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Sample records for falls efficacy scale

  1. Development and validation of a Chinese version of the Falls Efficacy Scale International.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Marcella M S; Tsang, William W N; Close, Jacqueline C T; Lord, Stephen R

    2013-01-01

    The FES-I is an instrument developed to assess concern about falls. The aim of this study was to develop a Chinese version of the 16-item Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I(Ch)) and evaluate its structure, measurement properties and convergent and predictive validity. The FES-I(Ch) was developed following the recommended 10-step protocol. The FES-I(Ch) was then administered to 399 community-dwelling Chinese older people (61-93 years) in conjunction with a range of other socio-demographic, physical, medical and functional measures. Falls were prospectively monitored over 12 months. Sub-samples were reassessed for determination of the FES-I(Ch)'s test-retest and inter-rater reliability. The overall structure and measurement properties of the FES-I(Ch), as evaluated with factor analysis and item-total correlations, was good. Internal consistency was excellent (Cronbach's ?=0.94), as was test-retest and inter-rater reliability (ICC(3,1)=0.89 and ICC(2,1)=0.95 respectively). FES-I(Ch) scores were significantly higher in participants with poor physical performance, depression, medical conditions associated with falls and disability indicating acceptable congruent validity. FES-I(Ch) scores did not differ between those who did and did not fall in the 12-month follow-up period. We found that the FES-I(Ch) is a valid and reliable measure of concern about falls in Chinese older people. The relatively high level on concern (high FES-I(Ch) scores) as well as relatively few prospective falls may explain the lack of association between FES-I(Ch) scores and falls in this population. Future studies should explore the FES-I(Ch)'s responsiveness to change over time and during intervention studies. PMID:23116978

  2. Investigation of psychometric properties of the Falls Efficacy Scale using Rasch analysis in patients with hemiplegic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Young; Choi, Yoo Im

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the Falls Efficacy Scale using Rasch analysis in patients with hemiplegic stroke. [Subjects] Fifty-five community-dwelling hemiplegic stroke patients were selected as participants. [Methods] Data were analyzed using the Winsteps program (version 3.62) with the Rasch model to confirm the unidimensionality through item fit, reliability, and appropriateness of the rating scale. [Results] There were no misfit persons or items. Furthermore, infit and outfit statistics appeared adjacent. The person separation value was 3.07, and the reliability coefficient was 0.90. The reliability of all items was at an acceptable level for patients with hemiplegic stroke. [Conclusion] This was the first study to investigate the psychometric properties of the Falls Efficacy Scale using Rasch analysis. The results of this study suggest that the 6-point Falls Efficacy Scale is an appropriate tool for measuring the self-perceived fear of falling in patients with hemiplegic stroke. PMID:26504303

  3. Clinical assessment of fear of falling after stroke: validity, reliability and responsiveness of the Persian version of the Fall Efficacy Scale-International

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Akram; Hassani Mehraban, Afsoon; Mehrpour, Masoud; Mohammadi, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fear of falling may be related to falling during stroke onset. The Fall Efficacy ScaleInternational (FES-I) with excellent psychometric properties, is an instrument developed to assess patients’ concerns about fallings. The aim of this study was to determine validation of this scale in Iranian patients with stroke. Methods: The "forward-backward" procedure was applied to translate the FES-I from English to Persian. One hundred-twenty patients who had suffered stroke, aged 40 to 80 years (55% male) completed the Persian FES-I, Geriatric Depression Scale-15 (GDS-15), General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28), Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and Timed up and Go (TUG) questionnaires. The interval time for the test-retest of the Persian scale was 7-14 days. Results: The test-retest and inter-rater reliabilities of the Persian FES-I were excellent (ICC2,1=0.98, p<0.001) and the internal consistency was high (Cronbach’s alpha=0.78). Factor analysis of the 16 items in the Persian scale showed only one significant factor. The total Persian FES-I score had a significantly negative correlation (p<0.001) with the BBS, but it had significantly positive correlation with the TUG, GHQ-28, and GDS-15. The difference in responsiveness scores across fallers and non-fallers yielded a large effect size (0.46), which indicated a good discriminating validity. Conclusion: The Persian FES-I proved to be an effective and valuable measurement tool to assess stroke patients’ fear of falling in practice and research setting. PMID:25694989

  4. The Relationship between Falls Efficacy and Improvement in Fall Risk Factors Following an Exercise Plus Educational Intervention for Older Adults with Hip Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, R.A.; Gyurcsik, N.C.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Older adults with decreased confidence in their ability to prevent a fall may benefit from an exercise programme that includes self-efficacy-enhancing education. The objectives of this study were to explore differences in fall-risk outcomes in older adults with higher vs. lower levels of falls efficacy and to evaluate the relationship between baseline falls-efficacy status and changes in fall risk factors following two interventions. Method: Fifty-four older adults with hip osteoarthritis and at least one risk factor for falls received aquatic exercise twice weekly plus education once weekly (EE) or aquatic exercise only, twice weekly (EO), for 11 weeks. Results: EE participants with low baseline falls efficacy demonstrated significantly (p<0.05) greater improvement in balance and falls efficacy compared to EE participants with high baseline falls efficacy. In the EE group only, baseline falls-efficacy status (low vs. high median split on the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale) was significantly (p<0.05) correlated with positive balance and falls-efficacy change scores (Spearman rank r=0.45 and 0.63 respectively). Conclusions: Individuals with one or more fall-risk factors and low falls efficacy may benefit from receiving an intervention that combines exercise with self-efficacy-enhancing education. Falls-efficacy screening may be important for decisions regarding referral to fall-prevention programmes. PMID:22942514

  5. The effect of modified trampoline training on balance, gait, and falls efficacy of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Joohee; Shin, Seonhae; Lee, Wanhee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This research was conducted to investigate the effects of modified trampoline training on the balance, gait, and falls efficacy of stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-four stroke patients participated in this study. The subjects were randomly allocated to one of two groups: the trampoline group (n=12) or the control group (n=12). [Methods] Both groups participated in conventional physical therapy for thirty minutes per day, three times a week for six weeks. The trampoline group also took part in trampoline training for thirty minutes per day, three times a week for six weeks. We evaluated balance (Berg balance scale, timed up and go test), gait (dynamic gait index), and falls efficacy (falls efficacy scale-K) to confirm the effects of the intervention. [Results] Both the trampoline and the control group showed significant improvements in balance, gait, and falls efficacy compared to before the intervention, and the improvements were significantly greater in the trampoline group than in the control group. [Conclusion] Modified trampoline training resulted in significantly improved balance, dynamic gait, and falls efficacy of stroke patients compared to the control group. These results suggest that modified trampoline training is feasible and effective at improving balance, dynamic gait, and falls efficacy after stroke. PMID:26696696

  6. Evaluation of the Frails' Fall Efficacy by Comparing Treatments (EFFECT) on reducing fall and fear of fall in moderately frail older adults: study protocol for a randomised control trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Falls are common in frail older adults and often result in injuries and hospitalisation. The Nintendo® Wii™ is an easily available exercise modality in the community which has been shown to improve lower limb strength and balance. However, not much is known on the effectiveness of the Nintendo® Wii™ to improve fall efficacy and reduce falls in a moderately frail older adult. Fall efficacy is the measure of fear of falling in performing various daily activities. Fear contributes to avoidance of activities and functional decline. Methods This randomised active-control trial is a comparison between the Nintendo WiiActive programme against standard gym-based rehabilitation of the older population. Eighty subjects aged above 60, fallers and non-fallers, will be recruited from the hospital outpatient clinic. The primary outcome measure is the Modified Falls Efficacy Scale and the secondary outcome measures are self-reported falls, quadriceps strength, walking agility, dynamic balance and quality of life assessments. Discussions The study is the first randomised control trial using the Nintendo Wii as a rehabilitation modality investigating a change in fall efficacy and self-reported falls. Longitudinally, the study will investigate if the interventions can successfully reduce falls and analyse the cost-effectiveness of the programme. Trial registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN12610000576022 PMID:21682909

  7. The COPD Self-Efficacy Scale.

    PubMed

    Wigal, J K; Creer, T L; Kotses, H

    1991-05-01

    Many individuals with COPD develop a lack of confidence regarding their ability to avoid breathing difficulty while participating in certain activities, however minimal the physical demands of the activity may be. This lack of confidence may be expressed as low self-efficacy. As a result of low self-efficacy, COPD patients may refrain from many routine activities of daily living. Identifying situations in which individuals with COPD experience low self-efficacy would allow the development of specific treatment interventions designed to increase the patient's self-efficacy in those situations and consequently increase activity. We developed a 34-item COPD Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES) to assess self-efficacy in individuals afflicted with COPD. The CSES has good test-retest reliability (r = .77), excellent internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = .95), and a five-factor structure (negative affect, intense emotional arousal, physical exertion, weather/environmental, and behavioral risk factors. PMID:2019177

  8. Development of Physics Self-Efficacy Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çali?kan, Serap; Selçuk, Gamze S.; Erol, Mustafa

    2007-04-01

    In this article, we describe development of a Physics Self-Efficacy Scale (PSES) that is a self-administered measure to assess physics self-efficacy beliefs regarding one's ability to successfully perform physics tasks in physics classroom. The scale is initially composed of 56 items prepared following a brief scrutiny of relating literature on self-efficacy. It was initially administered 30 physics teacher candidates and was also examined by 6 experts of physics education, then ambiguous or incomprehensible 6 items were dismissed. This PSES was tested on 558 undergraduate students all completed fundamental physics courses. Cronbach's Alpha reliability coefficient of the PSES was calculated as 0.94. The final version of the PSES contained 30 items with 5 dimensions namely, 1. Self-efficacy towards solving physics problems, 2. Self-efficacy towards physics laboratory, 3. Self-efficacy towards learning physics, 4. Self-efficacy towards application of physics knowledge and 5. Self-efficacy towards memorizing physics knowledge.

  9. Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Risk Factors for Falls, Fear of Falling, and Falls Efficacy in a Cohort of Middle-Aged African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Elena M.; Wolinsky, Fredric D.; Miller, J. Phillip; Wilson, Margaret-Mary G.; Malmstrom, Theodore K.; Miller, Douglas K.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to cross-sectionally and longitudinally identify risk factors for falls, fear of falling, and falls efficacy in late-middle-aged African Americans. Design and Methods: We performed in-home assessments on a probability sample of 998 African Americans and conducted two annual follow-up interviews. Multiple…

  10. Development of a Physical Education Teaching Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, Charlotte A.; Hebert, Edward; Daigle, Kay; Martin, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Relationships have been found between teacher efficacy and many teaching and learning variables, but few researchers have examined teaching efficacy in physical education. The instrument reported here, the Physical Education Teaching Efficacy Scale, was developed based on the teaching efficacy literature, existing scales, and National Association…

  11. The effects of aquatic walking and jogging program on physical function and fall efficacy in patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Hyun; Sung, Eunsook

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 12-week aqua walking and jogging program on muscle function, ankle range of motion (ROM), balance and fell efficacy in degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS) patients. Six patients (2 males, 4 females) with DLSS participated in aquatic exercise program 3 times per week with each session of 60 min (warming-up, aqua walking, aqua jogging and cool down) at 1 m 20 cm–1 m 30 cm deep pool. Janda’s muscle function test, ankle ROM, Berg balance scale (BBS) and fall efficacy scale (FES) were analyzed before and after the training intervention. We found significant increases in balance, muscle function, ankle ROM and fall efficacy after training intervention. In conclusion, aquatic exercise seems to affect physical function and fall efficacy positively in elderly DLSS patients. PMID:26535218

  12. A randomized controlled trial on Stroke telerehabilitation: The effects on falls self-efficacy and satisfaction with care.

    PubMed

    Chumbler, Neale R; Li, Xinli; Quigley, Patricia; Morey, Miriam C; Rose, Dorian; Griffiths, Patricia; Sanford, Jon; Hoenig, Helen

    2015-04-01

    We determined the effect of a multifaceted stroke telerehabilitation (STeleR) intervention on falls-related self-efficacy and satisfaction with care. We conducted a prospective, randomized, multisite, single-blinded trial in 52 veterans from three Veterans Affairs Medical Centers. Participants who experienced a stroke in the past 24 months were randomized to the STeleR intervention or usual care. Participants in the intervention arm were administered an exit interview to gather specific patient satisfaction data three months after their final outcome measure. The STeleR intervention consisted of three home visits, five telephone calls, and an in-home messaging device provided over three months to instruct patients in functionally based exercises and adaptive strategies. The outcome measures included Falls Efficacy Scale to measure fall-related self-efficacy and a Stroke-Specific Patient Satisfaction with Care (SSPSC) scale, a measure separated into two subscales (satisfaction with home care and satisfaction with hospital care) was employed to measure the participants' satisfaction. At six months, compared with the usual care group, the STeleR group showed statistically significant improvements in one of the two SSPSC scales (satisfaction with hospital care, p =?.029) and approached significance in the second SSPSC scale (satisfaction with home care, p =?.077). There were no improvements in fall-related self-efficacy. Core concepts identified were: (a) beneficial impact of the trained assistant; (b) exercises helpful; (c) home use of technology. The STeleR intervention improved satisfaction with care, especially as it relates to care following their experience from the hospital. With the limited resources available for in-home rehabilitation for stroke survivors, STeleR (and especially its exercise components) can be a useful complement to traditional post-stroke rehabilitation. PMID:25680390

  13. Developing the "Pedagogical Efficacy Perception Scale" for Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akbaba, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to develop the "Pedagogical Efficacy Perception Scale" for teacher candidates and to compare scale scores. The sample of this survey model study consists of 310 students studying in a faculty of education. The "Pedagogical Efficacy Perception Scale" developed by the author was used for data collection.…

  14. The effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation integration pattern exercise program on the fall efficacy and gait ability of the elders with experienced fall.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Seung; Park, Seong-Doo; Kim, Jin-Young

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of exercising program utilizing proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation integration pattern (PIP), which is effective in improvement of the physical function, on the fall efficacy and gait ability of the elders who experienced injuries from falls. Also, this study aims to investigate he applicability of exercise program as methods for fall reoccurrence prevention and physical functions enhancement. The subjects of the study were 30 elders in the local community with experience of injuries from falls. The period of the study was 4 weeks with 12 exercise sessions. The subjects were randomly allocated to 2 groups where 15 elders were allocated to PIP and the rest 15 elders were allocated to general exercise (GE) group. Fall efficacy scale (FES) and GAITRite were used for the measurements in this study. Paired t-test was used to analyze the differences within the group while independent t-test was used to analyze the difference between two groups. In the comparison of measurements before and after exercise program, FES, velocity, cadence, and stride length were shown to be significantly increased in both PIP group and GE group. Also, in the comparison between two groups after the exercise program, the measurements of FES, cadence, stride length, and step length in PIP group were shown to be significantly increased compared to the GE group. Therefore, the PNF combined pattern is judged to be applicable to as methods for fall reoccurrence prevention and physical functions enhancement of the elders with experience of being fallen. PMID:25210699

  15. A Self-Efficacy Scale for Chemical Dependency in Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Mary, Sharon; Russo, Thomas J.

    This study was conducted to develop a scale that assesses perceptions of self-efficacy in potentially stressful situations for chemically dependent adolescents. Adolescent subjects (N=100) currently receiving treatment for chemical dependency were given a 20-situation questionnaire, the Adolescent Self-Efficacy Scale (ASES). Students were…

  16. Factor Structure of the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornick, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    The current study utilized exercise self-efficacy ratings from undergraduate students to assess the factor structure of the Self-Efficacy to Regulate Exercise Scale (Bandura, 1997, 2006). An exploratory factor analysis (n = 759) indicated a two-factor model solution and three separate confirmatory factor analyses (n = 1,798) supported this…

  17. The Coaching Efficacy Scale II--High School Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Nicholas D.; Feltz, Deborah L.; Chase, Melissa A.; Reckase, Mark D.; Hancock, Gregory R.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this validity study was to improve measurement of coaching efficacy, an important variable in models of coaching effectiveness. A revised version of the coaching efficacy scale (CES) was developed for head coaches of high school teams (CES II-HST). Data were collected from head coaches of 14 relevant high school sports (N = 799).…

  18. Development of the School Counselor Self-Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodenhorn, Nancy; Skaggs, Gary

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the development and psychometric properties of scores from the 43-item School Counselor Self-Efficacy (SCSE) Scale. Self-efficacy, according to social cognitive theory, is a mediating factor in performance. Practicing school counselors and master's-level students completed the SCSE. Factor structure, construct validity, and…

  19. Development and Exploratory Validation of an Organizational Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohn, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Although many instruments have been developed to measure organizational constructs such as citizenship, climate, and organization-based esteem, to date no scale has been designed specifically to measure efficacy at the organizational level. Tools to measure organizational efficacy in a business context have been recommended for over two decades.…

  20. Children's Self-Efficacy Scale: Initial Psychometric Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinelli, Selma de Cassia; Bartholomeu, Daniel; Caliatto, Susana Gakyia; Sassi, Adriana de Grecci

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the development of a self-efficacy measure for elementary school children. A sample of 514 children, ages 8 to 11, enrolled in Grades 2 to 4 of public schools in Brazil was investigated. The scale included 78 descriptive items about academic situations, in which the child was required to respond on a 5-point scale, the…

  1. Musculoskeletal Strength, Balance Performance, and Self-Efficacy in Elderly Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Practitioners: Implications for Fall Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Shirley S. M.; Ng, Shamay S. M.; Liu, Karen P. Y.; Pang, Marco Y. C.; Lee, H. W.; Chung, Joanne W. Y.; Lam, Priscillia L.; Guo, X.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To (1) compare the bone strength, lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy between Ving Tsun (VT) martial art practitioners and nonpractitioners and (2) identify the associations between lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy among the VT-trained participants. Methods. Thirty-five VT practitioners (mean age ± SD = 62.7 ± 13.3 years) and 49 nonpractitioners (mean age ± SD = 65.9 ± 10.5 years) participated in the study. The bone strength of the distal radius, lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy were assessed using an ultrasound bone sonometer, the five times sit-to-stand test (FTSTS), the Berg balance scale (BBS), and the Chinese version of the activities-specific balance confidence scale, respectively. A multivariate analysis of covariance was performed to compare all the outcome variables between the two groups. Results. Elderly VT practitioners had higher radial bone strength on the dominant side (P < 0.05), greater lower limb muscular strength (P = 0.001), better functional balance performance (P = 0.003), and greater balance confidence (P < 0.001) than the nonpractitioners. Additionally, only the FTSTS time revealed a significant association with the BBS score (r = ?0.575, ?P = 0.013). Conclusions. VT may be a suitable health-maintenance exercise for the elderly. Our findings may inspire the development of VT fall-prevention exercises for the community-dwelling healthy elderly. PMID:25530782

  2. A Confirmatory Study of Rating Scale Category Effectiveness for the Coaching Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Nicholas D.; Feltz, Deborah L.; Wolfe, Edward W.

    2008-01-01

    This study extended validity evidence for measures of coaching efficacy derived from the Coaching Efficacy Scale (CES) by testing the rating scale categorizations suggested in previous research. Previous research provided evidence for the effectiveness of a four-category (4-CAT) structure for high school and collegiate sports coaches; it also…

  3. The Early Intervention Parenting Self-Efficacy Scale (EIPSES): Scale Construction and Initial Psychometric Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guimond, Amy B.; Wilcox, M. Jeanne; Lamorey, Suzanne G.

    2008-01-01

    The psychometric properties of an instrument designed to measure parenting efficacy within the context of early intervention, the Early Intervention Parenting Self-Efficacy Scale (EIPSES), were explored. One hundred seventeen caregivers of children receiving early intervention services completed the 20-item EIPSES. The scale was reduced to 16…

  4. The Contraceptive Self-Efficacy Scale: Analysis in Four Samples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinson, Ruth Andrea; Wan, Choi K.; Beamer, LuAnn J.

    1998-01-01

    The relationship of the Contraceptive Self-Efficacy Scale to contraceptive behavior was explored in four female samples: (1) 258 California adolescents, (2) 259 Chicago (Illinois) adolescents, (3) 231 Montreal (Canada) high school students, and (4) 148 college students. Results are discussed in terms of use in research and clinical settings. (SLD)

  5. A Psychometric Evaluation of the Self-Presentational Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamarche, Larkin; Gammage, Kimberley L.; Sullivan, Philip J.; Gabriel, David A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Self-Presentational Efficacy Scale (SPES) developed by Gammage, Hall, and Martin Ginis (2004). University students (196 men and 269 women) completed the SPES and measures of social physique anxiety, fear of negative evaluation, and physical activity. Participants also completed the SPES a…

  6. A Factor Analysis of the Research Self-Efficacy Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bieschke, Kathleen J.; And Others

    Counseling professionals' and counseling psychology students' interest in performing research seems to be waning. Identifying the impediments to graduate students' interest and participation in research is important if systematic efforts to engage them in research are to succeed. The Research Self-Efficacy Scale (RSES) was designed to measure…

  7. Psychometric properties of four fear of falling rating scales in people with Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fear of falling (FOF) is commonly experienced in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD). It is a predictor of recurrent falls, a barrier to physical exercise, and negatively associated with health-related quality of life. A variety of rating scales exist that assess different aspects of FOF but comprehensive head-to-head comparisons of their psychometric properties in people with PD are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of four FOF rating scales in people with PD. More specifically, we investigated and compared the scales’ data completeness, scaling assumptions, targeting, and reliability. Methods The FOF rating scales were: the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I), the Swedish FES (FES(S)), the Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale (ABC), and the modified Survey of Activities and Fear of Falling in the Elderly (mSAFFE). A postal survey was administered to 174 persons with PD. Responders received a second survey after two weeks. Results The mean (SD) age and PD duration of the 102 responders were 73 (8) and 7 (6) years, respectively. ABC had worse data completeness than the other scales (6.9 vs. 0.9–1.3% missing data). All scales had corrected item-total correlations exceeding 0.4 and showed acceptable reliabilities (Cronbach’s alpha and Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) >0.80) but only FES-I had ICC >0.90. The standard error of measurements ranged from 7% (FES-I) to 12% (FES(S)), and the smallest detectable differences ranged from 20% (FES-I) to 33% (FES(S)) of the total score ranges. ABC and FES(S) had substantially more outliers than mSAFFE and FES-I (10 and 15 vs. 3 and 4, respectively) when the two test occasions were compared. Conclusions When assessing FOF in people with PD, the findings in the present study favoured the choice of FES-I or mSAFFE. However, FES-I was the only scale with ICC >0.90 which has been suggested as a minimum when using a scale for individual comparisons. PMID:24884466

  8. Brief Psychometric Analysis of the Self-Efficacy Parent Report Scale (SEPRS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erford, Bradley T.; Gavin, Kate

    2013-01-01

    The Self-Efficacy Parent-Report Scale was designed to assess parent perceptions of self-efficacy of their children aged 7 to 17 years. Internal aspects of validity indicated a marginal fit of the data to the unidimensional model. External facets of validity indicated the Self-Efficacy Parent-Report Scale had excellent convergent and discriminant…

  9. Brief Psychometric Analysis of the Self-Efficacy Teacher Report Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erford, Bradley T.; Duncan, Kelly; Savin-Murphy, Janet

    2010-01-01

    This study provides preliminary analysis of reliability and validity of scores on the Self-Efficacy Teacher Report Scale, which was designed to assess teacher perceptions of self-efficacy of students aged 8 to 17 years. (Contains 3 tables.)

  10. Invited Reaction: Development and Exploratory Validation of an Organizational Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the author's comments on James G. Bohn's article "Development and Exploratory Validation of an Organizational Efficacy Scale". In his article, Bohn has captured a deficiency, as he quotes, of "over two decades" in the human resource development (HRD) field. Since no scale has been designed specifically to measure efficacy at…

  11. Evaluating the Turkish Version of the Discipline Efficacy Scale (DES): Translation Adequacy and Factor Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurt, Hakan; Ekici, Gulay

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to adapt the discipline efficacy scale to Turkish language, and conduct the validity and reliability analysis of the adapted scale. The scale was applied to 157 teacher candidates. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to reveal the construct validity of the scale. The results of the exploratory…

  12. Development and Validation of Scores on a Computer Programming Self-Efficacy Scale and Group Analyses of Novice Programmer Self-Efficacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramalingam, Vennila; Wiedenbeck, Susan

    1998-01-01

    A 32-item self-efficacy scale for computer programming was developed, primed to the C++ programming language. The scale was administered to 421 students at the beginning and end of an introductory course in C++ programming. There was growth in self-efficacy between two administrations of the scale 12 weeks apart, particularly for students who…

  13. 2011 Outstanding AFCPE[R] Conference Paper: Development and Validation of a Financial Self-Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lown, Jean M.

    2011-01-01

    This study developed a 6-item Financial Self-Efficacy Scale for use by researchers, educators, counselors, and advisors. Bandura's concept of self-efficacy and Prochaska's Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change provided the theoretical framework. Scale items were adapted from Schwarzer and Jerusalem's (1995) General Self-Efficacy Scale.…

  14. Anti-fall Efficacy of Oral Supplemental Vitamin D and Active Vitamin D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Results from fall prevention trials with supplemental vitamin D have been mixed and trials varied by dose, type of vitamin D (D3 = cholecalciferol or D2 = ergocalciferol), and quality of fall assessment. A possible differential benefit of supplemental versus alpha-hydroxylated vitamin D (active D) h...

  15. The Self-Efficacy Scale for Preschool Teachers Regarding Asthma Care: Instrument Development and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gau, Bih-Shya; Hung, Chao-Chia

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of a questionnaire that assesses preschool teachers' self-efficacy in providing asthma care. Methods: A total of 407 teachers from 54 preschools in Taiwan participated in the study by completing the asthma management self-efficacy scale. We assessed…

  16. Using Mathematics in Teaching Science Self-Efficacy Scale--UMSSS: A Validity and Reliability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Can, Bilge Taskin; Gunhan, Berna Canturk; Erdal, Sevinc Ongel

    2012-01-01

    In this study, an instrument, Using Mathematics in Science Self-efficacy Scale (UMSSS), was developed in order to determine preservice science teachers' self-efficacy toward the use of mathematics in their lessons. Data gathered from 250 preservice science teachers were used for Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis…

  17. A Scale to Measure Teachers' Self-Efficacy in Deaf-Blindness Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartmann, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The Teacher Efficacy in Deafblindness Education Scale (TEDE) was developed to expand the construct of self-efficacy to teach children with deaf-blindness. Methods: Eighty-seven special educators in the United States were asked to rate their confidence to perform a variety of tasks that are associated with teaching children who are…

  18. Cross-Validation of the Norwegian Teacher's Self-Efficacy Scale (NTSES)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avanzi, Lorenzo; Miglioretti, Massimo; Velasco, Veronica; Balducci, Cristian; Vecchio, Luca; Fraccaroli, Franco; Skaalvik, Einar M.

    2013-01-01

    The study assesses the psychometric properties of the Italian version of the Norwegian Teacher Self-Efficacy Scale--NTSES. Multiple group confirmatory factor analysis was used to explore the measurement invariance of the scale across two countries. Analyses performed on Italian and Norwegian samples confirmed a six-factor structure of the scale

  19. Psychometric properties of the General Self Efficacy-12 Scale in Spanish: general and clinical population samples.

    PubMed

    Herrero, R; Espinoza, M; Molinari, G; Etchemendy, E; Garcia-Palacios, A; Botella, C; Baños, R M

    2014-10-01

    The General Self Efficacy Scale (GSES-12) is a short version of the Sherer's Self-Efficacy Scale, and evaluates a general dimension and three aspects of self-efficacy: initiative, persistence and effort. The aim of this study is to explore the factorial structure, reliability, and criterion validity of the Spanish adaptation of the GSES-12 in general and clinical populations. The sample was composed of 714 volunteers (332 from the clinical population). Results of the principal components analysis yielded a 3-factor structure that was later confirmed through Confirmatory Factor Analysis. Moreover, this study shows good internal consistency and test-retest values, and differences in self-efficacy scores between the clinical and non-clinical groups. The present study demonstrates that the Spanish version of the GSES-12 is a valid and reliable measure, and it adds relevant information to the debate about the dimensional structure of general self-efficacy. PMID:24973225

  20. Adapting Computer Programming Self-Efficacy Scale and Engineering Students' Self-Efficacy Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korkmaz, Özgen; Altun, Halis

    2014-01-01

    Students might have different type and different level of perceptions: Positive or negative perceptions on programming; a perception on benefit of programming, perceptions related to difficulties of programming process etc. The perception of student on their own competence is defined as self-efficacy. Based on the discussions reported in…

  1. Analysis of the Professional Choice Self-Efficacy Scale Using the Rasch-Andrich Rating Scale Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambiel, Rodolfo A. M.; Noronha, Ana Paula Porto; de Francisco Carvalho, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to analyze the psychometrics properties of the professional choice self-efficacy scale (PCSES), using the Rasch-Andrich rating scale model. The PCSES assesses four factors: self-appraisal, gathering occupational information, practical professional information search and future planning. Participants were 883 Brazilian…

  2. Measuring the Efficacy of Leaders to Assess Information and Make Decisions in a Crisis: The C-LEAD Scale

    E-print Network

    Pittinsky, Todd L.

    2009-07-01

    Based on literature and expert interviews, we developed the Crisis Leader Efficacy in Assessing and Deciding scale (C-LEAD) to capture the efficacy of leaders to assess information and make decisions in a public health and ...

  3. A validation study of goal orientations and self-efficacy scales.

    PubMed

    Acarlar, Gizem; Bilgiç, Reyhan

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the validity and reliability of goal orientation and self-efficacy scales. The scales were administered to 264 university students (154 from engineering departments, 110 from business administration). Two samples were used. In the first sample, the original factor model was tested with confirmatory factor analysis. In the second sample, the Turkish versions of the scales were factor analyzed. Principal components analysis resulted in three components for the Goal Orientation scale: Learning goal orientation, Performance-prove goal orientation, and Performance-avoid goal orientation. The Self-efficacy scale had one factor as expected. Cronbach's alpha coefficients were satisfactory. The results did not fully support the use of current Turkish versions of the scales. Results of the studies are discussed along with the strengths and limitations of the study and suggestions for further development of the scales. PMID:21319613

  4. Comparison of the Validity of Four Fall-Related Psychological Measures in a Community-Based Falls Risk Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Delilah S.; Ellis, Rebecca; Kosma, Maria; Fabre, Jennifer M.; McCarter, Kevin S.; Wood, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the measurement properties of fall-related psychological instruments with a sample of 133 older adults (M age = 74.4 years, SD = 9.4). Measures included the Comprehensive Falls Risk Screening Instrument, Falls-efficacy Scale-International (FES-I), Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC), modified Survey of Activities and Fear of…

  5. The Smoking Outcome Expectation Scale and Anti-Smoking Self-Efficacy Scale for Early Adolescents: Instrument Development and Validation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen-Ju; Yeh, Ming-Chen; Tang, Fu-In; Yu, Shu

    2015-10-01

    Smoking-related outcome expectation and self-efficacy have been found to be associated with adolescent smoking initiation. There is, however, a lack of appropriate instruments to investigate early adolescents' smoking outcome expectations and antismoking self-efficacy. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate the Smoking Outcome Expectation Scale (SOES) and Anti-Smoking Self-Efficacy Scale (ASSES). A total of 232 fifth and sixth graders from four elementary schools in Taiwan participated in the study. Both scales had good content validity, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability. On the basis of exploratory factor analysis, the 6-item SOES with two factors accounted for 54.72% of total variance and the 15-item ASSES with three factors accounted for 56.49% of total variance. The SOES had convergent and discriminant validity and ASSES had convergent validity. The two scales could help school nurses to understand early adolescents' smoking outcome expectation and antismoking self-efficacy and to develop more appropriate antismoking curricula. PMID:25467167

  6. Vibration Therapy to Prevent Bone Loss and Falls: Mechanisms and Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Beck, Belinda R

    2015-12-01

    A considerable volume of evidence has accumulated to suggest that whole-body vibration (WBV) may have a therapeutic role to play in the prevention of osteoporotic fracture, particularly for individuals who are unable to tolerate vigorous exercise interventions. There is moderate to strong evidence that WBV will prevent falls (likely due to enhanced neuromuscular function), but also some indication that the effects of WBV do not outstrip those of targeted exercise. Animal data indicates that WBV will also improve bone mass, including preventing loss due to hormone withdrawal, disuse and glucocorticoid exposure. Human trials, however, have produced equivocal outcomes for bone. Positive trends are apparent at the hip and spine, but shortcomings in study designs have limited statistical power. The mechanism of the vibration effect on bone tissue is likely to be mechanical coupling between an oscillating cell nucleus and the cytoskeleton. More robust dose-response human data are required before therapeutic guidelines can be developed. PMID:26456496

  7. Using Small-Scale Randomized Controlled Trials to Evaluate the Efficacy of New Curricular Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drits-Esser, Dina; Bass, Kristin M.; Stark, Louisa A.

    2014-01-01

    How can researchers in K-12 contexts stay true to the principles of rigorous evaluation designs within the constraints of classroom settings and limited funding? This paper explores this question by presenting a small-scale randomized controlled trial (RCT) designed to test the efficacy of curricular supplemental materials on epigenetics. The…

  8. A Measurement Invariance Analysis of the General Self-Efficacy Scale on Two Different Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teo, Timothy; Kam, Chester

    2014-01-01

    The 10-item General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES) was developed to assess an individual's beliefs to cope with a variety of situations in life. Despite the GSES being used in numerous research from researchers in different countries and presented in different languages, little is known about the use of its validity in an Asian culture. The aim…

  9. The Development and Validation of the School-Based Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boughfman, Erica M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate the School-Based Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale (SB-SES). Two hundred sixty-five (N = 265) licensed mental health professionals participated in this study. Fifty-eight percent of the participants reported experience working as a school-based counselor with the remaining 42% reporting no…

  10. A Scenario-Based Dieting Self-Efficacy Scale: The DIET-SE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stich, Christine; Knauper, Barbel; Tint, Ami

    2009-01-01

    The article discusses a scenario-based dieting self-efficacy scale, the DIET-SE, developed from dieter's inventory of eating temptations (DIET). The DIET-SE consists of items that describe scenarios of eating temptations for a range of dieting situations, including high-caloric food temptations. Four studies assessed the psychometric properties of…

  11. Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form: A Rasch Analysis of the Portuguese Version

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miguel, Jose P.; Silva, Jose T.; Prieto, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    The present study analyzes the psychometric properties of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (CDSE-SF) in a sample of Portuguese secondary education students using the Rasch model. The results indicate that the 25 items of the CDSE-SF are well fitted to a latent unidimensional structure, as required by Rasch modeling. The response…

  12. Development and validation of the French-Canadian Chronic Pain Self-efficacy Scale

    PubMed Central

    Lacasse, Anaïs; Bourgault, Patricia; Tousignant-Laflamme, Yannick; Courtemanche-Harel, Roxanne; Choinière, Manon

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perceived self-efficacy is a non-negligible outcome when measuring the impact of self-management interventions for chronic pain patients. However, no validated, chronic pain-specific self-efficacy scales exist for studies conducted with French-speaking populations. OBJECTIVES: To establish the validity of the use of the French-Canadian Chronic Pain Self-efficacy Scale (FC-CPSES) among chronic pain patients. METHODS: The Chronic Disease Self-Efficacy Scale is a validated 33-item self-administered questionnaire that measures perceived self-efficacy to perform self-management behaviours, manage chronic disease in general and achieve outcomes (a six-item version is also available). This scale was adapted to the context of chronic pain patients following cross-cultural adaptation guidelines. The FC-CPSES was administered to 109 fibromyalgia and 34 chronic low back pain patients (n=143) who participated in an evidence-based self-management intervention (the PASSAGE program) offered in 10 health care centres across the province of Quebec. Cronbach’s alpha coefficients (?) were calculated to determine the internal consistency of the 33- and six-item versions of the FC-CPSES. With regard to convergent construct validity, the association between the FC-CPSES baseline scores and related clinical outcomes was examined. With regard to the scale’s sensitivity to change, pre- and postintervention FC-CPSES scores were compared. RESULTS: Internal consistency was high for both versions of the FC-CPSES (?=0.86 to ?=0.96). Higher self-efficacy was significantly associated with higher mental health-related quality of life and lower pain intensity and catastrophizing (P<0.05), supporting convergent validity of the scale. There was a statistically significant increase in FC-CPSES scores between pre- and postintervention measures for both versions of the FC-CPSES (P<0.003), which supports their sensitivity to clinical change during an intervention. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that both versions of the FC-CPSES are reliable and valid for the measurement of pain management self-efficacy among chronic pain patients. PMID:25848845

  13. Development and Validation of Chemistry Self-Efficacy Scale for College Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzuntiryaki, Esen; Çapa Ayd?n, Ye?im

    2009-08-01

    This study described the process of developing and validating the College Chemistry Self-Efficacy Scale (CCSS) that can be used to assess college students’ beliefs in their ability to perform essential tasks in chemistry. In the first phase, data collected from 363 college students provided evidence for the validity and reliability of the new scale. Three dimensions emerged: self-efficacy for cognitive skills, self-efficacy for psychomotor skills, and self-efficacy for everyday applications. In the second phase, data collected from an independent sample of 353 college students confirmed the factorial structure of the 21-item CCSS. The Cronbach alpha coefficients ranged from 0.82 to 0.92. In addition, each dimension of the CCSS had moderate and significant correlations with student chemistry achievement and differentiated between major and non-major students. Followed by the additional validation studies, the CCSS will serve as a valuable tool for both instructors and researchers in science education to assess college students’ chemistry self-efficacy beliefs.

  14. Self-Efficacy Scale for Weight Loss among Multi-Ethnic Women of Lower Income: A Psychometric Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latimer, Lara; Walker, Lorraine O.; Kim, Sunghun; Pasch, Keryn E.; Sterling, Bobbie Sue

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study examined test-retest reliability, internal consistency, and construct and predictive validity of the Physical Activity and Nutrition Self-Efficacy (PANSE) scale, an 11-item instrument to assess weight-loss self-efficacy among postpartum women of lower income. Methods: Seventy-one women completed the PANSE scale and…

  15. The Multiple Sclerosis-Fatigue Self– Efficacy (MS-FSE) scale: initial validation

    PubMed Central

    Kersten, Paula; Thomas, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the validity and sensitivity to change of the Multiple Sclerosis-Fatigue Self-Efficacy scale. Design: A validation study nested within a randomized controlled trial. Setting: Community setting. Participants: Adults with a clinically definite diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and significant fatigue taking part in a randomized controlled trial evaluating a group-based fatigue management programme (FACETS) for people with multiple sclerosis (N=164). Main measures: The 9-item Multiple Sclerosis-Fatigue Self-Efficacy scale was completed at baseline, 1-, 4- and 12 months post intervention. Validity, internal consistency and sensitivity to change were examined using classical test theory and Rasch analysis. Results: Item 3 was unanswered by 6% of respondents as they did not know any other people with multiple sclerosis; remaining analyses were carried out with this item deleted. All response choices were utilised, no floor or ceiling effects were evident and there were few missing responses. Cronbach’s alphas were high (baseline, 0.89; follow-up 1, 0.93; follow-up 2, 0.94; follow-up 3, 0.90). The Multiple Sclerosis-Fatigue Self-Efficacy scale (8-item) demonstrated good sensitivity to change following attendance of the FACETS programme (within participant effect sizes 0.66 and 0.69 and 0.54 at 1, 4, and 12 months follow-up). Principal Components Analysis yielded one component. In the Rasch analysis two items with disordered thresholds were rescored. Item 8 displayed differential item functioning by disability and was combined into a testlet with item 4, resulting in a unidimensional scale. The sample was well targeted to the scale. Conclusion: At a scale level the Multiple Sclerosis-Fatigue Self-Efficacy scale is internally valid and has good sensitivity to change. PMID:25160009

  16. [Validity and reliability of a scale to assess self-efficacy for physical activity in elderly].

