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Sample records for false positive reaction

  1. Phenolphthalein false-positive reactions from legume root nodules.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Daniel; Kovacs, Frank

    2014-03-01

    Presumptive tests for blood play a critical role in the examination of physical evidence and in the determination of subsequent analysis. The catalytic power of hemoglobin allows colorimetric reactions employing phenolphthalein (Kastle-Meyer test) to indicate "whether" blood is present. Consequently, DNA profiles extracted from phenolphthalein-positive stains are presumed to be from blood on the evidentiary item and can lead to the identification of "whose" blood is present. Crushed nodules from a variety of legumes yielded phenolphthalein false-positive reactions that were indistinguishable from true bloodstains both in color quality and in developmental time frame. Clothing and other materials stained by nodules also yielded phenolphthalein false-positive reactivity for several years after nodule exposure. Nodules from leguminous plants contain a protein (leghemoglobin) which is structurally and functionally similar to hemoglobin. Testing of purified leghemoglobin confirmed this protein as a source of phenolphthalein reactivity. A scenario is presented showing how the presence of leghemoglobin from nodule staining can mislead investigators. PMID:24313711

  2. False-positive, follicular and irritant patch test reactions to metal salts.

    PubMed

    Fischer, T; Rystedt, I

    1985-02-01

    853 hard metal workers were patch tested with nickel sulphate 5%, potassium dichromate 0.5% and cobalt chloride 1%, each in petrolatum. Non-allergic reactions appeared in 6.5% of the nickel tests, 13% of the chromium tests and 18.3% of the cobalt tests. Most of the individuals with positive, poral or pustular reactions were retested with serial dilutions of metal salts in pet. and in water. The accuracy of a positive initial nickel reaction was 83%, a chromium reaction 40% and a cobalt reaction 62%. The nonallergic reactions were partly reproducible and correlated with both the type of patch test material and with individual factors. Weak and moderately strong positive patch test reactions to metal salts may be irritant and should be checked with serial dilution tests or at least be retested. A reduction of the cobalt chloride concentration from 1% to 0.5% in the standard test material is discussed. PMID:3157537

  3. Diagnostic performance of serological tests for swine brucellosis in the presence of false positive serological reactions.

    PubMed

    Dieste-Pérez, L; Blasco, J M; de Miguel, M J; Moriyón, I; Muñoz, P M

    2015-04-01

    Swine brucellosis caused by Brucella suis biovar 2 is an emerging disease in Europe. Currently used diagnostic tests for swine brucellosis detect antibodies to the O-polysaccharide (O-PS) of Brucella smooth lipopolysaccharide (S-LPS) but their specificity is compromised by false-positive serological reactions (FPSRs) when bacteria carrying cross-reacting O-PS infect pigs. FPSRs occur throughout Europe, and the only tool available for a specific B. suis diagnosis is the intradermal test with Brucella protein extracts free of O-PS or S-LPS. Using sera of 162 sows naturally infected by B. suis biovar 2, 406 brucellosis-free sows, and 218 pigs of brucellosis-free farms affected by FPSR, we assessed the diagnostic performance of an indirect ELISA with rough LPS (thus devoid of O-PS) and of gel immunodiffusion, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, latex agglutination and indirect ELISA with O-PS free proteins in comparison with several S-LPS tests (Rose Bengal, complement fixation, gel immunodiffusion and indirect ELISA). When adjusted to 100% specificity, the sensitivity of the rough LPS ELISA was very low (30%), and adoption of other cut-offs resulted in poor specificity/sensitivity ratios. Although their specificity was 100%, the sensitivity of protein tests (ELISA, latex agglutination, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, and gel immunodiffusion) was only moderate (45, 58, 61 and 63%, respectively). Among S-LPS tests, gel immunodiffusion was the only test showing acceptable sensitivity/specificity (68 and 100%, respectively). Despite these shortcomings, and when the purpose is to screen out FPSR at herd level, gel immunodiffusion tests may offer a technically simple and practical alternative to intradermal testing. PMID:25661496

  4. False Position, Double False Position and Cramer's Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boman, Eugene

    2009-01-01

    We state and prove the methods of False Position (Regula Falsa) and Double False Position (Regula Duorum Falsorum). The history of both is traced from ancient Egypt and China through the work of Fibonacci, ending with a connection between Double False Position and Cramer's Rule.

  5. False positive and false negative reactions encountered in the use of sulfite test strips for the detection of sulfite-treated foods.

    PubMed

    Nordlee, J A; Naidu, S G; Taylor, S L

    1988-03-01

    The reliability of a qualitative test for sulfites in foods (Sulfitest sulfite test strips) was evaluated by comparison of the results obtained from the analysis of 90 food and beverage samples to results obtained by the quantitative, modified Monier-Williams method (the preferred procedure for sulfite analysis in foods of the Food and Drug Administration). The results obtained with the sulfite test strips compared favorably to the results of the Monier-Williams procedure when the sulfite test strips were used on sulfite-treated lettuce and raw or cooked potatoes. However, the strips yielded many false negative and false positive results with other types of foods. False positive results (strips indicated a substantial amount of sulfite when sulfite was not detectable by the Monier-Williams method) were obtained with fin fish, red meats, and poultry. False negative results (strips indicated the absence of sulfites when sulfite was detected at levels greater than 10 ppm total sulfur dioxide by the Monier-Williams method) were obtained with dried fruits and wines under certain conditions of testing. The false negative responses with the test strips may result in the hazardous consumption of foods with high levels of sulfites, such as dried fruit or wine, by a sulfite-sensitive individual. The false positive responses would not be hazardous but could lead sensitive individuals to avoid foods that could be safely consumed. Although the strips may be useful for the detection of sulfites in certain foods, such as lettuce and potatoes, their use by sulfite-sensitive individuals cannot be recommended because of the confusion and potential hazards posed by the false negative and false positive responses. PMID:3346484

  6. VESPA: False positive probabilities calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Timothy D.

    2015-03-01

    Validation of Exoplanet Signals using a Probabilistic Algorithm (VESPA) calculates false positive probabilities and statistically validates transiting exoplanets. Written in Python, it uses isochrones [ascl:1503.010] and the package simpledist.

  7. Urease-positive bacteria in the stomach induce a false-positive reaction in a urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Takako; Mabe, Katsuhiro; Hanawa, Tomoko; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2008-07-01

    This study investigated the influence of urease-positive non-Helicobacter pylori bacteria on the results of a urea breath test (UBT) to evaluate the diagnostic utility of a UBT using film-coated [(13)C]urea tablets. The UBT was performed in 102 patients treated with a proton pump inhibitor and antibiotics for the eradication of H. pylori. Urease-producing bacteria other than H. pylori were isolated and identified from the oral cavity and stomach. In 4/102 patients, the UBT gave false-positive results. These false-positive results were found to be caused by the presence of urease-positive bacteria in the oral cavity and stomach. Five bacterial species with urease activity (Proteus mirabilis, Citrobacter freundii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae and Staphylococcus aureus) were subsequently isolated from the oral cavity and/or stomach. As there was no correlation between the in vitro urease activity of urease-positive non-H. pylori bacteria and the UBT value, and all of the patients with a false-positive UBT result were suffering from atrophic gastritis, it is possible that the false-positive results in the UBT were a result of colonization of urease-positive bacteria and gastric hypochlorhydric conditions. Thus, for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection using a UBT, the influence of stomach bacteria must be considered when interpreting the results. PMID:18566138

  8. [Features of the humoral immune response in patients with chronic hepatitis C, spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus and false-positive reactions of anti-HCV].

    PubMed

    Zhandarova, N A

    2014-06-01

    Among the patients residing in the territory of Ukraine false-positive reaction of anti-HCV was determined in 5.4% of anti-HCVpositive patients with low frequency of antibodies and low reactivity of sera to a structural viral protein or nonstructural viral proteins (by SIA or RIBA). Cases of spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) were detected in 16.1% of anti-HCV positive patients and based on the detection of antibodies to the core-protein and one or several of nonstructural viral proteins on condition negativation of RNA-HCV twice with an interval of 6-12 months. Chronic hepatitis C with the presence of specific RNA-HCV in blood serum was confirmed in 83.9% of patients. The group of examinees with spontaneous clearance of HCV was characterized by low humoral immune response compared to chronic persistent infection. PMID:25020169

  9. Consequences of False-Positive Screening Mammograms

    PubMed Central

    Tosteson, Anna N. A.; Fryback, Dennis G.; Hammond, Cristina S.; Hanna, Lucy G.; Grove, Margaret R.; Brown, Mary; Wang, Qianfei; Lindfors, Karen; Pisano, Etta D.

    2014-01-01

    Importance False-positive mammograms, a common occurrence in breast cancer screening programs, represent a potential screening harm that is currently being evaluated by the United States Preventive Services Task Force. Objective To measure the impact of false-positive mammograms on quality of life by measuring personal anxiety, health utility and future screening attitudes. Design Longitudinal Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST) quality-of-life sub-study telephone survey shortly after screening and one year later. Setting Twenty-two DMIST sites Participants Randomly-selected DMIST participants with positive and negative mammograms. Exposure(s) for observational studies Mammogram requiring follow-up testing or referral without a cancer diagnosis. Main Outcome(s) and Measure(s) The Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Index short-form (STAI-6) and the EuroQol EQ-5D with United States scoring. Attitudes toward future screening measured by women’s self-report of future intention to undergo mammography screening and willingness to travel and stay overnight to receive a hypothetical new mammogram that would detect as many cancers with half the false-positives. Results Among 1,450 eligible women invited to participate, 1,226 women (85%) were enrolled with follow-up interviews obtained for 1,028 (84%). Anxiety was significantly higher for women with false-positive mammograms (STAI-6:35.2 vs. 32.7), but health utility did not differ and there were no significant differences between groups at one year. Future screening intentions differed by group (26% vs. 14% more likely in false-positive vs. negative); willingness to travel and stay overnight did not (11% vs. 10% in false-positive vs. negative). Future screening intention was significantly increased among women with false-positive mammograms (OR: 2.12; 95%CI:1.54, 2.93), younger age (OR:2.78; 95%CI:1.5,5.0) and poorer health (OR: 1.63; 95%CI:1.09, 2.43). Women’s anticipated high-level anxiety regarding

  10. An investigation of false positive dosimetry results

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, M.A.; Davis, S.A.; Goff, T.E.; Wu, C.F.

    1996-12-31

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a facility designed for the demonstration of the safe disposal of transuranic waste. Currently, the radiation source term is confined to sealed calibration and check sources since WIPP has not received waste for disposal. For several years the WIPP Dosimetry Group has operated a Harshaw Model 8800C reader to analyze Harshaw 8801-7776 thermoluminescent cards (3 TLD-700 and 1 TLD-600) with 8805 holder. The frequency of false positive results for quarterly dosimeter exchanges is higher than desired by the Dosimetry Group management. Initial observations suggested that exposure to intense ambient sunlight may be responsible for the majority of the false positive readings for element 3. A study was designed to investigate the possibility of light leaking through the holder and inducing a signal in element 3. This paper discusses the methods and results obtained, with special emphasis placed on recommendations to reduce the frequency of light-induced false positive readings.

  11. False-positive Gram-stained smears.

    PubMed

    Hoke, C H; Batt, J M; Mirrett, S; Cox, R L; Reller, L B

    1979-02-01

    The rate per 1,000 smears showing nonviable Gram-negative bacilli (false-positive smears) increased from a baseline of 10.8 to 38.5 following purchase of new culture-collection devices; the rate decreased to 8.0 following replacement of contaminated culture sets. False-positive reports led to changes in therapy for five patients. In addition to being sterile, commercial culture-collection devices should be certified by the manufacturer as being free of stainable microorganisms or as unsuitable for preparation of Gram-stained smears. PMID:83398

  12. Quantum efficiency and false positive rate

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, P. E.

    1969-01-01

    1. This paper presents an analysis of the efficiency of performance at the absolute threshold of human vision. The data are from the same series as the previous papers (Hallett, 1969b, c) and consist of frequency-of-seeing curves, thresholds, false positive rates and equivalent background measurements, accumulated as small samples over a number of days. 2. Quantum efficiency is defined here as the ratio of the thresholds of an ideal and a real detector performing the same task with the same sampling error. This avoids the problem as to whether the frequency-of-seeing curve of the real detector is exactly a Poisson sum or not. 3. The long-term quantum efficiency can be low (about 0·04) as a result of drifts in the mean threshold. 4. The average short-term quantum efficiency is in the region of 0·1, which is roughly the physiological limit set by Rushton's (1956b) measurements of rhodopsin density in the living rods. If this is correct, then the absorption of a quantum, and not the bleaching of a rhodopsin molecule, is sufficient for the generation of a neural event. 5. Application of a simple signal/noise theory to the data gives solutions close to those suggested by Barlow (1956) and shows that false positives almost invariably arise from errors subsequent to the signal/noise decision process. PMID:5784295

  13. Frequency of false-negative reactions to the fragrance mix.

    PubMed

    de Groot, A C; van der Kley, A M; Bruynzeel, D P; Meinardi, M M; Smeenk, G; van Joost, T; Pavel, S

    1993-03-01

    To estimate the frequency of false-negative reactions to the fragrance mix, the 8 constituents of the mix in concentrations of 5% (2% for cinnamic aldehyde) were added to the European standard series for routine testing. Patients with positive reactions to individual ingredients in the absence of a reaction to the mix were retested with serial dilutions. In a 4-month period, 677 patients were tested. 61 (9%) reacted to the mix and to 1 or more of the ingredients. 4 patients (0.6% of all patients tested and 6.2% of the patients allergic to fragrances) had false-negative reactions to the mix. They were allergic to cinnamic alcohol, geraniol, isoeugenol and oak moss (1 reaction each), in the absence of a reaction to the fragrance mix. It is concluded that the currently used concentration of the mix (8 x 1%) not infrequently results in false-negative reactions, and that further research should be done to overcome this problem. PMID:8462288

  14. Inferring False Beliefs from Actions and Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Louis J.; Flavell, John H.

    1990-01-01

    Two experiments investigated the possibility that three year olds would do better on tasks in which belief cues were stronger than on standard false belief tasks, in which the children could reason backward to the belief from its effects. Findings provided strong support for the view that three year olds do not fully understand the…

  15. A Closer Look at Self-Reported Suicide Attempts: False Positives and False Negatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploderl, Martin; Kralovec, Karl; Yazdi, Kurosch; Fartacek, Reinhold

    2011-01-01

    The validity of self-reported suicide attempt information is undermined by false positives (e.g., incidences without intent to die), or by unreported suicide attempts, referred to as false negatives. In a sample of 1,385 Austrian adults, we explored the occurrence of false positives and false negatives with detailed, probing questions. Removing…

  16. Epidemiologic surveillance to detect false-positive Mycobacterium tuberculosis cultures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Meng-Rui; Chung, Kuei-Pin; Chen, Wei-Ting; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Lee, Li-Na; Yu, Chong-Jen; Teng, Lee-Jene; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Luh, Kwen-Tay

    2012-08-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the ability of potential indices from epidemiologic surveillance to detect false-positive cultures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). All clinical specimens for mycobacterial culture from April 1 to August 31, 2010, were reviewed. Single-positive cultures without relevant clinical and pathologic information were categorized as suspected false-positive cultures. Genotyping methods were used to confirm false-positive cultures. The performance of epidemiologic surveillance indices to detect potential false-positive cultures was evaluated. A total of 14,462 specimens were sent to the laboratory and 214 batches were processed in 107 work days (average 67.6 specimens per batch, ranging from 21 to 130 specimens per batch). Seventy-one single-positive cultures were identified, among which 5 cultures of multidrug-resistant MTB in 1 batch were false-positive, confirmed by genotyping methods. Epidemiologic surveillance with statistical process control charts for single-positive cultures per day showed good performance in epidemiologic surveillance. The false-positive rate was 38.5% in the 13 potential false-positive cultures according to the statistical process control chart for single-positive cultures per day. Although the incidence of tuberculous disease is high in Taiwan, clustering of multidrug-resistant MTB in 1 batch or clustering of single-positive cultures still suggested the occurrence of false-positive MTB cultures. Therefore, epidemiologic surveillance for the clustering of single-positive cultures with the statistical process control chart could be used to monitor the occurrence of false-positive results. PMID:22705229

  17. On False-Positive and False-Negative Decisions with a Mastery Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Rand R.

    Wilcox (1977) examines two methods of estimating the probability of a false-positive on false-negative decision with a mastery test. Both procedures make assumptions about the form of the true score distribution which might not give good results in all situations. In this paper, upper and lower bounds on the two possible error types are described…

  18. Generalized site occupancy models allowing for false positive and false negative errors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Link, W.A.

    2006-01-01

    Site occupancy models have been developed that allow for imperfect species detection or ?false negative? observations. Such models have become widely adopted in surveys of many taxa. The most fundamental assumption underlying these models is that ?false positive? errors are not possible. That is, one cannot detect a species where it does not occur. However, such errors are possible in many sampling situations for a number of reasons, and even low false positive error rates can induce extreme bias in estimates of site occupancy when they are not accounted for. In this paper, we develop a model for site occupancy that allows for both false negative and false positive error rates. This model can be represented as a two-component finite mixture model and can be easily fitted using freely available software. We provide an analysis of avian survey data using the proposed model and present results of a brief simulation study evaluating the performance of the maximum-likelihood estimator and the naive estimator in the presence of false positive errors.

  19. How to limit false positives in environmental DNA and metabarcoding?

    PubMed

    Ficetola, Gentile Francesco; Taberlet, Pierre; Coissac, Eric

    2016-05-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) and metabarcoding are boosting our ability to acquire data on species distribution in a variety of ecosystems. Nevertheless, as most of sampling approaches, eDNA is not perfect. It can fail to detect species that are actually present, and even false positives are possible: a species may be apparently detected in areas where it is actually absent. Controlling false positives remains a main challenge for eDNA analyses: in this issue of Molecular Ecology Resources, Lahoz-Monfort et al. () test the performance of multiple statistical modelling approaches to estimate the rate of detection and false positives from eDNA data. Here, we discuss the importance of controlling for false detection from early steps of eDNA analyses (laboratory, bioinformatics), to improve the quality of results and allow an efficient use of the site occupancy-detection modelling (SODM) framework for limiting false presences in eDNA analysis. PMID:27062589

  20. Quality of life following a false positive mammogram.

    PubMed

    Gram, I T; Lund, E; Slenker, S E

    1990-12-01

    To assess how women regard having had a false positive mammogram screening exam, and the influence that this had on their quality of life, 126 such women were interviewed. Their responses were compared to those of 152 women randomly selected among screenees with a negative exam. Eighteen months after the screening the reported prevalence of anxiety about breast cancer was 29% among women with a false positive and 13% among women with a negative screening mammogram (P = 0.001). Of 30 women biopsied, 8 (27%) had pain in the breast and 10 (33%) had reduced sexual sensitivity. A false positive mammogram was described by 7 (5%) of the women as the worst thing they ever had experienced. However, most women with a false positive result regarded this experience, in retrospect, as but one of many minor stressful experiences creating a temporary decrease in quality of life. They report the same quality of life today as women with negative screening results and 98% would attend another screening. Even so, false positive results are a matter of concern, and efforts should be made to minimise this cost whenever a screening programme is conducted. PMID:2257206

  1. Looking for Childhood Schizophrenia: Case Series of False Positives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stayer, Catherine; Sporn, Alexandra; Gogtay, Nitin; Tossell, Julia; Lenane, Marge; Gochman, Peter; Rapoport, Judith L.

    2004-01-01

    Extensive experience with the diagnosis of childhood-onset schizophrenia indicates a high rate of false positives. Most mislabeled patients have chronic disabling, affective, or behavioral disorders. The authors report the cases of three children who passed stringent initial childhood-onset schizophrenia "screens" but had no chronic psychotic…

  2. A Demonstration of Regression False Positive Selection in Data Mining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinder, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Business analytics courses, such as marketing research, data mining, forecasting, and advanced financial modeling, have substantial predictive modeling components. The predictive modeling in these courses requires students to estimate and test many linear regressions. As a result, false positive variable selection ("type I errors") is…

  3. Detecting False Positives in Multielement Designs: Implications for Brief Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Sara M.; Rapp, John T.; Henrickson, Marissa L.

    2011-01-01

    The authors assessed the extent to which multielement designs produced false positives using continuous duration recording (CDR) and interval recording with 10-s and 1-min interval sizes. Specifically, they created 6,000 graphs with multielement designs that varied in the number of data paths, and the number of data points per data path, using a…

  4. False Positive Probabilities for all Kepler Objects of Interest: 1284 Newly Validated Planets and 428 Likely False Positives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Timothy D.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; Rowe, Jason F.; Ravichandran, Ganesh; Petigura, Erik A.; Haas, Michael R.; Batalha, Natalie M.

    2016-05-01

    We present astrophysical false positive probability calculations for every Kepler Object of Interest (KOI)—the first large-scale demonstration of a fully automated transiting planet validation procedure. Out of 7056 KOIs, we determine that 1935 have probabilities <1% of being astrophysical false positives, and thus may be considered validated planets. Of these, 1284 have not yet been validated or confirmed by other methods. In addition, we identify 428 KOIs that are likely to be false positives, but have not yet been identified as such, though some of these may be a result of unidentified transit timing variations. A side product of these calculations is full stellar property posterior samplings for every host star, modeled as single, binary, and triple systems. These calculations use vespa, a publicly available Python package that is able to be easily applied to any transiting exoplanet candidate.

  5. Reducing False Positives in Runtime Analysis of Deadlocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensalem, Saddek; Havelund, Klaus; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an improvement of a standard algorithm for detecting dead-lock potentials in multi-threaded programs, in that it reduces the number of false positives. The standard algorithm works as follows. The multi-threaded program under observation is executed, while lock and unlock events are observed. A graph of locks is built, with edges between locks symbolizing locking orders. Any cycle in the graph signifies a potential for a deadlock. The typical standard example is the group of dining philosophers sharing forks. The algorithm is interesting because it can catch deadlock potentials even though no deadlocks occur in the examined trace, and at the same time it scales very well in contrast t o more formal approaches to deadlock detection. The algorithm, however, can yield false positives (as well as false negatives). The extension of the algorithm described in this paper reduces the amount of false positives for three particular cases: when a gate lock protects a cycle, when a single thread introduces a cycle, and when the code segments in different threads that cause the cycle can actually not execute in parallel. The paper formalizes a theory for dynamic deadlock detection and compares it to model checking and static analysis techniques. It furthermore describes an implementation for analyzing Java programs and its application to two case studies: a planetary rover and a space craft altitude control system.

  6. ``False Positive,'' an Apt Term and Concept for Volcanologists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderman, R.

    2010-12-01

    A less-than-bold prediction is that signals that could presage an eruption, but later turn out not to have been predictive (false positives), will continue to vex volcanologists and societies touched by volcanic processes. At present, even at the most carefully monitored volcanoes, many remote-sensing, geophysical, and geochemical clues are often incompletely diagnostic. Even assessing multiple kinds of data cannot ensure successful prediction of eruption or eruptive behavior. Although we’ve witnessed improvements in instrumentation, a growing number of instructive examples, and advances in understanding, the concept of false positives might elevate public understanding since the term is in common use (eg., medical tests). The term helps reveal inherent uncertainty to the press and public, with much-needed emphasis on the limits of the data. Such understanding among the public is critical when scientists forecast an eruption that fails to materialize (“cry wolf”), a circumstance that can have profound negative consequences, including loss of credibility. Bayes’ theorem can calculate probabilities as well as the rates of false positives and false negatives. The rates are a function of both the accuracy of the test and the actual rate of occurrence of the phenomena in question. Globally, rates of occurrence differ for various volcanological processes. For example, dome extrusion is common, whereas caldera collapse, comparatively rare. The latter’s rarity may suggest caution in interpreting precursory signals that could indicate that outcome. Despite the risk of false positives, it may be appropriate to heed test results, even those of marginal reliability, because the consequences of disaster are much greater than the cost of avoidance. For example, risks of uncertain ash plumes detected by VAACs with remote sensing may be minimized by altering an aircraft’s route, a choice less onerous than confronting the danger of ash encounter.

  7. How the Sausage is Made: Kepler's False Alarms, False Positives, and Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, J.

    2014-04-01

    The Kepler mission has now designated over 7,000 Kepler objects of interest (KOIs), or transit-like signatures, utilizing up to four years of data. The number of potentially habitable planet candidates (PCs) among this sample has risen significantly over time. However, starting with Kepler threshold crossing events (TCEs), there are initially about as many false alarms (FAs) detected as there are KOIs. Furthermore, due to its design, contamination from eclipsing binaries, variable stars, and other transiting planets result in a significant number of KOIs being designated as false positives (FPs). Many of these FAs and FPs occur at long orbital periods, where habitable planets are typically found. I will review the process of how an initial TCE becomes a KOI, and then is ultimately classified as a FA, FP, or PC, along with the various vetting tools employed. The understanding of this process is crucial to performing accurate statistical analyses on populations of habitable planet candidates discovered by Kepler.

  8. ON THE LOW FALSE POSITIVE PROBABILITIES OF KEPLER PLANET CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, Timothy D.; Johnson, John Asher E-mail: johnjohn@astro.caltech.edu

    2011-09-10

    We present a framework to conservatively estimate the probability that any particular planet-like transit signal observed by the Kepler mission is in fact a planet, prior to any ground-based follow-up efforts. We use Monte Carlo methods based on stellar population synthesis and Galactic structure models, and report false positive probabilities (FPPs) for every Kepler Object of Interest, assuming a 20% intrinsic occurrence rate of close-in planets in the radius range 0.5 R{sub +} < R{sub p} < 20 R{sub +}. Nearly 90% of the 1235 candidates have FPP <10%, and over half have FPP <5%. This probability varies with the magnitude and Galactic latitude of the target star, and with the depth of the transit signal-deeper signals generally have higher FPPs than shallower signals. We establish that a single deep high-resolution image will be an effective follow-up tool for the shallowest (Earth-sized) transits, providing the quickest route toward probabilistically validating the smallest candidates by potentially decreasing the FPP of an Earth-sized transit around a faint star from >10% to <1%. Since Kepler has detected many more planetary signals than can be positively confirmed with ground-based follow-up efforts in the near term, these calculations will be crucial to using the ensemble of Kepler data to determine population characteristics of planetary systems. We also describe how our analysis complements the Kepler team's more detailed BLENDER false positive analysis for planet validation.

  9. Abort Trigger False Positive and False Negative Analysis Methodology for Threshold-Based Abort Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.; Cruz, Jose A.; Johnson Stephen B.; Lo, Yunnhon

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a quantitative methodology for bounding the false positive (FP) and false negative (FN) probabilities associated with a human-rated launch vehicle abort trigger (AT) that includes sensor data qualification (SDQ). In this context, an AT is a hardware and software mechanism designed to detect the existence of a specific abort condition. Also, SDQ is an algorithmic approach used to identify sensor data suspected of being corrupt so that suspect data does not adversely affect an AT's detection capability. The FP and FN methodologies presented here were developed to support estimation of the probabilities of loss of crew and loss of mission for the Space Launch System (SLS) which is being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The paper provides a brief overview of system health management as being an extension of control theory; and describes how ATs and the calculation of FP and FN probabilities relate to this theory. The discussion leads to a detailed presentation of the FP and FN methodology and an example showing how the FP and FN calculations are performed. This detailed presentation includes a methodology for calculating the change in FP and FN probabilities that result from including SDQ in the AT architecture. To avoid proprietary and sensitive data issues, the example incorporates a mixture of open literature and fictitious reliability data. Results presented in the paper demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach in providing quantitative estimates that bound the probability of a FP or FN abort determination.

  10. A positive emotional bias in confabulatory false beliefs about place.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Oliver H; Berry, Helen; Evans, Cathryn E Y

    2004-08-01

    Some neurological patients with medial frontal lesions exhibit striking confabulations. Most accounts of the cause of confabulations are cognitive, though the literature has produced anecdotal suggestions that confabulations may not be emotionally neutral, having a ('wish-fulfilment') bias that shapes the patient's perception of reality in a more affectively positive direction. The present study reviewed every case (N = 16) of false beliefs about place reported in the neuroscientific literature from 1980 to 2000, with blind raters evaluating the 'pleasantness' of the patient's actual and confabulated locations. In each case the confabulated location was evaluated as more pleasant. This striking finding supports the claim that there may be a systematic affective bias in the false beliefs held by neurological patients with confabulation. PMID:15223194

  11. A "false positive" octreoscan in ileal Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Alberto; Tabuenca, Olga; Peteiro, Angeles

    2008-09-14

    We present a case report of a patient with a suspicious ileal carcinoid tumour. Clinical examination as well as computer tomography (CT) scan suggested a tumour. Octeotride scan showed uptake in the same bowel loop reported as pathological in CT. The patient underwent surgery and biopsy which reported Crohn's disease (CD). The interest in the case is due to the fact that this is, to the best of our knowledge, the second report of Crohn's disease as a cause of false positive octeotride scan. Unfortunately, no somatostatin receptors could be found in the sample, so further studies should be performed. PMID:18785291

  12. Genomic Amplifications Cause False Positives in CRISPR Screens.

    PubMed

    Sheel, Ankur; Xue, Wen

    2016-08-01

    In CRISPR-based screens for essential genes, Munoz and colleagues and Aguirre and colleagues show that gene-independent targeting of genomic amplifications in human cancer cell lines reduces proliferation or survival. The correlation between CRISPR target site copy number and lethality demonstrates the need for scrutiny and complementary approaches to rule out off-target effects and false positives in CRISPR screens. Cancer Discov; 6(8); 824-6. ©2016 AACR.See related article by Munoz et al., p. 900See related article by Aguirre et al., p. 914. PMID:27485003

  13. "False Positive" Claims of Near-Death Experiences and "False Negative" Denials of Near-Death Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greyson, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Some persons who claim to have had near-death experiences (NDEs) fail research criteria for having had NDEs ("false positives"); others who deny having had NDEs do meet research criteria for having had NDEs ("false negatives"). The author evaluated false positive claims and false negative denials in an organization that promotes near-death…

  14. THE XO PLANETARY SURVEY PROJECT: ASTROPHYSICAL FALSE POSITIVES

    SciTech Connect

    Poleski, Radosaw; McCullough, Peter R.; Valenti, Jeff A.; Burke, Christopher J.; Machalek, Pavel; Janes, Kenneth

    2010-07-15

    Searches for planetary transits find many astrophysical false positives as a by-product. There are four main types analyzed in the literature: a grazing-incidence eclipsing binary (EB) star, an EB star with a small radius companion star, a blend of one or more stars with an unrelated EB star, and a physical triple star system. We present a list of 69 astrophysical false positives that had been identified as candidates of transiting planets of the on-going XO survey. This list may be useful in order to avoid redundant observation and characterization of these particular candidates that have been independently identified by other wide-field searches for transiting planets. The list may be useful for those modeling the yield of the XO survey and surveys similar to it. Subsequent observations of some of the listed stars may improve mass-radius relations, especially for low-mass stars. From the candidates exhibiting eclipses, we report three new spectroscopic double-line binaries and give mass function estimations for 15 single-line spectroscopic binaries.

  15. Mitigating false-positive associations in rare disease gene discovery.

    PubMed

    Akle, Sebastian; Chun, Sung; Jordan, Daniel M; Cassa, Christopher A

    2015-10-01

    Clinical sequencing is expanding, but causal variants are still not identified in the majority of cases. These unsolved cases can aid in gene discovery when individuals with similar phenotypes are identified in systems such as the Matchmaker Exchange. We describe risks for gene discovery in this growing set of unsolved cases. In a set of rare disease cases with the same phenotype, it is not difficult to find two individuals with the same phenotype that carry variants in the same gene. We quantify the risk of false-positive association in a cohort of individuals with the same phenotype, using the prior probability of observing a variant in each gene from over 60,000 individuals (Exome Aggregation Consortium). Based on the number of individuals with a genic variant, cohort size, specific gene, and mode of inheritance, we calculate a P value that the match represents a true association. A match in two of 10 patients in MECP2 is statistically significant (P = 0.0014), whereas a match in TTN would not reach significance, as expected (P > 0.999). Finally, we analyze the probability of matching in clinical exome cases to estimate the number of cases needed to identify genes related to different disorders. We offer Rare Disease Match, an online tool to mitigate the uncertainty of false-positive associations. PMID:26378430

  16. DSM-5, psychiatric epidemiology and the false positives problem.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, J C

    2015-06-01

    The revision effort leading to the publication of the fifth edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) was flawed in process, goals and outcome. The revision process suffered from lack of an adequate public record of the rationale for changes, thus shortchanging future scholarship. The goals, such as dimensionalising diagnosis, incorporating biomarkers and separating impairment from diagnosis, were ill-considered and mostly abandoned. However, DSM-5's greatest problem, and the target of the most vigorous and sustained criticism, was its failure to take seriously the false positives problem. By expanding diagnosis beyond plausible boundaries in ways inconsistent with DSM-5's own definition of disorder, DSM-5 threatened the validity of psychiatric research, including especially psychiatric epidemiology. I present four examples: increasing the symptom options while decreasing the diagnostic threshold for substance use disorder, elimination of the bereavement exclusion from major depression, allowing verbal arguments as evidence of intermittent explosive disorder and expanding attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder to adults before addressing its manifest false positives problems. PMID:25675983

  17. Decoy methods for assessing false positives and false discovery rates in shotgun proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanghui; Wu, Wells W; Zhang, Zheng; Masilamani, Shyama; Shen, Rong-Fong

    2009-01-01

    The potential of getting a significant number of false positives (FPs) in peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs) obtained by proteomic database search has been well-recognized. Among the attempts to assess FPs, the concomitant use of target and decoy databases is widely practiced. By adjusting filtering criteria, FPs and false discovery rate (FDR) can be controlled at a desired level. Although the target-decoy approach is gaining in popularity, subtle differences in decoy construction (e.g., reversing vs stochastic methods), rate calculation (e.g., total vs unique PSMs), or searching (separate vs composite) do exist among various implementations. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of these differences on FP and FDR estimations using a rat kidney protein sample and the SEQUEST search engine as an example. On the effects of decoy construction, we found that, when a single scoring filter (XCorr) was used, stochastic methods generated a higher estimation of FPs and FDR than sequence reversing methods, likely due to an increase in unique peptides. This higher estimation could largely be attenuated by creating decoy databases similar in effective size but not by a simple normalization with a unique-peptide coefficient. When multiple filters were applied, the differences seen between reversing and stochastic methods significantly diminished, suggesting multiple filterings reduce the dependency on how a decoy is constructed. For a fixed set of filtering criteria, FDR and FPs estimated by using unique PSMs were almost twice those using total PSMs. The higher estimation seemed to be dependent on data acquisition setup. As to the differences between performing separate or composite searches, in general, FDR estimated from the separate search was about three times that from the composite search. The degree of difference gradually decreased as the filtering criteria became more stringent. Paradoxically, the estimated true positives in separate search were higher when

  18. Clinical Brain Death with False Positive Radionuclide Cerebral Perfusion Scans

    PubMed Central

    Venkatram, Sindhaghatta; Bughio, Sara; Diaz-Fuentes, Gilda

    2015-01-01

    Practice guidelines from the American Academy of Neurology for the determination of brain death in adults define brain death as “the irreversible loss of function of the brain, including the brainstem.” Neurological determination of brain death is primarily based on clinical examination; if clinical criteria are met, a definitive confirmatory test is indicated. The apnea test remains the gold standard for confirmation. In patients with factors that confound the clinical determination or when apnea tests cannot safely be performed, an ancillary test is required to confirm brain death. Confirmatory ancillary tests for brain death include (a) tests of electrical activity (electroencephalography (EEG) and somatosensory evoked potentials) and (b) radiologic examinations of blood flow (contrast angiography, transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD), and radionuclide methods). Of these, however, radionuclide studies are used most commonly. Here we present data from two patients with a false positive Radionuclide Cerebral Perfusion Scan (RCPS). PMID:26167307

  19. Accurate decisions in an uncertain world: collective cognition increases true positives while decreasing false positives

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Max; Kurvers, Ralf H. J. M.; Ward, Ashley J. W.; Krause, Stefan; Krause, Jens

    2013-01-01

    In a wide range of contexts, including predator avoidance, medical decision-making and security screening, decision accuracy is fundamentally constrained by the trade-off between true and false positives. Increased true positives are possible only at the cost of increased false positives; conversely, decreased false positives are associated with decreased true positives. We use an integrated theoretical and experimental approach to show that a group of decision-makers can overcome this basic limitation. Using a mathematical model, we show that a simple quorum decision rule enables individuals in groups to simultaneously increase true positives and decrease false positives. The results from a predator-detection experiment that we performed with humans are in line with these predictions: (i) after observing the choices of the other group members, individuals both increase true positives and decrease false positives, (ii) this effect gets stronger as group size increases, (iii) individuals use a quorum threshold set between the average true- and false-positive rates of the other group members, and (iv) individuals adjust their quorum adaptively to the performance of the group. Our results have broad implications for our understanding of the ecology and evolution of group-living animals and lend themselves for applications in the human domain such as the design of improved screening methods in medical, forensic, security and business applications. PMID:23407830

  20. Selective reduction of CAD false-positive findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarlinghi, N.; Gori, I.; Retico, A.; Bagagli, F.

    2010-03-01

    Computer-Aided Detection (CAD) systems are becoming widespread supporting tools to radiologists' diagnosis, especially in screening contexts. However, a large amount of false positive (FP) alarms would inevitably lead both to an undesired possible increase in time for diagnosis, and to a reduction in radiologists' confidence in CAD as a useful tool. Most CAD systems implement as final step of the analysis a classifier which assigns a score to each entry of a list of findings; by thresholding this score it is possible to define the system performance on an annotated validation dataset in terms of a FROC curve (sensitivity vs. FP per scan). To use a CAD as a supportive tool for most clinical activities, an operative point has to be chosen on the system FROC curve, according to the obvious criterion of keeping the sensitivity as high as possible, while maintaining the number of FP alarms still acceptable. The strategy proposed in this study is to choose an operative point with high sensitivity on the CAD FROC curve, then to implement in cascade a further classification step, constituted by a smarter classifier. The key issue of this approach is that the smarter classifier is actually a meta-classifier of more then one decision system, each specialized in rejecting a particular type of FP findings generated by the CAD. The application of this approach to a dataset of 16 lung CT scans previously processed by the VBNACAD system is presented. The lung CT VBNACAD performance of 87.1% sensitivity to juxtapleural nodules with 18.5 FP per scan is improved up to 10.1 FP per scan while maintaining the same value of sensitivity. This work has been carried out in the framework of the MAGIC-V collaboration.

  1. False Positive Lyme Disease IgM Immunoblots in Children.

    PubMed

    Lantos, Paul M; Lipsett, Susan C; Nigrovic, Lise E

    2016-07-01

    In our cross-sectional sample of 7289 serologic tests for Lyme disease, we identified 167 instances of a positive IgM immunoblot but a negative IgG immunoblot test result. Considering that only 71% (95% CI 64%-78%) of patients had Lyme disease, a positive IgM immunoblot alone should be interpreted with caution to avoid over-diagnosis of Lyme disease. PMID:27157898

  2. False-positive indium-111 labeled leukocyte scintigram in a patient with a painful hip prosthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, N.; Makler, P.T. Jr.; Alavi, A.

    1986-01-01

    A Tronzo hip prosthesis is designed to elicit an inflammatory reaction in order to promote prosthesis stability. A three-phased bone scan and Ga-67 imaging in conjunction with physical examination and laboratory findings failed to demonstrate evidence for osteomyelitis in a patient with a painful hip prosthesis, in whom images obtained with In-111-labeled leukocytes were positive. This observation demonstrated that the interpretation of the latter technique in demonstrating inflammation can cause a false impression of an infectious process.

  3. Unusual false-positive case of urinary screening for buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Romero, Araelsis; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Mercadanti, Mariella

    2011-01-01

    Buprenorphine is a centrally acting analgesic drug that is administered for the management of opioid dependence and as an analgesic drug for the treatment of chronic pain. The growing use of this substance has determined an increased need for laboratory testing for either detection and confirmation of the illicit use or monitoring compliance as a substitution therapy for opioid dependence. We describe here the case of urinary sample adulteration with exogenous buprenorphine (6,952 ng/ml), which has led to afalse-positive immunoassay test result (14.9 ng/ml) on a subsequent sample due to a phenomenon of instrumental carry-over. This unusual case confirms the importance to take into account adulteration when screening urines for buprenorphine in patients undergoing substitution therapy for opioid dependence, routinely perform a confirmation assay on positive samples, and rule out instrumental carry-over. PMID:21786326

  4. False-positive cancer screens and health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Patricia M; Gross, Cynthia R; Krueger, Richard A; Engelhard, Deborah A; Cordes, Jill E; Church, Timothy R

    2004-01-01

    By design, screening tests are imperfect-unresponsive to some cancers (false negatives) while occasionally raising suspicion of cancer where none exists (false positives). This pilot study describes patients' responses to having a false-positive screening test for cancer, and identifies screening effects on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The pilot findings suggest issues important for incorporation in future evaluations of the impact of screening for prostate, lung, colon, or ovarian (PLCO) cancers. Seven focus groups were conducted to identify the nature and meaning of all phases of PLCO screening. Minnesota participants in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial who had completed screening, with at least 1 false-positive screen, participated (N = 47). Participants' reactions to abnormal screens and diagnostic work-ups were primarily emotional (eg, anxiety and distress), not physical, and ultimately positive for the majority. Health distress and fear of cancer and death were the major negative aspects of HRQoL identified. These concepts are not typically included in generic HRQoL questionnaires like the SF-36, but are highly relevant to PLCO screening. Clinicians were regarded as underestimating the discomfort of follow-up diagnostic testing. However, relief and assurance appeared to eventually outweigh the negative emotions for most participants. Implications for oncology nurses include the need to consider the emotional consequences of screening in association with screen reliability and validity. PMID:15525861

  5. Discriminating between true-positive and false-positive clinical mastitis alerts from automatic milking systems.

    PubMed

    Steeneveld, W; van der Gaag, L C; Ouweltjes, W; Mollenhorst, H; Hogeveen, H

    2010-06-01

    Automatic milking systems (AMS) generate alert lists reporting cows likely to have clinical mastitis (CM). Dutch farmers indicated that they use non-AMS cow information or the detailed alert information from the AMS to decide whether to check an alerted cow for CM. However, it is not yet known to what extent such information can be used to discriminate between true-positive and false-positive alerts. The overall objective was to investigate whether selection of the alerted cows that need further investigation for CM can be made. For this purpose, non-AMS cow information and detailed alert information were used. During a 2-yr study period, 11,156 alerts for CM, including 159 true-positive alerts, were collected at one farm in The Netherlands. Non-AMS cow information on parity, days in milk, season of the year, somatic cell count history, and CM history was added to each alert. In addition, 6 alert information variables were defined. These were the height of electrical conductivity, the alert origin (electrical conductivity, color, or both), whether or not a color alert for mastitic milk was given, whether or not a color alert for abnormal milk was given, deviation from the expected milk yield, and the number of alerts of the cow in the preceding 12 to 96 h. Subsequently, naive Bayesian networks (NBN) were constructed to compute the posterior probability of an alert being truly positive based only on non-AMS cow information, based on only alert information, or based on both types of information. The NBN including both types of information had the highest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC; 0.78), followed by the NBN including only alert information (AUC=0.75) and the NBN including only non-AMS cow information (AUC=0.62). By combining the 2 types of information and by setting a threshold on the computed probabilities, the number of false-positive alerts on a mastitis alert list was reduced by 35%, and 10% of the true-positive alerts would not

  6. Positive reaction to allergen (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  7. False positives and false negatives in functional near-infrared spectroscopy: issues, challenges, and the way forward.

    PubMed

    Tachtsidis, Ilias; Scholkmann, Felix

    2016-07-01

    We highlight a significant problem that needs to be considered and addressed when performing functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) studies, namely the possibility of inadvertently measuring fNIRS hemodynamic responses that are not due to neurovascular coupling. These can be misinterpreted as brain activity, i.e., "false positives" (errors caused by wrongly assigning a detected hemodynamic response to functional brain activity), or mask brain activity, i.e., "false negatives" (errors caused by wrongly assigning a not observed hemodynamic response in the presence of functional brain activity). Here, we summarize the possible physiological origins of these issues and suggest ways to avoid and remove them. PMID:27054143

  8. False positives and false negatives in functional near-infrared spectroscopy: issues, challenges, and the way forward.

    PubMed

    Tachtsidis, Ilias; Scholkmann, Felix

    2016-07-01

    We highlight a significant problem that needs to be considered and addressed when performing functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) studies, namely the possibility of inadvertently measuring fNIRS hemodynamic responses that are not due to neurovascular coupling. These can be misinterpreted as brain activity, i.e., "false positives" (errors caused by wrongly assigning a detected hemodynamic response to functional brain activity), or mask brain activity, i.e., "false negatives" (errors caused by wrongly assigning a not observed hemodynamic response in the presence of functional brain activity). Here, we summarize the possible physiological origins of these issues and suggest ways to avoid and remove them. PMID:26989757

  9. I am Not Dead Yet: Identification of False-Positive Matches to Death Master File.

    PubMed

    Turchin, Alexander; Shubina, Maria; Murphy, Shawn N

    2010-01-01

    Patient death is an important clinical outcome. It is typically ascertained by matching database records with external death indices. Accuracy of the matching algorithms is imperfect.We have investigated whether clinical records made > 1 month after the date of death accurately identify false positive matches to the Death Master File. Positive predictive value (PPV) varied from 74.7% (notes) to 95.9% (labs) and sensitivity from 57.4% (adverse medication reactions) to 94.9% (notes). Presence of any two out of four (billing data, labs, vital signs and medications) data elements had sensitivity of 83.0% and PPV of 98.3%. Area under the ROC curve for a multivariable logistic model that included the number of these four data elements recorded > 1 month after death was 0.987.Clinical data recorded after the date of death can help identify false positive matches to death indices and could be utilized to improve existing record linkage algorithms. PMID:21347090

  10. False positives observed on the Seratec® PSA SemiQuant Cassette Test with condom lubricants.

    PubMed

    Bitner, Sara E

    2012-11-01

    In the course of the validation of a new component of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) SemiQuant Cassette Test marketed by Seratec(®) , a false-positive reaction was observed when testing samples collected from the surface of unused, lubricated condoms. A variety of personal lubricants and condoms were tested to determine the frequency of the false positive, as well as its potential source. Samples were extracted in both water and the manufacturer-provided buffer, and the test was performed according to the manufacturer's suggested protocol. The false positive was observed intermittently, but occurred consistently with samples containing nonoxynol-9, a strong detergent utilized as a spermicide. The reaction may be attributable to the combination of latex and nonoxynol-9. Because of the unreliability of the test to confirm the presence of PSA in samples collected from condoms, the PSA cassette is an unsuitable method for confirming the presence of seminal fluid in condoms. PMID:22494324

  11. Bacteria associated with false-positive most-probable-number coliform test results for shellfish and estuaries.

    PubMed Central

    Hussong, D; Damaré, J M; Weiner, R M; Colwell, R R

    1981-01-01

    Aerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria isolated from false-positive, presumptive, total coliform, most-probable-number tests of Chesapeake Bay oyster, water, and sediment samples were characterized and then classified by numerical taxonomy. A total of 538 bacterial strains clustered into 17 phena, the predominant groups of which were Enterobacteriaceae (including Escherichia coli), Aeromonas spp., and Bacillus spp. Bacillus spp. were recovered most frequently from sediment samples. Gas-producing strains which were not members of the Enterobacteriaceae were not isolated during this study. However, disproportionately large numbers of atypical and anaerogenic lactose-fermenting strains were encountered. We concluded that no single, specific bacterial group can be identified as being responsible for the false-positive reaction in the presumptive coliform test. Instead, the false-positive reaction is a result of complex interactions among various genera, representing predominantly bacteria other than coliforms. PMID:7013700

  12. Statistical approaches to account for false-positive errors in environmental DNA samples.

    PubMed

    Lahoz-Monfort, José J; Guillera-Arroita, Gurutzeta; Tingley, Reid

    2016-05-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling is prone to both false-positive and false-negative errors. We review statistical methods to account for such errors in the analysis of eDNA data and use simulations to compare the performance of different modelling approaches. Our simulations illustrate that even low false-positive rates can produce biased estimates of occupancy and detectability. We further show that removing or classifying single PCR detections in an ad hoc manner under the suspicion that such records represent false positives, as sometimes advocated in the eDNA literature, also results in biased estimation of occupancy, detectability and false-positive rates. We advocate alternative approaches to account for false-positive errors that rely on prior information, or the collection of ancillary detection data at a subset of sites using a sampling method that is not prone to false-positive errors. We illustrate the advantages of these approaches over ad hoc classifications of detections and provide practical advice and code for fitting these models in maximum likelihood and Bayesian frameworks. Given the severe bias induced by false-negative and false-positive errors, the methods presented here should be more routinely adopted in eDNA studies. PMID:26558345

  13. PMA treatment is an effective means to reduce false positive PCR testing results

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional and real time PCR are widely used in detecting bacterial pathogens in various food matrix and environmental samples. Sometimes a positive detection using PCR can not be confirmed by subsequent culture isolation of the targeted pathogen, resulting in a potential “false positive.” False po...

  14. Addressing False Positives in Early Reading Assessment Using Intervention Response Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlenney, Athena Lentini; Coyne, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined a solution to high false positive reading risk classification rates in early kindergarten by investigating a method of identifying students with possible false positive risk classifications and returning them to general classroom instruction. Researchers assessed kindergarten students (N = 105) identified as at risk who…

  15. The "gastric fluid" sign: an unrecognized false-positive finding during focused assessment for trauma examinations.

    PubMed

    Nagdev, Arun; Racht, Justin

    2008-06-01

    The FAST exam has become the current standard for free intraperitoneal fluid determination in most emergency departments. Knowledge of false negative and false positive findings is imperative to improve accuracy. We detail a case in which an important false positive findings previously not discussed in the medical literature was noted. The ability of the physician to recognize the "gastric fluid" sign and make the adjustments accordingly could improve the specificity of the FAST exam, preventing non-therapeutic laparotomies. PMID:18534304

  16. Degradation of triglycidyl isocyanurate as a cause of false-negative patch test reaction.

    PubMed

    Erikstam, U; Bruze, M; Goossens, A

    2001-01-01

    Triglycidyl isocyanurate (TGIC) is mainly used in polyester-based powder paints, but also in laminates, insulating varnishes, coatings and adhesives. Several cases of contact allergy to TGIC have been reported during the last 10 years. Contact allergy to TGIC has developed in a factory producing the chemical, in a factory producing powder paints containing TGIC, and in industries using powder coating. In this paper, we report a man who developed a work-related dermatitis when working on the painting of metal frames. He was exposed to polyester powder pigments containing TGIC. When patch tested, he was negative to TGIC (prepared in 1988) 3x and positive to polyester powder pigment. Only when a new test preparation of fresh TGIC powder was tested, was a positive reaction obtained. Chemical analyses showed that there was no TGIC in the test preparation from 1988, and that in the TGIC powder from 1988, there was only 30% of the expected amount of TGIC. The investigations, clinical and chemical, strongly indicate degradation of TGIC in the test preparation and powder. Both substances and the test preparations made from them may change over time. Therefore, if a false-negative reaction due to a test preparation is strongly suspected, we recommend a re-test of the patient with a new test preparation of fresh material. As a general rule, patch testing should be performed with fresh substances and test preparations made from them, unless their stability and durability are known. PMID:11156005

  17. False-positive methadone urine drug screen in a patient treated with quetiapine.

    PubMed

    Lasić, Davor; Uglesić, Boran; Zuljan-Cvitanović, Marija; Supe-Domić, Daniela; Uglesić, Lovro

    2012-06-01

    We present a case of T.M. admitted to University Department of Psychiatry, Split University Hospital Center, in Croatia, because of the acute psychotic reaction (F23.9). The patient's urine tested positive for methadone without a history of methadone ingestion. Urine drug screen was performed with the COBAS Integra Methadone II test kit (kinetic interaction of microparticles in solution /KIMS/ methodology) by Roche. Drugs that have been shown to cross-react with methadone feature a tricyclic structure with a sulfur and nitrogen atom in the middle ring, which is common for both quetiapine and methadone. Therefore, it is plausible that this structural similarity between quetiapine and methadone could underlie the cross-reactivity on methadone drug screen. Besides quetiapine, a number of routinely prescribed medications have been associated with triggering false-positive urine drug screen results. Verification of the test results with a different screening test or additional analytical tests should be performed to avoid adverse consequences for the patients. PMID:23115954

  18. Experimental investigation of false positive errors in auditory species occurrence surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David A.W.; Weir, Linda A.; McClintock, Brett T.; Grant, Evan H. Campbell; Bailey, Larissa L.; Simons, Theodore R.

    2012-01-01

    False positive errors are a significant component of many ecological data sets, which in combination with false negative errors, can lead to severe biases in conclusions about ecological systems. We present results of a field experiment where observers recorded observations for known combinations of electronically broadcast calling anurans under conditions mimicking field surveys to determine species occurrence. Our objectives were to characterize false positive error probabilities for auditory methods based on a large number of observers, to determine if targeted instruction could be used to reduce false positive error rates, and to establish useful predictors of among-observer and among-species differences in error rates. We recruited 31 observers, ranging in abilities from novice to expert, that recorded detections for 12 species during 180 calling trials (66,960 total observations). All observers made multiple false positive errors and on average 8.1% of recorded detections in the experiment were false positive errors. Additional instruction had only minor effects on error rates. After instruction, false positive error probabilities decreased by 16% for treatment individuals compared to controls with broad confidence interval overlap of 0 (95% CI: -46 to 30%). This coincided with an increase in false negative errors due to the treatment (26%; -3 to 61%). Differences among observers in false positive and in false negative error rates were best predicted by scores from an online test and a self-assessment of observer ability completed prior to the field experiment. In contrast, years of experience conducting call surveys was a weak predictor of error rates. False positive errors were also more common for species that were played more frequently, but were not related to the dominant spectral frequency of the call. Our results corroborate other work that demonstrates false positives are a significant component of species occurrence data collected by auditory

  19. False-positive interferences of common urine drug screen immunoassays: a review.

    PubMed

    Saitman, Alec; Park, Hyung-Doo; Fitzgerald, Robert L

    2014-09-01

    Urine drug screen (UDS) immunoassays are a quick and inexpensive method for determining the presence of drugs of abuse. Many cross-reactivities exist with other analytes, potentially causing a false-positive result in an initial drug screen. Knowledge of these potential interferents is important in determining a course of action for patient care. We present an inclusive review of analytes causing false-positive interferences with drugs-of-abuse UDS immunoassays, which covers the literature from the year 2000 to present. English language articles were searched via the SciFinder platform with the strings 'false positive [drug] urine' yielding 173 articles. These articles were then carefully analyzed and condensed to 62 that included data on causes of false-positive results. The discussion is separated into six sections by drug class with a corresponding table of cross-reacting compounds for quick reference. False-positive results were described for amphetamines, opiates, benzodiazepines, cannabinoids, tricyclic antidepressants, phencyclidine, lysergic acid diethylamide and barbiturates. These false-positive results support the generally accepted practice that immunoassay positive results are considered presumptive until confirmed by a second independent chemical technique. PMID:24986836

  20. Accounting for false-positive acoustic detections of bats using occupancy models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clement, Matthew J.; Rodhouse, Thomas J.; Ormsbee, Patricia C.; Szewczak, Joseph M.; Nichols, James D.

    2014-01-01

    4. Synthesis and applications. Our results suggest that false positives sufficient to affect inferences may be common in acoustic surveys for bats. We demonstrate an approach that can estimate occupancy, regardless of the false-positive rate, when acoustic surveys are paired with capture surveys. Applications of this approach include monitoring the spread of White-Nose Syndrome, estimating the impact of climate change and informing conservation listing decisions. We calculate a site-specific probability of occupancy, conditional on survey results, which could inform local permitting decisions, such as for wind energy projects. More generally, the magnitude of false positives suggests that false-positive occupancy models can improve accuracy in research and monitoring of bats and provide wildlife managers with more reliable information.

  1. False positive stress-test in a patient with pericardial effusion.

    PubMed

    Mateja, Candice; Mishkin, Joseph; George, Malika; Chheda, Hemant; Guglin, Maya

    2009-10-01

    We report a case of false positive stress test in a patient with cardiac tamponade. After the drainage of pericardial effusion, reversible defect on a stress test resolved. Cardiac catheterization revealed normal coronary arteries. PMID:18768227

  2. Risk of breast cancer after false-positive results in mammographic screening.

    PubMed

    Román, Marta; Castells, Xavier; Hofvind, Solveig; von Euler-Chelpin, My

    2016-06-01

    Women with false-positive results are commonly referred back to routine screening. Questions remain regarding their long-term outcome of breast cancer. We assessed the risk of screen-detected breast cancer in women with false-positive results. We conducted a joint analysis using individual level data from the population-based screening programs in Copenhagen and Funen in Denmark, Norway, and Spain. Overall, 150,383 screened women from Denmark (1991-2008), 612,138 from Norway (1996-2010), and 1,172,572 from Spain (1990-2006) were included. Poisson regression was used to estimate the relative risk (RR) of screen-detected cancer for women with false-positive versus negative results. We analyzed information from 1,935,093 women 50-69 years who underwent 6,094,515 screening exams. During an average 5.8 years of follow-up, 230,609 (11.9%) women received a false-positive result and 27,849 (1.4%) were diagnosed with screen-detected cancer. The adjusted RR of screen-detected cancer after a false-positive result was 2.01 (95% CI: 1.93-2.09). Women who tested false-positive at first screen had a RR of 1.86 (95% CI: 1.77-1.96), whereas those who tested false-positive at third screening had a RR of 2.42 (95% CI: 2.21-2.64). The RR of breast cancer at the screening test after the false-positive result was 3.95 (95% CI: 3.71-4.21), whereas it decreased to 1.25 (95% CI: 1.17-1.34) three or more screens after the false-positive result. Women with false-positive results had a twofold risk of screen-detected breast cancer compared to women with negative tests. The risk remained significantly higher three or more screens after the false-positive result. The increased risk should be considered when discussing stratified screening strategies. PMID:26916154

  3. Congenital absence of the gallbladder: another cause of false-positive hepatobiliary image

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, C.Z.; Powers, T.A.; Sandler, M.P.; Partain, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    Hepatobiliary imaging with the various technetium-labeled IDA compounds is more than 90% sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis. Causes of false-positive studies include chronic cholecystitis, cystic-duct obstruction by tumor, prolonged fasting, the nonfasting state, pancreatitis, alcoholism, parenteral hyperalimentation, and severe intercurrent illness. A case of congenital absence of the gallbladder is sumbitted as another cause of a false-positive scan.

  4. A novel false-positive cause in testis scintigraphy in the diagnosis of testis torsion

    PubMed Central

    Koç, Zehra Pinar; Onur, Rahmi; Balci, Tansel Ansal

    2012-01-01

    Testis scintigraphy is the most reliable modality in the diagnosis of testis torsion since it directly reflects the vascularity of the testis. The ‘rim sign’ is considered as the pathognomonic sign of the missed torsion. However, there are some possible false-positive cases. In this case report, we would like to present an unexpected false-positive cause of the ‘rim sign’ in testis scintigraphy in an 18-year-old male patient. PMID:22987904

  5. False-positive cryptococcal antigen latex agglutination caused by disinfectants and soaps.

    PubMed

    Blevins, L B; Fenn, J; Segal, H; Newcomb-Gayman, P; Carroll, K C

    1995-06-01

    Five disinfectants or soaps were tested to determine if any could be responsible for false-positive results obtained with the Latex-Crypto Antigen Detection System kit (Immuno-Mycologics, Inc., Norman, Okla.). Three disinfectants or soaps (Derma soap, 7X, and Bacdown) produced false-positive agglutination after repeated washing of ring slides during testing of a known negative cerebrospinal fluid specimen. PMID:7650214

  6. Spectrum of false positivity for the fourth generation human immunodeficiency virus diagnostic tests.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peter; Jackson, Patrick; Shaw, Nathan; Heysell, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Novel fourth generation screening and confirmatory human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) assays are now commercially available and incorporated into new diagnostic algorithms. We report two cases involving a total of three patients which highlight the spectrum of false positivity for both the Abbott Architect p24 antigen/antibody assay and the confirmatory Multispot antibody differentiation test. We then discuss the mechanisms for false positivity and the associated clinical conditions or laboratory scenarios that may predispose to inaccurate interpretation. PMID:26734067

  7. Study of false positives in 5-ALA induced photodynamic diagnosis of bladder carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draga, Ronald O. P.; Grimbergen, Matthijs C. M.; Kok, Esther T.; Jonges, Trudy G. N.; Bosch, J. L. H. R.

    2009-02-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) is a technique that enhances the detection of tumors during cystoscopy using a photosensitizer which accumulates primarily in cancerous cells and will fluoresce when illuminated by violetblue light. A disadvantage of PDD is the relatively low specificity. In this retrospective study we aimed to identify predictors for false positive findings in PDD. Factors such as gender, age, recent transurethral resection of bladder tumors (TURBT), previous intravesical therapy (IVT) and urinary tract infections (UTIs) were examined for association with the false positive rates in a multivariate analysis. Data of 366 procedures and 200 patients were collected. Patients were instilled with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) intravesically and 1253 biopsies were taken from tumors and suspicious lesions. Female gender and TURBT are independent predictors of false positives in PDD. However, previous intravesical therapy with Bacille Calmette-Guérin is also an important predictor of false positives. The false positive rate decreases during the first 9-12 weeks after the latest TURBT and the latest intravesical chemotherapy. Although shortly after IVT and TURBT false positives increase, PDD improves the diagnostic sensitivity and results in more adequate treatment strategies in a significant number of patients.

  8. Prospective assessment of the false positive rate of the Australian snake venom detection kit in healthy human samples.

    PubMed

    Nimorakiotakis, Vasilios Bill; Winkel, Kenneth D

    2016-03-01

    The Snake Venom Detection Kit (SVDK; bioCSL Pty Ltd, Australia) distinguishes venom from the five most medically significant snake immunotypes found in Australia. This study assesses the rate of false positives that, by definition, refers to a positive assay finding in a sample from someone who has not been bitten by a venomous snake. Control unbroken skin swabs, simulated bite swabs and urine specimens were collected from 61 healthy adult volunteers [33 males and 28 females] for assessment. In all controls, simulated bite site and urine samples [a total of 183 tests], the positive control well reacted strongly within one minute and no test wells reacted during the ten minute incubation period. However, in two urine tests, the negative control well gave a positive reaction (indicating an uninterpretable test). A 95% confidence interval for the false positive rate, on a per-patient rate, derived from the findings of this study, would extend from 0% to 6% and, on a per-test basis, it would be 0-2%. It appears to be a very low incidence (0-6%) of intrinsic true false positives for the SVDK. The clinical impresssion of a high SVDK false positive rate may be mostly related to operator error. PMID:26690978

  9. Metal Impurities Cause False Positives in High-Throughput Screening Campaigns

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Organic impurities in compound libraries are known to often cause false-positive signals in screening campaigns for new leads, but organic impurities do not fully account for all false-positive results. We discovered inorganic impurities in our screening library that can also cause positive signals for a variety of targets and/or readout systems, including biochemical and biosensor assays. We investigated in depth the example of zinc for a specific project and in retrospect in various HTS screens at Roche and propose a straightforward counter screen using the chelator TPEN to rule out inhibition caused by zinc. PMID:24900642

  10. False positive results for antibody to HIV in two men with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Esteva, M H; Blasini, A M; Ogly, D; Rodríguez, M A

    1992-01-01

    False positive results were obtained for HIV tests in two men with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who were suspected of being infected with HIV because of fever, weight loss, lymphadenopathy, and inflammatory myopathy. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for HIV were twice positive when tested three times over a period of six months. Western blot analysis showed reactivity against the gp41 band in patient 1. False positive results for HIV tests can occur in patients with SLE, potentially leading to an erroneous diagnosis of HIV infection. PMID:1417140

  11. False-positive serum and bronchoalveolar lavage Aspergillus galactomannan assays caused by different antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Boonsarngsuk, Viboon; Niyompattama, Anuchit; Teosirimongkol, Chalermporn; Sriwanichrak, Kanchana

    2010-07-01

    Our objective was to identify false-positive serum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid galactomannan (GM) tests caused by various antibiotics commonly used in general practice. Serum and BAL samples from patients who did not have the diagnostic criteria of invasive aspergillosis and received different antibiotics were prospectively analyzed for GM. Serum and BAL samples were also collected from patients who did not receive antibiotics. At the cut-off index of >or=0.5, false-positive serum results were found in patients who received amoxicillin-clavulanate, piperacillin-tazobactam, cefepime, and cefoperazone-sulbactam (26.7%, 58.3%, 14.3%, and 66.7%, respectively). Fungal colonization in BAL samples had a higher BAL GM than those without fungal colonization. In 71 patients who had a negative BAL culture for fungi, at the cut-off value of >or=1.0, false-positive BAL fluid results were found in patients who received amoxicillin-clavulanate (27.3%), piperacillin-tazobactam (50%), cefepime (16.7%), carbapenem (45.5%), and ceftriaxone (45.5%). False-positive serum and BAL GM assays were also detected in patients who did not receive any antibiotics. In summary, this study demonstrates the false-positive GM levels in serum and BAL caused by beta-lactam antibiotics that are commonly used in general practice. Physicians should be aware of this possible interference. PMID:20192889

  12. Case Reports of Aripiprazole Causing False-Positive Urine Amphetamine Drug Screens in Children.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Justin; Shah, Pooja; Faley, Brian; Siegel, Mark E

    2015-12-01

    Urine drug screens (UDSs) are used to identify the presence of certain medications. One limitation of UDSs is the potential for false-positive results caused by cross-reactivity with other substances. Amphetamines have an extensive list of cross-reacting medications. The literature contains reports of false-positive amphetamine UDSs with multiple antidepressants and antipsychotics. We present 2 cases of presumed false-positive UDSs for amphetamines after ingestion of aripiprazole. Case 1 was a 16-month-old girl who accidently ingested 15 to 45 mg of aripiprazole. She was lethargic and ataxic at home with 1 episode of vomiting containing no identifiable tablets. She remained sluggish with periods of irritability and was admitted for observation. UDS on 2 consecutive days came back positive for amphetamines. Case 2 was of a 20-month-old girl who was brought into the hospital after accidental ingestion of an unknown quantity of her father's medications which included aripiprazole. UDS on the first day of admission came back positive only for amphetamines. Confirmatory testing with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) on the blood and urine samples were also performed for both patients on presentation to detect amphetamines and were subsequently negative. Both patients returned to baseline and were discharged from the hospital. To our knowledge, these cases represent the first reports of false-positive amphetamine urine drug tests with aripiprazole. In both cases, aripiprazole was the drug with the highest likelihood of causing the positive amphetamine screen. The implications of these false-positives include the possibility of unnecessary treatment and monitoring of patients. PMID:26527556

  13. False positives and false negatives in functional near-infrared spectroscopy: issues, challenges, and the way forward

    PubMed Central

    Tachtsidis, Ilias; Scholkmann, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. We highlight a significant problem that needs to be considered and addressed when performing functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) studies, namely the possibility of inadvertently measuring fNIRS hemodynamic responses that are not due to neurovascular coupling. These can be misinterpreted as brain activity, i.e., “false positives” (errors caused by wrongly assigning a detected hemodynamic response to functional brain activity), or mask brain activity, i.e., “false negatives” (errors caused by wrongly assigning a not observed hemodynamic response in the presence of functional brain activity). Here, we summarize the possible physiological origins of these issues and suggest ways to avoid and remove them. PMID:27054143

  14. Amplification of residual DNA sequences in sterile bronchoscopes leading to false-positive PCR results.

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, K; Luke, S; McGurn, C; Snowden, N; Monti, C; Fry, W A

    1996-01-01

    PCR has been used successfully for the direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in uncultured patient samples. Its potential is hindered by the risk of false-positive results as a result of either amplicon carryover of cross-contamination between patient samples. In the present study, we investigated whether residual amplifiable human or M. tuberculosis DNA could remain in sterile bronchoscopes and potentially be a cause of false-positive PCR results in subsequent patient samples. Sterilized bronchoscopes were flushed with sterile saline, and the collected eluate was submitted for PCR amplification of IS6110 sequences and exon 8 of the human p53 gene. Of a total of 55 washes of sterile bronchoscopes from two institutions, 2 (3.6%) contained amplifiable M. tuberculosis DNA and 11 (20%) contained residual human DNA. These findings indicate that residual DNA can remain in sterilized bronchoscopes and can be a source of false-positive PCR results. PMID:8818888

  15. False Positives in Multiple Regression: Unanticipated Consequences of Measurement Error in the Predictor Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shear, Benjamin R.; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2013-01-01

    Type I error rates in multiple regression, and hence the chance for false positive research findings, can be drastically inflated when multiple regression models are used to analyze data that contain random measurement error. This article shows the potential for inflated Type I error rates in commonly encountered scenarios and provides new…

  16. EMPLOYING TOPOGRAPHICAL HEIGHT MAP IN COLONIC POLYP MEASUREMENT AND FALSE POSITIVE REDUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jianhua; Li, Jiang; Summers, Ronald M.

    2008-01-01

    CT Colonography (CTC) is an emerging minimally invasive technique for screening and diagnosing colon cancers. Computer Aided Detection (CAD) techniques can increase sensitivity and reduce false positives. Inspired by the way radiologists detect polyps via 3D virtual fly-through in CTC, we borrowed the idea from geographic information systems to employ topographical height map in colonic polyp measurement and false positive reduction. After a curvature based filtering and a 3D CT feature classifier, a height map is computed for each detection using a ray-casting algorithm. We design a concentric index to characterize the concentric pattern in polyp height map based on the fact that polyps are protrusions from the colon wall and round in shape. The height map is optimized through a multi-scale spiral spherical search to maximize the concentric index. We derive several topographic features from the map and compute texture features based on wavelet decomposition. We then send the features to a committee of support vector machines for classification. We have trained our method on 394 patients (71 polyps) and tested it on 792 patients (226 polyps). Results showed that we can achieve 95% sensitivity at 2.4 false positives per patient and the height map features can reduce false positives by more than 50%. We compute the polyp height and width measurements and correlate them with manual measurements. The Pearson correlations are 0.74 (p=0.11) and 0.75 (p=0.17) for height and width, respectively. PMID:19578483

  17. IS HCI THAT IS USED AS A PRESERVATIVE CREATING FALSE POSITIVES FOR TBA IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Will hydrochloric acid produce false positives for TBA? Yes, if you heat the sample to get a lower detection limit for TBA. Conventional purge and trap methods at ambient temperature have a reporting limit for TBA between 50 and 100 g/liter. This is higher than the provisiona...

  18. False-positive HIV test results in infancy and management of uninfected children receiving antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Catherine G; Moss, William J; Thuma, Philip E

    2015-06-01

    This report summarizes 2 children misdiagnosed with HIV infection in a clinic in rural Zambia and discusses the implications of false-positive HIV DNA tests in HIV-exposed infants, including the potential magnitude of the problem. Recommendations are needed to address the management of children receiving antiretroviral therapy who are suspected of being uninfected. PMID:25973939

  19. Are False-Positive Rates Leading to an Overestimation of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlauch, Robert S.; Carney, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate false-positive rates for rules proposed to identify early noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) using the presence of notches in audiograms. Method: Audiograms collected from school-age children in a national survey of health and nutrition (the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey [NHANES III]; National Center…

  20. Air-exposed urine dipsticks give false-positive results for glucose and false-negative results for blood.

    PubMed

    Cohen, H T; Spiegel, D M

    1991-09-01

    Urine dipstick jars often are left uncapped, which led the authors to wonder what effect prolonged air exposure might have on dipstick accuracy. Unexpired Ames Multistixs (Miles Inc., Elkhart, IN) were exposed to ambient air for intervals of up to eight weeks and were used to test urine for the presence or absence of blood, protein, and glucose. Multistixs were read by a blinded participant. A urine sample reading negative for glucose with unexposed (control) Multistixs tested trace positive with three of three Multistixs exposed for 7 days, and 1+ (three of six) or trace positive (three of six) (P less than 0.05) with Multistixs exposed for 28 days. A urine sample reading 1+ for blood with controls tested negative with five of six (P less than 0.05) and six of six (P less than 0.05) Multistixs exposed for 28 and 56 days, respectively. Protein detection was accurate up to 56 days. The authors conclude that urine dipstick jars should be recapped to avoid prompting needless evaluations of glucosuria or delaying detection of important causes of microscopic hematuria. PMID:1877540

  1. Decisions to shoot in a weapon identification task: The influence of cultural stereotypes and perceived threat on false positive errors.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Kevin K; Bandy, Carole L; Kimble, Matthew O

    2010-01-01

    The decision to shoot a gun engages executive control processes that can be biased by cultural stereotypes and perceived threat. The neural locus of the decision to shoot is likely to be found in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), where cognition and affect converge. Male military cadets at Norwich University (N=37) performed a weapon identification task in which they made rapid decisions to shoot when images of guns appeared briefly on a computer screen. Reaction times, error rates, and electroencephalogram (EEG) activity were recorded. Cadets reacted more quickly and accurately when guns were primed by images of Middle-Eastern males wearing traditional clothing. However, cadets also made more false positive errors when tools were primed by these images. Error-related negativity (ERN) was measured for each response. Deeper ERNs were found in the medial-frontal cortex following false positive responses. Cadets who made fewer errors also produced deeper ERNs, indicating stronger executive control. Pupil size was used to measure autonomic arousal related to perceived threat. Images of Middle-Eastern males in traditional clothing produced larger pupil sizes. An image of Osama bin Laden induced the largest pupil size, as would be predicted for the exemplar of Middle East terrorism. Cadets who showed greater increases in pupil size also made more false positive errors. Regression analyses were performed to evaluate predictions based on current models of perceived threat, stereotype activation, and cognitive control. Measures of pupil size (perceived threat) and ERN (cognitive control) explained significant proportions of the variance in false positive errors to Middle-Eastern males in traditional clothing, while measures of reaction time, signal detection response bias, and stimulus discriminability explained most of the remaining variance. PMID:19813139

  2. Decisions to Shoot in a Weapon Identification Task: The Influence of Cultural Stereotypes and Perceived Threat on False Positive Errors

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Kevin K.; Bandy, Carole L.; Kimble, Matthew O.

    2014-01-01

    The decision to shoot engages executive control processes that can be biased by cultural stereotypes and perceived threat. The neural locus of the decision to shoot is likely to be found in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) where cognition and affect converge. Male military cadets at Norwich University (N=37) performed a weapon identification task in which they made rapid decisions to shoot when images of guns appeared briefly on a computer screen. Reaction times, error rates, and EEG activity were recorded. Cadets reacted more quickly and accurately when guns were primed by images of middle-eastern males wearing traditional clothing. However, cadets also made more false positive errors when tools were primed by these images. Error-related negativity (ERN) was measured for each response. Deeper ERN’s were found in the medial-frontal cortex following false positive responses. Cadets who made fewer errors also produced deeper ERN’s, indicating stronger executive control. Pupil size was used to measure autonomic arousal related to perceived threat. Images of middle-eastern males in traditional clothing produced larger pupil sizes. An image of Osama bin Laden induced the largest pupil size, as would be predicted for the exemplar of Middle East terrorism. Cadets who showed greater increases in pupil size also made more false positive errors. Regression analyses were performed to evaluate predictions based on current models of perceived threat, stereotype activation, and cognitive control. Measures of pupil size (perceived threat) and ERN (cognitive control) explained significant proportions of the variance in false positive errors to middle-eastern males in traditional clothing, while measures of reaction time, signal detection response bias, and stimulus discriminability explained most of the remaining variance. PMID:19813139

  3. Risk of Breast Cancer in Women with False-Positive Results according to Mammographic Features.

    PubMed

    Castells, Xavier; Torá-Rocamora, Isabel; Posso, Margarita; Román, Marta; Vernet-Tomas, Maria; Rodríguez-Arana, Ana; Domingo, Laia; Vidal, Carmen; Baré, Marisa; Ferrer, Joana; Quintana, María Jesús; Sánchez, Mar; Natal, Carmen; Espinàs, Josep A; Saladié, Francina; Sala, María

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To assess the risk of breast cancer in women with false-positive screening results according to radiologic classification of mammographic features. Materials and Methods Review board approval was obtained, with waiver of informed consent. This retrospective cohort study included 521 200 women aged 50-69 years who underwent screening as part of the Spanish Breast Cancer Screening Program between 1994 and 2010 and who were observed until December 2012. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to estimate the age-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of breast cancer and the 95% confidence interval (CI) in women with false-positive mammograms as compared with women with negative mammograms. Separate models were adjusted for screen-detected and interval cancers and for screen-film and digital mammography. Time without a breast cancer diagnosis was plotted by using Kaplan-Meier curves. Results When compared with women with negative mammograms, the age-adjusted HR of cancer in women with false-positive results was 1.84 (95% CI: 1.73, 1.95; P < .001). The risk was higher in women who had calcifications, whether they were (HR, 2.73; 95% CI: 2.28, 3.28; P < .001) or were not (HR, 2.24; 95% CI: 2.02, 2.48; P < .001) associated with masses. Women in whom mammographic features showed changes in subsequent false-positive results were those who had the highest risk (HR, 9.13; 95% CI: 8.28, 10.07; P < .001). Conclusion Women with false-positive results had an increased risk of breast cancer, particularly women who had calcifications at mammography. Women who had more than one examination with false-positive findings and in whom the mammographic features changed over time had a highly increased risk of breast cancer. Previous mammographic features might yield useful information for further risk-prediction models and personalized follow-up screening protocols. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26878225

  4. Pulmonary nodules causing false-positive liver scans. Preoperative and postoperative scintigraphic findings in three cases

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, K.; Kabuto, H.; Rikimaru, S.

    1984-04-01

    False-positive liver scans may occur due to intrinsic hepatic anatomy, extrinsic impression on the liver from adjacent structures, or external attenuation of gamma rays. However, reports of false-positive scans due to external attenuation by pulmonary nodules are very few, and postoperative changes in liver scintigraphy have not been reported. Three such cases are reported in this study. In each case, a pulmonary mass was located in the right posterior basal segment. The preoperative liver scan showed a focal ''cold'' area in the upper portion of the right lobe. This ''cold'' area was seen only in the posterior view, and after resection of the tumor it usually disappeared promptly unless direct liver invasion was present.

  5. False-positive elimination for computer-aided detection of pulmonary micronodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sukmoon; Zhou, Jinghao; Metaxas, Dimitris N.; Axel, Leon

    2006-03-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is generally accepted as the most sensitive way for lung cancer screening. Its high contrast resolution allows the detection of small nodules and, thus, lung cancer at a very early stage. Due to the amount of data it produces, however, automating the nodule detection process is viable. The challenging problem for any nodule detection system is to keep low false-positive detection rate while maintaining high sensitivity. In this paper, we first describe a 3D filter-based method for pulmonary micronodule detection from high-resolution 3D chest CT images. Then, we propose a false-positive elimination method based on a deformable model. Finally, we present promising results of applying our method to various clinical chest CT datasets with over 90% detection rate. The proposed method focuses on the automatic detection of both calcified (high-contrast) and noncalcified (low-contrast) granulomatous nodules less than 5mm in diameter.

  6. Diagnostic Issues and Controversies in DSM-5: Return of the False Positives Problem.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Jerome C

    2016-01-01

    The fifth revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) was the most controversial in the manual's history. This review selectively surveys some of the most important changes in DSM-5, including structural/organizational changes, modifications of diagnostic criteria, and newly introduced categories. It analyzes why these changes led to such heated controversies, which included objections to the revision's process, its goals, and the content of altered criteria and new categories. The central focus is on disputes concerning the false positives problem of setting a valid boundary between disorder and normal variation. Finally, this review highlights key problems and issues that currently remain unresolved and need to be addressed in the future, including systematically identifying false positive weaknesses in criteria, distinguishing risk from disorder, including context in diagnostic criteria, clarifying how to handle fuzzy boundaries, and improving the guidelines for "other specified" diagnosis. PMID:26772207

  7. KUIPER BELT OBJECT OCCULTATIONS: EXPECTED RATES, FALSE POSITIVES, AND SURVEY DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Bickerton, S. J.; Welch, D. L.; Kavelaars, J. J. E-mail: welch@physics.mcmaster.ca

    2009-05-15

    A novel method of generating artificial scintillation noise is developed and used to evaluate occultation rates and false positive rates for surveys probing the Kuiper Belt with the method of serendipitous stellar occultations. A thorough examination of survey design shows that (1) diffraction-dominated occultations are critically (Nyquist) sampled at a rate of 2 Fsu{sup -1}, corresponding to 40 s{sup -1} for objects at 40 AU, (2) occultation detection rates are maximized when targets are observed at solar opposition, (3) Main Belt asteroids will produce occultations light curves identical to those of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) if target stars are observed at solar elongations of: 116{sup 0} {approx}< {epsilon} {approx}< 125 deg., or 131 deg. {approx}< {epsilon} {approx}< 141 deg., and (4) genuine KBO occultations are likely to be so rare that a detection threshold of {approx}>7-8{sigma} should be adopted to ensure that viable candidate events can be disentangled from false positives.

  8. Lung carcinoma presenting with pathologic femur fracture and false-positive pregnancy test result.

    PubMed

    Maughan, Brandon C; Kamat, Achyut

    2012-09-01

    β-Human chorionic gonadotropin (βhCG) assays are routinely used to test for pregnancy. However, βhCG may be elevated in conditions other than pregnancy. We describe a case of metastatic lung adenocarcinoma presenting with a pathologic femur fracture and a false-positive urine pregnancy test. Lung cancer is the most common nongestational malignancy that produces βhCG among reproductive-age women. Emergency physicians should consider this rare cause of a positive pregnancy test result in women who deny recent sexual intercourse, especially if the patient is older than 40 years, has a history of tobacco use, or presents with respiratory complaints. PMID:22424649

  9. Heterophilic antibodies interfering with radioimmunoassay. A false-positive pregnancy test

    SciTech Connect

    Vladutiu, A.O.; Sulewski, J.M.; Pudlak, K.A.; Stull, C.G.

    1982-11-19

    A young woman with amenorrhea had a consistently positive pregnancy test result (serum radioimmunoassay measurement of ..beta..-human chorionic gonadotropin hormone). No fetal or placental tissue was found after uterine curettage and exploratory laparotomy. The false-positive pregnancy test result was due to heterophilic antibovine and antigoat antibodies in the patient's serum. These antibodies interfered with radioimmunoassays using goat antibodies. This case shows that serum heterophilic antibodies can interfere with immunoassays and result in unnecessary diagnostic procedures and/or unnecessary treatment.

  10. False-positive focused abdominal sonography in trauma in a hypotensive child: case report.

    PubMed

    Imamedjian, Isabelle; Baird, Robert; Dubrovsky, Alexander Sasha

    2015-06-01

    We report a case of a false-positive focused abdominal sonography in trauma (FAST) examination in a persistently hypotensive pediatric trauma patient, performed 12 hours after the trauma, suspected to be caused by massive fluid resuscitation leading to ascites. While a positive FAST in a hypotensive trauma patient usually indicates hemoperitoneum, this case illustrates that the timing of the FAST examination relative to the injury, as well as clinical evolution including the volume of fluid resuscitation, need to be considered when interpreting the results of serial and/or late FAST examinations. PMID:26035503

  11. An Unusual False-Positive Uptake of Radioiodine in Pericardial Effusion on Posttherapy Scan.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Gaurav; Moghe, Surendra H; Ranade, Rohit; Asopa, R Ramesh V

    2016-07-01

    Posttherapy scan in a 21-year-old woman with papillary carcinoma of thyroid with lymph node metastasis, who received 5.55 GBq of radioiodine (I), revealed halo-like diffuse tracer uptake in the pericardial region. Echocardiography showed no abnormality except pericardial effusion, which subsided after reinstitution of levothyroxine therapy. Although rare, false-positive radioiodine uptake can occur in pericardial effusion secondary to thyroxine withdrawal-related hypothyroidism and needs close monitoring of the patient. PMID:27055143

  12. Using Spitzer to Estimate the Kepler False Positive Rate and to Validate Kepler Candidates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, D.; Fressin, F.; Torres, G.

    2012-01-01

    I present the results from an ongoing large campaign with the Spitzer Space Telescope to gather near-infrared photometric measurements of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI). Our goals are (1) to validate the planetary status of these Kepler candidates, (2) to estimate observationally the false positive rate, and (3) to study the atmospheres of confirmed planets through measurements of their secondary eclipses. Our target list spans of wide range of candidate sizes and periods orbiting various spectral type stars. The Spitzer observations provide constraints on the possibility of astrophysical false positives resulting from stellar blends, including eclipsing binaries and hierarchical triples. The number of possible blends per star is estimated using stellar population synthesis models and observational probes of the KOI close environments from direct imaging (e.g. Adaptive Optics, Speckle images, Kepler centroids). Combining all the above information with the shape of the transit lightcurves from the Kepler photometry, we compute odd ratios for the 34 candidates we observed in order to determine their false positive probability. Our results suggest that the Kepler false positive rate in this subset of candidates is low. I finally present a new list of Kepler candidates that we were able to validate using this method. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer, which is operated by JPL/Caltech, under a contract with NASA. Support was provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA, Science Mission Directorate.

  13. A new method to reduce false positives due to antimony in detection of gunshot residues.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Çağdaş; Bora, Taner; Şenocak, Nilgün; Aydın, Fırat

    2015-05-01

    False positives due to the presence of antimony in vehicle seat fabrics are a problem in gunshot residue (GSR) analysis, in particular, when graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) is employed. In this study, we sought to determine the reason for the prevalence of false positive results and to propose a new approach for the analysis of GSR on vehicle seats. GFAAS was used to examine adhesive tape swabs collected from 100 seats of 50 different automobiles. Characterization of seat fabrics was carried out by using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) spectroscopy. The results of FTIR analysis indicated that all seat covers containing antimony were composed of polyester. Experimental results obtained by SEM/EDX analysis revealed that the fabrics in these seat covers contained evenly distributed antimony within the structure of polyester fibers. This study shows that the type of seat fabric should be determined by FTIR spectroscopy before elemental GSR analysis. In this way, most of the false positives caused by polyester fibers in GSR analysis can be prevented. PMID:25828380

  14. False positives complicate ancient pathogen identifications using high-throughput shotgun sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Identification of historic pathogens is challenging since false positives and negatives are a serious risk. Environmental non-pathogenic contaminants are ubiquitous. Furthermore, public genetic databases contain limited information regarding these species. High-throughput sequencing may help reliably detect and identify historic pathogens. Results We shotgun-sequenced 8 16th-century Mixtec individuals from the site of Teposcolula Yucundaa (Oaxaca, Mexico) who are reported to have died from the huey cocoliztli (‘Great Pestilence’ in Nahautl), an unknown disease that decimated native Mexican populations during the Spanish colonial period, in order to identify the pathogen. Comparison of these sequences with those deriving from the surrounding soil and from 4 precontact individuals from the site found a wide variety of contaminant organisms that confounded analyses. Without the comparative sequence data from the precontact individuals and soil, false positives for Yersinia pestis and rickettsiosis could have been reported. Conclusions False positives and negatives remain problematic in ancient DNA analyses despite the application of high-throughput sequencing. Our results suggest that several studies claiming the discovery of ancient pathogens may need further verification. Additionally, true single molecule sequencing’s short read lengths, inability to sequence through DNA lesions, and limited ancient-DNA-specific technical development hinder its application to palaeopathology. PMID:24568097

  15. Proteins interacting with cloning scars: a source of false positive protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Charles A. S.; Boanca, Gina; Lee, Zachary T.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    A common approach for exploring the interactome, the network of protein-protein interactions in cells, uses a commercially available ORF library to express affinity tagged bait proteins; these can be expressed in cells and endogenous cellular proteins that copurify with the bait can be identified as putative interacting proteins using mass spectrometry. Control experiments can be used to limit false-positive results, but in many cases, there are still a surprising number of prey proteins that appear to copurify specifically with the bait. Here, we have identified one source of false-positive interactions in such studies. We have found that a combination of: 1) the variable sequence of the C-terminus of the bait with 2) a C-terminal valine “cloning scar” present in a commercially available ORF library, can in some cases create a peptide motif that results in the aberrant co-purification of endogenous cellular proteins. Control experiments may not identify false positives resulting from such artificial motifs, as aberrant binding depends on sequences that vary from one bait to another. It is possible that such cryptic protein binding might occur in other systems using affinity tagged proteins; this study highlights the importance of conducting careful follow-up studies where novel protein-protein interactions are suspected. PMID:25704442

  16. Newborn screening for CF in a regional paediatric centre: the psychosocial effects of false-positive IRT results on parents.

    PubMed

    Moran, Janette; Quirk, Kirsten; Duff, Alistair J A; Brownlee, Keith G

    2007-05-01

    Neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis (CF) has been established in Leeds since 1975. The current method is measuring IRT and genotyping. Newborn screening for CF results in a small but significant number of false positives. This study explored the psychosocial reactions to such results in a group of parents (N=21) using semi-structured interviews. Responses were analysed using descriptive statistics and well-validated content analysis. Mothers described a range of emotions during the screening process including anxiety, distress and upset. Waiting for the repeat IRT test results was identified as the most emotionally difficult stage. Discussion focuses on good practice and implications for CF services. PMID:17056302

  17. THE FALSE POSITIVE RATE OF KEPLER AND THE OCCURRENCE OF PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Fressin, Francois; Torres, Guillermo; Charbonneau, David; Dressing, Courtney D.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Christiansen, Jessie; Jenkins, Jon M.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.

    2013-04-01

    The Kepler mission is uniquely suited to study the frequencies of extrasolar planets. This goal requires knowledge of the incidence of false positives such as eclipsing binaries in the background of the targets, or physically bound to them, which can mimic the photometric signal of a transiting planet. We perform numerical simulations of the Kepler targets and of physical companions or stars in the background to predict the occurrence of astrophysical false positives detectable by the mission. Using real noise level estimates, we compute the number and characteristics of detectable eclipsing pairs involving main-sequence stars and non-main-sequence stars or planets, and we quantify the fraction of those that would pass the Kepler candidate vetting procedure. By comparing their distribution with that of the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) detected during the first six quarters of operation of the spacecraft, we infer the false positive rate of Kepler and study its dependence on spectral type, candidate planet size, and orbital period. We find that the global false positive rate of Kepler is 9.4%, peaking for giant planets (6-22 R{sub Circled-Plus }) at 17.7%, reaching a low of 6.7% for small Neptunes (2-4 R{sub Circled-Plus }), and increasing again for Earth-size planets (0.8-1.25 R{sub Circled-Plus }) to 12.3%. Most importantly, we also quantify and characterize the distribution and rate of occurrence of planets down to Earth size with no prior assumptions on their frequency, by subtracting from the population of actual Kepler candidates our simulated population of astrophysical false positives. We find that 16.5% {+-} 3.6% of main-sequence FGK stars have at least one planet between 0.8 and 1.25 R{sub Circled-Plus} with orbital periods up to 85 days. This result is a significant step toward the determination of eta-earth, the occurrence of Earth-like planets in the habitable zone of their parent stars. There is no significant dependence of the rates of planet

  18. Occurrence of False-Positive Most Probable Number Tests for Fecal Streptococci in Marine Waters1

    PubMed Central

    Buck, John D.

    1969-01-01

    By the use of the most probable number technique with azide dextrose and ethyl violet azide broths for enterococci, the common occurrence of false-positive tests was noted when marine and estuarine waters were sampled. Organisms isolated included a marine bacterium, gram-positive and gram-negative nonmarine bacteria, and yeasts. All cultures were capable of growth in azide-dextrose, ethyl violet-azide, and KF broths. Representative isolates grew in media containing 0.08% NaN3. The tentatively accepted most probable number method for fecal streptococci is thus of dubious value in assessment of sewage pollution levels in estuarine waters. All positive tubes must be examined microscopically for the presence of nonstreptococcal forms. PMID:4983956

  19. Positive hepatitis B virus core antibody in HIV infection--false positive or evidence of previous infection?

    PubMed

    Pallawela, S N S; Sonnex, C; Mabayoje, D; Bloch, E; Chaytor, S; Johnson, M A; Carne, C; Webster, D P

    2015-02-01

    Isolated HBV core antibody (anti-HBc) is defined as the presence of anti-HBc with a negative HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) and HBV surface antibody (anti-HBs <10 IU/l). In patients infected with HIV with isolated anti-HBc, the aim was to determine: The prevalence of isolated positive anti-HBc; The most effective method of identifying which patients have had previous Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) infection; The prevalence of false positive anti-HBc. HBV serology results were identified from 539 patients infected with HIV sampled between January 2010 and December 2012. In those with an isolated anti-HBc and negative anti-HBe, a second anti-HBc test was carried out using a different assay. Samples were also screened for HBV DNA. The anti-retroviral regimens at time of screening were documented. 101/539 had an isolated anti-HBc. Of these, 32 (32%) had a positive anti-HBe (including 1 equivocal) and 69(68%) were anti-HBe negative. Of those negative for anti-HBe, 32 were tested for both DNA and a second anti-HBc. Of these 26 (81%) were on cART at time of HBV testing, with 25 (78%) on ART with anti-HBV activity. The prevalence of isolated anti-HBc was 19%. Only 32% were also anti-HBe positive, whereas 97% of those anti-HBe negative were positive on a second anti-HBc assay suggesting lack of utility of anti-HBe in resolving serological quandaries. One subject (3%) had a false positive anti-HBc. There was no evidence of chronic HBV but 78% patients were on HBV-suppressive combination anti-retroviral therapy. PMID:25174739

  20. Reduction of false-positive recalls using a computerized mammographic image feature analysis scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maxine; Pu, Jiantao; Zheng, Bin

    2014-08-01

    The high false-positive recall rate is one of the major dilemmas that significantly reduce the efficacy of screening mammography, which harms a large fraction of women and increases healthcare cost. This study aims to investigate the feasibility of helping reduce false-positive recalls by developing a new computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme based on the analysis of global mammographic texture and density features computed from four-view images. Our database includes full-field digital mammography (FFDM) images acquired from 1052 recalled women (669 positive for cancer and 383 benign). Each case has four images: two craniocaudal (CC) and two mediolateral oblique (MLO) views. Our CAD scheme first computed global texture features related to the mammographic density distribution on the segmented breast regions of four images. Second, the computed features were given to two artificial neural network (ANN) classifiers that were separately trained and tested in a ten-fold cross-validation scheme on CC and MLO view images, respectively. Finally, two ANN classification scores were combined using a new adaptive scoring fusion method that automatically determined the optimal weights to assign to both views. CAD performance was tested using the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). The AUC = 0.793  ±  0.026 was obtained for this four-view CAD scheme, which was significantly higher at the 5% significance level than the AUCs achieved when using only CC (p = 0.025) or MLO (p = 0.0004) view images, respectively. This study demonstrates that a quantitative assessment of global mammographic image texture and density features could provide useful and/or supplementary information to classify between malignant and benign cases among the recalled cases, which may eventually help reduce the false-positive recall rate in screening mammography.

  1. Prenatal Ultrasound Screening: False Positive Soft Markers May Alter Maternal Representations and Mother-Infant Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Viaux-Savelon, Sylvie; Dommergues, Marc; Rosenblum, Ouriel; Bodeau, Nicolas; Aidane, Elizabeth; Philippon, Odile; Mazet, Philippe; Vibert-Guigue, Claude; Vauthier-Brouzes, Danièle; Feldman, Ruth; Cohen, David

    2012-01-01

    Background In up to 5% of pregnancies, ultrasound screening detects a “soft marker” (SM) that places the foetus at risk for a severe abnormality. In most cases, prenatal diagnostic work-up rules out a severe defect. We aimed to study the effects of false positive SM on maternal emotional status, maternal representations of the infant, and mother-infant interaction. Methodology and Principal Findings Utilizing an extreme-case prospective case control design, we selected from a group of 244 women undergoing ultrasound, 19 pregnant women whose foetus had a positive SM screening and a reassuring diagnostic work up, and 19 controls without SM matched for age and education. In the third trimester of pregnancy, within one week after delivery, and 2 months postpartum, we assessed anxiety, depression, and maternal representations. Mother-infant interactions were videotaped during feeding within one week after delivery and again at 2 months postpartum and coded blindly using the Coding Interactive Behavior (CIB) scales. Anxiety and depression scores were significantly higher at all assessment points in the SM group. Maternal representations were also different between SM and control groups at all study time. Perturbations to early mother-infant interactions were observed in the SM group. These dyads showed greater dysregulation, lower maternal sensitivity, higher maternal intrusive behaviour and higher infant avoidance. Multivariate analysis showed that maternal representation and depression at third trimester predicted mother-infant interaction. Conclusion False positive ultrasound screenings for SM are not benign and negatively affect the developing maternal-infant attachment. Medical efforts should be directed to minimize as much as possible such false diagnoses, and to limit their psychological adverse consequences. PMID:22292077

  2. Pixel-Level Analysis Techniques for False-Positive Identification in Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, Steve; Jenkins, J.; Gilliland, R.; Batalha, N.; Gautier, T. N.; Rowe, J.; Dunham, E.; Latham, D.; Caldwell, D.; Twicken, J.; Tenenbaum, P.; Clarke, B.; Li, J.; Wu, H.; Quintana, E.; Ciardi, D.; Torres, G.; Dotson, J.; Still, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Kepler mission seeks to identify Earth-size exoplanets by detecting transits of their parent star. The resulting transit signature will be small ( 100 ppm). Several astrophysical phenomena can mimic an Earth-size transit signature, most notably background eclipsing binaries (BGEBs). As part of a larger false-positive identification effort, pixel-level analysis of the Kepler data has proven crucial in identifying the likelihood of these confounding signals. Pixel-level analysis is primarily useful for the case of the transit being a BGEB. Several analysis techniques are presented, including: - measurement of centroid motion in and out of transit compared with detailed modeling of expected centroid motion, including an estimate of the transit source location - transit source location determination through a high-precision PSF-fit of the difference between in- and out-of-transit pixels, directly measuring the location of the transit source - source location determination through fitting the observed summed flux time series (or the light curve derived from the transit model) to each pixel's time series data. These techniques have been automated and are being considered for inclusion in the Kepler Science Operations Center Data Analysis Pipeline. They are supplemented by various diagnostic plots of the Kepler data as well as comparison with background stars identified by the Kepler Follow-up Observing Program (FOP). The final determination of whether an observed transit is a false positive integrates several sources, including pixel-level analysis and FOP results. Pixel-level techniques can identify BGEBs that are separated from the Kepler target star by more than a certain radius, called the "radius of confusion". The determination of the radius of confusion, and the role it plays in assigning the probability of the transit being due to a planet, is briefly discussed. The statistics from the latest false-positive list are provided. Funding for this mission provided

  3. [Unexpected Diseases in Two Patients with False-Positive Dengue Immunoglobulin M Antibody Test Results].

    PubMed

    Matono, Takashi; Kutsuna, Satoshi; Kato, Yasuyuki; Takeshita, Nozomi; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Ohmagari, Norio

    2016-03-01

    In 2014, an outbreak of 162 domestic dengue fever infections occurred in Tokyo, Japan; the first outbreak of its kind in 70 years. Nineteen of these cases were confirmed in our center. Advancements in diagnostic methods have enabled an earlier diagnosis of dengue fever; however, unfamiliarity with the clinical course and characteristics of diagnostic tests for dengue fever can lead to misdiagnosis. We herein describe 2 cases of Japanese patients with false-positive dengue immunoglobulin M antibody test results, who were finally diagnosed as having dermatomyositis and acute hepatitis A infection, respectively. PMID:27197439

  4. [Expert research on sera yielding false-positive results for HIV antibodies during screening].

    PubMed

    Noskov, F S; Smol'skaia, T T; Konikova, R E; Borisova, V V; Leshchinskaia, N P; Noskova, O V; Lobanova, A L; Marennikova, S S; Matsevich, G R; Shelukhina, E M

    1992-04-01

    The significance of different serological methods and assay systems for the verification of false positive cases of HIV infection has been analyzed on the basis of materials obtained in arbitration studies. As demonstrated by this analysis, the use of such highly specific and sensitive systems as Huma-Lab, Enzygnost, Serodia and Erythrorecombinant has made it possible to obtain a reliable result as early as at the first stage of expert diagnosis in the enzyme immunoassay and the agglutination test. The methods of radioimmunoprecipitation and indirect immunofluorescence have permitted a more precise differentiation of doubtful results than that achieved by immune blotting. PMID:1496871

  5. Center not liable for defamation from false-positive hepatitis test.

    PubMed

    1997-04-18

    The Nebraska Court of Appeals ruled that [name removed] does not have a cause of action against the Lincoln Plasma Center in Lincoln, NE. The center blacklisted him as a carrier of hepatitis B virus; subsequent tests proved [name removed] was uninfected. [Name removed], a paid plasma donator, was placed on an ineligible list after he tested positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen. [Name removed] sued, alleging that Lincoln defamed him by publishing false information to blood banks about his eligibility to donate. The Court of Appeals upheld a trial court's directed verdict because there was no evidence that the plasma center acted in malice. PMID:11364229

  6. Finding False Positives Planet Candidates Due To Background Eclipsing Binaries in K2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullally, Fergal; Thompson, Susan E.; Coughlin, Jeffrey; DAVE team

    2016-06-01

    We adapt the difference image centroid approach, used for finding background eclipsing binaries, to vet K2 planet candidates. Difference image centroids were used with great success to vet planet candidates in the original Kepler mission, where the source of a transit could be identified by subtracting images of out-of-transit cadences from in-transit cadences. To account for K2's roll pattern, we reconstruct out-of-transit images from cadences that are nearby in both time and spacecraft roll angle. We describe the method and discuss some K2 planet candidates which this method suggests are false positives.

  7. Modified Jiles-Atherton model and parameters identification using false position method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamimid, M.; Feliachi, M.; Mimoune, S. M.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, a modified Jiles-Atherton model is proposed. This model uses a physical meaning by introducing the magnetization M instead of the irreversible magnetization M irr in the effective magnetic field H e-magnetic field H relationship. The false position method is coupled to the iterative algorithm to identify the Jiles-Atherton parameters for both classical and modified Jiles-Atherton model. These parameters are evaluated by the resolution of three nonlinear equations obtained from three conditions. The validity of the modified model is done by comparing the obtained hysteresis loops to the experimental ones.

  8. Brown tumor of bone: A potential source of false-positive thallium-201 localization

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.J.; Seabold, J.E.; Gurll, N.J.

    1989-07-01

    Brown tumor of bone (osteitis fibrosa cystica) should be included in the differential diagnosis of lesions that cause false-positive thallium-201 localization in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. We report a case of a brown tumor of the upper sternum mimicking a superior mediastinal parathyroid neoplasm in a patient with persistent hyperparathyroidism 9 years after a negative neck exploration (with subtotal thyroidectomy and thymectomy). A /sup 201/TI//sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate subtraction scintigram demonstrated complete subtraction of this /sup 201/TI focus.

  9. False positive gel-acetylcholinesterase results in blood-stained amniotic fluids.

    PubMed

    Barlow, R D; Cuckle, H S; Wald, N J; Rodeck, C H

    1982-10-01

    The effect of blood contamination on the gel-acetylcholinesterase (AChE) test used in the diagnosis of fetal open neural-tube defects was studied with amniotic fluid samples artificially contaminated with fetal or maternal blood in concentrations covering a range exceeding that usually found in clinical practice. Amniotic fluid samples contaminated with maternal blood gave negative gel-AChE results at all concentrations. Contamination with fetal blood yielded positive results if the erythrocyte concentration was greater than about 60 x 10(6) cells/ml. Thus contamination of amniotic fluid with blood is only likely to cause false positive gel-AChE results if this critical concentration is exceeded. Such samples will occur only rarely in clinical practice but when they do the diagnosis should be made with caution. PMID:7126503

  10. PIPIDA scintigraphy for cholecystitis: false positives in alcoholism and total parenteral nutrition

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, W.P.; Gibbs, P.; Rudd, T.G.; Mack, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    A review of gallbladder scintigraphy in patients with potentially compromised hepatobiliary function revealed two groups in whom cholecystitis might be mistakenly diagnosed. In 200 consecutive hospitalized patients studied with technetium-99m-PIPIDA for acute cholecystitis or cholestasis, there were 41 alcoholics and 17 patients on total parenteral nutrition. In 60% of the alcoholics and 92% of those on parenteral nutrition, absent or delayed visualization of the gallbladder occurred without physical or clinical evidence of cholecystitis. A cholecystagogue, sincalide, did not prevent the false-positive features which presumably are due to altered bile flow kinetics related to alcoholism and parenteral nutrition. Four patients on parenteral nutrition undergoing cholecystectomy for suspected cholecystitis had normal gallbladders filled with jellylike viscous thick bile. A positive (nonvisualized or delayed visualized) gallbladder PIPIDA scintigram in these two populations should not be interpreted as indicating a need for cholecystectomy.

  11. The psychological impact of a false-positive screening mammogram in Barcelona.

    PubMed

    Espasa, Rebecca; Murta-Nascimento, Cristiane; Bayés, Ramón; Sala, Maria; Casamitjana, Montserrat; Macià, Francesc; Castells, Xavier

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the psychological impact of mammographic screening for women who receive negative results and for those who need additional non-invasive and invasive complementary investigations to exclude breast cancer (false positives). One hundred fifty women who attended a breast cancer screening programme in Barcelona, aged 50-69 years, were included in this study: 50 with negative results and 100 with false positive mammograms (50 underwent non-invasive and 50 underwent invasive complementary investigations). Participants worried little until they underwent mammography, but worries increased when a telephone call notified the women of the need for further testing. A substantial proportion of women requiring further assessment reported that they were at least somewhat worried about having breast cancer throughout the screening process (P < 0.0001). Nevertheless, levels of anxiety and depression, measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, showed no statistically significant differences among the three groups. In conclusion, although the women showed no psychological morbidity, there is a substantial psychological response in those with an abnormal screening mammogram. PMID:22477233

  12. False-positive Uptake on Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Immediately After Lung Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jung Min; Lee, Ho Yun; Choi, Joon Young

    2015-01-01

    Abstract 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG-PET) is an evolving tool in the field of oncology. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose, however, is not a specific tool for malignant tumor that it may also accumulate in benign processes. To avoid false-positive interpretation of 18F-FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT), having knowledge of the potential pitfalls is important. The authors present a case of a patient with a lung mass who underwent fluoroscopy-guided transthoracic lung biopsy followed by 18F-FDG-PET/CT scan with a 4-hour interval between biopsy and scanning. Abnormally increased FDG uptake in the mass and pleural effusion was detected. Pathologic examination of the specimen, however, revealed only fibrous tissues with chronic inflammatory cells. On performing CT imaging, 1 month later, the mass and effusion had spontaneously resolved without treatment. Our findings suggest that PET/CT performed immediately following invasive procedures can result in false-positive results and thus mislead diagnosis. Therefore, the interval and order, in which PET/CT and invasive procedures are performed, should be carefully considered in oncologic work-up. PMID:26554786

  13. False-positive results after environmental pinworm PCR testing due to Rhabditid nematodes in Corncob bedding.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Mathias; Berry, Kristina; Graciano, Sandy; Becker, Brandon; Reuter, Jon D

    2014-11-01

    Modern rodent colonies are housed in individually ventilated cages to protect the animals from contamination with adventitious pathogens. Standard health monitoring through soiled-bedding sentinels does not always detect infections, especially in the context of low pathogen prevalence. Recently proposed alternatives include analyzing environmental samples from the cages or rack exhaust by PCR to improve the detection of rodent pathogens but optimal sampling strategies have not yet been established for different microorganisms. Although generally very sensitive and specific, these molecular assays are not foolproof and subject to false-positive and -negative results and should always be interpreted cautiously with an overall understanding of the intrinsic controls and all the variables that may affect the results. Here, we report a limited Aspiculuris tetraptera outbreak in a mouse barrier facility that was detected by fecal PCR in sentinels and confirmed by fecal flotation and direct cecal examination of both sentinels and colony animals. The outbreak led to a widespread survey of all facilities for pinworms by using environmental PCR from ventilated rack exhaust plenums. Environmental PCR suggested an unexpected widespread contamination of all ventilated racks holding nonautoclaved cages, but results could not be confirmed in sentinel or colony animals by fecal flotation, cecal and colonic examination, or cage PCR testing. After additional investigation, the unexpected environmental PCR results were confirmed as false-positive findings due to the nonspecificity of the assay, leading to the amplification of rhabditid nematodes, which are not infectious in rodents but which contaminated the corncob bedding. PMID:25650980

  14. False-Positive Results after Environmental Pinworm PCR Testing due to Rhabditid Nematodes in Corncob Bedding

    PubMed Central

    Leblanc, Mathias; Berry, Kristina; Graciano, Sandy; Becker, Brandon; Reuter, Jon D

    2014-01-01

    Modern rodent colonies are housed in individually ventilated cages to protect the animals from contamination with adventitious pathogens. Standard health monitoring through soiled-bedding sentinels does not always detect infections, especially in the context of low pathogen prevalence. Recently proposed alternatives include analyzing environmental samples from the cages or rack exhaust by PCR to improve the detection of rodent pathogens but optimal sampling strategies have not yet been established for different microorganisms. Although generally very sensitive and specific, these molecular assays are not foolproof and subject to false-positive and –negative results and should always be interpreted cautiously with an overall understanding of the intrinsic controls and all the variables that may affect the results. Here, we report a limited Aspiculuris tetraptera outbreak in a mouse barrier facility that was detected by fecal PCR in sentinels and confirmed by fecal flotation and direct cecal examination of both sentinels and colony animals. The outbreak led to a widespread survey of all facilities for pinworms by using environmental PCR from ventilated rack exhaust plenums. Environmental PCR suggested an unexpected widespread contamination of all ventilated racks holding nonautoclaved cages, but results could not be confirmed in sentinel or colony animals by fecal flotation, cecal and colonic examination, or cage PCR testing. After additional investigation, the unexpected environmental PCR results were confirmed as false-positive findings due to the nonspecificity of the assay, leading to the amplification of rhabditid nematodes, which are not infectious in rodents but which contaminated the corncob bedding. PMID:25650980

  15. A high false positive rate for Kepler planetary candidates of giant stars using asterodensity profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Sliski, David H.; Kipping, David M.

    2014-06-20

    Asterodensity profiling (AP) is a relatively new technique for studying transit light curves. By comparing the mean stellar density derived from the transit light curve to that found through an independent method, AP provides information on several useful properties such as orbital eccentricity and blended light. We present an AP survey of 41 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), with a single transiting candidate, for which the target star's mean stellar density has been measured using asteroseismology. The ensemble distribution of the AP measurements for the 31 dwarf stars in our sample shows excellent agreement with the spread expected if the KOIs were genuine and have realistic eccentricities. In contrast, the same test for the 10 giants in our sample reveals significant incompatibility at >4σ confidence. While extreme eccentricities could be invoked, this hypothesis requires four of the KOIs to contact their host star at periastron passage, including the recently claimed confirmation of Kepler-91b. After carefully examining several hypotheses, we conclude that the most plausible explanation is that the transiting objects orbit a different star to that measured with asteroseismology—cases we define as false-positives. Based on the AP distribution, we estimate a false-positive rate (FPR) for Kepler's giant stars with a single transiting object of FPR ≅ 70% ± 30%.

  16. Vy-PER: eliminating false positive detection of virus integration events in next generation sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Forster, Michael; Szymczak, Silke; Ellinghaus, David; Hemmrich, Georg; Rühlemann, Malte; Kraemer, Lars; Mucha, Sören; Wienbrandt, Lars; Stanulla, Martin; Franke, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Several pathogenic viruses such as hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency viruses may integrate into the host genome. These virus/host integrations are detectable using paired-end next generation sequencing. However, the low number of expected true virus integrations may be difficult to distinguish from the noise of many false positive candidates. Here, we propose a novel filtering approach that increases specificity without compromising sensitivity for virus/host chimera detection. Our detection pipeline termed Vy-PER (Virus integration detection bY Paired End Reads) outperforms existing similar tools in speed and accuracy. We analysed whole genome data from childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), which is characterised by genomic rearrangements and usually associated with radiation exposure. This analysis was motivated by the recently reported virus integrations at genomic rearrangement sites and association with chromosomal instability in liver cancer. However, as expected, our analysis of 20 tumour and matched germline genomes from ALL patients finds no significant evidence for integrations by known viruses. Nevertheless, our method eliminates 12,800 false positives per genome (80× coverage) and only our method detects singleton human-phiX174-chimeras caused by optical errors of the Illumina HiSeq platform. This high accuracy is useful for detecting low virus integration levels as well as non-integrated viruses. PMID:26166306

  17. Vy-PER: eliminating false positive detection of virus integration events in next generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Forster, Michael; Szymczak, Silke; Ellinghaus, David; Hemmrich, Georg; Rühlemann, Malte; Kraemer, Lars; Mucha, Sören; Wienbrandt, Lars; Stanulla, Martin; Franke, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Several pathogenic viruses such as hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency viruses may integrate into the host genome. These virus/host integrations are detectable using paired-end next generation sequencing. However, the low number of expected true virus integrations may be difficult to distinguish from the noise of many false positive candidates. Here, we propose a novel filtering approach that increases specificity without compromising sensitivity for virus/host chimera detection. Our detection pipeline termed Vy-PER (Virus integration detection bY Paired End Reads) outperforms existing similar tools in speed and accuracy. We analysed whole genome data from childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), which is characterised by genomic rearrangements and usually associated with radiation exposure. This analysis was motivated by the recently reported virus integrations at genomic rearrangement sites and association with chromosomal instability in liver cancer. However, as expected, our analysis of 20 tumour and matched germline genomes from ALL patients finds no significant evidence for integrations by known viruses. Nevertheless, our method eliminates 12,800 false positives per genome (80× coverage) and only our method detects singleton human-phiX174-chimeras caused by optical errors of the Illumina HiSeq platform. This high accuracy is useful for detecting low virus integration levels as well as non-integrated viruses. PMID:26166306

  18. Similarity based false-positive reduction for breast cancer using radiographic and pathologic imaging features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Akshay; Samala, Ravi K.; Zhang, Jianying; Qian, Wei

    2010-03-01

    Mammography reading by radiologists and breast tissue image interpretation by pathologists often leads to high False Positive (FP) Rates. Similarly, current Computer Aided Diagnosis (CADx) methods tend to concentrate more on sensitivity, thus increasing the FP rates. A novel method is introduced here which employs similarity based method to decrease the FP rate in the diagnosis of microcalcifications. This method employs the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and the similarity metrics in order to achieve the proposed goal. The training and testing set is divided into generalized (Normal and Abnormal) and more specific (Abnormal, Normal, Benign) classes. The performance of this method as a standalone classification system is evaluated in both the cases (general and specific). In another approach the probability of each case belonging to a particular class is calculated. If the probabilities are too close to classify, the augmented CADx system can be instructed to have a detailed analysis of such cases. In case of normal cases with high probability, no further processing is necessary, thus reducing the computation time. Hence, this novel method can be employed in cascade with CADx to reduce the FP rate and also avoid unnecessary computational time. Using this methodology, a false positive rate of 8% and 11% is achieved for mammography and cellular images respectively.

  19. Blue-white screening liquid can eliminate false positives in blue-white colony screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y S

    2016-01-01

    Although blue-white screening based on α-complementation has been widely used in the screening of genetically modified bacteria, only a single blue-white screening is typically not enough to eliminate false positives. Sometimes, a secondary blue-white screening for the target colonies is required. In this study, two methods were used to investigate the feasibility of secondary blue-white screening for target colonies on lysogeny broth (LB)-ampicillin agar plates. The first method consisted of covering the target colonies grown on LB-ampicillin plate medium with a sterilized filter paper soaked in a solution of 60 μL 20 mg/mL X-gal and 8 μL 20% IPTG. The second method was that blue and white colonies were randomly selected from the blue-white screening plate medium and then re-streaked onto the blue-white screening medium. The colonies were then treated by two methods and incubated at 37°C for 12 h. The results showed that some of the white colonies treated by the two methods showed results similar to the colonies grown on the blue-white screening medium. These results indicate that the target colonies grown on blue-white screening medium can still be used to carry out a secondary blue-white screening. Thus, a blue-white screening liquid was successfully developed. Using the blue-white screening liquid, false positives can be eliminated directly based on the color of the target colonies. This will greatly improve the screening efficiency of positive clones and has important practical implications. PMID:27323169

  20. A behavioral and environmental intervention to reduce false-positives in submaximal bicycle ergometry testing.

    PubMed

    Lombard, D N; Poston, W S; Lombard, T N

    1995-07-01

    Although submaximal cycle ergometry testing (CET) can provide a good estimate of an individual's physical fitness, anticipatory heart rate increases accompanying pre-test anxiety can negatively affect the outcome of a submaximal CET. The present study evaluated the efficacy of a low-cost, technician-administered anxiety reduction intervention in the natural setting to reduce false-positives by removing heart rate feedback, and offering cognitive distraction and controlled breathing techniques. There were consistent findings for removing heart rate (HR) feedback and offering relaxation and distraction techniques on increasing the passing rate and decreasing HR at minute 1. Furthermore, when evaluated by gender, this minimal intervention also had an effect on increasing VO2max estimates, decreasing average HR, and increasing the passing rate for the female subjects. Interestingly, there were no effects found for any of the treatment conditions for the male subjects. The intervention's implications and future research directions are discussed. PMID:7659241

  1. Quantification of false positive reduction in nucleic acid purification on hemorrhagic fever DNA.

    SciTech Connect

    James, Conrad D.; Pohl, Kenneth Roy; Derzon, Mark Steven; McClain, Jaime; Achyuthan, Komandoor

    2006-11-01

    Columbia University has developed a sensitive highly multiplexed system for genetic identification of nucleic acid targets. The primary obstacle to implementing this technology is the high rate of false positives due to high levels of unbound reporters that remain within the system after hybridization. The ability to distinguish between free reporters and reporters bound to targets limits the use of this technology. We previously demonstrated a new electrokinetic method for binary separation of kb pair long DNA molecules and oligonucleotides. The purpose of this project 99864 is to take these previous demonstrations and further develop the technique and hardware for field use. Specifically, our objective was to implement separation in a heterogeneous sample (containing target DNA and background oligo), to perform the separation in a flow-based device, and to develop all of the components necessary for field testing a breadboard prototype system.

  2. Reducing false positives of small bowel segmentation on CT scans by localizing colon regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weidong; Liu, Jiamin; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    Automated small bowel segmentation is essential for computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) of small bowel pathology, such as tumor detection and pre-operative planning. We previously proposed a method to segment the small bowel using the mesenteric vasculature as a roadmap. The method performed well on small bowel segmentation but produced many false positives, most of which were located on the colon. To improve the accuracy of small bowel segmentation, we propose a semi-automated method with minimum interaction to distinguish the colon from the small bowel. The method utilizes anatomic knowledge about the mesenteric vasculature and a statistical method of colon detection. First, anatomic labeling of the mesenteric arteries is used to identify the arteries supplying the colon. Second, a statistical detector is created by combining two colon probability maps. One probability map is of the colon location and is generated from colon centerlines generated from CT colonography (CTC) data. Another probability map is of 3D colon texture using Haralick features and support vector machine (SVM) classifiers. The two probability maps are combined to localize colon regions, i.e., voxels having high probabilities on both maps were labeled as colon. Third, colon regions identified by anatomical labeling and the statistical detector are removed from the original results of small bowel segmentation. The method was evaluated on 11 abdominal CT scans of patients suspected of having carcinoid tumors. The reference standard consisted of manually-labeled small bowel segmentation. The method reduced the voxel-based false positive rate of small bowel segmentation from 19.7%±3.9% to 5.9%±2.3%, with two-tailed P-value < 0.0001.

  3. Eliminating false positive C4 sugar tests on New Zealand Manuka honey.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Karyne M; Somerton, Kerry; Rogers, Pamela; Cox, Julie

    2010-08-30

    Carbon isotope analyses (delta(13)C) of some New Zealand Manuka honeys show that they often fail the internationally recognised Association of Official Analytical Chemists sugar test (AOAC method 998.12) which detects added C(4) sugar, although these honeys are from unadulterated sources. Failure of these high value products is detrimental to the New Zealand honey industry, not only in lost export revenue, but also in brand and market reputation damage. The standard AOAC test compares the carbon isotope value of the whole honey and corresponding protein isolated from the same honey. Differences between whole honey and protein delta(13)C values should not be greater than +1.0 per thousand, as it indicates the possibility of adulteration with syrups or sugars from C(4) plants such as high fructose corn syrup or cane sugar.We have determined that during the standard AOAC method, pollen and other insoluble components are isolated with the flocculated protein. These non-protein components have isotope values which are considerably different from those of the pure protein, and can shift the apparent delta(13)C value of protein further away from the delta(13)C value of the whole honey, giving a false positive result for added C(4) sugar. To eliminate a false positive C(4) sugar test for Manuka honey, prior removal of pollen and other insoluble material from the honey is necessary to ensure that only the pure protein is isolated. This will enable a true comparison between whole honey and protein delta(13)C isotopes. Furthermore, we strongly suggest this modification to the AOAC method be universally adopted for all honey C(4) sugar tests. PMID:20635333

  4. A FALSE POSITIVE FOR OCEAN GLINT ON EXOPLANETS: THE LATITUDE-ALBEDO EFFECT

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Nicolas B.; Abbot, Dorian S.; Voigt, Aiko

    2012-06-10

    Identifying liquid water on the surface of planets is a high priority, as this traditionally defines habitability. One proposed signature of oceans is specular reflection ('glint'), which increases the apparent albedo of a planet at crescent phases. We post-process a global climate model of an Earth-like planet to simulate reflected light curves. Significantly, we obtain glint-like phase variations even though we do not include specular reflection in our model. This false positive is the product of two generic properties: (1) for modest obliquities, a planet's poles receive less orbit-averaged stellar flux than its equator, so the poles are more likely to be covered in highly reflective snow and ice; and (2) we show that reflected light from a modest-obliquity planet at crescent phases probes higher latitudes than at gibbous phases, therefore a planet's apparent albedo will naturally increase at crescent phase. We suggest that this 'latitude-albedo effect' will operate even for large obliquities: in that case the equator receives less orbit-averaged flux than the poles, and the equator is preferentially sampled at crescent phase. Using rotational and orbital color variations to map the surfaces of directly imaged planets and estimate their obliquity will therefore be a necessary pre-condition for properly interpreting their reflected phase variations. The latitude-albedo effect is a particularly convincing glint false positive for zero-obliquity planets, and such worlds are not amenable to latitudinal mapping. This effect severely limits the utility of specular reflection for detecting oceans on exoplanets.

  5. PRE-SPECTROSCOPIC FALSE-POSITIVE ELIMINATION OF KEPLER PLANET CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Batalha, Natalie M.; Rowe, Jason F.; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Jenkins, Jon J.; Caldwell, Douglas; Dunham, Edward W.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Howell, Steve B.; Latham, David W.; Marcy, Geoff W.; Prsa, Andrej

    2010-04-20

    Ten days of commissioning data (Quarter 0) and 33 days of science data (Quarter 1) yield instrumental flux time series of {approx}150,000 stars that were combed for transit events, termed threshold crossing events(TCE), each having a total detection statistic above 7.1{sigma}. TCE light curves are modeled as star+planet systems. Those returning a companion radius smaller than 2R{sub J} are assigned a Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) number. The raw flux, pixel flux, and flux-weighted centroids of every KOI are scrutinized to assess the likelihood of being an astrophysical false positive versus the likelihood of being a planetary companion. This vetting using Kepler data is referred to as data validation (DV). Herein, we describe the DV metrics and graphics used to identify viable planet candidates amongst the KOIs. Light curve modeling tests for (1) the difference in depth of the odd- versus even-numbered transits, (2) evidence of ellipsoidal variations, and (3) evidence of a secondary eclipse event at phase = 0.5. Flux-weighted centroids are used to test for signals correlated with transit events with a magnitude and direction indicative of a background eclipsing binary. Centroid time series are complimented by analysis of images taken in-transit versus out-of-transit, the difference often revealing the pixel contributing the most to the flux change during transit. Examples are shown to illustrate each test. Candidates passing DV are submitted to ground-based observers for further false-positive elimination or confirmation/characterization.

  6. False-positive Extra-Mammary Findings in Breast MRI: Another Cause for Concern.

    PubMed

    Padia, Shilpa A; Freyvogel, Mary; Dietz, Jill; Valente, Stephanie; O'Rourke, Colin; Grobmyer, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been repeatedly shown to have a high false-positive rate for additional findings in the breast resulting in additional breast imaging and biopsies. We hypothesize that breast MRI is also associated with a high rate of false-positive findings outside of the breast requiring additional evaluation, interventions, and delays in treatment. We performed a retrospective review of all breast MRIs performed on breast cancer patients in 2010 at a single institution. MRI reports were analyzed for extra-mammary findings. The timing and yield of the additional procedures was also analyzed. Three hundred and twenty-seven breast cancer patients (average age = 53.53 ± 11.08 years) had a breast MRI. Incidental, extra-mammary findings were reported in 35/327 patients (10.7%) with a total of 38 incidental findings. The extra-mammary findings were located in the liver (n = 21, 60.0%), thoracic cavity (n = 12, 34.3%), kidneys (n = 1, 2.9%), musculoskeletal system (n = 3, 8.6%), and neck (n = 1, 2.9%). Eighteen of the 35 patients (51.4%) received additional radiographic imaging, 3 (8.6%) received additional laboratory testing, 2 (5.7%) received additional physician referrals and 2 (5.7%) received a biopsy of the finding. The average time to additional procedures in these patients was 14.5 days. None of the incidental, extra-mammary findings were associated with breast cancer or other malignancy. Breast MRI was associated with a high rate (10.7%) of extra-mammary findings, which led to costly additional imaging studies, referrals, and tests. These findings were not associated with breast cancer or other malignancies. Extra-mammary findings highlight an unrecognized adverse consequence of breast MRI. PMID:26511429

  7. Pre-spectroscopic False-positive Elimination of Kepler Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalha, Natalie M.; Rowe, Jason F.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Jenkins, Jon J.; Caldwell, Douglas; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Dunham, Edward W.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Howell, Steve B.; Latham, David W.; Marcy, Geoff W.; Prsa, Andrej

    2010-04-01

    Ten days of commissioning data (Quarter 0) and 33 days of science data (Quarter 1) yield instrumental flux time series of ~150,000 stars that were combed for transit events, termed threshold crossing events(TCE), each having a total detection statistic above 7.1σ. TCE light curves are modeled as star+planet systems. Those returning a companion radius smaller than 2RJ are assigned a Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) number. The raw flux, pixel flux, and flux-weighted centroids of every KOI are scrutinized to assess the likelihood of being an astrophysical false positive versus the likelihood of being a planetary companion. This vetting using Kepler data is referred to as data validation (DV). Herein, we describe the DV metrics and graphics used to identify viable planet candidates amongst the KOIs. Light curve modeling tests for (1) the difference in depth of the odd- versus even-numbered transits, (2) evidence of ellipsoidal variations, and (3) evidence of a secondary eclipse event at phase = 0.5. Flux-weighted centroids are used to test for signals correlated with transit events with a magnitude and direction indicative of a background eclipsing binary. Centroid time series are complimented by analysis of images taken in-transit versus out-of-transit, the difference often revealing the pixel contributing the most to the flux change during transit. Examples are shown to illustrate each test. Candidates passing DV are submitted to ground-based observers for further false-positive elimination or confirmation/characterization.

  8. False-positive rates associated with the use of multiple performance and symptom validity tests.

    PubMed

    Larrabee, Glenn J

    2014-06-01

    Performance validity test (PVT) error rates using Monte Carlo simulation reported by Berthelson and colleagues (in False positive diagnosis of malingering due to the use of multiple effort tests. Brain Injury, 27, 909-916, 2013) were compared with PVT and symptom validity test (SVT) failure rates in two nonmalingering clinical samples. At a per-test false-positive rate of 10%, Monte Carlo simulation overestimated error rates for: (i) failure of ≥2 out of 5 PVTs/SVT for Larrabee (in Detection of malingering using atypical performance patterns on standard neuropsychological tests. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 17, 410-425, 2003) and ACS (Pearson, Advanced clinical solutions for use with WAIS-IV and WMS-IV. San Antonio: Pearson Education, 2009) and (ii) failure of ≥2 out of 7 PVTs/SVT for Larrabee (Detection of malingering using atypical performance patterns on standard neuropsychological tests. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 17, 410-425, 2003; Malingering scales for the Continuous Recognition Memory Test and Continuous Visual Memory Test. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 23, 167-180, 2009 combined). Monte Carlo overestimation is likely because PVT performances are atypical in pattern or degree for what occurs in actual neurologic, psychiatric, or developmental disorders. Consequently, PVT scores form skewed distributions with performance at ceiling and restricted range, rather than forming a standard normal distribution with mean of 0 and standard deviation of 1.0. These results support the practice of using ≥2 PVT/SVT failures as representing probable invalid clinical presentation. PMID:24769887

  9. Prime time news: the influence of primed positive and negative emotion on susceptibility to false memories.

    PubMed

    Porter, Stephen; ten Brinke, Leanne; Riley, Sean N; Baker, Alysha

    2014-01-01

    We examined the relation between emotion and susceptibility to misinformation using a novel paradigm, the ambiguous stimuli affective priming (ASAP) paradigm. Participants (N = 88) viewed ambiguous neutral images primed either at encoding or retrieval to be interpreted as either highly positive or negative (or neutral/not primed). After viewing the images, they either were asked misleading or non-leading questions. Following a delay, memory accuracy for the original images was assessed. Results indicated that any emotional priming at encoding led to a higher susceptibility to misinformation relative to priming at recall. In particular, inducing a negative interpretation of the image at encoding led to an increased susceptibility of false memories for major misinformation (an entire object not actually present in the scene). In contrast, this pattern was reversed when priming was used at recall; a negative reinterpretation of the image decreased memory distortion relative to unprimed images. These findings suggest that, with precise experimental control, the experience of emotion at event encoding, in particular, is implicated in false memory susceptibility. PMID:24552271

  10. Kepler Eclipsing Binary Stars. VIII. Identification of False Positive Eclipsing Binaries and Re-extraction of New Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Masih, Michael; Prša, Andrej; Conroy, Kyle; Bloemen, Steven; Boyajian, Tabetha; Doyle, Laurance R.; Johnston, Cole; Kostov, Veselin; Latham, David W.; Matijevič, Gal; Shporer, Avi; Southworth, John

    2016-04-01

    The Kepler mission has provided unprecedented, nearly continuous photometric data of ∼200,000 objects in the ∼105 deg2 field of view (FOV) from the beginning of science operations in May of 2009 until the loss of the second reaction wheel in May of 2013. The Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog contains information including but not limited to ephemerides, stellar parameters, and analytical approximation fits for every known eclipsing binary system in the Kepler FOV. Using target pixel level data collected from Kepler in conjunction with the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog, we identify false positives among eclipsing binaries, i.e., targets that are not eclipsing binaries themselves, but are instead contaminated by eclipsing binary sources nearby on the sky and show eclipsing binary signatures in their light curves. We present methods for identifying these false positives and for extracting new light curves for the true source of the observed binary signal. For each source, we extract three separate light curves for each quarter of available data by optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio, the relative percent eclipse depth, and the flux eclipse depth. We present 289 new eclipsing binaries in the Kepler FOV that were not targets for observation, and these have been added to the catalog. An online version of this catalog with downloadable content and visualization tools is maintained at http://keplerEBs.villanova.edu.

  11. False positive detection of peanut residue in liquid caramel coloring using commercial ELISA kits.

    PubMed

    Stelk, T; Niemann, L; Lambrecht, D M; Baumert, J L; Taylor, S L

    2013-07-01

    Initial food industry testing in our laboratory using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods indicated that the darkest caramel color (class IV) unexpectedly contained traces of peanut protein, a potential undeclared allergen issue. Caramel production centers on the heating of sugars, often glucose, under controlled heat and chemical processing conditions with other ingredients including ammonia, sulfite, and/or alkali salts. These ingredients should not contain any traces of peanut residue. We sought to determine the reliability of commercially available peanut allergen ELISA methods for detection of apparent peanut residue in caramel coloring. Caramel color samples of classes I, II, III, and IV were obtained from 2 commercial suppliers and tested using 6 commercially available quantitative and qualitative peanut ELISA kits. Five lots of class IV caramel color were spiked with a known concentration of peanut protein from light roasted peanut flour to assess recovery of peanut residue using a spike and recovery protocol with either 15 ppm or 100 ppm peanut protein on a kit-specific basis. A false positive detection of peanut protein was found in class IV caramel colors with a range of 1.2 to 17.6 parts per million recovered in both spiked and unspiked liquid caramel color samples. ELISA kit spike/recovery results indicate that false negative results might also be obtained if peanut contamination were ever to actually exist in class IV caramel color. Manufacturers of peanut-free products often test all ingredients for peanut allergen residues using commercial ELISA kits. ELISA methods are not reliable for the detection of peanut in class IV caramel ingredients and their use is not recommended with this matrix. PMID:23647653

  12. Controlling the False-Positive Rate in Multilocus Genome Scans for Selection

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Kevin R.; Jensen, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    Rapid typing of genetic variation at many regions of the genome is an efficient way to survey variability in natural populations in an effort to identify segments of the genome that have experienced recent natural selection. Following such a genome scan, individual regions may be chosen for further sequencing and a more detailed analysis of patterns of variability, often to perform a parametric test for selection and to estimate the strength of a recent selective sweep. We show here that not accounting for the ascertainment of loci in such analyses leads to false inference of natural selection when the true model is selective neutrality, because the procedure of choosing unusual loci (in comparison to the rest of the genome-scan data) selects regions of the genome with genealogies similar to those expected under models of recent directional selection. We describe a simple and efficient correction for this ascertainment bias, which restores the false-positive rate to near-nominal levels. For the parameters considered here, we find that obtaining a test with the expected distribution of P-values depends on accurately accounting both for ascertainment of regions and for demography. Finally, we use simulations to explore the utility of relying on outlier loci to detect recent selective sweeps. We find that measures of diversity and of population differentiation are more effective than summaries of the site-frequency spectrum and that sequencing larger regions (2.5 kbp) in genome-scan studies leads to more power to detect recent selective sweeps. PMID:17110489

  13. Transient elastography and APRI score: looking at false positives and false negatives. Diagnostic performance and association to fibrosis staging in chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, L.C.; Ferreira, P.A.; Miotto, N.; Zanaga, L.; Gonçales, E.; Lazarini, M.S.; Gonçales, F.L.; Stucchi, R.S.B.; Vigani, A.G.

    2016-01-01

    Although long regarded as the gold standard for liver fibrosis staging in chronic hepatitis C (CHC), liver biopsy (LB) implies both the risk of an invasive procedure and significant variability. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance for transient elastography (TE) and aspartate aminotransferase to platelet index (APRI) used alone and in combination compared to liver biopsy and to analyze false positive/negative results. Patients with CHC, and no previous clinical diagnosis of cirrhosis were enrolled to undergo liver biopsy, TE and APRI. A total of 182 adult patients with a median age of 55 years and median body mass index of 26.71 kg/m2 were analyzed. On LB, 56% of patients had significant levels of fibrosis (METAVIR F≥2) and 28% had advanced fibrosis (F3/F4). The strongest performance for both tests was observed for exclusion of advanced fibrosis with good negative predictive values (89 and 86%, respectively). Low necroinflammatory activity on LB was associated with false negative TE. False positives were associated with NASH and smaller LB fragments. Correlation between APRI and Fibroscan for F≥2 was 100% and 84% for F≥3 and remained high in both false negative and false positive instances, correctly identifying F<2 in 71% of cases and F<3 in 78% (and potentially foregoing up to 84% of LB). We concluded that low individual performance indicators could be attributable to limitations of LB. Poorer differentiation of lower levels of fibrosis is a known issue for LB and remains so for noninvasive tests. Good predictability is possible, however, for advanced fibrosis. PMID:27533769

  14. THE POSSIBLE MOON OF KEPLER-90g IS A FALSE POSITIVE

    SciTech Connect

    Kipping, D. M.; Torres, G.; Buchhave, L. A.; Huang, X.; Bakos, G. Á.; Nesvorný, D.; Schmitt, A. R.

    2015-01-20

    The discovery of an exomoon would provide deep insights into planet formation and the habitability of planetary systems, with transiting examples being particularly sought after. Of the hundreds of Kepler planets now discovered, the seven-planet system Kepler-90 is unusual for exhibiting an unidentified transit-like signal in close proximity to one of the transits of the long-period gas-giant Kepler-90g, as noted by Cabrera et al. As part of the ''Hunt for Exomoons with Kepler'' project, we investigate this possible exomoon signal and find it passes all conventional photometric, dynamical, and centroid diagnostic tests. However, pixel-level light curves indicate that the moon-like signal occurs on nearly all of the target's pixels, which we confirm using a novel way of examining pixel-level data which we dub the ''transit centroid''. This test reveals that the possible exomoon to Kepler-90g is likely a false positive, perhaps due to a cosmic ray induced sudden pixel sensitivity dropout. This work highlights the extreme care required for seeking non-periodic low-amplitude transit signals, such as exomoons.

  15. False-positive breath-alcohol test after a ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Jones, A W; Rössner, S

    2007-03-01

    A 59-year-old man undergoing weight loss with very low calorie diets (VLCD) attempted to drive a car, which was fitted with an alcohol ignition interlock device, but the vehicle failed to start. Because the man was a teetotaller, he was surprised and upset by this result. VLCD treatment leads to ketonemia with high concentrations of acetone, acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate in the blood. The interlock device determines alcohol (ethanol) in breath by electrochemical oxidation, but acetone does not undergo oxidation with this detector. However, under certain circumstances acetone is reduced in the body to isopropanol by hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). The ignition interlock device responds to other alcohols (e.g. methanol, n-propanol and isopropanol), which therefore explains the false-positive result. This 'side effect' of ketogenic diets needs further discussion by authorities when people engaged in safety-sensitive work (e.g. bus drivers and airline pilots) submit to random breath-alcohol tests. PMID:16894360

  16. The uterine blush. A potential false-positive in Meckel's scan interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Fink-Bennett, D.

    1982-10-01

    To determine the presence, prevalence, and clinical importance of /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate uterine uptake, this retrospective analysis of 71 Meckel's scans was undertaken. Specifically, each study was evaluated for the presence of a focal accumulation of radiotracer cephalad to the bladder. Patients received an intravenous dose of 150 microCi/kg of /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate. Each study consisted of 15 one minute anterior serial gamma camera images, and a 15, 30, and 60 minute anterior, right lateral and posterior scintiscan. Menstrual histories were obtained from all patients except two. No males (33/33), nor premenstrual (13/13), menopausal (4/4) or posthysterectomy (2/2) patients revealed a uterine blush. Eleven of 15 patients (73%) with regular menses demonstrated a uterine blush. They were in the menstrual or secretory phases of their cycle. Four demonstrated no uterine uptake, had regular periods, but were in the proliferative phase of their cycle. Two with irregular periods, and one with no recorded menstrual history, manifested the blush. Radiotracer should be expected in the uterus during the menstrual and secretory phases of the menstrual cycle. It is a manifestation of a normal physiologic phenomenon, and must be recognized to prevent false-positive Meckel's scan interpretations.

  17. College football, elections, and false-positive results in observational research.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Anthony; Montagnes, B Pablo

    2015-11-10

    A recent, widely cited study [Healy AJ, Malhotra N, Mo CH (2010) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107(29):12804-12809] finds that college football games influence voting behavior. Victories within 2 weeks of an election reportedly increase the success of the incumbent party in presidential, senatorial, and gubernatorial elections in the home county of the team. We reassess the evidence and conclude that there is likely no such effect, despite the fact that Healy et al. followed the best practices in social science and used a credible research design. Multiple independent sources of evidence suggest that the original finding was spurious-reflecting bad luck for researchers rather than a shortcoming of American voters. We fail to estimate the same effect when we leverage situations where multiple elections with differing incumbent parties occur in the same county and year. We also find that the purported effect of college football games is stronger in counties where people are less interested in college football, just as strong when the incumbent candidate does not run for reelection, and just as strong in other parts of the state outside the home county of the team. Lastly, we detect no effect of National Football League games on elections, despite their greater popularity. We conclude with recommendations for evaluating surprising research findings and avoiding similar false-positive results. PMID:26504202

  18. Computerized detection of unruptured aneurysms in MRA images: reduction of false positives using anatomical location features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Yoshikazu; Gao, Xin; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Ando, Hiromichi; Yamakawa, Hiroyasu; Asano, Takahiko; Kato, Hiroki; Iwama, Toru; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2008-03-01

    The detection of unruptured aneurysms is a major subject in magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). However, their accurate detection is often difficult because of the overlapping between the aneurysm and the adjacent vessels on maximum intensity projection images. The purpose of this study is to develop a computerized method for the detection of unruptured aneurysms in order to assist radiologists in image interpretation. The vessel regions were first segmented using gray-level thresholding and a region growing technique. The gradient concentration (GC) filter was then employed for the enhancement of the aneurysms. The initial candidates were identified in the GC image using a gray-level threshold. For the elimination of false positives (FPs), we determined shape features and an anatomical location feature. Finally, rule-based schemes and quadratic discriminant analysis were employed along with these features for distinguishing between the aneurysms and the FPs. The sensitivity for the detection of unruptured aneurysms was 90.0% with 1.52 FPs per patient. Our computerized scheme can be useful in assisting the radiologists in the detection of unruptured aneurysms in MRA images.

  19. College football, elections, and false-positive results in observational research

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Anthony; Montagnes, B. Pablo

    2015-01-01

    A recent, widely cited study [Healy AJ, Malhotra N, Mo CH (2010) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107(29):12804–12809] finds that college football games influence voting behavior. Victories within 2 weeks of an election reportedly increase the success of the incumbent party in presidential, senatorial, and gubernatorial elections in the home county of the team. We reassess the evidence and conclude that there is likely no such effect, despite the fact that Healy et al. followed the best practices in social science and used a credible research design. Multiple independent sources of evidence suggest that the original finding was spurious—reflecting bad luck for researchers rather than a shortcoming of American voters. We fail to estimate the same effect when we leverage situations where multiple elections with differing incumbent parties occur in the same county and year. We also find that the purported effect of college football games is stronger in counties where people are less interested in college football, just as strong when the incumbent candidate does not run for reelection, and just as strong in other parts of the state outside the home county of the team. Lastly, we detect no effect of National Football League games on elections, despite their greater popularity. We conclude with recommendations for evaluating surprising research findings and avoiding similar false-positive results. PMID:26504202

  20. Mouse Genome-Wide Association Mapping Needs Linkage Analysis to Avoid False-Positive Loci

    PubMed Central

    Manenti, Giacomo; Galvan, Antonella; Pettinicchio, Angela; Trincucci, Gaia; Spada, Elena; Zolin, Anna; Milani, Silvano; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Dragani, Tommaso A.

    2009-01-01

    We carried out genome-wide association (GWA) studies in inbred mouse strains characterized for their lung tumor susceptibility phenotypes (spontaneous or urethane-induced) with panels of 12,959 (13K) or 138,793 (140K) single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Above the statistical thresholds, we detected only SNP rs3681853 on Chromosome 5, two SNPs in the pulmonary adenoma susceptibility 1 (Pas1) locus, and SNP rs4174648 on Chromosome 16 for spontaneous tumor incidence, urethane-induced tumor incidence, and urethane-induced tumor multiplicity, respectively, with the 13K SNP panel, but only the Pas1 locus with the 140K SNP panel. Haplotype analysis carried out in the latter panel detected four additional loci. Loci reported in previous GWA studies failed to replicate. Genome-wide genetic linkage analysis in urethane-treated (BALB/c×C3H/He)F2, (BALB/c×SWR/J)F2, and (A/J×C3H/He)F2 mice showed that Pas1, but none of the other loci detected previously or herein by GWA, had a significant effect. The Lasc1 gene, identified by GWA as a functional element (Nat. Genet., 38:888–95, 2006), showed no genetic effects in the two independent intercross mouse populations containing both alleles, nor was it expressed in mouse normal lung or lung tumors. Our results indicate that GWA studies in mouse inbred strains can suffer a high rate of false-positive results and that such an approach should be used in conjunction with classical linkage mapping in genetic crosses. PMID:19132132

  1. Reduction of false positives by machine learning for computer-aided detection of colonic polyps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xin; Wang, Su; Zhu, Hongbin; Liang, Zhengrong

    2009-02-01

    With the development of computer-aided detection of polyps (CADpolyp), various features have been extracted to detect the initial polyp candidates (IPCs). In this paper, three approaches were utilized to reduce the number of false positives (FPs): the multiply linear regression (MLR) and two modified machine learning methods, i.e., neural network (NN) and support vector machine (SVM), based on their own characteristics and specific learning purposes. Compared to MLR, the two modified machine learning methods are much more sophisticated and well-adapted to the data provided. To achieve the optimal sensitivity and specificity, raw features were pre-processed by the principle component analysis (PCA) in the hope of removing the second-order statistical correlation prior to any learning actions. The gain by the use of PCA was evidenced by the collected 26 patient studies, which included 32 colonic polyps confirmed by both optical colonoscopy (OC) and virtual colonoscopy (VC). The learning and testing results showed that the two modified machine-learning methods can reduce the number of FPs by 48.9% (or 7.2 FPs per patient) and 45.3% (or 7.7 FPs per patient) respectively, at 100% detection sensitivity in comparison with that of traditional MLR method. Generally, more than necessary number of features were stacked as input vectors to machine learning algorithms, dimensionality reduction for a more compact feature combination, i.e., how to determine the remaining dimensionality via PCA linear transform was considered and discussed in this paper. In addition, we proposed a new PCA-scaled data pre-processing method to help reduce the FPs significantly. Finally, fROC (free-response receiver operating characteristic) curves corresponding to three FP-reduction approaches were acquired, and comparative analysis was conducted.

  2. Use of Monte Carlo Methods for Evaluating Probability of False Positives in Archaeoastronomy Alignments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Anthony B.; Ambruster, C.; Jewell, E.

    2012-01-01

    Simple Monte Carlo simulations can assist both the cultural astronomy researcher while the Research Design is developed and the eventual evaluators of research products. Following the method we describe allows assessment of the probability for there to be false positives associated with a site. Even seemingly evocative alignments may be meaningless, depending on the site characteristics and the number of degrees of freedom the researcher allows. In many cases, an observer may have to limit comments to "it is nice and it might be culturally meaningful, rather than saying "it is impressive so it must mean something". We describe a basic language with an associated set of attributes to be cataloged. These can be used to set up simple Monte Carlo simulations for a site. Without collaborating cultural evidence, or trends with similar attributes (for example a number of sites showing the same anticipatory date), the Monte Carlo simulation can be used as a filter to establish the likeliness that the observed alignment phenomena is the result of random factors. Such analysis may temper any eagerness to prematurely attribute cultural meaning to an observation. For the most complete description of an archaeological site, we urge researchers to capture the site attributes in a manner which permits statistical analysis. We also encourage cultural astronomers to record that which does not work, and that which may seem to align, but has no discernable meaning. Properly reporting situational information as tenets of the research design will reduce the subjective nature of archaeoastronomical interpretation. Examples from field work will be discussed.

  3. Signature of life on exoplanets: Can Darwin produce false positive detections?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selsis, F.; Despois, D.; Parisot, J.-P.

    2002-06-01

    Darwin (ESA) and Terrestrial Planet Finder-TPF (NASA) are two projects of space telescopes aiming at the detection of extra-solar terrestrial planets and some of their atmospheric components. In particular, they will be sensitive to the 9.6 mu m band of O3 which may be the signature of an O2 -rich atmosphere produced by photosynthetic life forms. In this paper, we point out that O2 , and hence O3 , can also be produced by photochemistry and we investigate the risk of ``false positive'' detection of life incurred by these missions. For this purpose, we have developed new photochemical and radiative-convective models of terrestrial planet atmospheres. By modelling the photochemistry of some realistic atmospheres, (including present and past Earth and Mars) we show that O2 -rich atmospheres (up to 5%) and IR absorbing O3 layers can build up without life from H2O and CO2 photolysis. However, Darwin can still provide a reliable way to detect, through their mid-infrared signatures, ecosystems which have developed oxygenic photosynthesis. Indeed, the two photochemical sources of O2 are shown to interfere with each other; second, when the CO2 pressure is high enough (>50 mbar) to produce appreciable amounts of O2 and O3 , it also masks the O3 feature; and third, the by-products of H2O photolysis destroy O3 . As a result, whereas the unique detection of O2 remains ambiguous, the simultaneous infrared detection of O3 , CO2 and H2O , provided by Darwin, is established to be a robust way to discriminate photochemical O2 production from biological photosynthesis: none of the atmospheres modelled exhibits this ``triple signature'', even in the most extreme ``high risk'' cases.

  4. Overcoming the effects of false positives and threshold bias in graph theoretical analyses of neuroimaging data

    PubMed Central

    Drakesmith, M.; Caeyenberghs, K.; Dutt, A.; Lewis, G.; David, A.S.; Jones, D.K.

    2015-01-01

    Graph theory (GT) is a powerful framework for quantifying topological features of neuroimaging-derived functional and structural networks. However, false positive (FP) connections arise frequently and influence the inferred topology of networks. Thresholding is often used to overcome this problem, but an appropriate threshold often relies on a priori assumptions, which will alter inferred network topologies. Four common network metrics (global efficiency, mean clustering coefficient, mean betweenness and smallworldness) were tested using a model tractography dataset. It was found that all four network metrics were significantly affected even by just one FP. Results also show that thresholding effectively dampens the impact of FPs, but at the expense of adding significant bias to network metrics. In a larger number (n = 248) of tractography datasets, statistics were computed across random group permutations for a range of thresholds, revealing that statistics for network metrics varied significantly more than for non-network metrics (i.e., number of streamlines and number of edges). Varying degrees of network atrophy were introduced artificially to half the datasets, to test sensitivity to genuine group differences. For some network metrics, this atrophy was detected as significant (p < 0.05, determined using permutation testing) only across a limited range of thresholds. We propose a multi-threshold permutation correction (MTPC) method, based on the cluster-enhanced permutation correction approach, to identify sustained significant effects across clusters of thresholds. This approach minimises requirements to determine a single threshold a priori. We demonstrate improved sensitivity of MTPC-corrected metrics to genuine group effects compared to an existing approach and demonstrate the use of MTPC on a previously published network analysis of tractography data derived from a clinical population. In conclusion, we show that there are large biases and instability

  5. Reduction of False Positives by Internal Features for Polyp Detection in CT-Based Virtual Colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zigang; Liang, Zhengrong; Li, Lihong; Li, Xiang; Li, Bin; Anderson, Joseph; Harrington, Donald

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present a computer-aided detection (CAD) method to extract and use internal features to reduce false positive (FP) rate generated by surface-based measures on the inner colon wall in computed tomographic (CT) colonography. Firstly, a new shape description global curvature, which can provide an overall shape description of the colon wall, is introduced to improve the detection of suspicious patches on the colon wall whose geometrical features are similar to that of the colonic polyps. By a ray-driven edge finder, the volume of each detected patch is extracted as a fitted ellipsoid model. Within the ellipsoid model, CT image density distribution is analyzed. Three types of (geometrical, morphological and textural) internal features are extracted and applied to eliminate the FPs from the detected patches. The presented CAD method was tested by a total of 153 patient datasets in which 45 patients were found with 61 polyps of sizes 4–30 mm by optical colonoscopy. For a 100% detection sensitivity (on polyps), the presented CAD method had an average FPs of 2.68 per patient dataset and eliminated 93.1% of FPs generated by the surface-based measures. The presented CAD method was also evaluated by different polyp sizes. For polyp sizes of 10–30 mm, the method achieved mean number of FPs per dataset of 2.0 with 100% sensitivity. For polyp sizes of 4–10 mm, the method achieved 3.44 FP per dataset with 100% sensitivity. PMID:16475759

  6. Is the false-positive rate in mammography in North America too high?

    PubMed

    Le, Michelle T; Mothersill, Carmel E; Seymour, Colin B; McNeill, Fiona E

    2016-09-01

    The practice of investigating pathological abnormalities in the breasts of females who are asymptomatic is primarily employed using X-ray mammography. The importance of breast screening is reflected in the mortality-based benefits observed among females who are found to possess invasive breast carcinoma prior to the manifestation of clinical symptoms. It is estimated that population-based screening constitutes a 17% reduction in the breast cancer mortality rate among females affected by invasive breast carcinoma. In spite of the significant utility that screening confers in those affected by invasive cancer, limitations associated with screening manifest as potential harms affecting individuals who are free of invasive disease. Disease-free and benign tumour-bearing individuals who are subjected to diagnostic work-up following a screening examination constitute a population of cases referred to as false positives (FPs). This article discusses factors contributing to the FP rate in mammography and extends the discussion to an assessment of the consequences associated with FP reporting. We conclude that the mammography FP rate in North America is in excess based upon the observation of overtreatment of in situ lesions and the disproportionate distribution of detriment and benefit among the population of individuals recalled for diagnostic work-up subsequent to screening. To address the excessive incidence of FPs in mammography, we investigate solutions that may be employed to remediate the current status of the FP rate. Subsequently, it can be suggested that improvements in the breast-screening protocol, medical litigation risk, image interpretation software and the implementation of image acquisition modalities that overcome superimposition effects are promising solutions. PMID:27187600

  7. False positive reduction of microcalcification cluster detection in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ning; Yi, Sheng; Mendonca, Paulo; Tian, Tai-peng; Samala, Ravi; Chan, Heang-Ping

    2014-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a new modality that has strong potential in improving the sensitivity and specificity of breast mass detection. However, the detection of microcalcifications (MCs) in DBT is challenging because radiologists have to search for the often subtle signals in many slices. We are developing a computer-aided detection (CAD) system to assist radiologists in reading DBT. The system consists of four major steps, namely: image enhancement; pre-screening of MC candidates; false-positive (FP) reduction, and detection of MC cluster candidates of clinical interest. We propose an algorithm for reducing FPs by using 3D characteristics of MC clusters in DBT. The proposed method takes the MC candidates from the pre-screening step described in [14] as input, which are then iteratively clustered to provide training samples to a random-forest classifier and a rule-based classifier. The random forest classifier is used to learn a discriminative model of MC clusters using 3D texture features, whereas the rule-based classifier revisits the initial training samples and enhances them by combining median filtering and graph-cut-based segmentation followed by thresholding on the final number of MCs belonging to the candidate cluster. The outputs of these two classifiers are combined according to the prediction confidence of the random-forest classifier. We evaluate the proposed FP-reduction algorithm on a data set of two-view DBT from 40 breasts with biopsy-proven MC clusters. The experimental results demonstrate a significant reduction in FP detections, with a final sensitivity of 92.2% for an FP rate of 50%.

  8. Cumulative risk of false positive test in relation to breast symptoms in mammography screening: a historical prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deependra; Pitkäniemi, Janne; Malila, Nea; Anttila, Ahti

    2016-09-01

    Mammography has been found effective as the primary screening test for breast cancer. We estimated the cumulative probability of false positive screening test results with respect to symptom history reported at screen. A historical prospective cohort study was done using individual screening data from 413,611 women aged 50-69 years with 2,627,256 invitations for mammography screening between 1992 and 2012 in Finland. Symptoms (lump, retraction, and secretion) were reported at 56,805 visits, and 48,873 visits resulted in a false positive mammography result. Generalized linear models were used to estimate the probability of at least one false positive test and true positive at screening visits. The estimates were compared among women with and without symptoms history. The estimated cumulative probabilities were 18 and 6 % for false positive and true positive results, respectively. In women with a history of a lump, the cumulative probabilities of false positive test and true positive were 45 and 16 %, respectively, compared to 17 and 5 % with no reported lump. In women with a history of any given symptom, the cumulative probabilities of false positive test and true positive were 38 and 13 %, respectively. Likewise, women with a history of a 'lump and retraction' had the cumulative false positive probability of 56 %. The study showed higher cumulative risk of false positive tests and more cancers detected in women who reported symptoms compared to women who did not report symptoms at screen. The risk varies substantially, depending on symptom types and characteristics. Information on breast symptoms influences the balance of absolute benefits and harms of screening. PMID:27496148

  9. False-positive mycobacterium tuberculosis cultures in 44 laboratories in The Netherlands (1993 to 2000): incidence, risk factors, and consequences.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Annette S; Blommerde, Barbara; de Haas, Petra E W; Sebek, Maruschka M G G; Lambregts-van Weezenbeek, Kitty S B; Dessens, Mirjam; van Soolingen, Dick

    2002-11-01

    False-positive Mycobacterium tuberculosis cultures are a benchmark for the quality of laboratory processes and patient care. We studied the incidence of false-positive cultures, risk factors, and consequences for patients during the period from 1993 to 2000 in 44 peripheral laboratories in The Netherlands. The national reference laboratory tested 8,889 M. tuberculosis isolates submitted by these laboratories. By definition, a culture was false positive (i) if the DNA fingerprint of the isolate was identical to that of an isolate from another patient processed within 7 days in the same laboratory, (ii) if the isolate was taken from a patient without clinical signs of tuberculosis, and/or (iii) if the false-positive test result was confirmed by the peripheral laboratory and/or the public health tuberculosis officer. We identified 213 false-positive cultures (2.4%). The overall incidence of false-positive cultures decreased over the years, from 3.9% in 1993 to 1.1% in 2000. Laboratories with false-positive cultures more often processed less than 3,000 samples per year (P < 0.05). Among 110 patients for whom a false-positive culture was identified from 1995 to 1999, we found that for 36% of the patients an official tuberculosis notification had been provided to the appropriate public health services, 31% of the patients were treated, 14% of the patients were hospitalized, and a contact investigation had been initiated for 16% of the patients. The application of DNA fingerprinting to identify false-positive M. tuberculosis cultures and the provision of feedback to peripheral laboratories are useful instruments to improve the quality of laboratory processes and the quality of medical care. PMID:12409366

  10. Classification of radiological errors in chest radiographs, using support vector machine on the spatial frequency features of false- negative and false-positive regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzyk, Mariusz W.; Donovan, Tim; Brennan, Patrick C.; Dix, Alan; Manning, David J.

    2011-03-01

    Aim: To optimize automated classification of radiological errors during lung nodule detection from chest radiographs (CxR) using a support vector machine (SVM) run on the spatial frequency features extracted from the local background of selected regions. Background: The majority of the unreported pulmonary nodules are visually detected but not recognized; shown by the prolonged dwell time values at false-negative regions. Similarly, overestimated nodule locations are capturing substantial amounts of foveal attention. Spatial frequency properties of selected local backgrounds are correlated with human observer responses either in terms of accuracy in indicating abnormality position or in the precision of visual sampling the medical images. Methods: Seven radiologists participated in the eye tracking experiments conducted under conditions of pulmonary nodule detection from a set of 20 postero-anterior CxR. The most dwelled locations have been identified and subjected to spatial frequency (SF) analysis. The image-based features of selected ROI were extracted with un-decimated Wavelet Packet Transform. An analysis of variance was run to select SF features and a SVM schema was implemented to classify False-Negative and False-Positive from all ROI. Results: A relative high overall accuracy was obtained for each individually developed Wavelet-SVM algorithm, with over 90% average correct ratio for errors recognition from all prolonged dwell locations. Conclusion: The preliminary results show that combined eye-tracking and image-based features can be used for automated detection of radiological error with SVM. The work is still in progress and not all analytical procedures have been completed, which might have an effect on the specificity of the algorithm.

  11. The Illusion of the Positive: The impact of natural and induced mood on older adults’ false recall

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Lisa; Hess, Thomas M.; Elliot, Tonya

    2012-01-01

    Recent research suggests that affective and motivational processes can influence age differences in memory. In the current study, we examine the impact of both natural and induced mood state on age differences in false recall. Older and younger adults performed a version of the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM; Roediger & McDermott, 1995) false memory paradigm in either their natural mood state or after a positive or negative mood induction. Results indicated that, after accounting for age differences in basic cognitive function, age-related differences in positive mood during the testing session were related to increased false recall in older adults. Inducing older adults into a positive mood also exacerbated age differences in false memory. In contrast, veridical recall did not appear to be systematically influenced by mood. Together, these results suggest that positive mood states can impact older adults’ information processing and potentially increase underlying cognitive age differences. PMID:22292431

  12. Indium-111 leukocyte accumulation in submandibular gland saliva as a cause for false-positive gut uptake in children

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, S.L.; Williamson, M.R.; Seibert, J.J.; Boyd, C.M.; Latture, T.

    1987-11-01

    Unexplained false-positive accumulation of In-111 leukocyte in the gastrointestinal tract has been reported previously. In a pediatric population, uptake in the submandibular gland was noted in 19 of 42 children. This is believed to be a normal finding in children that is not seen in adults. In some of these 19 children, unexplained gastrointestinal activity was also noted. Saliva from a patient with false-positive gastrointestinal uptake and positive submandibular activity was positive for In-111. One suggested cause of unexplained gut activity may be secondary to swallowed activity in the saliva from the normal submandibular activity in children.

  13. Positive Psychology and Adolescent Mental Health: False Promise or True Breakthrough?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Thomas M.

    2004-01-01

    The emerging field of positive psychology has pledged to improve the mental health of American adolescents. Yet, without a principle-based conceptual foundation to guide its study of optimal youth functioning, positive psychology will ultimately fail to keep its promise. This paper suggests that the principles of Mind, Thought and Consciousness…

  14. Positive psychology and adolescent mental health: false promise or true breakthrough?

    PubMed

    Kelley, Thomas M

    2004-01-01

    The emerging field of positive psychology has pledged to improve the mental health of American adolescents. Yet, without a principle-based conceptual foundation to guide its study of optimal youth functioning, positive psychology will ultimately fail to keep its promise. This paper suggests that the principles of Mind, Thought and Consciousness can provide positive psychology with a clearer understanding of optimal psychological functioning, serve as a unifying conceptual framework to guide its proposed mission, and lead to a true breakthrough in adolescent mental health. It first describes how the logic of these principles accounts for all subjective human experience. It then demonstrates how optimal mental health is generated, and how it can be maintained irrespective of present or past circumstances. Finally, it discusses how several contemporary models of positive psychology (i.e., Csikszentmihalyi's flow. Seligman's learned optimism, Goleman's emotional intelligence, and Buss's evolutionary perspective) can be simplified and clarified using the logic of the above three principles. PMID:15563037

  15. Efavirenz does not cause false-positive urine cannabis test in HIV-infected patients on Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Koh, K C; Lee, W Y; Eh, Z W; Nor Julaika, I; Tee, P S; Azizon, O; Thilageswary, M

    2013-06-01

    Efavirenz is a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor used in combination with other drugs for the treatment of patients with HIV infection. Efavirenz has been reported to cause a positive urine cannabis test reaction which may create problems between HIV-infected patients on Efavirenz and law enforcement agencies. Doctors are at loss whether to issue documents certifying the potential false positive urine cannabis test with Efavirenz to patients. We investigated if the urine of HIV-infected patients on Efavirenz caused a positive urine cannabis test using the AxSYM Cannabinoids Assay®. Urine samples from 51 eligible patients on Efavirenz were tested for cannabis. All tested negative except for one who had used cannabis the day before. Efavirenz does not cause false positive urine cannabis test with the AxSYM Cannabinoids Assay®. Certification documents from doctors are therefore unnecessary. PMID:23749016

  16. All That Glisters Is Not Gold: Sampling-Process Uncertainty in Disease-Vector Surveys with False-Negative and False-Positive Detections

    PubMed Central

    Abad-Franch, Fernando; Valença-Barbosa, Carolina; Sarquis, Otília; Lima, Marli M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Vector-borne diseases are major public health concerns worldwide. For many of them, vector control is still key to primary prevention, with control actions planned and evaluated using vector occurrence records. Yet vectors can be difficult to detect, and vector occurrence indices will be biased whenever spurious detection/non-detection records arise during surveys. Here, we investigate the process of Chagas disease vector detection, assessing the performance of the surveillance method used in most control programs – active triatomine-bug searches by trained health agents. Methodology/Principal Findings Control agents conducted triplicate vector searches in 414 man-made ecotopes of two rural localities. Ecotope-specific ‘detection histories’ (vectors or their traces detected or not in each individual search) were analyzed using ordinary methods that disregard detection failures and multiple detection-state site-occupancy models that accommodate false-negative and false-positive detections. Mean (±SE) vector-search sensitivity was ∼0.283±0.057. Vector-detection odds increased as bug colonies grew denser, and were lower in houses than in most peridomestic structures, particularly woodpiles. False-positive detections (non-vector fecal streaks misidentified as signs of vector presence) occurred with probability ∼0.011±0.008. The model-averaged estimate of infestation (44.5±6.4%) was ∼2.4–3.9 times higher than naïve indices computed assuming perfect detection after single vector searches (11.4–18.8%); about 106–137 infestation foci went undetected during such standard searches. Conclusions/Significance We illustrate a relatively straightforward approach to addressing vector detection uncertainty under realistic field survey conditions. Standard vector searches had low sensitivity except in certain singular circumstances. Our findings suggest that many infestation foci may go undetected during routine surveys, especially when vector

  17. Commercial radioimmunoassay for beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin: falsely positive determinations due to elevated serum luteinizing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.E. Jr.; Platoff, G.E.; Kubrock, C.A.; Stuzman, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Among 17 men who had received seemingly curative treatment for unilateral non-seminomatous germ cell tumors for the testis and who had consistently normal serum human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) levels at a reference laboratory, 7 (41%) had at least one falsely positive commercial serum HCG determination. To investigate the cause of these falsely positive determinations the authors measured the cross reactivity of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) standards in the commercial HCG assay, and studied the relationships between commercial HCG levels and serum LH levels, serum FSH levels and gonadal status in men with and without normal gonadal function. The falsely positive HCG determinations appeared to be due to elevated serum LH levels and cross reactivity of LH in the commercial HCG assay because: 1) there was substantial cross reactivity of the LH standards in the commercial assay, 2) the serum LH was elevated in four of six men with solitary testes, 3) there was a striking correlation between elevated serum LH levels and falsely elevated commercial HCG levels in ten men with solitary or absent testes, and 4) there were no falsely positive HCG determinations in 13 normal men but there were falsely positive HCG determinations in seven of ten anorchid men.

  18. Cross-reactivity between Lyme and syphilis screening assays: Lyme disease does not cause false-positive syphilis screens.

    PubMed

    Patriquin, Glenn; LeBlanc, Jason; Heinstein, Charles; Roberts, Catherine; Lindsay, Robbin; Hatchette, Todd F

    2016-03-01

    Increased rates of Lyme disease and syphilis in the same geographic area prompted an assessment of screening test cross-reactivity. This study supports the previously described cross-reactivity of Lyme screening among syphilis-positive sera and reports evidence against the possibility of false-positive syphilis screening tests resulting from previous Borrelia burgdorferi infection. PMID:26707064

  19. Case report: false positive elevated serum-galactomannan levels after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation caused by oral nutritional supplements.

    PubMed

    Rachow, Tobias; Dornaus, Sebastian; Sayer, Herbert G; Hermann, Beate; Hochhaus, Andreas; von Lilienfeld-Toal, Marie

    2016-05-01

    Positive galactomannan tests in patients who underwent chemotherapy without any clinical signs of a fungal infection should lead the clinician to consideration of a false-positive test result. Oral nutritional supplements may be a cause, especially in the case of concomitant disturbance of the gastrointestinal mucosal barrier because of mucositis. PMID:27188260

  20. False Positive B-Cells Crossmatch after Prior Rituximab Exposure of the Kidney Donor

    PubMed Central

    Desoutter, Judith; Apithy, Marie-Joëlle; Bartczak, Ségolène; Guillaume, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Crossmatching is essential prior to kidney transplantation to confirm compatibility between the donor and the recipient, particularly to prevent acute antibody-mediated rejection. An unexpected positive crossmatch may be obtained in recipients with an autoimmune disease or preexisting antibodies not detected by single-antigen bead array due to complement interference or who have been previously treated by desensitization protocols such as rituximab, antithymocyte globulin, or intravenous immunoglobulins. We report donor and recipient investigations that revealed unexpected positive B-cells crossmatch, probably due to donor cells, as the donor had received rituximab therapy shortly before organ harvesting, in a context of severe idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. We consequently detected unexpected Class II IgG complement-dependent cytotoxicity for all sera tested. Other laboratory investigations failed to elucidate the reasons for this recipient-related positivity.

  1. Way forward in case of a false positive in vitro genotoxicity result for a cosmetic substance?

    PubMed

    Doktorova, Tatyana Y; Ates, Gamze; Vinken, Mathieu; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera

    2014-02-01

    The currently used regulatory in vitro mutagenicity/genotoxicity test battery has a high sensitivity for detecting genotoxicants, but it suffers from a large number of irrelevant positive results (i.e. low specificity) thereby imposing the need for additional follow-up by in vitro and/or in vivo genotoxicity tests. This could have a major impact on the cosmetic industry in Europe, seen the imposed animal testing and marketing bans on cosmetics and their ingredients. Afflicted, but safe substances could therefore be lost. Using the example of triclosan, a cosmetic preservative, we describe here the potential applicability of a human toxicogenomics-based in vitro assay as a potential mechanistically based follow-up test for positive in vitro genotoxicity results. Triclosan shows a positive in vitro chromosomal aberration test, but is negative during in vivo follow-up tests. Toxicogenomics analysis unequivocally shows that triclosan is identified as a compound acting through non-DNA reactive mechanisms. This proof-of-principle study illustrates the potential of genome-wide transcriptomics data in combination with in vitro experimentation as a possible weight-of-evidence follow-up approach for de-risking a positive outcome in a standard mutagenicity/genotoxicity battery. As such a substantial number of cosmetic compounds wrongly identified as genotoxicants could be saved for the future. PMID:24095862

  2. Efficient information theoretic strategies for classifier combination, feature extraction and performance evaluation in improving false positives and false negatives for spam e-mail filtering.

    PubMed

    Zorkadis, V; Karras, D A; Panayotou, M

    2005-01-01

    Spam emails are considered as a serious privacy-related violation, besides being a costly, unsolicited communication. Various spam filtering techniques have been so far proposed, mainly based on Naïve Bayesian algorithms. Other Machine Learning algorithms like Boosting trees, or Support Vector Machines (SVM) have already been used with success. However, the number of False Positives (FP) and False Negatives (FN) resulting through applying various spam e-mail filters still remains too high and the problem of spam e-mail categorization cannot be solved completely from a practical viewpoint. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for spam e-mail filtering based on efficient information theoretic techniques for integrating classifiers, for extracting improved features and for properly evaluating categorization accuracy in terms of FP and FN. The goal of the presented methodology is to empirically but explicitly minimize these FP and FN numbers by combining high-performance FP filters with high-performance FN filters emerging from a previous work of the authors [Zorkadis, V., Panayotou, M., & Karras, D. A. (2005). Improved spam e-mail filtering based on committee machines and information theoretic feature extraction. Proceedings of the International Joint Conference on Neural Networks, July 31-August 4, 2005, Montreal, Canada]. To this end, Random Committee-based filters along with ADTree-based ones are efficiently combined through information theory, respectively. The experiments conducted are of the most extensive ones so far in the literature, exploiting widely accepted benchmarking e-mail data sets and comparing the proposed methodology with the Naive Bayes spam filter as well as with the Boosting tree methodology, the classification via regression and other machine learning models. It is illustrated by means of novel information theoretic measures of FP & FN filtering performance that the proposed approach is very favorably compared to the other rival methods

  3. Is it time to sound an alarm about false-positive cell-free DNA testing for fetal aneuploidy?

    PubMed

    Mennuti, Michael T; Cherry, Athena M; Morrissette, Jennifer J D; Dugoff, Lorraine

    2013-11-01

    Testing cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in maternal blood samples has been shown to have very high sensitivity for the detection of fetal aneuploidy with very low false-positive results in high-risk patients who undergo invasive prenatal diagnosis. Recent observation in clinical practice of several cases of positive cfDNA tests for trisomy 18 and trisomy 13, which were not confirmed by cytogenetic testing of the pregnancy, may reflect a limitation of the positive predictive value of this quantitative testing, particularly when it is used to detect rare aneuploidies. Analysis of a larger number of false-positive cases is needed to evaluate whether these observations reflect the positive predictive value that should be expected. Infrequently, mechanisms (such as low percentage mosaicism or confined placental mosaicism) might also lead to positive cfDNA testing that is not concordant with standard prenatal cytogenetic diagnosis. The need to explore these and other possible causes of false-positive cfDNA testing is exemplified by 2 of these cases. Additional evaluation of cfDNA testing in clinical practice and a mechanism for the systematic reporting of false-positive and false-negative cases will be important before this test is offered widely to the general population of low-risk obstetric patients. In the meantime, incorporating information about the positive predictive value in pretest counseling and in clinical laboratory reports is recommended. These experiences reinforce the importance of offering invasive testing to confirm cfDNA results before parental decision-making. PMID:23529082

  4. False-Positive Rate Determination of Protein Target Discovery using a Covalent Modification- and Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Erin C.; Geer, M. Ariel; Hong, Jiyong; Fitzgerald, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Detection and quantitation of protein-ligand binding interactions is important in many areas of biological research. Stability of proteins from rates of oxidation (SPROX) is an energetics-based technique for identifying the proteins targets of ligands in complex biological mixtures. Knowing the false-positive rate of protein target discovery in proteome-wide SPROX experiments is important for the correct interpretation of results. Reported here are the results of a control SPROX experiment in which chemical denaturation data is obtained on the proteins in two samples that originated from the same yeast lysate, as would be done in a typical SPROX experiment except that one sample would be spiked with the test ligand. False-positive rates of 1.2-2.2 % and <0.8 % are calculated for SPROX experiments using Q-TOF and Orbitrap mass spectrometer systems, respectively. Our results indicate that the false-positive rate is largely determined by random errors associated with the mass spectral analysis of the isobaric mass tag (e.g., iTRAQ®) reporter ions used for peptide quantitation. Our results also suggest that technical replicates can be used to effectively eliminate such false positives that result from this random error, as is demonstrated in a SPROX experiment to identify yeast protein targets of the drug, manassantin A. The impact of ion purity in the tandem mass spectral analyses and of background oxidation on the false-positive rate of protein target discovery using SPROX is also discussed.

  5. A False-Positive Detection Bias as a Function of State and Trait Schizotypy in Interaction with Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Phillip; Balser, Mona; Munk, Aisha Judith Leila; Linder, Jens; Hennig, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    Hallucinatory experiences are by far not limited to patients with clinical psychosis. A number of internal and external factors may bring about such experiences in healthy individuals, whereby the personality trait of (positive) schizotypy is a major mediator of individual differences. Psychotic experiences are defined as associating abnormal meaning to real but objectively irrelevant perceptions. Especially, the ambiguity of a stimulus correlates positively with the likelihood of abnormal interpretation, and intelligence is believed to have an important influence and act as protective against clinical psychosis in highly schizotypic individuals. In this study, we presented 131 healthy participants with 216 15-letter strings containing either a word, a non-word, or only random letters and asked them to report, whether or not they believed to have seen a word. The aim was to replicate findings that participants with high values in positive schizotypy on the trait-level make more false-positive errors and assess the role of stimulus-ambiguity and verbal intelligence. Additionally, we wanted to examine whether the same effect could be shown for indices of state schizotypy. Our results support findings that both state and trait positive schizotypy explain significant variance in “seeing things that are not there” and that the properties of individual stimuli have additional strong effects on the false-positive hit rates. Finally, we found that verbal intelligence and positive schizotypy interact with stimulus-ambiguity in the production of false-positive perceptions. PMID:25309464

  6. False-Positive Serum Botulism Bioassay in Miller-Fisher Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zeylikman, Yuriy; Shah, Vishal; Shah, Umang; Mirsen, Thomas R; Campellone, Joseph V

    2015-09-01

    We describe a patient with acute progressive weakness and areflexia. Both botulism and Miller-Fisher variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome were initial diagnostic considerations, and she was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin and botulinum antitoxin. A mouse bioassay was positive for botulinum toxin A, although her clinical course, electrodiagnostic studies, and cerebrospinal fluid findings supported Miller-Fisher syndrome. This patient's atypical features offer points of discussion regarding the evaluation of patients with acute neuromuscular weakness and emphasize the limitations of the botulism bioassay. PMID:26301377

  7. A review of the psychosocial effects of false-positive results on parents and current communication practices in newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Hewlett, J; Waisbren, S E

    2006-10-01

    As more states adopt expanded newborn screening for metabolic disorders, the overall number of false positives increases. False-positive screening results have been associated with increased anxiety and stress in parents of infants who require follow-up testing, even after the infant's good health is confirmed. This article reviews the literature on the negative impact of false-positive newborn screening results on parents, along with a review of current communication practices for follow-up screening. The results of this review suggest that parental stress and anxiety can be reduced with improved education and communication to parents, specifically at the time of follow-up screening. Communication strategies with sample materials are proposed. PMID:16917730

  8. Volatile anesthetics give a false-positive reading in chemical agent monitors in the "H" mode.

    PubMed

    Risk, D; Verpy, D; Conley, J D; Jacobson, T; Sawyer, T W

    2001-08-01

    Chemical agent monitors (CAMs) are routinely used by the armed forces and emergency response teams of many countries for the detection of the vesicant sulfur mustard (HD) and the G series of organophosphate nerve agents. Ambient operating room isoflurane levels were found to produce strong positive signals in the "H" mode when the CAM was used to monitor the efficacy of decontamination procedures during routine surgical procedures on HD-poisoned animals requiring up to 8 hours of general anesthesia. Subsequent testing showed that isoflurane, as well as desflurane, sevoflurane, halothane and methoxyflurane, produce two ionization peaks in the CAM response. One of these peaks is interpreted by the CAM processing software as HD, resulting in a CAM "H" mode bar response. No interference was encountered with isoflurane, desflurane, and sevoflurane when the CAM was set to the "G" mode, although extremely high (nonclinical) concentrations of halothane and methoxyflurane yielded a weakly positive bar response. These findings have potentially serious ramifications for the medical management of patients resulting from terrorist, military, or chemical agent decommissioning activity when concomitant chemical injuries are also possible. PMID:11515322

  9. False-positive findings in Cochrane meta-analyses with and without application of trial sequential analysis: an empirical review

    PubMed Central

    Imberger, Georgina; Thorlund, Kristian; Gluud, Christian; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    Objective Many published meta-analyses are underpowered. We explored the role of trial sequential analysis (TSA) in assessing the reliability of conclusions in underpowered meta-analyses. Methods We screened The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and selected 100 meta-analyses with a binary outcome, a negative result and sufficient power. We defined a negative result as one where the 95% CI for the effect included 1.00, a positive result as one where the 95% CI did not include 1.00, and sufficient power as the required information size for 80% power, 5% type 1 error, relative risk reduction of 10% or number needed to treat of 100, and control event proportion and heterogeneity taken from the included studies. We re-conducted the meta-analyses, using conventional cumulative techniques, to measure how many false positives would have occurred if these meta-analyses had been updated after each new trial. For each false positive, we performed TSA, using three different approaches. Results We screened 4736 systematic reviews to find 100 meta-analyses that fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Using conventional cumulative meta-analysis, false positives were present in seven of the meta-analyses (7%, 95% CI 3% to 14%), occurring more than once in three. The total number of false positives was 14 and TSA prevented 13 of these (93%, 95% CI 68% to 98%). In a post hoc analysis, we found that Cochrane meta-analyses that are negative are 1.67 times more likely to be updated (95% CI 0.92 to 2.68) than those that are positive. Conclusions We found false positives in 7% (95% CI 3% to 14%) of the included meta-analyses. Owing to limitations of external validity and to the decreased likelihood of updating positive meta-analyses, the true proportion of false positives in meta-analysis is probably higher. TSA prevented 93% of the false positives (95% CI 68% to 98%). PMID:27519923

  10. The probability of false positives in zero-dimensional analyses of one-dimensional kinematic, force and EMG trajectories.

    PubMed

    Pataky, Todd C; Vanrenterghem, Jos; Robinson, Mark A

    2016-06-14

    A false positive is the mistake of inferring an effect when none exists, and although α controls the false positive (Type I error) rate in classical hypothesis testing, a given α value is accurate only if the underlying model of randomness appropriately reflects experimentally observed variance. Hypotheses pertaining to one-dimensional (1D) (e.g. time-varying) biomechanical trajectories are most often tested using a traditional zero-dimensional (0D) Gaussian model of randomness, but variance in these datasets is clearly 1D. The purpose of this study was to determine the likelihood that analyzing smooth 1D data with a 0D model of variance will produce false positives. We first used random field theory (RFT) to predict the probability of false positives in 0D analyses. We then validated RFT predictions via numerical simulations of smooth Gaussian 1D trajectories. Results showed that, across a range of public kinematic, force/moment and EMG datasets, the median false positive rate was 0.382 and not the assumed α=0.05, even for a simple two-sample t test involving N=10 trajectories per group. The median false positive rate for experiments involving three-component vector trajectories was p=0.764. This rate increased to p=0.945 for two three-component vector trajectories, and to p=0.999 for six three-component vectors. This implies that experiments involving vector trajectories have a high probability of yielding 0D statistical significance when there is, in fact, no 1D effect. Either (a) explicit a priori identification of 0D variables or (b) adoption of 1D methods can more tightly control α. PMID:27067363

  11. Effect of protocol-related variables and women's characteristics on the cumulative false-positive risk in breast cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Román, R.; Sala, M.; Salas, D.; Ascunce, N.; Zubizarreta, R.; Castells, X.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reducing the false-positive risk in breast cancer screening is important. We examined how the screening-protocol and women's characteristics affect the cumulative false-positive risk. Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study of 1 565 364 women aged 45–69 years who underwent 4 739 498 screening mammograms from 1990 to 2006. Multilevel discrete hazard models were used to estimate the cumulative false-positive risk over 10 sequential mammograms under different risk scenarios. Results: The factors affecting the false-positive risk for any procedure and for invasive procedures were double mammogram reading [odds ratio (OR) = 2.06 and 4.44, respectively], two mammographic views (OR = 0.77 and 1.56, respectively), digital mammography (OR = 0.83 for invasive procedures), premenopausal status (OR = 1.31 and 1.22, respectively), use of hormone replacement therapy (OR = 1.03 and 0.84, respectively), previous invasive procedures (OR = 1.52 and 2.00, respectively), and a familial history of breast cancer (OR = 1.18 and 1.21, respectively). The cumulative false-positive risk for women who started screening at age 50–51 was 20.39% [95% confidence interval (CI) 20.02–20.76], ranging from 51.43% to 7.47% in the highest and lowest risk profiles, respectively. The cumulative risk for invasive procedures was 1.76% (95% CI 1.66–1.87), ranging from 12.02% to 1.58%. Conclusions: The cumulative false-positive risk varied widely depending on the factors studied. These findings are relevant to provide women with accurate information and to improve the effectiveness of screening programs. PMID:21430183

  12. The evaluation of possible false positives with detergents when performing amylase serological testing on clothing.

    PubMed

    Feia, Andrea; Novroski, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    For almost 40 years, detergent companies have been adding enzymes such as amylases to their products as an effective method of breaking down tough stains created by polysaccharides and proteins. The possibility that α-amylases present in common household laundry detergents may contribute to the positive detection of α-amylase on evidentiary samples during forensic presumptive screening procedures is a potential problem that has not yet been investigated. To determine whether α-amylase detection is possible following routine laundering, five different fabrics were laundered in a variety of detergents, and presumptive testing using RSID(™)-Saliva and Phadebas(®) Amylase Test was conducted. Our results demonstrate that clothing laundered in detergents known to contain enzymes does not retain any detectable levels of α-amylase following a typical wash cycle. We also show that, unlike laundered clothing, undiluted detergents do contain detectable levels of α-amylase; however, these findings were only observed using the Phadebas(®) Amylase Test. PMID:22946767

  13. Patients' & Healthcare Professionals' Values Regarding True- & False-Positive Diagnosis when Colorectal Cancer Screening by CT Colonography: Discrete Choice Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Darren; Mallett, Susan; Zhu, Shihua; Yao, Guiqing Lily; Bell, Nichola; Ghanouni, Alex; von Wagner, Christian; Taylor, Stuart A.; Altman, Douglas G.; Lilford, Richard; Halligan, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To establish the relative weighting given by patients and healthcare professionals to gains in diagnostic sensitivity versus loss of specificity when using CT colonography (CTC) for colorectal cancer screening. Materials and Methods Following ethical approval and informed consent, 75 patients and 50 healthcare professionals undertook a discrete choice experiment in which they chose between “standard” CTC and “enhanced” CTC that raised diagnostic sensitivity 10% for either cancer or polyps in exchange for varying levels of specificity. We established the relative increase in false-positive diagnoses participants traded for an increase in true-positive diagnoses. Results Data from 122 participants were analysed. There were 30 (25%) non-traders for the cancer scenario and 20 (16%) for the polyp scenario. For cancer, the 10% gain in sensitivity was traded up to a median 45% (IQR 25 to >85) drop in specificity, equating to 2250 (IQR 1250 to >4250) additional false-positives per additional true-positive cancer, at 0.2% prevalence. For polyps, the figure was 15% (IQR 7.5 to 55), equating to 6 (IQR 3 to 22) additional false-positives per additional true-positive polyp, at 25% prevalence. Tipping points were significantly higher for patients than professionals for both cancer (85 vs 25, p<0.001) and polyps (55 vs 15, p<0.001). Patients were willing to pay significantly more for increased sensitivity for cancer (p = 0.021). Conclusion When screening for colorectal cancer, patients and professionals believe gains in true-positive diagnoses are worth much more than the negative consequences of a corresponding rise in false-positives. Evaluation of screening tests should account for this. PMID:24349014

  14. False positive radiographical evidence of pump catheter migration into the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Dardashti, Simon; Chang, Eric Y; Kim, Robert B; Alsharif, Kais I; Hata, Justin T; Perret, Danielle M

    2013-01-01

    Intrathecal drug delivery systems are becoming an increasingly common modality used by physicians to treat patients. Specifically, chronic spasticity secondary to multiple sclerosis (MS) may be treated with intrathecal baclofen (ITB) therapy when oral antispasmodics do not provide adequate relief. ITB therapy is effective, localizes drug delivery, and does not have the same degree of intolerable systemic effects often seen with oral and parenteral medications. As the use of intrathecal drug delivery systems has become more common, so has the incidence of adverse events. ITB administration requires the surgical implantation of indwelling catheters and a pump reservoir. Although this therapy is useful in treating spasticity, risks unique to intrathecal drug delivery systems include medication dosing errors, pump malfunction, infection, and catheter breakage or dislocation. To our knowledge intrathecal pump catheter migration into the spinal cord is a very rare complication with only 2 such complications reported. We present a case of an intrathecal baclofen pump catheter that was initially believed to have migrated into the spinal cord and the innovative use of cinefluoroscopy and digital subtraction used to identify catheter placement. Moreover, after confirmation of the catheter position within the spinal cord on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) our team elected to perform a laminectomy, which demonstrated that the catheter was not in the spinal cord but was surrounded by arachnoid adhesions. We hope our efforts will provide the clinician insight into the common difficulties that arise and how best to troubleshoot them to serve this specific patient population and prevent potentially life-threatening complications. PMID:24077212

  15. False Positive Radiographical Evidence of Pump Catheter Migration into the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Dardashti, Simon; Chang, Eric Y; Kim, Robert B; Alsharif, Kais I; Hata, Justin T.; Perret, Danielle M.

    2015-01-01

    Intrathecal drug delivery systems are becoming an increasingly common modality used by physicians to treat patients. Specifically, chronic spasticity secondary to multiple sclerosis (MS) may be treated with intrathecal baclofen (ITB) therapy when oral antispasmodics do not provide adequate relief. ITB therapy is effective, localizes drug delivery, and does not have the same degree of intolerable systemic effects often seen with oral and parenteral medications. As the use of intrathecal drug delivery systems has become more common, so has the incidence of adverse events. ITB administration requires the surgical implantation of indwelling catheters and a pump reservoir. Although this therapy is useful in treating spasticity, risks unique to intrathecal drug delivery systems include medication dosing errors, pump malfunction, infection, and catheter breakage or dislocation. To our knowledge intrathecal pump catheter migration into the spinal cord is a very rare complication with only 2 such complications reported. We present a case of an intrathecal baclofen pump catheter that was initially believed to have migrated into the spinal cord and the innovative use of cinefluoroscopy and digital subtraction used to identify catheter placement. Moreover, after confirmation of the catheter position within the spinal cord on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) our team elected to perform a laminectomy, which demonstrated that the catheter was not in the spinal cord but was surrounded by arachnoid adhesions. We hope our efforts will provide the clinician insight into the common difficulties that arise and how best to troubleshoot them to serve this specific patient population and prevent potentially life-threatening complications. PMID:24077212

  16. The presence of arginine may be a source of false positive results in the Ames test.

    PubMed

    Khandoudi, Nassirah; Porte, Pierre; Chtourou, Sami; Nesslany, Fabrice; Marzin, Daniel; Le Curieux, Frank

    2009-01-01

    An increase in the number of revertant colonies in the Ames test is generally taken as a strong indication of mutagenic activity of a test compound. However, irrelevant positive findings may constitute a major problem in regulatory drug testing. In this study, mixtures containing only amino acids such as glycine, lysine, arginine and isoleucine, routinely used as peptide preservatives in polypeptide pharmaceutical products, were investigated for mutagenesis in the Ames Salmonella typhimurium test. The results demonstrated that in the presence of metabolic activation, all the solutions containing arginine induced an increase in the number of revertant colonies in strains TA98, TA100 and TA1535 compared with the solvent control. More specifically, for strain TA98, all arginine doses tested, i.e. from 0.4 to 8 mg/plate induced a statistically significant increase in the number of revertants. This increase was biologically significant from 1.2 to 8 mg/plate. For strain TA100, the five highest test doses, i.e., from 1.2 to 8 mg/plate, induced statistically and biologically significant increases in the number of revertants. A statistically significant increase in colony number was also observed in strain TA1535, but only at the maximal test dose of 8 mg/plate arginine. These increases were observed with arginine from two different sources, suggesting that the observed effect would not be due to the presence of potential impurities in the type of arginine used. Our findings show that a functional metabolic activation system was required to induce an increase in the number of colonies. The presence of vitamin C inhibited the arginine-induced increase in the number of revertant colonies in S. typhimurium strain TA98, suggesting a potential involvement of oxidative stress. PMID:19619668

  17. Method to Reduce the False-Positive Rate of Loss of Resistance in the Cervical Epidural Region

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Uk; Kim, Doohwan; Park, Jun Young; Choi, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Ji Hyun; Bae, Heon-Yong; Joo, Eun-Young; Suh, Jeong Hun

    2016-01-01

    Background. The cervical epidural space can be detected by the loss of resistance (LOR) technique which is commonly performed using air. However, this technique using air has been associated with a high false-positive LOR rate during cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injections (CIESIs). Objective. We investigated whether the detection of LOR with contrast medium might reduce the false-positive LOR rate on the first attempt. Methods. We obtained data retrospectively. A total of 79 patients were divided into two groups according to the LOR technique. Groups 1 and 2 patients underwent CIESI with the LOR technique using air or contrast medium. During the procedure, the injection technique (median or paramedian approach), final depth, LOR technique (air or contrast), total number of LOR attempts, and any side effects were recorded. Results. The mean values for the total number of LOR attempts were 1.38 ± 0.65 (Group 1) and 1.07 ± 0.25 (Group 2). The false-positive rate on the first attempt was 29.4% and 6.6% in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.012). Conclusions. The use of contrast medium for LOR technique is associated with a lower rate of false-positivity compared with the use of air. PMID:27445637

  18. Rate of occurrence of false-positive results from total coliform most-probable-number analysis of shellfish and estuaries.

    PubMed Central

    Hussong, D; Colwell, R R; Weiner, R M

    1980-01-01

    The incidence of confirmed test, false-positive coliform most-probable-number results was compared with environmental parameters and was found to be inversely related to water temperature. It is concluded that the completed coliform test must be done when water temperatures drop below 15 degrees C. PMID:7004355

  19. The illusion of the positive: the impact of natural and induced mood on older adults' false recall.

    PubMed

    Emery, Lisa; Hess, Thomas M; Elliot, Tonya

    2012-11-01

    Recent research suggests that affective and motivational processes can influence age differences in memory. In the current study, we examine the impact of both natural and induced mood state on age differences in false recall. Older and younger adults performed a version of the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM; Roediger & McDermott, 1995 , Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 21, 803) false memory paradigm in either their natural mood state or after a positive or negative mood induction. Results indicated that, after accounting for age differences in basic cognitive function, age-related differences in positive mood during the testing session were related to increased false recall in older adults. Inducing older adults into a positive mood also exacerbated age differences in false memory. In contrast, veridical recall did not appear to be systematically influenced by mood. Together, these results suggest that positive mood states can impact older adults' information processing and potentially increase underlying cognitive age differences. PMID:22292431

  20. Confirming false adverse reactions to drugs by performing individualized, randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Sandra R; Uetrecht, Jack P; Shear, Neil H

    2002-01-01

    One-patient, randomized, double-blind, controlled trials (N-of-1 RCTs) have traditionally been used to assess the efficacy of treatment. At the Drug Safety Clinic, Toronto, this methodology is used to evaluate adverse effects related to medication use, specifically when the symptoms are vague and are in response to more than one medication. Two patients are described with histories of drug allergies to multiple medications; as well, guidelines for conducting N-of-1 trials are summarized. The first patient had a history of prolonged periorbital and generalized weakness lasting up to one week after exposure to a variety of drugs. Because of the ambiguous results of local anesthetic skin testing, an N-of-1 trial was performed using lidocaine without preservative. Two short-lived episodes of blepharospasm and lethargy were observed with placebo; no subjective or objective reaction occurred with active drug. The second patient had a history of prolonged weakness and drowsiness after exposure to many medications; she had been told that she was allergic to all drugs with a benzene ring. During the first N-of-1 trial, generalized weakness was observed with 10 mg of dimenhydrinate and all four placebo doses. During the second N-of-1 challenge using codeine, no unwarranted reactions occurred with either active or placebo drug. Traditional testing of these patients to disprove the clinical symptoms is often difficult because of the anxiety level associated with the patients' past experiences. N-of-1 trials provide a useful alternative for the management of patients with nonspecific symptomatology attributed to drug ingestion. PMID:12422252

  1. A False Positive Dengue Fever Rapid Diagnostic Test Result in a Case of Acute Parvovirus B19 Infection.

    PubMed

    Izumida, Toshihide; Sakata, Hidenao; Nakamura, Masahiko; Hayashibara, Yumiko; Inasaki, Noriko; Inahata, Ryo; Hasegawa, Sumiyo; Takizawa, Takenori; Kaya, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    An outbreak of dengue fever occurred in Japan in August 2014. We herein report the case of a 63-year-old man who presented with a persistent fever in September 2014. Acute parvovirus B19 infection led to a false positive finding of dengue fever on a rapid diagnostic test (Panbio Dengue Duo Cassette(TM)). To the best of our knowledge, there are no previous reports of a false positive result for dengue IgM with the dengue rapid diagnostic test. We believe that epidemiological information on the prevalence of parvovirus B19 is useful for guiding the interpretation of a positive result with the dengue rapid diagnostic test. PMID:27181552

  2. Concurrent combined verification: reducing false positives in automated NMR structure verification through the evaluation of multiple challenge control structures.

    PubMed

    Golotvin, Sergey S; Pol, Rostislav; Sasaki, Ryan R; Nikitina, Asya; Keyes, Philip

    2012-06-01

    Automated structure verification using (1)H NMR data or a combination of (1)H and heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) data is gaining more interest as a routine application for qualitative evaluation of large compound libraries produced by synthetic chemistry. The goal of this automated software method is to identify a manageable subset of compounds and data that require human review. In practice, the automated method will flag structure and data combinations that exhibit some inconsistency (i.e. strange chemical shifts, conflicts in multiplicity, or overestimated and underestimated integration values) and validate those that appear consistent. One drawback of this approach is that no automated system can guarantee that all passing structures are indeed correct structures. The major reason for this is that approaches using only (1)H or even (1)H and HSQC spectra often do not provide sufficient information to properly distinguish between similar structures. Therefore, current implementations of automated structure verification systems allow, in principle, false positive results. Presented in this work is a method that greatly reduces the probability of an automated validation system passing incorrect structures (i.e. false positives). This novel method was applied to automatically validate 127 non-proprietary compounds from several commercial sources. Presented also is the impact of this approach on false positive and false negative results. PMID:22549844

  3. Identification of false positive exercise tests with use of electrocardiographic criteria: A possible role for atrial repolarization waves

    SciTech Connect

    Sapin, P.M.; Koch, G.; Blauwet, M.B.; McCarthy, J.J.; Hinds, S.W.; Gettes, L.S. )

    1991-07-01

    Atrial repolarization waves are opposite in direction to P waves, may have a magnitude of 100 to 200 mu V and may extend into the ST segment and T wave. It was postulated that exaggerated atrial repolarization waves during exercise could produce ST segment depression mimicking myocardial ischemia. The P waves, PR segments and ST segments were studied in leads II, III, aVF and V4 to V6 in 69 patients whose exercise electrocardiogram (ECG) suggested ischemia (100 mu V horizontal or 150 mu V upsloping ST depression 80 ms after the J point). All had a normal ECG at rest. The exercise test in 25 patients (52% male, mean age 53 years) was deemed false positive because of normal coronary arteriograms and left ventricular function (5 patients) or normal stress single photon emission computed tomographic thallium or gated blood pool scans (16 patients), or both (4 patients). Forty-four patients with a similar age and gender distribution, anginal chest pain and at least one coronary stenosis greater than or equal to 80% served as a true positive control group. The false positive group was characterized by (1) markedly downsloping PR segments at peak exercise, (2) longer exercise time and more rapid peak exercise heart rate than those of the true positive group, and (3) absence of exercise-induced chest pain. The false positive group also displayed significantly greater absolute P wave amplitudes at peak exercise and greater augmentation of P wave amplitude by exercise in all six ECG leads than were observed in the true positive group.

  4. Differential Gene Expression Segregates Cattle Confirmed Positive for Bovine Tuberculosis from Antemortem Tuberculosis Test-False Positive Cattle Originating from Herds Free of Bovine Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ailam; Steibel, Juan P.; Coussens, Paul M.; Grooms, Daniel L.; Bolin, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Antemortem tests for bovine tuberculosis (bTB) currently used in the US measure cell-mediated immune responses against Mycobacterium bovis. Postmortem tests for bTB rely on observation of gross and histologic lesions of bTB, followed by bacterial isolation or molecular diagnostics. Cumulative data from the state of Michigan indicates that 98 to 99% of cattle that react positively in antemortem tests are not confirmed positive for bTB at postmortem examination. Understanding the fundamental differences in gene regulation between antemortem test-false positive cattle and cattle that have bTB may allow identification of molecular markers that can be exploited to better separate infected from noninfected cattle. An immunospecific cDNA microarray was used to identify altered gene expression (P ≤ 0.01) of 122 gene features between antemortem test-false positive cattle and bTB-infected cattle following a 4-hour stimulation of whole blood with tuberculin. Further analysis using quantitative real-time PCR assays validated altered expression of 8 genes that had differential power (adj  P ≤ 0.05) to segregate cattle confirmed positive for bovine tuberculosis from antemortem tuberculosis test-false positive cattle originating from herds free of bovine tuberculosis. PMID:22701814

  5. Investigation of optimal feature value set in false positive reduction process for automated abdominal lymph node detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Mizuno, Shinji; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Goto, Hidemi; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Masaaki; Nawano, Shigeru; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents an investigation of optimal feature value set in false positive reduction process for the automated method of enlarged abdominal lymph node detection. We have developed the automated abdominal lymph node detection method to aid for surgical planning. Because it is important to understand the location and the structure of an enlarged lymph node in order to make a suitable surgical plan. However, our previous method was not able to obtain the suitable feature value set. This method was able to detect 71.6% of the lymph nodes with 12.5 FPs per case. In this paper, we investigate the optimal feature value set in the false positive reduction process to improve the method for automated abdominal lymph node detection. By applying our improved method by using the optimal feature value set to 28 cases of abdominal 3D CT images, we detected about 74.7% of the abdominal lymph nodes with 11.8 FPs/case.

  6. Application of computer-extracted breast tissue texture features in predicting false-positive recalls from screening mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Shonket; Choi, Jae Y.; Keller, Brad M.; Chen, Jinbo; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2014-03-01

    Mammographic texture features have been shown to have value in breast cancer risk assessment. Previous models have also been developed that use computer-extracted mammographic features of breast tissue complexity to predict the risk of false-positive (FP) recall from breast cancer screening with digital mammography. This work details a novel locallyadaptive parenchymal texture analysis algorithm that identifies and extracts mammographic features of local parenchymal tissue complexity potentially relevant for false-positive biopsy prediction. This algorithm has two important aspects: (1) the adaptive nature of automatically determining an optimal number of region-of-interests (ROIs) in the image and each ROI's corresponding size based on the parenchymal tissue distribution over the whole breast region and (2) characterizing both the local and global mammographic appearances of the parenchymal tissue that could provide more discriminative information for FP biopsy risk prediction. Preliminary results show that this locallyadaptive texture analysis algorithm, in conjunction with logistic regression, can predict the likelihood of false-positive biopsy with an ROC performance value of AUC=0.92 (p<0.001) with a 95% confidence interval [0.77, 0.94]. Significant texture feature predictors (p<0.05) included contrast, sum variance and difference average. Sensitivity for false-positives was 51% at the 100% cancer detection operating point. Although preliminary, clinical implications of using prediction models incorporating these texture features may include the future development of better tools and guidelines regarding personalized breast cancer screening recommendations. Further studies are warranted to prospectively validate our findings in larger screening populations and evaluate their clinical utility.

  7. False-positive findings in mammography screening induces short-term distress - breast cancer-specific concern prevails longer.

    PubMed

    Aro, A R; Pilvikki Absetz, S; van Elderen, T M; van der Ploeg, E; van der Kamp, L J

    2000-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine psychological distress in a mammography screening process as a consequence of screening after adjusting for background, personality and prescreening distress. Subjects, aged 50 years, were invitees at their first screening. There were three groups; normal findings (n=1407), false-positive findings (n=492) and referents from outside the screening programme (n=1718, age 48-49 years). Distress was measured as illness worry, anxiety, depression, cancer beliefs and early detection behaviour. Measurements were one month before screening invitation with follow-ups at 2 and 12 months postscreening. At 2 months, there was a moderate multivariate effect of group on distress; and intrusive thinking and worry about breast cancer, in particular, were most frequent amongst the false positives. Intrusive thinking still prevailed at 12 months, in addition to a higher perceived breast cancer risk and susceptibility. Distress related to screening and false-positive findings seems to be moderate, but prevailing cancer-specific concerns call for improvements in screening programmes. PMID:10854941

  8. One Hundred False-Positive Amphetamine Specimens Characterized by Liquid Chromatography Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marin, Stephanie J; Doyle, Kelly; Chang, Annie; Concheiro-Guisan, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A; Johnson-Davis, Kamisha L

    2016-01-01

    Some amphetamine (AMP) and ecstacy (MDMA) urine immunoassay (IA) kits are prone to false-positive results due to poor specificity of the antibody. We employed two techniques, high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and an in silico structure search, to identify compounds likely to cause false-positive results. Hundred false-positive IA specimens for AMP and/or MDMA were analyzed by an Agilent 6230 time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. Separately, SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts) was used as an in silico structure search to generate a library of compounds that are known to cross-react with AMP/MDMA IAs. Chemical formulas and exact masses of 145 structures were then compared against masses identified by TOF. Compounds known to have cross-reactivity with the IAs were identified in the structure-based search. The chemical formulas and exact masses of 145 structures (of 20 chemical formulas) were compared against masses identified by TOF. Urine analysis by HRMS correlates accurate mass with chemical formulae, but provides little information regarding compound structure. Structural data of targeted antigens can be utilized to correlate HRMS-derived chemical formulas with structural analogs. PMID:26342055

  9. Dual Position Sensitive MWPC for tracking reaction products at VAMOS++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandebrouck, M.; Lemasson, A.; Rejmund, M.; Fremont, G.; Pancin, J.; Navin, A.; Michelagnoli, C.; Goupil, J.; Spitaels, C.; Jacquot, B.

    2016-03-01

    The characteristics and performance of a Dual Position Sensitive Multi-Wire Proportional Counter (DPS-MWPC) used to measure the scattering angle, the interaction position on the target and the velocity of reaction products detected in the VAMOS++ magnetic spectrometer, are reported. The detector consists of a pair of position sensitive low pressure MWPCs and provides both fast timing signals, along with the two-dimensional position coordinates required to define the trajectory of the reaction products. A time-of-flight resolution of 305(11) ps (FWHM) was measured. The measured resolutions (FWHM) were 2.5(3) mrad and 560(70) μm for the scattering angle and the interaction point at the target respectively. The subsequent improvement of the Doppler correction of the energy of the γ-rays, detected in the γ-ray tracking array AGATA in coincidence with isotopically identified ions in VAMOS++, is also discussed.

  10. Multi-scale textural feature extraction and particle swarm optimization based model selection for false positive reduction in mammography.

    PubMed

    Zyout, Imad; Czajkowska, Joanna; Grzegorzek, Marcin

    2015-12-01

    The high number of false positives and the resulting number of avoidable breast biopsies are the major problems faced by current mammography Computer Aided Detection (CAD) systems. False positive reduction is not only a requirement for mass but also for calcification CAD systems which are currently deployed for clinical use. This paper tackles two problems related to reducing the number of false positives in the detection of all lesions and masses, respectively. Firstly, textural patterns of breast tissue have been analyzed using several multi-scale textural descriptors based on wavelet and gray level co-occurrence matrix. The second problem addressed in this paper is the parameter selection and performance optimization. For this, we adopt a model selection procedure based on Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) for selecting the most discriminative textural features and for strengthening the generalization capacity of the supervised learning stage based on a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. For evaluating the proposed methods, two sets of suspicious mammogram regions have been used. The first one, obtained from Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM), contains 1494 regions (1000 normal and 494 abnormal samples). The second set of suspicious regions was obtained from database of Mammographic Image Analysis Society (mini-MIAS) and contains 315 (207 normal and 108 abnormal) samples. Results from both datasets demonstrate the efficiency of using PSO based model selection for optimizing both classifier hyper-parameters and parameters, respectively. Furthermore, the obtained results indicate the promising performance of the proposed textural features and more specifically, those based on co-occurrence matrix of wavelet image representation technique. PMID:25795630

  11. Improving screening recall services for women with false-positive mammograms: a comparison of qualitative evidence with UK guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Mary; Garside, Ruth; Hyde, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To gain an understanding of the views of women with false-positive screening mammograms of screening recall services, their ideas for service improvements and how these compare with current UK guidelines. Methods Inductive qualitative content analysis of semistructured interviews of 21 women who had false-positive screening mammograms. These were then compared with UK National Health Service (NHS) guidelines. Results Participants’ concerns about mammography screening recall services focused on issues of communication and choice. Many of the issues raised indicated that the 1998 NHS Breast Screening Programme guidelines on improving the quality of written information sent to women who are recalled, had not been fully implemented. This included being told a clear reason for recall, who may attend with them, the length of appointment, who they will see and what tests will be carried out. Additionally women voiced a need for: reassurance that a swift appointment did not imply they had cancer; choice about invasive assessment or watchful waiting; the offer of a follow-up mammogram for those uncertain about the validity of their all-clear and an extension of the role of the clinical nurse specialist, outlined in the 2012 NHS Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP) guidelines, to include availability at the clinic after the all-clear for women with false-positive mammograms. Conclusions It is time the NHSBSP 1998 recall information guidelines were fully implemented. Additionally, the further suggestions from this research, including extending the role of the clinical nurses from the 2012 NHSBSP guidelines, should be considered. These actions have the potential to reduce the anxiety of being recalled. PMID:25618139

  12. Overall false positive rates in tests for linear trend in tumor incidence in animal carcinogenicity studies of new drugs.

    PubMed

    Lin, K K; Rahman, M A

    1998-03-01

    Based on results of simulation and empirical studies conducted within the Divisions of Biometrics, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, and in collaboration with the National Toxicology Program, the Center has recently changed the significance levels for testing positive linear trend in incidence rate for common and rare tumors, respectively, from 0.01 and 0.05 to 0.005 and 0.025. The overall false positive rate resulting from the use of this new rule in the tests for linear trend in a two-species-two-sex study is about 10%, the rate that is judged as the most appropriate in a regulatory setting by the Center. This paper describes two of the studies. PMID:9547425

  13. False-positive rifampin resistant results with Xpert MTB/RIF version 4 assay in clinical samples with a low bacterial load.

    PubMed

    Ocheretina, Oksana; Byrt, Erin; Mabou, Marie-Marcelle; Royal-Mardi, Gertrude; Merveille, Yves-Mary; Rouzier, Vanessa; Fitzgerald, Daniel W; Pape, Jean W

    2016-05-01

    We report investigation of 22 TB cases with positive Xpert MTB/RIF result for resistance to Rifampin and "Very Low" MTB detection level. Twelve cases were false positive without rpoB mutations, 2 were false-positives with a silent mutation in rpoB codon T508, and only 10 were true positives. PMID:26915638

  14. High-magnification vascular imaging to reject false-positive sites in situ during Hexvix® fluorescence cystoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovisa, Blaise; Jichlinski, Patrice; Weber, Bernd-Claus; Aymon, Daniela; van den Bergh, Hubert; Wagnières, Georges

    2010-09-01

    Fluorescence imaging for detection of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer is based on the selective production and accumulation of fluorescing porphyrins-mainly, protoporphyrin IX-in cancerous tissues after the instillation of Hexvix®. Although the sensitivity of this procedure is very good, its specificity is somewhat limited due to fluorescence false-positive sites. Consequently, magnification cystoscopy has been investigated in order to discriminate false from true fluorescence positive findings. Both white-light and fluorescence modes are possible with the magnification cystoscope, allowing observation of the bladder wall with magnification ranging between 30× for standard observation and 650×. The optical zooming setup allows adjusting the magnification continuously in situ. In the high-magnification (HM) regime, the smallest diameter of the field of view is 600 microns and the resolution is 2.5 microns when in contact with the bladder wall. With this cystoscope, we characterized the superficial vascularization of the fluorescing sites in order to discriminate cancerous from noncancerous tissues. This procedure allowed us to establish a classification based on observed vascular patterns. Seventy-two patients subject to Hexvix® fluorescence cystoscopy were included in the study. Comparison of HM cystoscopy classification with histopathology results confirmed 32/33 (97%) cancerous biopsies and rejected 17/20 (85%) noncancerous lesions.

  15. A novel spherical shell filter for reducing false positives in automatic detection of pulmonary nodules in thoracic CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Leemput, Sil; Dorssers, Frank; Ehteshami Bejnordi, Babak

    2015-03-01

    Early detection of pulmonary nodules is crucial for improving prognosis of patients with lung cancer. Computer-aided detection of lung nodules in thoracic computed tomography (CT) scans has a great potential to enhance the performance of the radiologist in detecting nodules. In this paper we present a computer-aided lung nodule detection system for computed tomography (CT) scans that works in three steps. The system first segments the lung using thresholding and hole filling. From this segmentation the system extracts candidate nodules using Laplacian of Gaussian. To reject false positives among the detected candidate nodules, multiple established features are calculated. We propose a novel feature based on a spherical shell filter, which is specifically designed to distinguish between vascular structures and nodular structures. The performance of the proposed CAD system was evaluated by partaking in the ANODE09 challenge, which presents a platform for comparing automatic nodule detection programs. The results from the challenge show that our CAD system ranks third among the submitted works, demonstrating the efficacy of our proposed CAD system. The results also show that our proposed spherical shell filter in combination with conventional features can significantly reduce the number of false positives from the detected candidate nodules.

  16. Low False-Positives in an mLumin-Based Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation System with a Bicistronic Expression Vector

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shun; Li, Xiangyong; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Zhihong

    2014-01-01

    The simplicity and sensitivity of the bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay make it a powerful tool to investigate protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in living cells. However, non-specific association of the fluorescent protein fragments in a BiFC system can complicate evaluation of PPIs. Here, we introduced a bicistronic expression vector, pBudCE4.1, into an mLumin-based BiFC system, denoted as the BEVL-BiFC system. The BEVL-BiFC system achieved a 25-fold contrast in BiFC efficiency between positive (Fos/Jun) and negative (ΔFos/Jun) PPIs. The high BiFC efficiency was due to a low false-positive rate, where less than 2% of cells displayed BiFC in the negative control. K-Ras and its interactive proteins, Ras binding domain (RBD) of Raf-1 and Grb2 were used to confirm the accuracy of the BEVL-BiFC system. The results also provide direct evidence in individual cells that post-translational modification of K-Ras and its localization at the plasma membrane (PM) were not essential for the interaction of K-Ras and Raf-1, whereas the interaction of Grb2 and K-Ras did depend on the PM localization of K-Ras. Taken together, the BEVL-BiFC system was developed to reduce the false-positive phenomenon in BiFC assays, resulting in more robust and accurate measurement of PPIs in living cells. PMID:24556667

  17. Unusual False-Positive Mesenteric Lymph Nodes Detected by PET/CT in a Metastatic Survey of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kamiyama, Hirohiko; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro; Niwa, Koichiro; Ishiyama, Shun; Takahashi, Makoto; Kojima, Yutaka; Goto, Michitoshi; Tomiki, Yuichi; Nakamichi, Itsuko; Oh, Shiaki; Suzuki, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is a credible diagnostic modality for detecting primary and metastatic malignancy. PET/CT sometimes shows false positives and negatives, which make clinical diagnosis difficult. A 42-year-old man who had undergone right upper lobectomy for lung cancer 1 year previously had PET/CT for a metastatic survey of the lung. The lung cancer was stage IB (pT2N0M0) bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. PET/CT showed massive 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in the mesenteric lymph nodes. Because the mesentery is an unusual site of metastasis, the patient was under watchful observation. Another PET/CT after 6 months still showed FDG uptake in the same location, with a slightly increased standard uptake value. A systemic survey was performed, but it did not reveal any malignancies or inflammatory diseases. Eventually, the patient underwent probing laparoscopic surgery. For complete resection of the lymph nodes, laparoscopic ileocecal resection was performed. Histologically, the resected lymph nodes showed reactive lymphadenitis. Glucose transporter 1 immunostainings of the lung cancer and the lymph node were positive and partially positive, respectively. Although PET/CT is a powerful diagnostic modality, clinical interpretation of unusual results is difficult. PMID:27462197

  18. Unusual False-Positive Mesenteric Lymph Nodes Detected by PET/CT in a Metastatic Survey of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamiyama, Hirohiko; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro; Niwa, Koichiro; Ishiyama, Shun; Takahashi, Makoto; Kojima, Yutaka; Goto, Michitoshi; Tomiki, Yuichi; Nakamichi, Itsuko; Oh, Shiaki; Suzuki, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is a credible diagnostic modality for detecting primary and metastatic malignancy. PET/CT sometimes shows false positives and negatives, which make clinical diagnosis difficult. A 42-year-old man who had undergone right upper lobectomy for lung cancer 1 year previously had PET/CT for a metastatic survey of the lung. The lung cancer was stage IB (pT2N0M0) bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. PET/CT showed massive (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in the mesenteric lymph nodes. Because the mesentery is an unusual site of metastasis, the patient was under watchful observation. Another PET/CT after 6 months still showed FDG uptake in the same location, with a slightly increased standard uptake value. A systemic survey was performed, but it did not reveal any malignancies or inflammatory diseases. Eventually, the patient underwent probing laparoscopic surgery. For complete resection of the lymph nodes, laparoscopic ileocecal resection was performed. Histologically, the resected lymph nodes showed reactive lymphadenitis. Glucose transporter 1 immunostainings of the lung cancer and the lymph node were positive and partially positive, respectively. Although PET/CT is a powerful diagnostic modality, clinical interpretation of unusual results is difficult. PMID:27462197

  19. Low False Positive Rate of Kepler Candidates Estimated From A Combination Of Spitzer And Follow-Up Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Désert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, David; Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, François; Ballard, Sarah; Bryson, Stephen T.; Knutson, Heather A.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Brown, Timothy M.; Deming, Drake; Ford, Eric B.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Latham, David W.; Seager, Sara

    2015-05-01

    NASA’s Kepler mission has provided several thousand transiting planet candidates during the 4 yr of its nominal mission, yet only a small subset of these candidates have been confirmed as true planets. Therefore, the most fundamental question about these candidates is the fraction of bona fide planets. Estimating the rate of false positives of the overall Kepler sample is necessary to derive the planet occurrence rate. We present the results from two large observational campaigns that were conducted with the Spitzer Space Telescope during the the Kepler mission. These observations are dedicated to estimating the false positive rate (FPR) among the Kepler candidates. We select a sub-sample of 51 candidates, spanning wide ranges in stellar, orbital, and planetary parameter space, and we observe their transits with Spitzer at 4.5 μm. We use these observations to measures the candidate’s transit depths and infrared magnitudes. An authentic planet produces an achromatic transit depth (neglecting the modest effect of limb darkening). Conversely a bandpass-dependent depth alerts us to the potential presence of a blending star that could be the source of the observed eclipse: a false positive scenario. For most of the candidates (85%), the transit depths measured with Kepler are consistent with the transit depths measured with Spitzer as expected for planetary objects, while we find that the most discrepant measurements are due to the presence of unresolved stars that dilute the photometry. The Spitzer constraints on their own yield FPRs between 5% and depending on the Kepler Objects of Interest. By considering the population of the Kepler field stars, and by combining follow-up observations (imaging) when available, we find that the overall FPR of our sample is low. The measured upper limit on the FPR of our sample is 8.8% at a confidence level of 3σ. This observational result, which uses the achromatic property of planetary transit signals that is not investigated

  20. Experimental Null Method to Guide the Development of Technical Procedures and to Control False-Positive Discovery in Quantitative Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaomeng; Hu, Qiang; Li, Jun; Wang, Jianmin; Qu, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Comprehensive and accurate evaluation of data quality and false-positive biomarker discovery is critical to direct the method development/optimization for quantitative proteomics, which nonetheless remains challenging largely due to the high complexity and unique features of proteomic data. Here we describe an experimental null (EN) method to address this need. Because the method experimentally measures the null distribution (either technical or biological replicates) using the same proteomic samples, the same procedures and the same batch as the case-vs-contol experiment, it correctly reflects the collective effects of technical variability (e.g., variation/bias in sample preparation, LC-MS analysis, and data processing) and project-specific features (e.g., characteristics of the proteome and biological variation) on the performances of quantitative analysis. To show a proof of concept, we employed the EN method to assess the quantitative accuracy and precision and the ability to quantify subtle ratio changes between groups using different experimental and data-processing approaches and in various cellular and tissue proteomes. It was found that choices of quantitative features, sample size, experimental design, data-processing strategies, and quality of chromatographic separation can profoundly affect quantitative precision and accuracy of label-free quantification. The EN method was also demonstrated as a practical tool to determine the optimal experimental parameters and rational ratio cutoff for reliable protein quantification in specific proteomic experiments, for example, to identify the necessary number of technical/biological replicates per group that affords sufficient power for discovery. Furthermore, we assessed the ability of EN method to estimate levels of false-positives in the discovery of altered proteins, using two concocted sample sets mimicking proteomic profiling using technical and biological replicates, respectively, where the true-positives

  1. Repeated cryostimulation improves position sense and simple reaction time.

    PubMed

    Giemza, Czesław; Bieć, Ewa; Ostrowska, Bożena; Piechaczek, Bogusława; Sitny, Georg; Kuczyński, Michał

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Whole body cryotherapy has been shown to have many benefits, yet nothing is known if and how this modality can improve neuromuscular performance and retain those improvements. [Subjects and Methods] Joint position sense based on the bilateral knee joint matching test and simple reaction time was investigated in 25 young healthy adults who underwent an extended period of whole body cryostimulation. The measurements were taken at baseline and after 10, 20, and 30 whole body cryotherapy sessions, with three days elapsing after the last treatment, and comparing the results with 24 control subjects. [Results] Only when 20 sessions were completed did joint position sense and simple reaction time improve in the intervention group. After 30 sessions, the outcome was similar. Equal results were found at baseline and after 10 sessions in both groups, but the intervention group outstripped controls after 20 and 30 sessions in both joint position sense and simple reaction time. [Conclusion] These results indicate that the common standard of 10 sessions is insufficient, while approximately 20 sessions of whole body cryotherapy may efficiently enhance neuromuscular performance with an ability to sustain the effects for at least three days. PMID:27313369

  2. Repeated cryostimulation improves position sense and simple reaction time

    PubMed Central

    Giemza, Czesław; Bieć, Ewa; Ostrowska, Bożena; Piechaczek, Bogusława; Sitny, Georg; Kuczyński, Michał

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Whole body cryotherapy has been shown to have many benefits, yet nothing is known if and how this modality can improve neuromuscular performance and retain those improvements. [Subjects and Methods] Joint position sense based on the bilateral knee joint matching test and simple reaction time was investigated in 25 young healthy adults who underwent an extended period of whole body cryostimulation. The measurements were taken at baseline and after 10, 20, and 30 whole body cryotherapy sessions, with three days elapsing after the last treatment, and comparing the results with 24 control subjects. [Results] Only when 20 sessions were completed did joint position sense and simple reaction time improve in the intervention group. After 30 sessions, the outcome was similar. Equal results were found at baseline and after 10 sessions in both groups, but the intervention group outstripped controls after 20 and 30 sessions in both joint position sense and simple reaction time. [Conclusion] These results indicate that the common standard of 10 sessions is insufficient, while approximately 20 sessions of whole body cryotherapy may efficiently enhance neuromuscular performance with an ability to sustain the effects for at least three days. PMID:27313369

  3. False-positive liver scans due to portal hypertension: correlation with percutaneous transhepatic portograms in 33 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Takayasu, K.; Moriyama, N.; Suzuki, M.; Yamada, T.; Fukutake, T.; Shima, Y.; Kobayashi, C.; Musha, H.; Okuda, K.

    1983-04-01

    Tc-99m-phytate scanning of the liver and percutaneous transhepatic catheterization of the portal vein were performed in 33 patients--26 with cirrhosis, 3 with chronic active hepatitis, 2 with idiopathic portal hypertension, and 2 with unresolved acute hepatitis. A discrete defect in the porta hepatis area was seen in 6 of 28 patients who had portal vein pressure above 200 mm H2O. In 5 of the 6 patients with a false-positive scan, the umbilical portion of the left portal vein branch was dilated (larger than 25 x 20 mm) on the portogram, with or without a patent paraumbilical vein. The anatomical basis of this phenomenon is discussed, and it is suggested that this area be given special attention.

  4. False-positive uptake on radioiodine whole-body scintigraphy: physiologic and pathologic variants unrelated to thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jong-Ryool; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2012-01-01

    Radioiodine whole-body scintigraphy (WBS), which takes advantage of the high avidity of radioiodine in the functioning thyroid tissues, has been used for detection of differentiated thyroid cancer. Radioiodine is a sensitive marker for detection of thyroid cancer; however, radioiodine uptake is not specific for thyroid tissue. It can also be seen in healthy tissue, including thymus, breast, liver, and gastrointestinal tract, or in benign diseases, such as cysts and inflammation, or in a variety of benign and malignant non-thyroidal tumors, which could be mistaken for thyroid cancer. In order to accurately interpret radioiodine scintigraphy results, one must be familiar with the normal physiologic distribution of the tracer and frequently encountered physiologic and pathologic variants of radioiodine uptake. This article will provide a systematic overview of potential false-positive uptake of radioiodine in the whole body and illustrate how such unexpected findings can be appropriately evaluated. PMID:23133823

  5. A false positive newborn screening result due to a complex allele carrying two frequent CF-causing variants.

    PubMed

    Bergougnoux, Anne; Boureau-Wirth, Amandine; Rouzier, Cécile; Altieri, Jean-Pierre; Verneau, Fanny; Larrieu, Lise; Koenig, Michel; Claustres, Mireille; Raynal, Caroline

    2016-05-01

    The detection of two frequent CFTR disease-causing variations in the context of a newborn screening program (NBS) usually leads to the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) and a relevant genetic counseling in the family. In the present study, CF-causing variants p.Phe508del (F508del) and c.3140-26A>G (3272-26A>G) were identified on a neonate with positive ImmunoReactive Trypsinogen test by the Elucigene™ CF30 kit. The CF diagnosis initially suggested, despite three inconclusive Sweat Chloride Tests (SCT), was finally ruled out after the familial segregation study combined with a negative SCT. Haplotype studies, based on the comparison of 80 p.Phe508del haplotypes, suggested a probable de novo occurrence of c.3140-26A>G on the p.Phe508del ancestral allele in this family. This false positive case emphasizes the importance of SCT in the NBS strategy. Moreover, it raises the need for familial segregation studies in CF and in overall molecular diagnosis strategy of autosomal recessive diseases. PMID:27117206

  6. The prevalence of a false-positive myocardial perfusion stress SPET test in a skinny patient, induced by projection truncation.

    PubMed

    Tsougos, Ioannis; Alexiou, Sotiria; Theodorou, Kiki; Valotassiou, Varvara; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, technical developments in myocardial perfusion single photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging systems have significantly improved the accuracy of diagnosing coronary artery disease. Nevertheless, the patient's position and/or the acquisition protocol can affect the studies' quality, possibly leading to misdiagnoses. In HJNM and in other journals the importance of proper positioning of the heart of the patient to be examined by myocardial perfusion SPET stress/rest testing, has been emphasized. According to our knowledge, only three cases of truncation artifact during SPET myocardial perfusion imaging acquired with original SPET cameras, related to improper positioning in very thin patients, have been reported. In all cases, patients were examined according to a single day stress/rest technetium-99m-sestamibi protocol, using a dual 90 degree detector system, equipped with high resolution, parallel-hole collimators. However, several published manuscripts have underlined the significance of appropriate patients' positioning in myocardial perfusion scintigraphy using dedicated, cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) or small field-of-view cardiac SPET systems. A typical case is that of a 47 years old man (height 187cm, weight 67kg), heavy smoker, with atypical chest pain. He exercised very well according to the Bruce protocol, achieving 95% of maximal age-predicted heart-rate and a technetium-99m-tetrofosmin ((99m)Tc-TF) myocardial perfusion imaging with 370MBq of (99m)Tc-TF followed with a dual head camera (Infinia GE, USA), equipped with low-energy, high-resolution, parallel-hole collimators at 90° (L-mode configuration). Projection images were obtained from 45° RAO to 45° LPO position, in step and shoot mode (60 projections, 30sec per projection; matrix 64×64 and zoom 1.3). Auto body contour was not used. Unprocessed raw data, showed neither patient motion nor significant extracardiac activity that could result in false positive defects on

  7. AB093. A case of exogenous C5-acylcarnitine giving rise to a false positive result in newborn screening (NBS)

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Shu Jun; Tan, Ee Shien; Saumya, Jamuar; Poh, Sherry; Lim, James

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective NBS Screening by MS/MS is considered an effective screening test. However, the technique cannot distinguish between isobaric compounds, thus contributing to some false positive results. One such compound is C5-acylcarnitine in the in the identification of isovaleric acidemia (IVA) in the MS/MS profile. To report and contrast the findings of two newborns with C5-acylcarnitine elevations in newborn screening (NBS). Methods Blood collected on Guthrie card from newborns between 24-72 hours of life is analyzed by MS/MS. C5-acylcarnitine and its related ratios are measured in DBS sample to identify at risk newborn. Results Newborn A: DBS sample C5: 7.96 µmol/L (normal <0.50), C5/C0: 0.99 (normal <0.025), C5/C3: 16.1 (normal <0.40); Plasma acylcarnitines profile: C5: 9.42 µmol/L (normal 0.06-0.29). Urine organic acid profiles showed marked elevations of isovalerylglycine (IVG), ketone bodies and lactate. This profile is consistent with a patient presenting with a diagnosis of IVA. Newborn B: DBS sample C5: 0.84 µmol/L (normal <0.50), C5/C0: 0.041 (normal <0.025), C5/C3: 0.46 (normal <0.40); Despite the abnormal plasma acylcarnitines profile (C5: 4.38 µmol/L, normal 0.06-0.29), the urine acylglycine profile was normal [IVG: 1.02 mg/g Cr (normal 0.3-14.3 mg/g); 2-MBG: 0.16 mg/g Cr (normal: 0.3-7.5 mg/g)]. A 2nd plasma acylcarnitine showed a lower C5 level (1.49 µmol/L) and a repeat urine organic acid profile was normal; no IVG and 2-MBG detected. Mother’s (Newborn B) plasma acylcarnitines and urine organic acid profiles were normal, ruling out a possible maternal condition. Moreover, it was confirmed that mother and newborn were not on any antibiotics or steroids, which have been previously reported as the causal agents of falsely elevated C5-acylcarnitine. Further investigation revealed mom was using Mustela Nursing Comfort Balm which contained neopentanoate, a compound demonstrated by Boemer et al. [2014] as the causal agent for the false

  8. A novel method of partitioning regions in lungs and their usage in feature extraction for reducing false positives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharyya, Mausumi; Siddu, Dinesh M.; Manevitch, Alexandra; Stoeckel, Jonathan

    2008-03-01

    Chest X-ray (CXR) data is a 2D projection image. The main drawback of such an image is that each pixel of it represents a volumetric integration. This poses a challenge in detection and estimation of nodules and their characteristics. Due to human anatomy there are a lot of lung structures which can be falsely identified as nodules in a projection data. Detection of nodules with a large number of false positives (FP) adds more work for the radiologists. With the help of CAD algorithms we aim to identify regions which cause higher FP readings or provide additional information for nodule detection based on the human anatomy. Different lung regions have different image characteristics we take advantage of this and propose an automatic lung partitioning into vessel, apical, basal and exterior pulmonary regions. Anatomical landmarks like aortic arch and end of cardiac-notch along-with inter intra-rib width and their shape characteristics were used for this partitioning. Likelihood of FPs is more in vessel, apical and exterior pulmonary regions due to rib-crossing, overlap of vessel with rib and vessel branching. For each of these three cases, special features were designed based on histogram of rib slope and the structural properties of rib segments information. These features were assigned different weights based on the partitioning. An experiment was carried out using a prototype CAD system 150 routine CXR studies were acquired from three institutions (24 negatives, rest with one or more nodules). Our algorithm provided a sensitivity of 70.4% with 5 FP/image for cross-validation without partition. Inclusion of the proposed techniques increases the sensitivity to 78.1% with 4.1 FP/image.

  9. Computer-aided mass detection in mammography: False positive reduction via gray-scale invariant ranklet texture features

    SciTech Connect

    Masotti, Matteo; Lanconelli, Nico; Campanini, Renato

    2009-02-15

    In this work, gray-scale invariant ranklet texture features are proposed for false positive reduction (FPR) in computer-aided detection (CAD) of breast masses. Two main considerations are at the basis of this proposal. First, false positive (FP) marks surviving our previous CAD system seem to be characterized by specific texture properties that can be used to discriminate them from masses. Second, our previous CAD system achieves invariance to linear/nonlinear monotonic gray-scale transformations by encoding regions of interest into ranklet images through the ranklet transform, an image transformation similar to the wavelet transform, yet dealing with pixels' ranks rather than with their gray-scale values. Therefore, the new FPR approach proposed herein defines a set of texture features which are calculated directly from the ranklet images corresponding to the regions of interest surviving our previous CAD system, hence, ranklet texture features; then, a support vector machine (SVM) classifier is used for discrimination. As a result of this approach, texture-based information is used to discriminate FP marks surviving our previous CAD system; at the same time, invariance to linear/nonlinear monotonic gray-scale transformations of the new CAD system is guaranteed, as ranklet texture features are calculated from ranklet images that have this property themselves by construction. To emphasize the gray-scale invariance of both the previous and new CAD systems, training and testing are carried out without any in-between parameters' adjustment on mammograms having different gray-scale dynamics; in particular, training is carried out on analog digitized mammograms taken from a publicly available digital database, whereas testing is performed on full-field digital mammograms taken from an in-house database. Free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curve analysis of the two CAD systems demonstrates that the new approach achieves a higher reduction of FP marks

  10. False positive in the intravenous drug self-administration test in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Morgane; Caine, S Barak

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine C57BL/6J (B6) mice during extinction conditions, after food training, and for rates and patterns of operant behavior that seems similar to behavior maintained by intravenous cocaine injections. The rationale was to evaluate the potential for false positives in the intravenous self-administration test using protocols common in studies of knockout mice backcrossed to B6. An additional aim was to assess the influence of food-associated and drug-associated cues and mouse strain. Mice were allowed to acquire lever pressing reinforced by sweetened condensed milk under a fixed ratio 1 then fixed ratio 2 schedule of reinforcement accompanied by a flashing light. A catheter base was then implanted for simulation of intravenous self-administration conditions. Mice were allowed to lever press with cues remaining the same as during food training but without further scheduled consequences (i.e. no drug or food reinforcers delivered). All mice sustained lever pressing for several weeks, and over half met commonly used criteria for 'self-administration behavior.' Thus, B6 mice showed perseveration of a previously reinforced behavior that closely resembled rates and patterns of drug self-administration. This effect in B6 mice was greater than with A/J mice, and the lack of extinction was even more robust in the presence of cocaine-associated cues than with food-associated cues. We suggest that a necessary criterion for positive results in the intravenous drug self-administration test include an increase in responding when cocaine is made available after extinction with saline self-administration. PMID:21522054

  11. Predicting radiologists' true and false positive decisions in reading mammograms by using gaze parameters and image-based features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandomkar, Ziba; Tay, Kevin; Ryder, Will; Brennan, Patrick C.; Mello-Thoms, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    Radiologists' gaze-related parameters combined with image-based features were utilized to classify suspicious mammographic areas ultimately scored as True Positives (TP) and False Positives (FP). Eight breast radiologists read 120 two-view digital mammograms of which 59 had biopsy proven cancer. Eye tracking data was collected and nearby fixations were clustered together. Suspicious areas on mammograms were independently identified based on thresholding an intensity saliency map followed by automatic segmentation and pruning steps. For each radiologist reported area, radiologist's fixation clusters in the area, as well as neighboring suspicious areas within 2.5° of the center of fixation, were found. A 45-dimensional feature vector containing gaze parameters of the corresponding cluster along with image-based characteristics was constructed. Gaze parameters included total number of fixations in the cluster, dwell time, time to hit the cluster for the first time, maximum number of consecutive fixations, and saccade magnitude of the first fixation in the cluster. Image-based features consisted of intensity, shape, and texture descriptors extracted from the region around the suspicious area, its surrounding tissue, and the entire breast. For each radiologist, a userspecific Support Vector Machine (SVM) model was built to classify the reported areas as TPs or FPs. Leave-one-out cross validation was utilized to avoid over-fitting. A feature selection step was embedded in the SVM training procedure by allowing radial basis function kernels to have 45 scaling factors. The proposed method was compared with the radiologists' performance using the jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC). The JAFROC figure of merit increased significantly for six radiologists.

  12. Simplified false-positive reduction in computer-aided detection scheme of clustered microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Ji-Wook; Chae, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Sooyeul; Chae, Eun Young; Kim, Hak Hee; Choi, Young-Wook

    2015-03-01

    A computer-aided detection (CADe) system for clustered microcalcifications (MCs) in reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) volumes was suggested. The system consisted of prescreening, MC detecting, clustering, and falsepositive reduction steps. In the prescreening stage, the MC-like objects were enhanced by a multiscale-based 3D calcification response function. A connected component segmentation method was used to detect cluster seed objects, which were considered as potential clustering centers of MCs. Starting with each cluster seed object as the initial cluster center, a cluster candidate was formed by including nearby MC candidates within a 3D neighborhood of the cluster seed object satisfying the clustering criteria during the clustering step. The size and number of the clustered MCs in a cluster seed candidate were used to reduce the number of FPs. A bounding cube for each MCC was generated for each accepted seed candidates. Then, the overlapping cubes were combined and examined according to the FP reduction criteria. After FP reduction step, we obtained the average number of FPs of 2.47 per DBT volume with sensitivity of 83.3%. Our study indicates the simplified false-positive reduction approach applied to the detection of clustered MCs in DBT is promising as an efficient CADe system.

  13. On the occurrence of false positives in tests of migration under an isolation-with-migration model.

    PubMed

    Hey, Jody; Chung, Yujin; Sethuraman, Arun

    2015-10-01

    The population genetic study of divergence is often carried out using a Bayesian genealogy sampler, like those implemented in ima2 and related programs, and these analyses frequently include a likelihood ratio test of the null hypothesis of no migration between populations. Cruickshank and Hahn (2014, Molecular Ecology, 23, 3133-3157) recently reported a high rate of false-positive test results with ima2 for data simulated with small numbers of loci under models with no migration and recent splitting times. We confirm these findings and discover that they are caused by a failure of the assumptions underlying likelihood ratio tests that arises when using marginal likelihoods for a subset of model parameters. We also show that for small data sets, with little divergence between samples from two populations, an excellent fit can often be found by a model with a low migration rate and recent splitting time and a model with a high migration rate and a deep splitting time. PMID:26456794

  14. Cell Shaving and False-Positive Control Strategies Coupled to Novel Statistical Tools to Profile Gram-Positive Bacterial Surface Proteomes.

    PubMed

    Solis, Nestor; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2016-01-01

    A powerful start to the discovery and design of novel vaccines, and for better understanding of host-pathogen interactions, is to profile bacterial surfaces using the proteolytic digestion of surface-exposed proteins under mild conditions. This "cell shaving" approach has the benefit of both identifying surface proteins and their surface-exposed epitopes, which are those most likely to interact with host cells and/or the immune system, providing a comprehensive overview of bacterial cell topography. An essential requirement for successful cell shaving is to account for (or minimize) cellular lysis that can occur during the shaving procedure and thus generate data that is biased towards non-surface (e.g., cytoplasmic) proteins. This is further complicated by the presence of "moonlighting" proteins, which are proteins predicted to be intracellular but with validated surface or extracellular functions. Here, we describe an optimized cell shaving protocol for Gram-positive bacteria that uses proteolytic digestion and a "false-positive" control to reduce the number of intracellular contaminants in these datasets. Released surface-exposed peptides are analyzed by liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Additionally, the probabilities of proteins being surface exposed can be further calculated by applying novel statistical tools. PMID:27311663

  15. Investigating Initial Disclosures and Reactions to Unexpected, Positive HPV Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rachel A.; Hernandez, Rachael; Catona, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    Initial disclosures of health conditions are critical communication moments. Existing research focuses on disclosers; integrating confidants into studies of initial disclosures is needed. Guided by the disclosure decision-making model (DD-MM; Greene, 2009), this study examined what diagnosed persons and confidants may say when faced with unexpected test results and unexpected disclosures, respectively. Participants (N = 151) recorded an audio-visual message for another person, after imagining that they or the other person had just received unexpected, positive HPV test results. The qualitative analysis revealed four themes: (1) impression management and social distance, (2) invisible symptoms and advice regarding future disclosures, (3) expressing and acknowledging emotional reactions, and (4) misunderstandings and lacking knowledge about HPV. These findings suggested that DD-MM may be a relevant framework for understanding not only when disclosers share, but what disclosers and confidants say in early conversations about new diagnoses. While disclosers’ and confidants’ messages showed marked similarities, important differences appeared. For example, confidants focused on assuaging disclosers’ fear about the consequences, whereas disclosers expressed distress related to their uncertainty about the prognosis of an HPV infection and how to prepare for next steps. The discussion highlighted implications for the DD-MM, HPV disclosures, and future interventions. PMID:25642121

  16. Recall Latencies, Confidence, and Output Positions of True and False Memories: Implications for Recall and Metamemory Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jou, Jerwen

    2008-01-01

    Recall latency, recall accuracy rate, and recall confidence were examined in free recall as a function of recall output serial position using a modified Deese-Roediger-McDermott paradigm to test a strength-based theory against the dual-retrieval process theory of recall output sequence. The strength theory predicts the item output sequence to be…

  17. In Thyroidectomized Thyroid Cancer Patients, False-Positive I-131 Whole Body Scans Are Often Caused by Inflammation Rather Than Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garger, Yana Basis; Winfeld, Mathew; Friedman, Kent; Blum, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To show that I-131 false-positive results on whole-body scans (WBSs) after thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer may be a result of inflammation unassociated with the cancer. Methods. We performed a retrospective image analysis of our database of thyroid cancer patients who underwent WBS from January 2008 to January 2012 to identify and stratify false positives. Results. A total of 564 patients underwent WBS during the study period; 96 patients were referred for 99 I-131 single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT/CT) scans to better interpret cryptic findings. Among them, 73 scans were shown to be falsely positive; 40/73 or 54.7% of false-positive findings were a result of inflammation. Of the findings, 17 were in the head, 1 in the neck, 4 in the chest, 3 in the abdomen, and 14 in the pelvis; 1 had a knee abscess. Conclusions. In our series, inflammation caused the majority of false-positive WBSs. I-131 SPECT/CT is powerful in the differentiation of inflammation from thyroid cancer. By excluding metastatic disease, one can properly prognosticate outcome and avoid unnecessary, potentially harmful treatment of patients with thyroid cancer. PMID:26977418

  18. Focal hepatic uptake along the falciform: False positive for malignancy on 18F-FDG-PET in a lymphoma patient with superior vena cava obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Sarah; Tomich, Jennifer; Young, Daniel; Johnson, Lester

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of focal increased intrahepatic radiotracer activity on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in a patient with lymphoma and superior vena cava (SVC) obstruction, a false positive for malignancy. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) demonstrated an enhancing region of geographic focal hypoattenuation in the liver along the falciform, corresponding to the region of increased radiotracer activity on FDG-PET, with marked narrowing of the superior vena cava and resultant collateral venous pathways to the portal vein via paraumbilical veins. CT followup demonstrated stability of the hepatic abnormality, and no lesion was evident on ultrasound, suggesting that the finding on PET-CT represented a false positive for malignancy in this patient with known SVC obstruction. In patients with SVC obstruction, radiologists should consider this phenomenon of anomalous hepatic uptake along the falciform as a source of possible false positives for malignancy on PET. PMID:27141243

  19. Pulmonary suture abscess with false-positive 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission scan mimicking lung cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Teruo; Nakagawa, Katsuhiro; Katsura, Hiroshi; Nakane, Shigeru; Kawahara, Kunimitsu; Fukuda, Haruyuki

    2006-08-01

    We present the case of a 57-year-old woman with pulmonary suture abscess. She had undergone right S3 segmentectomy for early lung adenocarcinoma 7 years before and right breast-conserving surgery for invasive ductal carcinoma 5 months previously, followed by irradiation plus endocrine therapy. Chest radiography and computed tomography revealed an irregular mass (3.5 cm in diameter) between the residual S1 segment and the middle lobe, neighboring the staple line of the segmentectomy. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake into the mass increased, seen by positron emission scans. Therefore, we could not rule out the possibility of local recurrence of lung cancer and resected it. Pathologically and microbiologically, the mass was a suture abscess arising around the nylon suture of the previous segmentectomy. This lesion was the result of a foreign-body reaction, as confirmed by polarized microscopy. Moreover, titanium staples at the segmentectomy and breast-conserving surgery may also have contributed to this condition. PMID:16972643

  20. Invasive pulmonary mycosis due to Chaetomium globosum with false-positive galactomannan test: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Capoor, Malini R; Agarwal, Poojan; Goel, Manoj; Jain, Sarika; Shivaprakash, Mandya Rudramurthy; Honnavar, Prasanna; Gupta, Sunita; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke

    2016-03-01

    In this case, the authors report Chaetomium globosum as a cause of invasive pulmonary infection in a patient with Wegener's granulomatosis. Fungal hyphae (KOH and Calcofluor) were seen on direct microscopy of lung biopsy sample and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) sample. C. globosum isolated on culture clinched the diagnosis of invasive pulmonary infection by Chaetomium spp. A positive galactomannan of serum and BAL was repeatedly seen and was utilised for follow-up and as prognostic marker in patient management. The patient was successfully treated with liposomal amphotericin B followed by voriconazole. All the Chaetomium infections reported till date since 1980 are reviewed. Chaetomium spp. with its unique ecology has a hidden clinical potential to cause invasive mould infections. PMID:26691935

  1. When a Little Knowledge Can Be Dangerous: False-Positive Diagnosis of Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia among Community Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Shinagawa, Shunichiro; Catindig, