 2010 ­ Fall 2013 Undergraduate Colleges 2010 2011 2012 2013 Liberal Arts Art and Art History German Global Interdisciplinary Studies History Honors Humanities Italian Latin American Studies Liberal 318 Total Engineering 879 888 963 996 Nursing Nursing 567 603 577 564 Nursing UA 25 Total Nursing 567

  9. Assessing the impact of vicarious experiences on preservice elementary science teacher efficacy and preservice elementary teacher efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagler, Ronald Robert

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of vicarious experiences (preservice teacher field experiences) on perceived preservice science teacher efficacy and perceived preservice teacher efficacy. The participants for the study were 46 preservice elementary education students who were enrolled in CIED 3430 (Early Lab and Clinical Experience in Elementary Education II) at a large Midwestern state university and 20 classroom inservice teachers. A pretest was administered early in the spring 2007 semester, before the preservice teachers did their field experience and consisted of demographic questions and the STEBI-B. A posttest was administered at the end of the spring 2007 semester, after the preservice teachers had completed their field experiences, and consisted of demographic questions, a rating of the teachers they observed during their educational field experience, the STEBI-B and the TES. The field experience classroom inservice teachers provided personal, professional, and classroom data in the middle of the spring 2007 semester. All data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Findings and conclusions. Factors of gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status and preservice teacher program placement were found to be significant predictors of preservice teachers' efficacy scores. Even though, in some cases, these factors negatively impacted preservice teacher efficacy, preservice teachers should be placed in these environments when support is most available. The Teacher Efficacy Scale (Gibson & Dembo, 1984) is invalid. Even the construct of a general teacher efficacy is questionable.

  10. Modeling seasonal migration of fall armyworm moths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westbrook, J. K.; Nagoshi, R. N.; Meagher, R. L.; Fleischer, S. J.; Jairam, S.

    2015-06-01

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith), is a highly mobile insect pest of a wide range of host crops. However, this pest of tropical origin cannot survive extended periods of freezing temperature but must migrate northward each spring if it is to re-infest cropping areas in temperate regions. The northward limit of the winter-breeding region for North America extends to southern regions of Texas and Florida, but infestations are regularly reported as far north as Québec and Ontario provinces in Canada by the end of summer. Recent genetic analyses have characterized migratory pathways from these winter-breeding regions, but knowledge is lacking on the atmosphere's role in influencing the timing, distance, and direction of migratory flights. The Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model was used to simulate migratory flight of fall armyworm moths from distinct winter-breeding source areas. Model simulations identified regions of dominant immigration from the Florida and Texas source areas and overlapping immigrant populations in the Alabama-Georgia and Pennsylvania-Mid-Atlantic regions. This simulated migratory pattern corroborates a previous migratory map based on the distribution of fall armyworm haplotype profiles. We found a significant regression between the simulated first week of moth immigration and first week of moth capture (for locations which captured ?10 moths), which on average indicated that the model simulated first immigration 2 weeks before first captures in pheromone traps. The results contribute to knowledge of fall armyworm population ecology on a continental scale and will aid in the prediction and interpretation of inter-annual variability of insect migration patterns including those in response to climatic change and adoption rates of transgenic cultivars.

  11. CS-3333 Computer Vision Algorithms and Applications Fall 2014 Table of Contents

    E-print Network

    Beauchemin, Steven S.

    -pixel accuracy, with each point associated with a particular scale value. SIFT Features The SIFT (Scale-Invariant Feature Transform) algorithm also detects features as local maxima in image and scale space but usCS-3333 Computer Vision Algorithms and Applications Fall 2014 Table of Contents Feature Point

  12. The Efficacy of a Targeted Balance and Mobility Training Program in the Treatment of Older Adult Women with Arthritis

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    The Efficacy of a Targeted Balance and Mobility Training Program in the Treatment of Older Adult adult women with osteoarthritis and/or rheumatoid arthritis.Methods: Thirty-five community. Immediate fall risk declined by 18-24%. Conclusions: Older adult females with arthritis can derive

  13. An Empirical Investigation of the Relationshops Among Math Confidence, Computer Confidence and Computer Self-Efficacy: Implications for Technology Education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Morris Jr. R. Franklin; Evelyn H. Thrasher

    2008-01-01

    A popular issue in the 1980’s and early 1990’s, computer self-efficacy (CSE) remains an important area of research. Educators, industry leaders, and government officials argue that the United States is falling behind other countries in technology innovation. And, most attribute this situation to ineffective education in the areas of math, science, and technology. The current study provides insight into these

  14. [FALLS IN PATIENTS WITH DEMENTIA].

    PubMed

    Aizen, Efraim

    2015-05-01

    Older people with dementia are at increased risk of falls and their consequences. Patients with dementia fall twice as often as elderly cognitively intact people and are at greater risk of injurious falls. Falls in older people with dementia cause higher rates of morbidity, mortality and institutionalization. There is limited literature attempting to show specific risk factors for falls in this population, mainly: Lewy body dementia, dementia related to Parkinson's disease and depression, psychotropic medication, functional disability and behavioral disturbances. The Physiological Profile Assessment (PPAJ has been found to be a good fall risk screening tool in this population. There are few trials that have shown limited effectiveness of targeted fall prevention programs in community-dwelling cognitively impaired elderly. The evidence from hospitals and residential care is not conclusive. However, it has been demonstrated that some interventions, primarily exercise interventions, can modify certain risk factors in patients with dementia. Further research is required in specifically targeting fall prevention in older people with dementia. PMID:26168645

  15. Project Profile Report, Fall 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slotnick, Sandra

    Pennsylvania College of Technology's Project Profile is designed to collect data on the characteristics and objectives of each year's entering students and compare results to those from previous years. This report presents data on the 4,759 students who applied and matriculated in fall 1996 and includes comparisons to profiles developed from fall

  16. NOVA Fall 1999 Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Wayne; Karlan, James W.; Ransick, Kristina; Rosene, Dale; Sammons, Fran Lyons; Sammons, James

    This teacher's guide complements five programs that aired on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) in the fall of 1999. Programs include: (1) "Fall of the Leaning Tower"; (2) "Everest: The Mystery of Mallory and Irvine"; (3) "Time Travel, Decoding Nazi Secrets"; (3) "Voyage of Doom"; and (5) "Barely Breathing". It provides activity set-ups related…

  17. Academic Computing Newsletter: Fall 1998

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Jo Orzech

    1998-01-01

    Academic Computing Newsletter for Fall 1998. Contents include:\\u000aPrime Replacement 1 New PCs 1 Software Update 2 New Color Printer 2 TopClass 2 Did You Know? 2 Fall Workshops 3 Calendar of Events 4 Email Instructions 4 Computer Labs on Campus 5 General Information 6

  18. Development of a Survey to Measure Self-Efficacy and Attitudes toward Web-Based Professional Development among Elementary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kao, Chia-Pin; Tsai, Chin-Chung; Shih, Meilun

    2014-01-01

    The major purpose of this study was to develop a survey to measure elementary school teachers' self-efficacy for web-based professional development. Based on interviews with eight elementary school teachers, three scales of web-based professional development self-efficacy (WPDSE) were formed, namely, general self-efficacy (measuring…

  19. Obesity and hormonal contraceptive efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jennifer A; Burke, Anne E

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern affecting an increasing proportion of reproductive-aged women. Avoiding unintended pregnancy is of major importance, given the increased risks associated with pregnancy, but obesity may affect the efficacy of hormonal contraceptives by altering how these drugs are absorbed, distributed, metabolized or eliminated. Limited data suggest that long-acting, reversible contraceptives maintain excellent efficacy in obese women. Some studies demonstrating altered pharmacokinetic parameters and increased failure rates with combined oral contraceptives, the contraceptive patch and emergency contraceptive pills suggest decreased efficacy of these methods. It is unclear whether bariatric surgery affects hormonal contraceptive efficacy. Obese women should be offered the full range of contraceptive options, with counseling that balances the risks and benefits of each method, including the risk of unintended pregnancy. PMID:24007251

  20. Association between Physical Functionality and Falls Risk in Community-Living Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Smee, Disa J.; Anson, Judith M.; Waddington, Gordon S.; Berry, Helen L.

    2012-01-01

    Ageing-related declines in physiological attributes, such as muscle strength, can bring with them an increased risk of falls and subsequently greater risk of losing independence. These declines have substantial impact on an individual's functional ability. However, the precise relationship between falls risk and physical functionality has not been evaluated. The aims of this study were to determine the association between falls risk and physical functionality using objective measures and to create an appropriate model to explain variance in falls risk. Thirty-two independently living adults aged 65–92 years completed the FallScreen, the Continuous-Scale Physical Functional Performance 10 (CS-PFP10) tests, and the 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12). The relationships between falls risk, physical functionality, and age were investigated using correlational and multiple hierarchical regression analyses. Overall, total physical functionality accounted for 24% of variance in an individual's falls risk while age explained a further 13%. The oldest-old age group had significantly greater falls risk and significantly lower physical functional performance. Mean scores for all measures showed that there were substantial (but not significant) differences between males and females. While increasing age is the strongest single predictor of increasing falls risk, poorer physical functionality was strongly, independently related to greater falls risk. PMID:23304137

  1. Falling short: recruiting elderly individuals for a fall study.

    PubMed

    Wilding, Melody J; Seegert, Liz; Rupcic, Sonia; Griffin, Margaret; Kachnowski, Stan; Parasuraman, Sarika

    2013-03-01

    Despite the importance of movement and activity indicators in predicting the risk of falls in older adults, collection and analysis of such data are limited. The dearth may result from recruitment challenges faced by fall-related studies that capture data on movement and activity in older adults. This article addresses recruitment and sampling methodology issues and draws attention to the gap in best practices left by previous literature. Authors conducted a systematic review of methods used to recruit elderly individuals for "activity-related fall studies" that assessed subjects' movement and mobility, and investigated incidence of real falls. The review highlighted effective recruitment strategies and identified challenges across several settings. Literature review findings were compared to recruitment challenges encountered in an activity-related fall study from 2011, focused on enrolling a target group of older adults with both high risk of falling and the requisite cognitive capacity to adhere to activity protocols. The analysis yielded several recommendations for improving recruitment of older adults for activity-related fall studies, including: recruiting from community-based settings; utilizing short-term activity protocols to promote involvement among institutionalized elderly; establishing eligibility criteria that may include those with lower cognitive functioning, mobility restrictions, and co-morbidities; employing direct-mail recruitment methods; and utilizing intermediaries to recruit institutionalized elderly. PMID:23274452

  2. The Fall of Enron

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2006-01-01

    The very mention of Enron is enough to make some people rather upset, and in some circles, it is probably best not to bring up the name of this corporation at all. But, with an eye towards informing the public, the Houston Chronicle has taken on this thorny topic by creating this rather comprehensive and intelligent look at the fall of this once-mighty corporation. On the site, visitors can learn about the events leading up to the companyâ??s downfall through a timeline of events and past news stories created by staff members at the newspaper. The site also contains a tremendous amount of material on the current trial of Enron executives Kenneth Lay and Jeff Skilling. Coverage includes blogs containing observations from noted attorneys, transcripts of court documents and testimony, as well as photo galleries.

  3. Computer Self-Efficacy, Computer Anxiety, and Attitudes toward the Internet: A Study among Undergraduates in Unimas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hong Kian Sam; Abang Ekhsan Abang Othman; Zaimuarifuddin Shukri Nordin

    2005-01-01

    Eighty-one female and sixty-seven male undergraduates at a Malaysian university, from seven faculties and a Center for Language Studies completed a Computer Self-Efficacy Scale, Computer Anxiety Scale, and an Attitudes toward the Internet Scale and give information about their use of the Internet. This survey research investigated undergraduates' computer anxiety, computer self-efficacy, and reported use of and attitudes toward the

  4. Self-efficacy of knee function as a pre-operative predictor of outcome 1 year after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pia Thomeé; Peter Währborg; Mats Börjesson; Roland Thomeé; B. I. Eriksson; Jon Karlsson

    2008-01-01

    The knee self-efficacy scale (K-SES) has been shown to have good reliability, validity and responsiveness during rehabilitation\\u000a for patients’ perceived self-efficacy of knee function. Determinants of self-efficacy of knee function 1 year after ACL reconstruction\\u000a have been found to be the patients’ internal locus of control and knee symptoms in sports and recreation. The predictive ability\\u000a of perceived self-efficacy of knee

  5. Metolachlor dissipation following fall and spring application to eroded and rehabilitated landscapes of the US Corn Belt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of landscape position and soil properties on the rate of metolachlor dissipation and weed control efficacy of fall- and spring-applied metolachlor in eroded and rehabilitated landforms in the midwestern United States. Soil-landscape rehabilitation result...

  6. Shampoos: ingredients, efficacy and adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2007-05-01

    Shampoos are the most frequently prescribed treatment for the hair and scalp. The different qualities demanded from a shampoo go beyond cleansing. A cosmetic benefit is expected, and the shampoo has to be tailored to variations associated with hair quality, age, hair care habits, and specific problems related to the condition of the scalp. The reciprocal relationship between cosmetic technology and medical therapy is reflected in the advances of shampoo formulation that has made applications possible that combine benefits of cosmetic hair care products with efficacy of medicinal products. A shampoo is composed of 10 to 30 ingredients: cleansing agents (surfactants), conditioning agents, special care ingredients, and additives. Since the cleansing activity depends on the type and amount of surfactants utilized, shampoos are composed of a blend of different surfactants, depending on the requirements of the individual hair type. Development time from the concept to the commercial shampoo may take longer than a year. Much effort is invested in the development of conditioning agents, which impart luster, smoothness, volume and buoyancy. Another prerequisite is a scalp free of scaling. Current anti-dandruff agents primarily have an antimicrobial mode of action, and inhibit growth of Malassezia spp. Recent developments in shampoo technology have led to increased efficacy of anti-dandruff agents, allowing shorter contact time, and reducing irritation. PMID:17451380

  7. "Fall" Forum Our College is....

    E-print Network

    Welcome Everyone #12;"Fall" Forum #12;Our College is.... ....helping animals · Ensure the CVMBS is THE place to work #12;Transparency Financial · Ability to reinvest tuition be responsible #12;Collaboration · Across College & Campus · Shared Facilities · Combined Programs · SAU

  8. UAA Leadership Honors Fall 2013

    E-print Network

    Pantaleone, Jim

    1 UAA Leadership Honors Fall 2013 Purpose UAA Leadership their leadership contributions to the University of Alaska Anchorage while maintaining academic excellence. Leadership activities and involvement must promote individual

  9. UAA Leadership Honors Fall 2014

    E-print Network

    Pantaleone, Jim

    UAA Leadership Honors Fall 2014 Purpose UAA Leadership Honors are awarded to individuals upon graduation to recognize and honor their leadership. Leadership activities and involvement must promote individual and collective growth

  10. Highlights of 2012 Fall Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Carol

    2013-01-01

    This past December the streets of San Francisco, Calif., surrounding the Moscone Center were awash with a sea of Earth and space scientists attending the 45th consecutive AGU Fall Meeting, eager to share and expand their knowledge "for the benefit of humanity." As it has for many years, attendance at AGU's Fall Meeting—the largest gathering of Earth and space scientists in the world—continued to increase, this year passing the 24,000 mark. Attendees at the meeting, which took place on 3-7 December 2012, hailed from 97 countries; nearly 7000 of them were students. News from the Fall Meeting was carried in newspapers and on Web sites around the world, and the social media sphere lit up with talk of AGU and the Fall Meeting. It's even reported that for a short time we were a trending topic on Twitter.

  11. Fall 2012 Phonetics and Phonology

    E-print Network

    Spirtes, Peter

    80282 Fall 2012 Phonetics and Phonology Course goals: This course of the phonetic descriptions of sounds and phonemic patterns in languages. Students will learn to make phonetic transcriptions of raw data from unfamiliar

  12. Analysis of rock-fall and rock-fall avalanche seismograms in the French Alps

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Analysis of rock-fall and rock-fall avalanche seismograms in the French Alps J. Deparis, D reviews seismograms from 10 rock-fall events recorded between 1992 and 2001 by the permanent seismological and classify ground-motion vibrations generated by these Alpine rock-falls. Each rock-fall has also been

  13. A Conceptual Model of Referee Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Guillén, Félix; Feltz, Deborah L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual model of referee efficacy, defines the concept, proposes sources of referee specific efficacy information, and suggests consequences of having high or low referee efficacy. Referee efficacy is defined as the extent to which referees believe they have the capacity to perform successfully in their job. Referee efficacy beliefs are hypothesized to be influenced by mastery experiences, referee knowledge/education, support from significant others, physical/mental preparedness, environmental comfort, and perceived anxiety. In turn, referee efficacy beliefs are hypothesized to influence referee performance, referee stress, athlete rule violations, athlete satisfaction, and co-referee satisfaction. PMID:21713174

  14. Disentangling the Free-Fall Arch Paradox in Silo Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio-Largo, S. M.; Janda, A.; Maza, D.; Zuriguel, I.; Hidalgo, R. C.

    2015-06-01

    Several theoretical predictions of the mass flow rate of granular media discharged from a silo are based on the spontaneous development of a free-fall arch region, the existence of which is still controversial. In this Letter, we study experimentally and numerically the particle flow through an orifice placed at the bottom of 2D and 3D silos. The implementation of a coarse-grained technique allows a thorough description of all the kinetic and micromechanical properties of the particle flow in the outlet proximities. Though the free-fall arch does not exist as traditionally understood—a region above which particles have negligible velocity and below which particles fall solely under gravity action—we discover that the kinetic pressure displays a well-defined transition in a position that scales with the outlet size. This universal scaling explains why the free-fall arch picture has served as an approximation to describe the flow rate in the discharge of silos.

  15. Turkish Pre-Service Science and Mathematics Teachers' Computer Related Self-Efficacies, Attitudes, and the Relationship between These Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pamuk, Savas; Peker, Deniz

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate Turkish pre-service science and mathematics teachers' computer self-efficacies (CSEs) and computer attitude (CA) considering gender, year in program, and computer ownership as independent variables. Additionally the study aimed to examine the relationship between CSE and CA. Computer Self-efficacy Scale

  16. Efficacy of sweeteners and sugar substitutes in caries prevention.

    PubMed

    Imfeld, T

    1993-01-01

    The caries-preventive efficacy of sweeteners and sugar substitutes is not clearly established on an epidemiological scale. A review of cariogenicity assessments in vitro and in vivo as well as of human clinical caries trials, however, clearly demonstrates that the replacement of sugar by such products has a caries-preventive effect. The clinical relevance of some bacteriostatic and/or cariostatic properties ascribed to saccharin, aspartame, and xylitol remains to be corroborated. PMID:8500126

  17. The Analysis of Social Studies Pre-Service Teachers' Interpersonal Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yazici, Kubilay

    2010-01-01

    Interpersonal self efficacy scale which is developed by Brouser and Tomic (2002) and modified for Turkish by Capri and Kan (2006) is applied to 262 pre-service teachers studying in 1st-4th grades of social studies department in the Faculty of Education at Nigde University together with a personal information form. The scale is proved highly valid…

  18. Efficacy of psychiatric inpatient hospitalization for adolescents as measured by pre- and post-MMPI profiles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Valerie Klinge; James Culbert; Leonard R. Piggott

    1982-01-01

    The efficacy of inpatient hospitalization on emotionally impaired adolescents was investigated using present and past MMPI data. The results indicated that there is a “flattening of the profile toward normalcy” from time of admission to discharge time. Further statistical analysis revealed that of the 9 clinical MMPI scales, the “Depression” scale showed greatest change toward improvement.

  19. Development of an Instrument for Measuring Self-Efficacy in Cell Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeve, Suzanne; Kitchen, Elizabeth; Sudweeks, Richard R.; Bell, John D.; Bradshaw, William S.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the development of a ten-item scale to assess biology majors' self-efficacy towards the critical thinking and data analysis skills taught in an upper-division cell biology course. The original seven-item scale was expanded to include three additional items based on the results of item analysis. Evidence of reliability and…

  20. Vaccine Efficacy and Affinity Maturation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hayoun Lee; Michael W. Deem

    2002-01-01

    We propose macroscopic equations to describe variable vaccine efficacy between repeated vaccinee and first time vaccinee. The main ingredients are antigenic distance between epidemic strain and vaccne strain, and affinity maturation dynamics which differs in primary and second response. Increase of affinity by repeated vaccine leads to localization in immune space. This localization decreases the ability of the immune system

  1. Infant Care Self-Efficacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froman, Robin D.

    The Infant Care Survey (ICS) was developed to measure new mothers' confidence in their knowledge and skills regarding the care of babies under one year of age. One potential use of this test would be the identification of groups at high risk for health problems or for avoiding medical care. Self-efficacy was an important construct in the…

  2. OPERATIONAL NOTE EFFICACY OF DUETTM

    E-print Network

    OPERATIONAL NOTE EFFICACY OF DUETTM DUAL-ACTION ADULTICIDE AGAINST CAGED AEDES ALBOPICTUS, NJ 08901-8536 ABSTRACT. DuetTM was field evaluated against caged Aedes albopictus, with the use, sumithrin, adulticide, mosquito, Aedes albopictus Ultra-low volume (ULV) application is a proven method

  3. Precision Efficacy Analysis for Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Gordon P.

    When multiple linear regression is used to develop a prediction model, sample size must be large enough to ensure stable coefficients. If the derivation sample size is inadequate, the model may not predict well for future subjects. The precision efficacy analysis for regression (PEAR) method uses a cross- validity approach to select sample sizes…

  4. Efficacy Beliefs of Special Educators: The Relationships among Collective Efficacy, Teacher Self-Efficacy, and Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viel-Ruma, Kim; Houchins, David; Jolivette, Kristine; Benson, Gwen

    2010-01-01

    In order to examine the relationship between reported levels of teacher self-efficacy, collective efficacy, and job satisfaction in special educators, teachers in one school district completed three surveys measuring these constructs. The results indicated that teacher self-efficacy had a direct effect on job satisfaction. It was further found…

  5. Efficacy and safety of ginseng.

    PubMed

    Kitts, D; Hu, C

    2000-12-01

    Ginseng (Panax ginseng, C.A. Meyer) has been a popular herbal remedy used in eastern Asian cultures for thousands of years. In North America, the ginseng species indigenous to both Canada and the United States (Panax quinquefolium) represents an important industry for both domestic and export markets. There are numerous theories and claims describing the efficacy of ginseng, which can combat stress, enhance both the central and immune systems and contribute towards maintaining optimal oxidative status against certain chronic disease states and aging. Risk issues concerning the safety of ginseng at recommended dosages are less prominent and scientifically based. While some epidemiological or clinical studies have reported indications of efficacy for specific health benefits or potential toxicity, there are an equal number of studies that provide contradictory evidence. This situation has led to questionable conclusions concerning specific health benefits or risks associated with ginseng. Recent advances in the development of standardized extracts for both Panax ginseng (G-115) and Panax quinquefolius (CNT-2000) have and will continue to assist in the assessment of efficacy and safety standards for ginseng products. This paper reviews the scientific literature and evidence for ginseng efficacy and safety derived mostly from in vitro and animal studies and places emphasis on the need for more randomized, double-blinded, placebo clinical studies that can provide unequivocal conclusions. An example of the efficacy and safety of ginseng is provided with the description of biological activity of a North American ginseng extract (NAGE), which includes illustrating mechanisms for antioxidant activity without prooxidant properties. PMID:11276295

  6. Scales and hierarchies in warped compactifications and brane worlds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oliver Dewolfe; Steven B. Giddings

    2003-01-01

    Warped compactifications with branes provide a new approach to the hierarchy problem and generate a diversity of four-dimensional thresholds. We investigate the relationships between these scales, which fall into two classes. Geometrical scales, such as thresholds for Kaluza-Klein, excited string, and black hole production, are generically determined solely by the spacetime geometry. Dynamical scales, notably the scale of supersymmetry breaking

  7. On the use of ICE/SAT Lidar Space-Born Observations to Evaluate the Ability of MM5 Meso-Scale Model to Reproduce High Altitude Clouds Over Europe in Fall.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotkov, N. A.; Bhartia, P.; Yang, K.; Carn, S. A.; Krueger, A. J.; Dickerson, R. R.; Hains, J.; Li, C.; Li, Z.; Marufu, L.; Stehr, J.; Levelt, P. F.

    2005-05-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on EOS/Aura offers unprecedented spatial and spectral resolution, coupled with global coverage, for space-based UV measurements of sulfur dioxide (SO2). Publicly released SO2 pollution data are processed with the Band Residual Difference (BRD) algorithm that uses calibrated residuals at SO2 absorption band centers produced by the NASA operational ozone algorithm (OMTO3). By using optimum wavelengths for retrieval of SO2, the retrieval sensitivity is improved over NASA predecessor Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) by factors of 10 to 20, depending on location. The ground footprint of OMI is 8 times smaller than TOMS. These factors produce a two orders of magnitude improvement in the minimum detectable mass of SO2. The improved sensitivity now permits daily global measurement of heavy anthropogenic SO2 pollution. Anthropogenic SO2 emissions have been measured by OMI over known sources of air pollution, such as eastern China, Eastern Europe, and from individual copper smelters in South America and elsewhere. Here we present data from a case study conducted over Shenyang in NE China as part of EAST-AIRE in April 2005. SO2 observations from instrumented aircraft flights are compared with OMI SO2 maps. The OMI SO2 algorithm was improved to account for the known altitude profile of SO2, and the comparison demonstrates that this algorithm can distinguish between background SO2 conditions and heavy pollution on a daily basis. Between 5 and 7 April 2005 a cold front traveled from continental China, over Korea and on to the Sea of Japan. The satellite-derived measurements of SO2 confirm the in situ aircraft observations of high concentrations of SO2 (ca 4 DU) ahead of the front and lower concentrations behind it and provide evidence for a large-scale impact of pollutant emissions. The BRD algorithm sensitivity does not represent the maximum sensitivity theoretically achievable with OMI, and hence future improvements in instrument calibration and the algorithm should allow even weaker SO2 sources to be monitored routinely. Such measurements are essential given the growing concern over the effects of anthropogenically-forced climate change and intercontinental transport of air pollution. http://www.knmi.nl/omi/research/product/so2/introduction.html

  8. Cowlitz Falls Fish Passage.

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The upper Cowlitz was once home to native salmon and steelhead. But the combined impacts of overharvest, farming, logging and road building hammered fish runs. And in the 1960s, a pair of hydroelectric dams blocked the migration path of ocean-returning and ocean-going fish. The lower Cowlitz still supports hatchery runs of chinook, coho and steelhead. But some 200 river miles in the upper river basin--much of it prime spawning and rearing habitat--have been virtually cut off from the ocean for over 26 years. Now the idea is to trap-and-haul salmon and steelhead both ways and bypass previously impassable obstacles in the path of anadromous fish. The plan can be summarized, for the sake of explanation, in three steps: (1) trap and haul adult fish--collect ocean-returning adult fish at the lowermost Cowlitz dam, and truck them upstream; (2) reseed--release the ripe adults above the uppermost dam, and let them spawn naturally, at the same time, supplement these runs with hatchery born fry that are reared and imprinted in ponds and net pens in the watershed; (3) trap and haul smolts--collection the new generation of young fish as they arrive at the uppermost Cowlitz dam, truck them past the three dams, and release them to continue their downstream migration to the sea. The critical part of any fish-collection system is the method of fish attraction. Scientists have to find the best combination of attraction system and screens that will guide young fish to the right spot, away from the turbine intakes. In the spring of 1994 a test was made of a prototype system of baffles and slots on the upriver face of the Cowlitz Falls Dam. The prototype worked at 90% efficiency in early tests, and it worked without the kind of expensive screening devices that have been installed on other dams. Now that the success of the attraction system has been verified, Harza engineers and consultants will design and build the appropriate collection part of the system.

  9. Self-Efficacy and Self-Esteem in Third-Year Pharmacy Students

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To identify the experiential and demographic factors affecting the self-efficacy and self-esteem of third-year pharmacy (P3) students. Methods. A 25-item survey that included the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and the General Self-Efficacy Scale, as well as types and length of pharmacy practice experiences and demographic information was administered to doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students from 5 schools of pharmacy in New England at the completion of their P3 year. Results. The survey response rate was approximately 50% of the total target population (399/820). Students with a grade point average (GPA)?3.0 demonstrated a higher significant effect from unpaid introductory pharmacy practice experiences (IPPEs) on their self-efficacy scores (p<0.05) compared to students with lower GPAs. Students who had completed more than the required amount of pharmacy experiences had higher levels of self-efficacy and self-esteem (p<0.05). Ethnicity also was related to students’ levels of self-efficacy and self-esteem. Conclusion. Self-efficacy and self-esteem are two important factors in pharmacy practice. Colleges and schools of pharmacy should ensure that students complete enough practice experiences, beyond the minimum of 300 IPPE hours, as one way to improve their self-efficacy and self-esteem. PMID:25258439

  10. Analysis of biology candidate teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs on environmental education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Osman Çimen; Ahmet Gökmen; Sultan Altunsoy; Gülay Ekici; Mehmet Y?lmaz

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate candidate biology teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs of environmental education in terms of different variables. The study was of descriptive survey design. The sample comprised candidate teachers studying in Gazi University, Gazi Faculty of Education, Biology Teaching Department in the educational year of 2010-2011. Data were collected through “Environmental Education Self-Efficacy Belief Scale” devised

  11. Exploring the Sources of Turkish Pre-service Chemistry Teachers’ Chemistry Self-efficacy Beliefs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Esen Uzuntiryaki

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the underlying sources in developing chemistry self-efficacy beliefs of Turkish pre-service chemistry teachers. For this purpose, the College Chemistry Self-efficacy Scale (CCSS) was administered to 20 pre-service chemistry teachers. Then, phenomenological approach was employed and semi-structured interviews were conducted with five pre-service teachers selected based on their scores on the CCSS to identify the underlying

  12. Recycling misconceptions of perceived self-efficacy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Albert Bandura

    1984-01-01

    This commentary addresses misconceptions concerning perceived self-efficacy contained in the article by Eastman and Marzillier. People who regard themselves as highly efficacious act, think, and feel differently from those who perceive themselves as inefficacious. Self-percepts of efficacy thus contribute significantly to performance accomplishments rather than residing in the host organism simply as inert predictors of behaviors to come. A substantial

  13. Computer Self-Efficacy, Computer Anxiety, and Attitudes toward the Internet: A Study among Undergraduates in Unimas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sam, Hong Kian; Othman, Abang Ekhsan Abang; Nordin, Zaimuarifuddin Shukri

    2005-01-01

    Eighty-one female and sixty-seven male undergraduates at a Malaysian university, from seven faculties and a Center for Language Studies completed a Computer Self-Efficacy Scale, Computer Anxiety Scale, and an Attitudes toward the Internet Scale and give information about their use of the Internet. This survey research investigated undergraduates'…

  14. Historical rock falls in Yosemite National Park, California (1857-2011)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stock, Greg M.; Collins, Brian D.; Santaniello, David J.; Zimmer, Valerie L.; Wieczorek, Gerald F.; Snyder, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Inventories of rock falls and other types of landslides are valuable tools for improving understanding of these events. For example, detailed information on rock falls is critical for identifying mechanisms that trigger rock falls, for quantifying the susceptibility of different cliffs to rock falls, and for developing magnitude-frequency relations. Further, inventories can assist in quantifying the relative hazard and risk posed by these events over both short and long time scales. This report describes and presents the accompanying rock fall inventory database for Yosemite National Park, California. The inventory database documents 925 events spanning the period 1857–2011. Rock falls, rock slides, and other forms of slope movement represent a serious natural hazard in Yosemite National Park. Rock-fall hazard and risk are particularly relevant in Yosemite Valley, where glacially steepened granitic cliffs approach 1 km in height and where the majority of the approximately 4 million yearly visitors to the park congregate. In addition to damaging roads, trails, and other facilities, rock falls and other slope movement events have killed 15 people and injured at least 85 people in the park since the first documented rock fall in 1857. The accompanying report describes each of the organizational categories in the database, including event location, type of slope movement, date, volume, relative size, probable trigger, impact to humans, narrative description, references, and environmental conditions. The inventory database itself is contained in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet (Yosemite_rock_fall_database_1857-2011.xlsx). Narrative descriptions of events are contained in the database, but are also provided in a more readable Adobe portable document format (pdf) file (Yosemite_rock_fall_database_narratives_1857-2011.pdf) available for download separate from the database.

  15. BURDEN FALLS ROADLESS AREA, ILLINOIS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klasner, John S.; Thompson, Robert M.

    1984-01-01

    The Burden Falls Roadless Area lies in the Shawnee National Forest of southern Illinois, about 5 mi west of the western edge of the Illinois-Kentucky fluorspar district. Geologic mapping and geochemical surveys indicate that the area has little promise for the occurrence of fluorspar and associated minerals; other special studies also indicate little promise for oil and gas and construction materials. Traces of gold and silver were detected in some geochemical samples but follow-up studies indicate little promise for the occurrence of resources of these metals within the Burden Falls Roadless Area.

  16. Validating a multifactorial falls risk assessment.

    PubMed

    James, Michele B; Kimmons, Nancy J; Schasberger, Britta; Lefkowitz, Abigail

    2014-01-01

    Reducing risk of falls has been identified as a national safety goal by The Joint Commission (TJC). The purpose was to determine if the total score on the multifactorial Falls Risk Assessment accurately identifies the risk of falls in a homebound client. In addition, the study examined if any individual item had a higher predictive power with the incidence of falls. One hundred clients (> 65 years old) who sustained an avoidable fall during a home care episode of care, plus 25 home care clients in the same age range and time period, who did not fall. A retrospective chart review, including Falls Risk Assessment (FRA) performed at start of care, demographic information, specific physical therapy (PT) evaluation, and visit notes if necessary to determine if the fall met the inclusion criteria. Scores for each individual area of the assessment were collected for statistical analysis. Data were analyzed by a biostatistician using simple linear regression, t-tests, and regression of variable combinations. The total score on the multifactorial risk assessment tool was shown to have a strong relationship with incidence of falls. The average scores of individuals who fell after assessment were significantly higher than those of individuals who did not fall. No single factors were found to be highly predictive. A single approach to decreasing falls is likely to be less effective than a multipronged approach. Caregivers and providers are advised to consider the entirety of the falls risk and direct comprehensive interventions to address the multiple factors that lead to falls. PMID:24326470

  17. Diagnosis and Tests: Evaluating a Fall or Risk of Falling

    MedlinePLUS

    Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Falls Prevention › Diagnosis & Tests Font size A A A Print Share Glossary ... levels Detailed memory testing Physical therapy assessment A home safety evaluation. Updated: March 2012 Posted: March 2012 © 2015 Health in Aging. All rights reserved. Feedback • Site Map • Privacy Policy • ...

  18. Vaccine Efficacy and Affinity Maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hayoun; Deem, Michael W.

    2002-03-01

    We propose macroscopic equations to describe variable vaccine efficacy between repeated vaccinee and first time vaccinee. The main ingredients are antigenic distance between epidemic strain and vaccne strain, and affinity maturation dynamics which differs in primary and second response. Increase of affinity by repeated vaccine leads to localization in immune space. This localization decreases the ability of the immune system to response to distant, but related epidemic strains.

  19. Factors associated with nurses’ self-efficacy in clinical setting in Iran, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Soudagar, Simin; Rambod, Masoume; Beheshtipour, Noushin

    2015-01-01

    Background: In nursing, self-efficacy is quite critical for skill performance. Some factors might influence and predict self-efficacy in nurses. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate self-efficacy and the factors predicting nurses’ self-efficacy in clinical setting. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 264 nurses were selected from five hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences by stratified random sampling. General Self-efficacy Scale (GSE) was used to assess a general sense of perceived self-efficacy. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and multiple regression analysis. Results: The mean of self-efficacy in all the nurses was 29.78 [Standard Deviation (SD) = 5.82]. Moreover, the self-efficacy of the nurses with diploma, bachelor's, and master's degrees was 32.22 (SD = 6.21), 29.33 (SD = 5.68), and 32.00 (SD = 6.00), respectively. In addition, a significant difference was found between the nurses with bachelor's and diploma degrees regarding their self-efficacy (P = 0.01). Also, a significant relationship was found between self-efficacy and willingness to work in the nursing unit (F = 3.31, P = 0.01) and interest in the nursing field (F = 2.43, P = 0.04). The nurses who had more than 16 years of working experience in the field of nursing reported a better self-efficacy score. Overall, self-efficacy was predicted by the years of experience in the field of nursing (? =0.25, P = 0.009) and the interest in the nursing field (? = ?0.15, P = 0.02). Conclusions: This study indicated that the nurses with diploma degrees gained higher self-efficacy scores compared to those with bachelor's degrees. Changing the nursing curriculum and increasing the motivation in the nursing context might enhance the interest in the nursing field as well as the nurses’ self-efficacy. Of course, other studies are recommended to be conducted to improve the nurses’ self-efficacy. PMID:25878701

  20. Falls Among Older Adults: An Overview

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Room Social Media Publications Injury Center Falls Among Older Adults: An Overview On this Page How big is ... fracture rates than black women. 17 How can older adults prevent falls? Older adults can stay independent and ...

  1. 1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF LITTLE FALLS DAM POWERPLANT AND NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF LITTLE FALLS DAM POWERPLANT AND NORTHWEST END OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE. LOOKING WEST - Little Falls Tie Line Towers, Near Little Dam Falls on Spokane River, Wellpinit, Stevens County, WA

  2. 1. Photocopy of a photographca. 1920 VIEW OF AMERICAN FALLS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of a photograph--ca. 1920 VIEW OF AMERICAN FALLS PRIOR TO CONSTRUCTION OF HYDROELECTRIC PLANTS - American Falls Water, Power & Light Company, Island Power Plant, Snake River, below American Falls Dam, American Falls, Power County, ID

  3. Preventing Falls | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Falls and Older Adults Preventing Falls Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of ... departments for fall-related injuries each year. Among older adults, falls are the leading cause of fractures, hospital ...

  4. 32. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL FROM VICINITY OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL FROM VICINITY OF PROPOSED POWER CANAL, LOOKING UPSTREAM. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  5. 27. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADGATE WITH CANAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADGATE WITH CANAL BRIDGE IN DISTANCE; LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  6. Relationships Between Self-Efficacy, Self-Esteem and Procrastination in Undergraduate Psychology Students

    PubMed Central

    Hajloo, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed to review the relationships between procrastination and two self-factors self-efficacy and self-esteem. Methods: Participants were 140 undergraduates Psychology students enrolled in Mohagheg Ardabili University, Ardabil, Iran. Instruments used for collecting the required data were the student-version of the General Procrastination Scale (GP-S), General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE) and Rosenberg’s Self-Esteem Scale (SES). Results: Using causal modeling, two models were compared; a model with self-esteem as a mediator versus a model with procrastination as a mediator. The self-esteem mediator model accounted for 21% of the variance in procrastination. The significance of the mediation effect was found by bootstrapping method. Conclusion: The relationship of procrastination with self-esteem and self-efficacy was revealed among undergraduate psychology students. PMID:25780374

  7. NOVA Fall 2000 Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ransick, Kristina; Rosene, Dale; Sammons, Fran Lyons; Sammons, James

    This teacher's guide complements six programs that aired on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) in the fall of 2000. Programs include: (1) "Lincoln's Secret Weapon"; (2) "Hitler's Lost Sub"; (3) "Runaway Universe"; (4) "Garden of Eden"; (5) "Dying to Be Thin"; and (6) "Japan's Secret Garden". It provides activity set-ups related to the programs…

  8. Fall management of eastern gamagrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent research has suggested that eastern gamagrass (EGG) may be an effective alternative to chopped straw in the blended diets of dairy heifers and cows. Most extension materials discussing appropriate fall management of EGG recommend avoiding harvest within 6 weeks of first frost. Using this guid...

  9. Falling films on flexible inclines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. K. Matar; R. V. Craster; S. Kumar

    2007-01-01

    The nonlinear stability and dynamic behavior of falling fluid films is studied for flow over a flexible substrate. We use asymptotic methods to deduce governing equations valid in various limits. Long-wave theory is used to derive Benney-like coupled equations for the film thickness and substrate deflection. Weakly nonlinear equations are then derived from these equations that, in the limit of

  10. UNIVERSITY LIBRARY Fall Quarter 2013

    E-print Network

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    UC DAVIS UNIVERSITY LIBRARY TOWN HALL Fall Quarter 2013 September 24, 2013 UC Davis University://lib.ucdavis.edu/dept/admin/plan/ September 24, 2013 UC Davis University Library Town Hall 2 #12;Today's Agenda Part I: State of the Library&A September 24, 2013 UC Davis University Library Town Hall 3 #12;STATE OF THE LIBRARY REPORT Part I September

  11. Medical Genetics Fall Semester, 2013

    E-print Network

    is to instruct students in the basic concepts, principles, and language of human genetics and to equip students1 BMB 527 Medical Genetics Fall Semester, 2013 (rev. 08/20/13 PAW) Table of Contents Course ......................................................................................................................... 6 Student Evaluation of the Course

  12. Fall 1973 University Racial Census.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Glenwood C., Jr.; Sedlacek, William E.

    The fall 1973 enrollments for the 5 ethnic categories of students (black, Spanish surname, Oriental, American Indian and all other) are presented for the College Park campus of the University of Maryland. Blacks (6%), Orientals (2%), Spanish surname (1%), American Indian (1%), and others (91%) comprised the total College Park student body. Of the…

  13. Fall Enrollment & Staffing Report, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, Olympia.

    Seven areas were examined: (1) enrollment measurements are broken-down by FTEs, demographics, student purpose, funding sources, full and part-time status, and planned length of attendance, worthy to note is the 2% increase over fall 1997 enrollment; (2) under Student Demographics area, gender, disability, race and ethnicity, age, entering…

  14. Fall ceremonv Kain, Nemetz honored

    E-print Network

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    r c Fall ceremonv Kain, Nemetz honored by Jo Moss Justice Nathan Nemetz will be honored at UBC as a national treasure, Kain Indian artifacts found at golf course by Jo Moss A Tsawwassen golf course has. The Tsawwassen artifacts came to light when the Beach Grove Golf Club started construction on a water hazard

  15. BOSTONIA Fall 2013 ALUMNI BOOKS

    E-print Network

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    for such a paper, which Bass ran in the early '70s). Can quality online community journalism survive? Yes was to do a book on a wide range of online journalism projects. The Independent was on my radar, andt IBOSTONIA Fall 2013 ALUMNI BOOKS In The Wired City: Reimagining Journalism and Civic Life

  16. FALL / AUTOMNE 2014 RECREATION PROGRAMS

    E-print Network

    to make our Sports Centre a great community facility. This summer and fall the old portion of the Sports building, new classrooms, a large lounge space, and new clinics for Health Services and Sports Medicine remercier nos généreux donateurs et utilisateurs de nos installations qui font de notre centre sportif la

  17. New Student Survey, Fall 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weglarz, Shirley

    The Fall 1998 annual survey of new Johnson County Community College (JCCC) students was designed to determine new students' educational objectives and what factors influence new students' decisions to attend JCCC. Surveys mailed to 3874 students identified by the Admissions Office resulted in 713 usable returned surveys. This evaluation reports…

  18. Advanced Photogrammetry Fall 2012 Syllabus

    E-print Network

    Watson, Craig A.

    SUR 4350 Advanced Photogrammetry Fall 2012 Syllabus INSTRUCTOR: Bon Dewitt Office: 305 Reed Lab:55) Wed TEXTBOOK: Wolf, P.R., and B.A. Dewitt, Elements of Photogrammetry: with Applications in GIS, 3rd Coordinate systems for Photogrammetry - Map projections, Datums and conversions READ: Sections 5-6, 5-7, F-5

  19. Fall Semester 2014 Michael Fuchs

    E-print Network

    Fuchs, Michael

    Calculus Fall Semester 2014 Michael Fuchs Institute of Applied Mathematics September 15, 2014 Michael Fuchs (AM) Calculus September 15, 2014 1 / 19 #12;Contact Details and Office Time Contact details)571-2121-56461; Mail: mfuchs@math.nctu.edu.tw. Office time Monday from 11 : 00 to 12 : 00. Michael Fuchs (AM) Calculus

  20. [A study on fall accident].

    PubMed

    Lee, H S; Kim, M J

    1997-01-01

    The study was conducted from November 1995 to May 1996 at the one general hospital in Seoul. The total subjects of this study were 412 patients who have the experience of fall accident, among them 31 was who have fallen during hospitalization and 381 was who visited emergency room and out patient clinic. The purposes of this study were to determine the characteristics, risk factors and results of fall accident and to suggest the nursing strategies for prevention of fall. Data were collected by reviewing the medical records and interviewing with the fallers and their family members. For data analysis spss/pc+ program was utilized for descriptive statistics, adjusted standardized X2-test. The results of this study were as follows: 1) Total subjects were 412 fallers, of which 245 (59.5%) were men and 167 (40.5%) were women. Age were 0-14 years 79 (19.2%), 15-44 years 125 (30.4%), 45-64 years 104 (25.2%), over 65 years 104 (25.2%). 2) There was significant association between age and the sexes (X2 = 39.17, P = 0.00). 3) There was significant association between age and history of falls (X2 = 44.41, P = .00). And history of falls in the elderly was significantly associated with falls. 4) There was significant association with age and medical diagnosis (X2 = 140.66, P = .00), chief medical diagnosis were hypertension (34), diabetes mellitus (22), arthritis (11), stroke (8), fracture (7), pulmonary tuberculosis (6), dementia (5) and cataract (5). 5) There was significant association between age and intrinsic factors: cognitive impairment, mobility impairment, insomnia, emotional problems, urinary difficulty, visual impairments, hearing impairments, use of drugs (sedatives, antihypertensive drugs, diuretics, antidepressants) (P < 0.05). But there was no significant association between age and dizziness (X2 = 2.87, P = .41). 6) 15.3% of total fallers were drunken state when they were fallen. 7) Environmental factors of fall accident were unusual posture (50.9%), slips (35.2%), trips (9.5%) and collision (4.4%). 8) Most of falls occurred during the day time, peak frequencies of falls occurred from 1 pm to 6 pm and 7 am to 12 am. 9) The places of fall accident were roads (22.6%), house-stairs (16.7%), rooms, floors, kitchen (11.2%), the roof-top, veranda, windows (10.9%), hospital (7.5%), ice or snowy ways (5.8%), bathroom (4.9%), playground, park (4.9%), subway-stairs (4.4%) and public-bathrooms (2.2%). 10) Activities at the time of fall accident were walking (37.6%), turning around or reaching for something (20.9%), going up or down stairs (19.2%), exercise, working (17.4%), up or down from a bed (2.7%), using wheelchair or walking aids, standing up or down from a chair (2.2%) and standing still (2.2%). 11) Anatomical locations of injuries by falls were head, face, neck (31.3%), lower extremities (29.9%), upper extremities (20.6%), spine, thorax, abdomen or pelvic contents (11.4%) and unspecified (2.9%). 12) Types of injures were fracture (47.6%), bruises (13.8%), laceration (13.3%), sprains (9.0%), headache (6.6%), abrasions (2.9%), intracranial hemorhage (2.4%) and burns (0.5%). 13) 41.5% of the fallers were hospitalized and average of hospitalization was 22.3 days. 14) The six fallers (1.46%) died from fall injuries. The two fallers died from intracranial hemorhage and the four fallers died of secondary infection; pneumonia (2), sepsis (1) and cellulitis (1). It is suggested that 1) Further study is needed with larger sample size to identify the fall risk factors. 2) After the fall accident, comprehensive nursing care and regular physical exercise should be emphasized for the elderly person. 3) Safety education and safety facilities of the public place and home is necessary for fall prevention. PMID:10437605

  1. Fall 2012 Freshman retained to Fall 2013: 67% (26 of 39)

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    Fall 2012 Freshman retained to Fall 2013: 67% (26 of 39) 6-Yr Graduation Rate of Fall 2007 cohort Research & Assessment; Financial Aid Office Six-Year Graduation Rates Entering Fall Cohort of First-Time, Full-Time Bachelor Degree Seeking Freshmen Graduation Rates by Gender, by Ethnicity and by Financial

  2. Jones, Fall 2013 Page 1 of 5

    E-print Network

    Carter, John

    ECON 260 Jones, Fall 2013 Page 1 of 5 ECONOMICS 260: INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS STATISTICS Section 2 / Fall 2013 / MWF 9:20-10:45 am / Pigott 304 Section 1 / Fall 2013 / MWF 12:30-1:55 pm / Pigott 201, will be distributed in class and/or made available on the website: https://angel.seattleu.edu. #12;ECON 260 Jones

  3. Independent Falls are the main reason

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System Division of VA Desert Pacific Healthcare Network Fall Prevention AngelesVA Geriatric Research Education Clinical Center and affiliates and is a validated fall risk selfStay Independent Falls are the main reason why older people lose their independence. Are you

  4. Epidemiology of Falls in Older Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peel, Nancye May

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, falls among older people are a public health concern because of their frequency and adverse consequences in terms of morbidity, mortality, and quality of life, as well as their impact on health system services and costs. This epidemiological review outlines the public health burden of falls and fall-related injuries and the impact of…

  5. BFA: Studio Art Fall--First Year

    E-print Network

    Gering, Jon C.

    BFA: Studio Art Fall--First Year · ART 127 New Major Seminar · ART 101 Art Studio Foundations I · Liberal Studies Program (LSP) coursework Fall--Second Year · ART 190 Foundations Proficiency Review · Major Studio I · ART 222, 223, or 224 (Art History) · Liberal Studies Program (LSP) coursework Fall

  6. BA: Art History Fall--First Year

    E-print Network

    Gering, Jon C.

    BA: Art History Fall--First Year · ART 127 New Major Seminar · ART 222 Caves to Cathedrals · Liberal Studies Program (LSP) coursework Fall--Second Year · ART 101 Art Studio Foundations I · ART 324 Renaissance Art · Liberal Studies Program (LSP) coursework Fall--Third Year · ART 328 Art of Greece & Rome

  7. Tips to Keep Veterans from Falling Down

    MedlinePLUS

    ... control, your risk of falling is lessened. How health problems can increase your fall risk. Health problems like low blood sugar, high or low blood ... managed, but they don’t go away. Chronic health problems put you at greater risk of a fall. ...

  8. Yosemite Falls-All Three Sections

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this image, all three sections of Yosemite Falls can be seen. Yosemite Falls is the highest measured waterfall in North America at 2,425 ft (739 m) in height. Yosemite Falls is one of the most famous waterfalls within Yosemite National Park....

  9. Imager displays free fall in stop action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazer, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Microprocessor-controlled imaging system displays sequence of "frozen" images of free-falling object, using video cameras positioned along fall. Strobe lights flash as object passes each camera's viewfield. Sequence stored on video disk and displayed on television monitor is stop-action record of fall dynamics. With modification, system monitiors other high speed phenomena.

  10. Field note: comparative efficacy of a woody evapotranspiration landfill cover following the removal of aboveground biomass.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, William; Munk, Jens; Byrd, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Woody vegetation cultivated for moisture management on evapotranspiration (ET) landfill covers could potentially serve a secondary function as a biomass crop. However, research is required to evaluate the extent to which trees could be harvested from ET covers without significantly impacting their moisture management function. This study investigated the drainage through a six-year-old, primarily poplar/cottonwood ET test cover for a period of one year following the harvest of all woody biomass exceeding a height of 30 cm above ground surface. Results were compared to previously reported drainage observed during the years leading up to the coppice event. In the first year following coppice, the ET cover was found to be 93% effective at redirecting moisture during the spring/summer season, and 95% effective during the subsequent fall/winter season. This was slightly lower than the 95% and 100% efficacy observed in the spring/summer and fall/winter seasons, respectively, during the final measured year prior to coppice. However, the post-coppice efficacy was higher than the efficacy observed during the first three years following establishment of the cover. While additional longer-term studies are recommended, this project demonstrated that woody ET covers could potentially produce harvestable biomass while still effectively managing aerial moisture. PMID:25254294

  11. 150. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    150. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Surveyor's Book #363, Page 42, entitled, 'Diversion Tunnels', located in Twin Falls Canal Company office, Twin Falls, Idaho). PLAN OF DIVERSION TUNNELS, MILNER DAM. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  12. 180. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company. E. Pettygro, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    180. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company. E. Pettygro, Photographer, date unknown. BLASTING TWIN FALLS CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY; BLASTING COTTONWOOD AREA TO REPLACE FLUME BY RUNNING HIGH LINE THROUGH SOLID ROCK. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  13. Falls in People with Multiple Sclerosis Compared with Falls in Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Mazumder, Rajarshi; Murchison, Charles; Bourdette, Dennis; Cameron, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the risk, circumstances, consequences and causes of prospectively recorded falls between people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) and healthy controls of similar age and gender. Methods 58 PwMS and 58 healthy controls, who are community-dwelling, were recruited in this 6-month prospective cohort study. 90% of PwMS and 84% of healthy controls completed the study. Participants counted falls prospectively using fall calendars and noted fall location, fall-related injuries, and the cause of the falls. Kaplan Meier survival analysis and log-rank tests were performed to compare the distributions of survival without falling between PwMS and healthy controls. Results 40.8% of controls and 71.2% of PwMS fell at least once. 48.1% of PwMS and 18.4% of healthy controls fell at least twice. 42.3% of PwMS and 20.4% of health controls sustained a fall-related injury. After adjusting for age and gender, the time to first fall (HR: 1.87, p?=?0.033) and the time to recurrent falls (HR: 2.87, p?=?0.0082) were significantly different between PwMS and healthy controls. PwMS reported an almost equal number of falls inside and outside, 86% of the falls in healthy controls were outside. Healthy controls were more likely to fall due to slipping on a slippery surface (39.5% vs 10.4%). PwMS more often attributed falls to distraction (31% vs 7%) and uniquely attributed falls to fatigue or heat. Conclusions Fall risk, circumstances, consequences, and causes are different for PwMS than for healthy people of the same age and gender. PwMS fall more, are more likely to be injured by a fall, and often fall indoors. PwMS, but not healthy controls, frequently fall because they are distracted, fatigued or hot. PMID:25254633

  14. [Putting into place devices for prevention of falls at the hospital center at Haguenau].

    PubMed

    Demangeat, Jean-Louis; Geldreich, Marie-Anne; Kessler, Brigitte; Kohlbecker, Christine; Sure, Marie-Claude; Jeanmougin, Chantal

    2009-12-01

    Falls of patients represent the most frequent reported incidents in our 541-bed urban public hospital, reaching more than 200 occurrences per year.This prompted a fall-prevention program consisting of several steps: i) descriptive analysis of 295 consecutive falls in order to look at the factors commonly supposed to be associated with falls, among physical, psychic and pathological characteristics of patients, medication, circumstances or environmental hazards, ii) case-control study on 10 medicine and surgery wards of high risk (178 patients), designed to identify which factors are discriminant to predict the falls, iii) proposal of a fall-risk assessment score to be calculated at the admission of the patient, iv) if the risk is confirmed, implementation of general and specific actions identified by the components of the score. The score is based on a 15-point scale including age older than 65 years, history of previous falls, weakness or insufficient weight, impaired mobility or altered feet state, psychic disorders (depression-agitation-risky behavior), neuro-psychiatric diseases (CVA-confusion-dementia), fever or infection, polypharmacy. The mean scores of fallers and of control patients were 7.53 +/- 3.02 and 4.81 +/- 2.93 respectively (p < 0.000001). A score range between 5 and 11 was chosen to start the fall prevention program, which may predict a large proportion (about 80%) of valid patients prone to falls in the assessed medical and surgical wards (scores higher than 11 correspond to severely diseased, often bedridden invalid patients, not suspected to fall). However, these criteria are not suitable for nursing homes and for long-staying patients. PMID:20180337

  15. AIMing towards improved antitumor efficacy.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Matthew J; Kearns, Alison K; Stump, Sascha; Li, Chun; Gajewski, Mariusz P; Rider, Kevin C; Backos, Donald S; Reigan, Philip R; Beall, Howard D; Natale, Nicholas R

    2015-04-15

    Using the structure-activity relationship emerging from previous Letter, and guided by pharmacokinetic properties, new AIMs have been prepared with both improved efficacy against human glioblastoma cells and cell permeability as determined by fluorescent confocal microscopy. We present our first unambiguous evidence for telomeric G4-forming oligonucleotide anisotropy by NMR resulting from direct interaction with AIMs, which is consistent with both our G4 melting studies by CD, and our working hypothesis. Finally, we show that AIMs induce apoptosis in SNB-19 cells. PMID:25782743

  16. Improving internal medicine residents' falls assessment and evaluation: an interdisciplinary, multistrategy program.

    PubMed

    Caton, Cathryn; Wiley, M Kathleen; Zhao, Yumin; Moran, William P; Zapka, Jane

    2011-10-01

    Falls are a major problem in older adults, and physicians receive inadequate training in falls evaluation. A multicomponent program (lecture, academic detailing, and case studies) was implemented to enhance medical residents' knowledge, skills, decisions, and interventions made about falls as part of a larger project to improve assessment and care of older adults. Electronic medical record (EMR) template modifications provided cues and reminders, decision support, and documentation into the visit note. Nursing staff and the EMR prompted residents to evaluate patients with a history of falls. Knowledge and confidence were assessed using a pre- and postintervention questionnaire, and an attending physician assessed skills by direct observation of the Timed Up and Go Test (TUG). Effect on clinical actions was assessed using the EMR database. Participation in training of faculty and staff was high. Over the 3-month intervention period, an attending physician reviewed the detailing sheet outlining important points of the training with 86% of residents, and 64% demonstrated a TUG to an attending physician. Of 895 older adults seen, 15% (134) had a positive screen for falls, of whom 92% (123) had an EMR falls template completed, and 42% (56) had a TUG performed. Of the patients evaluated with the TUG, 53% (29) failed. A review of charts for patients who failed the screen or TUG revealed that the majority had special circumstances limiting their participation, even after a physical therapy evaluation. Education and system changes facilitated improvements in resident knowledge, skill, self-efficacy, and clinical action in screening, evaluating, and managing falls in older adults. PMID:21883104

  17. Fear of falling in vision impairment.

    PubMed

    White, Ursula E; Black, Alex A; Wood, Joanne M; Delbaere, Kim

    2015-06-01

    Falls are the leading cause of injury-related morbidity and mortality among older adults. In addition to the resulting physical injury and potential disability after a fall, there are also important psychological consequences, including depression, anxiety, activity restriction, and fear of falling. Fear of falling affects 20 to 43% of community-dwelling older adults and is not limited to those who have previously experienced a fall. About half of older adults who experience fear of falling subsequently restrict their physical and everyday activities, which can lead to functional decline, depression, increased falls risk, and reduced quality of life. Although there is clear evidence that older adults with visual impairment have higher falls risk, only a limited number of studies have investigated fear of falling in older adults with visual impairment and the findings have been mixed. Recent studies suggest increased levels of fear of falling among older adults with various eye conditions, including glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration, whereas other studies have failed to find differences. Interventions, which are still in their infancy in the general population, are also largely unexplored in those with visual impairment. The major aims of this review were to provide an overview of the literature on fear of falling, its measurement, and risk factors among older populations, with specific focus on older adults with visual impairment, and to identify directions for future research in this area. PMID:25930978

  18. Fall Incidence and Outcomes of Falls in a Prospective Study of Adults With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Stanmore, Emma K; Oldham, Jackie; Skelton, Dawn A; O'Neill, Terence; Pilling, Mark; Campbell, A John; Todd, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence of falls and to investigate the consequences of falls in adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods A total of 559 community-dwelling adults with RA, ages 18–88 years (mean age 62 years, 69% women), participated in this prospective cohort study. After a detailed clinical assessment, patients were followed for 1 year, using monthly falls calendars and followup telephone calls. Followup took place in the participant's usual place of residence in the Northwest of England. Outcome measures included fall occurrence, reason for fall, type and severity of injuries, fractures, fall location, lie-times, use of health services, and functional ability. Results A total of 535 participants followed for 1 year had a total of 598 falls. Of these participants, 36.4% (95% confidence interval 32%–41%) reported falling during the 1-year followup period, with an incidence rate of 1,313 per 1,000 person-years at risk or 1.11 falls per person. Age and sex were not associated with falls. More than one-third of the falls were reportedly caused by hips, knees, or ankle joints “giving way.” More than half of all the falls resulted in moderate injuries, including head injuries (n = 27) and fractures (n = 26). Treatment by general practitioners or other health professionals was required for 15.0% of falls, and emergency services were required for 8.8% of falls. Conclusion These results indicate that adults with RA are at high risk of falls and fall-related injuries, fractures, and head injuries. Strategies to prevent falls in adults with RA must be prioritized to reduce falls, fall-related injuries, and fractures. PMID:23139011

  19. Assessing Empathy and Self-Efficacy Levels of Pharmacy Students in an Elective Diabetes Management Course

    PubMed Central

    Stahnke, Amanda M.; Behnen, Erin M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the impact of a 6-week patient/provider interaction simulation on empathy and self-efficacy levels of diabetes management skills in third-year pharmacy students. Design. Pharmacy students enrolled in a diabetes elective course were paired to act as a patient with diabetes or as a provider assisting in the management of that patient during a 6-week simulation activity. After 3 weeks, students switched roles. The simulation was designed with activities to build empathy. Assessment. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE) and a self-efficacy survey were administered to assess change in empathy and confidence levels from baseline to the end of the activity. Completion of the activity resulted in significant improvement in total JSE scores. Additionally, significant improvements in overall self-efficacy scores regarding diabetes management were noted. Conclusion. The 6-week patient/provider interaction simulation improved empathy and self-efficacy levels in third-year pharmacy students. PMID:25995517

  20. Development and evaluation of a self-efficacy instrument for Japanese sleep apnea patients receiving continuous positive airway pressure treatment.

    PubMed

    Saito, Ayako; Kojima, Shigeko; Sasaki, Fumihiko; Hayashi, Masamichi; Mieno, Yuki; Sakakibara, Hiroki; Hashimoto, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a self-efficacy instrument for Japanese obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Analyzed subjects were 653 Japanese OSA patients (619 males and 34 females) treated with CPAP at a sleep laboratory in a respiratory clinic in a Japanese city. Based on Bandura's social cognitive theory, the CPAP Self-Efficacy Questionnaire for Sleep Apnea in Japanese (CSESA-J) was developed by a focus group of experts, using a group interview of OSA patients for the items of two previous self-efficacy scales for Western sleep apnea patients receiving CPAP treatment. CSESA-J has two subscales, one for self-efficacy and the other for outcome expectancy, and consists of a total of 15 items. Content validity was confirmed by the focus group. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the factor loadings of self-efficacy and outcome expectancy were 0.47-0.76 and 0.41-0.92, respectively, for the corresponding items. CSESA-J had a significant but weak positive association with the General Self-Efficacy Scale, and a strong positive association with "Self-efficacy scale on health behavior in patients with chronic disease." Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.85 for the self-efficacy subscale and 0.89 for the outcome expectancy subscale. The intraclass correlation coefficient using data from the first and second measurements with CSESA-J for a subset of 130 subjects was 0.93 for the self-efficacy and outcome expectancy subscales. These results support CSESA-J as a reliable and valid instrument for measuring the self-efficacy of Japanese OSA patients treated with CPAP. Further studies are warranted to confirm validity for female OSA patients and generalizability. PMID:25678832

  1. Self-efficacy mechanism in human agency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Albert Bandura

    1982-01-01

    Addresses the centrality of the self-efficacy mechanism (SEM) in human agency. SEM precepts influence thought patterns, actions, and emotional arousal. In causal tests, the higher the level of induced self-efficacy, the higher the performance accomplishments and the lower the emotional arousal. The different lines of research reviewed show that the SEM may have wide explanatory power. Perceived self-efficacy helps to

  2. The Role of Self-Efficacy Beliefs in Leader Development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Moe Machida; John Schaubroeck

    2011-01-01

    This article examines various ways in which self-efficacy belief influences leader development. Drawing from social cognitive theory, we discuss four self-efficacy concepts that are pertinent to leader development: (a) preparatory self-efficacy, (b) efficacy spirals, (c) learning self-efficacy, and (d) resilient self-efficacy. We argue that the role of self-efficacy in leader development is more complex than traditionally considered. The article also

  3. From Fall to Spring, or Spring to Fall? Seasonal Cholera Transmission Cycles and Implications for Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akanda, A. S.; Jutla, A. S.; Huq, A.; Colwell, R.; Islam, S.; WE Reason

    2010-12-01

    Cholera remains a major public health threat in many developing countries around the world. The striking seasonality and the annual recurrence of this infectious disease in endemic areas continues to be of considerable interest to scientists and public health workers. Despite major advances in the ecological, and microbiological understanding of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent, the role of underlying macro-scale hydroclimatic processes in propagating the disease in different seasons and years is not well understood. The incidence of cholera in the Bengal Delta region, the ‘native homeland’ of cholera, shows distinct biannual peaks in the southern floodplains, as opposed to single annual peaks in coastal areas and the northern parts of Bangladesh, as well as other cholera-endemic regions in the world. A coupled analysis of the regional hydroclimate and cholera incidence reveals a strong association of the spatio-temporal variability of incidence peaks with seasonal processes and extreme events. At a seasonal scale, the cycles indicate a spring-fall transmission pattern, contrary to the prevalent notion of a fall-spring transmission cycle. We show that the asymmetric seasonal hydroclimatology affects regional cholera dynamics by providing a coastal growth environment for bacteria in spring, while propagating transmission to fall by flooding. This seasonal interpretation of the progression of cholera has important implications, for formulating effective cholera intervention and mitigation efforts through improved water management and understanding the impacts of changing climate patterns on seasonal cholera transmission. (Water Environental Research Education Actionable Solutions Network)

  4. FALL CONCENTRATIONS OF BUTEOS NEAR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ARNOLD T. GERSTELL; CHARLES H. TROST

    ABSTICT.--Since 1974, we have counted raptors at Henry's Lake, Idaho, just south of the continental divide. Counts were made in late summer and early fall. Three species, red-tailed hawk (Buteojamaicensis), ferruginous hawk (Buteo regalis), and Swainson's hawks (Buteo swainsoni) were the most plentiful. None of these hawks showed any strong increasing or decreasing trend in numbers over the 20-yr survey

  5. HumanWildlife Interactions 6(2):212221, Fall 2012 Efficacy of aerial broadcast baiting in

    E-print Network

    by a toad (Bufo marinus), and one was taken by a monitor lizard (Varanus indicus). Mortality was observed. 1998, Campbell 1999, Aguon et al. 2002). Detector dogs are used for cargo inspection (Engeman et al

  6. HumanWildlife Interactions 6(2):222236, Fall 2012 Efficacy, effort, and cost comparisons of

    E-print Network

    ) are an invasive species to the island of Guam. Because they have extirpated the native forest avifauna on Guam of this population increase include the decline and extinction of avifauna and herpetofauna (Savidge 1987, Rodda

  7. Validation of the Online Efficacy 1 Running Head: VALIDATION OF THE ONLINE EFFICACY

    E-print Network

    Yu, Alex

    Validation of the Online Efficacy 1 Running Head: VALIDATION OF THE ONLINE EFFICACY Validation-0611 Phone: (480) 965-3475 Aalexyu98@hotmail #12;Validation of the Online Efficacy 2 Abstract Educational. This paper provides a brief history of the online environment and discusses the development and validation

  8. The Core Self-Evaluation Scale: Further Construct Validation Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Donald G.; Pierce, Jon L.

    2010-01-01

    The authors empirically examined two operationalizations of the core self-evaluation construct: (a) the Judge, Erez, Bono, and Thoresen 12-item scale and (b) a composite measure of self-esteem, self-efficacy, locus of control, and neuroticism.The study found that the composite scale relates more strongly than the shorter scale to performance,…

  9. Developing a personal health record self-efficacy tool.

    PubMed

    Nokes, Kathleen M; Verkuilen, Jay; Hickey, Dorothy E; James-Borga, Judith C; Shan, Jing

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this preliminary work was to develop a new short tool to assess personal health records (PHRs) self-efficacy. Prior work had found 4 distinct skills related to creating, updating, tracking symptoms, and sharing information with health care providers using PHR. Although PHRs have great promise, their uptake has been rather limited, especially in economically limited populations. A convenience sample of community-living persons with HIV/AIDS (N = 100) was asked to complete the new tool along with other self-efficacy measures. Preliminary work indicated more confidence about paper-based PHRs compared with computer-based PHRs. The paper-based subscale was significantly correlated to chronic illness and HIV treatment self-efficacy scales as expected, but there were no relationships for the computer-based subscale. This simple screening tool could identify interested clients and their preference either for a paper-based or computer-based PHR. Further research is needed with larger sample sizes and different chronically ill populations to further explore the psychometrics of the instrument. PMID:23332014

  10. Pharmacological principles of antidepressant efficacy.

    PubMed

    Schatzberg, Alan F

    2002-06-01

    Both noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) appear to be involved in depression. Evidence suggests that dual-acting antidepressants, i.e. those that affect both monoamine systems, such as tricyclic antidepressants and the noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant mirtazapine, may have greater efficacy and a faster onset of action than drugs that act on a single monoamine system only, such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Cell firing is reduced by SSRIs in the short-term, but is increased by mirtazapine, probably due to its actions on both NA (via alpha(2) antagonism) and 5-HT (via alpha(1)-stimulation by NA). This may help to explain clinical evidence suggesting that mirtazapine has a faster onset of action than the more selective antidepressants. PMID:12404665

  11. Career self-efficacy and career decision of African-American, Hispanic, and Anglo students enrolled in selected rural Texas high schools

    E-print Network

    Owre, Martha Leonora

    2006-08-16

    of the CDS (Osipow, Carney, Winer, Yanico & Koschier, 1976). Career decision self-efficacy was measured by the short form of the (CDSES) (Taylor & Betz, 1983). This instrument was originally referred to as the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale...

  12. The Effects of Multiple Assessments of the Discovery Education Assessment on Teacher Self-Efficacy of Eighth-Grade Mathematics Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinzie, Abasi H.

    2012-01-01

    This study utilized the student scores of eighth-grade mathematics students on the "Discovery Education Assessment," as well as the self-efficacy perceptions of eighth-grade mathematics teachers as determined by the "Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale" ("TSES") from seven middle schools that encompassed grades 6-8…

  13. Coping Self-Efficacy in a Community-Based Sample of Women and Men from the United Kingdom: The Impact of Sex and Health Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colodro, H.; Godoy-Izquierdo, D.; Godoy, J.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents pioneer findings regarding coping self-efficacy obtained with the Coping Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES) in a community-based sample composed of both women and men (to date, only data obtained in the 1980s from men with HIV and depression exist). The aims of this study were to investigate the psychometric properties of the CSES and…

  14. Do Pre-Service Teachers Feel Ready to Teach in Inclusive Classrooms? A Four Country Study of Teaching Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loreman, Tim; Sharma, Umesh; Forlin, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an international study examining pre-service teacher reports of teaching self-efficacy for inclusive education; principally focusing on the explanatory relationship between a scale designed to measure teaching self-efficacy in this area and key demographic variables within Canada, Australia, Hong Kong, and…

  15. TESTING ANTIMICROBIAL EFFICACY ON POROUS MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The efficacy of antimicrobial treatments to eliminate or control biological growth in the indoor environment can easily be tested on nonporous surfaces. However, the testing of antimicrobial efficacy on porous surfaces, such as those found in the indoor environment [i.e., gypsum ...

  16. Career Development and Self-Efficacy Belief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumari, Melati

    This article discusses the application of self-efficacy beliefs on career development. This theory was introduced by Hackett and Betz (1981) and has received many extensive studies. There are many factors that may influence career self-efficacy such as gender, culture, parental, and family backgrounds. The methods of increasing career…

  17. IDENTIFYING ROOF FALL PREDICTORS USING FUZZY CLASSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K. [NDE Lab, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, 23187-8795 (United States)

    2010-02-22

    Microseismic monitoring involves placing geophones on the rock surfaces of a mine to record seismic activity. Classification of microseismic mine data can be used to predict seismic events in a mine to mitigate mining hazards, such as roof falls, where properly bolting and bracing the roof is often an insufficient method of preventing weak roofs from destabilizing. In this study, six months of recorded acoustic waveforms from microseismic monitoring in a Pennsylvania limestone mine were analyzed using classification techniques to predict roof falls. Fuzzy classification using features selected for computational ease was applied on the mine data. Both large roof fall events could be predicted using a Roof Fall Index (RFI) metric calculated from the results of the fuzzy classification. RFI was successfully used to resolve the two significant roof fall events and predicted both events by at least 15 hours before visual signs of the roof falls were evident.

  18. Prevention of construction falls by organizational intervention

    PubMed Central

    Becker, P; Fullen, M; Akladios, M; Hobbs, G

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—Determine if a university based (third party) intervention can improve construction contractor organizational performance to increase use of fall prevention practices and technologies. Setting—Falls are the leading cause of worker injury and death in the construction industry. Equipment and practices that can prevent falls are often not used appropriately in the dynamic construction work environment. Methods—A contractual partnership between a university and construction contractors created management systems to ensure use of fall protection measures. Audits by university faculty provided accountability for implementing the fall prevention system. Evaluation was conducted by quasiexperimental methodology comparing changes in audit score from baseline to fifth quarter from baseline for intervention and control contractors. Results—Audit scores improvement was greater for intervention than for control contractor group. Conclusion—A third party intervention can improve contractor fall prevention performance. PMID:11565975

  19. Psychometric Examination of an Inventory of Self-Efficacy for the Holland Vocational Themes Using Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Brandon M.; Betz, Nancy E.; Edwards, Michael C.; Borgen, Fred H.

    2010-01-01

    The psychometric properties of measures of self-efficacy for the six themes of Holland's theory were examined using item response theory. Item and scale quality were compared across levels of the trait continuum; all the scales were highly reliable but differentiated better at some levels of the continuum than others. Applications for adaptive…

  20. Social Indicators, Dysfunctional Career Cognitions, and Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy in Work Role Participation of Welfare Recipients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Sharon

    Profiles of 104 welfare recipients in Georgia were examined to identify social indicators and cognitive variables that influenced work role participation. Three instruments were administered the Career Thought Inventory, the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form, and the demographic profile and participation scale of the Salience…

  1. Examining Elementary School-Aged Children's Self-Efficacy and Proxy Efficacy for Fruit and Vegetable Consumption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geller, Karly S.; Dzewaltowski, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Children's self-efficacy for fruit and vegetable consumption (FVC) and proxy efficacy to influence others to make fruit and vegetables (FV) available may influence their FVC. A previous investigation has demonstrated that self-efficacy for fruit consumption, self-efficacy for vegetable consumption, proxy efficacy to influence parents to make FV…

  2. Mathematics Anxiety as a Function of Multidimensional Self-Regulation and Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jain, Sachin; Dowson, Martin

    2009-01-01

    This study tested the veracity of a model of Mathematics Anxiety as the end-point of related self-regulatory and self-efficacy processes. Data were collected in India from 232, eighth grade students on the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire and the Mathematics Anxiety Scale. Demographic information such as student' gender, age, marks…

  3. Confidence: A Better Predictor of Academic Achievement than Self-Efficacy, Self-Concept and Anxiety?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stankov, Lazar; Lee, Jihyun; Luo, Wenshu; Hogan, David J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report the results from a study that assessed confidence together with scales measuring self-belief--i.e., self-efficacy, different kinds of self-concepts, and anxiety--among the 15-year old students from Singapore. A distinct confidence factor was identified in the domains of mathematics (N = 1940) and English (N = 1786). Our…

  4. Teacher Self-Efficacy and Occupational Stress: A Major Australian Curriculum Reform Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, John; Ayres, Paul L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to study teachers' self-efficacy and occupational stress in the context of a large-scale curriculum reform in New South Wales, Australia. The study aims to follow up and replicate a study carried out approximately one year earlier. Design/methodology/approach: A theoretical framework, primarily based on…

  5. A Pilot Study To Measure the Caring Efficacy of Baccalaureate Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Judith

    2003-01-01

    Results of the Coates Caring Efficacy Scale for 193 preentry to final-semester nursing students indicated that mean scores were higher than in Coates' sample of novice student nurses. Students were able to articulate the role of caring in nursing. Even preentry students scored well, suggesting that factors other than nursing education contribute…

  6. Antibody efficacy as a keen index to evaluate influenza vaccine effectiveness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoshio Hirota; Masaro Kaji; Saburo Ide; Jumboku Kajiwara; Kyoichiro Kataoka; Shuro Goto; Tetsuya Oka

    1997-01-01

    The efficacy of the influenza vaccine is often underestimated, due to the dilution of the outcome by noninfluenzal illnesses. We thus explored the methodology to evaluate the effect of the inactivated influenza vaccine under the following strict conditions: an assessment of the effectiveness on clinical illness among healthy adults in a small-scale mixed epidemic during the 1991–1992 season. The vaccine

  7. Fall 2003 Harvard College Alcohol Study Sanction Thematic Evaluations Harvard Study Review Sanction Evaluation Fall 2003

    E-print Network

    Gering, Jon C.

    Fall 2003 Harvard College Alcohol Study Sanction Thematic Evaluations Harvard Study Review Sanction requirements. 1 41 0 0 42 Sanctions Evaluated Responses #12;Fall 2003 Harvard College Alcohol Study Sanction

  8. 61 FR 4253 - Fall River Water Users SystemSouth Unit, Fall River County, South Dakota

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1996-02-05

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Natural Resources Conservation Service Fall River Water Users System--South...Conservation Service, Agriculture. ACTION: Notice of...S. Department of Agriculture, gives notice that...prepared for the Fall River Water Users...

  9. 61 FR 4254 - Fall River Water Users SystemNorth Unit, Fall River County, South Dakota

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1996-02-05

    ...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Fall River Water Users System--North...Conservation Service, Agriculture. ACTION: Notice of...S. Department of Agriculture, gives notice that...for the Fall River Water Users...

  10. A Geological Wonder: Niagara Falls

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This lesson plan is part of the DiscoverySchool.com lesson plan library for grades 9-12. It focuses on the geological history of the Niagara Falls area, as well as the physical and geological processes that have formed this region. It includes objectives, materials, procedures, discussion questions, evaluation ideas, performing extensions, suggested readings, and vocabulary. There are videos available to order which complement this lesson, audio vocabulary, and links to teaching tools for making custom quizzes, worksheets, puzzles and lesson plans.

  11. Fall Meeting by the Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    The 2012 Fall Meeting achieved many new successes, from advances in technology to presentations of exciting science. Attendance has once again grown, with more than 24,000 scientists, researchers, students, teachers, exhibitors, media, and guests convening in San Francisco to experience the week-long activities and workshops, including 6894 oral and 13,790 poster presentations, 5 general sessions, an exhibit hall with more than 270 exhibitors, more than 50 section and focus group social events and committee meetings, and 55 town hall meetings.

  12. 9/10/2002 Internet/Grid Computing -Fall 2002 1 What is Performance for Internet/Grid Computation?

    E-print Network

    Browne, James C.

    9/10/2002 Internet/Grid Computing - Fall 2002 1 What is Performance for Internet/Grid Computation? Goals for Internet/Grid Computation? Do things you cannot otherwise do because of: Lack of Capacity Large scale computations Cost SETI Scale/Scope of communication Internet searches All of the above #12

  13. 187. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    187. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. TOPOGRAPHICAL MAP OF MILNER DAM LOCATION, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; BLUEPRINT MAP. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  14. 183. Photocopy of map (Twin Falls Canal Company). TOPOGRAPHICAL MAP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    183. Photocopy of map (Twin Falls Canal Company). TOPOGRAPHICAL MAP OF MILNER DAM SITE, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; MAP, LEFT SIDE ONLY. CROSS REFERENCE: ID-15-192. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  15. 192. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    192. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. TOPOGRAPHICAL MAP (DAM DRAWN IN), MILNER SITE, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; RIGHT SIDE OF MAP (LEFT ON ID-15-183). - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  16. 155. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    155. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Surveyor's Transit Book #405T, Page 1, #46 Division One). STATEMENT RE: SURVEY ALIGNMENT 3/03, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  17. 158. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    158. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Transit Book #404T, Page 3, #46, Division One). START OF MAIN CANAL SURVEY, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  18. 189. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    189. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ROCK CREEK CROSSING, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; BLUEPRINT. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  19. 179. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company, Bisbee Photo, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    179. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company, Bisbee Photo, September, 1912. Photographer unknown. VIEW OF LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY; VIEW OF LOW LINE CANAL IN PETE LINK'S FIELD. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  20. 177. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company, Bisbee Photo, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    177. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company, Bisbee Photo, September, 1912. Photographer unknown. COTTONWOOD FLUME, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; SOUTH VIEW FROM UPPER SIDE. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  1. Predictors of Maternal Parental Self-Efficacy Among Primiparas in the Early Postnatal Period.

    PubMed

    Shorey, Shefaly; Chan, Sally Wai-Chi; Chong, Yap Seng; He, Hong-Gu

    2014-06-01

    Maternal parental self-efficacy is a crucial factor for facilitating the smooth transition into motherhood, particularly for primiparas. The aims of this study were to examine the predictors of maternal parental self-efficacy and its relationship with social support, postnatal depression (PND), and socio-demographic variables of primiparas during the early postnatal period. A descriptive correlational study design was adopted. The instruments, Perceived Maternal Parental Self-Efficacy, Perinatal Infant Care Social Support, and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, were used to collect data from a purposive sample of 122 primiparas on the day of discharge (1-3 days post delivery) in a tertiary public hospital in Singapore. There were significant correlations among maternal parental self-efficacy, social support, and postnatal depression. The main predictors of maternal parental self-efficacy were social support, ethnicity, maternal age, and family income. The maternal parental self-efficacy, social support, and PND should be routinely assessed to provide necessary support to needy mothers. PMID:24906360

  2. [The application of self-efficacy counseling skills to health education in patients with diabetes].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Fang; Li, Yu-Chan; Chang, Jia-Rong; Courtney, Mary; Chang, Yueh-Ling

    2007-02-01

    As the incidence of chronic disease increases, empowerment of patients with chronic disease to adopt self-care responsibilities becomes paramount. Self-efficacy is a belief in one's ability to perform a task that will lead to the desired outcome. Utilizing self-efficacy counseling skills is an effective way to enhance patients' compliance with self-care activities. The development of such skills can compensate for the lack of traditional health education provided for diabetes patients and plays a significant part in the prevention of acute and chronic complications. Self-efficacy counseling strategies involve: asking questions; focusing on patient's agenda; planning personal treatment schedules; defining problems; setting goals (taking a step-by-step approach); regular follow-up and contact with patients; scaling questions; brainstorming solutions; considering past efforts, successes and failures; reassessing confidence; and finally checking behavior changes. Self-efficacy counseling skills can be learned through structured training courses in counseling skills. The aims of this report were twofold: (1) to undertake a literature review on self-efficacy and counseling skills used as the theoretical framework in a health education training program for diabetes; (2) to analyze cases when a counseling guide based upon a self-efficacy framework was used by health counselors to help patients improve their self-confidence and self-care ability. This report reveals it is important to promote the application of counseling skills in nursing interventions in the clinical practice field. PMID:17340550

  3. Michigan Institute for Plasma Science and Engineering Fall 2009 Seminar Series

    E-print Network

    Shyy, Wei

    Transport and Frequency Dependent Ion Kinetics in a Capacitively Coupled Plasma Reactor 16 September 4MIPSE Michigan Institute for Plasma Science and Engineering Fall 2009 Seminar Series Date, Time- seminars".) Universal Scaling of the Electron Distribution Function in Relativistic Laser- Plasma

  4. The Equivalence Principle Comes to School--Falling Objects and Other Middle School Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie; Ekström, Peter; Hansson, Lena; Mars, Patrik; Ouattara, Lassana; Ryan, Ulrika

    2014-01-01

    Comparing two objects falling together is a small-scale version of Galileo's classical experiment, demonstrating the equivalence between gravitational and inertial mass. We present here investigations by a group of ten-year-olds, who used iPads to record the drops. The movie recordings were essential in the follow-up discussions, enabling the…

  5. VOL.31,NO.1 FALL 2004 cience on the nanoscale is revolutionizing technology, and

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    is a strong research program in the societal implications of nano- technology." This research program, he adds1 VOL.31,NO.1 FALL 2004 S cience on the nanoscale is revolutionizing technology of materials, processes and systems at this small scale and then develop technology based on these discoveries

  6. Development and validation of in-service teachers' self-efficacy beliefs in the context of Pakistan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sadia Shaukat

    2011-01-01

    This study explains the development and validation of a questionnaire instrument to measure the self-efficacy beliefs of 180 in-service schoolteachers in Pakistan. Four dimensions of teacher self-efficacy were identified in the Pakistani context: classroom management, persistent behaviour, level of teacher anxiety and professional mastery. Validation of the four scales for the Pakistani teachers was achieved by obtaining unidimensional factors. Cronbach

  7. Efficacy of Er:YAG laser in the treatment of chronic periodontitis: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fabrizio Sgolastra; Ambra Petrucci; Roberto Gatto; Annalisa Monaco

    Scaling root planing (SRP) has been proven efficacious as the traditional treatment approach for chronic periodontitis. However,\\u000a important limitations such as difficult access in deep pockets, grooves, and furcations have led to the development of new\\u000a therapeutic strategies. The erbium-doped:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) laser is one of the most promising laser types\\u000a for periodontal therapy. Its efficacy in radicular debris removal and

  8. Self-care self-efficacy, depression, and quality of life among patients receiving hemodialysis in Taiwan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shiow-Luan Tsay; Marilyn Healstead

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine relationships among self-care self-efficacy, depression, and quality of life in 160 patients receiving hemodialysis. The study is a descriptive, correlational design. Measures include Strategies Used by People to Promote Health, the Geriatric Depression Scale, and the Quality of Life Index.Results indicate that self-care self-efficacy and depression are the significant predictors of quality

  9. Sleep laboratory studies of hypnotic drugs: efficacy and withdrawal effects.

    PubMed

    Kales, A; Kales, J D

    1983-04-01

    Flurazepam, temazepam, and triazolam are compared in terms of initial and short term efficacy, effectiveness during intermediate and long term use, withdrawal effects, and general side effects. The usefulness of temazepam is considerably restricted since the drug is slowly absorbed; peak blood concentrations are not reached until 2 to 3 hours after ingestion. Consequently, while the majority of insomniac patients complain primarily of difficulty falling asleep, temazepam is not effective for this sleep complaint. Further, the drug has an intermediate elimination half-life and induces a significant degree of morning sleepiness (hang-over). Rebound insomnia of a moderate degree occurs with some frequency following withdrawal of temazepam. Triazolam is effective initially and with short term use both for inducing and maintaining sleep. However, much of this effectiveness is lost with continued nightly use over an intermediate period (2 weeks). The drug has a rapid elimination rate; during drug administration, sleep may worsen in the final hours of the night (early morning insomnia), and following drug withdrawal, rebound insomnia is frequent, immediate, and severe. Side effects are frequent and include some morning sleepiness (before tolerance develops) and significant memory impairment and even episodes of amnesia. Triazolam may have a narrow margin of safety in that serious behavioral symptoms have been reported even with a 1-mg dose. Flurazepam is effective both for initiating and maintaining sleep with initial and short term drug administration. Further, its efficacy is maintained not only with intermediate term use but with long term drug use (4 weeks). Flurazepam is a long elimination half-life drug, and there is significant daytime sedation during short term use; with continued use this effect diminishes. Rebound insomnia has not been noted following withdrawal of flurazepam; there is a carry-over effectiveness into the first and second nights of withdrawal, and any withdrawal sleep disturbance would be expected to be infrequent, delayed in appearance, and mild in degree. PMID:6132933

  10. Articulation Report: Report for the Florida Community College System, Data for Fall 1995, Fall 1996, Fall 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Board of Community Colleges, Tallahassee.

    This articulation report presents descriptive headcount statistics for undergraduates in Florida's State University System (SUS) institutions who, prior to enrolling in the university, were enrolled in a Florida public community college. In fall 1997, there were 66,299 such students, a decrease of 0.7 percent from fall 1995 in which there were…

  11. Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy and the Use of Prescription Medication: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mannion, Cynthia; Mansell, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To examine the association of self-efficacy, perception of milk production, and lactating women's use of medication prescribed to increase breast milk in a cohort of 18–40-year-old mothers over six months. Methods. Mothers (n = 76) attending community clinics completed the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale and the Humenick/Hill Lactation Scale, a measure of perceived milk production, three times. Results. Domperidone, a dopamine antagonist, was used by 28% of participants. On average, those using domperidone had lower self-efficacy scores than those not using it (P < 0.05) and were more likely to have used formula (Pearson chi-square test statistic? = 6.87, df = 1, P < 0.05). Breastfeeding self efficacy and perception of milk production were positively correlated. Conclusion. Breastfeeding assessment conducted prior to prescription of galactogogues is recommended for mothers and healthy term babies. Following Baby-Friendly hospital protocols and increasing self-efficacy for lactating women may be most effective in sustaining breastfeeding. Risks and benefits of various galactogogues are discussed. PMID:22220176

  12. Functional assessments for predicting a risk of multiple falls in independent ambulatory patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Srisim, Kitiyawadee; Saengsuwan, Jiamjit; Amatachaya, Sugalya

    2015-07-01

    Background/objectives Many ambulatory patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) encountered multiple falls and serious consequences after falls, but there was no quantitative practical measure for early identification of individuals at a risk of multiple falls. This study compared the utility of the Berg Balance Scale, Timed "Up & Go" Test, 10-Meter Walk Test, Functional Reach Test (FRT), Step Test, and Five Times Sit-to-Stand Test to predict risk of multiple falls (fall ?2 times) in these individuals. Methods Eighty-three independent ambulatory subjects with SCI were assessed for their functional abilities using the six tests. Then, their fall data were monitored prospectively every 2 weeks for 6 months in total. The first 25 subjects were also involved in the reliability tests. Results The FRT showed the best predictive ability for the risk of multiple falls (cut-off score ?20 cm, sensitivity = 73%, specificity = 55%, area under the receiver characteristic curve = 0.64, and adjusted odd ratio = 3.18, P < 0.05), excellent inter-tester reliability, and good feasibility. Conclusions The FRT may be used as a screening tool to predict risk of multiple falls in independent ambulatory individuals with SCI. However, with a moderate level of specificity, a further comprehensive test may be needed to clearly indicate individuals at a risk of falls. In addition, the findings suggest that a higher level of ability increases the risk of multiple falls. Thus, programs for functional integration in an actual environment may be needed to reduce the risk of falls for these individuals. PMID:24621036

  13. Fall-Related Injuries in Community-Dwelling Older Adults in Qom Province, Iran, 2010-2012

    PubMed Central

    Gilasi, Hamid Reza; Soori, Hamid; Yazdani, Shahram; Taheri Tenjani, Parisa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Falls and related injuries are common health problems in the elderly. Fractures, brain and internal organ injuries and death are the common consequences of the falls, which result in dependence, decreased self-efficacy, fear of falling, depression, restricted daily activities, hospitalization and admission to the nursing home and impose costs on the individual and the society. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the types of fall-related injuries and the related risk factors in the elderly population of Qom province, Iran. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study was performed on 424 elderly people (65 years and over) referred to Shahid Beheshti Hospital, Qom, Iran, due to falls between 2010 and 2012. The ICD-10 codes of external causes of injury from w00 to w19 related to falls were selected from the health information system of the hospital and demographic variables of the patients and external causes of falls were extracted after accessing the files of the patients. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 18 (SPSS Inc., USA). The duration of hospital stay and its relationship with underlying variables were investigated using t test and ANOVA. The level of significance was considered P < 0.05. Results: Among 424 elderly people, 180 cases (42.45%) were male and the mean age of the patients was 78.65 ± 7.70 years. Fall on the same level from slipping, tripping, and stumbling was the most common external cause with 291 victims (68.60%), and hip fracture in 121 patients (29.00%), intertrochanteric fracture in 112 patients (26.90%), and traumatic brain injury in 51 patients (12.20%) were the most common causes of hospital stay. The mean hospital stay was 7.33 ± 3.63 days. Conclusions: Lower limb fracture and traumatic brain injury were the most common causes of hospitalization, which resulted in the longest hospital stay and highest hospitalization costs in the elderly.

  14. When Functional Capacity and Real-World Functioning Converge: The Role of Self-Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas, Veronica; Abel, Stephanie; Bowie, Christopher R.; Tiznado, Denisse; Depp, Colin A.; Patterson, Thomas L.; Jeste, Dilip V.; Mausbach, Brent T.

    2013-01-01

    Although functional capacity is typically diminished, there is substantial heterogeneity in functional outcomes in schizophrenia. Motivational factors likely play a significant role in bridging the capacity-to-functioning gap. Self-efficacy theory suggests that although some individuals may have the capacity to perform functional behaviors, they may or may not have confidence they can successfully perform these behaviors in real-world settings. We hypothesized that the relationship between functional capacity and real-world functioning would be moderated by the individual’s self-efficacy in a sample of 97 middle-aged and older adults with schizophrenia (mean age = 50.9 ± 6.5 years). Functional capacity was measured using the Brief UCSD Performance-based Skills Assessment (UPSA-B), self-efficacy with the Revised Self-Efficacy Scale, and Daily Functioning via the Specific Level of Functioning (SLOF) scale and self-report measures. Results indicated that when self-efficacy was low, the relationship between UPSA-B and SLOF scores was not significant (P = .727). However, when self efficacy was high, UPSA-B scores were significantly related to SLOF scores (P = .020). Similar results were observed for self-reported social and work functioning. These results suggest that motivational processes (ie, self-efficacy) may aid in understanding why some individuals have the capacity to function well but do not translate this capacity into real-world functioning. Furthermore, while improvement in capacity may be necessary for improved functioning in this population, it may not be sufficient when motivation is absent. PMID:22328642

  15. Physical Methods for Intracellular Delivery: Practical Aspects from Laboratory Use to Industrial-Scale Processing

    PubMed Central

    Meacham, J. Mark; Durvasula, Kiranmai; Degertekin, F. Levent; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2015-01-01

    Effective intracellular delivery is a significant impediment to research and therapeutic applications at all processing scales. Physical delivery methods have long demonstrated the ability to deliver cargo molecules directly to the cytoplasm or nucleus, and the mechanisms underlying the most common approaches (microinjection, electroporation, and sonoporation) have been extensively investigated. In this review, we discuss established approaches, as well as emerging techniques (magnetofection, optoinjection, and combined modalities). In addition to operating principles and implementation strategies, we address applicability and limitations of various in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo platforms. Importantly, we perform critical assessments regarding (1) treatment efficacy with diverse cell types and delivered cargo molecules, (2) suitability to different processing scales (from single cell to large populations), (3) suitability for automation/integration with existing workflows, and (4) multiplexing potential and flexibility/adaptability to enable rapid changeover between treatments of varied cell types. Existing techniques typically fall short in one or more of these criteria; however, introduction of micro-/nanotechnology concepts, as well as synergistic coupling of complementary method(s), can improve performance and applicability of a particular approach, overcoming barriers to practical implementation. For this reason, we emphasize these strategies in examining recent advances in development of delivery systems. PMID:23813915

  16. Balance confidence and functional mobility are independently associated with falls in people with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mak, Margaret K Y; Pang, Marco Y C

    2009-05-01

    The present study aimed to examine the association of falls with self-perceived balance confidence level, and balance and mobility performance in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Forty-nine healthy subjects and 71 subjects with PD completed the study. Among the PD patients, 33 (46%) were fallers and 38 were non-fallers. All subjects were tested with the activities-specific balance confidence scale (ABC), one-leg-stance test (OLS), and timed-up-and-go test (TUG). Results indicated that PD fallers had significantly lower ABC scores, shorter OLS times and longer times to complete TUG than PD non-fallers (P < 0.05). Having a high ABC score (>80) was significantly associated with a lower fall risk, after adjusting for age, gender, and duration of PD, and for depression [odds ratio (OR) = 0.06, P = 0.020]. For performance-based measures of balance and mobility, a longer TUG time (> or =16 s) was independently associated with increased risk of falling after controlling for relevant factors (OR = 3.86, P = 0.043); OLS time, however, was not significantly associated with falls. A lower self-perceived balance confidence level and a prolonged time to complete TUG were associated with increased risk of falling in patients with PD. Interventions to improve these modifiable risk factors could be useful in reducing future falls in the PD population and will require further study. PMID:19240961

  17. Vaccine efficacy and control measures in pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, S R

    1991-01-01

    An outbreak of pertussis in primary school-children in the St David's area of Pembrokeshire provided the opportunity to estimate pertussis vaccine efficacy. The estimate of efficacy was 88% when notified cases were used, but this fell to 68% when all children with bouts of coughing for two or more weeks were included. Notified cases were significantly less likely to have been vaccinated than other cases with similar symptoms. Therefore vaccine efficacy estimates based upon notified cases are likely to be biased. However, even the lower estimates suggest that pertussis immunisation is highly desirable and efforts to improve coverage should be increased. PMID:1863099

  18. Thermal styling: efficacy, convenience, damage tradeoffs.

    PubMed

    Harper, Don; Qi, Jia Catherine; Kaplan, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a simple method to explore the efficacy of thermal styling, By using a temperature gradient curling iron we rapidly explore a range of thermal treatment conditions. The thermodynamic literature on the glass transition in keratin fibers explains the surprisingly limited role of elevated temperature in improvements in the efficacy of holding the styled curvature of the fibers. The onset of damage, however, is strongly temperature dependent. This combination of measurements of damage and efficacy shows the range of conditions over which thermal protection products must be functional. PMID:21635843

  19. 5. VIEW OF NORTHWEST ELEVATIONS OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF NORTHWEST ELEVATIONS OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE TOWERS NO. 59 AND NO. 60, EXAMPLE OF TRANSPOSITION TOWERS. LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Little Falls Tie Line Towers, Near Little Dam Falls on Spokane River, Wellpinit, Stevens County, WA

  20. 3. VIEW OF NORTHWEST CORNER OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF NORTHWEST CORNER OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE TOWER NO. 23, STANDARD PEAK TOWER. LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Little Falls Tie Line Towers, Near Little Dam Falls on Spokane River, Wellpinit, Stevens County, WA

  1. Spokane Falls Community College Portland State University Transfer Worksheet

    E-print Network

    Caughman, John

    Spokane Falls Community College Portland State University Transfer Worksheet Transferring to Portland State University (PSU) with a Direct Transfer Agreement (DTA) Associates degree from Spokane Falls) #12;Spokane Falls Community College Portland State University 2. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS The majority

  2. MATH 403 -FALL 2011 CLASSICAL ANALYSIS I

    E-print Network

    Mazzucato, Anna

    MATH 403 - FALL 2011 CLASSICAL ANALYSIS I Instructor: Professor Anna L. Mazzucato Office: 324 Mc page and/or ANGEL as time progress. PREREQUISITES: You must have passed Math 312 to register:30 -7:45 Page 1 of 3 #12;Math 403 - Syllabus Fall 2011 PM (subject to change). The final exam

  3. Non-Matriculant Survey Report, Fall 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Stephen

    In fall 1995, Pennsylvania College of Technology undertook a study of students who were accepted for admission but did not enroll to determine their reasons for not enrolling. Surveys were mailed to the 1,619 students, out of 3,524 accepted in fall 1995, who did not enroll, receiving responses from 52.4% (n=849). Study results included the…

  4. Studies on fall armyworm migration and monitoring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith; Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) or fall armyworm is an important agricultural pest of a number of crops in thewestern hemisphere. Two morphologically identical host strains of fall armyworm exist, the rice-strain and corn-strain, with the latter inflicting substantial eco...

  5. Fall 2012 www.veteran.uci.edu

    E-print Network

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    Fall 2012 www.veteran.uci.edu Fall 2012 In this Issue: Veterans Week 2 Workshops 3 Upcoming Events 4 VET QUARTERLY Our Mission UCI Veteran Services provides Veterans, Reservists students to the V.A., answering any questions veteran students or dependents may

  6. ELEC4705 Fall 2009 Electronic Structure

    E-print Network

    Smy, Tom

    electrons), where the band structure depends on atomic spacing and therefore the crystal structure. SeeELEC4705 ­ Fall 2009 Tom Smy LECTURE 8 Electronic Structure 1 #12;#12;Contents ELEC4705 ­ Fall 2009 1 Lecture 8. Electronic Structure 1 8.1. Number of States in a Band 4 8.2. Insulators, Metals

  7. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Fall Term Spring Term

    E-print Network

    Lee, Kelvin H.

    CHEMICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM FALL 2010 Fall Term Spring Term EGGG 101 Introduction to Chemical Engineering 3 MATH 242 Analytic Geometry & Calculus B 4 MATH 243 Analytic Geometry & Calculus C 4 Critical Reading and Writing 3 Breadth Requirement Elective 1 3 15 17 CHEG 231 Chemical Engineering

  8. Fall Semester Year 1 required coursework for

    E-print Network

    Thomas, David D.

    Year One Year Two Year Three Fall Semester Year 1 required coursework for PharmD, 18 credits PMBA 2100, 2 credits PMBA 2200, 2 credits Total semester credits = 20 Fall Semester Year 2 required coursework for PharmD, 18.5 credits MBA 8211, 2 credits PMBA 2400, 2 credits Total semester credits = 22

  9. Veterinary Report Fall 2004 Auxiliary Presents Scholarships

    E-print Network

    Gilbert, Matthew

    Veterinary Report · Fall 2004 1( Auxiliary Presents Scholarships During the Fall Conference alumni awards presentation, three Illinois veterinary students received $1,000 scholarships from the Aux- iliary to the Illinois State Veterinary Medical Association. They are Claire Ojala, Class of 2006, and Jason Wrage, Class

  10. Fall Incidents Detection for Intelligent Video Surveillance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ji Tao; Mukherjee Turjo; Mun-Fei Wong; Mengdi Wang; Yap-Peng Tan

    2005-01-01

    We present in this paper an intelligent video surveillance system to detect human fall incidents for enhanced safety in indoor environments. The system consists of two main parts: a vision component which can reliably detect and track moving people in the view of a camera, and an event-inference module which parses observation sequences of people features for possible falling behavioral

  11. 5, 155178, 2005 Fall vortex ozone

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 5, 155­178, 2005 Fall vortex ozone S. R. Kawa et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 5, 155­178, 2005 www.atmos-chem-phys.org/acpd/5/155/ SRef-ID: 1680-7375/acpd/2005-5-155 European Geosciences Union Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Fall vortex

  12. Drop Study/Attrition Rates, Fall 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summer, Pat

    This report describes the attrition rate at Johnson County Community College (JCCC) (Kansas). The overall attrition rate for classes starting in fall 2000 was nearly 12%--during the fall semester 4,652 students dropped classes. Useable drop surveys were completed for 93% of those classes. Findings indicated that: (1) the Science, Math, and Health…

  13. Impact of an Interprofessional Communication Course on Nursing, Medical, and Pharmacy Students’ Communication Skill Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Rick; Hagen, Kyle S; Sorah, Emily L

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To describe an interprofessional communication course in an academic health sciences center and to evaluate and compare interpersonal and interprofessional communication self-efficacy beliefs of medical, nursing, and pharmacy students before and after course participation, using Bandura’s self-efficacy theory as a guiding framework. Design. First-year nursing (n=36), first-year medical (n=73), and second-year pharmacy students (n=83) enrolled in an interprofessional communication skills development course voluntarily completed a 33-item survey instrument based on Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) core competencies prior to and upon completion of the course during the fall semester of 2012. Assessment. Nursing students entered the course with higher interpersonal and interprofessional communication self-efficacy beliefs compared to medical and pharmacy students. Pharmacy students, in particular, noted significant improvements in communication self-efficacy beliefs across multiple domains postcourse. Conclusion. Completion of an interprofessional communications course was associated with a positive impact on health professions students’ interpersonal and interprofessional communication self-efficacy beliefs. PMID:25657373

  14. Efficacy of a novel skin antiseptic against carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Wiemken, Timothy L; Kelley, Robert R; Carrico, Ruth M; Binford, Laura E; Guinn, Brian E; Mattingly, William A; Peyrani, Paula; Ramirez, Julio A

    2015-04-01

    Infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are increasing on a global scale. Because of the need for CRE transmission prevention and control, we sought to evaluate the efficacy of a silver-based skin antiseptic against these organisms. Using a human skin analog, a third party laboratory conducted efficacy testing. The results suggest that this product provides antimicrobial activity against CRE on human skin. Because of the unique properties, this antiseptic may be useful for daily bathing of hospitalized patients to assist in the control of CRE. PMID:25660077

  15. Effectiveness of a multifactorial falls prevention program in community-dwelling older people when compared to usual care: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial (Prevquedas Brazil)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Falling in older age is a major public health concern due to its costly and disabling consequences. However very few randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have been conducted in developing countries, in which population ageing is expected to be particularly substantial in coming years. This article describes the design of an RCT to evaluate the effectiveness of a multifactorial falls prevention program in reducing the rate of falls in community-dwelling older people. Methods/design Multicentre parallel-group RCT involving 612 community-dwelling men and women aged 60 years and over, who have fallen at least once in the previous year. Participants will be recruited in multiple settings in Sao Paulo, Brazil and will be randomly allocated to a control group or an intervention group. The usual care control group will undergo a fall risk factor assessment and be referred to their clinicians with the risk assessment report so that individual modifiable risk factors can be managed without any specific guidance. The intervention group will receive a 12-week Multifactorial Falls Prevention Program consisting of: an individualised medical management of modifiable risk factors, a group-based, supervised balance training exercise program plus an unsupervised home-based exercise program, an educational/behavioral intervention. Both groups will receive a leaflet containing general information about fall prevention strategies. Primary outcome measures will be the rate of falls and the proportion of fallers recorded by monthly falls diaries and telephone calls over a 12 month period. Secondary outcomes measures will include risk of falling, fall-related self-efficacy score, measures of balance, mobility and strength, fall-related health services use and independence with daily tasks. Data will be analysed using the intention-to-treat principle.The incidence of falls in the intervention and control groups will be calculated and compared using negative binomial regression analysis. Discussion This study is the first trial to be conducted in Brazil to evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention to prevent falls. If proven to reduce falls this study has the potential to benefit older adults and assist health care practitioners and policy makers to implement and promote effective falls prevention interventions. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01698580) PMID:23497000

  16. Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Sales Performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julian Barling; Russell Beattie

    1983-01-01

    Self-efficacy theory predicts that people will perform better when they believe they have the skills necessary for success. It also suggests, however, that believing in long-term rewards for success (\\

  17. ANTIMICROBIAL EFFICACY TESTING (IN-HOUSE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project initiates the in-house study of antimicrobial efficacy, growth parameters, and transport characteristics of biological contaminants. Viable and non-viable microbial analysis will be performed by growth culture and molecular biology techniques. Experiments w...

  18. New technologies transform Fall Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Michael

    2012-02-01

    The 2011 Fall Meeting was transformed by the introduction of nine new technologies, most notably, a mobile app and the AGU ePoster system. With more than 11,000 downloads and 250,000 page views, the mobile app quickly replaced the program books for many attendees. Peter Petley of Durham University and blogger for the Landslide Blog said, “I have found that one of the challenges of attending AGU is being able to identify all of the sessions that are of interest, and then creating a schedule without carrying reams of paper.” He continued, “I found that the mobile app has transformed my conference experience, providing a simple means to collate all of the sessions and to plan my day. As a result, I have found the meeting to be much more enjoyable and fulfilling.”

  19. [Comparative efficacy of different muscle relaxants in the rehabilitation of post-stroke patients with spasticity].

    PubMed

    Koval'chuk, V V; Skoromets, A A; Vasil'eva, I V

    2008-01-01

    An influence of different muscle relaxants on muscle tone and functional rehabilitation has been studied in 360 post-stroke patients. Muscle tone has been assessed with the Ashworth scale and functional rehabilitation with Barthel, Lindmark and Scandinavian scales as well as the Merton & Sutton scale. Efficacy of muscle relaxants has been assessed by the 2 min. walking test. Moreover, we suggested a coefficient for calculating drug efficacy. The results of the study revealed that tolperisone was the most efficient in the treatment of post-stroke patients with spasticity. Tizanidine was also effective but to a lesser extent. Other drugs studied did not reveal any significant effect. Tolperisone had a good tolerability, the adverse effects in patients treated with this drug were registered more rarely compared to other ones. PMID:18833102

  20. Self-efficacy beliefs and tennis performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julian Barling; Mike Abel

    1983-01-01

    Theoretical and methodological aspects of self-efficacy theory are assessed in this study, and the tennis performance of 40 active players (M age = 26.6 years) serves as the criterion variable. On a theoretical level, only self-efficacy beliefs, and not response-outcome expectations or the valence thereof, were consistently and significantly related to 12 dimensions of tennis performance. This phenomenon pertained to

  1. Accelerating HIV-1 Vaccine Efficacy Trials.

    PubMed

    Barouch, Dan H; Michael, Nelson L

    2014-11-20

    Despite major advances in HIV-1 therapeutics and prevention strategies, the development of a safe and effective prophylactic HIV-1 vaccine will likely be critical for ending the global HIV-1 epidemic. Yet only four HIV-1 vaccine concepts have been tested for clinical efficacy over the past 30 years. In this Commentary, we describe key hurdles facing the HIV-1 vaccine development field and outline strategies to accelerate efficacy evaluation of novel HIV-1 vaccine candidates. PMID:25416935

  2. The efficacy of Alcoholics Anonymous: the elusiveness of hard data.

    PubMed

    Bebbington, P E

    1976-06-01

    The paper is concerned with methodological problems relating to the scientific study of the effectiveness of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). Studies of the effectiveness of AA fall into two categories--longitudinal and cross-sectional, and may be criticized on the basis of over-simple criteria of success. The particular problems of the requirement for control groups in studies of effectiveness are pointed out. The problems arising out of the whole process of affiliation and disaffiliation and their implications for scientific study are discussed. The requirement for sound statistical analysis is stressed, and inadequacies in the techniques of follow-up are indicated. The studies which have some bearing on AA as a treatment facility are reviewed. These include multivariate studies involving AA attendance as one factor, studies in which AA was the main variable in a hospital programme, and longitudinal studies of AA from within the organization. Particular difficulties in using cross-sectional surveys for the purpose of estimating efficacy are pointed out. The conclusion reached is that because of the methodological difficulties the totality of these studies dose not add significantly to the knowledge concerning AA which we possess from clinical experience. Moreover, without a change in the unusual characteristics of AA when considered as a treatment facility it seems unlikely to be possible to assess its effectiveness in a scientific manner. PMID:1084198

  3. Enteral feeding pumps: efficacy, safety, and patient acceptability

    PubMed Central

    White, Helen; King, Linsey

    2014-01-01

    Enteral feeding is a long established practice across pediatric and adult populations, to enhance nutritional intake and prevent malnutrition. Despite recognition of the importance of nutrition within the modern health agenda, evaluation of the efficacy of how such feeds are delivered is more limited. The accuracy, safety, and consistency with which enteral feed pump systems dispense nutritional formulae are important determinants of their use and acceptability. Enteral feed pump safety has received increased interest in recent years as enteral pumps are used across hospital and home settings. Four areas of enteral feed pump safety have emerged: the consistent and accurate delivery of formula; the minimization of errors associated with tube misconnection; the impact of continuous feed delivery itself (via an enteral feed pump); and the chemical composition of the casing used in enteral feed pump manufacture. The daily use of pumps in delivery of enteral feeds in a home setting predominantly falls to the hands of parents and caregivers. Their understanding of the use and function of their pump is necessary to ensure appropriate, safe, and accurate delivery of enteral nutrition; their experience with this is important in informing clinicians and manufacturers of the emerging needs and requirements of this diverse patient population. The review highlights current practice and areas of concern and establishes our current knowledge in this field. PMID:25170284

  4. Evaluating the Efficacy of the Cloud for Cluster Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, David; Shams, Khawaja; Chang, George; Soderstrom, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Computing requirements vary by industry, and it follows that NASA and other research organizations have computing demands that fall outside the mainstream. While cloud computing made rapid inroads for tasks such as powering web applications, performance issues on highly distributed tasks hindered early adoption for scientific computation. One venture to address this problem is Nebula, NASA's homegrown cloud project tasked with delivering science-quality cloud computing resources. However, another industry development is Amazon's high-performance computing (HPC) instances on Elastic Cloud Compute (EC2) that promises improved performance for cluster computation. This paper presents results from a series of benchmarks run on Amazon EC2 and discusses the efficacy of current commercial cloud technology for running scientific applications across a cluster. In particular, a 240-core cluster of cloud instances achieved 2 TFLOPS on High-Performance Linpack (HPL) at 70% of theoretical computational performance. The cluster's local network also demonstrated sub-100 ?s inter-process latency with sustained inter-node throughput in excess of 8 Gbps. Beyond HPL, a real-world Hadoop image processing task from NASA's Lunar Mapping and Modeling Project (LMMP) was run on a 29 instance cluster to process lunar and Martian surface images with sizes on the order of tens of gigapixels. These results demonstrate that while not a rival of dedicated supercomputing clusters, commercial cloud technology is now a feasible option for moderately demanding scientific workloads.

  5. The development of self-efficacy and self-esteem in pharmacy students based on experiential education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorra, Mark L.

    This doctoral thesis contributes to the literature on self-efficacy and self-esteem and the relationship to a student's school, age, gender, ethnicity, GPA, paid and introductory pharmacy practice experiences in a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program. Graduates with a high level of self-efficacy and self-esteem are more desirable as pharmacists upon graduation. A quantitative survey, which includes two standardized instruments, the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE) and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), was administered to students at five schools of pharmacy in the northeast United States, resulting in a total of 399 responses. The findings confirm the significance of paid experiences and increased levels of a student's self-efficacy in a pharmacy setting. The other finding was related to ethnicity where the Asian/Pacific Islander students showed lower self-efficacy than other ethnic groups, which may be due to a cultural difference in displaying traits of high self-efficacy. Self-esteem also showed a positive finding for students with paid experiences and students who were older. There was an ethnicity finding where Asian/Pacific Islanders scored lower on the self-esteem scale, while the African-Americans scored higher than all the other groups. The results show that students improve their levels of self-efficacy and self-esteem through extended practical experiences. Schools should provide structured experiences of a sufficient length, beyond the present 300 hours, to prepare students for their transition into a professional role. Educators should be aware of the difference in Asian/Pacific Islander culture and encourage students to demonstrate their self-efficacy and self-esteem so other professionals can recognize them for their attributes.

  6. Clinical and Antibiofilm Efficacy of Antimicrobial Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Finnegan, Simon; Percival, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Hydrogels have been shown to have a significant role to play in wound healing. Hydrogels are used to assist in the management of dry, sloughy, or necrotic wounds. However, recent scientific evidence has shown that biofilms delay wound healing and increase a wound propensity to infection. It is therefore essential that hydrogels incorporating antimicrobials demonstrate efficacy on biofilms. Consequently, it is the aim of this article to review the efficacy of hydrogels, incorporating antimicrobials, on wounds with specific reference to their efficacy on biofilms. Recent Advances: Technologies being developed for the management of wounds are rapidly expanding. In particularly next-generation hydrogels, incorporating copolymers, have been reported to enable the smart release of antimicrobials. This has led to the development of a more tailored patient-specific antimicrobial hydrogel therapy. Critical Issues: Evidence relating to the efficacy of hydrogels, incorporating antimicrobials, on biofilms within both the in vitro and in vivo environments is lacking. Future Direction: Studies that investigate the efficacy of antimicrobial hydrogel wound dressings on both in vivo and in vitro biofilms are important. However, there is a significant need for better and more reproducible in vivo biofilm models. Until this is possible, data generated from appropriate and representative in vitro models will help to assist researchers and clinicians in evaluating antimicrobial and antibiofilm hydrogel technology for the extrapolation of efficacy data relevant to biofilms present in the in vivo environment.

  7. Adolescent Work Experience and Self-efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Cunnien, Keith A.; MartinRogers, Nicole; Mortimer, Jeylan T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of this paper To assess the relationship between high school work experiences and self-efficacy. Design/methodology/approach OLS regressions are applied to longitudinal data from the Youth Development Study to examine work experiences and self-efficacy. Findings The analyses indicate that employment fosters self-efficacy in multiple realms, Occasional and sporadic workers exhibit less self-efficacy than steady workers. Supervisory support may be especially important in enhancing adolescents’ confidence as they anticipate their future family lives, community participation, personal health, and economic achievements. Research limitations/Implications This research includes only a small set of the work dimensions that may be important for adolescents. Ethnography and in-depth interviews are recommended to further explore the subjective and emotional dimensions of youth work experiences. Practical implications In developing policies and guidance, educators, parents, and employers should be aware that steady employment and supervisory support enhance the development of adolescent self-efficacy. Original value of paper This paper finds evidence that adolescent work experiences spill over to influence youth’s developing confidence in the realms of family life, community and personal health. It also suggests that sporadic and occasional work patterns can impair the development of self-efficacy in adolescence. PMID:19750144

  8. Biodynamics: Why the Wirewalker Doesn't Fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.; Griffin, Lori A.

    2003-11-01

    You can never step in the same river twice, goes the old adage of philosophy. An observation on the transitory nature of fluids in motion, this saying also describes the endless variations researchers face when studying human movement. Understanding these biodynamics-why the wirewalker doesn't fall-requires a grasp of the constant fluctuations and fine tunings which maintain balance in the complex, fluid system of human locomotion. Taking a comprehensive approach to the phenomenon of locomotion, Biodynamics: Why the Wirewalker Doesn't Fall integrates physical laws and principles with concepts of fractals, chaos, and randomness. In so doing, it formulates a description of both the large-scale, smooth aspects of locomotion and the more minute, randomized mechanisms of this physiological process. Ideal for beginners in this subject, Biodynamics provides an elegant explanation without assuming the reader's understanding of complex physical principles or mathematical equations. Chapter topics include: * Dimensions, measurement, and scaling * Mechanics and dynamics * Biometrics * Conservation of momentum * Biomechanics * Bioelectricity * Bioenergetics * Fluid mechanics and dynamics * Data analysis * Biostatistics Packed with problem sets, examples, and original line drawings, Biodynamics is an invaluable text for advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and instructors in medicine, biology, physiology, biophysics, and bioengineering.

  9. Linking Leadership to Student Learning: The Contributions of Leader Efficacy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth Leithwood; Doris Jantzi

    2008-01-01

    Purposes: This study aimed to improve our understanding of the nature, causes and consequence of school leader efficacy, including indirect influences on student learning. We asked about district contributions to school leader efficacy, whether leader self- and collective efficacy responded to the same or different district conditions and the effects of leader efficacy on conditions in the school and the

  10. Age and sex influences on fall characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, T W; Varlow, J; Silman, A J; Reeve, J; Reid, D M; Todd, C; Woolf, A D

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate age and sex influences on fall characteristics. METHODS--A total of 1243 subjects (517 males and 726 females) aged 50 years and over and drawn from population based sampling frames were invited to complete an interviewer administered questionnaire concerning descriptive characteristics of falls experienced in the previous four months. Information collected included details about the part of the body to strike the ground, direction of the fall, level of trauma and whether or not injury or fracture was sustained. RESULTS--One hundred and seventy two subjects reported a fall in the previous four months. Restricting analysis to the 142 subjects who fell from a standing height or less, females aged 50-64 years were more than twice as likely to fall onto their hand compared with older females (odds ratio (OR) = 2.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.8 to 6.2) and at all ages (50+) were more than three times as likely to fall on their hip compared with males (OR = 3.4; 95% CI 1.0 to 11.5). Compared with older males, males aged 50-64 were more likely to fall sideways (OR = 5.1; 95% CI 1.5 to 17.4) and less likely to fall forwards (OR = 0.4; 95% CI 0.1 to 1.1). CONCLUSION--There is a potentially clinically important variation in fall type by age and sex. In particular, this variation might explain patterns of occurrence of hip and Colles' fracture. PMID:7826141

  11. at the University of Wisconsin-Madison FALL 2011at the University of Wisconsin-Madison FALL 2011at the University of Wisconsin-Madison FALL 2011at the University of Wisconsin-Madison FALL 2011at the University of Wisconsin-Madison FALL 2011at the Universi

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    at the University of Wisconsin-Madison FALL 2011at the University of Wisconsin-Madison FALL 2011at the University of Wisconsin-Madison FALL 2011at the University of Wisconsin-Madison FALL 2011at the University of Wisconsin-Madison FALL 2011at the University of Wisconsin-Madison FALL 2011at the University of Wisconsin

  12. Elders Health Empowerment Scale

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Empowerment refers to patient skills that allow them to become primary decision-makers in control of daily self-management of health problems. As important the concept as it is, particularly for elders with chronic diseases, few available instruments have been validated for use with Spanish speaking people. Objective: Translate and adapt the Health Empowerment Scale (HES) for a Spanish-speaking older adults sample and perform its psychometric validation. Methods: The HES was adapted based on the Diabetes Empowerment Scale-Short Form. Where "diabetes" was mentioned in the original tool, it was replaced with "health" terms to cover all kinds of conditions that could affect health empowerment. Statistical and Psychometric Analyses were conducted on 648 urban-dwelling seniors. Results: The HES had an acceptable internal consistency with a Cronbach's ? of 0.89. The convergent validity was supported by significant Pearson's Coefficient correlations between the HES total and item scores and the General Self Efficacy Scale (r= 0.77), Swedish Rheumatic Disease Empowerment Scale (r= 0.69) and Making Decisions Empowerment Scale (r= 0.70). Construct validity was evaluated using item analysis, half-split test and corrected item to total correlation coefficients; with good internal consistency (?> 0.8). The content validity was supported by Scale and Item Content Validity Index of 0.98 and 1.0, respectively. Conclusions: HES had acceptable face validity and reliability coefficients; which added to its ease administration and users' unbiased comprehension, could set it as a suitable tool in evaluating elder's outpatient empowerment-based medical education programs. PMID:25767307

  13. Efficacy of different contraceptive methods.

    PubMed

    Vessey, M; Lawless, M; Yeates, D

    1982-04-10

    The Oxford Family Planning Association (Oxford, England) contraceptive study has yielded data on the efficacy of a wide range of birth control methods for a large, homogeneous group of married women attending family planning clinics. Some of the main findings are summarized in the hope that they may be of direct value to the practicing physician. 17,032 women were recruited from 17 large family planning clinics in England and Scotland during 1968-1974. At recruitment, every woman was aged 25-39 years, married, a white British subject, willing to participate, and either a current user of oral contraceptives (OCs) of at least 5 months' standing or a current user of a diaphragm or an IUD of at least 5 months' standing without prior exposure to the pill. On return visits to the clinic, each woman is questioned and data, including details of all pregnancies and any change in contraceptive practice together with reasons for the change, are recorded on a special form. In the analyses which follow, the failure rates represent "use-effectiveness," i.e., they include accidental pregnancies attributable both to failure of the method and to failure by the woman to use the method correctly. Overall failure rates for the different contraceptive methods together with 95% confidence limits are shown in a table. The failure rate/100 woman-years is as follows: for combined OCs with more than 50 mcg estrogen--0.32, with 50 mcg estrogen--0.16, and with less than 50 mcg estrogen--0.27; progestogen-only OC, 1.2; diaphragm, 1.9; condom, 3.6; Lippes loop A 6.8; Lippes loop B, 1.8; Lippes loop C, 1.4; Lippes loop D, 1.3; Saf-T-Coil, 1.3; Dalkon shield, 2.4; Birnberg bow, 1.6; Antigon, 0.4; M-213, 1.3; Copper-T, 1.2; Copper-7, 1.5; Multiload, 0.0; type unknown, 1.8; rhythm, 15.5; coitus interruptus, 6.7; chemicals alone, 11.9; female sterilization, 0.13; and male sterilization, 0.02. Sustained motivation is essential for effective use of contraceptive methods requiring deliberate action on the part of the user. Accordingly, the failure rates were analyzed for OC users, diaphragm and condom users in relation to the only direct indicator of motivation recorded in the study, i.e., whether or not a woman considered her family to be complete. A substantial effect was apparent only for diaphragm users. PMID:6122067

  14. Breaking up the correlation between efficacy and toxicity for nonviral gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Breunig, Miriam; Lungwitz, Uta; Liebl, Renate; Goepferich, Achim

    2007-01-01

    Nonviral nucleic acid delivery to cells and tissues is considered a standard tool in life science research. However, although an ideal delivery system should have high efficacy and minimal toxicity, existing materials fall short, most of them being either too toxic or little effective. We hypothesized that disulfide cross-linked low-molecular-weight (MW) linear poly(ethylene imine) (MW <4.6 kDa) would overcome this limitation. Investigations with these materials revealed that the extracellular high MW provided outstandingly high transfection efficacies (up to 69.62 ± 4.18% in HEK cells). We confirmed that the intracellular reductive degradation produced mainly nontoxic fragments (cell survival 98.69 ± 4.79%). When we compared the polymers in >1,400 individual experiments to seven commercial transfection reagents in seven different cell lines, we found highly superior transfection efficacies and substantially lower toxicities. This renders reductive degradation a highly promising tool for the design of new transfection materials. PMID:17726101

  15. Evaluation of Accelerometer-Based Fall Detection Algorithms on Real-World Falls

    PubMed Central

    Bagalà, Fabio; Becker, Clemens; Cappello, Angelo; Chiari, Lorenzo; Aminian, Kamiar; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Klenk, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Despite extensive preventive efforts, falls continue to be a major source of morbidity and mortality among elderly. Real-time detection of falls and their urgent communication to a telecare center may enable rapid medical assistance, thus increasing the sense of security of the elderly and reducing some of the negative consequences of falls. Many different approaches have been explored to automatically detect a fall using inertial sensors. Although previously published algorithms report high sensitivity (SE) and high specificity (SP), they have usually been tested on simulated falls performed by healthy volunteers. We recently collected acceleration data during a number of real-world falls among a patient population with a high-fall-risk as part of the SensAction-AAL European project. The aim of the present study is to benchmark the performance of thirteen published fall-detection algorithms when they are applied to the database of 29 real-world falls. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first systematic comparison of fall detection algorithms tested on real-world falls. We found that the SP average of the thirteen algorithms, was (mean±std) 83.0%±30.3% (maximum value?=?98%). The SE was considerably lower (SE?=?57.0%±27.3%, maximum value?=?82.8%), much lower than the values obtained on simulated falls. The number of false alarms generated by the algorithms during 1-day monitoring of three representative fallers ranged from 3 to 85. The factors that affect the performance of the published algorithms, when they are applied to the real-world falls, are also discussed. These findings indicate the importance of testing fall-detection algorithms in real-life conditions in order to produce more effective automated alarm systems with higher acceptance. Further, the present results support the idea that a large, shared real-world fall database could, potentially, provide an enhanced understanding of the fall process and the information needed to design and evaluate a high-performance fall detector. PMID:22615890

  16. Impact loads of falling rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, W.

    2009-04-01

    Depending on the chosen protection system the planning engineer has to proceed differently. If the impact energies stay below 3'000 - 5'000 kJ solutions using flexible protection systems are recommended in many cases being the most efficient solution. Since 2001, such systems are type tested in Switzerland. The results are published on the internet (www.umwelt-schweiz.ch/typenpruefung). Therefore, the engineers can concentrate on the design of the anchorage and do not need to consider the brake down process of the falling rock because its details including the acting forces within the barrier are given. This is different to the design of rockfall protection earth dams. Here, the evidence of the structural safety is the major task and questions like the following ones have to be answered: What magnitude are the forces that have to be carried for a certain kinetic energy? How are the forces influenced by mass or impact velocity? What is the influence of the soil properties such as strength, density and friction angle? How deep does the rock penetrate? Previous research on the impact loads on the cushion layer of protection galleries were performed by EPFL in the mid-nineties and led to a Swiss Guideline (ASTRA/SBB 1998) to calculate an equivalent static load for the structure underneath. This approach also delivers a function to predict the penetration depth. This contribution now checks whether above approach can also be used to design earth dams or how it can be modified. For that, the results of previous experiments performed by different institutions were analysed and, if possible, compared to the guideline. This could confirm above mentioned function to predict the penetration depth. In addition, an experimental series with different bodies (800 kg, 4000 kg) falling from different heights (2 - 15 m) on differently conditioned soils were performed. Measurements were taken through accelerometers attached to the blocks and measuring the vertical deceleration. The penetration into the ground was obtained by using digital high-speed video recording during the experiments and surveyor's optical level before and afterwards. The combination of accelerometers and digital high-speed video recordings additionally allows for a check of the function of the single systems. The rock's velocity can be obtained on the one hand through integration of the accelerations and on the other hand by differentiation of the video data; both values should differ not too much. Finally, the analyses of the test series enabled a calibration of an improved individual load model for the impact of falling bodies into more or less compacted soil and revealed that the loads resulting from the previous guideline can be reduced by 20%. However, because the maximum impact energy was 600 kJ further experiments are recommended to enable a prediction of the performance for energies higher than 5'000 kJ - an energy sector dams are normally used for.

  17. MODERATOR EFFECTS OF SELF-EFFICACY ON OCCUPATIONAL STRESS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rosa Grau; Marisa Salanova; José María Peiró

    This paper analyses self-efficacy as a moderator in the occupational stress process. Specifically, it analyses the comple- mentarity between two self-efficacy measures: generalised and professional. The initial hypothesis was that specific self- efficacy will moderate more stress-strain relationships than generalised self-efficacy. Based on data collected from 140 wor- kers that use new technologies in their jobs, we found that self-efficacy

  18. Energy profile and secondary structure impact shRNA efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong; Zeng, Xiao

    2009-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) is a cellular mechanism in which a short/small double stranded RNA induces the degradation of its sequence specific target mRNA, leading to specific gene silencing. Since its discovery, RNAi has become a powerful biological technique for gene function studies and drug discovery. The very first requirement of applying RNAi is to design functional small interfering RNA (siRNA) that can uniquely induce the degradation of the targeted mRNA. It has been shown that many functional synthetic siRNAs share some common characteristics, such as GC content limitation and free energy preferences at both terminals, etc. Results Our three-phase algorithm was developed to design siRNA on a whole-genome scale based on those identified characteristics of functional siRNA. When this algorithm was applied to design short hairpin RNA (shRNA), the validated success rate of shRNAs was over 70%, which was almost double the rate reported for TRC library. This indicates that the designs of siRNA and shRNA may share the same concerns. Further analysis of the shRNA dataset of 444 designs reveals that the high free energy states of the two terminals have the largest positive impact on the shRNA efficacy. Enforcing these energy characteristics of both terminals can further improve the shRNA design success rate to 83.1%. We also found that functional shRNAs have less probability for their 3' terminals to be involved in mRNA secondary structure formation. Conclusion Functional shRNAs prefer high free energy states at both terminals. High free energy states of the two terminals were found to be the largest positive impact factor on shRNA efficacy. In addition, the accessibility of the 3' terminal is another key factor to shRNA efficacy. PMID:19594886

  19. Covariates of Self-Efficacy: Caregiver Characteristics Related to Mental Health Services Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reich, S.; Bickman, L.; Heflinger, C. A.

    2004-01-01

    Increasingly, professionals are recognizing the need to involve parents and other caregivers in the mental health treatment of children. However, parents and caregivers may not feel efficacious when participating in mental health care. Self-efficacy is a mechanism of human agency that describes people's beliefs about their capabilities to exercise…

  20. The impact of self-efficacy and perceived system efficacy on effectiveness of virtual training systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dawei Jia; Asim Bhatti; Saeid Nahavandi

    2012-01-01

    This study developed and tested a research model which examined the impact of user perceptions of self-efficacy (SE) and virtual environment (VE) efficacy on the effectiveness of VE training systems. The model distinguishes between the perceptions of one's own capability to perform trained tasks effectively and the perceptions of system performance, regarding the established parameters from literature. Specifically, the model

  1. Factor analyses of condom attitudes, norms, and self-efficacy measures in diverse samples.

    PubMed

    Pratte, Katherine; Whitesell, Nancy; McFarlane, Mary; Bull, Sheana

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of condom attitudes, norms, and self-efficacy is variable, reducing research generalizability. The purpose of this study was to assess reliability and construct validity of measures of condom attitudes, norms, and self-efficacy across 3,989 youth. Data were collected at computer kiosks and on the Internet. Analyses included internal consistency reliability assessments and exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of three constructs in a 32-item a priori instrument. Reliability estimates ranged between 0.68 and 0.89, and goodness of fit indices all exceeded 0.90. Factor analysis results supported the compatibility of the items from the three subscales with their conceptual domains. Final scales include measures of positive and negative outcome expectancies related to condom use, peer and partner condom norms, self-efficacy for condom negotiation, and self-efficacy for condom use. These measures of condom attitudes, norms, and self-efficacy can be employed for assessments to improve standardization of measures and generalizability of research, particularly related to HIV prevention. PMID:21290923

  2. The influence of self-efficacy, pre-stroke depression and perceived social support on self-reported depressive symptoms during stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Lewin, A; Jöbges, M; Werheid, K

    2013-01-01

    Post-stroke depression (PSD) is the most common mental disorder following stroke; however, little is known about its pathogenesis. We investigated the predictive value and mutual relationship of psychological factors such as self-efficacy and social support and known risk factors such as pre-stroke depression, activities of daily living (ADL), cognitive functioning, and age for the emergence of depressive symptoms in the acute phase after stroke. Ninety-six ischaemic stroke inpatients residing at a rehabilitation centre completed an interview about 6.5 weeks post-stroke. The interview included demographic data, psychiatric anamnesis, the Barthel Index, Mini-Mental State Examination, Social Support Questionnaire, Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale, Stroke Self-Efficacy Questionnaire, and the Geriatric Depression Scale. A multiple regression analysis was performed to ascertain the predictive value of the factors on depressive symptoms. High self-efficacy, no history of pre-stroke depression, and high levels of perceived social support were the strongest protective factors for depressive symptoms. The influence of cognitive functioning on depressive symptoms was fully mediated by general self-efficacy, and general self-efficacy was a stronger predictor than stroke-specific self-efficacy. Neither ADL nor age significantly predicted depressive symptoms. Our findings suggest that consideration of self-efficacy and perceived social support in the inpatient rehabilitation setting may help prevent PSD. PMID:23656456

  3. Fall detection and management in biped humanoid robots

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Javier Ruiz-del-Solar; Javier Moya; Isao Parra-Tsunekawa

    2010-01-01

    The appropriate management of fall situations - i.e. fast instability detection, avoidance of unintentional falls, falling without damaging the body, fast recovering of the standing position after a fall - is an essential ability of biped humanoid robots. This issue is especially important for humanoid robots carrying out demanding movements such as walking in irregular surfaces, running or practicing a

  4. LSRCP Response to ISRP Snake River Fall Chinook Program Review

    E-print Network

    LSRCP Response to ISRP Snake River Fall Chinook Program Review ISRP's major recommendations Snake River fall Chinook. ......... The LSRCP fall Chinook program needs to be balanced the fall Chinook recovery plan has not been finalized. The Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP

  5. 197. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls, Canal Company, date unknown. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    197. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls, Canal Company, date unknown. GATE STEMS AND LIFTING DEVICES, NO COUNTY; BLUEPRINT SKETCHES. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  6. 198. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    198. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. SEGREGATION OF PUBLIC LAND, LINCOLN AND CASSIA COUNTIES; MAP. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  7. Fall Semester -Register in Pharmacy Year 1 required coursework for

    E-print Network

    Thomas, David D.

    for PharmD, 18 credits PharmD/MPH info session held each fall Total semester credits = 18 Fall Semester - Register in Pharmacy Year 2 required coursework for PharmD, 18.5 credits Phar6236, 2 credits PharmD/MPH info session held each fall Total semester credits = 20.5 Fall Semester - Register in Pharmacy Year 3

  8. 121. MCMULLEN CREEK DRAW, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    121. MCMULLEN CREEK DRAW, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; OUTLET SIDE OF CREEK, SOUTH VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  9. 95. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    95. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY SOUTH OF FILER, IDAHO; OVERALL VIEW LOOKING EAST. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  10. 124. MCMULLEN CREEK HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    124. MCMULLEN CREEK HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; OVERALL SOUTH VIEW OF DRAW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  11. 109. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    109. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF FILER, IDAHO; OVERALL VIEW LOOKING WEST. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  12. 88. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    88. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF FILER, IDAHO; WEST VIEW OF CANAL AND GATES. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  13. 92. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    92. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY SOUTH OF FILER, IDAHO; CLOSE-UP OF OUTLET SIDE OF GATES, SOUTH VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  14. 91. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    91. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF FILER, IDAHO; NORTHEAST VIEW OF CANAL AND GATES. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  15. 96. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    96. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY SOUTH OF FILER, IDAHO; OUTLET SIDE OF CEDAR DRAW, WEST VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  16. 89. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    89. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF FILER, IDAHO; OUTLET SIDE OF CANAL, SOUTHWEST VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  17. 90. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    90. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF FILER, IDAHO; CLOSE-UP OF GATES. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  18. 94. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    94. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY SOUTH OF FILER, IDAHO; CLOSE-UP OF GATES FROM THE CANAL SIDE. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  19. 120. COTTONWOOD CUT AREA, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    120. COTTONWOOD CUT AREA, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; OVERALL VIEW OF THE COTTONWOOD CREEK DRAW, SOUTH VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  20. 28. VIEW FROM IMMEDIATELY DOWNSTREAM OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. VIEW FROM IMMEDIATELY DOWNSTREAM OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS WITH CANAL BRIDGE IN DISTANCE. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  1. 123. MCMULLEN CREEK, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    123. MCMULLEN CREEK, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; SOUTH VIEW OF THE CREEK EMPTYING INTO THE HIGH LINE CANAL. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  2. American Chemical Society Fall National Meeting

    Cancer.gov

    August 16, 2009 12:00 AM - August 20, 2009 12:00 AM Washington, DC + Add to Outlook Calendar Probe Development in Molecular Imaging and Therapy Print This Page American Chemical Society Fall National Meeting News & Events

  3. ParentFall 2009 BOSTON UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    Goldberg, Bennett

    Fall 2009Parent About This Magazine The Boston University Parents Program links parents and other of the Women's Resource Center and a member of our championship hockey team. We also want to highlight Parents

  4. ADVISEMENT GUIDE ENGLISH DEPARTMENT COURSES, FALL 2012

    E-print Network

    Maryland, Baltimore County, University of

    ADVISEMENT GUIDE ENGLISH DEPARTMENT COURSES, FALL 2012 NEW TRACKS (over in English courses at 300 or 400 level; may include one 200-level course: ENGL 317, 360, 364, 375 Courses Meeting Secondary English Education Requirement

  5. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Fall 2013-Winter 2014

    E-print Network

    California at Davis, University of

    ADVANCED CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Fall 2013-Winter 2014 Certificate Program CONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATIONCONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION #12;About the Advanced Chemical Engineering Certificate Program The new Advanced Chemical Engineering Certificate Program offers professionals in chemi- cal engineering

  6. Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483-Fall

    E-print Network

    Sherrill, David

    Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483- Fall Tuesdays organic materials. The discussion will include aspects of synthesis on Organic Photonics and Electronics at Georgia Tech) and of an ultra-thin 55

  7. Effect of free fall on higher plants.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    The influence of exposure to the free-fall state on the orientation, morphogenesis, physiology, and radiation response of higher plants is briefly summarized. It is proposed that the duration of the space-flight experiments has been to brief to permit meaningful effects of free fall on general biochemistry, growth, and development to appear. However, two types of significant effect did occur. The first is on differential growth - i.e., tropism and epinasty - resulting from the absence of a normal geostimulus. For these phenomena it is suggested that ground-based experiments with the clinostat would suffice to mimic the effect of the free-fall state. The second is an apparent interaction between the radiation response and some flight condition, yielding an enhanced microspore abortion, a disturbed spindle function, and a stunting of stamen hairs. It is suggested that this apparent interaction may be derived from a shift in the rhythm of the cell cycle, induced by the free fall.

  8. Featured Scientific Meetings - OCCAM Newsletter fall 2011

    Cancer.gov

    Fall 2011, Vol. 6 Issue 2 Skip navigation Home Feature A Conversation with News from the Field Funding Opportunities Research Resources Research Highlights CAM Information Meetings Featured Scientific Meetings Back to OCCAM Featured Scientific Meetings Date Meeting Location OCCAM

  9. OSU PARKING UTILIZATION FALL TERM 2008

    E-print Network

    Escher, Christine

    OSU PARKING UTILIZATION STUDY FALL TERM 2008 FACILITIES SERVICES CAMPUS PLANNING #12;Facilities Services- Campus Planning March, 2009 2008 OSU PARKING UTILIZATION STUDY Table of Contents Purpose.....................................................................................................3 OSU Main Campus Parking Survey

  10. Polypharmacy and falls in older people: Balancing evidence-based medicine against falls risk.

    PubMed

    Zia, Anam; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul Bahyah; Tan, Maw Pin

    2015-04-01

    The term polypharmacy has negative connotations due to its association with adverse drug reactions and falls. This spectrum of adverse events widens when polypharmacy occurs among the already vulnerable geriatric population. To date, there is no consensus definition of polypharmacy, and diverse definitions have been used by various researchers, the most common being the consumption of multiple number of medications. Taking multiple medications is considered a risk factor for falls through the adverse effects of drug-drug or drug-disease interactions. Falls studies have determined that taking ? 4 drugs is associated with an increased incidence of falls, recurrent falls, and injurious falls. In light of existing evidence, careful and regular medication reviews are advised to reduce the effect of polypharmacy on falls. However, intervention studies on medication reviews and their effectiveness on falls reduction have been scarce. This article reviews and discusses the evidence behind polypharmacy and its association with falls among older individuals, and highlights important areas for future research. PMID:25539567

  11. Older Persons’ Perception of Risk of Falling: Implications for Fall-Prevention Campaigns

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Karen; van Beurden, Eric; Eakin, Elizabeth G.; Barnett, Lisa M.; Patterson, Elizabeth; Backhouse, Jan; Jones, Sue; Hauser, Darren; Beard, John R.; Newman, Beth

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. We examined older people’s attitudes about falls and implications for the design of fall-prevention awareness campaigns. Methods. We assessed data from (1) computer-assisted telephone surveys conducted in 2002 with Australians 60 years and older in Northern Rivers, New South Wales (site of a previous fall-prevention program; n=1601), and Wide Bay, Queensland (comparison community; n=1601), and (2) 8 focus groups (n=73). Results. Participants from the previous intervention site were less likely than were comparison participants to agree that falls are not preventable (odds ratio [OR]=0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.65, 0.90) and more likely to rate the prevention of falls a high priority (OR=1.31; 95% CI=1.09, 1.57). There was no difference between the groups for self-perceived risk of falls; more than 60% rated their risk as low. Those with a low perceived risk were more likely to be men, younger, partnered, and privately insured, and to report better health and no history of falls. Focus group data indicated that older people preferred messages that emphasized health and independence rather than falls. Conclusions. Although older people accepted traditional fall-prevention messages, most viewed them as not personally relevant. Messages that promote health and independence may be more effective. PMID:18172132

  12. Effect of residence time on the efficacy of antidandruff shampoos.

    PubMed

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Uhoda, E; Loussouarn, G; Saint-Léger, D; Piérard, G E

    2003-12-01

    Dandruff is known to be controlled by fungistatic shampoos active against Malassezia spp. These products also remove the loosely attached scales. This study was performed to assess the effect of a 5-min residence time on the efficacy of antidandruff shampoos. Two commercially available shampoos were used in two groups of 21 panelists with severe dandruff. They contained either 1% ketoconazole or 1% piroctone olamine. In each group, intraindividual comparisons were made by a split-scalp design between the effect of a 5-min residence time versus no residence time. Both shampoos induced significant reductions in scaliness and yeast colonization. The beneficial effects were obvious immediately after one single shampooing and 3 days later as well. The improvement was greater with a 5-min residence time. The piroctone olamine treatment benefited more than the ketoconazole treatment from the extension of shampoo-exposure time. In conclusion, the benefit of a residence time in treating dandruff is documented. The level of improvement in efficacy may vary according to the nature of the shampoo. PMID:18494909

  13. Interventions to Prevent Falls Among Older Adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laurence Z. Rubenstein; Judy A. Stevens; Vicky Scott

    Falls consistently rank among the most serious problems facing older persons and cause a tremendous amount of morbidity, mortality,\\u000a and disability (Brown, 1999; Nevitt, 1997; Robbins et al., 1989; Rubenstein, Josephson, & Robbins, 1994; Tinetti, Williams,\\u000a & Mayewski, 1986). At least a third of community-dwelling people aged 65 years and older fall each year (Centers for Disease\\u000a Control and Prevention

  14. Ampicillin: Rise Fall and Resurgence

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Dwarikadhish; Mohan, Mudit; Borade, Dhammraj M

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global problem. AMR has posed new challenges in treatment of infectious diseases. Antimicrobials are losing efficacy due to development of resistant pathogens. It has lead to re-emergence of certain infectious diseases. Treatment of such diseases has undergone changes with use of alternative antimicrobials and drug combinations. Pathogens are likely to develop resistance to alternative antimicrobials also and risk of infections with nonexistent treatment is real. Salmonella showed widespread resistant to ampicillin which resulted in use of alternative antimicrobials like fluroquinolones and cephalosporins in the treatment of enteric fever in last two decades. Unfortunately there are growing reports of resistance to these antimicrobials. Interestingly there are numerous reports of ampicillin regaining activity against Salmonella. Speculatively lack of exposure of Salmonella to ampicillin for long time resulted in the loss of plasmid mediated resistance in the pathogen. There may have been emergence of de novo ampicillin susceptible strains. This is assuring in the era where problem of AMR is compounded by the scarcity of new antimicrobial development. PMID:24995206

  15. Ampicillin: rise fall and resurgence.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Dwarikadhish; Mohan, Mudit; Borade, Dhammraj M; Swami, Onkar C

    2014-05-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global problem. AMR has posed new challenges in treatment of infectious diseases. Antimicrobials are losing efficacy due to development of resistant pathogens. It has lead to re-emergence of certain infectious diseases. Treatment of such diseases has undergone changes with use of alternative antimicrobials and drug combinations. Pathogens are likely to develop resistance to alternative antimicrobials also and risk of infections with nonexistent treatment is real. Salmonella showed widespread resistant to ampicillin which resulted in use of alternative antimicrobials like fluroquinolones and cephalosporins in the treatment of enteric fever in last two decades. Unfortunately there are growing reports of resistance to these antimicrobials. Interestingly there are numerous reports of ampicillin regaining activity against Salmonella. Speculatively lack of exposure of Salmonella to ampicillin for long time resulted in the loss of plasmid mediated resistance in the pathogen. There may have been emergence of de novo ampicillin susceptible strains. This is assuring in the era where problem of AMR is compounded by the scarcity of new antimicrobial development. PMID:24995206

  16. Five-year efficacy of finasteride in 801 Japanese men with androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Yoshitake, Toshihiro; Takeda, Akira; Ohki, Kensaku; Inoue, Yuko; Yamawaki, Takanori; Otsuka, Saori; Akimoto, Minekatsu; Nemoto, Mitsuru; Shimakura, Yasuhito; Sato, Akio

    2015-07-01

    Finasteride is standard medical treatment for androgenetic alopecia; however, no large studies with 5 years or more of follow up have been performed in Japan. The authors followed Japanese men with androgenetic alopecia treated with finasteride for 5 years to evaluate long-term treatment efficacy. Of 903 men treated with finasteride (1 mg/day), 801 patients were evaluated over 5 years by modified global photographic assessment. Although the proportion of improvement was high (99.4%), modified global photographic assessment scores after 5 years of treatment were lower in patients with more advanced disease as measured by the modified Norwood-Hamilton scale. After separating patients into "sufficient" and "insufficient" efficacy groups according to the modified global photographic assessment score after 5 years (scores ?6 and <6, respectively), multivariate analysis showed that independent risk factors of insufficient efficacy were age at start of treatment of 40 years or more (P = 0.021) and classification on the modified Norwood-Hamilton scale (P < 0.001), whereas presence of stress at start of treatment was a negative predictor (P = 0.025). In conclusion, continuous finasteride treatment for 5 years improved androgenetic alopecia with sustained effect among Japanese. Younger age and less advanced disease at start of treatment were the key predictors of higher finasteride efficacy. PMID:25903108

  17. Inpatient Falls: Defining the Problem and Identifying Possible Solutions. Part II

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Jennifer R.; Rosenthal, Laura D.; Cumbler, Ethan U.; Likosky, David J.

    2013-01-01

    In this 2 part series, analysis of the risk stratification tools that are available and definition of the scope of the problem and potential solutions through a review of the literature is presented. A systematic review was used to identify articles for risk stratification and interventions. Three risk stratification systems are discussed, STRATIFY, Morse Fall Scale, and the Hendrich Fall Risk Model (HFRM). Of these scoring systems, the HFRM is the easiest to use and score. Predominantly, multifactorial interventions are used to prevent patient falls. Education and rehabilitation are common themes in studies with statistically significant results. The second article presents a guide to implementing a quality improvement project around hospital falls. A 10-step approach to Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycles is described. Specific examples of problems and analysis are easily applicable to any institution. Furthermore, the sustainability of interventions and targeting new areas for improvement are discussed. Although specific to falls in the hospitalized patient, the goal is to present a stepwise approach that is broadly applicable to other areas requiring quality improvement. PMID:24198902

  18. Regional ash fall hazard II: Asia-Pacific modelling results and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Susanna; McAneney, John; Magill, Christina; Blong, Russell

    2012-09-01

    In a companion paper (this volume), the authors propose a methodology for assessing ash fall hazard on a regional scale. In this study, the methodology is applied to the Asia-Pacific region, determining the hazard from 190 volcanoes to over one million square kilometre of urban area. Ash fall hazard is quantified for each square kilometre grid cell of urban area in terms of the annual exceedance probability (AEP), and its inverse, the average recurrence interval (ARI), for ash falls exceeding 1, 10 and 100 mm. A surrogate risk variable, the Population-Weighted Hazard Score: the product of AEP and population density, approximates the relative risk for each grid cell. Within the Asia-Pacific region, urban areas in Indonesia are found to have the highest levels of hazard and risk, while Australia has the lowest. A clear demarcation emerges between the hazard in countries close to and farther from major subduction plate boundaries, with the latter having ARIs at least 2 orders of magnitude longer for the same thickness thresholds. Countries with no volcanoes, such as North Korea and Malaysia, also face ash falls from volcanoes in neighbouring countries. Ash falls exceeding 1 mm are expected to affect more than one million people living in urban areas within the study region; in Indonesia, Japan and the Philippines, this situation could occur with ARIs less than 40 years.

  19. Colistin: efficacy and safety in different populations.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Foroud; Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin

    2015-07-01

    This article reviews mechanisms, incidences, risk factors and preventive modalities of colistin toxicity as well as colistin use in special populations and through special routes. All clinical studies that examined the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic, efficacy and side effects of colistin in the management of multidrug-resistant organisms in different patient population including pediatrics, adults, obese, critically ill, burn or cancer patients with any route of drug administration were considered. Compared with older recommended doses, current dosing approach improves cure rate without significant increase in the rate of colistin-induced nephrotoxicity. Efficacy and safety of high doses of colistin should be considered in the future studies. Also comparing efficacy and safety of different doses of aerosolized colistin and defining the appropriate dose in different populations is another open area of future researches. PMID:26041134

  20. Safety and Efficacy of Neonatal Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Demirjian, Alicia; Levy, Ofer

    2009-01-01

    Newborns have an immature immune system that renders them at high risk for infection while simultaneously reducing responses to most vaccines, thereby posing challenges in protecting this vulnerable population. Nevertheless, certain vaccines, such as Bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG) and Hepatitis B vaccine (HBV), do demonstrate safety and some efficacy at birth, providing proof of principal that certain antigen-adjuvant combinations are able to elicit protective neonatal responses. Moreover, birth is a major point of healthcare contact globally meaning that effective neonatal vaccines achieve high population penetration. Given the potentially significant benefit of vaccinating at birth, availability of a broader range of more effective neonatal vaccines is an unmet medical need and a public health priority. This review focuses on safety and efficacy of neonatal vaccination in humans as well as recent research employing novel approaches to enhance the efficacy of neonatal vaccination. PMID:19089811

  1. Retrofit Savings Determination for Wichita Falls Independent School District 

    E-print Network

    Shao, X.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Claridge, D. E.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory Wichita Falls ISD Texas A&M University Carrigan Center Energy Systems Laboratory Texas Engineering Experiment station Wichita Falls ISD Texas A&M University College Station. TX Carrigan Center Energy Systems Laboratory Wichita Falls ISO Texas A...&M University Denver Center Energy Systems Laboratory Texas Engineering Experiment Station Wichita Falls ISD Texas A&M University College station. TX Denver Center Energy Systems Laboratory Wichita Falls ISO Texas A&M University Fannin Elementary Energy Systems...

  2. Trends in Enrollment: Fall 2002 Update. Informational Memorandum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ. System, Madison. Office of Policy Analysis and Research.

    This memorandum contains tables of data about enrollment in institutions in the University of Wisconsin (UW) System in fall 2001 and some information about trends over time. The fall 2002 full-time equivalent (FTE) enrollment was 135,653, up 1,952 (1.5%) from fall 2001. The fall 2002 headcount enrollment was 160,635, up 1,202 (0.8%) from fall

  3. Retrofit Savings Determination for Wichita Falls Independent School District

    E-print Network

    Shao, X.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Claridge, D. E.

    2001-01-01

    Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University System Wichita Falls ISD SAV-Barwise 10/1/01 10:48 AM Wichita Falls ISD SAV-BenMilan 10/1/01 2:46 PM Wichita Falls ISD SAV-Bonham KV1/01 10:52 AM Wichita Falls ISD SAV-Brook 10/1/01 10:52 AM Wichita Falls ISD...

  4. Efficacy of Rotovation in Controlling Eurasian Watermilfoil in the Pend Oreille River, Washington

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maribeth V. Gibbons; Harry L. Gibbons Jr

    1988-01-01

    Full-scale mechanical rotovation of Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum) beds was conducted at selected sites along the Pend Oreille River in eastern Washington during the fall of 1986. Fifteen hectares (36 acres) of milfoil-infested river sediments were mechanically tilled to dislodge rootcrowns from the substrate. Treatment was performed by a prototype float-mounted rotovator equipped with a 2.5 m (8-foot) wide pivoting

  5. EFFECTS OF MOVEABLE PLATFORM TRAINING IN PREVENTING SLIP-INDUCED FALLS IN OLDER ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Parijat, Prakriti; Lockhart, Thurmon E

    2011-01-01

    Identifying effective interventions is vitalin preventing slip-induced fall accidents in older adults. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy of moveable platform training in improving recovery reactions and reducing fall frequency in older adults. Twenty-four older adults were recruited and randomly assigned to two groups (training and control). Both groups underwent three sessions including baseline slip, training, and transfer of training on a slippery surface. Both groups experienced two slips on a slippery surface, one during the baseline and the other (after two weeks) during the transfer of training session. In the training session, the training group underwent twelve simulated slips using a moveable platform while the control group performed normal walking trials. Kinematic, kinetic, and EMG data were collected during all the sessions. Results indicated a reduced incidence of falls in the training group during the transfer of training trial as compared to the control group. The training group was able to transfer proactive and reactive control strategies learned during training to the second slip trial. The proactive adjustments include increased center-of-mass velocity and transitional acceleration after training. Reactive adjustments include reduction in muscle onset and time to peak activations of knee flexors and ankle plantarflexors, reduced ankle and knee coactivation, reduced slip displacement, and reduced time to peak knee flexion, trunk flexion, and hip flexion velocities. In general, the results indicated a beneficial effect of perturbation training in reducing slip severity and recovery kinematics in healthy older adults. PMID:22134467

  6. Effects of moveable platform training in preventing slip-induced falls in older adults.

    PubMed

    Parijat, Prakriti; Lockhart, Thurmon E

    2012-05-01

    Identifying effective interventions is vital in preventing slip-induced fall accidents in older adults. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy of moveable platform training in improving recovery reactions and reducing fall frequency in older adults. Twenty-four older adults were recruited and randomly assigned to two groups (training and control). Both groups underwent three sessions including baseline slip, training, and transfer of training on a slippery surface. Both groups experienced two slips on a slippery surface, one during the baseline and the other (after 2 weeks) during the transfer of training session. In the training session, the training group underwent twelve simulated slips using a moveable platform while the control group performed normal walking trials. Kinematic, kinetic, and EMG data were collected during all the sessions. Results indicated a reduced incidence of falls in the training group during the transfer of training trial as compared to the control group. The training group was able to transfer proactive and reactive control strategies learned during training to the second slip trial. The proactive adjustments include increased center-of-mass velocity and transitional acceleration after training. Reactive adjustments include reduction in muscle onset and time to peak activations of knee flexors and ankle plantar flexors, reduced ankle and knee coactivation, reduced slip displacement, and reduced time to peak knee flexion, trunk flexion, and hip flexion velocities. In general, the results indicated a beneficial effect of perturbation training in reducing slip severity and recovery kinematics in healthy older adults. PMID:22134467

  7. [Electroencephalographic correlates of transpersonal psychotherapy efficacy in neurotic depressions].

    PubMed

    Akhmetova, V V; Kolchin, A I; Govorin, N V

    2011-01-01

    Based on the results of examination of 157 patients with neurotic depression (ICD-10 items F43.20, F43.21, F43.22), electroencephalographic criteria of transpersonal psychotherapy efficacy have been specified as following: the increase of alpha-3 activity in the frontotemporal region and the decrease of a spectral index of theta-activity in parietal, central, occipital and prefrontal regions; some changes in beta-band (the increase of spectral index of beta-1 in frontotemporal and prefrontal regions and the decrease of beta-2 in parietal and occipital regions). The direction of these changes is objectively supported by the clinical dynamics, data of correlation analysis of neurophysiological parameters and psychometric scales used for assessment of the presence and severity of emotional and personality disorders. PMID:21350411

  8. Antibacterial efficacy of exogenous nitric oxide on periodontal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Backlund, C J; Sergesketter, A R; Offenbacher, S; Schoenfisch, M H

    2014-11-01

    Current treatments for periodontitis (e.g., scaling/root planing and chlorhexidine) have limited efficacy since they fail to suppress microbial biofilms satisfactorily over time, and the use of adjunctive antimicrobials can promote the emergence of antibiotic-resistant organisms. Herein, we report the novel application of nitric oxide (NO)-releasing scaffolds (i.e., dendrimers and silica particles) as anti-periodontopathogenic agents. The effectiveness of macromolecular NO release was demonstrated by a 3-log reduction in periodontopathogenic Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis viability. In contrast, Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis, caries-associated organisms, were substantially less sensitive to NO treatment. Both dendrimer- and silica-based NO release exhibited substantially less toxicity to human gingival fibroblasts at concentrations necessary to eradicate periodontopathogens than did clinical concentrations of chlorhexidine. These results suggest the potential utility of macromolecular NO-release scaffolds as a novel platform for the development of periodontal disease therapeutics. PMID:25139363

  9. A wavelet-based approach to fall detection.

    PubMed

    Palmerini, Luca; Bagalà, Fabio; Zanetti, Andrea; Klenk, Jochen; Becker, Clemens; Cappello, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Falls among older people are a widely documented public health problem. Automatic fall detection has recently gained huge importance because it could allow for the immediate communication of falls to medical assistance. The aim of this work is to present a novel wavelet-based approach to fall detection, focusing on the impact phase and using a dataset of real-world falls. Since recorded falls result in a non-stationary signal, a wavelet transform was chosen to examine fall patterns. The idea is to consider the average fall pattern as the "prototype fall".In order to detect falls, every acceleration signal can be compared to this prototype through wavelet analysis. The similarity of the recorded signal with the prototype fall is a feature that can be used in order to determine the difference between falls and daily activities. The discriminative ability of this feature is evaluated on real-world data. It outperforms other features that are commonly used in fall detection studies, with an Area Under the Curve of 0.918. This result suggests that the proposed wavelet-based feature is promising and future studies could use this feature (in combination with others considering different fall phases) in order to improve the performance of fall detection algorithms. PMID:26007719

  10. A Wavelet-Based Approach to Fall Detection

    PubMed Central

    Palmerini, Luca; Bagalà, Fabio; Zanetti, Andrea; Klenk, Jochen; Becker, Clemens; Cappello, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Falls among older people are a widely documented public health problem. Automatic fall detection has recently gained huge importance because it could allow for the immediate communication of falls to medical assistance. The aim of this work is to present a novel wavelet-based approach to fall detection, focusing on the impact phase and using a dataset of real-world falls. Since recorded falls result in a non-stationary signal, a wavelet transform was chosen to examine fall patterns. The idea is to consider the average fall pattern as the “prototype fall”.In order to detect falls, every acceleration signal can be compared to this prototype through wavelet analysis. The similarity of the recorded signal with the prototype fall is a feature that can be used in order to determine the difference between falls and daily activities. The discriminative ability of this feature is evaluated on real-world data. It outperforms other features that are commonly used in fall detection studies, with an Area Under the Curve of 0.918. This result suggests that the proposed wavelet-based feature is promising and future studies could use this feature (in combination with others considering different fall phases) in order to improve the performance of fall detection algorithms. PMID:26007719

  11. Functional gait rehabilitation in elderly people following a fall-related hip fracture using a treadmill with visual context: design of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Walking requires gait adjustments in order to walk safely in continually changing environments. Gait adaptability is reduced in older adults, and (near) falls, fall-related hip fractures and fear of falling are common in this population. Most falls occur due to inaccurate foot placement relative to environmental hazards, such as obstacles. The C-Mill is an innovative, instrumented treadmill on which visual context (e.g., obstacles) is projected. The C-Mill is well suited to train foot positioning relative to environmental properties while concurrently utilizing the high-intensity practice benefits associated with conventional treadmill training. The present protocol was designed to examine the efficacy of C-Mill gait adaptability treadmill training for improving walking ability and reducing fall incidence and fear of falling relative to conventional treadmill training and usual care. We hypothesize that C-Mill gait adaptability treadmill training and conventional treadmill training result in better walking ability than usual care due to the enhanced training intensity, with superior effects for C-Mill gait adaptability treadmill training on gait adaptability aspects of walking given the concurrent focus on practicing step adjustments. Methods/design The protocol describes a parallel group, single-blind, superiority randomized controlled trial with pre-tests, post-tests, retention-tests and follow-up. Hundred-twenty-six older adults with a recent fall-related hip fracture will be recruited from inpatient rehabilitation care and allocated to six weeks of C-Mill gait adaptability treadmill training (high-intensity, adaptive stepping), conventional treadmill training (high-intensity, repetitive stepping) or usual care physical therapy using block randomization, with allocation concealment by opaque sequentially numbered envelopes. Only data collectors are blind to group allocation. Study parameters related to walking ability will be assessed as primary outcome pre-training, post-training, after 4 weeks retention and 12 months follow-up. Secondary study parameters are measures related to fall incidence, fear of falling and general health. Discussion The study will shed light on the relative importance of adaptive versus repetitive stepping and practice intensity for effective intervention programs directed at improving walking ability and reducing fall risk and fear of falling in older adults with a recent fall-related hip fracture, which may help reduce future fall-related health-care costs. Trial registration The Netherlands Trial Register (http://NTR3222). PMID:23590327

  12. Does the number of cancer patients' close social ties affect cancer-related information seeking through communication efficacy? Testing a mediation model.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Nehama; Martinez, Lourdes S

    2014-09-01

    This study addresses whether having a broad social network of close friends equips cancer patients with increased efficacy to engage in communication about their cancer, which then leads to an increased likelihood of patients actively seeking cancer-related information. Guided by the theory of motivated information management, the study also tests whether the effect of the number of close social ties on information seeking is mediated, in part, by communication efficacy. Results are based on data collected from a randomly drawn sample from the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry of 2,013 cancer patients who completed mail surveys in the Fall of 2006. Results are consistent with a cross-sectional mediation effect in which the number of close social ties in one's social network is positively associated with communication efficacy (b = .17, p = .001), which, in turn, is positively associated with cancer-related information seeking (b = .13, p < .001). PMID:24673194

  13. Can social dancing prevent falls in older adults? a protocol of the Dance, Aging, Cognition, Economics (DAnCE) fall prevention randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Falls are one of the most common health problems among older people and pose a major economic burden on health care systems. Exercise is an accepted stand-alone fall prevention strategy particularly if it is balance training or regular participation in Tai chi. Dance shares the ‘holistic’ approach of practices such as Tai chi. It is a complex sensorimotor rhythmic activity integrating multiple physical, cognitive and social elements. Small-scale randomised controlled trials have indicated that diverse dance styles can improve measures of balance and mobility in older people, but none of these studies has examined the effect of dance on falls or cognition. This study aims to determine whether participation in social dancing: i) reduces the number of falls; and ii) improves cognitive functions associated with fall risk in older people. Methods/design A single-blind, cluster randomised controlled trial of 12 months duration will be conducted. Approximately 450 participants will be recruited from 24 self-care retirement villages that house at least 60 residents each in Sydney, Australia. Village residents without cognitive impairment and obtain medical clearance will be eligible. After comprehensive baseline measurements including physiological and cognitive tests and self-completed questionnaires, villages will be randomised to intervention sites (ballroom or folk dance) or to a wait-listed control using a computer randomisation method that minimises imbalances between villages based on two baseline fall risk measures. Main outcome measures are falls, prospectively measured, and the Trail Making cognitive function test. Cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analyses will be performed. Discussion This study offers a novel approach to balance training for older people. As a community-based approach to fall prevention, dance offers older people an opportunity for greater social engagement, thereby making a major contribution to healthy ageing. Providing diversity in exercise programs targeting seniors recognises the heterogeneity of multicultural populations and may further increase the number of taking part in exercise. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612000889853 The trial is now in progress with 12 villages already have been randomised. PMID:23675705

  14. China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18%

    E-print Network

    China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% 11/08/2009 - 09:05 According to China's latest Customs statistics, foreign trade of China's forest products in the first five months showed a year-on-year general downturn. The total value of foreign trade of China

  15. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #2 Fall 2003 Fall 2003 Biology 111 Exam #2 Classical Genetics

    E-print Network

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #2 ­ Fall 2003 1 Fall 2003 Biology 111 Exam #2 ­ Classical Genetics) Describe a change in DNA that may lead to a dominant allele but the DNA sequence of the gene is not altered. Explain how this protein would result in a specific genetic disease. 6 pts. 12) How are RFLPs related

  16. CS61C Fall 2011 Floating Point and CALL -Notes modified from Fall 2010 Floating Point

    E-print Network

    California at Irvine, University of

    CS61C Fall 2011 Floating Point and CALL - Notes modified from Fall 2010 Floating Point /* 100 thousand */ #define INCREMENT .00003f /* 3 hundred thousandths */ int main(void) { int i; float x = 0.f; for (i = 0; i float result = (x - 3.f)/3.f; printf

  17. UC Santa Cruz Review / Fall 2005 98 UC Santa Cruz Review / Fall 2005 Christina Morales

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Yi

    UC Santa Cruz Review / Fall 2005 98 UC Santa Cruz Review / Fall 2005 r.r.jones Christina Morales learning." Growing up in a low- income neighborhood in Gilroy, California, Morales was actively involved educa- tion and recruit students and faculty of color. After graduating with a B.A. in history, Morales

  18. UNH GRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CALENDAR FOR FALL SEMESTER 2013 FALL TERM AUGUST

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    UNH GRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CALENDAR FOR FALL SEMESTER 2013 FALL TERM ­ AUGUST Tuesday, August 20 fee Graduate web registration ends at 6 PM (except GRAD 800, 900, and DEPT 999 which continues thru approval and $25 per course late drop fee LAST DAY for Graduate students to register and pay without

  19. UNH GRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CALENDAR FOR FALL SEMESTER 2012 FALL TERM AUGUST

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    UNH GRADUATE SCHOOL ACADEMIC CALENDAR FOR FALL SEMESTER 2012 FALL TERM ­ AUGUST Monday, August 1 web registration ends at 6 PM (except GRAD 800, 900, and DEPT 999 which continues thru September 14 and $25 per course late drop fee · LAST DAY for Graduate students to register and pay without having

  20. Race/Ethnicity of Graduate Students (U.S. Citizens) Fall 1994 to Fall 2013

    E-print Network

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Race/Ethnicity of Graduate Students (U.S. Citizens) Fall 1994 to Fall 2013 University/ Latino Hawaiian/ races, Non- U.S. Non- Race/ Alaska African of any Pacific Hispanic/ ALANA Citizen* Resident Ethnicity Native Asian American race Islander Latino Total White(reporting) URM Alien Unknown

  1. Race/Ethnicity of Undergraduate Students (U. S. Citizens) Fall 1994 to Fall 2013

    E-print Network

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Race/Ethnicity of Undergraduate Students (U. S. Citizens) Fall 1994 to Fall 2013 University/ LatinoHawaiian/ races, Non- U.S. Non- Race/ Alaska African of any Pacific Hispanic/ ALANA Citizen* Resident Ethnicity Native Asian American race Islander Latino Total White(reporting) URM Alien Unknown

  2. Women's studiesWomen's studies WMST 101 Online Fall 2011WMST 101 Online Fall 2011

    E-print Network

    Women's studiesWomen's studies WMST 101 Online Fall 2011WMST 101 Online Fall 2011 ContaCt Office the Future Women's studies is the study of gender from an interdisciplinary approach that includes historical a comprehensive introduction to the various fields within Women's Studies. Students will consider how societies

  3. Antidepressants and falls in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Darowski, Adam; Chambers, Sally-Ann C F; Chambers, David J

    2009-01-01

    Antidepressants have long been recognized as a contributory factor to falls and many studies show an association between antidepressants and falls. There are extensive data for tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and related drugs, and for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), but few data for other classes of antidepressants. Sedation, insomnia and impaired sleep, nocturia, impaired postural reflexes and increased reaction times, orthostatic hypotension, cardiac rhythm and conduction disorders, and movement disorders have all been postulated as contributing factors to falls in patients taking antidepressants. Sleep disturbance is a cardinal feature of depression, and all antidepressants have effects on sleep. TCAs and related drugs cause marked sedation with daytime drowsiness. SSRIs and related drugs have an alerting effect, impairing sleep duration and quality and causing insomnia, which may result in nocturia and daytime drowsiness. Daytime drowsiness is a significant risk factor for falls, both in untreated depression and in depression treated with antidepressants. Clinically significant orthostatic hypotension is common with TCAs and related drugs, the older monoamine oxidase inhibitors and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). It occurs less commonly with SSRIs, and rarely with moclobemide and bupropion, and is not reported as a significant adverse effect of hypericum (St John's wort). Cardiac rhythm and conduction disturbances are well recognized with TCAs, tetracyclics and SNRIs, but have also been reported with SSRIs. The contribution of antidepressant-induced conduction and rhythm disturbances to falls cannot be assessed with current data. There are insufficient data to exonerate any individual antidepressant or class of antidepressants as a potential cause of falls. The magnitude of the increased risk of falling with an antidepressant is about the same as the excess risk found in patients with untreated depression. PMID:19552490

  4. Well-being and self-efficacy in a sample of undergraduate nurse students: A small survey study.

    PubMed

    Priesack, Anneken; Alcock, John

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports findings from a survey which aimed to explore well-being and self-efficacy and test measures of those constructs with a sample of nurse students in a University setting in the United Kingdom. Evidence indicates that undergraduate nurse programmes combine academic work and clinical placement experience in a mix that can potentially lead to stress and impact on health and well-being. Self-efficacy is known to be a resource that contributes to well-being, resilience and academic achievement and therefore relevant for investigation. A cross-sectional survey approach was used to obtain data using a paper questionnaire including the BBC Well-being Scale and Generalised Self-efficacy Scale. A total of n=108 undergraduate preregistration nurse students participated in this small study from a potential population of 450. The majority of participants (86%) were female, and the majority (75%) were aged 17-35years old. Mean and subscale scores were calculated for both instruments and inferential analyses were carried out using non-parametric techniques. Exploratory factor analyses of the BBC Well-being Scale indicated a three factor structure consistent with validation study findings. Cronbach's alpha was ?=.92 for the BBC Well-being Scale and ?=.85 for the GSE suggesting that the instruments are valid and reliable measures for nurse education research. Nurse students indicated higher scores on the BBC Well-being Scale and the GSE compared with previously studied populations and a small but significant positive correlation was found between psychological well-being and self-efficacy. Cluster analysis indicated discrete student communities in this sample that varied in their Well-being and GSE scale and subscale scores. Self-efficacy and general well-being in nurse students are worthy of further study and relevant to contemporary nurse education given current interest in interventions to promote student retention and resilience post-registration. PMID:25702848

  5. Efficacy of liquid and foam decontamination technologies for chemical warfare agents on indoor surfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adam H. Love; Christopher G. Bailey; M. Leslie Hanna; Saphon Hok; Alex K. Vu; Dennis J. Reutter; Ellen Raber

    2011-01-01

    Bench-scale testing was used to evaluate the efficacy of four decontamination formulations on typical indoor surfaces following exposure to the liquid chemical warfare agents sarin (GB), soman (GD), sulfur mustard (HD), and VX. Residual surface contamination on coupons was periodically measured for up to 24h after applying one of four selected decontamination technologies [0.5% bleach solution with trisodium phosphate, Allen

  6. Efficacy of Sertraline in a 12Week Trial for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christer Allgulander; Alv A. Dahl; Carol Austin; Philip L. P. Morris; Jesper A. Sogaard; Rana Fayyad; Stan P. Kutcher; Cathryn M. Clary

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Sertraline's efficacy and toler- ability in treating generalized anxiety dis- order were evaluated. Method: Adult outpatients with DSM-IV generalized anxiety disorder and a total score of 18 or higher on the Hamilton Anx- iety Rating Scale were eligible. After a 1- week single-blind placebo lead-in, patients were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of double-blind treatment with placebo (N= 188,

  7. Efficacy of diflubenzuron plus methoprene against Sitophilus oryzae and Rhyzopertha dominica in stored sorghum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gregory J. Daglish; Barry E. Wallbank

    2005-01-01

    The efficacy of diflubenzuron (1mgkg?1)+methoprene (1mgkg?1) against Sitophilus oryzae (L.) and Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) in sorghum was evaluated in a silo-scale trial in southeast Queensland, Australia. Sorghum is normally protected from a wide range of insects by mixtures of grain protectants. The chitin synthesis inhibitor diflubenzuron was evaluated as a potential new protectant for S. oryzae in combination with the

  8. Examination of the Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Prospective Chemistry Teachers in Terms of Different Variables (the Sample of Dokuz Eylul University)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akkuzu, Nalan; Akcay, Husamettin

    2012-01-01

    This research was conducted to adapt the chemistry self efficacy belief (CSEB) scale using Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFI) and to examine pre service teachers' CSEB in terms of some demographic features. This descriptive study was carried out Dokuz Eylul University in 2008-2010 academic years. Firstly, for validity and reliability, the scale

  9. Parenting Effects on Self-Efficacy and Self-Esteem in Late Adolescence and How Those Factors Impact Adjustment to College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gregory J

    2007-01-01

    Approximately three months before starting college, 203 high school seniors completed a questionnaire consisting of the General Self-Efficacy Scale, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and the Parental Authority Questionnaire (PAQ) assessing their parents' parenting styles. The PAQ yielded scores on three parenting styles originally proposed by…

  10. Efficacy of Atomoxetine for the Treatment of ADHD Symptoms in Patients with Pervasive Developmental Disorders: A Prospective, Open-Label Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez-Jaen, Alberto; Fernandez-Mayoralas, Daniel Martin; Calleja-Perez, Beatriz; Munoz-Jareno, Nuria; Campos Diaz, Maria del Rosario; Lopez-Arribas, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Atomoxetine's tolerance and efficacy were studied in 24 patients with pervasive developmental disorder and symptoms of ADHD. Method: Prospective, open-label, 16-week study was performed, using the variables of the Clinical Global Impression Scale and the Conners' Scale, among others. Results: A significant difference was found…

  11. Percutaneous Lung Biopsy: Technique, Efficacy, and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Winokur, Ronald S.; Pua, Bradley B.; Sullivan, Brian W.; Madoff, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomography-guided percutaneous needle biopsy of the lung is an indispensable tool in the evaluation of pulmonary abnormalities due to its high diagnostic accuracy in the detection of malignancy. Percutaneous biopsy in the lung plays a critical role in obtaining pathologic proof of malignancy, guiding staging and planning treatment. This article reviews biopsy techniques and their related efficacy and complications. PMID:24436527

  12. The Efficacy of Career Education, Career Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arterbury, Elvis; And Others

    The paper reviewed existing evaluative studies indicative of the efficacy of the career awareness element of career education. The studies represent a sampling of the degree of success achieved in implementing and evaluating career education across the nation. Information sources included the U.S. Office of Education and the National Institute of…

  13. The Efficacy of Optometric Vision Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the American Optometric Association, 1988

    1988-01-01

    This review aims to document the efficacy and validity of vision therapy for modifying and improving vision functioning. The paper describes the essential components of the visual system and disorders which can be physiologically and clinically identified. Vision therapy is defined as a clinical approach for correcting and ameliorating the effects…

  14. Leadership, Self-Efficacy, and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between teacher leadership, science teacher self-efficacy, and fifth-grade science student achievement in diverse schools in a San Antonio, Texas, metropolitan school district. Teachers completed a modified version of the "Leadership Behavior Description Question" (LBDQ) Form XII by Stogdill (1969),…

  15. Self-Efficacy and Music Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, Gary E.; McCormick, John

    2006-01-01

    This study is the second in a series of investigations attempting to clarify relationships between variables that impact on a young musician's ability to perform music (as assessed on a graded music examination). Consistent with studies on school academic subjects, our previous investigation demonstrated the importance of self-efficacy in…

  16. Self-Efficacy Perspective on Achievement Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schunk, Dale H.

    In an initial section, this paper presents a review of the literature and discusses the hypothesized relationship between self-efficacy, (defined as personal judgments of how well one can organize and implement behaviors in situations that may contain novel, unpredictable and possibly stressful elements) and achievement behavior. Source of…

  17. Treatment efficacy in behavioral pediatric sleep medicine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brett R Kuhn; Amy J Elliott

    2003-01-01

    Behavioral interventions have been identified as the treatment of choice for many forms of pediatric sleep disturbance. We adopt criteria established by the Task Force on Promotion and Dissemination of Psychological Procedures (1996) to evaluate the literature base describing behavioral interventions for pediatric sleep disturbance. Three well-established interventions, one promising intervention and one probably efficacious intervention, have emerged for bedtime

  18. Creative Self-Efficacy: An Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathisen, Gro Ellen; Bronnick, Kolbjorn S.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of creativity training on creative self-efficacy. We developed a creativity course based on social cognitive theory. The course was conducted in two formats: a five-day course and a condensed one-day course. Samples consisted of students and municipality employees (five-day course), and special education teachers…

  19. Improving Math Proficiency through Self Efficacy Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanlon, Ellie H.; Schneider, Yasemin

    This paper reports the results of a pilot intervention designed to improve students' mathematics proficiency through self-efficacy training. Seventeen pre-first year college students participated in a five-week summer program that included whole class instruction, small group tutoring, and individual meetings with instructional coordinators. As…

  20. The efficacy of relaxation training with children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Neil C. Richter

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews studies that have examined the efficacy of relaxation training techniques in the treatment of childhood disorders. Methodological problems encountered in doing research in this area resemble those found in working with an adult population: imprecise definitions of subject populations and use of a variety of dependent variables from one study to another. Findings suggest that relaxation training