    PubMed

    Borges, Rossana Arruda; Rech, Cassiano Ricardo; Meurer, Simone Teresinha; Benedetti, Tânia Rosane Bertoldo

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to analyze the confirmatory factor validity and reliability of a self-efficacy scale for physical activity in a sample of 118 elderly (78% women) from 60 to 90 years of age. Mplus 6.1 was used to evaluate the confirmatory factor analysis. Reliability was tested by internal consistency and temporal stability. The original scale consisted of five items with dichotomous answers (yes/no), independently for walking and moderate and vigorous physical activity. The analysis excluded the item related to confidence in performing physical activities when on vacation. Two constructs were identified, called "self-efficacy for walking" and "self-efficacy for moderate and vigorous physical activity", with a factor load ? 0.50. Internal consistency was adequate both for walking (> 0.70) and moderate and vigorous physical activity (> 0.80), and temporal stability was adequate for all the items. In conclusion, the self-efficacy scale for physical activity showed adequate validity, reliability, and internal consistency for evaluating this construct in elderly Brazilians. PMID:25945980

  17. Validation of the Australian/English version of the Diabetes Management Self-Efficacy Scale.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Jan; Courtney, Mary; Edwards, Helen; Shortridge-Baggett, Lillie

    2005-08-01

    Australians' use of the English language is influenced by a British educational curriculum, exposure to international television programmes and cultural backgrounds. Hence, adapting research instruments for use with Australian populations can be challenging. This study adapted the United Kingdom's version of the 20-item Diabetes Management Self-Efficacy Scale and tested it psychometrically with Australians. Face validity of the adapted instrument was established through consultation with diabetes educators and people with type 2 diabetes. Data from a convenience sample of 88 people with type 2 diabetes were analysed to determine the psychometric properties of the adapted instrument. The results indicate that the Australian/English version of the instrument is internally consistent, stable over time and it measures self-efficacy. However, there was evidence to show that there might be some redundant items in the scale. Further psychometric testing is warranted with a larger sample to determine whether the scale requires refinement. PMID:15985096

  18. Scaling CPD through Professional Learning Communities: Development of Teachers' Self-Efficacy in Relation to Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weißenrieder, Jochen; Roesken-Winter, Bettina; Schueler, Sven; Binner, Elke; Blömeke, Sigrid

    2015-01-01

    Whereas much is known about designing effective continuous professional development (CPD) for teachers, little is known about spillover effects of CPD by fostering collegial interactions. In this respect, the self-efficacy expectancy of multipliers to spread CPD issues within their own school is an important predictor for scaling. Self-efficacy

  19. Rasch Calibration of Physical Activity Self-Efficacy and Social Support Scale for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Miyoung; Peterson, Jana J.; Dixon, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the construct validity of the Self-Efficacy/Social Support for Activity for persons with Intellectual Disability (SE/SS-AID) scales developed by Peterson, Peterson, Lowe, & Nothwehr (2009). A total of 146 participants with intellectual disabilities completed 6 self-efficacy (SE) items and 18 social…

  20. ELEMENTARY STUDENT SELF EFFICACY SCALE DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION FOCUSED ON STUDENT LEARNING, PEER RELATIONS, AND RESISTING DRUG USE

    PubMed Central

    FERTMAN, CARL I.; PRIMACK, BRIAN A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of a child self efficacy scale for learning, peer interactions, and resisting pressure to use drugs, to use in an elementary school drug prevention education program based on social cognitive theory. A diverse cohort of 392 4th and 5th grade students completed the 20-item self efficacy scale and social support and social skills instruments. The results provide evidence for a valid and reliable 3-factor self efficacy scale. Subscale internal consistency reliability was good to excellent (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.75, 0.83, 0.91). Construct validity was supported by correlations between each subscale and social skills, social support, and demographic data. The scale has potential as a tool to measure self efficacy in children related to learning, peer interactions, and resisting peer pressure to use drags and to help shape drag education programs. PMID:19886160

  1. A Psychometric Evaluation of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale with Korean Students: A Rasch Model Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nam, Suk Kyung; Yang, Eunjoo; Lee, Sang Min; Lee, Sang Hee; Seol, Hyunsoo

    2011-01-01

    The Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale (CDSE) is one of the most frequently used in the field of career development and counseling. In this study, using the Rasch rating scale model analysis, the CDSE Scale was evaluated by the content, structural, and substantive aspects of validity in a sample of college students from South Korea. Overall, the…

  2. Preliminary Study of the Autism Self-Efficacy Scale for Teachers (ASSET)

    PubMed Central

    Ruble, Lisa A.; Toland, Michael D.; Birdwhistell, Jessica L.; McGrew, John H.; Usher, Ellen L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate a new measure, the Autism Self-Efficacy Scale for Teachers (ASSET) for its dimensionality, internal consistency, and construct validity derived in a sample of special education teachers (N = 44) of students with autism. Results indicate that all items reflect one dominant factor, teachers’ responses to items were internally consistent within the sample, and compared to a 100-point scale, a 6-point response scale is adequate. ASSET scores were found to be negatively correlated with scores on two subscale measures of teacher stress (i.e., self-doubt/need for support and disruption of the teaching process) but uncorrelated with teacher burnout scores. The ASSET is a promising tool that requires replication with larger samples. PMID:23976899

  3. Danish version of 'The COPD self-efficacy scale': translation and psychometric properties.

    PubMed

    Emme, Christina; Mortensen, Erik L; Rydahl-Hansen, Susan; Ostergaard, Birte; Phanareth, Klaus

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the study was to translate 'The COPD self-efficacy scale' (CSES) into Danish and to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Danish version (CSES-DK). CSES enables assessment of self-efficacy in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The scale consists of 34 items, describing situations which may cause dyspnoea in patients with COPD. The CSES was translated into Danish using a standard forward-backward translation procedure. To estimate the reliability, measurements of internal consistency and repeatability were applied. The validity of the Danish version was evaluated by examining the associations between the CSES-DK score and socio-demographic variables (age, gender, education, disease severity and self-rated health). Factor analysis was conducted to compare the internal structure of the Danish version and the American source version. The study included 151 patients with COPD, recruited from three outpatient clinics. Estimates of reliability were in accordance with the original version of CSES (Cronbach's ? = 0.97, test-retest r = 0.82, p < 0.001). Significant correlations were obtained between the CSES-DK total score and vocational training and education (r = 0.27, p = 0.001), disease severity (r = -0.27, p = 0.001) and self-rated health (r = -0.41, p < 0.001), indicating construct validity. Five factors were extracted from both versions of CSES. However, in the CSES-DK, only one factor concerns emotions, whereas two factors describing emotions were obtained for the original scale. Furthermore, important discrepancies exist with respect to the direction of the scoring of CSES. In some studies, a high score indicates high self-efficacy, whereas it indicates low self-efficacy in other studies, which complicates the comparison of studies. The Danish version of CSES showed acceptable measurements of reliability and validity. Potential limitations of the scale were identified, and discrepancies exist between the factor structure of the original and Danish version. Consequently, more studies of the factor structure should be conducted on both the original CSES and the translated versions of the instrument. PMID:22272564

  4. A Self-Efficacy Scale for Clinical Nurse Leaders: Results of a Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Gilmartin, Mattia J; Nokes, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Introduced in 2003, the Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) role is the first new nursing role introduced in more than 30 years. The hallmark of CNL practice is the management of client-centered care and clinical excellence at the point of care. As part of multifaceted efforts to implement the CNL role, understanding how an individual's self-efficacy with the identified role competencies changes over time has important implications for individuals, educational programs preparing CNLs, and health care organizations employing CNLs. In this study, preliminary psychometric analyses assessing the construct validity, reliability, and discriminant validity for a new state-specific scale (CNL Self-Efficacy Scale) that assesses nurses' perceptions of their ability to function effectively as a CNL are reported. Because self-confidence is a key predictor of successful role transition, job satisfaction, and job performance, measuring individuals' self-confidence with the core competencies associated with the CNL role over time will be important to gain the full benefit of this innovative, unit-based advanced generalist role. PMID:26259337

  5. Evaluation of the Validity of the Condom Use Self-Efficacy Scale (CUSES) in Young Men Using Two Behavioral Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Andrew D.; Carey, Michael P.; Fuqua, R. Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of behavioral skills remains critical to the evaluation of HIV prevention interventions; however, investigators often rely upon participant reports of self-efficacy to estimate such skills. We evaluated the relationship between self-efficacy beliefs for condom use and behavioral performance. Forty-three men completed the Condom Use Self-Efficacy Scale (CUSES) and participated in two behavioral assessments. Regression analyses indicated that the CUSES subscales relevant to negotiation of condom use did not account for a significant amount of variability in interpersonal skills; similarly, the CUSES subscale relevant to technical condom use skill did not account for variability in the condom application scores. We caution investigators against the assumption that higher self-efficacy reflects behavioral competence for HIV-risk reduction. PMID:9269889

  6. Evaluation of the validity of the condom use self-efficacy scale (CUSES) in young men using two behavioral simulations.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, A D; Carey, M P; Fuqua, R W

    1997-03-01

    Assessment of behavioral skills remains critical to the evaluation of HIV prevention interventions; however, investigators often rely upon participant reports of self-efficacy to estimate such skills. We evaluated the relationship between self-efficacy beliefs for condom use and behavioral performance. Forty-three men completed the Condom Use Self-Efficacy Scale (CUSES) and participated in 2 behavioral assessments. Regression analyses indicated that the CUSES subscales relevant to negotiation of condom use did not account for a significant amount of variability in interpersonal skills; similarly, the CUSES subscale relevant to technical condom use skill did not account for variability in the condom application scores. We caution investigators against the assumption that higher self-efficacy reflects behavioral competence for HIV-risk reduction. PMID:9269889

  7. Efficacy of petal fall and shuck split fungicides for control of scab on peach in middle Georgia, 2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungicides were evaluated for control of scab in a mid-ripening experimental peach block (‘Flameprince’) located at the USDA-ARS Fruit and Tree Nut Research Laboratory (Byron, GA). Chemical formulations were applied at each application date: 3 Apr (petal fall to 1% shuck split), 10 Apr (shuck split ...

  8. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Teacher Efficacy Scale for Prospective Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denzine, Gypsy M.; Cooney, John B.; McKenzie, Rita

    2005-01-01

    Background: Research on teacher self-efficacy has revealed substantive problems concerning the validity of instruments used to measure teacher self-efficacy beliefs. Although claims about the influence of teachers' self-efficacy beliefs on student achievement, success with curriculum innovation, and so on, may be true statements, one cannot make…

  9. A Validation and Reliability Study of the Physical Activity and Healthy Food Efficacy Scale for Children (PAHFE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Christina M.; De Ayala, R. J.; Lebow, Ryan; Hayden, Emily

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain validity evidence for the Physical Activity and Healthy Food Efficacy Scale for Children (PAHFE). Construct validity evidence identifies four subscales: Goal-Setting for Physical Activity, Goal-Setting for Healthy Food Choices, Decision-Making for Physical Activity, and Decision-Making for Healthy Food…

  10. An Examination of the Structure of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale (Short Form) among Italian High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presti, Alessandro Lo; Pace, Francesco; Mondo, Marina; Nota, Laura; Casarubia, Provvidenza; Ferrari, Lea; Betz, Nancy E.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the factor structure of Career Decision Self-Efficacy scale-short form in a sample of Italian high school adolescents. confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to test the degree to which a one-factor structure and a five-factor structure provided the best fit. In view of available research the five-factor structure…

  11. Combined Use of Self-Efficacy Scale for Oral Health Behaviour and Oral Health Questionnaire: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soutome, Sakiko; Kajiwara, Kazumi; Oho, Takahiko

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether the combined use of a task-specific self-efficacy scale for oral health behaviour (SEOH) and an oral health questionnaire (OHQ) would be useful for evaluating subjects' behaviours and cognitions. Design: Questionnaires. Methods: One hundred and eighty-five students completed the SEOH and OHQ. The 30-item OHQ uses a…

  12. Elementary Student Self Efficacy Scale Development and Validation Focused on Student Learning, Peer Relations, and Resisting Drug Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fertman, Carl I.; Primack, Brian A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of a child self efficacy scale for learning, peer interactions, and resisting pressure to use drugs, to use in an elementary school drug prevention education program based on social cognitive theory. A diverse cohort of 392 4th and 5th grade students completed the 20-item…

  13. The Dimensionality of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form among Chinese Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Leili; Ye, Shengquan; Watkins, David

    2012-01-01

    The factorial structure of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (CDSES-SF) was examined in a sample of 796 Chinese graduate students recruited from five universities in Beijing. A single-factor model is recommended on the basis of two of this study's findings. First, confirmatory factor analyses revealed that the parsimonious…

  14. Testing for the Structure of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form among Chinese College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, Nan Zhang

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the factor structure of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (CDSES-SF) among Chinese college students. Two samples of college students from China were used. The original 25-item CDSES-SF was not supported by the data derived from a sample of 256 Chinese college students (Sample 1). However, a modified 13-item,…

  15. A Psychometric Evaluation of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form among French University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudron, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the reliability and the factor structure of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (CDSES-SF) among French university students. Based on a sample of 650 respondents, the alpha coefficients indicated high reliability for total scores but not for the subscale scores with values of 0.70 and…

  16. A Psychometric Evaluation of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form in Chinese High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, Nan Zhang

    2006-01-01

    This study explores the reliability and validity of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (CDSES-SF) in Chinese high school students. One hundred and eighty-three high school students from a city in northeastern China participated in the study. The results indicate that scores on the CDSES-SF are reliable (internal consistency…

  17. A Confirmatory Test of the Factor Structure of the Short Form of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Matthew J.; Roy, Kerrin Sendrowitz; Brown, Steven D.; Thomas, James; McDaniel, Cyndi

    2009-01-01

    The present study tested a number of theoretically and empirically derived measurement models of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (CDSES-SF) using confirmatory factor analysis. Betz's five-factor model of the CDSES-SF, along with a number of alternative models, demonstrated adequate model fit in two independent samples. Based on…

  18. Effects of a multifactorial fall prevention program on balance, gait, and fear of falling in post-stroke inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Younuk; Lee, Kyeongbong; Shin, Seonhae; Lee, Wanhee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of a multifactorial fall prevention program on balance, gait, and fear of falling in stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-five stroke patients were divided randomly into multifactorial fall prevention program group (n=15) and control treadmill group (n=10). [Methods] All interventions were applied for 30?min, five times per week, for five weeks. The fall prevention program included interventions based on the “Step Up to Stop Falls” initiative and educational interventions based on the Department of Health guidelines. For those in the treadmill group, the speed was increased gradually. The Korean falls efficacy scale and Korean activities-specific balance confidence scale were used to assess fear of falling. To assess balance and walking ability, the Korean performance-oriented mobility assessment scale and the 10-m and 6-minute walk tests were used. [Results] The fall prevention program interventions were found to be very effective at improving gait, balance, and fear of falling compared with the treadmill intervention and therefore seem appropriate for stroke patients. [Conclusion] A multifactorial fall prevention program is effective at improving balance, gait ability, and fear of falling. It is a more specific and broad intervention for reducing falls among inpatients in facilities and hospitals. PMID:26180337

  19. The Smoking Outcome Expectation Scale and Anti-Smoking Self-Efficacy Scale for Early Adolescents: Instrument Development and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chen-Ju; Yeh, Ming-Chen; Tang, Fu-In; Yu, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Smoking-related outcome expectation and self-efficacy have been found to be associated with adolescent smoking initiation. There is, however, a lack of appropriate instruments to investigate early adolescents' smoking outcome expectations and antismoking self-efficacy. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate the Smoking Outcome…

  20. Large-Scale Prediction of Beneficial Drug Combinations Using Drug Efficacy and Target Profiles.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Hiroaki; Sawada, Ryusuke; Mizutani, Sayaka; Kotera, Masaaki; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro

    2015-12-28

    The identification of beneficial drug combinations is a challenging issue in pharmaceutical and clinical research toward combinatorial drug therapy. In the present study, we developed a novel computational method for large-scale prediction of beneficial drug combinations using drug efficacy and target profiles. We designed an informative descriptor for each drug-drug pair based on multiple drug profiles representing drug-targeted proteins and Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System codes. Then, we constructed a predictive model by learning a sparsity-induced classifier based on known drug combinations from the Orange Book and KEGG DRUG databases. Our results show that the proposed method outperforms the previous methods in terms of the accuracy of high-confidence predictions, and the extracted features are biologically meaningful. Finally, we performed a comprehensive prediction of novel drug combinations for 2,639 approved drugs, which predicted 142,988 new potentially beneficial drug-drug pairs. We showed several examples of successfully predicted drug combinations for a variety of diseases. PMID:26624799

  1. From Efficacy Research to Large-Scale Impact on Undernutrition: The Role of Organizational Cultures12

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, David; Pelto, Gretel

    2013-01-01

    Undernutrition in low-income countries is receiving unprecedented attention at global and national levels due to the convergence of many forces, including strong evidence concerning its magnitude, consequences, and potential solutions and effective advocacy by many organizations. The translation of this attention into large-scale reductions in undernutrition at the country level requires the alignment and support of many organizations in the development and implementation of a coherent policy agenda for nutrition, including the strengthening of operational and strategic capacities and a supportive research agenda. However, many countries experience difficulties achieving such alignment. This article uses the concept of organizational culture to better understand some of the reasons for these difficulties. This concept is applied to the constellation of organizations that make up the “National Nutrition Network” in a given country and some of the individual organizations within that network, including academic institutions that conduct research on undernutrition. We illustrate this concept through a case study involving a middle-income country. We conclude that efforts to align organizations in support of coherent nutrition agendas should do the following: 1) make intentional and sustained efforts to foster common understanding, shared learning, and socialization of new members and other elements of a shared culture among partners; 2) seek a way to frame problems and solutions in a fashion that enables individual organizations to secure some of their particular interests by joining the effort; and 3) not only advocate on the importance of nutrition but also insist that high-level officials hold organizations accountable for aligning in support of common-interest solutions (through some elements of a common culture) that can be effective and appropriate in the national context. We further conclude that a culture change is needed within academic departments if the discipline of nutrition is to play a central role in translating the findings from efficacy trials into large-scale reductions in undernutrition. PMID:24228200

  2. A Scale to Measure Pharmacy Students’ Self-Efficacy in Performing Medication Therapy Management Services

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Jaela R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether a college of pharmacy curriculum creates a sense of self-efficacy among students with respect to providing medication therapy management (MTM) services. Methods. An electronic survey instrument was sent to all pharmacy students to elicit information on their perceived confidence in providing MTM services, and the results were reviewed. Results. Of the 1,160 students targeted, 464 (40%) completed the survey instrument. Responses indicated that overall self-efficacy increased with each successive year of the curriculum that students completed. Fourth-year students completing an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) in medication therapy management (MTM) had significantly higher self-efficacy than did other fourth-year students, whose self-efficacy was similar to that of third-year students. Conclusion. In this study population, students’ self-efficacy increased with each successive year in pharmacy school, with those who completed an APPE in MTM exhibiting the highest level of self-efficacy. These students may be more likely to pursue MTM opportunities in future careers. PMID:24249853

  3. Factors Underlying the Collective Teacher Efficacy Scale and Their Mediating Role in the Effect of Socioeconomic Status on Academic Achievement at the School Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoach, D. Betsy; Colbert, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    The authors examine the psychometric properties of the Collective Teacher Efficacy Scale (CTES), an instrument designed to measure collective teacher efficacy. Specifically, a multilevel confirmatory factor analysis is used to determine the factor structure of the CTES, comparing one- and two-factor models. The mediating role of the CTES factors…

  4. Large-scale spatial variability of riverbed temperature gradients in Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning areas

    SciTech Connect

    Hanrahan, Timothy P.

    2007-02-01

    In the Snake River basin of the Pacific northwestern United States, hydroelectric dam operations are often based on the predicted emergence timing of salmon fry from the riverbed. The spatial variability and complexity of surface water and riverbed temperature gradients results in emergence timing predictions that are likely to have large errors. The objectives of this study were to quantify the thermal heterogeneity between the river and riverbed in fall Chinook salmon spawning areas and to determine the effects of thermal heterogeneity on fall Chinook salmon emergence timing. This study quantified river and riverbed temperatures at 15 fall Chinook salmon spawning sites distributed in two reaches throughout 160 km of the Snake River in Hells Canyon, Idaho, USA, during three different water years. Temperatures were measured during the fall Chinook salmon incubation period with self-contained data loggers placed in the river and at three different depths below the riverbed surface. At all sites temperature increased with depth into the riverbed, including significant differences (p<0.05) in mean water temperature of up to 3.8°C between the river and the riverbed among all the sites. During each of the three water years studied, river and riverbed temperatures varied significantly among all the study sites, among the study sites within each reach, and between sites located in the two reaches. Considerable variability in riverbed temperatures among the sites resulted in fall Chinook salmon emergence timing estimates that varied by as much as 55 days, depending on the source of temperature data used for the estimate. Monitoring of riverbed temperature gradients at a range of spatial scales throughout the Snake River would provide better information for managing hydroelectric dam operations, and would aid in the design and interpretation of future empirical research into the ecological significance of physical riverine processes.

  5. Efficacy of curcumin as an adjunct to scaling and root planning in chronic periodontitis patients: A clinical and microbiological study

    PubMed Central

    Nagasri, M.; Madhulatha, M.; Musalaiah, S. V. V. S.; Kumar, P. Aravind; Krishna, C. H. Murali; Kumar, P. Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Curcumin is a naturally occurring anti-inflammatory agent with various biologic and medicinal properties. Its therapeutic applications have been studied in a variety of conditions, but only few studies have evaluated the efficacy of curcumin as local drug delivery agent and in the treatment of periodontitis. The present study was to evaluate the efficacy of the adjunctive use of curcumin with scaling/root planing as compared with scaling/root planing alone in the treatment of the chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with two sites in the contralateral quadrants having probing pocket depths (PPDs) of ?5 mm were selected. Full mouth scaling and root planing (SRP) was performed followed by application of curcumin gel on a single side. Assessment of plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), PPD, and clinical attachment levels (CALs) were done at baseline and at 4th week. Microbiologic assessment with polymerase chain reaction was done for Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tanerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola by collection of plaque samples. Results: The results revealed that there was a reduction in PI, GI, probing depth, CAL, and microbiologic parameters in test sites following SRP and curcumin gel application, when compared with SRP alone in control group. Conclusion: The local application of curcumin in conjunction with scaling and root planing have showed improvement in periodontal parameters and has a beneficial effect in patients with chronic periodontitis. PMID:26538916

  6. Thompson: Fruits and Vegetables (FV) Norms Self-efficacy School Lunch Scales

    Cancer.gov

    FV Norms-self-efficacy – school lunch 1. My friends eat a serving of fruit at school lunch when I am with them. ?Never ?Sometimes ?Often ?Always 1. My friends eat a serving of cooked vegetables at school lunch when I am with them. ?Never

  7. Evaluating treatment efficacy in commercial food facilities: Insights gained from small-scale simulated warehouse experiments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although critical to a successful IPM program, it is challenging to evaluate treatment efficacy in commercial food facilities because of the inability to obtain absolute estimates of insect population levels. These populations are spatial fragmented and occupy cryptic habitats such as equipment, pa...

  8. Evaluating Treatment Efficacy in Commercial Food Facilities: Insights Gained from Small-Scale Simulated Warehouse Experiments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although critical to a successful IPM program, it is challenging to evaluate treatment efficacy in commercial food facilities because of the inability to obtain absolute estimates of insect population levels. These populations are spatially fragmented and occupy cryptic habitats, such as equipment,...

  9. The Norwegian version of the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease self-efficacy scale (CSES): a validation and reliability study.

    PubMed

    Bentsen, Signe Berit; Rokne, Berit; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Henriksen, Anne Hildur; Wahl, Astrid Klopstad

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, internal consistency and face and construct validity of the Norwegian version of the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES). The CSES was translated into Norwegian according to standard procedures for forward and backward translation, and administered to 100 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (51% men, mean age 66.1 years, range 42-82) prior to their participation in an outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation programme. The CSES-N (translated version) consists of 34 items comprising five subscales describing negative affect, intense emotional arousal, physical exertion, weather/environment and behavioural risk factors. Each scale ranges from 1 to 5, with higher scores indicating better self-efficacy. For validation purposes, we measured lung function (FEV(1) , FEV(1) % predicted) and exercise capacity (ISWT), and administered the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). A pilot study confirmed that the CSES-N was clear, understandable and easy to self-administer. Cronbach's alpha was 0.98 for the total score (0.80-0.96 for subscales). Results showed small to medium negative correlations between all CSES-N scales and anxiety, depression (HADS), physical activity, psychosocial impact of disease and total health status (SGRQ) (-0.20 to -0.49). Small or negligible negative correlations between different CSES-N scales and respiratory symptoms (SGRQ) (-0.03 to -0.23) were found. Any correlations among exercise capacity, lung function and different socio-demographic variables (age, gender and education) and CSES-N were also small or negligible (0.00 to 0.23). This study shows acceptable feasibility, internal consistency and face and construct validity for the CSES-N in a sample of Norwegian COPD patients. PMID:20534027

  10. Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale: Validation of the Italian Version and Correlation With Breast-feeding at 3 Months.

    PubMed

    Petrozzi, Angela; Gagliardi, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Psychological factors can influence breast-feeding. We translated into Italian and validated the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale Short Form (BSES-SF) and investigated its predictive ability and its relation with postpartum depression symptoms.BSES-SF and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) were administered 2 to 3 days after delivery to 122 mothers. Breast-feeding was assessed at 3 months.The BSES-SF displayed good validity (receiver operating characteristic area?=?0.69) for predicting full breast-feeding at 3 months. In multivariate analysis, the probability of full breast-feeding increased 2.4% for 1-point increase of BSES-SF. The BSES-SF and EPDS scores were inversely correlated. BSES-SF is a useful tool to identify the risk of early breast-feeding attrition. PMID:26192699

  11. Racer efficacy study, Fall 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed control is a serious concern for commercial vegetable producers because of the limited number of herbicides available for this group of minor crops and the potential for crop injury. Organic producers of vegetables have an even bigger challenge since their weed control tools are limited to cul...

  12. Racer efficacy study, Fall 2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research in 2007 demonstrated the effectiveness of Racer (ammonium nonanoate) for burn-down control of several weed species. Racer has been labeled by EPA in the past year for burn-down weed control in food crops and is close to receiving approval for use by organic producers. The objective of thi...

  13. Adaptation and Psychometric Properties of the Self-Efficacy/Social Support for Activity for Persons with Intellectual Disability Scale (SE/SS-AID) in a Spanish Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio Ignacio; Paz-Lourido, Berta; Lee, Miyoung; Peterson-Besse, Jana J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In this study we aimed to develop a Spanish version of the Self-Efficacy/Social Support Scales for Activity for persons with Intellectual Disability (SE/SS-AID). Method: A cross-sectional study was carried out in a sample of 117 individuals with intellectual disability (ID). The SE/SS-AID scales were translated into Spanish and their…

  14. The relationship between specific cognitive domains, fear of falling, and falls in people with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kalron, Alon

    2014-01-01

    The primary aim was to examine the relationship between seven definite aspects of cognition measured by a computerized cognitive testing tool on the history falls in people with mild to moderate MS (PwMS). Secondary aims focused on whether cognition performance is correlated to fear of falling, walking velocity, and a patient-rated measure of walking ability. One hundred and one PwMS were included in the study analysis. Fifty-two had a history of at least one fall during the past year. Outcome measures included a computerized cognitive test battery designed to evaluate multiple cognitive domains, gait speed, and self-reported questionnaires; 12-item MS walking scale (MSWS-12); and Falls Efficacy Scale International. Significant differences between fallers and nonfallers were exhibited in attention and verbal function, scoring 7.5% (P = 0.013) and 6.2% (P = 0.05), respectively, below the parallel scores of the nonfallers. Attention was the only cognitive component significantly correlated with the MSWS-12 self-reported questionnaire. Fear of falling was significantly correlated with 6 (out of 7) definite cognitive variables. The present findings support the concept that when evaluating and attempting to reduce fall risk, emphasis should be placed not only on traditional fall risk factors like muscle strength and motor function, but also on cognitive function. PMID:25165694

  15. Correlation Between Pain, Fear of Falling and Disability in Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Bharat Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Objective To ascertain if there is a correlation between low back pain (LBP), fear of falling, and disability so that the patients with LBP are aware of the fact that other problems may occur with LBP. Hence, steps can be taken for decreasing the fear of falling and disability in order to improve the condition of patients. Methods A sample size of 100 patients with low back pain, with a range of ages from 40 to 73 years, participated in the study. The Falls Efficacy Scale was used to assess the fear of falling and the Oswestry Disability Index was used to assess the disability and pain in LBP individuals. Results The Pearson correlation analysis signifies the relationship between pain, fear of falling, and disability in LBP. Conclusion First, LBP increases the fear of falling. Second, LBP can result in a person becoming disabled. Third, the fear of falling and disability are correlated with each other. PMID:26605180

  16. Pilot-scale evaluation of UV reactors' efficacy against in vitro infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts.

    PubMed

    Entrala, Emilio; Garin, Yves J F; Meneceur, Pascale; Hayat, Maud; Scherpereel, Guillaume; Savin, Cyril; Féliers, Cédric; Derouin, Francis

    2007-12-01

    An experimental protocol was developed to assess the efficacy of two UV reactors (medium-pressure UVaster), and a low-pressure reactor) on the infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts under conditions mimicking small- or medium-size water distribution units. The protocol included purification of large amounts of viable oocysts from experimentally infected calf feces, pilot spiking, sample concentration and purification after UV radiation, oocyst quantification and in vitro evaluation of oocyst infectivity on HCT-8 cells. Water samples were collected at intervals upstream and downstream from the UV reactor after spiking. Oocysts were concentrated by centrifugation, purified by immunomagnetic capture and quantified using laser-scanning cytometry. An enhanced in vitro infectivity test on HCT-8 cells was developed, where oocysts were pretreated in order to obtain maximized in vitro infectivity, and infectious foci were enumerated after immunofluorescence staining after 3 days of culture. This method was superior to viability measured by excystation for assessing oocyst infectivity. The infectivity rate of untreated oocysts ranged between 9% and 30% in replicate experiments. The method allowed us to determine inactivation rates >4.92 (log) with UVaster and >4.82 with the LP reactor after exposition of oocysts to an effective dose of 400 J m(-2) at flow rates of 15 and 42 m(3) h(-1), respectively. PMID:17941833

  17. Validity and Reliability Study of the Self-Efficacy Scale in Rendering Piano Education to Children of 6-12 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekinci, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to develop a valid and reliable scale that can be used in measuring self-efficacy of candidate music teachers in rendering piano education to children of 6-12 years. To this end, a pool of 51 items was created by using the literature, and taking the opinions of piano professors and piano instructors working with…

  18. Using the Mouse Grimace Scale to Reevaluate the Efficacy of Postoperative Analgesics in Laboratory Mice

    PubMed Central

    Matsumiya, Lynn C; Sorge, Robert E; Sotocinal, Susana G; Tabaka, John M; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S; Zaloum, Austin; King, Oliver D; Mogil, Jeffrey S

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative pain management in animals is complicated greatly by the inability to recognize pain. As a result, the choice of analgesics and their doses has been based on extrapolation from greatly differing pain models or the use of measures with unclear relevance to pain. We recently developed the Mouse Grimace Scale (MGS), a facial-expression–based pain coding system adapted directly from scales used in nonverbal human populations. The MGS has shown to be a reliable, highly accurate measure of spontaneous pain of moderate duration, and therefore is particularly useful in the quantification of postoperative pain. In the present study, we quantified the relative intensity and duration of postoperative pain after a sham ventral ovariectomy (laparotomy) in outbred mice. In addition, we compiled dose–response data for 4 commonly used analgesics: buprenorphine, carprofen, ketoprofen, and acetaminophen. We found that postoperative pain in mice, as defined by facial grimacing, lasts for 36 to 48 h, and appears to show relative exacerbation during the early dark (active) photophase. We find that buprenorphine was highly effective in inhibiting postoperative pain-induced facial grimacing in mice at doses equal to or lower than current recommendations, that carprofen and ketoprofen are effective only at doses markedly higher than those currently recommended, and that acetaminophen was ineffective at any dose used. We suggest the revision of practices for postoperative pain management in mice in light of these findings. PMID:22330867

  19. A Pilot Study of an Intervention Designed to Promote Walking, Balance, and Self-Efficacy in Older Adults with Fear of Falling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dattilo, John; Martire, Lynn; Gottschall, Jinger; Weybright, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to provide interventions that are of interest to older adults who are not inclined to participate in conventional exercise programs and that can improve balance and fear of falling. One purpose of this pilot study was to assess feasibility and acceptability of an eight-week (3x/wk, 90-minute sessions) multifaceted, small group,…

  20. Pilot Scale Production of Highly Efficacious and Stable Enterovirus 71 Vaccine Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cheng-Peng; Guo, Meng-Shin; Hsieh, Shih-Yang; Yang, Wen-Hsueh; Chao, Hsin-Ju; Wu, Chien-Long; Huang, Ju-Lan; Lee, Min-Shi; Hu, Alan Yung-Chi; Lin, Sue-Chen; Huang, Yu-Yun; Hu, Mei-Hua; Chow, Yen-Hung; Chiang, Jen-Ron; Chang, Jui-Yuan; Chong, Pele

    2012-01-01

    Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71) has caused several epidemics of hand, foot and mouth diseases (HFMD) in Asia and now is being recognized as an important neurotropic virus. Effective medications and prophylactic vaccine against EV71 infection are urgently needed. Based on the success of inactivated poliovirus vaccine, a prototype chemically inactivated EV71 vaccine candidate has been developed and currently in human phase 1 clinical trial. Principal Finding In this report, we present the development of a serum-free cell-based EV71 vaccine. The optimization at each step of the manufacturing process was investigated, characterized and quantified. In the up-stream process development, different commercially available cell culture media either containing serum or serum-free was screened for cell growth and virus yield using the roller-bottle technology. VP-SFM serum-free medium was selected based on the Vero cell growth profile and EV71 virus production. After the up-stream processes (virus harvest, diafiltration and concentration), a combination of gel-filtration liquid chromatography and/or sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation down-stream purification processes were investigated at a pilot scale of 40 liters each. Although the combination of chromatography and sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation produced extremely pure EV71 infectious virus particles, the overall yield of vaccine was 7–10% as determined by a VP2-based quantitative ELISA. Using chromatography as the downstream purification, the virus yield was 30–43%. To retain the integrity of virus neutralization epitopes and the stability of the vaccine product, the best virus inactivation was found to be 0.025% formalin-treatment at 37°C for 3 to 6 days. Furthermore, the formalin-inactivated virion vaccine candidate was found to be stable for >18 months at 4°C and a microgram of viral proteins formulated with alum adjuvant could induce strong virus-neutralizing antibody responses in mice, rats, rabbits, and non-human primates. Conclusion These results provide valuable information supporting the current cell-based serum-free EV71 vaccine candidate going into human Phase I clinical trials. PMID:22529942

  1. Methylphenidate Efficacy: Immediate versus Extended Release at Short Term in Mexican Children with ADHD Assessed by Conners Scale and EEG

    PubMed Central

    Alatorre-Miguel, Efren; Zambrano-Sánchez, Elizabeth; Reyes-Legorreta, Celia

    2015-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affects 5-6% of school aged children worldwide. Pharmacological therapy is considered the first-line treatment and methylphenidate (MPH) is considered the first-choice medication. There are two formulations: immediate release (IR) MPH and long-acting (or extended release) formulation (MPH-ER). In this work, we measure the efficacy of treatment for both presentations in one month with Conners' scales and electroencephalography (EEG). Results. for IR group, in parents and teachers Conners test, all items showed significant differences, towards improvement, except for teachers in perfectionism and emotional instability. For ER group in parent's Conners test, the items in which there were no significant differences are psychosomatic and emotional instability. For teachers, there were no significant differences in: hyperactivity and perfectionism. Comparing the Conners questionnaires (parents versus teachers) we find significant differences before and after treatment in hyperactivity, perfectionism, psychosomatics, DSM-IV hyperactive-impulsive, and DSM-IV total. In the EEG the Wilcoxon test showed a significant difference (P < 0.0001). As we can see, both presentations are suitable for managing the ADHD and have the same effect on the symptomatology and in the EEG. PMID:25838946

  2. The Predictive Validity of the Return-to-Work Self-Efficacy Scale for Return-to-Work Outcomes in Claimants with Musculoskeletal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Sandra; Amick, Benjamin C; Lee, Hyunmi; Franche, Renée-Louise; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah

    2015-12-01

    Purpose To examine the predictive validity of the Return-to-Work Self-Efficacy (RTWSE) Scale in terms of the scale's baseline absolute values and of changes in self-efficacy scores, with the outcome of return-to-work (RTW) status in a sample of injured workers with upper extremity and back musculoskeletal disorders. Methods RTWSE was measured with a 10-item scale assessing Overall RTWSE and three self-efficacy subdomains: (1) ability to cope with pain, (2) ability to obtain help from supervisor and (3) ability to obtain help from co-workers. Outcome measures included RTW status (yes/no) measured at 6- and 12-month follow-up. RTWSE improvement was defined as an increase in self-efficacy scores between baseline and 6-month follow-up time points. Logistic regression analyses were performed with RTW status as the dependent variable and adjusted for age, gender, educational level, personal income, pain site, pain severity, functional status, and depressive symptoms, and for baseline RTWSE scores in the improvement score analyses. Results A total of 632 claimants completed the baseline telephone interview 1 month post-injury; 446 subjects completed the 6-month interview (71 %) and 383 subjects completed the 12-month interview (61 %). The baseline Pain RTWSE scores were found to be useful to predict RTW status 6 months post-injury, with a trend for baseline Overall RTWSE. Improvements over time in Overall RTWSE and in Co-worker RTWSE were found to be useful to predict 12-month RTW status, with trends for improvements in Supervisor RTWSE and Pain RTWSE. Conclusion The study found evidence supporting the predictive validity of the RTWSE scale within 12 months after injury. The RTWSE scale may be a potentially valuable scale in research and in managing work disabled claimants with musculoskeletal disorders. PMID:25990375

  3. The Relationship Between Balance Measured With a Modified Bathroom Scale and Falls and Disability in Older Adults: A 6-Month Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background There are indications that older adults who suffer from poor balance have an increased risk for adverse health outcomes, such as falls and disability. Monitoring the development of balance over time enables early detection of balance decline, which can identify older adults who could benefit from interventions aimed at prevention of these adverse outcomes. An innovative and easy-to-use device that can be used by older adults for home-based monitoring of balance is a modified bathroom scale. Objective The objective of this paper is to study the relationship between balance scores obtained with a modified bathroom scale and falls and disability in a sample of older adults. Methods For this 6-month follow-up study, participants were recruited via physiotherapists working in a nursing home, geriatricians, exercise classes, and at an event about health for older adults. Inclusion criteria were being aged 65 years or older, being able to stand on a bathroom scale independently, and able to provide informed consent. A total of 41 nursing home patients and 139 community-dwelling older adults stepped onto the modified bathroom scale three consecutive times at baseline to measure their balance. Their mean balance scores on a scale from 0 to 16 were calculated—higher scores indicated better balance. Questionnaires were used to study falls and disability at baseline and after 6 months of follow-up. The cross-sectional relationship between balance and falls and disability at baseline was studied using t tests and Spearman rank correlations. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to study the relationship between balance measured at baseline and falls and disability development after 6 months of follow-up. Results A total of 128 participants with complete datasets—25.8% (33/128) male—and a mean age of 75.33 years (SD 6.26) were included in the analyses of this study. Balance scores of participants who reported at baseline that they had fallen at least once in the past 6 months were lower compared to nonfallers—8.9 and 11.2, respectively (P<.001). The correlation between mean balance score and disability sum-score at baseline was -.51 (P<.001). No significant associations were found between balance at baseline and falls after 6 months of follow-up. Baseline balance scores were significantly associated with the development of disability after 6 months of follow-up in the univariate analysis—odds ratio (OR) 0.86 (95% CI 0.76-0.98)—but not in the multivariate analysis when correcting for age, gender, baseline disability, and falls at follow-up—OR 0.94 (95% CI 0.79-1.11). Conclusions There is a cross-sectional relationship between balance measured by a modified bathroom scale and falls and disability in older adults. Despite this cross-sectional relationship, longitudinal data showed that balance scores have no predictive value for falls and might only have limited predictive value for disability development after 6 months of follow-up. PMID:26018423

  4. The Efficacy of Paroxetine and Placebo in Treating Anxiety and Depression: A Meta-Analysis of Change on the Hamilton Rating Scales

    PubMed Central

    Sugarman, Michael A.; Loree, Amy M.; Baltes, Boris B.; Grekin, Emily R.; Kirsch, Irving

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous meta-analyses of published and unpublished trials indicate that antidepressants provide modest benefits compared to placebo in the treatment of depression; some have argued that these benefits are not clinically significant. However, these meta-analyses were based only on trials submitted for the initial FDA approval of the medication and were limited to those aimed at treating depression. Here, for the first time, we assess the efficacy of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) in the treatment of both anxiety and depression, using a complete data set of all published and unpublished trials sponsored by the manufacturer. Methods and Findings GlaxoSmithKline has been required to post the results for all sponsored clinical trials online, providing an opportunity to assess the efficacy of an SSRI (paroxetine) with a complete data set of all trials conducted. We examined the data from all placebo-controlled, double-blind trials of paroxetine that included change scores on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HRSA) and/or the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD). For the treatment of anxiety (k?=?12), the efficacy difference between paroxetine and placebo was modest (d?=?0.27), and independent of baseline severity of anxiety. Overall change in placebo-treated individuals replicated 79% of the magnitude of paroxetine response. Efficacy was superior for the treatment of panic disorder (d?=?0.36) than for generalized anxiety disorder (d?=?0.20). Published trials showed significantly larger drug-placebo differences than unpublished trials (d’s?=?0.32 and 0.17, respectively). In depression trials (k?=?27), the benefit of paroxetine over placebo was consistent with previous meta-analyses of antidepressant efficacy (d?=?0.32). Conclusions The available empirical evidence indicates that paroxetine provides only a modest advantage over placebo in treatment of anxiety and depression. Treatment implications are discussed. PMID:25162656

  5. Preventing Falls

    MedlinePLUS

    ... there are simple ways you can prevent most falls. Stay physically active. Regular exercise makes you stronger. ... that may result from falling. Here are some fall prevention tips from Go4Life : l Have your eyes ...

  6. Novaluron as an ovicide for bollworm on cotton: Deposition and efficacy of field-scale aerial applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novaluron, Diamond 0.83 EC, was evaluated for deposition on cotton and ovicidal efficacy against bollworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), because of the need to use insecticides with modes of action different than synthetic pyrethroids. Novaluron at the lowest label recommended rate was aerially-applied...

  7. The REFORM study protocol: a cohort randomised controlled trial of a multifaceted podiatry intervention for the prevention of falls in older people

    PubMed Central

    Cockayne, Sarah; Adamson, Joy; Corbacho Martin, Belen; Fairhurst, Caroline; Hewitt, Catherine; Hicks, Kate; Hull, Robin; Keenan, Anne Maree; Lamb, Sarah E; Loughrey, Lorraine; McIntosh, Caroline; Menz, Hylton B; Redmond, Anthony C; Rodgers, Sara; Vernon, Wesley; Watson, Judith; Torgerson, David

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Falls and fall-related injuries are a serious cause of morbidity and cost to society. Foot problems and inappropriate footwear may increase the risk of falls; therefore podiatric interventions may play a role in reducing falls. Two Cochrane systematic reviews identified only one study of a podiatry intervention aimed to reduce falls, which was undertaken in Australia. The REFORM trial aims to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a multifaceted podiatry intervention in reducing falls in people aged 65?years and over in a UK and Irish setting. Methods and analysis This multicentre, cohort randomised controlled trial will recruit 2600 participants from routine podiatry clinics in the UK and Ireland to the REFORM cohort. In order to detect a 10% point reduction in falls from 50% to 40%, with 80% power 890 participants will be randomised to receive routine podiatry care and a falls prevention leaflet or routine podiatry care, a falls prevention leaflet and a multifaceted podiatry intervention. The primary outcome is rate of falls (falls/person/time) over 12?months assessed by patient self-report falls diary. Secondary self-report outcome measures include: the proportion of single and multiple fallers and time to first fall over a 12-month period; Short Falls Efficacy Scale—International; fear of falling in the past 4?weeks; Frenchay Activities Index; fracture rate; Geriatric Depression Scale; EuroQoL-five dimensional scale 3-L; health service utilisation at 6 and 12?months. A qualitative study will examine the acceptability of the package of care to participants and podiatrists. Ethics and dissemination The trial has received a favourable opinion from the East of England—Cambridge East Research Ethics Committee and Galway Research Ethics Committee. The trial results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and at conference presentations. Trial registration number Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN68240461assigned 01/07/2011. PMID:25518875

  8. Reducing Sun Exposure for Prevention of Skin Cancers: Factorial Invariance and Reliability of the Self-Efficacy Scale for Sun Protection

    PubMed Central

    Babbin, Steven F.; Yin, Hui-Qing; Rossi, Joseph S.; Redding, Colleen A.; Paiva, Andrea L.; Velicer, Wayne F.

    2015-01-01

    The Self-Efficacy Scale for Sun Protection consists of two correlated factors with three items each for Sunscreen Use and Avoidance. This study evaluated two crucial psychometric assumptions, factorial invariance and scale reliability, with a sample of adults (N = 1356) participating in a computer-tailored, population-based intervention study. A measure has factorial invariance when the model is the same across subgroups. Three levels of invariance were tested, from least to most restrictive: (1) Configural Invariance (nonzero factor loadings unconstrained); (2) Pattern Identity Invariance (equal factor loadings); and (3) Strong Factorial Invariance (equal factor loadings and measurement errors). Strong Factorial Invariance was a good fit for the model across seven grouping variables: age, education, ethnicity, gender, race, skin tone, and Stage of Change for Sun Protection. Internal consistency coefficient Alpha and factor rho scale reliability, respectively, were .84 and .86 for Sunscreen Use, .68 and .70 for Avoidance, and .78 and .78 for the global (total) scale. The psychometric evidence demonstrates strong empirical support that the scale is consistent, has internal validity, and can be used to assess population-based adult samples. PMID:26457203

  9. Preventing Falls

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of falling. Exercises that improve balance, such as tai chi, are helpful. Your local health or senior center ... to prevent falls. Do balance exercises, such as tai chi. These types of exercises can lower the chances ...

  10. Efficacy of Guanfacine Extended Release Assessed During the Morning, Afternoon, and Evening Using a Modified Conners' Parent Rating Scale–Revised: Short Form

    PubMed Central

    Rugino, Thomas; Dammerman, Ryan; Lyne, Andrew; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of once-daily guanfacine extended release (GXR) monotherapy administered either in the morning or evening, using a modified Conners' Parent Rating Scale–Revised: Short Form (CPRS–R:S) assessed three times/day in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods: This multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled study randomized children 6–12 years of age with ADHD into three groups: GXR a.m. (GXR in the morning and placebo in the evening), GXR p.m. (placebo in the morning and GXR in the evening), or twice-daily placebo. The CPRS–R:S, administered in the morning, afternoon, and evening prior to each study visit, was a secondary measure of efficacy. Results: A total of 333 subjects were included in the analysis population (GXR a.m., n=107; GXR p.m., n=114; placebo, n=112). At visit 10, last observation carried forward (LOCF), subjects receiving GXR demonstrated significantly greater improvement from baseline in the daily mean CPRS–R:S total score, as well as in each of the morning, afternoon, and evening CPRS–R:S assessments, compared with placebo, regardless of the time of GXR administration (p<0.001 vs. placebo for GXR a.m. and GXR p.m.). In addition, subjects receiving GXR showed significantly greater improvements from baseline in each subscale score (oppositional, cognitive problems/inattention, hyperactivity, and ADHD index) compared with those receiving placebo, regardless of time of administration (p<0.003 vs. placebo across all subscales for GXR a.m. and GXR p.m.). Conclusions: These results provide further support for the demonstrated efficacy of once-daily GXR in reducing ADHD symptoms, and demonstrate that response is consistent throughout the day regardless of the time of administration, with improvement seen in ratings of oppositional as well as of ADHD symptoms. PMID:25286026

  11. [The biological effects of a nuclear explosion. Introduction of a new system on a colorimetric scale (black, grey, red, orange, yellow and white zone) to estimate the effects of fall-out on civilian populations].

    PubMed

    Nacci, G

    2002-08-01

    Following September 11 the eventuality of terrorist attacks using bags containing nuclear devices is considered possible in western cities like New York, London, Paris, Rome, Berlin, Moscow etc. However, with a modern Civil Defence programme the effects of a catastrophe of this nature can be partially limited, at least as far as Fall-out is concerned. The present paper explains the medical reasons for building anti-fall-out shelters for the larger part of western populations: from the USA to Russia. The paper also sets out a new method for classifying levels of radioactive Fall-out based on a scale of colours (black, grey, red, orange, yellow and white) whatever kind of radioactivity is involved (total gamma levels, Cesium 137 levels, Strontium 90 levels). The arrival times for fall-out in each area of the scale are fixed, whatever the energy of the explosion and the speed of the wind might be. The radioactive decay in each area of the scale, from the time of arrival of the fall-out is described with precision. Also described are the acute radiation syndrome, tumours, miscarriages and genetic diseases. A nomogram is attached for civil defence purposes showing the leeward extension of these areas, easily measurable in just a few minutes, if four parameters are known: ground zero (locality) of the explosion, the energy of the explosion, the direction of the wind and the speed of the wind. PMID:12207196

  12. The Internet Self-Perception Scale: Measuring Elementary Students' Levels of Self-Efficacy regarding Internet Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinson, Janice; DiStefano, Christine; Daniel, Cathy

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated fourth grade students' perceptions of abilities to use the Internet. The 31-item research instrument measuring Internet Self-Perceptions was adapted for use from the Reader Self-Perception Scale (RSPS) developed by Henk and Melnick (1995). The RSPS survey was based upon Bandura's (1977, 1986, 1995) research in the areas of…

  13. Racer efficacy study - Bixby, Fall 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed competition is a primary concern for conventional and organic vegetable producers. Racer (ammonium nonanoate) is labeled for non-food use and efforts are currently underway to label it as a bio-herbicide for organically grown food crops. The objective of this study was to investigate differen...

  14. Rapid large- and site scale RPAS mission planning for remote sensing of rock falls and landslides in alpine areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräupl, Thomas; Pschernig, Elias; Rokitansky, Carl-Herbert; Oleire-Oltmanns, Sebastian; Zobl, Fritz

    2014-05-01

    Since landslides and rock falls are complex phenomena involving a multitude of factors, current and historic surface data play besides geologic conditions and others an important role in analyzing hazard situation and efficient site-specific remediation actions. Especially in displacement acceleration phases which are frequently linked to bad weather conditions, data acquisition remains difficult. Therefore RPAS with their small ground sampling distance and correspondingly high resolution open up possibilities for surveying ground situations not only for visual inspection but also for geodetic data acquisition. Both, visual and geodetic data provide valuable information for geologists and related decision makers. Slides or rock falls in alpine areas pose special challenges due to mostly acute and unforeseen displacements on the one hand and geographic conditions of narrow valleys along with steep slopes on the other hand. Rapid RPAS mission planning and mission adaption for individual requirements according to different project stages (initial investigation, repeat measurements, identification of hazard zones for urgent remediation actions, etc.) is therefore of particular importance. Here we present a computer-simulation supported approach to RPAS mission planning taking the identified thematic and remote sensing targets, the relevant terrain and obstacle databases, legal restrictions, aircraft performance, sensor characteristics, and communication ranges into account in order to produce a safe and mission-optimized flight route. For the RPAS mission planning, we combine and adapt tools developed at University of Salzburg, namely a flight track generator taking into account a 3D-model of the earth surface with both, focus on large area coverage (e.g. Austria) and the highest available resolution (e.g. sub-meter for specific areas), available obstacle data bases for the mission area (e.g. cable car lines, power lines, buildings, slope stabilization constructions, etc.) and ad-hoc or predefined target lists. Whereas large area data with moderate resolution allows rapid and remote mission planning, high resolution data avoids flights into terrain even in steep and tricky slopes. We utilize a fast-time air traffic simulation to verify that the generated mission plan satisfies the mission requirements through the prediction and near-realtime 3D visualization of the flight path as well as survey camera views. If required for the mission, the survey camera view can be supported by augmented reality features (showing up-to-date or historic or thematic analysis data relevant to the mission). The accurate mission planning and generation of a detailed flight track supports also systematic repetitions of the RPAS survey flight for situation awareness or research purposes. During the execution of the mission the simulated flight track provides a nominal-actual comparison guiding the operation that can be rapidly changed using the same tools with predictable results during the mission. We present the developed rapid mission planning approach on the basis of selected examples in the Austrian Alps.

  15. Full-Scale Direct Numerical Simulation of Two- and Three-Dimensional Instabilities and Rivulet Formulation in Heated Falling Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamoorthy, S.; Ramaswamy, B.; Joo, S. W.

    1995-01-01

    A thin film draining on an inclined plate has been studied numerically using finite element method. Three-dimensional governing equations of continuity, momentum and energy with a moving boundary are integrated in an arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian frame of reference. Kinematic equation is solved to precisely update interface location. Rivulet formation based on instability mechanism has been simulated using full-scale computation. Comparisons with long-wave theory are made to validate the numerical scheme. Detailed analysis of two- and three-dimensional nonlinear wave formation and spontaneous rupture forming rivulets under the influence of combined thermocapillary and surface-wave instabilities is performed.

  16. Inactivated Enterovirus 71 Vaccine Produced by 200-L Scale Serum-Free Microcarrier Bioreactor System Provides Cross-Protective Efficacy in Human SCARB2 Transgenic Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chia-Ying; Lin, Yi-Wen; Kuo, Chia-Ho; Liu, Wan-Hsin; Tai, Hsiu-Fen; Pan, Chien-Hung; Chen, Yung-Tsung; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; Chan, Chi-Hsien; Chang, Ching-Chuan; Liu, Chung-Cheng; Chow, Yen-Hung; Chen, Juine-Ruey

    2015-01-01

    Epidemics and outbreaks caused by infections of several subgenotypes of EV71 and other serotypes of coxsackie A viruses have raised serious public health concerns in the Asia-Pacific region. These concerns highlight the urgent need to develop a scalable manufacturing platform for producing an effective and sufficient quantity of vaccines against deadly enteroviruses. In this report, we present a platform for the large-scale production of a vaccine based on the inactivated EV71(E59-B4) virus. The viruses were produced in Vero cells in a 200 L bioreactor with serum-free medium, and the viral titer reached 107 TCID50/mL 10 days after infection when using an MOI of 10?4. The EV71 virus particles were harvested and purified by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Fractions containing viral particles were pooled based on ELISA and SDS-PAGE. TEM was used to characterize the morphologies of the viral particles. To evaluate the cross-protective efficacy of the EV71 vaccine, the pooled antigens were combined with squalene-based adjuvant (AddaVAX) or aluminum phosphate (AlPO4) and tested in human SCARB2 transgenic (Tg) mice. The Tg mice immunized with either the AddaVAX- or AlPO4-adjuvanted EV71 vaccine were fully protected from challenges by the subgenotype C2 and C4 viruses, and surviving animals did not show any degree of neurological paralysis symptoms or muscle damage. Vaccine treatments significantly reduced virus antigen presented in the central nervous system of Tg mice and alleviated the virus-associated inflammatory response. These results strongly suggest that this preparation results in an efficacious vaccine and that the microcarrier/bioreactor platform offers a superior alternative to the previously described roller-bottle system. PMID:26287531

  17. Psychometric Properties of the Diabetes Management Self-Efficacy Scale in Korean Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shortridge-Baggett, Lillie M.; Han, Seung Jin; Moon, Seung Hei

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The aims of this study were to perform a cultural translation of the DMSES and evaluate the psychometric properties of the translated scale in a Korean population with type 2 diabetics. Methods. This study was conducted in patients with diabetes recruited from university hospitals. The first stage of this study involved translating the DMSES into Korean using a forward- and backward-translation technique. The content validity was assessed by an expert group. In the second stage, the psychometric properties of the Korean version of the DMSES (K-DMSES) were evaluated. Results. The content validity of the K-DMSES was satisfactory. Sixteen-items clustered into four-subscales were extracted by exploratory factor analysis, and supported by confirmatory factor analysis. The construct validity of the K-DMSES with the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities scale was satisfactory (r = 0.50, P<0.001). The Cronbach's alpha and intraclass correlation coefficient were 0.92 and 0.85 (P<0.001; 95% CI = 0.75–0.91), respectively, which indicate excellent internal consistency reliability and test-retest reliability. Conclusions. The K-DMSES is a brief instrument that has demonstrated good psychometric properties. It is therefore feasible to use in practice, and is ready for use in clinical research involving Korean patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26089892

  18. The Effectiveness of a Participatory Program on Fall Prevention in Oncology Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Li-Chi; Ma, Wei-Fen; Li, Tsai-Chung; Liang, Yia-Wun; Tsai, Li-Yun; Chang, Fy-Uan

    2015-01-01

    Falls are known to be one of the most common in patient adverse events. A high incidence of falls was reported on patients with cancer. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a participatory program on patient's knowledge and self-efficacy of fall prevention and fall incidence in an oncology ward. In this quasi-experimental study,…

  19. Preventing falls

    MedlinePLUS

    Gillespie LD, Robertson MC, Gillespie WJ, Lamb SE, Gates S, Cumming RG, Rowe BH. Interventions for preventing falls in older people living in the community. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2009, Issue ...

  20. Bridalveil Fall

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this image, Bridalveil Fall can be seen from Tunnel View in Yosemite National Park. The waterfall is 617 ft (188 m) in height and is one of the most well-known of Yosemite National Park's waterfalls....

  1. Influences on modern multifactorial falls prevention interventions and fear of falling in non-frail older adults: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Svantesson, Ulla; Babagbemi, Buki; Foster, Lakicia; Alricsson, Marie

    2014-10-01

    This review explores underlying features that may influence fear of falling and the effectiveness of multifactorial falls prevention programs in community dwelling non-frail adults aged 65 and older. It also examines the interrelationship between fear of falling and multifactorial falls prevention interventions. A literature search of medical databases was conducted to identify articles that address the fear of falling and multifactorial programs as either a primary or secondary component of their findings. Multifactorial interventions were assessed in terms of their program content, design, demographics, implementation techniques, and cost-effectiveness. Falls are a common, but preventable, cause of morbidity and injury in older adults 65 and over. In addition to physiological variables, fear of falling and self-efficacy are psychosocial factors that impact the incidence of falls in this population. Addressing fear of falling in addition to physiological parameters may influence the success of multifactorial falls prevention programs for adults 65 and over. PMID:25110534

  2. Influences on Modern Multifactorial Falls Prevention Interventions and Fear of Falling in Non-Frail Older Adults: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Svantesson, Ulla; Babagbemi, Buki; Foster, Lakicia; Alricsson, Marie

    2014-01-01

    This review explores underlying features that may influence fear of falling and the effectiveness of multifactorial falls prevention programs in community dwelling non-frail adults aged 65 and older. It also examines the interrelationship between fear of falling and multifactorial falls prevention interventions. A literature search of medical databases was conducted to identify articles that address the fear of falling and multifactorial programs as either a primary or secondary component of their findings. Multifactorial interventions were assessed in terms of their program content, design, demographics, implementation techniques, and cost-effectiveness. Falls are a common, but preventable, cause of morbidity and injury in older adults 65 and over. In addition to physiological variables, fear of falling and self-efficacy are psychosocial factors that impact the incidence of falls in this population. Addressing fear of falling in addition to physiological parameters may influence the success of multifactorial falls prevention programs for adults 65 and over. PMID:25110534

  3. Determining a Cut-Off Point for Scores of the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale–Short Form: Secondary Data Analysis of an Intervention Study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nanishi, Keiko; Green, Joseph; Taguri, Masataka; Jimba, Masamine

    2015-01-01

    Background Breastfeeding self-efficacy can be measured with the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (BSES-SF). Mothers with low BSES-SF scores stop exclusive breastfeeding prematurely, but specific interventions can prevent that undesirable outcome. Because those interventions can be expensive, often one must decide which mothers will receive them. For that purpose, a cut-off BSES-SF score would be useful, but none is available. Therefore, we aimed to assess the overall accuracy of BSES-SF scores as predictors of not practicing post-discharge exclusive breastfeeding, and to choose an appropriate cut-off score for making that prediction. Methods This is a secondary data analysis of an intervention study. Data from 378 women in two non-Baby-Friendly Hospitals were analyzed. Participants were women in their third trimester who were 16 years of age or older, were able to read and write Japanese, were expected to have a singleton birth, and had completed the BSES-SF before discharge. BSES-SF scores were measured before discharge. Breastfeeding status was assessed 4 weeks and 12 weeks postpartum. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves were used to assess the predictive ability of the BSES-SF and to inform the choice of a cut-off point. Results For both of the ROC curves (4 and 12 weeks postpartum) the area under the curve was 0.74. To obtain a high sensitivity, a cut-off score of 50 was chosen. With that cut-off score the sensitivity was 79% and the specificity was 52% 4 weeks postpartum, and they were 77% and 52%, respectively, 12 weeks postpartum. Conclusion In conclusion, the BSES-SF has moderate overall accuracy to distinguish women who will not practice exclusive breastfeeding after discharge from those who will. At non-Baby-Friendly hospitals in Japan, interventions to support exclusive breastfeeding might be considered for new mothers who have BSES-SF scores that are less than or equal to 50. PMID:26107382

  4. Report 2013 Fall Enrollment

    E-print Network

    VandeVord, Pamela

    Report 2013 Fall Enrollment Office of Budget, Planning and Analysis #12;Page 2 Fall Enrollment............................................5 Total Fall Enrollment/College.........................................................6 Enrollment by Race

  5. FALL ENROLLMENT REPORT 2011

    E-print Network

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    FALL ENROLLMENT REPORT 2011 Office of Budget, Planning and Analysis #12;Page 2 Fall Enrollment ............................................5 Total Fall Enrollment/College .........................................................6 Enrollment by Race

  6. Zero-Inflated Poisson Modeling of Fall Risk Factors in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Jung, Dukyoo; Kang, Younhee; Kim, Mi Young; Ma, Rye-Won; Bhandari, Pratibha

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for falls among community-dwelling older adults. The study used a cross-sectional descriptive design. Self-report questionnaires were used to collect data from 658 community-dwelling older adults and were analyzed using logistic and zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) regression. Perceived health status was a significant factor in the count model, and fall efficacy emerged as a significant predictor in the logistic models. The findings suggest that fall efficacy is important for predicting not only faller and nonfaller status but also fall counts in older adults who may or may not have experienced a previous fall. The fall predictors identified in this study-perceived health status and fall efficacy-indicate the need for fall-prevention programs tailored to address both the physical and psychological issues unique to older adults. PMID:25315901

  7. Efficacy of commercial produce sanitizers against nontoxigenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 during processing of iceberg lettuce in a pilot-scale leafy green processing line.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Gordon R; Buchholz, Annemarie L; Ryser, Elliot T

    2013-11-01

    Chemical sanitizers are routinely used during commercial flume washing of fresh-cut leafy greens to minimize cross-contamination from the water. This study assessed the efficacy of five commercial sanitizer treatments against Escherichia coli O157:H7 on iceberg lettuce, in wash water, and on equipment during simulated commercial production in a pilot-scale processing line. Iceberg lettuce (5.4 kg) was inoculated to contain 10(6) CFU/g of a four-strain cocktail of nontoxigenic, green fluorescent protein-labeled, ampicillin-resistant E. coli O157:H7 and processed after 1 h of draining at ~22 °C. Lettuce was shredded using a commercial slicer, step-conveyed to a flume tank, washed for 90 s using six different treatments (water alone, 50 ppm of peroxyacetic acid, 50 ppm of mixed peracid, or 50 ppm of available chlorine either alone or acidified to pH 6.5 with citric acid [CA] or T-128), and then dried using a shaker table and centrifugal dryer. Various product (25-g) and water (50-ml) samples collected during processing along with equipment surface samples (100 cm(2)) from the flume tank, shaker table, and centrifugal dryer were homogenized in neutralizing buffer and plated on tryptic soy agar. During and after iceberg lettuce processing, none of the sanitizers were significantly more effective (P ? 0.05) than water alone at reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations on lettuce, with reductions ranging from 0.75 to 1.4 log CFU/g. Regardless of the sanitizer treatment used, the centrifugal dryer surfaces yielded E. coli O157:H7 populations of 3.49 to 4.98 log CFU/100 cm(2). Chlorine, chlorine plus CA, and chlorine plus T-128 were generally more effective (P ? 0.05) than the other treatments, with reductions of 3.79, 5.47, and 5.37 log CFU/ml after 90 s of processing, respectively. This indicates that chlorine-based sanitizers will likely prevent wash water containing low organic loads from becoming a vehicle for cross-contamination. PMID:24215685

  8. Efficacy of radioiodine urinalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Broga, D.W.; Berk, H.W.; Sharpe, A.R. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    Little exists in the literature to support the efficacy of urinalysis for demonstrating thyroid uptake of radioiodine. A review was made of a variety of kinetic models. Computer analysis and graphics were used to assess the variables in the two models chosen for this study. The applicability of each model was tested by using data obtained from a group of euthyroid subjects. The results indicate that using an integral urine-sampling method and a three-component model yields minimum detectable thyroid uptakes which fall well below required reporting limits. Furthermore, the results show that integral urine samples obtained in the first few hours post exposure may be used to predict major thyroid uptakes in time for effective thyroid blocking.

  9. Preservice Agricultural Education Teachers' Sense of Teaching Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stripling, Christopher; Ricketts, John C.; Roberts, T. Grady; Harlin, Julie F.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a longitudinal examination of the teaching self-efficacy of preservice agricultural education teachers. Data were collected for two years at The University of Georgia and Texas A&M University during the Fall 2004 and Spring 2005 and the Fall 2005 and Spring 2006 semesters (N = 102). Data were collected at…

  10. Examining Dimensions of Self-Efficacy for Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruning, Roger; Dempsey, Michael; Kauffman, Douglas F.; McKim, Courtney; Zumbrunn, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    A multifactor perspective on writing self-efficacy was examined in 2 studies. Three factors were proposed--self-efficacy for writing ideation, writing conventions, and writing self-regulation--and a scale constructed to reflect these factors. In Study 1, middle school students (N = 697) completed the Self-Efficacy for Writing Scale (SEWS), along…

  11. Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge Self-Efficacy Scale (TPACK-SeS) for Pre-Service Science Teachers: Construction, Validation, and Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilici, Sedef Canbazoglu; Yamak, Havva; Kavak, Nusret; Guzey, S. Selcen

    2013-01-01

    Problem Statement: Based on developments in the 21st century technology has become a large part of the classroom experience. Teachers need to have an understanding of how technology can be coordinated with pedagogy and content knowledge in order to integrate technology effectively into classroom instruction. Self-efficacy beliefs toward technology…

  12. Differential diagnosis between 'unexplained' fall and syncopal fall: a difficult or impossible task.

    PubMed

    Alboni, Paolo; Coppola, Paola; Stucci, Nicola; Tsakiridu, Vassiliki

    2015-02-01

    Falls may be accidental (because of slipping, tripping or environmental hazards) or 'unexplained', when there is no apparent cause. Syncope is a transient loss of consciousness (LOC) and, if it occurs when the person is in the upright position, may lead to a fall. The differential diagnosis between 'unexplained' fall and syncopal fall can be difficult, if not impossible, because many patients have retrograde amnesia after syncope, that is they do not remember their prodromal symptoms. Based on the results of many randomized studies, the international guidelines on falls suggest multifactorial assessment and multifactorial treatment. Unfortunately, however, the vast majority of studies have been carried out on a mixed population of patients who have suffered accidental and 'unexplained' falls. As 'unexplained' falls account for a minority of cases, we really do not know the efficacy of multifactorial treatment in patients with this type of fall. Very recent data seem to prove that many older patients with 'unexplained' falls are actually affected by reflex syncope with retrograde amnesia, as they experience LOC during tilt testing or carotid sinus massage. Although these data make an important contribution to our knowledge of the mechanism of 'unexplained' falls, the therapeutic problems remain largely unsolved. PMID:24838038

  13. [Efficacy studies].

    PubMed

    Pedro-Botet, Juan; Flores-Le Roux, Juana A

    2014-07-01

    Pravafenix(®) is a fixed-dose combination of 40mg of pravastatin and 160 mg of fenofibrate. The rationale behind the use of Pravafenix(®) is based on the increased residual cardiovascular risk observed in high risk patients with hypertriglyceridemia and/or low HDL cholesterol levels despite treatment with statins in monotherapy. In this article, we review the available evidence on the clinical efficacy of Pravafenix(®), which shows complementary benefits in the overall lipid profile of high risk patients with mixed dyslipidemia not controlled with 40-mg pravastatin or 20-mg simvastatin. PMID:25043542

  14. Perceptions of Barriers to Employment, Coping Efficacy, and Career Search Efficacy in People with Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbiere, Marc; Mercier, Celine; Lesage, Alain

    2004-01-01

    The Barriers to Employment and Coping Efficacy Scale (BECES) and the Career Search Efficacy Scale (CSES) were designed to assist people in their work integration process. The BECES was specifically developed for people with mental illness. Although the CSES was not specifically designed for people with mental illness, its items appear relevant for…

  15. Preventing Falls and Related Fractures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Basics Falls and Fractures Preventing Falls and Related Fractures Publication available in: PDF (79 KB) Related Resources Falls and Fractures Caídas y fracturas (Falls and Fractures) Osteoporosis and ...

  16. Prevalence and cost of imaging in inpatient falls: the rising cost of falling

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Jessica; Alturkistani, Tahani; Kumar, Neal; Kanuri, Arjun; Salem, Deeb N; Munn, Samson; Blazey-Martin, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Objective To quantify the type, prevalence, and cost of imaging following inpatient falls, identify factors associated with post-fall imaging, and determine correlates of positive versus negative imaging. Design Single-center retrospective cohort study of inpatient falls. Data were collected from the hospital’s adverse event reporting system, DrQuality. Age, sex, date, time, and location of fall, clinical service, Morse Fall Scale/fall protocol, admitting diagnosis, and fall-related imaging studies were reviewed. Cost included professional and facilities fees for each study. Setting Four hundred and fifteen bed urban academic hospital over 3 years (2008–2010). Patients All adult inpatient falls during the study period were included. Falls experienced by patients aged <18 years, outpatient and emergency patients, visitors to the hospital, and staff were excluded. Measurements and main results Five hundred and thirty inpatient falls occurred during the study period, average patient age 60.7 years (range 20–98). More than half of falls were men (55%) and patients considered at risk of falls (56%). Falls were evenly distributed across morning (33%), evening (34%), and night (33%) shifts. Of 530 falls, 178 (34%) patients were imaged with 262 studies. Twenty percent of patients imaged had at least one positive imaging study attributed to the fall and 82% of studies were negative. Total cost of imaging was $160,897, 63% ($100,700) from head computed tomography (CT). Conclusion Inpatient falls affect patients of both sexes, all ages, occur at any time of day and lead to expensive imaging, mainly from head CTs. Further study should be targeted toward clarifying the indications for head CT after inpatient falls and validating risk models for positive and negative imaging, in order to decrease unnecessary imaging and thereby limit unnecessary cost and radiation exposure. PMID:26082653

  17. History of falls, gait, balance, and fall risks in older cancer survivors living in the community

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Min H; Shilling, Tracy; Miller, Kara A; Smith, Kristin; LaVictoire, Kayle

    2015-01-01

    Older cancer survivors may be predisposed to falls because cancer-related sequelae affect virtually all body systems. The use of a history of falls, gait speed, and balance tests to assess fall risks remains to be investigated in this population. This study examined the relationship of previous falls, gait, and balance with falls in community-dwelling older cancer survivors. At the baseline, demographics, health information, and the history of falls in the past year were obtained through interviewing. Participants performed tests including gait speed, Balance Evaluation Systems Test, and short-version of Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale. Falls were tracked by mailing of monthly reports for 6 months. A “faller” was a person with ?1 fall during follow-up. Univariate analyses, including independent sample t-tests and Fisher’s exact tests, compared baseline demographics, gait speed, and balance between fallers and non-fallers. For univariate analyses, Bonferroni correction was applied for multiple comparisons. Baseline variables with P<0.15 were included in a forward logistic regression model to identify factors predictive of falls with age as covariate. Sensitivity and specificity of each predictor of falls in the model were calculated. Significance level for the regression analysis was P<0.05. During follow-up, 59% of participants had one or more falls. Baseline demographics, health information, history of falls, gaits speed, and balance tests did not differ significantly between fallers and non-fallers. Forward logistic regression revealed that a history of falls was a significant predictor of falls in the final model (odds ratio =6.81; 95% confidence interval =1.594–29.074) (P<0.05). Sensitivity and specificity for correctly identifying a faller using the positive history of falls were 74% and 69%, respectively. Current findings suggested that for community-dwelling older cancer survivors with mixed diagnoses, asking about the history of falls may help detect individuals at risk of falling. PMID:26425079

  18. Falls exercise interventions and reduced falls rate: always in the patient's interest?

    PubMed

    Laybourne, A H; Biggs, S; Martin, F C

    2008-01-01

    Falls are a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in older adults. Physical, psychological and social consequences include injury, fall-related fear and loss of self-efficacy. In turn, these may result in decreased physical activity, reduced functional capacity, and increased risk of institutionalisation. Falls prevention exercise programmes (FPEP) are now widespread within the National Health Service, often part of multifactorial interventions, and are designed to minimise impairments that impact physical function, such as strength and balance. Assessment of the clinical efficacy of FPEPs has therefore focused on the measurement of physical function and rate of falls. Whilst important, this approach may be too narrow to capture the highly variable and multidimensional responses that individuals make to a fall and to a FPEP. We argue that the current focus may miss a paradoxical lack of or even deleterious impact on quality of life, despite a reduction in physical performance-related falls risk. We draw upon the Selective Optimisation and Compensation (SOC) model, developed by Paul and Margret Baltes, to explore how this paradox may be a result of the coping strategies adopted by individuals in response to a fall. PMID:18194966

  19. Falls and Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... rises with age. Click for more information Falls Lead to Fractures, Trauma Each year, more than 1. ... and injury deaths. Fractures caused by falls can lead to hospital stays and disability. Most often, fall- ...

  20. Falls in Nursing Homes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for health care providers. Learn More Falls in Nursing Homes Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... 5 Why do falls occur more often in nursing homes? Falling can be a sign of other ...

  1. trig.ms CarlLee Fall1997 This is a Maple worksheet to plot the trigonometric functions. Note: scaling=constrained causes the same scale to be used on

    E-print Network

    Lee, Carl

    trig.ms CarlLee Fall1997 This is a Maple worksheet to plot the trigonometric functions. Note the plot to be restricted to the given ranges of x and y. I do this to avoid plotting problems to recognize discontinuities in the function and plot accordingly, not trying to connect the disconnected

  2. Measuring Teacher Efficacy to Implement Inclusive Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Umesh; Loreman, Tim; Forlin, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an instrument to measure perceived teacher efficacy to teach in inclusive classrooms. An 18-item scale was developed on a sample of 607 pre-service teachers selected from four countries (Canada, Australia, Hong Kong and India). Factor analysis of responses from the sample revealed three factors: efficacy in…

  3. Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2009-01-01

    The common approach to scaling, according to Christopher Dede, a professor of learning technologies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, is to jump in and say, "Let's go out and find more money, recruit more participants, hire more people. Let's just keep doing the same thing, bigger and bigger." That, he observes, "tends to fail, and fail…

  4. FALL WINTER SPRING FALL WINTER SPRING FALL WINTER SPRING SUMMER FALL WINTER SPRING SUMMER FALL WINTER SPRING LIN CALC DIF

    E-print Network

    Bertini, Robert L.

    FALL WINTER SPRING FALL WINTER SPRING FALL WINTER SPRING SUMMER FALL WINTER SPRING SUMMER FALL WINTER SPRING LIN CALC DIF I II ALG IV EQ I MTH MTH MTH MTH MTH 251 252 261 254 256 CHEM CHEM PH PH PH CH

  5. FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 CORE W Flowchart Catalog: 2008-2010 updated Mar. 2009 CHBE Lab 1 à CHBE 442 or CHBE 461 CHBE 226 3 cr Note: A dual

  6. Functional capacity and fear of falling in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Niederer, Daniel; Schmidt, Katharina; Vogt, Lutz; Egen, Janis; Klingler, Julia; Hübscher, Markus; Thiel, Christian; Bernhörster, Marcus; Banzer, Winfried

    2014-03-01

    Cancer patients, particularly during chemotherapy, often encounter functional status limitations. This study examines fear of falling, balance, gait and lower limb strength in cancer patients during ongoing or recently completed (?12 months) chemotherapeutic treatment in comparison to age-matched and senior controls (?65 years). Data were obtained from 69 subjects; 21 cancer patients (51±7 years) with histological confirmed diagnosis and two control groups (2×n=24): one age-matched (53±7 years) and one senior group (70±3 years). Fear of falling (FoF) was evaluated using the Falls Efficacy Scale-International Version. Motor function measurement included postural sway (centre of pressure) in upright stance with eyes covered, gait speed (comfortable fluid walking) and maximum voluntary isometric quadriceps strength (MIVF). One-way ANOVA followed by corrected post hoc paired-sample t-test revealed inferior values in cancer patients than in age-matched healthy regarding all parameters. Gait speed and MIVF of cancer patients were higher than in the senior control group (p<.05), whereas their FoF and postural sway were comparable (p>.05). Physical performance parameters of cancer patients were found to be lower in comparison to healthy age-matched subjects. Cancer patients show physical impairments which may limit independence and may increase fall risk. The present findings call for routine screening of physical function in cancer patients, and further stress the relevance of exercise interventions during and after chemotherapy. PMID:24360638

  7. A seasonal-scale climatological analysis correlating spring tornadic activity with antecedent fall-winter drought in the southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Marshall; Niyogi, Dev; Mote, Thomas L.

    2009-04-01

    Using rain gauge and satellite-based rainfall climatologies and the NOAA Storm Prediction Center tornado database (1952-2007), this study found a statistically significant tendency for fall-winter drought conditions to be correlated with below-normal tornado days the following spring in north Georgia (i.e. 93% of the years) and other regions of the Southeast. Non-drought years had nearly twice as many tornado days in the study area as drought years and were also five to six times more likely to have multiple tornado days. Individual tornadic events are largely a function of the convective-mesoscale thermodynamic and dynamic environments, thus the study does not attempt to overstate predictability. Yet, the results may provide seasonal guidance in an analogous manner to the well known Sahelian rainfall and Cape Verde hurricane activity relationships.

  8. Fall Enrollment Report. 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes and analyzes fall enrollment in Iowa's community colleges. Each year, Iowa's 15 community colleges submit data on enrollment on the 10th business day of the fall semester. Some highlights from this report include: (1) Fall 2014 enrollment was 93,772 students--a decline of 0.49 percent from last fall; (2) Enrollment continues…

  9. Lower Yosemite Falls

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this image, Lower Yosemite Falls may be seen. Lower Yosemite Falls is the lowest of the three sectiosn of Yosemite Falls. It is about 320 ft (98 m) high. Yosemite Falls is one of the most famous waterfalls within Yosemite National Park....

  10. Upper Yosemite Falls

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this image, Upper Yosemite Falls may be seen from the Yosemite Falls Trail. Upper Yosemite Falls has a total plunge of 1,430 ft (440 m). Yosemite Falls is one of the most famous waterfalls within Yosemite National Park....

  11. Upper Yosemite Falls

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this image, Upper Yosemite Falls may be seen. Upper Yosemite Falls is the highest of the three sectiosn of Yosemite Falls. It is about 1,430 ft (440 m) high. Yosemite Falls is one of the most famous waterfalls within Yosemite National Park....

  12. Upper Yosemite Falls Detail

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this image, a detailed view Upper Yosemite Falls may be seen from the Yosemite Falls Trail. Upper Yosemite Falls has a total plunge of 1,430 ft (440 m). Yosemite Falls is one of the most famous waterfalls within Yosemite National Park....

  13. Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  14. Scales

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2010-01-08

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain ? a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  15. Spring 2012 Fall 2012 Spring 2013 Fall 2013 Spring 2014 Fall 2014 Spring 2015 Fall 2015 Spring 2016 Fall 2016 College of Applied Sciences

    E-print Network

    Su, Xiao

    Spring 2012 Fall 2012 Spring 2013 Fall 2013 Spring 2014 Fall 2014 Spring 2015 Fall 2015 Spring 2016 242 SCWK 242 SCWK 242 SCWK 242 SCWK 242 College of Business Spring 2012 Fall 2012 Spring 2013 Fall 2013 Spring 2014 Fall 2014 Spring 2015 Fall 2015 Spring 2016 Fall 2016 Accountancy BUS 220J BUS 220J

  16. A Shifting Paradigm: Preservice Teachers' Multicultural Attitudes and Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadelson, Louis S.; Boham, Mikaela D.; Conlon-Khan, Lori; Fuentealba, Molly J.; Hall, Cynthia J.; Hoetker, Gregory A.; Hooley, Diana S.; Jang, Bong Seok; Luckey, Kristina L.; Moneymaker, Kelley J.; Shapiro, Matthew A.; Zenkert, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Effective teaching in multicultural settings requires the awareness and ability to adapt to diverse needs and viewpoints. Teachers' multicultural efficacy may be gained from coursework or interactions within diverse communities. In this study the authors determined preservice teachers' multicultural efficacy using the Multicultural Efficacy Scale

  17. Dimensions of Teacher Self-Efficacy and Relations with Strain Factors, Perceived Collective Teacher Efficacy, and Teacher Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaalvik, Einar M.; Skaalvik, Sidsel

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the authors developed and factor analyzed the Norwegian Teacher Self-Efficacy Scale. They also examined relations among teacher self-efficacy, perceived collective teacher efficacy, external control (teachers' general beliefs about limitations to what can be achieved through education), strain factors, and teacher burnout.…

  18. Writing Essays: Does Self-Efficacy Matter? The Relationship between Self-Efficacy in Reading and in Writing and Undergraduate Students' Performance in Essay Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prat-Sala, Merce; Redford, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Self-efficacy beliefs have been identified as associated with students' academic performance. The present research assessed the relationship between two new self-efficacy scales (self-efficacy in reading [SER] and self-efficacy in writing [SEW]) and students' writing performance on a piece of assessed written coursework. Using data from first and…

  19. Generalized Self-Efficacy, Holland Theme Self-Efficacy, and Academic Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindley, Lori D.; Borgen, Fred H.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of Self-Efficacy Scale, Skills Confidence Inventory; ACT Assessment, and grade point average (GPA) results for 189 women and 91 men revealed strong relationships between generalized self-efficacy and confidence in Investigative and Enterprising occupations for both and Conventional occupations for men. ACT scores were related to…

  20. The relationship between fear of falling to spatiotemporal gait parameters measured by an instrumented treadmill in people with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kalron, Alon; Achiron, Anat

    2014-02-01

    People with multiple sclerosis (MS) identify mobility limitations as one of the greatest challenges of this disease. Continued loss of mobility and falls are among their greatest concerns for the future. Our objective was to determine if fear of falling is associated with spatial and temporal gait parameters in persons with MS, when measured by an instrumented treadmill. This observational case control study was performed at the MS Center, Center of Advanced Technologies in Rehabilitation, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel. Sixty-eight relapsing-remitting patients diagnosed with MS, 38 women, aged 40.9 (S.D. = 11.9), participated in this investigation. Twenty-five healthy subjects, 14 women, aged 39.5 (S.D. = 9.4) served as controls gait controls. Gait spatiotemporal parameters were obtained using the Zebris FDM-T Treadmill (Zebris(®) Medical GmbH, Germany). The Falls Efficacy Scale International was used to assess the level of concern relating to falls. Forty-one people with MS were classified as highly fearful of falling. Twenty-seven patients were slightly concerned. Highly fearful of falling patients walked slower had a shorter step length, a wider base of support and prolonged double support phase compared to slightly concerned patients. Fearful patients also demonstrated elevated variability of the center of pressure (CoP) trajectory compared to slightly concerned MS patients. Fear of falling and spatiotemporal gait alterations in people with MS are linked. Additionally, variability of the CoP during walking appears to be connected with the level of concern. PMID:24200869

  1. The interplay between gait, falls and cognition: can cognitive therapy reduce fall risk?

    PubMed Central

    Segev-Jacubovski, Orit; Herman, Talia; Yogev-Seligmann, Galit; Mirelman, Anat; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we briefly summarize the incidence and significant consequences of falls among older adults, the insufficient effectiveness of commonly used multifactorial interventions and the evidence linking falls and cognitive function. Recent pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic studies that evaluated the effects of cognitive therapy on fall risk are reviewed. The results of this article illustrate the potential utility of multiple, diverse forms of cognitive therapy for reducing fall risk. The article also indicates that large-scale, randomized controlled trials are warranted and that additional research is needed to better understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the interplay between human mobility, fall risk and cognitive function. Nonetheless, we suggest that multimodality interventions that combine motor and cognitive therapy should, eventually, be incorporated into clinical practice to enable older adults and patients to move safer and with a reduced fall risk. PMID:21721921

  2. Doppler radar fall activity detection using the wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Su, Bo Yu; Ho, K C; Rantz, Marilyn J; Skubic, Marjorie

    2015-03-01

    We propose in this paper the use of Wavelet transform (WT) to detect human falls using a ceiling mounted Doppler range control radar. The radar senses any motions from falls as well as nonfalls due to the Doppler effect. The WT is very effective in distinguishing the falls from other activities, making it a promising technique for radar fall detection in nonobtrusive inhome elder care applications. The proposed radar fall detector consists of two stages. The prescreen stage uses the coefficients of wavelet decomposition at a given scale to identify the time locations in which fall activities may have occurred. The classification stage extracts the time-frequency content from the wavelet coefficients at many scales to form a feature vector for fall versus nonfall classification. The selection of different wavelet functions is examined to achieve better performance. Experimental results using the data from the laboratory and real inhome environments validate the promising and robust performance of the proposed detector. PMID:25376033

  3. Gait characteristics of patients with phobic postural vertigo: effects of fear of falling, attention, and visual input.

    PubMed

    Schniepp, Roman; Wuehr, Max; Huth, Sabrina; Pradhan, Cauchy; Brandt, Thomas; Jahn, Klaus

    2014-04-01

    Phobic postural vertigo (PPV) is the most common cause of chronic dizziness in middle-aged patients. Many patients report symptoms involving gait. We investigated the gait performance and its relationship to the fear of falling and attention of PPV patients in a prospective study of 24 patients with PPV and 24 healthy subjects (HS) using a pressure-sensitive mat (GAITRite(®)). Subjects walked at three different speeds (slow, preferred, fast), both during cognitive dual tasks (DTc) and with eyes closed (EC). Falls efficacy and balance confidence were rated by the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I) and the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC). PPV patients walked slower, with reduced cadence (all p < 0.01), stride length (p < 0.05), and increased double support (p < 0.01) compared to HS. These changes correlated with FES-I (R = -0.528, p < 0.001) and ABC (R = 0.481, p < 0.01). Walking deterioration under DTc did not differ between PPV patients and HS, but patients showed a reduced cognitive processing speed (p < 0.05). When walking with EC, gait speed decreased more in PPV patients compared to HS (p < 0.05). Patients with PPV show gait changes which correlate with their fear of falling and balance confidence. Absent visual feedback leads to more pronounced gait deteriorations in PPV patients than in HS, indicating a higher reliance of patients on visual information during walking. These findings support the view that the gait characteristics of PPV can be attributed to an inadequate, cautious gait control. PMID:24519356

  4. Relationship of Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Urban Public School Students to Performance on a High-Stakes Mathematics Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afolabi, Kolajo A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of "self-efficacy" for "Enlisting Social Resources, Self-Regulatory Efficacy, self-efficacy" for "Self-Regulated Learning," and "self-efficacy" for "Academic Achievement" (Bandura's Children's "Self-Efficacy Scale," 2006) of urban public school students to performance on the high stakes…

  5. Falls and Fractures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... costs. Home Improvements Prevent Falls Many State and local governments have education and/or home modification programs to help older people prevent falls. Check with your local health department, senior affairs office, or area agency ...

  6. Assessing Regulatory Emotional Self-Efficacy in Three Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Giunta, Laura Di; Eisenberg, Nancy; Gerbino, Maria; Pastorelli, Concetta; Tramontano, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    The Regulatory Emotional Self-Efficacy (RESE) scale was developed to assess perceived self-efficacy in managing negative (NEG) and in expressing positive (POS) affect (G. V. Caprara & M. Gerbino, 2001). In this study of young adults, the factorial structure of the RESE scale was found to be similar in Italy, the United States, and Bolivia: In…

  7. Snow Falls - Maine

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    As the Little Androscoggin River flows through western Maine it eventually reaches Snow Falls, a 25 ft cascading waterfall in the town of West Paris.  This photo was taken during a high flow event at the falls. The USGS monitors the Little Androscoggin River upstream of the falls at station 01...

  8. Base of Yosemite Falls

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this image, Yosemite Falls may be seen from its base. Yosemite Falls is the tallest waterfall in North America. It is about 2,425 ft (739 m) high. Yosemite Falls is one of the most famous waterfalls within Yosemite National Park....

  9. Teacher Efficacy of Turkish Physical Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gencay, Okkes Alpaslan

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to determine the validity and reliability of the Teacher Efficacy Scale in Physical Education (TESPE) in Turkey's conditions, and to test if there are any differences in gender and teaching experience of Turkish PE teachers. Turkish version of the scale was administered to 257 physical education teachers (184…

  10. Tailored prevention of inpatient falls: development and usability testing of the fall TIPS toolkit.

    PubMed

    Zuyev, Lyubov; Benoit, Angela N; Chang, Frank Y; Dykes, Patricia C

    2011-02-01

    Patient falls and fall-related injuries are serious problems in hospitals. The Fall TIPS application aims to prevent patient falls by translating routine nursing fall risk assessment into a decision support intervention that communicates fall risk status and creates a tailored evidence-based plan of care that is accessible to the care team, patients, and family members. In our design and implementation of the Fall TIPS toolkit, we used the Spiral Software Development Life Cycle model. Three output tools available to be generated from the toolkit are bed poster, plan of care, and patient education handout. A preliminary design of the application was based on initial requirements defined by project leaders and informed by focus groups with end users. Preliminary design partially simulated the paper version of the Morse Fall Scale currently used in hospitals involved in the research study. Strengths and weaknesses of the first prototype were identified by heuristic evaluation. Usability testing was performed at sites where research study is implemented. Suggestions mentioned by end users participating in usability studies were either directly incorporated into the toolkit and output tools, were slightly modified, or will be addressed during training. The next step is implementation of the fall prevention toolkit on the pilot testing units. PMID:20975543

  11. The Effects of an Education Program on Home Renovation for Fall Prevention of Korean Older People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Miseon; Lee, Yeunsook

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to verify the effects of an education program on home renovation for fall prevention among older people, more specifically fall efficacy and home renovation intentions. A quasiexperimental study with nonequivalent control and comparative groups was conducted to demonstrate the effects of the education. A total of 51 older people…

  12. Summer/Fall Summer/Fall

    E-print Network

    Psychology Program Profile Admissions 8% 6% 5% 4% 3% 5% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% Su/Fall 2009 Su. Clinical Psychology Program Profile Enrollment and Demographics New Enrollment* Total Enrollment 25 28 34

  13. Evaluation of three full-scale stormwater treatment systems with respect to water yield, pathogen removal efficacy and human health risk from faecal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Petterson, Susan R; Mitchell, V Grace; Davies, Cheryl M; O'Connor, James; Kaucner, Christine; Roser, David; Ashbolt, Nicholas

    2016-02-01

    In this study, three full-scale, operational stormwater harvesting systems located in Melbourne, Australia were evaluated with respect to water yields; pathogen removal performance by analysis of native surrogate data (Escherichiacoli, somatic coliphages and Clostridium perfringens); and potential human health risk associated with exposures to faecal pathogens using Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA). The water yield assessment confirmed variation between design and measured yields. Faecal contamination of urban stormwater was site specific and variable. Different treatment removal performance was observed between each of the microbial surrogates and varied between event and baseline conditions, with negligible removal of viruses during event conditions. Open storages that provide a habitat for waterfowl may lead to elevated risk due to the potential for zoonotic transmission. Nevertheless, in the Australian urban setting studied, the potential for human faecal contamination of the separated stormwater system was a critical driver of risk. If the integrity of the sewerage system can be ensured, then predicted health risks are dramatically reduced. PMID:26615487

  14. Efficacy and well-being in rural north India: The role of social identification with a large-scale community identity

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sammyh S; Hopkins, Nick; Tewari, Shruti; Srinivasan, Narayanan; Reicher, Stephen David; Ozakinci, Gozde

    2014-01-01

    Identifying with a group can contribute to a sense of well-being. The mechanisms involved are diverse: social identification with a group can impact individuals' beliefs about issues such as their connections with others, the availability of social support, the meaningfulness of existence, and the continuity of their identity. Yet, there seems to be a common theme to these mechanisms: identification with a group encourages the belief that one can cope with the stressors one faces (which is associated with better well-being). Our research investigated the relationship between identification, beliefs about coping, and well-being in a survey (N = 792) administered in rural North India. Using structural equation modelling, we found that social identification as a Hindu had positive and indirect associations with three measures of well-being through the belief that one can cope with everyday stressors. We also found residual associations between participants' social identification as a Hindu and two measures of well-being in which higher identification was associated with poorer well-being. We discuss these findings and their implication for understanding the relationship between social identification (especially with large-scale group memberships) and well-being. We also discuss the application of social psychological theory developed in the urban West to rural north India. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Social Psychology published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26160989

  15. Evaluations of Bollgard, Bollgard II, and Widestrike technologies against beet and fall armyworm larvae (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic cottons containing the Bollgard®, Bollgard II® and WideStrike® traits were grown in 2005 and 2007 to examine the efficacy against beet [Spodoptera exigua (Hübner)] and fall armyworms [S. frugiperda (J. E. Smith)]. Results suggest that both dual-gene traits are more efficacious against th...

  16. Transfer effects of fall training on balance performance and spatiotemporal gait parameters in healthy community-dwelling older adults: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Donath, Lars; Faude, Oliver; Bridenbaugh, Stephanie A; Roth, Ralf; Soltermann, Martin; Kressig, Reto W; Zahner, Lukas

    2014-07-01

    This study examined transfer effects of fall training on fear of falling (Falls Efficacy Scale-International [FES-I]), balance performance, and spatiotemporal gait characteristics in older adults. Eighteen community-dwelling older adults (ages 65-85) were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. The intervention group completed 12 training sessions (60 min, 6 weeks). During pre- and posttesting, we measured FES-I, balance performance (double limb, closed eyes; single limb, open eyes; double limb, open eyes with motor-interfered task), and gait parameters (e.g., velocity; cadence; stride time, stride width, and stride length; variability of stride time and stride length) under single- and motor-interfered tasks. Dual tasks were applied to appraise improvements of cognitive processing during balance and gait. FES-I (p = .33) and postural sway did not significantly change (0.36 < p < .79). Trends toward significant interaction effects were found for step width during normal walking and stride length variability during the motor dual task (p = .05, ?p 2 = .22). Fall training did not sufficiently improve fear of falling, balance, or gait performance under single- or dual-task conditions in healthy older adults. PMID:23881433

  17. Efficacy of VIP3A and Cry1Ab Genotypes against various Lepidopteran Pests.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    2004 through 2005, plots of experimental transgenic cotton lines containing the exotoxin, VIP3A; endotoxin, Cry1Ab; and both VIP3A and Cry1Ab were evaluated for efficacy against certain lepidopteran pests. Results showed that VIP3A was more efficacious against the beet and fall armyworm compared to...

  18. The Efficacy of the Mathematical Academic Centre for Excellence

    E-print Network

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    The Efficacy of the Mathematical Academic Centre for Excellence MACE A Technical Report Delivered by Jennifer Hyndman, Mathematics Peter MacMillan, Education Vivian Fayowski, Learning Skills Centre Advisor In Fall 2007 the Teaching and Learning building opened and with it the Mathematical Academic Centre

  19. Principal Self-Efficacy: Relations with Burnout, Job Satisfaction and Motivation to Quit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federici, Roger A.; Skaalvik, Einar M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore relations between principals' self-efficacy, burnout, job satisfaction and principals' motivation to quit. Principal self-efficacy was measured by a recently developed multidimensional scale called the Norwegian Principal Self-Efficacy Scale. Burnout was measured by a modified version of the Maslach Burnout…

  20. Principals' Self-Efficacy: Relations with Job Autonomy, Job Satisfaction, and Contextual Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federici, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore relations between principals' self-efficacy, perceived job autonomy, job satisfaction, and perceived contextual constraints to autonomy. Principal self-efficacy was measured by a multidimensional scale called the Norwegian Principal Self-Efficacy Scale. Job autonomy, job satisfaction, and contextual…

  1. The large-scale distribution and internal geometry of the fall 2000 Po River flood deposit: Evidence from digital X-radiography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheatcroft, R.A.; Stevens, A.W.; Hunt, L.M.; Milligan, T.G.

    2006-01-01

    Event-response coring on the Po River prodelta (northern Adriatic Sea) coupled with shipboard digital X-radiography, resistivity profiling, and grain-size analyses permitted documentation of the initial distribution and physical properties of the October 2000 flood deposit. The digital X-radiography system comprises a constant-potential X-ray source and an amorphous silicon imager with an active area of 29??42 cm and 12-bit depth resolution. Objective image segmentation algorithms based on bulk density (brightness), layer contacts (edge detection) and small-scale texture (fabric) were used to identify the flood deposit. Results indicate that the deposit formed in water depths of 6-29 m immediately adjacent to the three main distributary mouths of the Po (Pila, Tolle and Gnocca/Goro). Maximal thickness was 36 cm at a 20-m site off the main mouth (Pila), but many other sites hadthicknesses >20 cm. The Po flood deposit has a complex internal stratigraphy, with multiple layers, a diverse suite of physical sedimentary structures (e.g., laminations, ripple cross bedding, lenticular bedding, soft-sediment deformation structures), and dramatic changes in grain size that imply rapid deposition and fluctuations in energy during emplacement. Based on the flood deposit volume and well-constrained measurements of deposit bulk density the mass of the flood deposit was estimated to be 16??109 kg, which is about two-thirds of the estimated suspended sediment load delivered by the river during the event. The locus of deposition, overall thickness, and stratigraphic complexity of the flood deposit can best be explained by the relatively long sediment throughput times of the Po River, whereby sediment is delivered to the ocean during a range of conditions (i.e., the storm responsible for the precipitation is long gone), the majority of which are reflective of the fair-weather condition. Sediment is therefore deposited proximal to the river mouths, where it can form thick, but stratigraphically complex deposits. In contrast, floods of small rivers such as the Eel (northern California) are coupled to storm conditions, which lead to high levels of sediment dispersion. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Diagnosis and Tests: Evaluating a Fall or Risk of Falling

    MedlinePLUS

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Falls Prevention Diagnosis & Tests Evaluating a Fall or Risk of Falling At your next regular ... professional about your risk of falling. Describe any falls or close calls you’ve had, even if ...

  3. The Patient Who Falls

    PubMed Central

    Tinetti, Mary E.; Kumar, Chandrika

    2013-01-01

    Falls are common health events that cause discomfort and disability for older adults and stress for caregivers. Using the case of an older man who has experienced multiple falls and a hip fracture, this article, which focuses on community-living older adults, addresses the consequences and etiology of falls; summarizes the evidence on predisposing factors and effective interventions; and discusses how to translate this evidence into patient care. Previous falls; strength, gait, and balance impairments; and medications are the strongest risk factors for falling. Effective single interventions include exercise and physical therapy, cataract surgery, and medication reduction. Evidence suggests that the most effective strategy for reducing the rate of falling in community-living older adults may be intervening on multiple risk factors. Vitamin D has the strongest clinical trial evidence of benefit for preventing fractures among older men at risk. Issues involved in incorporating these evidence-based fall prevention interventions into outpatient practice are discussed, as are the trade-offs inherent in managing older patients at risk of falling. While challenges and barriers exist, fall prevention strategies can be incorporated into clinical practice. PMID:20085954

  4. Comparative Efficacy of the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-Item Scale and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale as Screening Tools for Generalized Anxiety Disorder in Pregnancy and the Postpartum Period

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, William; Glazer, Melanie; Michalski, Natalie; Steiner, Meir; Frey, Benicio N

    2014-01-01

    Objective: About 24.1% of pregnant women suffer from at least 1 anxiety disorder, 8.5% of whom suffer specifically from generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). GAD is often associated with major depressive disorder (MDD). During the perinatal period, the presence of physical and somatic symptoms often makes differentiation between depression and anxiety more challenging. To date, no screening tools have been developed to detect GAD in the perinatal population. We investigated the psychometric properties of the GAD 7-item Scale (GAD-7) as a screening tool for GAD in pregnant and postpartum women. Methods: Two hundred and forty perinatal women (n = 155 pregnant and n = 85 postpartum) referred for psychiatric consultation were enrolled. On the day of initial assessment, all women completed the GAD-7 and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition–based diagnoses were made by experienced psychiatrists. Scores from the GAD-7 and EPDS were compared with the clinical diagnoses to evaluate the psychometric properties of the GAD-7 and EPDS when used as a screening tool for GAD. Results: The GAD-7 yielded a sensitivity of 61.3% and specificity of 72.7% at an optimal cut-off score of 13. Compared with the EPDS and the EPDS-3A subscale, the GAD-7 displayed greater accuracy and specificity over a greater range of cut-off scores and more accurately identified GAD in patients with comorbid MDD. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the GAD-7 represents a clinically useful scale for the detection of GAD in perinatal women. PMID:25161068

  5. Fall Enrollment Report 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes fall enrollment in Iowa's community colleges. Every year Iowa's 15 community college districts submit data on students enrolled on the 10th day of the fall semester. Highlights include: (1) Enrollment grew at its fastest pace since 1975 to a record high of 100,736 students; (2) Year-to-year growth was 14.3 percent, which is…

  6. First Aid: Falls

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Aid: Falls KidsHealth > Parents > First Aid & Safety > Printable Safety Guides > First Aid: Falls Print A A A Text Size What's ... Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Household Safety Checklists Childproofing and Preventing Household Accidents First Aid: Broken Bones A to Z: Head ...

  7. Fall armyworm migration patterns.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), infestations in most of North America arise from annual migrations of populations that overwinter in southern Texas and Florida. Cytochrome Oxidase I haplotype profiles within the fall armyworm corn-strain, the subgroup tha...

  8. Experiments in Free Fall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Art, Albert

    2006-01-01

    A model lift containing a figure of Albert Einstein is released from the side of a tall building and its free fall is arrested by elastic ropes. This arrangement allows four simple experiments to be conducted in the lift to demonstrate the effects of free fall and show how they can lead to the concept of the equivalence of inertial and…

  9. Fall Leaf Portraits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hara, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how students can create a stunning as well as economical mosaic utilizing fall's brilliantly colored leaves, preserved at their peak in color. Start by choosing a beautiful fall day to take students on a nature walk to collect a variety of leaves in different shapes, sizes, and colors. Focus on collecting a…

  10. Microsoft Word - Self-efficacy_Scale.doc

    Cancer.gov

    Smoking Survey The following items ask you to describe your ability to handle smoking situations. Your answers will be kept secret. Not even your teacher or parents will see them. You do not need to write your name on the paper. Please try to answer

  11. Summer/Fall Summer/Fall

    E-print Network

    /Fall 2014 2009 - 2014 Average 5 YR % Change Number Applied 69 79 70 79 62 0 60 -100% Number Admitted 13 12 graduate school programs are excluded. Selectivity Average = 14% Yield Average = 46% Linguistics Program. Students who transfer in from other graduate school programs are excluded. Linguistics Program Profile

  12. Perfectionism and Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganske, Kathryn H.; Ashby, Jeffrey S.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between perfectionism and career decision-making self-efficacy. Participants completed the Almost Perfect Scale-Revised (R. B. Slaney, K. G. Rice, M. Mobley, J. Trippi, & J. S. Ashby, 2001) and the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy-Short Form (N. E. Betz, K. L. Klein, & K. M. Taylor, 1996). Adaptive…

  13. Attributional Style and Self-Efficacy in Singaporean Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeo, Lay See; Tan, Kayce

    2012-01-01

    This investigation examined the relationship between adolescent students' attributional style and their perceived academic self-efficacy using the Children's Attributional Style Questionnaire (CASQ) (Seligman et al., 1984) and Multidimensional Scales of Perceived Self Efficacy (Bandura, 1989). Attributional style, defined as the way in which…

  14. Career Decision Self-Efficacy among Turkish Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isik, Erkan

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate the career decision-making self-efficacy in a sample of 356 Turkish undergraduate students. Method: With this purpose, 356 (138 females; 218 males) Turkish undergraduate students aged 17-24 completed a Turkish-translated version of Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (CDSE-SF) to…

  15. Music Teachers' Computer Anxiety and Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiliç, Deniz Beste Çevik

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the computer anxiety and self-efficacy of music teachers in terms of different variables. The research is implemented on 124 music teachers. A personal information form and scales of Computer Anxiety and Self Efficacy are implemented on 124 music teachers. Data are analyzed with one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and…

  16. OSE Alumni List from Fall 1999 to Present Period Name Degree Thesis/Dissertation Title

    E-print Network

    New Mexico, University of

    , Patrick K. PHD Laser-induced lightning Fall 2000 Tyler, David W. PHD Noise reduction in astronomical speckle effects in CO2 lidar Spring 2000 Teehan, Russell F. PHD Power scaling and frequency stabilization of an injection-locked laser Fall 2000 Logofatu, Petre C PHD Sensitivity optimized scatterometry Fall 2000 Rambo

  17. Opening Fall Enrollments: Florida's Community Colleges, Fall 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. State Board of Community Colleges.

    An unduplicated headcount of students enrolled in college-level credit courses in Florida's community colleges is provided as taken at the end of the initial drop-add period in fall 1985. The first portion of the report provides data showing 5-year (fall 1981 through fall 1985) statewide trends in actual opening fall credit enrollments. Figures…

  18. Social Self-Efficacy, Academic Locus of Control, and Internet Addiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iskender, Murat; Akin, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship of internet addiction, social self-efficacy, and academic locus of control. Participants were 311 university students who completed a questionnaire package that included the Online Cognition Scale, the Academic Locus of Control Scale, and the Perceived Social Self-efficacy Scale. The…

  19. The Relationships between University Students' Chemistry Laboratory Anxiety, Attitudes, and Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurbanoglu, N. Izzet; Akin, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationships between chemistry laboratory anxiety, chemistry attitudes, and self-efficacy. Participants were 395 university students. Participants completed the Chemistry Laboratory Anxiety Scale, the Chemistry Attitudes Scale, and the Self-efficacy Scale. Results showed that chemistry laboratory anxiety…

  20. Survival of falling robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Jonathan M.; Arkin, Ronald C.

    1992-01-01

    As mobile robots are used in more uncertain and dangerous environments, it will become important to design them so that they can survive falls. In this paper, we examine a number of mechanisms and strategies that animals use to withstand these potentially catastrophic events and extend them to the design of robots. A brief survey of several aspects of how common cats survive falls provides an understanding of the issues involved in preventing traumatic injury during a falling event. After outlining situations in which robots might fall, a number of factors affecting their survival are described. From this background, several robot design guidelines are derived. These include recommendations for the physical structure of the robot as well as requirements for the robot control architecture. A control architecture is proposed based on reactive control techniques and action-oriented perception that is geared to support this form of survival behavior.

  1. Base of Bridalveil Fall

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this image, Bridalveil Fall can be seen from its base in Yosemite National Park. The waterfall is 617 ft (188 m) in height and is one of the most well-known of Yosemite National Park's waterfalls....

  2. Editors' Fall Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffert, Barbara; Heilbrun, Margaret; Kuzyk, Raya; Kim, Ann; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Burns, Ann; Williams, Wilda

    2008-01-01

    From the fall's cascade of great new books, "Library Journal's" editors select their favorites--a dark rendition of Afghan life, a look at the "self-esteem trap," a celebration of Brooklyn activism, and much more.

  3. Welcome Fall 2007

    E-print Network

    Diaz Moore, Keith

    2007-08-15

    Keith Diaz Moore, Chair of the University of Kansas School of Architecture, introduces the new KU Archcast, welcomes students for the fall 2007 semester and announces some accomplishments of faculty and students as well ...

  4. Building to Fall

    E-print Network

    Spain, Mitchell Ross

    2015-05-31

    Abstract Building to Fall is an exploration of our experiences that establish ideas of balance, risk, and failure, testing theories about the physical and social world in which we exist. Throughout history we have encountered many failures...

  5. FALL WINTER SPRING FALL WINTER SPRING FALL WINTER SPRING SUMMER FALL WINTER SPRING SUMMER FALL WINTER SPRING CALC CALC LIN CALC DIF STAT

    E-print Network

    Bertini, Robert L.

    FALL WINTER SPRING FALL WINTER SPRING FALL WINTER SPRING SUMMER FALL WINTER SPRING SUMMER FALL WINTER SPRING CALC CALC LIN CALC DIF STAT I II ALG IV EQ I MTH MTH MTH MTH MTH 451CM 251 CHEM 252 261 254

  6. Distalgesic; safety and efficacy. Efficacy: UK experience.

    PubMed

    Sturrock, R D

    1984-08-01

    The UK experience of Distalgesic efficacy is examined, and 18 trials have been reviewed, of which only five were controlled and only three contained a placebo. Three trials are examined in detail and the problems of trial methodology discussed. The assessment of analgesic effect in chronic painful conditions presents considerable problems. Despite the fact that Distalgesic appears to be a useful analgesic in the clinical situation, long-term controlled studies of its effectiveness in chronic pain are still awaited. PMID:6384026

  7. Predictive Power of the Sources of Primary School Students' Self-Efficacy Beliefs on Their Self-Efficacy Beliefs for Learning and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arslan, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to reveal the extent to which the sources of 6th- 8th grade students' self-efficacy beliefs predict their self-efficacy beliefs for learning and performance. The study is correlational and was conducted on a total of 1049 students during the fall term of the educational year 2010-2011. The data of the study were…

  8. Teacher Self-Efficacy and Teacher Burnout: A Study of Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaalvik, Einar M.; Skaalvik, Sidsel

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was partly to test the factor structure of a recently developed Norwegian scale for measuring teacher self-efficacy and partly to explore relations between teachers' perception of the school context, teacher self-efficacy, collective teacher efficacy, teacher burnout, teacher job satisfaction, and teachers' beliefs that…

  9. Exploring Baccalaureate Social Work Students' Self-Efficacy: Did It Change over Time?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahn, Bonnie; Boykin, Lolita; Hebert, Corie; Kulkin, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    This study explored baccalaureate social work students' self-efficacy at a rural southern university. Bandura's concept of self-efficacy is used as a theoretical base for the study. Students (N = 43) in introductory social work courses and in the field practicum course completed the Foundation Practice Self Efficacy Scale. Following The Council on…

  10. Teachers' Perceived Efficacy among English as a Foreign Language Teachers in Middle Schools in Venezuela

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chacon, C.T.

    2005-01-01

    Teachers' sense of efficacy has been shown to influence teachers' actions and student outcomes. This study explored self-efficacy beliefs among English as a Foreign Language teachers in selected schools in Venezuela. Data were collected through a survey administered to 100 teachers. The Teacher Sense of Efficacy Scale (Tschannen-Moran & Woolfolk…

  11. An Exploratory Study of Teacher Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Professional Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romeo, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    The exploratory study sought to examine the relationships between teachers' self-efficacy beliefs and professional learning community. Specifically, this study presents a quantitative analysis of the relationship between teachers' perceptions of self-efficacy and PLC implementation. The Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale (TSES) (long form)…

  12. An Investigation of Factors Related to Self-Efficacy for Java Programming among Engineering Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askar, Petek; Davenport, David

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the factors related to self-efficacy for Java programming among first year engineering students. An instrument assessing Java programming self-efficacy was developed from the computer programming self-efficacy scale of Ramalingam & Wiedenbeck. The instrument was administered at the beginning of the course…

  13. A best practice fall prevention exercise program to improve balance, strength / power, and psychosocial health in older adults: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With increasing age neuromuscular deficits (e.g., sarcopenia) may result in impaired physical performance and an increased risk for falls. Prominent intrinsic fall-risk factors are age-related decreases in balance and strength / power performance as well as cognitive decline. Additional studies are needed to develop specifically tailored exercise programs for older adults that can easily be implemented into clinical practice. Thus, the objective of the present trial is to assess the effects of a fall prevention program that was developed by an interdisciplinary expert panel on measures of balance, strength / power, body composition, cognition, psychosocial well-being, and falls self-efficacy in healthy older adults. Additionally, the time-related effects of detraining are tested. Methods/Design Healthy old people (n?=?54) between the age of 65 to 80 years will participate in this trial. The testing protocol comprises tests for the assessment of static / dynamic steady-state balance (i.e., Sharpened Romberg Test, instrumented gait analysis), proactive balance (i.e., Functional Reach Test; Timed Up and Go Test), reactive balance (i.e., perturbation test during bipedal stance; Push and Release Test), strength (i.e., hand grip strength test; Chair Stand Test), and power (i.e., Stair Climb Power Test; countermovement jump). Further, body composition will be analysed using a bioelectrical impedance analysis system. In addition, questionnaires for the assessment of psychosocial (i.e., World Health Organisation Quality of Life Assessment-Bref), cognitive (i.e., Mini Mental State Examination), and fall risk determinants (i.e., Fall Efficacy Scale – International) will be included in the study protocol. Participants will be randomized into two intervention groups or the control / waiting group. After baseline measures, participants in the intervention groups will conduct a 12-week balance and strength / power exercise intervention 3 times per week, with each training session lasting 30 min. (actual training time). One intervention group will complete an extensive supervised training program, while the other intervention group will complete a short version ('3 times 3’) that is home-based and controlled by weekly phone calls. Post-tests will be conducted right after the intervention period. Additionally, detraining effects will be measured 12 weeks after program cessation. The control group / waiting group will not participate in any specific intervention during the experimental period, but will receive the extensive supervised program after the experimental period. Discussion It is expected that particularly the supervised combination of balance and strength / power training will improve performance in variables of balance, strength / power, body composition, cognitive function, psychosocial well-being, and falls self-efficacy of older adults. In addition, information regarding fall risk assessment, dose–response-relations, detraining effects, and supervision of training will be provided. Further, training-induced health-relevant changes, such as improved performance in activities of daily living, cognitive function, and quality of life, as well as a reduced risk for falls may help to lower costs in the health care system. Finally, practitioners, therapists, and instructors will be provided with a scientifically evaluated feasible, safe, and easy-to-administer exercise program for fall prevention. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01906034 PMID:24106864

  14. Enrollment Market Share Report Fall 2008 to Fall 2013

    E-print Network

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Enrollment Market Share Report Fall 2008 to Fall 2013 Office of Budget) 5772001 http://budget.wayne.edu #12; Enrollment Market Share Report Page i Tableof ........................................................................................................................................ 60 MPU Enrollment Comparison

  15. Changes in preservice elementary teachers' personal science teaching efficacy and science teaching outcome expectancies: The influence of context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hechter, Richard P.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how retrospective-test/post-test perceptions of science teaching self-efficacy differ according to personal science expectancy and science teaching outcome expectancy among preservice elementary teachers when exposed to a science teaching methods course. Preservice elementary teacher candidates (N=69) enrolled in Spring and Fall 2007 sessions of an elementary science methods class were asked to assess their science teaching self-efficacy using the Science Teaching Expectancy Belief Instrument (STEBI-B). The survey was administered three times using pre-test, post-test and retrospective-test methodology. The 23-item instrument contains a Likert-scale with a 1 to 5 range of "strongly disagree" to "strongly agree". A higher score indicated a stronger sense science teaching self-efficacy. The dependent variable was change in self-efficacy. Science teaching self-efficacy comprises two subcomponents: (1) personal science teaching efficacy (PSTE); and (2) science teaching outcome expectancy (STOE). Both components were represented as subscales on the STEBI-B. The independent variables were: (1) number of postsecondary science content courses taken; (2) perceptions of prior science experiences; and (3) a science methods course. Research questions sought to investigate main effects and interaction effects of independent variables on each of the PSTE and STOE subscales. A 2X2 ANOVA was used to statistically analyze the data with a Type I error rate of 0.05 as the judgment criteria for statistical significance. The findings revealed that whether preservice elementary teachers met or exceeded the number of postsecondary science courses required to graduate, and their positive or negative perceptions of prior school science experiences had a statistically significant main effect on the change in PSTE but not STOE. There was no evidence to suggest significant interaction effects of number of postsecondary science courses taken and perception of school science experiences on the change in both PSTE and STOE. Practical significance of the results is also discussed. The results will guide reforming teacher preparation to strengthen science teaching self-efficacy of preservice elementary teacher candidates throughout their programs of study leading out into the teaching profession. The implications of this study have bearing on current and future organization, structure, and dynamics of elementary science teacher preparation.

  16. The effects of high frequency subthalamic stimulation on balance performance and fear of falling in patients with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Maria H; Fransson, Per-Anders; Jarnlo, Gun-Britt; Magnusson, Måns; Rehncrona, Stig

    2009-01-01

    Background Balance impairment is one of the most distressing symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) even with pharmacological treatment (levodopa). A complementary treatment is high frequency stimulation in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Whether STN stimulation improves postural control is under debate. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of STN stimulation alone on balance performance as assessed with clinical performance tests, subjective ratings of fear of falling and posturography. Methods Ten patients (median age 66, range 59–69 years) with bilateral STN stimulation for a minimum of one year, had their anti-PD medications withdrawn overnight. Assessments were done both with the STN stimulation turned OFF and ON (start randomized). In both test conditions, the following were assessed: motor symptoms (descriptive purposes), clinical performance tests, fear of falling ratings, and posturography with and without vibratory proprioceptive disturbance. Results STN stimulation alone significantly (p = 0.002) increased the scores of the Berg balance scale, and the median increase was 6 points. The results of all timed performance tests, except for sharpened Romberg, were significantly (p ? 0.016) improved. The patients rated their fear of falling as less severe, and the total score of the Falls-Efficacy Scale(S) increased (p = 0.002) in median with 54 points. All patients completed posturography when the STN stimulation was turned ON, but three patients were unable to do so when it was turned OFF. The seven patients with complete data showed no statistical significant difference (p values ? 0.109) in torque variance values when comparing the two test situations. This applied both during quiet stance and during the periods with vibratory stimulation, and it was irrespective of visual input and sway direction. Conclusion In this sample, STN stimulation alone significantly improved the results of the clinical performance tests that mimic activities in daily living. This improvement was further supported by the patients' ratings of fear of falling, which were less severe with the STN stimulation turned ON. Posturography could not be performed by three out of the ten patients when the stimulation was turned OFF. The posturography results of the seven patients with complete data showed no significant differences due to STN stimulation. PMID:19405954

  17. The rise and fall.

    PubMed

    Japsen, B

    1997-09-01

    By the time the government raided Columbia/HCA Healthcare Corp. facilities this summer, colleagues had been trying for years to warn the company's then-top executive, Richard Scott, about the unnerving arrogance from the executive suite in Nashville. Modern Healthcare explores key events in the rise and fall of Scott and the company he built. PMID:10170124

  18. Editors' Fall Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilbrun, Margaret; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Kuzyk, Raya; Roncevic, Mirela; Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal's" review editors select fall titles readers won't want to miss--"Waiting on a Train: The Embattled Future of Passenger Rail Service" (James McCommons); "Happy" (Alex Lemon); "Free for All: Joe Papp, the Public, and the Greatest Theater Story Ever Told" (Kenneth Turan & Joseph Papp); "In My Father's Shadow: A Daughter Remembers…

  19. Fall 2005 Enrollment Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This annual report includes the following information presented in tabular form: (1) Location of West Virginia Public Institutions of Higher Education; (2) Location of West Virginia Independent Institutions of Higher Education; (3) Freshmen Headcount Enrollment, by Attendance Status, Early Fall 2005; (4) Headcount Enrollment by Residence,…

  20. Fall 2006 Newsletter

    Cancer.gov

    Diet&Health Stud? Ne?sPublished for Study Participants by the National Cancer Institute Fall 2006 A Hear?fel? Thank? Dear Participant, My team and I are indebted to you and your fellow cohort members for your continued participation in the NIH-AARP Diet

  1. Facilities Inventory, Fall 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine State Higher Education Facilities Commission, Augusta.

    The tables in this report present a summary of the area, in net assignable square feet, used by each institution of higher education in Maine, broken down by room type and by organizational unit for fall 1971. Data is presented concerning enrollment information of public and independent colleges and organizational unit and room type for public…

  2. Bridalveil Fall in Fog

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this image, Bridalveil Fall can be seen shrouded in fog from Tunnel View in Yosemite National Park. The waterfall is 617 ft (188 m) in height and is one of the most well-known of Yosemite National Park's waterfalls....

  3. Illilouette Falls Detail

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this image, Illilouettea Falls, a tributary of the Merced River can be seen just upstream of Happy Isles and the USGS Benchmark Streamgage in Yosemite National Park. The Merced River is a 145 mile (233 km) long tributary of the San Joaquin River. It drains a large section of the Sierra Nevad...

  4. Freshmen Survey. Fall 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodyear, Don

    In 1985, College of the Sequoias (COS) was asked by the Cooperative Institutional Research Program (conducted jointly by the American Council on Education and the University of California, Los Angeles) to participate in a survey of incoming freshmen for the fall 1985 semester. During the summer counseling session, 259 new COS freshmen were…

  5. Fall 1982 Retention Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralta Community Coll. District, Oakland, CA. Office of Research, Planning and Development.

    In fall 1982, a study was conducted in the Peralta Community College District (PCCD) using withdrawal and grade distribution data to analyze student retention patterns. Successful retention rates were based on the percentage of students who received a passing grade, while total retention rates were based on the percentage of students who received…

  6. Fall 2013 International Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Evaluation Association, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This Fall report is an aggregated statistical analysis of Measures of Academic Progress® (MAP®) data from international schools. The report provides a consistent means of comparisons of specific sub-groups by subject and grade, which allows partners to compare their MAP® results with other schools within their region or membership organization.…

  7. Yosemite Falls behind Illilouette Ridge

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Uppder Yosemite Falls is visible on the right side of this image, taken behind Illilouette Ridge. Upper Yosemite Falls is 1,430 ft (440 m) tall. It is one of the most famous waterfalls in Yosemite National Park....

  8. Teaching Efficacy and Teaching Performance among Student Teachers in a Jordanian Childhood Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weshah, Hani A.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the teaching efficacy of student teachers in the Childhood Education Program at the University of Jordan. The sample consisted of (106) female student teachers. The Teacher Efficacy Scale and the Effective Teaching Behaviors Scale were used to collect the data of this study. Results showed that a third of the…

  9. The Relationship between School Principals' Leadership Styles and Collective Teacher Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akan, Durdagi

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to determine the relationship between school administrators' leadership styles and the collective teacher efficacy based on teachers' perceptions. In line with this objective, the multifactor leadership style scale and the collective teacher efficacy scale were applied on 223 teachers who were working in the province of…

  10. Beijing In-Service Teachers' Self-Efficacy and Attitudes towards Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malinen, Olli-Pekka; Savolainen, Hannu; Xu, Jiacheng

    2012-01-01

    Four-hundred-and-fifty-one in-service teachers from the Beijing municipality filled in a questionnaire containing a Teacher Efficacy for Inclusive Practices (TEIP) scale. The aim was to examine the factor structure of the TEIP scale among mainland Chinese in-service teachers, and to investigate the relationship between self-efficacy for inclusive…

  11. Treatment Efficacy: Voice Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramig, Lorraine Olson; Verdolini, Katherine

    1998-01-01

    Reviews research on the efficacy of treatment for voice disorders. Voice disorders are defined, their frequency of occurrence is reported, and their impact on individuals is documented. Treatment related to vocal misuse, medical or physical conditions, and psychogenic disorders are discussed and case studies are presented. (Author/CR)

  12. Poaceae (Grass family) Fall panicum

    E-print Network

    Poaceae (Grass family) Fall panicum Panicum dichotomiflorum Michx. Life cycle Erect summer annual to identifying Christmas tree weeds. #12;Poaceae (Grass family) Fall panicum continued Flowers and fruit panicum. #12;Poaceae (Grass family) Fall panicum continued Wild proso millet collar region. Witchgrass

  13. Middle and Lower Yosemite Falls

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this image, Middle Cascades and Lower Yosemite Falls may be seen from left to right. Middle Cascades have a total drop of 673 ft (206 m), while Lower Yosemite Falls has a drop of 320 ft (98 m). Yosemite Falls is one of the most famous waterfalls within Yosemite National Park....

  14. Using Likert-Type Scales in the Social Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croasmun, James T.; Ostrom, Lee

    2011-01-01

    Likert scales are useful in social science and attitude research projects. The General Self-Efficacy Exam is a test used to determine whether factors in educational settings affect participant's learning self-efficacy. The original instrument had 10 efficacy items and used a 4-point Likert scale. The Cronbach's alphas for the original test ranged…

  15. Breastfeeding Self-efficacy: A Critical Review of Available Instruments.

    PubMed

    Tuthill, Emily L; McGrath, Jacqueline M; Graber, Melanie; Cusson, Regina M; Young, Sera L

    2016-02-01

    Increasing breastfeeding rates in the United States is a national priority. Yet, initiation and duration of breastfeeding remains below national targets. Breastfeeding self-efficacy has been shown to be a strong predictor of both breastfeeding initiation and duration and is therefore an important characteristic to be able to measure. However, there is currently a myriad of instruments for measuring breastfeeding self-efficacy, which makes selection of an appropriate instrument difficult. Thus, our aim was to identify, compare, and critically review available breastfeeding self-efficacy instruments. In a systematic review, 6 breastfeeding self-efficacy instruments were identified. The instruments' purposes, theoretical framework, final scale development, and application in 5 most recent settings were analyzed. The 6 breastfeeding self-efficacy instruments apply a number of theoretical and conceptual frameworks in their development, with Bandura's social cognitive theory being most common. Content, construct, and predictive validity were strong for most scales. Some, but not all, have been successfully adapted to novel settings. In sum, there are several measurements of breastfeeding self-efficacy that can and should be employed to better understand reasons for suboptimal breastfeeding rates and the effects of interventions on breastfeeding self-efficacy. Instrument selection should be based on domains of primary interest, time available, peripartum timing, and assessment of previous adaptations. Failure to apply appropriate measures in research may garner results that are inconclusive, inaccurate, or nonrepresentative of true study effects. PMID:26319113

  16. Effects of communal exercise with visual and auditory feedback provided by a smart application on gait ability and fear of falling in Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Yun-Jin

    2014-10-01

    Parkinson's disease is a chronically developing neurodegenerative disease showing typical motor symptoms of the following triad: resting tremor, freezing of gait, and bradykinesia-hypokinesia. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a communal exercise program, using the visual and auditory feedback provided by a smart application, to assess gait ability, fear of falling, and fall efficacy in Parkinson's disease patients. Subjects consisted of 29 Parkinson's disease patients who were non-demented individuals. The subjects were randomly divided into three groups: the control group (n= 9, CG), the communal exercise group using the smart application (n= 10, CCEG), and the individual exercise group using the smart application (n= 10, ICEG). The communal exercise program consisted of a warm up (10 min) followed by communal exercise using the smart application (40 min), and a cool down (10 min) for 3 days per week over 10 weeks. The results presented here show that velocity and cadence were significantly increased among groups. Step and stride length were significantly increased among times. Fear of falling and fall efficacy were significantly different among groups and times. In particular, fear of falling was lower and fall efficacy was higher in the CCEG than in the ICEG and CG. These findings indicate that 10 weeks of the communal exercise program using the smart application can be effective in improving gait ability, fear of falling, and fall efficacy in Parkinson's disease patients. PMID:25426465

  17. High School Decision-Making at Henry Lord Middle School in Fall River

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronhard, Aimee A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate how students at Henry Lord Middle School in Fall River take into consideration their initial college and career aspirations when making their decision for high school. Self-efficacy theory, critical theory, and a literature review related to high school decision-making inform the analysis of…

  18. Elementary Students' Self-Efficacy Beliefs in Science: Role of Grade Level, Gender, and Socio-Economic Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karaarslan, Guliz; Sungur, Semra

    2011-01-01

    This study examined grade level and gender difference with respect to elementary students' science and technology self-efficacy. Additionally, relationship between socio-economic status (SES) and self-efficacy was examined. A total of 145 elementary students participated in the study. Self efficacy towards Science and Technology Scale was used to…

  19. Junior High School Students Internet Usage and Self-Efficacy: A Re-Examination of the Gender Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Meng-Jung; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigated the gender differences in junior high school students' Internet self-efficacy and their use of the Internet. A total of 1080 eighth graders were randomly selected from all junior high school students in Taiwan. The Internet Self-Efficacy Scale (ISES) was developed and used to examine students' Internet self-efficacy in two…

  20. Gender Differences in School Children's Self-Efficacy Beliefs: Students' and Teachers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb-Williams, Jane

    2014-01-01

    This small scale study examined gender differences in self-efficacy. 24 girls and 28 boys aged between 10 and 12 years completed self-efficacy questionnaires and attainment tests. The study was conducted in two primary school classrooms in England and the results indicated that gender differences in self-efficacy were significant with boys holding…

  1. `In free fall'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beijerinck, Herman C. W.

    2014-01-01

    Physicists in the lead of a fiction book or a play, that's a rare event! Writers in general do not understand physics, while physicists seldom have the talent of writing for a large audience. So when it happens, we should rejoice. The up-and-coming German author Juli Zeh [1] (1974), who studied law, has succeeded in combining beautiful prose, psychological drama, crime and physics in a challenging book `In free fall' [2]. A good friend of hers, Bettina Bruinier, has put the core message of the book into a compelling play in the `Volkstheater' in Munich [1]. Yes, it can be done.

  2. The Sky is Falling 

    E-print Network

    Crawford, Amanda

    2005-01-01

    is FallingStory by Amanda Crawford tx H2O | pg. 12 Because drought and water shortages areever-present threats, many Texas Water Districts have constructed alternate methods of preserving, and now producing water. Cloud-seeding is one such solution.... Cloud-seeding introduces foreign particles into an unproductive cloud, enhancing the formation of water droplets. In simpler terms, it is a way to produce rain by increasing the size of water droplets in a cloud that otherwise aren't heavy enough...

  3. 2010 Fall : Distinguished Honors Distinguished

    E-print Network

    Kunkle, Tom

    Margaret Distinguished Becker Russell Hamilton Monte Distinguished 1 #12;2010 Fall : Distinguished Honors Borgeson Chelsea Virginia Distinguished Bostick William Brooks Distinguished Bostrom Seth Michael

  4. Klamath Falls geothermal field, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

    1989-09-01

    Klamath Falls, Oregon, is located in a Known Geothermal Resource Area which has been used by residents, principally to obtain geothermal fluids for space heating, at least since the turn of the century. Over 500 shallow-depth wells ranging from 90 to 2,000 ft (27 to 610 m) in depth are used to heat (35 MWt) over 600 structures. This utilization includes the heating of homes, apartments, schools, commercial buildings, hospital, county jail, YMCA, and swimming pools by individual wells and three district heating systems. Geothermal well temperatures range from 100 to 230{degree}F (38 to 110{degree}C) and the most common practice is to use downhole heat exchangers with city water as the circulating fluid. Larger facilities and district heating systems use lineshaft vertical turbine pumps and plate heat exchangers. Well water chemistry indicates approximately 800 ppM dissolved solids, with sodium sulfate having the highest concentration. Some scaling and corrosion does occur on the downhole heat exchangers (black iron pipe) and on heating systems where the geo-fluid is used directly. 73 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. A Piece of Paper Falling Faster than Free Fall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vera, F.; Rivera, R.

    2011-01-01

    We report a simple experiment that clearly demonstrates a common error in the explanation of the classic experiment where a small piece of paper is put over a book and the system is let fall. This classic demonstration is used in introductory physics courses to show that after eliminating the friction force with the air, the piece of paper falls

  6. Community College Estimated Growth: Fall 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillippe, Kent; Mullin, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    A survey from the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) found that enrollment growth in fall 2010 slowed its pace at community colleges, increasing 3.2% from the previous year. This contrasts with more dramatic increases in recent years: more than 11% between fall 2008 and fall 2009, and nearly 17% between fall 2007 and fall 2009,…

  7. The medico-legal evaluation of injuries from falls in pediatric age groups.

    PubMed

    Kafadar, Safiye; Kafadar, Hüseyin

    2015-04-01

    Blunt trauma from accidental falls or intentional jumping from great heights occurs frequently in forensic medicine. The goal of this study was to investigate injuries due to falls in children under 19 years of age. Injuries from falls are the leading cause of visits to emergency departments and to deaths due to injuries. Various methods are used in the classification of falls. In this study, we have classified falls as "high-level" (? 5 m), "low-level" (<5 m) and "ground-level". We have retrospectively evaluated 814 boys (61.18%) and 512 girls (38.62%), making up a total of 1326 children (under 19 years old) with the mean age of 7.85 ± 3.46, that were admitted to State Hospital between January 2009 and December 2013 due to falls from heights and falls on ground-level. Falls were low-level in 738 cases, high-level in 176 cases, and ground-level in 412 cases. Cases were categorized by gender, age, age group, fall height, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), injured body part(s), mortality rate, and distribution according to months. In conclusion, falls merit attention because of their high risk of mortality and morbidity, as well as their burden on medical budgets. If the medico-legal aspects of falls were evaluated with regard to preventive event or death, the importance of the topic could be better understood. PMID:25735785

  8. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese martial art training on musculoskeletal health, balance performance, and self-efficacy in community-dwelling older adults

    PubMed Central

    Lip, Ryan W.T.; Fong, Shirley S.M.; Ng, Shamay S.M.; Liu, Karen P.Y.; Guo, X.

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) Chinese martial art training on radial bone strength, upper- and lower-limb muscular strength, shoulder joint mobility, balance performance, and self-efficacy in elderly participants. [Subjects and Methods] Twelve seniors voluntarily joined the VT training group, and twenty-seven seniors voluntarily joined the control group. The VT group received VT training for three months, while the control group received no training. The bone strength of the distal radius was assessed using an ultrasound bone sonometer. Muscular strength in the limbs was evaluated using a Jamar handgrip dynamometer and the five times sit-to-stand test. Shoulder joint mobility was examined using a goniometer. Balance performance and self-efficacy were evaluated using the Berg Balance Scale and the Chinese version of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, respectively. [Results] The results revealed a nonsignificant group-by-time interaction effect, group effect, and time effect for all outcome variables. However, general trends of maintenance or improvement in all outcome parameters were observed to a greater extent in the VT group than in the control group. [Conclusion] VT training might be a potential fall-prevention exercise that can be used to maintain general physique, balance, and confidence in the elderly population. A further randomized controlled trial is needed to confirm this postulation. PMID:25931704

  9. Clinical prediction of fall risk and white matter abnormalities: a diffusion tensor imaging study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Tinetti scale is a simple clinical tool designed to predict risk of falling by focusing on gait and stance impairment in elderly persons. Gait impairment is also associated with white matter (WM) abnormalities. Objective: To test the hypothesis that elderly subjects at risk for falling, as deter...

  10. [FALLS IN PATIENTS WITH DEMENTIA].

    PubMed

    Aizen, Efraim

    2015-05-01

    Older people with dementia are at increased risk of falls and their consequences. Patients with dementia fall twice as often as elderly cognitively intact people and are at greater risk of injurious falls. Falls in older people with dementia cause higher rates of morbidity, mortality and institutionalization. There is limited literature attempting to show specific risk factors for falls in this population, mainly: Lewy body dementia, dementia related to Parkinson's disease and depression, psychotropic medication, functional disability and behavioral disturbances. The Physiological Profile Assessment (PPAJ has been found to be a good fall risk screening tool in this population. There are few trials that have shown limited effectiveness of targeted fall prevention programs in community-dwelling cognitively impaired elderly. The evidence from hospitals and residential care is not conclusive. However, it has been demonstrated that some interventions, primarily exercise interventions, can modify certain risk factors in patients with dementia. Further research is required in specifically targeting fall prevention in older people with dementia. PMID:26168645

  11. Not Just a Fall Tree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller-Hewes, Kathy A.

    2004-01-01

    Trees burst with color in the northern states. Autumn leaves dust the ground. Painting the fall landscape is nothing new. Teachers have been doing it in classrooms for decades. The approach, however, can make the difference between whether the fall landscape is simply painting for fun, or a real learning experience. Students learn best when they…

  12. Persistence. Snapshot Report, Fall 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Today's college student is not your '60s drop-out. In 2010, college students tended to stay enrolled (i.e., persist), even if it was in a different school, according to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. For a student enrolled in the fall, persistence is defined as either continued enrollment during the next term after the fall or…

  13. NOVA Fall 1999 Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Wayne; Karlan, James W.; Ransick, Kristina; Rosene, Dale; Sammons, Fran Lyons; Sammons, James

    This teacher's guide complements five programs that aired on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) in the fall of 1999. Programs include: (1) "Fall of the Leaning Tower"; (2) "Everest: The Mystery of Mallory and Irvine"; (3) "Time Travel, Decoding Nazi Secrets"; (3) "Voyage of Doom"; and (5) "Barely Breathing". It provides activity set-ups related…

  14. Coins falling in water

    E-print Network

    Luke Heisinger; Paul K Newton; Eva Kanso

    2013-12-08

    When a coin falls in water, its trajectory is one of four types determined by its dimensionless moment of inertia $I^\\ast$ and Reynolds number Re: (A) steady; (B) fluttering; (C) chaotic; or (D) tumbling. The dynamics induced by the interaction of the water with the surface of the coin, however, makes the exact landing site difficult to predict a priori. Here, we describe a carefully designed experiment in which a coin is dropped repeatedly in water, so that we can determine the probability density functions (pdf) associated with the landing positions for each of the four trajectory types, all of which are radially symmetric about the center-drop line. In the case of the steady mode, the pdf is approximately Gaussian distributed, with variances that are small, indicating that the coin is most likely to land at the center, right below the point it is dropped from. For the other falling modes, the center is one of the least likely landing sites. Indeed, the pdf's of the fluttering, chaotic and tumbling modes are characterized by a "dip" around the center. For the tumbling mode, the pdf is a ring configuration about the center-line, with a ring width that depends on the dimensionless parameters $I^\\ast$ and Re and height from which the coin is dropped. For the chaotic mode, the pdf is generally a broadband distribution spread out radially symmetrically about the center-line. For the steady and fluttering modes, the coin never flips, so the coin lands with the same side up as was dropped. For the chaotic mode, the probability of heads or tails is close to 0.5. In the case of the tumbling mode, the probability of heads or tails based on the height of the drop which determines whether the coin flips an even or odd number of times during descent.

  15. Automatic Fall Monitoring: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Pannurat, Natthapon; Thiemjarus, Surapa; Nantajeewarawat, Ekawit

    2014-01-01

    Falls and fall-related injuries are major incidents, especially for elderly people, which often mark the onset of major deterioration of health. More than one-third of home-dwelling people aged 65 or above and two-thirds of those in residential care fall once or more each year. Reliable fall detection, as well as prevention, is an important research topic for monitoring elderly living alone in residential or hospital units. The aim of this study is to review the existing fall detection systems and some of the key research challenges faced by the research community in this field. We categorize the existing platforms into two groups: wearable and ambient devices; the classification methods are divided into rule-based and machine learning techniques. The relative merit and potential drawbacks are discussed, and we also outline some of the outstanding research challenges that emerging new platforms need to address. PMID:25046016

  16. Modeling seasonal migration of fall armyworm moths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westbrook, J. K.; Nagoshi, R. N.; Meagher, R. L.; Fleischer, S. J.; Jairam, S.

    2015-06-01

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith), is a highly mobile insect pest of a wide range of host crops. However, this pest of tropical origin cannot survive extended periods of freezing temperature but must migrate northward each spring if it is to re-infest cropping areas in temperate regions. The northward limit of the winter-breeding region for North America extends to southern regions of Texas and Florida, but infestations are regularly reported as far north as Québec and Ontario provinces in Canada by the end of summer. Recent genetic analyses have characterized migratory pathways from these winter-breeding regions, but knowledge is lacking on the atmosphere's role in influencing the timing, distance, and direction of migratory flights. The Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model was used to simulate migratory flight of fall armyworm moths from distinct winter-breeding source areas. Model simulations identified regions of dominant immigration from the Florida and Texas source areas and overlapping immigrant populations in the Alabama-Georgia and Pennsylvania-Mid-Atlantic regions. This simulated migratory pattern corroborates a previous migratory map based on the distribution of fall armyworm haplotype profiles. We found a significant regression between the simulated first week of moth immigration and first week of moth capture (for locations which captured ?10 moths), which on average indicated that the model simulated first immigration 2 weeks before first captures in pheromone traps. The results contribute to knowledge of fall armyworm population ecology on a continental scale and will aid in the prediction and interpretation of inter-annual variability of insect migration patterns including those in response to climatic change and adoption rates of transgenic cultivars.

  17. Fall prevention in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Ungar, Andrea; Rafanelli, Martina; Iacomelli, Iacopo; Brunetti, Maria Angela; Ceccofiglio, Alice; Tesi, Francesca; Marchionni, Niccolò

    2013-05-01

    Falls are frequent in the elderly and affect mortality, morbidity, loss of functional capacity and institutionalization. In the older patient the incidence of falls can sometimes be underestimated, even in the absence of a clear cognitive impairment, because it is often difficult to reconstruct the dynamics. It is quite common that forms due to syncope are associated with retrograde amnesia and in 40 to 60% of the cases falls happen in the absence of witnesses. The pathogenesis of falls is often multifactorial, due to physiological age-related changes or more properly pathological factors, or due to the environment. The identification of risk factors is essential in the planning of preventive measures. Syncope is one of major causes of falls. About 20% of cardiovascular syncope in patients older than 70 appears as a fall and more than 20% of older people with Carotid Sinus Syndrome complain of falls as well as syncope. These data clearly state that older patients with history of falls should undergo a cardiovascular and neuroautonomic assessment besides the survey of other risk factors. Multifactorial assessment requires a synergy of various specialists. The geriatrician coordinates the multidisciplinary intervention in order to make the most effective evaluation of the risk of falling, searching for all predisposing factors, aiming towards a program of prevention. In clear pathological conditions it is possible to enact a specific treatment. Particular attention must indeed be paid to the re-evaluation of drug therapy, with dose adjustments or withdrawal especially for antihypertensive, diuretics and benzodiazepines. The Guidelines of the American Geriatrics Society recommend modification of environmental hazards, training paths, hip protectors and appropriate use of support tools (sticks, walkers), which can be effective elements of a multifactorial intervention program. Balance exercises are also recommended. In conclusion, an initial assessment, supported by a comprehensive cardiovascular and neuroautonomic evaluation, allows for reaching a final diagnosis in most cases, demonstrating a key role in the real identification of the etiology of the fall and implementing the treatment measures. PMID:24133524

  18. After a fall in the hospital

    MedlinePLUS

    ... new surroundings Hospital staff often do not see patients fall. But falls require attention right away to lessen ... use a backboard or a lift. Watch the patient closely after the fall. You may need to check the person's alertness, ...

  19. Falls Among Older Adults: An Overview

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Important Facts about Falls Costs of Falls Hip Fractures Among Older Adults Older Adult Falls Programs Compendium ... often because of a head injury or hip fracture. 3 Each year at least 250,000 older ...

  20. Posttraumatic stress symptoms in older adults hospitalized for fall injury?

    PubMed Central

    Jayasinghe, Nimali; Sparks, Martha A.; Kato, Kaori; Wyka, Katarzyna; Wilbur, Kaitlyn; Chiaramonte, Gabrielle; Barie, Philip S.; Lachs, Mark S.; O'Dell, Michael; Evans, Arthur; Bruce, Martha L.; Difede, JoAnn

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although unintentional falls may pose a threat of death or injury, few studies have investigated their psychological impact on older adults. This study sought to gather data on early posttraumatic stress symptoms in older adults in the hospital setting after a fall. Method Participants in this study were 100 adults age 65 years or older admitted to a large urban hospital in New York City because of a fall. Men and women were represented approximately equally in the sample; most were interviewed within days of the fall event. The study's bedside interview included the Posttraumatic Stress Symptom Scale, which inquires about the presence and severity of 17 trauma-related symptoms. Results Twenty-seven participants reported substantial posttraumatic stress symptoms (moderate or higher severity). Exploratory bivariate analyses suggested an association between posttraumatic stress symptom severity and female gender, lower level of education, unemployment, number of medical conditions, and back/chest injury. Conclusions A significant percentage of older patients hospitalized after a fall suffer substantial posttraumatic stress. Future investigations are needed to assess the association between the psychiatric impact of a fall and short-term inpatient outcomes as well as longer-term functional outcomes. PMID:25213226

  1. Changes in task self-efficacy and emotion across competitive performances in golf.

    PubMed

    Boardley, Ian D; Jackson, Ben; Simmons, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    This research aimed to investigate (a) the effect of golfers' perceptions of coach motivation efficacy on golfers' precompetition task self-efficacy, (b) the effect of performance on pre-to-postround changes in self-efficacy, (c) the effect of pre-to-postround changes in self-efficacy on pre-to-postround changes in affect and emotion, and (d) whether any effects of performance on pre-to-postcompetition changes in affect and emotion were mediated by pre-to-postcompetition changes in self-efficacy. In Study 1, a scale measuring golf self-efficacy was developed and validated using data from 197 golfers. In Study 2, 200 golfers completed this measure alongside measures of coach motivation efficacy, and positive and negative affect before a golf competition; all measures (except coach motivation efficacy) were again completed following the competition. Structural equation modeling showed that coach motivation efficacy positively predicted precompetition self-efficacy, performance positively predicted pre-to-postcompetition changes in self-efficacy, which had positive and negative effects, respectively, on pre-to-postcompetition changes in positive and negative affect; mediation analyses demonstrated that pre-to-postcompetition changes in self-efficacy mediated effects of performance on pre-to-postcompetition changes in positive and negative affect. In Study 3, the Study-2 procedures were replicated with a separate sample of 212 golfers, except measures of excitement, concentration disruption, somatic anxiety, and worry replaced those for positive and negative affect. Structural analyses showed the findings from Study 2 were largely replicated when specific emotions were investigated in place of general indices of affect. This investigation makes novel contributions regarding the potential importance of perceptions of coach efficacy for golfers' own efficacy beliefs, and the role personal efficacy beliefs may play in facilitating the effects of performance on affective outcomes. PMID:26442770

  2. Global Self-Esteem and Self-Efficacy Correlates: Relation of Academic Achievement and Self-Esteem among Emirati Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afari, Ernest; Ward, Graeme; Khine, Myint Swe

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the relationships between global self-esteem, academic self-efficacy and academic performance among a sample of 255 college students in the United Arab Emirates. The widely used Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale (RSES; Rosenberg, 1965) and an academic self-efficacy scale, modified from (Jinks and Morgan, 1999) were used to assess…

  3. The Roles of Teacher Efficacy in Instructional Innovation: Its Predictive Relations to Constructivist and Didactic Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nie, Youyan; Tan, Gim Hoon; Liau, Albert Kienfie; Lau, Shun; Chua, Bee Leng

    2013-01-01

    Constructivist instruction has been implemented in the current instructional innovation in Singapore. Large scale survey study was conducted to examine the roles of teacher efficacy in implementing the innovative constructivist instruction. The results showed that the positive correlation between teacher efficacy and constructivist instruction was…

  4. The Perception of Educational Software Development Self-Efficacy among Undergraduate CEIT Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzun, Adem; Ozkilic, Ruchan; Senturk, Aysan

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze self-efficacy perceptions for education software development of teacher candidates studying at Department of Computer Education and Instructional Technologies, with respect to a range of variables. The Educational Software Development Self-Efficacy Perception Scale was used as data collection tool. Sixty…

  5. Instructional Leadership Influence on Collective Teacher Efficacy to Improve School Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fancera, Samuel F.; Bliss, James R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether instructional leadership functions, as defined in Hallinger's Principal Instructional Management Rating Scale, positively influence collective teacher efficacy to improve school achievement. Teachers from sample schools provided data for measures of collective teacher efficacy and instructional…

  6. Mastery of Negative Affect: A Hierarchical Model of Emotional Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Di Giunta, Laura; Pastorelli, Concetta; Eisenberg, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Building on previous studies that formulated measures for assessing self-efficacy beliefs regarding the management of anger/irritation and despondency/sadness, we developed 3 new scales to assess perceived self-efficacy in managing fear, shame/embarrassment, and guilt. In Study 1, the internal and construct validity of the 5 aforementioned…

  7. Mathematics Anxiety and Mathematics Teacher Efficacy in Elementary Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gresham, Gina

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between mathematics anxiety and mathematics teacher efficacy among 156 elementary pre-service teachers from a university in the southeastern United States. Data sources included the Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale (MARS), Mathematics Teaching Efficacy Beliefs Instrument, and pre-service teacher interviews.…

  8. Pre-Service Mathematics Teacher Efficacy: Its Nature and Relationship to Teacher Concerns and Orientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyper, Jamie Scott

    2014-01-01

    In a mixed method study, teacher efficacy and contributing theoretical constructs of teacher concerns and teacher orientation with Intermediate/Senior mathematics preservice teachers from two Ontario Faculties of Education are examined. Data sources include a web-based questionnaire containing two teacher efficacy scales and short answer…

  9. Further Validation of a U.S. Adult Social Self-Efficacy Inventory in Chinese Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Jinyan; Meng, Hui; Zhao, Bihua; Patel, Trishna

    2012-01-01

    The authors report further validity evidence for the Chinese version of a U.S. adult social self-efficacy inventory, the "Perceived Social Self-Efficacy" (PSSE) scale in Chinese populations. Study 1 participants were 323 new graduate students enrolled at a large university in an east coast city of the People's Republic of China. Differential item…

  10. The Development of a Physical Education Teachers' Physical Activity Self-Efficacy Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jeffrey J.; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges

    2003-01-01

    Developed a valid, reliable physical education teachers' physical activity self-efficacy scale for teaching classes in which students were engaged in high levels of physical activity. Results offer preliminary support for the psychometric properties of this instrument, which can help understand physical education teachers' efficacy in overcoming…

  11. The Effects of School Administration Self-Efficacy on School Climate and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if there are significant relationships between the efficacies of the school principal, the climate of the school, and student achievement. Five schools within a small rural school district participated in this study. The principals completed the Principal Sense of Efficacy Scale, while the teachers at the…

  12. The Effect of Self-Efficacy and Psychosocial Development on Major-Changing Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Karen E.; Smothers, Anthony W.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we sought to determine whether psychosocial development and self-efficacy of major changers differ from those classified as relatively stable. Participants completed the "Life-Skills Inventory-College" (Picklesimer, 1991) form to measure psychosocial development and the "General Self-efficacy" (Schwarzer & Jerusalem, 1995) scale to…

  13. Burnout and Teacher Self-Efficacy among Teachers Working in Special Education Institutions in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sariçam, Hakan; Sakiz, Halis

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the relationship between teacher self-efficacy and burnout among special education school teachers in Turkey. One hundred and eighteen teachers completed the Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Teachers belonged to the psychological counselling and guidance programme,…

  14. Measuring the Sources of Self-Efficacy among Secondary School Music Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zelenak, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the four sources of self-efficacy in music performance and examine responses from the Music Performance Self-Efficacy Scale (MPSES). Participants (N = 290) were middle and high school music students from 10 schools in two regions of the United States. Questions included the following: (1) How much…

  15. Emotional Intelligence and Teacher Efficacy: A Study of Turkish EFL Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocoglu, Zeynep

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between emotional intelligence and teacher efficacy among 90 English language pre-service teachers from a university in Turkey. Data sources included Tschannen-Moran and Woolfolk-Hoy's Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale and Reuven Bar-On's Emotional Quotient Inventory. The findings indicated that Turkish EFL…

  16. Determination of Self-Efficacy Beliefs of High School Students towards Math Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozgen, Kemal; Bindaka, Recep

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the high school students' self-efficacy beliefs about math literacy, and examine this beliefs in terms of some variables. The research was conducted on 712 high school students. A questionnaire and Math Literacy Self-Efficacy Scale were used for data collection. The data were analyzed in terms of t-test,…

  17. Item Response Modeling: An Evaluation of the Children's Fruit and Vegetable Self-Efficacy Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Kathy; Baranowski, Tom; Thompson, Debbe

    2006-01-01

    Perceived self-efficacy (SE) for eating fruit and vegetables (FV) is a key variable mediating FV change in interventions. This study applies item response modeling (IRM) to a fruit, juice and vegetable self-efficacy questionnaire (FVSEQ) previously validated with classical test theory (CTT) procedures. The 24-item (five-point Likert scale) FVSEQ…

  18. School Psychologists' Sense of Self-Efficacy for Consultation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guiney, Meaghan C.; Harris, Abigail; Zusho, Akane; Cancelli, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The Consultation Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES) was developed and validated to assess school psychologists' perceptions of self-efficacy for engaging in school-based consultation. A pilot study with graduate students (N = 92) indicated high internal consistency (a = 0.99) and provided evidence of discriminant validity, as a group with more…

  19. Fibromyalgia is Associated with Impaired Balance and Falls

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kim D.; Horak, Fay B.; Winters, Kerri Stone; Morea, Jessica M.; Bennett, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether FM patients differ from matched healthy controls in clinical tests of balance ability and fall frequency. Methods 34 FM patients and 32 age matched controls were administered the Balance Evaluation-Systems Test (BESTest), rated their balance confidence with the Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC) and reported the number of falls in the last 6 months. The Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) was used to assess FM severity. Results FM patients had significantly impaired balance in all components of the BESTest compared to controls. They also scored more poorly on balance confidence. Overall fibromyalgia severity (FIQ) correlated significantly with the BESTest, and the ABC scale. The BESTest and ABC correlated significantly with 6 commonly reported FM symptoms (excluding pain). FM patients reported a total of 37 falls over the last six-months compared to 6 falls in healthy controls. Conclusion Fibromyalgia is associated with balance problems and increased fall frequency. Patients were aware of their balance problems. These results suggest that FM may affect peripheral and/or central mechanisms of postural control. Further objective study is needed to identify the relative contributions of neural and musculoskeletal impairments to postural stability in FM, thus providing clinicians with exercise prescriptions that maximize postural stability. PMID:19125137

  20. Ecosystem scale acoustic sensing reveals humpback whale behavior synchronous with herring spawning processes and re-evaluation finds no effect of sonar on humpback song occurrence in the Gulf of Maine in fall 2006.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zheng; Jain, Ankita D; Tran, Duong; Yi, Dong Hoon; Wu, Fan; Zorn, Alexander; Ratilal, Purnima; Makris, Nicholas C

    2014-01-01

    We show that humpback-whale vocalization behavior is synchronous with peak annual Atlantic herring spawning processes in the Gulf of Maine. With a passive, wide-aperture, densely-sampled, coherent hydrophone array towed north of Georges Bank in a Fall 2006 Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing (OAWRS) experiment, vocalizing whales could be instantaneously detected and localized over most of the Gulf of Maine ecosystem in a roughly 400-km diameter area by introducing array gain, of 18 dB, orders of magnitude higher than previously available in acoustic whale sensing. With humpback-whale vocalizations consistently recorded at roughly 2000/day, we show that vocalizing humpbacks (i) were overwhelmingly distributed along the northern flank of Georges Bank, coinciding with the peak spawning time and location of Atlantic herring, and (ii) their overall vocalization behavior was strongly diurnal, synchronous with the formation of large nocturnal herring shoals, with a call rate roughly ten-times higher at night than during the day. Humpback-whale vocalizations were comprised of (1) highly diurnal non-song calls, suited to hunting and feeding behavior, and (2) songs, which had constant occurrence rate over a diurnal cycle, invariant to diurnal herring shoaling. Before and during OAWRS survey transmissions: (a) no vocalizing whales were found at Stellwagen Bank, which had negligible herring populations, and (b) a constant humpback-whale song occurrence rate indicates the transmissions had no effect on humpback song. These measurements contradict the conclusions of Risch et al. Our analysis indicates that (a) the song occurrence variation reported in Risch et al. is consistent with natural causes other than sonar, (b) the reducing change in song reported in Risch et al. occurred days before the sonar survey began, and (c) the Risch et al. method lacks the statistical significance to draw the conclusions of Risch et al. because it has a 98-100% false-positive rate and lacks any true-positive confirmation. PMID:25289938

  1. Ecosystem Scale Acoustic Sensing Reveals Humpback Whale Behavior Synchronous with Herring Spawning Processes and Re-Evaluation Finds No Effect of Sonar on Humpback Song Occurrence in the Gulf of Maine in Fall 2006

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zheng; Jain, Ankita D.; Tran, Duong; Yi, Dong Hoon; Wu, Fan; Zorn, Alexander; Ratilal, Purnima; Makris, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    We show that humpback-whale vocalization behavior is synchronous with peak annual Atlantic herring spawning processes in the Gulf of Maine. With a passive, wide-aperture, densely-sampled, coherent hydrophone array towed north of Georges Bank in a Fall 2006 Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing (OAWRS) experiment, vocalizing whales could be instantaneously detected and localized over most of the Gulf of Maine ecosystem in a roughly 400-km diameter area by introducing array gain, of 18 dB, orders of magnitude higher than previously available in acoustic whale sensing. With humpback-whale vocalizations consistently recorded at roughly 2000/day, we show that vocalizing humpbacks (i) were overwhelmingly distributed along the northern flank of Georges Bank, coinciding with the peak spawning time and location of Atlantic herring, and (ii) their overall vocalization behavior was strongly diurnal, synchronous with the formation of large nocturnal herring shoals, with a call rate roughly ten-times higher at night than during the day. Humpback-whale vocalizations were comprised of (1) highly diurnal non-song calls, suited to hunting and feeding behavior, and (2) songs, which had constant occurrence rate over a diurnal cycle, invariant to diurnal herring shoaling. Before and during OAWRS survey transmissions: (a) no vocalizing whales were found at Stellwagen Bank, which had negligible herring populations, and (b) a constant humpback-whale song occurrence rate indicates the transmissions had no effect on humpback song. These measurements contradict the conclusions of Risch et al. Our analysis indicates that (a) the song occurrence variation reported in Risch et al. is consistent with natural causes other than sonar, (b) the reducing change in song reported in Risch et al. occurred days before the sonar survey began, and (c) the Risch et al. method lacks the statistical significance to draw the conclusions of Risch et al. because it has a 98–100% false-positive rate and lacks any true-positive confirmation. PMID:25289938

  2. Falls - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ?????? ?? ???????? - ??????? Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Safety Tips to Prevent Falls at Home (Arabic) ??????? Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Preventing Falls in the Hospital Sprje?avanje ...

  3. Benchmarks for Psychotherapy Efficacy in Adult Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minami, Takuya; Wampold, Bruce E.; Serlin, Ronald C.; Kircher, John C.; Brown, George S.

    2007-01-01

    This study estimates pretreatment-posttreatment effect size benchmarks for the treatment of major depression in adults that may be useful in evaluating psychotherapy effectiveness in clinical practice. Treatment efficacy benchmarks for major depression were derived for 3 different types of outcome measures: the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression…

  4. Prediction of Research Self-Efficacy and Future Research Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Rosean M.; And Others

    Although graduate programs hope that their students will be committed to research in their careers, most students express ambivalence towards research. Identifying the variables that predict involvement in research thus seems crucial. In this study 136 doctoral students from a wide range of disciplines completed the Research Self-Efficacy Scale

  5. The Relationship between Computer Anxiety and Computer Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simsek, Ali

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between computer anxiety and computer self-efficacy of students and teachers in elementary and secondary schools. The sample included a total of 845 subjects from two private school systems in Turkey. The Oetting's Computer Anxiety Scale was used to measure computer anxiety whereas the Murphy's Computer…

  6. Enhancing Entrepreneurial Self-Efficacy through Vocational Entrepreneurship Education Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maritz, Alex; Brown, Chris

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report the results of a longitudinal evaluation of a vocational entrepreneurship education programme (EEP) using entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE) measures. An empirical, mixed methods longitudinal and effectuation scale was used to measure ESE scores. Results indicate that participation in the programme had a…

  7. Ability Self-Estimates and Self-Efficacy: Meaningfully Distinct?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bubany, Shawn T.; Hansen, Jo-Ida C.

    2010-01-01

    Conceptual differences between self-efficacy and ability self-estimate scores, used in vocational psychology and career counseling, were examined with confirmatory factor analysis, discriminate relations, and reliability analysis. Results suggest that empirical differences may be due to measurement error or scale content, rather than due to the…

  8. Effects of hearing aids in the balance, quality of life and fear to fall in elderly people with sensorineural hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Lacerda, Clara Fonseca; Silva, Luciana Oliveira e; de Tavares Canto, Roberto Sérgio; Cheik, Nadia Carla

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction:?The aging process provokes structural modifications and functional to it greets, compromising the postural control and central processing. Studies have boarded the necessity to identify to the harmful factors of risk to aged the auditory health and security in stricken aged by auditory deficits and with alterations of balance. Objective:?To evaluate the effect of auditory prosthesis in the quality of life, the balance and the fear of fall in aged with bilateral auditory loss. Method:?Carried through clinical and experimental study with 56 aged ones with sensorineural auditory loss, submitted to the use of auditory prosthesis of individual sonorous amplification (AASI). The aged ones had answered to the questionnaires of quality of life Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), Falls Efficacy International Scale- (FES-I) and the test of Berg Balance Scale (BBS). After 4 months, the aged ones that they adapted to the use of the AASI had been reevaluated. Results:?It had 50% of adaptation of the aged ones to the AASI. It was observed that the masculine sex had greater difficulty in adapting to the auditory device and that the variable age, degree of loss, presence of humming and vertigo had not intervened with the adaptation to auditory prosthesis. It had improvement of the quality of life in the dominance of the State General Health (EGS) and Functional Capacity (CF) and of the humming, as well as the increase of the auto-confidence after adaptation of auditory prosthesis. Conclusion:?The use of auditory prosthesis provided the improvement of the domains of the quality of life, what it reflected consequently in one better auto-confidence and in the long run in the reduction of the fear of fall in aged with sensorineural auditory loss. PMID:25991930

  9. Comparative evaluation of the efficacy of curcumin gel with and without photo activation as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in the treatment of chronic periodontitis: A split mouth clinical and microbiological study

    PubMed Central

    Sreedhar, Annaji; Sarkar, Indranil; Rajan, Padma; Pai, Jagdish; Malagi, Sachin; Kamath, Vinesh; Barmappa, Radhikka

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Harnessing Mother Nature's bountiful remedies for rejuvenation has been in vogue since time immemorial. Turmeric contains the polyphenol Curcumin in its rhizome. It produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) with visible light irradiation as photodynamic therapy (PDT) - which validates its use in the treatment of periodontitis. This study compares Curcumin and Curcumin PDT as an adjunct to conventional Scaling and Root Planing (SRP) with SRP alone in the treatment of patients with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Sixty sites in fifteen untreated chronic periodontitis patients were randomly assigned in a split mouth design for one of the treatment modalities; 1) Scaling and root planing (SRP) alone, (2) SRP + Curcumin application for 5 min, (3) SRP + Curcumin application for 5 min + irradiation with blue light emitting diode of wavelength 470 nm for 5 min. (Curcumin PDT) on 0 day.(4) SRP + Curcumin PDT on “0”, 7th and 21st day. The clinical parameters included plaque index (PI), bleeding on probing (BOP) measured by sulcus bleeding index (SBI), probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL) recorded at the baseline & 3rd month. The site with greatest probing pocket depth (PPD) was selected from each quadrant for bacterial sampling and culturing for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) and other black pigment producing microorganisms (BPB) like Porphyromonas gingivalis & Prevotella intermedia. Conclusion: The present study showed that Curcumin photodynamic therapy is a valuable treatment modality adjunctive to conventional scaling and root planing over Curcumin application. Moreover, multiple adjunctive applications of photodynamic therapy are more beneficial than single application in reducing clinical & microbiological parameters. PMID:26604595

  10. TABLE OF CONTENTS Fall Protection

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ............................................................................... 21-10 21.E Controlled Access Zones .................................................. 21-32 Figures: 21-1 ­ Control Zone/Safe Zone Fall Protection Section 24.A.01.d. Note 1: Floating Plant and Vessels are excluded from these requirements except where

  11. Outcome Rating Scale and Session Rating Scale in Psychological Practice: Clinical Utility of Ultra-Brief Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Alistair; Hemsley, Samantha

    2009-01-01

    The validity and reliability of the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS) and the Session Rating Scale (SRS) were evaluated against existing longer measures, including the Outcome Questionnaire-45, Working Alliance Inventory, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21, Quality of Life Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and General Self-efficacy Scale. The measures…

  12. Self-Report of Missteps in Older Adults: A Valid Proxy of Fall Risk?

    PubMed Central

    Srygley, Jennifer M.; Herman, Talia; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relationship between missteps and falls and to identify factors associated with missteps to potentially generate a broader picture of fall risk. Design Prospective, observational cohort. Setting General community. Subjects A sample of healthy, community-living older adults (N=266; ages: 70–90y) who were cognitively intact and walked independently. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Baseline testing of gait, motor function, cognitive function, affect, and balance confidence was followed by a 12-month period in which subjects completed a daily log documenting the number of falls and missteps (defined as a trip, slip, or other loss of balance in which recovery occurred to prevent a fall). Results Mean ± SD participant age was 76.4±4.3 years. Among the participants, 20.7% reported at least 1 misstep and 25.6% of the participants reported at least 1 fall during the 12 months. Among subjects who had multiple falls, missteps were more common than falls by a ratio of 3:1 (P<.001). Subjects who reported multiple missteps were more likely to fall prospectively (relative risk=3.89). Missteps were associated with higher scores on the Geriatric Depression Scale (P=.009) and increased anxiety (P=0.014), but were not associated with other known risk factors of falls, including gait and cognitive function. Conclusions The self-report of missteps may be a valuable tool in the research of falls and fall risk and may provide a way to identify patients at risk for falls before they fall. PMID:19406298

  13. Fall prevention with supplemental and alpha-hydroxylated vitamin D: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Results from fall prevention trials with supplemental vitamin D have been mixed and a possible differential benefit of supplemental versus alpha-hydroxylated vitamin D (activeD) has not been established. We performed a meta-analysis on the efficacy of supplemental vitamin D and activeD with or witho...

  14. Obesity and hormonal contraceptive efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jennifer A; Burke, Anne E

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern affecting an increasing proportion of reproductive-aged women. Avoiding unintended pregnancy is of major importance, given the increased risks associated with pregnancy, but obesity may affect the efficacy of hormonal contraceptives by altering how these drugs are absorbed, distributed, metabolized or eliminated. Limited data suggest that long-acting, reversible contraceptives maintain excellent efficacy in obese women. Some studies demonstrating altered pharmacokinetic parameters and increased failure rates with combined oral contraceptives, the contraceptive patch and emergency contraceptive pills suggest decreased efficacy of these methods. It is unclear whether bariatric surgery affects hormonal contraceptive efficacy. Obese women should be offered the full range of contraceptive options, with counseling that balances the risks and benefits of each method, including the risk of unintended pregnancy. PMID:24007251

  15. Field efficacy of wintertime insecticide applications against greenbugs, Schizaphis graminum (Rondani) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), on winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter wheat producers in Oklahoma often combine an insecticide with a top-dress application of nitrogen during late fall or winter to control existing greenbug populations. We evaluated the efficacy of three classes of insecticides applied in cold weather conditions ranging from -13.3 degrees to 2...

  16. Inpatient falls in freestanding children's hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jamerson, Patricia A; Graf, Elaine; Messmer, Patricia R; Fields, Heidi W; Barton, Sharon; Berger, Anne; Daraiseh, Nancy M; Fix, Michele; Huth, Myra; Latta, Linda; Smith, Andrea B; Lunbeck, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Patient falls are considered a significant safety risk, but little evidence regarding the significance of falls in children is available. A multisite, observational study of fall events occurring in pediatric inpatients (younger than 18 years of age) from Child Health Corporation of America member hospitals was conducted to determine the prevalence and significance of falls. Fall prevalence was 0.84 per 1,000 patient days with 48% classified as preventable. Injuries occurred in 32%, but only two falls resulted in an increased length of stay; none resulted in permanent disability or death. Only 47% of the children who fell were identified to be at risk for fall. Alert mechanisms were used in 60% and preventive measures in 23%. These findings suggest that while inpatient pediatric fall rates are lower than those of adults, greater diligence in identification and risk reduction may further reduce the prevalence of falls and the proportion of fall-related injuries. PMID:25134226

  17. Development of a Survey to Measure Self-Efficacy and Attitudes toward Web-Based Professional Development among Elementary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kao, Chia-Pin; Tsai, Chin-Chung; Shih, Meilun

    2014-01-01

    The major purpose of this study was to develop a survey to measure elementary school teachers' self-efficacy for web-based professional development. Based on interviews with eight elementary school teachers, three scales of web-based professional development self-efficacy (WPDSE) were formed, namely, general self-efficacy (measuring…

  18. Fall prevention in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ungar, Andrea; Rafanelli, Martina; Iacomelli, Iacopo; Brunetti, Maria Angela; Ceccofiglio, Alice; Tesi, Francesca; Marchionni, Niccolò

    2013-01-01

    Summary Falls are frequent in the elderly and affect mortality, morbidity, loss of functional capacity and institutionalization. In the older patient the incidence of falls can sometimes be underestimated, even in the absence of a clear cognitive impairment, because it is often difficult to reconstruct the dynamics. It is quite common that forms due to syncope are associated with retrograde amnesia and in 40 to 60% of the cases falls happen in the absence of witnesses. The pathogenesis of falls is often multifactorial, due to physiological age-related changes or more properly pathological factors, or due to the environment. The identification of risk factors is essential in the planning of preventive measures. Syncope is one of major causes of falls. About 20% of cardiovascular syncope in patients older than 70 appears as a fall and more than 20% of older people with Carotid Sinus Syndrome complain of falls as well as syncope. These data clearly state that older patients with history of falls should undergo a cardiovascular and neuroautonomic assessment besides the survey of other risk factors. Multifactorial assessment requires a synergy of various specialists. The geriatrician coordinates the multidisciplinary intervention in order to make the most effective evaluation of the risk of falling, searching for all predisposing factors, aiming towards a program of prevention. In clear pathological conditions it is possible to enact a specific treatment. Particular attention must indeed be paid to the re-evaluation of drug therapy, with dose adjustments or withdrawal especially for antihypertensive, diuretics and benzodiazepines. The Guidelines of the American Geriatrics Society recommend modification of environmental hazards, training paths, hip protectors and appropriate use of support tools (sticks, walkers), which can be effective elements of a multifactorial intervention program. Balance exercises are also recommended. In conclusion, an initial assessment, supported by a comprehensive cardiovascular and neuroautonomic evaluation, allows for reaching a final diagnosis in most cases, demonstrating a key role in the real identification of the etiology of the fall and implementing the treatment measures. PMID:24133524

  19. Reliability and validity of the German short version of the Activities specific Balance Confidence (ABC-D6) scale in older adults.

    PubMed

    Schott, Nadja

    2014-01-01

    The Activities specific Balance Confidence (ABC) is a questionnaire which was developed to assess falls-associated self-efficacy. The aim of this study was to evaluate reliability and validity of the German abbreviated 6-item version of the ABC scores in community-dwelling older people. The study sample included 384 subjects (age 71.1 ± 9.7). In order to determine the psychometric properties, reliability and validity were assessed through administration of the German adaptation of the ABC-D16 to participants twice, 10 days apart, and comparison of the ABC-D16 and the ABC-D6 with functional measures of balance and mobility (one-leg stance; 10 m walk; TUG; Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale (FAB)), physical activity (Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE)), physical fitness (30s arm curl, 30s chair stand, 6 min walk), cognition (Trail-Making-Test (TMT)), falls status, and quality of life (SF36). Factor analyses suggested a 1-factor solution for the ABC-D6 scale (explained variance 79.8%). Internal consistency (.95) and test-retest reliability (.98) for the ABC-D6 scores were excellent. Scores on the ABC-D6 were significantly lower than on the ABC-D16, but ABC-D16 and ABC-D6 scores were highly correlated (.94). There was an increasing difference in the ABC-scores between men and women with increasing age. Fallers reported lower balance confidence than non-fallers. The ABC-D6 score significantly correlated with functional measures of balance and mobility, physical activity, physical fitness, cognition, and quality of life (-.698falls-associated self-efficacy and may be used in future research projects and clinical trials. PMID:24962236

  20. Cowlitz Falls Fish Passage.

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The upper Cowlitz was once home to native salmon and steelhead. But the combined impacts of overharvest, farming, logging and road building hammered fish runs. And in the 1960s, a pair of hydroelectric dams blocked the migration path of ocean-returning and ocean-going fish. The lower Cowlitz still supports hatchery runs of chinook, coho and steelhead. But some 200 river miles in the upper river basin--much of it prime spawning and rearing habitat--have been virtually cut off from the ocean for over 26 years. Now the idea is to trap-and-haul salmon and steelhead both ways and bypass previously impassable obstacles in the path of anadromous fish. The plan can be summarized, for the sake of explanation, in three steps: (1) trap and haul adult fish--collect ocean-returning adult fish at the lowermost Cowlitz dam, and truck them upstream; (2) reseed--release the ripe adults above the uppermost dam, and let them spawn naturally, at the same time, supplement these runs with hatchery born fry that are reared and imprinted in ponds and net pens in the watershed; (3) trap and haul smolts--collection the new generation of young fish as they arrive at the uppermost Cowlitz dam, truck them past the three dams, and release them to continue their downstream migration to the sea. The critical part of any fish-collection system is the method of fish attraction. Scientists have to find the best combination of attraction system and screens that will guide young fish to the right spot, away from the turbine intakes. In the spring of 1994 a test was made of a prototype system of baffles and slots on the upriver face of the Cowlitz Falls Dam. The prototype worked at 90% efficiency in early tests, and it worked without the kind of expensive screening devices that have been installed on other dams. Now that the success of the attraction system has been verified, Harza engineers and consultants will design and build the appropriate collection part of the system.

  1. Characteristics of Sheath and Presheath Recovery during Pulse Fall Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Jae-Myung; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.; Kim, Gon-Ho

    2012-10-01

    Recovery motion of sheath and presheath is investigated with various fall times of negative bias on the target. Experimental observation was carried out with the collisionless argon plasma and the various pulses with fast and slow fall times which are shorter and longer than the ion transition time scaled of 3/?pi(?pi=ion plasma frequency), respectively. Electrical probe was employed to measure the density distribution. Ion distribution and speed near the target are important factors in determining the position of sheath . For the slow fall time, sheath and presheath boundaries recover with the same speed. Child-Langmuir sheath continuously persists due to enough time to rearrange ions and electrons. For the fast fall time, ion matrix sheath, which is immediately responding to the target voltage, leads the recovery of sheath with supersonic speed. Presheath follows ion inertia that was formed at the plateau time and its speed does not follow the speed of the sheath. Voltage-responding electrons enhance the ion diffusion from the bulk plasma, resulting in the plasma filling in the depletion region. For the intermediate fall time (3/?pi), the transformation from ion matrix to Child-Langmuir sheath occurs after ion responds. Detailed results will be presented.

  2. Trauma Coping Self-Efficacy: A Context Specific Self-Efficacy Measure for Traumatic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Benight, Charles C.; Shoji, Kotaro; James, Lori E.; Waldrep, Edward E.; Delahanty, Douglas L.; Cieslak, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The psychometric properties of a Trauma Coping Self-Efficacy (CSE-T) scale that assesses general trauma-related coping self-efficacy perceptions were assessed. Measurement equivalence was assessed using several different samples: hospitalized trauma patients (n1 = 74, n2 = 69, n3 = 60), three samples of disaster survivors (n1 = 273, n2 = 227, n3 = 138), and trauma exposed college students (N = 242). This is the first multi-sample evaluation of the psychometric properties for a general trauma-related CSE measure. Results showed that a brief and parsimonious 9-item version of the CSE performed well across the samples with a robust factor structure; factor structure and factor loadings were similar across study samples. The 9-item scale CSE-T demonstrated measurement equivalence across samples indicating that the underlying concept of general post-traumatic CSE is organized in a similar manner in the different trauma-exposed groups. These results offer strong support for cross-event construct validity of the CSE-T scale. Associations of the CSE-T with important expected covariates showed significant evidence for convergent validity. Finally, discriminant validity was also supported. Replication of the factor structure, internal reliability, and other evidence for construct validity is a critical next step for future research. PMID:26524542

  3. EVALUATION OF THE EFFICACY OF TITANIUM DIOXIDE WITH MONOVALENT SILVER IONS COVALENTLY LINKED (TIAB) AS AN ADJUNCT TO SCALING AND ROOT PLANING IN THE MANAGEMENT OF CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS USING PCR ANALYSIS: A MICROBIOLOGICAL STUDY.

    PubMed

    Lauritano, D; Cura, F; Candotto, V; Gaudio, R M; Mucchi, D; Carinci, F

    2015-01-01

    The use of chemical devices for non-surgical periodontal therapy has led to new treatment strategies aimed primarily at controlling infection. Over the last few years, titanium dioxide (TiO2) with monovalent silver ions (A) covalently linked and added to benzalkonium (B) (named TIAB) has been subjected to medical studies, especially in dermatology. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of TIAB on the red complex bacteria using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) for microbiological analysis. A split mouth study was conducted, and 10 subjects were enrolled. TIAB as topical medication was placed at study sites after scaling and root planing. Sub-gingival plaque samples were collected after 2 weeks, and red complex micro-organisms were studied using PCR. SPSS program was used for statistical purposes and a paired sample correlation was performed at the end of the observation period between treated and untreated sites. The results showed statistically significant reduction of red complex organisms in the study compared to the control group. TIAB can be used as an effective local drug along with supportive periodontal therapy in treatment of chronic periodontitis. PMID:26511192

  4. Depth-based human fall detection via shape features and improved extreme learning machine.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin; Wang, Haibo; Xue, Bingxia; Zhou, Mingang; Ji, Bing; Li, Yibin

    2014-11-01

    Falls are one of the major causes leading to injury of elderly people. Using wearable devices for fall detection has a high cost and may cause inconvenience to the daily lives of the elderly. In this paper, we present an automated fall detection approach that requires only a low-cost depth camera. Our approach combines two computer vision techniques-shape-based fall characterization and a learning-based classifier to distinguish falls from other daily actions. Given a fall video clip, we extract curvature scale space (CSS) features of human silhouettes at each frame and represent the action by a bag of CSS words (BoCSS). Then, we utilize the extreme learning machine (ELM) classifier to identify the BoCSS representation of a fall from those of other actions. In order to eliminate the sensitivity of ELM to its hyperparameters, we present a variable-length particle swarm optimization algorithm to optimize the number of hidden neurons, corresponding input weights, and biases of ELM. Using a low-cost Kinect depth camera, we build an action dataset that consists of six types of actions (falling, bending, sitting, squatting, walking, and lying) from ten subjects. Experimenting with the dataset shows that our approach can achieve up to 91.15% sensitivity, 77.14% specificity, and 86.83% accuracy. On a public dataset, our approach performs comparably to state-of-the-art fall detection methods that need multiple cameras. PMID:25375688

  5. Depressive symptoms are independently associated with recurrent falls in community-dwelling older adults.

    PubMed

    Grenier, Sébastien; Payette, Marie-Christine; Langlois, Francis; Vu, Thien Tuong Minh; Bherer, Louis

    2014-04-23

    ABSTRACT Background: Falls and depression are two major public health problems that affect millions of older people each year. Several factors associated with falls are also related to depressive symptoms such as medical conditions, sleep quality, use of medications, cognitive functioning, and physical capacities. To date, studies that investigated the association between falls and depressive symptoms did not control for all these shared factors. The current study addresses this issue by examining the relationship between falls and depression symptoms after controlling for several confounders. Methods: Eighty-two community-dwelling older adults were enrolled in this study. The Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-30) was used to evaluate the presence of depressive symptoms, and the following question was used to assess falls: "Did you fall in the last 12 months, and if so, how many times?" Results: Univariate analyses indicated that the number of falls was significantly correlated with gender (women), fractures, asthma, physical inactivity, presence of depressive symptoms, complaints about quality of sleep, use of antidepressant drugs, and low functional capacities. Multivariate analyses revealed that depressive symptoms were significantly and independently linked to recurrent falls after controlling for confounders. Conclusions: Results of the present study highlight the importance of assessing depressive symptoms during a fall risk assessment. PMID:24758735

  6. Safe Fall: Humanoid robot fall direction change through intelligent stepping and inertia shaping

    E-print Network

    Yun, Seung-kook

    Although fall is a rare event in the life of a humanoid robot, we must be prepared for it because its consequences are serious. In this paper we present a fall strategy which rapidly modifies the robot's fall direction in ...

  7. Alterations in Cerebral White Matter and Neuropsychology in Patients with Cirrhosis and Falls

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Ansón, Beatriz; Román, Eva; Fernández de Bobadilla, Ramón; Pires-Encuentra, Patricia; Díaz-Manera, Jordi; Núñez, Fidel; Martinez-Horta, Saül; Vives-Gilabert, Yolanda; Pagonabarraga, Javier; Kulisevsky, Jaume; Guarner, Carlos; Soriano, Germán

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aim Falls are frequent in patients with cirrhosis but underlying mechanisms are unknown. The aim was to determine the neuropsychological, neurological and brain alterations using magnetic resonance-diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI) in cirrhotic patients with falls. Patients and methods Twelve patients with cirrhosis and falls in the previous year were compared to 9 cirrhotic patients without falls. A comprehensive neuropsychological and neurological evaluation of variables that may predispose to falls included: the Mini-Mental State Examination, Psychometric Hepatic Encephalopathy Score (PHES), Parkinson’s Disease-Cognitive Rating Scale, specific tests to explore various cognitive domains, Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale to evaluate parkinsonism, scales for ataxia and muscular strength, and electroneurography. High-field MR (3T) including DTI and structural sequences was performed in all patients. Results The main neuropsychological findings were impairment in PHES (p = 0.03), Parkinson’s Disease-Cognitive Rating Scale (p = 0.04) and in executive (p<0.05) and visuospatial-visuoconstructive functions (p<0.05) in patients with falls compared to those without. There were no statistical differences between the two groups in the neurological evaluation or in the visual assessment of MRI. MR-DTI showed alterations in white matter integrity in patients with falls compared to those without falls (p<0.05), with local maxima in the superior longitudinal fasciculus and corticospinal tract. These alterations were independent of PHES as a covariate and correlated with executive dysfunction (p<0.05). Conclusions With the limitation of the small sample size, our results suggest that patients with cirrhosis and falls present alterations in brain white matter tracts related to executive dysfunction. These alterations are independent of PHES impairment. PMID:25793766

  8. Disentangling the Free-Fall Arch Paradox in Silo Discharge.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Largo, S M; Janda, A; Maza, D; Zuriguel, I; Hidalgo, R C

    2015-06-12

    Several theoretical predictions of the mass flow rate of granular media discharged from a silo are based on the spontaneous development of a free-fall arch region, the existence of which is still controversial. In this Letter, we study experimentally and numerically the particle flow through an orifice placed at the bottom of 2D and 3D silos. The implementation of a coarse-grained technique allows a thorough description of all the kinetic and micromechanical properties of the particle flow in the outlet proximities. Though the free-fall arch does not exist as traditionally understood--a region above which particles have negligible velocity and below which particles fall solely under gravity action--we discover that the kinetic pressure displays a well-defined transition in a position that scales with the outlet size. This universal scaling explains why the free-fall arch picture has served as an approximation to describe the flow rate in the discharge of silos. PMID:26196830

  9. Falls in outpatients with Parkinson's disease: frequency, impact and identifying factors.

    PubMed

    Balash, Y; Peretz, C; Leibovich, G; Herman, T; Hausdorff, J M; Giladi, N

    2005-11-01

    Falls are one of the most serious complications of gait disturbances in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Among previous reports, the percentage of patients with PD who fall varies between 38% to 68%. We sought to determine the frequency of falls and the factors associated with falls in a group of patients with idiopathic PD who attended an outpatient, tertiary movement disorders clinic. 350 ambulatory, non-demented patients (230 males) were studied. Mean age was 69.7+/-10.6 years (range: 43-97 yrs) and mean duration of PD symptoms was 8.6+/- 6.2 years (range: 1-33 yrs). Assessments included characterization of demographics, disease duration, disease severity as measured by the Hoehn and Yahr Scale (H&Y), co-morbidities, the presence of depressive symptoms, the presence of urinary incontinence, use of anti-parkinsonian medications, and two performance-based tests of balance and gait (tandem standing and Timed Up & Go). Fall history was determined during three time periods: previous week, previous month, and previous year. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were applied to evaluate the relationship between the above-mentioned factors and falls. 46% of the subjects reported at least one fall in the previous year and 33% reported 2 or more falls and were classified as Fallers. Fallers had significantly more prolonged and advanced PD compared with Non-fallers (p=0.001 and p<0.001, respectively). Urinary incontinence was the factor most closely associated with falls (crude and adjusted OR were 1.95 and 5.89, respectively). Other factors significantly associated with fall status included increased Timed Up & Go times and increased PD duration. These findings confirm that falls are a common problem among patients with advanced PD and suggest easily measurable features that may be used to prospectively identify those PD patients with the greatest risk of falls. PMID:15895303

  10. Effects of a targeted multimodal exercise program incorporating high-speed power training on falls and fracture risk factors in older adults: a community-based randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gianoudis, Jenny; Bailey, Christine A; Ebeling, Peter R; Nowson, Caryl A; Sanders, Kerrie M; Hill, Keith; Daly, Robin M

    2014-01-01

    Multimodal exercise programs incorporating traditional progressive resistance training (PRT), weight-bearing impact training and/or balance training are recommended to reduce risk factors for falls and fracture. However, muscle power, or the ability to produce force rapidly, has emerged as a more crucial variable to functional decline than muscle strength or mass. The aim of this 12-month community-based randomized controlled trial, termed Osteo-cise: Strong Bones for Life, was to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of a multimodal exercise program incorporating high-velocity (HV)-PRT, combined with an osteoporosis education and behavioral change program, on bone mineral density (BMD), body composition, muscle strength and functional muscle performance in older adults. Falls incidence was evaluated as a secondary outcome. A total of 162 older adults (mean?±?SD; 67?±?6 years) with risk factors for falls and/or low BMD were randomized to the Osteo-cise program (n?=?81) or a control group (n?=?81). Exercise consisted of fitness center-based HV-PRT, weight-bearing impact and challenging balance/mobility activities performed three times weekly. After 12 months, the Osteo-cise program led to modest but significant net gains in femoral neck and lumbar spine BMD (1.0% to 1.1%, p?falls rate (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.22; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72-2.04). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the Osteo-cise: Strong Bones for Life community-based, multimodal exercise program represents an effective approach to improve multiple musculoskeletal and functional performance measures in older adults with risk factors for falls and/or low BMD. Although this did not translate into a reduction in the rate of falls, further large-scale trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy of this multimodal approach on reducing falls and fracture. PMID:23775701

  11. On the use of ICE/SAT Lidar Space-Born Observations to Evaluate the Ability of MM5 Meso-Scale Model to Reproduce High Altitude Clouds Over Europe in Fall.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotkov, N. A.; Bhartia, P.; Yang, K.; Carn, S. A.; Krueger, A. J.; Dickerson, R. R.; Hains, J.; Li, C.; Li, Z.; Marufu, L.; Stehr, J.; Levelt, P. F.

    2005-05-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on EOS/Aura offers unprecedented spatial and spectral resolution, coupled with global coverage, for space-based UV measurements of sulfur dioxide (SO2). Publicly released SO2 pollution data are processed with the Band Residual Difference (BRD) algorithm that uses calibrated residuals at SO2 absorption band centers produced by the NASA operational ozone algorithm (OMTO3). By using optimum wavelengths for retrieval of SO2, the retrieval sensitivity is improved over NASA predecessor Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) by factors of 10 to 20, depending on location. The ground footprint of OMI is 8 times smaller than TOMS. These factors produce a two orders of magnitude improvement in the minimum detectable mass of SO2. The improved sensitivity now permits daily global measurement of heavy anthropogenic SO2 pollution. Anthropogenic SO2 emissions have been measured by OMI over known sources of air pollution, such as eastern China, Eastern Europe, and from individual copper smelters in South America and elsewhere. Here we present data from a case study conducted over Shenyang in NE China as part of EAST-AIRE in April 2005. SO2 observations from instrumented aircraft flights are compared with OMI SO2 maps. The OMI SO2 algorithm was improved to account for the known altitude profile of SO2, and the comparison demonstrates that this algorithm can distinguish between background SO2 conditions and heavy pollution on a daily basis. Between 5 and 7 April 2005 a cold front traveled from continental China, over Korea and on to the Sea of Japan. The satellite-derived measurements of SO2 confirm the in situ aircraft observations of high concentrations of SO2 (ca 4 DU) ahead of the front and lower concentrations behind it and provide evidence for a large-scale impact of pollutant emissions. The BRD algorithm sensitivity does not represent the maximum sensitivity theoretically achievable with OMI, and hence future improvements in instrument calibration and the algorithm should allow even weaker SO2 sources to be monitored routinely. Such measurements are essential given the growing concern over the effects of anthropogenically-forced climate change and intercontinental transport of air pollution. http://www.knmi.nl/omi/research/product/so2/introduction.html

  12. The relationship among shame, guilt, and self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kim M; Baldwin, John R; Ewald, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The perception of the self has been one of the fundamental constructs in psychotherapy, with attention devoted to shame, guilt, and, more recently, one's perception of ability to influence a situation-that is, self-efficacy; however, the relationship between these constructs merits scholarly attention. In the present study, researchers analyze the survey responses of 194 college students to determine relationships between shame and guilt as measured by the Test of Self-Conscious Affect (TOSCA 3, Tangney & Dearing, 2002), and self-efficacy as measured by the general and social self-efficacy scales (by Sherer, Maddux, Mercandante, Prentice-Dunn, Jacobs, & Rogers, 1982). Results support a hypothesis that higher shame scores were related to reduced self-efficacy; however, scores did not reveal a significant correlation between guilt and self-efficacy. Post-hoc analyses suggest some differences based on gender and private-versus-public school setting. The researchers draw theoretical and counseling implications from the findings. PMID:16770913

  13. BURDEN FALLS ROADLESS AREA, ILLINOIS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klasner, John S.; Thompson, Robert M.

    1984-01-01

    The Burden Falls Roadless Area lies in the Shawnee National Forest of southern Illinois, about 5 mi west of the western edge of the Illinois-Kentucky fluorspar district. Geologic mapping and geochemical surveys indicate that the area has little promise for the occurrence of fluorspar and associated minerals; other special studies also indicate little promise for oil and gas and construction materials. Traces of gold and silver were detected in some geochemical samples but follow-up studies indicate little promise for the occurrence of resources of these metals within the Burden Falls Roadless Area.

  14. Collective efficacy and depressive symptoms in Brazilian elderly.

    PubMed

    Quatrin, Louise Bertoldo; Galli, Rosangela; Moriguchi, Emilio Hideyuki; Gastal, Fábio Leite; Pattussi, Marcos Pascoal

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the association between depressive symptoms and collective efficacy among the elderly in a municipality in southern Brazil. A cross-sectional population-based design was carried out. Structured interviews were held at the homes of 1007 elderly individuals. The presence of depressive symptoms was measured using the Geriatric Depression Scale, exposures were a standard 8-item collective efficacy scale and a single item about elderly participation in groups. Data were analyzed using Poisson regression to obtain the crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs). The sample consisted mostly of female (63%), white (96%) and married (64%) elderly individuals. The mean age, income and educational level were, respectively: 73 years (SD=4), R$ 1836 (SD=2170) and 5 years of education (SD=4). After controlling for demographic, socioeconomic, behavioral and health-related variables, participants who reported low collective efficacy at the places where they lived presented a prevalence of depressive symptoms that was twice as high as the prevalence among those who reported high collective efficacy. In the same way, elderly individuals who did not participate in groups presented prevalence of the outcome around 64% higher than among those who took part in one or more groups. The study suggests that creation of and participation in social networks and community groups may be an important strategy for promoting mental health among the elderly. PMID:25183439

  15. FALL ENROLLMENT Office of Budget, Planning and Analysis

    E-print Network

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    FALL ENROLLMENT Office of Budget, Planning and Analysis REPORT 2014 #12;Page 2 Fall Enrollment............................................5 Total Fall Enrollment/College.........................................................6 Enrollment by Race

  16. Improved efficacy in onychomycosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K; Paquet, Maryse

    2013-01-01

    The success rate of onychomycosis treatment is limited by several factors, including the access of the therapeutic agent to the fungal mass, the presence of conidia, and the susceptibility of the different infectious agents to the antifungals. Different strategies used to improve efficacy of the currently available antifungal treatments, their rationale, and the published evidence of their beneficial effects are reviewed. An improved efficacy was demonstrated for some of these strategies, such as combined oral and topical antifungal therapies, whereas most of them lack clear and direct evidence of an increase in therapeutic success. PMID:24079584

  17. On a liquid drop "falling" inside a heavier miscible fluid

    E-print Network

    Paul K. Buah-Bassuah; René Rojas; Stefania Residori; Fortunato Tito Arecchi

    2005-12-06

    We report a new type of drop instability, where the density difference between the drop and the solvent is negative. We show that the drop falls inside the solvent down to a minimum height, then fragmentation takes place and secondary droplets rise up to the surface. We have developed a theoretical model that captures the essential of the phenomenon and predicts the correct scalings for the rise-up time and the minimum height.

  18. Clinical Self-Efficacy in Senior Nursing Students: A Mixed- Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Abdal, Marzieh; Masoudi Alavi, Negin; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Clinical education has a basic role in nursing education, and effective clinical training establishes a sense of clinical self-efficacy in senior nursing students. Self-efficacy is a key component for acting independently in the nursing profession. Objectives: This study was designed to outline senior nursing students’ views about clinical self-efficacy and to determine its level in nursing students. Patients and Methods: A mixed-methods approach, including a quantitative cross-sectional study and qualitative content analysis,was used in this study. Participants were senior nursing students who were in their two last semesters. During the initial quantitative stage, all students in the 7th and 8th semesters of the nursing major were invited to participate. They were asked to complete the Nursing Clinical Self-Efficacy Scale (NCSES) and, during the subsequent qualitative stage, the 14 students in the 7th and 8th semesters were asked to participate in semi-structured interviews. Results: In the quantitative part, 58 students completed the self-efficacy questionnaire; the mean score was 219.28 ± 35.8, which showed moderate self-efficacy in students. Self-efficacy was different across skills. In the qualitative part, the 355 open codes that were extracted from the interviews were clustered to 12 categories and 3 themes. The main themes included the factors related to self-efficacy, outcomes of self-efficacy, and ways to improve self-efficacy. Conclusions: Students had moderate self-efficacy. Several factors such as environment, nursing colleagues, and clinical educators could influence the creation of clinical self-efficacy in nursing students. PMID:26576443

  19. What Shapes Adolescents' Future Perceptions? The Effects of Hearing Loss, Social Affiliation, and Career Self-Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Michael, Rinat; Cinamon, Rachel Gali; Most, Tova

    2015-10-01

    The current study examined the contribution of hearing loss, social affiliation, and career self-efficacy to adolescents' future perceptions. Participants were 191 11th and 12th grade students: 60 who were deaf, 36 who were deaf or hard of hearing, and 95 who were hearing. They completed the Future Perceptions Scale, the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy (CDMSE) Scale, and the Self-Efficacy for the Management of Work-Family Conflict Scale. Results indicated that participants who were deaf reported significantly higher levels of future clarity and intensity than the other groups. However, no significant differences were found in career self-efficacy. Hearing status and affiliation and the efficacy to manage future conflict between work and family roles were significant predictors of participants' future clarity. CDMSE was a significant predictor of future planning. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. PMID:26101211

  20. z Difficulty with... > Falling asleep

    E-print Network

    sleepy z Get out of bed when unable to fall asleep z Wake up at the same time each morning z No daytime motivation > Headache, GI distress #12;z Reduced QOL before, during and after treatment z Decreased survival, poor follow-up and occurrence of other symptoms > Pain, nausea, fatigue z Difficult to measure z

  1. Fall Armyworm in the Southeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two separate experiments testing fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) migration patterns were set up in the southeastern U.S. in 2012. Previous results showed that moths from progeny of overwintering populations from south Texas were found west of the Chattahoochee-Flint-Apalachicola river basin, ...

  2. Computerworld 'net performance vow falls

    E-print Network

    Simonson, Shai

    in that performance tests to measure whether the company has lived up to its commitments are done with ANS' ownComputerworld 'net performance vow falls short By Mitch Wagner AUGUST 05, 1996 Content Type: Story Source: Knowledge Centers Careers CRM Data Management Development E-business ERP/Supply Chain Hardware

  3. AGRICULTURAL SUMMER/FALL 2009

    E-print Network

    AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION | SUMMER/FALL 2009 VOL. 27 NOS. 2 & 3 4 Standing on the Shoulders of Giants The Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station's rich history of excellence and innovation makes MSU unique among Hands, Helping Humans MAES scientists' pioneering research is helping people cope, learn and make

  4. Offered Fall Semester: Biological Physics

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    Offered Fall Semester: Biological Physics Physics 466 / Physics 566 (conjoint) provides a fundamental physical understanding of the operation of cells, biomolecules and molecular machines. MWF 4:10-5:00pm, Webster 11 (3 cr) Instructor: Fred Gittes, Clinical Professor of Physics and Astronomy: gittes

  5. 2013 Fall : Distinguished Honors Distinguished

    E-print Network

    Kunkle, Tom

    Distinguished Bair Keira Marie Distinguished Baker Huntley J Distinguished Baldini Julia Hope Distinguished Barber Zachary Michael Distinguished 1 #12;2013 Fall : Distinguished Honors LAST_NAME FIRST_NAME MIDDLE Distinguished Bishop William McGeehan Distinguished Black Lauren Rise' Distinguished Blumenthal Alicia Ann

  6. Daytona Beach Fall 2012 Dates

    E-print Network

    Sin, Peter

    , shopping, eating at restaurants, and having lots of fun! When: Saturday, July 21st. We will meet at Norman money for lunch and shopping (if you like). What to Bring: Bring lunch, snacks, your bathing suit 2012 Dates Returning for Fall C? Check in online between August 31 and September 4. The check-in link

  7. NOVA Fall 2000 Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ransick, Kristina; Rosene, Dale; Sammons, Fran Lyons; Sammons, James

    This teacher's guide complements six programs that aired on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) in the fall of 2000. Programs include: (1) "Lincoln's Secret Weapon"; (2) "Hitler's Lost Sub"; (3) "Runaway Universe"; (4) "Garden of Eden"; (5) "Dying to Be Thin"; and (6) "Japan's Secret Garden". It provides activity set-ups related to the programs…

  8. FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL E7 ME 40 ME 106 EE 16A ME 102B DESIGN COURSES

    E-print Network

    Frenklach, Michael

    FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL E7 ME 40 ME 106 EE 16A ME 102B DESIGN COURSES 4 3 3 4 4 E 117 E128 (E # UNITS Prerequisite IMPORTANT NOTES: · Math 53 & 54 must be completed prior to entering an upper div ME

  9. FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL ME 40 ME 132 ME 106 ME 102A ME 102B DESIGN COURSES

    E-print Network

    Frenklach, Michael

    FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL ME 40 ME 132 ME 106 ME 102A ME 102B DESIGN COURSES 3 3 3 4 4 E 117 E Prerequisite IMPORTANT NOTES: · Math 53 & 54 must be completed prior to entering an upper div ME course. · 18

  10. FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL ME 132 ME 104 ME 106 ME 102A ME 102B DESIGN COURSES

    E-print Network

    Frenklach, Michael

    FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL ME 132 ME 104 ME 106 ME 102A ME 102B DESIGN COURSES 3 3 3 4 4 E 117 E Prerequisite IMPORTANT NOTES: · Math 53 & 54 must be completed prior to entering an upper div ME course. · 18

  11. FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL E7 ME 40 ME 106 ME 102A ME 102B DESIGN COURSES

    E-print Network

    Frenklach, Michael

    FALL SPRING FALL SPRING FALL E7 ME 40 ME 106 ME 102A ME 102B DESIGN COURSES 4 3 3 4 4 E 117 E128 (E # UNITS Prerequisite IMPORTANT NOTES: · Math 53 & 54 must be completed prior to entering an upper div ME

  12. A Conceptual Model of Referee Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Guillén, Félix; Feltz, Deborah L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual model of referee efficacy, defines the concept, proposes sources of referee specific efficacy information, and suggests consequences of having high or low referee efficacy. Referee efficacy is defined as the extent to which referees believe they have the capacity to perform successfully in their job. Referee efficacy beliefs are hypothesized to be influenced by mastery experiences, referee knowledge/education, support from significant others, physical/mental preparedness, environmental comfort, and perceived anxiety. In turn, referee efficacy beliefs are hypothesized to influence referee performance, referee stress, athlete rule violations, athlete satisfaction, and co-referee satisfaction. PMID:21713174

  13. Speak Up: Reduce Your Risk of Falling

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Helping health care organizations help patients Why do falls happen? • Person is weak, tired or ill • Person ... precautions in the hospital or nursing home Many falls occur when patients or residents try to get ...

  14. 75 FR 79921 - Fall 2010 Unified Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ...FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 12 CFR Ch. III Fall 2010 Unified Agenda AGENCY: Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation...Insurance Corporation (FDIC) is hereby publishing items for the Fall 2010 Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and...

  15. Falls, Fights Cause Most Serious Eye Injuries

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_155749.html Falls, Fights Cause Most Serious Eye Injuries: Study And cost ... MONDAY, Nov. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Falls and fights are the leading causes of eye injuries that ...

  16. The Effect of Prior Experience with Computers, Statistical Self-Efficacy, and Computer Anxiety on Students' Achievement in an Introductory Statistics Course: A Partial Least Squares Path Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abd-El-Fattah, Sabry M.

    2005-01-01

    A Partial Least Squares Path Analysis technique was used to test the effect of students' prior experience with computers, statistical self-efficacy, and computer anxiety on their achievement in an introductory statistics course. Computer Anxiety Rating Scale and Current Statistics Self-Efficacy Scale were administered to a sample of 64 first-year…

  17. Precision Efficacy Analysis for Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Gordon P.

    When multiple linear regression is used to develop a prediction model, sample size must be large enough to ensure stable coefficients. If the derivation sample size is inadequate, the model may not predict well for future subjects. The precision efficacy analysis for regression (PEAR) method uses a cross- validity approach to select sample sizes…

  18. Preliminary Investigation of the Sources of Self-Efficacy Among Teachers of Students with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Ruble, Lisa A.; Usher, Ellen L.; McGrew, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Teacher self-efficacy refers to the beliefs teachers hold regarding their capability to bring about desired instructional outcomes and may be helpful for understanding and addressing critical issues such as teacher attrition and teacher use of research-supported practices. Educating students with autism likely presents teachers with some of the most significant instructional challenges. The self-efficacy of 35 special education teachers of students with autism between the ages of 3 to 9 years was evaluated. Teachers completed rating scales that represented self-efficacy and aspects of the following 3 of Bandura’s 4 sources of self-efficacy: (1) sense of mastery, (2) social persuasions, and (3) physiological/affective states. Significant associations were observed between physiological/affective states and self-efficacy, but no associations were observed for the other sources. PMID:21691453

  19. Turkish Pre-Service Science and Mathematics Teachers' Computer Related Self-Efficacies, Attitudes, and the Relationship between These Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pamuk, Savas; Peker, Deniz

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate Turkish pre-service science and mathematics teachers' computer self-efficacies (CSEs) and computer attitude (CA) considering gender, year in program, and computer ownership as independent variables. Additionally the study aimed to examine the relationship between CSE and CA. Computer Self-efficacy Scale

  20. Pre-Service Science and Technology Teachers' Efficacy Beliefs about Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) Usage and Material Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bursal, Murat; Yigit, Nevzat

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a scale entitled "Information and Communication Technologies Usage and Material Design Efficacy [ICT_MDE]" is developed to investigate pre-service science and technology teachers' efficacy beliefs regarding ICT usage and Material Design and the factors impacting these beliefs. By using the validity and reliability data from 310…

  1. Fostering Cautious Political Efficacy through Civic Advocacy Projects: A Mixed Methods Case Study of an Innovative High School Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Brett L. M.

    2011-01-01

    One of the strongest predictors of political participation is political efficacy, the belief that individuals' action can influence governmental processes. Prior research indicates that political efficacy is higher for individuals who have had opportunities to discuss public issues (e.g., Hahn, 1999; Morrell, 2005) and participate in small-scale

  2. Teacher Self-Efficacy: A Link to Student Achievement in English Language and Mathematics in Belizean Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez-Nunez, Tanya Mae

    2012-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study: This quantitative, non-experimental study sought to determine if a statistically significant difference existed in student achievement on the PSE exam in Belizean primary schools for students who have teachers with varying levels of self-efficacy (high, medium and low). The Teacher Efficacy Scale (TES), which captures…

  3. Yair Amir 1 Fall 00 / Lecture 5

    E-print Network

    Amir, Yair

    and the rest is shared by multiple processes. Yair Amir 4 Fall 00 / Lecture 5 Contiguous Allocation . SingleYair Amir 1 Fall 00 / Lecture 5 Operating Systems 600.418 Memory Management Department of Computer Science The Johns Hopkins University Yair Amir 2 Fall 00 / Lecture 5 Memory Management Lecture 5 Reading

  4. Yair Amir 1 Fall 00 / Lecture 2

    E-print Network

    Amir, Yair

    6 Fall 00 / Lecture 2 Multiple Blocked Queues Processor Ready queue Event 1 queue Timeout Event nYair Amir 1 Fall 00 / Lecture 2 Operating Systems 600.418 Process Control & Scheduling Department of Computer Science The Johns Hopkins University Yair Amir 2 Fall 00 / Lecture 2 Process Control & Scheduling

  5. 29 CFR 1917.41 - House falls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false House falls. 1917.41 Section 1917.41...Handling Gear and Equipment § 1917.41 House falls. (a) Span beams shall be secured...shall be provided for employees working with house fall blocks. (c) Designated...

  6. BA: Art History Fall--First Year

    E-print Network

    Gering, Jon C.

    BA: Art History Fall--First Year · ART 127 New Major Seminar · ART 222 Caves to Cathedrals · Liberal Studies Program (LSP) coursework Fall--Second Year · ART 101 Art Studio Foundations I · ART 324 Renaissance Art · Liberal Studies Program (LSP) coursework Fall--Third Year · ART 328 Art of Greece & Rome

  7. Tirhert — July 2014 — Eucrite Fall in Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chennaoui Aoudjehane, H.; Agee, C. B.; Irving, A. J.; Garvie, L. A. J.; Ziegler, K.; Jambon, A.; Weber, P.

    2015-07-01

    Tirhert is the latest eucrite fall reported in Morocco on July 2014 in Foum Al Hisn area. A fieldwork has been conducted to document the fall and limit the strewnfield. The meteorite has been found immediately the day after the fall.

  8. 29 CFR 1917.41 - House falls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false House falls. 1917.41 Section 1917.41...Handling Gear and Equipment § 1917.41 House falls. (a) Span beams shall be secured...shall be provided for employees working with house fall blocks. (c) Designated...

  9. 29 CFR 1917.41 - House falls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false House falls. 1917.41 Section 1917.41...Handling Gear and Equipment § 1917.41 House falls. (a) Span beams shall be secured...shall be provided for employees working with house fall blocks. (c) Designated...

  10. 29 CFR 1917.41 - House falls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false House falls. 1917.41 Section 1917.41...Handling Gear and Equipment § 1917.41 House falls. (a) Span beams shall be secured...shall be provided for employees working with house fall blocks. (c) Designated...

  11. 29 CFR 1917.41 - House falls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false House falls. 1917.41 Section 1917.41...Handling Gear and Equipment § 1917.41 House falls. (a) Span beams shall be secured...shall be provided for employees working with house fall blocks. (c) Designated...

  12. 29 CFR 1917.41 - House falls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false House falls. 1917.41 Section 1917.41 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Cargo Handling Gear and Equipment § 1917.41 House falls. (a) Span beams shall be secured... working with house fall blocks. (c) Designated employees shall inspect chains, links, shackles,...

  13. 29 CFR 1917.41 - House falls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false House falls. 1917.41 Section 1917.41 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Cargo Handling Gear and Equipment § 1917.41 House falls. (a) Span beams shall be secured... working with house fall blocks. (c) Designated employees shall inspect chains, links, shackles,...

  14. Epidemiology of Falls in Older Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peel, Nancye May

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, falls among older people are a public health concern because of their frequency and adverse consequences in terms of morbidity, mortality, and quality of life, as well as their impact on health system services and costs. This epidemiological review outlines the public health burden of falls and fall-related injuries and the impact of…

  15. Yosemite Falls-All Three Sections

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this image, all three sections of Yosemite Falls can be seen. Yosemite Falls is the highest measured waterfall in North America at 2,425 ft (739 m) in height. Yosemite Falls is one of the most famous waterfalls within Yosemite National Park....

  16. Diverse Pathways of Psychology Majors: Vocational Interests, Self-Efficacy, and Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rottinghaus, Patrick J.; Gaffey, Abigail R.; Borgen, Fred H.; Ralston, Christopher A.

    2006-01-01

    The authors examine the differences in vocational interests and self-efficacy of 254 undergraduate psychology majors organized by 7 career intention groups (e.g., psychological research). The explanatory power of individual General Occupational Themes (GOTs), Basic Interest Scales (BISs), and Personal Style Scales (PPSs) of the Strong Interest…

  17. Development of an Instrument for Measuring Self-Efficacy in Cell Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeve, Suzanne; Kitchen, Elizabeth; Sudweeks, Richard R.; Bell, John D.; Bradshaw, William S.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the development of a ten-item scale to assess biology majors' self-efficacy towards the critical thinking and data analysis skills taught in an upper-division cell biology course. The original seven-item scale was expanded to include three additional items based on the results of item analysis. Evidence of reliability and…

  18. What Are Ways to Prevent Falls and Related Fractures?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... What Are Ways to Prevent Falls and Related Fractures? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ... 57 KB) Español Related Resources Preventing Falls and Fractures Osteoporosis and Falls Osteoporosis and Falls (????) Partner ...

  19. 1. Photocopy of a photographca. 1920 VIEW OF AMERICAN FALLS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of a photograph--ca. 1920 VIEW OF AMERICAN FALLS PRIOR TO CONSTRUCTION OF HYDROELECTRIC PLANTS - American Falls Water, Power & Light Company, Island Power Plant, Snake River, below American Falls Dam, American Falls, Power County, ID

  20. Development and validity of the Outdoor Falls Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Chippendale, Tracy

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and examine the content and face validity of the Outdoor Falls Questionnaire. The initial questionnaire was developed by the primary investigator on the basis of the existing literature on outdoor falls. A rating scale was used to obtain feedback from content experts to ascertain the validity of each question and the questionnaire as a whole. Cognitive interviewing of community-dwelling seniors was performed to ensure accurate interpretation of each question. An expert in questionnaire design reviewed the questions for language and structure. Content experts rated the questionnaire as a whole as 'quite relevant' or 'very relevant' to outdoor falls. The majority of individual questions (22 of 32) were rated by experts as either quite relevant or very relevant. Feedback from reviewers and older adults on specific questions were incorporated into the revised questionnaire. Preliminary testing demonstrates that the Outdoor Falls Questionnaire has good content and face validity. Further testing is needed to examine factor structure, to establish reliability, internal consistency, and interclass correlations. PMID:25851838

  1. Falls in People with Multiple Sclerosis Compared with Falls in Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Mazumder, Rajarshi; Murchison, Charles; Bourdette, Dennis; Cameron, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the risk, circumstances, consequences and causes of prospectively recorded falls between people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) and healthy controls of similar age and gender. Methods 58 PwMS and 58 healthy controls, who are community-dwelling, were recruited in this 6-month prospective cohort study. 90% of PwMS and 84% of healthy controls completed the study. Participants counted falls prospectively using fall calendars and noted fall location, fall-related injuries, and the cause of the falls. Kaplan Meier survival analysis and log-rank tests were performed to compare the distributions of survival without falling between PwMS and healthy controls. Results 40.8% of controls and 71.2% of PwMS fell at least once. 48.1% of PwMS and 18.4% of healthy controls fell at least twice. 42.3% of PwMS and 20.4% of health controls sustained a fall-related injury. After adjusting for age and gender, the time to first fall (HR: 1.87, p?=?0.033) and the time to recurrent falls (HR: 2.87, p?=?0.0082) were significantly different between PwMS and healthy controls. PwMS reported an almost equal number of falls inside and outside, 86% of the falls in healthy controls were outside. Healthy controls were more likely to fall due to slipping on a slippery surface (39.5% vs 10.4%). PwMS more often attributed falls to distraction (31% vs 7%) and uniquely attributed falls to fatigue or heat. Conclusions Fall risk, circumstances, consequences, and causes are different for PwMS than for healthy people of the same age and gender. PwMS fall more, are more likely to be injured by a fall, and often fall indoors. PwMS, but not healthy controls, frequently fall because they are distracted, fatigued or hot. PMID:25254633

  2. 77 FR 21761 - Alice Falls Corporation, Alice Falls Hydro, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer of License...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ...Regulatory Commission [Project No. 5867-051] Alice Falls Corporation, Alice Falls Hydro, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer...Motions To Intervene On February 23, 2012, Alice Falls Corporation (transferor) and Alice Falls...

  3. Self-Efficacy and Self-Esteem in Third-Year Pharmacy Students

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To identify the experiential and demographic factors affecting the self-efficacy and self-esteem of third-year pharmacy (P3) students. Methods. A 25-item survey that included the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and the General Self-Efficacy Scale, as well as types and length of pharmacy practice experiences and demographic information was administered to doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students from 5 schools of pharmacy in New England at the completion of their P3 year. Results. The survey response rate was approximately 50% of the total target population (399/820). Students with a grade point average (GPA)?3.0 demonstrated a higher significant effect from unpaid introductory pharmacy practice experiences (IPPEs) on their self-efficacy scores (p<0.05) compared to students with lower GPAs. Students who had completed more than the required amount of pharmacy experiences had higher levels of self-efficacy and self-esteem (p<0.05). Ethnicity also was related to students’ levels of self-efficacy and self-esteem. Conclusion. Self-efficacy and self-esteem are two important factors in pharmacy practice. Colleges and schools of pharmacy should ensure that students complete enough practice experiences, beyond the minimum of 300 IPPE hours, as one way to improve their self-efficacy and self-esteem. PMID:25258439

  4. Singapore High School Students' Creativity Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Ai-Girl; Ho, Valerie; Yong, Lim-Chyi

    2007-01-01

    Background: Singapore education adopted nurturing creativity and developing creativity efficacy among their students and children. This study investigated Singapore high school students' creativity efficacy based on the contemporary model of creativity (Amabile, 1983, 1996), self efficacy (Bandura, 1989, 1997) and inclusion education. Aims:…

  5. Enhancing Self-Efficacy and Learning Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Jay W.

    2002-01-01

    Studied the effect of a communication designed to enhance the self-efficacy beliefs of introductory psychology students. Neutral e-mail messages of messages designed to enhance self-efficacy were sent to 76 college students. Results show that self-efficacy beliefs were related to examination scores and were significantly affected by the…

  6. 150. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    150. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Surveyor's Book #363, Page 42, entitled, 'Diversion Tunnels', located in Twin Falls Canal Company office, Twin Falls, Idaho). PLAN OF DIVERSION TUNNELS, MILNER DAM. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  7. Relative contributions of self-efficacy, self-regulation, and self-handicapping in predicting student procrastination.

    PubMed

    Strunk, Kamden K; Steele, Misty R

    2011-12-01

    The relative contributions of self-efficacy, self-regulation, and self-handicapping student procrastination were explored. College undergraduate participants (N = 138; 40 men, 97 women, one not reporting sex) filled out the Procrastination Scale, the Self-Handicapping Scale-Short Form, and the Self-regulation and Self-handicapping scales of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire. A hierarchical regression of the above measures indicated that self-efficacy, self-regulation, and self-handicapping all predicted scores on the Procrastination Scale, but self-regulation fully accounted for the predictive power of self-efficacy. The results suggested self-regulation and self-handicapping predict procrastination independently. These findings are discussed in relation to the literature on the concept of "self-efficacy for self-regulation" and its use in the field of procrastination research. PMID:22420126

  8. [Falling in geriatrics. Diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Becker, C; Rapp, K

    2011-08-01

    Falls are among the most frequent adverse events in the life of an older person. Accident and emergency units, outpatient services and internal medicine wards should have a diagnostic concept for falls and fall-related injuries and implement an evidence-based risk management for fall prevention. The recently published Reviews of the Cochrane Collaboration and the revised guidelines of the Anglo-American medical societies are a proper basis to plan these steps. This, of course, has to be adapted for the needs of each institution. Currently, it is probable that at least 30% of all falls are preventable. A structured fall history and multifactorial assessment is not part of the routine of outpatient and inpatient services in Germany. The planned revision of the German nursing guideline on fall prevention and the current activities of the Aktionsbündnis Patientensicherheit will also lead to a legal dilemma for those institutions that have not implemented an adequate workup. PMID:21755365

  9. [Prevention programs of risk factors for falls].

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Shuzo; Sakita, Masahiro

    2014-10-01

    Approximately 17% of Japanese older people fall for a year. The femoral neck fractures with falls caused by various functional problems make them depress remarkably activities of daily living and quality of life. In risk factors for falls in old people, muscle weakness, balance and gait disorders particularly increases to falls. The major results from recent systematic reviews have indicated that interventions of exercise, multifactorial, environmental modification and gradual withdrawal of psychotropic medication in community-dwelling elderly people were effective for preventing falls. Regarding the older people in hospitals and sanatoriums, it appeared that comprehensive multifactorial interventions and vitamin D supplementation could be effective in falls rather than exercises intervention only. However, the short period of the exercise intervention may affect ineffectiveness in preventing falls. PMID:25509808

  10. Fall Incidence and Outcomes of Falls in a Prospective Study of Adults With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Stanmore, Emma K; Oldham, Jackie; Skelton, Dawn A; O'Neill, Terence; Pilling, Mark; Campbell, A John; Todd, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence of falls and to investigate the consequences of falls in adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods A total of 559 community-dwelling adults with RA, ages 18–88 years (mean age 62 years, 69% women), participated in this prospective cohort study. After a detailed clinical assessment, patients were followed for 1 year, using monthly falls calendars and followup telephone calls. Followup took place in the participant's usual place of residence in the Northwest of England. Outcome measures included fall occurrence, reason for fall, type and severity of injuries, fractures, fall location, lie-times, use of health services, and functional ability. Results A total of 535 participants followed for 1 year had a total of 598 falls. Of these participants, 36.4% (95% confidence interval 32%–41%) reported falling during the 1-year followup period, with an incidence rate of 1,313 per 1,000 person-years at risk or 1.11 falls per person. Age and sex were not associated with falls. More than one-third of the falls were reportedly caused by hips, knees, or ankle joints “giving way.” More than half of all the falls resulted in moderate injuries, including head injuries (n = 27) and fractures (n = 26). Treatment by general practitioners or other health professionals was required for 15.0% of falls, and emergency services were required for 8.8% of falls. Conclusion These results indicate that adults with RA are at high risk of falls and fall-related injuries, fractures, and head injuries. Strategies to prevent falls in adults with RA must be prioritized to reduce falls, fall-related injuries, and fractures. PMID:23139011

  11. Postoperative self-efficacy and psychological morbidity in radical prostatectomy1

    PubMed Central

    da Mata, Luciana Regina Ferreira; de Carvalho, Emilia Campos; Gomes, Cássia Regina Gontijo; da Silva, Ana Cristina; Pereira, Maria da Graça

    2015-01-01

    Objective: evaluate the general and perceived self-efficacy, psychological morbidity, and knowledge about postoperative care of patients submitted to radical prostatectomy. Identify the relationships between the variables and know the predictors of self-efficacy. Method: descriptive, cross-sectional study, conducted with 76 hospitalized men. The scales used were the General and Perceived Self-efficacy Scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, in addition to sociodemographic, clinical and knowledge questionnaires. Results: a negative relationship was found for self-efficacy in relation to anxiety and depression. Psychological morbidity was a significant predictor variable for self-efficacy. An active professional situation and the waiting time for surgery also proved to be relevant variables for anxiety and knowledge, respectively. Conclusion: participants had a good level of general and perceived self-efficacy and small percentage of depression. With these findings, it is possible to produce the profile of patients about their psychological needs after radical prostatectomy and, thus, allow the nursing professionals to act holistically, considering not only the need for care of physical nature, but also of psychosocial nature. PMID:26487129

  12. Vaccine Efficacy and Affinity Maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hayoun; Deem, Michael W.

    2002-03-01

    We propose macroscopic equations to describe variable vaccine efficacy between repeated vaccinee and first time vaccinee. The main ingredients are antigenic distance between epidemic strain and vaccne strain, and affinity maturation dynamics which differs in primary and second response. Increase of affinity by repeated vaccine leads to localization in immune space. This localization decreases the ability of the immune system to response to distant, but related epidemic strains.

  13. The Relation of Classroom Environment and School Belonging to Academic Self-Efficacy among Urban Fourth- and Fifth-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Susan D.; Wernsman, Jamie; Rose, Dale S.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, 149 low-income, ethnically heterogeneous, fourth- and fifth-grade students completed self-report surveys in the fall and spring of 1 academic year. We examined classroom climate (satisfaction, cohesion, friction, task difficulty, and competition) and school belonging in relation to language arts and math and science self-efficacy,…

  14. From Fall to Spring, or Spring to Fall? Seasonal Cholera Transmission Cycles and Implications for Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akanda, A. S.; Jutla, A. S.; Huq, A.; Colwell, R.; Islam, S.; WE Reason

    2010-12-01

    Cholera remains a major public health threat in many developing countries around the world. The striking seasonality and the annual recurrence of this infectious disease in endemic areas continues to be of considerable interest to scientists and public health workers. Despite major advances in the ecological, and microbiological understanding of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent, the role of underlying macro-scale hydroclimatic processes in propagating the disease in different seasons and years is not well understood. The incidence of cholera in the Bengal Delta region, the ‘native homeland’ of cholera, shows distinct biannual peaks in the southern floodplains, as opposed to single annual peaks in coastal areas and the northern parts of Bangladesh, as well as other cholera-endemic regions in the world. A coupled analysis of the regional hydroclimate and cholera incidence reveals a strong association of the spatio-temporal variability of incidence peaks with seasonal processes and extreme events. At a seasonal scale, the cycles indicate a spring-fall transmission pattern, contrary to the prevalent notion of a fall-spring transmission cycle. We show that the asymmetric seasonal hydroclimatology affects regional cholera dynamics by providing a coastal growth environment for bacteria in spring, while propagating transmission to fall by flooding. This seasonal interpretation of the progression of cholera has important implications, for formulating effective cholera intervention and mitigation efforts through improved water management and understanding the impacts of changing climate patterns on seasonal cholera transmission. (Water Environental Research Education Actionable Solutions Network)

  15. Relationships Between Self-Efficacy, Self-Esteem and Procrastination in Undergraduate Psychology Students

    PubMed Central

    Hajloo, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed to review the relationships between procrastination and two self-factors self-efficacy and self-esteem. Methods: Participants were 140 undergraduates Psychology students enrolled in Mohagheg Ardabili University, Ardabil, Iran. Instruments used for collecting the required data were the student-version of the General Procrastination Scale (GP-S), General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE) and Rosenberg’s Self-Esteem Scale (SES). Results: Using causal modeling, two models were compared; a model with self-esteem as a mediator versus a model with procrastination as a mediator. The self-esteem mediator model accounted for 21% of the variance in procrastination. The significance of the mediation effect was found by bootstrapping method. Conclusion: The relationship of procrastination with self-esteem and self-efficacy was revealed among undergraduate psychology students. PMID:25780374

  16. Detecting Falling Snow from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Gail Skofronick; Johnson, Ben; Munchak, Joe

    2012-01-01

    There is an increased interest in detecting and estimating the amount of falling snow reaching the Earth's surface in order to fully capture the atmospheric water cycle. An initial step toward global spaceborne falling snow algorithms includes determining the thresholds of detection for various active and passive sensor channel configurations, snow event cloud structures and microphysics, snowflake particle electromagnetic properties, and surface types. In this work, cloud resolving model simulations of a lake effect and synoptic snow event were used to determine the minimum amount of snow (threshold) that could be detected by the following instruments: the W -band radar of CloudSat, Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) Ku and Ka band, and the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) channels from 10 to 183 plus or minus 7 GHz. Eleven different snowflake shapes were used to compute radar reflectivities and passive brightness temperatures. Notable results include: (1) the W-Band radar has detection thresholds more than an order of magnitude lower than the future GPM sensors, (2) the cloud structure macrophysics influences the thresholds of detection for passive channels, (3) the snowflake microphysics plays a large role in the detection threshold for active and passive instruments, (4) with reasonable assumptions, "the passive 166 GHz channel has detection threshold values comparable to the GPM DPR Ku and Ka band radars with approximately 0.05 g per cubic meter detected at the surface, or an approximately 0.5-1 millimeter per hr. melted snow rate (equivalent to 0.5-2 centimeters per hr. solid fluffy snowflake rate). With detection levels of falling snow known, we can focus current and future retrieval efforts on detectable storms and concentrate advances on achievable results. We will also have an understanding of the light snowfall events missed by the sensors and not captured in the global estimates.

  17. Dept Course Course Title Fall

    E-print Network

    McCarthy, John F.

    Fall 2016 Spring 2017 MUPF 103 Flute X X X X X X MUPF 104 Flute X X X X X X MUPF 105 Oboe X X X X X X X X X MUPF 203 Flute X X X X X X MUPF 204 Flute X X X X X X MUPF 205 Oboe X X X X X X MUPF 206 Oboe X MUPF 294 Composition X X X X X X MUPF 295 Composition X X X X X X MUPF 303 Flute X X X X X X MUPF

  18. Comparisons of luminaires: Efficacies and system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, L. D.; Both, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    Lighting designs for architectural (aesthetic) purposes, vision and safety, and plant growth have many features in common but several crucial ones that are not. The human eye is very sensitive to the color (wavelength) of light, whereas plants are less so. There are morphological reactions, particularly to the red and blue portions of the light spectrum but, in general, plants appear to accept and use light for photosynthesis everywhere over the PAR region of the spectrum. In contrast, the human eye interprets light intensity on a logarithmic scale, making people insensitive to significant differences of light intensity. As a rough rule, light intensity must change by 30 to 50% for the human eye to recognize the difference. Plants respond much more linearly to light energy, at least at intensities below photosynthetic saturation. Thus, intensity differences not noticeable to the human eye can have significant effects on total plant growth and yield, and crop timing. These factors make luminaire selection and lighting system design particularly important when designing supplemental lighting systems for plant growth. Supplemental lighting for plant growth on the scale of commercial greenhouses is a relatively expensive undertaking. Light intensities are often much higher than required for task (vision) lighting, which increases both installation and operating costs. However, and especially in the northern regions of the United States (and Canada, Europe, etc.), supplemental lighting during winter may be necessary to produce certain crops (e.g., tomatoes) and very useful to achieve full plant growth potential and crop timing with most other greenhouse crops. Operating costs over the life of a luminaire typically will exceed the initial investment, making lighting efficacy a major consideration. This report reviews tests completed to evaluate the efficiencies of various commercially-available High-Pressure Sodium luminaires, and then describes the results of using a commercial lighting design computer program, Lumen-Micro, to explore how to place luminaires within greenhouses and plant growth chambers to achieve light (PAR) uniformity and relatively high lighting efficacies. Several suggestions are presented which could encourage systematic design of plant lighting systems.

  19. Comparisons of luminaires: Efficacies and system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, L. D.; Both, A. J.

    1994-03-01

    Lighting designs for architectural (aesthetic) purposes, vision and safety, and plant growth have many features in common but several crucial ones that are not. The human eye is very sensitive to the color (wavelength) of light, whereas plants are less so. There are morphological reactions, particularly to the red and blue portions of the light spectrum but, in general, plants appear to accept and use light for photosynthesis everywhere over the PAR region of the spectrum. In contrast, the human eye interprets light intensity on a logarithmic scale, making people insensitive to significant differences of light intensity. As a rough rule, light intensity must change by 30 to 50% for the human eye to recognize the difference. Plants respond much more linearly to light energy, at least at intensities below photosynthetic saturation. Thus, intensity differences not noticeable to the human eye can have significant effects on total plant growth and yield, and crop timing. These factors make luminaire selection and lighting system design particularly important when designing supplemental lighting systems for plant growth. Supplemental lighting for plant growth on the scale of commercial greenhouses is a relatively expensive undertaking. Light intensities are often much higher than required for task (vision) lighting, which increases both installation and operating costs. However, and especially in the northern regions of the United States (and Canada, Europe, etc.), supplemental lighting during winter may be necessary to produce certain crops (e.g., tomatoes) and very useful to achieve full plant growth potential and crop timing with most other greenhouse crops. Operating costs over the life of a luminaire typically will exceed the initial investment, making lighting efficacy a major consideration. This report reviews tests completed to evaluate the efficiencies of various commercially-available High-Pressure Sodium luminaires, and then describes the results of using a commercial lighting design computer program, Lumen-Micro, to explore how to place luminaires within greenhouses and plant growth chambers to achieve light (PAR) uniformity and relatively high lighting efficacies. Several suggestions are presented which could encourage systematic design of plant lighting systems.

  20. Chronic cough – assessment of treatment efficacy based on two questionnaires

    PubMed Central

    Grabczak, El?bieta M.; Arcimowicz, Magdalena; Domeracka-Ko?odziej, Anna; Domaga?a-Kulawik, Joanna; Krenke, Rafa?; Maskey-Warz?chowska, Marta; Tarchalska-Kry?ska, Bo?ena; Krasnod?bska, Paulina; Chazan, Ryszarda

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Efficacy of chronic cough treatment is ambiguous. The aim of the study was to analyze chronic cough alleviation after specific treatment and the relationship between cough etiology and treatment efficacy. Material and methods A stepwise diagnostic approach was used to diagnose cough etiology in non-smoking adults with chronic cough. In all patients specific treatment was applied. Two different questionnaires – a visual analog scale and a 5-degree scale – were used to assess cough severity before and after 4-6 months of treatment. Results A significant correlation between pre-treatment and post-treatment results of both questionnaires was found (Spearman coefficient 0.43, p = 0.0003 and 0.73, p < 0.0001, respectively). Baseline questionnaire analysis revealed no differences in cough severity between patients with different cough causes or multiple cough causes. Although specific treatment resulted in a significant decrease of cough severity in the entire group, only partial improvement was noted. According to the visual analogue scale, a decrease of cough severity by at least 50% was achieved only in 54.4% of patients (37/68). Similarly, satisfactory improvement was noted in only 54.4% (37/68) of patients when using the 5-point scale. There were three sub-groups of patients, in whom no relevant decrease of cough severity was observed despite treatment: patients with 1. three coexisting cough causes, 2. non-asthmatic eosinophilic bronchitis, and 3. chronic idiopathic cough. Conclusions Cough severity does not depend on its etiology. Efficacy of chronic cough treatment in non-smoking patients is only moderate. PMID:25395948

  1. Pixantrone: merging safety with efficacy.

    PubMed

    Papadatos-Pastos, Dionysios; Pettengell, Ruth

    2013-02-01

    Pixantrone is a novel anthracycline derivative, manufactured by Cell Therapeutics Incorporated, WA, USA. It was developed with the aim to retain the efficacy of anthracyclines and be less cardiotoxic. Initial safety trials and single-arm, Phase II trials have shown preliminary evidence of anticancer activity and manageable toxicity. These results were validated in multicenter, randomized clinical trials where pixantrone was used as single agent or in combination with other cytotoxics. Following the results of PIX301, it is now approved by the EMA for use as monotherapy in pretreated patients with refractory non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Ongoing trials are assessing the use of pixantrone in combination with other drugs. PMID:23373776

  2. Help! Guide Fall 2014-Spring 2015

    E-print Network

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Help! Guide Fall 2014-Spring 2015 Department of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Miscellaneous Curriculum Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Miscellaneous Curriculum Notes

  3. Help! Guide Fall 2015-Spring 2016

    E-print Network

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Help! Guide Fall 2015-Spring 2016 Department of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Miscellaneous Curriculum Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Miscellaneous Curriculum Notes

  4. Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration Fall 2014 Biotechnology

    E-print Network

    Eustice, Ryan

    Biomedical Engineering Graduate Concentration ­ Fall 2014 Biotechnology Advisor: Michael Mayer, Ph.D. BIOTECHNOLOGY (select one course): BIOMEDE 410 Design and Applications of Biomaterials (3) (I) BIOMEDE 556

  5. Swan falls instream flow study

    SciTech Connect

    Anglin, D.R.; Cummings, T.R.; Ecklund, A.E.

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of the Swan Falls Instream Flow Study was to define the relationship between streamflows and instream habitat for resident fish species and to assess the relative impact of several different hydrographs on resident fish habitat. Specific objectives included the following: (1) Conduct a literature search to compile life history, distribution, and habitat requirements for species of interest. Physical and hydrologic characteristics of the Snake River were also compiled. (2) Determine physical habitat versus discharge relationships and conduct habitat time series analysis for each species/lifestage using the Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. (3) Examine the impacts on resident fish habitat of proposed hydrographs, including Swan Falls Agreement flows, relative to current conditions. (4) Characterize water quality conditions, including water temperature and dissolved oxygen, in the vicinity of the study area and determine the implications of those conditions for the resident species of interest. (5) Determine streamflows necessary to protect and maintain resident fish habitat in the study area.

  6. Relative efficacy of ritalin and biofeedback treatments in the management of hyperactivity.

    PubMed

    Potashkin, B D; Beckles, N

    1990-12-01

    This study examined the efficacy of biofeedback and Ritalin treatments on hyperactivity as reflected by muscular electrical activity and as observed by teachers and parents. Eighteen male subjects between the ages of 10 and 13 were assigned to three groups, matched by age, IQ, and race. One group received 10 biofeedback sessions, another received Ritalin, and the third group controlled for nonspecific treatment effects. EMG readings, the Conners Teacher Rating Scale, the Werry-Weiss-Peters Scale, and the Zukow Parent Rating Scale were used to measure treatment efficacy. Results indicated that biofeedback-assisted relaxation significantly reduced muscle tension levels, whereas neither Ritalin nor personal attention produced significant change. On teacher ratings of hyperactivity, significant improvement was made by all three groups. Parent ratings on the Zukow scale indicated significant improvement by subjects in all groups. On the Werry-Weiss-Peters scale, the biofeedback and control groups made significant improvements in hyperactivity. PMID:2275943

  7. Principals' transformational leadership and teachers' collective efficacy.

    PubMed

    Dussault, Marc; Payette, Daniel; Leroux, Mathieu

    2008-04-01

    The study was designed to test the relationship of principals' transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire leadership with teachers' collective efficacy. Bandura's theory of efficacy applied to the group and Bass's transformational leadership theory were used as the theoretical framework. Participants included 487 French Canadian teachers from 40 public high schools. As expected, there were positive and significant correlations between principals' transformational and transactional leadership and teachers' collective efficacy. Also, there was a negative and significant correlation between laissez-faire leadership and teachers' collective efficacy. Moreover, regression analysis showed transformational leadership significantly enhanced the predictive capabilities of transactional leadership on teachers' collective efficacy. These results confirm the importance of leadership to predict collective efficacy and, by doing so, strengthen Bass's theory of leadership. PMID:18567210

  8. Efficacy and Safety of Tai Chi for Parkinson's Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xiaojia; Liu, Shaonan; Lu, Fuchang; Shi, Xiaogeng; Guo, Xinfeng

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective In Parkinson's disease (PD), wearing off and side effects of long-term medication and complications pose challenges for neurologists. Although Tai Chi is beneficial for many illnesses, its efficacy for PD remains uncertain. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Tai Chi for PD. Methods Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of Tai Chi for PD were electronically searched by the end of December 2013 and identified by two independent reviewers. The tool from the Cochrane Handbook 5.1 was used to assess the risk of bias. A standard meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5.2 software. Results Ten trials with PD of mild-to-moderate severity were included in the review, and nine trials (n?=?409) were included in the meta-analysis. The risk of bias was generally high in the blinding of participants and personnel. Improvements in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part III (mean difference (MD) ?4.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) ?6.67–?2.01), Berg Balance Scale (MD: 4.25, 95% CI: 2.83–5.66), functional reach test (MD: 3.89, 95% CI: 1.73–6.04), Timed Up and Go test (MD: ?0.75, 95% CI: ?1.30–?0.21), stride length (standardized MD: 0.56, 95% CI: 0.03–1.09), health-related quality of life (standardized MD: ?1.10, 95% CI: ?1.81–?0.39) and reduction of falls were greater after interventions with Tai Chi plus medication. Satisfaction and safety were high. Intervention with Tai Chi alone was more effective for only a few balance and mobility outcomes. Conclusions Tai Chi performed with medication resulted in promising gains in mobility and balance, and it was safe and popular among PD patients at an early stage of the disease. This provides a new evidence for PD management. More RCTs with larger sample size that carefully address blinding and prudently select outcomes are needed. PROSPERO registration number CRD42013004989. PMID:24927169

  9. 3 Semesters MBA: Fall 2015/ Spring 2016/ Fall 2016 4 Required non-credit courses

    E-print Network

    Linhardt, Robert J.

    : Business Analytics Finance Management Information Systems Marketing - New Product Development Supply for Reporting and Control (Fall-15) Monday 6-8:50 p.m. MGMT 7050 Design, Manufacturing and Marketing (Fall-15 and Marketing (Spring-16) - Tuesday 6-8:50 p.m. MGMT 6060 Business Implications of Emerging Technologies (Fall

  10. Falling and fall risk factors in adults with haemophilia: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Sammels, M; Vandesande, J; Vlaeyen, E; Peerlinck, K; Milisen, K

    2014-11-01

    Falls are a particular risk in persons with haemophilia (PWH) because of damaged joints, high risk of bleeding, possible impact on the musculoskeletal system and functioning and costs associated with treatment for these fall-related injuries. In addition, fall risk increases with age and PWH are increasingly entering the over 65 age group. The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of falls during the past year and to explore which fall risk factors are present in community-dwelling PWH. Dutch speaking community-dwelling adults were included from the age of 40 years with severe or moderate haemophilia A or B, independent in their mobility and registered at the University Hospitals Leuven. They were asked to come to the haemophilia centre; otherwise a telephone survey was conducted. Demographic and social variables, medical variables, fall evaluation and clinical variables were queried. From the 89 PWH, 74 (83.1%) participated in the study. Twenty-four (32.4%) fell in the past year, and 10 of them (41.7%) more than once with an average of four falls. Living conditions, physical activity, avoidance of winter sports due to fear of falling, orthopaedic status, urinary incontinence and mobility impairments are potential fall risk factors in adult PWH. This exploratory study indicates that PWH are attentive to falling since they are at higher risk for falls and because of the serious consequences it might have. Screening and fall prevention should be stimulated in the daily practice of haemophilia care. PMID:25354771

  11. Gavilan College Student Profile of Opening Enrollment, Fall 2000-Fall 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Terrence

    This report contains the student profile of opening enrollment for Gavilan College between Fall 2000 and Fall 2003. The document provides highlights of the data as well as tables and graphs that visually depict the data. Some of the highlights of the report are as follows: (1) Fall 2003 headcount is similar to Spring 2003 but with a slight…

  12. Self-efficacy in multimorbid elderly patients with osteoarthritis in primary care-influence on pain-related disability.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Sven; Brenk-Franz, Katja; Kratz, Anne; Petersen, Juliana J; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G; Schäfer, Ingmar; Weyerer, Siegfried; Wiese, Birgitt; Fuchs, Angela; Maier, Wolfgang; Bickel, Horst; König, Hans-Helmut; Scherer, Martin; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Gensichen, Jochen

    2015-10-01

    The impact of self-efficacy on pain-related disability in multimorbid elderly patients in primary care is not known. The aim of our study was to analyze the influence of self-efficacy on the relation between pain intensity and pain-related disability, controlled for age and disease count, in aged multimorbid primary care patients with osteoarthritis and chronic pain. Patients were recruited in the German MultiCare study (trial registration: ISRCTN89818205). Pain was assessed using the Graded Chronic Pain Scale, and self-efficacy using the General Self-Efficacy Scale. We employed SPSS for statistical analysis. One thousand eighteen primary care patients were included in the study. Correlation analyses showed significant correlations between pain intensity and pain-related disability (r?=?0.591, p?efficacy (r?=?0.078, p?efficacy and pain-related disability (r?=?0.153, p?efficacy partially mediates the relation between pain intensity and pain-related disability. In our results, we found little evidence that self-efficacy partially mediates the relation between pain intensity and pain-related disability in aged multimorbid primary care patients with osteoarthritis and chronic pain. Further research is necessary to prove the effect. PMID:25190365

  13. The Efficacy of Soccer Headgear

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Yan-Ying; Broglio, Michael D.; Sell, Timothy C.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The potential for risks associated with chronic soccer heading has led some soccer leagues to mandate the use of soccer headgear. Although manufacturers have designed and promoted these headbands to decrease the forces associated with heading a soccer ball, their efficacy has not been tested. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of 3 brands of soccer headgear: Headers, Headblast, and Protector, as compared with a non-headband condition. Design and Setting: A force platform was mounted vertically with each headband attached with a length of hook-and-loop tape. A JUGS Soccer Machine projected balls at the platform and headband at 56.45 kph (35 mph). Measurements: We measured vertical ground reaction force for 50 trials of each condition and calculated peak force, time to peak force, and impulse. Results: We found a significant reduction in peak force of impact with all 3 headbands. The Protector headband also showed the greatest decrease in time to peak force and impulse, whereas the Headers headband showed a significant increase in impulse. Conclusions: All 3 headbands were effective at reducing the peak impact force. The Protector headband appeared the most effective at reducing time to peak force and impulse within the design of this study. The clinical effectiveness of these products remains to be seen. PMID:14608431

  14. Thinking Styles and University Self-Efficacy Among Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, and Hearing Students.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Sanyin; Zhang, Li-Fang; Hu, Xiaozhong

    2016-01-01

    This study explores how students' thinking styles are related to their university self-efficacy, by administering the Thinking Styles Inventory-Revised II and the University Self-Efficacy Scale to 366 deaf or hard-of-hearing (DHH) and 467 hearing university students in mainland China. Results showed that, among all participants, those with Type I styles (i.e., more creativity-generating, less structured, and cognitively more complex) had higher levels of university self-efficacy. At the same time, DHH students with Type II styles (i.e., more norm-favoring, more structured, and cognitively more simplistic) had lower levels of university self-efficacy. The contributions, limitations, and implications of the present research are discussed. PMID:26272481

  15. Assessing Empathy and Self-Efficacy Levels of Pharmacy Students in an Elective Diabetes Management Course

    PubMed Central

    Stahnke, Amanda M.; Behnen, Erin M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the impact of a 6-week patient/provider interaction simulation on empathy and self-efficacy levels of diabetes management skills in third-year pharmacy students. Design. Pharmacy students enrolled in a diabetes elective course were paired to act as a patient with diabetes or as a provider assisting in the management of that patient during a 6-week simulation activity. After 3 weeks, students switched roles. The simulation was designed with activities to build empathy. Assessment. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE) and a self-efficacy survey were administered to assess change in empathy and confidence levels from baseline to the end of the activity. Completion of the activity resulted in significant improvement in total JSE scores. Additionally, significant improvements in overall self-efficacy scores regarding diabetes management were noted. Conclusion. The 6-week patient/provider interaction simulation improved empathy and self-efficacy levels in third-year pharmacy students. PMID:25995517

  16. 158. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    158. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Transit Book #404T, Page 3, #46, Division One). START OF MAIN CANAL SURVEY, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  17. 154. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    154. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Surveyor's Transit Book #405T, Page 2, #46 Division One). STATEMENT OF SIGHT-SETTING FOR 1903 SURVEY TO ALIGN SOUTH SIDE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  18. 155. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    155. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Surveyor's Transit Book #405T, Page 1, #46 Division One). STATEMENT RE: SURVEY ALIGNMENT 3/03, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  19. Fall Gardening for Health and Wellbeing Lecture Series

    E-print Network

    Shoubridge, Eric

    -084 #12;Outline · Fall plantings: · perennials, annuals, bulbs, and vegetables. · Fall care: · Pruning · Ornamental cabbages #12;Fall Plantings: Perennials · Why? · Many actually do best when planted in the fall Plantings: Vegetables · Fall Harvests: · Many plants actually taste better when grown in cold conditions

  20. 152. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    152. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Surveyor's Transit Book #363, Page 1). 1912 CONDITION REPORT OF MILNER DAM AREA, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  1. 153. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    153. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Field Book #360, Page 74, entitled, 'Clay-Seam Cut-Off.' Cross-Reference: ID-15-157). MILNER DAM SURVEY, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  2. 151. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    151. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Surveyor's Transit Book #363, Page 20). SURVEY PRINT SHOWING POINT SPILLWAY AND FIELD NOTES, TWIN FALLS COUNTY NORTHWEST OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  3. Development and evaluation of a self-efficacy instrument for Japanese sleep apnea patients receiving continuous positive airway pressure treatment

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Ayako; Kojima, Shigeko; Sasaki, Fumihiko; Hayashi, Masamichi; Mieno, Yuki; Sakakibara, Hiroki; Hashimoto, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a self-efficacy instrument for Japanese obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Analyzed subjects were 653 Japanese OSA patients (619 males and 34 females) treated with CPAP at a sleep laboratory in a respiratory clinic in a Japanese city. Based on Bandura’s social cognitive theory, the CPAP Self-Efficacy Questionnaire for Sleep Apnea in Japanese (CSESA-J) was developed by a focus group of experts, using a group interview of OSA patients for the items of two previous self-efficacy scales for Western sleep apnea patients receiving CPAP treatment. CSESA-J has two subscales, one for self-efficacy and the other for outcome expectancy, and consists of a total of 15 items. Content validity was confirmed by the focus group. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the factor loadings of self-efficacy and outcome expectancy were 0.47–0.76 and 0.41–0.92, respectively, for the corresponding items. CSESA-J had a significant but weak positive association with the General Self-Efficacy Scale, and a strong positive association with “Self-efficacy scale on health behavior in patients with chronic disease.” Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was 0.85 for the self-efficacy subscale and 0.89 for the outcome expectancy subscale. The intraclass correlation coefficient using data from the first and second measurements with CSESA-J for a subset of 130 subjects was 0.93 for the self-efficacy and outcome expectancy subscales. These results support CSESA-J as a reliable and valid instrument for measuring the self-efficacy of Japanese OSA patients treated with CPAP. Further studies are warranted to confirm validity for female OSA patients and generalizability. PMID:25678832

  4. Development and evaluation of a self-efficacy instrument for Japanese sleep apnea patients receiving continuous positive airway pressure treatment.

    PubMed

    Saito, Ayako; Kojima, Shigeko; Sasaki, Fumihiko; Hayashi, Masamichi; Mieno, Yuki; Sakakibara, Hiroki; Hashimoto, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a self-efficacy instrument for Japanese obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Analyzed subjects were 653 Japanese OSA patients (619 males and 34 females) treated with CPAP at a sleep laboratory in a respiratory clinic in a Japanese city. Based on Bandura's social cognitive theory, the CPAP Self-Efficacy Questionnaire for Sleep Apnea in Japanese (CSESA-J) was developed by a focus group of experts, using a group interview of OSA patients for the items of two previous self-efficacy scales for Western sleep apnea patients receiving CPAP treatment. CSESA-J has two subscales, one for self-efficacy and the other for outcome expectancy, and consists of a total of 15 items. Content validity was confirmed by the focus group. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the factor loadings of self-efficacy and outcome expectancy were 0.47-0.76 and 0.41-0.92, respectively, for the corresponding items. CSESA-J had a significant but weak positive association with the General Self-Efficacy Scale, and a strong positive association with "Self-efficacy scale on health behavior in patients with chronic disease." Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.85 for the self-efficacy subscale and 0.89 for the outcome expectancy subscale. The intraclass correlation coefficient using data from the first and second measurements with CSESA-J for a subset of 130 subjects was 0.93 for the self-efficacy and outcome expectancy subscales. These results support CSESA-J as a reliable and valid instrument for measuring the self-efficacy of Japanese OSA patients treated with CPAP. Further studies are warranted to confirm validity for female OSA patients and generalizability. PMID:25678832

  5. Antidepressant Efficacy of the Antimuscarinic Drug Scopolamine

    PubMed Central

    Furey, Maura L.; Drevets, Wayne C.

    2010-01-01

    Context The need for improved therapeutic agents that more quickly and effectively treat depression is critical. In a pilot study we evaluated the role of the cholinergic system in cognitive symptoms of depression and unexpectedly observed rapid reductions in depression severity following the administration of the antimuscarinic drug scopolamine hydrobromide (4 ?g/kg intravenously) compared with placebo (P=.002). Subsequently a clinical trial was designed to assess more specifically the antidepressant efficacy of scopolamine. Objective To evaluate scopolamine as a potential antidepressant agent. Design Two studies were conducted: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-finding study followed by a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover clinical trial. Setting The National Institute of Mental Health. Patients Currently depressed outpatients aged 18 to 50 years meeting DSM-IV criteria for recurrent major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder. Of 39 eligible patients, 19 were randomized and 18 completed the trial. Interventions Multiple sessions including intravenous infusions of placebo or scopolamine hydrobromide (4 ?g/kg). Individuals were randomized to a placebo/ scopolamine or scopolamine/placebo sequence (series of 3 placebo sessions and series of 3 scopolamine sessions). Sessions occurred 3 to 5 days apart. Main Outcome Measures Psychiatric evaluations using the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale and the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale were performed to assess antidepressant and antianxiety responses to scopolamine. Results The placebo/scopolamine group showed no significant change during placebo infusion vs baseline; reductions in depression and anxiety rating scale scores (P<.001 for both) were observed after the administration of scopolamine compared with placebo. The scopolamine/placebo group also showed reductions in depression and anxiety rating scale scores (P<.001 for both) after the administration of scopolamine, relative to baseline, and these effects persisted as they received placebo. In both groups, improvement was significant at the first evaluation after scopolamine administration (P?.002). Conclusion Rapid, robust antidepressant responses to the antimuscarinic scopolamine occurred in currently depressed patients who predominantly had poor prognoses. PMID:17015814

  6. Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients).

    PubMed

    Chiara, Mussi; Gianluigi, Galizia; Pasquale, Abete; Alessandro, Morrione; Alice, Maraviglia; Gabriele, Noro; Paolo, Cavagnaro; Loredana, Ghirelli; Giovanni, Tava; Franco, Rengo; Giulio, Masotti; Gianfranco, Salvioli; Niccolò, Marchionni; Andrea, Ungar

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82 ± 7 years, range 65-101). Falls were defined "accidental" (fall explained by a definite accidental cause), "medical" (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease), "dementia-related" (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia), and "unexplained" (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause). According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury. PMID:23533394

  7. The Development and Refinement of the Coping with Death Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Paul L.; Young, Patricia

    The initial form of the Coping with Death Scale consisted of 30 items designed to obtain responses arranged along a seven-point Likert-type scale. Each item on the scale was derived from personal responses of students who completed a death and dying seminar. The items appeared to fall into two categories: coping with self and coping with others.…

  8. Osteosarcopenic obesity and fall prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Martínez-Amat, Antonio; Cruz-Díaz, David; Pérez-López, Faustino R

    2015-02-01

    Sarcopenia, obesity, and osteoporosis are three interrelated entities which may share common pathophysiological factors. In the last decades, overall survival has drastically increased. Postmenopausal women, due to their estrogen depletion, are at higher risk of developing any of these three conditions or the three, which is termed osteosarcopenic obesity. One of the most common health problems among these patients is the elevated risk of falls and fractures. Falls and fall-related injuries are one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in older adults, and have a significant impact on social, economical and health-related costs. Several extrinsic and intrinsic risk factors have been described that play a role in the etiology of falls. A therapeutic approach to osteosarcopenic obesity aimed at the prevention of falls must include several factors, and act on those risk elements which can be effectively modified. An adequate weight-loss diet and a good nutritional intake, with an appropriate amount of vitamin D and the right protein/carbohydrates ratio, may contribute to the prevention of falls. The recommendation of physical exercise, both traditional (resistance or aerobic training) and more recent varieties (Tai Chi, Pilates, body vibration), can improve balance and positively contribute to fall prevention, whether by itself or in combination with other therapeutic strategies. Finally, a pharmacological approach, especially one focused on hormone therapy, has shown to have a positive effect on postmenopausal women's balance, leading to a decreased risk of falls. PMID:25533145

  9. Yosemite Falls and Half Dome Panorama

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this panorama, Yosemite Falls may be seen on the left and Half Dome on the right. Yosemite Falls is the tallest known waterfall in North America, with a total plunge of 2,425 ft (739 m). Half Dome is a granite dome, part of the Sierra Nevada batholith....

  10. Fall Arts and Rock Climbing Scholarship Nominees

    E-print Network

    Sin, Peter

    Highlights Fall Arts and Rock Climbing Scholarship Nominees CELT ­ Part-time Students Notes from the Office Manners Grammar TheELIWeekly Fall Arts and Rock Climbing Enjoy the arts and the Gainesville Rock Gym! Come have fun rock climbing and seeing art from the Gainesville area! When: Meet

  11. Infections, Not Clumsiness, Cause Many Falls

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and 45 percent of falls are caused by infection, the study authors said. They noted, however, that many relatives, ... caregivers don't associate falls with possible illness. Infections can lower ... the study authors said. The study involved 161 patients treated ...

  12. Why Does My Foot Fall Asleep?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the Body Works Main Page Why Does My Foot Fall Asleep? KidsHealth > Kids > Q&A > Q&A > Why Does My Foot Fall Asleep? Print A A A Text Size ... while you might have lost feeling in your foot, it might have felt heavy, or you might ...

  13. Trends, Fall 1993. Diablo Valley College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdsall, Les

    Providing data on institutional trends up to fall 1993 at Diablo Valley College, in California, this report consists of 14 charts on enrollment and student characteristics. Following an introduction describing a general decline in enrollments due to a statewide increase in fees, the following tables are provided: (1) fall enrollment from 1984 to…

  14. CMPUT 631 Fall 2014 Robotics: Visual Navigation

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Hong

    9/7/14 1 CMPUT 631 Fall 2014 CMPUT 631: Robotics: Visual Navigation Prof. Hong Zhang 407 Athabasca and cognition (?) CMPUT 631 Fall 2014 Robotics · Robotics is the intelligent connection of perception to action Issue Equipped with a camera, how does a robot model its environment and move from A and B

  15. Fall Semester Year 1 required coursework for

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    Year One Year Two Year Three Fall Semester Year 1 required coursework for PharmD, 18 credits PMBA 2100, 2 credits PMBA 2200, 2 credits Total semester credits = 16 Fall Semester Year 2 required coursework for PharmD, 18.5 credits MBA 8211, 2 credits PMBA 2400, 2 credits Total semester credits = 22

  16. Student Enrollment Visa Classification Fall 2012

    E-print Network

    Rasdeaconu, Rares

    #12;Student Enrollment Visa Classification Fall 2012 Student Visa Classifications Non-Immigrant Status F-1 1181 J-1 99 Total 1280 About the International Enrollment Report The International Enrollment Report is a statistical report of our F-1 and J-1 international students enrolled during the Fall 2012

  17. Enrollment Analysis Final for Fall 2014

    E-print Network

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Enrollment Analysis Final for Fall 2014 Office of Strategic Research & Analysis November 11, 2014 #12;Georgia Southern University, Office of Strategic Research and Analysis Enrollment Analysis, Final) November 6, 2014 Project Request: Enrollment Analysis ­ Final for Fall 2014. Requested by: Dr. Brooks Keel

  18. Studies on fall armyworm migration and monitoring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith; Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) or fall armyworm is an important agricultural pest of a number of crops in thewestern hemisphere. Two morphologically identical host strains of fall armyworm exist, the rice-strain and corn-strain, with the latter inflicting substantial eco...

  19. The Latino Experience in Central Falls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Central Falls is, by far, the poorest community in Rhode Island. More than 40 percent of the children under 18 live in poverty, and 40 percent of that group live in severe poverty. At Central Falls High School, low-income Latino students have fallen behind their white counterparts, with shockingly low graduation, poor literacy, and low…

  20. ELEC4705 Fall 2009 Electronic Structure

    E-print Network

    Smy, Tom

    electrons), where the band structure depends on atomic spacing and therefore the crystal structure. SeeELEC4705 ­ Fall 2009 Tom Smy LECTURE 8 Electronic Structure 1 #12;#12;Contents ELEC4705 ­ Fall 2009 1 Lecture 8. Electronic Structure 1 8.1. Number of States in a Band 4 8.2. Insulators, Metals

  1. How Fast Does a Building Fall?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Mark

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the time required for a tower block to collapse is calculated. The tower collapses progressively, with one floor falling onto the floor below, causing it to fall. The rate of collapse is found to be not much slower than freefall. The calculation is an engaging and relevant application of Newton's laws, suitable for undergraduate…

  2. Digital Mapping SUR 5365 Fall 2013

    E-print Network

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Digital Mapping SUR 5365 ­ Fall 2013 School of Forest Resources and Conservation Fort Lauderdale _______________________________________________________________________________________ 1 SUR 5365 - Digital Mapping ­ Fall 2013 INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Hartwig Henry HOCHMAIR (FLREC Fort and practical aspects for mapping and analyzing digital spatial data. The course objective is to provide

  3. TEXAS FEEDER SCHOOLS SUMMER/FALL 2014

    E-print Network

    Pillow, Jonathan

    TEXAS FEEDER SCHOOLS SUMMER/FALL 2014 September 23, 2014 HS Code HS Name HS City Total 2440010 Austin 35 1 of 17 2014-0149 #12;TEXAS FEEDER SCHOOLS SUMMER/FALL 2014 September 23, 2014 HS Code HS Name ACE ACADEMY Austin 2 2440069 LIBERAL ARTS & SCIENCE ACAD HS Austin 30 2440294 L C ANDERSON HIGH SCHOOL

  4. FALL PROTECTION PROGRAM OVERVIEW November 18, 2013

    E-print Network

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    to this overview. 2.2 Passive restraint systems may include safety nets, guardrails, etc. 2.3 Personal fall arrest restraint system may consist of a full body harness that is connected to an anchor point by a lanyard arrest or restraint systems, and any passive fall protection components. Departments ensure

  5. Music BM Performance Fall--First Year

    E-print Network

    Gering, Jon C.

    Music ­ BM Performance Fall--First Year MUSI 130: Music Analysis I MUSI 132: Aural Skills in Music I MUSI 279: Concert and Recital Atten. MUSI 153: Keyboard Skills I MUSI xxx: Major Instrument) coursework Fall--Second Year MUSI 230: Music Analysis III MUSI 232: Aural Skills in Music III MUSI 339

  6. Non-Matriculant Survey Report, Fall 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Stephen

    In fall 1995, Pennsylvania College of Technology undertook a study of students who were accepted for admission but did not enroll to determine their reasons for not enrolling. Surveys were mailed to the 1,619 students, out of 3,524 accepted in fall 1995, who did not enroll, receiving responses from 52.4% (n=849). Study results included the…

  7. The Relative Importance of Specific Self-Efficacy Sources in Pretraining Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howardson, Garett N.; Behrend, Tara S.

    2015-01-01

    Self-efficacy is clearly important for learning. Research identifying the most important sources of self-efficacy beliefs, however, has been somewhat limited to date in that different disciplines focus largely on different sources of self-efficacy. Whereas education researchers focus on Bandura's original sources of "enactive mastery,"…

  8. Collective Efficacy Beliefs in Student Work Teams: Relation to Self-Efficacy, Cohesion, and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lent, Robert W.; Schmidt, Janet; Schmidt, Linda

    2006-01-01

    A measure of collective efficacy was developed and administered to undergraduates working in project teams in engineering courses. Findings in each of two samples revealed that the measure contained a single factor and was related to ratings of team cohesion and personal efficacy. Collective efficacy was also found to relate to indicators of team…

  9. Falls in the Elderly: A Practical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Handfield-Jones, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Falls in the elderly constitute a major problem confronting physicians. Their cost to individual patients and to society in terms of incidence, morbidity, and mortality is enormous. This paper attempts to outline some of the common etiological factors related to falls and a practical approach to the diagnosis and management. Causes of falls are clssified as extrinsic and intrinsic factors. The latter include disorders of many organ systems, especially those resulting from neurological and cardiovascular diseases. The role of drugs and alcohol is stressed. Determining the cause of falls requires a thorough history and physical examination. In order to manage successfully an elderly person with multiple falls, a co-ordinated effort by a multi-disciplinary team is often essential. PMID:21249001

  10. 9/10/2002 Internet/Grid Computing -Fall 2002 1 What is Performance for Internet/Grid Computation?

    E-print Network

    Browne, James C.

    ? Goals for Internet/Grid Computation? Do things you cannot otherwise do because of: Lack of Capacity9/10/2002 Internet/Grid Computing - Fall 2002 1 What is Performance for Internet/Grid Computation Large scale computations Cost SETI Scale/Scope of communication Internet searches All of the above #12

  11. Astronomy 111, Fall 2015 5 November 2015 (c) University of Rochester 1

    E-print Network

    Mamajek, Eric E.

    111, Fall 2015 1 AST 111 Lecture #18: Saturn, Uranus and Neptune All four giant planets, on the same scale (Voyager images, JPL/NASA). qThe other giant planets · Vitals of Saturn, Uranus and Neptune · Gas giants and ice giants qThe rings of the giant planets · Saturn's bright icy rings · Uranus's dark rocky

  12. The Equivalence Principle Comes to School--Falling Objects and Other Middle School Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie; Ekström, Peter; Hansson, Lena; Mars, Patrik; Ouattara, Lassana; Ryan, Ulrika

    2014-01-01

    Comparing two objects falling together is a small-scale version of Galileo's classical experiment, demonstrating the equivalence between gravitational and inertial mass. We present here investigations by a group of ten-year-olds, who used iPads to record the drops. The movie recordings were essential in the follow-up discussions, enabling the…

  13. Home Safety, Safe Behaviors of Elderly People, and Fall Accidents At Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erkal, Sibel

    2010-01-01

    The present study analyzed home safety and safe behaviors against fall accidents of elderly people living at home. The study group comprised 121 people aged 65+ living in the catchment area of Ankara Mamak Halil Ulgen Health Center. Data were collected via a personal information form and Home-Screen Scale. Statistical analysis used an independent…

  14. BIOMASS YIELD AND BIOFUEL QUALITY OF SWITCHGRASS HARVESTED IN FALL OR SPRING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Harvest management of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) grown for biofuel must consider not only biomass yield, but also the fuel quality of the biomass. A field study was conducted over a range of landscape scales to determine the effect of fall and spring harvest on biomass yield and biofuel quali...

  15. 4. VIEW OF SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE TOWER NO. 41, OSPREY NEST ON TOWER TOP. LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Little Falls Tie Line Towers, Near Little Dam Falls on Spokane River, Wellpinit, Stevens County, WA

  16. 2. VIEW OF WEST ELEVATION OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF WEST ELEVATION OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE TOWER NO. 23, OSPREY NEST ON TOWER TOP. LOOKING EAST - Little Falls Tie Line Towers, Near Little Dam Falls on Spokane River, Wellpinit, Stevens County, WA

  17. Geosciences 308 Fall 2004 Name___________________________

    E-print Network

    Rees, Allister

    the geologic time scale. Include the eras, the periods, the epochs of the Cenozoic, the ages of the boundaries graph extends from the Vendian to the Holocene and shows the approximate location of the Permian

  18. Effectiveness of a Releasing Exercise Program on Anxiety and Self-Efficacy Among Nurses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huei-Mein; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Chiu, Min-Hui

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a releasing exercise program (REP) on anxiety and exercise self-efficacy among nurses. The REP consisted of warm-up and tension-releasing exercises and mood adjustment. Ninety-nine nurses (age = 33.38 ± 7.38 years) experiencing anxiety (average Visual Analog Scale for Anxiety [VASA] score of 5.63 ± 1.44 at baseline) were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 50) that received 50-min REP sessions 3 times a week or a control group (n = 49) that did not attend REP sessions. The outcome measures were VASA, the Chinese Version of the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale scores. At Weeks 12 and 24, the experimental group had significantly lower anxiety levels and higher exercise self-efficacy scores than the control group. Therefore, the REP effectively reduces anxiety and enhances self-confidence in exercise capability. PMID:25326004

  19. Fall-Related Injuries in Community-Dwelling Older Adults in Qom Province, Iran, 2010-2012

    PubMed Central

    Gilasi, Hamid Reza; Soori, Hamid; Yazdani, Shahram; Taheri Tenjani, Parisa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Falls and related injuries are common health problems in the elderly. Fractures, brain and internal organ injuries and death are the common consequences of the falls, which result in dependence, decreased self-efficacy, fear of falling, depression, restricted daily activities, hospitalization and admission to the nursing home and impose costs on the individual and the society. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the types of fall-related injuries and the related risk factors in the elderly population of Qom province, Iran. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study was performed on 424 elderly people (65 years and over) referred to Shahid Beheshti Hospital, Qom, Iran, due to falls between 2010 and 2012. The ICD-10 codes of external causes of injury from w00 to w19 related to falls were selected from the health information system of the hospital and demographic variables of the patients and external causes of falls were extracted after accessing the files of the patients. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 18 (SPSS Inc., USA). The duration of hospital stay and its relationship with underlying variables were investigated using t test and ANOVA. The level of significance was considered P < 0.05. Results: Among 424 elderly people, 180 cases (42.45%) were male and the mean age of the patients was 78.65 ± 7.70 years. Fall on the same level from slipping, tripping, and stumbling was the most common external cause with 291 victims (68.60%), and hip fracture in 121 patients (29.00%), intertrochanteric fracture in 112 patients (26.90%), and traumatic brain injury in 51 patients (12.20%) were the most common causes of hospital stay. The mean hospital stay was 7.33 ± 3.63 days. Conclusions: Lower limb fracture and traumatic brain injury were the most common causes of hospitalization, which resulted in the longest hospital stay and highest hospitalization costs in the elderly. PMID:26064869

  20. The Core Self-Evaluation Scale: Further Construct Validation Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Donald G.; Pierce, Jon L.

    2010-01-01

    The authors empirically examined two operationalizations of the core self-evaluation construct: (a) the Judge, Erez, Bono, and Thoresen 12-item scale and (b) a composite measure of self-esteem, self-efficacy, locus of control, and neuroticism.The study found that the composite scale relates more strongly than the shorter scale to performance,…

  1. Teacher Efficacy: Influence of Principal Leadership Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hipp, Kristine A.

    This paper presents findings of a study that explored the relationships among principals' leadership behaviors and teacher efficacy in Wisconsin middle schools involved in building-level change efforts. An adaptation of Bandura's social cognitive learning theory of self-efficacy (A. Woolfolk and W. Hoy 1993) provided the theoretical framework.…

  2. TESTING ANTIMICROBIAL EFFICACY ON POROUS MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The efficacy of antimicrobial treatments to eliminate or control biological growth in the indoor environment can easily be tested on nonporous surfaces. However, the testing of antimicrobial efficacy on porous surfaces, such as those found in the indoor environment [i.e., gypsum ...

  3. Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial (CARET)

    Cancer.gov

    The Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial (CARET) was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the cancer prevention efficacy and safety of a daily combination of 30 milligrams (mg) of beta-carotene and 25,000 IU of retinyl palmitate in 18,314 persons who were at high risk for lung cancer.

  4. Teachers' Self-Efficacy for Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavelle, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: While "teaching self-efficacy" has been supported as an important construct related to teacher competence (eg. Goddard, Hoy & Hoy, 2000), little is known about how in-service teachers think about themselves as writers, or writing self-efficacy, particularly as it relates to writing performance. The present study is a preliminary…

  5. Analyzing the problem of falls among older people

    PubMed Central

    Dionyssiotis, Yannis

    2012-01-01

    Falls are a serious problem facing the elderly. The prevention of falls that contribute to disability, mainly in elderly people, is an important issue. Ensuring the greatest possible functionality for elderly people is an important element in the prevention of disability. This paper analyzes the importance of falls, risk factors for falls, and interventions to prevent falls. Recent publications as well as research regarding the prevention and rehabilitation for falls are reviewed. PMID:23055770

  6. Predictors of low levels of self-efficacy among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haejung; Lim, Yeonjung; Kim, Sungmin; Park, Hye-Kyung; Ahn, Jong-Joon; Kim, Yunseong; Lee, Bong Chun

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify related factors of low levels of self-efficacy in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). A cross-sectional research design used descriptive statistics, ?(2) test, t-test, and binary logistic regression. Two hundred and forty-five patients with COPD were recruited from five hospitals in South Korea. The COPD Self-Efficacy Scale, the Bristol COPD Knowledge Questionnaire, Personal Resource Questionnaire 2000, BODE index, and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire short version were utilized to assess self-efficacy, disease-related knowledge, social support, disease severity, and physical activity, respectively. The BODE index, affect-oriented coping, and duration since diagnosis of COPD were included as significant predictors of self-efficacy. These findings suggest possible screening methods to identify patients with low levels of self-efficacy and future intervention targeting for these patients would strengthen the efficiency of an intervention. PMID:23682708

  7. The Effects of Multiple Assessments of the Discovery Education Assessment on Teacher Self-Efficacy of Eighth-Grade Mathematics Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinzie, Abasi H.

    2012-01-01

    This study utilized the student scores of eighth-grade mathematics students on the "Discovery Education Assessment," as well as the self-efficacy perceptions of eighth-grade mathematics teachers as determined by the "Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale" ("TSES") from seven middle schools that encompassed grades 6-8…

  8. An Investigation of Taiwanese High School Students' Science Learning Self-Efficacy in Relation to Their Conceptions of Learning Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Tzung-Jin; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Background: Past studies have shown significant associations between students' conceptions of learning science and their science learning self-efficacy. However, in most of the studies, students' science learning self-efficacy has often been measured by a singular scale. Purpose: Extending the findings of these studies, the present study…

  9. Coping Self-Efficacy in a Community-Based Sample of Women and Men from the United Kingdom: The Impact of Sex and Health Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colodro, H.; Godoy-Izquierdo, D.; Godoy, J.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents pioneer findings regarding coping self-efficacy obtained with the Coping Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES) in a community-based sample composed of both women and men (to date, only data obtained in the 1980s from men with HIV and depression exist). The aims of this study were to investigate the psychometric properties of the CSES and…

  10. Measures of self-efficacy and norms for low-fat milk consumption are reliable and related to beverage consumption among 5th graders at school lunch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to determine the reliability and validity of scales measuring low-fat milk consumption self-efficacy and norms during school lunch among a cohort of 5th graders. Two hundred seventy-five students completed lunch food records and a psychosocial questionnaire measuring self-efficacy ...

  11. When Being Able Is Not Enough. The Combined Value of Positive Affect and Self-Efficacy for Job Satisfaction in Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Angelica; Pazzaglia, Francesca; Ronconi, Lucia

    2010-01-01

    This study examines how good strategies and praxis interplay with positive affect and self-efficacy to determine a teacher's job satisfaction, in the hypothesis that teaching effectively does not in itself guarantee satisfaction: positive affect and self-efficacy beliefs are needed. Self-assessment scales, designed to assess the use of efficient…

  12. Assessment of Arm Motions with Fall Direction in Human Subjects

    E-print Network

    Krishnan, Bhargavi

    2012-08-31

    monitoring device [50]. Impact during a fall Studying the mechanics of a fall is important to reducing the impact from a fall. Studies have shown that a sideways fall compared to a fall in the anterior/posterior directions increases hip fracture risk... settings [63]. Other systems to prevent fall injuries include a wearable inflatable system that is designed to protect from falls. It contains at least one inflatable element that can be worn on the body which 10 during a fall inflates itself...

  13. The Fall 2000 and Fall 2001 SOHO-Ulysses Quadratures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Poletto, G.

    2000-01-01

    SOHO-Ulysses quadrature occurs when the SOHO-Sun-Ulysses included angle is 90 degrees. It is only at such times that the same plasma leaving the Sun in the direction of Ulysses can first be remotely analyzed with SOHO instruments and then later be sampled in situ by Ulysses instruments. The quadratures in December 2000 and 2001 are of special significance because Ulysses will be near the south and north heliographic poles, respectively, and the solar cycle will be near sunspot maximum. Quadrature geometry is sometimes confusing and observations are influenced by solar rotation. The Fall 2000 and 2001 quadratures are more complex than usual because Ulysses is not in a true polar orbit and the orbital speed of Ulysses about the Sun is becoming comparable to the speed of SOHO about the Sun. In 2000 Ulysses will always be slightly behind the pole but will appear to hang over the pole for over two months because it is moving around the Sun in the same direction as SOHO. In 20001, Ulysses will be slightly in front of the pole so that its footpoint will be directly observable. Detailed plots will be shown of the relative positions of SOHO and Ulysses will their relative positions. In neither case is true quadrature actually achieved, but this works to the observers advantage in 2001.

  14. The Fall 2000 and Fall 2001 SOHO-Ulysses Quadratures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Poletto, G.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    SOHO-Ulysses quadrature occurs when the SOHO-Sun-Ulysses included angle is 90 degrees. It is only at such times that the same plasma leaving the Sun in the direction of Ulysses can first be remotely analyzed with SOHO instruments and then later be sampled in situ by Ulysses instruments. The quadratures in December 2000 and 2001 are of special significance because Ulysses will be near the south and north heliographic poles, respectively, and the solar cycle will be near sunspot maximum. Quadrature geometry is sometimes confusing and observations are influenced by solar rotation. The Fall 2000 and 2001 quadratures are more complex than usual because Ulysses is not in a true polar orbit and the orbital speed of Ulysses about the Sun is becoming comparable to the speed of SOHO about the Sun. In 2000 Ulysses will always be slightly behind the pole but will appear to hang over the pole for over two months because it is moving around the Sun in the same direction as SOHO. In 2001 Ulysses will be slightly in front of the pole so that its footpoint will be directly observable. Detailed plots will be shown of the relative positions of SOHO and Ulysses will their relative positions. In neither case is true quadrature actually achieved, but this works to the observers advantage in 2001.

  15. Antecedents of Mathematics Self-Efficacy Beliefs for Middle and High School Students: An Instrument Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freed, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    There were three primary purposes for this study. First, I investigated the psychometric properties of the Sources of Middle School Mathematics Self-Efficacy (SMMSE) scale (Usher, 2007; Usher & Pajares, 2009) with high school students. Validation for expanded use of the SMMSE scale was achieved by assessing the instrument's psychometric…

  16. Building Student Self-Efficacy and Mastery of Skills through Service Learning Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilarski, C.

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate students (N = 40) responded positively to a semantic differential scale after experiencing a "direct practice" service learning group work course. Qualitative data documented student's perceptions of increased skill levels relating to self-efficacy--understood as positively influencing mastery of skills and performance…

  17. Confidence: A Better Predictor of Academic Achievement than Self-Efficacy, Self-Concept and Anxiety?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stankov, Lazar; Lee, Jihyun; Luo, Wenshu; Hogan, David J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report the results from a study that assessed confidence together with scales measuring self-belief--i.e., self-efficacy, different kinds of self-concepts, and anxiety--among the 15-year old students from Singapore. A distinct confidence factor was identified in the domains of mathematics (N = 1940) and English (N = 1786). Our…

  18. Efficacy and Safety of Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate in Adolescents with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findling, Robert L.; Childress, Ann C.; Cutler, Andrew J.; Gasior, Maria; Hamdani, Mohamed; Ferreira-Cornwell, M. Celeste; Squires, Liza

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) efficacy and safety versus placebo in adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: Adolescents (13 through 17) with at least moderately symptomatic ADHD (ADHD Rating Scale IV: Clinician Version [ADHD-RS-IV] score greater than or equal to 28) were randomized to…

  19. Mathematics Anxiety as a Function of Multidimensional Self-Regulation and Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jain, Sachin; Dowson, Martin

    2009-01-01

    This study tested the veracity of a model of Mathematics Anxiety as the end-point of related self-regulatory and self-efficacy processes. Data were collected in India from 232, eighth grade students on the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire and the Mathematics Anxiety Scale. Demographic information such as student' gender, age, marks…

  20. Impact loads of falling rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, W.

    2009-04-01

    Depending on the chosen protection system the planning engineer has to proceed differently. If the impact energies stay below 3'000 - 5'000 kJ solutions using flexible protection systems are recommended in many cases being the most efficient solution. Since 2001, such systems are type tested in Switzerland. The results are published on the internet (www.umwelt-schweiz.ch/typenpruefung). Therefore, the engineers can concentrate on the design of the anchorage and do not need to consider the brake down process of the falling rock because its details including the acting forces within the barrier are given. This is different to the design of rockfall protection earth dams. Here, the evidence of the structural safety is the major task and questions like the following ones have to be answered: What magnitude are the forces that have to be carried for a certain kinetic energy? How are the forces influenced by mass or impact velocity? What is the influence of the soil properties such as strength, density and friction angle? How deep does the rock penetrate? Previous research on the impact loads on the cushion layer of protection galleries were performed by EPFL in the mid-nineties and led to a Swiss Guideline (ASTRA/SBB 1998) to calculate an equivalent static load for the structure underneath. This approach also delivers a function to predict the penetration depth. This contribution now checks whether above approach can also be used to design earth dams or how it can be modified. For that, the results of previous experiments performed by different institutions were analysed and, if possible, compared to the guideline. This could confirm above mentioned function to predict the penetration depth. In addition, an experimental series with different bodies (800 kg, 4000 kg) falling from different heights (2 - 15 m) on differently conditioned soils were performed. Measurements were taken through accelerometers attached to the blocks and measuring the vertical deceleration. The penetration into the ground was obtained by using digital high-speed video recording during the experiments and surveyor's optical level before and afterwards. The combination of accelerometers and digital high-speed video recordings additionally allows for a check of the function of the single systems. The rock's velocity can be obtained on the one hand through integration of the accelerations and on the other hand by differentiation of the video data; both values should differ not too much. Finally, the analyses of the test series enabled a calibration of an improved individual load model for the impact of falling bodies into more or less compacted soil and revealed that the loads resulting from the previous guideline can be reduced by 20%. However, because the maximum impact energy was 600 kJ further experiments are recommended to enable a prediction of the performance for energies higher than 5'000 kJ - an energy sector dams are normally used for.

  1. Pathogenesis and treatment of falls in elderly

    PubMed Central

    Pasquetti, Pietro; Apicella, Lorenzo; Mangone, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Summary Falls in the elderly are a public health problem. Consequences of falls are increased risk of hospitalization, which results in an increase in health care costs. It is estimated that 33% of individuals older than 65 years undergoes falls. Causes of falls can be distinguished in intrinsic and extrinsic predisposing conditions. The intrinsic causes can be divided into age-related physiological changes and pathological predisposing conditions. The age-related physiological changes are sight disorders, hearing disorders, alterations in the Central Nervous System, balance deficits, musculoskeletal alterations. The pathological conditions can be Neurological, Cardiovascular, Endocrine, Psychiatric, Iatrogenic. Extrinsic causes of falling are environmental factors such as obstacles, inadequate footwear. The treatment of falls must be multidimensional and multidisciplinary. The best instrument in evaluating elderly at risk is Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA). CGA allows better management resulting in reduced costs. The treatment should be primarily preventive acting on extrinsic causes; then treatment of chronic and acute diseases. Rehabilitation is fundamental, in order to improve residual capacity, motor skills, postural control, recovery of strength. There are two main types of exercises: aerobic and muscular strength training. Education of patient is a key-point, in particular through the Back School. In conclusion falls in the elderly are presented as a “geriatric syndrome”; through a multidimensional assessment, an integrated treatment and a rehabilitation program is possible to improve quality of life in elderly. PMID:25568657

  2. Neuropsychological mechanisms of falls in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Chan, John S. Y.; Yan, Jin H.

    2014-01-01

    Falls, a common cause of injury among older adults, have become increasingly prevalent. As the world’s population ages, the increase in—and the prevalence of—falls among older people makes this a serious and compelling societal and healthcare issue. Physical weakness is a critical predictor in falling. While considerable research has examined this relationship, comprehensive reviews of neuropsychological predictors of falls have been lacking. In this paper, we examine and discuss current studies of the neuropsychological predictors of falls in older adults, as related to sporting and non-sporting contexts. By integrating the existing evidence, we propose that brain aging is an important precursor of the increased risk of falls in older adults. Brain aging disrupts the neural integrity of motor outputs and reduces neuropsychological abilities. Older adults may shift from unconscious movement control to more conscious or attentive motor control. Increased understanding of the causes of falls will afford opportunities to reduce their incidence, reduce consequent injuries, improve overall well-being and quality of life, and possibly to prolong life. PMID:24782761

  3. Greenhouse Gas-ette Fall 1988, Spring, Fall 1989, Winter, Spring, Fall 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenhouse Gas-ette, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This newsletter is for educators interested in developing lessons related to global climate change. The newsletter contains sample lessons, news items involving global climate change on an international scale, and background information on issues related to global climate change. (CW)

  4. An Analysis on the Effect of Computer Self-Efficacy over Scientific Research Self-Efficacy and Information Literacy Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuncer, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Present research investigates reciprocal relations amidst computer self-efficacy, scientific research and information literacy self-efficacy. Research findings have demonstrated that according to standardized regression coefficients, computer self-efficacy has a positive effect on information literacy self-efficacy. Likewise it has been detected…

  5. Wireless slips and falls prediction system.

    PubMed

    Krenzel, Devon; Warren, Steve; Li, Kejia; Natarajan, Bala; Singh, Gurdip

    2012-01-01

    Accidental slips and falls due to decreased strength and stability are a concern for the elderly. A method to detect and ideally predict these falls can reduce their occurrence and allow these individuals to regain a degree of independence. This paper presents the design and assessment of a wireless, wearable device that continuously samples accelerometer and gyroscope data with a goal to detect and predict falls. Lyapunov-based analyses of these time series data indicate that wearer instability can be detected and predicted in real time, implying the ability to predict impending incidents. PMID:23366815

  6. Early childhood teachers' self-efficacy toward teaching science: Outcomes of professional development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Sarah

    The teaching of science in the early childhood classrooms has slowly been decreasing. As the years have passed, the subject of science has been put on the backburner while mathematics and language arts have taken center stage in the educational system. Early childhood teachers need to find ways to integrate science with other subjects in order to ensure children are receiving a well-rounded and full education. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of professional development on teachers' efficacy in teaching science. Volunteer teachers completed the Weisgram and Bigler scale (TWBS) pre and post training, in order to determine their self-efficacy toward teaching science, they also completed pre- and post- concept maps about their knowledge of teaching science, and a demographic questionnaire. Findings indicate the training provided was effective in increasing teachers' knowledge of teaching science. Teachers who had an increase in science teaching knowledge were also found to feel more efficacious about teaching science after completing the training and an academic year of implementing science lessons in their classrooms. There was not a relationship between teacher demographics and their science-teaching efficacy. This means that the demographics of participants in this study were not influential on teachers' efficacy, but professional development workshops enabled teachers to gain more knowledge about teaching as well as increase their efficacy about teaching science.

  7. Effect of education on self-efficacy of Turkish patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Kara, Ma?firet; A?ti, Türkinaz

    2004-10-01

    This study was designed to compare the effect of structured education on self-efficacy in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The study was carried out with an experimental group on which a structured education was provided, and a control group on which only educational advice was provided. There were 30 patients in both groups. Control and experimental group measurements were obtained on the COPD Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES). There was a significant difference between control group and experimental group scores on the CSES. Self-efficacy, as it affects managing or avoiding breathing difficulty, was measured before and after the structured education program and the nursing care. Patients' self-efficacy scores significantly improved after the structured education and remained significantly improved 1-month later. Standard nursing care alone was also effective in significantly improving self-efficacy scores, but patients' scores 1-month later were not significantly better than pre-program scores. This study indicates that a planned education program that is more effective in improving self-efficacy in patients with COPD. PMID:15476998

  8. A self-management program for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: relationship to dyspnea and self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, B W; Brown, S T; Bowman, J M

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to determine the effects of a nurse-directed self-management program on dyspnea and self-efficacy levels in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The Health Belief Model and the Theory of Self-Efficacy provided the theoretical framework for the study. The sample included 10 COPD patients from rural North Carolina who attended a 6-week nurse-directed self-management program. Dyspnea and self-efficacy were measured before and after the program by using a vertical visual analogue scale for dyspnea and the COPD Self-Efficacy Scale. A single-group quasi-experimental design that incorporated a pretest and a posttest was used. Paired t tests were used to compare the pretest and the posttest levels of dyspnea and self-efficacy. The findings revealed no significant change in levels of dyspnea after the program. Levels of self-efficacy, however, were found to have increased at a statistically significant level (p < .001) following the program. This study indicates that using a group teaching method to teach self-management skills improved self-efficacy levels. PMID:8868756

  9. The role of self-efficacy in assisting patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to manage breathing difficulty.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Y K; Schmieder, L E

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine changes in self-efficacy after attending a pulmonary rehabilitation program. Twenty-nine subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were enrolled in the program, which was designed to increase patients' confidence in their own ability to manage or avoid breathing difficulty in certain situations. Results showed a significant improvement (p < .05) in scores on the COPD Self-Efficacy Scale between preprogram and postprogram attendance. These findings were still evident at 6 months following program attendance. Incorporation of self-efficacy theory should be considered in the rehabilitation of individuals with COPD. PMID:8850776

  10. The efficacy of nonopioid analgesics for postoperative dental pain: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, N.; Grad, H. A.; Haas, D. A.; Aronson, K. J.; Jokovic, A.; Locker, D.

    1997-01-01

    The evidence for the efficacy of nonopioid analgesics in the dental pain model was examined by conducting a meta-analysis. Studies were obtained by searching the literature from August 1996 back to 1975 using the terms pain, analgesics, and dentistry. This led to the review of 294 articles, of which 33 studies met the inclusion criteria. Pain scale results were transformed into a common percent scale and converted to N-weighted means with differences in efficacy considered significant using a 95% confidence interval. Collectively, therapeutic doses of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) commonly used in dentistry were significantly more efficacious than the combination of acetaminophen (600 or 650 mg) with codeine (60 mg). Similarly, specific doses of each of diflunisal, flurbiprofen, ibuprofen, and ketorolac were significantly more efficacious than the commonly used acetaminophen-codeine combination. These quantitative results show that particular NSAIDs may be more efficacious than the acetaminophen-codeine combination for relief of postoperative dental pain. PMID:9481955

  11. Factors Related to Sexual Self-Efficacy among Thai Youth Living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Viseskul, Nongkran; Fongkaew, Warunee; Settheekul, Saowaluck; Grimes, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    Studies of sexual behavior among HIV-infected Thai youth show conflicting results due to the different ages of the respondents. This study examined the relationships between sexual self-efficacy and risk behaviors among 92 HIV-positive Thai youth aged 14 to 21 years. A questionnaire previously validated in Thailand measured sexual self-efficacy. There were low levels of sexual activity with 13 respondents having sex in the last 6 months. The sexual self-efficacy scales were inversely related to the risk behaviors of having sex, having multiple partners, and drinking alcohol in the last 6 months. The scores of the sexual self-efficacy scale and its subscales were significantly lower in those aged 17 to 21 than in 14 to 16. Sexual risk behaviors were significantly higher in those aged 17 to 21 than in 14 to 16. These findings suggest that interventions to increase sexual self-efficacy should be emphasized as HIV-infected Thai youth reach late adolescence. PMID:23708679

  12. Keep Up or Fall Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramaswami, Rama

    2007-01-01

    In the race to enable information access and collaboration, institutions are taking advantage of new tools to drive content management innovation. New content management systems (CMS) features and functions are driving true innovation in content management, and enabling information access, sharing, collaboration, and tracking on a scale heretofore…

  13. UNIVERSITY LIBRARY Fall Quarter 2013

    E-print Network

    Ishida, Yuko

    elsewhere (e.g. Google, Wikipedia, PubMed) · Patron expectations for ease-of-use Space · Student demand but hard to link to student success · Little faculty interest · Current approach won't scale to 35) · Digitization Projects ongoing · Google Books · LSTA grants (California agricultural, Giannini Foundation

  14. Sertindole: a clinical efficacy profile.

    PubMed

    Hale, A

    2002-01-01

    Sertindole is an effective atypical antipsychotic drug that is associated with significant improvements in the symptoms of schizophrenia. It is at least as efficacious as haloperidol and risperidone in treating the overall and positive symptoms of schizophrenia and has been shown to have advantages over these two drugs with respect to the treatment of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. In clinical trials, notable improvements in patients' quality of life were observed, which suggest that patients prescribed sertindole would be more likely to adhere to treatment and continue taking the drug as part of their long-term treatment regimen. Continued treatment gives patients the best chance of avoiding relapse. Indeed, other benefits of sertindole demonstrated in clinical trials include relatively low relapse and re-admission rates. Sertindole could theoretically reduce the financial burden of schizophrenia on health- and social-care systems by reducing the need for re-hospitalization and by enabling patients to manage their illness and to live as normal a life as possible. PMID:24931885

  15. The relation between teachers' personal teaching efficacy and students' academic efficacy for science and inquiry science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurien, Sarah Anjali

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relation between middle school teachers' personal teaching efficacy and their students' academic efficacy for science and inquiry science. Teachers can create classroom environments that promote the development of students' science self-efficacy (Britner & Pajares, 2006). Teachers who are efficacious and believe they are able to effectively teach science are more comfortable teaching science (Plourde, 2002) and more likely to commit classroom time to teaching science. Additionally, they are better equipped to challenge and support students as they develop their science skills and efficacy beliefs. Therefore, it was expected that teachers' personal teaching efficacy for science would be related to their students' science efficacy. Similarly, it was predicted that teachers' personal teaching efficacy for inquiry science would be related to their students' inquiry science efficacy. It was expected that the relation between teacher and student efficacy would not differ by students' gender. Data was collected from 26 middle school science teachers who were participating in a professional development program and 660 students from their classes. Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) analyses were completed to evaluate the relation between teacher and student efficacy for science and inquiry science. Planned analyses revealed no significant predictors of students' science and inquiry science efficacy. Exploratory analyses were then conducted which added student grade and a measure evaluating the quality of teacher-student relationships to the original HLM analyses. Results indicated a significant interaction between the quality of teacher-student relationships and student grade on the prediction of students' science and inquiry science efficacy. A discussion of the results along with limitations of the study and avenues for future research will be provided.

  16. Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483-Fall

    E-print Network

    Sherrill, David

    Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483- Fall Tuesdays organic materials. The discussion will include aspects of synthesis. Example of a flexible organic light-emitting diode (OLED) (from the Center

  17. Featured Scientific Meetings- OCCAM Newsletter, Fall 2010

    Cancer.gov

    Fall 2010, Vol. 5 Issue 2 Skip navigation Home Feature A Conversation with News from the Field Funding Opportunities Research Resources Research Highlights CAM Information Meetings Featured Scientific Meetings Back to OCCAM Featured Scientific Meetings Date Meeting Location OCCAM

  18. Fall 2015 Internship/ Cooperative Education Program

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Fall 2015 Internship/ Cooperative Education Program Application Internship/Co-op Course Registration Deadline: Friday, August 21, 2015 STUDENT CHECKLIST: INTERNSHIP/COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM Classification: FAU Cumulative GPA: Internship / Cooperative Education Parttime Fulltime Total

  19. American Chemical Society Fall National Meeting

    Cancer.gov

    August 16, 2009 12:00 AM - August 20, 2009 12:00 AM Washington, DC + Add to Outlook Calendar Probe Development in Molecular Imaging and Therapy Print This Page American Chemical Society Fall National Meeting News & Events

  20. Siena, 1794: History's Most Consequential Meteorite Fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvin, U. B.

    1995-09-01

    In the mythos of meteoritics, the fall of stones at L'Aigle in Normandy at 1 p. m. on April 26, 1803, is commonly regarded as the event that turned skeptics into believers and opened the way for the new science. A strong case can be made, however, that the fall of stones at Siena at 7:00 p.m. on June 16, 1794, established the authenticity of meteorite falls and set in motion the reexaminations of entrenched beliefs that led to the founding of the new science. The Siena fall was heralded by the appearance of an extraordinarily high, dark cloud emitting smoke, sparks like rockets, and bolts of unusually slow-moving red lightning. With a tremendous explosion a shower of stones, ranging in weight from a few milligrams to 3 kg, fell southeast of Siena. This was the first meteorite fall to occur in the vicinity of a sizeable European city and the first to be witnessed by so many people, including English visitors, that the fall of the stones from the sky could not be denied. It also was the first fall to be seriously investigated by scholars, at several universities in Italy, who collected eye-witness reports and specimens and formulated hypotheses of origin. Their task was greatly complicated by the timing of the fall which occurred 18 hours after Mt. Vesuvius sprang into full eruption. Some believed that the two events were entirely coincidental; others thought that the stones either were ejecta from the volcano (which lay about 320 km to the southeast of Siena) or had consolidated in the fiery masses of dust and ash expelled by the mountain. No explanations seemed entirely satisfactory, but, in an age when the very possibility of falling stones had been decisively ruled out by savants of the Enlightenment, the well-observed fall at Siena opened a new dialog on this subject. The Siena fall occurred only two months after the publication in Riga and Leipzig of Ernst F. F. Chladni's book On the Origin of Ironmasses in which he concluded from historical records that fragments of iron and stone fall do, indeed, fall from sky. News traveled so slowly in the 18th century that Chladni's book received negative reviews in Germany throughout 1794 and much of 1795 before the first notice of the Siena fall appeared in a Berlin paper in 1796. The same amount of time passed before Chladni's book reached England, but the groundwork for a more tolerant reception of it in that country was laid by travelers returning from Italy in 1794 with their descriptions and their specimens from Siena (including bogus "fallen stones" fabricated for the tourist market). Widespread interest was aroused in 1795 when the Royal Society published an account of the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius by Sir William Hamilton, the English Ambassador at Naples, who included a short discussion of the Siena stones and their possible link with the volcano. Hamilton's article carried the story of the Siena fall to France and Germany. The case for fallen stones was further strengthened when a 56-pound stone fell at 3:30 p.m. on December 13th, 1795, at Wold Cottage in Yorkshire. Early in 1796, Edward King, a Fellow of the Royal Society, published the first book in English on fallen stones. In it, he focused primarily on the Siena event but just as he was finishing his text he received a copy of Chladni's book and quoted from it extensively. King's 36-page book was widely read. It received some bad reviews in England but it immediately prompted one reader to report the fall of a stone [apparently a genuine meteorite] at Pettiswood, Ireland. He had withheld his story for 17 years for fear of ridicule. Now, the climate of opinion had changed and meteoritics already was becoming a new branch of science.

  1. [Site of injuries in falls on staircases].

    PubMed

    Driever, F; Dettmeyer, R; Madea, B

    2001-01-01

    52 autopsy cases in combination with falls on staircases examined in the Bonn Institute of Legal Medicine in 1992 to 2000 were evaluated with respect to the query whether the morphological criteria were valid for reconstruction of the fall, in what way facial injuries were involved and whether isolated trunk injuries caused the death. In 80 per cent of all cases the localization of impact on skull and trunk could be deliminated in regards to heaviness of injuries with fractures and involvement of inner organs. Facial injuries were noticed in 50 per cent and were--as well as arm and leg injuries--caused by strike in fall or after impact. In only two cases in consequence of falls on staircases trauma of the trunk led to death by bleeding. PMID:11721601

  2. Fall Detection from Depth Map Video Sequences

    E-print Network

    Mignotte, Max

    countries motivates the development of new healthcare systems to ensure the safety of elderly people at home is near the camera, so that thresholds to discriminate falls from a person sitting down abruptly, for B

  3. Effect of free fall on higher plants.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    The influence of exposure to the free-fall state on the orientation, morphogenesis, physiology, and radiation response of higher plants is briefly summarized. It is proposed that the duration of the space-flight experiments has been to brief to permit meaningful effects of free fall on general biochemistry, growth, and development to appear. However, two types of significant effect did occur. The first is on differential growth - i.e., tropism and epinasty - resulting from the absence of a normal geostimulus. For these phenomena it is suggested that ground-based experiments with the clinostat would suffice to mimic the effect of the free-fall state. The second is an apparent interaction between the radiation response and some flight condition, yielding an enhanced microspore abortion, a disturbed spindle function, and a stunting of stamen hairs. It is suggested that this apparent interaction may be derived from a shift in the rhythm of the cell cycle, induced by the free fall.

  4. 2010 Fall : Highly Distinguished Honors Highly Distinguished

    E-print Network

    Kunkle, Tom

    Distinguished Bellin Christina J Highly Distinguished Bellomy Jennifer Roxzine Highly Distinguished Bemis Binda Rachel Anne Highly Distinguished Bing Alexandra Chan Highly Distinguished Bishop Anna Laurel Blackshaw Aaron Michael Highly Distinguished Blackwell Evan Robert Highly Distinguished 2 #12;2010 Fall

  5. Fall from Grace: The Decline of America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnepper, Jeff A.; Schnepper, Barbara

    1976-01-01

    Asks whether the United States is about to join the Roman Empire as a historical lesson of inevitable rise and fall. The government, economic and industrial leaders, and social scientists are examined. (Editor/RK)

  6. Fall 2012 | UCSF Magazine 1 Inventions that

    E-print Network

    Soloveichik, David

    Fall 2012 | UCSF Magazine 1 By our own devices Inventions that are saving sight, breath ­ and lives. By Our Own Devices Five inventors on five inventions that are changing the face of medicine. Identity

  7. Fall 2015 1 Citation Management Resource Toolkit

    E-print Network

    Salzman, Daniel

    Fall 2015 1 Citation Management Resource Toolkit Lindsay Greenawalt, Informationist Email: lg2683@cumc.columbia.edu Choosing a Citation Manager About citation managers A citation manager is a tool that helps you organize, store

  8. Featured Scientific Meetings - OCCAM Newsletter fall 2011

    Cancer.gov

    Fall 2011, Vol. 6 Issue 2 Skip navigation Home Feature A Conversation with News from the Field Funding Opportunities Research Resources Research Highlights CAM Information Meetings Featured Scientific Meetings Back to OCCAM Featured Scientific Meetings Date Meeting Location OCCAM

  9. OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR Fall 2015 Schedule

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    of Classes Online Resources Key Dates for Registration and Enrollment Announcements Enrollment Information Enrollment for UC Online Courses Announcements Online Resources Registration Payment Information Key Dates before your appointment time. Fall 2015 Schedule of Classes Announcements Online Resources Key Dates

  10. Physical methods for intracellular delivery: practical aspects from laboratory use to industrial-scale processing.

    PubMed

    Meacham, J Mark; Durvasula, Kiranmai; Degertekin, F Levent; Fedorov, Andrei G

    2014-02-01

    Effective intracellular delivery is a significant impediment to research and therapeutic applications at all processing scales. Physical delivery methods have long demonstrated the ability to deliver cargo molecules directly to the cytoplasm or nucleus, and the mechanisms underlying the most common approaches (microinjection, electroporation, and sonoporation) have been extensively investigated. In this review, we discuss established approaches, as well as emerging techniques (magnetofection, optoinjection, and combined modalities). In addition to operating principles and implementation strategies, we address applicability and limitations of various in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo platforms. Importantly, we perform critical assessments regarding (1) treatment efficacy with diverse cell types and delivered cargo molecules, (2) suitability to different processing scales (from single cell to large populations), (3) suitability for automation/integration with existing workflows, and (4) multiplexing potential and flexibility/adaptability to enable rapid changeover between treatments of varied cell types. Existing techniques typically fall short in one or more of these criteria; however, introduction of micro-/nanotechnology concepts, as well as synergistic coupling of complementary method(s), can improve performance and applicability of a particular approach, overcoming barriers to practical implementation. For this reason, we emphasize these strategies in examining recent advances in development of delivery systems. PMID:23813915

  11. Physical Methods for Intracellular Delivery: Practical Aspects from Laboratory Use to Industrial-Scale Processing

    PubMed Central

    Meacham, J. Mark; Durvasula, Kiranmai; Degertekin, F. Levent; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2015-01-01

    Effective intracellular delivery is a significant impediment to research and therapeutic applications at all processing scales. Physical delivery methods have long demonstrated the ability to deliver cargo molecules directly to the cytoplasm or nucleus, and the mechanisms underlying the most common approaches (microinjection, electroporation, and sonoporation) have been extensively investigated. In this review, we discuss established approaches, as well as emerging techniques (magnetofection, optoinjection, and combined modalities). In addition to operating principles and implementation strategies, we address applicability and limitations of various in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo platforms. Importantly, we perform critical assessments regarding (1) treatment efficacy with diverse cell types and delivered cargo molecules, (2) suitability to different processing scales (from single cell to large populations), (3) suitability for automation/integration with existing workflows, and (4) multiplexing potential and flexibility/adaptability to enable rapid changeover between treatments of varied cell types. Existing techniques typically fall short in one or more of these criteria; however, introduction of micro-/nanotechnology concepts, as well as synergistic coupling of complementary method(s), can improve performance and applicability of a particular approach, overcoming barriers to practical implementation. For this reason, we emphasize these strategies in examining recent advances in development of delivery systems. PMID:23813915

  12. Quantifying Temperature Effects on Fall Chinook Salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Jager, Yetta

    2011-11-01

    The motivation for this study was to recommend relationships for use in a model of San Joaquin fall Chinook salmon. This report reviews literature pertaining to relationships between water temperature and fall Chinook salmon. The report is organized into three sections that deal with temperature effects on development and timing of freshwater life stages, temperature effects on incubation survival for eggs and alevin, and temperature effects on juvenile survival. Recommendations are made for modeling temperature influences for all three life stages.

  13. Lava falls at Mauna Ulu Eruption, 1969

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Lava falls pour into 'Alae Crater at 11 p.m., HST, on August 5, 1969, supplied by a high lava fountain at Mauna Ulu, 600 m (2,000 feet) away. The falls, more than 100 m (330 ft) high and 300 m (1,000 ft) wide, had nearly filled the crater by the time the fountains stopped at 5:45 a.m., August 6....

  14. Efficacy of Crest Herbal Toothpaste in “Clearing Internal Heat”: A Randomized, Double-Blind Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia-Xu; Liu, Yue-Yun; Wang, Shao-Xian; Li, Xiao-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Evaluation of the efficacy of Crest Herbal Crystal Toothpaste in “clearing internal heat.” Methods. This was a randomized, double-blind, controlled parallel design clinical test of a product that was already on the market. 72 subjects were randomly assigned to control group (group A with Colgate Herbal Salty Toothpaste) or treatment group (group B with Crest Herbal Crystal Toothpaste) with ratio of 1?:?2. Subjects were instructed to brush with 1g toothpaste for 2 minutes each time, 2 times per day in a 4-aweek test period; measurement with the rating scale on the efficacy of “clearing internal heat” for the herbal toothpaste was done at baseline, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks of toothpaste usage. Results. The rating scale on efficacy of “clearing internal heat” for the herbal toothpaste reveals that the primitive points of 72-case intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis and 67-case per-protocol (PP) analysis for subjects in group A and subjects in group B were found to be reduced progressively with statistical significance (P < 0.05). The overall effective rates for group A and group B were, respectively, 62.50%, 56.25% (ITT) and 62.50%, 60.64% (PP). The statistical results indicated that the symptoms of fire-heat for both groups of subjects have been improved after application of toothpaste. Conclusion. The efficacy of Crest Herbal Crystal Toothpaste in “clearing internal heat” was confirmed by the trial as compared to Colgate Herbal Salty Toothpaste. And its efficacy was objectively evaluated by the rating scale on efficacy of “clearing internal heat.” PMID:24228064

  15. Elderly outpatient profile and predictors of falls.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Grace Angélica de Oliveira; Cintra, Fernanda Aparecida; Batista, Fernanda Sotelo; Neri, Anita Liberalesso; Guariento, Maria Elena; Sousa, Maria da Luz Rosario de; D'Elboux, Maria José

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVES Falls are a serious public health problem and are one of the biggest reasons for hospitalization, morbidity and mortality among elderly people. Moreover, few studies on predictors of falls have been conducted in low and middle income countries. The aim here was to identify elderly outpatient profiles according to sociodemographic, clinical, physical and functional variables and correlate them with occurrences of falls among these subjects. DESIGN AND SETTING Cross-sectional descriptive study forming part of the project "Quality of Life of Frail Elderly People", carried out in Campinas, Brazil. METHODS The subjects were 145 elderly individuals (76.3 ± 7.8 years old), of whom 65% were women, who were living in the city of Campinas or nearby and were attended at the geriatric outpatient clinic of a University Hospital. Sociodemographic, clinical, physical and functional data, as well as fall occurrence data, were gathered. Cluster analyses and comparisons between groups were carried out. RESULTS Cluster analysis identified two distinct groups related to the study variables, and the determinants for this distinction were: gender, marital status, physical performance, handgrip strength and functional independence. These groups were compared according to occurrences of falls over the last year, and significant differences between them were found. CONCLUSIONS The results showed that greater occurrences of falls were associated with a profile of elderly people comprising female gender, single status, lower muscle strength and physical performance regarding balance and gait, and lower independence in motor tasks for activities of daily living. PMID:23538590

  16. Using self-efficacy theory to educate a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A case study of 1-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ka??kç?, Magfiret K

    2011-02-01

    Self-efficacy is important in determining which activities or situations an individual will perform or avoid. This is a case study report to explore the utility of structured education programme on strengthening self-efficacy in an older adult with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). To comprehensively evaluate this intervention, a combined qualitative and quantitative approach was used. Although qualitative data were collected following the interview guide, quantitative data were collected by the demographic data form and the COPD Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES) at the preprogramme and postprogramme stage. The patient's self-efficacy scores improved after 8 weeks of the structured education programme and remained relatively constant on all the repeated measurements after education. Qualitative data were identified as 'difficulties' and 'facilities'. This study indicates that, by applying a self-efficacy theory, a planned education programme could be useful in improving both short-term and long-term self-efficacy in patients with COPD. PMID:21251148

  17. Mississippi Public Community and Junior Colleges Fall Enrollment Report, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Board for Community and Junior Colleges, Jackson.

    This statistical report offers statewide and college-by-college data on enrollment at Mississippi's 15 public community and junior colleges, focusing primarily on data for fall 1997. The following nine tables are provided: (1) a statewide enrollment summary for fall 1997; (2) a comparison of fall 1996 and fall 1997 enrollment for academic,…

  18. 156. Photocopy of written record (taken from Twin Falls Canal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    156. Photocopy of written record (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company, Low Line Book #1, pp.2,3). LOW LINE CONTRACTORS AND BORROW RECORD. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  19. 159. Photocopy of written record (taken from Twin Falls Canal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    159. Photocopy of written record (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Low Line Book #1, pp. 76,77). RECORD OF BORROW AT LOW LINE SIPHON. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  20. 197. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls, Canal Company, date unknown. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    197. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls, Canal Company, date unknown. GATE STEMS AND LIFTING DEVICES, NO COUNTY; BLUEPRINT SKETCHES. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID