Science.gov

Sample records for falls efficacy scale

  1. Investigation of psychometric properties of the Falls Efficacy Scale using Rasch analysis in patients with hemiplegic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Young; Choi, Yoo Im

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the Falls Efficacy Scale using Rasch analysis in patients with hemiplegic stroke. [Subjects] Fifty-five community-dwelling hemiplegic stroke patients were selected as participants. [Methods] Data were analyzed using the Winsteps program (version 3.62) with the Rasch model to confirm the unidimensionality through item fit, reliability, and appropriateness of the rating scale. [Results] There were no misfit persons or items. Furthermore, infit and outfit statistics appeared adjacent. The person separation value was 3.07, and the reliability coefficient was 0.90. The reliability of all items was at an acceptable level for patients with hemiplegic stroke. [Conclusion] This was the first study to investigate the psychometric properties of the Falls Efficacy Scale using Rasch analysis. The results of this study suggest that the 6-point Falls Efficacy Scale is an appropriate tool for measuring the self-perceived fear of falling in patients with hemiplegic stroke. PMID:26504303

  2. Investigation of psychometric properties of the Falls Efficacy Scale using Rasch analysis in patients with hemiplegic stroke.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Young; Choi, Yoo Im

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the Falls Efficacy Scale using Rasch analysis in patients with hemiplegic stroke. [Subjects] Fifty-five community-dwelling hemiplegic stroke patients were selected as participants. [Methods] Data were analyzed using the Winsteps program (version 3.62) with the Rasch model to confirm the unidimensionality through item fit, reliability, and appropriateness of the rating scale. [Results] There were no misfit persons or items. Furthermore, infit and outfit statistics appeared adjacent. The person separation value was 3.07, and the reliability coefficient was 0.90. The reliability of all items was at an acceptable level for patients with hemiplegic stroke. [Conclusion] This was the first study to investigate the psychometric properties of the Falls Efficacy Scale using Rasch analysis. The results of this study suggest that the 6-point Falls Efficacy Scale is an appropriate tool for measuring the self-perceived fear of falling in patients with hemiplegic stroke. PMID:26504303

  3. Clinical assessment of fear of falling after stroke: validity, reliability and responsiveness of the Persian version of the Fall Efficacy Scale-International

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Akram; Hassani Mehraban, Afsoon; Mehrpour, Masoud; Mohammadi, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fear of falling may be related to falling during stroke onset. The Fall Efficacy ScaleInternational (FES-I) with excellent psychometric properties, is an instrument developed to assess patients’ concerns about fallings. The aim of this study was to determine validation of this scale in Iranian patients with stroke. Methods: The "forward-backward" procedure was applied to translate the FES-I from English to Persian. One hundred-twenty patients who had suffered stroke, aged 40 to 80 years (55% male) completed the Persian FES-I, Geriatric Depression Scale-15 (GDS-15), General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28), Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and Timed up and Go (TUG) questionnaires. The interval time for the test-retest of the Persian scale was 7-14 days. Results: The test-retest and inter-rater reliabilities of the Persian FES-I were excellent (ICC2,1=0.98, p<0.001) and the internal consistency was high (Cronbach’s alpha=0.78). Factor analysis of the 16 items in the Persian scale showed only one significant factor. The total Persian FES-I score had a significantly negative correlation (p<0.001) with the BBS, but it had significantly positive correlation with the TUG, GHQ-28, and GDS-15. The difference in responsiveness scores across fallers and non-fallers yielded a large effect size (0.46), which indicated a good discriminating validity. Conclusion: The Persian FES-I proved to be an effective and valuable measurement tool to assess stroke patients’ fear of falling in practice and research setting. PMID:25694989

  4. Reliability and Validity of the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I) in Individuals with Dizziness and Imbalance

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Michael T.; Friscia, Lauren A.; Whitney, Susan L.; Furman, Joseph M.; Sparto, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    Hypothesis The purpose of this research is to establish the test-retest reliability and convergent validity of the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I) in people with vestibular disorders. Background Individuals with vestibular dysfunction have an increased risk of falling. The FES-I is a measure used to quantify an individual’s concern of falling during different tasks. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was used in order to determine the test-retest reliability and convergent validity of the FES-I. Fifty-three individuals with vestibular or balance dysfunction completed the FES-I twice during an initial evaluation by a neurotologist. Test-retest reliability was assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient. The convergent validity was measured by correlating the FES-I with the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale, Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), Vestibular Activities and Participation (VAP) scale, 4-item Dynamic Gait Index (DGI-4), and measuring gait speed. Results The FES-I demonstrated high test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient, model 3,1: 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.90–0.97) and had concurrent validity with other self-report and physical performance measures (correlation coefficients for the ABC: −0.84; DHI: 0.75; VAP: 0.78, gait speed: −0.55; and DGI-4: −0.55). Conclusion The FES-I is a reliable and valid tool for measuring an individual’s concern of falling in a sample of people with vestibular disorders. PMID:23542134

  5. Cross-cultural adaptation and measurement properties of the Arabic version of the Fall Efficacy Scale International

    PubMed Central

    Alghadir, Ahmad H.; Al-Momani, Murad; Marchetti, Gregory F.; Whitney, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To translate the Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I) into Arabic according to the World Health Organization’s criteria and to evaluate the concurrent validity of the FES-I in persons living with balance and vestibular disorders. Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study included 43 persons with balance and vestibular disorders presenting to an outpatient dizziness center at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between June 2012 and May 2013. All participants completed the Arabic version of the FES-I and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) during their assessment with the clinical audiologist. In addition, subjects completed the Dynamic Gait Index 4-item (DGI-4) gait test. An additional 55 control participants also completed the Arabic FES-I, the DGI-4, and the Arabic DHI. Results: Forty-three participants with vestibular disorders (36 females, 7 males) with a mean age of 32 years (standard deviation (SD) 10 years, range 18-56 years) and 55 control participants (27 females, 28 males) with a mean age of 33, (SD-12), and age range of 18-78 participated. The correlation between the Arabic FES-I and the Arabic DHI was 0.75 in patients and 0.77 in control participants. The correlation between the Arabic FES-I and the DGI-4 was r=-0.30 (p=0.003). Conclusion: The Arabic FES-I has established concurrent validity and may be helpful for measuring an individual’s concern of falling in people with vestibular and balance disorders. PMID:26166590

  6. The effects of obesity on fall efficacy in elderly people.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Byoung-Jin

    2013-11-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to identify the effects of obesity on falls as a practical verification of the importance of obesity-targeting interventions as part of future fall prevention programs. [Subjects and Methods] The study involved 351 elderly people (172 men, 179 women) living in rural areas. The dependent variable, fall efficacy, was measured using the Falls Efficacy Scale, while the independent variables, body mass index (BMI) and visceral fat, were measured using the InBody 720. The Faces Pain Scale was used to measure pain. Mobility was measured using the Timed Up and Go Test, and balance ability was measured according to the duration subjects could stand on one foot with their eyes closed. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was performed for the final data analysis. [Results] Investigation of the correlations between the variables revealed a negative correlation between fall efficacy and the other variables. Ultimatley, investigation of the causality of fall efficacy revealed that the BMI, pain, and mobility were influential factors. In other words, fall efficacy tends to be lower when there are higher degrees of obesity, increased pain, and decreased mobility. [Conclusion] To improve the fall efficacy of elderly people living in rural areas, pain management and the maintenance of physical functionality are required. The present study confirms that the elderly need continuous obesity management to lead healthy lives. PMID:24396217

  7. Reliability and validity of the Turkish version of the Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I) in community-dwelling older persons.

    PubMed

    Ulus, Yasemin; Durmus, Dilek; Akyol, Yesim; Terzi, Yuksel; Bilgici, Ayhan; Kuru, Omer

    2012-01-01

    The FES-I is a questionnaire which was developed to assess fear of falling. The aim of this study was to evaluate validity and reliability of a Turkish language version of the FES-I in Turkish older people. The study sample included 70 volunteers with an age range of 65-81. To assess the test-retest reliability of the Turkish FES-I, questionnaire was applied again 10-15 days after the first interview (interclass correlation: ICC). FES-I was compared with The Modified Barthel Index (MBI), the timed up and go test (TUG), and The Berg Balance Scale (BBS) for construct validity. Cronbach's alpha (α) was used to evaluate the internal consistency. The internal structure of the FES-I was examined by factor analysis. ROC plots were used to define cut-point for the FES-I scales. Cronbach's α of the Turkish FES-I was 0.94 and the individual item ICC ranged from 0.97 to 0.99. The Turkish FES-I total scores were correlated with TUG positively, and MBI, and BBS negatively. The cut-off score to differentiate between persons with fear of falling and persons without fear of falling was 24 points. It was found that the Turkish version of the FES-I was a reliable and valid measure of fear of falling in Turkish older people. PMID:21831462

  8. The effects of multidirectional stepping training on balance, gait ability, and falls efficacy following stroke

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gi-Deok; Choi, Jin-Uk; Kim, Young-Min

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine whether a multidirectional stepping training improves balance, gait ability, and falls efficacy in stroke patients. [Subjects] Firty patients who met the selection criteria and agreed to participate in research at hospital N were randomly allocated and enrolled in this study. Twenty of the subjects were assigned to an experimental group that participated in combined stepping exercise, and the other twenty subjects were assigned to a control group that received general physical therapy. [Methods] In the two groups, balance was measured using the Berg Balance Scale, gait ability was measured using the 10-m Walk Test, and falls efficacy was measured using the Falls Efficacy Scale before training and after 6 weeks of training. [Results] Comparative analysis of the experimental group’s pretest and post-test results showed statistically significant differences in the Berg Balance Scale, 10-m Walk Test, and Falls Efficacy Scale scores. There were significant between-group differences in the Berg Balance Scale, 10-m Walk Test, and Falls Efficacy Scale scores. [Conclusion] The results suggest that a combined stepping exercise can be an effective intervention to improve the balance, gait ability, and falls efficacy in stroke patients. PMID:26957733

  9. The effects of multidirectional stepping training on balance, gait ability, and falls efficacy following stroke.

    PubMed

    Park, Gi-Deok; Choi, Jin-Uk; Kim, Young-Min

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine whether a multidirectional stepping training improves balance, gait ability, and falls efficacy in stroke patients. [Subjects] Firty patients who met the selection criteria and agreed to participate in research at hospital N were randomly allocated and enrolled in this study. Twenty of the subjects were assigned to an experimental group that participated in combined stepping exercise, and the other twenty subjects were assigned to a control group that received general physical therapy. [Methods] In the two groups, balance was measured using the Berg Balance Scale, gait ability was measured using the 10-m Walk Test, and falls efficacy was measured using the Falls Efficacy Scale before training and after 6 weeks of training. [Results] Comparative analysis of the experimental group's pretest and post-test results showed statistically significant differences in the Berg Balance Scale, 10-m Walk Test, and Falls Efficacy Scale scores. There were significant between-group differences in the Berg Balance Scale, 10-m Walk Test, and Falls Efficacy Scale scores. [Conclusion] The results suggest that a combined stepping exercise can be an effective intervention to improve the balance, gait ability, and falls efficacy in stroke patients. PMID:26957733

  10. The effect of modified trampoline training on balance, gait, and falls efficacy of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Joohee; Shin, Seonhae; Lee, Wanhee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This research was conducted to investigate the effects of modified trampoline training on the balance, gait, and falls efficacy of stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-four stroke patients participated in this study. The subjects were randomly allocated to one of two groups: the trampoline group (n=12) or the control group (n=12). [Methods] Both groups participated in conventional physical therapy for thirty minutes per day, three times a week for six weeks. The trampoline group also took part in trampoline training for thirty minutes per day, three times a week for six weeks. We evaluated balance (Berg balance scale, timed up and go test), gait (dynamic gait index), and falls efficacy (falls efficacy scale-K) to confirm the effects of the intervention. [Results] Both the trampoline and the control group showed significant improvements in balance, gait, and falls efficacy compared to before the intervention, and the improvements were significantly greater in the trampoline group than in the control group. [Conclusion] Modified trampoline training resulted in significantly improved balance, dynamic gait, and falls efficacy of stroke patients compared to the control group. These results suggest that modified trampoline training is feasible and effective at improving balance, dynamic gait, and falls efficacy after stroke. PMID:26696696

  11. Evaluation of the Frails' Fall Efficacy by Comparing Treatments (EFFECT) on reducing fall and fear of fall in moderately frail older adults: study protocol for a randomised control trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Falls are common in frail older adults and often result in injuries and hospitalisation. The Nintendo® Wii™ is an easily available exercise modality in the community which has been shown to improve lower limb strength and balance. However, not much is known on the effectiveness of the Nintendo® Wii™ to improve fall efficacy and reduce falls in a moderately frail older adult. Fall efficacy is the measure of fear of falling in performing various daily activities. Fear contributes to avoidance of activities and functional decline. Methods This randomised active-control trial is a comparison between the Nintendo WiiActive programme against standard gym-based rehabilitation of the older population. Eighty subjects aged above 60, fallers and non-fallers, will be recruited from the hospital outpatient clinic. The primary outcome measure is the Modified Falls Efficacy Scale and the secondary outcome measures are self-reported falls, quadriceps strength, walking agility, dynamic balance and quality of life assessments. Discussions The study is the first randomised control trial using the Nintendo Wii as a rehabilitation modality investigating a change in fall efficacy and self-reported falls. Longitudinally, the study will investigate if the interventions can successfully reduce falls and analyse the cost-effectiveness of the programme. Trial registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN12610000576022 PMID:21682909

  12. Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Risk Factors for Falls, Fear of Falling, and Falls Efficacy in a Cohort of Middle-Aged African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Elena M.; Wolinsky, Fredric D.; Miller, J. Phillip; Wilson, Margaret-Mary G.; Malmstrom, Theodore K.; Miller, Douglas K.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to cross-sectionally and longitudinally identify risk factors for falls, fear of falling, and falls efficacy in late-middle-aged African Americans. Design and Methods: We performed in-home assessments on a probability sample of 998 African Americans and conducted two annual follow-up interviews. Multiple…

  13. Falls efficacy and self-rated health in older African American adults.

    PubMed

    Tiernan, Chad; Lysack, Cathy; Neufeld, Stewart; Goldberg, Allon; Lichtenberg, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    Fear of falling and mobility restrictions have a significant negative impact on the quality of life of older adults. Because older African American adults are at increased risk for various modifiable health problems, understanding potential constraints on their overall health and mobility is critical in this population. The current study investigated this issue by analyzing a dataset of 449 older African American adults (mean age=72.3 years) living in Detroit. We characterized and investigated the relationships among the following falls- and health-related variables: previous falls, falls efficacy, mobility, self-rated health (SRH), and depression and well-being. As a whole, participants reported moderate health and well-being, little depression, few mobility problems (mean=8.4/40), and very high falls efficacy (mean=94.9/100) despite the fact that a quarter of the sample experienced a fall within the past year. Correlation results indicated that previous falls, falls efficacy, mobility, SRH and depression and well-being were all inter-related. Regression analyses revealed that higher falls efficacy was more closely associated with better SRH than was having previously fallen. Findings suggest that improving falls efficacy in older African American adults may be beneficial to their mobility and overall health and well-being. Further, by asking a single-item SRH question, clinicians may be able to quickly identify older African American adults who have low falls efficacy and are at high risk for falling. PMID:24063870

  14. Development and Validation of a Falls Grading Scale

    PubMed Central

    Davalos-Bichara, Marcela; Lin, Frank R.; Carey, John P.; Walston, Jeremy D.; Fairman, Jennifer E.; Schubert, Michael C.; Barron, Jeremy S.; Hughes, Jennifer; Millar, Jennifer; Spar, Anne; Weber, Kristy L.; Ying, Howard S.; Zackowski, Kathleen M.; Zee, David

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The recording of fall events is usually subjective and imprecise, which limits clinical practice and falls-related research. We sought to develop and validate a scale to grade near-fall and fall events based on their severity represented by the use of healthcare resources, with the goal of standardizing fall reporting in the clinical and research settings. Methods Qualitative instrument development was based on a literature review and semi-structured interviews to assess face and content validity. We queried older individuals and healthcare professionals with expertise in the care of patients at risk of falling about clinically important differences to detect and how to optimize the scale's ease of use. To assess the scale's inter-rater reliability, we created 30 video-vignettes of falls and compared how healthcare professionals and volunteers rated each of the falls according to our grading scale. Results We developed the illustrated 4-point Hopkins Falls Grading Scale (HFGS). The grades distinguish a near-fall (Grade 1) from a fall for which an individual did not receive medical attention (Grade 2), a fall associated with medical attention but not hospital admission (Grade 3), and a fall associated with hospital admission (Grade 4). Overall, the HFGS exhibited good face and content validity, and had an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.998. Conclusion The 4-point HFGS demonstrates good face and content validity and high inter-rater reliability. We predict this tool will facilitate the standardization of falls reporting in both the clinical and research settings. PMID:22810170

  15. Effects of the Otago exercise program on fall efficacy, activities of daily living and quality of life in elderly stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Youngju; Chang, Moonyoung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the Otago exercise program on fall efficacy, activities of daily living, and quality of life in elderly stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Eight subjects performed the Otago exercise program three times per week, for 8 weeks. The outcome measures were the Fall Efficacy Scale score for fall efficacy, modified Barthel index for activities of daily living, and EQ-5D for quality of life. [Results] In our comparison of the results before and after the intervention, we found that the Otago exercise program improved fall efficacy significantly as well as the score for activities of daily living and quality of life, though not significantly. [Conclusion] We consider that the Otago exercise program is an effective method for improving fall efficacy in elderly stroke patients. PMID:26957755

  16. A randomized controlled trial on Stroke telerehabilitation: The effects on falls self-efficacy and satisfaction with care.

    PubMed

    Chumbler, Neale R; Li, Xinli; Quigley, Patricia; Morey, Miriam C; Rose, Dorian; Griffiths, Patricia; Sanford, Jon; Hoenig, Helen

    2015-04-01

    We determined the effect of a multifaceted stroke telerehabilitation (STeleR) intervention on falls-related self-efficacy and satisfaction with care. We conducted a prospective, randomized, multisite, single-blinded trial in 52 veterans from three Veterans Affairs Medical Centers. Participants who experienced a stroke in the past 24 months were randomized to the STeleR intervention or usual care. Participants in the intervention arm were administered an exit interview to gather specific patient satisfaction data three months after their final outcome measure. The STeleR intervention consisted of three home visits, five telephone calls, and an in-home messaging device provided over three months to instruct patients in functionally based exercises and adaptive strategies. The outcome measures included Falls Efficacy Scale to measure fall-related self-efficacy and a Stroke-Specific Patient Satisfaction with Care (SSPSC) scale, a measure separated into two subscales (satisfaction with home care and satisfaction with hospital care) was employed to measure the participants' satisfaction. At six months, compared with the usual care group, the STeleR group showed statistically significant improvements in one of the two SSPSC scales (satisfaction with hospital care, p = .029) and approached significance in the second SSPSC scale (satisfaction with home care, p = .077). There were no improvements in fall-related self-efficacy. Core concepts identified were: (a) beneficial impact of the trained assistant; (b) exercises helpful; (c) home use of technology. The STeleR intervention improved satisfaction with care, especially as it relates to care following their experience from the hospital. With the limited resources available for in-home rehabilitation for stroke survivors, STeleR (and especially its exercise components) can be a useful complement to traditional post-stroke rehabilitation. PMID:25680390

  17. A randomized controlled trial on Stroke telerehabilitation: The effects on falls self-efficacy and satisfaction with care

    PubMed Central

    Chumbler, Neale R; Li, Xinli; Quigley, Patricia; Morey, Miriam C; Rose, Dorian; Griffiths, Patricia; Sanford, Jon; Hoenig, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Summary We determined the effect of a multifaceted stroke telerehabilitation (STeleR) intervention on falls-related self-efficacy and satisfaction with care. We conducted a prospective, randomized, multisite, single-blinded trial in 52 veterans from three Veterans Affairs Medical Centers. Participants who experienced a stroke in the past 24 months were randomized to the STeleR intervention or usual care. Participants in the intervention arm were administered an exit interview to gather specific patient satisfaction data three months after their final outcome measure. The STeleR intervention consisted of three home visits, five telephone calls, and an in-home messaging device provided over three months to instruct patients in functionally based exercises and adaptive strategies. The outcome measures included Falls Efficacy Scale to measure fall-related self-efficacy and a Stroke-Specific Patient Satisfaction with Care (SSPSC) scale, a measure separated into two subscales (satisfaction with home care and satisfaction with hospital care) was employed to measure the participants’ satisfaction. At six months, compared with the usual care group, the STeleR group showed statistically significant improvements in one of the two SSPSC scales (satisfaction with hospital care, p =.029) and approached significance in the second SSPSC scale (satisfaction with home care, p =.077). There were no improvements in fall-related self-efficacy. Core concepts identified were: (a) beneficial impact of the trained assistant; (b) exercises helpful; (c) home use of technology. The STeleR intervention improved satisfaction with care, especially as it relates to care following their experience from the hospital. With the limited resources available for in-home rehabilitation for stroke survivors, STeleR (and especially its exercise components) can be a useful complement to traditional post-stroke rehabilitation. PMID:25680390

  18. The effects of aquatic walking and jogging program on physical function and fall efficacy in patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Hyun; Sung, Eunsook

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 12-week aqua walking and jogging program on muscle function, ankle range of motion (ROM), balance and fell efficacy in degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS) patients. Six patients (2 males, 4 females) with DLSS participated in aquatic exercise program 3 times per week with each session of 60 min (warming-up, aqua walking, aqua jogging and cool down) at 1 m 20 cm–1 m 30 cm deep pool. Janda’s muscle function test, ankle ROM, Berg balance scale (BBS) and fall efficacy scale (FES) were analyzed before and after the training intervention. We found significant increases in balance, muscle function, ankle ROM and fall efficacy after training intervention. In conclusion, aquatic exercise seems to affect physical function and fall efficacy positively in elderly DLSS patients. PMID:26535218

  19. Development of Physics Self-Efficacy Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çalişkan, Serap; Selçuk, Gamze S.; Erol, Mustafa

    2007-04-01

    In this article, we describe development of a Physics Self-Efficacy Scale (PSES) that is a self-administered measure to assess physics self-efficacy beliefs regarding one's ability to successfully perform physics tasks in physics classroom. The scale is initially composed of 56 items prepared following a brief scrutiny of relating literature on self-efficacy. It was initially administered 30 physics teacher candidates and was also examined by 6 experts of physics education, then ambiguous or incomprehensible 6 items were dismissed. This PSES was tested on 558 undergraduate students all completed fundamental physics courses. Cronbach's Alpha reliability coefficient of the PSES was calculated as 0.94. The final version of the PSES contained 30 items with 5 dimensions namely, 1. Self-efficacy towards solving physics problems, 2. Self-efficacy towards physics laboratory, 3. Self-efficacy towards learning physics, 4. Self-efficacy towards application of physics knowledge and 5. Self-efficacy towards memorizing physics knowledge.

  20. Falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems with circulation, thyroid or nervous systems. Some medicines make people dizzy. Eye problems or alcohol can be factors. Any of these things can make a fall more likely. Babies and young children are also at risk of falling - off ...

  1. Fall-related self-efficacy, not balance and mobility performance, is related to accidental falls in chronic stroke survivors with low bone mineral density

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Marco Y.C.; Eng, Janice J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chronic stroke survivors with low bone mineral density (BMD) are particularly prone to fragility fractures. The purpose of this study was to identify the determinants of balance, mobility and falls in this sub-group of stroke patients. Methods Thirty nine chronic stroke survivors with low hip BMD (T-score <-1.0) were studied. Each subject was evaluated for: balance, mobility, leg muscle strength, spasticity, and falls-related self-efficacy. Any falls in the past 12 months were also recorded. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify the determinants of balance and mobility performance whereas logistic regression was used to identify the determinants of falls. Results Multiple regression analysis revealed that after adjusting for basic demographics, falls-related self-efficacy remained independently associated with balance/mobility performance (R2=0.494, P<0.001). Logistic regression showed that falls-related self-efficacy, but not balance and mobility performance, was a significant determinant of falls (odds ratio: 0.18, P=0.04). Conclusions Falls-related self-efficacy, but not mobility and balance performance, was the most important determinant of accidental falls. This psychological factor should not be overlooked in the prevention of fragility fractures among chronic stroke survivors with low hip BMD. PMID:18097709

  2. Development of a Physical Education Teaching Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, Charlotte A.; Hebert, Edward; Daigle, Kay; Martin, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Relationships have been found between teacher efficacy and many teaching and learning variables, but few researchers have examined teaching efficacy in physical education. The instrument reported here, the Physical Education Teaching Efficacy Scale, was developed based on the teaching efficacy literature, existing scales, and National Association…

  3. Psychometric properties of four fear of falling rating scales in people with Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fear of falling (FOF) is commonly experienced in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD). It is a predictor of recurrent falls, a barrier to physical exercise, and negatively associated with health-related quality of life. A variety of rating scales exist that assess different aspects of FOF but comprehensive head-to-head comparisons of their psychometric properties in people with PD are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of four FOF rating scales in people with PD. More specifically, we investigated and compared the scales’ data completeness, scaling assumptions, targeting, and reliability. Methods The FOF rating scales were: the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I), the Swedish FES (FES(S)), the Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale (ABC), and the modified Survey of Activities and Fear of Falling in the Elderly (mSAFFE). A postal survey was administered to 174 persons with PD. Responders received a second survey after two weeks. Results The mean (SD) age and PD duration of the 102 responders were 73 (8) and 7 (6) years, respectively. ABC had worse data completeness than the other scales (6.9 vs. 0.9–1.3% missing data). All scales had corrected item-total correlations exceeding 0.4 and showed acceptable reliabilities (Cronbach’s alpha and Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) >0.80) but only FES-I had ICC >0.90. The standard error of measurements ranged from 7% (FES-I) to 12% (FES(S)), and the smallest detectable differences ranged from 20% (FES-I) to 33% (FES(S)) of the total score ranges. ABC and FES(S) had substantially more outliers than mSAFFE and FES-I (10 and 15 vs. 3 and 4, respectively) when the two test occasions were compared. Conclusions When assessing FOF in people with PD, the findings in the present study favoured the choice of FES-I or mSAFFE. However, FES-I was the only scale with ICC >0.90 which has been suggested as a minimum when using a scale for individual comparisons. PMID:24884466

  4. Fear of falling: efficacy of virtual reality associated with serious games in elderly people

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Fanny; Leboucher, Pierre; Rautureau, Gilles; Komano, Odile; Millet, Bruno; Jouvent, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Objective Fear of falling is defined as an ongoing concern about falling that is not explained by physical examination. Focusing on the psychological dimension of this pathology (phobic reaction to walking), we looked at how virtual reality associated with serious games can be used to treat this pathology. Methods Participants with fear of falling were randomly assigned to either a treatment group or a waiting list. The therapy consisted of 12 weekly sessions of virtual reality exposure therapy associated with serious games. Results Sixteen participants were included. The mean age of the treatment group was 72 years and that of the control group was 69 years. Participants’ scores on the fear of falling measure improved after treatment with virtual reality associated with serious games, leading to a significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion Virtual reality exposure therapy associated with serious games can be used in the treatment of fear of falling. The two techniques are complementary (top-down and bottom-up processes). To our knowledge, this is the first time that a combination of the two has been assessed. There was a specific effect of this therapy on the phobic reaction. Further studies are needed to confirm its efficacy and identify its underlying mechanism. PMID:27143889

  5. Efficacy of a multifaceted podiatry intervention to improve balance and prevent falls in older people: study protocol for a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Spink, Martin J; Menz, Hylton B; Lord, Stephen R

    2008-01-01

    Background Falls in older people are a major public health problem, with at least one in three people aged over 65 years falling each year. There is increasing evidence that foot problems and inappropriate footwear increase the risk of falls, however no studies have been undertaken to determine whether modifying these risk factors decreases the risk of falling. This article describes the design of a randomised trial to evaluate the efficacy of a multifaceted podiatry intervention to reduce foot pain, improve balance, and reduce falls in older people. Methods Three hundred community-dwelling men and women aged 65 years and over with current foot pain and an increased risk of falling will be randomly allocated to a control or intervention group. The "usual cae" control group will receive routine podiatry (i.e. nail care and callus debridement). The intervention group will receive usual care plus a multifaceted podiatry intervention consisting of: (i) prefabricated insoles customised to accommodate plantar lesions; (ii) footwear advice and assistance with the purchase of new footwear if current footwear is inappropriate; (iii) a home-based exercise program to strengthen foot and ankle muscles; and (iv) a falls prevention education booklet. Primary outcome measures will be the number of fallers, number of multiple fallers and the falls rate recorded by a falls diary over a 12 month period. Secondary outcome measures assessed six months after baseline will include the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 12 (SF-12), the Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index, the Falls Efficacy Scale International, and a series of balance and functional tests. Data will be analysed using the intention to treat principle. Discussion This study is the first randomised trial to evaluate the efficacy of podiatry in improving balance and preventing falls. The trial has been pragmatically designed to ensure that the findings can be generalised to clinical practice. If found to be effective, the multifaceted podiatry intervention will be a unique addition to common falls prevention strategies already in use. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12608000065392 PMID:19025668

  6. Developing the "Pedagogical Efficacy Perception Scale" for Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akbaba, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to develop the "Pedagogical Efficacy Perception Scale" for teacher candidates and to compare scale scores. The sample of this survey model study consists of 310 students studying in a faculty of education. The "Pedagogical Efficacy Perception Scale" developed by the author was used for data collection.…

  7. Musculoskeletal Strength, Balance Performance, and Self-Efficacy in Elderly Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Practitioners: Implications for Fall Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Shirley S. M.; Ng, Shamay S. M.; Liu, Karen P. Y.; Pang, Marco Y. C.; Lee, H. W.; Chung, Joanne W. Y.; Lam, Priscillia L.; Guo, X.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To (1) compare the bone strength, lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy between Ving Tsun (VT) martial art practitioners and nonpractitioners and (2) identify the associations between lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy among the VT-trained participants. Methods. Thirty-five VT practitioners (mean age ± SD = 62.7 ± 13.3 years) and 49 nonpractitioners (mean age ± SD = 65.9 ± 10.5 years) participated in the study. The bone strength of the distal radius, lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy were assessed using an ultrasound bone sonometer, the five times sit-to-stand test (FTSTS), the Berg balance scale (BBS), and the Chinese version of the activities-specific balance confidence scale, respectively. A multivariate analysis of covariance was performed to compare all the outcome variables between the two groups. Results. Elderly VT practitioners had higher radial bone strength on the dominant side (P < 0.05), greater lower limb muscular strength (P = 0.001), better functional balance performance (P = 0.003), and greater balance confidence (P < 0.001) than the nonpractitioners. Additionally, only the FTSTS time revealed a significant association with the BBS score (r = −0.575,  P = 0.013). Conclusions. VT may be a suitable health-maintenance exercise for the elderly. Our findings may inspire the development of VT fall-prevention exercises for the community-dwelling healthy elderly. PMID:25530782

  8. Principal Self-Efficacy and Work Engagement: Assessing a Norwegian Principal Self-Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federici, Roger A.; Skaalvik, Einar M.

    2011-01-01

    One purpose of the present study was to develop and test the factor structure of a multidimensional and hierarchical Norwegian Principal Self-Efficacy Scale (NPSES). Another purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between principal self-efficacy and work engagement. Principal self-efficacy was measured by the 22-item NPSES. Work…

  9. Evaluation of falls by inpatients in an acute care hospital in Korea using the Morse Fall Scale.

    PubMed

    Sung, Yung Hee; Cho, Myung Sook; Kwon, In Gak; Jung, Yoen Yi; Song, Mi Ra; Kim, Kyunghee; Won, Sungho

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cut-off values of the Korean version of the Morse Fall Scale (MFS-K) that would be most useful in identifying hospitalized patients at risk of falls in an acute-care setting in Korea. This study was conducted using the medical records of 66 patients who fell and 100 patients who did not fall (no-fall patients) sampled from inpatients hospitalized at a tertiary acute-care hospital in Seoul during the period from 1 January to 30 November 2009. The optimal cut-off point for the MFS-K was found to be 45 points, which produced an acceptable sensitivity and a fairly good specificity, negative predictive value and accuracy. The highest peak on the receiver operating characteristic curve was a cut-off score of 45 points in the MFS-K. Further research needs to be performed to determine the optimal cut-off score according to subjects' conditions through daily measurement with the MFS in medical or surgical patients who are relatively homogeneous in terms of individual and disease-related factors. PMID:24118515

  10. Efficacy of Cry1F insecticidal protein in maize and cotton for control of fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Efficacy of maize, Zea mays L., hybrids and cotton, Gossypium hirsutum (L.), varieties expressing Cry1F insecticidal crystal protein of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) var. aizawai Berliner (transformation event TC1507 in corn and event DAS-24236-5 in cotton) was evaluated for control of fall armyworm, ...

  11. Development and Exploratory Validation of an Organizational Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohn, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Although many instruments have been developed to measure organizational constructs such as citizenship, climate, and organization-based esteem, to date no scale has been designed specifically to measure efficacy at the organizational level. Tools to measure organizational efficacy in a business context have been recommended for over two decades.…

  12. Development of the Social Efficacy and Social Outcome Expectations Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Stephen L.; Wright, Dorothy A.; Jenkins-Guarnieri, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    The current study developed an 18-item scale measuring individuals' social expectations in relationships related to their efficacy expectations (Subscale 1) and outcome expectations (Subscale 2) based on Bandura's self-efficacy theory. Results from exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, using an undergraduate sample ("N"…

  13. Factor Structure of the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornick, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    The current study utilized exercise self-efficacy ratings from undergraduate students to assess the factor structure of the Self-Efficacy to Regulate Exercise Scale (Bandura, 1997, 2006). An exploratory factor analysis (n = 759) indicated a two-factor model solution and three separate confirmatory factor analyses (n = 1,798) supported this…

  14. Factor Structure of the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornick, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    The current study utilized exercise self-efficacy ratings from undergraduate students to assess the factor structure of the Self-Efficacy to Regulate Exercise Scale (Bandura, 1997, 2006). An exploratory factor analysis (n=759) indicated a two-factor model solution and three separate confirmatory factor analyses (n=1,798) supported this

  15. Development and Exploratory Validation of an Organizational Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohn, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Although many instruments have been developed to measure organizational constructs such as citizenship, climate, and organization-based esteem, to date no scale has been designed specifically to measure efficacy at the organizational level. Tools to measure organizational efficacy in a business context have been recommended for over two decades.

  16. The HIV Medication Taking Self-Efficacy Scale: Psychometric Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Erlen, Judith A.; Cha, EunSeok; Kim, Kevin H.; Caruthers, Donna; Sereika, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim This paper is a report of an examination of the psychometric properties of the HIV Medication Taking Self-efficacy Scale. Background Self-efficacy is a critically important component of strategies to improve HIV medication-taking; however, valid and reliable tools for assessing HIV medication-taking self-efficacy are limited. Method We used a cross-sectional, correlational design. Between 2003 and 2007, 326 participants were recruited from sites in Pennsylvania and Ohio in the United States of America. Six self-report questionnaires administered at baseline and 12 weeks later during Improving Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy were used to examine the variables of interest. Means and variances, reliability, criterion, and construct validity of the HIV Medication Taking Self-efficacy Scale were assessed. Findings Participants reported high self-confidence in their ability to carry out specific medication-related tasks (mean=8.31) and in the medications ability to effect good outcomes (mean=8.56). The HIV Medication Taking Self-efficacy Scale and subscales showed excellent reliability (? = .93 ~ .94). Criterion validity was well-established by examining the relationships between the HIV Medication Taking Self-efficacy Scale and selected physiological and psychological factors, and self-reported medication adherence (r = ?.20 ~ .58). A two-factor model with a correlation between self-efficacy belief and outcome expectancy fitted the data well (model ?2 = 3871.95, df = 325, p<001; CFA =.96; RMSEA =.046). Conclusion The HIV Medication Taking Self-efficacy Scale is a psychometrically sound measure of medication-taking self-efficacy for use by researchers and clinicians with people with HIV. The findings offer insight into the development of interventions to promote self-efficacy and medication adherence in persons with HIV. PMID:20722799

  17. Discriminant analysis for predictor of falls in stroke patients by using the Berg Balance Scale

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Noriaki; Urabe, Yukio; Murakami, Masahito; Itotani, Keisuke; Kato, Junichi

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION An observational study was carried out to estimate the strength of the relationships among balance, mobility and falls in hemiplegic stroke inpatients. The objective was to examine factors that may aid in the prediction of the likelihood of falls in stroke patients. METHODS A total of 53 stroke patients (30 male, 23 female) aged 67.0 ± 11.1 years were interviewed regarding their fall history. Physical performance was assessed using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scale. Variables that differed between fallers and non-fallers were identified, and a discriminant function analysis was carried out to determine the combination of variables that effectively predicted fall status. RESULTS Of the 53 stroke patients, 19 were fallers. Compared with the non-fallers, the fallers scored low on the FIM, and differed with respect to age, time from stroke onset, length of hospital stay, Brunnstrom recovery stage and admission BBS score. Discriminant analysis for predicting falls in stroke patients showed that admission BBS score was significantly related to the likelihood of falls. Moreover, discriminant analysis showed that the use of a significant BBS score to classify fallers and non-fallers had an accuracy of 81.1%. The discriminating criterion between the two groups was a score of 31 points on the BBS. CONCLUSION The results of this study suggest that BBS score is a strong predictor of falls in stroke patients. As balance is closely related to the risk of falls in hospitalised stroke patients, BBS might be useful in the prediction of falls. PMID:25678051

  18. Validation of the Sexual Communication Self-Efficacy Scale.

    PubMed

    Quinn-Nilas, Christopher; Milhausen, Robin R; Breuer, Rebecca; Bailey, Julia; Pavlou, Menelaos; DiClemente, Ralph J; Wingood, Gina M

    2016-04-01

    This study assessed a newly developed Sexual Communication Self-Efficacy Scale designed to measure the sexual communication self-efficacy of adolescent men and women. Three-hundred and seventy-four U.K. adolescents completed this new scale, along with several other validity measures. Factor analysis revealed that the Sexual Communication Self-Efficacy Scale consisted of five underlying factors: contraception communication, positive sexual messages, negative sexual messages, sexual history, and condom negotiation. These factors demonstrated high internal consistency and presents evidence to support construct validity. This scale may have utility in assessing the effectiveness of interventions designed to enhance sexual communication and sexual health behaviors among young people. PMID:26286296

  19. The Early Intervention Parenting Self-Efficacy Scale (EIPSES): Scale Construction and Initial Psychometric Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guimond, Amy B.; Wilcox, M. Jeanne; Lamorey, Suzanne G.

    2008-01-01

    The psychometric properties of an instrument designed to measure parenting efficacy within the context of early intervention, the Early Intervention Parenting Self-Efficacy Scale (EIPSES), were explored. One hundred seventeen caregivers of children receiving early intervention services completed the 20-item EIPSES. The scale was reduced to 16…

  20. A Confirmatory Study of Rating Scale Category Effectiveness for the Coaching Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Nicholas D.; Feltz, Deborah L.; Wolfe, Edward W.

    2008-01-01

    This study extended validity evidence for measures of coaching efficacy derived from the Coaching Efficacy Scale (CES) by testing the rating scale categorizations suggested in previous research. Previous research provided evidence for the effectiveness of a four-category (4-CAT) structure for high school and collegiate sports coaches; it also…

  1. A Confirmatory Study of Rating Scale Category Effectiveness for the Coaching Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Nicholas D.; Feltz, Deborah L.; Wolfe, Edward W.

    2008-01-01

    This study extended validity evidence for measures of coaching efficacy derived from the Coaching Efficacy Scale (CES) by testing the rating scale categorizations suggested in previous research. Previous research provided evidence for the effectiveness of a four-category (4-CAT) structure for high school and collegiate sports coaches; it also

  2. Fall detection and classifications based on time-scale radar signal characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadde, Ajay; Amin, Moeness G.; Zhang, Yimin D.; Ahmad, Fauzia

    2014-05-01

    Unattended catastrophic falls result in risk to the lives of elderly. There are growing efforts and rising interest in detecting falls of the aging population, especially those living alone. Radar serves as an effective non-intrusive sensor for detecting human activities. For radar to be effective, it is important to achieve low false alarms, i.e., the system can reliably differentiate between a fall and other human activities. In this paper, we discuss the time-scale based signal analysis of the radar returns from a human target. Reliable features are extracted from the scalogram and are used for fall classifications. The classification results and the advantages of using a wavelet transform are discussed.

  3. Laboratory toxicity and field efficacy of selected insecticides against fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Notctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), is an occasional but often serious pest of several southern row crops, including: cotton, field corn, and grain sorghum. The objective of these studies was to generate baseline dose-mortality responses for fall armyworm larvae in laboratory bioas...

  4. The efficacy of winter cover crops to stabilize soil inorganic nitrogen after fall-applied anhydrous ammonia.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Corey; Armstrong, Shalamar

    2015-03-01

    There is a dearth of knowledge on the ability of cover crops to increase the effectiveness of fall-applied nitrogen (N). The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of two cover crop species to stabilize inorganic soil N after a fall application of N. Fall N was applied at a rate of 200 kg N ha into living stands of cereal rye, tillage radish, and a control (no cover crop) at the Illinois State University Research and Teaching Farm in Lexington, Illinois. Cover crops were sampled to determine N uptake, and soil samples were collected in the spring at four depths to 80 cm to determine the distribution of inorganic N within the soil profile. Tillage radish (131.9-226.8 kg ha) and cereal rye (188.1-249.9 kg ha N) demonstrated the capacity to absorb a minimum of 60 to 80% of the equivalent rate of fall-applied N, respectively. Fall applying N without cover crops resulted in a greater percentage of soil NO-N (40%) in the 50- to 80-cm depth, compared with only 31 and 27% when tillage radish and cereal rye were present at N application. At planting, tillage radish stabilized an average of 91% of the equivalent rate of fall-applied N within the 0- to 20-cm, depth compared with 66 and 57% for the cereal rye and control treatments, respectively. This study has demonstrated that fall applying N into a living cover crop stand has the potential to reduce the vulnerability of soil nitrate and to stabilize a greater concentration of inorganic N within the agronomic depths of soil. PMID:26023963

  5. A description of a process to calibrate the Morse fall scale in a long-term care home.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Patricia Hill; Rietze, Lori Lynn; Moroso, Sandra; Szilva, Natalie

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the process of calibrating the Morse Fall Scale in a Canadian long-term care home as one aspect of a complex fall prevention program. The authors propose that the implementation of a calibration process of a fall risk assessment tool enables care providers to identify residents at greatest risk for falling. The authors further suggest that the ability to identify those residents most likely to experience a fall facilitates tailoring of fall prevention strategies for these individuals at greatest risk. PMID:21601423

  6. The Teacher Efficacy for Inclusive Practices (TEIP) Scale: Dimensionality and Factor Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Mi-Hwa; Dimitrov, Dimiter M.; Das, Ajay; Gichuru, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    The "Teacher Efficacy for Inclusive Practices" (TEIP) scale is designed to measure teacher-self efficacy to teach in inclusive classrooms. The original study identified three scale factors: "efficacy in using inclusive instruction" ("EII"), "efficacy in collaboration" ("EC"), and "efficacy in…

  7. A Factor Analysis of the Research Self-Efficacy Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bieschke, Kathleen J.; And Others

    Counseling professionals' and counseling psychology students' interest in performing research seems to be waning. Identifying the impediments to graduate students' interest and participation in research is important if systematic efforts to engage them in research are to succeed. The Research Self-Efficacy Scale (RSES) was designed to measure…

  8. Investigating the Latent Structure of the Teacher Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagler, Amy; Wagler, Ron

    2013-01-01

    This article reevaluates the latent structure of the Teacher Efficacy Scale using confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) on a sample of preservice teachers from a public university in the U.S. Southwest. The fit of a proposed two-factor CFA model with an error correlation structure consistent with internal/ external locus of control is compared to…

  9. A Psychometric Evaluation of the Self-Presentational Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamarche, Larkin; Gammage, Kimberley L.; Sullivan, Philip J.; Gabriel, David A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Self-Presentational Efficacy Scale (SPES) developed by Gammage, Hall, and Martin Ginis (2004). University students (196 men and 269 women) completed the SPES and measures of social physique anxiety, fear of negative evaluation, and physical activity. Participants also completed the SPES a…

  10. Rating Scale Analysis and Psychometric Properties of the Caregiver Self-Efficacy Scale for Transfers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cipriani, Daniel J.; Hensen, Francine E.; McPeck, Danielle L.; Kubec, Gina L. D.; Thomas, Julie J.

    2012-01-01

    Parents and caregivers faced with the challenges of transferring children with disability are at risk of musculoskeletal injuries and/or emotional stress. The Caregiver Self-Efficacy Scale for Transfers (CSEST) is a 14-item questionnaire that measures self-efficacy for transferring under common conditions. The CSEST yields reliable data and valid…

  11. [Morse Fall Scale: translation and transcultural adaptation for the Portuguese language].

    PubMed

    de Urbanetto, Janete Souza; Creutzberg, Marion; Franz, Flávia; Ojeda, Beatriz Sebben; da Gustavo, Andreia Silva; Bittencourt, Hélio Radke; Steinmetz, Quézia Lidiane; Farina, Veronica Alacarini

    2013-06-01

    The study aimed to translate and adapt the Morse Fall Scale from English into the Portuguese language. This was performed in seven steps: authorization by the author of the scale; translation into Portuguese; evaluation and structuring of the translated scale; reverse translation into English; evaluation and validation of the scale by a committee of experts; evaluation of clarity of items and operational definitions with 45 professionals; evaluation of agreement between raters and the reliability of reproducibility, related to data from the evaluation of 90 patients, performed by four evaluators/judges. The clarity of the scale was considered very satisfactory, with a confidence interval of 73.0% to 100% in the option very clear. For the concordance of responses, the results showed Kappa coefficients of approximately 0.80 or higher. It was concluded that the adaptation of the scale was successful, indicating that its use is appropriate for the population of Brazilian patients. PMID:24601131

  12. Affordable, automatic quantitative fall risk assessment based on clinical balance scales and Kinect data.

    PubMed

    Colagiorgio, P; Romano, F; Sardi, F; Moraschini, M; Sozzi, A; Bejor, M; Ricevuti, G; Buizza, A; Ramat, S

    2014-01-01

    The problem of a correct fall risk assessment is becoming more and more critical with the ageing of the population. In spite of the available approaches allowing a quantitative analysis of the human movement control system's performance, the clinical assessment and diagnostic approach to fall risk assessment still relies mostly on non-quantitative exams, such as clinical scales. This work documents our current effort to develop a novel method to assess balance control abilities through a system implementing an automatic evaluation of exercises drawn from balance assessment scales. Our aim is to overcome the classical limits characterizing these scales i.e. limited granularity and inter-/intra-examiner reliability, to obtain objective scores and more detailed information allowing to predict fall risk. We used Microsoft Kinect to record subjects' movements while performing challenging exercises drawn from clinical balance scales. We then computed a set of parameters quantifying the execution of the exercises and fed them to a supervised classifier to perform a classification based on the clinical score. We obtained a good accuracy (~82%) and especially a high sensitivity (~83%). PMID:25570745

  13. Vibration Therapy to Prevent Bone Loss and Falls: Mechanisms and Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Beck, Belinda R

    2015-12-01

    A considerable volume of evidence has accumulated to suggest that whole-body vibration (WBV) may have a therapeutic role to play in the prevention of osteoporotic fracture, particularly for individuals who are unable to tolerate vigorous exercise interventions. There is moderate to strong evidence that WBV will prevent falls (likely due to enhanced neuromuscular function), but also some indication that the effects of WBV do not outstrip those of targeted exercise. Animal data indicates that WBV will also improve bone mass, including preventing loss due to hormone withdrawal, disuse and glucocorticoid exposure. Human trials, however, have produced equivocal outcomes for bone. Positive trends are apparent at the hip and spine, but shortcomings in study designs have limited statistical power. The mechanism of the vibration effect on bone tissue is likely to be mechanical coupling between an oscillating cell nucleus and the cytoskeleton. More robust dose-response human data are required before therapeutic guidelines can be developed. PMID:26456496

  14. Predicting the risk of fallingefficacy of a risk assessment tool compared to nurses' judgement: a cluster-randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN37794278

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Gabriele; Köpke, Sascha; Bender, Ralf; Mühlhauser, Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    Background Older people living in nursing homes are at high risk of falling because of their general frailty and multiple pathologies. Prediction of falls might lead to an efficient allocation of preventive measures. Although several tools to assess the risk of falling have been developed, their impact on clinically relevant endpoints has never been investigated. The present study will evaluate the clinical efficacy and consequences of different fall risk assessment strategies. Study design Cluster-randomised controlled trial with nursing home clusters randomised either to the use of a standard fall risk assessment tool alongside nurses' clinical judgement or to nurses' clinical judgement alone. Standard care of all clusters will be optimised by structured education on best evidence strategies to prevent falls and fall related injuries. 54 nursing home clusters including 1,080 residents will be recruited. Residents must be ≥ 70 years, not bedridden, and living in the nursing home for more than three months. The primary endpoint is the number of participants with at least one fall at 12 months. Secondary outcome measures are the number of falls, clinical consequences including side effects of the two risk assessment strategies. Other measures are fall related injuries, hospital admissions and consultations with a physician, and costs. PMID:16285880

  15. Comparison of the Validity of Four Fall-Related Psychological Measures in a Community-Based Falls Risk Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Delilah S.; Ellis, Rebecca; Kosma, Maria; Fabre, Jennifer M.; McCarter, Kevin S.; Wood, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the measurement properties of fall-related psychological instruments with a sample of 133 older adults (M age = 74.4 years, SD = 9.4). Measures included the Comprehensive Falls Risk Screening Instrument, Falls-efficacy Scale-International (FES-I), Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC), modified Survey of Activities and Fear of

  16. Comparison of the Validity of Four Fall-Related Psychological Measures in a Community-Based Falls Risk Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Delilah S.; Ellis, Rebecca; Kosma, Maria; Fabre, Jennifer M.; McCarter, Kevin S.; Wood, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the measurement properties of fall-related psychological instruments with a sample of 133 older adults (M age = 74.4 years, SD = 9.4). Measures included the Comprehensive Falls Risk Screening Instrument, Falls-efficacy Scale-International (FES-I), Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC), modified Survey of Activities and Fear of…

  17. Brief Psychometric Analysis of the Self-Efficacy Parent Report Scale (SEPRS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erford, Bradley T.; Gavin, Kate

    2013-01-01

    The Self-Efficacy Parent-Report Scale was designed to assess parent perceptions of self-efficacy of their children aged 7 to 17 years. Internal aspects of validity indicated a marginal fit of the data to the unidimensional model. External facets of validity indicated the Self-Efficacy Parent-Report Scale had excellent convergent and discriminant

  18. Brief Psychometric Analysis of the Self-Efficacy Parent Report Scale (SEPRS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erford, Bradley T.; Gavin, Kate

    2013-01-01

    The Self-Efficacy Parent-Report Scale was designed to assess parent perceptions of self-efficacy of their children aged 7 to 17 years. Internal aspects of validity indicated a marginal fit of the data to the unidimensional model. External facets of validity indicated the Self-Efficacy Parent-Report Scale had excellent convergent and discriminant…

  19. Brief Psychometric Analysis of the Self-Efficacy Teacher Report Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erford, Bradley T.; Duncan, Kelly; Savin-Murphy, Janet

    2010-01-01

    This study provides preliminary analysis of reliability and validity of scores on the Self-Efficacy Teacher Report Scale, which was designed to assess teacher perceptions of self-efficacy of students aged 8 to 17 years. (Contains 3 tables.)

