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1

Assessment of fall-related self-efficacy and activity avoidance in people with Parkinson's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Fear of falling (FOF) is common in Parkinson's disease (PD), and it is considered a vital aspect of comprehensive balance assessment in PD. FOF can be conceptualized differently. The Falls-Efficacy Scale (FES) assesses fall-related self-efficacy, whereas the Survey of Activities and Fear of Falling in the Elderly (SAFFE) assesses activity avoidance due to the risk of falling. This study

Maria H Nilsson; Anna-Maria Drake; Peter Hagell

2010-01-01

2

Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Risk Factors for Falls, Fear of Falling, and Falls Efficacy in a Cohort of Middle-Aged African Americans  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to cross-sectionally and longitudinally identify risk factors for falls, fear of falling, and falls efficacy in late-middle-aged African Americans. Design and Methods: We performed in-home assessments on a probability sample of 998 African Americans and conducted two annual follow-up interviews. Multiple…

Anderson, Elena M.; Wolinsky, Fredric D.; Miller, J. Phillip; Wilson, Margaret-Mary G.; Malmstrom, Theodore K.; Miller, Douglas K.

2006-01-01

3

Falls efficacy and self-rated health in older African American adults  

PubMed Central

Fear of falling and mobility restrictions have a significant negative impact on the quality of life of older adults. Because older African American adults are at increased risk for various modifiable health problems, understanding potential constraints on their overall health and mobility is critical in this population. The current study investigated this issue by analyzing a dataset of 449 older African American adults (mean age = 72.3 years) living in Detroit. We characterized and investigated the relationships among the following falls- and health-related variables: previous falls, falls efficacy, mobility, self-rated health (SRH), and depression and well-being. As a whole, participants reported moderate health and well-being, little depression, few mobility problems (mean = 8.4/40), and very high falls efficacy (mean = 94.9/100) despite the fact that a quarter of the sample experienced a fall within the past year. Correlation results indicated that previous falls, falls efficacy, mobility, SRH and depression and well-being were all inter-related. Regression analyses revealed that higher falls efficacy was more closely associated with better SRH than was having previously fallen. Findings suggest that improving falls efficacy in older African American adults may be beneficial to their mobility and overall health and well-being. Further, by asking a single-item SRH question, clinicians may be able to quickly identify older African American adults who have low falls efficacy and are at high risk for falling.

Tiernan, Chad; Lysack, Cathy; Neufeld, Stewart; Goldberg, Allon; Lichtenberg, Peter A.

2014-01-01

4

Falls efficacy and self-rated health in older African American adults.  

PubMed

Fear of falling and mobility restrictions have a significant negative impact on the quality of life of older adults. Because older African American adults are at increased risk for various modifiable health problems, understanding potential constraints on their overall health and mobility is critical in this population. The current study investigated this issue by analyzing a dataset of 449 older African American adults (mean age=72.3 years) living in Detroit. We characterized and investigated the relationships among the following falls- and health-related variables: previous falls, falls efficacy, mobility, self-rated health (SRH), and depression and well-being. As a whole, participants reported moderate health and well-being, little depression, few mobility problems (mean=8.4/40), and very high falls efficacy (mean=94.9/100) despite the fact that a quarter of the sample experienced a fall within the past year. Correlation results indicated that previous falls, falls efficacy, mobility, SRH and depression and well-being were all inter-related. Regression analyses revealed that higher falls efficacy was more closely associated with better SRH than was having previously fallen. Findings suggest that improving falls efficacy in older African American adults may be beneficial to their mobility and overall health and well-being. Further, by asking a single-item SRH question, clinicians may be able to quickly identify older African American adults who have low falls efficacy and are at high risk for falling. PMID:24063870

Tiernan, Chad; Lysack, Cathy; Neufeld, Stewart; Goldberg, Allon; Lichtenberg, Peter A

2014-01-01

5

Continental scale patterns in mangrove litter fall  

Microsoft Academic Search

Litter fall was monitored in stands of the mangrove species Rhizophora stylosa Griff., Ceriops tagal (Perr.) C. B. Robinson and Avicennia marina (Forsk.), Vierh. at approximately monthly intervals over a single annual cycle at selected locations around the coastline of Australia and throughout the distribution of each species. Concurrent data were obtained from a single location near Port Moresby in

John S. Bunt

1995-01-01

6

Convergent and predictive validity of three scales related to falls in the elderly.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to determine if the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) Scale, Falls Efficacy Scale (FES), and Survey of Activities and Fear of Falling in the Elderly (SAFE) assessments measured fear of falling in the same manner (convergent validity) and to determine if they predicted those individuals who, based upon a previous history of falls, limitation of activity, and not leaving home, had an increased potential for falling (predictive validity). One hundred and eighteen individuals, 60 years of age and older, completed each of the assessments. They self-reported activity restriction, fall history, and the number of times they left the home each week. The convergent validity of each assessment was established by correlating each assessment tool with each of the others. Findings indicated the ABC and FES were highly correlated with each other, indicating they measured similar constructs, and both were moderately correlated with the SAFE, suggesting these assessments measured different constructs. The predictive validity of each instrument in relation to the frequency of falls, limitation of activity, and frequency of leaving the home revealed no individual tool could accurately predict any of these characteristics of the sample. As a result, no one test by itself was able to identify individuals who may be at risk and a candidate for an intervention program. PMID:14763641

Hotchkiss, Anita; Fisher, Andrea; Robertson, Randi; Ruttencutter, Amy; Schuffert, Julie; Barker, David Bruce

2004-01-01

7

Temporal adaptations in generic and population-specific quality of life and falls efficacy in men with recent lower-limb amputations.  

PubMed

This study examined the longitudinal changes in generic health-related quality of life (QOL), prosthesis-related QOL, falls efficacy, and walking speed in men with lower-limb amputations up to 6 months following discharge from rehabilitation. Seven male unilateral transtibial amputees completed the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, the Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire, and the Modified Falls Efficacy Scale at 1, 3, and 6 months postdischarge from rehabilitation. Walking speed was also recorded to objectively assess participants' mobility. Health-related QOL measures displayed increases, resulting in large effect sizes though not reaching statistical significance. Prosthesis-related QOL measures indicated that scales relating to the participants' prostheses improved and the support of significant others was the most positively scored variable. Walking speed increased by 0.12 m/s, although it was not significantly related to indices of QOL or falls efficacy. Falls efficacy did not improve significantly during the study period, although it was strongly related to QOL (p < 0.05). These results provide a novel insight into how QOL and falls efficacy develop in people with lower-limb amputations, alongside changes in mobility, after discharge from rehabilitation. Further improvements in physical health following discharge may be required to elicit subsequent increases in overall QOL and concurrent improvements in falls efficacy. PMID:23881768

Barnett, Cleveland T; Vanicek, Natalie; Polman, Remco C J

2013-01-01

8

Development of a Physical Education Teaching Efficacy Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relationships have been found between teacher efficacy and many teaching and learning variables, but few researchers have examined teaching efficacy in physical education. The instrument reported here, the Physical Education Teaching Efficacy Scale, was developed based on the teaching efficacy literature, existing scales, and National Association…

Humphries, Charlotte A.; Hebert, Edward; Daigle, Kay; Martin, Jeffrey

2012-01-01

9

Psychometric properties of four fear of falling rating scales in people with Parkinson's disease  

PubMed Central

Background Fear of falling (FOF) is commonly experienced in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD). It is a predictor of recurrent falls, a barrier to physical exercise, and negatively associated with health-related quality of life. A variety of rating scales exist that assess different aspects of FOF but comprehensive head-to-head comparisons of their psychometric properties in people with PD are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of four FOF rating scales in people with PD. More specifically, we investigated and compared the scales’ data completeness, scaling assumptions, targeting, and reliability. Methods The FOF rating scales were: the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I), the Swedish FES (FES(S)), the Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale (ABC), and the modified Survey of Activities and Fear of Falling in the Elderly (mSAFFE). A postal survey was administered to 174 persons with PD. Responders received a second survey after two weeks. Results The mean (SD) age and PD duration of the 102 responders were 73 (8) and 7 (6) years, respectively. ABC had worse data completeness than the other scales (6.9 vs. 0.9–1.3% missing data). All scales had corrected item-total correlations exceeding 0.4 and showed acceptable reliabilities (Cronbach’s alpha and Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) >0.80) but only FES-I had ICC >0.90. The standard error of measurements ranged from 7% (FES-I) to 12% (FES(S)), and the smallest detectable differences ranged from 20% (FES-I) to 33% (FES(S)) of the total score ranges. ABC and FES(S) had substantially more outliers than mSAFFE and FES-I (10 and 15 vs. 3 and 4, respectively) when the two test occasions were compared. Conclusions When assessing FOF in people with PD, the findings in the present study favoured the choice of FES-I or mSAFFE. However, FES-I was the only scale with ICC >0.90 which has been suggested as a minimum when using a scale for individual comparisons.

2014-01-01

10

The Coaching Efficacy Scale II--High School Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this validity study was to improve measurement of coaching efficacy, an important variable in models of coaching effectiveness. A revised version of the coaching efficacy scale (CES) was developed for head coaches of high school teams (CES II-HST). Data were collected from head coaches of 14 relevant high school sports (N = 799).…

Myers, Nicholas D.; Feltz, Deborah L.; Chase, Melissa A.; Reckase, Mark D.; Hancock, Gregory R.

2008-01-01

11

Development of the Social Efficacy and Social Outcome Expectations Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current study developed an 18-item scale measuring individuals' social expectations in relationships related to their efficacy expectations (Subscale 1) and outcome expectations (Subscale 2) based on Bandura's self-efficacy theory. Results from exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, using an undergraduate sample ("N"…

Wright, Stephen L.; Wright, Dorothy A.; Jenkins-Guarnieri, Michael A.

2013-01-01

12

A Factor Analysis of the Discipline Efficacy Scale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Discipline Efficacy Scale (DES) was designed to measure personal and general teacher efficacy beliefs about student discipline. A confirmatory factor analysis of the proposed two-factor model was carried out using a sample of 206 junior- and senior-level preservice teacher education students. Goodness of fit measures did not suggest a good fit…

Giles, Rebecca McMahon; Kazelskis, Richard; Reeves-Kazelskis, Carolyn

13

Further examination of the Self-efficacy Scale.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine further the factorial validity of the Self-efficacy Scale via component and subsequent correlational analyses. 651 undergraduates enrolled in an introductory psychology course voluntarily completed the Self-efficacy Scale and the Bem Sex-role Inventory. A principal component analysis with an orthogonal rotation produced a two-factor solution which was remarkably similar to the factor structures reported previously. The two factors (General Self-efficacy and Social Self-efficacy) accounted for about 34% of the total variance. Further, the correlation coefficients indicated that General Self-efficacy was more strongly related to masculine traits than to feminine traits, as defined by the Bem Sex-role Inventory. PMID:12785628

Choi, Namok

2003-04-01

14

Scale-dependent habitat use by fall migratory birds: vegetation architecture, floristics, and geographic consistency  

Microsoft Academic Search

Animal habitat selection is a central focus of ecology and conservation biology. Understanding habitat associations in migratory animals is particularly complicated because individuals have variable habitat requirements during the annual cycle, across their geographic range, along migratory routes, and at multiple spatial scales. We studied habitat associations of 16 fall Nearctic–Neotropical migratory land birds at two spatial scales at a

Jill L. Deppe; John T. Rotenberry

2008-01-01

15

The Early Intervention Parenting Self-Efficacy Scale (EIPSES): Scale Construction and Initial Psychometric Evidence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The psychometric properties of an instrument designed to measure parenting efficacy within the context of early intervention, the Early Intervention Parenting Self-Efficacy Scale (EIPSES), were explored. One hundred seventeen caregivers of children receiving early intervention services completed the 20-item EIPSES. The scale was reduced to 16…

Guimond, Amy B.; Wilcox, M. Jeanne; Lamorey, Suzanne G.

2008-01-01

16

Results from a Chloramine-T Clinical Efficacy Trial to Control Mortality among Fall Chum Salmon Caused by Bacterial Gill Disease. Developments in Fish Culture.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A clinical field trial was conducted at the Quilcene National Fish Hatchery (Quilcene, Washington) to evaluate the efficacy of chloramine-T to control mortality among fall chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) fingerlings infected with bacterial gill disease (B...

J. D. Bowker L. Telles

1997-01-01

17

A Factor Analysis of the Research Self-Efficacy Scale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Counseling professionals' and counseling psychology students' interest in performing research seems to be waning. Identifying the impediments to graduate students' interest and participation in research is important if systematic efforts to engage them in research are to succeed. The Research Self-Efficacy Scale (RSES) was designed to measure…

Bieschke, Kathleen J.; And Others

18

SCALE-DEPENDENT HABITAT USE BY FALL MIGRATORY BIRDS: VEGETATION STRUCTURE, FLORISTICS, AND GEOGRAPHY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract. Animal habitat selection is a central focus of ecology and conservation,biology. Understanding,habitat associations in migratory,animals,is particularly complicated,because individuals have variable habitat requirements during the annual cycle, across their geographic range, along migratory routes, and at multiple spatial scales. We studied habitat associations of 16 fall Nearctic–Neotropical migratory,land birds at two,spatial scales at a stopover,site along the northern Yucatan coast

Jill L. Deppe; John T. Rotenberry

2008-01-01

19

Brief Psychometric Analysis of the Self-Efficacy Teacher Report Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study provides preliminary analysis of reliability and validity of scores on the Self-Efficacy Teacher Report Scale, which was designed to assess teacher perceptions of self-efficacy of students aged 8 to 17 years. (Contains 3 tables.)

Erford, Bradley T.; Duncan, Kelly; Savin-Murphy, Janet

2010-01-01

20

Knowledge of Extrinsic Fall Risk Factors in Elders 65 Years and Older: The efficacy of an education program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Falls are a serious health problem in people over 65-years-old. It is estimated that one out of every three people in this population fall each year. Furthermore, 85% of falls occur in the home as a result of preventable extrinsic risk factors. Currently, there is limited research evaluating seniors awareness of fall prevention within the home. The purpose of this

Nicole Horst; Jennifer Tuttle; Kristina Walter

2000-01-01

21

Evaluating the Turkish Version of the Discipline Efficacy Scale (DES): Translation Adequacy and Factor Structure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study is to adapt the discipline efficacy scale to Turkish language, and conduct the validity and reliability analysis of the adapted scale. The scale was applied to 157 teacher candidates. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to reveal the construct validity of the scale. The results of the exploratory…

Kurt, Hakan; Ekici, Gulay

2013-01-01

22

2011 Outstanding AFCPE[R] Conference Paper: Development and Validation of a Financial Self-Efficacy Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study developed a 6-item Financial Self-Efficacy Scale for use by researchers, educators, counselors, and advisors. Bandura's concept of self-efficacy and Prochaska's Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change provided the theoretical framework. Scale items were adapted from Schwarzer and Jerusalem's (1995) General Self-Efficacy Scale.…

Lown, Jean M.

2011-01-01

23

Reliability of a Scale of Work-Related Self-Efficacy for People with Psychiatric Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Work-related self-efficacy at a core task level fits with the social cognitive career theory explaining the career development of people with severe mental illness. The aim of this study was to further investigate the psychometric properties of the "Work-related Self- Efficacy Scale" for use with people with psychiatric disabilities. Sixty…

Harris, Meredith

2010-01-01

24

Using Mathematics in Teaching Science Self-Efficacy Scale--UMSSS: A Validity and Reliability Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, an instrument, Using Mathematics in Science Self-efficacy Scale (UMSSS), was developed in order to determine preservice science teachers' self-efficacy toward the use of mathematics in their lessons. Data gathered from 250 preservice science teachers were used for Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis…

Can, Bilge Taskin; Gunhan, Berna Canturk; Erdal, Sevinc Ongel

2012-01-01

25

A Psychometric Evaluation of the Parent Self-Efficacy in Managing the Transition to School Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The psychometric properties of the Parent Self-efficacy in Managing the Transition to School Scale (PSMTSS) were investigated with a sample of 763 mothers whose children were starting primary school in Australia. Exploratory factor analysis identified two factors, Efficacy and Worry, accounting for 56.6% of the total variance in parent…

Giallo, Rebecca; Kienhuis, Mandy; Treyvaud, Karli; Matthews, Jan

2008-01-01

26

The Self-Efficacy Scale for Preschool Teachers Regarding Asthma Care: Instrument Development and Validation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: The purpose of this study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of a questionnaire that assesses preschool teachers' self-efficacy in providing asthma care. Methods: A total of 407 teachers from 54 preschools in Taiwan participated in the study by completing the asthma management self-efficacy scale. We assessed…

Gau, Bih-Shya; Hung, Chao-Chia

2014-01-01

27

Field Scale Controls of Uranium Bioreduction Efficacy: the Role of Physico-chemical Heterogeneity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It has been demonstrated in laboratory systems that bacteria from natural environments can reduce U(VI) to immobile U(IV), therefore preventing the spreading of U(VI). The ultimate rate and efficacy of bioreduction at the field scale, however, is often challenging to quantify because it depends on the characteristics of field sites. In this work, the field scale efficacy of uranium bioreduction is quantified using an integrated approach. The approach combines field data, inverse and forward hydrological and reactive transport modeling, and upscaling. The approach is used to explore the impact of local scale (tens of centimeters) parameters and processes on field scale (tens of meters) system responses to biostimulation treatments and the controls of physicochemical heterogeneity on bioreduction efficacy. Using the biostimulation experiments at the Department of Energy Old Rifle site as an example, our results show that the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity and solid phase mineral (Fe(III)) play a critical role in determining the field-scale bioreduction efficacy. Due to the dependence on Fe-reducing bacteria, the overall U(VI) bioreduction efficacy was found to be largely controlled by the abundance of Fe(III) minerals at the vicinity of the injection wells. In addition, if there is preferential flow paths that connect injection wells to down gradient Fe(III) abundant areas, uranium bioreduction efficacy can also be enhanced.

Li, L.; Gawande, N.; Kowalsky, M. B.; Steefel, C.; Hubbard, S. S.

2011-12-01

28

Volcanic Hazard in New Zealand: Scaling and Attenuation Relations for Tephra fall deposits from Taupo Volcano  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is a first step in developing a probabilistic hazard model for tephra fall deposits in New Zealand. The database consists of measurements of tephra thickness and eruptive volumefrom 32 past eruptive events at Taupo Volcano. From these are derivedrelations for the mean and maximum tephra thickness as a function ofevent volume and distance from the vent, and for

D. A. Rhoades; D. J. Dowrick; C. J. N. Wilson

2002-01-01

29

Development and validation of a condom self-efficacy scale for college students.  

PubMed

This study proposed to develop and validate a scale for the college population that measures self-efficacy in using condoms. The Condom Use Self-Efficacy Scale (CUSES) was derived from several sources and consisted of 28 items describing an individual's feelings of confidence about being able to purchase condoms, put them on and take them off, and negotiate their use with a new sexual partner. This scale was administered to a sample of 768 college students. It was found to possess adequate reliability (Cronbach's alpha = .91; test-retest correlation = .81) and correlated well with the Attitude Toward the Condom Scale (r = .51) and the Contraceptive Self-Efficacy Scale for women (r = .55). Our scale also correlated with a measure of intention to use condoms (r = .40) but was unrelated to a measure of social desirability. Students who differed on measures of previous condom use as well as on sexual intercourse experience also showed significant differences on this scale in the expected direction, indicating evidence of this scale's discriminant validity. The potential uses of this scale in a college population are discussed, along with the issues underlying condom usage self-efficacy. PMID:1783705

Brafford, L J; Beck, K H

1991-03-01

30

Examining Measurement Properties of an English Self-Efficacy Scale for English Language Learners in Korea  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study provides evidence for the validity of the Questionnaire of English Self-Efficacy in a sample of 167 college students in Korea. Results show that the scale measures largely satisfy the Rasch model for unidimensionality. The rating scale appeared to function effectively. The item hierarchy was consistent with the expected item order. The…

Wang, Chuang; Kim, Do-Hong; Bong, Mimi; Ahn, Hyun Seon

2013-01-01

31

Assessing and Improving the Factorial Structures of the Computer Self-Efficacy Scale.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Computer Self-Efficacy Scale (CSE) developed by C. A. Murphy, D. Coover, and S. V. Owen (1989) is an instrument purported to assess computer-related competencies. Previous research into the factor structure of the CSE has yielded conflicting results. In this study, the scale was used to collect data from 216 graduate education students. A…

Moroz, Pauline A.; Nash, John B.

32

Large-scale spatial variability of riverbed temperature gradients in Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning areas  

SciTech Connect

In the Snake River basin of the Pacific northwestern United States, hydroelectric dam operations are often based on the predicted emergence timing of salmon fry from the riverbed. The spatial variability and complexity of surface water and riverbed temperature gradients results in emergence timing predictions that are likely to have large errors. The objectives of this study were to quantify the thermal heterogeneity between the river and riverbed in fall Chinook salmon spawning areas and to determine the effects of thermal heterogeneity on fall Chinook salmon emergence timing. This study quantified river and riverbed temperatures at 15 fall Chinook salmon spawning sites distributed in two reaches throughout 160 km of the Snake River in Hells Canyon, Idaho, USA, during three different water years. Temperatures were measured during the fall Chinook salmon incubation period with self-contained data loggers placed in the river and at three different depths below the riverbed surface. At all sites temperature increased with depth into the riverbed, including significant differences (p<0.05) in mean water temperature of up to 3.8°C between the river and the riverbed among all the sites. During each of the three water years studied, river and riverbed temperatures varied significantly among all the study sites, among the study sites within each reach, and between sites located in the two reaches. Considerable variability in riverbed temperatures among the sites resulted in fall Chinook salmon emergence timing estimates that varied by as much as 55 days, depending on the source of temperature data used for the estimate. Monitoring of riverbed temperature gradients at a range of spatial scales throughout the Snake River would provide better information for managing hydroelectric dam operations, and would aid in the design and interpretation of future empirical research into the ecological significance of physical riverine processes.

Hanrahan, Timothy P.

2007-02-01

33

Validity testing of the Long-Term Medication Behavior Self-Efficacy Scale.  

PubMed

Self-efficacy is an important determinant of health behavior that can be targeted for intervention. Little effort has been given to the development of valid measures for self-efficacy with medication taking for adherence research. The purpose of this study was to determine the criterion validity of the Long-Term Medication Behavior Self-Efficacy Scale (LTMBSES). Individual patient data from 6 existing adherence studies in transplant, hyperlipidemia, and AIDS/HIV patients (n = 1021) were pooled. Validity was determined by assessing the relation between the LTMBSES score and medication adherence--both self-reported and electronically monitored. A weak relationship was found between the LTMBSES score and adherence, which can possibly be attributed to a ceiling effect, caused by a too homogeneous population and/or a failure of the scale to challenge patients. Generalized Estimating Equations revealed that the total average self-efficacy score predicted reported medication adherence (p < .0001). The Receiver Operating Characteristic curve revealed the area under the curve was 0.67, indicating a significant (p < .0001), but poor predictive capability. Evidence for criterion validity of the Long-Term Medication Behavior Self-Efficacy Scale is not yet convincing. Future research should focus on: (1) validation in a population with a more heterogenous level of adherence, and (2) making the scale more challenging by referring to "always taking the medication without exception." PMID:15633781

Denhaerynck, Kris; Abraham, Ivo; Gourley, Greta; Drent, Gerda; De Vleeschouwer, Peter; Papajcik, Doreen; Lince, Elaine; De Geest, Sabina

2003-01-01

34

A Dutch translation of the Self-Efficacy for Rehabilitation Outcome Scale (SER): a first impression on reliability and validity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Self-efficacy is a relevant factor during rehabilitation after total hip or knee arthroplasty. Research was done into the reliability and validity of a Dutch translation of the Self-Efficacy for Rehabilitation Outcome Scale (SER). One hundred and forty-one persons filled in the SER questionnaire and the Self-Efficacy Expectation Scale (SES) as a control scale. Research was done into reliability and into

Martin Stevens; Inge van den Akker-Scheek; Jim R. van Horn

2005-01-01

35

The Psychometric Properties of the Difficult Behavior Self-Efficacy Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study was designed to estimate the psychometric properties of Hastings and Brown's (2002a) Difficult Behavior Self-efficacy Scale. Participants were two samples of physical educators teaching in Korea (n = 229) and the United States (U.S.; n = 139). An initial translation of the questionnaire to Korean and pilot study were conducted along with…

Oh, Hyun-Kyoung; Kozub, Francis M.

2010-01-01

36

Practical Paper Disinfectant efficacy in distribution systems: a pilot-scale assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Disinfection efficacy was evaluated in four pilot-scale systems that were operated at four water utilities across North America. Through this approach, factors which are difficult to simulate in a laboratory environment (such as water properties, process conditions, climatic conditions) were assessed, in order to determine their influence on disinfectant effectiveness. The results from this study show that a critical level

Graham A. Gagnon; Helene Baribeau; Simon O. Rutledge; Robert Dumancic; Adrian Oehmen; Christian Chauret; Susan Andrews; Carollo Engineers

37

A Reliability Generalization Study of the Teacher Efficacy Scale and Related Instruments.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studied sources of measurement error variance in the Teacher Efficacy Scale (TES) (Gibson and Dembo, 1984). Used reliability generalization to characterize the typical score reliability for the TES and potential sources of measurement error variance across 43 studies. Also examined related instruments for measurement integrity. (SLD)

Henson, Robin K.; Kogan, Lori R.; Vacha-Haase, Tammi

2001-01-01

38

Development of the Ethical and Legal Issues in Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors present the development of the Ethical and Legal Issues in Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale (ELICSES). The purpose of this article is threefold: (a) present a rationale for the ELICSES, (b) review statistical analysis procedures used to develop the ELICSES, and (c) offer implications for future research and counselor education.

Mullen, Patrick R.; Lambie, Glenn W.; Conley, Abigail H.

2014-01-01

39

An Analysis of the Reliability and Validity of Bandura's Multidimensional Scales of Perceived Self-Efficacy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The reliability of A. Bandura's Multidimensional Scales of Perceived Self-Efficacy (MSPSE) was studied using the Cronbach alpha measure of internal consistency. The divergent validity of the MSPSE was also examined using subscale correlations, and the construct validity of the measure was studied through application of principal axes factor…

Williams, Janice E.; Coombs, William T.

40

A Scenario-Based Dieting Self-Efficacy Scale: The DIET-SE  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article discusses a scenario-based dieting self-efficacy scale, the DIET-SE, developed from dieter's inventory of eating temptations (DIET). The DIET-SE consists of items that describe scenarios of eating temptations for a range of dieting situations, including high-caloric food temptations. Four studies assessed the psychometric properties of…

Stich, Christine; Knauper, Barbel; Tint, Ami

2009-01-01

41

The Development and Validation of the School-Based Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to develop and validate the School-Based Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale (SB-SES). Two hundred sixty-five (N = 265) licensed mental health professionals participated in this study. Fifty-eight percent of the participants reported experience working as a school-based counselor with the remaining 42% reporting no…

Boughfman, Erica M.

2010-01-01

42

Experimental correlation of falling film absorption heat transfer on micro-scale hatched tubes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of this paper are to investigate the effect of surface roughness of micro-hatching tubes on the absorption performance and to develop an experimental correlation of Nusselt number as a function of the roughness. Two different micro-scale hatched tubes and a bare tube are tested to quantify the effect of the surface roughness on the absorption performance. The roughness

Chan Woo Park; Sung Soo Kim; Hyun Churl Cho; Yong Tae Kang

2003-01-01

43

Falling asleep with Angry Birds, Facebook and Kindle: a large scale study on mobile application usage  

Microsoft Academic Search

While applications for mobile devices have become extremely important in the last few years, little public information exists on mobile application usage behavior. We describe a large-scale deployment-based research study that logged detailed application usage information from over 4,100 users of Android-powered mobile devices. We present two types of results from analyzing this data: basic descriptive statistics and contextual descriptive

Matthias Böhmer; Brent Hecht; Johannes Schöning; Antonio Krüger; Gernot Bauer

2011-01-01

44

Diagnostic validity of the care dependency scale as a screening tool for pressure ulcer and fall risks in Dutch and German hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pressure ulcers and falls are frequent adverse events with negative impacts for hospital patients. Guidelines recommend risk\\u000a assessment as the first step in prevention. Care dependency correlates with falls and pressure ulcers and the Care Dependency\\u000a Scale showed a diagnostic validity comparable to that of specific risk assessment tools. The aim of this study was to establish\\u000a a simple and

Elke Mertens; Theo Dassen; Ramona Scheufele; Ruud J Halfens; Antje Tannen

2010-01-01

45

Efficacy of a multifaceted podiatry intervention to improve balance and prevent falls in older people: study protocol for a randomised trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Falls in older people are a major public health problem, with at least one in three people aged over 65 years falling each year. There is increasing evidence that foot problems and inappropriate footwear increase the risk of falls, however no studies have been undertaken to determine whether modifying these risk factors decreases the risk of falling. This article

Martin J Spink; Hylton B Menz; Stephen R Lord

2008-01-01

46

The development and testing of the pelvic floor muscle exercise self-efficacy scale.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to establish a reliable and valid instrument to evaluate women' s confidence in performing pelvic floor muscle exercise (PFME). Based on the researcher' s own experience and with extended literature review, social cognitive theory and a health promotion model were utilized to formulate the 17-item Chen pelvic floor muscle exercise self-efficacy (PFMSE) scale. Data were collected from 106 urinarily incontinent women and the reliability and validity of the scale were tested. The results showed that the scale has a high Cronbach' s alpha of .95 for its internal consistency. Test-retest reliability over 6-30 days was r = .86 (p < .001), showing acceptable stability of the Chen PFMSE scale. Exploratory factor analysis was used to test the initial construct validity, and two factors were extracted, which explained 34.16% and 32.55% of the total variance respectively, with a total of 66.71% . The two factors were named as (1) belief in PFME execution and its benefits, and (2) belief in performing PFME as scheduled and despite barriers. It is also evident that the Chen PFMSE scale satisfies concurrent validity when compared with well-developed and tested instruments such as general self-efficacy ( GSE), perceived PFME benefits, and incontinence impact questionnaire-7 (IIQ-7). The results suggest that the Chen PFMSE scale has solid psychometric properties, and is a useful tool for clinicians to design appropriate interventions and to foster positive PFME self-efficacy during treatment for women with urinary incontinence and undergoing PFME training. PMID:15619176

Chen, Shu-Yueh

2004-12-01

47

Development of a scale to measure health professions students' self-efficacy beliefs in interprofessional learning.  

PubMed

A need exists for measures to evaluate the impact of interprofessional education (IPE) interventions. We undertook development and evaluation of a scale to measure self-efficacy perceptions of pre-licensure students in medicine, dentistry and health professions. The scale was developed in the context of a project entitled, "Seamless Care: An Experiential Model of Interprofessional Education for Collaborative Patient-Centered Practice". As self-efficacy perceptions are associated with the likelihood of taking on certain tasks, the difficulty of those tasks, and perseverance in the face of barriers, we reasoned that understanding changes in students' perceptions and their relation to other outcomes was important. A 16-item scale was developed from a conceptual analysis of relevant tasks and the existing literature. Content validity was assessed by six Canadian IPE experts. Pre-licensure students (n = 209) participated in a pilot test of the instrument. Content validity was rated highly by the six judges; internal consistency of the scale (Cronbach's ? = 96) and subscales 1 (? = .94) and 2 (? = .93) were high. Principal components analysis resulted in identification of two factors, each accounting for 34% of the variance: interprofessional interaction, and interprofessional team evaluation and feedback. We conclude that this scale can be useful in evaluating IPE interventions. PMID:22166126

Mann, Karen; McFetridge-Durdle, Judith; Breau, Lynn; Clovis, Joanne; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Matheson, Tanya; Beanlands, Hope; Sarria, Maria

2012-03-01

48

Development and evaluation of the Marijuana Reduction Strategies Self-Efficacy Scale.  

PubMed

To evaluate several psychometric properties of a questionnaire designed to assess college students' self-efficacy to employ 21 cognitive-behavioral strategies intended to reduce the amount and/or frequency with which they consume marijuana, we recruited 273 marijuana-using students to rate their confidence that they could employ each of the strategies. Examination of frequency counts for each item, principal components analysis, internal consistency reliability, and mean interitem correlation supported retaining all 21 items in a single scale. In support of criterion validity, marijuana use-reduction self-efficacy scores were significantly positively correlated with cross-situational confidence to abstain from marijuana, and significantly negatively correlated with quantity and frequency of marijuana use and marijuana-related problems. In addition, compared with respondents whose use of marijuana either increased or remained stable, self-efficacy was significantly higher among those who had decreased their use of marijuana over the past year. This relatively short and easily administered questionnaire could be used to identify college students who have low self-efficacy to employ specific marijuana reduction strategies and as an outcome measure to evaluate educational and skill-training interventions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24955675

Davis, Alan K; Osborn, Lawrence A; Leith, Jaclyn; Rosenberg, Harold; Ashrafioun, Lisham; Hawley, Anna; Bannon, Erin E; Jesse, Samantha; Kraus, Shane; Kryszak, Elizabeth; Cross, Nicole; Carhart, Victoria; Baik, Kyoung-Deok

2014-06-01

49

Rasch Calibration of Physical Activity Self-Efficacy and Social Support Scale for Persons with Intellectual Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate the construct validity of the Self-Efficacy/Social Support for Activity for persons with Intellectual Disability (SE/SS-AID) scales developed by Peterson, Peterson, Lowe, & Nothwehr (2009). A total of 146 participants with intellectual disabilities completed 6 self-efficacy (SE) items and 18 social…

Lee, Miyoung; Peterson, Jana J.; Dixon, Alicia

2010-01-01

50

The Validity and Reliability Study of the Turkish Version of the Online Technologies Self-Efficacy Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of the present study is to adapt a scale of self-efficacy towards online technologies which was developed by Miltiadou and Yu (2000) to Turkish. In order to adapt the scale, first, the scale items were translated to Turkish by the researchers. Then, a translation form was further developed by consulting eight specialists. These English and…

Horzum, Mehmet Baris; Cakir, Ozlem

2009-01-01

51

Postural control, falls and fear of falling in people with multiple sclerosis without mobility aids.  

PubMed

The purpose of the study was to determine the relationship between static postural control parameters to fear of falling and falling history in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) without mobility assistive devices. One-hundred and seven relapsing-remitting patients diagnosed with MS, 62 women aged 42.8 (S.D.=12.0), participated in this investigation. Participants were divided into groups based on fall history; 47 had no history during the past 6 months and 60 had a history of at least one fall within the same period. Static postural control parameters were obtained from the Zebris FDM-T Treadmill (zebris® Medical GmbH, Germany). The patient's self-reported questionnaire, the Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I), was used to assess the level of concern relating to falls. People with MS classified as fallers exhibited increased center of pressure (CoP) path length, sway velocity and greater overall sway area. CoP path length performed with eyes open was found to explain 42% of the variance related to at least one fall during the past six months; R(2)=0.424, ?(2)(1)=40.727, P<0.01. The correlation between the FES-I and CoP path length was 0.620 (P<0.001). Measurement of the CoP trajectories with instrumented posturography should be considered in managing fall risk in the MS population. PMID:24095270

Kalron, Alon; Achiron, Anat

2013-12-15

52

Mapping the efficacy of new designs for large scale sonochemical reactors.  

PubMed

Sonochemical reactors have a great promise for many physical and chemical processing applications but its applicability at pilot or industrial scale levels is hindered by lack of novel designs which can reproduce the spectacular effects generated at the laboratory scale. The present work evaluates the efficacy of two new designs, operating at a liquid capacity of 7l. Mapping of the cavitational activity has been carried out using measurements of local pressure using hydrophone and cativational intensity using Cavitation Activity Indicator (Model IC-3, N. Deznukov, Belarus State University, Minsk, Belarus). Aim has been to identify the distribution of the cavitational activity in radial and axial directions and possibly characterizing the zones with very high and very low cavitational activity in these reactor configurations. It has been observed that the cavitational activity is substantially uniform in both the reactors unlike the conventional single transducer based reactors. The study clearly indicates the feasibility of these designs for future large scale applications. PMID:17224297

Kumar, Ajay; Gogate, Parag R; Pandit, Aniruddha B

2007-07-01

53

A New Scale for Evaluating the Risks for In-Hospital Falls of Newborn Infants: A Failure Modes and Effects Analysis Study  

PubMed Central

We aimed to develop a new scale for evaluating risks and preventive measures for in-hospital falls of newborn infants, from admission to discharge of the expectant mother. Our study was prepared in accordance with Failure Modes and Effects Analysis criteria. The risks and preventive measures for in-hospital falls of newborns were determined. Risk Priority Numbers (RPNs) were determined by multiplication of the scores of severity, probability of occurrence, and probability of detection. Analyses showed that risks having the highest RPNs were the mother with epidural anesthesia (RPN: 350 point), holding of the baby at the moment of delivery (RPN: 240), and transportation of baby right after delivery (RPN: 240). A reduction was detected in all RPNs after the application of preventive measures. Our risk model can function as a guide for obstetric clinics that need to form strategies to prevent newborn falls.

Abike, Faruk; Tiras, Sinan; Dunder, Ilkkan; Bahtiyar, Ayfer; Akturk Uzun, Ozlem; Demircan, Ozlusen

2010-01-01

54

The efficacy of the Waterloo-Stanford Group Scale of hypnotic susceptibility: form C.  

PubMed

This study explored whether the Waterloo-Stanford Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility Form: C (WSGC) approximates the predictive power of the individually administered Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale: Form C (SHSS: C). Seventy-one undergraduates were administered the WSGC in a group setting and then tested individually on the SHSS: C. The participants were then hypnotized and tested on four types of targeted hypnotic behaviors sampled from the Revised Stanford Profile Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility: I & II (RSPSHS: I & II). The following four factors were chosen: (a) cognitive distortion; (b) positive hallucination; (c) negative hallucination, and (d) dreams and regression. The items from these factors were matched on difficulty level. A series of multiple regression and logistic regression analyses were performed. The Waterloo: C was found to match the SHSS: C on predictive power for only one of the four hypnotic factors: "dreams and regression." On the other three factors, the SHSS: C was clearly superior in predictive efficacy. These results mirror previous research (Kurtz & Strube, 1996) that examined other group scales of hypnotic susceptibility in relation to the individually administered SHSS: C. In general, group scales such as the WSGC are poor substitutes for the SHSS: C. PMID:11799536

Moran, Tracy E; Kurtz, Richard M; Strube, Michael J

2002-01-01

55

How Do Things Fall?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Learners engage in close observation of falling objects. They determine it is the amount of air resistance, not the weight of an object, which determines how quickly an object falls. This demonstration and activity can be combined with other activities to create a larger lesson. Resource contains vocabulary definitions and suggestions for assessment, extensions, and scaling for different levels of learners.

Zamora-Thompson, Xochitl; Heavner, Ben; Zarske, Malinda S.; Carlson, Denise

2004-01-01

56

Assessing medication adherence self-efficacy among low-literacy patients: development of a pictographic visual analogue scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health behavior interventions are often groundedin SocialCognitive Theory,butinstru- ments used to assess self-efficacy rely on verbal skills and yield scores that are highly positively skewed. Based on a review of the research literature and qualitative research with key informants, a pictographic medication adher- ence self-efficacy scale was developed. Two studies were conducted to test the pictographic and color visual analogue

Seth C. Kalichman; Demetria Cain; Andrea Fuhrel; Lisa Eaton; Kari Di Fonzo; Thom Ertl

2004-01-01

57

Development and evaluation of a medication adherence self-efficacy scale in hypertensive African-American patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Self-efficacy, a known predictor of a wide range of health behaviors, has not been investigated in studies of adherence to antihypertensive medications. A medication adherence self-efficacy scale was developed and evaluated in ambulatory hypertensive African-American patients in two sequential phases. For the item-generation phase, open-ended interviews with 106 patients were used to elicit their experiences with taking antihypertensive medications. Using

Gbenga Ogedegbe; Carol A Mancuso; John P Allegrante; Mary E Charlson

2003-01-01

58

Perfectionism, self-efficacy, and depression: preliminary analysis of the Japanese version of the Almost Perfect Scale-Revised.  

PubMed

The Almost Perfect Scale-Revised is a self-report measure of perfectionism. The present study examined the psychometric properties of the scale's Japanese version and its relation to self-efficacy and depression. Japanese university students (N = 249) completed the Japanese version of the Almost Perfect Scale-Revised along with the General Self-Efficacy Scale-12 and the Self-Rating Depression Scale. Exploratory factor analysis indicated three factors: Discrepancy, High Standards, and Order. Estimates of internal consistency reliability for the three subscales were high. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Almost Perfect Scale-Revised in another group of Japanese university students (N = 206) supported the 3-factor structure. Cluster analyses using the three subscales yielded four clusters. In addition to adaptive perfectionists, maladaptive perfectionists, and nonperfectionists, identified in previous studies, a normal perfectionists group was identified, with mean scores similar to those of the total sample and depression and self-efficacy scores close to those of nonperfectionists. Adaptive perfectionists, characterized by high scores on High Standards and Order and low scores on Discrepancy, also had higher scores on self-efficacy and lower scores on depression than maladaptive perfectionists and even nonperfectionists. The influence of Japanese culture is discussed. PMID:19708416

Nakano, Keiko

2009-06-01

59

Self efficacy for fruit, vegetable and water intakes: Expanded and abbreviated scales from item response modeling analyses  

PubMed Central

Objective To improve an existing measure of fruit and vegetable intake self efficacy by including items that varied on levels of difficulty, and testing a corresponding measure of water intake self efficacy. Design Cross sectional assessment. Items were modified to have easy, moderate and difficult levels of self efficacy. Classical test theory and item response modeling were applied. Setting One middle school at each of seven participating sites (Houston TX, Irvine CA, Philadelphia PA, Pittsburg PA, Portland OR, rural NC, and San Antonio TX). Subjects 714 6th grade students. Results Adding items to reflect level (low, medium, high) of self efficacy for fruit and vegetable intake achieved scale reliability and validity comparable to existing scales, but the distribution of items across the latent variable did not improve. Selecting items from among clusters of items at similar levels of difficulty along the latent variable resulted in an abbreviated scale with psychometric characteristics comparable to the full scale, except for reliability. Conclusions The abbreviated scale can reduce participant burden. Additional research is necessary to generate items that better distribute across the latent variable. Additional items may need to tap confidence in overcoming more diverse barriers to dietary intake.

2010-01-01

60

Psychometric Properties of a Symptom Management Self-Efficacy Scale for Women Living with HIV/AIDS  

PubMed Central

Context Many people with HIV/AIDS find it difficult to manage the symptoms of the disease, but by adopting effective symptom management behavior, they increase the potential of alleviating the burden of those symptoms. Self-efficacy is a recognized mediator of successful behavior change and is utilized by many researchers and clinicians when developing symptom management interventions. Despite this, an instrument measuring the self-efficacy of symptom management behavior specifically for people living with HIV/AIDS has not yet been made available. Objective To introduce and test the psychometric properties of the HIV Symptom Management Self-Efficacy for Women Scale (HSM-SEWS) for women with HIV/AIDS. This scale, a new 9-item measurement instrument, was modified from the Chronic Disease Self-Efficacy Scale. Methods In this study, psychometric testing focused on the reliability and validity of the HSM-SEWS instrument. Reliability was assessed using Cronbach’s alpha. Exploratory factor analysis with oblique promax rotation was used to examine validity and test hypothetical associations. Results Eighty-nine HIV-positive women were recruited and asked to complete the scale every four weeks for a total of 16 weeks. Factor analysis supported a one-factor solution explaining 93% of the variance among items. Internal consistency of the nine items was found to range from 0.83–0.93, with an overall Cronbach’s alpha of 0.92. Conclusions Psychometric analyses suggest that the HIV Symptom Management Self-Efficacy for Women Scale is a reliable and valid instrument that measures the self-efficacy of symptom management behavior in women with HIV/AIDS and can be used during interventions and in research targeting this area of health care research.

Webel, Allison R.; Okonsky, Jennifer

2010-01-01

61

Measuring Self-Efficacy: Multi-Trait Multi-Method Comparison of Scaling Procedures.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Convergent and discriminant validity of various self-efficacy measures was examined across two studies. In Study 1, U.S. high school students (n=358) rated their self-efficacy in 6 school subjects with reference to specific problems or general self-efficacy statements on the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) (P. Pintrich and…

Bong, Mimi; Hocevar, Dennis

62

Combined Use of Self-Efficacy Scale for Oral Health Behaviour and Oral Health Questionnaire: A Pilot Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To examine whether the combined use of a task-specific self-efficacy scale for oral health behaviour (SEOH) and an oral health questionnaire (OHQ) would be useful for evaluating subjects' behaviours and cognitions. Design: Questionnaires. Methods: One hundred and eighty-five students completed the SEOH and OHQ. The 30-item OHQ uses a…

Soutome, Sakiko; Kajiwara, Kazumi; Oho, Takahiko

2012-01-01

63

Plant Growth Regulators as Potential Tools in Aquatic Plant Management: Efficacy and Persistence in Small-Scale Tests.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Bioassay and small-scale test systems were used to determine the efficacy and persistence of plant growth regulators with potential for aquatic plant management. The goal of the project was to identify compounds that reduce plant height and thus weediness...

C. A. Lembi T. Chand-Goyal

1994-01-01

64

Elementary Student Self Efficacy Scale Development and Validation Focused on Student Learning, Peer Relations, and Resisting Drug Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of a child self efficacy scale for learning, peer interactions, and resisting pressure to use drugs, to use in an elementary school drug prevention education program based on social cognitive theory. A diverse cohort of 392 4th and 5th grade students completed the 20-item…

Fertman, Carl I.; Primack, Brian A.

2009-01-01

65

The Dimensionality of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form among Chinese Graduate Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The factorial structure of the Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (CDSES-SF) was examined in a sample of 796 Chinese graduate students recruited from five universities in Beijing. A single-factor model is recommended on the basis of two of this study's findings. First, confirmatory factor analyses revealed that the parsimonious…

Jin, Leili; Ye, Shengquan; Watkins, David

2012-01-01

66

Promoting Leisure Physical Activity Participation among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: Validation of Self-Efficacy and Social Support Scales  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Many individuals with intellectual disabilities are not sufficiently active for availing health benefits. Little is known about correlates of physical activity among this population on which to build health promotion interventions. Materials and Methods: We developed scales for measurement of self-efficacy and social support for…

Peterson, Jana J.; Peterson, N. Andrew; Lowe, John B.; Nothwehr, Faryle K.

2009-01-01

67

Self-Efficacy for Managing Work-Family Conflict: Validating the English Language Version of a Hebrew Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Self-Efficacy for Work-Family Conflict Management Scale (SE-WFC), developed in Israel, was designed to assess beliefs regarding one's ability to manage conflict between work and family roles. This study examined the factor structure, reliability, and validity of an English language version of the SE-WFC in a sample of 159 working mothers in…

Hennessy, Kelly D.; Lent, Robert W.

2008-01-01

68

The Iranian Version of the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES): Factor Structure, Internal Consistency and Construct Validity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The exercise self-efficacy scale (ESES) is largely used among diabetic patients to enhance exercise behaviour. However, the Iranian version of ESES was not available. The aim of this study was to validate ESES in this country. Method: Data were collected from 348 women who referred to a diabetes institute in Iran through convenience…

Noroozi, Azita; Ghofranipour, Fazlollah; Heydarnia, Ali Reza; Nabipour, Iraj; Tahmasebi, Rahim; Tavafian, Sedighe Sadat

2011-01-01

69

A Pilot Study of an Intervention Designed to Promote Walking, Balance, and Self-Efficacy in Older Adults with Fear of Falling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a need to provide interventions that are of interest to older adults who are not inclined to participate in conventional exercise programs and that can improve balance and fear of falling. One purpose of this pilot study was to assess feasibility and acceptability of an eight-week (3x/wk, 90-minute sessions) multifaceted, small group,…

Dattilo, John; Martire, Lynn; Gottschall, Jinger; Weybright, Elizabeth

2014-01-01

70

From efficacy research to large-scale impact on undernutrition: the role of organizational cultures.  

PubMed

Undernutrition in low-income countries is receiving unprecedented attention at global and national levels due to the convergence of many forces, including strong evidence concerning its magnitude, consequences, and potential solutions and effective advocacy by many organizations. The translation of this attention into large-scale reductions in undernutrition at the country level requires the alignment and support of many organizations in the development and implementation of a coherent policy agenda for nutrition, including the strengthening of operational and strategic capacities and a supportive research agenda. However, many countries experience difficulties achieving such alignment. This article uses the concept of organizational culture to better understand some of the reasons for these difficulties. This concept is applied to the constellation of organizations that make up the "National Nutrition Network" in a given country and some of the individual organizations within that network, including academic institutions that conduct research on undernutrition. We illustrate this concept through a case study involving a middle-income country. We conclude that efforts to align organizations in support of coherent nutrition agendas should do the following: 1) make intentional and sustained efforts to foster common understanding, shared learning, and socialization of new members and other elements of a shared culture among partners; 2) seek a way to frame problems and solutions in a fashion that enables individual organizations to secure some of their particular interests by joining the effort; and 3) not only advocate on the importance of nutrition but also insist that high-level officials hold organizations accountable for aligning in support of common-interest solutions (through some elements of a common culture) that can be effective and appropriate in the national context. We further conclude that a culture change is needed within academic departments if the discipline of nutrition is to play a central role in translating the findings from efficacy trials into large-scale reductions in undernutrition. PMID:24228200

Pelletier, David; Pelto, Gretel

2013-11-01

71

Adolescents' Self-Efficacy to Overcome Barriers to Physical Activity Scale  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes a revised measure of self-efficacy to overcome barriers to moderate and vigorous physical activity in a sample of 484 high school students in Toronto, Ontario. The students had a mean age of 15.3 years. Principal axis factoring with oblique rotation yielded five factors: self-efficacy to overcome internal, harassment, physical…

Dwyer, John J. M.; Chulak, Tala; Maitland, Scott; Allison, Kenneth R.; Lysy, Daria C.; Faulkner, Guy E. J.; Sheeshka, Judy

2012-01-01

72

[Accidental falls].  

PubMed

Falls are common cause of injuries among elderly people, and fractures are the most serious consequence of falls. For seniors, hip fractures are the second major cause of bedridden. The feature and acute care of head injury, spinal cord injury, vertebrae fracture, and hip fracture are described. Just had fracture fixation, the patient can not go back to the original ADL. In order not to become bedridden, both medication and physical examination are important based on the new disease concept of locomotive syndrome. To do so, requires hospital and clinic cooperation. Sufficient cooperation is not currently possible, and spread of liaison service is essential. PMID:23855211

Inokuchi, Koichi

2013-06-01

73

Multicultural Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale – Racial Diversity Form: Factor structure and test of a social cognitive model  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was conducted to gather evidence on the factor structure and concurrent criterion validity of the Multicultural Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale – Racial Diversity Form (MCSE-RD; Sheu & Lent, 2007). The MCSE-RD was designed to assess therapists' perceived capabilities in performing culturally relevant in-session behaviors in cross-racial counseling. Participants were 209 students in counseling-related graduate programs in the USA. Confirmatory

Hung-Bin Sheu; Marybeth Rigali-Oiler; Robert W. Lent

2012-01-01

74

Rapid large- and site scale RPAS mission planning for remote sensing of rock falls and landslides in alpine areas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since landslides and rock falls are complex phenomena involving a multitude of factors, current and historic surface data play besides geologic conditions and others an important role in analyzing hazard situation and efficient site-specific remediation actions. Especially in displacement acceleration phases which are frequently linked to bad weather conditions, data acquisition remains difficult. Therefore RPAS with their small ground sampling distance and correspondingly high resolution open up possibilities for surveying ground situations not only for visual inspection but also for geodetic data acquisition. Both, visual and geodetic data provide valuable information for geologists and related decision makers. Slides or rock falls in alpine areas pose special challenges due to mostly acute and unforeseen displacements on the one hand and geographic conditions of narrow valleys along with steep slopes on the other hand. Rapid RPAS mission planning and mission adaption for individual requirements according to different project stages (initial investigation, repeat measurements, identification of hazard zones for urgent remediation actions, etc.) is therefore of particular importance. Here we present a computer-simulation supported approach to RPAS mission planning taking the identified thematic and remote sensing targets, the relevant terrain and obstacle databases, legal restrictions, aircraft performance, sensor characteristics, and communication ranges into account in order to produce a safe and mission-optimized flight route. For the RPAS mission planning, we combine and adapt tools developed at University of Salzburg, namely a flight track generator taking into account a 3D-model of the earth surface with both, focus on large area coverage (e.g. Austria) and the highest available resolution (e.g. sub-meter for specific areas), available obstacle data bases for the mission area (e.g. cable car lines, power lines, buildings, slope stabilization constructions, etc.) and ad-hoc or predefined target lists. Whereas large area data with moderate resolution allows rapid and remote mission planning, high resolution data avoids flights into terrain even in steep and tricky slopes. We utilize a fast-time air traffic simulation to verify that the generated mission plan satisfies the mission requirements through the prediction and near-realtime 3D visualization of the flight path as well as survey camera views. If required for the mission, the survey camera view can be supported by augmented reality features (showing up-to-date or historic or thematic analysis data relevant to the mission). The accurate mission planning and generation of a detailed flight track supports also systematic repetitions of the RPAS survey flight for situation awareness or research purposes. During the execution of the mission the simulated flight track provides a nominal-actual comparison guiding the operation that can be rapidly changed using the same tools with predictable results during the mission. We present the developed rapid mission planning approach on the basis of selected examples in the Austrian Alps.

Gräupl, Thomas; Pschernig, Elias; Rokitansky, Carl-Herbert; Oleire-Oltmanns, Sebastian; Zobl, Fritz

2014-05-01

75

Free Fall  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this quick activity (page 1 of PDF), learners will use a simple physics of motion and gravity demonstration to test their predicting skills. Learners predict which quarter will hit the floor first during this free fall experiment. This activity not only requires learners to observe carefully, but also listen carefully! Relates to the linked video, DragonflyTV: Hockey.

Twin Cities Public Television, Inc.

2005-01-01

76

Falling Faster  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity about gravity (page 6 of the PDF), learners will come to understand how all objects will fall at the same rate, but that air will slow things down. This is a simple activity (it uses only two pieces of paper) that provides an excellent "Wow!" moment.

Cosi

2009-01-01

77

Clinical and posturographic correlates of falling in Parkinson's disease.  

PubMed

Various clinical tests and balance scales have been used to assess postural stability and the risk of falling in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). Quantitative posturography allows a more objective assessment but the findings in previous studies have been inconsistent and few studies have investigated which posturographic measures correlate best with a history of falling. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of clinical tests, balance scales, and stable-platform posturography in detecting postural instability and discriminating between fallers and non-fallers in a home-dwelling PD cohort. Forty-eight PD subjects (Hoehn & Yahr stage 1-3) and 17 age-matched controls had the following assessments: Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale, Berg Balance Scale, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) (motor), pull-test, timed up-and-go, static posturography, and dynamic posturography to assess multidirectional leaning balance. Of the clinical assessments, all but the pull-test were closely correlated with a history of falling. Static posturography discriminated between PD fallers and controls but not between PD fallers and non-fallers, whereas dynamic posturography (reaction time, velocity, and target hit-time) also discriminated between fallers and non-fallers. Our findings suggest that this combination of clinical and posturographic measures would be useful in the prospective assessment of falls risk in PD patients. A further prospective study is now required to assess their predictive value. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society. PMID:23609352

Johnson, Liam; James, Ian; Rodrigues, Julian; Stell, Rick; Thickbroom, Gary; Mastaglia, Frank

2013-08-01

78

Students fall for Fall Meeting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

From Boston to Beijing, thousands of students traveled to San Francisco for the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting. Of those who participated, 183 students were able to attend thanks to AGU's student travel grant program, which assists students with travel costs and seeks to enrich the meeting through ethnic and gender diversity. Students at Fall Meeting enjoyed a variety of programs and activities designed to help them better network with their peers, learn about new fields, and disseminate their research to the interested public. More than 800 students attended AGU's first annual student mixer, sharing drinks and ideas with fellow student members and future colleagues as well as forging new friendships and intellectual relationships.

Smedley, Kara

2012-02-01

79

Full-Scale Direct Numerical Simulation of Two- and Three-Dimensional Instabilities and Rivulet Formulation in Heated Falling Films  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A thin film draining on an inclined plate has been studied numerically using finite element method. Three-dimensional governing equations of continuity, momentum and energy with a moving boundary are integrated in an arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian frame of reference. Kinematic equation is solved to precisely update interface location. Rivulet formation based on instability mechanism has been simulated using full-scale computation. Comparisons with long-wave theory are made to validate the numerical scheme. Detailed analysis of two- and three-dimensional nonlinear wave formation and spontaneous rupture forming rivulets under the influence of combined thermocapillary and surface-wave instabilities is performed.

Krishnamoorthy, S.; Ramaswamy, B.; Joo, S. W.

1995-01-01

80

Bicultural Self-Efficacy among College Students: Initial Scale Development and Mental Health Correlates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Theory and empirical research suggest that perceived self-efficacy, or one's perceived ability to perform personally significant tasks, is related to individuals' psychological well-being and mental health. Thus, the authors hypothesized that bicultural individuals' perceived ability to function competently in 2 cultures, or perceived bicultural…

David, E. J. R.; Okazaki, Sumie; Saw, Anne

2009-01-01

81

Effects of Scale Differences on the Generality of Academic Self-Efficacy Judgments.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two of the most widely used academic self-efficacy assessment techniques, problem-referenced measurement and the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) were compared. Participants were 383 high school students from 4 Los Angeles (California) schools. Multi-trait multi-method analyses revealed that the two techniques were not…

Bong, Mimi

82

Some Studies in Large-Scale Surface Fluxes and Vertical Motions Associated with Land falling Hurricane Katrina over the Gulf of Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigated the possible relationship between the large- scale heat fluxes and intensity change associated with the landfall of Hurricane Katrina. After reaching the category 5 intensity on August 28th , 2005 over the central Gulf of Mexico, Katrina weekend to category 3 before making landfall (August 29th , 2005) on the Louisiana coast with the maximum sustained winds of over 110 knots. We also examined the vertical motions associated with the intensity change of the hurricane. The data on Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), sea level pressure and wind speed were obtained from the Atmospheric Soundings, and NOAA National Hurricane Center (NHC), respectively for the period August 24 to September 3, 2005. We developed an empirical model and a C++ program to calculate surface potential temperatures and heat fluxes using the above data. We also computed vertical motions using CAPE values. The study showed that the large-scale heat fluxes reached maximum (7960W/m2) with the central pressure 905mb. The Convective Available Potential Energy and the vertical motions peaked 3-5 days before landfall. The large atmospheric vertical motions associated with the land falling hurricane Katrina produced severe weather including thunderstorms and tornadoes.

Reddy, S. R.

2010-12-01

83

Issues in the Application of the Public School Version of the AAMD Adaptive Behavior Scale in School Setting. Field Study of the Efficacy of the AAMD Adaptive Behavior Scale-Public School Version. Substudy 5 of 5.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A representative sample of California school psychologists was surveyed to determine the extent of the use of the Adaptive Behavior Scale and the relationship between training in the use of the scale and perceptions of the efficacy of its measures. A large majority of psychologists had used the scale two or fewer times, though 30-45% had been…

Lambert, Nadine M.

84

[Falls in patients with stroke].  

PubMed

Falls are the most common medical complication during the post-stroke period. Falls are of great concern in this population in particular because of their severe consequences. Stroke survivors have an increased frequency of hip fracture and psychosocial problems such as fear of falling. The most important risk factors for falls in these patients are balance and gait deficits. Balance deficits in post-stroke patients entail reduced postural stability during standing and disturbed responses to self-induced and external balance perturbations. Gait deficits in post-stroke patients involve reduced propulsion at push-off, disturbed hip and knee flexion in the swing phase and disturbed stability in the stance phase. Beneficial effects can be expected from fall prevention programs targeting these deficits. The few studies that have evaluated the efficacy of task-oriented exercises have shown that these programs are the most promising in preventing falls in post-stroke patients. Technological advances in assistive devices also have potential for fall reduction. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to provide more conclusive evidence. PMID:24791565

Aizen, Efraim

2014-01-01

85

Small-scale hydroelectric power demonstration project: Broad River Electric Cooperative, Inc. , Cherokee Falls Hydroelectric Project: Final technical and construction cost report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to fulfill part of the requirement of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement Number FC07-80ID12125 of the Small Scale Hydropower Program and is submitted on behalf of the Broad River Electric Cooperative, Inc. of Gaffney, South Carolina. The project was initially studied in 1978 with construction commencing in January, 1984. The primary work elements of the project consisted of the renovation of an existing dam and a new powerhouse. The dam was rehabilitated and flashboards were installed along the top of the structure. The powerhouse was supplied with a single open pit turbine and a new substation was constructed. The project generated power in December of 1985 but has been plagued with numerous problems compounded by a flood in March, 1987 causing extensive damages. The flood of March, 1987 resulted in filing of litigative action by the developers against their project managers and engineers which has yet to reach settlement and will possibly culminate in court sometime during the fall of 1988.

Not Available

1988-06-01

86

Tailored Prevention of Inpatient Falls  

PubMed Central

Patient falls and fall-related injuries are serious problems in hospitals. The Fall TIPS application aims to prevent patient falls by translating routine nursing fall risk assessment into a decision support intervention that communicates fall risk status and creates a tailored evidence-based plan of care that is accessible to the care team, patients, and family members. In our design and implementation of the Fall TIPS toolkit, we used the Spiral Software Development Life Cycle model. Three output tools available to be generated from the toolkit are bed poster, plan of care, and patient education handout. A preliminary design of the application was based on initial requirements defined by project leaders and informed by focus groups with end users. Preliminary design partially simulated the paper version of the Morse Fall Scale currently used in hospitals involved in the research study. Strengths and weaknesses of the first prototype were identified by heuristic evaluation. Usability testing was performed at sites where research study is implemented. Suggestions mentioned by end users participating in usability studies were either directly incorporated into the toolkit and output tools, were slightly modified, or will be addressed during training. The next step is implementation of the fall prevention toolkit on the pilot testing units.

ZUYEV, LYUBOV; BENOIT, ANGELA N.; CHANG, FRANK Y.; DYKES, PATRICIA C.

2011-01-01

87

Fall detection sensor for fall protection airbag  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fall detection sensor for fall protection airbag was investigated to evaluate the airbag system. There are several methods to detect the fall: contact to the ground and detection of free fall. The problems with both methods are discussed. Since the usability of the latter come into practical use, tests in the future standard of airbag are discussed.

K. Fukaya

2002-01-01

88

Neurology Falls. Patient Falls Risk Assessment, Neurology Clinic, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Falls among the elderly are common and result in personal injury, mortality, and increased healthcare costs. Employing the Elderly Falls Screening Test (EFST), Timed Up and Go (TUG) and Tinetti Scale, a multidisciplinary team at Johns Hopkins Hospital con...

J. M. Gardner

2009-01-01

89

Psychometric Qualities of the Short Form of the Self-efficacy for Parenting Tasks Index-Toddler Scale.  

PubMed

Parental self-efficacy (PSE; parental self-perceived competence in parenting) is known to have considerable impact on parenting quality. Although PSE is particularly under pressure during the turbulent period of toddlerhood, most studies so far have focused on PSE in parents of older children. The current study presents the psychometric qualities of the Short Form of the Self-Efficacy for Parenting Tasks Index-Toddler Scale (SEPTI-TS). Parents from a normal (n = 282) and clinical sample (n = 27) of children filled in the SEPTI-TS, and other questionnaires concerning PSE, general self-evaluation, and psychological problems. Factor analysis resulted in a 26-item instrument, representing four domains of PSE with a strong factor structure and high reliability: nurturance, discipline, play, and routine. For this new Short Form of the SEPTI-TS, good face, discriminative, concurrent, and divergent validity were found. Cut-offs for normal PSE were provided. The Short Form SEPTI-TS enables identifying problematic PSE in specific domains of parenting during toddlerhood. PMID:24186305

van Rijen, E H M; Gasanova, N; Boonstra, A M; Huijding, J

2014-08-01

90

EFFICACY OF PATHOGEN REMOVAL DURING FULL-SCALE OPERATION OF WATER REUSE FACILITIES IN MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The full-scale operation of water reuse facilities—and delivery of recycled water to farms— by the Monterey Regional Water Pollution Control Agency began in April 1998. Depending on demand for the reclaimed municipal wastewater, up to 90,000 m3\\/day (24 million gal\\/d) can be treated and distributed to farmers to irrigate 5,000 hectares (12,000 acres) of food crops, including artichokes, lettuce, broccoli,

Kara Nelson; Bahman Sheikh; Robert C. Cooper; Robert Holden; Keith Israel

91

Development and Validation of a Cervical Cancer Screening Self-Efficacy Scale for Low-Income Mexican American Women  

PubMed Central

While self-efficacy (SE), a construct from Social Cognitive Theory, has been shown to influence other screening behaviors, few measures currently exist for measuring Pap test SE. This paper describes the development and psychometric testing of such a measure for Mexican-American women. Data from two separate samples of Mexican-American women 50 years or older, obtained as part of a study to develop and evaluate a breast and cervical cancer screening educational program, were used in the current study. Exploratory factor analysis indicated a single factor solution and all item loadings were > .73. Confirmatory analysis confirmed a single factor structure with all standardized loadings greater than .40 as hypothesized. The eight item SE scale demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = .95). As hypothesized, SE was correlated with knowledge, prior experience, and screening intention. Logistic regression supported the theoretical relationship that women with higher SE were more likely to have had a recent Pap test. Findings showed a significant increase in SE following the intervention, indicating the measure has good sensitivity to change over time.

Fernandez, Maria E.; Diamond, Pamela M.; Rakowski, William; Gonzales, Alicia; Tortolero-Luna, Guillermo; Williams, Janet; Morales-Campos, Daisy Y.

2011-01-01

92

Small-scale hydroelectric power demonstration project: Broad River Electric Cooperative, Inc. , Cherokee Falls, South Carolina: Final operations and maintenance report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to give a final accounting of the costs and benefits derived from the first two years of operation of the Cherokee Falls, Broad River Hydroelectric Demonstration Project which was built at Cherokee Falls, South Carolina. Prior to construction, Broad River Electric Cooperative, Inc. (BREC) executed a Cooperative Agreement with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Number FC07-80ID12125 which provided $1,052,664 toward the construction of the facility. This agreement requires that BREC document for DOE a summary of the complete operating statistics, operating and maintenance cost, and revenues from power sales for a two-year operating period. A complete reporting covering the design, technical, construction, legal, institutional, environmental and other related aspects of the total project was furnished to DOE previously for publication as the ''Final Technical and Construction Cost Report''. For this reason these elements will not be addressed in detail in this report. In order to make this account a more meaningful discussion of the initial two-year and four month production period, it is necessary to detail several unique events concerning the project which set Cherokee Falls apart from other projects developed under similar Cooperative Agreements with DOE. Accordingly, this report will discuss certain major problems experienced with the design, operation and maintenance, energy production, as well as the operation and maintenance cost and value of the power produced for the first 28 months of operation. 3 figs.

Not Available

1988-08-01

93

Measuring fall program outcomes.  

PubMed

Nurses help to ensure patient safety, which includes preventing falls and fall related injuries. The aging Veteran population, like the general population, is at risk for falls and fall related injuries whether at home, in hospitals or in long term care facilities. Nurses are leading practice innovations to systematically assess patients' risk for falls and implement population based prevention interventions. To determine the effectiveness of programs, data can be analyzed using a variety of statistical measures to determine program impacts. Thus, data analysis of fall rates by type of fall and severity of fall related injury can help facilities examine the effectiveness of their interventions and program outcomes. Examples of actual fall prevention programs and their approaches to measurement are showcased in this article. PMID:21848355

Quigley, Pat; Neily, Julia; Watson, Mary; Wright, Marilyn; Strobe, Karen

2007-05-01

94

Albeni Fall Wildlife Mitigation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group continued to actively engage in implementing wildlife mitigation actions in 2002. Regular Work Group meetings were held to discuss budget concerns affecting the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, to present p...

2003-01-01

95

Falls in Nursing Homes  

MedlinePLUS

... AS. Falls in the nursing home. Annals of Internal Medicine 1994;121:442–51. Rubenstein LZ. Preventing falls ... elderly population. A randomized clinical trial. Annals of Internal Medicine 1990;113(4):308–16. Thapa PB, Brockman ...

96

[Fall or syncope?].  

PubMed

Falls among older adults are a major health problem. When older adults fall, it is difficult to determine whether it is just a simple fall or is caused by syncope, as people often have amnesia for the loss of consciousness. We report three cases in which cardiac monitoring, for seven days or more, showed that falls had been caused by cardiac-related syncopes. PMID:17217872

Bundgaard, Lene Strauss; Holm, Ellen Astrid; Ottesen, Michael Mundt

2006-12-11

97

How Do Things Fall?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students learn that it is incorrect to believe that heavier objects fall faster than lighter objects. By close observation of falling objects, they see that it is the amount of air resistance, not the weight of an object, which determines how quickly an object falls.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

98

Disparity in the Fear of Falling Between Urban and Rural Residents in Relation With Socio-economic Variables, Health Issues, and Functional Independency  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate disparities in the fear of falling between urban and rural communities in relation to socio-demographics, health status, and functional level. Methods A total of 974 subjects aged 40 years or older participated in this study (335 urban residents and 639 rural). They completed a questionnaire about socio-demographics, health-related variables, and experience with falls. We employed both direct questioning and the Korean version of Falls Efficacy Scale-International (KFES-I) to investigate fear of falling in terms of perceptive fear and higher level of concern over falling during daily activities. The Korean version of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living was used to assess functional independency. Results Aging, female gender, fall history, and the presence of chronic medical problems were independently associated with higher prevalence for the fear of falling. Both perceptive fear of falling and a higher level of concern over falling were more prevalent in the rural senior population compared with those in the urban population when they had the following characteristics: lower income or educational background, physical laborer or unemployed, no chronic medical morbidity, or functional independency in daily activities. Conclusion The disparity in the fear of falling between the two areas is thought to be related to age structure, and it may also exist in healthy or functionally independent senior populations under the influence of socio-environmental factors. A senior population with lower socio-economic status residing in a rural area might be related with a greater vulnerability to the fear of falling. We should consider regional characteristics when we design fall-related studies or develop fall-prevention programs at the community level.

Cho, Hyungpil; Seol, Seung Jun; Yoon, Do Hyun; Kim, Mi Jung; Choi, Bo Youl

2013-01-01

99

Comparison of the Efficacy of Free Residual Chlorine and Monochloramine against Biofilms in Model and Full Scale Cooling Towers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The presence of microbial cells on surfaces results in the formation of biofilms, which may also give rise to microbiologically influenced corrosion. Biofilms accumulate on all submerged industrial and environmental surfaces. The efficacy of disinfectants is usually evaluated using planktonic cultures, which often leads to an underestimate of the concentration required to control a biofilm. The aim of this study

Irfan Türetgen

2004-01-01

100

The Interdisciplinary Nature of Unintended Fall Prevention among Older Adults: Renewed Emphasis Needed on Underlying Psychological Constructs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prevention of unintended falls among adults is a major public health focus. Previous researchers have indicated the importance of addressing the physiological issues impacting fall risk, as well as the inclusion of activities designed to improve self efficacy regarding the completion of activities of daily living. However, less published research has examined the impact of psychological variables impacting falls efficacy.

John F. Yannessa

101

Comparison of the efficacy of free residual chlorine and monochloramine against biofilms in model and full scale cooling towers.  

PubMed

The presence of microbial cells on surfaces results in the formation of biofilms, which may also give rise to microbiologically influenced corrosion. Biofilms accumulate on all submerged industrial and environmental surfaces. The efficacy of disinfectants is usually evaluated using planktonic cultures, which often leads to an underestimate of the concentration required to control a biofilm. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of monochloramine on biofilms developed in a cooling tower. The disinfectants selected for the study were commercial formulations recommended for controlling microbial growth in cooling towers. A cooling tower and a laboratory model recirculating water system were used as biofilm reactors. Although previous studies have evaluated the efficacy of free chlorine and monochloramine for controlling biofilm growth, there is a lack of published data concerning the use monochloramine in cooling towers. Stainless steel coupons were inserted in each tower basin for a period of 30 d before removal. Monochloramine and free chlorine were tested under identical conditions on mixed biofilms which had been allowed to grow on coupons. Monochloramine was found to be significantly more effective than free chlorine against cooling tower biofilms. PMID:15203961

Türetgen, Irfan

2004-04-01

102

Learning From Falling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Walkers fall frequently, especially during infancy. Children (15, 21, 27, 33, and 39 month-olds) and adults were tested in a novel foam pit paradigm to examine age-related changes in the relationship between falling and prospective control of locomotion. In trial 1, participants walked and fell into a deformable foam pit marked with distinct…

Joh, Amy, S.; Adolph, Karen, E.

2006-01-01

103

Experiments in Free Fall  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A model lift containing a figure of Albert Einstein is released from the side of a tall building and its free fall is arrested by elastic ropes. This arrangement allows four simple experiments to be conducted in the lift to demonstrate the effects of free fall and show how they can lead to the concept of the equivalence of inertial and…

Art, Albert

2006-01-01

104

Experiments in free fall  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A model lift containing a figure of Albert Einstein is released from the side of a tall building and its free fall is arrested by elastic ropes. This arrangement allows four simple experiments to be conducted in the lift to demonstrate the effects of free fall and show how they can lead to the concept of the equivalence of inertial and gravitational masses.

Art, Albert

2006-09-01

105

Neurologic aspects and falls  

PubMed Central

Summary Falls are widely recognized as a social problem due to the related economic burden on public health budgets. Following the growing body of evidences on the physiopathology of postural control in humans, many factors leading to falls are already well established in the literature. Given the high prevalence of falls among elderly people, the present review focuses on parkinsonism and those “mild parkinsonian signs” frequently presented by elderly subjects. Parkinsonism is a good paradigm for the understanding of the pathophysiology of falling. Specifically, parkinsonian patients display specific features related to falls, such as axial motor symptoms, the impairment of executive functions and of the interplay between motion and cognition, as revealed by the disruption of automaticity.

Fasano, Alfonso; Plotnik, Meir

2012-01-01

106

Fall prevention conceptual framework.  

PubMed

Falls can have lasting psychological and physical consequences, particularly fractures and slow-healing processes, and patients may also lose confidence in walking. Injuries from falls lead to functional decline, institutionalization, higher health care costs, and decreased quality of life. The process related to the problem of patient falls in the hospital, using the nursing model developed by the theorist, Ida Jean Orlando, is explained in this article. The useful tool that provides guidance to marketers in this endeavor is Maslow's hierarchy of needs. During acute illness, individuals are greatly in need of satisfying their physiological needs. If these needs are not met, patients leave the hospital lacking a positive experience. Initial fall risk assessment is critical to plan intervention and individualize care plan. Interventions depend on the severity of fall risk factors. PMID:21537141

Abraham, Sam

2011-01-01

107

The interplay between gait, falls and cognition: can cognitive therapy reduce fall risk?  

PubMed Central

In this article, we briefly summarize the incidence and significant consequences of falls among older adults, the insufficient effectiveness of commonly used multifactorial interventions and the evidence linking falls and cognitive function. Recent pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic studies that evaluated the effects of cognitive therapy on fall risk are reviewed. The results of this article illustrate the potential utility of multiple, diverse forms of cognitive therapy for reducing fall risk. The article also indicates that large-scale, randomized controlled trials are warranted and that additional research is needed to better understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the interplay between human mobility, fall risk and cognitive function. Nonetheless, we suggest that multimodality interventions that combine motor and cognitive therapy should, eventually, be incorporated into clinical practice to enable older adults and patients to move safer and with a reduced fall risk.

Segev-Jacubovski, Orit; Herman, Talia; Yogev-Seligmann, Galit; Mirelman, Anat; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

2011-01-01

108

Validation of the Saskatoon Falls Prevention Consortium's Falls Screening and Referral Algorithm  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Purpose: To investigate the concurrent validity of the Saskatoon Falls Prevention Consortium's Falls Screening and Referral Algorithm (FSRA). Method: A total of 29 older adults (mean age 77.7 [SD 4.0] y) residing in an independent-living senior's complex who met inclusion criteria completed a demographic questionnaire and the components of the FSRA and Berg Balance Scale (BBS). The FSRA consists of the Elderly Fall Screening Test (EFST) and the Multi-factor Falls Questionnaire (MFQ); it is designed to categorize individuals into low, moderate, or high fall-risk categories to determine appropriate management pathways. A predictive model for probability of fall risk, based on previous research, was used to determine concurrent validity of the FSRI. Results: The FSRA placed 79% of participants into the low-risk category, whereas the predictive model found the probability of fall risk to range from 0.04 to 0.74, with a mean of 0.35 (SD 0.25). No statistically significant correlation was found between the FSRA and the predictive model for probability of fall risk (Spearman's ?=0.35, p=0.06). Conclusion: The FSRA lacks concurrent validity relative to to a previously established model of fall risk and appears to over-categorize individuals into the low-risk group. Further research on the FSRA as an adequate tool to screen community-dwelling older adults for fall risk is recommended.

Lawson, Sara Nicole; Zaluski, Neal; Petrie, Amanda; Arnold, Cathy; Basran, Jenny

2013-01-01

109

141. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL DIVERSION, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

141. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL DIVERSION, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; CLOSE-UP OF MAIN HEADGATES, RADIAL GATES INSIDE, SOUTHEAST VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

110

97. POINT SPILL, TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

97. POINT SPILL, TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY NORTHWEST OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; OVERALL WEST VIEW FROM CANAL SIDE. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

111

99. POINT SPILL, TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

99. POINT SPILL, TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY NORTHWEST OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; CLOSE-UP OF OUTLET SIDE OF GATES, SOUTH VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

112

98. SHOESTRING, TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY NORTHWEST ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

98. SHOESTRING, TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY NORTHWEST OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; PROFILE VIEW, SOUTH. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

113

148. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL DIVERSION, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

148. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL DIVERSION, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER DAM; HEADGATES AT INLET, SOUTHWEST VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

114

147. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL DIVERSION, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

147. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL DIVERSION, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; VIEW OF MAIN HEADGATES, EAST VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

115

149. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL DIVERSION, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

149. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL DIVERSION, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER DAM; CLOSE-UP OF MAIN CANAL GATES, SOUTH VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

116

A Randomized Trial of a Multifaceted Intervention to Reduce Falls among Community-Dwelling Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using a randomized controlled trial, we tested the efficacy of a fall prevention intervention to reduce falls among adults in a community-based health promotion program. Adults aged 65 and older within two counties were recruited (control n = 257; intervention n = 286). After 12 months, there was a significant decrease in the number of falls in…

Fox, Patrick J.; Vazquez, Laurie; Tonner, Chris; Stevens, Judy A.; Fineman, Norman; Ross, Leslie K.

2010-01-01

117

Falling Loop Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The EJS Falling Loop Model shows a conducting loop falling out of a uniform magnetic field. Users can change the size and orientation of the loop. If Ejs is installed, right-clicking within the plot and selecting âOpen Ejs Modelâ from the pop-up menu item allows for editing of the model. The Falling Loop model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (Ejs) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_em_FallingLoop.jar file will run the program if Java is installed. Ejs is a part of the Open Source Physics Project and is designed to make it easier to access, modify, and generate computer models. Additional Ejs models are available. They can be found by searching ComPADRE for Open Source Physics, OSP, or Ejs.

Cox, Anne

2009-09-24

118

Editors' Fall Picks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

From the fall's cascade of great new books, "Library Journal's" editors select their favorites--a dark rendition of Afghan life, a look at the "self-esteem trap," a celebration of Brooklyn activism, and much more.

Hoffert, Barbara; Heilbrun, Margaret; Kuzyk, Raya; Kim, Ann; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Burns, Ann; Williams, Wilda

2008-01-01

119

Seneca Falls. Classroom Focus.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a secondary school lesson based on the Seneca Falls Declaration of Sentiments. Provides lesson objectives and step-by-step instructional procedures. Includes quoted sections of the Declaration of Sentiments. (CFR)

Balantic, Jeannette; Libresco, Andrea S.

1995-01-01

120

Falling in Fluid Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Falling in Fluid model shows a sphere falling through a fluid. The sphere is acted on by gravitational, buoyant, and viscous drag forces acting at the interface between the fluid and the object. At high speed, the drag force is proportional to the square of the speed whereas at low speed it is proportional to the speed. These regimes are characterized by the Reynolds number and this model computes the viscous drag force using a phenomenological equation that depends on the Reynolds number. The Falling in Fluid model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (EJS) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_mech__fluids_FallingInFluid.jar file will run the program if Java is installed.

Christian, Wolfgang

2010-05-18

121

Gravity and Falling  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This fun and simple hands-on astronomy activity lets learners experiment with a bucket, stretchy fabric, marbles, and weights to discover some basics about gravity. Learners will explore how mass curves space, how an object with more mass will curve more space, why things fall to Earth, and why all objects, regardless of their mass, will fall at the same rate into the same massive object. The pdf contains step-by-step instructions, photos, presentation tips, and links to background information.

Pacific, Astronomical S.

2008-01-01

122

Preventing Falls and Related Fractures  

MedlinePLUS

... your browser. Home Bone Basics Falls and Fractures Preventing Falls and Related Fractures Publication available in: PDF ( ... Senior Health) Caídas y fracturas (NIA) Director’s Comments: Preventing Falls

123

Associated factors for falls and fear of falling in Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed

The objective of this is to determine factors associated with falls in Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Among the patients who participated in a single-institute-based prospective observational cohort study of patients with RA, namely, Institute of Rheumatology Rheumatoid Arthritis, 4,996 (male 765, female 4231, median age 60 years) responded to questions related to falls during the previous 6 months in April or May 2008. Logistic regression was used to determine the association between variables and falls. Five hundred and five (10.1%), 110 (2.2%), and 958 patients (19.2%) reported at least one fall, multiple falls, and fear of falling, respectively. Those who fell tended to report incident fractures during the same 6 months compared to those who did not (14.7% versus 1.1%, P < 0.001). In multivariate models, Japanese health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) scores (odds ratios (OR) 1.52, 2.49, and 3.88), tender joint counts (OR 1.39, 1.72, and 1.36), patient-reported visual analog scale for general health (OR 1.08, 1.16, and 1.20), and body mass index (OR 1.05, 1.08, and 1.04) were associated (P < 0.05) with at least one fall, multiple falls, and fear of falling, respectively. Other clinical variables and medications were also associated with falls and fear of falling. HAQ disability score, tender joint counts, and impaired general health appear to be associated with falls in Japanese patients with RA, as previously reported for patients of other ethnicities. PMID:19618097

Furuya, Takefumi; Yamagiwa, Kiyotaka; Ikai, Tetsuo; Inoue, Eisuke; Taniguchi, Atuo; Momohara, Shigeki; Yamanaka, Hisashi

2009-11-01

124

The Internet Self-Perception Scale: Measuring Elementary Students' Levels of Self-Efficacy regarding Internet Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated fourth grade students' perceptions of abilities to use the Internet. The 31-item research instrument measuring Internet Self-Perceptions was adapted for use from the Reader Self-Perception Scale (RSPS) developed by Henk and Melnick (1995). The RSPS survey was based upon Bandura's (1977, 1986, 1995) research in the areas of…

Hinson, Janice; DiStefano, Christine; Daniel, Cathy

2003-01-01

125

Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy evaluation of efficacy of scaling and root planing using magnification: A randomized controlled clinical study  

PubMed Central

Aim: A randomized controlled clinical study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of scaling and root planing (SRP) by using Magnifying Loupes (ML) and dental operating microscope (DOM). Materials and Methods: A total of 90 human teeth scheduled for extraction from 18 patients aged between 25 and 65 years suffering from generalized chronic severe periodontitis were randomly assigned to three treatment groups. Group 1 consisted SRP performed without using magnification (unaided), Group 2-SRP with ML and Group 3-SRP with DOM. Following extractions, samples were prepared for (i) evaluation of surface topography by atomic force microscopy, (ii) presence of smear layer, debris by scanning electron microscopy (iii) elemental analysis by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Data was subjected to statistical analysis using analysis of variance, post-hoc (Tukey-HSD) and Chi-square test. Results: Statistically significant (P < 0.001) difference was found among the different treatment groups. Group 3 was the best while Group 1 was the least effective technique for SRP. Order of efficacy in terms of the surface was found to be - Palatal < Lingual < Distal ? Mesial < Buccal. Efficiency in mandibular to maxillary teeth was found to be significant (P < 0.05), also anterior to posterior teeth (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Magnification tools significantly enhance the efficacy of supragingival and subgingival SRP.

Mohan, Ranjana; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Gundappa, Mohan

2013-01-01

126

iFall - Case studies in unexpected falls  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous research has developed a new embedded system, called iFall, for the detection of unexpected falls for elderly people. This paper reports a larger set of fall experiments that have been done in laboratory setups, similar to typical real-world experiments. These experiments indicate that with monitoring its own rotation along any axis, iFall is able to detect a fall in

Ralf Salomon; M. Lu?der; G. Bieber

2010-01-01

127

Falling into Winter.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an activity that connects art, science, and nature in which elementary school students learn about deciduous trees. Explains that students create a torn-tissue collage, using fall colors for a background and drawing a silhouette of a tree without leaves on top of the background with black crayon. (CMK)

Harrington, Carolyn Lang

2000-01-01

128

Freshmen Survey. Fall 1985.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1985, College of the Sequoias (COS) was asked by the Cooperative Institutional Research Program (conducted jointly by the American Council on Education and the University of California, Los Angeles) to participate in a survey of incoming freshmen for the fall 1985 semester. During the summer counseling session, 259 new COS freshmen were…

Goodyear, Don

129

First Aid: Falls  

MedlinePLUS

... Seek Medical Care Think Prevention! With all the running, climbing, and exploring kids do, it's no surprise that falls are common. Although many result in mild bumps, cuts, and bruises, some can cause serious injuries that need immediate medical attention. What to Do Call 911 for emergency help ...

130

Prevalence of falls in fibromyalgia patients  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To compare the risk of falls in fibromyalgia (FM) patients compared to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and normal controls. METHODS: We studied 60 FM, 60 RA patients and 60 controls for fall frequency in one week, one month, six months and one year. Patients were submitted to body mass index determination and balance evaluation through the Berg scale. Data on disease impact and depression were collected in FM patients through the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and the Beck Questionnaire. RESULTS: FM patients had a higher frequency of falls than RA patients and control individuals in one month (p<0.0001), in six months (p<0.0001) and in one year (p<0.0001). No relationship was found between falls and body mass index, pain or depression scores. Falls in 12 months were associated with higher FIQ values. CONCLUSION: FM patients fall more often than RA patients and control individuals. Level of Evidence II, Investigation of the effect of a patient characteristic on the disease outcome.

Meireles, Sandra Adolph; Antero, Daniel Casagrande; Kulczycki, Marciane Maria; Skare, Thelma Larocca

2014-01-01

131

Teacher efficacy: A construct validation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Developed an instrument to measure teacher efficacy and examined the relationship between teacher efficacy and observable teacher behaviors. Factor analysis of responses from 208 elementary school teachers to a 30-item Teacher Efficacy Scale yielded 2 substantial factors that corresponded to A. Bandura's 2-factor theoretical model of self-efficacy. A multitrait–multimethod analysis that supported both convergent and discriminant validity analyzed data from

Sherri Gibson; Myron H. Dembo

1984-01-01

132

The relationship between fear of falling to spatiotemporal gait parameters measured by an instrumented treadmill in people with multiple sclerosis.  

PubMed

People with multiple sclerosis (MS) identify mobility limitations as one of the greatest challenges of this disease. Continued loss of mobility and falls are among their greatest concerns for the future. Our objective was to determine if fear of falling is associated with spatial and temporal gait parameters in persons with MS, when measured by an instrumented treadmill. This observational case control study was performed at the MS Center, Center of Advanced Technologies in Rehabilitation, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel. Sixty-eight relapsing-remitting patients diagnosed with MS, 38 women, aged 40.9 (S.D. = 11.9), participated in this investigation. Twenty-five healthy subjects, 14 women, aged 39.5 (S.D. = 9.4) served as controls gait controls. Gait spatiotemporal parameters were obtained using the Zebris FDM-T Treadmill (Zebris(®) Medical GmbH, Germany). The Falls Efficacy Scale International was used to assess the level of concern relating to falls. Forty-one people with MS were classified as highly fearful of falling. Twenty-seven patients were slightly concerned. Highly fearful of falling patients walked slower had a shorter step length, a wider base of support and prolonged double support phase compared to slightly concerned patients. Fearful patients also demonstrated elevated variability of the center of pressure (CoP) trajectory compared to slightly concerned MS patients. Fear of falling and spatiotemporal gait alterations in people with MS are linked. Additionally, variability of the CoP during walking appears to be connected with the level of concern. PMID:24200869

Kalron, Alon; Achiron, Anat

2014-02-01

133

Stick balancing, falls and Dragon-Kings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The extent to which the occurrence of falls, the dominant feature of human attempts to balance a stick at their fingertip, can be predicted is examined in the context of the "Dragon-King" hypothesis. For skilled stick balancers, fluctuations in the controlled variable, namely the vertical displacement angle ?, exhibit power law behaviors. When stick balancing is made less stable by either decreasing the length of the stick or by requiring the subject to balance the stick on the surface of a table tennis racket, systematic departures from the power law behaviors are observed in the range of large ?. This observation raises the possibility that the presence of departures from the power law in the large length scale region, possibly Dragon-Kings, may identify situations in which the occurrence of a fall is more imminent. However, whether or not Dragon-Kings are observed, there is a Weibull-type survival function for stick falling. The possibility that increased risk of falling can, at least to some extent, be predicted from fluctuations in the controlled variable before the event occurs has important implications for the development of preventative strategies for the management of phenomena ranging from earthquakes to epileptic seizures to falls in the elderly.

Cabrera, J. L.; Milton, J. G.

2012-05-01

134

Salmon Falls Creek Fish Inventory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Salmon Falls Creek fisheries and instream habitat was investigated between Lily Grade and Salmon Falls Creek Dam in 1994. This reach of Salmon Falls Creek is within a remote, narrow steep canyon with limited access. The source of most of the water within ...

C. D. Warren F. E. Partridge

1995-01-01

135

Fall detection - Principles and Methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fall detection of the elderly is a major public health problem. Thus it has generated a wide range of applied research and prompted the development of telemonitoring systems to enable the early diagnosis of fall conditions. This article is a survey of systems, algorithms and sensors, for the automatic early detection of the fall of elderly persons. It points out

N. Noury; A. Fleury; P. Rumeau; A. K. Bourke; G. O. Laighin; V. Rialle; J. E. Lundy

2007-01-01

136

Simulated fall detection via accelerometers  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have derived a fall detection algorithm with high sensitivity and specificity from a single accelerometer device worn at the hip. A small clinical trial to obtain accelerometer data corresponding with actual falls experienced by elderly patients failed to provide a statistically significant number of fall events from which to develop an algorithm. Consequently, the detection algorithm was based on

Justin Boyle; Mohan Karunanithi

2008-01-01

137

`In free fall'  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Physicists in the lead of a fiction book or a play, that's a rare event! Writers in general do not understand physics, while physicists seldom have the talent of writing for a large audience. So when it happens, we should rejoice. The up-and-coming German author Juli Zeh [1] (1974), who studied law, has succeeded in combining beautiful prose, psychological drama, crime and physics in a challenging book `In free fall' [2]. A good friend of hers, Bettina Bruinier, has put the core message of the book into a compelling play in the `Volkstheater' in Munich [1]. Yes, it can be done.

Beijerinck, Herman C. W.

2014-01-01

138

A pilot plant scale evaluation of a new process aid for enhancing chlorine efficacy against pathogen survival and cross-contamination during produce wash.  

PubMed

Developing food safety intervention technology that can be readily adopted by the industry often requires test conditions that match as closely as possible to those of commercial food processing operations; yet biosafety risks inherent in pathogen studies constrain most experiments to laboratory settings. In this study, we report the first semi-commercial pilot-scale evaluation of a new process aid, T128, for its impact on enhancing the antimicrobial efficacy of chlorinated wash water against pathogen survival and cross-contamination. A non-pathogenic, BSL-1, strain of Escherichia coli O157:H7 was inoculated onto freshly harvested baby spinach leaves and washed with large amounts of freshly cut un-inoculated iceberg lettuce shreds in wash water with free chlorine periodically replenished, in the presence or absence of T128. Changes in water quality and pathogen survival and cross-contamination were monitored at every 2 min intervals for up to 36 min for each treatment during the wash operation. Results indicated that the use of T128 did not significantly (P>0.05) influence the rate of wash water deterioration, nor the pathogen populations remaining on the inoculated spinach leaves. However, in the absence of T128 (control), survival of E. coli O157:H7 in wash water and cross-contamination of un-inoculated lettuce frequently occurred when free chlorine in solution dropped below 1mg/l during the wash process. In contrast, the use of T128 significantly reduced the occurrence of E. coli O157:H7 surviving in wash water and of cross-contamination to un-inoculated shredded iceberg lettuce under the same operational conditions, suggesting that the application of T128 in a chlorine-based fresh produce sanitization system could increase the safety margin of process control on fresh-cut operations. PMID:22857846

Luo, Yaguang; Nou, Xiangwu; Millner, Patricia; Zhou, Bin; Shen, Cangliang; Yang, Yang; Wu, Yunpeng; Wang, Qin; Feng, Hao; Shelton, Dan

2012-08-17

139

The Fall of Enron  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The very mention of Enron is enough to make some people rather upset, and in some circles, it is probably best not to bring up the name of this corporation at all. But, with an eye towards informing the public, the Houston Chronicle has taken on this thorny topic by creating this rather comprehensive and intelligent look at the fall of this once-mighty corporation. On the site, visitors can learn about the events leading up to the companyâÂÂs downfall through a timeline of events and past news stories created by staff members at the newspaper. The site also contains a tremendous amount of material on the current trial of Enron executives Kenneth Lay and Jeff Skilling. Coverage includes blogs containing observations from noted attorneys, transcripts of court documents and testimony, as well as photo galleries.

2006-01-01

140

Scales  

ScienceCinema

Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

141

Scales  

SciTech Connect

Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

Murray Gibson

2007-04-27

142

Scales  

ScienceCinema

Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain ? a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

Murray Gibson

2010-01-08

143

Fear of Falling in Subacute Hemiplegic Stroke Patients: Associating Factors and Correlations with Quality of Life  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine the associating factors of fear of falling (FOF) and the correlations between FOF and quality of life (QOL) on subacute stroke patients in Korea. Method Fifty hemiplegic subacute stroke patients in our clinic were recruited. We directly asked patients with their fear of falling and interviewed them with the Korean version of falls efficacy scale-international (KFES-I). We divided the participants into two groups; with FOF and without FOF. We compared these groups with the strength of hemiplegic hip abductor, knee extensor, ankle plantar flexor, functional ambulation category (FAC) scale, stroke specific quality of life (SSQOL), and hospital anxiety depression scale (HADS). Results Thirty-four participants were enrolled, and more than half of the patients with subacute stroke had FOF. We compared the patients with and without FOF. According to the results, FOF was associated with the strength of hemiplegic hip abductor, knee extensor and ankle plantar flexor, FAC, total SSQOL, and domains (energy, mobility, self care, upper extremity function) of SSQOL (p<0.05). FOF was also associated with the anxiety score of HADS (p<0.05). KFES-I had a significant negative correlation with the strength of hemiplegic hip abductor, knee extensor and ankle plantar flexor, FAC, total SSQOL, and domains (energy, mobility, self care, upper extremity function) of SSQOL (p<0.01). Conclusion The FOF was associated with not only QOL but also with the physical and psychological factors, and in particular, anxiety. Therefore, further concerns about FOF in subacute stroke patients might be required.

Kim, Eun Joo; Kim, Wan Ho; Lee, Kwang Lae; Yoon, Yong Hoon; Park, Jeong Mi; Shin, Jung In; Kim, Seong Kyu; Kim, Dong Goo

2012-01-01

144

Linking Preservice Teachers' Mathematics Self-Efficacy and Mathematics Teaching Efficacy to Their Mathematical Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined preservice teachers' mathematics self-efficacy and mathematics teaching efficacy and compared them to their mathematical performance. Participants included 89 early childhood preservice teachers at a Midwestern university. Instruments included the Mathematics Self-Efficacy Scale (MSES), Mathematics Teaching Efficacy Beliefs…

Bates, Alan B.; Latham, Nancy; Kim, Jin-ah

2011-01-01

145

Evaluation of Online Courses, Fall 2000 to Fall 2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document reports on outcomes of online courses offered at Santa Barbara City College (SBCC), California, during the three semesters from fall 2000 to fall 2001. The study combines a comparative and exploratory design to investigate the demographic makeup and academic success of online students compared to peer on campus classes and the campus…

Serban, Andreea M.; Fleming, Steven

146

A Piece of Paper Falling Faster than Free Fall  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We report a simple experiment that clearly demonstrates a common error in the explanation of the classic experiment where a small piece of paper is put over a book and the system is let fall. This classic demonstration is used in introductory physics courses to show that after eliminating the friction force with the air, the piece of paper falls

Vera, F.; Rivera, R.

2011-01-01

147

Transfer effects of fall training on balance performance and spatiotemporal gait parameters in healthy community-dwelling older adults: a pilot study.  

PubMed

This study examined transfer effects of fall training on fear of falling (Falls Efficacy Scale-International [FES-I]), balance performance, and spatiotemporal gait characteristics in older adults. Eighteen community-dwelling older adults (ages 65-85) were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. The intervention group completed 12 training sessions (60 min, 6 weeks). During pre- and posttesting, we measured FES-I, balance performance (double limb, closed eyes; single limb, open eyes; double limb, open eyes with motor-interfered task), and gait parameters (e.g., velocity; cadence; stride time, stride width, and stride length; variability of stride time and stride length) under single- and motor-interfered tasks. Dual tasks were applied to appraise improvements of cognitive processing during balance and gait. FES-I (p = .33) and postural sway did not significantly change (0.36 < p < .79). Trends toward significant interaction effects were found for step width during normal walking and stride length variability during the motor dual task (p = .05, ?p 2 = .22). Fall training did not sufficiently improve fear of falling, balance, or gait performance under single- or dual-task conditions in healthy older adults. PMID:23881433

Donath, Lars; Faude, Oliver; Bridenbaugh, Stephanie A; Roth, Ralf; Soltermann, Martin; Kressig, Reto W; Zahner, Lukas

2014-07-01

148

[Fall risk and fracture. Locomotive syndrome and fall].  

PubMed

Locomotive syndrome means a condition at a risk for requiring nursing care due to deteriorated musculoskeletal organs in the middle-aged and older people. Considering that this concept aims to care prevention and that fracture for fall consists of one-tenth of causes for requiring using care, fall prevention should be an important goal of preventing or improving locomotive syndrome. As a matter of fact, locomotion check - a short form for predicting locomotive syndrome- contains items evaluating fall risk, and locomotion training - recommended exercises designated for strengthening muscles of lower extremities and balance - likely to decrease future incidence of falls. Thus, locomotive syndrome seems to be deeply related to prevention of falls as well as care prevention. PMID:23628679

Ishibashi, Hideaki

2013-05-01

149

Fall Meeting site  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The world is clearly a very troubled place. Many problems contributing to this trouble, such as climatic changes, effects of global war, geophysical disasters, etc., are the concern and come under the purview of members of AGU. Within this context, it was clear at the last AGU Fall Meeting that the matter uppermost in most members minds was the large number of parallel sessions.In light of the overwhelming importance ascribed to this issue, I have devoted considerable thought as to how to solve this overcrowding. Putting aside for the moment the issue of whether or not the recent Cathedral Hill Hotel fire was a sign from on high in this matter, I wish to pursue what we, as a Union, can do to solve the problem. Remarkably enough, the Meetings Committee had already apparently perceived the nature of the solution (although dimly) and had stumbled upon a form of my result in a different context. It is perhaps worthwhile for me to review this previous situation prior to presenting my ideas for the West Coast meeting.

Baker, D. N.

150

Klamath Falls geothermal field, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Klamath Falls, Oregon, is located in a Known Geothermal Resource Area which has been used by residents, principally to obtain geothermal fluids for space heating, at least since the turn of the century. Over 500 shallow-depth wells ranging from 90 to 2,000 ft (27 to 610 m) in depth are used to heat (35 MWt) over 600 structures. This utilization includes the heating of homes, apartments, schools, commercial buildings, hospital, county jail, YMCA, and swimming pools by individual wells and three district heating systems. Geothermal well temperatures range from 100 to 230{degree}F (38 to 110{degree}C) and the most common practice is to use downhole heat exchangers with city water as the circulating fluid. Larger facilities and district heating systems use lineshaft vertical turbine pumps and plate heat exchangers. Well water chemistry indicates approximately 800 ppM dissolved solids, with sodium sulfate having the highest concentration. Some scaling and corrosion does occur on the downhole heat exchangers (black iron pipe) and on heating systems where the geo-fluid is used directly. 73 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

1989-09-01

151

Efficacy of commercial produce sanitizers against nontoxigenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 during processing of iceberg lettuce in a pilot-scale leafy green processing line.  

PubMed

Chemical sanitizers are routinely used during commercial flume washing of fresh-cut leafy greens to minimize cross-contamination from the water. This study assessed the efficacy of five commercial sanitizer treatments against Escherichia coli O157:H7 on iceberg lettuce, in wash water, and on equipment during simulated commercial production in a pilot-scale processing line. Iceberg lettuce (5.4 kg) was inoculated to contain 10(6) CFU/g of a four-strain cocktail of nontoxigenic, green fluorescent protein-labeled, ampicillin-resistant E. coli O157:H7 and processed after 1 h of draining at ~22 °C. Lettuce was shredded using a commercial slicer, step-conveyed to a flume tank, washed for 90 s using six different treatments (water alone, 50 ppm of peroxyacetic acid, 50 ppm of mixed peracid, or 50 ppm of available chlorine either alone or acidified to pH 6.5 with citric acid [CA] or T-128), and then dried using a shaker table and centrifugal dryer. Various product (25-g) and water (50-ml) samples collected during processing along with equipment surface samples (100 cm(2)) from the flume tank, shaker table, and centrifugal dryer were homogenized in neutralizing buffer and plated on tryptic soy agar. During and after iceberg lettuce processing, none of the sanitizers were significantly more effective (P ? 0.05) than water alone at reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations on lettuce, with reductions ranging from 0.75 to 1.4 log CFU/g. Regardless of the sanitizer treatment used, the centrifugal dryer surfaces yielded E. coli O157:H7 populations of 3.49 to 4.98 log CFU/100 cm(2). Chlorine, chlorine plus CA, and chlorine plus T-128 were generally more effective (P ? 0.05) than the other treatments, with reductions of 3.79, 5.47, and 5.37 log CFU/ml after 90 s of processing, respectively. This indicates that chlorine-based sanitizers will likely prevent wash water containing low organic loads from becoming a vehicle for cross-contamination. PMID:24215685

Davidson, Gordon R; Buchholz, Annemarie L; Ryser, Elliot T

2013-11-01

152

Can fall risk be incorporated into fracture risk assessment algorithms: a pilot study of responsiveness to clodronate  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Fall risk does not significantly impact on the efficacy of the bisphosphonate clodronate in reducing the incidence of fracture.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Introduction  The debate about the efficacy of skeletal therapies on fracture risk in women at increased risk of falling continues. We determined\\u000a whether fall risk impeded the efficacy of clodronate to reduce osteoporotic fracture incidence.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  This is a post hoc analysis of

K. Kayan; H. Johansson; A. Oden; S. Vasireddy; K. Pande; J. Orgee; J. A. Kanis; E. V. McCloskey

2009-01-01

153

Persistence. Snapshot Report, Fall 2011  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Today's college student is not your '60s drop-out. In 2010, college students tended to stay enrolled (i.e., persist), even if it was in a different school, according to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. For a student enrolled in the fall, persistence is defined as either continued enrollment during the next term after the fall or…

National Student Clearinghouse, 2011

2011-01-01

154

NOVA Fall 1999 Teacher's Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This teacher's guide complements five programs that aired on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) in the fall of 1999. Programs include: (1) "Fall of the Leaning Tower"; (2) "Everest: The Mystery of Mallory and Irvine"; (3) "Time Travel, Decoding Nazi Secrets"; (3) "Voyage of Doom"; and (5) "Barely Breathing". It provides activity set-ups related…

French, Wayne; Karlan, James W.; Ransick, Kristina; Rosene, Dale; Sammons, Fran Lyons; Sammons, James

155

Egypt's falling IMR.  

PubMed

In Egypt, the infant mortality rate (IMR) has been reduced from 120/1000 live births in 1979 to 55/1000 births in 1988. This is one of the fastest declines of a country's IMR on record. A government commitment to increase per capita GNP and to meet the health and welfare needs of the people contributed to decline in the IMR. In the 1950s and 1960s, the Egyptian government executed a land reform program while it also assisted farmers with advice and extension services. These events greatly increased crop production which in turn led to an improvement in the people's quality of life. Other factors that helped the IMR to decrease were not planned. For example, employment opportunities expanded throughout the Middle East. Egyptians who took these jobs sent money back to their villages, therefore adding to the village's resources. As a result of this departure of manpower, real agricultural wages for the landless increased substantially. In addition, the highly motivated farmers increased production which caused an increase in jobs and demand for work. The US also played a significant role in the fall of the IMR. US aid concentrated on programs that would reduce the incidence of many infectious diseases that mostly strike infants and children 5 years old. Examples include immunization programs, village sanitation and safe water and drainage projects, and an oral rehydration project. The aforementioned examples of the Egyptian government and people's total commitment to the development of their economy and the improvement in the standard of living all contributed to the rapid decline of the IMR. PMID:12282155

1988-08-31

156

Falling short: recruiting elderly individuals for a fall study.  

PubMed

Despite the importance of movement and activity indicators in predicting the risk of falls in older adults, collection and analysis of such data are limited. The dearth may result from recruitment challenges faced by fall-related studies that capture data on movement and activity in older adults. This article addresses recruitment and sampling methodology issues and draws attention to the gap in best practices left by previous literature. Authors conducted a systematic review of methods used to recruit elderly individuals for "activity-related fall studies" that assessed subjects' movement and mobility, and investigated incidence of real falls. The review highlighted effective recruitment strategies and identified challenges across several settings. Literature review findings were compared to recruitment challenges encountered in an activity-related fall study from 2011, focused on enrolling a target group of older adults with both high risk of falling and the requisite cognitive capacity to adhere to activity protocols. The analysis yielded several recommendations for improving recruitment of older adults for activity-related fall studies, including: recruiting from community-based settings; utilizing short-term activity protocols to promote involvement among institutionalized elderly; establishing eligibility criteria that may include those with lower cognitive functioning, mobility restrictions, and co-morbidities; employing direct-mail recruitment methods; and utilizing intermediaries to recruit institutionalized elderly. PMID:23274452

Wilding, Melody J; Seegert, Liz; Rupcic, Sonia; Griffin, Margaret; Kachnowski, Stan; Parasuraman, Sarika

2013-03-01

157

[Fall risk and fracture. Falls in patients with dementia].  

PubMed

The fall risk has 3.6 fold in Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) and 16 fold post faller syndrome among diseases to cause dementia, and it was reported that have a significant parkinsonism and a fall more. DLB has multiple symptoms such as that physical symptom, rather than worsening a symptom by characteristics of high sensibility medical intervention for medication, and has severe problem falls. It was indicated that make a decrease a fall risk for restored cognitive function with executive function in the elderly peoples. Thus, improve the quality of care and the establishment of non - pharmacological therapies, for it is important to further therapeutic exercise as prevention is required cooperation and sharing information across professions. PMID:23628687

Komatsu, Taiki

2013-05-01

158

Diagnosis and Tests: Evaluating a Fall or Risk of Falling  

MedlinePLUS

... illnesses Your fear of falling and your mood Memory and brain functioning Risks in your home environment. Tests Your ... assess bone strength Heart assessments such as echocardiography Brain imaging such as CT ... therapy assessment A home safety evaluation. ...

159

A Report of the Responses of Botswana Junior Secondary School Teachers on the Three Subscales of the Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale (TSES)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The focus of this paper is to present the findings of the study on teacher efficacy and classroom management. To collect data a survey was administered to 1006 Botswana participants. Out of 1006 participants only 6 did not complete the survey. Pearson-product moment correlation was computed to analyze the data using Statistical Package of Social…

Dibapile, Waitshega Tefo Smitta

2012-01-01

160

[Gait changes and fall risk].  

PubMed

Walking is a complex motor task generally performed automatically by older adults. Falls with or without serious consequences such as fractures or fear of falling can be the result. Gait analysis shows that even minor stride-to-stride variations increase the risk for falls. These gait changes are often too small to be detected during normal walking alone, but rather appear in combination with an additional task, the so-called dual tasking. Irregular gait is not an inevitability of older age, but can be improved by targeted interventions. PMID:22294303

Wolf, I; Bridenbaugh, S A; Gschwind, Y J; Kressig, R W

2012-02-01

161

Highlights of Fall Meeting 2011  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Every December for the past 44 years, something special has happened in the world of Earth and space science: AGU's Fall Meeting. This special pullout section of Eos offers highlights of the 2011 Fall Meeting in a format structured to echo AGU's Strategic Plan. Scientific Leadership and Collaboration were at an all-time high: For the first time in Fall Meeting history, attendance passed the 20,000 mark—20,890 to be exact. Attendees hailed from 96 countries; 30% were students.

McPhaden, Michael J.

2012-02-01

162

Community College Estimated Growth: Fall 2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey from the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) found that enrollment growth in fall 2010 slowed its pace at community colleges, increasing 3.2% from the previous year. This contrasts with more dramatic increases in recent years: more than 11% between fall 2008 and fall 2009, and nearly 17% between fall 2007 and fall 2009,…

Phillippe, Kent; Mullin, Christopher M.

2011-01-01

163

Information Technology Innovation Survey: Fall 2001  

NSF Publications Database

... Information Technology Innovation Survey: Fall 2001 Detailed Statistical Tables Hypertext Format ... Information Technology Innovation Survey: Fall 2001 Portable Document Format (.pdf) Information ...

164

Implementing a Community-Based Falls-Prevention Program: From Drawing Board to Reality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several studies have demonstrated the efficacy of falls-prevention programs designed for community-dwelling seniors using randomized designs. However, little is known about the feasibility of implementing these programs under natural conditions and about the success of these programs when delivered under such conditions. The objectives of this paper are to (a) describe a multifactorial falls-prevention program (called Stand Up!) designed for

Johanne Filiatrault; Manon Parisien; Sophie Laforest; Carole Genest; Lise Gauvin; Michel Fournier; Francine Trickey; Yvonne Robitaille

2007-01-01

165

BURDEN FALLS ROADLESS AREA, ILLINOIS.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Burden Falls Roadless Area lies in the Shawnee National Forest of southern Illinois, about 5 mi west of the western edge of the Illinois-Kentucky fluorspar district. Geologic mapping and geochemical surveys indicate that the area has little promise for the occurrence of fluorspar and associated minerals; other special studies also indicate little promise for oil and gas and construction materials. Traces of gold and silver were detected in some geochemical samples but follow-up studies indicate little promise for the occurrence of resources of these metals within the Burden Falls Roadless Area.

Klasner, John, S.; Thompson, Robert, M.

1984-01-01

166

Free-Fall Bottles & Tubes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this physics activity, learners conduct two experiments to explore free-falling. In the first experiment, water-filled plastic bottles with holes in them spurt water under normal conditions, but don't leak while in free-fall. In the second experiment, a ping-pong ball in a water-filled plastic tube floats upward under normal conditions, but remains motionless when the tube is dropped or thrown. Educators can use pre-assembled materials for group demonstration purposes. Note: this activity will get the floor wet, so consider doing this outside.

Rathjen, Don

2011-08-20

167

Dynamics of falling liquid films.  

PubMed

Falling liquid films are examples of open flows which undergo a sequence of supercritical instabilities giving way to a spatio-temporal weak disorder organized around interfacial waves in interaction. The long-wave nature of the waves and the laminar state of the flow enable to derive reduced sets of equations or models that are amenable to thorough analytic investigations. This paper reviews the phenomenology of falling film flows and discusses recent low-dimensional modeling attempts. Some open questions and perspectives are also considered. PMID:24771235

Ruyer-Quil, Christian; Kofman, Nicolas; Chasseur, Didier; Mergui, Sophie

2014-04-01

168

Efficacy of activated sludge\\/powdered activated carbon for removal of organic constituents in wastewater from commercial-scale, high-Btu coal gasification plant  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bench-scale, activated-sludge (AS) treatability studies indicate that approximately 98 percent of total organic constituents can be removed from wastewater generated by HYGAS and slagging-type, high-Btu coal gasification pilot plants. This suggests that the most important unit of a wastewater treatment system for organics removal in commercial-scale versions of such plants will be the AS unit, augmented by powdered activated carbon

W. Harrison; D. L. Ford

1980-01-01

169

Falling films on flexible inclines  

Microsoft Academic Search

The nonlinear stability and dynamic behavior of falling fluid films is studied for flow over a flexible substrate. We use asymptotic methods to deduce governing equations valid in various limits. Long-wave theory is used to derive Benney-like coupled equations for the film thickness and substrate deflection. Weakly nonlinear equations are then derived from these equations that, in the limit of

O. K. Matar; R. V. Craster; S. Kumar

2007-01-01

170

Student Transfer Matrix, Fall 1992.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Comprised primarily of data matrices, this report provides information on students transferring from Oklahoma public and private post-secondary institutions to other public and private post-secondary institutions in the state in fall 1992. The report consists of nine sections. Section I provides an aggregate flow of all students in the state,…

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

171

Stick Falling from Table Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Stick Falling from Table Model shows the translational and rotational motion of a stick falling from a table.  The normal and gravitational force vectors and the center of mass trajectory are shown.  Users can vary the initial velocity of the stick and height of the table. The stick's motion occurs in three phases.  In first phase, the stick slides along the tabletop without rotating until the CM reaches the tabletop edge.  In the second phase, the gravitational force acts at the CM and a normal force acts at the edge to produce both linear and angular accelerations.  In the final phase, the stick is no longer in contact with the table and free-falls with constant angular velocity and constant CM acceleration. The model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (EJS) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_newton_StickFallingFromTable.jar file will run the program if Java is installed.

Christian, Wolfgang

2012-01-11

172

[A study on fall accident].  

PubMed

The study was conducted from November 1995 to May 1996 at the one general hospital in Seoul. The total subjects of this study were 412 patients who have the experience of fall accident, among them 31 was who have fallen during hospitalization and 381 was who visited emergency room and out patient clinic. The purposes of this study were to determine the characteristics, risk factors and results of fall accident and to suggest the nursing strategies for prevention of fall. Data were collected by reviewing the medical records and interviewing with the fallers and their family members. For data analysis spss/pc+ program was utilized for descriptive statistics, adjusted standardized X2-test. The results of this study were as follows: 1) Total subjects were 412 fallers, of which 245 (59.5%) were men and 167 (40.5%) were women. Age were 0-14 years 79 (19.2%), 15-44 years 125 (30.4%), 45-64 years 104 (25.2%), over 65 years 104 (25.2%). 2) There was significant association between age and the sexes (X2 = 39.17, P = 0.00). 3) There was significant association between age and history of falls (X2 = 44.41, P = .00). And history of falls in the elderly was significantly associated with falls. 4) There was significant association with age and medical diagnosis (X2 = 140.66, P = .00), chief medical diagnosis were hypertension (34), diabetes mellitus (22), arthritis (11), stroke (8), fracture (7), pulmonary tuberculosis (6), dementia (5) and cataract (5). 5) There was significant association between age and intrinsic factors: cognitive impairment, mobility impairment, insomnia, emotional problems, urinary difficulty, visual impairments, hearing impairments, use of drugs (sedatives, antihypertensive drugs, diuretics, antidepressants) (P < 0.05). But there was no significant association between age and dizziness (X2 = 2.87, P = .41). 6) 15.3% of total fallers were drunken state when they were fallen. 7) Environmental factors of fall accident were unusual posture (50.9%), slips (35.2%), trips (9.5%) and collision (4.4%). 8) Most of falls occurred during the day time, peak frequencies of falls occurred from 1 pm to 6 pm and 7 am to 12 am. 9) The places of fall accident were roads (22.6%), house-stairs (16.7%), rooms, floors, kitchen (11.2%), the roof-top, veranda, windows (10.9%), hospital (7.5%), ice or snowy ways (5.8%), bathroom (4.9%), playground, park (4.9%), subway-stairs (4.4%) and public-bathrooms (2.2%). 10) Activities at the time of fall accident were walking (37.6%), turning around or reaching for something (20.9%), going up or down stairs (19.2%), exercise, working (17.4%), up or down from a bed (2.7%), using wheelchair or walking aids, standing up or down from a chair (2.2%) and standing still (2.2%). 11) Anatomical locations of injuries by falls were head, face, neck (31.3%), lower extremities (29.9%), upper extremities (20.6%), spine, thorax, abdomen or pelvic contents (11.4%) and unspecified (2.9%). 12) Types of injures were fracture (47.6%), bruises (13.8%), laceration (13.3%), sprains (9.0%), headache (6.6%), abrasions (2.9%), intracranial hemorhage (2.4%) and burns (0.5%). 13) 41.5% of the fallers were hospitalized and average of hospitalization was 22.3 days. 14) The six fallers (1.46%) died from fall injuries. The two fallers died from intracranial hemorhage and the four fallers died of secondary infection; pneumonia (2), sepsis (1) and cellulitis (1). It is suggested that 1) Further study is needed with larger sample size to identify the fall risk factors. 2) After the fall accident, comprehensive nursing care and regular physical exercise should be emphasized for the elderly person. 3) Safety education and safety facilities of the public place and home is necessary for fall prevention. PMID:10437605

Lee, H S; Kim, M J

1997-01-01

173

New Student Survey, Fall 1998.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Fall 1998 annual survey of new Johnson County Community College (JCCC) students was designed to determine new students' educational objectives and what factors influence new students' decisions to attend JCCC. Surveys mailed to 3874 students identified by the Admissions Office resulted in 713 usable returned surveys. This evaluation reports…

Weglarz, Shirley

174

Fall detection using multiple cameras  

Microsoft Academic Search

Today, different ways are suggested to help elderly people in case of emergency. Our aim here is to propose a novel method, without any wearable device, to detect falls on the floor with a multiple cameras system. This proposal uses image analysis to localise people and reconstruct their 3D shape and position. The particularity of this contribution is the use

Edouard Auvinet; Lionel Reveret; Alain St-Arnaud; Jacqueline Rousseau; Jean Meunier

2008-01-01

175

Free fall and projectile motion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This EJS simulation allows the user to simulate free fall relative to two inertial frames. The simulation was created using the Easy Java Simulations (Ejs) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_ntnu_fkh_projectileNfreefall.jar file will run the program if Java is installed.

Hwang, Fu-Kwun

2010-06-22

176

NOVA Fall 2000 Teacher's Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This teacher's guide complements six programs that aired on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) in the fall of 2000. Programs include: (1) "Lincoln's Secret Weapon"; (2) "Hitler's Lost Sub"; (3) "Runaway Universe"; (4) "Garden of Eden"; (5) "Dying to Be Thin"; and (6) "Japan's Secret Garden". It provides activity set-ups related to the programs…

Ransick, Kristina; Rosene, Dale; Sammons, Fran Lyons; Sammons, James

177

Fall 1997 Russian Military Draft.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper will examine the Fall 1997 conscription effort by the Russian military and use it as a prism to highlight some of the current problems within the Russian armed forces. The Russian government continues to rely upon conscription to staff its mili...

R. C. Finch

1998-01-01

178

Fear of falling and postural control in Parkinson's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the relationship between fear of falling (FOF) and qualitative and quantitative postural con- trol in Parkinson's disease (PD). Fifty-eight nondemented PD patients were studied along with age-matched healthy controls. The degree of FOF was estimated using the Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale. Qualitative postural control was evaluated using a component of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale. Postural

Allan L. Adkin; James S. Frank; Mandar S. Jog

2003-01-01

179

Fall Risk Assessment for Older Adults: The Hendrich II Fall Risk Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

symptoms of dizziness, and known categories of medications increasing risk.10 This tool screens for primary prevention of falls and is integral in a post-fall assessment for the secondary prevention of falls. TARGET POPULATION: The Hendrich II Fall Risk Model is intended to be used in the acute care setting to identify adults at risk for falls. The Model is being

Deanna Gray-Miceli; Sherry A. Greenberg

180

[Efficacy studies].  

PubMed

Pravafenix(®) is a fixed-dose combination of 40mg of pravastatin and 160mg of fenofibrate. The rationale behind the use of Pravafenix(®) is based on the increased residual cardiovascular risk observed in high risk patients with hypertriglyceridemia and/or low HDL cholesterol levels despite treatment with statins in monotherapy. In this article, we review the available evidence on the clinical efficacy of Pravafenix(®), which shows complementary benefits in the overall lipid profile of high risk patients with mixed dyslipidemia not controlled with 40-mg pravastatin or 20-mg simvastatin. PMID:25043542

Pedro-Botet, Juan; Flores-Le Roux, Juana A

2014-07-01

181

A best practice fall prevention exercise program to improve balance, strength / power, and psychosocial health in older adults: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background With increasing age neuromuscular deficits (e.g., sarcopenia) may result in impaired physical performance and an increased risk for falls. Prominent intrinsic fall-risk factors are age-related decreases in balance and strength / power performance as well as cognitive decline. Additional studies are needed to develop specifically tailored exercise programs for older adults that can easily be implemented into clinical practice. Thus, the objective of the present trial is to assess the effects of a fall prevention program that was developed by an interdisciplinary expert panel on measures of balance, strength / power, body composition, cognition, psychosocial well-being, and falls self-efficacy in healthy older adults. Additionally, the time-related effects of detraining are tested. Methods/Design Healthy old people (n?=?54) between the age of 65 to 80 years will participate in this trial. The testing protocol comprises tests for the assessment of static / dynamic steady-state balance (i.e., Sharpened Romberg Test, instrumented gait analysis), proactive balance (i.e., Functional Reach Test; Timed Up and Go Test), reactive balance (i.e., perturbation test during bipedal stance; Push and Release Test), strength (i.e., hand grip strength test; Chair Stand Test), and power (i.e., Stair Climb Power Test; countermovement jump). Further, body composition will be analysed using a bioelectrical impedance analysis system. In addition, questionnaires for the assessment of psychosocial (i.e., World Health Organisation Quality of Life Assessment-Bref), cognitive (i.e., Mini Mental State Examination), and fall risk determinants (i.e., Fall Efficacy Scale – International) will be included in the study protocol. Participants will be randomized into two intervention groups or the control / waiting group. After baseline measures, participants in the intervention groups will conduct a 12-week balance and strength / power exercise intervention 3 times per week, with each training session lasting 30 min. (actual training time). One intervention group will complete an extensive supervised training program, while the other intervention group will complete a short version ('3 times 3’) that is home-based and controlled by weekly phone calls. Post-tests will be conducted right after the intervention period. Additionally, detraining effects will be measured 12 weeks after program cessation. The control group / waiting group will not participate in any specific intervention during the experimental period, but will receive the extensive supervised program after the experimental period. Discussion It is expected that particularly the supervised combination of balance and strength / power training will improve performance in variables of balance, strength / power, body composition, cognitive function, psychosocial well-being, and falls self-efficacy of older adults. In addition, information regarding fall risk assessment, dose–response-relations, detraining effects, and supervision of training will be provided. Further, training-induced health-relevant changes, such as improved performance in activities of daily living, cognitive function, and quality of life, as well as a reduced risk for falls may help to lower costs in the health care system. Finally, practitioners, therapists, and instructors will be provided with a scientifically evaluated feasible, safe, and easy-to-administer exercise program for fall prevention. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01906034

2013-01-01

182

Efficacy of Activated Sludge/Powdered Activated Carbon for Removal of Organic Constituents in Wastewater from Commercial-Scale, High-Btu Coal Gasification Plant.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Bench-scale, activated-sludge (AS) treatability studies indicate that approximately 98 percent of total organic constituents can be removed from wastewater generated by HYGAS and slagging-type, high-Btu coal gasification pilot plants. This suggests that t...

W. Harrison D. L. Ford

1980-01-01

183

Informational Memorandum: The New Freshman Class, Fall 1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication presents data on the University of Wisconsin (UW) System new freshman enrollment for fall 1999. Data tables include new freshman headcount information: by institution, fall 1999; by institution, fall 1989, fall 1994, and fall 1999; by resident status and institution, fall 1999; by resident status, fall 1989 to fall 1999; by gender…

Wisconsin Univ. System, Madison.

184

The effectiveness of a multidisciplinary QI activity for accidental fall prevention: Staff compliance is critical  

PubMed Central

Background Accidental falls among inpatients are a substantial cause of hospital injury. A number of successful experimental studies on fall prevention have shown the importance and efficacy of multifactorial intervention, though success rates vary. However, the importance of staff compliance with these effective, but often time-consuming, multifactorial interventions has not been fully investigated in a routine clinical setting. The purpose of this observational study was to describe the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary quality improvement (QI) activity for accidental fall prevention, with particular focus on staff compliance in a non-experimental clinical setting. Methods This observational study was conducted from July 2004 through December 2010 at St. Luke’s International Hospital in Tokyo, Japan. The QI activity for in-patient falls prevention consisted of: 1) the fall risk assessment tool, 2) an intervention protocol to prevent in-patient falls, 3) specific environmental safety interventions, 4) staff education, and 5) multidisciplinary healthcare staff compliance monitoring and feedback mechanisms. Results The overall fall rate was 2.13 falls per 1000 patient days (350/164331) in 2004 versus 1.53 falls per 1000 patient days (263/172325) in 2010, representing a significant decrease (p?=?0.039). In the first 6?months, compliance with use of the falling risk assessment tool at admission was 91.5% in 2007 (3998/4368), increasing to 97.6% in 2010 (10564/10828). The staff compliance rate of implementing an appropriate intervention plan was 85.9% in 2007, increasing to 95.3% in 2010. Conclusion In our study we observed a substantial decrease in patient fall rates and an increase of staff compliance with a newly implemented falls prevention program. A systematized QI approach that closely involves, encourages, and educates healthcare staff at multiple levels is effective.

2012-01-01

185

Reconceptualizing Efficacy in Substance Use Prevention Research: Refusal Response Efficacy and Drug Resistance Self-Efficacy in Adolescent Substance Use  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study is to utilize the Extended Parallel Process Model (EPPM) to expand the construct of efficacy in the adolescent substance use context. Using survey data collected from 2,129 seventh-grade students in 39 rural schools, we examined the construct of drug refusal efficacy and demonstrated relationships among response efficacy (RE), self-efficacy (SE), and adolescent drug use. Consistent with the hypotheses, confirmatory factor analyses of a 12-item scale yielded a three-factor solution: refusal RE, alcohol-resistance self-efficacy (ASE), and marijuana-resistance self-efficacy (MSE). Refusal RE and ASE/MSE were negatively related to alcohol use and marijuana use, whereas MSE was positively associated with alcohol use. These data demonstrate that efficacy is a broader construct than typically considered in drug prevention. Prevention programs should reinforce both refusal RE and substance-specific resistance SE.

Choi, Hye Jeong; Krieger, Janice L.; Hecht, Michael L.

2014-01-01

186

Osteoarthritis and falls in the older person.  

PubMed

Osteoarthritis and falls are common conditions affecting older individuals which are associated with disability and escalating health expenditure. It has been widely assumed that osteoarthritis is an established risk factor for falls in older people. The relationship between osteoarthritis and falls has, quite surprisingly, not been adequately elucidated, and published reports have been conflicting. Our review of the existing literature has found limited evidence supporting the current assumption that the presence of osteoarthritis is associated with increased risk of falls with suggestions that osteoarthritis may actually be protective against falls related fractures. In addition, joint arthroplasty appears to increase the risk of falls in individuals with osteoarthritis. PMID:23864423

Ng, Chin Teck; Tan, Maw Pin

2013-09-01

187

(Accipiter striatus) DURING FALL MIGRATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTP, ACT.--Packed cell volume (%), total solids (g\\/dl), white blood cell count (cells\\/tl), differential and absolute white blood cell counts, and prevalence of hemoparasites were determined for 85 healthy sharp- shinned hawks (Accipiter striatus) during the 1991 fall migration. The packed cell volume (47.6 + 6.73%), total solids (2.83 _+ 0.58 g\\/dl) and white blood cell count (12 900 +

LAUREN V. POWERS; MARK POKRAS; KIM RIO; CATHY VIVERETTE; LAURIE GOODRICH

188

Ejs Free Fall Cartesian Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Ejs Free Fall Cartesian model displays the dynamics of a ball dropped near the surface of Earth onto a platform. The initial conditions for the ball are an initial positive velocity in the x direction and zero initial velocity in the y direction. The coefficient of restitution for the ballâs collision with the platform is less than one. You can modify this simulation if you have Ejs installed by right-clicking within the plot and selecting âOpen Ejs Modelâ from the pop-up menu item. Ejs Free Fall Cartesian model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (Ejs) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_newton_FreeFallCartesian.jar file will run the program if Java is installed. Ejs is a part of the Open Source Physics Project and is designed to make it easier to access, modify, and generate computer models. Additional Ejs models for Newtonian mechanics are available. They can be found by searching ComPADRE for Open Source Physics, OSP, or Ejs.

Christian, Wolfgang

2008-06-03

189

Efficacy of tranexamic acid mouthwash as an alternative for factor replacement in gingival bleeding during dental scaling in cases of hemophilia: A randomized clinical trial  

PubMed Central

Objective: The objective of the following study is to evaluate freshly prepared tranexamic acid mouth wash (FTAMW) as an alternative to factor replacement therapy (FRT) in controlling gingival bleeding in hemophiliacs during dental scaling. Materials and Methods: Experimental treatment regime (ETR) involved saline transfusion followed by FTAMW and the control treatment regime (CTR) involved FRT followed by placebo mouthwash. A total of 22 hemophiliacs randomly received dental scaling under either CTR or ETR at two different visits, following a split mouth design. They were instructed to use the rendered mouthwash 4 times a day for 5 days and record the mouthwash usage and bleeding episodes in a logbook. The difference in the bleeding episodes was analyzed using Chi-square test with the level of significance predetermined at 0.05. Results: Totally 19 patients completed the study. Seven patients reported no bleeding either in ETR or CTR; five patients noticed bleeding in CTR, but not in ETR. Three patients noticed bleeding in ETR, but not in CTR. Patients reported ease in usage and cost-effectiveness of ETR. Conclusion: FTAMW was found to be an effective alternative to FRT in controlling gingival hemorrhage in hemophiliacs during dental scaling.

Nuvvula, Sivakumar; Gaddam, Kumar Raja; Kamatham, Rekhalakshmi

2014-01-01

190

Falls - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus  

MedlinePLUS

... ?????? ?? ???????? - ??????? Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Safety Tips to Prevent Falls at Home (Arabic) ??????? Bilingual ... ???????? - ???? (Chinese - Simplified) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Safety Tips to Prevent Falls at Home ?????????? - ???? (Chinese - ...

191

After a fall in the hospital  

MedlinePLUS

Falls can be a serious problem in the hospital. They may be caused by: Poor lighting, slippery ... illness or surgery and being in new surroundings Hospital staff often do not see patients fall. But ...

192

Implementing a Community-Based Falls-Prevention Program: From Drawing Board to Reality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Several studies have demonstrated the efficacy of falls-prevention programs designed for community-dwelling seniors using randomized designs. However, little is known about the feasibility of implementing these programs under natural conditions and about the success of these programs when delivered under such conditions. The objectives of this…

Filiatrault, Johanne; Parisien, Manon; Laforest, Sophie; Genest, Carole; Gauvin, Lise; Fournier, Michel; Trickey, Francine; Robitaille, Yvonne

2007-01-01

193

Intensive physical training in geriatric patients after severe falls and hip surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: intensive exercise training can lead to improvement in strength and functional performance in older people living at home and nursing home residents. There is little information whether intensive physical exercise may be applicable and effective in elderly patients suffering from the acute sequelae of injurious falls or hip surgery. Objective: to assess the feasibility, safety and efficacy of intensive,

KLAUS HAUER; N ORBERT SPECHT; M ATTHIAS SCHULER; P ETER BARTSCH; P ETER OSTER

2002-01-01

194

Living alone and fall risk factors in community-dwelling middle age and older adults.  

PubMed

As part of a larger study on fall-related risk factors, this study investigated the relationship between living alone status and fall-related variables among community-dwelling adults who lived in a rural county in eastern North Carolina. A convenience sample of 666 community-dwelling adults ages 50 and over participated in this 4-year study and completed a fall questionnaire. Significant findings were found in relation to living alone status and experiencing a fall, who they informed about their fall, injuries, safety equipment, ambulatory devices, and personal emergency response system usage. Three hundred thirty-eight participants stated they lived alone, compared to 300 who lived with others. The percentage reporting a fall was appreciably larger for those living alone (52%) than for those living with others (48%) in both genders in all age groups except for the 61-70 year old adults where the percentage was less. Findings from this research enhance knowledge about the prevalence and contributing fall-related factors in adults who live alone compared to those who live with others. Insights gained from this research will assist community and public health leaders and health care professionals in developing more efficacious intervention strategies to prevent or reduce falls, and associated psychological and physical consequences. PMID:19333744

Elliott, Sharon; Painter, Jane; Hudson, Suzanne

2009-08-01

195

Foot Disorders and Falls in Older Persons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Fall rates are high among older people even in the healthy population. An aging foot may affect ambulatory function and increase the risk of fall(s). Objective: To study foot musculoskeletal disorders, falls and associated factors in healthy elderly subjects. Methods: Healthy volunteers aged 60–80 years who were independent in self-care and walking were recruited from urban Bangkok. Trained physicians

Dootchai Chaiwanichsiri; Siriporn Janchai; Natthiya Tantisiriwat

2009-01-01

196

Missed nursing care, staffing, and patient falls.  

PubMed

Patient falls in hospitals continue to be a major and costly problem. This study tested the mediating effect of missed nursing care on the relationship of staffing levels (hours per patient day [HPPD]) and patient falls. The sample was 124 patient units in 11 hospitals. The HPPD was negatively associated with patient falls (r = -0.36, P < .01), and missed nursing care was found to mediate the relationship between HPPD and patient falls. PMID:21738057

Kalisch, Beatrice J; Tschannen, Dana; Lee, Kyung Hee

2012-01-01

197

A Wearable Airbag to Prevent Fall Injuries  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have developed a wearable airbag that incorporates a fall-detection system that uses both acceleration and angular velocity signals to trigger inflation of the airbag. The fall-detection algorithm was devised using a thresholding technique with an accelerometer and gyro sensor. Sixteen subjects mimicked falls, and their acceleration waveforms were monitored. Then, we developed a fall-detection algorithm that could detect signals

Toshiyo Tamura; Takumi Yoshimura; Masaki Sekine; Mitsuo Uchida; Osamu Tanaka

2009-01-01

198

Mobile phone-based pervasive fall detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Falls are a major health risk that diminishes the quality of life among the elderly people. The importance of fall detection\\u000a increases as the elderly population surges, especially with aging “baby boomers”. However, existing commercial products and\\u000a academic solutions all fall short of pervasive fall detection. In this paper, we propose utilizing mobile phones as a platform for developing pervasive

Jiangpeng Dai; Xiaole Bai; Zhimin Yang; Zhaohui Shen; Dong Xuan

2010-01-01

199

Falls: Epidemiology, pathophysiology, and relationship to fracture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Falls are common in the elderly, and frequently result in injury and disability. Most falls result from an interaction between\\u000a individual characteristics that increase an individual’s propensity to fall and acute mediating risk factors that provide\\u000a the opportunity to fall. Predisposing risk factors include age-associated changes in strength and balance, comorbidities such\\u000a as osteoarthritis, visual impairment and dementia, psychotropic medications,

Sarah D. Berry; Ram R. Miller

2008-01-01

200

Measuring Teacher Efficacy to Implement Inclusive Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to develop an instrument to measure perceived teacher efficacy to teach in inclusive classrooms. An 18-item scale was developed on a sample of 607 pre-service teachers selected from four countries (Canada, Australia, Hong Kong and India). Factor analysis of responses from the sample revealed three factors: efficacy in…

Sharma, Umesh; Loreman, Tim; Forlin, Chris

2012-01-01

201

Efficacy and longevity of a new formulation of temephos larvicide tested in village-scale trials against larval Aedes aegypti in water-storage containers.  

PubMed

Field trials on the initial and long-term efficacy of a new formulation of temephos granules (1% on zeolite) applied at 1 ppm active ingredient (AI) were conducted in water-storage containers against Aedes aegypti in 3 villages in the Kanchanaburi Province in Thailand. A total of 316 water-storage containers of various types and sizes were included in the study. In the initial survey, we found that some containers were positive for larval Ae. aegypti, whereas others were devoid of larvae before the initiation of treatments. The containers all were numbered with paint and divided into 4 groups: with larvae and treated, without larvae and treated, with larvae untreated, and without larvae and untreated. Assessment of larval abundance was made 48 h after treatment and monthly thereafter for 5 months. Containers with larvae and that were treated exhibited almost complete absence of larval Ae. aegypti for 2 months, but a small proportion became positive after 3 months. Most of these positive containers were devoid of zeolite granules, which are visible in the containers. The number of positive containers increased in months 4 and 5, despite the fact that residues of temephos granules were present in some of the larvae-positive containers. The containers initially without larvae and treated with temephos essentially were devoid of larvae for 2 months. After 3, 4, and 5 months, about 6-23% of the containers became positive despite the fact that some had visible amounts of temephos granules. In the 2 control groups initially with and without larvae, sustained and consistent production of larvae occurred. Even in the group initially without a larval population, the containers became positive for larvae 1 month after the start of the experiment and the positivity rate increased as the trial progressed. From these studies, the conclusion can be made that a single application of temephos zeolite granules at 1 ppm AI can provide highly satisfactory control of larval Ae. aegypti in water-storage containers for at least 3 months in the field under normal water-use practices. PMID:15264628

Thavara, Usavadee; Tawatsin, Apiwat; Kong-Ngamsuk, Wichai; Mulla, Mir S

2004-06-01

202

Falls and Physical Activity in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis  

PubMed Central

Objectives. To examine the association between fall history and physical activity using an objective measure of physical activity (i.e., accelerometry) in persons with multiple sclerosis. Design. A community-based sample of 75 ambulatory persons with multiple sclerosis volunteered for the investigation. Participants self-reported fall history in the last year, underwent a neurological exam to determine Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score, and wore an accelerometer around the waist for 7 consecutive days to determine physical activity. Results. Overall, 37 persons (49.3% of the sample) reported falling in the last year with 28 of the 37 falling more than once. Persons who fell in the last year had a significantly lower number of steps/day than nonfallers (3510 versus 4940 steps/day; P < .05). However, when controlling for disability status there was no statistically significant difference between fallers and nonfallers (4092 versus 4373 steps/day; P > .05). Conclusions. Collectively, the findings suggest that fall history may have little impact on current physical activity levels in persons with multiple sclerosis.

Sosnoff, J. J.; Sandroff, B. M.; Pula, J. H.; Morrison, S. M.; Motl, R. W.

2012-01-01

203

Characteristics of Sheath and Presheath Recovery during Pulse Fall Time  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recovery motion of sheath and presheath is investigated with various fall times of negative bias on the target. Experimental observation was carried out with the collisionless argon plasma and the various pulses with fast and slow fall times which are shorter and longer than the ion transition time scaled of 3/?pi(?pi=ion plasma frequency), respectively. Electrical probe was employed to measure the density distribution. Ion distribution and speed near the target are important factors in determining the position of sheath . For the slow fall time, sheath and presheath boundaries recover with the same speed. Child-Langmuir sheath continuously persists due to enough time to rearrange ions and electrons. For the fast fall time, ion matrix sheath, which is immediately responding to the target voltage, leads the recovery of sheath with supersonic speed. Presheath follows ion inertia that was formed at the plateau time and its speed does not follow the speed of the sheath. Voltage-responding electrons enhance the ion diffusion from the bulk plasma, resulting in the plasma filling in the depletion region. For the intermediate fall time (3/?pi), the transformation from ion matrix to Child-Langmuir sheath occurs after ion responds. Detailed results will be presented.

Choe, Jae-Myung; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.; Kim, Gon-Ho

2012-10-01

204

Epidemiology of Falls in Older Age  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Worldwide, falls among older people are a public health concern because of their frequency and adverse consequences in terms of morbidity, mortality, and quality of life, as well as their impact on health system services and costs. This epidemiological review outlines the public health burden of falls and fall-related injuries and the impact of…

Peel, Nancye May

2011-01-01

205

A method for fast fall detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper proposes a new approach to detect the fall of the elderly. The detection system is composed of a PC server and distributed cameras. The distributed cameras are used to capture images of different place in a house, and the PC server is used for fall recognition. In the fall recognition process, we extracted a new feature using for

Bin Huang; Guohui Tian; Xiaolei Li

2008-01-01

206

Fall Prevention in Hospitals: An Integrative Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article summarizes research and draws overall conclusions from the body of literature on fall prevention interventions to provide nurse administrators with a basis for developing evidence-based fall prevention programs in the hospital setting. Data are obtained from published studies. Thirteen articles are retrieved that focused on fall interventions in the hospital setting. An analysis is performed based on levels

Sandra L. Spoelstra; Barbara A. Given; Charles W. Given

2012-01-01

207

Detecting Falling Snow from Space  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There is an increased interest in detecting and estimating the amount of falling snow reaching the Earth's surface in order to fully capture the atmospheric water cycle. An initial step toward global spaceborne falling snow algorithms includes determining the thresholds of detection for various active and passive sensor channel configurations, snow event cloud structures and microphysics, snowflake particle electromagnetic properties, and surface types. In this work, cloud resolving model simulations of a lake effect and synoptic snow event were used to determine the minimum amount of snow (threshold) that could be detected by the following instruments: the W -band radar of CloudSat, Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) Ku and Ka band, and the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) channels from 10 to 183 plus or minus 7 GHz. Eleven different snowflake shapes were used to compute radar reflectivities and passive brightness temperatures. Notable results include: (1) the W-Band radar has detection thresholds more than an order of magnitude lower than the future GPM sensors, (2) the cloud structure macrophysics influences the thresholds of detection for passive channels, (3) the snowflake microphysics plays a large role in the detection threshold for active and passive instruments, (4) with reasonable assumptions, "the passive 166 GHz channel has detection threshold values comparable to the GPM DPR Ku and Ka band radars with approximately 0.05 g per cubic meter detected at the surface, or an approximately 0.5-1 millimeter per hr. melted snow rate (equivalent to 0.5-2 centimeters per hr. solid fluffy snowflake rate). With detection levels of falling snow known, we can focus current and future retrieval efforts on detectable storms and concentrate advances on achievable results. We will also have an understanding of the light snowfall events missed by the sensors and not captured in the global estimates.

Jackson, Gail Skofronick; Johnson, Ben; Munchak, Joe

2012-01-01

208

External Validity of Physical Activity Interventions for Community-Dwelling Older Adults with Fall Risk: A Quantitative Systematic Literature Review  

PubMed Central

Aim To appraise the external validity of physical activity interventions designed to reduce falls among community-dwelling older adults, using the reach, efficacy/effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance framework. Background Falls are a globally common, significant, and preventable problem. The efficacy of physical activity interventions to reduce falls among older adults is well established. Translation of this research into practice is slow as evidenced by persistently low proportions of older adults who engage in physical activities and the rising incidence of falls. Data Sources Four electronic databases were searched for relevant studies published between 2000 and 2010. Studies that examined the effects of physical activity interventions designed to reduce falls among community dwelling older adults were included in this review (n = 46). Review Methods This was a quantitative systematic review with narrative synthesis. The reach, efficacy/effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance framework guided the identification, appraisal, and synthesis of indicators representing study validity. Results The majority of studies in this review described indicators representing internal validity. Details about indicators representing external validity were reported infrequently, limiting the generalizability of fall-preventive physical activity interventions in diverse cultures and social contexts over time. Conclusions To foster translational research in real world settings, additional programmatic intervention research is needed that: (a) targets diverse populations; (b) incorporates theories of behavioural change; (c) describes and operationalizes critical content that enables replication and translation; (d) tests innovative measures of fall risk and physical activity; and (e) evaluates feasibility and acceptability.

McMahon, Siobhan; Fleury, Julie

2012-01-01

209

A Geological Wonder: Niagara Falls  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson plan is part of the DiscoverySchool.com lesson plan library for grades 9-12. It focuses on the geological history of the Niagara Falls area, as well as the physical and geological processes that have formed this region. It includes objectives, materials, procedures, discussion questions, evaluation ideas, performing extensions, suggested readings, and vocabulary. There are videos available to order which complement this lesson, audio vocabulary, and links to teaching tools for making custom quizzes, worksheets, puzzles and lesson plans.

210

Efficacy Beliefs, Background Variables, and Differentiated Instruction of Israeli Prospective Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined efficacy beliefs and choices of differentiated instructional strategies needed for effective teaching in inclusive classrooms. Israeli preservice teachers completed teacher efficacy scale and instructional strategy scales. Overall, personal teaching efficacy related to choice of instruction, but teaching efficacy did not. Participants…

Wertheim, Cheruta; Leyser, Yona

2002-01-01

211

iFall - a new embedded system for the detection of unexpected falls  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a new embedded system, called iFall, for the detection of unexpected falls for elderly people. In combination with a new sensors system and the monitoring of its own rotation, iFall is able to detect a fall in its very beginning. It is thus able to initiate some emergency actions, such as inflating a tiny airbag, in order

Ralf Salomon; Martin Lüder; Gerald Bieber

2010-01-01

212

PerFallD: A pervasive fall detection system using mobile phones  

Microsoft Academic Search

Falls are a major health risk that diminish the quality of life among elderly people. With the elderly population surging, especially with aging ¿baby boomers¿, fall detection becomes increasingly important. However, existing commercial products and academic solutions struggle to achieve pervasive fall detection. In this paper, we propose utilizing mobile phones as a platform for pervasive fall detection system development.

Jiangpeng Dai; Xiaole Bai; Zhimin Yang; Zhaohui Shen; Dong Xuan

2010-01-01

213

Fall TIPS: strategies to promote adoption and use of a fall prevention toolkit.  

PubMed

Patient falls are serious problems in hospitals. Risk factors for falls are well understood and nurses routinely assess for fall risk on all hospitalized patients. However, the link from nursing assessment of fall risk, to identification and communication of tailored interventions to prevent falls is yet to be established. The Fall TIPS (Tailoring Interventions for Patient Safety) Toolkit was developed to leverage existing practices and workflows and to employ information technology to improve fall prevention practices. The purpose of this paper is to describe the Fall TIPS Toolkit and to report on strategies used to drive adoption of the Toolkit in four acute care hospitals. Using the IHI "Framework for Spread" as a conceptual model, the research team describes the "spread" of the Fall TIPS Toolkit as means to integrate effective fall prevention practices into the workflow of interdisciplinary caregivers, patients and family members. PMID:20351840

Dykes, Patricia C; Carroll, Diane L; Hurley, Ann; Gersh-Zaremski, Ronna; Kennedy, Ann; Kurowski, Jan; Tierney, Kim; Benoit, Angela; Chang, Frank; Lipsitz, Stuart; Pang, Justine; Tsurkova, Ruslana; Zuyov, Lyubov; Middleton, Blackford

2009-01-01

214

Falling palm fronds structure amazonian rainforest sapling communities.  

PubMed Central

The senescence and loss of photosynthetic and support structures is a nearly universal aspect of tree life history, and can be a major source of disturbance in forest understoreys, but the ability of falling canopy debris in determining the stature and composition of understorey communities seems not to have been documented. In this study, we show that senescent fronds of the palm Iriartea deltoidea cause substantial disturbance in tropical forest sapling communities. This disturbance influences the species composition of the canopy and subcanopy by acting as an ecological filter, favouring sapling species with characteristics conducive to recovery after physical damage. The scale of this dominance suggests that falling I. deltoidea debris may be influencing sapling community structure and species composition in Amazonian rainforests over very large spatial scales.

Peters, Halton A; Pauw, Anton; Silman, Miles R; Terborgh, John W

2004-01-01

215

["Who is glossary?"--Focus-group evaluation of an evidence-based consumer information brochure on risk of falling and fall prevention in the elderly].  

PubMed

Evidence-based patient and consumer health information (EBPI) implies unbiased presentation of the scientific evidence aimed at consumers' informed decision making. A number of consumer information brochures on fall prevention in the elderly have been developed. However, none of these fulfil the criteria of EBPI. It is almost unknown how elderly people respond to EBPI. We performed three focus-group interviews including 19 senior citizens to explore the comprehensibility and acceptance of an EBPI on risk of falling and fall prevention strategies. The analysis of the interviews revealed that the majority of participants did not understand the aim of the brochure, although it was explicitly stated. Most of them had expected concrete instructions on fall-risk management. The numerical and graphical figures and tables displaying fall-risk factors, fall and fracture incidence, and efficacy of the interventions were predominantly judged as confusing and unfamiliar. Beside negative emotional reactions, devaluation, and selective information seeking, a relevant number of participants also appreciated the objective and non-indoctrinating character of the EBPI. Our investigation confirms limited acceptance of EBPI which might predominately be caused by unsatisfied expectations and unfamiliarity with this kind of information. PMID:20687039

Schmitz, Astrid; Lins, Sabine; Krüger, Cäcilia; Segmüller, Tanja; Adler, Kai; Meyer, Gabriele

2010-08-01

216

Collapse: Why do Civilizations Fall?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Collapse: Why do Civilizations Fall? is an educational exhibit recently added to the Annenberg/CPB Projects Learner Online site (described in the September 12, 1997 Scout Report). The exhibit explores the decline of ancient civilizations in four regions of the world: the Maya of Copan, the Anasazi of the Chaco Canyon, the Mashkan-shapir of Mesopotamia, and the empires of Mali and Songhai of Timbuktu. The site presents the theories and investigative methods employed by archaeologists to study the decline of these great societies. In addition, special features allow visitors to study excavation clues from the ancient city of Copan and to examine the revealing science of "garbage-ology." Web links relevant to the online exhibition, along with a short bibliography, provide material for further investigation into the downfall of ancient civilizations.

217

Fall Meeting Subsurface Hydrology Highlights  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As has become the norm in recent years, subsurface hydrology sessions took place every day of AGU's Fall 1992 Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. Sessions were organized around various approaches to groundwater modeling, hydrogeology field studies, hydrochemical investigations, vadose-zone studies, and measurement methods. Session chairs contributed the following highlights.A well-attended special session looked at the “History of Groundwater Hydrology in the Nuclear Era.” F. L. Parker, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn., reviewed early developments in U.S. radioactive-waste disposal and offered the provocative viewpoint that a disposal program is characterized by a high degree of inflexibility. W. W. Dudley of the U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, Colo., summarized the hydrological studies that have been such an important component of the nuclear explosion program at the Nevada Test Site. Two papers presented results of investigations in connection with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site, where military waste is to be stored in salt.

Bales, Roger

218

127. COTTONWOOD CUT AREA, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

127. COTTONWOOD CUT AREA, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; NORTH VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

219

31. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL BRIDGE FROM DOWNSTREAM ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

31. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL BRIDGE FROM DOWNSTREAM LOOKING UPSTREAM. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

220

128. COTTONWOOD CUT, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

128. COTTONWOOD CUT, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; NORTH VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

221

108. MURTAUGH LAKE HEADGATES, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF MURTAUGH, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

108. MURTAUGH LAKE HEADGATES, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; OVERALL VIEW SOUTH. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

222

24. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS, DOWNSTREAM LOOKING TOWARD THE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

24. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS, DOWNSTREAM LOOKING TOWARD THE EAST. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

223

22. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS WITH MILNER DAM IN ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

22. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS WITH MILNER DAM IN DISTANCE; LOOKING EAST. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

224

107. MURTAUGH LAKE, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

107. MURTAUGH LAKE, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; WEST VIEW OF LAKE. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

225

100. MURTAUGH LAKE HEADGATES, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF MURTAUGH, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

100. MURTAUGH LAKE HEADGATES, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; SOUTH VIEW OF HEADGATES. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

226

26. DETAIL OF HEADGATE HOIST MACHINERY, TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

26. DETAIL OF HEADGATE HOIST MACHINERY, TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

227

29. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL BRIDGE FROM UPSTREAM ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

29. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL BRIDGE FROM UPSTREAM LOOKING DOWNSTREAM. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

228

27. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADGATE WITH CANAL ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

27. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADGATE WITH CANAL BRIDGE IN DISTANCE; LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

229

23. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS WITH MILNER DAM IN ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

23. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS WITH MILNER DAM IN DISTANCE; LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

230

125. COTTONWOOD CUT AREA, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

125. COTTONWOOD CUT AREA, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; SOUTH VIEW OF CANAL. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

231

32. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL FROM VICINITY OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

32. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL FROM VICINITY OF PROPOSED POWER CANAL, LOOKING UPSTREAM. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

232

30. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL FROM BRIDGE LOOKING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

30. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL FROM BRIDGE LOOKING WEST DOWNSTREAM. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

233

1. Photocopy of a photographca. 1920 VIEW OF AMERICAN FALLS ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. Photocopy of a photograph--ca. 1920 VIEW OF AMERICAN FALLS PRIOR TO CONSTRUCTION OF HYDROELECTRIC PLANTS - American Falls Water, Power & Light Company, Island Power Plant, Snake River, below American Falls Dam, American Falls, Power County, ID

234

Self-Efficacy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a comprehensive summary of the topic written by one of its pioneers. The site provides a definition of self-efficacy, characteristics of efficacious people, and a description of how self-efficacy can be developed or undermined. The author describes self-efficacy in social, family and school settings and in various stages of life. There is also a short bibliography.

Bandura, Albert; University, Stanford

235

Overactive bladder symptom severity is associated with falls in community-dwelling adults: LOHAS study  

PubMed Central

Objectives To examine the association between overactive bladder (OAB) symptom severity and falls and the contribution of OAB symptoms to falls in a community-dwelling population. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting 2 Japanese municipalities. Participants A total of 2505 residents aged over 40?years, who participated in health check-ups conducted in 2010. OAB symptom assessed via overactive bladder symptom score (OABSS) was divided into six categories based on distribution and Japanese clinical guidelines. Mobility problems and depressive symptoms were assessed via the Timed Up and Go test and the short form of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, respectively. Primary outcome measures Self-reported any fall and frequent fall (?2) over the 1-month period. Independent contributions to any fall and frequent falls were assessed via logistic regression to generate population-attributable fractions (PAFs), assuming separate causal relationships between OAB symptoms, mobility problems and depressive symptoms and any or frequent falls. Results Among the total 1350 participants (mean age: 68.3?years) analysed, any fall and frequent falls were reported by 12.7% and 4.4%, respectively. Compared with no OABSS score, moderate-to-severe OAB and mild OAB were associated with any fall (adjusted ORs 2.37 (95% CI 1.12 to 4.98) and 2.51 (95% CI 1.14 to 5.52), respectively). Moderate-to-severe OAB was also strongly associated with frequent falls (adjusted OR 6.90 (95% CI 1.50 to 31.6)). Adjusted PAFs of OAB symptoms were 40.7% (95% CI 0.7% to 64.6%) for any fall and 67.7% (95% CI ?23.1% to 91.5%) for frequent falls. Further, these point estimates were similar to or larger than those of mobility problems and depressive symptoms. Conclusions An association does indeed exist between OAB symptom severity and falls, and OAB symptoms might be important contributors to falls among community-dwelling adults. Further longitudinal studies are warranted to examine whether or not OAB symptoms predict risk of future falls and fall-related injuries.

Kurita, Noriaki; Yamazaki, Shin; Fukumori, Norio; Otoshi, Kenichi; Otani, Koji; Sekiguchi, Miho; Onishi, Yoshihiro; Takegami, Misa; Ono, Rei; Horie, Shigeo; Konno, Shin-ichi; Kikuchi, Shin-ichi; Fukuhara, Shunichi

2013-01-01

236

The Role of Falls in Fracture Prediction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Close to 75% of hip and non-hip fractures occur among seniors age 65 years and older. Notably, the primary risk factor for\\u000a a hip fracture is a fall, and over 90% of all fractures occur after a fall. Thus, critical for the understanding and prevention\\u000a of fractures at later age is their close relationship with muscle weakness and falling. In fact,

Heike A. Bischoff-Ferrari

237

Impact loads of falling rocks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Depending on the chosen protection system the planning engineer has to proceed differently. If the impact energies stay below 3'000 - 5'000 kJ solutions using flexible protection systems are recommended in many cases being the most efficient solution. Since 2001, such systems are type tested in Switzerland. The results are published on the internet (www.umwelt-schweiz.ch/typenpruefung). Therefore, the engineers can concentrate on the design of the anchorage and do not need to consider the brake down process of the falling rock because its details including the acting forces within the barrier are given. This is different to the design of rockfall protection earth dams. Here, the evidence of the structural safety is the major task and questions like the following ones have to be answered: What magnitude are the forces that have to be carried for a certain kinetic energy? How are the forces influenced by mass or impact velocity? What is the influence of the soil properties such as strength, density and friction angle? How deep does the rock penetrate? Previous research on the impact loads on the cushion layer of protection galleries were performed by EPFL in the mid-nineties and led to a Swiss Guideline (ASTRA/SBB 1998) to calculate an equivalent static load for the structure underneath. This approach also delivers a function to predict the penetration depth. This contribution now checks whether above approach can also be used to design earth dams or how it can be modified. For that, the results of previous experiments performed by different institutions were analysed and, if possible, compared to the guideline. This could confirm above mentioned function to predict the penetration depth. In addition, an experimental series with different bodies (800 kg, 4000 kg) falling from different heights (2 - 15 m) on differently conditioned soils were performed. Measurements were taken through accelerometers attached to the blocks and measuring the vertical deceleration. The penetration into the ground was obtained by using digital high-speed video recording during the experiments and surveyor's optical level before and afterwards. The combination of accelerometers and digital high-speed video recordings additionally allows for a check of the function of the single systems. The rock's velocity can be obtained on the one hand through integration of the accelerations and on the other hand by differentiation of the video data; both values should differ not too much. Finally, the analyses of the test series enabled a calibration of an improved individual load model for the impact of falling bodies into more or less compacted soil and revealed that the loads resulting from the previous guideline can be reduced by 20%. However, because the maximum impact energy was 600 kJ further experiments are recommended to enable a prediction of the performance for energies higher than 5'000 kJ - an energy sector dams are normally used for.

Gerber, W.

2009-04-01

238

150. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

150. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Surveyor's Book #363, Page 42, entitled, 'Diversion Tunnels', located in Twin Falls Canal Company office, Twin Falls, Idaho). PLAN OF DIVERSION TUNNELS, MILNER DAM. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

239

180. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company. E. Pettygro, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

180. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company. E. Pettygro, Photographer, date unknown. BLASTING TWIN FALLS CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY; BLASTING COTTONWOOD AREA TO REPLACE FLUME BY RUNNING HIGH LINE THROUGH SOLID ROCK. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

240

Automated fall detection with quality improvement "rewind" to reduce falls in hospital rooms.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to test the implementation of a fall detection and "rewind" privacy-protecting technique using the Microsoft® Kinect™ to not only detect but prevent falls from occurring in hospitalized patients. Kinect sensors were placed in six hospital rooms in a step-down unit and data were continuously logged. Prior to implementation with patients, three researchers performed a total of 18 falls (walking and then falling down or falling from the bed) and 17 non-fall events (crouching down, stooping down to tie shoe laces, and lying on the floor). All falls and non-falls were correctly identified using automated algorithms to process Kinect sensor data. During the first 8 months of data collection, processing methods were perfected to manage data and provide a "rewind" method to view events that led to falls for post-fall quality improvement process analyses. Preliminary data from this feasibility study show that using the Microsoft Kinect sensors provides detection of falls, fall risks, and facilitates quality improvement after falls in real hospital environments unobtrusively, while taking into account patient privacy. PMID:24296567

Rantz, Marilyn J; Banerjee, Tanvi S; Cattoor, Erin; Scott, Susan D; Skubic, Marjorie; Popescu, Mihail

2014-01-01

241

Dynamics of the Polonnaruwa meteorite fall  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Polonnaruwa meteorite fell over the north east of Sri Lanka on 29 Dec. 2012, with the fireball observed descending at 18.30 local time. Fragments were picked up the following day from paddy fields, sized from 10-15cm down to few mm. Meteorite fragments were readily identifiable on top of the sandy soil and scattered over an area of 1 km scale. The meteorites are unusually fragile and porous, with mean density less than water. A thin fusion crust is found around some cm-sized pieces. From their spatial distribution, we infer the meteoroid survived to an unusually low altitude ~10km. This does not fit with canonical models for bolides in the atmosphere, in which fragile bolides break up much higher, unless the bolide speed was unusually low and it was protected against the shock-induced pressure gradients by vigorous ablation. Here we suggest that such fragile bodies may survive to low altitudes by a protective outgassing sheath of volatile ices and organics that shields the meteoroid from direct atmospheric heating. The fusion crusts could be formed in the fireball or during the subsequent fall of independent fragments. We compare the Polonnaruwa meteorite with the meteorite fragments associated with the recent Chelyabinsk fireball and the samples of cometry material recovered from the Comet Wild/2 during the STARDUST mission. In all three cases, analysis of the trajectory of the bodies and the surviving material imply that pristine comets are highly porous and heterogeneous in composition.

Coulson, S.; Wallis, M. K.; Miyake, N.; Wallis, J.; Wickramasinghe, N. C.

2013-09-01

242

Viscoelastic drop falling through a viscous medium  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Deformation and sedimentation velocities of a viscoelastic drop falling through a Newtonian medium are numerically investigated using a front-tracking finite difference method. In contrast to a viscous drop, viscoelasticity deforms an initially spherical drop into an oblate shape and decreases its sedimentation velocity. Further increase of elasticity results in a dimple at the rear end, as the viscoelastic stress at the trailing end of the drop pulls the drop interface inward. The dimple becomes more prominent with increasing Deborah number, amount of polymeric viscosity, and capillary number. An approximate analysis is performed to model the stress development along the axis of symmetry, specifically its increase at the rear end that governs the dimple formation. For even higher values of Deborah number, the interfacial tension cannot balance the viscoelastic stresses leading to an unstable situation toward a toroidal shape. We numerically find the critical Deborah number for the transition. It shows an approximate inverse scaling with capillary number. For unstable cases, downward progressing dimple develops a globular end. Development of the globular end results in a sudden increase in the cross-sectional area of the drop and a sharp decrease of the settling velocity.

Mukherjee, Swarnajay; Sarkar, Kausik

2011-01-01

243

Robust Multidimensional Scaling.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A method for multidimensional scaling that is highly resistant to the effects of outliers is described. Some Monte Carlo simulations illustrate the efficacy of the procedure, which performs well with or without outliers. (SLD)

Spence, Ian; Lewandowsky, Stephan

1989-01-01

244

Relationships between Personality Type and Teaching Efficacy of Student Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine if relationships exist between teaching efficacy and personality type of student teachers. The population of interest was all agricultural science student teachers at Texas A&M University. The sampling frame included all student teachers during the spring and fall semesters of 2005 (n= 72). Teaching…

Roberts, T. Grady; Mowen, Diana L.; Edgar, Don W.; Harlin, Julie F.; Briers, Gary E.

2007-01-01

245

Automated fall detection: saving senior lives one fall at a time.  

PubMed

Many elderly have health issues which make falling asignificant likelihood. Falls may result from a variety of conditions such as mobility, difficulty from arthritis, vertigo from poor circulation, negative reactions to medication, etc. whatever the cause, more than one third of seniors will fall 1n a given year. This means that in the U.S. alone, 12 million seniors will fall this year. PMID:19402442

Otto, Chris A; Chen, Xiaofang

2009-03-01

246

Assessing Regulatory Emotional Self-Efficacy in Three Countries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Regulatory Emotional Self-Efficacy (RESE) scale was developed to assess perceived self-efficacy in managing negative (NEG) and in expressing positive (POS) affect (G. V. Caprara & M. Gerbino, 2001). In this study of young adults, the factorial structure of the RESE scale was found to be similar in Italy, the United States, and Bolivia: In…

Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Giunta, Laura Di; Eisenberg, Nancy; Gerbino, Maria; Pastorelli, Concetta; Tramontano, Carlo

2008-01-01

247

Falls Among Older Adults: An Overview  

MedlinePLUS

... SMF, Smit JH, et al. Fall-risk screening test: a prospective study on predictors for falls in community-dwelling elderly. J Clin Epidemiol 2001;54(8):837–844. Stevens JA, Ballesteros MF, Mack KA, Rudd RA, DeCaro ...

248

29 CFR 1926.760 - Fall protection.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...shall be protected from fall hazards by guardrail systems, safety net systems, personal...for fall protection equipment. (1) Guardrail systems, safety net systems, personal...safety cables shall meet the criteria for guardrail systems in § 1926.502 (see...

2013-07-01

249

Trends, Fall 1993. Diablo Valley College.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Providing data on institutional trends up to fall 1993 at Diablo Valley College, in California, this report consists of 14 charts on enrollment and student characteristics. Following an introduction describing a general decline in enrollments due to a statewide increase in fees, the following tables are provided: (1) fall enrollment from 1984 to…

Birdsall, Les

250

Drop Study/Attrition Rates, Fall 2000.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes the attrition rate at Johnson County Community College (JCCC) (Kansas). The overall attrition rate for classes starting in fall 2000 was nearly 12%--during the fall semester 4,652 students dropped classes. Useable drop surveys were completed for 93% of those classes. Findings indicated that: (1) the Science, Math, and Health…

Summer, Pat

251

PLCO News, Fall/Winter 1998  

Cancer.gov

PLCO News, Fall/Winter 1998 Volume 1, Number 2 ----- Fall/Winter 1998 Cancer Information Center If you have a question about cancer you can call and speak with a trained specialist at NCI's Cancer Information Service (CIS). The CIS operates a toll-free,

252

PLCO News, Fall/Winter 1998  

Cancer.gov

PLCO News, Fall/Winter 1998 Volume 1, Number 2 ----- Fall/Winter 1998 Trial Update Enrollment goal: 148,000 Total enrollment (as of September 30, 1998): 111,515 Men enrolled: 58,283 Women enrolled: 53,232 Number of people enrolled

253

Cardiac causes for falls and their treatment.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular disorders are a common cause of falls and syncope in older adults. The most common cardiac disorders linked to falls and syncope are carotid sinus syndrome, postprandial hypotension, orthostatic hypotension, vasovagal syncope, and bradyarrhythmias. It is important to recognize these conditions, because they may be associated with an increased mortality. Most are easily treatable. PMID:20934610

Cronin, Hilary; Kenny, Rose Anne

2010-11-01

254

Procrustes Shape Analysis for Fall Detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Western countries, the growing population of seniors brings us to think about new healthcare systems to ensure the safety of elderly people at home. Falls are one of the greatest risk for seniors living alone. Computer vision pro- vides a promising solution to analyze people behavior and detect some unusual events like falls. In this paper, we pro- pose

Caroline Rougier; Jean Meunier; Alain St-Arnaud; Jacqueline Rousseau

2008-01-01

255

Fall Incidents Detection for Intelligent Video Surveillance  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present in this paper an intelligent video surveillance system to detect human fall incidents for enhanced safety in indoor environments. The system consists of two main parts: a vision component which can reliably detect and track moving people in the view of a camera, and an event-inference module which parses observation sequences of people features for possible falling behavioral

Ji Tao; Mukherjee Turjo; Mun-Fei Wong; Mengdi Wang; Yap-Peng Tan

2005-01-01

256

Charge Falling Through a Charged Ring Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Charge Falling Through a Charged Ring shows dynamics of a charged ball as it is released and falls through a ring of charge. The ball and the ring can be charged with a positive blue) or a (red) negative charge.

Krizaj, Dejan

2010-11-09

257

PREDICTING SPRING LAKE CHEMISTRY FROM FALL SAMPLES  

EPA Science Inventory

The relationship between fall and spring lake chemistry was investigated for five chemical variables of 103 lakes in seven regions of the United States. Strong linear relationships were found between preceding springs and fall values for acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), pH, sulf...

258

Evolution of the AGU Fall Meeting  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Fall Meeting is AGU's flagship meeting and is the largest Earth and space sciences meeting in the world. The high quality of this meeting is due to the joint efforts of the Fall Meeting Program Committee, the professional AGU meetings staff, AGU members who serve as session chairs, and AGU members who submit abstracts and attend the meeting. The

John Bates; Kathy Hibbard

2011-01-01

259

Geologic History Field Investigation - Minnehaha Falls  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is an inquiry-based field investigation of the geologic history of the Minnehaha Falls and St. Anthony Falls areas of Minneapolis. Students will be introduced to rocks and the stories rocks tell in a genuine geologic context, rather than as samples in the classroom.

Kevin Swanson and Justin Larson, Chippewa Middle School, North Oaks, MN

260

Keep Up or Fall Behind  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the race to enable information access and collaboration, institutions are taking advantage of new tools to drive content management innovation. New content management systems (CMS) features and functions are driving true innovation in content management, and enabling information access, sharing, collaboration, and tracking on a scale heretofore…

Ramaswami, Rama

2007-01-01

261

Safe fall: Humanoid robot fall direction change through intelligent stepping and inertia shaping  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although fall is a rare event in the life of a humanoid robot, we must be prepared for it because its consequences are serious. In this paper we present a fall strategy which rapidly modifies the robot's fall direction in order to avoid hitting a person or an object in the vicinity. Our approach is based on the key observation

Seung-kook Yun; Ambarish Goswami; Yoshiaki Sakagami

2009-01-01

262

Persistence of New Students Who Entered College of the Desert, Fall 1991 and Fall 1992.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was undertaken at California's College of the Desert to determine the persistence rates of new students who entered the college in fall 1991 and fall 1992. Course enrollment was tracked for these students through fall 1996, with outcomes examined by student gender, ethnicity, and age; student enrollment in credit or non-credit courses;…

Breindel, Matthew D.

263

Falling in Love as a Therapeutic Moment-Therapy as a Moment of Falling in Love  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author compares falling in love in ordinary life with falling in love in therapy. This way, he offers a wider understanding of these phenomena, regarding in particular to transferring processes. The result is a model, inside the frame of reference of Gestalt Therapy, to work through the positive sources of falling in love process-in ordinary life and in therapy.

Giovanni Salonia

1991-01-01

264

Improving the accuracy of a fall detection algorithm using free fall characteristics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The number of elderly who live on their own is increasing. Falls in the elderly are a major problem which has a long term effect. If the elderly can get help immediately after a fall, the severity of the injury, and the cost could be reduced. This paper presents a fall detection algorithm utilizing two thresholds for the resultant acceleration

P. Jantaraprim; P. Phukpattaranont; C. Limsakul; B. Wongkittisuksa

2010-01-01

265

Evaluation of fall and fall recovery in a simulated seismic environment: A pilot study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fall-related injuries, disabilities, and fatalities are known to seriously affect the healthcare and industry sectors. Nevertheless, an abled individual, as well as a trained senior citizen, is believed to be capable of withstanding and overcoming unusual environmental variations in terms of postural stability and balance. Understanding the biomechanics of fall and fall recovery through quantitative measurements could provide academic and

Ziad O. Abu-Faraj; Hassan A. Akar; Elie H. Assaf; Mohamad N. Al-Qadiri; Elssy G. Youssef

2010-01-01

266

Falls and cognitive decline in Mexican Americans 75 years and older  

PubMed Central

Background Little is known about long-term emotional and cognitive consequences of falls. We examined the association between falls and subsequent cognitive decline, and tested the hypothesis that depression would mediate any falls–cognition association among cognitively intact Hispanic Elders. Methods We used data from the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiological Study of the Elderly to examine change in Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores over the 6-year period according to number of falls. All participants (N=1,119) had MMSE scores ?21 and complete data on Center for Epidemiologic Studies of Depression Scale, social and demographic factors, medical conditions (diabetes, heart attack, stroke, and hypertension), and hand grip muscle strength. Results At baseline, participants’ mean age was 80.8 years (range, 74–109), mean education was 6.3 years (range, 0–17), and mean MMSE was 25.2 (range, 21–30). Of the 1,119 participants, 15.8% experienced one fall and 14.4% had two or more falls. In mixed model analyses, having two or more falls was associated with greater decline in MMSE score (estimate =?0.81, standard error =0.19, P<0.0001) compared to having no fall, after adjusting for age, sex, marital status, and education. The magnitude of the association decreased (estimate =?0.65, standard error =0.19, P=0.0007) when adjustment was made for high depressive symptoms, suggesting a possible mediating effect of depression on the falls–cognition association. Female sex, high level of education, and high performance in hand grip muscle strength were associated with a slower decline in MMSE scores. Conclusion Having two or more falls was independently associated with steeper decline in cognition over 6 years, with a possible mediating effect of depression on the falls–cognition association.

Padubidri, Anokha; Al Snih, Soham; Samper-Ternent, Rafael; Markides, Kyriakos S; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Raji, Mukaila A

2014-01-01

267

Studying a free fall experiment using short sequences of images  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We discuss a new alternative for obtaining position and time coordinates from a video of a free fall experiment. In our approach, after converting the video to a short sequence of images, the images are analyzed using a web page application developed by the author. The main advantage of the setup explained in this work, is that it is simple to use, no software license fees are necessary, and can be scaled-up to be used by a big number of students in introductory physics courses. The steps involved in the full analysis of a falling object are: we grab a short digital video of the experiment and convert it to a sequence of images, then, using a web page that includes all the necessary javascript, the student can easily click on the object of interest to obtain the (x,y,t) coordinates, finally, the student analyze motion using a spreadsheet.

Vera, Francisco; Romanque, Cristian

2008-11-01

268

Ampicillin: Rise Fall and Resurgence  

PubMed Central

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global problem. AMR has posed new challenges in treatment of infectious diseases. Antimicrobials are losing efficacy due to development of resistant pathogens. It has lead to re-emergence of certain infectious diseases. Treatment of such diseases has undergone changes with use of alternative antimicrobials and drug combinations. Pathogens are likely to develop resistance to alternative antimicrobials also and risk of infections with nonexistent treatment is real. Salmonella showed widespread resistant to ampicillin which resulted in use of alternative antimicrobials like fluroquinolones and cephalosporins in the treatment of enteric fever in last two decades. Unfortunately there are growing reports of resistance to these antimicrobials. Interestingly there are numerous reports of ampicillin regaining activity against Salmonella. Speculatively lack of exposure of Salmonella to ampicillin for long time resulted in the loss of plasmid mediated resistance in the pathogen. There may have been emergence of de novo ampicillin susceptible strains. This is assuring in the era where problem of AMR is compounded by the scarcity of new antimicrobial development.

Kaushik, Dwarikadhish; Mohan, Mudit; Borade, Dhammraj M

2014-01-01

269

Ampicillin: rise fall and resurgence.  

PubMed

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global problem. AMR has posed new challenges in treatment of infectious diseases. Antimicrobials are losing efficacy due to development of resistant pathogens. It has lead to re-emergence of certain infectious diseases. Treatment of such diseases has undergone changes with use of alternative antimicrobials and drug combinations. Pathogens are likely to develop resistance to alternative antimicrobials also and risk of infections with nonexistent treatment is real. Salmonella showed widespread resistant to ampicillin which resulted in use of alternative antimicrobials like fluroquinolones and cephalosporins in the treatment of enteric fever in last two decades. Unfortunately there are growing reports of resistance to these antimicrobials. Interestingly there are numerous reports of ampicillin regaining activity against Salmonella. Speculatively lack of exposure of Salmonella to ampicillin for long time resulted in the loss of plasmid mediated resistance in the pathogen. There may have been emergence of de novo ampicillin susceptible strains. This is assuring in the era where problem of AMR is compounded by the scarcity of new antimicrobial development. PMID:24995206

Kaushik, Dwarikadhish; Mohan, Mudit; Borade, Dhammraj M; Swami, Onkar C

2014-05-01

270

From Fall to Spring, or Spring to Fall? Seasonal Cholera Transmission Cycles and Implications for Climate Change  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cholera remains a major public health threat in many developing countries around the world. The striking seasonality and the annual recurrence of this infectious disease in endemic areas continues to be of considerable interest to scientists and public health workers. Despite major advances in the ecological, and microbiological understanding of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent, the role of underlying macro-scale hydroclimatic processes in propagating the disease in different seasons and years is not well understood. The incidence of cholera in the Bengal Delta region, the ‘native homeland’ of cholera, shows distinct biannual peaks in the southern floodplains, as opposed to single annual peaks in coastal areas and the northern parts of Bangladesh, as well as other cholera-endemic regions in the world. A coupled analysis of the regional hydroclimate and cholera incidence reveals a strong association of the spatio-temporal variability of incidence peaks with seasonal processes and extreme events. At a seasonal scale, the cycles indicate a spring-fall transmission pattern, contrary to the prevalent notion of a fall-spring transmission cycle. We show that the asymmetric seasonal hydroclimatology affects regional cholera dynamics by providing a coastal growth environment for bacteria in spring, while propagating transmission to fall by flooding. This seasonal interpretation of the progression of cholera has important implications, for formulating effective cholera intervention and mitigation efforts through improved water management and understanding the impacts of changing climate patterns on seasonal cholera transmission. (Water Environental Research Education Actionable Solutions Network)

Akanda, A. S.; Jutla, A. S.; Huq, A.; Colwell, R.; Islam, S.; WE Reason

2010-12-01

271

Falls and fall injuries among adults with arthritis - United States, 2012.  

PubMed

Falls are the leading cause of injury-related morbidity and mortality among older adults, with more than one in three older adults falling each year, resulting in direct medical costs of nearly $30 billion. Some of the major consequences of falls among older adults are hip fractures, brain injuries, decline in functional abilities, and reductions in social and physical activities. Although the burden of falls among older adults is well-documented, research suggests that falls and fall injuries are also common among middle-aged adults. One risk factor for falling is poor neuromuscular function (i.e., gait speed and balance), which is common among persons with arthritis. In the United States, the prevalence of arthritis is highest among middle-aged adults (aged 45-64 years) (30.2%) and older adults (aged ?65 years) (49.7%), and these populations account for 52% of U.S. adults. Moreover, arthritis is the most common cause of disability. To examine the prevalence of falls among middle-aged and older adults with arthritis in different states/territories, CDC analyzed data from the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) to assess the state-specific prevalence of having fallen and having experienced a fall injury in the past 12 months among adults aged ?45 years with and without doctor-diagnosed arthritis. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which found that for all 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC), the prevalence of any fall (one or more), two or more falls, and fall injuries in the past 12 months was significantly higher among adults with arthritis compared with those without arthritis. The prevalence of falls and fall injuries is high among adults with arthritis but can be addressed through greater dissemination of arthritis management and fall prevention programs in clinical and community practice. PMID:24785984

Barbour, Kamil E; Stevens, Judy A; Helmick, Charles G; Luo, Yao-Hua; Murphy, Louise B; Hootman, Jennifer M; Theis, Kristina; Anderson, Lynda A; Baker, Nancy A; Sugerman, David E

2014-05-01

272

Long-wavelength equation for vertically falling films  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An equation is derived for describing wave evolution on the surface of a vertically falling viscous film. The traditional long-wavelength scaling is replaced by a new scaling to reduce the two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations to a single evolution equation for the scaled film thickness h(x,t) . The scaling suggests that the Weber number ( We ) must be used instead of the Reynolds number (Re) to distinguish between viscous and inertia dominated regimes for vertically falling films. This equation includes viscous dissipation and pressure correction terms that are missing in the existing single evolution equations at the same order. Comparison of the neutral stability curves and growth rates predicted by different models to that of the Orr-Sommerfeld (OS) equation shows that our equation matches with the OS results better than the existing single evolution equations. However, our equation is not free from finite time blowup. Selective regularization leads to a two mode model in flow rate and film thickness. The regularized equation is free from finite time blowup and predicts two families of solitary waves. Numerical simulations of the derived equation and its regularized version in the traveling wave coordinate show the transition of wave structure from regular (periodic) to chaotic profiles. Model predictions on maximum wave amplitude on the low celerity branch show good agreement with experimental data.

Panga, Mohan K. R.; Mudunuri, Ramesh R.; Balakotaiah, Vemuri

2005-03-01

273

Falls and consequent injuries in hospitalized patients: effects of an interdisciplinary falls prevention program  

PubMed Central

Background Patient falls in hospitals are common and may lead to negative outcomes such as injuries, prolonged hospitalization and legal liability. Consequently, various hospital falls prevention programs have been implemented in the last decades. However, most of the programs had no sustained effects on falls reduction over extended periods of time. Methods This study used a serial survey design to examine in-patient fall rates and consequent injuries before and after the implementation of an interdisciplinary falls prevention program (IFP) in a 300-bed urban public hospital. The population under study included adult patients, hospitalized in the departments of internal medicine, geriatrics, and surgery. Administrative patient data and fall incident report data from 1999 to 2003 were examined and summarized using frequencies, proportions, means and standard deviations and were analyzed accordingly. Results A total of 34,972 hospitalized patients (mean age: 67.3, SD ± 19.3 years; female 53.6%, mean length of stay: 11.9 ± 13.2 days, mean nursing care time per day: 3.5 ± 1.4 hours) were observed during the study period. Overall, a total of 3,842 falls affected 2,512 (7.2%) of the hospitalized patients. From these falls, 2,552 (66.4%) were without injuries, while 1,142 (29.7%) falls resulted in minor injuries, and 148 (3.9%) falls resulted in major injuries. The overall fall rate in the hospitals' patient population was 8.9 falls per 1,000 patient days. The fall rates fluctuated slightly from 9.1 falls in 1999 to 8.6 falls in 2003. After the implementation of the IFP, in 2001 a slight decrease to 7.8 falls per 1,000 patient days was observed (p = 0.086). The annual proportion of minor and major injuries did not decrease after the implementation of the IFP. From 1999 to 2003, patient characteristics changed in terms of slight increases (female gender, age, consumed nursing care time) or decreases (length of hospital stay), as well as the prevalence of fall risk factors increased up to 46.8% in those patients who fell. Conclusion Following the implementation of an interdisciplinary falls prevention program, neither the frequencies of falls nor consequent injuries decreased substantially. Future studies need to incorporate strategies to maximize and evaluate ongoing adherence to interventions in hospital falls prevention programs.

Schwendimann, Rene; Buhler, Hugo; De Geest, Sabina; Milisen, Koen

2006-01-01

274

Predicting in-hospital falls: development of the Scott and White Falls Risk Screener.  

PubMed

Falling is the most common hospital accident, and up to 15% of fallers sustain a serious injury. This study focused on developing a simple, practical fall risk screener using routine admission and daily in-hospital stay data. A case-control design was used. Logistic regression identified individual characteristics associated with an increased risk of a fall. Four variables were identified: history of falls, ambulation assistance, disoriented, and bowel control problems, creating a fall risk model with 70% sensitivity and 57% specificity. PMID:15839291

Yauk, Sheryl; Hopkins, Barbara A; Phillips, Charles D; Terrell, Sandra; Bennion, Joyce; Riggs, Mark

2005-01-01

275

Applications of Self-Efficacy Theory to the Career Assessment of Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summarizes Bandura's self-efficacy theory. Reviews occupational, scientific-technical, and mathematics self-efficacy, Holland's hexagonal model, the Occupational Self-Efficacy Scale, and the relationship of self-efficacy to vocational interests. Considers the applicability of these concepts to women's career development and assessment. (SK)

Betz, Nancy E.; Hackett, Gail

1997-01-01

276

Neuropsychological mechanisms of falls in older adults  

PubMed Central

Falls, a common cause of injury among older adults, have become increasingly prevalent. As the world’s population ages, the increase in—and the prevalence of—falls among older people makes this a serious and compelling societal and healthcare issue. Physical weakness is a critical predictor in falling. While considerable research has examined this relationship, comprehensive reviews of neuropsychological predictors of falls have been lacking. In this paper, we examine and discuss current studies of the neuropsychological predictors of falls in older adults, as related to sporting and non-sporting contexts. By integrating the existing evidence, we propose that brain aging is an important precursor of the increased risk of falls in older adults. Brain aging disrupts the neural integrity of motor outputs and reduces neuropsychological abilities. Older adults may shift from unconscious movement control to more conscious or attentive motor control. Increased understanding of the causes of falls will afford opportunities to reduce their incidence, reduce consequent injuries, improve overall well-being and quality of life, and possibly to prolong life.

Liu, Yu; Chan, John S. Y.; Yan, Jin H.

2014-01-01

277

Efficacy of climate forcings  

Microsoft Academic Search

We use a global climate model to compare the effectiveness of many climate forcing agents for producing climate change. We find a substantial range in the ``efficacy'' of different forcings, where the efficacy is the global temperature response per unit forcing relative to the response to CO2 forcing. Anthropogenic CH4 has efficacy ~110%, which increases to ~145% when its indirect

J. Hansen; M. Sato; R. Ruedy; L. Nazarenko; A. Lacis; G. A. Schmidt; G. Russell; I. Aleinov; M. Bauer; S. Bauer; N. Bell; B. Cairns; V. Canuto; M. Chandler; Y. Cheng; A. Del Genio; G. Faluvegi; E. Fleming; A. Friend; T. Hall; C. Jackman; M. Kelley; N. Kiang; D. Koch; J. Lean; J. Lerner; K. Lo; S. Menon; R. Miller; P. Minnis; T. Novakov; V. Oinas; Ja. Perlwitz; Ju. Perlwitz; D. Rind; A. Romanou; D. Shindell; P. Stone; S. Sun; N. Tausnev; D. Thresher; B. Wielicki; T. Wong; M. Yao; S. Zhang

2005-01-01

278

Efficacy of climate forcings  

Microsoft Academic Search

We use a global climate model to compare the effectiveness of many climate forcing agents for producing climate change. We find a substantial range in the “efficacy” of different forcings, where the efficacy is the global temperature response per unit forcing relative to the response to CO2 forcing. Anthropogenic CH4 has efficacy ?110%, which increases to ?145% when its indirect

J. Hansen; M. Sato; R. Ruedy; L. Nazarenko; A. Lacis; G. A. Schmidt; G. Russell; I. Aleinov; M. Bauer; S. Bauer; N. Bell; B. Cairns; V. Canuto; M. Chandler; Y. Cheng; A. Del Genio; G. Faluvegi; E. Fleming; A. Friend; T. Hall; C. Jackman; M. Kelley; N. Kiang; D. Koch; J. Lean; J. Lerner; K. Lo; S. Menon; R. Miller; P. Minnis; T. Novakov; V. Oinas; Ja. Perlwitz; Ju. Perlwitz; D. Rind; A. Romanou; D. Shindell; P. Stone; S. Sun; N. Tausnev; D. Thresher; B. Wielicki; T. Wong; M. Yao; S. Zhang

2005-01-01

279

Planning for 2012 AGU Fall Meeting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Fall Meeting is AGU's flagship meeting and is the largest Earth and space sciences meeting in the world. The high quality of this meeting is due to the joint efforts of the Fall Meeting Program Committee, the professional AGU meetings staff, AGU members who serve as session chairs, and AGU members who submit abstracts and attend the meeting. The 2011 Fall Meeting was attended by more than 21,000 people, including 30% from outside the United States. To maintain the high quality of AGU science and the reputation of AGU for excellence in meetings, the AGU Meetings Committee has finalized the 2012 schedule.

Bates, John J.

2012-04-01

280

Wearable sensors for reliable fall detection.  

PubMed

Unintentional falls are a common cause of severe injury in the elderly population. By introducing small, non-invasive sensor motes in conjunction with a wireless network, the Ivy Project aims to provide a path towards more independent living for the elderly. Using a small device worn on the waist and a network of fixed motes in the home environment, we can detect the occurrence of a fall and the location of the victim. Low-cost and low-power MEMS accelerometers are used to detect the fall while RF signal strength is used to locate the person. PMID:17280991

Chen, Jay; Kwong, Karric; Chang, Dennis; Luk, Jerry; Bajcsy, Ruzena

2005-01-01

281

Sizing and fit of fall-protection harnesses.  

PubMed

Full-body fall-protection harnesses have been a critical work-practice control technology for reducing the number of fall-related injuries and fatalities among construction workers; yet, very little is known about the fit of these harnesses to the population that wears them. This study evaluated the fit and sizing efficacy of a harness system. Seventy-two male and 26 female construction workers participated in the study. Their body size-and-shape information was measured while they were suspended (with a harness) and standing (with and without a harness), using a 3-D full-body laser scanner and traditional anthropometric calipers. Fisher's discriminant analysis results did not point to the need for a change in the current sizing selection scheme by body height and weight for end users. However, an integrated redesign of harness components is needed because 40% of subjects did not pass fit-performance criteria in either the standing or suspended condition. A multivariate accommodation analysis has identified 15 representative body models for the 'standard-size' harness design. These models can serve as a useful population to test harness design until a larger survey of the nation's construction workers can be done. Finally, further developments in 3-D shape quantification methods are recommended to improve the harness design process; the point-to-point anthropometric information currently used seems to be insufficient for harness design. PMID:12933082

Hsiao, Hongwei; Bradtmiller, Bruce; Whitestone, Jennifer

2003-10-10

282

Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients)  

PubMed Central

To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82 ± 7 years, range 65–101). Falls were defined “accidental” (fall explained by a definite accidental cause), “medical” (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease), “dementia-related” (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia), and “unexplained” (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause). According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury.

Chiara, Mussi; Gianluigi, Galizia; Pasquale, Abete; Alessandro, Morrione; Alice, Maraviglia; Gabriele, Noro; Paolo, Cavagnaro; Loredana, Ghirelli; Giovanni, Tava; Franco, Rengo; Giulio, Masotti; Gianfranco, Salvioli; Niccolo, Marchionni; Andrea, Ungar

2013-01-01

283

Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients).  

PubMed

To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82 ± 7 years, range 65-101). Falls were defined "accidental" (fall explained by a definite accidental cause), "medical" (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease), "dementia-related" (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia), and "unexplained" (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause). According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury. PMID:23533394

Chiara, Mussi; Gianluigi, Galizia; Pasquale, Abete; Alessandro, Morrione; Alice, Maraviglia; Gabriele, Noro; Paolo, Cavagnaro; Loredana, Ghirelli; Giovanni, Tava; Franco, Rengo; Giulio, Masotti; Gianfranco, Salvioli; Niccolò, Marchionni; Andrea, Ungar

2013-01-01

284

Randomised controlled trial of prevention of falls in people aged >=75 with severe visual impairment: the VIP trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives To assess the efficacy and cost effectiveness of a home safety programme and a home exercise programme to reduce falls and injuries in older people with low vision. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Dunedin and Auckland, New Zealand. Participants 391 women and men aged ? 75 with visual acuity of 6\\/24 or worse who were living in the community;

A John Campbell; M Clare Robertson; Steven J La Grow; Ngaire M Kerse; Gordon F Sanderson; Robert J Jacobs; Dianne M Sharp; Leigh A Hale

2005-01-01

285

187. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

187. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. TOPOGRAPHICAL MAP OF MILNER DAM LOCATION, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; BLUEPRINT MAP. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

286

182. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company. Photographer and ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

182. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company. Photographer and date unknown. MILNER DAM TUNNELS, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; APPROACH TO TUNNELS. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

287

183. Photocopy of map (Twin Falls Canal Company). TOPOGRAPHICAL MAP ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

183. Photocopy of map (Twin Falls Canal Company). TOPOGRAPHICAL MAP OF MILNER DAM SITE, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; MAP, LEFT SIDE ONLY. CROSS REFERENCE: ID-15-192. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

288

137. TWIN FALLS SOUTH SIDE MAIN CANAL DIVERSION HEADGATES, TWIN ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

137. TWIN FALLS SOUTH SIDE MAIN CANAL DIVERSION HEADGATES, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; OVERALL VIEW OF MAIN HEADGATES, DAM IN BACKGROUND. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

289

151. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

151. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Surveyor's Transit Book #363, Page 20). SURVEY PRINT SHOWING POINT SPILLWAY AND FIELD NOTES, TWIN FALLS COUNTY NORTHWEST OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

290

191. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

191. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. SPILLWAY GATES, MILNER DAM, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; BLUEPRINT. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

291

158. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

158. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Transit Book #404T, Page 3, #46, Division One). START OF MAIN CANAL SURVEY, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

292

154. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

154. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Surveyor's Transit Book #405T, Page 2, #46 Division One). STATEMENT OF SIGHT-SETTING FOR 1903 SURVEY TO ALIGN SOUTH SIDE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

293

186. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

186. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. DRY CREEK RESERVOIR, CASSIA COUNTY (NOW TWIN FALLS COUNTY); MAP. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

294

157. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

157. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Field Book #360, Page 75, entitled, 'Clay-Seam Cut-Off.' Cross-Reference: ID-15-153). MILNER DAM SURVEY, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

295

177. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company, Bisbee Photo, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

177. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company, Bisbee Photo, September, 1912. Photographer unknown. COTTONWOOD FLUME, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; SOUTH VIEW FROM UPPER SIDE. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

296

152. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

152. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Surveyor's Transit Book #363, Page 1). 1912 CONDITION REPORT OF MILNER DAM AREA, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

297

193. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

193. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. MILNER DAM PROFILE, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; BLUEPRINT. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

298

181. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company. Photographer and ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

181. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company. Photographer and date unknown. POINT SPILL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY; SOUTH VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

299

189. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

189. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ROCK CREEK CROSSING, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; BLUEPRINT. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

300

194. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

194. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. PROFILE AND GATE PLAN, NORTH ISLAND CROSS SECTION OF DAM, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; BLUEPRINT. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

301

192. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

192. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. TOPOGRAPHICAL MAP (DAM DRAWN IN), MILNER SITE, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; RIGHT SIDE OF MAP (LEFT ON ID-15-183). - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

302

185. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

185. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. MILNER DAM CROSS SECTION PLAN, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; BLUEPRINT. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

303

153. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

153. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Field Book #360, Page 74, entitled, 'Clay-Seam Cut-Off.' Cross-Reference: ID-15-157). MILNER DAM SURVEY, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

304

190. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

190. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. GENERAL PLAN OF MILNER DAM TUNNELS, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; BLUEPRINT. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

305

179. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company, Bisbee Photo, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

179. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company, Bisbee Photo, September, 1912. Photographer unknown. VIEW OF LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY; VIEW OF LOW LINE CANAL IN PETE LINK'S FIELD. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

306

178. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company. C. R. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

178. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company. C. R. Savage, Photographer, March, 1905. FIRST FULL WATER OVER MILNER DAM, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; SOUTHWEST VIEW OF SPILLWAY GATES. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

307

155. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

155. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Surveyor's Transit Book #405T, Page 1, #46 Division One). STATEMENT RE: SURVEY ALIGNMENT 3/03, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

308

195. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

195. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. PLAN OF CONSTRUCTION AREA PLANT, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO; BLUEPRINT. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

309

Socio-demographic, health-related and psychosocial correlates of fear of falling and avoidance of activity in community-living older persons who avoid activity due to fear of falling  

PubMed Central

Background Fear of falling and avoidance of activity are common in old age and are suggested to be (public) health problems of equal importance to falls. Earlier studies of correlates of fear of falling and avoidance of activity did hardly differentiate between severe and mild levels of fear of falling and avoidance of activity which may be relevant from clinical point of view. Furthermore, most studies focused only on socio-demographics and/or health-related variables and hardly incorporated an extensive range of potential correlates of fear of falling including psychosocial variables. This study analyzes the univariate and multivariate associations between five socio-demographic, seven health-related and six psychosocial variables and levels of fear of falling and avoidance of activity in older persons who avoid activity due to fear of falling. Methods Cross-sectional study in 540 community-living older people aged ? 70 years with at least mild fear of falling and avoidance of activity. Chi-squares, t-tests and logistics regression analyses were performed to study the associations between the selected correlates and both outcomes. Results Old age, female sex, limitations in activity of daily living, impaired vision, poor perceived health, chronic morbidity, falls, low general self-efficacy, low mastery, loneliness, feelings of anxiety and symptoms of depression were identified as univariate correlates of severe fear of falling and avoidance of activity. Female sex, limitations in activity of daily living and one or more falls in the previous six months correlated independently with severe fear of falling. Higher age and limitations in activity of daily living correlated independently with severe avoidance of activity. Conclusion Psychosocial variables did not contribute independently to the difference between mild and severe fear of falling and to the difference between mild and severe avoidance of activity due to fear of falling. Although knowledge about the unique associations of specific variables with levels of severe fear of falling and avoidance of activity is of interest for theoretical reasons, knowledge of univariate association may also help to specify the concepts for developing interventions and programmes to reduce fear of falling and avoidance of activity in old age, particularly in their early stages of development.

Kempen, Gertrudis IJM; van Haastregt, Jolanda CM; McKee, Kevin J; Delbaere, Kim; Zijlstra, GA Rixt

2009-01-01

310

Quantitative falls risk assessment using the timed up and go test.  

PubMed

Falls are a major problem in older adults worldwide with an estimated 30% of elderly adults over 65 years of age falling each year. The direct and indirect societal costs associated with falls are enormous. A system that could provide an accurate automated assessment of falls risk prior to falling would allow timely intervention and ease the burden on overstretched healthcare systems worldwide. An objective method for assessing falls risk using body-worn kinematic sensors is reported. The gait and balance of 349 community-dwelling elderly adults was assessed using body-worn sensors while each patient performed the "timed up and go" (TUG) test. Patients were also evaluated using the Berg balance scale (BBS). Of the 44 reported parameters derived from body-worn kinematic sensors, 29 provided significant discrimination between patients with a history of falls and those without. Cross-validated estimates of retrospective falls prediction performance using logistic regression models yielded a mean sensitivity of 77.3% and a mean specificity of 75.9%. This compares favorably to the cross-validated performance of logistic regression models based on the time taken to complete the TUG test (manually timed TUG) and the Berg balance score. These models yielded mean sensitivities of 58.0% and 57.8%, respectively, and mean specificities of 64.8% and 64.2%, respectively. Results suggest that this method offers an improvement over two standard falls risk assessments (TUG and BBS) and may have potential for use in supervised assessment of falls risk as part of a longitudinal monitoring protocol. PMID:20923729

Greene, Barry R; O'Donovan, Alan; Romero-Ortuno, Roman; Cogan, Lisa; Scanaill, Cliodhna Ni; Kenny, Rose A

2010-12-01

311

Efficacy Beliefs, Background Variables, and Differentiated Instruction of Israeli Prospective Teachers  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, the authors examined efficacy beliefs and choices of differentiated instructional strategies needed for effective teaching in inclusive classrooms. Participants included 191 Israeli prospective teachers. They responded to a modified form of the Teacher Efficacy Scale (Gibson & Dembo, 1984) and a 59-item instructional strategies scale. Findings revealed that the Personal Teaching Efficacy factor (PTE) was related to

Cheruta Wertheim; Yona Leyser

2002-01-01

312

Principal Self-Efficacy: Relations with Burnout, Job Satisfaction and Motivation to Quit  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to explore relations between principals' self-efficacy, burnout, job satisfaction and principals' motivation to quit. Principal self-efficacy was measured by a recently developed multidimensional scale called the Norwegian Principal Self-Efficacy Scale. Burnout was measured by a modified version of the Maslach Burnout…

Federici, Roger A.; Skaalvik, Einar M.

2012-01-01

313

Model for Evaporation of Freely Falling Droplets.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Results of theoretical investigations concerning the quasistationary evaporation of freely falling droplets in the continuum regime are presented. The mathematical model is based on simultaneous numerical solution of equations governing mass and heat tran...

T. Vesala J. Kukkonen M. Kulmala

1989-01-01

314

APS Forum on Education Newsletter - Fall 2007  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Fall edition of the APS Forum on Education newsletter contains an extensive discussion of teacher preparation resources in ComPADRE, FEd sessions at the 2007 March meeting, and an update of the Gathering Storm.

2008-02-08

315

Void Detection with the Falling Weight Deflectometer.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study evaluated the effectiveness of the falling weight deflectometer (FWD) for determining the presence of voids under concrete pavement slabs at bridge approach locations. It also evaluated the deflection improvement, after the slabs with voids had...

J. P. Donahue

2004-01-01

316

Siena, 1794: History's Most Consequential Meteorite Fall  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the mythos of meteoritics, the fall of stones at L'Aigle in Normandy at 1 p. m. on April 26, 1803, is commonly regarded as the event that turned skeptics into believers and opened the way for the new science. A strong case can be made, however, that the fall of stones at Siena at 7:00 p.m. on June 16, 1794, established the authenticity of meteorite falls and set in motion the reexaminations of entrenched beliefs that led to the founding of the new science. The Siena fall was heralded by the appearance of an extraordinarily high, dark cloud emitting smoke, sparks like rockets, and bolts of unusually slow-moving red lightning. With a tremendous explosion a shower of stones, ranging in weight from a few milligrams to 3 kg, fell southeast of Siena. This was the first meteorite fall to occur in the vicinity of a sizeable European city and the first to be witnessed by so many people, including English visitors, that the fall of the stones from the sky could not be denied. It also was the first fall to be seriously investigated by scholars, at several universities in Italy, who collected eye-witness reports and specimens and formulated hypotheses of origin. Their task was greatly complicated by the timing of the fall which occurred 18 hours after Mt. Vesuvius sprang into full eruption. Some believed that the two events were entirely coincidental; others thought that the stones either were ejecta from the volcano (which lay about 320 km to the southeast of Siena) or had consolidated in the fiery masses of dust and ash expelled by the mountain. No explanations seemed entirely satisfactory, but, in an age when the very possibility of falling stones had been decisively ruled out by savants of the Enlightenment, the well-observed fall at Siena opened a new dialog on this subject. The Siena fall occurred only two months after the publication in Riga and Leipzig of Ernst F. F. Chladni's book On the Origin of Ironmasses in which he concluded from historical records that fragments of iron and stone fall do, indeed, fall from sky. News traveled so slowly in the 18th century that Chladni's book received negative reviews in Germany throughout 1794 and much of 1795 before the first notice of the Siena fall appeared in a Berlin paper in 1796. The same amount of time passed before Chladni's book reached England, but the groundwork for a more tolerant reception of it in that country was laid by travelers returning from Italy in 1794 with their descriptions and their specimens from Siena (including bogus "fallen stones" fabricated for the tourist market). Widespread interest was aroused in 1795 when the Royal Society published an account of the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius by Sir William Hamilton, the English Ambassador at Naples, who included a short discussion of the Siena stones and their possible link with the volcano. Hamilton's article carried the story of the Siena fall to France and Germany. The case for fallen stones was further strengthened when a 56-pound stone fell at 3:30 p.m. on December 13th, 1795, at Wold Cottage in Yorkshire. Early in 1796, Edward King, a Fellow of the Royal Society, published the first book in English on fallen stones. In it, he focused primarily on the Siena event but just as he was finishing his text he received a copy of Chladni's book and quoted from it extensively. King's 36-page book was widely read. It received some bad reviews in England but it immediately prompted one reader to report the fall of a stone [apparently a genuine meteorite] at Pettiswood, Ireland. He had withheld his story for 17 years for fear of ridicule. Now, the climate of opinion had changed and meteoritics already was becoming a new branch of science.

Marvin, U. B.

1995-09-01

317

Effect of free fall on higher plants.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The influence of exposure to the free-fall state on the orientation, morphogenesis, physiology, and radiation response of higher plants is briefly summarized. It is proposed that the duration of the space-flight experiments has been to brief to permit meaningful effects of free fall on general biochemistry, growth, and development to appear. However, two types of significant effect did occur. The first is on differential growth - i.e., tropism and epinasty - resulting from the absence of a normal geostimulus. For these phenomena it is suggested that ground-based experiments with the clinostat would suffice to mimic the effect of the free-fall state. The second is an apparent interaction between the radiation response and some flight condition, yielding an enhanced microspore abortion, a disturbed spindle function, and a stunting of stamen hairs. It is suggested that this apparent interaction may be derived from a shift in the rhythm of the cell cycle, induced by the free fall.

Gordon, S. A.

1973-01-01

318

Fact-File: Fall 1983 Enrollment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tables detail fall 1983 higher education enrollment by type and control of institutions, by student level, and by state. Included are students enrolled in specialized institutions and new institutions not yet classified. (MLW)

Chronicle of Higher Education, 1985

1985-01-01

319

American Chemical Society Fall National Meeting  

Cancer.gov

August 16, 2009 12:00 AM - August 20, 2009 12:00 AM Washington, DC + Add to Outlook Calendar Probe Development in Molecular Imaging and Therapy Print This Page American Chemical Society Fall National Meeting News & Events

320

Interventions to Prevent Falls Among Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Falls consistently rank among the most serious problems facing older persons and cause a tremendous amount of morbidity, mortality,\\u000a and disability (Brown, 1999; Nevitt, 1997; Robbins et al., 1989; Rubenstein, Josephson, & Robbins, 1994; Tinetti, Williams,\\u000a & Mayewski, 1986). At least a third of community-dwelling people aged 65 years and older fall each year (Centers for Disease\\u000a Control and Prevention

Laurence Z. Rubenstein; Judy A. Stevens; Vicky Scott

321

Siena, 1794: History's Most Consequential Meteorite Fall  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the mythos of meteoritics, the fall of stones at L'Aigle in Normandy at 1 p. m. on April 26, 1803, is commonly regarded as the event that turned skeptics into believers and opened the way for the new science. A strong case can be made, however, that the fall of stones at Siena at 7:00 p.m. on June 16,

U. B. Marvin

1995-01-01

322

Fall of skin impedance and bone and joint pain.  

PubMed

Pain is a complex neurophysiological and psychological process associated with various electrodermal phenomena, including Galvanic skin response, a fall of resistance to Galvanic current. Because skin impedance, an alternative current counterpart of direct current resistance, is readily measured and is probably more sensitive and stable in reflecting the state of the skin, the relationship between changes in pain and skin impedance was evaluted in the present study. Baseline skin impedance was stable and reproducible within a short time of less than 1 h and on consecutive days with a coefficient of variation of 1%-4%, but it may vary more widely over a longer period of 1 year. Baseline skin impedance gradually rose with advancing age, and females tended to show higher values than males. A highly significant correlation was noted between the percentage fall in skin impedance in response to strain on the joint, such as standing, bending, squatting, walking on a flat floor, and ascending and descending stairs, and pain scores obtained by a visual rating scale according to the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient test. Measurement of the fall in skin impedance may be a useful index of pain-associated somatic changes for a better understanding of the overall manifestations of pain as a step toward to an objective evalution of pain. PMID:11368303

Fujita, T; Fujii, Y; Okada, S F; Miyauchi, A; Takagi, Y

2001-01-01

323

Evaluation of Accelerometer-Based Fall Detection Algorithms on Real-World Falls  

PubMed Central

Despite extensive preventive efforts, falls continue to be a major source of morbidity and mortality among elderly. Real-time detection of falls and their urgent communication to a telecare center may enable rapid medical assistance, thus increasing the sense of security of the elderly and reducing some of the negative consequences of falls. Many different approaches have been explored to automatically detect a fall using inertial sensors. Although previously published algorithms report high sensitivity (SE) and high specificity (SP), they have usually been tested on simulated falls performed by healthy volunteers. We recently collected acceleration data during a number of real-world falls among a patient population with a high-fall-risk as part of the SensAction-AAL European project. The aim of the present study is to benchmark the performance of thirteen published fall-detection algorithms when they are applied to the database of 29 real-world falls. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first systematic comparison of fall detection algorithms tested on real-world falls. We found that the SP average of the thirteen algorithms, was (mean±std) 83.0%±30.3% (maximum value?=?98%). The SE was considerably lower (SE?=?57.0%±27.3%, maximum value?=?82.8%), much lower than the values obtained on simulated falls. The number of false alarms generated by the algorithms during 1-day monitoring of three representative fallers ranged from 3 to 85. The factors that affect the performance of the published algorithms, when they are applied to the real-world falls, are also discussed. These findings indicate the importance of testing fall-detection algorithms in real-life conditions in order to produce more effective automated alarm systems with higher acceptance. Further, the present results support the idea that a large, shared real-world fall database could, potentially, provide an enhanced understanding of the fall process and the information needed to design and evaluate a high-performance fall detector.

Bagala, Fabio; Becker, Clemens; Cappello, Angelo; Chiari, Lorenzo; Aminian, Kamiar; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Klenk, Jochen

2012-01-01

324

Central and Peripheral Visual Impairment and the Risk of Falls and Falls with Injury  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate central and peripheral visual impairment as independent risk factors for falls and falls with injury among adults. Design Population-based prospective cohort study. Participants A total of 3,203 LALES participants. Methods Baseline presenting binocular central distance acuity was measured and impairment was classified as mild (20/40–20/63), moderate/severe (20/80 or worse). Peripheral visual impairment was classified as mild (?6dBFalls and falls with injury in the past 12 months were assessed by self-report at 4-year follow-up visit. Results Out of 3,203 individuals, 19% reported falls and 10% falls with injury; participants with falls were more likely to: be ? 60 years of age, be female, report lower income, have more than two co-morbidities, report alcohol use, report wearing bifocal glasses and report obesity. Among those who reported falls, 7% had central visual impairment (visual acuity?20/40) compared to 4% who did not report falls; and 49% had peripheral visual impairment (mean deviationfalls (both p-values<.0001). After adjusting for confounders, moderate to severe central and peripheral visual impairment were associated with increased risk for falls (odds ratio 2.36 95% confidence interval 1.02–5.45, p-trend= .04 and odds ratio 1.42 95% confidence interval 1.06–1.91, p-trend= .01, respectively) and with falls with injury (odds ratio 2.76 95% confidence interval 1.10–7.02, p-value= .03, and odds ratio 1.40 95% confidence interval .94–2.05, p-trend= .04, respectively). Conclusion Both central and peripheral visual impairment were independently associated with increased risk for falls and falls with injury in a dose-response manner. Although vision related interventions for preventing falls have mainly focused on correcting central visual impairment, this study suggests that targeting both central and peripheral components may be necessary to reduce rates of falls and falls with injury related to vision loss effectively.

Patino, Cecilia M.; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Azen, Stanley P.; Allison, Jessica Chung; Choudhury, Farzana; Varma, Rohit

2009-01-01

325

30 CFR 56.14110 - Flying or falling materials.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...14110 Flying or falling materials. In areas where flying or falling materials generated from the operation of screens, crushers, or conveyors present a hazard, guards, shields, or other devices that provide protection against such flying or falling...

2013-07-01

326

30 CFR 57.14110 - Flying or falling materials.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...14110 Flying or falling materials. In areas where flying or falling materials generated from the operation of screens, crushers, or conveyors present a hazard, guards, shields, or other devices that provide protection against such flying or falling...

2013-07-01

327

4. VIEW OF SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. VIEW OF SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE TOWER NO. 41, OSPREY NEST ON TOWER TOP. LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Little Falls Tie Line Towers, Near Little Dam Falls on Spokane River, Wellpinit, Stevens County, WA

328

2. VIEW OF WEST ELEVATION OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. VIEW OF WEST ELEVATION OF LITTLE FALLS TIE LINE TOWER NO. 23, OSPREY NEST ON TOWER TOP. LOOKING EAST - Little Falls Tie Line Towers, Near Little Dam Falls on Spokane River, Wellpinit, Stevens County, WA

329

Dance! Don't Fall - preventing falls and promoting exercise at home.  

PubMed

Falling is a serious danger to older adults that is usually only addressed after a person has fallen, when doctors administer clinical tests to determine the patient's risk of falling again. Having the technological capability of performing fall risk assessment tests with a smartphone, the authors set out to design a mobile application that would enable users to monitor their risk themselves and consequently prevent falls from occurring. The authors conducted a literature review and two observation sessions before beginning the iterative design process that resulted in the Dance! Don't Fall (DDF) game, a mobile application that enables users to both monitor their fall risk and actively reduce it through fun and easy exercise. PMID:22942064

Kerwin, Maureen; Nunes, Francisco; Silva, Paula Alexandra

2012-01-01

330

[Locomotive syndrome and frailty. Frailty in patients with fall & fall-related fracture].  

PubMed

Among geriatric syndromes, fall and fall-related fractures are one of the leading causes of the elderly's need for long-term care. Hip fractures are the typical cases. The underlying diseases of locomotive syndrome, such as sarcopenia, musculoskeletal ambulation disorder symptom complex, and osteoporosis, are closely associated with fall and fall-related fractures. From the stand point of frailty, sarcopenia, which is considered the major cause of aging-associated declines in function and reserve across multiple physiologic systems, plays a role in fall and fall-related fractures. The common adverse health outcomes both in locomotive syndrome and frailty, is a decrease in walking function and muscle strength. Understanding the role of the underlying diseases of locomotive syndrome including osteoarthritis, osteoporosis within the frailty cycle is important for the future. PMID:22460508

Harada, Atsushi

2012-04-01

331

9. RENDERING OF PROPOSED FALLS BRIDGE Photocopy of historic photograph ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

9. RENDERING OF PROPOSED FALLS BRIDGE Photocopy of historic photograph (photographer unknown, December 1894) - Falls Bridge, Spanning Schuylkill River, connecting East & West River Drives, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

332

Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 1999  

NSF Publications Database

Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 1999 Detailed Statistical ... and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 1999 Portable Document Format (.pdf) Graduate ...

333

Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 1998  

NSF Publications Database

Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 1998 Detailed Statistical ... and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 1998 Portable Document Format (.pdf) Graduate ...

334

Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 2000  

NSF Publications Database

... Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 2000 Detailed Statistical ... Hypertext Format Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 2000 Portable ...

335

Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 2001  

NSF Publications Database

... Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 2001 Detailed Statistical ... Hypertext Format Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 2001 Portable ...

336

Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 1997  

NSF Publications Database

Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 1997 Detailed Statistical ... Hypertext Format Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 1997 Portable ...

337

Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 1999  

NSF Publications Database

... Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 1999 Detailed Statistical Tables Hypertext Format ... and Engineering: Fall 1999 Portable Document Format (.pdf) Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in ...

338

Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 1996  

NSF Publications Database

... 1996 Hypertext Format Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 1996 ... Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 1996 This report is available in hypertext (.htm ...

339

Fear of falling and quality of life of apparently-healthy elderly individuals from a nigerian population.  

PubMed

Ageing is associated with increased morbidity, increased fear of falling (FOF) and reduced activity. These may consequently impair the quality of life (QOL) of the elderly. Studies from Africa investigating FOF and its relationship with QOL among elderly individuals are rare. This study investigated the prevalence of FOF and QOL of apparently-healthy elderly residents of two Local Government Areas (LGAs) from Anambra State, Nigeria and also determined the relationship between the two variables. Two hundred and sixty-one (131 males and 130 females) volunteering elderly individuals, from three randomly-selected communities from each of the LGAs, participated in this cross-sectional survey. The Modified Fall Efficacy Scale (MFES) and the Short-Form Health Survey 36-item (SF-36) questionnaire were used to evaluate FOF and QOL respectively. Data were analysed using frequency, percentage, mean and standard deviation, Chi-square, Independent t-test, Pearson correlation and multivariate regression analysis statistics. Alpha level was set at 0.05. FOF was markedly prevalent in the population at 23.4 % and the QOL score of 55.27?±?17.28 was just modest. QOL was particularly low in the role limitations due to the physical and emotional problems domains but high in the mental health, social function and bodily pain domains. Significant relationship was found between FOF and all the QOL domains. FOF was present in nearly one of every four elderly individuals in the sample and was related to their QOL. FOF should be routinely investigated in community-dwelling elderly and strategies devised to combat it. PMID:24710949

Akosile, Christopher O; Anukam, Gabriel O; Johnson, Olubusola E; Fabunmi, Ayodeji A; Okoye, Emmanuel C; Iheukwumere, Ngozi; Akinwola, Mojisola O

2014-06-01

340

Occupational ladder fall injuries - United States, 2011.  

PubMed

Falls remain a leading cause of unintentional injury mortality nationwide [corrected].Among workers, approximately 20% of fall injuries involve ladders. Among construction workers, an estimated 81% of fall injuries treated in U.S. emergency departments (EDs) involve a ladder. To fully characterize fatal and nonfatal injuries associated with ladder falls among workers in the United States, CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) analyzed data across multiple surveillance systems: 1) the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI), 2) the Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (SOII), and 3) the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-occupational supplement (NEISS-Work). In 2011, work-related ladder fall injuries (LFIs) resulted in 113 fatalities (0.09 per 100,000 full-time equivalent [FTE] workers), an estimated 15,460 nonfatal injuries reported by employers that involved ?1 days away from work (DAFW), and an estimated 34,000 nonfatal injuries treated in EDs. Rates for nonfatal, work-related, ED-treated LFIs were higher (2.6 per 10,000 FTE) than those for such injuries reported by employers (1.2 per 10,000 FTE). LFIs represent a substantial public health burden of preventable injuries for workers. Because falls are the leading cause of work-related injuries and deaths in construction, NIOSH, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, and the Center for Construction Research and Training are promoting a national campaign to prevent workplace falls. NIOSH is also developing innovative technologies to complement safe ladder use. PMID:24759655

Socias, Christina M; Chaumont Menéndez, Cammie K; Collins, James W; Simeonov, Peter

2014-04-25

341

Interior cavern conditions and salt fall potential  

SciTech Connect

A relatively large number of salt caverns are used for fluid hydrocarbon storage, including an extensive set of facilities in the Gulf Coast salt domes for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Program. Attention is focused on the SPR caverns because of available histories that detail events involving loss and damage of the hanging string casing. The total number of events is limited, making the database statistically sparse. The occurrence of the events is not evenly distributed, with some facilities, and some caverns, more susceptible than others. While not all of these events could be attributed to impacts from salt falls, many did show the evidence of such impacts. As a result, a study has been completed to analyze the potential for salt falls in the SPR storage caverns. In this process, it was also possible to deduce some of the cavern interior conditions. Storage caverns are very large systems in which many factors could possibly play a part in casing damage. In this study, all of the potentially important factors such as salt dome geology, operational details, and material characteristics were considered, with all being logically evaluated and most being determined as secondary in nature. As a result of the study, it appears that a principal factor in determining a propensity for casing damage from salt falls is the creep and fracture characteristics of salt in individual caverns. In addition the fracture depends strongly upon the concentration of impurity particles in the salt. Although direct observation of cavern conditions is not possible, the average impurity concentration and the accumulation of salt fall material can be determined. When this is done, there is a reasonable correlation between the propensity for a cavern to show casing damage events and accumulation of salt fall material. The accumulation volumes of salt fall material can be extremely large, indicating that only a few of the salt falls are large enough to cause impact damage.

Munson, D.E.; Molecke, M.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Myers, R.E. [Strategic Petroleum Reserve, New Orleans, LA (United States)

1998-03-01

342

Falling U-shaped Chain Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Falling U-shaped Chain model simulates the dynamics of a discrete falling chain with total length L and n links. Each link is acted on by the force of gravity mg and by the link-link interaction. A freely falling object is released near the last link for comparison. The surprise is that the acceleration of the last link can be larger than g.   Links in the model are assumed to be uniform rigid rods with mass m and length L/n connected by ideal joints. The first link is attached to a fixed point and the last link is releases a distance D from the fixed point. A small damping coefficient b is included to allow the chain to equilibrate to its hanging position below the fixed point. The Falling U-shaped Chain model is a supplemental simulation for the article "A chain that speeds up, rather than slows, due to collisions: How compression can cause tension " by Anoop Grewal, Phillip Johnson, and Andy Ruina in the American Journal of Physics 79(7), 723-729 (2011) and has been approved by the authors and the American Journal of Physics (AJP) editor. The simulation was developed using the Easy Java Simulations (EJS) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double click the ejs_mech_lagrangian_FallingUShapedChain.jar file to run the program if Java is installed.

Christian, Wolfgang

2011-03-25

343

Prevention of Falls and Fall-Related Injuries in Community-Dwelling Seniors  

PubMed Central

Executive Summary In early August 2007, the Medical Advisory Secretariat began work on the Aging in the Community project, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding healthy aging in the community. The Health System Strategy Division at the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care subsequently asked the secretariat to provide an evidentiary platform for the ministry’s newly released Aging at Home Strategy. After a broad literature review and consultation with experts, the secretariat identified 4 key areas that strongly predict an elderly person’s transition from independent community living to a long-term care home. Evidence-based analyses have been prepared for each of these 4 areas: falls and fall-related injuries, urinary incontinence, dementia, and social isolation. For the first area, falls and fall-related injuries, an economic model is described in a separate report. Please visit the Medical Advisory Secretariat Web site, http://www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/mas_about.html, to review these titles within the Aging in the Community series. Aging in the Community: Summary of Evidence-Based Analyses Prevention of Falls and Fall-Related Injuries in Community-Dwelling Seniors: An Evidence-Based Analysis Behavioural Interventions for Urinary Incontinence in Community-Dwelling Seniors: An Evidence-Based Analysis Caregiver- and Patient-Directed Interventions for Dementia: An Evidence-Based Analysis Social Isolation in Community-Dwelling Seniors: An Evidence-Based Analysis The Falls/Fractures Economic Model in Ontario Residents Aged 65 Years and Over (FEMOR) Objective To identify interventions that may be effective in reducing the probability of an elderly person’s falling and/or sustaining a fall-related injury. Background Although estimates of fall rates vary widely based on the location, age, and living arrangements of the elderly population, it is estimated that each year approximately 30% of community-dwelling individuals aged 65 and older, and 50% of those aged 85 and older will fall. Of those individuals who fall, 12% to 42% will have a fall-related injury. Several meta-analyses and cohort studies have identified falls and fall-related injuries as a strong predictor of admission to a long-term care (LTC) home. It has been shown that the risk of LTC home admission is over 5 times higher in seniors who experienced 2 or more falls without injury, and over 10 times higher in seniors who experienced a fall causing serious injury. Falls result from the interaction of a variety of risk factors that can be both intrinsic and extrinsic. Intrinsic factors are those that pertain to the physical, demographic, and health status of the individual, while extrinsic factors relate to the physical and socio-economic environment. Intrinsic risk factors can be further grouped into psychosocial/demographic risks, medical risks, risks associated with activity level and dependence, and medication risks. Commonly described extrinsic risks are tripping hazards, balance and slip hazards, and vision hazards. Note: It is recognized that the terms “senior” and “elderly” carry a range of meanings for different audiences; this report generally uses the former, but the terms are treated here as essentially interchangeable. Evidence-Based Analysis of Effectiveness Research Question Since many risk factors for falls are modifiable, what interventions (devices, systems, programs) exist that reduce the risk of falls and/or fall-related injuries for community-dwelling seniors? Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria Inclusion Criteria English language; published between January 2000 and September 2007; population of community-dwelling seniors (majority aged 65+); and randomized controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-experimental trials, systematic reviews, or meta-analyses. Exclusion Criteria special populations (e.g., stroke or osteoporosis; however, studies restricted only to women were included); studies only reporting surrogate outcomes; or studies whose outcome cannot be extracted fo

2008-01-01

344

Biodynamics: Why the Wirewalker Doesn't Fall  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

You can never step in the same river twice, goes the old adage of philosophy. An observation on the transitory nature of fluids in motion, this saying also describes the endless variations researchers face when studying human movement. Understanding these biodynamics-why the wirewalker doesn't fall-requires a grasp of the constant fluctuations and fine tunings which maintain balance in the complex, fluid system of human locomotion. Taking a comprehensive approach to the phenomenon of locomotion, Biodynamics: Why the Wirewalker Doesn't Fall integrates physical laws and principles with concepts of fractals, chaos, and randomness. In so doing, it formulates a description of both the large-scale, smooth aspects of locomotion and the more minute, randomized mechanisms of this physiological process. Ideal for beginners in this subject, Biodynamics provides an elegant explanation without assuming the reader's understanding of complex physical principles or mathematical equations. Chapter topics include: * Dimensions, measurement, and scaling * Mechanics and dynamics * Biometrics * Conservation of momentum * Biomechanics * Bioelectricity * Bioenergetics * Fluid mechanics and dynamics * Data analysis * Biostatistics Packed with problem sets, examples, and original line drawings, Biodynamics is an invaluable text for advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and instructors in medicine, biology, physiology, biophysics, and bioengineering.

West, Bruce J.; Griffin, Lori A.

2003-11-01

345

Long-wavelength equation for vertically falling films.  

PubMed

An equation is derived for describing wave evolution on the surface of a vertically falling viscous film. The traditional long-wavelength scaling is replaced by a new scaling to reduce the (We) must be used instead of the Reynolds number (Re) to distinguish between viscous and inertia dominated regimes for vertically falling films. This equation includes viscous dissipation and pressure correction terms that are missing in the existing single evolution equations at the same order. Comparison of the neutral stability curves and growth rates predicted by different models to that of the Orr-Sommerfeld (OS) equation shows that our equation matches with the OS results better than the existing single evolution equations. However, our equation is not free from finite time blowup. Selective regularization leads to a two mode model in flow rate and film thickness. The regularized equation is free from finite time blowup and predicts two families of solitary waves. Numerical simulations of the derived equation and its regularized version in the traveling wave coordinate show the transition of wave structure from regular (periodic) to chaotic profiles. Model predictions on maximum wave amplitude on the low celerity branch show good agreement with experimental data. PMID:15903577

Panga, Mohan K R; Mudunuri, Ramesh R; Balakotaiah, Vemuri

2005-03-01

346

Seniors Falls Investigative Methodology (SFIM): A Systems Approach to the Study of Falls in Seniors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An in-depth understanding of human factors and human error is lacking in current research on seniors' falls. Additional knowledge is needed to understand why seniors are falling. The purpose of this article is to describe the adapting of the Integrated Safety Investigation Methodology (ISIM) (used for investigating transportation and industrial…

Zecevic, Aleksandra A.; Salmoni, Alan W.; Lewko, John H.; Vandervoort, Anthony A.

2007-01-01

347

Effects of a targeted multimodal exercise program incorporating high-speed power training on falls and fracture risk factors in older adults: a community-based randomized controlled trial.  

PubMed

Multimodal exercise programs incorporating traditional progressive resistance training (PRT), weight-bearing impact training and/or balance training are recommended to reduce risk factors for falls and fracture. However, muscle power, or the ability to produce force rapidly, has emerged as a more crucial variable to functional decline than muscle strength or mass. The aim of this 12-month community-based randomized controlled trial, termed Osteo-cise: Strong Bones for Life, was to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of a multimodal exercise program incorporating high-velocity (HV)-PRT, combined with an osteoporosis education and behavioral change program, on bone mineral density (BMD), body composition, muscle strength and functional muscle performance in older adults. Falls incidence was evaluated as a secondary outcome. A total of 162 older adults (mean?±?SD; 67?±?6 years) with risk factors for falls and/or low BMD were randomized to the Osteo-cise program (n?=?81) or a control group (n?=?81). Exercise consisted of fitness center-based HV-PRT, weight-bearing impact and challenging balance/mobility activities performed three times weekly. After 12 months, the Osteo-cise program led to modest but significant net gains in femoral neck and lumbar spine BMD (1.0% to 1.1%, p?falls rate (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.22; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72-2.04). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the Osteo-cise: Strong Bones for Life community-based, multimodal exercise program represents an effective approach to improve multiple musculoskeletal and functional performance measures in older adults with risk factors for falls and/or low BMD. Although this did not translate into a reduction in the rate of falls, further large-scale trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy of this multimodal approach on reducing falls and fracture. PMID:23775701

Gianoudis, Jenny; Bailey, Christine A; Ebeling, Peter R; Nowson, Caryl A; Sanders, Kerrie M; Hill, Keith; Daly, Robin M

2014-01-01

348

Fatal falls from bicycles: a case report.  

PubMed

Though rare occurrences, fatal falls from bicycles are generally linked to the absence of a protective helmet and/or a collision with another vehicle. The case presented here is exceptional due to its circumstances and the consequences of the accident: a fall with no obstacle at a low speed that brought about multiple traumas and the death of a cyclist wearing a protective helmet. Comparing this against a review of cyclist accidentology literature, this case is unique. The increased use of autopsy in terms of forensic accidentology is to be encouraged so as not to misunderstand the possibility of such lesion-based consequences following a simple fall from a bicycle. PMID:23312586

Venara, A; Mauillon, D; Gaudin, A; Rouge-Maillart, C; Jousset, N

2013-03-10

349

Statistical modelling for falls count data.  

PubMed

Falls and their injury outcomes have count distributions that are highly skewed toward the right with clumping at zero, posing analytical challenges. Different modelling approaches have been used in the published literature to describe falls count distributions, often without consideration of the underlying statistical and modelling assumptions. This paper compares the use of modified Poisson and negative binomial (NB) models as alternatives to Poisson (P) regression, for the analysis of fall outcome counts. Four different count-based regression models (P, NB, zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP), zero-inflated negative binomial (ZINB)) were each individually fitted to four separate fall count datasets from Australia, New Zealand and United States. The finite mixtures of P and NB regression models were also compared to the standard NB model. Both analytical (F, Vuong and bootstrap tests) and graphical approaches were used to select and compare models. Simulation studies assessed the size and power of each model fit. This study confirms that falls count distributions are over-dispersed, but not dispersed due to excess zero counts or heterogeneous population. Accordingly, the P model generally provided the poorest fit to all datasets. The fit improved significantly with NB and both zero-inflated models. The fit was also improved with the NB model, compared to finite mixtures of both P and NB regression models. Although there was little difference in fit between NB and ZINB models, in the interests of parsimony it is recommended that future studies involving modelling of falls count data routinely use the NB models in preference to the P or ZINB or finite mixture distribution. The fact that these conclusions apply across four separate datasets from four different samples of older people participating in studies of different methodology, adds strength to this general guiding principle. PMID:20159058

Ullah, Shahid; Finch, Caroline F; Day, Lesley

2010-03-01

350

Risk factors responsible for patients' falls.  

PubMed

The study determined intrinsic factors which contributed to the falls of adults hospitalized in a general hospital during 1987-88. Two hundred and fourteen patients were studied in two groups. Group A consisted of 108 patients who fell during their hospitalization and control Group B consisted of 106 patients with the same characteristics also hospitalized during the same period who did not fall. Of the 23 variables which have been analyzed by the multivariate logistic regression method, seven present statistically significant incidence and increased risk of patients' falls: (1) gender: the number of accidents occurring among male patients was higher than that among females (p = 0.0022); (2) age: the majority of accidents occurred in the 65 greater than or equal to years old age group (p = 0.00426); (3) general pathological conditions: mostly patients with cardiac problems (p = 0.0062); (4) neoplasms (p = 0.0334); (5) anaemias (p = 0.0128); (6) post-operative conditions (p = 0.0063); and the taking of hypnotic/tranquilizer drugs (p = 0.0486). Other significant findings were: the highest incidence of falls occurred during the first 4 days of the patients' admission to hospital and most during the early morning hours (5-6 am). Injuries incurred were bruises (32.4%), minor injuries (24%), major injuries (16.7%) and fractures (10.2%). The high correlation between patients' falls and (1) specific diseases, namely neoplasms, anaemias, cardiac and post-operative conditions and (2) the taking of hypnotic/tranquilizer drugs are risk factors in relation to patients' falls in general hospitals. PMID:1641531

Plati, C; Lanara, V; Mantas, J

1992-01-01

351

A model for falling-tone chorus  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Motivated by the fact that geomagnetic field inhomogeneity is weak close to the chorus generation region and the observational evidence that falling-tone chorus tend to have large oblique angles of propagation, we propose that falling-tone chorus start as a marginally unstable mode. The marginally unstable mode requires the presence of a relatively large damping, which has its origins in the Landau damping of oblique waves in this collisionless environment. A marginally unstable mode produces phase-space structures that release energy and produce wave chirping. We show that the present model produces results in reasonable agreement with observations.

Soto-Chavez, A. R.; Wang, G.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fu, G. Y.; Smith, H. M.

2014-03-01

352

Path transition of freely falling thin disks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The free falling motions of thin circular disks in still water were investigated experimentally. All six degrees of freedom of a falling disk were determined by a stereoscopic vision method. For the disk of small dimensionless moment of inertia (I* < 6.0 × 10-3), three types of motions were identified, including a planar zigzag one and two newly discoveried motions. The two new motion both have non-planar trajectory and continous rotation about the disk's symmetry axis. Flow visualizations were also carried out to show the wake structures with different types of motions.

Zhong, H.-J.; Lee, C.-B.

2009-12-01

353

Flexible sheets falling in an inviscid fluid  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use inviscid simulations to study falling flexible sheets in the two-parameter space of sheet density and bending rigidity. The basic behavior is a repeated series of accelerations to a critical speed at which the sheet flexes and rapidly decelerates, shedding large vortices. The maximum and average speeds of the sheet are closely related to the critical flutter speed. The sheet trajectories also show persistent circling, quasiperiodic flapping, and more complex repeated patterns. For small bending rigidity, the motion becomes less regular. At intermediate bending rigidity, trajectories show a well-defined falling angle relative to the vertical. For larger sheet density and bending rigidity, the overall motion is more horizontal.

Alben, Silas

2010-06-01

354

Public events at Fall Meeting 2012  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Three much-anticipated events at Fall Meeting are AGU's family science programs, which take place the Sunday before Fall Meeting begins. Beginning at noon on 2 December, the public lecture will be given by Michael Meyer, John Grotzinger, and Rebecca Williams. These three NASA scientists are working with the rover Curiosity, which is currently exploring Mars. They will engage the public in a discussion of Mars exploration and the latest activities of the most sophisticated explorer ever sent to another planet. The panelists will discuss the hopes and excitement of exploring Mars through a robot's eyes, nose, taste, and touch.

Holm Adamec, Bethany

2012-11-01

355

Fall Meeting Abstracts Set New Record  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

When the dust had settled after the Fall Meeting abstract deadline on September 10, a new record was set: 4,604 abstracts had been received for the San Francisco meeting. This is a 12% increase over last year, making the 1992 meeting the largest AGU meeting ever held!This follows the success of the AGU Spring Meeting in Montreal, which also broke records for the number of presentations and attendees at the annual spring event. We expect 6,000 people to attend this year's Fall Meeting, to be held December 7-11. There will be 400 scientific sessions as well as 120 exhibitors on hand.

Weaver, Brenda

356

Fall Enrollment in Postsecondary Institutions, 1996  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This report, released December 8 by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), provides detailed information about students enrolled in degree-granting postsecondary institutions in the United States for the fall term of 1996. The report presents data in 26 tables and figures, and provides a summary of findings in five major sections: Characteristics of Enrolled Students, Types of Institutions Attended, Attendance Status, Changes in Enrollment: 1992-98, and Enrollment by State. The data are from the Fall Enrollment survey, a component of the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) of the US Department of Education.

357

Predictive Power of the Sources of Primary School Students' Self-Efficacy Beliefs on Their Self-Efficacy Beliefs for Learning and Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to reveal the extent to which the sources of 6th- 8th grade students' self-efficacy beliefs predict their self-efficacy beliefs for learning and performance. The study is correlational and was conducted on a total of 1049 students during the fall term of the educational year 2010-2011. The data of the study were…

Arslan, Ali

2012-01-01

358

25. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS FROM UPSTREAM LOOKING TOWARD ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

25. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS FROM UPSTREAM LOOKING TOWARD THE WEST (DAM-TENDER RICHARD CARL ADJUSTING THE GATES TO ALLOW 3400 CFS THROUGH). - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

359

Falls among the elderly: key is prevention, not detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Falls at home among the elderly are frequent and costly occurrences. Timely responses to falls are possible when initiated by the use of Personal Emergency Response Systems (PERS). More work is needed, however, in preventing these falls from occurring. Means to prevent falls among the elderly include using higher technology such as telehealth systems and lower technology such as home

Audrey Kinsella

2010-01-01

360

118. COTTONWOOD CREEK SPILL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

118. COTTONWOOD CREEK SPILL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; WEST VIEW OF GATES ON HIGH LINE CANAL. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

361

129. COTTONWOOD CREEK SIPHON, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

129. COTTONWOOD CREEK SIPHON, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; OUTLET SIDE OF SIPHON UNDER CANAL. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

362

90. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

90. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF FILER, IDAHO; CLOSE-UP OF GATES. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

363

110. ROCK CREEK SIPHON, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

110. ROCK CREEK SIPHON, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; INLET SIDE WEST VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

364

28. VIEW FROM IMMEDIATELY DOWNSTREAM OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

28. VIEW FROM IMMEDIATELY DOWNSTREAM OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS WITH CANAL BRIDGE IN DISTANCE. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

365

93. ROCK CREEK SIPHON, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

93. ROCK CREEK SIPHON, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; OVERALL NORTHEAST VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

366

113. ROCK CREEK SIPHON LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

113. ROCK CREEK SIPHON LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY IDAHO; CLOSE-UP OF INLET SIDE OF SIPHON, NORTHWEST VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

367

115. ROCK CREEK SIPHON LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

115. ROCK CREEK SIPHON LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY IDAHO; WEST VIEW OF SIPHON CROSSING ROCK CREEK. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

368

104. DRY CREEK OUTLET (SPILL), TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

104. DRY CREEK OUTLET (SPILL), TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; OUTLET FOR MURTAUGH LAKE, SOUTHEAST VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

369

103. DRY CREEK SPILL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF MURTAUGH, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

103. DRY CREEK SPILL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; INLET SIDE TO DRY CREEK, SOUTH VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

370

109. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

109. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF FILER, IDAHO; OVERALL VIEW LOOKING WEST. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

371

94. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

94. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY SOUTH OF FILER, IDAHO; CLOSE-UP OF GATES FROM THE CANAL SIDE. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

372

91. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

91. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF FILER, IDAHO; NORTHEAST VIEW OF CANAL AND GATES. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

373

121. MCMULLEN CREEK DRAW, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

121. MCMULLEN CREEK DRAW, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; OUTLET SIDE OF CREEK, SOUTH VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

374

122. MCMULLEN CREEK, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

122. MCMULLEN CREEK, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; INLET SIDE OF THE CREEK, ENTRANCE INTO THE HIGH LINE CANAL, SOUTH VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

375

89. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

89. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF FILER, IDAHO; OUTLET SIDE OF CANAL, SOUTHWEST VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

376

101. DRY CREEK SPILL, MURTAUGH LAKE, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

101. DRY CREEK SPILL, MURTAUGH LAKE, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; NORTHEAST VIEW OF DRY CREEK OUTLET. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

377

114. ROCK CREEK SIPHON LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

114. ROCK CREEK SIPHON LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY IDAHO; OVERALL VIEW, WEST OF INLET SIDE. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

378

106. DRY CREEK SPILL, MURTAUGH LAKE, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

106. DRY CREEK SPILL, MURTAUGH LAKE, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; CLOSE-UP OF GATES, NORTHWEST VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

379

117. COTTONWOOD CREEK SPILL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

117. COTTONWOOD CREEK SPILL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; CLOSE-UP OF OUTLET SIDE OF SPILL, SOUTH VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

380

126. COTTONWOOD CREEK SIPHON, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

126. COTTONWOOD CREEK SIPHON, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; CLOSE-UP OF OUTLET SIDE OF SIPHON, SOUTH VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

381

119. COTTONWOOD CREEK SIPHON, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

119. COTTONWOOD CREEK SIPHON, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; INLET SIDE OF COTTONWOOD CREEK, SOUTH VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

382

116. ROCK CREEK SIPHON LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

116. ROCK CREEK SIPHON LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY IDAHO; CLOSE-UP OF OUTLET, DIVERSION SPILL IN BACKGROUND, WEST VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

383

112. ROCK CREEK SIPHON LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

112. ROCK CREEK SIPHON LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY IDAHO; OUTLET SIDE, EAST VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

384

88. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

88. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF FILER, IDAHO; WEST VIEW OF CANAL AND GATES. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

385

105. MURTAUGH LAKE, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

105. MURTAUGH LAKE, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; NORTHWEST VIEW OF LAKE AND HEADGATES. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

386

111. ROCK CREEK SIPHON LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

111. ROCK CREEK SIPHON LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY IDAHO; OVERALL VIEW OF SIPHON, EAST VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

387

95. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

95. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY SOUTH OF FILER, IDAHO; OVERALL VIEW LOOKING EAST. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

388

124. MCMULLEN CREEK HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

124. MCMULLEN CREEK HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; OVERALL SOUTH VIEW OF DRAW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

389

120. COTTONWOOD CUT AREA, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

120. COTTONWOOD CUT AREA, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; OVERALL VIEW OF THE COTTONWOOD CREEK DRAW, SOUTH VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

390

92. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

92. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY SOUTH OF FILER, IDAHO; CLOSE-UP OF OUTLET SIDE OF GATES, SOUTH VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

391

96. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

96. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY SOUTH OF FILER, IDAHO; OUTLET SIDE OF CEDAR DRAW, WEST VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

392

8. BRIDGEWORK PLANKING FROM EAST SIDE WITH TWIN FALLS MAIN ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

8. BRIDGEWORK PLANKING FROM EAST SIDE WITH TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS IN DISTANCE; LOOKING WEST. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

393

102. MURTAUGH LAKE HEADGATES, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF MURTAUGH, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

102. MURTAUGH LAKE HEADGATES, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; LAKE SIDE OF HEADGATES, NORTHWEST VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

394

123. MCMULLEN CREEK, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

123. MCMULLEN CREEK, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; SOUTH VIEW OF THE CREEK EMPTYING INTO THE HIGH LINE CANAL. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

395

Fall detection of elderly through floor vibrations and sound  

Microsoft Academic Search

Falls are very prevalent among the elderly especially in their home. The statistics show that approximately one in every three adults 65 years old or older falls each year. Almost 30% of those falls result in serious injuries. Studies have shown that the medical outcome of a fall is largely dependent upon the response and rescue time. Therefore, reliable and

Dima Litvak; Yaniv Zigel; Israel Gannot

2008-01-01

396

Towards automatic detection of falls using wireless sensors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Accurate detection of falls leading to injury is essential for providing timely medical assistance. In this paper, we describe a wireless sensor network system for automatic fall detection. To detect falls, we use a combination of a body- worn triaxial accelerometer with motion detectors placed in the monitored area. While accelerometer provides information about the body motion during a fall,

Soundararajan Srinivasan; Jun Han; Dhananjay Lal; Aca Gacic

2007-01-01

397

Approaches and principles of fall detection for elderly and patient  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fall detection for elderly and patient has been an active research topic due to that the healthcare industry has a big demand for products and technology of fall detection. This paper gives a survey of fall detection for elderly and patient, focusing on identifying approaches and principles of the existing fall detection methods. To properly build the classification tree of

Xinguo Yu

2008-01-01

398

A wearable system for pre-impact fall detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Unique features of body segment kinematics in falls and activities of daily living (ADL) are applied to make automatic detection of a fall in its descending phase, prior to impact, possible. Fall-related injuries can thus be prevented or reduced by deploying fall impact reduction systems, such as an inflatable airbag for hip protection, before the impact. In this application, the

M. N. Nyan; Francis E. H. Tay; E. Murugasu

2008-01-01

399

Development of a Fall Detecting System for the Elderly Residents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Accidental falls are common causes of serious injury and health threats in the elder population. To deliver adequate medical support, the robust and immediate falls detection is important. Since the fall detection in the elderly remains a major challenge in the public health domain, effective fall-detection will provide urgent support and dramatically reduce the cost of medical care. In this

Chia-Chi Wang; Chin-Yen Chiang; Po-Yen Lin; Yi-Chieh Chou; I-Ting Kuo; Chih-Ning Huang; Chia-Tai Chan

2008-01-01

400

Thoughts on effective falls prevention intervention on a population basis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevention of accidental injury associated with falls in older people is a public health target in many countries. Older people make up a large and increasing percentage of the population. As people grow older, they are at increasing risk of falling and suffering injury from falling. Falls are not an inevitable result of ageing, but they are the most

Dawn A. Skelton; Chris J. Todd

2005-01-01

401

Career Decision Self-Efficacy among Turkish Undergraduate Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate the career decision-making self-efficacy in a sample of 356 Turkish undergraduate students. Method: With this purpose, 356 (138 females; 218 males) Turkish undergraduate students aged 17-24 completed a Turkish-translated version of Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (CDSE-SF) to…

Isik, Erkan

2010-01-01

402

Attributional Style and Self-Efficacy in Singaporean Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This investigation examined the relationship between adolescent students' attributional style and their perceived academic self-efficacy using the Children's Attributional Style Questionnaire (CASQ) (Seligman et al., 1984) and Multidimensional Scales of Perceived Self Efficacy (Bandura, 1989). Attributional style, defined as the way in which…

Yeo, Lay See; Tan, Kayce

2012-01-01

403

Assessing Efficacy and Importance of Career Counseling Competencies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Uses social cognitive career theory as conceptual framework for examining self-efficacy. Participants completed a version of the Career Counseling Self-Efficacy Scale to determine generalizability of original findings to practicing school counselors. Suggests that in-service training to help change counselors' attitudes towards the importance of…

Perrone, Kristin M.; Perrone, Philip A.; Chan, Fong; Thomas, Kenneth R.

2000-01-01

404

Perfectionism and Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the relationship between perfectionism and career decision-making self-efficacy. Participants completed the Almost Perfect Scale-Revised (R. B. Slaney, K. G. Rice, M. Mobley, J. Trippi, & J. S. Ashby, 2001) and the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy-Short Form (N. E. Betz, K. L. Klein, & K. M. Taylor, 1996). Adaptive…

Ganske, Kathryn H.; Ashby, Jeffrey S.

2007-01-01

405

"The balancing act"-- Licensed practical nurse experiences of falls and fall prevention: a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background Falls are common in old age and may have serious consequences. There are many strategies to predict and prevent falls from occurring in long-term care and hospitals. The aim of this study was to describe licensed practical nurse experiences of predicting and preventing further falls when working with patients who had experienced a fall-related fracture. Licensed practical nurses are the main caretakers that work most closely with the patients. Methods A qualitative study of focus groups interviews and field observations was done. 15 licensed practical nurses from a rehabilitation ward and an acute ward in a hospital in northern Sweden were interviewed. Content was analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results The result of the licensed practical nurse thoughts and experiences about risk of falling and fall prevention work is represented in one theme, “the balancing act”. The theme includes three categories: “the right to decide”, “the constant watch”, and “the ongoing negotiation” as well as nine subcategories. The analysis showed similarities and differences between rehabilitation and acute wards. At both wards it was a core strategy in the licensed practical nurse work to always be ready and to pay attention to patients’ appearance and behavior. At the rehabilitation ward, it was an explicit working task to judge the patients’ risk of falling and to be active to prevent falls. At the acute ward, the words “risk of falling” were not used and fall prevention were not discussed; instead the licensed practical nurses used for example “dizzy and pale”. The results also indicated differences in components that facilitate workplace learning and knowledge transfer. Conclusions Differences between the wards are most probably rooted in organizational differences. When it is expected by the leadership, licensed practical nurses can express patient risk of falling, share their observations with others, and take actions to prevent falls. The climate and the structure of the ward are essential if licensed practical nurses are to be encouraged to routinely consider risk of falling and implement risk reduction strategies.

2012-01-01

406

Improving staff reports of falls in assisted living.  

PubMed

This study examined falls data reported by staff to (a) describe characteristics of falls in this population and (b) analyze the quality and utility of the data available from incident reports (IRs) to improve fall prevention. Data from 34 incident reports were analyzed. Descriptive and frequency analyses were conducted to describe fall characteristics, use of assistive devices, high-risk medication use, and prevalence of omitted data on IRs. Thirty-four falls occurred among 15 residents (age, M = 84 years). More than half resulted in injury. Significant omissions of data were noted in the IRs, which may have limited full analysis of fall events and the ability to communicate about health outcomes of these events and the prevention of subsequent falls. This study provides data about falls in assisted living and recommendations for enhanced data collection to support the monitoring of falls risk and the prevention of future falls. PMID:23983004

Silva-Smith, Amy L; Kluge, Mary Ann; LeCompte, Michelle; Snook, Alison

2013-11-01

407

The Relationships between University Students' Chemistry Laboratory Anxiety, Attitudes, and Self-Efficacy Beliefs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study is to examine the relationships between chemistry laboratory anxiety, chemistry attitudes, and self-efficacy. Participants were 395 university students. Participants completed the Chemistry Laboratory Anxiety Scale, the Chemistry Attitudes Scale, and the Self-efficacy Scale. Results showed that chemistry laboratory anxiety…

Kurbanoglu, N. Izzet; Akin, Ahmet

2010-01-01

408

Teaching Johnny not to fall for phish  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phishing attacks exploit users' inability to distinguish legitimate websites from fake ones. Strategies for combating phishing include: prevention and detection of phishing scams, tools to help users identify phishing web sites, and training users not to fall for phish. While a great deal of effort has been devoted to the first two approaches, little research has been done in the

Ponnurangam Kumaraguru; Steve Sheng; Alessandro Acquisti; Lorrie Faith Cranor; Jason I. Hong

2010-01-01

409

West Tennessee ACEI 2006 Fall Conference  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the West Tennessee ACEI 2006 Fall Conference held at Union University in Jackson, Tennessee on October 14, 2006. The conference theme, Turning the Pages: A Focus on Children's Literature, was emphasized throughout the day. During the conference, the early childhood classroom teachers, preservice teachers, and administrators…

Clifford, Anna; Hailey, Beth

2007-01-01

410

Seneca Falls: A Women's Demonstration for Peace.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A reporter gives her personal impressions of the Seneca Falls Women's Encampment for a Future of Peace and Justice and the march by members of the encampment to the Seneca Army Depot. Confrontations between the demonstrators and conservative counterdemonstrators and the army response are also covered. (IS)

Khan, Billie

1984-01-01

411

Hospitalized fall injuries and race in California  

PubMed Central

Objective—To compare risks for falls and their consequences among four major race/ethnic groups in California. Methods—Cases are 104 902 hospital discharges of California residents with a same level fall injury as the principal external cause of injury. Included are all discharges for a first hospitalization for a given injury in any California non-federal hospital from 1995–97. Analysis includes crude and age standardized rates to describe risks, diagnoses, and consequences. Results—Rates per 100 000 for same level hospitalized fall injuries for whites (161) are distinctively higher than for blacks (64), Hispanics (43), and Asian/Pacific Islanders (35). Whites are more likely to have a fracture diagnosis and to be discharged to long term care rather than home, suggesting a poorer outcome or greater severity. Same level falls absorb a large proportion of hospital resources directed to the treatment of injuries. Conclusions—In a four way comparison among race/ethnic groups, whites are distinguished by their high incidence, rates of fracture, and unfavorable discharge status. Prevention, particularly aimed at whites, has potential to improve health and save treatment resources.

Ellis, A; Trent, R

2001-01-01

412

Faculty Workload: Community Colleges, Fall 1975.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report organizes fall, 1975 registration data for the seven Hawaii community colleges in tabular form. The focus of the report is on faculty workload in terms of the classroom situation: credits and classes taught, student credit hours generated, and class size. There was a general increase in the number of courses, classes, credit hours,…

Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Community Coll. System.

413

Evaluation of Fall 1999 Online Courses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is a study of the demographic and academic traits of fall 1999 online students taking electronic courses through Santa Barbara City College (SBCC) (California). The study aims to compare online students with SBCC students and peer students taking the on-campus versions of the electronic courses at SBCC. This evaluation examines the…

Serban, Andreea M.

414

29 CFR 1926.1423 - Fall protection.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...be at least 12 inches wide. (ii) Guardrails, railings and other permanent fall...supported by pendant ropes or bars if the guardrails/railings/attachments could be snagged...disassembled). (D) Where not prohibited, guardrails or railings may be of any height...

2013-07-01

415

Plan-Ahead Guide to Fall 1992.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A plan-ahead guide offers teaching suggestions for fall 1992. There are three sections: the Columbus quincentenary (products and activities reflecting various historical and cultural perspectives); the 1992 election (teaching and resource suggestions); and international space year (resources and materials on space exploration). (SM)

Dillon, Doris; And Others

1992-01-01

416

Southwestern College Student Profile, Fall 1990.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intended to inform the governing board, administration, faculty and staff about the general characteristics of students served by Southwestern College (SWC), this annual student profile examines a number of demographic and educational characteristics of fall 1990 students. First, introductory sections provide an overview of demographic and…

Southwestern Coll., Chula Vista, CA.

417

Ethnic Student Survey--Fall 1995.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In fall 1995, Illinois' Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC) conducted a survey of a random sample of 1,447 current students to gather information on their attitudes and goals and to compare responses for Asian, Black, Hispanic, and White students. Completed surveys were received from 433 students, including 53 Asians, 73 Blacks, 127 Hispanics,…

Moraine Valley Community College., Palos Hills, IL. Office of Institutional Research.

418

External Resource: Science NetLinks: Falling  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The goal of this activity is to have students explore the role of gravity in falling and to encourage learners/students to view gravity as a force, rather than just a natural occurrence. The term gravity may interfere with students' understanding because

1900-01-01

419

Motion of spheres falling through fluids  

Microsoft Academic Search

Motion of spheres falling through fluids is a classic problem in fluid mechanics. The problem is solved for steady motion and other special cases such as for small and large Reynolds numbers, but not yet for transitional flow motion because of the complicated drag law. Recently, a series approximation for the transitional motion at zero initial velocity was proposed by

Junke Guo

2011-01-01

420

APS Forum on Education Newsletter - Fall 2008  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The fall 2008 edition of the Forum on Education newsletter contains a discussion of the new PhysTEC program at the University of Minnesota by Jon Anderson, a discussion of intercity teaching by Richard Steinberg, and a discussion of some less well known pressure forcing out of field physics teaching by Marty Alderman.

2009-01-05

421

A disorder of falling in love  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is suggested that falling in love may have some characteristics in common with the affective disorders, and in some circumstances may require skilled clinical management. Case material is presented by way of exemplifying some of the characteristics of the disorder.

Paul Brown; Pat Lloyd

1986-01-01

422

Hormonal changes when falling in love  

Microsoft Academic Search

To fall in love is the first step in pair formation in humans and is a complex process which only recently has become the object of neuroscientific investigation. The little information available in this field prompted us to measure the levels of some pituitary, adrenal and gonadal hormones in a group of 24 subjects of both sexes who had recently

Donatella Marazziti; Domenico Canale

2004-01-01

423

Community Needs Assessment Survey Report, Fall 1990.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools self-study process for reaffirmation of accreditation, Gainesville College (GC) conducted its second decennial needs assessment survey in fall 1990 to obtain data to assist in college planning and program improvement. Separate survey instruments were developed to gather data from…

Gainesville Coll., GA. Office of Planning and Institutional Research.

424

Patient Fall Detection using Support Vector Machines  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a novel implementation of a patient fall detection system that may be used for patient activity recognition and emergency treatment. Sensors equipped with accelerometers are attached on the body of the patients and transmit patient movement data wirelessly to the monitoring unit. The methodology of support Vector Machines is used for precise classification of the acquired data

Charalampos Doukas; Ilias Maglogiannis; Philippos Tragas; Dimitris Liapis; Gregory Yovanof

2007-01-01

425

Wearable Sensors for Reliable Fall Detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Unintentional falls are a common cause of severe injury in the elderly population. By introducing small, non-invasive sensor motes in conjunction with a wireless network, the Ivy Project aims to provide a path towards more independent living for the elderly. Using a small device worn on the waist and a network of fixed motes in the home environment, we can

Jay Chen; Karric Kwong; Dennis Chang; Jerry Luk; Ruzena Bajcsy

2005-01-01

426

Fall Meeting Abstracts Set New Record  

Microsoft Academic Search

When the dust had settled after the Fall Meeting abstract deadline on September 10, a new record was set: 4,604 abstracts had been received for the San Francisco meeting. This is a 12% increase over last year, making the 1992 meeting the largest AGU meeting ever held!This follows the success of the AGU Spring Meeting in Montreal, which also broke

Brenda Weaver

1992-01-01

427

PLCO News, Fall/Winter 1998  

Cancer.gov

PLCO News, Fall/Winter 1998 Volume 2, Number 1 ----- Spring/Summer 1999 Trial Update Enrollment goal: 148,000 Total enrollment (as of March 15, 1999): 121,027 Men enrolled: 62,409 Women enrolled: 58,618 Number of people enrolled

428

OATYC Journal, Fall 1990-Spring 1991.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Published by the Ohio Association of Two-Year Colleges, the "OATYC Journal" is designed to provide a medium for sharing concepts, methods, and findings relevant to the classroom, and an open forum for the discussion and review of problems. This 16th volume of the journal, consisting of the fall 1990 and spring 1991 issues, contains the following…

Fullen, Jim, Ed.

1991-01-01

429

Cohort Analysis, Fall 1993 New Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In October 1996, Illinois' Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC) conducted a longitudinal study of the characteristics of and outcomes experienced by students who entered the college for the first time in fall 1993, gathering data on retention rates, average attempted and earned cumulative hours, and graduation rates over 3 years. Of the 3,146…

Moraine Valley Community College., Palos Hills, IL. Office of Institutional Research.

430

Grade Distribution. Community Colleges, Fall 1978.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data on the grade point ratios (GPR's) and the distribution of grades earned were gathered and analyzed for all students enrolled in credit courses at the seven Hawaii community colleges during Fall 1978. These data indicate that the average assigned grade was 2.7, and that the credits-earned rate was 71%. As in previous semesters, the…

Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Community Coll. System.

431

PLCO News, Fall/Winter 1998  

Cancer.gov

PLCO News, Fall/Winter 1998 Volume 3, Number 1 ----- Spring/Summer 2000 Trial Update Enrollment goal: 148,000 Total enrollment (as of December 29, 1999): 138,847 Men enrolled: 69,990 Women enrolled: 68,857 Number of people enrolled

432

Lessons Learned, Operation Niagara/Cedar Falls.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The wide spread terrorism in the SAIGON-CHOLON Area perpetrated the conception of Operation NIAGARA/CEDAR FALLS, one of the largest, most complex and one of the most effective operations in the VIETNAM WAR. Intelligence reports fed to MACJ2 indicated that...

1967-01-01

433

Fatal falls from height in taiwan.  

PubMed

This study conducts an investigation of fatal falls from height, examines gender differences, and compares our findings with those of Western countries. We review deaths in Taiwan caused by falls from height that underwent forensic autopsy from 1994 to 2010. Among the examined cases, 182 were suicide, 156 were accidents, and 18 were homicides. Men who fell from greater heights had a lower probability of fatal head trauma (p = 0.045), and women exhibited a lower fatal head trauma rate when falling from heights of between 10 and 25 m in accident group (p = 0.003). There was no significant difference between cases of falling from greater and lower heights within the suicide group (p = 0.834). Psychiatric illness was only reported in 20.3% and 28.8% cases in suicide and accident groups. Only in male cases was the use of psychotropic substances higher in the suicide groups than in the accident groups (p = 0.047). PMID:24738880

Peng, Tzu-An; Lee, Chien-Chang; Lin, Jasper Chia-Cheng; Shun, Chia-Tung; Shaw, Kai-Ping; Weng, Te I

2014-07-01

434

Anode Fall Formation in a Hall Thruster  

SciTech Connect

As was reported in our previous work, accurate, nondisturbing near-anode measurements of the plasma density, electron temperature, and plasma potential performed with biased and emissive probes allowed the first experimental identification of both electron-repelling (negative anode fall) and electron-attracting (positive anode fall) anode sheaths in Hall thrusters. An interesting new phenomenon revealed by the probe measurements is that the anode fall changes from positive to negative upon removal of the dielectric coating, which appears on the anode surface during the course of Hall thruster operation. As reported in the present work, energy dispersion spectroscopy analysis of the chemical composition of the anode dielectric coating indicates that the coating layer consists essentially of an oxide of the anode material (stainless steel). However, it is still unclear how oxygen gets into the thruster channel. Most importantly, possible mechanisms of anode fall formation in a Hall thruster with a clean and a coated anodes are analyzed in this work; practical implication of understanding the general structure of the electron-attracting anode sheath in the case of a coated anode is also discussed.

Leonid A. Dorf; Yevgeny F. Raitses; Artem N. Smirnov; Nathaniel J. Fisch

2004-06-29

435

Artists Paint ... Fall: Grades K-1  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Artists often paint the different seasonal activities people engage in and the way the world looks as changes take place. The weather for each of the four seasons is different. Farmers plant crops and gardens in the spring and harvest their crops in the fall, just like "The Harvesters" by Pieter Bruegel the Elder. To begin, children will observe…

Herberholz, Barbara

2012-01-01

436

Does Fall History Influence Residential Adjustments?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose of the study: To determine whether reported falls at baseline are associated with an older adult's decision to make a residential adjustment (RA) and the type of adjustment made in the subsequent 2 years. Design and Methods: Observations (n = 25,036) were from the Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative sample of…

Leland, Natalie; Porell, Frank; Murphy, Susan L.

2011-01-01

437

Myths and Misconceptions in Fall Protection  

SciTech Connect

Since 1973, when OSHA CFRs 1910 and 1926 began to influence the workplace, confusion about the interpretation of the standards has been a problem and fall protection issues are among them. This confusion is verified by the issuance of 351 (as of 11/25/05) Standard Interpretations issued by OSHA in response to formally submitted questions asking for clarification. Over the years, many workers and too many ES&H Professionals have become 'self-interpreters', reaching conclusions that do not conform to either the Standards or the published Interpretations. One conclusion that has been reached by the author is that many ES&H Professionals are either not aware of, or do not pay attention to the Standard Interpretations issued by OSHA, or the State OSHA interpretation mechanism, whoever has jurisdiction. If you fall in this category, you are doing your organization or clients a disservice and are not providing them with the best information available. Several myths and/or misconceptions have been promulgated to the point that they become accepted fact, until an incident occurs and OSHA becomes involved. For example, one very pervasive myth is that you are in compliance as long as you maintain a distance of 6 feet from the edge. No such carte blanche rule exists. In this presentation, this myth and several other common myths/misconceptions will be discussed. This presentation is focused only on Federal OSHA CFR1910 Subpart D--Walking-Working Surfaces, CFR1926 Subpart M--Fall Protection and the Fall Protection Standard Interpretation Letters. This presentation does not cover steel erection, aerial lifts and other fall protection issues. Your regulations will probably be different than those presented if you are operating under a State plan.

Epp, R J

2006-02-23

438

1989 Federal Nursing Service Award Winner. Reducing patient falls: a research-based comprehensive fall prevention program.  

PubMed

This article describes the development of a fall risk assessment tool for hospitalized patients that became the key component in a fall prevention program at one medical center. The characteristics of 102 patients who fell were compared with those of 102 patients matched by age and length of stay who did not fall. The statistically significant differences found between these two groups of patients were used to develop a fall risk assessment tool that was further tested on 334 patients for reliability and validity. This assessment tool was used in conjunction with a standardized nursing care plan, fall risk alert signs and stickers, a written nursing evaluation of all falls, and new safety equipment as part of an integrated fall prevention program. In the 12 months following the institution of the fall prevention program, decreases in monthly falls per patient day have averaged 20% lower than peak levels in 1988, or 41 falls per 10,000 patient days. PMID:2114579

Schmid, N A

1990-05-01

439

Randomised controlled trial of prevention of falls in people aged >=75 with severe visual impairment: the VIP trial  

PubMed Central

Objectives To assess the efficacy and cost effectiveness of a home safety programme and a home exercise programme to reduce falls and injuries in older people with low vision. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Dunedin and Auckland, New Zealand. Participants 391 women and men aged ?75 with visual acuity of 6/24 or worse who were living in the community; 92% (361 of 391) completed one year of follow-up. Interventions Participants received a home safety assessment and modification programme delivered by an occupational therapist (n = 100), an exercise programme prescribed at home by a physiotherapist plus vitamin D supplementation (n = 97), both interventions (n = 98), or social visits (n = 96). Main outcome measures Numbers of falls and injuries resulting from falls, costs of implementing the home safety programme. Results Fewer falls occurred in the group randomised to the home safety programme but not in the exercise programme (incidence rate ratios 0.59 (95% confidence interval 0.42 to 0.83) and 1.15 (0.82 to 1.61), respectively). However, within the exercise programme, stricter adherence was associated with fewer falls (P = 0.001). A conservative analysis showed neither intervention was effective in reducing injuries from falls. Delivering the home safety programme cost $NZ650 (£234, 344 euros, $US432) (at 2004 prices) per fall prevented. Conclusion The home safety programme reduced falls and was more cost effective than an exercise programme in this group of elderly people with poor vision. The Otago exercise programme with vitamin D supplementation was not effective in reducing falls or injuries in this group, possibly due to low levels of adherence. Trial registration number ISRCTN15342873.

Campbell, A John; Robertson, M Clare; La Grow, Steven J; Kerse, Ngaire M; Sanderson, Gordon F; Jacobs, Robert J; Sharp, Dianne M; Hale, Leigh A

2005-01-01

440

Energy-shunting hip padding system attenuates femoral impact force in a simulated fall.  

PubMed

Recent studies suggest that hip padding systems reduce the incidence of hip fractures during falls. However, no data exist on the force attenuating capacity of hip pads under realistic fall impact conditions, and thus it is difficult to compare the protective merit of various pad designs. Our goal is to design a comfortable hip padding system which reduces femoral impact force in a fall below the mean force required to fracture the elderly cadaveric femur. In pursuit of this objective, we designed and constructed a hip pad testing system consisting of an impact pendulum and surrogate human pelvis. We then developed a hip pad containing a shear-thickening material which allows for shunting of the impact energy away from the femur and into the surrounding soft tissue. Finally, we conducted experiments to assess whether the surrogate pelvis accurately represents the impact behavior of the human female pelvis in a fall, and to determine whether our energy-shunting pad attenuates femoral impact force in a fall more effectively than seven available padding systems. We found the surrogate pelvis accurately represented the human female pelvis in regional variation in soft tissue stiffness, total effective stiffness and damping, and impact force attenuation provided by trochanteric soft tissues. We also found that our padding system attenuated femoral impact force by 65 percent, thereby providing two times the force attenuation of the next best system. Moreover, the energy-shunting pad was the only system capable of lowering femoral impact force well below the mean force required to fracture the elderly femur in a fall loading configuration. These results suggest that the force attenuating potential of hip pads which focus on shunting energy away from the femur is superior to those which rely on absorbing energy in the pad material. While these in-vitro results are encouraging, carefully designed prospective clinical trials will be necessary to determine the efficacy of these approaches to hip fracture prevention. PMID:8748522

Robinovitch, S N; Hayes, W C; McMahon, T A

1995-11-01

441

Androgens and doping tests: genetic variation and pit-falls  

PubMed Central

The large variation in disposition known for most drugs is also true for anabolic androgenic steroids. Genetic factors are probably the single most important cause of this variation. Further, there are reasons to believe that there is a corresponding variation in efficacy of doping agents. Doped individuals employ a large variety of doping strategies in respect of choice of substance, dose, dose interval, duration of treatment and use of other drugs for enforcement of effects or correction of side effects. Metabolic steps up-stream and down-stream of testosterone are genetically variable and contribute substantially to the variation in disposition of testosterone, the most common doping agent in sports and in society. Large inter- and intra-ethnic variation in testosterone glucuronidation and excretion is described as well as the pit-falls in evaluation of testosterone doping test results. The hydrolysis and bioactivation of testosterone enanthate is also genetically variable yielding a 2–3 fold variation in excretion rate and serum concentration, thereby implicating a substantial variation in ‘efficacy’ of testosterone. Given this situation it is logical to adopt the new findings in the doping control programme. The population based cut-off level for the testosterone : epitestosterone ratio should be replaced by a Bayesian interpretation of consecutive tests in the same individual. When combined with the above genetic information the sensitivity of the test is considerably improved. The combination of the three approaches should reduce the rate of falsely negative or positive results and the number of expensive follow-up tests, stipulated by the World Anti-Doping Agency.

Rane, Anders; Ekstrom, Lena

2012-01-01

442

The hydrothermal system in central Twin Falls County, Idaho  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Thermal water in Twin Fall County has been used for space heating, large-scale greenhouse operations, and aquaculture since the mid-1970's. More recently, increased utilization of the thermal water has caused aquifer pressures to decline. Near the city of Twin Falls, water levels in some formerly flowing thermal wells have declined to below land surface. The thermal water is principally in the silicic volcanic rocks of the Idavada Volcanics. Electrical resistivity soundings indicate that thickness of the rocks ranges from about 700 to 3,000 ft and averages about 2,000 ft. Temperatures of water sampled range from 26 C to nearly 50 C in wells completed in the upper part of the reservoir near Twin Falls. Water from deeper parts of the reservoir may be warmer than 50 C. Most of the thermal water is a sodium bicarbonate type. The maximum fluoride concentration was 22 mg/L. Chloride concentrations between about 50 and 150 mg/L are the result of mixing of deep water with shallower, cooler water that has been affected by percolation of irrigation water. Carbon-14 concentrations in selected thermal water samples indicate ages of 1,000 to 15,000 years. The water becomes progressively older northward along proposed groundwater flowpaths. On the basis of transit times in the system of 10,000 to 15,000 years and the reservoir volume, recharge is estimated to be about 5 to 7 cu ft/sec. Net heat flux in the area is about 2.2 heat flow units.

Lewis, R. E.; Young, H. W.

1989-01-01

443

Fall-Back Disks in Long and Short GRBS  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present numerical time-dependent calculations for fall-back disks relevant for GRBs in which the disk of material surrounding the black hole (BH) powering the GRB jet modulates the mass flow, and hence the strength of the jet. Given the initial existence of a small mass appr oximately less than 10(exp -4) M(solar) near the progenitor with a circularization radius approximately 10(exp 10) - 10(exp 11) cm, an una voidable consequence will be the formation of an "external disk" whose outer edge continually moves to larger radii due to angular momentum transport and lack of a confining torque. For long GRBs, if the mass distribution in the initial fall-back disk traces the progenitor envelope, then a radius approximates 10(exp 11) cm gives a time scale app roximately 10(exp 4) s for the X-ray plateau. For late times t > 10(exp 7) s a steepening due to a cooling front in the disk may have obser vational support in GRB 060729. For short GRBs, one expects most of t he mass initially to lie at small radii < 10(exp 8) cm; however the presence of even a trace amount approximately 10(exp -9) M(solar) of hi gh angular material can give a brief plateau in the light curve.

Cannizo, John K.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.

2011-01-01

444

Oscillations of a solid sphere falling through a wormlike micellar fluid  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an experimental study of the motion of a solid sphere falling through a wormlike micellar fluid. While smaller or lighter spheres quickly reach a terminal velocity, larger or heavier spheres are found to oscillate in the direction of their falling motion. The onset of this instability correlates with a critical value of the velocity gradient scale ?c˜1 s-1. We relate this condition to the known complex rheology of wormlike micellar fluids, and suggest that the unsteady motion of the sphere is caused by the formation and breaking of flow-induced structures.

Jayaraman, Anandhan; Belmonte, Andrew

2003-06-01

445

Conditioning of sandhill cranes during fall migration  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Body mass of adult female and male sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) increased an average of 17 and 20%, respectively, from early September to late October on staging areas in central North Dakota and varied by year. Increases in body mass averaged 550 and 681 g among female and male G. c. canadensis, respectively, and 616 and 836 g among female and male G. c. rowani. Adult and juvenile G. c. rowani were lean at arrival, averaging 177 and 83 g of fat, respectively, and fat reserves increased to 677 and 482 g by mid-October. Fat-free dry mass increased by 12% among juveniles, reflecting substantial growth, but remained constant among adults. The importance of fall staging areas as conditioning sites for sandhill cranes, annual variation in body mass, and vulnerability of cranes to habitat loss underscore the need to monitor status of fall staging habitat in the northern plains region and to take steps to maintain suitable habitat where necessary.

Krapu, G. L.; Johnson, D. H.

1990-01-01

446

Air Resistance on Falling Balls and Balloons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Studying the effect of air resistance on falling objects in an introductory mechanics course has the merit of relevance to a considerable part of our everyday experience: Leaves, parachutes, raindrops, or soot particles do not keep accelerating as they fall. This topic has been discussed in this and other journals many times,1-7 ranging from theoretical treatments to various experimental investigations, mostly for coffee filters, depending on the apparatus at the disposal of the writers (video clips, graphic calculators, and so on). We report here a sequence of activities for our 11th-grade high school students dealing with this topic. The analysis of data emphasizes points that do not seem to have been done in previous articles.

Gluck, Paul

2003-03-01

447

Cardiovascular Assessment of Falls in Older People  

PubMed Central

Falls in older people can be caused by underlying cardiovascular disorders, either because of balance instability in persons with background gait and balance disorders, or because of amnesia for loss of consciousness during unwitnessed syncope. Pertinent investigations include a detailed history, 12-lead electrocardiography, lying and standing blood pressure, carotid sinus massage (CSM), head-up tilt, cardiac electrophysiological tests, and ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate monitoring, which includes external and internal cardiac monitoring. The presence of structural heart disease predicts an underlying cardiac cause. Conversely, the absence of either indicates that neurally mediated etiology is likely. CSM and tilt-table testing should be considered in patients with unexplained and recurrent falls. Holter monitoring over 24 hours has a low diagnostic yield. Early use of an implantable loop recorder may be more cost-effective. A dedicated investigation unit increases the likelihood of achieving positive diagnoses and significantly reduces hospital stay and health expenditure.

Tan, Maw Pin; Kenny, Rose Anne

2006-01-01

448

On falling in love and creativity.  

PubMed

This paper discusses the ego functioning and self psychological aspects of falling in love and passionate love. These universal and extraordinary phenomena are conceptualized as representing the activity of the creative imagination in solving problems related to coping with intense narcissistic and libidinal pressures. The work of other authors is reviewed and recast into a metapsychological framework involving ego and superego contributions to the experience, and focused on self cohesion. An illustrative clinical psychotherapy case is presented in an effort to understand what has traditionally appeared to be a mysterious and disjunctive life experience, and to explore the creative surge that can be generated by falling in love both in and out of the transference. PMID:1429115

Chessick, R D

1992-01-01

449

Falling Body On Rotating Earth 2D  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The EJS Falling Body On Rotating Earth 2D model illustrates the trajectory of an object dropped from rest (relative to the rotating Earth) from a point above Earth's equator. The user can set the initial height of the object above (or below) the Earth's surface, as well as the rotational speed of Earth. The motion of the object can be viewed from an inertial reference frame, or from a frame that rotates with the Earth (illustrating the effects of the so-called "Coriolis force"). The simulation can be made to stop when the object hits Earth's surface, or it can allow the object to move through the Earth. The user can select from a variety of options that control the gravitational and resistive forces acting on the object as it falls. The simulation can also generate a plot of the object's longitude (initially assumed to be zero) as a function of time.

Timberlake, Todd

2012-07-26

450

Fall Meeting abstract submission inspires science poetry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

When the 4 August deadline for submitting Fall Meeting abstracts passed, AGU had received more than 20,000 abstracts, a record-breaking number. The submission process had an unexpected by-product: It inspired some scientists to write haiku on Twitter. (Haiku is a form of Japanese poetry typically having three lines, the first with five syllables, the second with seven, and the third with five.) The following are examples of the haiku tweets, with the hashtag #AGU11AbstractHaiku. (For those who want to keep updated about the Fall Meeting on Twitter, the hashtag is #AGU11.) For more information about the meeting, including registration and housing, visit http://sites.agu.org/fallmeeting/.

Balcerak, Ernie

2011-08-01

451

Exploring Baccalaureate Social Work Students' Self-Efficacy: Did It Change over Time?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored baccalaureate social work students' self-efficacy at a rural southern university. Bandura's concept of self-efficacy is used as a theoretical base for the study. Students (N = 43) in introductory social work courses and in the field practicum course completed the Foundation Practice Self Efficacy Scale. Following The Council on…

Ahn, Bonnie; Boykin, Lolita; Hebert, Corie; Kulkin, Heidi

2012-01-01

452

Teachers' Perceived Efficacy among English as a Foreign Language Teachers in Middle Schools in Venezuela  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers' sense of efficacy has been shown to influence teachers' actions and student outcomes. This study explored self-efficacy beliefs among English as a Foreign Language teachers in selected schools in Venezuela. Data were collected through a survey administered to 100 teachers. The Teacher Sense of Efficacy Scale (Tschannen-Moran & Woolfolk…

Chacon, C.T.

2005-01-01

453

Teacher Self-Efficacy and Teacher Burnout: A Study of Relations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was partly to test the factor structure of a recently developed Norwegian scale for measuring teacher self-efficacy and partly to explore relations between teachers' perception of the school context, teacher self-efficacy, collective teacher efficacy, teacher burnout, teacher job satisfaction, and teachers' beliefs that…

Skaalvik, Einar M.; Skaalvik, Sidsel

2010-01-01

454

Terrorism and the fall of imperial Russia  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the role of terrorism in the decline and fall of Imperial Russia. It analyzes the struggle between terrorists and the Tsarist government during three stages: (1) 1861–66, amidst the ‘Great Reforms’ and radicalization of students; (2) 1877–81, a confrontation between populist terrorists and government; and (3) the crisis of 1904–7, which witnessed open battles between terrorists on

Norman M. Naimark

1990-01-01

455

Fall Meeting abstract submission inspires science poetry  

Microsoft Academic Search

When the 4 August deadline for submitting Fall Meeting abstracts passed, AGU had received more than 20,000 abstracts, a record-breaking number. The submission process had an unexpected by-product: It inspired some scientists to write haiku on Twitter. (Haiku is a form of Japanese poetry typically having three lines, the first with five syllables, the second with seven, and the third

Ernie Balcerak

2011-01-01

456

Fear of falling modifies anticipatory postural control  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the influence of fear of falling or postural threat on the control of posture and movement during\\u000a a voluntary rise to toes task for 12 healthy young adults. Postural threat was modified through alterations to the surface\\u000a height at which individuals stood (low or high platform) and changes in step restriction (away from or at the edge

Allan L. Adkin; James S. Frank; Mark G. Carpenter; Gerhard W. Peysar

2002-01-01

457

[Polypharmacy and falls in the Elderly].  

PubMed

Falls and their consequences are a major problem in geriatric medicine. Main causes are the combination of age-related physiological changes with multimorbidity and subsequent polypharmacy. Elderly patients are more susceptible to adverse drug effects and have less compensatory capacity than younger adults. Therefore careful monitoring of side effects is indicated and prescribing for elderly patients calls for alertness in order to identify symptoms as possible adverse drug effects. PMID:20640927

Sommeregger, Ulrike; Iglseder, Bernhard; Böhmdorfer, Birgit; Benvenuti-Falger, Ursula; Dovjak, Peter; Lechleitner, Monika; Otto, Ronald; Roller, Regina E; Gosch, Markus

2010-06-01

458

SOS Water Falls Post-Visit  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Intended for use after viewing the Science on a Sphere film "Water Falls," this lesson deepens student's understanding of global precipitation measurement. Students will explore NASA satellite data gathered during Hurricane Sandy to learn how that data was essential in helping scientists forecast its path and precipitation amounts. All background information, student worksheets and images/photographs/data are included in these downloadable sections: Teacherâs Guide, Student Capture Sheet, Assessment and PowerPoint Presentation.

459

APS Council Holds Fall Council Meeting  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is an article from The Physiologist. The APS Council held their fall meeting at the Scottsdale Marriott at McDowell Mountains, Scottsdale, AZ, November 8-9, 2007. Council received reports from the Publications, Finance, Membership, Education, and other Committees. APS staff members Marsha Matyas, Robert Price, Alice RaÃÂanan, and Margaret Reich joined the meeting to assist with the committee report presentations.

2008-02-01

460

Modern Rehabilitation in Osteoporosis, Falls, and Fractures  

PubMed Central

In prevention and management of osteoporosis, modern rehabilitation should focus on how to increase muscular and bone strength. Resistance exercises are beneficial for muscle and bone strength, and weight-bearing exercises help maintain fitness and bone mass. In subjects at higher risk for osteoporotic fractures, particular attention should be paid to improving balance – the most important element in falls prevention. Given the close interaction between osteoporosis and falls, prevention of fractures should be based on factors related to bone strength and risk factors for falls. Fractures are the most serious complication of osteoporosis and may be prevented. The use of modern spinal orthosis helps to reduce pain and improve posture. Vibration platforms are used in rehabilitation of osteoporosis, based on the concept that noninvasive, short-duration, mechanical stimulation could have an impact on osteoporosis risk. Pharmacologic therapy should be added for those at high risk of fracture, and vitamin D/calcium supplementation is essential in all prevention strategies. Success of rehabilitation in osteoporotic and fractured subjects through an individualized educational approach optimizes function to the highest level of independence while improving the overall quality of life.

Dionyssiotis, Yannis; Skarantavos, Grigorios; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis

2014-01-01

461

Modern rehabilitation in osteoporosis, falls, and fractures.  

PubMed

In prevention and management of osteoporosis, modern rehabilitation should focus on how to increase muscular and bone strength. Resistance exercises are beneficial for muscle and bone strength, and weight-bearing exercises help maintain fitness and bone mass. In subjects at higher risk for osteoporotic fractures, particular attention should be paid to improving balance - the most important element in falls prevention. Given the close interaction between osteoporosis and falls, prevention of fractures should be based on factors related to bone strength and risk factors for falls. Fractures are the most serious complication of osteoporosis and may be prevented. The use of modern spinal orthosis helps to reduce pain and improve posture. Vibration platforms are used in rehabilitation of osteoporosis, based on the concept that noninvasive, short-duration, mechanical stimulation could have an impact on osteoporosis risk. Pharmacologic therapy should be added for those at high risk of fracture, and vitamin D/calcium supplementation is essential in all prevention strategies. Success of rehabilitation in osteoporotic and fractured subjects through an individualized educational approach optimizes function to the highest level of independence while improving the overall quality of life. PMID:24963273

Dionyssiotis, Yannis; Skarantavos, Grigorios; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis

2014-01-01

462

A Second H Chondrite Stream of Falls  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Earlier, Dodd et al. [1] described a statistically significant concentration of 17 H4-6 chondrite falls in May between 1855 and 1895, that clustered on a year-day plot, indicating a coorbital meteoroid stream or two closely-related ones. Contents of 10 thermally labile trace elements (Rb, Ag, Se, Cs, Te,Zn, Cd, Bi, Tl, In) determined by RNAA demonstrated that 13 of these H Cluster 1 (hereafter HC1) falls are compositionally distinguishable from another 45 non-H Cluster 1 (non-HC1) falls [1] (as are Antarctic samples with nominal terrestrial ages >50 ky [2,3]). This compositional distinguishability is demonstrable using two standard, model-dependent multivariate statistical tests (linear discriminant analysis LDA or logistic regression LR) or the model-independent, randomization-simulation (R-S) methods of Lipschutz and Samuels [4]. Despite petrographic and cosmic ray exposure age variabilities, like Antarctic suites [2] HC1 meteorites seemingly derive from coorbital meteoroids (from their circumstances of fall) and apparently have a common thermal history (reflected in contents of thermally labile trace elements) distinguishable from those of other H4-6 chondrite falls [1]. Other explanations seem inviable [5]. During days 220-300 when streams of large fireballs [6] and near-Earth asteroids [7] occur several H chondrite concentrations are evident (Fig. 1), particularly if petrographic type becomes a criterion [1]. Here, we focus on H Clusters 2 through 4 (HC2-4) containing, respectively, 10 H4-6, 5 H5 and 12 H6 chondrite members, for which full data sets exist because of the generosity of many colleagues/institutions. H chondrite clusters in the same time-span might include samples derived from related parent regions. Hence, we changed our comparison-base to approximate a random background of falls by including only the 34 non-Cluster H chondrites, HC0; this also simplified our calculations. To establish whether this choice impacts our observations, we compared 13 HC1 with 34 HC0 meteorites (Table 1). As is evident, the LDA, LR and R-S results are nearly identical to those obtained by comparing 13 HC1 with 45 non- HC1 falls [1]. As Table 1 shows, 10 HC2 chondrites are not compositionally distinguishable from 34 HC0 falls by any criterion. However, 12 HC4 falls may be compositionally distinguishable from the HC0 suite using model-dependent LDA and LR techniques. The small HC3 suite seems to lie on an extension of HC4 (Fig. 1) and we compared the 17-member combined suite, HC34, with HC0. Model-dependent or -independent results (Table 1) provide strong evidence for a compositional difference: apparently HC34, like HC1 [1], derive from coorbital meteoroid streams. The oldest and youngest HC34 members are particularly interesting: Borodino fell 5 Sept. 1812 just before the battle there: its fall is unrecorded in military histories of the era [8]. The final orbit of the Peekskill fall in 1992 is particularly well-established [9] linking HC34 to a specific orbit. Acknowledgments: Support from NASA grant NAGW-3396 and DOE grant DE-FG07-80ER1-072SJ. References: [1] Dodd R. T. et al. (1993) JGR, 98, 15105-15118. [2] Michlovich S. et al. (1995) JGR, 100, 3317-3333. [3] Wolf S. F. and Lipschutz M. E. (1995) JGR, 100, 3335-3349. [4] Lipschutz M. E. and Samuels S. M. (1991) GCA, 55, 19-47. [5] Wolf S. F. and Lipschutz M. E. (1995) JGR, 100, 3297-3316. [6] Halliday I. et al. (1990) Meteoritics, 24, 93-99. [7] Drummond J. D. (1991) Icarus, 89, 14-25. [8] Rothenberg G. E., personal communication. [9] Brown P. et al. (1994) Nature, 367, 624-626. Table 1 shows multivariate statistical comparisons of RNAA data for 10 thermally-labile trace elements in various putative suites of H4-6 chondrite falls.

Wolf, S. F.; Wang, M.-S.; Dodd, R. T.; Lipschutz, M. E.

1995-09-01

463

Two new chondrite-falls in Japan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Circumstances of two recent chondrite falls in the northern part of Honshu, Japan, are reported, the first (Aomori) at 1:50 p.m. on June 30, 1984 and the second (Tomiya) at 1:35 p.m. on August 22, 1984. Results of chemical analyses of major elements and composition ratios indicate that the meteorites are typical L- and H-group ordinary chondrites, respectively. In the Aomori, chondrules are present as relicts in the well-crystallized matrix. Olivine and pyroxene are homogeneous in composition, and coarse clear feldspar, up to 100 micrometers in size, is wll developed in the chondrules and matrix. Though the Aomori is a petrologic type 6 based on its texture and mineralogy, it includes a few grains of multiple twinned clinbronzite which is rarely observed in high equilibrated ordinary chondrites. In the Tomiya, chondrules possess a fine-grained mesostasis, and both orthopyroxene and clinobronzite are noticeable in thin sections; this meteorite was classified to be petrologic type between 4 and 5. The deformation texture of olivine, pyroxene and plagioclase indicates that both meteorites were shocked by 0.2-0.25 Mb. In conjunction with the discussion of the frequency of meteorite falls, all observed falls of meteorites in Japan are tabulated.

Shima, M.; Murayama, S.; Wakabayashi, F.; Okada, A.; Yabuki, H.

1986-03-01

464

A dynamic evidential network for fall detection.  

PubMed

This study is part of the development of a remote home healthcare monitoring application designed to detect distress situations through several types of sensors. The multisensor fusion can provide more accurate and reliable information compared to information provided by each sensor separately. Furthermore, data from multiple heterogeneous sensors present in the remote home healthcare monitoring systems have different degrees of imperfection and trust. Among the multisensor fusion methods, Dempster-Shafer theory (DST) is currently considered the most appropriate for representing and processing the imperfect information. Based on a graphical representation of the DST called evidential networks, a structure of heterogeneous data fusion from multiple sensors for fall detection has been proposed. The evidential networks, implemented on our remote medical monitoring platform, are also proposed in this paper to maximize the performance of automatic fall detection and thus make the system more reliable. However, the presence of noise, the variability of recorded signals by the sensors, and the failing or unreliable sensors may thwart the evidential networks performance. In addition, the sensors signals nonstationary nature may degrade the experimental conditions. To compensate the nonstationary effect, the time evolution is considered by introducing the dynamic evidential network which was evaluated by the simulated fall scenarios corresponding to various use cases. PMID:24235255

Aguilar, Paulo Armando Cavalcante; Boudy, Jerome; Istrate, Dan; Dorizzi, Bernadette; Mota, Joao Cesar Moura

2014-07-01

465

Experimental and theoretical investigations of falling film evaporation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, a mathematical model was developed for falling film evaporation in vacuum using heat transfer relations. An experimental device was designed. experimental set-up which was used was equipped with a triangular weir distribution device and it had the ability to record data up to 3 m. Experiments were performed in a single-effect process with sucrose-water solution varying from 3 to 20% concentration rate of sucrose and we used a vertical tube evaporator with the dimensions of laboratory scale. The model that was developed considers convection, shear stress, viscosity and conjugate heat transfer while most of the previous works ignored these factors. The main factors influencing the heat transfer mechanism performance of the unit were investigated and analyzed. We concluded that the experimental studies are verified by the developed model. Furthermore, it was also concluded that, the heat transfer is affected by the mass flow rate, sucrose concentration rate in solution, film thickness and pressure.

Pehlivan, Hüseyin; Özdemir, Mustafa

2012-06-01

466

75 FR 79725 - Fall 2010 Semiannual Agenda of Regulations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...III, IV, and VI Fall 2010 Semiannual Agenda of Regulations AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Commerce...By memorandum of July 23, 2010, the Office of Management and Budget...and publication of the fall 2010 Unified Agenda. The...

2010-12-20

467

Vitamin D May Not Lower Seniors' Fall Risk  

MedlinePLUS

... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Vitamin D May Not Lower Seniors' Fall Risk Researchers conclude ... 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Falls Seniors' Health Vitamin D THURSDAY, April 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Taking vitamin ...

468

Scheduling Fall Seedings for Cold-Climate Revegetation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Revegetating construction sites in the fall requires the scheduling of seeding and mulching for either permanent or dormant seedings. Dormant seedings must be late enough in the fall to prevent germination, while permanent seedings must be early enough to...

A. J. Palazzo C. H. Racine R. N. Bailey

1990-01-01

469

21. VIEW OF COTTAGE 101 AND THE SWAN FALLS POWER ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

21. VIEW OF COTTAGE 101 AND THE SWAN FALLS POWER PLANT AND DAM TAKEN AROUND 1920, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. BUILDING AT LOWER LEFT IS COTTAGE THAT LATER BURNED. - Swan Falls Village, Snake River, Kuna, Ada County, ID

470

29 CFR 1926.501 - Duty to have fall protection.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...protected from objects falling through holes (including skylights) by covers. (5) Formwork and reinforcing steel. Each employee on the face of formwork or reinforcing steel shall be protected from falling 6 feet (1.8 m) or more to...

2010-07-01

471

Historic view of Nooksack Falls, taken in 1904 prior to ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Historic view of Nooksack Falls, taken in 1904 prior to construction of the hydroelectric project. (J.B. Hahn, photographer, 1904.) - Nooksack Falls Hydroelectric Plant, Route 542, Glacier, Whatcom County, WA

472

Skin-contact sensor for automatic fall detection.  

PubMed

This paper describes an adhesive sensor system worn on the skin that automatically detects human falls. The sensor, which consists of a tri-axial accelerometer, a microcon-troller and a Bluetooth Low Energy transceiver, can be worn anywhere on a subject's torso and in any orientation. In order to distinguish easily between falls and activities of daily living (ADL), a possible fall is detected only if an impact is detected and if the subject is horizontal shortly afterwards. As an additional criterion to reduce false positives, a fall is confirmed if the user activity level several seconds after a possible fall is below a threshold. Intentional falls onto a gymnastics mat were performed by 10 volunteers (total of 297 falls); ADL were performed by 15 elderly volunteers (total of 315 ADL). The fall detection algorithm provided a sensitivity of 99% and a specificity of 100%. PMID:23366814

Narasimhan, Ravi

2012-01-01

473

Preventing Falls | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine  

MedlinePLUS

... But many cannot and need long-term care. Fear of Falling Fear of falling becomes more common with age, even ... and restore your walking confidence. Getting over your fear can help you to stay active, maintain your ...

474

10. CONSTRUCTION OF FALLS BRIDGE, EAST ACROSS THE SCHUYLKILL Photocopy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

10. CONSTRUCTION OF FALLS BRIDGE, EAST ACROSS THE SCHUYLKILL Photocopy of historic photograph (photographer unknown, January 11, 1895) - Falls Bridge, Spanning Schuylkill River, connecting East & West River Drives, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

475

11. CONSTRUCTION OF FALLS BRIDGE, EAST ACROSS THE SCHUYLKILL Photocopy ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

11. CONSTRUCTION OF FALLS BRIDGE, EAST ACROSS THE SCHUYLKILL Photocopy of historic photograph (photographer unknown, 1896) - Falls Bridge, Spanning Schuylkill River, connecting East & West River Drives, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

476

Sanford USD Medical Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota  

Cancer.gov

Sanford USD Medical Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota Sanford Cancer Center 1305 W. 18th Street Sioux Falls, SD 57105 www.sanfordhealth.org • Pat O’Brien, MD, President, Sanford USD Medical Center • Dan Blue, MD, President, Sanford Clinic •

477

Technology Innovation Enabling Falls Risk Assessment in a Community Setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Approximately one in three people over the age of 65 will fall each year, resulting in significant financial, physical, and\\u000a emotional cost on the individual, their family, and society. Currently, falls are managed using on-body sensors and alarm\\u000a pendants to notify others when a falls event occurs. However these technologies do not prevent a fall from occurring. There\\u000a is now

Cliodhna Ni Scanaill; Chiara Garattini; Barry R. Greene; Michael J. McGrath

2011-01-01

478

Trends in Enrollment: Fall 2001 Update. Informational Memorandum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This memorandum contains tables of data about enrollment in institutions in University of Wisconsin (UW) System institutions in fall 2001 and some information about trends over time. The fall 2001 full-time equivalent (FTE) enrollment of 133,701 was up 2,316 (1.8%) from fall 2000. The fall 2001 headcount enrollment of 159,433 was up 2,457 (1.6%)…

Wisconsin Univ. System, Madison. Office of Policy Analysis and Research.

479

Multidimensional Perfectionism and Self-Reported Self-Efficacy in College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between perfectionism and self-efficacy in college students. A multivari-ate analysis of variance including subscales of the Self-Efficacy Scale revealed significant differences between adaptive perfectionists, mal-adaptive perfectionists, and non-perfectionists. Follow-up tests showed that adaptive perfectionists scored significantly higher than both mal-adaptive perfectionists and non-perfectionists on General Self-Efficacy and Social Self-Efficacy. The

Kenneth A. Locicero; Jeffrey S. Ashby

2000-01-01

480

Can social dancing prevent falls in older adults? a protocol of the Dance, Aging, Cognition, Economics (DAnCE) fall prevention randomised controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Falls are one of the most common health problems among older people and pose a major economic burden on health care systems. Exercise is an accepted stand-alone fall prevention strategy particularly if it is balance training or regular participation in Tai chi. Dance shares the ‘holistic’ approach of practices such as Tai chi. It is a complex sensorimotor rhythmic activity integrating multiple physical, cognitive and social elements. Small-scale randomised controlled trials have indicated that diverse dance styles can improve measures of balance and mobility in older people, but none of these studies has examined the effect of dance on falls or cognition. This study aims to determine whether participation in social dancing: i) reduces the number of falls; and ii) improves cognitive functions associated with fall risk in older people. Methods/design A single-blind, cluster randomised controlled trial of 12 months duration will be conducted. Approximately 450 participants will be recruited from 24 self-care retirement villages that house at least 60 residents each in Sydney, Australia. Village residents without cognitive impairment and obtain medical clearance will be eligible. After comprehensive baseline measurements including physiological and cognitive tests and self-completed questionnaires, villages will be randomised to intervention sites (ballroom or folk dance) or to a wait-listed control using a computer randomisation method that minimises imbalances between villages based on two baseline fall risk measures. Main outcome measures are falls, prospectively measured, and the Trail Making cognitive function test. Cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analyses will be performed. Discussion This study offers a novel approach to balance training for older people. As a community-based approach to fall prevention, dance offers older people an opportunity for greater social engagement, thereby making a major contribution to healthy ageing. Providing diversity in exercise programs targeting seniors recognises the heterogeneity of multicultural populations and may further increase the number of taking part in exercise. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612000889853 The trial is now in progress with 12 villages already have been randomised.

2013-01-01

481

Relationship between falls, knee osteoarthritis, and health-related quality of life: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative study  

PubMed Central

Background The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between self-reported falls, doctor-diagnosed knee osteoarthritis (OA), and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). We hypothesized that falls and knee OA would be associated with poor HRQoL on both disease-specific and generic measures. Methods This cross-sectional study used data from the publicly available Osteoarthritis Initiative data sets. A total of 4,484 subjects aged 45–79 years at baseline were divided into three subpopulations: those who had neither a history of falling nor doctor-diagnosed knee OA; those who had either a self-reported history of falling or doctor-diagnosed knee OA; and those who had both a self-reported history of falling and doctor-diagnosed knee OA. HRQoL was assessed using both disease-specific and generic measures. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between self-reported falls, doctor-diagnosed knee OA, and HRQoL assessed using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score-Quality of Life (KOOS-QoL) subscale and two Short Form-12 (SF-12) summary scales. The models were adjusted for participant sociodemographic, lifestyle, and clinical characteristics. Results Falls and knee OA were significantly associated with lower scores on the KOOS-QoL (?= ?34.4, standard error 2.27, P?0.0001) and on the physical component scale of the SF-12 (?= ?9.44, standard error 0.90, P<0.0001). No significant relationship was found with the mental component scale score when adjusted for sociodemographic, lifestyle, and clinical characteristics. Conclusion When compared with those having neither a self-reported history of falling nor doctor-diagnosed knee OA and those with a self-reported history of falling or doctor-diagnosed knee OA, persons with both conditions (falls and knee OA) had significantly lower KOOS-QoL and physical component scale scores after adjusting for sociodemographic, lifestyle, and clinical characteristics. Future research should assess potential mediating factors in an effort to improve HRQoL in persons with knee OA who are at high risk of falling.

Vennu, Vishal; Bindawas, Saad M

2014-01-01

482

Regional ash fall hazard II: Asia-Pacific modelling results and implications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In a companion paper (this volume), the authors propose a methodology for assessing ash fall hazard on a regional scale. In this study, the methodology is applied to the Asia-Pacific region, determining the hazard from 190 volcanoes to over one million square kilometre of urban area. Ash fall hazard is quantified for each square kilometre grid cell of urban area in terms of the annual exceedance probability (AEP), and its inverse, the average recurrence interval (ARI), for ash falls exceeding 1, 10 and 100 mm. A surrogate risk variable, the Population-Weighted Hazard Score: the product of AEP and population density, approximates the relative risk for each grid cell. Within the Asia-Pacific region, urban areas in Indonesia are found to have the highest levels of hazard and risk, while Australia has the lowest. A clear demarcation emerges between the hazard in countries close to and farther from major subduction plate boundaries, with the latter having ARIs at least 2 orders of magnitude longer for the same thickness thresholds. Countries with no volcanoes, such as North Korea and Malaysia, also face ash falls from volcanoes in neighbouring countries. Ash falls exceeding 1 mm are expected to affect more than one million people living in urban areas within the study region; in Indonesia, Japan and the Philippines, this situation could occur with ARIs less than 40 years.

Jenkins, Susanna; McAneney, John; Magill, Christina; Blong, Russell

2012-09-01

483

Central Falls High School: First Year Transformation Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In January 2010, the Rhode Island Department of Education (RIDE) identified Central Falls High School (CFHS) as one of the state's persistently lowest-achieving schools. The Central Falls School District (CFSD) and the Central Falls Teachers Union (CFTU) considered the transformation model but could not come to an agreement initially around…

Burns, Amy; Whitney, Joye; Shah, Hardeek; Foley, Ellen; Dure, Elsa

2011-01-01

484

5. General view of the Glens Falls Dam from the ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. General view of the Glens Falls Dam from the vicinity of its southeast end. The log chute is in the background. Facing west-southwest. - Glens Falls Dam, 100' to 450' West of U.S. Route 9 Bridge Spanning Hudson River, Glens Falls, Warren County, NY

485

Falling in Love: Prospective Studies of Self-Concept Change  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two prospective, longitudinal studies examined the consequences of falling in love, focusing on predictions developed in the context of A. Aron and E. N. Aron's (1986, in press) self-expansion model of motivation and cognition in close relationships. In each study a sample with a high expected incidence of falling in love (first- and second-year undergraduates in the fall term) was

Arthur Aron; Meg Paris; Elaine N. Aron

1995-01-01

486

A theoretic algorithm for fall and motionless detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

A robust method of fall and motionless detection is presented. The approach is able to detect falls and motionless periods (standing, sitting, and lying) using only one belt-worn kinematic sensor. The fall detection algorithm analyses the phase changes of vertical acceleration in relation to gravity and impact force using kinematic variables. A phase angle value was used as a threshold

Shumei Zhang; Paul McCullagh; Chris Nugent; Huiru Zheng

2009-01-01

487

Acoustic fall detection using one-class classifiers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Falling represents a major health concern for the elderly. To address this concern we proposed in a previous paper an acoustic fall detection system, FADE, composed of a microphone array and a motion detector. FADE may help the elderly living alone by alerting a caregiver as soon as a fall is detected. A crucial component of FADE is the classification

M. Popescu; A. Mahnot

2009-01-01

488

Acoustic fall detection using Gaussian mixture models and GMM supervectors  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a fall classification and detection system to distin- guish falls from other noise in the home environment using only a far-field microphone. We propose modeling each fall or noise segment using a GMM supervector, whose Euclidean distance measures the pairwise difference between audio seg- ments. A Support Vector Machine built on a kernel between GMM supervectors is used

Xiaodan Zhuang; Jing Huang; Gerasimos Potamianos; Mark Hasegawa-Johnson

2009-01-01

489

Fall Risk Assessment for Older Adults: The Hendrich II Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

TARGET POPULATION: The Hendrich II Fall Risk Model is intended to be used in the acute care setting to identify adults at risk for falls. The Model is being validated for further application of the specific risk factors in pediatrics and obstetrical populations. VALIDITY AND RELIABILITY: The Hendrich II Fall Risk Model was validated in a large case control study

Deanna Gray-Miceli

490