  20. Impact of SCALE-UP on science teaching self-efficacy of students in general education science courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassani, Mary Kay Kuhr

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of two pedagogical models used in general education science on non-majors' science teaching self-efficacy. Science teaching self-efficacy can be influenced by inquiry and cooperative learning, through cognitive mechanisms described by Bandura (1997). The Student Centered Activities for Large Enrollment Undergraduate Programs (SCALE-UP) model of inquiry and cooperative learning incorporates cooperative learning and inquiry-guided learning in large enrollment combined lecture-laboratory classes (Oliver-Hoyo & Beichner, 2004). SCALE-UP was adopted by a small but rapidly growing public university in the southeastern United States in three undergraduate, general education science courses for non-science majors in the Fall 2006 and Spring 2007 semesters. Students in these courses were compared with students in three other general education science courses for non-science majors taught with the standard teaching model at the host university. The standard model combines lecture and laboratory in the same course, with smaller enrollments and utilizes cooperative learning. Science teaching self-efficacy was measured using the Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument - B (STEBI-B; Bleicher, 2004). A science teaching self-efficacy score was computed from the Personal Science Teaching Efficacy (PTSE) factor of the instrument. Using non-parametric statistics, no significant difference was found between teaching models, between genders, within models, among instructors, or among courses. The number of previous science courses was significantly correlated with PTSE score. Student responses to open-ended questions indicated that students felt the larger enrollment in the SCALE-UP room reduced individual teacher attention but that the large round SCALE-UP tables promoted group interaction. Students responded positively to cooperative and hands-on activities, and would encourage inclusion of more such activities in all of the courses. The large enrollment SCALE-UP model as implemented at the host university did not increase science teaching self-efficacy of non-science majors, as hypothesized. This was likely due to limited modification of standard cooperative activities according to the inquiry-guided SCALE-UP model. It was also found that larger SCALE-UP enrollments did not decrease science teaching self-efficacy when standard cooperative activities were used in the larger class.

  1. Psychometric Properties of the Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale within the Greek Educational Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsigilis, Nikolaos; Koustelios, Athanasios; Grammatikopoulos, Vasilios

    2010-01-01

    Many concerns have been raised about the validity of the existing instruments measuring teachers' efficacy. Recently, a new instrument to measure teachers' perceived efficacy has been presented, namely, the Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale (TSES). The purpose of the present study is to examine the psychometric properties of the TSES in the Greek…

  2. Invited Reaction: Development and Exploratory Validation of an Organizational Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the author's comments on James G. Bohn's article "Development and Exploratory Validation of an Organizational Efficacy Scale". In his article, Bohn has captured a deficiency, as he quotes, of "over two decades" in the human resource development (HRD) field. Since no scale has been designed specifically to measure efficacy at…

  3. Invited Reaction: Development and Exploratory Validation of an Organizational Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the author's comments on James G. Bohn's article "Development and Exploratory Validation of an Organizational Efficacy Scale". In his article, Bohn has captured a deficiency, as he quotes, of "over two decades" in the human resource development (HRD) field. Since no scale has been designed specifically to measure efficacy at

  4. Development of Self-Efficacy towards Using Alternative Assessment Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buldur, Serkan; Tatar, Nilgun

    2011-01-01

    Determining the candidate teachers' opinions regarding self-efficacy towards alternative assessment will be beneficial in that this will improve their competencies while using these approaches in their applications within the classroom. In this article, the development and validation of the "Self-efficacy towards Using Alternative Assessment…

  5. Evaluating the Turkish Version of the Discipline Efficacy Scale (DES): Translation Adequacy and Factor Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurt, Hakan; Ekici, Gulay

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to adapt the discipline efficacy scale to Turkish language, and conduct the validity and reliability analysis of the adapted scale. The scale was applied to 157 teacher candidates. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to reveal the construct validity of the scale. The results of the exploratory…

  6. Construction and Validation of a Self-Efficacy Scale for Latex Barrier Use.

    PubMed

    Morell-Mengual, Vicente; Gil-Llario, María Dolores; Castro-Calvo, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Some studies have concluded there is a relationship between perceived self-efficacy and behaviors that prevent HIV transmission. This paper presents the construction and validation of the latex barrier use self-efficacy scale (LBSS), which 480 participants filled out. Exploratory factor analysis yielded two components: positive expectations of self-efficacy (ES-POS) and negative expectations of self-efficacy (ES-NEG), which together accounted for 65.59% of total variance. That structure was later verified through confirmatory factor analysis. Internal consistency was .80 for the total scale, and .78 for each of the two factors. Moreover, the instrument had adequate convergent validity and was positively related with condom use self-efficacy, attitudes toward condom and latex barrier use, and ability to refuse sex if the partner refuses to use preventive methods. In conclusion, this instrument is a useful measure of self-efficacy in latex barrier use. PMID:27003502

  7. Psychometric evaluations of the efficacy expectations and Outcome Expectations for Exercise Scales in African American women.

    PubMed

    Murrock, Carolyn J; Gary, Faye

    2014-01-01

    This secondary analysis tested the reliability and validity of the Self-Efficacy for Exercise (SEE) and the Outcome Expectations for Exercise (OEE) scales in 126 community dwelling, middle aged African American women. Social Cognitive Theory postulates self-efficacy is behavior age, gender and culture specific. Therefore, it is important to determine ifself-efficacy scales developed and tested in older Caucasian female adults are reliable and valid in middle aged, minority women. Cronbach's alpha and construct validity using hypothesis testing and confirmatory factor analysis supported the reliability and validity of the SEE and OEE scales in community dwelling, middle aged African American women. PMID:25612395

  8. Fear of falling and falls in older adults with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Borges, Sheila de Melo; Radanovic, Márcia; Forlenza, Orestes Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairment and fear of falling are risk factors for falls in older adults. Recurrent falls are more prevalent in older adults with cognitive impairment. We examined the number of previous falls, self-reported fear of falling, and the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I) in 104 older adults [26 with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD), 42 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 36 cognitively healthy]. Older adults with AD and MCI had a higher number of falls (1.1 ± 1.2 and 1.5 ± 1.5, respectively) compared to the control group (0.3 ± 0.5, P < .001). Older adults with MCI more often reported fear of falling (74%) than patients with AD (31%) (P ≤ .002) and scored higher on the FES-I (29.7 and 23.8, respectively, P ≤ .01). The prevalence of falls in older adults with MCI and AD is higher than in subjects cognitively healthy. Older adults with MCI and AD differ in terms of reported fear of falling and falls self-efficacy. PMID:24992289

  9. Reliability and Factor Analyses of a Teacher Efficacy Scale for Nigerian Secondary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faleye, Bamidele Abiodun

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: The suitability of 52 items for measuring Teacher Efficacy was investigated with the aim of developing and validating a Teacher Efficacy Scale (TES) for Nigerian secondary school teachers. Method: The TES was administered on 2400 teachers (mean age = 36.75 years). Data were subjected to factor and reliability analyses. Results:…

  10. A Scale to Measure Teachers' Self-Efficacy in Deaf-Blindness Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartmann, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The Teacher Efficacy in Deafblindness Education Scale (TEDE) was developed to expand the construct of self-efficacy to teach children with deaf-blindness. Methods: Eighty-seven special educators in the United States were asked to rate their confidence to perform a variety of tasks that are associated with teaching children who are…

  11. Reliability of a Scale of Work-Related Self-Efficacy for People with Psychiatric Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Meredith

    2010-01-01

    Work-related self-efficacy at a core task level fits with the social cognitive career theory explaining the career development of people with severe mental illness. The aim of this study was to further investigate the psychometric properties of the "Work-related Self- Efficacy Scale" for use with people with psychiatric disabilities. Sixty…

  12. Using Mathematics in Teaching Science Self-Efficacy Scale--UMSSS: A Validity and Reliability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Can, Bilge Taskin; Gunhan, Berna Canturk; Erdal, Sevinc Ongel

    2012-01-01

    In this study, an instrument, Using Mathematics in Science Self-efficacy Scale (UMSSS), was developed in order to determine preservice science teachers' self-efficacy toward the use of mathematics in their lessons. Data gathered from 250 preservice science teachers were used for Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis…

  13. The Self-Efficacy Scale for Preschool Teachers Regarding Asthma Care: Instrument Development and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gau, Bih-Shya; Hung, Chao-Chia

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of a questionnaire that assesses preschool teachers' self-efficacy in providing asthma care. Methods: A total of 407 teachers from 54 preschools in Taiwan participated in the study by completing the asthma management self-efficacy scale. We assessed

  14. The Self-Efficacy Scale for Preschool Teachers Regarding Asthma Care: Instrument Development and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gau, Bih-Shya; Hung, Chao-Chia

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of a questionnaire that assesses preschool teachers' self-efficacy in providing asthma care. Methods: A total of 407 teachers from 54 preschools in Taiwan participated in the study by completing the asthma management self-efficacy scale. We assessed…

  15. A Scale to Measure Teachers' Self-Efficacy in Deaf-Blindness Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartmann, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The Teacher Efficacy in Deafblindness Education Scale (TEDE) was developed to expand the construct of self-efficacy to teach children with deaf-blindness. Methods: Eighty-seven special educators in the United States were asked to rate their confidence to perform a variety of tasks that are associated with teaching children who are

  16. Construction and Field Testing of the "Job Seeking Self-Efficacy Scale"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauser, David R.; Berven, Norman L.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an instrument, the "Job Seeking Self-Efficacy Scale," to measure perceived self-efficacy in job-seeking activities. The construction of the instrument, which incorporated tasks that have been determined to be important in job seeking for individuals with disabilities, was based on Bandura's theory of…

  17. Reliability of a Scale of Work-Related Self-Efficacy for People with Psychiatric Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Meredith

    2010-01-01

    Work-related self-efficacy at a core task level fits with the social cognitive career theory explaining the career development of people with severe mental illness. The aim of this study was to further investigate the psychometric properties of the "Work-related Self- Efficacy Scale" for use with people with psychiatric disabilities. Sixty

  18. A Psychometric Evaluation of the Parent Self-Efficacy in Managing the Transition to School Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giallo, Rebecca; Kienhuis, Mandy; Treyvaud, Karli; Matthews, Jan

    2008-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Parent Self-efficacy in Managing the Transition to School Scale (PSMTSS) were investigated with a sample of 763 mothers whose children were starting primary school in Australia. Exploratory factor analysis identified two factors, Efficacy and Worry, accounting for 56.6% of the total variance in parent…

  19. 2011 Outstanding AFCPE[R] Conference Paper: Development and Validation of a Financial Self-Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lown, Jean M.

    2011-01-01

    This study developed a 6-item Financial Self-Efficacy Scale for use by researchers, educators, counselors, and advisors. Bandura's concept of self-efficacy and Prochaska's Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change provided the theoretical framework. Scale items were adapted from Schwarzer and Jerusalem's (1995) General Self-Efficacy Scale.…

  20. Establishing a Common Metric for Selected Teacher Self-Efficacy Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curda, Leslie K.; Smith, Everett V.

    2002-01-01

    Examined a process for unifying two teacher self-efficacy scales, providing a common metric for communicating and comparing results. Data from 118 education students indicated that items from the two scales defined a unidimensional construct. Correlations between person measures from the two scales demonstrated their strengths for measuring…

  1. Evidence for a Multidimensional Self-Efficacy for Exercise Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, W. M.; Wilson, P. M.; Hall, C. R.; Fraser, S. N.; Murray, T. C.

    2008-01-01

    This series of three studies considers the multidimensionality of exercise self-efficacy by examining the psychometric characteristics of an instrument designed to assess three behavioral subdomains: task, scheduling, and coping. In Study 1, exploratory factor analysis revealed the expected factor structure in a sample of 395 students.…

  2. Inpatient Falls

    PubMed Central

    Cumbler, Ethan U.; Simpson, Jennifer R.; Rosenthal, Laura D.; Likosky, David J.

    2013-01-01

    In this 2 part series, analysis of the risk stratification tools that are available, definition for the scope of the problem, and potential solutions through a review of the literature are presented. A systematic review was used to identify articles for risk stratification and interventions. Three risk stratification systems are discussed, St Thomas’s Risk Assessment Tool in Falling Elderly Inpatients, Morse Fall Scale, and the Hendrich Fall Risk Model. Of these scoring systems, the Hendrich Fall Risk Model is the easiest to use and score. Predominantly, multifactorial interventions are used to prevent patient falls. Education and rehabilitation are common themes in studies with statistically significant results. The second article presents a guide to implementing a quality improvement project around hospital falls. A 10-step approach to Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycles is described. Specific examples of problems and analysis are easily applicable to any institution. Furthermore, the sustainability of interventions and targeting new areas for improvement is discussed. Although specific to falls in the hospitalized patient, the goal is to present a stepwise approach which is broadly applicable to other areas requiring quality improvement. PMID:24167647

  3. Analysis of the Professional Choice Self-Efficacy Scale Using the Rasch-Andrich Rating Scale Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambiel, Rodolfo A. M.; Noronha, Ana Paula Porto; de Francisco Carvalho, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to analyze the psychometrics properties of the professional choice self-efficacy scale (PCSES), using the Rasch-Andrich rating scale model. The PCSES assesses four factors: self-appraisal, gathering occupational information, practical professional information search and future planning. Participants were 883 Brazilian…

  4. Adapting Computer Programming Self-Efficacy Scale and Engineering Students' Self-Efficacy Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korkmaz, Özgen; Altun, Halis

    2014-01-01

    Students might have different type and different level of perceptions: Positive or negative perceptions on programming; a perception on benefit of programming, perceptions related to difficulties of programming process etc. The perception of student on their own competence is defined as self-efficacy. Based on the discussions reported in…

  5. Efficacy of petal fall and shuck split fungicides for control of scab on peach in middle Georgia, 2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungicides were evaluated for control of scab in a mid-ripening experimental peach block (‘Flameprince’) located at the USDA-ARS Fruit and Tree Nut Research Laboratory (Byron, GA). Chemical formulations were applied at each application date: 3 Apr (petal fall to 1% shuck split), 10 Apr (shuck split ...

  6. Large-scale spatial variability of riverbed temperature gradients in Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning areas

    SciTech Connect

    Hanrahan, Timothy P.

    2007-02-01

    In the Snake River basin of the Pacific northwestern United States, hydroelectric dam operations are often based on the predicted emergence timing of salmon fry from the riverbed. The spatial variability and complexity of surface water and riverbed temperature gradients results in emergence timing predictions that are likely to have large errors. The objectives of this study were to quantify the thermal heterogeneity between the river and riverbed in fall Chinook salmon spawning areas and to determine the effects of thermal heterogeneity on fall Chinook salmon emergence timing. This study quantified river and riverbed temperatures at 15 fall Chinook salmon spawning sites distributed in two reaches throughout 160 km of the Snake River in Hells Canyon, Idaho, USA, during three different water years. Temperatures were measured during the fall Chinook salmon incubation period with self-contained data loggers placed in the river and at three different depths below the riverbed surface. At all sites temperature increased with depth into the riverbed, including significant differences (p<0.05) in mean water temperature of up to 3.8°C between the river and the riverbed among all the sites. During each of the three water years studied, river and riverbed temperatures varied significantly among all the study sites, among the study sites within each reach, and between sites located in the two reaches. Considerable variability in riverbed temperatures among the sites resulted in fall Chinook salmon emergence timing estimates that varied by as much as 55 days, depending on the source of temperature data used for the estimate. Monitoring of riverbed temperature gradients at a range of spatial scales throughout the Snake River would provide better information for managing hydroelectric dam operations, and would aid in the design and interpretation of future empirical research into the ecological significance of physical riverine processes.

  7. Development and validation of a condom self-efficacy scale for college students.

    PubMed

    Brafford, L J; Beck, K H

    1991-03-01

    This study proposed to develop and validate a scale for the college population that measures self-efficacy in using condoms. The Condom Use Self-Efficacy Scale (CUSES) was derived from several sources and consisted of 28 items describing an individual's feelings of confidence about being able to purchase condoms, put them on and take them off, and negotiate their use with a new sexual partner. This scale was administered to a sample of 768 college students. It was found to possess adequate reliability (Cronbach's alpha = .91; test-retest correlation = .81) and correlated well with the Attitude Toward the Condom Scale (r = .51) and the Contraceptive Self-Efficacy Scale for women (r = .55). Our scale also correlated with a measure of intention to use condoms (r = .40) but was unrelated to a measure of social desirability. Students who differed on measures of previous condom use as well as on sexual intercourse experience also showed significant differences on this scale in the expected direction, indicating evidence of this scale's discriminant validity. The potential uses of this scale in a college population are discussed, along with the issues underlying condom usage self-efficacy. PMID:1783705

  8. A validation study of goal orientations and self-efficacy scales.

    PubMed

    Acarlar, Gizem; Bilgiç, Reyhan

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the validity and reliability of goal orientation and self-efficacy scales. The scales were administered to 264 university students (154 from engineering departments, 110 from business administration). Two samples were used. In the first sample, the original factor model was tested with confirmatory factor analysis. In the second sample, the Turkish versions of the scales were factor analyzed. Principal components analysis resulted in three components for the Goal Orientation scale: Learning goal orientation, Performance-prove goal orientation, and Performance-avoid goal orientation. The Self-efficacy scale had one factor as expected. Cronbach's alpha coefficients were satisfactory. The results did not fully support the use of current Turkish versions of the scales. Results of the studies are discussed along with the strengths and limitations of the study and suggestions for further development of the scales. PMID:21319613

  9. Assessing and Improving the Factorial Structures of the Computer Self-Efficacy Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moroz, Pauline A.; Nash, John B.

    The Computer Self-Efficacy Scale (CSE) developed by C. A. Murphy, D. Coover, and S. V. Owen (1989) is an instrument purported to assess computer-related competencies. Previous research into the factor structure of the CSE has yielded conflicting results. In this study, the scale was used to collect data from 216 graduate education students. A…

  10. Cross-Validation of the Norwegian Teacher's Self-Efficacy Scale (NTSES)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avanzi, Lorenzo; Miglioretti, Massimo; Velasco, Veronica; Balducci, Cristian; Vecchio, Luca; Fraccaroli, Franco; Skaalvik, Einar M.

    2013-01-01

    The study assesses the psychometric properties of the Italian version of the Norwegian Teacher Self-Efficacy Scale--NTSES. Multiple group confirmatory factor analysis was used to explore the measurement invariance of the scale across two countries. Analyses performed on Italian and Norwegian samples confirmed a six-factor structure of the scale…

  11. Validation of the General Self-Efficacy Scale among Qatari young women.

    PubMed

    Crandall, A; Rahim, H F Abdul; Yount, K M

    2016-12-01

    The General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES) is a measure of people's beliefs about their capacity to cope with life's demands. Self-efficacy may be particularly relevant in transitional stages such as in late adolescence, when young people make decisions that will impact their adult lives. In the present study, we aimed to validate an Arabic version of GSES among 355 Qatari young women aged 18+ years and finishing their final year of high school. We conducted exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to assess the scale dimensionality. The final model fit was adequate (root mean square error of approximation = 0.07, comparative fit index = 1.00, Tucker-Lewis index = 0.99), confirming a unidimensional self-efficacy measure. The Qatari Standard Arabic GSES is a reliable tool for measuring general self-efficacy among young Qatari women. PMID:26996362

  12. Breastfeeding Peer Counseling: From Efficacy through Scale-up

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Donna J.; Morel, Katherine; Anderson, Alex Kojo; Damio, Grace; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    There are a growing number of publications evaluating various breastfeeding peer counseling (PC) models. We have systematically reviewed a) the randomized trials assessing the effectiveness of breastfeeding PC in improving rates of breastfeeding initiation, duration, exclusivity and maternal and child health outcomes; and b) scientific literature describing the scale-up of breastfeeding PC programs. Twenty-six peer-reviewed publications were included in this review. The overwhelming majority of evidence from randomized, controlled trials evaluating breastfeeding PC indicates that peer counselors effectively improve rates of breastfeeding initiation, duration and exclusivity. PC interventions were also shown to significantly decrease the incidence of infant diarrhea and significantly increase the duration of lactational amenorrhea. We conclude that breastfeeding PC initiatives are effective and can be scaled up in both developed and developing countries, as part of well-coordinated national breastfeeding promotion or maternal-child health programs. PMID:20715336

  13. Effects of a multifactorial fall prevention program on balance, gait, and fear of falling in post-stroke inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Younuk; Lee, Kyeongbong; Shin, Seonhae; Lee, Wanhee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of a multifactorial fall prevention program on balance, gait, and fear of falling in stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-five stroke patients were divided randomly into multifactorial fall prevention program group (n=15) and control treadmill group (n=10). [Methods] All interventions were applied for 30 min, five times per week, for five weeks. The fall prevention program included interventions based on the “Step Up to Stop Falls” initiative and educational interventions based on the Department of Health guidelines. For those in the treadmill group, the speed was increased gradually. The Korean falls efficacy scale and Korean activities-specific balance confidence scale were used to assess fear of falling. To assess balance and walking ability, the Korean performance-oriented mobility assessment scale and the 10-m and 6-minute walk tests were used. [Results] The fall prevention program interventions were found to be very effective at improving gait, balance, and fear of falling compared with the treadmill intervention and therefore seem appropriate for stroke patients. [Conclusion] A multifactorial fall prevention program is effective at improving balance, gait ability, and fear of falling. It is a more specific and broad intervention for reducing falls among inpatients in facilities and hospitals. PMID:26180337

  14. A Scenario-Based Dieting Self-Efficacy Scale: The DIET-SE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stich, Christine; Knauper, Barbel; Tint, Ami

    2009-01-01

    The article discusses a scenario-based dieting self-efficacy scale, the DIET-SE, developed from dieter's inventory of eating temptations (DIET). The DIET-SE consists of items that describe scenarios of eating temptations for a range of dieting situations, including high-caloric food temptations. Four studies assessed the psychometric properties of…

  15. A Measurement Invariance Analysis of the General Self-Efficacy Scale on Two Different Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teo, Timothy; Kam, Chester

    2014-01-01

    The 10-item General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES) was developed to assess an individual's beliefs to cope with a variety of situations in life. Despite the GSES being used in numerous research from researchers in different countries and presented in different languages, little is known about the use of its validity in an Asian culture. The aim…

  16. Using Small-Scale Randomized Controlled Trials to Evaluate the Efficacy of New Curricular Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drits-Esser, Dina; Bass, Kristin M.; Stark, Louisa A.

    2014-01-01

    How can researchers in K-12 contexts stay true to the principles of rigorous evaluation designs within the constraints of classroom settings and limited funding? This paper explores this question by presenting a small-scale randomized controlled trial (RCT) designed to test the efficacy of curricular supplemental materials on epigenetics. The

  17. A Measurement Invariance Analysis of the General Self-Efficacy Scale on Two Different Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teo, Timothy; Kam, Chester

    2014-01-01

    The 10-item General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES) was developed to assess an individual's beliefs to cope with a variety of situations in life. Despite the GSES being used in numerous research from researchers in different countries and presented in different languages, little is known about the use of its validity in an Asian culture. The aim

  18. The Development and Validation of the School-Based Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boughfman, Erica M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate the School-Based Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale (SB-SES). Two hundred sixty-five (N = 265) licensed mental health professionals participated in this study. Fifty-eight percent of the participants reported experience working as a school-based counselor with the remaining 42% reporting no…

  19. The Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale: Confirming the Factor Structure with Beginning Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffin, Lisa C.; French, Brian F.; Patrick, Helen

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the factor structure of the Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale (TSES; Tschannen-Moran & Woolfolk Hoy, 2001) using the scores of pre-service teachers at the beginning stage of teacher development to gather internal structure score validity evidence. Two plausible rival models derived from prior research were tested using CFA.…

  20. Development of the Ethical and Legal Issues in Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Patrick R.; Lambie, Glenn W.; Conley, Abigail H.

    2014-01-01

    The authors present the development of the Ethical and Legal Issues in Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale (ELICSES). The purpose of this article is threefold: (a) present a rationale for the ELICSES, (b) review statistical analysis procedures used to develop the ELICSES, and (c) offer implications for future research and counselor education.

  1. Development and Validation of Chemistry Self-Efficacy Scale for College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzuntiryaki, Esen; Aydin, Yesim Capa

    2009-01-01

    This study described the process of developing and validating the College Chemistry Self-Efficacy Scale (CCSS) that can be used to assess college students' beliefs in their ability to perform essential tasks in chemistry. In the first phase, data collected from 363 college students provided evidence for the validity and reliability of the new…

  2. An Analysis of the Reliability and Validity of Bandura's Multidimensional Scales of Perceived Self-Efficacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Janice E.; Coombs, William T.

    The reliability of A. Bandura's Multidimensional Scales of Perceived Self-Efficacy (MSPSE) was studied using the Cronbach alpha measure of internal consistency. The divergent validity of the MSPSE was also examined using subscale correlations, and the construct validity of the measure was studied through application of principal axes factor…

  3. Using Small-Scale Randomized Controlled Trials to Evaluate the Efficacy of New Curricular Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drits-Esser, Dina; Bass, Kristin M.; Stark, Louisa A.

    2014-01-01

    How can researchers in K-12 contexts stay true to the principles of rigorous evaluation designs within the constraints of classroom settings and limited funding? This paper explores this question by presenting a small-scale randomized controlled trial (RCT) designed to test the efficacy of curricular supplemental materials on epigenetics. The…

  4. Development and Validation of Chemistry Self-Efficacy Scale for College Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzuntiryaki, Esen; Çapa Aydın, Yeşim

    2009-08-01

    This study described the process of developing and validating the College Chemistry Self-Efficacy Scale (CCSS) that can be used to assess college students’ beliefs in their ability to perform essential tasks in chemistry. In the first phase, data collected from 363 college students provided evidence for the validity and reliability of the new scale. Three dimensions emerged: self-efficacy for cognitive skills, self-efficacy for psychomotor skills, and self-efficacy for everyday applications. In the second phase, data collected from an independent sample of 353 college students confirmed the factorial structure of the 21-item CCSS. The Cronbach alpha coefficients ranged from 0.82 to 0.92. In addition, each dimension of the CCSS had moderate and significant correlations with student chemistry achievement and differentiated between major and non-major students. Followed by the additional validation studies, the CCSS will serve as a valuable tool for both instructors and researchers in science education to assess college students’ chemistry self-efficacy beliefs.

  5. Self-Efficacy Scale for Weight Loss among Multi-Ethnic Women of Lower Income: A Psychometric Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latimer, Lara; Walker, Lorraine O.; Kim, Sunghun; Pasch, Keryn E.; Sterling, Bobbie Sue

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study examined test-retest reliability, internal consistency, and construct and predictive validity of the Physical Activity and Nutrition Self-Efficacy (PANSE) scale, an 11-item instrument to assess weight-loss self-efficacy among postpartum women of lower income. Methods: Seventy-one women completed the PANSE scale and…

  6. Development and validation of the French-Canadian Chronic Pain Self-efficacy Scale

    PubMed Central

    Lacasse, Anaïs; Bourgault, Patricia; Tousignant-Laflamme, Yannick; Courtemanche-Harel, Roxanne; Choinière, Manon

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perceived self-efficacy is a non-negligible outcome when measuring the impact of self-management interventions for chronic pain patients. However, no validated, chronic pain-specific self-efficacy scales exist for studies conducted with French-speaking populations. OBJECTIVES: To establish the validity of the use of the French-Canadian Chronic Pain Self-efficacy Scale (FC-CPSES) among chronic pain patients. METHODS: The Chronic Disease Self-Efficacy Scale is a validated 33-item self-administered questionnaire that measures perceived self-efficacy to perform self-management behaviours, manage chronic disease in general and achieve outcomes (a six-item version is also available). This scale was adapted to the context of chronic pain patients following cross-cultural adaptation guidelines. The FC-CPSES was administered to 109 fibromyalgia and 34 chronic low back pain patients (n=143) who participated in an evidence-based self-management intervention (the PASSAGE program) offered in 10 health care centres across the province of Quebec. Cronbach’s alpha coefficients (α) were calculated to determine the internal consistency of the 33- and six-item versions of the FC-CPSES. With regard to convergent construct validity, the association between the FC-CPSES baseline scores and related clinical outcomes was examined. With regard to the scale’s sensitivity to change, pre- and postintervention FC-CPSES scores were compared. RESULTS: Internal consistency was high for both versions of the FC-CPSES (α=0.86 to α=0.96). Higher self-efficacy was significantly associated with higher mental health-related quality of life and lower pain intensity and catastrophizing (P<0.05), supporting convergent validity of the scale. There was a statistically significant increase in FC-CPSES scores between pre- and postintervention measures for both versions of the FC-CPSES (P<0.003), which supports their sensitivity to clinical change during an intervention. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that both versions of the FC-CPSES are reliable and valid for the measurement of pain management self-efficacy among chronic pain patients. PMID:25848845

  7. Scale of health: indices of safety and efficacy in the evolving environment of large biological datasets.

    PubMed

    Sayes, Christie M; Staats, Herman; Hickey, Anthony J

    2014-09-01

    The interdependent relationship between pharmacology and toxicology is fundamental to the concepts of efficacy and safety of both drugs and xenobiotics. The traditional concept of establishing efficacious and tolerated doses to define a 'therapeutic window' appears simplistic in the context of an exponentially increasing database on molecular mechanisms and cell biology that inform our understanding of homeostasis. Recent advances in nano medicine illustrate the convergence of efficacy and safety considerations that are central to establishing a clear pathway for regulatory review. The following overview considers biological responses to the administration of nanoparticles and the scale of balanced, within a range that might be considered 'normal', to unbalanced, abnormal responses associated with health and disease. PMID:24919930

  8. Development and validation of the Family Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale

    PubMed Central

    NOLAN, MARIE T.; HUGHES, MARK T.; KUB, JOAN; TERRY, PETER B.; ASTROW, ALAN; THOMPSON, RICHARD E.; CLAWSON, LORA; TEXEIRA, KENNETH; SULMASY, DANIEL P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Several studies have reported high levels of distress in family members who have made health care decisions for loved ones at the end of life. A method is needed to assess the readiness of family members to take on this important role. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop and validate a scale to measure family member confidence in making decisions with (conscious patient scenario) and for (unconscious patient scenario) a terminally ill loved one. Methods On the basis of a survey of family members of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) enriched by in-depth interviews guided by Self-Efficacy Theory, we developed six themes within family decision making self-efficacy. We then created items reflecting these themes that were refined by a panel of end-of-life research experts. With 30 family members of patients in an outpatient ALS and a pancreatic cancer clinic, we tested the tool for internal consistency using Cronbach’s alpha and for consistency from one administration to another using the test–retest reliability assessment in a subset of 10 family members. Items with item to total scale score correlations of less than .40 were eliminated. Results A 26-item scale with two 13-item scenarios resulted, measuring family self-efficacy in decision making for a conscious or unconscious patient with a Cronbach’s alphas of .91 and .95, respectively. Test–retest reliability was r = .96, p = .002 in the conscious senario and r = .92, p = .009 in the unconscious scenario. Significance of results The Family Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale is valid, reliable, and easily completed in the clinic setting. It may be used in research and clinical care to assess the confidence of family members in their ability to make decisions with or for a terminally ill loved one. PMID:19788773

  9. Development and Psychometric Testing of a Breast Cancer Survivor Self-Efficacy Scale

    PubMed Central

    Champion, Victoria L.; Ziner, Kim W.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Stump, Timothy E.; Cella, David; Smith, Lisa G.; Bell, Cynthia J.; Von Ah, Diane; Sledge, George W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To describe the development of a self-efficacy instrument that measures perceived ability to manage symptoms and quality-of-life problems resulting from the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. Design Items were developed and content validity assessed. A 14-item scale was psychometrically evaluated using internal consistency reliability and several types of construct validity. Sample 1,127 female breast cancer survivors (BCSs). Methods Written consents were mailed to the research office. Data were collected via mail and telephone. Main Research Variables Demographics, symptom bother, communication with healthcare provider, attention function, fear of recurrence, depression, marital satisfaction, fatigue, sexual functioning, trait and state anxiety, and overall well-being. Findings Data demonstrated that the breast cancer self-efficacy scale (BCSES) was reliable, with an alpha coefficient of 0.89, inter-item correlations ranging from 0.3–0.6, and item-total correlation coefficients ranging from 0.5–0.73. Three of 14 items were deleted because of redundancy as identified through high (> 0.7) inter-item correlations. Factor analysis revealed that the scale was unidimensional. Predictive validity was supported through testing associations between self-efficacy and theoretically supported quality-of-life variables, including physical, psychological, and social dimensions, as well as overall well-being. Conclusions The BCSES demonstrated high internal consistency reliability, unidimensionality, and excellent content and construct validity. This scale should be integrated into interventions that target self-efficacy for managing symptoms in BCSs. Implications for Nursing Nurses working with BCSs may use this tool to assess areas in which survivors might need to build confidence to adequately cope with their specific survivorship concerns. Knowledge Translation The use of the BCSES can inform nurse researchers about the impact of an intervention on self-efficacy in the context of breast cancer survivorship, improving the ability to deliver effective interventions. The scale is brief and easy to administer. Results of this study demonstrate clear psychometric reliability and validity, suggesting that the BCSES should be put to use immediately in interventions targeting the quality of life of BCSs. PMID:24161644

  10. Validation of the condom use self-efficacy scale in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The measurement of condom use self-efficacy requires contextually suitable, valid and reliable instruments due to variability of the scale across nations with different cultural and ethnic backgrounds. This study aims to construct a condom use self-efficacy scale suitable to Ethiopia (CUSES-E), based on the original scale developed by Brafford and Beck. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on a random sample of 492 students at Hawassa University. A self-administered questionnaire containing 28 items from the original scale was used to collect the data. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) with Varimax rotation was used to extract factor structures. Cronbach’s alpha and item-total correlations were used to determine the internal consistency of the scale. The convergent and discriminant validity of the scale was verified using a correlation matrix. Results The PCA extracted three factors containing a total of 9-items. The extracted factors were labeled Assertiveness, Fear for partner rejection and Intoxicant Control, with internal consistency coefficients (Cronbach’s alpha) of 0.86, 0.86 and 0.92, respectively. Altogether, the factors explained 77.8% of variance in the items. An evaluation of CUSES-E showed a significantly higher self-efficacy score among students who ever used condoms; P < 0.001. The correlation matrix revealed that all of the convergent correlations were higher than the discriminant ones, providing evidence in support of both types of validity. In the split sample validation, the communalities, factor loadings and factor structure were the same on the analysis on each half and the full data set, suggesting that the new scale is generalizable and replicable. Conclusion This study of CUSES using an Ethiopian population found a different dimension to emerge, suggesting that the scale should be validated to local contexts before application. The CUSES-E is valid, reliable and replicable. Therefore, health cadres and researchers in Ethiopia can apply this scale to promote condom utilization to Ethiopian school youths. However, future research to develop a suitable scale (highly valid and reliable) in concordance with the local vernacular using a prior qualitative study is needed. PMID:23617404

  11. Racer efficacy study, Fall 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed control is a serious concern for commercial vegetable producers because of the limited number of herbicides available for this group of minor crops and the potential for crop injury. Organic producers of vegetables have an even bigger challenge since their weed control tools are limited to cul...

  12. Racer efficacy study, Fall 2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research in 2007 demonstrated the effectiveness of Racer (ammonium nonanoate) for burn-down control of several weed species. Racer has been labeled by EPA in the past year for burn-down weed control in food crops and is close to receiving approval for use by organic producers. The objective of thi...

  13. Psychometric Properties of the 8-Item English Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale in a Diverse Sample

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Sara; Schoffman, Danielle E.; Dowda, Marsha; Sharpe, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Arthritis self-efficacy is important for successful disease management. This study examined psychometric properties of the 8-item English version of the Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale (ASES-8) and differences in ASES-8 scores across sample subgroups. In 401 participants with self-reported doctor-diagnosed arthritis, exploratory factor analysis and tests of internal consistency were conducted. Concurrent validity was examined by associating ASES-8 scores with disease-specific, psychosocial, functional, and behavioral measures expected to be related to arthritis self-efficacy. All analyses were conducted for the full sample and within subgroups (gender, race, age, education, and weight status). Exploratory factor analysis for the entire sample and in all 12 subgroups demonstrated a one factor solution (factor loadings: 0.61 to 0.89). Internal consistency was high for measures of Cronbach's alpha (0.87 to 0.94), omega (0.87 to 0.93), and greatest lower bound (0.90 to 0.95). ASES-8 scores were significantly correlated with all measures assessed (P < 0.05), demonstrating concurrent validity. Those with a high school education or greater had higher ASES-8 scores than those with less than a high school education (P < .001); no other subgroup differences were found. The ASES-8 is a valid and reliable tool to measure arthritis self-efficacy efficiently and thereby reduce participant burden in research studies. PMID:25215233

  14. Development and evaluation of the Marijuana Reduction Strategies Self-Efficacy Scale.

    PubMed

    Davis, Alan K; Osborn, Lawrence A; Leith, Jaclyn; Rosenberg, Harold; Ashrafioun, Lisham; Hawley, Anna; Bannon, Erin E; Jesse, Samantha; Kraus, Shane; Kryszak, Elizabeth; Cross, Nicole; Carhart, Victoria; Baik, Kyoung-deok

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate several psychometric properties of a questionnaire designed to assess college students' self-efficacy to employ 21 cognitive-behavioral strategies intended to reduce the amount and/or frequency with which they consume marijuana, we recruited 273 marijuana-using students to rate their confidence that they could employ each of the strategies. Examination of frequency counts for each item, principal components analysis, internal consistency reliability, and mean interitem correlation supported retaining all 21 items in a single scale. In support of criterion validity, marijuana use-reduction self-efficacy scores were significantly positively correlated with cross-situational confidence to abstain from marijuana, and significantly negatively correlated with quantity and frequency of marijuana use and marijuana-related problems. In addition, compared with respondents whose use of marijuana either increased or remained stable, self-efficacy was significantly higher among those who had decreased their use of marijuana over the past year. This relatively short and easily administered questionnaire could be used to identify college students who have low self-efficacy to employ specific marijuana reduction strategies and as an outcome measure to evaluate educational and skill-training interventions. PMID:24955675

  15. Confirmatory factor analysis of the generalized self-efficacy scale in Brazil and Portugal.

    PubMed

    Leme, Vanessa B R; Coimbra, Susana; Gato, Jorge; Fontaine, Anne Marie; Del Prette, Zilda A P

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the construct validity, internal consistency and cross-cultural invariance of the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale-Portuguese version (GSE) in a Brazilian and Portuguese sample. The GSE is composed of 10 items, designed to parsimoniously and comprehensively assess self-efficacy beliefs to deal with a wide range of stress-inducing situations. The construct validity (factorial, convergent and discriminant) and internal consistency of the instrument were established within a sample of 304 Portuguese adolescents (study 1) and a sample of 477 Brazilian adolescents (study 2). Then, the invariance of the GSE was tested in a sample of Brazilian adolescents (study 3), using Multigroup Confirmatory Factor Analysis (MGCFA). In the first two studies, the construct validity of the GSE was demonstrated in its three components and the reliability of the scales was confirmed based on satisfactory levels of internal consistency. In the third study, the cross-cultural invariance of the instrument was established. This work adds to previous research on generalized self-efficacy instruments, with good psychometric qualities. Moreover, comparisons can now be made with confidence using this instrument among adolescent samples from Portugal and Brazil. PMID:24230956

  16. Cross-Cultural Validation of Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale in Three Asian Countries: Test of Measurement Invariance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruan, Jiening; Nie, Youyan; Hong, Ji; Monobe, Gumiko; Zheng, Guomin; Kambara, Hitomi; You, Sula

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to validate the widely adopted Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale (TSES) for the East Asian context. The researchers seek to find out whether TSES holds validity and reliability and is appropriate for use to measure teacher efficacy in China, Korea, and Japan. 489 teachers from the three countries participated in the…

  17. A Job-Seeking Self-Efficacy Scale for People with Physical Disabilities: Preliminary Development and Psychometric Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Julie; Wright, Chris; Cullen, Lesley

    2002-01-01

    Study sought to develop and conduct preliminary testing of the psychometric properties of a job-seeking self-efficacy (JSS) scale that reflected the experiences of people with physical disabilities. Greater job seeking self-efficacy and perceived ability to manage disability at interview were associated with more positive psychological well-being.…

  18. The Validity and Reliability Study of the Turkish Version of the Online Technologies Self-Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horzum, Mehmet Baris; Cakir, Ozlem

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to adapt a scale of self-efficacy towards online technologies which was developed by Miltiadou and Yu (2000) to Turkish. In order to adapt the scale, first, the scale items were translated to Turkish by the researchers. Then, a translation form was further developed by consulting eight specialists. These English and…

  19. Preliminary Study of the Autism Self-Efficacy Scale for Teachers (ASSET)

    PubMed Central

    Ruble, Lisa A.; Toland, Michael D.; Birdwhistell, Jessica L.; McGrew, John H.; Usher, Ellen L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate a new measure, the Autism Self-Efficacy Scale for Teachers (ASSET) for its dimensionality, internal consistency, and construct validity derived in a sample of special education teachers (N = 44) of students with autism. Results indicate that all items reflect one dominant factor, teachers’ responses to items were internally consistent within the sample, and compared to a 100-point scale, a 6-point response scale is adequate. ASSET scores were found to be negatively correlated with scores on two subscale measures of teacher stress (i.e., self-doubt/need for support and disruption of the teaching process) but uncorrelated with teacher burnout scores. The ASSET is a promising tool that requires replication with larger samples. PMID:23976899

  20. Mapping the efficacy of new designs for large scale sonochemical reactors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Gogate, Parag R; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2007-07-01

    Sonochemical reactors have a great promise for many physical and chemical processing applications but its applicability at pilot or industrial scale levels is hindered by lack of novel designs which can reproduce the spectacular effects generated at the laboratory scale. The present work evaluates the efficacy of two new designs, operating at a liquid capacity of 7l. Mapping of the cavitational activity has been carried out using measurements of local pressure using hydrophone and cativational intensity using Cavitation Activity Indicator (Model IC-3, N. Deznukov, Belarus State University, Minsk, Belarus). Aim has been to identify the distribution of the cavitational activity in radial and axial directions and possibly characterizing the zones with very high and very low cavitational activity in these reactor configurations. It has been observed that the cavitational activity is substantially uniform in both the reactors unlike the conventional single transducer based reactors. The study clearly indicates the feasibility of these designs for future large scale applications. PMID:17224297

  1. ELEMENTARY STUDENT SELF EFFICACY SCALE DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION FOCUSED ON STUDENT LEARNING, PEER RELATIONS, AND RESISTING DRUG USE

    PubMed Central

    FERTMAN, CARL I.; PRIMACK, BRIAN A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of a child self efficacy scale for learning, peer interactions, and resisting pressure to use drugs, to use in an elementary school drug prevention education program based on social cognitive theory. A diverse cohort of 392 4th and 5th grade students completed the 20-item self efficacy scale and social support and social skills instruments. The results provide evidence for a valid and reliable 3-factor self efficacy scale. Subscale internal consistency reliability was good to excellent (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.75, 0.83, 0.91). Construct validity was supported by correlations between each subscale and social skills, social support, and demographic data. The scale has potential as a tool to measure self efficacy in children related to learning, peer interactions, and resisting peer pressure to use drags and to help shape drag education programs. PMID:19886160

  2. Efficacy of novaluron against Culex quinquefasciatus in small- and medium-scale trials, India.

    PubMed

    Jambulingam, P; Sadanandane, C; Nithiyananthan, N; Subramanian, S; Zaim, M

    2009-09-01

    Novaluron 10% emulsifiable concentrate (EC), an insect growth regulator (IGR), was tested against Culex quinquefasciatus immatures at 1, 5, and 10 mg active ingredient (AI)/m2 applied to cesspits, drains, and abandoned wells. The IGR produced 80-100% inhibition of adult emergence (IE) for > 1 week (10-14 days) in cesspits, 1-2 weeks in street drains, and 5-10 weeks in abandoned wells at the 3 application rates. The efficacy increased with the increasing dose in street drains and abandoned wells. The residual activity of the IGR was longer in abandoned wells compared to drains and cesspits. Based on the small-scale trial, doses of 1, 5, and 10 mg AI/m2 were used in the medium-scale trial for cesspits, abandoned wells, and street drains, respectively. The efficacy observed in medium-scale trial was similar to that in the small-scale trial. The results indicate that novaluron 10% EC can be used for larval control against Cx. quinquefisciatus at the application rate of 1 mg AI/m2 at 10-day intervals in cesspits, at 5 mg AI/m2 at 2-month intervals in abandoned wells, and at 10 mg AI/m2 applied at fortnightly intervals to drains. Even at the lowest rate of 1 mg AI/m2, the IGR prevented adult emergence for at least a week in cesspits and street drains and for a month in abandoned wells. Novaluron 10% EC could be one of the options for larval control operations in integrated vector management. PMID:19852222

  3. A Self-Efficacy Scale for Clinical Nurse Leaders: Results of a Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Gilmartin, Mattia J; Nokes, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Introduced in 2003, the Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) role is the first new nursing role introduced in more than 30 years. The hallmark of CNL practice is the management of client-centered care and clinical excellence at the point of care. As part of multifaceted efforts to implement the CNL role, understanding how an individual's self-efficacy with the identified role competencies changes over time has important implications for individuals, educational programs preparing CNLs, and health care organizations employing CNLs. In this study, preliminary psychometric analyses assessing the construct validity, reliability, and discriminant validity for a new state-specific scale (CNL Self-Efficacy Scale) that assesses nurses' perceptions of their ability to function effectively as a CNL are reported. Because self-confidence is a key predictor of successful role transition, job satisfaction, and job performance, measuring individuals' self-confidence with the core competencies associated with the CNL role over time will be important to gain the full benefit of this innovative, unit-based advanced generalist role. PMID:26259337

  4. The Relationship Between Balance Measured With a Modified Bathroom Scale and Falls and Disability in Older Adults: A 6-Month Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background There are indications that older adults who suffer from poor balance have an increased risk for adverse health outcomes, such as falls and disability. Monitoring the development of balance over time enables early detection of balance decline, which can identify older adults who could benefit from interventions aimed at prevention of these adverse outcomes. An innovative and easy-to-use device that can be used by older adults for home-based monitoring of balance is a modified bathroom scale. Objective The objective of this paper is to study the relationship between balance scores obtained with a modified bathroom scale and falls and disability in a sample of older adults. Methods For this 6-month follow-up study, participants were recruited via physiotherapists working in a nursing home, geriatricians, exercise classes, and at an event about health for older adults. Inclusion criteria were being aged 65 years or older, being able to stand on a bathroom scale independently, and able to provide informed consent. A total of 41 nursing home patients and 139 community-dwelling older adults stepped onto the modified bathroom scale three consecutive times at baseline to measure their balance. Their mean balance scores on a scale from 0 to 16 were calculated—higher scores indicated better balance. Questionnaires were used to study falls and disability at baseline and after 6 months of follow-up. The cross-sectional relationship between balance and falls and disability at baseline was studied using t tests and Spearman rank correlations. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to study the relationship between balance measured at baseline and falls and disability development after 6 months of follow-up. Results A total of 128 participants with complete datasets—25.8% (33/128) male—and a mean age of 75.33 years (SD 6.26) were included in the analyses of this study. Balance scores of participants who reported at baseline that they had fallen at least once in the past 6 months were lower compared to nonfallers—8.9 and 11.2, respectively (P<.001). The correlation between mean balance score and disability sum-score at baseline was -.51 (P<.001). No significant associations were found between balance at baseline and falls after 6 months of follow-up. Baseline balance scores were significantly associated with the development of disability after 6 months of follow-up in the univariate analysis—odds ratio (OR) 0.86 (95% CI 0.76-0.98)—but not in the multivariate analysis when correcting for age, gender, baseline disability, and falls at follow-up—OR 0.94 (95% CI 0.79-1.11). Conclusions There is a cross-sectional relationship between balance measured by a modified bathroom scale and falls and disability in older adults. Despite this cross-sectional relationship, longitudinal data showed that balance scores have no predictive value for falls and might only have limited predictive value for disability development after 6 months of follow-up. PMID:26018423

  5. Psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the General Self-Efficacy Scale in stroke survivors.

    PubMed

    Carlstedt, Emma; Lexell, Eva Månsson; Pessah-Rasmussen, Hélène; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of a Swedish version of the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE) in stroke survivors. The GSE was administered by the same assessor on two occasions 3 weeks apart with 34 stroke survivors (21 men, 13 women; mean age=68.1 years) 6-10 months after stroke. Psychometric properties including targeting and scaling assumptions, and several reliability indices, were calculated. The mean score was well above the midpoint of the scale and the total scores spanned almost the entire scale range. Floor and ceiling effects were within the limits of 15-20% for total scores (0 and 8.8%, respectively), but not for each item individually. Total skewness was estimated at -1.02 and skewness for individual items was estimated as -1.55 to -0.33. The corrected item-total correlations were all above 0.3, except for one item. Cronbach's α was high (0.92) and the test-retest reliability was acceptable (intraclass correlation coefficient2,1=0.82). The mean difference (đ) was -0.68 (NS). The SEM was 2.97 (SEM%; 9.40). In conclusion, although targeting in relation to skewness and ceiling effects was observed in some items, the GSE was reliable for use in mobile stroke survivors 6-10 months after stroke. PMID:26288119

  6. Functional Restriction for the Fear of Falling In Family Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jing; Hu, Fangke; Liu, Fucun; Tong, Peijian

    2015-07-01

    Hip fractures often result from falls, and most family caregivers fear another fall. This study aimed to assess this fear in family caregivers and analyze its influence on functional recovery.This study was retrospectively performed by interview at the clinic or through telephone contact. The Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I) was used to assess fall-related feelings of patients and their family caregivers.Of the 539 patients studied, hip fracture was caused by a fall in 467 (86.6%). The mean FES-I value of the family caregivers was significantly lower than that of the patients (85.39 versus 99.02, P?fall and recurrent fall-related fractures both reduced caregiver FES-I scores. The difference between patient and caregiver FES-I scores showed a significant positive correlation with the FRS (P?falls than were patients. Furthermore, a greater difference in the fall-related reaction between caregivers and patients was associated with greater adverse effects on rehabilitation. PMID:26166092

  7. Reliability of a scale of work-related self-efficacy for people with psychiatric disabilities.

    PubMed

    Harris, Meredith; Gladman, Beverley; Hennessy, Nicole; Lloyd, Chris; Mowry, Bryan; Waghorn, Geoffrey

    2010-06-01

    Work-related self-efficacy at a core task level fits with the social cognitive career theory explaining the career development of people with severe mental illness. The aim of this study was to further investigate the psychometric properties of the 'Work-related Self-Efficacy Scale' for use with people with psychiatric disabilities. Sixty individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder participated in repeated telephone interviews conducted 2-5 days apart. Short-cycle test-retest reliability and internal structure were assessed. Face validity, consumer and clinician acceptability and utility were examined qualitatively. Short-cycle test-retest reliability was found to be very good at item and total score levels. The internal structure was consistent with previous investigations. Although face validity, acceptability and utility were adequate, use of face-to-face interviews is preferred over telephone interviews. The construct validity evidence supports wider use for research purposes in community mental health service, supported employment and other psychiatric rehabilitation settings. PMID:19561512

  8. Correlation Between Pain, Fear of Falling and Disability in Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Bharat Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Objective To ascertain if there is a correlation between low back pain (LBP), fear of falling, and disability so that the patients with LBP are aware of the fact that other problems may occur with LBP. Hence, steps can be taken for decreasing the fear of falling and disability in order to improve the condition of patients. Methods A sample size of 100 patients with low back pain, with a range of ages from 40 to 73 years, participated in the study. The Falls Efficacy Scale was used to assess the fear of falling and the Oswestry Disability Index was used to assess the disability and pain in LBP individuals. Results The Pearson correlation analysis signifies the relationship between pain, fear of falling, and disability in LBP. Conclusion First, LBP increases the fear of falling. Second, LBP can result in a person becoming disabled. Third, the fear of falling and disability are correlated with each other. PMID:26605180

  9. The inter-rater reliability test of the modified Morse Fall Scale among patients ≥ 55 years old in an acute care hospital in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wing Sze; Chow, Yeow Leng; Koh, Serena Siew Lin

    2014-02-01

    A prospective, descriptive study was conducted in an acute care hospital in Singapore to determine the inter-rater reliability of the modified Morse Fall Scale by evaluating the degrees of agreement on the ratings of the individual items and overall score between the 'gold standard' assessor and the facility assessors. One hundred and forty-two subjects were recruited during the 1.5 month data collection period. The simple and weighted κ-values were all > 0.8 except for the item 'effects of medications' (κ and κw  = 0.63), and the correlation coefficient (rs  = 0.89) was significantly high at a significance level of < 0.001. The modified Morse Fall Scale was shown to be a reliable fall risk assessment tool having a relative high inter-rater reliability level for the overall score and individual items. This study provides evidence-based psychometric support for the clinical application of this tool. PMID:24580973

  10. Self efficacy for fruit, vegetable and water intakes: Expanded and abbreviated scales from item response modeling analyses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To improve an existing measure of fruit and vegetable intake self efficacy by including items that varied on levels of difficulty, and testing a corresponding measure of water intake self efficacy. Design Cross sectional assessment. Items were modified to have easy, moderate and difficult levels of self efficacy. Classical test theory and item response modeling were applied. Setting One middle school at each of seven participating sites (Houston TX, Irvine CA, Philadelphia PA, Pittsburg PA, Portland OR, rural NC, and San Antonio TX). Subjects 714 6th grade students. Results Adding items to reflect level (low, medium, high) of self efficacy for fruit and vegetable intake achieved scale reliability and validity comparable to existing scales, but the distribution of items across the latent variable did not improve. Selecting items from among clusters of items at similar levels of difficulty along the latent variable resulted in an abbreviated scale with psychometric characteristics comparable to the full scale, except for reliability. Conclusions The abbreviated scale can reduce participant burden. Additional research is necessary to generate items that better distribute across the latent variable. Additional items may need to tap confidence in overcoming more diverse barriers to dietary intake. PMID:20350316

  11. Using Small-Scale Randomized Controlled Trials to Evaluate the Efficacy of New Curricular Materials

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Kristin M.; Stark, Louisa A.

    2014-01-01

    How can researchers in K–12 contexts stay true to the principles of rigorous evaluation designs within the constraints of classroom settings and limited funding? This paper explores this question by presenting a small-scale randomized controlled trial (RCT) designed to test the efficacy of curricular supplemental materials on epigenetics. The researchers asked whether the curricular materials improved students’ understanding of the content more than an alternative set of activities. The field test was conducted in a diverse public high school setting with 145 students who were randomly assigned to a treatment or comparison condition. Findings indicate that students in the treatment condition scored significantly higher on the posttest than did students in the comparison group (effect size: Cohen's d = 0.40). The paper discusses the strengths and limitations of the RCT, the contextual factors that influenced its enactment, and recommendations for others wishing to conduct small-scale rigorous evaluations in educational settings. Our intention is for this paper to serve as a case study for university science faculty members who wish to employ scientifically rigorous evaluations in K–12 settings while limiting the scope and budget of their work. PMID:25452482

  12. Using small-scale randomized controlled trials to evaluate the efficacy of new curricular materials.

    PubMed

    Drits-Esser, Dina; Bass, Kristin M; Stark, Louisa A

    2014-01-01

    How can researchers in K-12 contexts stay true to the principles of rigorous evaluation designs within the constraints of classroom settings and limited funding? This paper explores this question by presenting a small-scale randomized controlled trial (RCT) designed to test the efficacy of curricular supplemental materials on epigenetics. The researchers asked whether the curricular materials improved students' understanding of the content more than an alternative set of activities. The field test was conducted in a diverse public high school setting with 145 students who were randomly assigned to a treatment or comparison condition. Findings indicate that students in the treatment condition scored significantly higher on the posttest than did students in the comparison group (effect size: Cohen's d = 0.40). The paper discusses the strengths and limitations of the RCT, the contextual factors that influenced its enactment, and recommendations for others wishing to conduct small-scale rigorous evaluations in educational settings. Our intention is for this paper to serve as a case study for university science faculty members who wish to employ scientifically rigorous evaluations in K-12 settings while limiting the scope and budget of their work. PMID:25452482

  13. A Pilot Study of an Intervention Designed to Promote Walking, Balance, and Self-Efficacy in Older Adults with Fear of Falling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dattilo, John; Martire, Lynn; Gottschall, Jinger; Weybright, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to provide interventions that are of interest to older adults who are not inclined to participate in conventional exercise programs and that can improve balance and fear of falling. One purpose of this pilot study was to assess feasibility and acceptability of an eight-week (3x/wk, 90-minute sessions) multifaceted, small group,…

  14. A Pilot Study of an Intervention Designed to Promote Walking, Balance, and Self-Efficacy in Older Adults with Fear of Falling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dattilo, John; Martire, Lynn; Gottschall, Jinger; Weybright, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to provide interventions that are of interest to older adults who are not inclined to participate in conventional exercise programs and that can improve balance and fear of falling. One purpose of this pilot study was to assess feasibility and acceptability of an eight-week (3x/wk, 90-minute sessions) multifaceted, small group,

  15. Measuring Self-Efficacy: Multi-Trait Multi-Method Comparison of Scaling Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bong, Mimi; Hocevar, Dennis

    Convergent and discriminant validity of various self-efficacy measures was examined across two studies. In Study 1, U.S. high school students (n=358) rated their self-efficacy in 6 school subjects with reference to specific problems or general self-efficacy statements on the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) (P. Pintrich and…

  16. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Teacher Efficacy Scale for Prospective Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denzine, Gypsy M.; Cooney, John B.; McKenzie, Rita

    2005-01-01

    Background: Research on teacher self-efficacy has revealed substantive problems concerning the validity of instruments used to measure teacher self-efficacy beliefs. Although claims about the influence of teachers' self-efficacy beliefs on student achievement, success with curriculum innovation, and so on, may be true statements, one cannot make…

  17. The Smoking Outcome Expectation Scale and Anti-Smoking Self-Efficacy Scale for Early Adolescents: Instrument Development and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chen-Ju; Yeh, Ming-Chen; Tang, Fu-In; Yu, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Smoking-related outcome expectation and self-efficacy have been found to be associated with adolescent smoking initiation. There is, however, a lack of appropriate instruments to investigate early adolescents' smoking outcome expectations and antismoking self-efficacy. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate the Smoking Outcome…

  18. The Smoking Outcome Expectation Scale and Anti-Smoking Self-Efficacy Scale for Early Adolescents: Instrument Development and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chen-Ju; Yeh, Ming-Chen; Tang, Fu-In; Yu, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Smoking-related outcome expectation and self-efficacy have been found to be associated with adolescent smoking initiation. There is, however, a lack of appropriate instruments to investigate early adolescents' smoking outcome expectations and antismoking self-efficacy. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate the Smoking Outcome

  19. The study skills self-efficacy scale for use with Chinese students.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Mantak; Smith, Everett V; Dobria, Lidia; Fu, Qiong

    2009-01-01

    Silver, Smith and Greene (2001) examined the dimensionality of responses to the Study Skills Self-Efficacy Scale (SSSES) using exploratory principal factor analysis (PFA) and Rasch measurement techniques based on a sample of social science students from a community college in the United States. They found that responses defined three related dimensions. In the present study, Messick's (1995) conceptualization of validity was used to organize the exploration of the psychometric properties of data from a Chinese version of the SSSES. Evidence related to the content aspect of validity was obtained via item fit evaluation; the substantive aspect of validity was addressed by examining the functioning of the rating scales; the structural aspect of validity was explored with exploratory PFA and Rasch item fit statistics; and support for the generalizability aspect of validity was investigate via differential item functioning and internal consistency reliability estimates for both items and persons. The exploratory PFA and Rasch analysis of responses to the Chinese version of the SSSES were conducted with a sample of 494 Hong Kong high school students. Four factors emerged including Study Routines, Resource Use, Text-Based Critical Thinking, and Self-Modification. The fit of the data to the Rasch rating scale model for each dimension generally supported the unidimensionality of the four constructs. The ordered average measures and thresholds from the four Rasch analyses supported the continued use of the six-point response format. Item and person reliability were found to be adequate. Differential item functioning across gender and language taught in was minimal. PMID:19671989

  20. Relationships between Harter's Scale of Intrinsic versus Extrinsic Orientation and Bandura's Scale of Self-Efficacy for Self-Regulated Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, David L.; Griesemer, Bonnie A.

    A recent unpublished study by B. Griesemer (1995) studied the relationship between motivation and self-efficacy for learning among 146 sixth graders. Griesemer used two instruments in that study: one to measure intrinsic versus extrinsic motivation composed of three subscales from the Scale of Intrinsic versus Extrinsic Orientation in the…

  1. Preventing falls

    MedlinePlus

    Gillespie LD, Robertson MC, Gillespie WJ, Lamb SE, Gates S, Cumming RG, Rowe BH. Interventions for preventing falls in older people living in the community. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2009, Issue ...

  2. Preventing Falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stay physically active. Regular exercise makes you stronger. Weight-bearing activities, such as walking or climbing stairs, may slow bone loss from osteoporosis. Lower-body strength exercises and balance exercises can help you prevent falls and avoid ...

  3. Bridalveil Fall

    In this image, Bridalveil Fall can be seen from Tunnel View in Yosemite National Park. The waterfall is 617 ft (188 m) in height and is one of the most well-known of Yosemite National Park's waterfalls....

  4. The Reliability and Validity of the Greek Version of the Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koumoundourou, Georgia A.

    2004-01-01

    The present study examined the reliability and validity of the Greek version of the Task-Specific Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale in a sample of 170 high school students. Drawing on current social cognitive career theory, the validity of the TSOSS is supported by the expected gender differences on the TSOSS factors, and their high correlations…

  5. An Examination of the Structure of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale (Short Form) among Italian High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presti, Alessandro Lo; Pace, Francesco; Mondo, Marina; Nota, Laura; Casarubia, Provvidenza; Ferrari, Lea; Betz, Nancy E.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the factor structure of Career Decision Self-Efficacy scale-short form in a sample of Italian high school adolescents. confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to test the degree to which a one-factor structure and a five-factor structure provided the best fit. In view of available research the five-factor structure…

  6. Scaling CPD through Professional Learning Communities: Development of Teachers' Self-Efficacy in Relation to Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weißenrieder, Jochen; Roesken-Winter, Bettina; Schueler, Sven; Binner, Elke; Blömeke, Sigrid

    2015-01-01

    Whereas much is known about designing effective continuous professional development (CPD) for teachers, little is known about spillover effects of CPD by fostering collegial interactions. In this respect, the self-efficacy expectancy of multipliers to spread CPD issues within their own school is an important predictor for scaling. Self-efficacy…

  7. Combined Use of Self-Efficacy Scale for Oral Health Behaviour and Oral Health Questionnaire: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soutome, Sakiko; Kajiwara, Kazumi; Oho, Takahiko

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether the combined use of a task-specific self-efficacy scale for oral health behaviour (SEOH) and an oral health questionnaire (OHQ) would be useful for evaluating subjects' behaviours and cognitions. Design: Questionnaires. Methods: One hundred and eighty-five students completed the SEOH and OHQ. The 30-item OHQ uses a…

  8. Reliability and Validity of Five-Level Response Continua for the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betz, Nancy E.; Hammond, Marie S.; Multon, Karen D.

    2005-01-01

    The present study, based on three samples of college students totaling 1,832 participants, resulted in the conclusion that a 5-level response continuum for the short form of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale (CDSE) proved at least as reliable and valid as the 10-level continua used in normative studies. Values of coefficient alpha ranged…

  9. Elementary Student Self Efficacy Scale Development and Validation Focused on Student Learning, Peer Relations, and Resisting Drug Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fertman, Carl I.; Primack, Brian A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of a child self efficacy scale for learning, peer interactions, and resisting pressure to use drugs, to use in an elementary school drug prevention education program based on social cognitive theory. A diverse cohort of 392 4th and 5th grade students completed the 20-item…

  10. Relationships between Computer Self-Efficacy, Technology, Attitudes and Anxiety: Development of the Computer Technology Use Scale (CTUS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Agatha M.; Munro, Don

    2008-01-01

    Two studies are reported which describe the development and evaluation of a new instrument, the Computer Technology Use Scale (CTUS), comprising three domains: computer self-efficacy, attitudes to technology, and technology related anxiety. Study 1 describes the development of the instrument and explores its factor structure. Study 2 used…

  11. A Psychometric Evaluation of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form among French University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudron, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the reliability and the factor structure of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (CDSES-SF) among French university students. Based on a sample of 650 respondents, the alpha coefficients indicated high reliability for total scores but not for the subscale scores with values of 0.70 and…

  12. A Validation and Reliability Study of the Physical Activity and Healthy Food Efficacy Scale for Children (PAHFE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Christina M.; De Ayala, R. J.; Lebow, Ryan; Hayden, Emily

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain validity evidence for the Physical Activity and Healthy Food Efficacy Scale for Children (PAHFE). Construct validity evidence identifies four subscales: Goal-Setting for Physical Activity, Goal-Setting for Healthy Food Choices, Decision-Making for Physical Activity, and Decision-Making for Healthy Food…

  13. The Iranian Version of the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES): Factor Structure, Internal Consistency and Construct Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noroozi, Azita; Ghofranipour, Fazlollah; Heydarnia, Ali Reza; Nabipour, Iraj; Tahmasebi, Rahim; Tavafian, Sedighe Sadat

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The exercise self-efficacy scale (ESES) is largely used among diabetic patients to enhance exercise behaviour. However, the Iranian version of ESES was not available. The aim of this study was to validate ESES in this country. Method: Data were collected from 348 women who referred to a diabetes institute in Iran through convenience…

  14. Self-Efficacy for Managing Work-Family Conflict: Validating the English Language Version of a Hebrew Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennessy, Kelly D.; Lent, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    The Self-Efficacy for Work-Family Conflict Management Scale (SE-WFC), developed in Israel, was designed to assess beliefs regarding one's ability to manage conflict between work and family roles. This study examined the factor structure, reliability, and validity of an English language version of the SE-WFC in a sample of 159 working mothers in…

  15. Efficacy of Cry1Ac:Cry1F proteins in cotton leaf tissue against fall armyworm, beet armyworm, and soybean looper (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Tindall, K V; Siebert, M Willrich; Leonard, B R; All, J; Haile, F J

    2009-08-01

    Cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., plants expressing Cry1Ac and Cry1F insecticidal crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bt) were evaluated against selected lepidopteran pests including fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner), and soybean looper, Pseudoplusia includens (Walker). Studies were conducted in a range of environments, challenging various cotton tissue types from several varieties containing a combination of Cry1Ac and Cry1F proteins. In fresh tissue bioassays of mature leaves and squares (flower buds) and in artificial field infestations of white flowers, plants containing Cry1Ac:Cry1F significantly reduced levels of damage (leaf defoliation, bract feeding, penetrated squares and bolls, and boll abscission) and induced significantly greater mortality (90-100%) of fall armyworm compared with that on non-Bt cotton plants. Plants containing Cry1Ac:Cry1F conferred high levels (100%) of soybean looper mortality and low levels (0.2%) of leaf defoliation compared with non-Bt cotton. Beet armyworm was relatively less sensitive to Cry1Ac:Cry1F cotton plants compared with fall armyworm and soybean looper. However, beet armyworm larval development was delayed 21 d after infestation (DAI), and ingestion of plant tissue was inhibited (14 and 21 DAI) on the Cry1Ac:Cry1F plants compared with that on non-Bt cotton plants. These results show Cry1Ac:Cry1F cotton varieties can be an effective component in a management program for these lepidopteran pest species. Differential susceptibility of fall armyworm, beet armyworm, and soybean looper larvae to Cry1Ac:Cry1F cotton reinforces the need to sample during plant development and respond with a foliar insecticide if local action thresholds are exceeded. PMID:19736762

  16. From efficacy research to large-scale impact on undernutrition: the role of organizational cultures.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, David; Pelto, Gretel

    2013-11-01

    Undernutrition in low-income countries is receiving unprecedented attention at global and national levels due to the convergence of many forces, including strong evidence concerning its magnitude, consequences, and potential solutions and effective advocacy by many organizations. The translation of this attention into large-scale reductions in undernutrition at the country level requires the alignment and support of many organizations in the development and implementation of a coherent policy agenda for nutrition, including the strengthening of operational and strategic capacities and a supportive research agenda. However, many countries experience difficulties achieving such alignment. This article uses the concept of organizational culture to better understand some of the reasons for these difficulties. This concept is applied to the constellation of organizations that make up the "National Nutrition Network" in a given country and some of the individual organizations within that network, including academic institutions that conduct research on undernutrition. We illustrate this concept through a case study involving a middle-income country. We conclude that efforts to align organizations in support of coherent nutrition agendas should do the following: 1) make intentional and sustained efforts to foster common understanding, shared learning, and socialization of new members and other elements of a shared culture among partners; 2) seek a way to frame problems and solutions in a fashion that enables individual organizations to secure some of their particular interests by joining the effort; and 3) not only advocate on the importance of nutrition but also insist that high-level officials hold organizations accountable for aligning in support of common-interest solutions (through some elements of a common culture) that can be effective and appropriate in the national context. We further conclude that a culture change is needed within academic departments if the discipline of nutrition is to play a central role in translating the findings from efficacy trials into large-scale reductions in undernutrition. PMID:24228200

  17. From Efficacy Research to Large-Scale Impact on Undernutrition: The Role of Organizational Cultures12

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, David; Pelto, Gretel

    2013-01-01

    Undernutrition in low-income countries is receiving unprecedented attention at global and national levels due to the convergence of many forces, including strong evidence concerning its magnitude, consequences, and potential solutions and effective advocacy by many organizations. The translation of this attention into large-scale reductions in undernutrition at the country level requires the alignment and support of many organizations in the development and implementation of a coherent policy agenda for nutrition, including the strengthening of operational and strategic capacities and a supportive research agenda. However, many countries experience difficulties achieving such alignment. This article uses the concept of organizational culture to better understand some of the reasons for these difficulties. This concept is applied to the constellation of organizations that make up the “National Nutrition Network” in a given country and some of the individual organizations within that network, including academic institutions that conduct research on undernutrition. We illustrate this concept through a case study involving a middle-income country. We conclude that efforts to align organizations in support of coherent nutrition agendas should do the following: 1) make intentional and sustained efforts to foster common understanding, shared learning, and socialization of new members and other elements of a shared culture among partners; 2) seek a way to frame problems and solutions in a fashion that enables individual organizations to secure some of their particular interests by joining the effort; and 3) not only advocate on the importance of nutrition but also insist that high-level officials hold organizations accountable for aligning in support of common-interest solutions (through some elements of a common culture) that can be effective and appropriate in the national context. We further conclude that a culture change is needed within academic departments if the discipline of nutrition is to play a central role in translating the findings from efficacy trials into large-scale reductions in undernutrition. PMID:24228200

  18. [Contraceptive self efficacy in male and female adolescents: validation of the French version of the Levinson scale].

    PubMed

    Bilodeau, A; Forget, G; Tétreault, J

    1994-01-01

    The social learning theory of Bandura leads us to believe that contraceptive self-efficacy supports the adoption and the maintenance of effective contraceptive behaviours during the teenage years. Levinson has developed a validated measure of this concept which consists of an 18-item scale for sexually active girls. However there are no such scales in French or for sexually active boys. The health promotion program, entitled SEXPRIMER, which aims at reducing teenage pregnancy, has incorporated the French version of the Levinson scale, the adapted boy's version and the validity studies. A 15-item scale for girls and a 14-item scale for boys with respective reliability coefficients of .78 and .71 resulted from this program. A logistic regression analysis shows the predictive value of the measures in regard to contraceptive behaviours. According to Levinson's more recent studies, results indicate that new research on the factor matrix of the scale are relevant. PMID:8012913

  19. The five-times-sit-to-stand-test (FTSST), the short version of the activities-specific balance confidence (ABC) scale, and fear of falling predict step execution time (SET) in older adults.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Allon

    2012-01-01

    Rapid stepping is a common strategy employed by older adults to avoid falls. The relative contributions of dynamic balance, balance confidence and fear of falling to SET, was investigated in older adults. Thirty-three community-dwelling older adults completed tests of SET as well as the FTSST, a test of motor performance associated with dynamic balance. Psychological indicators of balance-related confidence assessed were the ABC 6-item scale (ABC-6) and fear of falling. Mean SET was significantly slower in the fear of falling group than in the no fear of falling group (p<0.001). Correlational analysis indicated that poorer performance on the FTSST and lower balance confidence, were associated with slower time to execute a rapid step. A stepwise multiple regression model including the FTSST, ABC-6 score, and fear of falling as predictor variables, explained 58% of the variance in SET (p<0.001). The FTSST explained the largest proportion of the variance in SET (36%), followed by fear of falling (15%) and ABC-6 score (7%). These data show that the FTSST, ABC-6 score and fear of falling are significant and independent predictors of SET in older adults. Dynamic balance, balance confidence and fear of falling, may play important roles in executing rapid steps in older adults. Motor performance and psychological indicators of balance-related confidence appear to have crucial roles in SET in older adults. PMID:21763011

  20. Adolescents' Self-Efficacy to Overcome Barriers to Physical Activity Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, John J. M.; Chulak, Tala; Maitland, Scott; Allison, Kenneth R.; Lysy, Daria C.; Faulkner, Guy E. J.; Sheeshka, Judy

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a revised measure of self-efficacy to overcome barriers to moderate and vigorous physical activity in a sample of 484 high school students in Toronto, Ontario. The students had a mean age of 15.3 years. Principal axis factoring with oblique rotation yielded five factors: self-efficacy to overcome internal, harassment, physical

  1. Adolescents' Self-Efficacy to Overcome Barriers to Physical Activity Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, John J. M.; Chulak, Tala; Maitland, Scott; Allison, Kenneth R.; Lysy, Daria C.; Faulkner, Guy E. J.; Sheeshka, Judy

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a revised measure of self-efficacy to overcome barriers to moderate and vigorous physical activity in a sample of 484 high school students in Toronto, Ontario. The students had a mean age of 15.3 years. Principal axis factoring with oblique rotation yielded five factors: self-efficacy to overcome internal, harassment, physical…

  2. Turkish Version of the Principals' Sense of Efficacy Scale: Validity and Reliability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isik, Ayse Negis; Derinbay, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Problem Statement: Principals are known as important actors in effective schools. So it is important to know which variables influence principals' success. One of these predictors can be self-efficacy. However, there is very few research about principals' sense of efficacy. Purpose of the Study: The purpose of this research was to test the…

  3. Rapid large- and site scale RPAS mission planning for remote sensing of rock falls and landslides in alpine areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräupl, Thomas; Pschernig, Elias; Rokitansky, Carl-Herbert; Oleire-Oltmanns, Sebastian; Zobl, Fritz

    2014-05-01

    Since landslides and rock falls are complex phenomena involving a multitude of factors, current and historic surface data play besides geologic conditions and others an important role in analyzing hazard situation and efficient site-specific remediation actions. Especially in displacement acceleration phases which are frequently linked to bad weather conditions, data acquisition remains difficult. Therefore RPAS with their small ground sampling distance and correspondingly high resolution open up possibilities for surveying ground situations not only for visual inspection but also for geodetic data acquisition. Both, visual and geodetic data provide valuable information for geologists and related decision makers. Slides or rock falls in alpine areas pose special challenges due to mostly acute and unforeseen displacements on the one hand and geographic conditions of narrow valleys along with steep slopes on the other hand. Rapid RPAS mission planning and mission adaption for individual requirements according to different project stages (initial investigation, repeat measurements, identification of hazard zones for urgent remediation actions, etc.) is therefore of particular importance. Here we present a computer-simulation supported approach to RPAS mission planning taking the identified thematic and remote sensing targets, the relevant terrain and obstacle databases, legal restrictions, aircraft performance, sensor characteristics, and communication ranges into account in order to produce a safe and mission-optimized flight route. For the RPAS mission planning, we combine and adapt tools developed at University of Salzburg, namely a flight track generator taking into account a 3D-model of the earth surface with both, focus on large area coverage (e.g. Austria) and the highest available resolution (e.g. sub-meter for specific areas), available obstacle data bases for the mission area (e.g. cable car lines, power lines, buildings, slope stabilization constructions, etc.) and ad-hoc or predefined target lists. Whereas large area data with moderate resolution allows rapid and remote mission planning, high resolution data avoids flights into terrain even in steep and tricky slopes. We utilize a fast-time air traffic simulation to verify that the generated mission plan satisfies the mission requirements through the prediction and near-realtime 3D visualization of the flight path as well as survey camera views. If required for the mission, the survey camera view can be supported by augmented reality features (showing up-to-date or historic or thematic analysis data relevant to the mission). The accurate mission planning and generation of a detailed flight track supports also systematic repetitions of the RPAS survey flight for situation awareness or research purposes. During the execution of the mission the simulated flight track provides a nominal-actual comparison guiding the operation that can be rapidly changed using the same tools with predictable results during the mission. We present the developed rapid mission planning approach on the basis of selected examples in the Austrian Alps.

  4. Full-Scale Direct Numerical Simulation of Two- and Three-Dimensional Instabilities and Rivulet Formulation in Heated Falling Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamoorthy, S.; Ramaswamy, B.; Joo, S. W.

    1995-01-01

    A thin film draining on an inclined plate has been studied numerically using finite element method. Three-dimensional governing equations of continuity, momentum and energy with a moving boundary are integrated in an arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian frame of reference. Kinematic equation is solved to precisely update interface location. Rivulet formation based on instability mechanism has been simulated using full-scale computation. Comparisons with long-wave theory are made to validate the numerical scheme. Detailed analysis of two- and three-dimensional nonlinear wave formation and spontaneous rupture forming rivulets under the influence of combined thermocapillary and surface-wave instabilities is performed.

  5. Development and Analysis of a Scale for Meauring Teachers' Sense of Efficacy in Urban Schools (SEUS).

    PubMed

    Garner, Mary; Kokan, Julie; Annis, Kathy; Baker, Mark; Phillips, Maggie; Head, Catherine; Hearrington, Doug; Yanosky, Daniel; Holbein, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Research in teacher self-efficacy has a long history that can be traced back to Bandura (1986) and has been shown to be linked to teacher performance. This article presents evidence for teacher self-efficacy in urban schools, a construct that is separate from but related to the more general construct of teacher self-efficacy. An instrument was developed and validated by a team of university faculty, urban teachers, and school administrators. The Teachers' Sense of Efficacy in Urban Schools (SEUS) is a 15-item instrument designed to address factors that are important for success in teaching in an urban environment, including working effectively with English language learners, students with disabilities, economically disadvantaged students, cultural diversity, literacy, technology, differentiation, and assessment data. The present study analyzes SEUS on multiple levels, using the Rasch partial credit model. PMID:26771568

  6. Development, implementation, and evaluation of an Interprofessional Falls Prevention Program for older adults.

    PubMed

    Banez, Carol; Tully, Sandra; Amaral, Lina; Kwan, Debbie; Kung, Anita; Mak, Kitty; Moghabghab, Rola; Alibhai, Shabbir M H

    2008-08-01

    This article describes the development and implementation of an Interprofessional Falls Prevention Program (IFPP) designed for community-dwelling seniors. The program was a collaborative pilot research study conducted in a retirement home and an outpatient hospital setting. The pilot was successful and was positioned into a permanent falls prevention program. The IFPP aimed at improving physical function and balance and reducing the fear of falling in seniors with a history of falls. The pilot study included an interprofessional falls assessment followed by a 12-week program of once-weekly group education and exercise sessions, 3- and 6-month follow-up visits, and individual counseling. To measure program effectiveness, the Berg Balance Scale, the Timed Up and Go Test, the Falls Efficacy Scale, and the Morse Fall Risk Scale were used at baseline, upon program completion, and at 3- and 6-month follow-up. Process measures were also collected, including patient satisfaction. Persistent improvements were found in participants' balance, strength, functional mobility, and fear of falling. Patient satisfaction with the program was high. Challenges faced in program implementation are also highlighted. PMID:18557964

  7. Efficacy of curcumin as an adjunct to scaling and root planning in chronic periodontitis patients: A clinical and microbiological study

    PubMed Central

    Nagasri, M.; Madhulatha, M.; Musalaiah, S. V. V. S.; Kumar, P. Aravind; Krishna, C. H. Murali; Kumar, P. Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Curcumin is a naturally occurring anti-inflammatory agent with various biologic and medicinal properties. Its therapeutic applications have been studied in a variety of conditions, but only few studies have evaluated the efficacy of curcumin as local drug delivery agent and in the treatment of periodontitis. The present study was to evaluate the efficacy of the adjunctive use of curcumin with scaling/root planing as compared with scaling/root planing alone in the treatment of the chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with two sites in the contralateral quadrants having probing pocket depths (PPDs) of ≥5 mm were selected. Full mouth scaling and root planing (SRP) was performed followed by application of curcumin gel on a single side. Assessment of plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), PPD, and clinical attachment levels (CALs) were done at baseline and at 4th week. Microbiologic assessment with polymerase chain reaction was done for Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tanerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola by collection of plaque samples. Results: The results revealed that there was a reduction in PI, GI, probing depth, CAL, and microbiologic parameters in test sites following SRP and curcumin gel application, when compared with SRP alone in control group. Conclusion: The local application of curcumin in conjunction with scaling and root planing have showed improvement in periodontal parameters and has a beneficial effect in patients with chronic periodontitis. PMID:26538916

  8. Factors Underlying the Collective Teacher Efficacy Scale and Their Mediating Role in the Effect of Socioeconomic Status on Academic Achievement at the School Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoach, D. Betsy; Colbert, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    The authors examine the psychometric properties of the Collective Teacher Efficacy Scale (CTES), an instrument designed to measure collective teacher efficacy. Specifically, a multilevel confirmatory factor analysis is used to determine the factor structure of the CTES, comparing one- and two-factor models. The mediating role of the CTES factors…

  9. The Development of a Peer Aggression Coping Self-Efficacy Scale for Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Puneet; Bussey, Kay

    2009-01-01

    This study presents findings regarding the reliability and validity of a newly developed measure designed to assess children's self-efficacy for coping with peer aggression. The sample consisted of 2,161 participants (1,071 females and 1,090 males, who ranged in age from 10 to 15 years; 63% White, 17% Middle-Eastern, 10% Asian, and 10% from other…

  10. Evaluating treatment efficacy in commercial food facilities: Insights gained from small-scale simulated warehouse experiments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although critical to a successful IPM program, it is challenging to evaluate treatment efficacy in commercial food facilities because of the inability to obtain absolute estimates of insect population levels. These populations are spatial fragmented and occupy cryptic habitats such as equipment, pa...

  11. Coping with Late-Life Challenges: Development and Validation of the Care-Receiver Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Enid O.; Green, Kathy E.; Seo, Honglan; Inaba, Miyuki; Quillen, Alicia Alyla

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Measures are lacking that address the challenges that people think they face in their roles as elderly care receivers. However, the development of a sense of efficacy in this role by mentally competent care receivers is critical to successful partnerships between caregivers and care receivers. The purpose of this article is to report the…

  12. Evaluating Treatment Efficacy in Commercial Food Facilities: Insights Gained from Small-Scale Simulated Warehouse Experiments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although critical to a successful IPM program, it is challenging to evaluate treatment efficacy in commercial food facilities because of the inability to obtain absolute estimates of insect population levels. These populations are spatially fragmented and occupy cryptic habitats, such as equipment,...

  13. Falls risk assessment, multitargeted interventions and the impact on hospital falls.

    PubMed

    McFarlane-Kolb, Heather

    2004-10-01

    There is an urgent need for inquiry to validate existing scales in the accurate assessment of falls risk. Moreover, where fall prevention projects have targeted specific risk factors of falling, such as cognitive impairment, few have measured the impact of their intervention on fall outcomes. A comparative design compared and described differences in falls data within and between two study cohorts before and after a multitargeted intervention was introduced. A cut-off score of > or = 50 using the Morse Scale was a good baseline indicator for accurate identification of fall risk and outcomes verify that the modified Morse Falls Scale, in combination with other risk factors, more accurately profiled fall risk among this population. Fall incidence among the intervention cohort did not increase significantly despite a rise in the number of hospital admissions and a significantly higher reported fall risk potential. PMID:15461689

  14. Psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Self-Efficacy for Appropriate Medication Use Scale in patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiao-fang; Liu, Yan-jin; Wang, Ai-xia; Lv, Pei-hua

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been reported that stroke has a higher incidence and mortality rate in the People’s Republic of China compared to the global average. These conditions can be managed by proper medication use, but ensuring medication adherence is challenging. Objective To translate the Self-Efficacy for Appropriate Medication Use Scale into Chinese and test its validity and reliability in patients with stroke. Methods Instrument performances were measured from January 15, 2015 to April 28, 2015 on a convenience sample of 400 patients with stroke recruited at four neurology departments of the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University. Questionnaires included the Chinese versions of the Self-Efficacy for Appropriate Medication Use Scale (C-SEAMS) and the General Self-Efficacy Scale (C-GSE). Construct validity, convergent validity, internal consistency, and test–retest reliability were measured. Results Item analysis showed that item-to-total correlations were in the range of 0.362–0.672. Exploratory factor analysis revealed two factors (which accounted for 60.862% of total variance), with factor loading ranging from 0.534 to 0.756. Confirmatory factor analysis was performed to support the results, with an acceptable fit (χ2=73.716; df=64; P<0.01; goodness-of-fit index =0.902; adjusted goodness-of-fit index =0.897; comparative fit index =0.865; root-mean-square error of approximation =0.058). The convergent validity of the C-SEAMS correlated well with the validated measure of the C-GSE in measuring self-efficacy (r=0.531, P<0.01). Good internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha ranged from 0.826 to 0.915) and test–retest reliability (Pearson’s correlation coefficient r=0.642, P<0.01) were found. Conclusion The C-SEAMS is a brief and psychometrically sound measure for evaluating self-efficacy for medication adherence in the Chinese population with stroke. PMID:27042023

  15. [The biological effects of a nuclear explosion. Introduction of a new system on a colorimetric scale (black, grey, red, orange, yellow and white zone) to estimate the effects of fall-out on civilian populations].

    PubMed

    Nacci, G

    2002-08-01

    Following September 11 the eventuality of terrorist attacks using bags containing nuclear devices is considered possible in western cities like New York, London, Paris, Rome, Berlin, Moscow etc. However, with a modern Civil Defence programme the effects of a catastrophe of this nature can be partially limited, at least as far as Fall-out is concerned. The present paper explains the medical reasons for building anti-fall-out shelters for the larger part of western populations: from the USA to Russia. The paper also sets out a new method for classifying levels of radioactive Fall-out based on a scale of colours (black, grey, red, orange, yellow and white) whatever kind of radioactivity is involved (total gamma levels, Cesium 137 levels, Strontium 90 levels). The arrival times for fall-out in each area of the scale are fixed, whatever the energy of the explosion and the speed of the wind might be. The radioactive decay in each area of the scale, from the time of arrival of the fall-out is described with precision. Also described are the acute radiation syndrome, tumours, miscarriages and genetic diseases. A nomogram is attached for civil defence purposes showing the leeward extension of these areas, easily measurable in just a few minutes, if four parameters are known: ground zero (locality) of the explosion, the energy of the explosion, the direction of the wind and the speed of the wind. PMID:12207196

  16. Psychometric Validation of the Self-Efficacy for Restricting Dietary Salt in Hemodialysis Scale

    PubMed Central

    Clark-Cutaia, Maya N.; Ren, Dianxu; Hoffman, Leslie A.; Snetselaar, Linda; Sevick, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    The development and progression of left ventricular hypertrophy is a consequence of multiple comorbid conditions associated with end-stage renal disease and large variations in interdialytic weight gains. The literature suggests that dietary sodium restriction alone significantly reduces interdialytic weight gains. A total of 124 hemodialysis participants in an ongoing randomized control trial participated in the validation in which psychometric properties of a self-efficacy survey were a secondary analysis. We evaluated the internal consistency, construct validity, and convergent validity of the instrument. The overall Cronbach α was 0.93. Three factors extracted explain 67.8% of the variance of the white and African American participants. The Self-Efficacy Survey has adequate internal consistency and construct and convergent validity. Future research is needed to evaluate the stability and discriminant validity of the instrument. PMID:26213444

  17. Recurrent Falls in People with Parkinson's Disease without Cognitive Impairment: Focusing on Modifiable Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Lorena R. S.; Valença, Guilherme T.; Negreiros, Nádja N.; Pinto, Elen B.

    2014-01-01

    Falls can be considered a disabling feature in Parkinson's disease. We aimed to identify risk factors for falling, testing simultaneously the ability of disease-specific and balance-related measures. We evaluated 171 patients, collecting demographic and clinical data, including standardized assessments with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), activities of daily living (ADL) and motor sections, modified Hoehn and Yahr Scale, Schwab and England, eight-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire, Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I), Berg Balance Scale, Dynamic Gait Index, Functional Reach, and Timed Up and Go. ROC curves were constructed to determine the cutoff scores for all measures. Variables with P < 0.1 entered a logistic regression model. The prevalence of recurrent falls was 30% (95% CI 24%–38%). In multivariate analysis, independent risk factors for recurrent falls were (P < 0.05) levodopa equivalent dose (OR = 1.283 per 100 mg increase; 95% CI = 1.092–1.507), UPDRS-ADL > 16 points (OR = 10.0; 95% CI = 3.6–28.3), FES-I > 30 points (OR = 6.0; 95% CI = 1.6–22.6), and Berg ≤ 48 points (OR = 3.9; 95% CI = 1.2–12.7).We encourage the utilization of these modifiable risk factors in the screening of fall risk. PMID:25506466

  18. Tailored Prevention of Inpatient Falls

    PubMed Central

    ZUYEV, LYUBOV; BENOIT, ANGELA N.; CHANG, FRANK Y.; DYKES, PATRICIA C.

    2011-01-01

    Patient falls and fall-related injuries are serious problems in hospitals. The Fall TIPS application aims to prevent patient falls by translating routine nursing fall risk assessment into a decision support intervention that communicates fall risk status and creates a tailored evidence-based plan of care that is accessible to the care team, patients, and family members. In our design and implementation of the Fall TIPS toolkit, we used the Spiral Software Development Life Cycle model. Three output tools available to be generated from the toolkit are bed poster, plan of care, and patient education handout. A preliminary design of the application was based on initial requirements defined by project leaders and informed by focus groups with end users. Preliminary design partially simulated the paper version of the Morse Fall Scale currently used in hospitals involved in the research study. Strengths and weaknesses of the first prototype were identified by heuristic evaluation. Usability testing was performed at sites where research study is implemented. Suggestions mentioned by end users participating in usability studies were either directly incorporated into the toolkit and output tools, were slightly modified, or will be addressed during training. The next step is implementation of the fall prevention toolkit on the pilot testing units. PMID:20975543

  19. Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale: Validation of the Italian Version and Correlation With Breast-feeding at 3 Months.

    PubMed

    Petrozzi, Angela; Gagliardi, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Psychological factors can influence breast-feeding. We translated into Italian and validated the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale Short Form (BSES-SF) and investigated its predictive ability and its relation with postpartum depression symptoms.BSES-SF and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) were administered 2 to 3 days after delivery to 122 mothers. Breast-feeding was assessed at 3 months.The BSES-SF displayed good validity (receiver operating characteristic area = 0.69) for predicting full breast-feeding at 3 months. In multivariate analysis, the probability of full breast-feeding increased 2.4% for 1-point increase of BSES-SF. The BSES-SF and EPDS scores were inversely correlated. BSES-SF is a useful tool to identify the risk of early breast-feeding attrition. PMID:26192699

  20. Adaptation and Psychometric Properties of the Self-Efficacy/Social Support for Activity for Persons with Intellectual Disability Scale (SE/SS-AID) in a Spanish Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio Ignacio; Paz-Lourido, Berta; Lee, Miyoung; Peterson-Besse, Jana J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In this study we aimed to develop a Spanish version of the Self-Efficacy/Social Support Scales for Activity for persons with Intellectual Disability (SE/SS-AID). Method: A cross-sectional study was carried out in a sample of 117 individuals with intellectual disability (ID). The SE/SS-AID scales were translated into Spanish and their…

  1. Adaptation and Psychometric Properties of the Self-Efficacy/Social Support for Activity for Persons with Intellectual Disability Scale (SE/SS-AID) in a Spanish Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio Ignacio; Paz-Lourido, Berta; Lee, Miyoung; Peterson-Besse, Jana J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In this study we aimed to develop a Spanish version of the Self-Efficacy/Social Support Scales for Activity for persons with Intellectual Disability (SE/SS-AID). Method: A cross-sectional study was carried out in a sample of 117 individuals with intellectual disability (ID). The SE/SS-AID scales were translated into Spanish and their

  2. Racer efficacy study - Bixby, Fall 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed competition is a primary concern for conventional and organic vegetable producers. Racer (ammonium nonanoate) is labeled for non-food use and efforts are currently underway to label it as a bio-herbicide for organically grown food crops. The objective of this study was to investigate differen...

  3. Racer efficacy study – Lane, Fall 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Racer (ammonium nonanoate) is labeled for non-food use and efforts are currently underway to label it as a bio-herbicide for organically grown food crops. The main component of Racer is ammonium nonanoate which occurs in nature and is primarily formed from biodegradation of higher fatty acids. The...

  4. Therapeutic efficacy of clindamycin gel as an adjunct to scaling and root planing therapy in chronic periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Pejčić, Ana; Kojović, Draginja; Minić, Ivan; Mirković, Dimitrije; Denić, Marko; Stojanović, Mariola

    2015-03-01

    Clindamycin, a lincosamide antibiotic, has been under-recognized as an antimicrobial agent for use in dentistry. The aim of the present work was to evaluate clinical efficacy of 2% clindamycin gel in addition to the basic mechanical periodontal therapy. At baseline, scaling and root planing (SRP) was performed at all 50 subjects (control group and test group). Clindamycin gel was applied after SRP only in the test group. Clinical measurements including periodontal pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL), bleeding on probing (BOP) and plaque index (PI) were done at baseline, and at 3 and 6 months after treatment. Compared to baseline, the PPD and CAL values significantly decreased in the test group (p < 0.05) and were statistically lower (p < 0.05) compared to control group. PPD reduction of 2.42 mm was obtained in the test group and could be generally considered as clinically significant. A PPD reduction greater than 2 mm indicated that clindamycin gel could be used efficiently as an adjunct to SRP. Also, between-group difference in BOP and PI scores was statistically significant 6 months after treatment. In conclusion, the application of clindamycin gel in combination with SRP enhanced the efficacy of non surgical periodontal therapy in reducing pocket depth and improving attachment levels in chronic periodontitis subjects and had additional benefits over mechanical therapy alone. PMID:26058242

  5. Fear of falling in elderly people living in a nursing home -- perspective from Manisa.

    PubMed

    Tavsanli, Nurgul Gungor; Turkmen, Sevgi Nehir

    2015-04-01

    Our study aimed to determine the level of fear of falling in elderly nursing home residents. The research population consisted of all the elderly residents of Manisa Municipal Nursing Home between November 2011 and February 2012. The 76 elderly people who agreed to participate were included in the study. A demographics form and the Tinetti Falls Efficacy Scale were used in data collection. The statistical analysis of the data was performed using SPSS 15.0, using percentage calculations, the t-test and Cronbach's alpha. The mean score on the Tinetti Falls Efficacy Scale for elderly individuals was found to be 4.57 3.80. 57.9% of the old people feared falling while taking a bath, 59.2% while going to bed or getting up, and 53.6% while sitting down or getting up from a chair. It was found that mean fear of falling scores were significantly higher in elderly individuals with chronic diseases, sleep problems and urinary incontinence. PMID:25976579

  6. Falls and Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... rises with age. Click for more information Falls Lead to Fractures, Trauma Each year, more than 1. ... and injury deaths. Fractures caused by falls can lead to hospital stays and disability. Most often, fall- ...

  7. The REFORM study protocol: a cohort randomised controlled trial of a multifaceted podiatry intervention for the prevention of falls in older people

    PubMed Central

    Cockayne, Sarah; Adamson, Joy; Corbacho Martin, Belen; Fairhurst, Caroline; Hewitt, Catherine; Hicks, Kate; Hull, Robin; Keenan, Anne Maree; Lamb, Sarah E; Loughrey, Lorraine; McIntosh, Caroline; Menz, Hylton B; Redmond, Anthony C; Rodgers, Sara; Vernon, Wesley; Watson, Judith; Torgerson, David

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Falls and fall-related injuries are a serious cause of morbidity and cost to society. Foot problems and inappropriate footwear may increase the risk of falls; therefore podiatric interventions may play a role in reducing falls. Two Cochrane systematic reviews identified only one study of a podiatry intervention aimed to reduce falls, which was undertaken in Australia. The REFORM trial aims to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a multifaceted podiatry intervention in reducing falls in people aged 65 years and over in a UK and Irish setting. Methods and analysis This multicentre, cohort randomised controlled trial will recruit 2600 participants from routine podiatry clinics in the UK and Ireland to the REFORM cohort. In order to detect a 10% point reduction in falls from 50% to 40%, with 80% power 890 participants will be randomised to receive routine podiatry care and a falls prevention leaflet or routine podiatry care, a falls prevention leaflet and a multifaceted podiatry intervention. The primary outcome is rate of falls (falls/person/time) over 12 months assessed by patient self-report falls diary. Secondary self-report outcome measures include: the proportion of single and multiple fallers and time to first fall over a 12-month period; Short Falls Efficacy Scale—International; fear of falling in the past 4 weeks; Frenchay Activities Index; fracture rate; Geriatric Depression Scale; EuroQoL-five dimensional scale 3-L; health service utilisation at 6 and 12 months. A qualitative study will examine the acceptability of the package of care to participants and podiatrists. Ethics and dissemination The trial has received a favourable opinion from the East of England—Cambridge East Research Ethics Committee and Galway Research Ethics Committee. The trial results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and at conference presentations. Trial registration number Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN68240461assigned 01/07/2011. PMID:25518875

  8. Fall Enrollment Report. 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes and analyzes fall enrollment in Iowa's community colleges. Each year, Iowa's 15 community colleges submit data on enrollment on the 10th business day of the fall semester. Some highlights from this report include: (1) Fall 2014 enrollment was 93,772 students--a decline of 0.49 percent from last fall; (2) Enrollment continues…

  9. Upper Yosemite Falls

    In this image, Upper Yosemite Falls may be seen from the Yosemite Falls Trail. Upper Yosemite Falls has a total plunge of 1,430 ft (440 m). Yosemite Falls is one of the most famous waterfalls within Yosemite National Park....

  10. Upper Yosemite Falls Detail

    In this image, a detailed view Upper Yosemite Falls may be seen from the Yosemite Falls Trail. Upper Yosemite Falls has a total plunge of 1,430 ft (440 m). Yosemite Falls is one of the most famous waterfalls within Yosemite National Park....

  11. Upper Yosemite Falls

    In this image, Upper Yosemite Falls may be seen. Upper Yosemite Falls is the highest of the three sectiosn of Yosemite Falls. It is about 1,430 ft (440 m) high. Yosemite Falls is one of the most famous waterfalls within Yosemite National Park....

  12. Lower Yosemite Falls

    In this image, Lower Yosemite Falls may be seen. Lower Yosemite Falls is the lowest of the three sectiosn of Yosemite Falls. It is about 320 ft (98 m) high. Yosemite Falls is one of the most famous waterfalls within Yosemite National Park....

  13. Validity and Reliability Study of the Self-Efficacy Scale in Rendering Piano Education to Children of 6-12 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekinci, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to develop a valid and reliable scale that can be used in measuring self-efficacy of candidate music teachers in rendering piano education to children of 6-12 years. To this end, a pool of 51 items was created by using the literature, and taking the opinions of piano professors and piano instructors working with

  14. Validity and Reliability Study of the Self-Efficacy Scale in Rendering Piano Education to Children of 6-12 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekinci, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to develop a valid and reliable scale that can be used in measuring self-efficacy of candidate music teachers in rendering piano education to children of 6-12 years. To this end, a pool of 51 items was created by using the literature, and taking the opinions of piano professors and piano instructors working with…

  15. Methylphenidate Efficacy: Immediate versus Extended Release at Short Term in Mexican Children with ADHD Assessed by Conners Scale and EEG

    PubMed Central

    Alatorre-Miguel, Efren; Zambrano-Sánchez, Elizabeth; Reyes-Legorreta, Celia

    2015-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affects 5-6% of school aged children worldwide. Pharmacological therapy is considered the first-line treatment and methylphenidate (MPH) is considered the first-choice medication. There are two formulations: immediate release (IR) MPH and long-acting (or extended release) formulation (MPH-ER). In this work, we measure the efficacy of treatment for both presentations in one month with Conners' scales and electroencephalography (EEG). Results. for IR group, in parents and teachers Conners test, all items showed significant differences, towards improvement, except for teachers in perfectionism and emotional instability. For ER group in parent's Conners test, the items in which there were no significant differences are psychosomatic and emotional instability. For teachers, there were no significant differences in: hyperactivity and perfectionism. Comparing the Conners questionnaires (parents versus teachers) we find significant differences before and after treatment in hyperactivity, perfectionism, psychosomatics, DSM-IV hyperactive-impulsive, and DSM-IV total. In the EEG the Wilcoxon test showed a significant difference (P < 0.0001). As we can see, both presentations are suitable for managing the ADHD and have the same effect on the symptomatology and in the EEG. PMID:25838946

  16. Psychometric evaluation of the Korean Version of the Self-Efficacy for Exercise Scale for older adults.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mona; Ahn, Sangwoo; Jung, Dukyoo

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the psychometric properties of the Korean version of the Self-Efficacy for Exercise Scale (SEE-K). The SEE-K consists of nine items and was translated into Korean using the forward-backward translation method. We administered it to 212 community-dwelling older adults along with measures of outcome expectation for exercise, quality of life, and physical activity. The validity was determined using confirmatory factor analysis and Rasch analysis with INFIT and OUTFIT statistics, which showed acceptable model fit. The concurrent validity was confirmed according to positive correlations between the SEE-K, outcome expectation for exercise, and quality of life. Furthermore, the high physical activity group had higher SEE-K scores. Finally, the reliability of the SEE-K was deemed acceptable based on Cronbach's alpha, coefficients of determination, and person and item separation indices with reliability. Thus, the SEE-K appears to have satisfactory validity and reliability among older adults in South Korea. PMID:25935357

  17. Development and Validation of a Cervical Cancer Screening Self-Efficacy Scale for Low-Income Mexican American Women

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Maria E.; Diamond, Pamela M.; Rakowski, William; Gonzales, Alicia; Tortolero-Luna, Guillermo; Williams, Janet; Morales-Campos, Daisy Y.

    2011-01-01

    While self-efficacy (SE), a construct from Social Cognitive Theory, has been shown to influence other screening behaviors, few measures currently exist for measuring Pap test SE. This paper describes the development and psychometric testing of such a measure for Mexican-American women. Data from two separate samples of Mexican-American women 50 years or older, obtained as part of a study to develop and evaluate a breast and cervical cancer screening educational program, were used in the current study. Exploratory factor analysis indicated a single factor solution and all item loadings were > .73. Confirmatory analysis confirmed a single factor structure with all standardized loadings greater than .40 as hypothesized. The eight item SE scale demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = .95). As hypothesized, SE was correlated with knowledge, prior experience, and screening intention. Logistic regression supported the theoretical relationship that women with higher SE were more likely to have had a recent Pap test. Findings showed a significant increase in SE following the intervention, indicating the measure has good sensitivity to change over time. PMID:19258484

  18. Efficacy of a biomonitoring (moss bag) technique for determining element deposition trends on a mid-range (375 km) scale.

    PubMed

    Makholm, M M; Mladenoff, David J

    2005-05-01

    National networks detect multi-state trends in element deposition using direct measurement methods. Biomonitoring techniques have been used to examine deposition in local areas and around point sources. We sought to determine the efficacy of a moss bag technique to detect element deposition trends on a mid-range (state) scale, and to compare these results with those of the National Acid Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN, 1999). We sampled heavy metals, sulfur, and nitrogen deposition (21 elements) using mesh bags containing Sphagnum russowii at nine sites, over a 375 km transect crossing southern Wisconsin (upper Midwest, USA). We found statistically significant trends of decreasing deposition in a northwesterly direction for 13 elements: Al, B, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, S, and Zn. Six of these have moderate to large changes in concentration (14-37%). The trends for Ca, Mg, and S are consistent with regional deposition patterns in 1998 isopleth maps from the NADP/NTN (1999) which are derived from a sampling array far less dense than the transect sites. This national network indicates that Ca and Mg increase to the southeast, beyond Wisconsin borders. The fact that the present study demonstrates strong correlations between both of these elements (Ca and Mg) and Al, B, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Zn (mean r for all correlations = 0.75, p < 0.02) implies that these correlated elements also increase to the southeast in neighboring states. PMID:15931974

  19. Methylphenidate Efficacy: Immediate versus Extended Release at Short Term in Mexican Children with ADHD Assessed by Conners Scale and EEG.

    PubMed

    Durand-Rivera, Alfredo; Alatorre-Miguel, Efren; Zambrano-Sánchez, Elizabeth; Reyes-Legorreta, Celia

    2015-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affects 5-6% of school aged children worldwide. Pharmacological therapy is considered the first-line treatment and methylphenidate (MPH) is considered the first-choice medication. There are two formulations: immediate release (IR) MPH and long-acting (or extended release) formulation (MPH-ER). In this work, we measure the efficacy of treatment for both presentations in one month with Conners' scales and electroencephalography (EEG). Results. for IR group, in parents and teachers Conners test, all items showed significant differences, towards improvement, except for teachers in perfectionism and emotional instability. For ER group in parent's Conners test, the items in which there were no significant differences are psychosomatic and emotional instability. For teachers, there were no significant differences in: hyperactivity and perfectionism. Comparing the Conners questionnaires (parents versus teachers) we find significant differences before and after treatment in hyperactivity, perfectionism, psychosomatics, DSM-IV hyperactive-impulsive, and DSM-IV total. In the EEG the Wilcoxon test showed a significant difference (P < 0.0001). As we can see, both presentations are suitable for managing the ADHD and have the same effect on the symptomatology and in the EEG. PMID:25838946

  20. Falls prevention advice and visual feedback to those at risk of falling: study protocol for a pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that functional strength and balance exercises can reduce the risk of falling in older people if they are done on a regular basis. However, the repetitive nature of these exercises; combined with the inherent lack of feedback of progress may discourage seniors from exercising in the home, thereby rendering such an intervention ineffective. This study hypothesizes that the use of visual feedback and multimodal games will be more effective in encouraging adherence to home rehabilitation than standard care; thereby promoting independence and improving the quality of life in older adults at risk of falling. Methods A pllel-group pilot randomized controlled trial with 3 groups of participants will be conducted in the home for 12 weeks. Participants will include older adults who have been identified as at risk of falling (n = 48), over the age of 65, living in the community, and suitable for a home exercise intervention. The primary outcome is adherence to exercise. Secondary outcomes include: variability in stride length, stride time and double support time (DST); walking speed; Timed up and go test (TUG); Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I); CONFbal scale; Romberg’s test; and quality of life measures (SF-12 and EuroQol EQ-5D). Qualitative assessments on personal experiences with rehabilitation tools will be done before and after the trial. Discussion This study will investigate the use of visual feedback and engaging multimodal activities to address the problem of non-compliance to home exercises for falls rehabilitation. One of the unique qualities of this study is the adaptation of special participatory design methods through which the end users (fallers) will be involved in the design of the proposed rehabilitation tools at various stages of the design process. Trial registration ISRCTN79967470 PMID:23510162

  1. Measuring fall program outcomes.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Pat; Neily, Julia; Watson, Mary; Wright, Marilyn; Strobe, Karen

    2007-05-01

    Nurses help to ensure patient safety, which includes preventing falls and fall related injuries. The aging Veteran population, like the general population, is at risk for falls and fall related injuries whether at home, in hospitals or in long term care facilities. Nurses are leading practice innovations to systematically assess patients' risk for falls and implement population based prevention interventions. To determine the effectiveness of programs, data can be analyzed using a variety of statistical measures to determine program impacts. Thus, data analysis of fall rates by type of fall and severity of fall related injury can help facilities examine the effectiveness of their interventions and program outcomes. Examples of actual fall prevention programs and their approaches to measurement are showcased in this article. PMID:21848355

  2. Falls among institutionalized elderly in Alexandria.

    PubMed

    Makhlouf, M M; Ayoub, A I

    2000-01-01

    Falls are a common geriatric problem causing considerable morbidity, mortality, and affecting the quality of life of many elderly people. A cross sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence and risk factors of falls among elderly people living in geriatric institutions in Alexandria. The total sample included 103 elderly females and 62 elderly males from six institutions. All participants were subjected to interviewing questionnaire to collect data about history, circumstances, outcome of falls, previous falls and history of diseases and drug intake It included also data about activities of daily living. Anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, postural hypotension assessment, complete physical examination and Tinetti scale for balance and gait could be completed for a sub-sample. The prevalence of falls was 32.1%. Most of the falls occurred during the daytime (77.4%), mainly in the bedroom or in the way from bed to bathroom (37.7% each). The most likely causes were slip/trip (41.5%) followed by dizziness/vertigo (32.1%). Fractures occurred in 20.8% of falls. Advanced age (70-79, 80 years and above), history of three or more falls, history of disability from previous falls, history of visual problem, history of cardiac and antihypertensive drug use, and mild impairment of balance and gait were significant risk factors for falls in the univariate analysis. All these factors except for the impairment of balance and gait were also significant predictors of falls in the multivariate analysis. PMID:17219886

  3. Fall prevention in a Swiss acute care hospital setting Reducing multiple falls.

    PubMed

    Schwendimann, René; Milisen, Koen; Bühler, Hugo; De Geest, Sabina

    2006-03-01

    Preventing in-hospital falls is an important goal in avoiding poor patient outcomes. In this quasi-experimental study, the authors evaluated the effectiveness of a nurse-led fall prevention program in a 300-bed Swiss hospital. Four hundred and nine patients (internal medicine) were included: intervention group (n = 198), usual-care group (n = 211). The program consisted of training nurses in the use of the Morse Fall Scale, and the implementation of 15 selected preventive interventions. In the intervention group, the proportion of patients at risk for falls was higher (p = .048), and fewer patients with multiple falls were observed (p = .009). The intervention program showed an effect in preventing multiple falls, but not first falls. The prolonged mean time to a first fall in a subgroup of fallers in the intervention group may indicate an increased awareness of the nurses and the appropriateness of the interventions used. PMID:16544453

  4. Self efficacy for fruit, vegetable and water intakes: expanded and abbreviated scales from item response modeling analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to improve an existing measure of fruit and vegetable intake self efficacy, by including items that varied on levels of difficulty, and testing a corresponding measure of water intake self efficacy. A cross sectional assessment was used. Items were modified to have easy, moderate, ...

  5. A Short Version of the Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale: Structural and Construct Validity across Five Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigotti, Thomas; Schyns, Birgit; Mohr, Gisela

    2008-01-01

    Occupational self-efficacy is an important resource for individuals in organizations. To be able to compare the occupational self-efficacy of employees across different countries, equivalent versions of the standard instruments need to be made available in different languages. In this article, the authors report on the structural and construct…

  6. The Effectiveness of a Participatory Program on Fall Prevention in Oncology Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Li-Chi; Ma, Wei-Fen; Li, Tsai-Chung; Liang, Yia-Wun; Tsai, Li-Yun; Chang, Fy-Uan

    2015-01-01

    Falls are known to be one of the most common in patient adverse events. A high incidence of falls was reported on patients with cancer. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a participatory program on patient's knowledge and self-efficacy of fall prevention and fall incidence in an oncology ward. In this quasi-experimental study,…

  7. Falls in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Hodgetts, P. Geoffrey

    1992-01-01

    Falls are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly. One in three older people will fall every year. Assessing intrinsic (patient) factors and extrinsic (environmental) factors that increase the risk of falling is an important part of caring for the elderly. Physicians can readily assess balance and mobility as part of a preventive approach. PMID:21221300

  8. Snow Falls - Maine

    As the Little Androscoggin River flows through western Maine it eventually reaches Snow Falls, a 25 ft cascading waterfall in the town of West Paris.  This photo was taken during a high flow event at the falls. The USGS monitors the Little Androscoggin River upstream of the falls at station 01...

  9. Base of Yosemite Falls

    In this image, Yosemite Falls may be seen from its base. Yosemite Falls is the tallest waterfall in North America. It is about 2,425 ft (739 m) high. Yosemite Falls is one of the most famous waterfalls within Yosemite National Park....

  10. It Takes a Village to Prevent Falls: Reconceptualizing Fall Prevention and Management for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ganz, David A.; Alkema, Gretchen E.; Wu, Shinyi

    2013-01-01

    Systematic evidence reviews support the efficacy of physical activity programs and multifactorial strategies for fall prevention. However, community settings where fall prevention programs occur often differ substantially from the research settings in which efficacy was first demonstrated. Because of these differences, alternative approaches are needed to judge the adequacy of fall prevention activities occurring as part of standard medical care or community efforts. This paper uses the World Health Organization Innovative Care for Chronic Conditions (ICCC) framework to rethink how fall prevention programs might be implemented routinely in both medical and community settings. We highlight examples of innovative programs and policies that provide fall prevention strategies consistent with the ICCC framework, and provide evidence where available on the effects of these strategies on processes and outcomes of care. We close by proposing a “no wrong door” approach to fall prevention and management, in which older adults who are found to be at risk for falls in either a medical or community setting are linked to a standard fall risk evaluation across three domains (physical activity, medical risks and home safety). PMID:18676787

  11. History of falls, gait, balance, and fall risks in older cancer survivors living in the community

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Min H; Shilling, Tracy; Miller, Kara A; Smith, Kristin; LaVictoire, Kayle

    2015-01-01

    Older cancer survivors may be predisposed to falls because cancer-related sequelae affect virtually all body systems. The use of a history of falls, gait speed, and balance tests to assess fall risks remains to be investigated in this population. This study examined the relationship of previous falls, gait, and balance with falls in community-dwelling older cancer survivors. At the baseline, demographics, health information, and the history of falls in the past year were obtained through interviewing. Participants performed tests including gait speed, Balance Evaluation Systems Test, and short-version of Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale. Falls were tracked by mailing of monthly reports for 6 months. A “faller” was a person with ≥1 fall during follow-up. Univariate analyses, including independent sample t-tests and Fisher’s exact tests, compared baseline demographics, gait speed, and balance between fallers and non-fallers. For univariate analyses, Bonferroni correction was applied for multiple comparisons. Baseline variables with P<0.15 were included in a forward logistic regression model to identify factors predictive of falls with age as covariate. Sensitivity and specificity of each predictor of falls in the model were calculated. Significance level for the regression analysis was P<0.05. During follow-up, 59% of participants had one or more falls. Baseline demographics, health information, history of falls, gaits speed, and balance tests did not differ significantly between fallers and non-fallers. Forward logistic regression revealed that a history of falls was a significant predictor of falls in the final model (odds ratio =6.81; 95% confidence interval =1.594–29.074) (P<0.05). Sensitivity and specificity for correctly identifying a faller using the positive history of falls were 74% and 69%, respectively. Current findings suggested that for community-dwelling older cancer survivors with mixed diagnoses, asking about the history of falls may help detect individuals at risk of falling. PMID:26425079

  12. Prevalence and cost of imaging in inpatient falls: the rising cost of falling

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Jessica; Alturkistani, Tahani; Kumar, Neal; Kanuri, Arjun; Salem, Deeb N; Munn, Samson; Blazey-Martin, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Objective To quantify the type, prevalence, and cost of imaging following inpatient falls, identify factors associated with post-fall imaging, and determine correlates of positive versus negative imaging. Design Single-center retrospective cohort study of inpatient falls. Data were collected from the hospital’s adverse event reporting system, DrQuality. Age, sex, date, time, and location of fall, clinical service, Morse Fall Scale/fall protocol, admitting diagnosis, and fall-related imaging studies were reviewed. Cost included professional and facilities fees for each study. Setting Four hundred and fifteen bed urban academic hospital over 3 years (2008–2010). Patients All adult inpatient falls during the study period were included. Falls experienced by patients aged <18 years, outpatient and emergency patients, visitors to the hospital, and staff were excluded. Measurements and main results Five hundred and thirty inpatient falls occurred during the study period, average patient age 60.7 years (range 20–98). More than half of falls were men (55%) and patients considered at risk of falls (56%). Falls were evenly distributed across morning (33%), evening (34%), and night (33%) shifts. Of 530 falls, 178 (34%) patients were imaged with 262 studies. Twenty percent of patients imaged had at least one positive imaging study attributed to the fall and 82% of studies were negative. Total cost of imaging was $160,897, 63% ($100,700) from head computed tomography (CT). Conclusion Inpatient falls affect patients of both sexes, all ages, occur at any time of day and lead to expensive imaging, mainly from head CTs. Further study should be targeted toward clarifying the indications for head CT after inpatient falls and validating risk models for positive and negative imaging, in order to decrease unnecessary imaging and thereby limit unnecessary cost and radiation exposure. PMID:26082653

  13. Differential diagnosis between 'unexplained' fall and syncopal fall: a difficult or impossible task.

    PubMed

    Alboni, Paolo; Coppola, Paola; Stucci, Nicola; Tsakiridu, Vassiliki

    2015-02-01

    Falls may be accidental (because of slipping, tripping or environmental hazards) or 'unexplained', when there is no apparent cause. Syncope is a transient loss of consciousness (LOC) and, if it occurs when the person is in the upright position, may lead to a fall. The differential diagnosis between 'unexplained' fall and syncopal fall can be difficult, if not impossible, because many patients have retrograde amnesia after syncope, that is they do not remember their prodromal symptoms. Based on the results of many randomized studies, the international guidelines on falls suggest multifactorial assessment and multifactorial treatment. Unfortunately, however, the vast majority of studies have been carried out on a mixed population of patients who have suffered accidental and 'unexplained' falls. As 'unexplained' falls account for a minority of cases, we really do not know the efficacy of multifactorial treatment in patients with this type of fall. Very recent data seem to prove that many older patients with 'unexplained' falls are actually affected by reflex syncope with retrograde amnesia, as they experience LOC during tilt testing or carotid sinus massage. Although these data make an important contribution to our knowledge of the mechanism of 'unexplained' falls, the therapeutic problems remain largely unsolved. PMID:24838038

  14. Falls Among Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Kristen J.; Lee, Duck-chul; Sui, Xuemei; Powell, Kenneth E.; Blair, Steven N.

    2010-01-01

    Background Falls are a major cause of deaths, hospitalizations, and emergency room visits in the U.S., but circumstances surrounding falls are not well described. Among the elderly, balance and gait disorders and muscle weakness are associated with increased risk for falling, but the relationship of cardiorespiratory fitness and physical activity with falls is unclear. Purpose This purpose of this study is to describe characteristics of falls among adults and assess the association of cardiorespiratory fitness and physical activity with walking-related falls. Methods Data on participants enrolled in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study (ACLS) from 1970 through 1989 who responded to questions on falls on the 1990 follow-up survey were analyzed in 2008–2009. The percentage of participants reporting at least one fall during the year before the follow-up survey was calculated and the activities at the time of falling were described. The relative risk and 95% CIs for the association of baseline fitness and physical activity with walking-related falls were calculated and logistic regression models for walking-related falls were developed. Results Of 10,615 participants aged 20–87 years, 20% (95% CI 19%, 21%) reported falling during the past year. Of those falling, 54% (95% CI 52%, 56%) fell during sports or exercise, 15% (95% CI 14%,17%) while walking, and 4% (95% CI 3%,5%) from a stool or ladder. People aged ≥65 years were no more likely than younger people to report falling in general, but they were more likely than people aged <45 years to report falling while walking (RR 1.9; 95% CI 1.2, 3.0 for men; RR 2.2; 95% CI 1.3, 3.9 for women). Men with a low level of fitness were more likely to fall while walking than men who were highly fit (RR 2.2; 95% CI 1.5,3.3). In the multivariate analysis, walking-related falls were associated with low levels of fitness (AOR 1.8; 95% CI 1.1,2.8) and with physical inactivity (AOR 1.7; 95% CI 1.1–2.7) in men but not in women. Conclusions Falls are common throughout adulthood but activities at time of falls differ by age. Low fitness levels and physical inactivity may increase risk for walking-related falls. PMID:20547276

  15. A Selective Corrective Exercise to Decrease Falling and Improve Functional Balance in Idiopathic Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sedaghati, Parisa; Daneshmandi, Hassan; Karimi, Noureddin; Barati, Amir-Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Posture instability and unsteady gait disorders in Parkinson’s Disease (PD) usually contribute to fall-related fractures. Fall-related trauma in PD is the most common reason for injury. Despite providing modern care for PD patients (PP) in the recent years, anti-PD drugs have no effect on falling. There is an urgent need to administer exercise interventions to reduce falls and related injuries in the rehabilitation program of PP. Objectives: To explore the effect of a selective 10-week corrective exercise with an emphasis on gait training activities (GTA) on the number of falls (NOFs), fear of falling, functional balance, timed up and go (TUG) test among PD patients. Patients and Methods: A purposeful sampling was performed on PP who had fallen or were at risk of falling in 2014. The study intervention consisted of a 10-week (3 sessions each week, each lasting 60 min) corrective exercise program. Participants were randomly allocated to control and two exercise groups; the exercise group with balance pad (EGBP) or exercise group with no balance pad (EGNBP). The analysis of variance (ANOVA) and paired t-test were used for comparison between the groups (P ≤ 0.05). Results: Administrating a selective corrective exercise in exercise group with balance pad (EGBP) showed a significant difference in number of falls (NOF), Fall Efficacy Scale-international (FES-I), Berg balance scale (BBS) (and timed up and go) TUG (P = 0.001); while administrating the same exercise in exercise group with no balance pad (EGNBP) showed no significant difference in NOF (P = 0.225) and a significant difference in FES-I (P = 0.031), BBS (P = 0.047) and TUG (P = 0.012). The control group showed no significant difference in each of the dependent variables. Conclusions: Performing a selective corrective exercise on balance pad improves falling and functional balance in idiopathic PD. PMID:27218051

  16. Preliminary Assessment of Rock Fall Hazard and Risk In The Central Part of The Nera Valley, Umbria Region, Central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghigi, S.; Guzzetti, F.; Reichenbach, P.; Detti, R.

    Rock falls are one of the most common types of fast moving landslides in mountain areas. They represent the most abundant landslides triggered by earthquakes. Rock falls are one of the primary causes of fatalities and of damage caused by landslides. Despite being widespread and highly destructive, only a few attempts have been made to establish rock fall hazard and the associate risk along transportation corridors in mountain areas. We present a preliminary assessment of rock fall hazard and risk for the central part of the Nera River Valley, in the Umbria Region of Central Italy. The Nera River, a tributary of the Tiber River, flows across the Apennines in a deep and narrow valley. Two national roads, the SS 305 and the SS 209, and several mountain villages are located along the valley bottom. The villages and the roads are frequently affected by rock falls. On October 1997, aftershocks of the Umbria-Marche earth- quake triggered hundreds of rock falls, ranging in size from few cubic decimeters, to some tens of cubic meter. Damage was severe and the two national roads were closed for several weeks. Following the earthquake defensive measures (including scaling, rock fences, elastic fences, and artificial tunnels) were installed along the valley. These costly defensive measures were installed without any specific assessment of rock fall hazard and the associated risk. Using a 3-dimensional, spatially distributed rock falls simulation program, we have quantitatively evaluated rock fall hazard along a 20 kilo- metres section of the central part of the valley. The source areas of rock falls (i.e., the detachment zones) were identified from vertical aerial photographs and in the field. Parameters controlling the loss of energy at impact points and during rolling were ob- tained from a surface geology map prepared updating a geological map through the analysis of aerial photographs and field surveys. Maps of the expected rock fall count, a proxy for the probability of being hit by rock falls, and of the expected maximum velocity and flying height, proxies for rock fall intensity, were used to evaluate rock fall hazard. A map of the main structures (i.e., villages and single houses) and of the infrastructure (state roads and other secondary roads) was combined into a GIS with the rock fall hazard map to obtain a preliminary map of rock fall risk. The location and characteristics of the new defensive measures were compared to the rock fall hazard 1 and risk maps to evaluate their usefulness and efficacy 2

  17. The Efficacy of Paroxetine and Placebo in Treating Anxiety and Depression: A Meta-Analysis of Change on the Hamilton Rating Scales

    PubMed Central

    Sugarman, Michael A.; Loree, Amy M.; Baltes, Boris B.; Grekin, Emily R.; Kirsch, Irving

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous meta-analyses of published and unpublished trials indicate that antidepressants provide modest benefits compared to placebo in the treatment of depression; some have argued that these benefits are not clinically significant. However, these meta-analyses were based only on trials submitted for the initial FDA approval of the medication and were limited to those aimed at treating depression. Here, for the first time, we assess the efficacy of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) in the treatment of both anxiety and depression, using a complete data set of all published and unpublished trials sponsored by the manufacturer. Methods and Findings GlaxoSmithKline has been required to post the results for all sponsored clinical trials online, providing an opportunity to assess the efficacy of an SSRI (paroxetine) with a complete data set of all trials conducted. We examined the data from all placebo-controlled, double-blind trials of paroxetine that included change scores on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HRSA) and/or the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD). For the treatment of anxiety (k?=?12), the efficacy difference between paroxetine and placebo was modest (d?=?0.27), and independent of baseline severity of anxiety. Overall change in placebo-treated individuals replicated 79% of the magnitude of paroxetine response. Efficacy was superior for the treatment of panic disorder (d?=?0.36) than for generalized anxiety disorder (d?=?0.20). Published trials showed significantly larger drug-placebo differences than unpublished trials (ds?=?0.32 and 0.17, respectively). In depression trials (k?=?27), the benefit of paroxetine over placebo was consistent with previous meta-analyses of antidepressant efficacy (d?=?0.32). Conclusions The available empirical evidence indicates that paroxetine provides only a modest advantage over placebo in treatment of anxiety and depression. Treatment implications are discussed. PMID:25162656

  18. A prospective study to identify the fall-prone patient.

    PubMed

    Morse, J M; Black, C; Oberle, K; Donahue, P

    1989-01-01

    A prospective study in 16 patient care units in two institutions was conducted to assess patients' risk of falling. Three types of patient care units were utilized (acute medical and surgical, long term geriatric and rehabilitation areas), with 2689 patients over a 4-month period rated daily for fall risk using the Morse Fall Scale. Differences in mean fall score were evident between the acute care areas and the long term and the rehabilitation areas. Examination of the scores in the acute care institution by length of stay, showed different patterns of fall risk; the mean score of the long term patients showed less variation and higher scores. Patients' falls were analyzed by fall score and type of fall. All types of falls (anticipated physiological, unanticipated physiological and accidental), and the severity of injuries increased, with increasing scores indicating clinical validity of the scale. PMID:2928815

  19. Effect of Whole Body Vibration Exercise in the Horizontal Direction on Balance and Fear of Falling in Elderly People: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Shim, ChungSin; Lee, YunBok; Lee, DongGeon; Jeong, BeomHo; Kim, JinBeom; Choi, YoungWoo; Lee, GyuChang; Park, Dong-sik

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of whole body vibration exercise in the horizontal direction on balance and fear of falling in the elderly. [Methods] This study was a case series of 17 elderly individuals. Participants performed whole body vibration exercise in the horizontal direction using a whole body vibration device for 15 minutes a day, 3 times a week, for 6 weeks. At baseline and after the 6-week intervention, balance was measured using the Berg Balance Scale and Timed Up and Go test, and fear of falling was assessed using the Falls Efficacy Scale. [Results] After the intervention, significant improvements from baseline values in the Berg Balance Scale, Timed Up and Go test, and Falls Efficacy Scale were observed in the study participants. [Conclusion] Elderly individuals who performed whole body vibration exercise in the horizontal direction showed significant improvements in balance and fear of falling. However, the observed benefits of whole body vibration exercise in the horizontal direction need to be confirmed by additional studies. PMID:25140102

  20. Sustainable transportation stage of change, decisional balance, and self-efficacy scale development and validation in two university samples.

    PubMed

    Redding, Colleen A; Mundorf, Norbert; Kobayashi, Hisanori; Brick, Leslie; Horiuchi, Satoshi; Paiva, Andrea L; Prochaska, James O

    2015-01-01

    Single occupancy vehicle (SOV) transportation is a key contributor to climate change and air pollution. Sustainable transportation (ST), commuting by any means other than SOV, could both slow climate change and enhance public health. The transtheoretical model (TTM) provides a useful framework for examining how people progress towards adopting ST. Short valid and reliable measures for ST decisional balance, self-efficacy, and climate change doubt were developed and their relationship with stages of change was examined. Two large university-based volunteer samples participated in measurement studies. Using multiple procedures, three brief internally consistent measures were developed: decisional balance, self-efficacy, and climate change doubt. The stages of change correctly discriminated both decisional balance and self-efficacy, as well as replicated hypothesized relationships. Climate change doubt did not vary by stages; however, it may prove useful in future studies. Results support the validation of these measures and the application of the TTM to ST. PMID:25089023

  1. Falls in Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... a combination of medical treatment, rehabilitation, and environmental changes. Fall prevention interventions can be implemented at the organizational, staff or patient levels. 15 The most effective ...

  2. Novaluron as an ovicide for bollworm on cotton: Deposition and efficacy of field-scale aerial applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novaluron, Diamond 0.83 EC, was evaluated for deposition on cotton and ovicidal efficacy against bollworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), because of the need to use insecticides with modes of action different than synthetic pyrethroids. Novaluron at the lowest label recommended rate was aerially-applied...

  3. Fall armyworm migration patterns.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), infestations in most of North America arise from annual migrations of populations that overwinter in southern Texas and Florida. Cytochrome Oxidase I haplotype profiles within the fall armyworm corn-strain, the subgroup tha...

  4. Fall Enrollment Report 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes fall enrollment in Iowa's community colleges. Every year Iowa's 15 community college districts submit data on students enrolled on the 10th day of the fall semester. Highlights include: (1) Enrollment grew at its fastest pace since 1975 to a record high of 100,736 students; (2) Year-to-year growth was 14.3 percent, which is…

  5. Experiments in Free Fall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Art, Albert

    2006-01-01

    A model lift containing a figure of Albert Einstein is released from the side of a tall building and its free fall is arrested by elastic ropes. This arrangement allows four simple experiments to be conducted in the lift to demonstrate the effects of free fall and show how they can lead to the concept of the equivalence of inertial and

  6. Experiments in Free Fall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Art, Albert

    2006-01-01

    A model lift containing a figure of Albert Einstein is released from the side of a tall building and its free fall is arrested by elastic ropes. This arrangement allows four simple experiments to be conducted in the lift to demonstrate the effects of free fall and show how they can lead to the concept of the equivalence of inertial and…

  7. Fall Leaf Portraits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hara, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how students can create a stunning as well as economical mosaic utilizing fall's brilliantly colored leaves, preserved at their peak in color. Start by choosing a beautiful fall day to take students on a nature walk to collect a variety of leaves in different shapes, sizes, and colors. Focus on collecting a…

  8. Fall prevention conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Sam

    2011-01-01

    Falls can have lasting psychological and physical consequences, particularly fractures and slow-healing processes, and patients may also lose confidence in walking. Injuries from falls lead to functional decline, institutionalization, higher health care costs, and decreased quality of life. The process related to the problem of patient falls in the hospital, using the nursing model developed by the theorist, Ida Jean Orlando, is explained in this article. The useful tool that provides guidance to marketers in this endeavor is Maslow's hierarchy of needs. During acute illness, individuals are greatly in need of satisfying their physiological needs. If these needs are not met, patients leave the hospital lacking a positive experience. Initial fall risk assessment is critical to plan intervention and individualize care plan. Interventions depend on the severity of fall risk factors. PMID:21537141

  9. Challenges in Defining and Categorizing Falls on Diverse Unit Types

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Jan; Dunton, Nancy; Crosser, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators launched a project to expand its falls indicator for use on pediatric, neonatal, and psychiatric units. We discuss challenges encountered, argue that schemes for categorizing falls by cause or supposed preventability are not suitable for large-scale efforts to track and prevent falls, express concern about the growing burden of collecting increasingly granular quality data, and discuss limitations of total and injurious fall rates as quality measures. PMID:25188525

  10. The interplay between gait, falls and cognition: can cognitive therapy reduce fall risk?

    PubMed Central

    Segev-Jacubovski, Orit; Herman, Talia; Yogev-Seligmann, Galit; Mirelman, Anat; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we briefly summarize the incidence and significant consequences of falls among older adults, the insufficient effectiveness of commonly used multifactorial interventions and the evidence linking falls and cognitive function. Recent pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic studies that evaluated the effects of cognitive therapy on fall risk are reviewed. The results of this article illustrate the potential utility of multiple, diverse forms of cognitive therapy for reducing fall risk. The article also indicates that large-scale, randomized controlled trials are warranted and that additional research is needed to better understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the interplay between human mobility, fall risk and cognitive function. Nonetheless, we suggest that multimodality interventions that combine motor and cognitive therapy should, eventually, be incorporated into clinical practice to enable older adults and patients to move safer and with a reduced fall risk. PMID:21721921

  11. 97. POINT SPILL, TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    97. POINT SPILL, TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY NORTHWEST OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; OVERALL WEST VIEW FROM CANAL SIDE. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  12. 98. SHOESTRING, TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    98. SHOESTRING, TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY NORTHWEST OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; PROFILE VIEW, SOUTH. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  13. 99. POINT SPILL, TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    99. POINT SPILL, TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY NORTHWEST OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; CLOSE-UP OF OUTLET SIDE OF GATES, SOUTH VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  14. 149. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL DIVERSION, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    149. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL DIVERSION, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER DAM; CLOSE-UP OF MAIN CANAL GATES, SOUTH VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  15. 141. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL DIVERSION, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    141. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL DIVERSION, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; CLOSE-UP OF MAIN HEADGATES, RADIAL GATES INSIDE, SOUTHEAST VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  16. 147. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL DIVERSION, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    147. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL DIVERSION, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; VIEW OF MAIN HEADGATES, EAST VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  17. 148. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL DIVERSION, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    148. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL DIVERSION, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER DAM; HEADGATES AT INLET, SOUTHWEST VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  18. Injuries sustained by falls.

    PubMed Central

    Rozycki, G S; Maull, K I

    1991-01-01

    During a recent 4-year period, 381 patients were admitted with injuries sustained from falls. Equal numbers of patients were less than and greater than 50 years of age and included 53 children (less than or equal to 16 years) and 214 elderly (greater than or equal to 55 years). Falls from heights occurred predominantly in young males (mean age 34.2 years), were most commonly job or recreation related and resulted in higher injury severity scores (ISS). Falls in the elderly occurred more commonly in women, typically on a flat surface, and were less severe. Despite lower mean ISS, fall victims over 55 years of age had longer hospitalizations (11.4 vs. 4.5 days) and incurred higher hospital charges compared to younger patients. There were 35 deaths (9.2%). In patients under 55 years, deaths resulted from fall-related central nervous system (CNS) injury and/or multisystem trauma. In patients over 55 years, fatalities were most commonly related to pre-existent medical conditions. Based on a review of this experience, we conclude that: (1) unlike other causes of blunt and penetrating trauma, both sexes are equally at risk from fall-related injuries but sex incidence is age related; (2) falls from heights are more common in men; (3) advanced age and pre-existing medical conditions account for the increased morbidity and mortality following falls and; (4) cost containment measures for fall-related trauma must consider not only injury severity, but the age and pre-existent medical conditions of the patient. PMID:1772536

  19. Veterans' fall risk profile: a prevalence study.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Patricia A; Palacios, Polly; Spehar, Andrea M

    2006-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) serves the health care needs of an adult, predominantly male, and aging population. The aging profile of VHA patients is 25% greater than the civilian sector (DVA 2001). Aged patients are at higher risk for falls. In February 2002, 6 VHA medical centers profiled their inpatients' fall risk profile as one aspect of program initiatives targeted at reducing veterans' fall risk and fall-related injuries, participating in a one-day collection of fall risk measurement using the Morse Fall Scale (MFS) for all inpatients (n = 1819), acute and long-term care units. Data results are reported for age, MFS score, and the relationship between age and score, and by type of ward/unit, ie, predominately acute and critical care or long-term care. The results of this prevalence study documented that the veteran inpatient population are at high-risk for anticipated physiological falls. This Veteran Integrated Services Network-wide Deployment of an Evidence-based Program to Prevent Patient Falls study was completed as part of a nationally funded clinical initiative, National Program Initiative 20-006-1. PMID:18044113

  20. First Aid: Falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... THIS TOPIC Household Safety Checklists A to Z: Head Injury Household Safety: Preventing Injuries From Falling, Climbing, and ... Stairways: Household Safety Checklist First Aid: Broken Bones Head Injuries Preventing Children's Sports Injuries Concussions Broken Bones Childproofing ...

  1. Survival of falling robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Jonathan M.; Arkin, Ronald C.

    1992-01-01

    As mobile robots are used in more uncertain and dangerous environments, it will become important to design them so that they can survive falls. In this paper, we examine a number of mechanisms and strategies that animals use to withstand these potentially catastrophic events and extend them to the design of robots. A brief survey of several aspects of how common cats survive falls provides an understanding of the issues involved in preventing traumatic injury during a falling event. After outlining situations in which robots might fall, a number of factors affecting their survival are described. From this background, several robot design guidelines are derived. These include recommendations for the physical structure of the robot as well as requirements for the robot control architecture. A control architecture is proposed based on reactive control techniques and action-oriented perception that is geared to support this form of survival behavior.

  2. Editors' Fall Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffert, Barbara; Heilbrun, Margaret; Kuzyk, Raya; Kim, Ann; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Burns, Ann; Williams, Wilda

    2008-01-01

    From the fall's cascade of great new books, "Library Journal's" editors select their favorites--a dark rendition of Afghan life, a look at the "self-esteem trap," a celebration of Brooklyn activism, and much more.

  3. Base of Bridalveil Fall

    In this image, Bridalveil Fall can be seen from its base in Yosemite National Park. The waterfall is 617 ft (188 m) in height and is one of the most well-known of Yosemite National Park's waterfalls....

  4. Reducing Sun Exposure for Prevention of Skin Cancers: Factorial Invariance and Reliability of the Self-Efficacy Scale for Sun Protection

    PubMed Central

    Babbin, Steven F.; Yin, Hui-Qing; Rossi, Joseph S.; Redding, Colleen A.; Paiva, Andrea L.; Velicer, Wayne F.

    2015-01-01

    The Self-Efficacy Scale for Sun Protection consists of two correlated factors with three items each for Sunscreen Use and Avoidance. This study evaluated two crucial psychometric assumptions, factorial invariance and scale reliability, with a sample of adults (N = 1356) participating in a computer-tailored, population-based intervention study. A measure has factorial invariance when the model is the same across subgroups. Three levels of invariance were tested, from least to most restrictive: (1) Configural Invariance (nonzero factor loadings unconstrained); (2) Pattern Identity Invariance (equal factor loadings); and (3) Strong Factorial Invariance (equal factor loadings and measurement errors). Strong Factorial Invariance was a good fit for the model across seven grouping variables: age, education, ethnicity, gender, race, skin tone, and Stage of Change for Sun Protection. Internal consistency coefficient Alpha and factor rho scale reliability, respectively, were .84 and .86 for Sunscreen Use, .68 and .70 for Avoidance, and .78 and .78 for the global (total) scale. The psychometric evidence demonstrates strong empirical support that the scale is consistent, has internal validity, and can be used to assess population-based adult samples. PMID:26457203

  5. The large-scale distribution and internal geometry of the fall 2000 Po River flood deposit: Evidence from digital X-radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatcroft, Robert A.; Stevens, Andrew W.; Hunt, Louise M.; Milligan, Timothy G.

    2006-03-01

    Event-response coring on the Po River prodelta (northern Adriatic Sea) coupled with shipboard digital X-radiography, resistivity profiling, and grain-size analyses permitted documentation of the initial distribution and physical properties of the October 2000 flood deposit. The digital X-radiography system comprises a constant-potential X-ray source and an amorphous silicon imager with an active area of 2942 cm and 12-bit depth resolution. Objective image segmentation algorithms based on bulk density (brightness), layer contacts (edge detection) and small-scale texture (fabric) were used to identify the flood deposit. Results indicate that the deposit formed in water depths of 6-29 m immediately adjacent to the three main distributary mouths of the Po (Pila, Tolle and Gnocca/Goro). Maximal thickness was 36 cm at a 20-m site off the main mouth (Pila), but many other sites had thicknesses >20 cm. The Po flood deposit has a complex internal stratigraphy, with multiple layers, a diverse suite of physical sedimentary structures (e.g., laminations, ripple cross bedding, lenticular bedding, soft-sediment deformation structures), and dramatic changes in grain size that imply rapid deposition and fluctuations in energy during emplacement. Based on the flood deposit volume and well-constrained measurements of deposit bulk density the mass of the flood deposit was estimated to be 1610 9 kg, which is about two-thirds of the estimated suspended sediment load delivered by the river during the event. The locus of deposition, overall thickness, and stratigraphic complexity of the flood deposit can best be explained by the relatively long sediment throughput times of the Po River, whereby sediment is delivered to the ocean during a range of conditions (i.e., the storm responsible for the precipitation is long gone), the majority of which are reflective of the fair-weather condition. Sediment is therefore deposited proximal to the river mouths, where it can form thick, but stratigraphically complex deposits. In contrast, floods of small rivers such as the Eel (northern California) are coupled to storm conditions, which lead to high levels of sediment dispersion.

  6. The large-scale distribution and internal geometry of the fall 2000 Po River flood deposit: Evidence from digital X-radiography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheatcroft, R.A.; Stevens, A.W.; Hunt, L.M.; Milligan, T.G.

    2006-01-01

    Event-response coring on the Po River prodelta (northern Adriatic Sea) coupled with shipboard digital X-radiography, resistivity profiling, and grain-size analyses permitted documentation of the initial distribution and physical properties of the October 2000 flood deposit. The digital X-radiography system comprises a constant-potential X-ray source and an amorphous silicon imager with an active area of 29??42 cm and 12-bit depth resolution. Objective image segmentation algorithms based on bulk density (brightness), layer contacts (edge detection) and small-scale texture (fabric) were used to identify the flood deposit. Results indicate that the deposit formed in water depths of 6-29 m immediately adjacent to the three main distributary mouths of the Po (Pila, Tolle and Gnocca/Goro). Maximal thickness was 36 cm at a 20-m site off the main mouth (Pila), but many other sites hadthicknesses >20 cm. The Po flood deposit has a complex internal stratigraphy, with multiple layers, a diverse suite of physical sedimentary structures (e.g., laminations, ripple cross bedding, lenticular bedding, soft-sediment deformation structures), and dramatic changes in grain size that imply rapid deposition and fluctuations in energy during emplacement. Based on the flood deposit volume and well-constrained measurements of deposit bulk density the mass of the flood deposit was estimated to be 16??109 kg, which is about two-thirds of the estimated suspended sediment load delivered by the river during the event. The locus of deposition, overall thickness, and stratigraphic complexity of the flood deposit can best be explained by the relatively long sediment throughput times of the Po River, whereby sediment is delivered to the ocean during a range of conditions (i.e., the storm responsible for the precipitation is long gone), the majority of which are reflective of the fair-weather condition. Sediment is therefore deposited proximal to the river mouths, where it can form thick, but stratigraphically complex deposits. In contrast, floods of small rivers such as the Eel (northern California) are coupled to storm conditions, which lead to high levels of sediment dispersion. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. 147. Linville Falls Recreation Area. View of Linville Falls from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    147. Linville Falls Recreation Area. View of Linville Falls from castle view looking northwest. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  8. 148. Linville Falls Recreation Area. View of Linville Falls from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    148. Linville Falls Recreation Area. View of Linville Falls from Erwin's view looking west. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  9. A Randomized Trial of a Multifaceted Intervention to Reduce Falls among Community-Dwelling Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Patrick J.; Vazquez, Laurie; Tonner, Chris; Stevens, Judy A.; Fineman, Norman; Ross, Leslie K.

    2010-01-01

    Using a randomized controlled trial, we tested the efficacy of a fall prevention intervention to reduce falls among adults in a community-based health promotion program. Adults aged 65 and older within two counties were recruited (control n = 257; intervention n = 286). After 12 months, there was a significant decrease in the number of falls in…

  10. The efficacy of scale sampling for monitoring trace element concentrations and stable isotopes in commercially harvested walleye (Sander vitreus).

    PubMed

    Ofukany, Amy F A; Hobson, Keith A; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Bond, Alexander L

    2015-01-01

    Commercial and sport fishes are subject to rigorous monitoring for concentrations of elements that could pose threats to human health, with numerous advisories issued by authorities annually for those fisheries with high mercury (Hg) concentrations. In Lake Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, the commercial walleye fishery is valued at more than $20 million/year, but has historically been subject to Hg advisories. We used an information theoretic approach to evaluate the utility of non-destructive fish-scale sampling to predict As, Mn and Hg concentrations, as well as stable isotope values in walleye muscle by analysing paired samples. Hg concentrations in scales were significantly related to those in muscle (r(2) = 0.75), but the relationships were weaker for As and Mn. The δ(15)N values in scales predicted δ(15)N in muscle reasonably well (r(2) = 0.72), whereas scale δ(13)C and δ(34)S had less predictive power for estimating their respective muscle stable isotope values. For all three isotope values, sex was a marginal predictor, with parameter confidence intervals bounding zero. Analytical constraints currently limit the utility of non-destructively analysing scales for Hg, but hindcasting trophic changes using archived walleye scales may be useful in understanding shifts in nutrients and production, particularly in impacted lake systems. PMID:25811795

  11. Doppler radar fall activity detection using the wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Su, Bo Yu; Ho, K C; Rantz, Marilyn J; Skubic, Marjorie

    2015-03-01

    We propose in this paper the use of Wavelet transform (WT) to detect human falls using a ceiling mounted Doppler range control radar. The radar senses any motions from falls as well as nonfalls due to the Doppler effect. The WT is very effective in distinguishing the falls from other activities, making it a promising technique for radar fall detection in nonobtrusive inhome elder care applications. The proposed radar fall detector consists of two stages. The prescreen stage uses the coefficients of wavelet decomposition at a given scale to identify the time locations in which fall activities may have occurred. The classification stage extracts the time-frequency content from the wavelet coefficients at many scales to form a feature vector for fall versus nonfall classification. The selection of different wavelet functions is examined to achieve better performance. Experimental results using the data from the laboratory and real inhome environments validate the promising and robust performance of the proposed detector. PMID:25376033

  12. Tailored prevention of inpatient falls: development and usability testing of the fall TIPS toolkit.

    PubMed

    Zuyev, Lyubov; Benoit, Angela N; Chang, Frank Y; Dykes, Patricia C

    2011-02-01

    Patient falls and fall-related injuries are serious problems in hospitals. The Fall TIPS application aims to prevent patient falls by translating routine nursing fall risk assessment into a decision support intervention that communicates fall risk status and creates a tailored evidence-based plan of care that is accessible to the care team, patients, and family members. In our design and implementation of the Fall TIPS toolkit, we used the Spiral Software Development Life Cycle model. Three output tools available to be generated from the toolkit are bed poster, plan of care, and patient education handout. A preliminary design of the application was based on initial requirements defined by project leaders and informed by focus groups with end users. Preliminary design partially simulated the paper version of the Morse Fall Scale currently used in hospitals involved in the research study. Strengths and weaknesses of the first prototype were identified by heuristic evaluation. Usability testing was performed at sites where research study is implemented. Suggestions mentioned by end users participating in usability studies were either directly incorporated into the toolkit and output tools, were slightly modified, or will be addressed during training. The next step is implementation of the fall prevention toolkit on the pilot testing units. PMID:21372641

  13. Tailored prevention of inpatient falls: development and usability testing of the fall TIPS toolkit.

    PubMed

    Zuyev, Lyubov; Benoit, Angela N; Chang, Frank Y; Dykes, Patricia C

    2011-02-01

    Patient falls and fall-related injuries are serious problems in hospitals. The Fall TIPS application aims to prevent patient falls by translating routine nursing fall risk assessment into a decision support intervention that communicates fall risk status and creates a tailored evidence-based plan of care that is accessible to the care team, patients, and family members. In our design and implementation of the Fall TIPS toolkit, we used the Spiral Software Development Life Cycle model. Three output tools available to be generated from the toolkit are bed poster, plan of care, and patient education handout. A preliminary design of the application was based on initial requirements defined by project leaders and informed by focus groups with end users. Preliminary design partially simulated the paper version of the Morse Fall Scale currently used in hospitals involved in the research study. Strengths and weaknesses of the first prototype were identified by heuristic evaluation. Usability testing was performed at sites where research study is implemented. Suggestions mentioned by end users participating in usability studies were either directly incorporated into the toolkit and output tools, were slightly modified, or will be addressed during training. The next step is implementation of the fall prevention toolkit on the pilot testing units. PMID:20975543

  14. Neighborhood walkability, fear and risk of falling and response to walking promotion: The Easy Steps to Health 12-month randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Merom, D.; Gebel, K.; Fahey, P.; Astell-Burt, T.; Voukelatos, A.; Rissel, C.; Sherrington, C.

    2015-01-01

    In older adults the relationships between health, fall-related risk factors, perceived neighborhood walkability, walking behavior and intervention impacts are poorly understood. To determine whether: i) health and fall-related risk factors were associated with perceptions of neighborhood walkability; ii) perceived environmental attributes, and fall-related risk factors predicted change in walking behavior at 12 months; and iii) perceived environmental attributes and fall-related risk factors moderated the effect of a self-paced walking program on walking behavior. Randomized trial on walking and falls conducted between 2009 and 2012 involving 315 community-dwelling inactive adults ≥ 65 years living in Sydney, Australia. Measures were: mobility status, fall history, injurious fall and fear of falling (i.e., fall-related risk factors), health status, walking self-efficacy and 11 items from the neighborhood walkability scale and planned walking ≥ 150 min/week at 12 months. Participants with poorer mobility, fear of falling, and poor health perceived their surroundings as less walkable. Walking at 12 months was significantly greater in “less greenery” (AOR = 3.3, 95% CI: 1.11–9.98) and “high traffic” (AOR = 1.98, 95% CI: 1.00–3.91) neighborhoods. The intervention had greater effects in neighborhoods perceived to have poorer pedestrian infrastructure (p for interaction = 0.036). Low perceived walkability was shaped by health status and did not appear to be a barrier to walking behavior. There appears to be a greater impact of, and thus, need for, interventions to encourage walking in environments perceived not to have supportive walking infrastructure. Future studies on built environments and walking should gather information on fall-related risk factors to better understand how these characteristics interact. PMID:26844140

  15. Toy models for the falling chimney

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varieschi, Gabriele; Kamiya, Kaoru

    2003-10-01

    In this paper we review the theory of the "falling chimney," which deals with the breaking in mid-air of tall structures when they fall to the ground. We show that these ruptures can be caused by either shear forces typically developing near the base, or by the bending of the structure which is caused primarily by the internal bending moment. In the latter case the breaking is more likely to occur between one-third and one-half of the height of the chimney. Small scale toy models are used to reproduce the dynamics of the falling chimney. By examining photos taken during the fall of these models we test the adequacy of the theory. This type of experiment, which is easy to perform and conceptually challenging, can become part of a rotational mechanics lab for undergraduate students.

  16. Development of the Edmonson Psychiatric Fall Risk Assessment Tool.

    PubMed

    Edmonson, Deborah; Robinson, Sherry; Hughes, Larry

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a fall risk assessment instrument for the inpatient psychiatric population. Nine risk factors were identified through a review of the literature. The instrument was applied retrospectively to patient records, and the percentage of those who fell who triggered each of the items in each domain was calculated. The expected value of the population and weighting system were established. The Morse Fall Scale and Edmonson Psychiatric Fall Risk Assessment Tool (EPFRAT) were administered simultaneously to inpatient psychiatric patients. Sensitivity of the EPFRAT was 0.63, compared with 0.49 for the Morse Fall Scale; specificity of the EPFRAT was 0.86, compared with 0.85 for the Morse Fall Scale. Initial psychometric testing of the EPFRAT indicates the instrument is more sensitive in assessing fall risk in the acutely ill psychiatric population than those currently available. Additional psychometric testing is needed to determine the reliability and validity of the EPFRAT. PMID:21175120

  17. From Efficacy Trial to Large Scale Effectiveness Trial: A Tier 2 Mathematics Intervention for First Graders with Difficulties in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolfhus, Eric; Clarke, Ben; Decker, Lauren E.; Williams, Chuck; Dimino, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Large scale longitudinal research (Morgan, Farkas, & Wu, 2009) and a meta-analysis (Duncan et al., 2007) have found that early mathematics achievement is a strong predictor of later mathematics achievement. In fact, end of Kindergarten and end of grade 1 mathematics achievement on ECLS-K and similar mathematics proficiency measures tends to be…

  18. The Internet Self-Perception Scale: Measuring Elementary Students' Levels of Self-Efficacy regarding Internet Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinson, Janice; DiStefano, Christine; Daniel, Cathy

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated fourth grade students' perceptions of abilities to use the Internet. The 31-item research instrument measuring Internet Self-Perceptions was adapted for use from the Reader Self-Perception Scale (RSPS) developed by Henk and Melnick (1995). The RSPS survey was based upon Bandura's (1977, 1986, 1995) research in the areas of…

  19. Research Training Environment, Attitudes toward Research, and Research Self-Efficacy: The Revised Research Training Environment Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelso, Charles J.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Determines the relationship of research training environment to variables theorized to be either related or unrelated to that environment. Subjects were graduate students (n=171) who responded to the Research Training Environment Scale (RTES). The RTES was unrelated to participants' interest in the practitioner's role and minimally related to…

  20. Functional capacity and fear of falling in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Niederer, Daniel; Schmidt, Katharina; Vogt, Lutz; Egen, Janis; Klingler, Julia; Hübscher, Markus; Thiel, Christian; Bernhörster, Marcus; Banzer, Winfried

    2014-03-01

    Cancer patients, particularly during chemotherapy, often encounter functional status limitations. This study examines fear of falling, balance, gait and lower limb strength in cancer patients during ongoing or recently completed (≤12 months) chemotherapeutic treatment in comparison to age-matched and senior controls (≥65 years). Data were obtained from 69 subjects; 21 cancer patients (51±7 years) with histological confirmed diagnosis and two control groups (2×n=24): one age-matched (53±7 years) and one senior group (70±3 years). Fear of falling (FoF) was evaluated using the Falls Efficacy Scale-International Version. Motor function measurement included postural sway (centre of pressure) in upright stance with eyes covered, gait speed (comfortable fluid walking) and maximum voluntary isometric quadriceps strength (MIVF). One-way ANOVA followed by corrected post hoc paired-sample t-test revealed inferior values in cancer patients than in age-matched healthy regarding all parameters. Gait speed and MIVF of cancer patients were higher than in the senior control group (p<.05), whereas their FoF and postural sway were comparable (p>.05). Physical performance parameters of cancer patients were found to be lower in comparison to healthy age-matched subjects. Cancer patients show physical impairments which may limit independence and may increase fall risk. The present findings call for routine screening of physical function in cancer patients, and further stress the relevance of exercise interventions during and after chemotherapy. PMID:24360638

  1. Fall 1982 Retention Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralta Community Coll. District, Oakland, CA. Office of Research, Planning and Development.

    In fall 1982, a study was conducted in the Peralta Community College District (PCCD) using withdrawal and grade distribution data to analyze student retention patterns. Successful retention rates were based on the percentage of students who received a passing grade, while total retention rates were based on the percentage of students who received…

  2. Editors' Fall Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilbrun, Margaret; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Kuzyk, Raya; Roncevic, Mirela; Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal's" review editors select fall titles readers won't want to miss--"Waiting on a Train: The Embattled Future of Passenger Rail Service" (James McCommons); "Happy" (Alex Lemon); "Free for All: Joe Papp, the Public, and the Greatest Theater Story Ever Told" (Kenneth Turan & Joseph Papp); "In My Father's Shadow: A Daughter Remembers…

  3. The News, Fall 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Ray, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This fall 2002 newsletter from the Community College League of California contains several articles, news stories, and the brochure from the 2002 Annual Convention, "Celebrating the Way California LEARNS." Articles include: (1) "Nursing Shortage Poses Dilemma for Colleges: Access vs. Efficiency," a discussion of the debate over how to increase the…

  4. Fall 2013 International Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Evaluation Association, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This Fall report is an aggregated statistical analysis of Measures of Academic Progress® (MAP®) data from international schools. The report provides a consistent means of comparisons of specific sub-groups by subject and grade, which allows partners to compare their MAP® results with other schools within their region or membership organization.…

  5. Freshmen Survey. Fall 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodyear, Don

    In 1985, College of the Sequoias (COS) was asked by the Cooperative Institutional Research Program (conducted jointly by the American Council on Education and the University of California, Los Angeles) to participate in a survey of incoming freshmen for the fall 1985 semester. During the summer counseling session, 259 new COS freshmen were…

  6. Illilouette Falls Detail

    In this image, Illilouettea Falls, a tributary of the Merced River can be seen just upstream of Happy Isles and the USGS Benchmark Streamgage in Yosemite National Park. The Merced River is a 145 mile (233 km) long tributary of the San Joaquin River. It drains a large section of the Sierra Nevad...

  7. Editors' Fall Picks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilbrun, Margaret; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Kuzyk, Raya; Roncevic, Mirela; Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal's" review editors select fall titles readers won't want to miss--"Waiting on a Train: The Embattled Future of Passenger Rail Service" (James McCommons); "Happy" (Alex Lemon); "Free for All: Joe Papp, the Public, and the Greatest Theater Story Ever Told" (Kenneth Turan & Joseph Papp); "In My Father's Shadow: A Daughter Remembers

  8. Precision Falling Body Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, James A.; Koenig, R.

    1976-01-01

    Described is a simple apparatus to determine acceleration due to gravity. It utilizes direct contact switches in lieu of conventional photocells to time the fall of a ball bearing. Accuracies to better than one part in a thousand were obtained. (SL)

  9. Bridalveil Fall in Fog

    In this image, Bridalveil Fall can be seen shrouded in fog from Tunnel View in Yosemite National Park. The waterfall is 617 ft (188 m) in height and is one of the most well-known of Yosemite National Park's waterfalls....

  10. Falling into Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Carolyn Lang

    2000-01-01

    Presents an activity that connects art, science, and nature in which elementary school students learn about deciduous trees. Explains that students create a torn-tissue collage, using fall colors for a background and drawing a silhouette of a tree without leaves on top of the background with black crayon. (CMK)

  11. Falls prevention in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Each year 1.57 million older people fall more than three times and 70 000 fracture their hips. Falls can lead to disability and even death. The NSF for Older People identified falls prevention as a major health priority. This paper explains how primary care practitioners can contribute to falls prevention, reduce falls risk and improve quality of life for the older person. PMID:25949597

  12. Prevalence of falls in fibromyalgia patients

    PubMed Central

    Meireles, Sandra Adolph; Antero, Daniel Casagrande; Kulczycki, Marciane Maria; Skare, Thelma Larocca

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the risk of falls in fibromyalgia (FM) patients compared to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and normal controls. METHODS: We studied 60 FM, 60 RA patients and 60 controls for fall frequency in one week, one month, six months and one year. Patients were submitted to body mass index determination and balance evaluation through the Berg scale. Data on disease impact and depression were collected in FM patients through the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and the Beck Questionnaire. RESULTS: FM patients had a higher frequency of falls than RA patients and control individuals in one month (p<0.0001), in six months (p<0.0001) and in one year (p<0.0001). No relationship was found between falls and body mass index, pain or depression scores. Falls in 12 months were associated with higher FIQ values. CONCLUSION: FM patients fall more often than RA patients and control individuals. Level of Evidence II, Investigation of the effect of a patient characteristic on the disease outcome. PMID:25061425

  13. [Self concept in falling and non-falling elderly].

    PubMed

    Fromage, B

    2005-01-01

    The fall in elderly is frequent and implies great outcomes. Inhibition and turning on oneself mark the post-fall syndrome which illustrates perturbations from fall. This study compares the self concept of old persons with fall and without fall, self concept definited like the perceptions of a subject about himself. Words production is significatively less important for fall subjects and indicates the preponderance of the structure personal Self (SP). The auto description is negative with auto depreciatory, loss of confidence, decreasing of activities, feeling of helpessness in daily life and in future. PMID:16598964

  14. A multifactorial falls risk prediction model for hospitalized older adults.

    PubMed

    GholamHosseini, Hamid; Baig, Mirza Mansoor; Connolly, Martin J; Lindén, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Ageing population worldwide has grown fast with more cases of chronic illnesses and co-morbidity, involving higher healthcare costs. Falls are one of the leading causes of unintentional injury-related deaths in older adults. The aim of this study was to develop a robust multifactorial model toward the falls risk prediction. The proposed model employs real-time vital signs, motion data, falls history and muscle strength. Moreover, it identifies high-risk individuals for the development falls in their activity of daily living (ADL). The falls risk prediction model has been tested at a controlled-environment in hospital with 30 patients and compared with the results from the Morse fall scale. The simulated results show the proposed algorithm achieved an accuracy of 98%, sensitivity of 96% and specificity of 100% among a total of 80 intentional falls and 40 ADLs. The ultimate aim of this study is to extend the application to elderly home care and monitoring. PMID:25570741

  15. Relationships Among the Knowledge, Efficacy, and Practices Instrument, Color-Blind Racial Attitudes Scale, Deamonte Driver Survey, and Defining Issues Test 2.

    PubMed

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Garvan, Cynthia W

    2016-03-01

    Concordance studies indicate the degree to which instruments measure the same or similar constructs or something different. The aims of this study were to identify the factor structure of the Deamonte Driver Survey and determine the relationship between the Deamonte Driver (a measure of social class stereotyping), the Defining Issues Test 2 (DIT2; a measure of ethical sensitivity), the Color-Blind Racial Attitudes Scale (CoBRAS; a measure of racial stereotyping), and the Knowledge, Efficacy, and Practices Instrument (KEPI; a measure of cultural competence). The results showed a three-factor solution for the Deamonte Driver Survey and significant relationships between CoBRAS and DIT2 subscales and between CoBRAS and Deamonte Driver subscales. Significant relationships between the measures and exploratory variables, underrepresented minority status, age, citizenship, marital status, political stance, English as a first language, and gender were found. The lack of a significant relationship between the KEPI and Deamonte Driver, DIT2, or CoBRAS subscales suggests that the KEPI is measuring a unique construct. These findings showed how these scales contributed to the assessment of cultural competence among dental students and faculty. PMID:26933112

  16. Physical Activity and the Association With Self-Reported Impairments, Walking Limitations, Fear of Falling, and Incidence of Falls in Persons With Late Effects of Polio.

    PubMed

    Winberg, Cecilia; Brogårdh, Christina; Flansbjer, Ulla-Britt; Carlsson, Gunilla; Rimmer, James; Lexell, Jan

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the association between physical activity and self-reported disability in ambulatory persons with mild to moderate late effects of polio (N = 81, mean age 67 years). The outcome measures were: Physical Activity and Disability Survey (PADS), a pedometer, Self-Reported Impairments in Persons with Late Effects of Polio Scale (SIPP), Walking Impact Scale (Walk-12), Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I), and self-reported incidence of falls. The participants were physically active on average 158 min per day and walked 6,212 steps daily. Significant associations were found between PADS and Walk-12 (r = -.31, p < .001), and between the number of steps and SIPP, Walk-12, and FES-I (r = -.22 to -.32, p < .05). Walk-12 and age explained 14% of the variance in PADS and FES-I explained 9% of the variance in number of steps per day. Thus, physical activity was only weakly to moderately associated with self-reported disability. PMID:25268608

  17. A fall and near-fall assessment and evaluation system.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Anh; Shi, Yang; Teng, Daniel; Ralhan, Amitoz; Chen, Li; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina; Basran, Jenny; Ko, Seok-Bum; McCrowsky, Carl

    2009-01-01

    The FANFARE (Falls And Near Falls Assessment Research and Evaluation) project has developed a system to fulfill the need for a wearable device to collect data for fall and near-falls analysis. The system consists of a computer and a wireless sensor network to measure, display, and store fall related parameters such as postural activities and heart rate variability. Ease of use and low power are considered in the design. The system was built and tested successfully. Different machine learning algorithms were applied to the stored data for fall and near-fall evaluation. Results indicate that the Naïve Bayes algorithm is the best choice, due to its fast model building and high accuracy in fall detection. PMID:19662151

  18. Inactivated Enterovirus 71 Vaccine Produced by 200-L Scale Serum-Free Microcarrier Bioreactor System Provides Cross-Protective Efficacy in Human SCARB2 Transgenic Mouse.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Ying; Lin, Yi-Wen; Kuo, Chia-Ho; Liu, Wan-Hsin; Tai, Hsiu-Fen; Pan, Chien-Hung; Chen, Yung-Tsung; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; Chan, Chi-Hsien; Chang, Ching-Chuan; Liu, Chung-Cheng; Chow, Yen-Hung; Chen, Juine-Ruey

    2015-01-01

    Epidemics and outbreaks caused by infections of several subgenotypes of EV71 and other serotypes of coxsackie A viruses have raised serious public health concerns in the Asia-Pacific region. These concerns highlight the urgent need to develop a scalable manufacturing platform for producing an effective and sufficient quantity of vaccines against deadly enteroviruses. In this report, we present a platform for the large-scale production of a vaccine based on the inactivated EV71(E59-B4) virus. The viruses were produced in Vero cells in a 200 L bioreactor with serum-free medium, and the viral titer reached 10(7) TCID50/mL 10 days after infection when using an MOI of 10(-4). The EV71 virus particles were harvested and purified by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Fractions containing viral particles were pooled based on ELISA and SDS-PAGE. TEM was used to characterize the morphologies of the viral particles. To evaluate the cross-protective efficacy of the EV71 vaccine, the pooled antigens were combined with squalene-based adjuvant (AddaVAX) or aluminum phosphate (AlPO4) and tested in human SCARB2 transgenic (Tg) mice. The Tg mice immunized with either the AddaVAX- or AlPO4-adjuvanted EV71 vaccine were fully protected from challenges by the subgenotype C2 and C4 viruses, and surviving animals did not show any degree of neurological paralysis symptoms or muscle damage. Vaccine treatments significantly reduced virus antigen presented in the central nervous system of Tg mice and alleviated the virus-associated inflammatory response. These results strongly suggest that this preparation results in an efficacious vaccine and that the microcarrier/bioreactor platform offers a superior alternative to the previously described roller-bottle system. PMID:26287531

  19. Inactivated Enterovirus 71 Vaccine Produced by 200-L Scale Serum-Free Microcarrier Bioreactor System Provides Cross-Protective Efficacy in Human SCARB2 Transgenic Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chia-Ying; Lin, Yi-Wen; Kuo, Chia-Ho; Liu, Wan-Hsin; Tai, Hsiu-Fen; Pan, Chien-Hung; Chen, Yung-Tsung; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; Chan, Chi-Hsien; Chang, Ching-Chuan; Liu, Chung-Cheng; Chow, Yen-Hung; Chen, Juine-Ruey

    2015-01-01

    Epidemics and outbreaks caused by infections of several subgenotypes of EV71 and other serotypes of coxsackie A viruses have raised serious public health concerns in the Asia-Pacific region. These concerns highlight the urgent need to develop a scalable manufacturing platform for producing an effective and sufficient quantity of vaccines against deadly enteroviruses. In this report, we present a platform for the large-scale production of a vaccine based on the inactivated EV71(E59-B4) virus. The viruses were produced in Vero cells in a 200 L bioreactor with serum-free medium, and the viral titer reached 107 TCID50/mL 10 days after infection when using an MOI of 10−4. The EV71 virus particles were harvested and purified by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Fractions containing viral particles were pooled based on ELISA and SDS-PAGE. TEM was used to characterize the morphologies of the viral particles. To evaluate the cross-protective efficacy of the EV71 vaccine, the pooled antigens were combined with squalene-based adjuvant (AddaVAX) or aluminum phosphate (AlPO4) and tested in human SCARB2 transgenic (Tg) mice. The Tg mice immunized with either the AddaVAX- or AlPO4-adjuvanted EV71 vaccine were fully protected from challenges by the subgenotype C2 and C4 viruses, and surviving animals did not show any degree of neurological paralysis symptoms or muscle damage. Vaccine treatments significantly reduced virus antigen presented in the central nervous system of Tg mice and alleviated the virus-associated inflammatory response. These results strongly suggest that this preparation results in an efficacious vaccine and that the microcarrier/bioreactor platform offers a superior alternative to the previously described roller-bottle system. PMID:26287531

  20. Fall Prevention in Apprentice Carpenters

    PubMed Central

    Kaskutas, Vicki; Dale, Ann Marie; Lipscomb, Hester; Gaal, John; Fuchs, Mark; Evanoff, Bradley; Faucette, Julia; Gillen, Marion; Deych, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Falls from heights are a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the construction industry, especially among inexperienced workers. We surveyed apprentice carpenters to identify individual and organizational factors associated with falls from heights. Methods We developed a 72-item fall prevention survey with multiple domains including fall experience, fall prevention knowledge, risk perceptions, confidence in ability to prevent falls, training experience, and perceptions of the safety climate and crew safety behaviors. We administered the questionnaire to apprentice carpenters in this cross-sectional study. Results Of the 1,025 respondents, 51% knew someone who had fallen from height at work and 16% had personally fallen in the past year, with ladders accounting for most of the falls. Despite participation in school-based and on-the-job training, fall prevention knowledge was poor. Ladders were perceived as low risk and ladder training was rare. Apprentices reported high levels of unsafe fall-related behaviors on their work crews. Apprentices working residential construction were more likely to fall than those working commercial construction, as were apprentices working on crews with fewer senior carpenters to provide mentorship, and those reporting more unsafe behaviors among fellow workers. Conclusions Despite participation in a formal apprenticeship program, many apprentices work at heights without adequate preparation and subsequently experience falls. Apprenticeship programs can improve the timing and content of fall prevention training. This study suggests that organizational changes in building practices, mentorship, and safety culture must also occur in order to decrease worker falls from heights. PMID:19953214

  1. Effects of a Randomized Controlled Recurrent Fall Prevention Program on Risk Factors for Falls in Frail Elderly Living at Home in Rural Communities

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Mi Yang; Jeong, HyeonCheol; Petrofsky, Jerrold; Lee, Haneul; Yim, JongEun

    2014-01-01

    Background Falling can lead to severe health issues in the elderly and importantly contributes to morbidity, death, immobility, hospitalization, and early entry to long-term care facilities. The aim of this study was to devise a recurrent fall prevention program for elderly women in rural areas. Material/Methods This study adopted an assessor-blinded, randomized, controlled trial methodology. Subjects were enrolled in a 12-week recurrent fall prevention program, which comprised strength training, balance training, and patient education. Muscle strength and endurance of the ankles and the lower extremities, static balance, dynamic balance, depression, compliance with preventive behavior related to falls, fear of falling, and fall self-efficacy at baseline and immediately after the program were assessed. Sixty-two subjects (mean age 69.2±4.3 years old) completed the program – 31 subjects in the experimental group and 31 subjects in the control group. Results When the results of the program in the 2 groups were compared, significant differences were found in ankle heel rise test, lower extremity heel rise test, dynamic balance, depression, compliance with fall preventative behavior, fear of falling, and fall self-efficacy (p<0.05), but no significant difference was found in static balance. Conclusions This study shows that the fall prevention program described effectively improves muscle strength and endurance, balance, and psychological aspects in elderly women with a fall history. PMID:25394805

  2. Maxillofacial Fractures due to Falls: does Fall Modality Determine the Pattern of Injury?

    PubMed Central

    Boffano, Paolo; Bianchi, Francesca A.; Zavattero, Emanuele

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives In several epidemiological studies of maxillofacial trauma, falls were one of the most frequent causes of facial injury. The aim of this study is to analyse the patterns of fall-related maxillofacial injuries based on the height of the fall. Material and Methods Using a systematic computer-assisted database of patients hospitalised with maxillofacial fractures, only those with fall-related injuries were considered. The falls were divided into four groups: falls from slipping, tripping or stumbling (STSF), loss of consciousness (LOCF), stairs (SAF), and height (HF). Data on the age, gender, fracture site, Facial Injury Severity Scale (FISS), facial lacerations, associated lesions, type of treatment, and length of hospital stay were also analysed. Results This study included 557 patients (338 males, 219 females; average age 51.5 years [range 4 - 99 years]). In the over 60 age group, females were more prevalent in STSF than males. According to aetiology, STSF was the most frequent cause of maxillofacial fractures (315 patients; 56.5%) followed by LOCF (157; 28.2%), HF (55; 9.9%), and SAF (30; 5.4%). The middle third of the face was affected most frequently. After LOCF, however, the inferior third was prevalently involved. The majority of associated fractures, as well as the most severe injuries and greatest rate of facial lacerations, occurred secondary to HF. Conclusions This study showed that fracture severity and site are influenced not only by patient age, but also by the nature of the fall. PMID:25635212

  3. The Scale of Self-Efficacy Expectations of Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment: A Tool for Identifying Risk for Non-Adherence to Treatment for HIV

    PubMed Central

    Drachler, Maria de Lourdes; Drachler, Carlos Wietzke; Teixeira, Luciana Barcellos; de Carvalho Leite, José Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of risk for non-adherence to treatment is a challenge for personalized care for people living with HIV. Standardized questionnaires of patients’ expectations of their capability to overcome obstacles for treatment adherence may be used as a pre-screening for risk identification. A scale of self-efficacy expectations of adherence to antiretroviral treatment (SEA-ART scale) was previously developed. This study assesses the scale validity in predicting non-adherence to ART in adults living with HIV. Methods and Findings A prospective cohort study applied a 21-item SEA-ART scale to 275 adults in ART treatment at an outpatient public service for HIV in Southern Brazil. ART medications taken were assessed at one-month follow-up; ART adherence was devised as an intake of 95% and more of the prescribed medication. A SEA-ART score was calculated by adding up the scores of all items. Multivariable logistic regression and the Area Under the Receiver-Operating-Characteristic Curve (AUROC) were applied to examine the ability of the SEA-ART score to predict non-adherence at follow-up. The SEA-ART score varied from 21 to 105; mean 93.9; median 103.0. Non-adherence was 30.3% (n = 81/267). The odds of non-adherence was 8% lower for each unit increase of the SEA-ART score; after adjustment for age, sex, formal education and time in treatment (OR = 0.92; 95%CI 0.90–0.95; LRT for linear trend, p = 0.002). The AUROC was 0.80 (95%CI 0.73–0.87; p<0.001). The SEA-ART optimal cut-off value was 101, providing a sensitivity of 76.5%, a specificity of 73.1%, a positive predictive value of 55.4% and a negative predictive value of 87.7%. There was no evidence of difference in sensitivity, and specificity among groups organized by age, gender, formal education and time in treatment. Conclusions The SEA-ART scale appears to have a good capacity to discriminate between adherents and non-adherents at one-month follow-up. Further studies should confirm these results in other populations. PMID:26895270

  4. AGU Fall Meeting Street Pedestrians

    Pedestrians cross 4th Street outside the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco while traffic waits at a stoplight. In the foreground are street banners for the AGU Fall Meeting. In the background is the Moscone Convention Center - West building....

  5. Yosemite Falls behind Illilouette Ridge

    Uppder Yosemite Falls is visible on the right side of this image, taken behind Illilouette Ridge. Upper Yosemite Falls is 1,430 ft (440 m) tall. It is one of the most famous waterfalls in Yosemite National Park....

  6. Effects of Low-Impact Dance on Blood Biochemistry, Bone Mineral Density, the Joint Range of Motion of Lower Extremities, Knee Extension Torque, and Fall in Females.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui Ying; Tu, Jui Hung; Hsu, Chin Hsing; Tsao, Te Hung

    2016-01-01

    The effect of low-impact dance on blood metabolites, the joint range of motion (ROM) of the lower extremities, knee extension torque, bone mass density (BMD), the number of falls, and the confidence to perform daily activities (Modified Falls Efficacy Scale [MFES]) was examined in older sedentary women (age: 59 4 years) before and after a 16-week intervention. Results showed that the average score for the MFES, some parameters of blood chemistry, and joint ROM were significantly improved after low-impact intervention. In addition to improvements in blood lipids and body fat percentages, the increases shown in the parameters regarding the lower extremities may contribute to confidence in performing common daily activities in older women, although the number of falls did not significantly differ between the two groups during the 16-week period. PMID:25642949

  7. `In free fall'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beijerinck, Herman C. W.

    2014-01-01

    Physicists in the lead of a fiction book or a play, that's a rare event! Writers in general do not understand physics, while physicists seldom have the talent of writing for a large audience. So when it happens, we should rejoice. The up-and-coming German author Juli Zeh [1] (1974), who studied law, has succeeded in combining beautiful prose, psychological drama, crime and physics in a challenging book `In free fall' [2]. A good friend of hers, Bettina Bruinier, has put the core message of the book into a compelling play in the `Volkstheater' in Munich [1]. Yes, it can be done.

  8. Fall's Changing Colors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    As the clouds allowed during the past two months, the Sea-viewing Wide field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) recorded the changing colors of eastern U.S. and Canadian vegetation. This series of true-color images from the fall of 2000 shows the deciduous forests of the region change from dark green to bright red and orange, and begin to drop their leaves. Image provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  9. Middle and Lower Yosemite Falls

    In this image, Middle Cascades and Lower Yosemite Falls may be seen from left to right. Middle Cascades have a total drop of 673 ft (206 m), while Lower Yosemite Falls has a drop of 320 ft (98 m). Yosemite Falls is one of the most famous waterfalls within Yosemite National Park....

  10. [The psychological dimensions of falls].

    PubMed

    Schoenenburg, Sylvie; Beghin, Vinciane; Pardessus, Vinciane; Puiseux, Franois

    2015-01-01

    Falls in the elderly can have serious consequences both functional and psychological. In addition to the severe post-fall syndrome, other psychological consequences require adapted care. This article intends to highlight the multiple dimensions of the psychological impact of falls, through testimony. Loss of control of her body, awakening of fear of death, narcissistic injury...; the elderly talk about their felt. PMID:25966526

  11. The relationship between fear of falling to spatiotemporal gait parameters measured by an instrumented treadmill in people with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kalron, Alon; Achiron, Anat

    2014-02-01

    People with multiple sclerosis (MS) identify mobility limitations as one of the greatest challenges of this disease. Continued loss of mobility and falls are among their greatest concerns for the future. Our objective was to determine if fear of falling is associated with spatial and temporal gait parameters in persons with MS, when measured by an instrumented treadmill. This observational case control study was performed at the MS Center, Center of Advanced Technologies in Rehabilitation, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel. Sixty-eight relapsing-remitting patients diagnosed with MS, 38 women, aged 40.9 (S.D. = 11.9), participated in this investigation. Twenty-five healthy subjects, 14 women, aged 39.5 (S.D. = 9.4) served as controls gait controls. Gait spatiotemporal parameters were obtained using the Zebris FDM-T Treadmill (Zebris(®) Medical GmbH, Germany). The Falls Efficacy Scale International was used to assess the level of concern relating to falls. Forty-one people with MS were classified as highly fearful of falling. Twenty-seven patients were slightly concerned. Highly fearful of falling patients walked slower had a shorter step length, a wider base of support and prolonged double support phase compared to slightly concerned patients. Fearful patients also demonstrated elevated variability of the center of pressure (CoP) trajectory compared to slightly concerned MS patients. Fear of falling and spatiotemporal gait alterations in people with MS are linked. Additionally, variability of the CoP during walking appears to be connected with the level of concern. PMID:24200869

  12. The role of entrainment by falling raindrops in microbursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Steven K.

    1988-01-01

    The numerical model of Krueger et al. (1986) for dry microburst simulations is used to study the role of entrainment by falling raindrops. Two series of numerical simulations were conducted: a control series, and a series with the raindrop fall speed set to zero so that the rain moved with the air instead of falling through it. The results show that entrainment due to falling raindrops helps microbursts with large raindrop mixing ratios to form in stable stratifications. It is found that entrainment appears to contribute to the small spatial and temporal scales that characterize microburst outflows.

  13. Stick balancing, falls and Dragon-Kings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, J. L.; Milton, J. G.

    2012-05-01

    The extent to which the occurrence of falls, the dominant feature of human attempts to balance a stick at their fingertip, can be predicted is examined in the context of the "Dragon-King" hypothesis. For skilled stick balancers, fluctuations in the controlled variable, namely the vertical displacement angle θ, exhibit power law behaviors. When stick balancing is made less stable by either decreasing the length of the stick or by requiring the subject to balance the stick on the surface of a table tennis racket, systematic departures from the power law behaviors are observed in the range of large θ. This observation raises the possibility that the presence of departures from the power law in the large length scale region, possibly Dragon-Kings, may identify situations in which the occurrence of a fall is more imminent. However, whether or not Dragon-Kings are observed, there is a Weibull-type survival function for stick falling. The possibility that increased risk of falling can, at least to some extent, be predicted from fluctuations in the controlled variable before the event occurs has important implications for the development of preventative strategies for the management of phenomena ranging from earthquakes to epileptic seizures to falls in the elderly.

  14. [Can falls be prevented?].

    PubMed

    Dubousset, Jean

    2014-06-01

    Most recommendations and measures intended to prevent falls focus on the elderly (see HAS guideline of April 2009) but, in our opinion, this isfar too late: prevention must begin much earlier, not only by identifying persons at risk, but also by providing personalized lifestyle advice adapted to each individual's biomechanical, somatic, neurological and biological characteristics. The first preventive measure is to identify a possible deterioration of balance, starting with a physical examination at the age of 45 and repeated regularly throughout life. Extrinsic preventive measures focusing on the domestic and external environments are clearly necessary. But what is most important is to detect and, if necessary, correct any degradation of intrinsic (intracorporeal or somatic) factors starting at the age of 45 years; these include vision, vestibular function and balance, proprioception, and psychological and neurological status. Chronic illnesses and their treatments must also be taken into account: treatment must be limited to indispensable drugs; sedative psychotropics must be avoided if possible; and polymedication must be tightly controlled, as it is a major risk factor for falls. Prevention also requires a diet sufficiently rich in protein, calcium and vitamin D3 (to prevent osteoporosis), and regular daily exercise adapted to the individual, if possible associated with a simultaneous cognitive task. The last key point is the absolute need for thorough functional rehabilitation after any accidental or medical trauma, regardless of age, with the aim of restoring functional status to that existing prior to the accident. PMID:26983186

  15. [Falls in patients with dementia].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kiyoshi

    2008-11-01

    People with cognitive impairment are at about 2 to 3 times higher risk of falling compared with cognitively intact elderly. Incidence of falls among patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is high, nevertheless the clinical feature common in patients with mild to moderate AD is the absence of motor impairment. Recent studies suggest that the divided attention markedly impairs the ability of patients with AD to regulate the gait. Falls are particularly common in Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) patients and may aid diagnosis, and the falls are associated with parkinsonism and other unclear factors. Treatment studies evaluating fall reduction strategies in dementia patients are a priority. PMID:18974447

  16. Preventing falls with vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Shuler, Franklin D; Schlierf, Thomas; Wingate, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Falls are the number one cause for injury-related morbidity and mortality in West Virginia's seniors. Multiple independent variables contribute to the risk of a fall: previous falls, alterations in balance and vision, impairments in gait and strength, and medications most highly correlate with the risk for a fall. Vitamin D supplementation is emerging as an easy, safe and well-tolerated fall reduction/prevention strategy due to the beneficial effects on the musculoskeletal system with improvements in strength, function and navigational abilities. From meta-analysis data, maximal fall reduction benefit in seniors is achieved when correcting vitamin D deficiency and when using adjunctive calcium supplementation. It is therefore recommended that practitioners in our state screen for fall risks and consider the addition of supplementation protocols that provide sufficient vitamin D and calcium to our seniors. PMID:24984399

  17. Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2009-01-01

    The common approach to scaling, according to Christopher Dede, a professor of learning technologies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, is to jump in and say, "Let's go out and find more money, recruit more participants, hire more people. Let's just keep doing the same thing, bigger and bigger." That, he observes, "tends to fail, and fail…

  18. Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2009-01-01

    The common approach to scaling, according to Christopher Dede, a professor of learning technologies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, is to jump in and say, "Let's go out and find more money, recruit more participants, hire more people. Let's just keep doing the same thing, bigger and bigger." That, he observes, "tends to fail, and fail

  19. Functional Performance As a Predictor of Injurious Falls Among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Rachel E.; Leveille, Suzanne G.; Beauchamp, Marla K.; Travison, Thomas; Alexander, Neil; Jette, Alan M.; Bean, Jonathan F.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Guidelines for falls risk assessment include functional performance although evidence supporting specific tests for predicting injurious falls is lacking. We investigated whether a performance battery/its components aid in predicting injurious falls. DESIGN Longitudinal analysis; prospective cohort study. SETTING Clinical site. PARTICIPANTS 755 Boston area community-dwelling adults (mean SD: age=78.1 5.4, 64.1% women, 77.6% white). MEASUREMENTS Baseline functional performance was determined by the SPPB measuring balance, gait speed, and 5 repeated chair stands. Fall history (past year) and efficacy in performing 10 daily activities without falling were assessed. Falls were assessed using a daily calendar over 4 years. Injurious falls were defined by fractures, sprains, dislocations, pulled or torn muscles, ligaments, or tendons or by seeking medical attention. RESULTS Poorest chair stand performance was associated with greater hazard of injurious falls compared to all other groups (HR [95% CI]: 1.96 [1.183.26], 1.65 [1.072.55], and 1.60 [1.032.48] for ?16.7s vs. 13.716.6s, 11.213.6s, and <11.2s). SPPB did not predict injurious falls. Fall history predicted injurious falls (HR [95% CI]: 1.82 [1.392.39]); falls efficacy did not. Fall history and a slow chair stand (<16.7s) compounded 2-year cumulative incidence of an injurious fall (0.46, [0.340.58]) compared to positive fall history (0.29, [0.250.34]) or a slow chair stand alone (0.21, [0.130.30]). CONCLUSION An easily administered chair stand test may be sufficient for evaluating performance as part of a risk stratification strategy for injurious falls. PMID:25688606

  20. The safety of safety research: the case of patient fall research.

    PubMed

    Morse, Janice M

    2006-06-01

    Most fall intervention programs consist of 2 components: fall risk prediction instruments to identify the patient who is likely to fall, and fall intervention strategies to prevent the patient from falling or to protect the patient from injury should a fall occur. While critical to the effectiveness of a fall intervention program, many of the fall risk prediction instruments have been criticized for their failure to accurately identify the fall-prone patient. In this article, in the context of the validity assessments conducted on the Morse Fall Scale, the research conducted in the past 2 decades on fall risk assessment is critiqued. Some fall prediction research is based upon invalid assumptions and/or errors in design, both in the development of risk scales and in the evaluation of these instruments. Many of these instruments have been constructed with inappropriate reliance on face validity, have been evaluated inadequately, or have been tested in the clinical setting using an invalid design. Finally, improper use of fall scales in the clinical area may increase the risk of injury to the patient. The author concludes that much nursing research on patient falls does not contribute to improved patient safety. PMID:16871851

  1. The Effects of an Education Program on Home Renovation for Fall Prevention of Korean Older People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Miseon; Lee, Yeunsook

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to verify the effects of an education program on home renovation for fall prevention among older people, more specifically fall efficacy and home renovation intentions. A quasiexperimental study with nonequivalent control and comparative groups was conducted to demonstrate the effects of the education. A total of 51 older people…

  2. The Effects of an Education Program on Home Renovation for Fall Prevention of Korean Older People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Miseon; Lee, Yeunsook

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to verify the effects of an education program on home renovation for fall prevention among older people, more specifically fall efficacy and home renovation intentions. A quasiexperimental study with nonequivalent control and comparative groups was conducted to demonstrate the effects of the education. A total of 51 older people

  3. A pilot plant scale evaluation of a new process aid for enhancing chlorine efficacy against pathogen survival and cross-contamination during produce wash.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yaguang; Nou, Xiangwu; Millner, Patricia; Zhou, Bin; Shen, Cangliang; Yang, Yang; Wu, Yunpeng; Wang, Qin; Feng, Hao; Shelton, Dan

    2012-08-17

    Developing food safety intervention technology that can be readily adopted by the industry often requires test conditions that match as closely as possible to those of commercial food processing operations; yet biosafety risks inherent in pathogen studies constrain most experiments to laboratory settings. In this study, we report the first semi-commercial pilot-scale evaluation of a new process aid, T128, for its impact on enhancing the antimicrobial efficacy of chlorinated wash water against pathogen survival and cross-contamination. A non-pathogenic, BSL-1, strain of Escherichia coli O157:H7 was inoculated onto freshly harvested baby spinach leaves and washed with large amounts of freshly cut un-inoculated iceberg lettuce shreds in wash water with free chlorine periodically replenished, in the presence or absence of T128. Changes in water quality and pathogen survival and cross-contamination were monitored at every 2 min intervals for up to 36 min for each treatment during the wash operation. Results indicated that the use of T128 did not significantly (P>0.05) influence the rate of wash water deterioration, nor the pathogen populations remaining on the inoculated spinach leaves. However, in the absence of T128 (control), survival of E. coli O157:H7 in wash water and cross-contamination of un-inoculated lettuce frequently occurred when free chlorine in solution dropped below 1mg/l during the wash process. In contrast, the use of T128 significantly reduced the occurrence of E. coli O157:H7 surviving in wash water and of cross-contamination to un-inoculated shredded iceberg lettuce under the same operational conditions, suggesting that the application of T128 in a chlorine-based fresh produce sanitization system could increase the safety margin of process control on fresh-cut operations. PMID:22857846

  4. The efficacy of a commercial competitive exclusion product on Campylobacter colonization in broiler chickens in a 5-week pilot-scale study.

    PubMed

    Schneitz, C; Hakkinen, M

    2016-05-01

    The efficacy of the commercial competitive exclusion product Broilact againstCampylobacter jejuniwas evaluated in broiler chickens in a 5-week pilot-scale study. Newly-hatched broiler chicks were brought from a commercial hatchery. After arrival 50 seeder chicks were challenged orally with approximately 10(3)cfu ofC. jejuni, wing marked, and placed back in a delivery box and moved to a separate room. The rest of the chicks (contact chicks) were placed in floor pens, 100 chicks per pen. Birds in two pens were treated orally on the day of hatch with the commercial competitive exclusion (CE) product Broilact, and three pens were left untreated. The following day 10 seeder chicks were introduced into the Broilact treated and untreated control pens. One pen was left both untreated and unchallenged (0-control). Each week the ceca of 10 contact chicks and one seeder chick were examined quantitatively forCampylobacter The treatment prevented or significantly reduced the colonization of the challenge organism in the ceca during the two first weeks; the percentage of colonized birds being 0% after the first week and 30% after the second week in the Broilact treated groups but was 100% in the control groups the entire 5-week rearing period. During the third rearing week the proportion ofCampylobacterpositive birds started to increase in the treated pens, being 80% after the third week and 95 and 90% after the fourth and fifth rearing weeks, respectively. Similarly the average count ofCampylobacterin the cecal contents of the Broilact treated chicks started to increase, the difference between the treated and control chicks being 1.4 logs at the end of the rearing period. Although the protective effect was temporary and occurred only during the first two weeks of the rearing period, the results of this study support the earlier observations that CE flora designed to protect chicks fromSalmonellamay also reduceCampylobactercolonization of broiler chickens. PMID:26944963

  5. Is the General Self-Efficacy Scale a Reliable Measure to be used in Cross-Cultural Studies? Results from Brazil, Germany and Colombia.

    PubMed

    Damásio, Bruno F; Valentini, Felipe; Núñes-Rodriguez, Susana I; Kliem, Soeren; Koller, Sílvia H; Hinz, Andreas; Brähler, Elmar; Finck, Carolyn; Zenger, Markus

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated cross-cultural measurement invariance for the General Self-efficacy Scale (GSES) in a large Brazilian (N = 2.394) and representative German (N = 2.046) and Colombian (N = 1.500) samples. Initially, multiple-indicators multiple-causes (MIMIC) analyses showed that sex and age were biasing items responses on the total sample (2 and 10 items, respectively). After controlling for these two covariates, a multigroup confirmatory factor analysis (MGCFA) was employed. Configural invariance was attested. However, metric invariance was not supported for five items, in a total of 10, and scalar invariance was not supported for all items. We also evaluated the differences between the latent scores estimated by two models: MIMIC and MGCFA unconstraining the non-equivalent parameters across countries. The average difference was equal to |.07| on the estimation of the latent scores, and 22.8% of the scores were biased in at least .10 standardized points. Bias effects were above the mean for the German group, which the average difference was equal to |.09|, and 33.7% of the scores were biased in at least .10. In synthesis, the GSES did not provide evidence of measurement invariance to be employed in this cross-cultural study. More than that, our results showed that even when controlling for sex and age effects, the absence of control on items parameters in the MGCFA analyses across countries would implicate in bias of the latent scores estimation, with a higher effect for the German population. PMID:27225231

  6. Efficacy of local use of probiotics as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in chronic periodontitis and halitosis: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Penala, Soumya; Kalakonda, Butchibabu; Pathakota, Krishnajaneya Reddy; Jayakumar, Avula; Koppolu, Pradeep; Lakshmi, Bolla Vijaya; Pandey, Ruchi; Mishra, Ashank

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Periodontitis is known to have multifactorial etiology, involving interplay between environmental, host and microbial factors. The current treatment approaches are aimed at reducing the pathogenic microorganisms. Administration of beneficial bacteria (probiotics) has emerged as a promising concept in the prevention and treatment of periodontitis. Thus, the aim of the present study is to evaluate the efficacy of the local use of probiotics as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP) in the treatment of patients with chronic periodontitis and halitosis. Methods: This is a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded trial involving 32 systemically healthy chronic periodontitis patients. After SRP, the subjects were randomly assigned into the test and control groups. Test group (SRP + probiotics) received subgingival delivery of probiotics and probiotic mouthwash, and control group (SRP + placebo) received subgingival delivery of placebo and placebo mouthwash for 15 days. Plaque index (PI), modified gingival index (MGI), and bleeding index (BI) were assessed at baseline, 1 and 3 months thereafter, whereas probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment level were assessed at baseline and after 3 months. Microbial assessment using N-benzoyl-DL-arginine-naphthylamide (BANA) and halitosis assessment using organoleptic scores (ORG) was done at baseline, 1 and 3 months. Findings: All the clinical and microbiological parameters were significantly reduced in both groups at the end of the study. Inter-group comparison of PD reduction (PDR) and clinical attachment gain (CAG) revealed no statistical significance except for PDR in moderate pockets for the test group. Test group has shown statistically significant improvement in PI, MGI, and BI at 3 months compared to control group. Inter-group comparison revealed a significant reduction in BANA in test group at 1 month. ORG were significantly reduced in test group when compared to control group. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, the present investigation showed that the adjunctive use of probiotics offers clinical benefit in terms of pocket depth reduction in moderate pockets and reduced oral malodor parameters. PMID:27162801

  7. Fall Meeting site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. N.

    The world is clearly a very troubled place. Many problems contributing to this trouble, such as climatic changes, effects of global war, geophysical disasters, etc., are the concern and come under the purview of members of AGU. Within this context, it was clear at the last AGU Fall Meeting that the matter uppermost in most members minds was the large number of parallel sessions.In light of the overwhelming importance ascribed to this issue, I have devoted considerable thought as to how to solve this overcrowding. Putting aside for the moment the issue of whether or not the recent Cathedral Hill Hotel fire was a sign from on high in this matter, I wish to pursue what we, as a Union, can do to solve the problem. Remarkably enough, the Meetings Committee had already apparently perceived the nature of the solution (although dimly) and had stumbled upon a form of my result in a different context. It is perhaps worthwhile for me to review this previous situation prior to presenting my ideas for the West Coast meeting.

  8. 1991 Fall Meeting Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, David S.

    The AGU 1991 Fall Meeting, held in San Francisco December 9-13, was the largest national AGU meeting ever held. Meeting participation continued the steady growth trend set throughout the previous decade. A total of 4,037 papers and posters were presented, and by Friday noon of the meeting over 5,500 members had registered.Several special events were scheduled to inform and engage members on societal and programmatic aspects of our science. AGU's Committee on Education and Human Resources sponsored an open forum that addressed opportunities and problems associated with dual-career couples. A discussion of NASA's strategic plan by Berrien Moore and Joseph Alexander drew a large audience, and a special session on societal aspects of the Mt. Pinatubo eruption drew an overflow crowd. Two special lectures— “Plumes, Plates, and Deep Earth Structure” by Don L. Anderson and “New Frontiers in Aeronomy: Effects of Global Atmospheric Change” by P. M. Banks-also drew overflow crowds.

  9. Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  10. Scales

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2010-01-08

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain ? a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  11. Student Profile, Fall 1977 to Fall 1986. Historical Profiles Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Office of the Chancellor.

    The tables and graphs presented in this report reflect changes in community college enrollments in California over the past 10 years (fall 1977 to fall 1986), as they have responded to fluctuations in the state's economy, available state revenues, and community college funding. First, an executive summary highlights the following trends over the…

  12. A Piece of Paper Falling Faster than Free Fall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vera, F.; Rivera, R.

    2011-01-01

    We report a simple experiment that clearly demonstrates a common error in the explanation of the classic experiment where a small piece of paper is put over a book and the system is let fall. This classic demonstration is used in introductory physics courses to show that after eliminating the friction force with the air, the piece of paper falls

  13. Can sit-to-stand lower limb muscle power predict fall status?

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan-Yang; Wei, Shun-Hwa; Chen, Po-Yin; Tsai, Mei-Wun; Cheng, I-Chung; Liu, Ding-Hao; Kao, Chung-Lan

    2014-07-01

    Sit-to-stand (STS) movements are essential for daily activities. Failure to perform STS movements efficiently and smoothly may lead to falls. In this study, we developed a forceplate to analyze vertical ground reaction force (VGRF), STS duration and generated muscle power to investigate which parameters were fall status predictors. A total of 105 participants were included in this study and were grouped into those (1) aged between 20 and 30 years (Young), (2) aged above 65 years without a history of falling (Non-fallers) and (3) aged above 65 with a history of falling in the past 12 months (Fallers). The results indicated a significantly higher maximal lower limb muscle power (MP) for the Young (9.05 ± 3.66 W/kg), followed by Non-fallers (5.50 ± 2.02W/kg) and Fallers (3.66 ± 1.45 W/kg) as well as higher modified falls efficacy scale (MFES) scores for the Young (Young: 9.88 ± 0.10; Non-fallers: 6.27 ± 1.40; Fallers: 4.83 ± 0.89) and shorter times for the five times sit-to-stand test (FSTST) for the young (Young: 6.09 ± 2.20 s; Non-fallers: 15.65 ± 3.30s; Fallers: 19.82 ± 4.46 s). There was a significant difference between the Young group and the Non-fallers in the maximal vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) (138.79 ± 24.20 N/BW in Young, 117.51 ± 8.57 N/BW in old Non-fallers, p < 0.01), and there was a significant difference between the Non-fallers and the Fallers in the duration of the STS movement (2.74 ± 0.87 s for the Non-fallers, 4.27 ± 2.56 s for the Fallers, p < 0.01). The regression analysis results further indicated that only MP and the STS stabilization phase could differentiate individuals who had past fall events. Therefore, the equipment we developed could potentially be useful in the assessment and monitoring of balance and the risk of falling in older people. PMID:24974126

  14. Klamath Falls geothermal field, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

    1989-09-01

    Klamath Falls, Oregon, is located in a Known Geothermal Resource Area which has been used by residents, principally to obtain geothermal fluids for space heating, at least since the turn of the century. Over 500 shallow-depth wells ranging from 90 to 2,000 ft (27 to 610 m) in depth are used to heat (35 MWt) over 600 structures. This utilization includes the heating of homes, apartments, schools, commercial buildings, hospital, county jail, YMCA, and swimming pools by individual wells and three district heating systems. Geothermal well temperatures range from 100 to 230{degree}F (38 to 110{degree}C) and the most common practice is to use downhole heat exchangers with city water as the circulating fluid. Larger facilities and district heating systems use lineshaft vertical turbine pumps and plate heat exchangers. Well water chemistry indicates approximately 800 ppM dissolved solids, with sodium sulfate having the highest concentration. Some scaling and corrosion does occur on the downhole heat exchangers (black iron pipe) and on heating systems where the geo-fluid is used directly. 73 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Catching a Falling Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-07-01

    ESO's Very Large Telescope Obtains Unique Spectrum of a Meteor Summary While observing a supernova in a distant galaxy with the FORS instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope at the Paranal Observatory (Chile), astronomers were incredibly lucky to obtain serendipitously a high quality spectrum of a very large meteor in the terrestrial atmosphere. The VLT spectrograph provided a well calibrated spectrum, making it a reference in this field of research. From this spectrum, the temperature of the meteor trail was estimated to be about 4600 degrees centigrade. The serendipitous spectrum reveals the telltale meteor emissions of oxygen and nitrogen atoms and nitrogen molecules. The VLT spectrum was the first to reveal the far red range where carbon emission lines are predicted; the absence of the lines puts constraints on the role of atmospheric chemistry when life started on earth. Because the VLT is tuned to observe objects far out in space, it focuses at infinity. The meteor, being "only" 100 km above the telescope, therefore appears out of focus in the field of view. PR Photo 22a/04: Meteor Caught in the Act (MASCOT) PR Photo 22b/04: Spectrum of a Meteor (FORS1/VLT) PR Photo 22c/04: Details of the Meteor Spectrum (FORS1/VLT) Astronomers' luck ESO PR Photo 22a/04 ESO PR Photo 22a/04 Meteor Caught in the Act (MASCOT) [Preview - JPEG: 426 x 400 pix - 85k] [Normal - JPEG: 851 x 800 pix - 187k] [Full Res - JPEG: 2567 x 2413 pix - 908k] Captions: ESO PR Photo 22a/04 shows the trail of a bright meteor, photographed by the Mini All-Sky Cloud Observation Tool (MASCOT) at the ESO Paranal Observatory. MASCOT consists of a small CCD camera behind a fish-eye objective. It typically takes 90s exposures every 3 minutes and helps astronomers inside the VLT Control Room to keep an eye on the sky. The main purpose of MASCOT is to monitor the clouds over Paranal but it also observes from time to time serendipitous events like meteor showers, atmospheric phenomena, artificial satellites, etc. This image was obtained by MASCOT on August 25, 2002 and shows a meteor caught in the act. (Note that this is not the meteor whose spectrum was recorded). The Milky Way is also clearly visible in the centre. A popular saying states that when you see a meteor, you may make a wish. While astronomers cannot promise that it will be realised, a team of astronomers [1] have indeed seen a dream come true! On May 12, 2002, they were lucky to record the spectrum of a bright meteor when it happened - by sheer chance and against all reasonable odds - to cross the narrow slit of the FORS1 instrument on the ESO Very Large Telescope. At the time of this unlikely event, the telescope was performing a series of 20-minute spectroscopic exposures of a supernova in a distant galaxy in order to establish constraints on the dark energy content of the Universe (see e.g. ESO PR 21/98). Thanks to its enormous light-collecting and magnifying power, the VLT recorded the spectrum of the meteor trail perpendicular to its path on one of these exposures. "We really hit the jackpot", says ESO astronomer Emmanuel Jehin: "Chances of capturing a meteor in the narrow slit of the FORS1 spectrograph are about as big as for me winning the national lottery." Meteor spectra have on occasion been obtained serendipitously during photographic star spectra surveys. But this is now maybe the only meteor spectrum recorded with a large telescope and a modern spectrograph. The spectrum covers the wavelength range from 637 to 1050 nm, which is dominated by emissions from air atoms and molecules in the meteor path and teach us about the collision processes in the wake of a meteoroid. The rapid motion of the meteor across the sky resulted in a very brief exposure while crossing the narrow spectrograph slit - only 1/50 of a millisecond! - and despite the relative brightness of the meteor it was only thanks to the VLT's great light-gathering power that any record was procured. The meteor was estimated at magnitude -8, or nearly as bright as the first-quarter Moon. Although it is not possible to be sure from which shower this meteor belongs, a possible candidate is the Southern May Ophiuchid shower which appears from a direction just east of the bright star Antares. The shower contributes only one or two meteors per hour but was one of the stronger showers of that night. Telltale emissions ESO PR Photo 22b/04 ESO PR Photo 22b/04 Spectrum of a Meteor (FORS1/VLT) [Preview - JPEG: 426 x 400 pix - 91k] [Normal - JPEG: 851 x 800 pix - 232k] [Full Res - JPEG: 2567 x 2413 pix - 2.1M] ESO PR Photo 22c/04 ESO PR Photo 22c/04 Details of the Meteor Spectrum (FORS1/VLT) [Preview - JPEG: 1006 x 400 pix - 122k] [Normal - JPEG: 2011 x 800 pix - 236k] [Full Res - JPEG: 3414 x 1358 pix - 957k] Captions: ESO PR Photo 22b/04 shows the spectrum of a bright meteor, as observed serendipitously by the multi-mode FORS 1 instrument on the ESO Very Large Telescope during the night of May 12-13, 2002, in front of a photo of the VLT enclosures and with a meteor trail inserted in the sky (montage). The position of the meteor trail on the narrow slit of FORS (not to scale) is also indicated. The lower panel shows the spectrum of the meteor, following removal of the supernova spectrum and before (up) and after (down) removal of the spectrum of the night sky by image processing. Several emission lines from colliding Oxygen and Nitrogen atoms (sharp emissions) and molecules (broad emissions) are visible. ESO PR Photo 22c/04 illustrates details of the extracted VLT meteor spectrum (solid line): the intensity (in arbitrary units) is shown as a function of the wavelength. The dashed line is a theoretical model of the spectrum of air heated to a temperature of 4600 degrees at an altitude of 95 km. "At first, the bright trace across the supernova spectrum was a puzzle, but then I realized that the spectroscopic signature was that of our atmosphere being bombarded," says astronomer Remi Cabanac of the Catholic University of Santiago de Chile. "We asked around to see if others in our country had witnessed the meteor, but it seems we at the VLT were the only ones, perhaps not too surprising as Paranal is located in the middle of the empty desert." And unfortunately for the astronomers, the MASCOT all-sky camera (e.g. PR Photo 22a/04) was not yet in operation at that time. The VLT spectrograph provided a well calibrated spectrum of the meteor emission, making it a reference in this field of research. The meteor emission results from collisions between air molecules, knocked to high speeds after initial collision with the meteoroid. Closer inspection of the spectrum revealed about 20 telltale meteor emissions of oxygen and nitrogen atoms and nitrogen molecules (see PR Photo 22b/04 and 22c/04). The ratio of atomic and molecular emissions could be used as a "thermometer" to measure the conditions in the meteor-induced hot gas in the wake of the meteoroid, by means of laboratory measurements and meteor models that calibrate the VLT data. From here to infinity "To our surprise, we found the meteor trail to be wider than expected and also that the meteor's heat appeared evenly distributed in the trail, with the temperature varying only from about 4,570 to 4,650 degrees across the trail," says meteor specialist, astronomer Peter Jenniskens of the SETI Intitute, who analysed the data together with Christophe Laux of the Ecole Centrale Paris (France) and Iain Boyd of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor (USA). "We later realised that this was due to the fact that, as seen by the VLT, the meteor trail was out of focus, even though it was 100 kilometres away!" The VLT is indeed focussed at infinity, which is perfect for most astronomical objects that it routinely observes. But not for meteoroids entering the atmosphere above Paranal. A point at 100 kilometres distance will appear as a small circle of diameter 15 arcsec at the VLT focal plane. This corresponds to roughly half of the maximum apparent diameter of Mars in the evening sky! It is the same effect as when you try to photograph your children with a forest in the background. If you focus your camera on the distant forest, then (in most cases) your children will be out of focus. Or to put this in another way, the VLT is clearly not very suited to observe ships passing by on the Pacific Ocean, just 12 km from Paranal! No Trace of Carbon The meteor spectrum also provided a first view of such an object in the near-infrared window between wavelengths 900 and 1050 nm. This spectral region contains relatively strong lines of atomic carbon, but no such emissions were detected. "We calculated that these lines should have been visible if all atmospheric carbon dioxide in the meteor path was dissociated into carbon and oxygen atoms," says Jenniskens, "but they were conspicuously absent". This observation is important because it sets new constraints on the efficiency of meteor-induced atmospheric chemistry at the time when life began on our planet. Appendix: Cosmic showers Meteoroids are small grains of rocks orbiting the Sun. Far smaller than asteroids, they make their presence known to us in a dramatic and beautiful way when they enter earth's atmosphere and burn up, producing a short glowing trail in the night sky, rarely lasting more than a second or two - a meteor. Most meteoroids are completely destroyed at altitudes between 80 and 110 km, but some of the bigger ones make it to the ground. Here they may be collected as meteorites. Many meteoroids originate as fragments of asteroids and appear to be unaltered since the formation of the Solar System, some 4500 million years ago. Based on the peculiar composition of some meteorites, we know that a small fraction of meteoroids originate from the Moon, Mars or the large asteroid Vesta. They obviously result from major impacts on these bodies which blasted rock fragments into space. These fragments then orbit the Sun and may eventually collide with the Earth. Comets are another important source of meteoroids and perhaps the most spectacular. After many visits near the Sun, a comet "dirty-snowball" nucleus of ice and dust decays and fragments, leaving a trail of meteoroids along its orbit. Some "meteoroid streams" cross the earth's orbit and when our planet passes through them, some of these particles will enter the atmosphere. The outcome is a meteor shower - the most famous being the "Perseids" in the month of August [2] and the "Leonids" in November. Thus, although meteors are referred to as "shooting" or "falling stars" in many languages, they are of a very different nature. More information The research presented in this paper is published in the journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science, Vol. 39, Nr. 4, p. 1, 2004 ("Spectroscopic anatomy of a meteor trail cross section with the ESO Very Large Telescope", by P. Jenniskens et al.). Notes [1] The team is composed of Peter Jenniskens (SETI Institute, USA), Emmanuël Jehin (ESO), Remi Cabanac (Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile), Christophe Laux (Ecole Centrale de Paris, France), and Iain Boyd (University of Michigan, USA). [2] The maximum of the Perseids is expected on August 12 after sunset and should be easily seen.

  16. A short form of the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE-6): Development, psychometric properties and validity in an intercultural non-clinical sample and a sample of patients at risk for heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Romppel, Matthias; Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph; Wachter, Rolf; Edelmann, Frank; Düngen, Hans-Dirk; Pieske, Burkert; Grande, Gesine

    2013-01-01

    Objective: General self-efficacy has been found to be an influential variable related to the adaptation to stress and chronic illness, with the General Self-Efficacy (GSE) Scale by Jerusalem and Schwarzer being a reliable and valid instrument to assess this disposition. The aim of this study was to construct and test a short form of this scale to allow for a more economical assessment of the construct. Methods: The item characteristics of the original scale were assessed using an intercultural non-clinical sample (n=19,719). Six items with the highest coefficient of variation and good discrimination along the range of the trait were selected to build a short form of the instrument (GSE-6). Subsequently, the psychometric properties and the concurrent and predictive validity of the GSE-6 were tested in a longitudinal design with three measurements using a sample of patients with risk factors for heart failure (n=1,460). Results: Cronbach’s alpha for the GSE-6 was between .79 and .88. We found negative associations with symptoms of depression (–.35 and –.45), anxiety (–.35), and vital exhaustion (–.38) and positive associations with social support (.30), and mental health (.36). In addition, the GSE-6 score was positively associated with active problem-focused coping (.26) and distraction/self-encouragement (.25) and negatively associated with depressive coping (–.34). The baseline GSE-6 score predicted mental health and physical health after 28 months, even after controlling for the respective baseline score. The relative stability over twelve and 28 months was r=.50 and r=.60, respectively, while the mean self-efficacy score did not change over time. Conclusions: The six item short form of the GSE scale is a reliable and valid instrument that is useful for the economical assessment of general self-efficacy in large multivariate studies and for screening purposes. PMID:23429426

  17. Evaluations of Bollgard, Bollgard II, and Widestrike technologies against beet and fall armyworm larvae (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic cottons containing the Bollgard®, Bollgard II® and WideStrike® traits were grown in 2005 and 2007 to examine the efficacy against beet [Spodoptera exigua (Hübner)] and fall armyworms [S. frugiperda (J. E. Smith)]. Results suggest that both dual-gene traits are more efficacious against th...

  18. Not Just a Fall Tree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller-Hewes, Kathy A.

    2004-01-01

    Trees burst with color in the northern states. Autumn leaves dust the ground. Painting the fall landscape is nothing new. Teachers have been doing it in classrooms for decades. The approach, however, can make the difference between whether the fall landscape is simply painting for fun, or a real learning experience. Students learn best when they…

  19. Persistence. Snapshot Report, Fall 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Today's college student is not your '60s drop-out. In 2010, college students tended to stay enrolled (i.e., persist), even if it was in a different school, according to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. For a student enrolled in the fall, persistence is defined as either continued enrollment during the next term after the fall or…

  20. Preventing Falls and Related Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... mental alertness as well as those taking some types of medications (see above table) are more likely to fall as a result of drug-related side effects such as dizziness, confusion, disorientation, or slowed reflexes. Drinking alcoholic beverages also increases the risk of falling. Alcohol ...

  1. Results of falling barrier analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, G.L.

    1994-10-31

    This document assesses the consequences if the isolation barrier plate is dropped and falls over on the fuel stored in the water-filled K-East basin. The water slows the rate of fall and some canister bending is expected but only a few rods, if any, would get crushed. The basin criticality calculations will not be affected.

  2. Automatic Fall Monitoring: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Pannurat, Natthapon; Thiemjarus, Surapa; Nantajeewarawat, Ekawit

    2014-01-01

    Falls and fall-related injuries are major incidents, especially for elderly people, which often mark the onset of major deterioration of health. More than one-third of home-dwelling people aged 65 or above and two-thirds of those in residential care fall once or more each year. Reliable fall detection, as well as prevention, is an important research topic for monitoring elderly living alone in residential or hospital units. The aim of this study is to review the existing fall detection systems and some of the key research challenges faced by the research community in this field. We categorize the existing platforms into two groups: wearable and ambient devices; the classification methods are divided into rule-based and machine learning techniques. The relative merit and potential drawbacks are discussed, and we also outline some of the outstanding research challenges that emerging new platforms need to address. PMID:25046016

  3. Cowlitz Falls Fish Passage.

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The upper Cowlitz was once home to native salmon and steelhead. But the combined impacts of overharvest, farming, logging and road building hammered fish runs. And in the 1960s, a pair of hydroelectric dams blocked the migration path of ocean-returning and ocean-going fish. The lower Cowlitz still supports hatchery runs of chinook, coho and steelhead. But some 200 river miles in the upper river basin--much of it prime spawning and rearing habitat--have been virtually cut off from the ocean for over 26 years. Now the idea is to trap-and-haul salmon and steelhead both ways and bypass previously impassable obstacles in the path of anadromous fish. The plan can be summarized, for the sake of explanation, in three steps: (1) trap and haul adult fish--collect ocean-returning adult fish at the lowermost Cowlitz dam, and truck them upstream; (2) reseed--release the ripe adults above the uppermost dam, and let them spawn naturally, at the same time, supplement these runs with hatchery born fry that are reared and imprinted in ponds and net pens in the watershed; (3) trap and haul smolts--collection the new generation of young fish as they arrive at the uppermost Cowlitz dam, truck them past the three dams, and release them to continue their downstream migration to the sea. The critical part of any fish-collection system is the method of fish attraction. Scientists have to find the best combination of attraction system and screens that will guide young fish to the right spot, away from the turbine intakes. In the spring of 1994 a test was made of a prototype system of baffles and slots on the upriver face of the Cowlitz Falls Dam. The prototype worked at 90% efficiency in early tests, and it worked without the kind of expensive screening devices that have been installed on other dams. Now that the success of the attraction system has been verified, Harza engineers and consultants will design and build the appropriate collection part of the system.

  4. Transfer effects of fall training on balance performance and spatiotemporal gait parameters in healthy community-dwelling older adults: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Donath, Lars; Faude, Oliver; Bridenbaugh, Stephanie A; Roth, Ralf; Soltermann, Martin; Kressig, Reto W; Zahner, Lukas

    2014-07-01

    This study examined transfer effects of fall training on fear of falling (Falls Efficacy Scale-International [FES-I]), balance performance, and spatiotemporal gait characteristics in older adults. Eighteen community-dwelling older adults (ages 65-85) were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. The intervention group completed 12 training sessions (60 min, 6 weeks). During pre- and posttesting, we measured FES-I, balance performance (double limb, closed eyes; single limb, open eyes; double limb, open eyes with motor-interfered task), and gait parameters (e.g., velocity; cadence; stride time, stride width, and stride length; variability of stride time and stride length) under single- and motor-interfered tasks. Dual tasks were applied to appraise improvements of cognitive processing during balance and gait. FES-I (p = .33) and postural sway did not significantly change (0.36 < p < .79). Trends toward significant interaction effects were found for step width during normal walking and stride length variability during the motor dual task (p = .05, ηp 2 = .22). Fall training did not sufficiently improve fear of falling, balance, or gait performance under single- or dual-task conditions in healthy older adults. PMID:23881433

  5. Efficacy of commercial produce sanitizers against nontoxigenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 during processing of iceberg lettuce in a pilot-scale leafy green processing line.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Gordon R; Buchholz, Annemarie L; Ryser, Elliot T

    2013-11-01

    Chemical sanitizers are routinely used during commercial flume washing of fresh-cut leafy greens to minimize cross-contamination from the water. This study assessed the efficacy of five commercial sanitizer treatments against Escherichia coli O157:H7 on iceberg lettuce, in wash water, and on equipment during simulated commercial production in a pilot-scale processing line. Iceberg lettuce (5.4 kg) was inoculated to contain 10(6) CFU/g of a four-strain cocktail of nontoxigenic, green fluorescent protein-labeled, ampicillin-resistant E. coli O157:H7 and processed after 1 h of draining at ~22 °C. Lettuce was shredded using a commercial slicer, step-conveyed to a flume tank, washed for 90 s using six different treatments (water alone, 50 ppm of peroxyacetic acid, 50 ppm of mixed peracid, or 50 ppm of available chlorine either alone or acidified to pH 6.5 with citric acid [CA] or T-128), and then dried using a shaker table and centrifugal dryer. Various product (25-g) and water (50-ml) samples collected during processing along with equipment surface samples (100 cm(2)) from the flume tank, shaker table, and centrifugal dryer were homogenized in neutralizing buffer and plated on tryptic soy agar. During and after iceberg lettuce processing, none of the sanitizers were significantly more effective (P ≤ 0.05) than water alone at reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations on lettuce, with reductions ranging from 0.75 to 1.4 log CFU/g. Regardless of the sanitizer treatment used, the centrifugal dryer surfaces yielded E. coli O157:H7 populations of 3.49 to 4.98 log CFU/100 cm(2). Chlorine, chlorine plus CA, and chlorine plus T-128 were generally more effective (P ≤ 0.05) than the other treatments, with reductions of 3.79, 5.47, and 5.37 log CFU/ml after 90 s of processing, respectively. This indicates that chlorine-based sanitizers will likely prevent wash water containing low organic loads from becoming a vehicle for cross-contamination. PMID:24215685

  6. Child Adjustment and Parent Efficacy Scale-Developmental Disability (CAPES-DD): First psychometric evaluation of a new child and parenting assessment tool for children with a developmental disability.

    PubMed

    Emser, Theresa S; Mazzucchelli, Trevor G; Christiansen, Hanna; Sanders, Matthew R

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Child Adjustment and Parent Efficacy Scale-Developmental Disability (CAPES-DD), a brief inventory for assessing emotional and behavioral problems of children with developmental disabilities aged 2- to 16-years, as well as caregivers' self-efficacy in managing these problems. A sample of 636 parents participated in the study. Children's ages ranged from 2 to 15. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported a 21-item, three-factor model of CAPES-DD child adjustment with 13 items describing behavioral (10 items) and emotional (3 items) problems and 8 items describing prosocial behavior. Three additional items were included due to their clinical usefulness and contributed to a Total Problem Score. Factor analyses also supported a 16-item, one factor model of CAPES-DD self-efficacy. Psychometric evaluation of the CAPES-DD revealed scales had satisfactory to very good internal consistency, as well as very good convergent and predictive validity. The instrument is to be in the public domain and free for practitioners and researchers to use. Potential uses of the measure and implications for future validation studies are discussed. PMID:26921524

  7. Highlights of 2012 Fall Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Carol

    2013-01-01

    This past December the streets of San Francisco, Calif., surrounding the Moscone Center were awash with a sea of Earth and space scientists attending the 45th consecutive AGU Fall Meeting, eager to share and expand their knowledge "for the benefit of humanity." As it has for many years, attendance at AGU's Fall Meeting—the largest gathering of Earth and space scientists in the world—continued to increase, this year passing the 24,000 mark. Attendees at the meeting, which took place on 3-7 December 2012, hailed from 97 countries; nearly 7000 of them were students. News from the Fall Meeting was carried in newspapers and on Web sites around the world, and the social media sphere lit up with talk of AGU and the Fall Meeting. It's even reported that for a short time we were a trending topic on Twitter.

  8. Community College Estimated Growth: Fall 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillippe, Kent; Mullin, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    A survey from the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) found that enrollment growth in fall 2010 slowed its pace at community colleges, increasing 3.2% from the previous year. This contrasts with more dramatic increases in recent years: more than 11% between fall 2008 and fall 2009, and nearly 17% between fall 2007 and fall 2009,…

  9. A Report of the Responses of Botswana Junior Secondary School Teachers on the Three Subscales of the Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale (TSES)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dibapile, Waitshega Tefo Smitta

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to present the findings of the study on teacher efficacy and classroom management. To collect data a survey was administered to 1006 Botswana participants. Out of 1006 participants only 6 did not complete the survey. Pearson-product moment correlation was computed to analyze the data using Statistical Package of Social…

  10. Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge Self-Efficacy Scale (TPACK-SeS) for Pre-Service Science Teachers: Construction, Validation, and Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilici, Sedef Canbazoglu; Yamak, Havva; Kavak, Nusret; Guzey, S. Selcen

    2013-01-01

    Problem Statement: Based on developments in the 21st century technology has become a large part of the classroom experience. Teachers need to have an understanding of how technology can be coordinated with pedagogy and content knowledge in order to integrate technology effectively into classroom instruction. Self-efficacy beliefs toward technology…

  11. Falls in ambulatory non-demented patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rascol, Olivier; Perez-Lloret, Santiago; Damier, Philippe; Delval, Arnaud; Derkinderen, Pascal; Destée, Alain; Meissner, Wassilios G; Tison, Francois; Negre-Pages, Laurence

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed at determining the prevalence of falling in PD patients, to assess generic and disease-specific clinical and pharmacological factors, relationship with health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) and changes in falls from OFF to ON in patients with motor fluctuations. Six-hundred and eighty-three PD patients of the COPARK survey were evaluated (11 had missing data and were excluded from the analysis). Patients with falls were identified as those with a UPDRS Item 13 ≥ 1 in the ON condition. All patients were assessed in a standardized manner [demographics, treatments, Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Pittsburg questionnaire and HR-QoL scales (SF36, PDQ39)]. Falling was reported by 108/672 (16%) PD patients during the ON state and prevalence increased according to PD severity, from 5% in Hoehn and Yahr stage 1-60% in stage 4. Falling was significantly related to lower HR-QoL. Falling correlated with (1) generic factors such as female gender, age at the end of academic studies and diuretics consumption, (2) motor PD-specific factors including disease severity, frozen gait, difficulties when arising from a chair, dyskinesia and higher levodopa daily equivalent dose and (3) non-motor PD-specific factors such as orthostatic hypotension and hallucinations. Falling was more frequent in OFF than in ON in 48/74 (64%) patients with motor fluctuations and remained unchanged in 27 patients (36%). In summary, falling affected a significant proportion of PD patients, especially in advanced stages. It was associated with a variety of generic and PD-specific factors and was related to reduced HR-QoL. PMID:25845678

  12. After a fall in the hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Falls can be a serious problem in the hospital. Factors that increase the risk of falls include: ... from illness or surgery Being in new surroundings Hospital staff often do not see patients fall. But ...

  13. Modeling seasonal migration of fall armyworm moths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westbrook, J. K.; Nagoshi, R. N.; Meagher, R. L.; Fleischer, S. J.; Jairam, S.

    2015-06-01

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith), is a highly mobile insect pest of a wide range of host crops. However, this pest of tropical origin cannot survive extended periods of freezing temperature but must migrate northward each spring if it is to re-infest cropping areas in temperate regions. The northward limit of the winter-breeding region for North America extends to southern regions of Texas and Florida, but infestations are regularly reported as far north as Québec and Ontario provinces in Canada by the end of summer. Recent genetic analyses have characterized migratory pathways from these winter-breeding regions, but knowledge is lacking on the atmosphere's role in influencing the timing, distance, and direction of migratory flights. The Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model was used to simulate migratory flight of fall armyworm moths from distinct winter-breeding source areas. Model simulations identified regions of dominant immigration from the Florida and Texas source areas and overlapping immigrant populations in the Alabama-Georgia and Pennsylvania-Mid-Atlantic regions. This simulated migratory pattern corroborates a previous migratory map based on the distribution of fall armyworm haplotype profiles. We found a significant regression between the simulated first week of moth immigration and first week of moth capture (for locations which captured ≥10 moths), which on average indicated that the model simulated first immigration 2 weeks before first captures in pheromone traps. The results contribute to knowledge of fall armyworm population ecology on a continental scale and will aid in the prediction and interpretation of inter-annual variability of insect migration patterns including those in response to climatic change and adoption rates of transgenic cultivars.

  14. Modeling seasonal migration of fall armyworm moths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westbrook, J. K.; Nagoshi, R. N.; Meagher, R. L.; Fleischer, S. J.; Jairam, S.

    2016-02-01

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith), is a highly mobile insect pest of a wide range of host crops. However, this pest of tropical origin cannot survive extended periods of freezing temperature but must migrate northward each spring if it is to re-infest cropping areas in temperate regions. The northward limit of the winter-breeding region for North America extends to southern regions of Texas and Florida, but infestations are regularly reported as far north as Québec and Ontario provinces in Canada by the end of summer. Recent genetic analyses have characterized migratory pathways from these winter-breeding regions, but knowledge is lacking on the atmosphere's role in influencing the timing, distance, and direction of migratory flights. The Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model was used to simulate migratory flight of fall armyworm moths from distinct winter-breeding source areas. Model simulations identified regions of dominant immigration from the Florida and Texas source areas and overlapping immigrant populations in the Alabama-Georgia and Pennsylvania-Mid-Atlantic regions. This simulated migratory pattern corroborates a previous migratory map based on the distribution of fall armyworm haplotype profiles. We found a significant regression between the simulated first week of moth immigration and first week of moth capture (for locations which captured ≥10 moths), which on average indicated that the model simulated first immigration 2 weeks before first captures in pheromone traps. The results contribute to knowledge of fall armyworm population ecology on a continental scale and will aid in the prediction and interpretation of inter-annual variability of insect migration patterns including those in response to climatic change and adoption rates of transgenic cultivars.

  15. Modeling seasonal migration of fall armyworm moths.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, J K; Nagoshi, R N; Meagher, R L; Fleischer, S J; Jairam, S

    2016-02-01

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith), is a highly mobile insect pest of a wide range of host crops. However, this pest of tropical origin cannot survive extended periods of freezing temperature but must migrate northward each spring if it is to re-infest cropping areas in temperate regions. The northward limit of the winter-breeding region for North America extends to southern regions of Texas and Florida, but infestations are regularly reported as far north as Québec and Ontario provinces in Canada by the end of summer. Recent genetic analyses have characterized migratory pathways from these winter-breeding regions, but knowledge is lacking on the atmosphere's role in influencing the timing, distance, and direction of migratory flights. The Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model was used to simulate migratory flight of fall armyworm moths from distinct winter-breeding source areas. Model simulations identified regions of dominant immigration from the Florida and Texas source areas and overlapping immigrant populations in the Alabama-Georgia and Pennsylvania-Mid-Atlantic regions. This simulated migratory pattern corroborates a previous migratory map based on the distribution of fall armyworm haplotype profiles. We found a significant regression between the simulated first week of moth immigration and first week of moth capture (for locations which captured ≥10 moths), which on average indicated that the model simulated first immigration 2 weeks before first captures in pheromone traps. The results contribute to knowledge of fall armyworm population ecology on a continental scale and will aid in the prediction and interpretation of inter-annual variability of insect migration patterns including those in response to climatic change and adoption rates of transgenic cultivars. PMID:26045330

  16. Preservice Agricultural Education Teachers' Sense of Teaching Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stripling, Christopher; Ricketts, John C.; Roberts, T. Grady; Harlin, Julie F.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a longitudinal examination of the teaching self-efficacy of preservice agricultural education teachers. Data were collected for two years at The University of Georgia and Texas A&M University during the Fall 2004 and Spring 2005 and the Fall 2005 and Spring 2006 semesters (N = 102). Data were collected at…

  17. Clinical Prediction of Fall Risk and White Matter Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Bang-Bon; Bergethon, Peter; Qiu, Wei Qiao; Scott, Tammy; Hussain, Mohammed; Rosenberg, Irwin; Caplan, Louis R.; Bhadelia, Rafeeque A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Tinetti scale is a simple clinical tool designed to predict risk of falling by focusing on gait and stance impairment in elderly persons. Gait impairment is also associated with white matter (WM) abnormalities. Objective To test the hypothesis that elderly subjects at risk for falling, as determined by the Tinetti scale, have specific patterns of WM abnormalities on diffusion tensor imaging. Design, Setting, and Patients Community-based cohort of 125 homebound elderly individuals. Main Outcome Measures Diffusion tensor imaging scans were analyzed using tract-based spatial statistics analysis to determine the location of WM abnormalities in subjects with Tinetti scale scores of 25 or higher (without risk of falls) and lower than 25 (with risk of falls). Multivariate linear least squares correlation analysis was performed to determine the association between Tinetti scale scores and local fractional anisotropy values on each skeletal voxel controlling for possible confounders. Results In subjects with risk of falls (Tinetti scale score <25), clusters of abnormal WM were seen in the medial frontal and parietal subcortical pathways, genu and splenium of corpus callosum, posterior cingulum, prefrontal and orbitofrontal pathways, and longitudinal pathways that connect frontal-parietal-temporal lobes. Among these abnormalities, those in medial frontal and parietal subcortical pathways correlated with Mini-Mental State Examination scores, while the other locations were unrelated to these scores. Conclusions Elderly individuals at risk for falls as determined by the Tinetti scale have WM abnormalities in specific locations on diffusion tensor imaging, some of which correlate with cognitive function scores. PMID:22332181

  18. The effects of a walking exercise program on fall-related fitness, bone metabolism, and fall-related psychological factors in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Eun Jung; Jun, Tae Won; Hawkins, Steven A

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 3-month walking exercise program with ankle weights on fall-related fitness, bone metabolism, and fall-related psychological factors. Fall-related fitness was determined from strength, balance, agility, aerobic endurance, muscle mass, and fat mass measures. Bone metabolism was measured using bone density, hormones, and biochemical markers. Fall-related psychological factors included fear of falling and falls efficacy. A 2 × 2 factorial with repeated measures design was used. All subjects were community-dwelling elderly women who volunteered to participate, and randomly were assigned to either an exercise group (n = 11) or a control group (n = 10). Results revealed significant changes in upper body strength, leg strength, aerobic endurance, and body composition. Additionally, hormones and biochemical markers changed significantly over time. Trunk fat and fear of falling changed differently among the two groups. In conclusion, this study suggests that a 3-month walking exercise program with ankle weights may have positive effects on fall-related fitness, bone metabolism, and fall-related psychological factors. PMID:21058209

  19. Yale FICSIT: risk factor abatement strategy for fall prevention.

    PubMed

    Tinetti, M E; Baker, D I; Garrett, P A; Gottschalk, M; Koch, M L; Horwitz, R I

    1993-03-01

    Based on finding a strong association between number of impairments and risk of falling in earlier studies, Yale FICSIT investigators are conducting an intervention trial comparing the effectiveness of usual care plus social visits (SV) and a targeted risk abatement intervention (TI) strategy in reducing falls among at risk community elderly persons. Subjects include members of a participating HMO who are > or = 70 years of age, cognitively intact, not terminally ill, not too physically active, and possess at least one fall risk factor. The targeted risk factors include postural hypotension; sedative use; at least four targeted medications; upper and lower extremity strength and range of motion impairments; foot problems; and balance, gait, and transfer dysfunctions. The interventions include medication adjustments, behavioral change recommendations, education and training, and home-based exercise regimens targeting the identified risk factors. The interventions are carried out by the study nurse practitioner and physical therapist in TI subjects' homes. The SV subjects receive a comparable number of home visits as the TI subjects during which a structured life review is performed by social work students. The primary outcome is occurrence of falls during the 12-month followup. Secondary outcomes include change in mobility performance and fall-related efficacy. PMID:8440856

  20. A Piece of Paper Falling Faster than Free Fall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vera, F.; Rivera, R.

    2011-01-01

    We report a simple experiment that clearly demonstrates a common error in the explanation of the classic experiment where a small piece of paper is put over a book and the system is let fall. This classic demonstration is used in introductory physics courses to show that after eliminating the friction force with the air, the piece of paper falls…

  1. Pupil Membership and Related Information. Fall 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wamboldt, Martina

    Information used to prepare this report on Colorado's public school enrollment was collected from the state's public school districts. In fall 1996, there were 673,438 students in Colorado's public schools, an increase of 17,159 students (2.6%) over the fall 1995 membership. Membership increased by 9.9% from fall 1992 to fall 1996, and this…

  2. Fall 1973 University Racial Census.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Glenwood C., Jr.; Sedlacek, William E.

    The fall 1973 enrollments for the 5 ethnic categories of students (black, Spanish surname, Oriental, American Indian and all other) are presented for the College Park campus of the University of Maryland. Blacks (6%), Orientals (2%), Spanish surname (1%), American Indian (1%), and others (91%) comprised the total College Park student body. Of the…

  3. The Fall 1980 Student Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Lowell J.; Pimentel, Eugene A.

    In fall 1980, a survey was conducted to determine the background characteristics, enrollment patterns, academic goals, and perceptions of students enrolled in the Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD) and to gather information of specific relevance to the individual campuses. The study sample of 14,198 students represented 10% of the…

  4. Continuing Education Survey, Fall 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaCalle, James F.; And Others

    In fall 1981, all students attending a continuing education course at Harford Community College (HCC) were asked to complete a survey instrument designed to collect information on student demographics, reasons for attendance, tuition payment, sources of information about the non-credit courses, registration and commuting patterns, satisfaction…

  5. Fall Armyworm in the Southeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two separate experiments testing fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) migration patterns were set up in the southeastern U.S. in 2012. Previous results showed that moths from progeny of overwintering populations from south Texas were found west of the Chattahoochee-Flint-Apalachicola river basin, ...

  6. NOVA Fall 2000 Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ransick, Kristina; Rosene, Dale; Sammons, Fran Lyons; Sammons, James

    This teacher's guide complements six programs that aired on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) in the fall of 2000. Programs include: (1) "Lincoln's Secret Weapon"; (2) "Hitler's Lost Sub"; (3) "Runaway Universe"; (4) "Garden of Eden"; (5) "Dying to Be Thin"; and (6) "Japan's Secret Garden". It provides activity set-ups related to the programs…

  7. Fall management of eastern gamagrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent research has suggested that eastern gamagrass (EGG) may be an effective alternative to chopped straw in the blended diets of dairy heifers and cows. Most extension materials discussing appropriate fall management of EGG recommend avoiding harvest within 6 weeks of first frost. Using this guid...

  8. Fellows celebrated at Fall Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anonymous

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 AGU Fellows will be presented during the Fall Meeting Honors Tribute in San Francisco, Calif. The formal ceremony will be held on Wednesday, 14 December 2011, during which President-Elect Carol Finn will introduce each Fellow and read a brief statement of the achievements for which each has been selected.

  9. Fellows celebrated at Fall Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-11-01

    The 2012 AGU Fellows will be presented during the Fall Meeting Honors Tribute in San Francisco, Calif. The formal ceremony will be held on Wednesday, 5 December 2012, during which President-elect Carol Finn will introduce each Fellow and read a brief statement of the achievements for which each has been selected.

  10. Fellows Celebrated at Fall Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-11-01

    The 2013 class of AGU Fellows will be presented during the Fall Meeting Honors Tribute in San Francisco, Calif. The formal ceremony will be held on Wednesday, 11 December 2013, during which President-elect Margaret Leinen will introduce each Fellow and read a brief statement of the achievements for which each has been selected.

  11. Student Characteristics Report, Fall 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metropolitan Community Colleges of Kansas City, MO. Div. of Planning and Development.

    As part of a continuing survey of student population characteristics at the Metropolitan Community Colleges, this report presents questionnaire responses of 14,630 regular credit enrollment students for fall 1976. Twenty-eight tables organize information by campus in terms of: male and female students by part- or full-time status; enrollment…

  12. Ecosystem Scale Acoustic Sensing Reveals Humpback Whale Behavior Synchronous with Herring Spawning Processes and Re-Evaluation Finds No Effect of Sonar on Humpback Song Occurrence in the Gulf of Maine in Fall 2006

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zheng; Jain, Ankita D.; Tran, Duong; Yi, Dong Hoon; Wu, Fan; Zorn, Alexander; Ratilal, Purnima; Makris, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    We show that humpback-whale vocalization behavior is synchronous with peak annual Atlantic herring spawning processes in the Gulf of Maine. With a passive, wide-aperture, densely-sampled, coherent hydrophone array towed north of Georges Bank in a Fall 2006 Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing (OAWRS) experiment, vocalizing whales could be instantaneously detected and localized over most of the Gulf of Maine ecosystem in a roughly 400-km diameter area by introducing array gain, of 18 dB, orders of magnitude higher than previously available in acoustic whale sensing. With humpback-whale vocalizations consistently recorded at roughly 2000/day, we show that vocalizing humpbacks (i) were overwhelmingly distributed along the northern flank of Georges Bank, coinciding with the peak spawning time and location of Atlantic herring, and (ii) their overall vocalization behavior was strongly diurnal, synchronous with the formation of large nocturnal herring shoals, with a call rate roughly ten-times higher at night than during the day. Humpback-whale vocalizations were comprised of (1) highly diurnal non-song calls, suited to hunting and feeding behavior, and (2) songs, which had constant occurrence rate over a diurnal cycle, invariant to diurnal herring shoaling. Before and during OAWRS survey transmissions: (a) no vocalizing whales were found at Stellwagen Bank, which had negligible herring populations, and (b) a constant humpback-whale song occurrence rate indicates the transmissions had no effect on humpback song. These measurements contradict the conclusions of Risch et al. Our analysis indicates that (a) the song occurrence variation reported in Risch et al. is consistent with natural causes other than sonar, (b) the reducing change in song reported in Risch et al. occurred days before the sonar survey began, and (c) the Risch et al. method lacks the statistical significance to draw the conclusions of Risch et al. because it has a 98–100% false-positive rate and lacks any true-positive confirmation. PMID:25289938

  13. Ecosystem scale acoustic sensing reveals humpback whale behavior synchronous with herring spawning processes and re-evaluation finds no effect of sonar on humpback song occurrence in the Gulf of Maine in fall 2006.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zheng; Jain, Ankita D; Tran, Duong; Yi, Dong Hoon; Wu, Fan; Zorn, Alexander; Ratilal, Purnima; Makris, Nicholas C

    2014-01-01

    We show that humpback-whale vocalization behavior is synchronous with peak annual Atlantic herring spawning processes in the Gulf of Maine. With a passive, wide-aperture, densely-sampled, coherent hydrophone array towed north of Georges Bank in a Fall 2006 Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing (OAWRS) experiment, vocalizing whales could be instantaneously detected and localized over most of the Gulf of Maine ecosystem in a roughly 400-km diameter area by introducing array gain, of 18 dB, orders of magnitude higher than previously available in acoustic whale sensing. With humpback-whale vocalizations consistently recorded at roughly 2000/day, we show that vocalizing humpbacks (i) were overwhelmingly distributed along the northern flank of Georges Bank, coinciding with the peak spawning time and location of Atlantic herring, and (ii) their overall vocalization behavior was strongly diurnal, synchronous with the formation of large nocturnal herring shoals, with a call rate roughly ten-times higher at night than during the day. Humpback-whale vocalizations were comprised of (1) highly diurnal non-song calls, suited to hunting and feeding behavior, and (2) songs, which had constant occurrence rate over a diurnal cycle, invariant to diurnal herring shoaling. Before and during OAWRS survey transmissions: (a) no vocalizing whales were found at Stellwagen Bank, which had negligible herring populations, and (b) a constant humpback-whale song occurrence rate indicates the transmissions had no effect on humpback song. These measurements contradict the conclusions of Risch et al. Our analysis indicates that (a) the song occurrence variation reported in Risch et al. is consistent with natural causes other than sonar, (b) the reducing change in song reported in Risch et al. occurred days before the sonar survey began, and (c) the Risch et al. method lacks the statistical significance to draw the conclusions of Risch et al. because it has a 98-100% false-positive rate and lacks any true-positive confirmation. PMID:25289938

  14. Efficacy of Ba Duan Jin in Improving Balance: A Study in Chinese Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Yun; Gao, Jing; Yin, Bing-Xiang; Yang, Xiang-Yu; Bai, Ding-Xi

    2016-05-01

    The current quasiexperimental study was intended to determine the efficacy of Ba Duan Jin (translation: eight-section brocade) in improving balance ability of Chinese community-dwelling older adults. The trial group (n = 47) engaged in a Ba Duan Jin exercise program for 12 weeks, whereas the control group (n = 48) participated in a 12-week walking exercise program. After the intervention, participants' balance ability was evaluated using the Timed Up and Go Test (TUGT), One Leg Standing Test (OLST), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), and Modified Falls Efficacy Scale (MFES). Ba Duan Jin was associated with increased TUGT and OLST scores at Week 6 with continuous increases reported through Week 12. Ba Duan Jin was also associated with increased BBS and MFES scores at Week 12. Ba Duan Jin may be an effective means for improving balance ability in Chinese community-dwelling older adults. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(5), 38-46.]. PMID:27110739

  15. Falling Magnets and Electromagnetic Braking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culbreath, Christopher; Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    2009-03-01

    The slow fall of a rare earth magnet through a copper pipe is a striking example of electromagnetic braking; this remarkable phenomenon has been the subject of a number of scientific paper s [1, 2]. In a pipe having radius R and wall thickness D, the terminal velocity of the falling magnet is proportional to (R̂4)/D. It is interesting to ask what happens in the limit as D becomes very large. We report our experimental observations and theoretical predictions of the dependence of the terminal velocity on pipe radius R for large D. [1] Y. Levin, F.L. da Silveira, and F.B. Rizzato, ``Electromagnetic braking: A simple quantitative model''. American Journal of Physics, 74(9): p. 815-817 (2006). [2] J.A. Pelesko, M. Cesky, and S. Huertas, Lenz's law and dimensional analysis. American Journal of Physics, 3(1): p. 37-39. 2005.

  16. Experiments with a falling rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Vitor

    2016-02-01

    We study the motion of a uniform thin rod released from rest, with the bottom end initially in contact with a horizontal surface. Our focus here is the motion of the bottom end as the rod falls. For small angles of release with respect to the horizontal, the rod falls without the bottom end slipping. For larger angles, the slipping direction depends on the static friction coefficient between the rod and the horizontal surface. Small friction coefficients cause the end to slip initially in one direction and then in the other, while for high coefficients, the end slips in one direction only. For intermediate values, depending on the angle of release, both situations can occur. We find the initial slipping direction to depend on a relation between the angle at which the rod slips, and a critical angle at which the frictional force vanishes. Comparison between experimental data and numerical simulations shows good agreement.

  17. Fellows Celebrated at Fall Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anonymous

    2014-11-01

    The 2014 class of AGU Union Fellows will be recognized during the Honors Tribute at the AGU Fall Meeting, to be held in San Francisco, Calif. The newly elected class will be presented by president-elect Margaret Leinen during the Honors Ceremony on Wednesday, 17 December 2014. A brief statement of the achievements for which each of the 62 Fellows have been elected is provided below.

  18. Design, delivery, and outcomes from an interprofessional fall prevention course.

    PubMed

    Dauenhauer, Jason A; Glose, Susan; Watt, Celia

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the development, delivery, and outcomes from an interprofessional evidence-based falls management course for undergraduate and graduate students. The 3-credit elective course was developed by a gerontological social work and nursing faculty member in partnership with community-based housing and case management organizations. Creation of the course was in response to a mandate by the Health Resources and Services Administration, funding source for federal Geriatric Education Centers, to train interprofessional students using an evidence-based approach while tying the outcomes to improved health measures in the target population. Therefore, this article describes student competencies pre- and postcourse completion and outcomes of community-dwelling older adults completing a Matter of Balance (MOB) program delivered by these students. A total of 16 students completed the course which included delivery of the MOB program to 41 older adults. Results indicate statistically significant improvements in student outcomes from a pre/post falls knowledge test. For older adult participants, many screened positively for fall risk factors pre-post MOB participation showed statistically significant improvements in falls efficacy, control, management, and overall mobility. Opportunities and challenges associated with course delivery are also described. PMID:25941927

  19. Examining Dimensions of Self-Efficacy for Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruning, Roger; Dempsey, Michael; Kauffman, Douglas F.; McKim, Courtney; Zumbrunn, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    A multifactor perspective on writing self-efficacy was examined in 2 studies. Three factors were proposed--self-efficacy for writing ideation, writing conventions, and writing self-regulation--and a scale constructed to reflect these factors. In Study 1, middle school students (N = 697) completed the Self-Efficacy for Writing Scale (SEWS), along…

  20. Examining Dimensions of Self-Efficacy for Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruning, Roger; Dempsey, Michael; Kauffman, Douglas F.; McKim, Courtney; Zumbrunn, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    A multifactor perspective on writing self-efficacy was examined in 2 studies. Three factors were proposed--self-efficacy for writing ideation, writing conventions, and writing self-regulation--and a scale constructed to reflect these factors. In Study 1, middle school students (N = 697) completed the Self-Efficacy for Writing Scale (SEWS), along

  1. Falling for her psychiatrist: an unusual cause of falls in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Glauser, Michelle; Payman, Vahid

    2016-04-01

    We describe the case of an elderly woman with auditory hallucinations of her psychiatrist commanding her to fall. The case highlights an unusual cause of falls in the elderly, not previously described in the falls literature. PMID:26626405

  2. [Efficacy studies].

    PubMed

    Pedro-Botet, Juan; Flores-Le Roux, Juana A

    2014-07-01

    Pravafenix(®) is a fixed-dose combination of 40mg of pravastatin and 160 mg of fenofibrate. The rationale behind the use of Pravafenix(®) is based on the increased residual cardiovascular risk observed in high risk patients with hypertriglyceridemia and/or low HDL cholesterol levels despite treatment with statins in monotherapy. In this article, we review the available evidence on the clinical efficacy of Pravafenix(®), which shows complementary benefits in the overall lipid profile of high risk patients with mixed dyslipidemia not controlled with 40-mg pravastatin or 20-mg simvastatin. PMID:25043542

  3. 138. MILNER DAM, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; SPILLWAY GATES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    138. MILNER DAM, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; SPILLWAY GATES AND IRRIGATION FALLS, SOUTHEAST VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  4. A best practice fall prevention exercise program to improve balance, strength / power, and psychosocial health in older adults: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With increasing age neuromuscular deficits (e.g., sarcopenia) may result in impaired physical performance and an increased risk for falls. Prominent intrinsic fall-risk factors are age-related decreases in balance and strength / power performance as well as cognitive decline. Additional studies are needed to develop specifically tailored exercise programs for older adults that can easily be implemented into clinical practice. Thus, the objective of the present trial is to assess the effects of a fall prevention program that was developed by an interdisciplinary expert panel on measures of balance, strength / power, body composition, cognition, psychosocial well-being, and falls self-efficacy in healthy older adults. Additionally, the time-related effects of detraining are tested. Methods/Design Healthy old people (n = 54) between the age of 65 to 80 years will participate in this trial. The testing protocol comprises tests for the assessment of static / dynamic steady-state balance (i.e., Sharpened Romberg Test, instrumented gait analysis), proactive balance (i.e., Functional Reach Test; Timed Up and Go Test), reactive balance (i.e., perturbation test during bipedal stance; Push and Release Test), strength (i.e., hand grip strength test; Chair Stand Test), and power (i.e., Stair Climb Power Test; countermovement jump). Further, body composition will be analysed using a bioelectrical impedance analysis system. In addition, questionnaires for the assessment of psychosocial (i.e., World Health Organisation Quality of Life Assessment-Bref), cognitive (i.e., Mini Mental State Examination), and fall risk determinants (i.e., Fall Efficacy Scale – International) will be included in the study protocol. Participants will be randomized into two intervention groups or the control / waiting group. After baseline measures, participants in the intervention groups will conduct a 12-week balance and strength / power exercise intervention 3 times per week, with each training session lasting 30 min. (actual training time). One intervention group will complete an extensive supervised training program, while the other intervention group will complete a short version ('3 times 3’) that is home-based and controlled by weekly phone calls. Post-tests will be conducted right after the intervention period. Additionally, detraining effects will be measured 12 weeks after program cessation. The control group / waiting group will not participate in any specific intervention during the experimental period, but will receive the extensive supervised program after the experimental period. Discussion It is expected that particularly the supervised combination of balance and strength / power training will improve performance in variables of balance, strength / power, body composition, cognitive function, psychosocial well-being, and falls self-efficacy of older adults. In addition, information regarding fall risk assessment, dose–response-relations, detraining effects, and supervision of training will be provided. Further, training-induced health-relevant changes, such as improved performance in activities of daily living, cognitive function, and quality of life, as well as a reduced risk for falls may help to lower costs in the health care system. Finally, practitioners, therapists, and instructors will be provided with a scientifically evaluated feasible, safe, and easy-to-administer exercise program for fall prevention. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01906034 PMID:24106864

  5. The medico-legal evaluation of injuries from falls in pediatric age groups.

    PubMed

    Kafadar, Safiye; Kafadar, Hüseyin

    2015-04-01

    Blunt trauma from accidental falls or intentional jumping from great heights occurs frequently in forensic medicine. The goal of this study was to investigate injuries due to falls in children under 19 years of age. Injuries from falls are the leading cause of visits to emergency departments and to deaths due to injuries. Various methods are used in the classification of falls. In this study, we have classified falls as "high-level" (≥ 5 m), "low-level" (<5 m) and "ground-level". We have retrospectively evaluated 814 boys (61.18%) and 512 girls (38.62%), making up a total of 1326 children (under 19 years old) with the mean age of 7.85 ± 3.46, that were admitted to State Hospital between January 2009 and December 2013 due to falls from heights and falls on ground-level. Falls were low-level in 738 cases, high-level in 176 cases, and ground-level in 412 cases. Cases were categorized by gender, age, age group, fall height, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), injured body part(s), mortality rate, and distribution according to months. In conclusion, falls merit attention because of their high risk of mortality and morbidity, as well as their burden on medical budgets. If the medico-legal aspects of falls were evaluated with regard to preventive event or death, the importance of the topic could be better understood. PMID:25735785

  6. The effectiveness of a multidisciplinary QI activity for accidental fall prevention: Staff compliance is critical

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Accidental falls among inpatients are a substantial cause of hospital injury. A number of successful experimental studies on fall prevention have shown the importance and efficacy of multifactorial intervention, though success rates vary. However, the importance of staff compliance with these effective, but often time-consuming, multifactorial interventions has not been fully investigated in a routine clinical setting. The purpose of this observational study was to describe the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary quality improvement (QI) activity for accidental fall prevention, with particular focus on staff compliance in a non-experimental clinical setting. Methods This observational study was conducted from July 2004 through December 2010 at St. Luke’s International Hospital in Tokyo, Japan. The QI activity for in-patient falls prevention consisted of: 1) the fall risk assessment tool, 2) an intervention protocol to prevent in-patient falls, 3) specific environmental safety interventions, 4) staff education, and 5) multidisciplinary healthcare staff compliance monitoring and feedback mechanisms. Results The overall fall rate was 2.13 falls per 1000 patient days (350/164331) in 2004 versus 1.53 falls per 1000 patient days (263/172325) in 2010, representing a significant decrease (p = 0.039). In the first 6 months, compliance with use of the falling risk assessment tool at admission was 91.5% in 2007 (3998/4368), increasing to 97.6% in 2010 (10564/10828). The staff compliance rate of implementing an appropriate intervention plan was 85.9% in 2007, increasing to 95.3% in 2010. Conclusion In our study we observed a substantial decrease in patient fall rates and an increase of staff compliance with a newly implemented falls prevention program. A systematized QI approach that closely involves, encourages, and educates healthcare staff at multiple levels is effective. PMID:22788785

  7. Efficacy and safety of liraglutide 3.0 mg for weight management are similar across races: subgroup analysis across the SCALE and phase II randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Ard, J; Cannon, A; Lewis, C E; Lofton, H; Vang Skjøth, T; Stevenin, B; Pi-Sunyer, X

    2016-04-01

    The efficacy and safety of liraglutide 3.0 mg versus placebo, as adjunct to diet and exercise, was evaluated in racial subgroups. This post hoc analysis of pooled data from five double-blind randomized, placebo-controlled trials was conducted in 5325 adults with either a body mass index (BMI) ≥27 kg/m(2) plus ≥1 comorbidity or a BMI ≥30 kg/m(2) . Statistical interaction tests evaluated possible treatment effect differences between racial subgroups: white (4496, 84.4%), black/African-American (550, 10.3%), Asian (168, 3.2%) and other (111, 2.1%). Effects of liraglutide 3.0 mg on weight loss, associated metabolic effects and safety profile were generally consistent across racial subgroups. All achieved statistically significant mean weight loss at end-of-treatment with liraglutide 3.0 mg versus placebo: white 7.7% versus 2.3%, black/African-American 6.3% versus 1.4%, Asian 6.3% versus 2.5%, other 7.3% versus 0.49%. Treatment effects on weight and cardiovascular risk markers generally showed no dependence on race (interaction test p > 0.05). Adverse events were similar across racial subgroups. PMID:26744025

  8. Clinical prediction of fall risk and white matter abnormalities: a diffusion tensor imaging study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Tinetti scale is a simple clinical tool designed to predict risk of falling by focusing on gait and stance impairment in elderly persons. Gait impairment is also associated with white matter (WM) abnormalities. Objective: To test the hypothesis that elderly subjects at risk for falling, as deter...

  9. Community Delivery of a Comprehensive Fall-Prevention Program in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Debra; Tompkins, Sara A.; Cameron, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Background: People with multiple sclerosis (MS) fall frequently. In 2011, the National Multiple Sclerosis Society launched a multifactorial fall-prevention group exercise and education program, Free From Falls (FFF), to prevent falls in MS. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of participation in the FFF program on balance, mobility, and falls in people with MS. Methods: This was a retrospective evaluation of assessments from community delivery of FFF. Changes in Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale scores, Berg Balance Scale scores, 8-foot Timed Up and Go performance, and falls were assessed. Results: A total of 134 participants completed the measures at the first and last FFF sessions, and 109 completed a 6-month follow-up assessment. Group mean scores on the Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale (F1,66 = 17.14, P < .05, η2 = 0.21), Berg Balance Scale (F1,68 = 23.39, P < .05, η2 = 0.26), and 8-foot Timed Up and Go (F1,79 = 4.83, P < .05, η2 = 0.06) all improved significantly from the first to the last session. At the 6-month follow-up, fewer falls were reported (χ2 [4, N = 239] = 10.56, P < .05, Phi = 0.21). Conclusions: These observational data suggest that the FFF group education and exercise program improves balance confidence, balance performance, and functional mobility and reduces falls in people with MS. PMID:26917997

  10. Detecting Falling Snow from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Gail Skofronick; Johnson, Ben; Munchak, Joe

    2012-01-01

    There is an increased interest in detecting and estimating the amount of falling snow reaching the Earth's surface in order to fully capture the atmospheric water cycle. An initial step toward global spaceborne falling snow algorithms includes determining the thresholds of detection for various active and passive sensor channel configurations, snow event cloud structures and microphysics, snowflake particle electromagnetic properties, and surface types. In this work, cloud resolving model simulations of a lake effect and synoptic snow event were used to determine the minimum amount of snow (threshold) that could be detected by the following instruments: the W -band radar of CloudSat, Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) Ku and Ka band, and the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) channels from 10 to 183 plus or minus 7 GHz. Eleven different snowflake shapes were used to compute radar reflectivities and passive brightness temperatures. Notable results include: (1) the W-Band radar has detection thresholds more than an order of magnitude lower than the future GPM sensors, (2) the cloud structure macrophysics influences the thresholds of detection for passive channels, (3) the snowflake microphysics plays a large role in the detection threshold for active and passive instruments, (4) with reasonable assumptions, "the passive 166 GHz channel has detection threshold values comparable to the GPM DPR Ku and Ka band radars with approximately 0.05 g per cubic meter detected at the surface, or an approximately 0.5-1 millimeter per hr. melted snow rate (equivalent to 0.5-2 centimeters per hr. solid fluffy snowflake rate). With detection levels of falling snow known, we can focus current and future retrieval efforts on detectable storms and concentrate advances on achievable results. We will also have an understanding of the light snowfall events missed by the sensors and not captured in the global estimates.

  11. A fully relativistic radial fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spallicci, Alessandro D. A. M.; Ritter, Patxi

    2014-10-01

    Radial fall has historically played a momentous role. It is one of the most classical problems, the solutions of which represent the level of understanding of gravitation in a given epoch. A gedankenexperiment in a modern frame is given by a small body, like a compact star or a solar mass black hole, captured by a supermassive black hole. The mass of the small body itself and the emission of gravitational radiation cause the departure from the geodesic path due to the back-action, that is the self-force. For radial fall, as any other non-adiabatic motion, the instantaneous identity of the radiated energy and the loss of orbital energy cannot be imposed and provide the perturbed trajectory. In the first part of this paper, we present the effects due to the self-force computed on the geodesic trajectory in the background field. Compared to the latter trajectory, in the Regge-Wheeler, harmonic and all others smoothly related gauges, a far observer concludes that the self-force pushes inward (not outward) the falling body, with a strength proportional to the mass of the small body for a given large mass; further, the same observer notes a higher value of the maximal coordinate velocity, this value being reached earlier during infall. In the second part of this paper, we implement a self-consistent approach for which the trajectory is iteratively corrected by the self-force, this time computed on osculating geodesics. Finally, we compare the motion driven by the self-force without and with self-consistent orbital evolution. Subtle differences are noticeable, even if self-force effects have hardly the time to accumulate in such a short orbit.

  12. 29 CFR 1917.41 - House falls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false House falls. 1917.41 Section 1917.41 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Cargo Handling Gear and Equipment § 1917.41 House falls. (a) Span beams shall be secured... working with house fall blocks. (c) Designated employees shall inspect chains, links, shackles,...

  13. 29 CFR 1917.41 - House falls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false House falls. 1917.41 Section 1917.41 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Cargo Handling Gear and Equipment § 1917.41 House falls. (a) Span beams shall be secured... working with house fall blocks. (c) Designated employees shall inspect chains, links, shackles,...

  14. 29 CFR 1917.41 - House falls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false House falls. 1917.41 Section 1917.41 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Cargo Handling Gear and Equipment § 1917.41 House falls. (a) Span beams shall be secured... working with house fall blocks. (c) Designated employees shall inspect chains, links, shackles,...

  15. 29 CFR 1917.41 - House falls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false House falls. 1917.41 Section 1917.41 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Cargo Handling Gear and Equipment § 1917.41 House falls. (a) Span beams shall be secured... working with house fall blocks. (c) Designated employees shall inspect chains, links, shackles,...

  16. Imager displays free fall in stop action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazer, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Microprocessor-controlled imaging system displays sequence of "frozen" images of free-falling object, using video cameras positioned along fall. Strobe lights flash as object passes each camera's viewfield. Sequence stored on video disk and displayed on television monitor is stop-action record of fall dynamics. With modification, system monitiors other high speed phenomena.

  17. Yosemite Falls-All Three Sections

    In this image, all three sections of Yosemite Falls can be seen. Yosemite Falls is the highest measured waterfall in North America at 2,425 ft (739 m) in height. Yosemite Falls is one of the most famous waterfalls within Yosemite National Park....

  18. 29 CFR 1917.41 - House falls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false House falls. 1917.41 Section 1917.41 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Cargo Handling Gear and Equipment § 1917.41 House falls. (a) Span beams shall be secured... working with house fall blocks. (c) Designated employees shall inspect chains, links, shackles,...

  19. Epidemiology of Falls in Older Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peel, Nancye May

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, falls among older people are a public health concern because of their frequency and adverse consequences in terms of morbidity, mortality, and quality of life, as well as their impact on health system services and costs. This epidemiological review outlines the public health burden of falls and fall-related injuries and the impact of…

  20. Implementing a Community-Based Falls-Prevention Program: From Drawing Board to Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filiatrault, Johanne; Parisien, Manon; Laforest, Sophie; Genest, Carole; Gauvin, Lise; Fournier, Michel; Trickey, Francine; Robitaille, Yvonne

    2007-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the efficacy of falls-prevention programs designed for community-dwelling seniors using randomized designs. However, little is known about the feasibility of implementing these programs under natural conditions and about the success of these programs when delivered under such conditions. The objectives of this…

  1. High School Decision-Making at Henry Lord Middle School in Fall River

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronhard, Aimee A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate how students at Henry Lord Middle School in Fall River take into consideration their initial college and career aspirations when making their decision for high school. Self-efficacy theory, critical theory, and a literature review related to high school decision-making inform the analysis of

  2. High School Decision-Making at Henry Lord Middle School in Fall River

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronhard, Aimee A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate how students at Henry Lord Middle School in Fall River take into consideration their initial college and career aspirations when making their decision for high school. Self-efficacy theory, critical theory, and a literature review related to high school decision-making inform the analysis of…

  3. Fermentation of fall-oat balage over winter in northern climates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of below-freezing temperatures on silage fermentation are poorly understood. Recently, several studies have evaluated the efficacy of producing fall-grown oat as an emergency silage crop within central Wisconsin; this late-season forage option is attractive because the yield potential is...

  4. On the use of ICE/SAT Lidar Space-Born Observations to Evaluate the Ability of MM5 Meso-Scale Model to Reproduce High Altitude Clouds Over Europe in Fall.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotkov, N. A.; Bhartia, P.; Yang, K.; Carn, S. A.; Krueger, A. J.; Dickerson, R. R.; Hains, J.; Li, C.; Li, Z.; Marufu, L.; Stehr, J.; Levelt, P. F.

    2005-05-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on EOS/Aura offers unprecedented spatial and spectral resolution, coupled with global coverage, for space-based UV measurements of sulfur dioxide (SO2). Publicly released SO2 pollution data are processed with the Band Residual Difference (BRD) algorithm that uses calibrated residuals at SO2 absorption band centers produced by the NASA operational ozone algorithm (OMTO3). By using optimum wavelengths for retrieval of SO2, the retrieval sensitivity is improved over NASA predecessor Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) by factors of 10 to 20, depending on location. The ground footprint of OMI is 8 times smaller than TOMS. These factors produce a two orders of magnitude improvement in the minimum detectable mass of SO2. The improved sensitivity now permits daily global measurement of heavy anthropogenic SO2 pollution. Anthropogenic SO2 emissions have been measured by OMI over known sources of air pollution, such as eastern China, Eastern Europe, and from individual copper smelters in South America and elsewhere. Here we present data from a case study conducted over Shenyang in NE China as part of EAST-AIRE in April 2005. SO2 observations from instrumented aircraft flights are compared with OMI SO2 maps. The OMI SO2 algorithm was improved to account for the known altitude profile of SO2, and the comparison demonstrates that this algorithm can distinguish between background SO2 conditions and heavy pollution on a daily basis. Between 5 and 7 April 2005 a cold front traveled from continental China, over Korea and on to the Sea of Japan. The satellite-derived measurements of SO2 confirm the in situ aircraft observations of high concentrations of SO2 (ca 4 DU) ahead of the front and lower concentrations behind it and provide evidence for a large-scale impact of pollutant emissions. The BRD algorithm sensitivity does not represent the maximum sensitivity theoretically achievable with OMI, and hence future improvements in instrument calibration and the algorithm should allow even weaker SO2 sources to be monitored routinely. Such measurements are essential given the growing concern over the effects of anthropogenically-forced climate change and intercontinental transport of air pollution. http://www.knmi.nl/omi/research/product/so2/introduction.html

  5. 1988 Fall Meeting AGU Fall Meeting and ASLO Winter Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The 1988 Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union, with collaboration from the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, was the largest AGU meeting ever, with 3,857 abstracts and 5,247 attendees. The facilities at the San Francisco Civic Auditorium, Brooks Hall, Cathedral Hill Hotel, and Holiday Inn Golden Gateway Hotel were not quite stretched to their capacity, but it appears unlikely that substantial meeting growth can take place without going to even larger percentages of poster papers, which for 1988 made up 24% of the presentations.Meeting statistics: Total sessions, 339; oral sessions, 282; poster sessions, 57Total presentations, 3857; oral presentations, 2933; poster presentations, 924Total meeting registrants, 5247Total media registrants, 65Total exhibits, 101

  6. Efficacy of Photodynamic Therapy and Lasers as an Adjunct to Scaling and Root Planing in the Treatment of Aggressive Periodontitis – A Clinical and Microbiologic Short Term Study

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Indranil; Rajan, Padma; Pai, Jagdish; Malagi, Sachin; Bharmappa, Radhika; Kamath, Vinesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Aggressive periodontitis comprises a group of rare, severe, rapidly progressive form of periodontitis. Conventional treatment includes mechanical debridement augmented with adjunctive antimicrobial therapy. Development of antibiotic resistance has led to use of lasers. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a novel non-invasive therapeutic approach with increased site and pathogen specificity. This study compares PDT and Lasers as an adjunct to conventional Scaling in the treatment of patients with aggressive periodontitis. Materials and Methods Fifteen untreated aggressive periodo-ntitis patients were randomly assigned in a split mouth design for one of the following treatment modalities: 1) SRP alone; (2) SRP + Diode Laser irradiation with 810 nm at 1W, continuous mode for 30 sec per tooth; (3) SRP + PDT on “0” day; (4) SRP + PDT on “0”, 7th and 21st day. The clinical parameters included PI, BOP, PPD, CAL recorded at the baseline & 3rd month. The site with greatest probing pocket depth (PPD) was selected from each quadrant for bacterial sampling and cultured for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis & Prevotella intermedia. Results Statistically significant reduction in clinical & microbial parameters was seen. Sites 4 showed a greater reduction compared to other groups. Conclusion Photodynamic therapy is a valuable treatment modality adjunctive to conventional scaling and root planing. PMID:27042576

  7. Gust effects on a freely falling plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Hui; Dong, Haibo; Liang, Zongxian; FSRG Team

    2011-11-01

    Depending on the Reynolds number and the Froude number, a freely falling plate usually performs one of the following four types of motion, flutter, tumble, steady or chaos fall. It is interesting to know that if and how a gust changes the falling status of a plate. In this work, Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) will be conducted to study the effects of gust on the freely falling plate by varying the gust amplitude, frequency, and phase relative to the falling plate. Especially, for a plate lies in the chaotic (transitional) region, how its motion be affected as a response to the gust will be discussed. NSF CBET-1055949.

  8. Disentangling the Free-Fall Arch Paradox in Silo Discharge.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Largo, S M; Janda, A; Maza, D; Zuriguel, I; Hidalgo, R C

    2015-06-12

    Several theoretical predictions of the mass flow rate of granular media discharged from a silo are based on the spontaneous development of a free-fall arch region, the existence of which is still controversial. In this Letter, we study experimentally and numerically the particle flow through an orifice placed at the bottom of 2D and 3D silos. The implementation of a coarse-grained technique allows a thorough description of all the kinetic and micromechanical properties of the particle flow in the outlet proximities. Though the free-fall arch does not exist as traditionally understood--a region above which particles have negligible velocity and below which particles fall solely under gravity action--we discover that the kinetic pressure displays a well-defined transition in a position that scales with the outlet size. This universal scaling explains why the free-fall arch picture has served as an approximation to describe the flow rate in the discharge of silos. PMID:26196830

  9. Disentangling the Free-Fall Arch Paradox in Silo Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio-Largo, S. M.; Janda, A.; Maza, D.; Zuriguel, I.; Hidalgo, R. C.

    2015-06-01

    Several theoretical predictions of the mass flow rate of granular media discharged from a silo are based on the spontaneous development of a free-fall arch region, the existence of which is still controversial. In this Letter, we study experimentally and numerically the particle flow through an orifice placed at the bottom of 2D and 3D silos. The implementation of a coarse-grained technique allows a thorough description of all the kinetic and micromechanical properties of the particle flow in the outlet proximities. Though the free-fall arch does not exist as traditionally understood—a region above which particles have negligible velocity and below which particles fall solely under gravity action—we discover that the kinetic pressure displays a well-defined transition in a position that scales with the outlet size. This universal scaling explains why the free-fall arch picture has served as an approximation to describe the flow rate in the discharge of silos.

  10. Inpatient Falls: Defining the Problem and Identifying Possible Solutions. Part II: Application of Quality Improvement Principles to Hospital Falls.

    PubMed

    Cumbler, Ethan U; Simpson, Jennifer R; Rosenthal, Laura D; Likosky, David J

    2013-10-01

    In this 2 part series, analysis of the risk stratification tools that are available and definition of the scope of the problem and potential solutions through a review of the literature is presented. A systematic review was used to identify articles for risk stratification and interventions. Three risk stratification systems are discussed, STRATIFY, Morse Fall Scale, and the Hendrich Fall Risk Model (HFRM). Of these scoring systems, the HFRM is the easiest to use and score. Predominantly, multifactorial interventions are used to prevent patient falls. Education and rehabilitation are common themes in studies with statistically significant results. The second article presents a guide to implementing a quality improvement project around hospital falls. A 10-step approach to Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycles is described. Specific examples of problems and analysis are easily applicable to any institution. Furthermore, the sustainability of interventions and targeting new areas for improvement are discussed. Although specific to falls in the hospitalized patient, the goal is to present a stepwise approach that is broadly applicable to other areas requiring quality improvement. PMID:24198902

  11. Prevalence of falls in elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Vitor, Priscila Regina Rorato; de Oliveira, Ana Carolina Kovaleski; Kohler, Renan; Winter, Gabriele Regiane; Rodacki, Cintia; Krause, Maressa Priscila

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To verify prevalence of falls and fear of falling, and to compare functional fitness among elderly women fallers and non-fallers. METHODS: Seventy-eight elderly women participated in this study. Cases of falls and the fear of falling were self-reported by the elderly women, while the functional fitness was measured by a set of functional tests. Mean and standard deviation were used to describe the sample. Independent t-test was used to compare functional fitness between groups. RESULTS: The prevalence of falls in this sample was 32.4%. Among women fallers, 40% self-reported a high fear of falling. CONCLUSION: It is recommended that functional and resistance exercises are included in the preventive strategies for reducing risk factors for falls and its determinants in elderly women. Level of Evidence II, Prognostic-Prospective Study. PMID:26207095

  12. MUD and Self Efficacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kwan Min

    2000-01-01

    Proposes a theoretical framework for analyzing the effect of MUD (Multi-User Dungeons) playing on users' self-efficacy by applying Bandura's social learning theory, and introduces three types of self-efficacy: computer self-efficacy; social self-efficacy; and generalized self-efficacy. Considers successful performance, vicarious experience,…

  13. Measuring Teacher Efficacy to Implement Inclusive Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Umesh; Loreman, Tim; Forlin, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an instrument to measure perceived teacher efficacy to teach in inclusive classrooms. An 18-item scale was developed on a sample of 607 pre-service teachers selected from four countries (Canada, Australia, Hong Kong and India). Factor analysis of responses from the sample revealed three factors: efficacy in…

  14. Self-Efficacy for Creative Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schack, Gina

    The Efficacy Scale for Creative Productivity (ESCreP) was developed to measure students' convictions that they could be creative producers. Self-efficacy, an individual's estimation of ability to perform a behavior, is based upon performance accomplishments, vicarious experiences, verbal persuasion, and emotional or physiological arousal. Three…

  15. Evaluation of three full-scale stormwater treatment systems with respect to water yield, pathogen removal efficacy and human health risk from faecal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Petterson, Susan R; Mitchell, V Grace; Davies, Cheryl M; O'Connor, James; Kaucner, Christine; Roser, David; Ashbolt, Nicholas

    2016-02-01

    In this study, three full-scale, operational stormwater harvesting systems located in Melbourne, Australia were evaluated with respect to water yields; pathogen removal performance by analysis of native surrogate data (Escherichiacoli, somatic coliphages and Clostridium perfringens); and potential human health risk associated with exposures to faecal pathogens using Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA). The water yield assessment confirmed variation between design and measured yields. Faecal contamination of urban stormwater was site specific and variable. Different treatment removal performance was observed between each of the microbial surrogates and varied between event and baseline conditions, with negligible removal of viruses during event conditions. Open storages that provide a habitat for waterfowl may lead to elevated risk due to the potential for zoonotic transmission. Nevertheless, in the Australian urban setting studied, the potential for human faecal contamination of the separated stormwater system was a critical driver of risk. If the integrity of the sewerage system can be ensured, then predicted health risks are dramatically reduced. PMID:26615487

  16. Efficacy of five volatile oils and their mixtures against the soft scale insect, Saissetia coffeae (Walker) (Hemiptera: Coccidae) infesting the Sago palm, Cycas revoluta in Alexandria, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Mesbah, H A; Nagda, A El Sayed; Mourad, A K; Abdel-Razak, I Soad; Samar, E Abd El-Rahman

    2010-01-01

    Five tested plant volatile oils and their mixtures were evaluated for controlling the coccid, Saissetia coffeae (Walker) on growing Sago palms Cycas revoluta in Antoniades public gardens, Alexandria, Egypt. The tested volatile oils at concentration rates of 0.5, 1 and 1.5% (v/v) were: Camphor 20%, Dill 20%, Rose 30%, Peppermint 20% and Clove 30% (v/v). Their mixtures were : Camphor/Peppermint, Camphor/Rose at a rate of 1:1, Camphor/Rose/Peppermint at 1:1:2 rate and Camphor/Rose/Dill at 2:1:1 rate. The results, as a general mean of residual reduction percent for the whole inspection intervals of the test lasted 2 days up to 9 days post treatment, indicated that the superior volatile oils in reducing the insect were both Camphor and Rose, followed by Dill, Peppermint and the least efficient one was the Clove oil. The evaluated mixtures of the volatile oils showed that each of Camphor/Rose/Peppermint, Camphor/Rose and Camphor/Peppermint mixtures attained a higher rank of efficiency against that of the assigned soft scale insect. PMID:21539257

  17. Efficacy and well-being in rural north India: The role of social identification with a large-scale community identity

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sammyh S; Hopkins, Nick; Tewari, Shruti; Srinivasan, Narayanan; Reicher, Stephen David; Ozakinci, Gozde

    2014-01-01

    Identifying with a group can contribute to a sense of well-being. The mechanisms involved are diverse: social identification with a group can impact individuals' beliefs about issues such as their connections with others, the availability of social support, the meaningfulness of existence, and the continuity of their identity. Yet, there seems to be a common theme to these mechanisms: identification with a group encourages the belief that one can cope with the stressors one faces (which is associated with better well-being). Our research investigated the relationship between identification, beliefs about coping, and well-being in a survey (N = 792) administered in rural North India. Using structural equation modelling, we found that social identification as a Hindu had positive and indirect associations with three measures of well-being through the belief that one can cope with everyday stressors. We also found residual associations between participants' social identification as a Hindu and two measures of well-being in which higher identification was associated with poorer well-being. We discuss these findings and their implication for understanding the relationship between social identification (especially with large-scale group memberships) and well-being. We also discuss the application of social psychological theory developed in the urban West to rural north India. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Social Psychology published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26160989

  18. Reducing Falls and Fall-Related Injuries in Medical-Surgical Units: One-Year Multihospital Falls Collaborative.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Patricia A; Barnett, Scott D; Bulat, Tatjana; Friedman, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of fall injury program characteristics across multiple inpatient medical-surgical units from 6 medical centers, we developed and implemented an operational strategic plan to address fall and injury prevention program attributes and enhance program infrastructure and capacity. Expert faculty provided lectures and served as coaches and mentors through triweekly conference calls and collaborative e-mail exchange. Statistically significant findings support improved fall and injury prevention program components and processes at the organizational and unit levels. PMID:26323049

  19. The Fall 2000 and Fall 2001 SOHO-Ulysses Quadratures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Poletto, G.

    2000-01-01

    SOHO-Ulysses quadrature occurs when the SOHO-Sun-Ulysses included angle is 90 degrees. It is only at such times that the same plasma leaving the Sun in the direction of Ulysses can first be remotely analyzed with SOHO instruments and then later be sampled in situ by Ulysses instruments. The quadratures in December 2000 and 2001 are of special significance because Ulysses will be near the south and north heliographic poles, respectively, and the solar cycle will be near sunspot maximum. Quadrature geometry is sometimes confusing and observations are influenced by solar rotation. The Fall 2000 and 2001 quadratures are more complex than usual because Ulysses is not in a true polar orbit and the orbital speed of Ulysses about the Sun is becoming comparable to the speed of SOHO about the Sun. In 2000 Ulysses will always be slightly behind the pole but will appear to hang over the pole for over two months because it is moving around the Sun in the same direction as SOHO. In 20001, Ulysses will be slightly in front of the pole so that its footpoint will be directly observable. Detailed plots will be shown of the relative positions of SOHO and Ulysses will their relative positions. In neither case is true quadrature actually achieved, but this works to the observers advantage in 2001.

  20. The Fall 2000 and Fall 2001 SOHO-Ulysses Quadratures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Poletto, G.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    SOHO-Ulysses quadrature occurs when the SOHO-Sun-Ulysses included angle is 90 degrees. It is only at such times that the same plasma leaving the Sun in the direction of Ulysses can first be remotely analyzed with SOHO instruments and then later be sampled in situ by Ulysses instruments. The quadratures in December 2000 and 2001 are of special significance because Ulysses will be near the south and north heliographic poles, respectively, and the solar cycle will be near sunspot maximum. Quadrature geometry is sometimes confusing and observations are influenced by solar rotation. The Fall 2000 and 2001 quadratures are more complex than usual because Ulysses is not in a true polar orbit and the orbital speed of Ulysses about the Sun is becoming comparable to the speed of SOHO about the Sun. In 2000 Ulysses will always be slightly behind the pole but will appear to hang over the pole for over two months because it is moving around the Sun in the same direction as SOHO. In 2001 Ulysses will be slightly in front of the pole so that its footpoint will be directly observable. Detailed plots will be shown of the relative positions of SOHO and Ulysses will their relative positions. In neither case is true quadrature actually achieved, but this works to the observers advantage in 2001.

  1. Comparative Efficacy of the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-Item Scale and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale as Screening Tools for Generalized Anxiety Disorder in Pregnancy and the Postpartum Period

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, William; Glazer, Melanie; Michalski, Natalie; Steiner, Meir; Frey, Benicio N

    2014-01-01

    Objective: About 24.1% of pregnant women suffer from at least 1 anxiety disorder, 8.5% of whom suffer specifically from generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). GAD is often associated with major depressive disorder (MDD). During the perinatal period, the presence of physical and somatic symptoms often makes differentiation between depression and anxiety more challenging. To date, no screening tools have been developed to detect GAD in the perinatal population. We investigated the psychometric properties of the GAD 7-item Scale (GAD-7) as a screening tool for GAD in pregnant and postpartum women. Methods: Two hundred and forty perinatal women (n = 155 pregnant and n = 85 postpartum) referred for psychiatric consultation were enrolled. On the day of initial assessment, all women completed the GAD-7 and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition–based diagnoses were made by experienced psychiatrists. Scores from the GAD-7 and EPDS were compared with the clinical diagnoses to evaluate the psychometric properties of the GAD-7 and EPDS when used as a screening tool for GAD. Results: The GAD-7 yielded a sensitivity of 61.3% and specificity of 72.7% at an optimal cut-off score of 13. Compared with the EPDS and the EPDS-3A subscale, the GAD-7 displayed greater accuracy and specificity over a greater range of cut-off scores and more accurately identified GAD in patients with comorbid MDD. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the GAD-7 represents a clinically useful scale for the detection of GAD in perinatal women. PMID:25161068

  2. IDENTIFYING ROOF FALL PREDICTORS USING FUZZY CLASSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

    2010-02-22

    Microseismic monitoring involves placing geophones on the rock surfaces of a mine to record seismic activity. Classification of microseismic mine data can be used to predict seismic events in a mine to mitigate mining hazards, such as roof falls, where properly bolting and bracing the roof is often an insufficient method of preventing weak roofs from destabilizing. In this study, six months of recorded acoustic waveforms from microseismic monitoring in a Pennsylvania limestone mine were analyzed using classification techniques to predict roof falls. Fuzzy classification using features selected for computational ease was applied on the mine data. Both large roof fall events could be predicted using a Roof Fall Index (RFI) metric calculated from the results of the fuzzy classification. RFI was successfully used to resolve the two significant roof fall events and predicted both events by at least 15 hours before visual signs of the roof falls were evident.

  3. Identifying Roof Fall Predictors Using Fuzzy Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

    2010-02-01

    Microseismic monitoring involves placing geophones on the rock surfaces of a mine to record seismic activity. Classification of microseismic mine data can be used to predict seismic events in a mine to mitigate mining hazards, such as roof falls, where properly bolting and bracing the roof is often an insufficient method of preventing weak roofs from destabilizing. In this study, six months of recorded acoustic waveforms from microseismic monitoring in a Pennsylvania limestone mine were analyzed using classification techniques to predict roof falls. Fuzzy classification using features selected for computational ease was applied on the mine data. Both large roof fall events could be predicted using a Roof Fall Index (RFI) metric calculated from the results of the fuzzy classification. RFI was successfully used to resolve the two significant roof fall events and predicted both events by at least 15 hours before visual signs of the roof falls were evident.

  4. Unobtrusive monitoring and identification of fall accidents.

    PubMed

    van de Ven, Pepijn; O'Brien, Hugh; Nelson, John; Clifford, Amanda

    2015-05-01

    Falls are a societal and economic problem of great concern with large parts of the population, in particular older citizens, at significant risk and the result of a fall often being grave. It has long been established that it is of importance to provide help to a faller soon after the event to prevent complications and this can be achieved with a fall monitor. Yet, the practical use of currently available fall monitoring solutions is limited due to accuracy, usability, cost, and, not in the least, the stigmatising effect of many solutions. This paper proposes a fall sensor concept that can be embedded in the user's footwear and discusses algorithms, software and hardware developed. Sensor performance is illustrated using results of a series of functional tests. These show that the developed sensor can be used for the accurate measurement of various mobility and gait parameters and that falls are detected accurately. PMID:25769224

  5. Translating a Multifactorial Fall Prevention Intervention into Practice: A Controlled Evaluation of a Fall Prevention Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Meghann; Williams, Barbara; Ragsdale, Sally; LoGerfo, James P.; Goss, J. Richard; Schreuder, Astrid B.; Phelan, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Although multifactorial fall prevention interventions have been shown to reduce falls and injurious falls, their translation into clinical settings has been limited. We describe a hospital-based, fall prevention clinic established to increase availability of preventive care for falls. Outcomes for forty-three adults aged 65+ seen during the clinic’s first six months of operation were compared to outcomes for 86 age-, gender-, and race-matched controls; all persons included in analyses received primary care at the hospital’s geriatrics clinic. Non-significant differences in falls, injurious falls, and fall-related healthcare use by study group in multivariate adjusted models were observed, likely due to the small, fixed sample size. The percent experiencing any injurious falls during the follow-up period was comparable for fall clinic visitors and controls (14% vs. 13%), despite a dramatic difference at baseline (42% of clinic visitors vs. 15% of controls). Fall-related healthcare use was higher for clinic visitors during the baseline period (21%, vs. 12% for controls) and decreased slightly (to 19%) during follow-up; differences in fall-related healthcare use by study group from baseline to follow-up were non-significant. These findings, although preliminary due both to the small sample size and the baseline difference between the groups in fall rates, suggest that being seen in a fall prevention clinic may reduce injurious falls. Additional studies will be necessary to conclusively determine the effects of multifactorial fall risk assessment and management delivered by mid-level providers working in real-world, clinical practice settings on key outcomes, including injurious falls, downstream fall-related healthcare use, and costs. PMID:20370859

  6. Reducing the risk of inpatient falls.

    PubMed

    Oxtoby, Kathy

    A national audit of inpatient falls, published by the Royal College of Physicians in October this year, features data on nearly 5,000 patients aged 65 and over, across 170 hospitals in England and Wales. This is the first overview of how well trusts and health boards are complying with official guidance on falls assessment and prevention. Recommendations have been made by the audit team to reduce the risk of falling. PMID:26721092

  7. 1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF LITTLE FALLS DAM POWERPLANT AND NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF LITTLE FALLS DAM POWERPLANT AND NORTHWEST END OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE. LOOKING WEST - Little Falls Tie Line Towers, Near Little Dam Falls on Spokane River, Wellpinit, Stevens County, WA

  8. 100. MURTAUGH LAKE HEADGATES, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF MURTAUGH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    100. MURTAUGH LAKE HEADGATES, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; SOUTH VIEW OF HEADGATES. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  9. 107. MURTAUGH LAKE, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    107. MURTAUGH LAKE, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; WEST VIEW OF LAKE. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  10. 108. MURTAUGH LAKE HEADGATES, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF MURTAUGH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    108. MURTAUGH LAKE HEADGATES, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; OVERALL VIEW SOUTH. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  11. 1. Photocopy of a photographca. 1920 VIEW OF AMERICAN FALLS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of a photograph--ca. 1920 VIEW OF AMERICAN FALLS PRIOR TO CONSTRUCTION OF HYDROELECTRIC PLANTS - American Falls Water, Power & Light Company, Island Power Plant, Snake River, below American Falls Dam, American Falls, Power County, ID

  12. 29. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL BRIDGE FROM UPSTREAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL BRIDGE FROM UPSTREAM LOOKING DOWNSTREAM. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  13. 31. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL BRIDGE FROM DOWNSTREAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL BRIDGE FROM DOWNSTREAM LOOKING UPSTREAM. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  14. 24. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS, DOWNSTREAM LOOKING TOWARD THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS, DOWNSTREAM LOOKING TOWARD THE EAST. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  15. 125. COTTONWOOD CUT AREA, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    125. COTTONWOOD CUT AREA, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; SOUTH VIEW OF CANAL. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  16. 32. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL FROM VICINITY OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL FROM VICINITY OF PROPOSED POWER CANAL, LOOKING UPSTREAM. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  17. 30. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL FROM BRIDGE LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL FROM BRIDGE LOOKING WEST DOWNSTREAM. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  18. 27. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADGATE WITH CANAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADGATE WITH CANAL BRIDGE IN DISTANCE; LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  19. 22. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS WITH MILNER DAM IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS WITH MILNER DAM IN DISTANCE; LOOKING EAST. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  20. 26. DETAIL OF HEADGATE HOIST MACHINERY, TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. DETAIL OF HEADGATE HOIST MACHINERY, TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  1. 127. COTTONWOOD CUT AREA, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    127. COTTONWOOD CUT AREA, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; NORTH VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  2. 23. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS WITH MILNER DAM IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS WITH MILNER DAM IN DISTANCE; LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  3. 128. COTTONWOOD CUT, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    128. COTTONWOOD CUT, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; NORTH VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  4. 139. MILNER DAM, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; OUTLET SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    139. MILNER DAM, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; OUTLET SIDE OF SPILLWAY, EAST VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  5. Greenhouse Gas-ette Fall 1988, Spring, Fall 1989, Winter, Spring, Fall 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenhouse Gas-ette, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This newsletter is for educators interested in developing lessons related to global climate change. The newsletter contains sample lessons, news items involving global climate change on an international scale, and background information on issues related to global climate change. (CW)

  6. Falling films on flexible inclines.

    PubMed

    Matar, O K; Craster, R V; Kumar, S

    2007-11-01

    The nonlinear stability and dynamic behavior of falling fluid films is studied for flow over a flexible substrate. We use asymptotic methods to deduce governing equations valid in various limits. Long-wave theory is used to derive Benney-like coupled equations for the film thickness and substrate deflection. Weakly nonlinear equations are then derived from these equations that, in the limit of large wall damping and/or large wall tension, reduce to the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation. These models break down when inertia becomes more significant, so we also use a long-wave approximation in conjunction with integral theory to derive three strongly coupled nonlinear evolution equations for the film thickness, substrate deflection, and film volumetric flow rate valid at higher Reynolds numbers. These equations, accounting for inertia, capillary, viscous, wall tension, and damping effects, are solved over a wide range of parameters. Our results suggest that decreasing wall damping and/or wall tension can promote the development of chaos in the weakly nonlinear regime and lead to severe substrate deformations in the strongly nonlinear regime; these can give rise to situations in which the free surface and underlying substrate come into contact in finite time. PMID:18233750

  7. Depth-based human fall detection via shape features and improved extreme learning machine.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin; Wang, Haibo; Xue, Bingxia; Zhou, Mingang; Ji, Bing; Li, Yibin

    2014-11-01

    Falls are one of the major causes leading to injury of elderly people. Using wearable devices for fall detection has a high cost and may cause inconvenience to the daily lives of the elderly. In this paper, we present an automated fall detection approach that requires only a low-cost depth camera. Our approach combines two computer vision techniques-shape-based fall characterization and a learning-based classifier to distinguish falls from other daily actions. Given a fall video clip, we extract curvature scale space (CSS) features of human silhouettes at each frame and represent the action by a bag of CSS words (BoCSS). Then, we utilize the extreme learning machine (ELM) classifier to identify the BoCSS representation of a fall from those of other actions. In order to eliminate the sensitivity of ELM to its hyperparameters, we present a variable-length particle swarm optimization algorithm to optimize the number of hidden neurons, corresponding input weights, and biases of ELM. Using a low-cost Kinect depth camera, we build an action dataset that consists of six types of actions (falling, bending, sitting, squatting, walking, and lying) from ten subjects. Experimenting with the dataset shows that our approach can achieve up to 91.15% sensitivity, 77.14% specificity, and 86.83% accuracy. On a public dataset, our approach performs comparably to state-of-the-art fall detection methods that need multiple cameras. PMID:25375688

  8. 150. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    150. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Surveyor's Book #363, Page 42, entitled, 'Diversion Tunnels', located in Twin Falls Canal Company office, Twin Falls, Idaho). PLAN OF DIVERSION TUNNELS, MILNER DAM. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  9. 180. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company. E. Pettygro, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    180. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company. E. Pettygro, Photographer, date unknown. BLASTING TWIN FALLS CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY; BLASTING COTTONWOOD AREA TO REPLACE FLUME BY RUNNING HIGH LINE THROUGH SOLID ROCK. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  10. Stride time variability as a marker for higher level of gait control in multiple sclerosis: its association with fear of falling.

    PubMed

    Allali, Gilles; Laidet, Magali; Armand, Stéphane; Elsworth-Edelsten, Charlotte; Assal, Frédéric; Lalive, Patrice H

    2016-06-01

    Fear of falling (FOF) and gait disorders represent both prevalent symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS); however, the association between FOF and higher level of gait control (HLGC) has not been studied in MS. This study aims to assess the association between FOF and HLGC in patients with MS. HLGC was assessed by stride time variability (STV) during single and dual-tasks (forward counting, backward counting, categorical verbal fluency and literal verbal fluency) and FOF was quantified by the falls efficacy scale-international (FES-I). Seventy-one patients (age: 39.27 ± 9.77 years; 63 % female) were included in this cross-sectional study (Expanded Disability Status Scale (median): 2.00) with a low prevalence of FOF (FES-I: 21.52 ± 8.37). The mean gait speed was 1.19 ± 0.23 m/s with a STV of 2.35 ± 1.68 % during single walking task. STV during single task and the dual tasks of forward counting and backward counting were associated with the FES-I in the univariable linear regression models (p ≤ 0.001), but only STV while backward counting (β: 0.42, [0.18;0.66]) was associated with FOF in the multivariable model (adjusted for age, gender, previous fall, Expanded Disability Status Scale and gait speed). These findings indicate that FOF is associated with STV while backward counting, a marker of HLGC in relationship with working memory in a MS population including a majority of low disabled patients. PMID:27106906

  11. Relationship between obesity and falls by middle-aged and older women.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, Noah J; Grabiner, Mark D

    2012-04-01

    It has been suggested that obesity increases fall risk, based on diminished static balance and increased fall-related injury risk. However, these findings only indirectly relate obesity and falls. The purpose of this study was to use existing data to directly explore the relationship between obesity and falls by community-dwelling women aged 55 years and older. Eighty-six subjects (42 obese) reported falls occurring during the previous year (retrospective falls), and over the following year responded to biweekly communications inquiring whether they fell or stumbled (prospective falls/stumbles). Because trips represent the largest fall cause by community-dwelling adults, we also analyzed outcomes and recovery strategies of 25 women (13 obese) after laboratory-induced trips. Obese and healthy weight women retrospectively reported similar fall rates (40.9% vs 40.5%; P=.97). Similar percentages of healthy weight and obese women prospectively fell (64.7% vs 64.3%; P=.98) and stumbled (38.9% vs 14.3%; P=.24). After laboratory-induced trips, 46.2% of obese verse 25.0% of healthy weight women fell (P=.44). Unlike healthy weight fallers, most obese fallers failed to initiate or complete the recovery step before full-body harness support. Obesity does not appear to increase overall fall risk; although, fall rates after laboratory-induced trips were notably higher, potentially due to altered recovery responses. An incomplete recovery step could increase impact force with the ground, predisposing obese individuals to injury. The fact that there is concurrence between 4 independent outcomes strengthens the findings, suggesting that further, large-scale studies are warranted to inform future clinical practice regarding fall-risk assessment for obese older adults. PMID:22218136

  12. Motor impairment predicts falls in specialized Alzheimer care units.

    PubMed

    Camicioli, Richard; Licis, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    We sought to identify clinical risk factors for falls in people with advanced Alzheimer disease (AD) in a prospective longitudinal observational study set in specialized AD care units. Forty-two patients with probable or possible AD were recruited. Age, sex, Mini-Mental Status Examination, Clinical Dementia Rating Scale, Neuropsychiatric Inventory/Nursing Home, Morse Fall Scale (MFS), modified Unified Parkinson's Rating Scale (mUPDRS), and gait parameters using a GAITRite Gold Walkway System with and without dual-task performance were examined. Time to a first fall was the primary outcome measure, and independent risk factors were identified. Participating subjects were old (non-fallers age, 82.3 +/- 6.7 years; fallers: 83.1 +/- 9.6 years; p = 0.76) and predominantly women (36 female/6 male). Fallers did not differ from non-fallers on any parameter except the MFS (non-fallers: 35.6 +/- 26.1; fallers: 54.4 +/- 29.8; p = 0.04), the UPDRS (non-fallers: 4.75 +/- 3.98; fallers: 7.61 +/- 4.3, p = 0.03) and cadence (steps per minute: non-fallers: 102.3 +/- 12.3; fallers: 91.7 +/- 16, p = 0.02). Fallers and non-fallers were equally affected by dual-task performance. The hazard ratios for MFS, UPDRS, and cadence were not affected by adjusting for age, sex, MMSE, or NPI scores. In conclusion, falls in advanced AD can be predicted using simple clinical measures of motor impairment or cadence. These measures may be useful for targeting interventions. PMID:15592133

  13. Alterations in Cerebral White Matter and Neuropsychology in Patients with Cirrhosis and Falls

    PubMed Central

    Gmez-Ansn, Beatriz; Romn, Eva; Fernndez de Bobadilla, Ramn; Pires-Encuentra, Patricia; Daz-Manera, Jordi; Nez, Fidel; Martinez-Horta, Sal; Vives-Gilabert, Yolanda; Pagonabarraga, Javier; Kulisevsky, Jaume; Guarner, Carlos; Soriano, Germn

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aim Falls are frequent in patients with cirrhosis but underlying mechanisms are unknown. The aim was to determine the neuropsychological, neurological and brain alterations using magnetic resonance-diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI) in cirrhotic patients with falls. Patients and methods Twelve patients with cirrhosis and falls in the previous year were compared to 9 cirrhotic patients without falls. A comprehensive neuropsychological and neurological evaluation of variables that may predispose to falls included: the Mini-Mental State Examination, Psychometric Hepatic Encephalopathy Score (PHES), Parkinsons Disease-Cognitive Rating Scale, specific tests to explore various cognitive domains, Unified Parkinsons Disease Rating Scale to evaluate parkinsonism, scales for ataxia and muscular strength, and electroneurography. High-field MR (3T) including DTI and structural sequences was performed in all patients. Results The main neuropsychological findings were impairment in PHES (p = 0.03), Parkinsons Disease-Cognitive Rating Scale (p = 0.04) and in executive (p<0.05) and visuospatial-visuoconstructive functions (p<0.05) in patients with falls compared to those without. There were no statistical differences between the two groups in the neurological evaluation or in the visual assessment of MRI. MR-DTI showed alterations in white matter integrity in patients with falls compared to those without falls (p<0.05), with local maxima in the superior longitudinal fasciculus and corticospinal tract. These alterations were independent of PHES as a covariate and correlated with executive dysfunction (p<0.05). Conclusions With the limitation of the small sample size, our results suggest that patients with cirrhosis and falls present alterations in brain white matter tracts related to executive dysfunction. These alterations are independent of PHES impairment. PMID:25793766

  14. Keep Up or Fall Behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramaswami, Rama

    2007-01-01

    In the race to enable information access and collaboration, institutions are taking advantage of new tools to drive content management innovation. New content management systems (CMS) features and functions are driving true innovation in content management, and enabling information access, sharing, collaboration, and tracking on a scale heretofore…

  15. Dimensions of Teacher Self-Efficacy and Relations with Strain Factors, Perceived Collective Teacher Efficacy, and Teacher Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaalvik, Einar M.; Skaalvik, Sidsel

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the authors developed and factor analyzed the Norwegian Teacher Self-Efficacy Scale. They also examined relations among teacher self-efficacy, perceived collective teacher efficacy, external control (teachers' general beliefs about limitations to what can be achieved through education), strain factors, and teacher burnout.…

  16. Fall Meeting by the numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, Pranoti

    2012-02-01

    - Visits to the Fall Meeting Web site: 650,000 - Total participants at the meeting: 20,890 - Abstracts submitted to the meeting: 20,087 - Donors who attended and took advantage of donor lounges: 1835 - Total attendance at Simon Winchester's Presidential Forum Lecture: 1200 - Total attendance at the Honors Banquet: 905 - Books sold at the AGU Marketplace: 671 - Individuals registered for the Fun Run: 487 - Students who participated in the Student Breakfast: 450 - Individuals who crossed the finish line at the Fun Run: 384 - Total attendees at Exploration Station: 307 - Total booths sold in the Exhibit Hall: 304 - registered for the meeting: 288 - Membership transactions completed for renewing and registering members at AGU Marketplace: 156 - Meeting attendees who were past Congressional Visits Day participants: 82 - Editors, associate editors, and their student guests who visited the Editors Resource Center: 63 - Copies of Navigating Graduate School and Beyond: A Career Guide for Graduate Students and a Must Read for Every Advisor sold during and after the talk and book signing by author Sundar A. Christopher: 50 - Kegs of beer consumed during the Ice Breaker on Sunday, 4 December: 48 - Hours of video footage shot at the meeting by the AGU videographer: 40 - Potential geopress authors and editors who attended the daily "Come Publish With geopress" sessions in the AGU Marketplace: 31 - Press conferences held at the meeting: 25 - Average age of minors attending Exploration Station: 8.7 - Educational seminars sponsored by AGU Publications: 2 (one on how to write a good scientific paper and the other on the rewards of reviewing) - Watching three preschoolers in space suits waiting to meet astronaut Andrew Feustel after the Public Lecture: Priceless (with apologies to Mastercard®)

  17. Central Falls' Kids First: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tufts Univ., Medford, MA. Center on Hunger, Poverty and Nutrition Policy.

    Central Falls' Kids First, a 3-year initiative was designed to eradicate local childhood hunger through the expansion of federal child nutrition programs in Central Falls, a small, densely populated, ethnically diverse and low-income city in northeastern Rhode Island. A strong community partnership was created and included the office of the city's…

  18. Osteosarcopenic obesity and fall prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Martínez-Amat, Antonio; Cruz-Díaz, David; Pérez-López, Faustino R

    2015-02-01

    Sarcopenia, obesity, and osteoporosis are three interrelated entities which may share common pathophysiological factors. In the last decades, overall survival has drastically increased. Postmenopausal women, due to their estrogen depletion, are at higher risk of developing any of these three conditions or the three, which is termed osteosarcopenic obesity. One of the most common health problems among these patients is the elevated risk of falls and fractures. Falls and fall-related injuries are one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in older adults, and have a significant impact on social, economical and health-related costs. Several extrinsic and intrinsic risk factors have been described that play a role in the etiology of falls. A therapeutic approach to osteosarcopenic obesity aimed at the prevention of falls must include several factors, and act on those risk elements which can be effectively modified. An adequate weight-loss diet and a good nutritional intake, with an appropriate amount of vitamin D and the right protein/carbohydrates ratio, may contribute to the prevention of falls. The recommendation of physical exercise, both traditional (resistance or aerobic training) and more recent varieties (Tai Chi, Pilates, body vibration), can improve balance and positively contribute to fall prevention, whether by itself or in combination with other therapeutic strategies. Finally, a pharmacological approach, especially one focused on hormone therapy, has shown to have a positive effect on postmenopausal women's balance, leading to a decreased risk of falls. PMID:25533145

  19. 29 CFR 1926.1423 - Fall protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... equipment covered by this subpart except tower cranes. (2) Paragraphs (c)(1), (c)(2), (d), (g), (j) and (k... placed grip tape, expanded metal, or slip-resistant paint). (4) Tower cranes manufactured after November... tape, expanded metal, or slip-resistant paint). (d) Personal fall arrest and fall restraint...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.1423 - Fall protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fall protection. 1926.1423 Section 1926.1423 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1423 Fall protection. (a) Application....

  1. Compton Community College Information Notebook, Fall 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camacho, Julian S.

    Each year, Compton Community College (CCC), in California, collects statistical information on current trends related to the gender, race/ethnicity, and age of the college's student body, faculty, and classified employees. Findings from an analysis of the period from fall 1991 to fall 1994 included the following: (1) the vast majority of CCC…

  2. Trends, Fall 1993. Diablo Valley College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdsall, Les

    Providing data on institutional trends up to fall 1993 at Diablo Valley College, in California, this report consists of 14 charts on enrollment and student characteristics. Following an introduction describing a general decline in enrollments due to a statewide increase in fees, the following tables are provided: (1) fall enrollment from 1984 to…

  3. Yosemite Falls and Half Dome Panorama

    In this panorama, Yosemite Falls may be seen on the left and Half Dome on the right. Yosemite Falls is the tallest known waterfall in North America, with a total plunge of 2,425 ft (739 m). Half Dome is a granite dome, part of the Sierra Nevada batholith....

  4. How Fast Does a Building Fall?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Mark

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the time required for a tower block to collapse is calculated. The tower collapses progressively, with one floor falling onto the floor below, causing it to fall. The rate of collapse is found to be not much slower than freefall. The calculation is an engaging and relevant application of Newton's laws, suitable for undergraduate…

  5. 75 FR 79921 - Fall 2010 Unified Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ...) FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 12 CFR Ch. III Fall 2010 Unified Agenda AGENCY: Federal Deposit.... Timetable: Action Date FR Cite ANPRM 08/25/10 75 FR 52283 ANPRM Comment Period End 10/25/10 Next Action... Corporation (FDIC) is hereby publishing items for the Fall 2010 Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory...

  6. Studies on fall armyworm migration and monitoring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith; Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) or fall armyworm is an important agricultural pest of a number of crops in thewestern hemisphere. Two morphologically identical host strains of fall armyworm exist, the rice-strain and corn-strain, with the latter inflicting substantial eco...

  7. Falls - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... السقوط في المستشفى - العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Safety Tips to Prevent Falls at Home (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Preventing Falls in the Hospital Sprječavanje ...

  8. Compton Community College Information Notebook, Fall 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camacho, Julian S.

    This notebook serves the purpose of informing the Compton Community College District about the student body population, faculty and classified employees in reference to gender, race/ethnicity and age. Findings from an analysis of the period from fall 1991 to fall 1995 included the following: (1) over the period, the enrollment of Black students…

  9. Washington Community Colleges Fall Quarter Report, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Story, Sherie; And Others

    This three-part report presents a series of 46 tables providing data about enrollments, student characteristics, and personnel in the Washington community college system for Fall Quarter 1980. After a summary of the statistical highlights of the study, Chapter I offers historical data on Fall Quarter, full-time equivalent (FTE) and student…

  10. 1978-1979 Fall Enrollment Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillberg, Rebecca

    Enrollment in the Los Angeles Community Colleges in fall 1978 dropped to 124,523, a 3.7% decrease from fall 1977. Instructional Television and West Los Angeles College showed the only increases, although the increase at West (and the decrease at Trade-Technical College) were related to the administrative tranfer of the Airport Center from Trade to…

  11. The Latino Experience in Central Falls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Central Falls is, by far, the poorest community in Rhode Island. More than 40 percent of the children under 18 live in poverty, and 40 percent of that group live in severe poverty. At Central Falls High School, low-income Latino students have fallen behind their white counterparts, with shockingly low graduation, poor literacy, and low…

  12. Ampicillin: rise fall and resurgence.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Dwarikadhish; Mohan, Mudit; Borade, Dhammraj M; Swami, Onkar C

    2014-05-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global problem. AMR has posed new challenges in treatment of infectious diseases. Antimicrobials are losing efficacy due to development of resistant pathogens. It has lead to re-emergence of certain infectious diseases. Treatment of such diseases has undergone changes with use of alternative antimicrobials and drug combinations. Pathogens are likely to develop resistance to alternative antimicrobials also and risk of infections with nonexistent treatment is real. Salmonella showed widespread resistant to ampicillin which resulted in use of alternative antimicrobials like fluroquinolones and cephalosporins in the treatment of enteric fever in last two decades. Unfortunately there are growing reports of resistance to these antimicrobials. Interestingly there are numerous reports of ampicillin regaining activity against Salmonella. Speculatively lack of exposure of Salmonella to ampicillin for long time resulted in the loss of plasmid mediated resistance in the pathogen. There may have been emergence of de novo ampicillin susceptible strains. This is assuring in the era where problem of AMR is compounded by the scarcity of new antimicrobial development. PMID:24995206

  13. Instruments for measuring fall risk in older adults living in long-term care facilities: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Kehinde, Julius Oluwole

    2009-10-01

    Lack of consistency in the literature regarding the use of fall risk assessment in long-term care settings and the uniqueness of the environment demand a critical analysis of fall risk instruments specific to older adults living in long-term care facilities. This integrative review of the existing literature on instruments used to measure fall risk in residents living in long-term care facilities revealed a total of 16 fall risk assessment tools from 13 studies. Of the 13 studies, only 8 reported sensitivity, specificity, and interrater reliability values of the tools. Only the Morse Fall Scale and Mobility Fall Chart demonstrated high predictive values in their initial developmental studies. This review can help clinicians make informed choices about tools to predict falls in their settings and establish appropriate preventive interventions. PMID:19772229

  14. Generalized Self-Efficacy, Holland Theme Self-Efficacy, and Academic Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindley, Lori D.; Borgen, Fred H.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of Self-Efficacy Scale, Skills Confidence Inventory; ACT Assessment, and grade point average (GPA) results for 189 women and 91 men revealed strong relationships between generalized self-efficacy and confidence in Investigative and Enterprising occupations for both and Conventional occupations for men. ACT scores were related to

  15. Fall 1980 to Fall 1981 Enrollment Comparisons Based on First Census.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Dave

    This report examines trends in the personal and academic characteristics of the students enrolled at Bakersfield College (BC) and provides tables comparing fall 1980 and fall 1981 data. The report first presents summary enrollment data, revealing that fall enrollment in graded classes decreased by 10.1% between 1980 and 1981; that enrollment in…

  16. Utilization of Residence Hall Facilities, Fall 1990, with Trends from Fall 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Albany. Central Staff Office of Institutional Research.

    Data are presented on the utilization of residence hall facilities at campuses of the State University of New York (excluding community colleges) for fall 1990, with summary data from fall 1981 through fall 1990. Part One offers seven tables on utilization of original design capacity of residence hall facilities; utilization by institution within…

  17. Writing Essays: Does Self-Efficacy Matter? The Relationship between Self-Efficacy in Reading and in Writing and Undergraduate Students' Performance in Essay Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prat-Sala, Merce; Redford, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Self-efficacy beliefs have been identified as associated with students' academic performance. The present research assessed the relationship between two new self-efficacy scales (self-efficacy in reading [SER] and self-efficacy in writing [SEW]) and students' writing performance on a piece of assessed written coursework. Using data from first and…

  18. Writing Essays: Does Self-Efficacy Matter? The Relationship between Self-Efficacy in Reading and in Writing and Undergraduate Students' Performance in Essay Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prat-Sala, Merce; Redford, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Self-efficacy beliefs have been identified as associated with students' academic performance. The present research assessed the relationship between two new self-efficacy scales (self-efficacy in reading [SER] and self-efficacy in writing [SEW]) and students' writing performance on a piece of assessed written coursework. Using data from first and

  19. Studying a free fall experiment using short sequences of images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera, Francisco; Romanque, Cristian

    2008-11-01

    We discuss a new alternative for obtaining position and time coordinates from a video of a free fall experiment. In our approach, after converting the video to a short sequence of images, the images are analyzed using a web page application developed by the author. The main advantage of the setup explained in this work, is that it is simple to use, no software license fees are necessary, and can be scaled-up to be used by a big number of students in introductory physics courses. The steps involved in the full analysis of a falling object are: we grab a short digital video of the experiment and convert it to a sequence of images, then, using a web page that includes all the necessary javascript, the student can easily click on the object of interest to obtain the (x,y,t) coordinates, finally, the student analyze motion using a spreadsheet.

  20. From Fall to Spring, or Spring to Fall? Seasonal Cholera Transmission Cycles and Implications for Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akanda, A. S.; Jutla, A. S.; Huq, A.; Colwell, R.; Islam, S.; WE Reason

    2010-12-01

    Cholera remains a major public health threat in many developing countries around the world. The striking seasonality and the annual recurrence of this infectious disease in endemic areas continues to be of considerable interest to scientists and public health workers. Despite major advances in the ecological, and microbiological understanding of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent, the role of underlying macro-scale hydroclimatic processes in propagating the disease in different seasons and years is not well understood. The incidence of cholera in the Bengal Delta region, the ‘native homeland’ of cholera, shows distinct biannual peaks in the southern floodplains, as opposed to single annual peaks in coastal areas and the northern parts of Bangladesh, as well as other cholera-endemic regions in the world. A coupled analysis of the regional hydroclimate and cholera incidence reveals a strong association of the spatio-temporal variability of incidence peaks with seasonal processes and extreme events. At a seasonal scale, the cycles indicate a spring-fall transmission pattern, contrary to the prevalent notion of a fall-spring transmission cycle. We show that the asymmetric seasonal hydroclimatology affects regional cholera dynamics by providing a coastal growth environment for bacteria in spring, while propagating transmission to fall by flooding. This seasonal interpretation of the progression of cholera has important implications, for formulating effective cholera intervention and mitigation efforts through improved water management and understanding the impacts of changing climate patterns on seasonal cholera transmission. (Water Environental Research Education Actionable Solutions Network)

  1. Historical rock falls in Yosemite National Park, California (1857-2011)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stock, Greg M.; Collins, Brian D.; Santaniello, David J.; Zimmer, Valerie L.; Wieczorek, Gerald F.; Snyder, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Inventories of rock falls and other types of landslides are valuable tools for improving understanding of these events. For example, detailed information on rock falls is critical for identifying mechanisms that trigger rock falls, for quantifying the susceptibility of different cliffs to rock falls, and for developing magnitude-frequency relations. Further, inventories can assist in quantifying the relative hazard and risk posed by these events over both short and long time scales. This report describes and presents the accompanying rock fall inventory database for Yosemite National Park, California. The inventory database documents 925 events spanning the period 1857–2011. Rock falls, rock slides, and other forms of slope movement represent a serious natural hazard in Yosemite National Park. Rock-fall hazard and risk are particularly relevant in Yosemite Valley, where glacially steepened granitic cliffs approach 1 km in height and where the majority of the approximately 4 million yearly visitors to the park congregate. In addition to damaging roads, trails, and other facilities, rock falls and other slope movement events have killed 15 people and injured at least 85 people in the park since the first documented rock fall in 1857. The accompanying report describes each of the organizational categories in the database, including event location, type of slope movement, date, volume, relative size, probable trigger, impact to humans, narrative description, references, and environmental conditions. The inventory database itself is contained in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet (Yosemite_rock_fall_database_1857-2011.xlsx). Narrative descriptions of events are contained in the database, but are also provided in a more readable Adobe portable document format (pdf) file (Yosemite_rock_fall_database_narratives_1857-2011.pdf) available for download separate from the database.

  2. Pathogenesis and treatment of falls in elderly.

    PubMed

    Pasquetti, Pietro; Apicella, Lorenzo; Mangone, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    Falls in the elderly are a public health problem. Consequences of falls are increased risk of hospitalization, which results in an increase in health care costs. It is estimated that 33% of individuals older than 65 years undergoes falls. Causes of falls can be distinguished in intrinsic and extrinsic predisposing conditions. The intrinsic causes can be divided into age-related physiological changes and pathological predisposing conditions. The age-related physiological changes are sight disorders, hearing disorders, alterations in the Central Nervous System, balance deficits, musculoskeletal alterations. The pathological conditions can be Neurological, Cardiovascular, Endocrine, Psychiatric, Iatrogenic. Extrinsic causes of falling are environmental factors such as obstacles, inadequate footwear. The treatment of falls must be multidimensional and multidisciplinary. The best instrument in evaluating elderly at risk is Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA). CGA allows better management resulting in reduced costs. The treatment should be primarily preventive acting on extrinsic causes; then treatment of chronic and acute diseases. Rehabilitation is fundamental, in order to improve residual capacity, motor skills, postural control, recovery of strength. There are two main types of exercises: aerobic and muscular strength training. Education of patient is a key-point, in particular through the Back School. In conclusion falls in the elderly are presented as a "geriatric syndrome"; through a multidimensional assessment, an integrated treatment and a rehabilitation program is possible to improve quality of life in elderly. PMID:25568657

  3. Neuropsychological mechanisms of falls in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Chan, John S. Y.; Yan, Jin H.

    2014-01-01

    Falls, a common cause of injury among older adults, have become increasingly prevalent. As the worlds population ages, the increase inand the prevalence offalls among older people makes this a serious and compelling societal and healthcare issue. Physical weakness is a critical predictor in falling. While considerable research has examined this relationship, comprehensive reviews of neuropsychological predictors of falls have been lacking. In this paper, we examine and discuss current studies of the neuropsychological predictors of falls in older adults, as related to sporting and non-sporting contexts. By integrating the existing evidence, we propose that brain aging is an important precursor of the increased risk of falls in older adults. Brain aging disrupts the neural integrity of motor outputs and reduces neuropsychological abilities. Older adults may shift from unconscious movement control to more conscious or attentive motor control. Increased understanding of the causes of falls will afford opportunities to reduce their incidence, reduce consequent injuries, improve overall well-being and quality of life, and possibly to prolong life. PMID:24782761

  4. Pathogenesis and treatment of falls in elderly

    PubMed Central

    Pasquetti, Pietro; Apicella, Lorenzo; Mangone, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Summary Falls in the elderly are a public health problem. Consequences of falls are increased risk of hospitalization, which results in an increase in health care costs. It is estimated that 33% of individuals older than 65 years undergoes falls. Causes of falls can be distinguished in intrinsic and extrinsic predisposing conditions. The intrinsic causes can be divided into age-related physiological changes and pathological predisposing conditions. The age-related physiological changes are sight disorders, hearing disorders, alterations in the Central Nervous System, balance deficits, musculoskeletal alterations. The pathological conditions can be Neurological, Cardiovascular, Endocrine, Psychiatric, Iatrogenic. Extrinsic causes of falling are environmental factors such as obstacles, inadequate footwear. The treatment of falls must be multidimensional and multidisciplinary. The best instrument in evaluating elderly at risk is Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA). CGA allows better management resulting in reduced costs. The treatment should be primarily preventive acting on extrinsic causes; then treatment of chronic and acute diseases. Rehabilitation is fundamental, in order to improve residual capacity, motor skills, postural control, recovery of strength. There are two main types of exercises: aerobic and muscular strength training. Education of patient is a key-point, in particular through the Back School. In conclusion falls in the elderly are presented as a “geriatric syndrome”; through a multidimensional assessment, an integrated treatment and a rehabilitation program is possible to improve quality of life in elderly. PMID:25568657

  5. Teacher Efficacy of Turkish Physical Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gencay, Okkes Alpaslan

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to determine the validity and reliability of the Teacher Efficacy Scale in Physical Education (TESPE) in Turkey's conditions, and to test if there are any differences in gender and teaching experience of Turkish PE teachers. Turkish version of the scale was administered to 257 physical education teachers (184

  6. Teacher Efficacy of Turkish Physical Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gencay, Okkes Alpaslan

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to determine the validity and reliability of the Teacher Efficacy Scale in Physical Education (TESPE) in Turkey's conditions, and to test if there are any differences in gender and teaching experience of Turkish PE teachers. Turkish version of the scale was administered to 257 physical education teachers (184…

  7. Relationships between Personality Type and Teaching Efficacy of Student Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, T. Grady; Mowen, Diana L.; Edgar, Don W.; Harlin, Julie F.; Briers, Gary E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if relationships exist between teaching efficacy and personality type of student teachers. The population of interest was all agricultural science student teachers at Texas A&M University. The sampling frame included all student teachers during the spring and fall semesters of 2005 (n= 72). Teaching…

  8. Experimental Study of Falling Film on the Outside of Horizontal Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, L. B.; Li, H. X.; Guo, B.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, Y. F.

    2010-03-01

    Evaporating falling film on horizontal tubes has been widely used in desalinization, refrigeration, chemical process industries, and so on. In this paper, the flow characteristics of falling film outside horizontal tubes in horizontal air flows was studied theoretically and experimentally. Two low patterns of the falling film, i.e., droplet flow pattern and columnar flow pattern, were considered. Effects of the velocity of airflow, the flux of falling film flow, the external diameter of tube and the surface property of tube on the falling film flowing characters were investigated. Experimental study indicated that, in a definite flow scale, as the flow increased, the diameters of falling droplets and falling columns of the liquid enlarged, and the liquid film became thick and the area covered by the liquid film increased. As the air velocity increased, the offset of the droplet and the column to the top of the tube enlarged, and the rate of increase come down until it complete depart from the the top of the horizontal tube. Besides, a theoretical model was established about the offset of the droplet and liquid column from the top of the tube under the force of the horizontal air flows, and the model was validated by a comparison between the numerical predictions and experimental data.A further analysis about the excursion law of falling film flow outside horizontal tube was also made at the last paprt of the paper.

  9. Comparison of three instruments in predicting accidental falls in selected inpatients in a general teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Eagle, D J; Salama, S; Whitman, D; Evans, L A; Ho, E; Olde, J

    1999-07-01

    Accidental patient falls are becoming a major cause of concern for hospitalized inpatients. It is well known that patients who fall once during their hospital stay are more likely to fall again and that fall rates tend to be higher in hospitalized elderly individuals. Concerned health care team personnel recognize that many accidental patient falls may be predicted and, thus, prevented. The best tool to predict falls has not been determined yet. The purpose of this study was to compare the abilities of the Morse Fall Scale (MFS), the Functional Reach (FR) test, and the nurses' clinical judgment in predicting those inpatients on a rehabilitation unit and a geriatric medical ward who were most likely to fall. A total of 98 patients were screened in a 3-month period, with each patient undergoing all three instruments the same day. The results showed that the two objective standardized tests (i.e., MFS, FR) were time consuming and often inconvenient and were no better at prediction than the clinical judgments made by the primary nurses. PMID:10476130

  10. Impact of falls on mental health outcomes for older adult mental health patients: An Australian study.

    PubMed

    Heslop, Karen Ruth; Wynaden, Dianne Gaye

    2016-02-01

    Sustaining a fall during hospitalization reduces a patient's ability to return home following discharge. It is well accepted that factors, such as alteration in balance, functional mobility, muscle strength, and fear of falling, are all factors that impact on the quality of life of elderly people following a fall. However, the impact that falls have on mental health outcomes in older adult mental health patients remains unexplored. The present study reports Health of the Nation Outcome Scale scores for people over the age of 65 (HoNOS65+), which were examined in a cohort of 65 patients who sustained a fall and 73 non-fallers admitted to an older adult mental health service (OAMHS). Results were compared with state and national HoNOS65+ data recorded in Australian National Outcome Casemix Collection data to explore the effect that sustaining a fall while hospitalized has on mental health outcomes. Australian state and national HoNOS65+ data indicate that older adults generally experience improved HoNOS65+ scores from admission to discharge. Mental health outcomes for patients who sustained a fall while admitted to an OAMHS did not follow this trend. Sustaining a fall while admitted to an OAMHS negatively affects discharge mental health outcomes. PMID:26603350

  11. Assessing Regulatory Emotional Self-Efficacy in Three Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Giunta, Laura Di; Eisenberg, Nancy; Gerbino, Maria; Pastorelli, Concetta; Tramontano, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    The Regulatory Emotional Self-Efficacy (RESE) scale was developed to assess perceived self-efficacy in managing negative (NEG) and in expressing positive (POS) affect (G. V. Caprara & M. Gerbino, 2001). In this study of young adults, the factorial structure of the RESE scale was found to be similar in Italy, the United States, and Bolivia: In…

  12. Meal-induced blood pressure fall in patients with isolated morning hypertension.

    PubMed

    Barochiner, Jessica; Alfie, José; Aparicio, Lucas S; Cuffaro, Paula E; Rada, Marcelo A; Morales, Margarita S; Galarza, Carlos R; Marín, Marcos J; Waisman, Gabriel D

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to determine a possible association between isolated morning hypertension (IMH) and meal-induced blood pressure (BP) fall in adult treated hypertensive patients who underwent home BP measurements. A total of 230 patients were included, median age 73.6, 65.2% women. After adjusting for age, sex, number of antihypertensive drugs, office and home BP levels, the association between IMH and meal-induced BP fall was statistically significant. In conclusion, meal-induced BP fall and IMH detected through home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) are independently associated in hypertensive patients. The therapeutic implications of such observation need to be clarified in large-scale prospective studies. PMID:25347162

  13. Exercise for falls prevention in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Sherrington, Catherine; Lord, Stephen R.; Close, Jacqueline C.T.; Heritier, Stephane; Heller, Gillian Z.; Howard, Kirsten; Allen, Natalie E.; Latt, Mark D.; Murray, Susan M.; O'Rourke, Sandra D.; Paul, Serene S.; Song, Jooeun; Fung, Victor S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether falls can be prevented with minimally supervised exercise targeting potentially remediable fall risk factors, i.e., poor balance, reduced leg muscle strength, and freezing of gait, in people with Parkinson disease. Methods: Two hundred thirty-one people with Parkinson disease were randomized into exercise or usual-care control groups. Exercises were practiced for 40 to 60 minutes, 3 times weekly for 6 months. Primary outcomes were fall rates and proportion of fallers during the intervention period. Secondary outcomes were physical (balance, mobility, freezing of gait, habitual physical activity), psychological (fear of falling, affect), and quality-of-life measures. Results: There was no significant difference between groups in the rate of falls (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.45–1.17, p = 0.18) or proportion of fallers (p = 0.45). Preplanned subgroup analysis revealed a significant interaction for disease severity (p < 0.001). In the lower disease severity subgroup, there were fewer falls in the exercise group compared with controls (IRR = 0.31, 95% CI 0.15–0.62, p < 0.001), while in the higher disease severity subgroup, there was a trend toward more falls in the exercise group (IRR = 1.61, 95% CI 0.86–3.03, p = 0.13). Postintervention, the exercise group scored significantly (p < 0.05) better than controls on the Short Physical Performance Battery, sit-to-stand, fear of falling, affect, and quality of life, after adjusting for baseline performance. Conclusions: An exercise program targeting balance, leg strength, and freezing of gait did not reduce falls but improved physical and psychological health. Falls were reduced in people with milder disease but not in those with more severe Parkinson disease. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that for patients with Parkinson disease, a minimally supervised exercise program does not reduce fall risk. This study lacked the precision to exclude a moderate reduction or modest increase in fall risk from exercise. Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12608000303347). PMID:25552576

  14. Falls and Fall-Related Injuries among Community-Dwelling Adults in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Santosh K.; Willetts, Joanna L.; Corns, Helen L.; Marucci-Wellman, Helen R.; Lombardi, David A.; Courtney, Theodore K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Falls are the leading cause of unintentional injuries in the U.S.; however, national estimates for all community-dwelling adults are lacking. This study estimated the national incidence of falls and fall-related injuries among community-dwelling U.S. adults by age and gender and the trends in fall-related injuries across the adult life span. Methods Nationally representative data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) 2008 Balance and Dizziness supplement was used to develop national estimates of falls, and pooled data from the NHIS was used to calculate estimates of fall-related injuries in the U.S. and related trends from 2004–2013. Costs of unintentional fall-related injuries were extracted from the CDC’s Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System. Results Twelve percent of community-dwelling U.S. adults reported falling in the previous year for a total estimate of 80 million falls at a rate of 37.2 falls per 100 person-years. On average, 9.9 million fall-related injuries occurred each year with a rate of 4.38 fall-related injuries per 100 person-years. In the previous three months, 2.0% of older adults (65+), 1.1% of middle-aged adults (45–64) and 0.7% of young adults (18–44) reported a fall-related injury. Of all fall-related injuries among community-dwelling adults, 32.3% occurred among older adults, 35.3% among middle-aged adults and 32.3% among younger adults. The age-adjusted rate of fall-related injuries increased 4% per year among older women (95% CI 1%–7%) from 2004 to 2013. Among U.S. adults, the total lifetime cost of annual unintentional fall-related injuries that resulted in a fatality, hospitalization or treatment in an emergency department was 111 billion U.S. dollars in 2010. Conclusions Falls and fall-related injuries represent a significant health and safety problem for adults of all ages. The findings suggest that adult fall prevention efforts should consider the entire adult lifespan to ensure a greater public health benefit. PMID:26977599

  15. Effects of hearing aids in the balance, quality of life and fear to fall in elderly people with sensorineural hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Lacerda, Clara Fonseca; Silva, Luciana Oliveira e; de Tavares Canto, Roberto Sérgio; Cheik, Nadia Carla

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: The aging process provokes structural modifications and functional to it greets, compromising the postural control and central processing. Studies have boarded the necessity to identify to the harmful factors of risk to aged the auditory health and security in stricken aged by auditory deficits and with alterations of balance. Objective: To evaluate the effect of auditory prosthesis in the quality of life, the balance and the fear of fall in aged with bilateral auditory loss. Method: Carried through clinical and experimental study with 56 aged ones with sensorineural auditory loss, submitted to the use of auditory prosthesis of individual sonorous amplification (AASI). The aged ones had answered to the questionnaires of quality of life Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), Falls Efficacy International Scale- (FES-I) and the test of Berg Balance Scale (BBS). After 4 months, the aged ones that they adapted to the use of the AASI had been reevaluated. Results: It had 50% of adaptation of the aged ones to the AASI. It was observed that the masculine sex had greater difficulty in adapting to the auditory device and that the variable age, degree of loss, presence of humming and vertigo had not intervened with the adaptation to auditory prosthesis. It had improvement of the quality of life in the dominance of the State General Health (EGS) and Functional Capacity (CF) and of the humming, as well as the increase of the auto-confidence after adaptation of auditory prosthesis. Conclusion: The use of auditory prosthesis provided the improvement of the domains of the quality of life, what it reflected consequently in one better auto-confidence and in the long run in the reduction of the fear of fall in aged with sensorineural auditory loss. PMID:25991930

  16. Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients).

    PubMed

    Chiara, Mussi; Gianluigi, Galizia; Pasquale, Abete; Alessandro, Morrione; Alice, Maraviglia; Gabriele, Noro; Paolo, Cavagnaro; Loredana, Ghirelli; Giovanni, Tava; Franco, Rengo; Giulio, Masotti; Gianfranco, Salvioli; Niccolò, Marchionni; Andrea, Ungar

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82 ± 7 years, range 65-101). Falls were defined "accidental" (fall explained by a definite accidental cause), "medical" (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease), "dementia-related" (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia), and "unexplained" (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause). According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury. PMID:23533394

  17. AmeriFlux US-PFa Park Falls/WLEF

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-PFa Park Falls/WLEF. Site Description - The flux footprint encompasses a highly heterogeneous landscape of upland forests and wetlands (forested and nonforested). The forests are mainly deciduous but also include substantial coniferous coverage. The upland/lowland variability occurs on spatial scales of a few hundred meters. This heterogeneous landscape is further complicated by a nonuniform, small scale mosaic of thinning and clearcutting of the forest. At larger scales (1 km or greater) the forest cover mosaic is quite homogeneous for many kilometers. The site was chosen not for study of a simple stand, but for upscaling experiments. The daytime fetch of flux measurements from the 396m level is on the order of 5-10 km, yielding a flux footprint roughly 100x the area of a typical stand-level flux tower. AC power (tower is a TV transmitter).

  18. Fall from Grace: The Decline of America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnepper, Jeff A.; Schnepper, Barbara

    1976-01-01

    Asks whether the United States is about to join the Roman Empire as a historical lesson of inevitable rise and fall. The government, economic and industrial leaders, and social scientists are examined. (Editor/RK)

  19. Siena, 1794: History's Most Consequential Meteorite Fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvin, U. B.

    1995-09-01

    In the mythos of meteoritics, the fall of stones at L'Aigle in Normandy at 1 p. m. on April 26, 1803, is commonly regarded as the event that turned skeptics into believers and opened the way for the new science. A strong case can be made, however, that the fall of stones at Siena at 7:00 p.m. on June 16, 1794, established the authenticity of meteorite falls and set in motion the reexaminations of entrenched beliefs that led to the founding of the new science. The Siena fall was heralded by the appearance of an extraordinarily high, dark cloud emitting smoke, sparks like rockets, and bolts of unusually slow-moving red lightning. With a tremendous explosion a shower of stones, ranging in weight from a few milligrams to 3 kg, fell southeast of Siena. This was the first meteorite fall to occur in the vicinity of a sizeable European city and the first to be witnessed by so many people, including English visitors, that the fall of the stones from the sky could not be denied. It also was the first fall to be seriously investigated by scholars, at several universities in Italy, who collected eye-witness reports and specimens and formulated hypotheses of origin. Their task was greatly complicated by the timing of the fall which occurred 18 hours after Mt. Vesuvius sprang into full eruption. Some believed that the two events were entirely coincidental; others thought that the stones either were ejecta from the volcano (which lay about 320 km to the southeast of Siena) or had consolidated in the fiery masses of dust and ash expelled by the mountain. No explanations seemed entirely satisfactory, but, in an age when the very possibility of falling stones had been decisively ruled out by savants of the Enlightenment, the well-observed fall at Siena opened a new dialog on this subject. The Siena fall occurred only two months after the publication in Riga and Leipzig of Ernst F. F. Chladni's book On the Origin of Ironmasses in which he concluded from historical records that fragments of iron and stone fall do, indeed, fall from sky. News traveled so slowly in the 18th century that Chladni's book received negative reviews in Germany throughout 1794 and much of 1795 before the first notice of the Siena fall appeared in a Berlin paper in 1796. The same amount of time passed before Chladni's book reached England, but the groundwork for a more tolerant reception of it in that country was laid by travelers returning from Italy in 1794 with their descriptions and their specimens from Siena (including bogus "fallen stones" fabricated for the tourist market). Widespread interest was aroused in 1795 when the Royal Society published an account of the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius by Sir William Hamilton, the English Ambassador at Naples, who included a short discussion of the Siena stones and their possible link with the volcano. Hamilton's article carried the story of the Siena fall to France and Germany. The case for fallen stones was further strengthened when a 56-pound stone fell at 3:30 p.m. on December 13th, 1795, at Wold Cottage in Yorkshire. Early in 1796, Edward King, a Fellow of the Royal Society, published the first book in English on fallen stones. In it, he focused primarily on the Siena event but just as he was finishing his text he received a copy of Chladni's book and quoted from it extensively. King's 36-page book was widely read. It received some bad reviews in England but it immediately prompted one reader to report the fall of a stone [apparently a genuine meteorite] at Pettiswood, Ireland. He had withheld his story for 17 years for fear of ridicule. Now, the climate of opinion had changed and meteoritics already was becoming a new branch of science.

  20. Falls Prevention: Unique to Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... a painless, decreased sensitivity to touch known as neuropathy. This is often a complication of diabetes but ... its own. If it affects feet and legs, neuropathy can be an important risk factor for falling. ...

  1. Effect of free fall on higher plants.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    The influence of exposure to the free-fall state on the orientation, morphogenesis, physiology, and radiation response of higher plants is briefly summarized. It is proposed that the duration of the space-flight experiments has been to brief to permit meaningful effects of free fall on general biochemistry, growth, and development to appear. However, two types of significant effect did occur. The first is on differential growth - i.e., tropism and epinasty - resulting from the absence of a normal geostimulus. For these phenomena it is suggested that ground-based experiments with the clinostat would suffice to mimic the effect of the free-fall state. The second is an apparent interaction between the radiation response and some flight condition, yielding an enhanced microspore abortion, a disturbed spindle function, and a stunting of stamen hairs. It is suggested that this apparent interaction may be derived from a shift in the rhythm of the cell cycle, induced by the free fall.

  2. 151. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    151. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Surveyor's Transit Book #363, Page 20). SURVEY PRINT SHOWING POINT SPILLWAY AND FIELD NOTES, TWIN FALLS COUNTY NORTHWEST OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  3. 153. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    153. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Field Book #360, Page 74, entitled, 'Clay-Seam Cut-Off.' Cross-Reference: ID-15-157). MILNER DAM SURVEY, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  4. 152. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    152. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Surveyor's Transit Book #363, Page 1). 1912 CONDITION REPORT OF MILNER DAM AREA, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  5. 158. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    158. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Transit Book #404T, Page 3, #46, Division One). START OF MAIN CANAL SURVEY, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  6. 154. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    154. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Surveyor's Transit Book #405T, Page 2, #46 Division One). STATEMENT OF SIGHT-SETTING FOR 1903 SURVEY TO ALIGN SOUTH SIDE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  7. 155. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    155. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Surveyor's Transit Book #405T, Page 1, #46 Division One). STATEMENT RE: SURVEY ALIGNMENT 3/03, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  8. 179. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company, Bisbee Photo, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    179. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company, Bisbee Photo, September, 1912. Photographer unknown. VIEW OF LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY; VIEW OF LOW LINE CANAL IN PETE LINK'S FIELD. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  9. 187. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    187. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. TOPOGRAPHICAL MAP OF MILNER DAM LOCATION, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; BLUEPRINT MAP. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  10. 192. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    192. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. TOPOGRAPHICAL MAP (DAM DRAWN IN), MILNER SITE, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; RIGHT SIDE OF MAP (LEFT ON ID-15-183). - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  11. 189. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    189. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ROCK CREEK CROSSING, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; BLUEPRINT. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  12. 182. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company. Photographer and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    182. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company. Photographer and date unknown. MILNER DAM TUNNELS, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; APPROACH TO TUNNELS. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  13. 137. TWIN FALLS SOUTH SIDE MAIN CANAL DIVERSION HEADGATES, TWIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    137. TWIN FALLS SOUTH SIDE MAIN CANAL DIVERSION HEADGATES, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; OVERALL VIEW OF MAIN HEADGATES, DAM IN BACKGROUND. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  14. 195. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    195. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. PLAN OF CONSTRUCTION AREA PLANT, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; BLUEPRINT. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  15. 191. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    191. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. SPILLWAY GATES, MILNER DAM, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; BLUEPRINT. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  16. 186. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    186. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. DRY CREEK RESERVOIR, CASSIA COUNTY (NOW TWIN FALLS COUNTY); MAP. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  17. 181. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company. Photographer and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    181. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company. Photographer and date unknown. POINT SPILL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY; SOUTH VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  18. 157. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    157. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Field Book #360, Page 75, entitled, 'Clay-Seam Cut-Off.' Cross-Reference: ID-15-153). MILNER DAM SURVEY, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  19. 194. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    194. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. PROFILE AND GATE PLAN, NORTH ISLAND CROSS SECTION OF DAM, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; BLUEPRINT. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  20. 193. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    193. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. MILNER DAM PROFILE, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; BLUEPRINT. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID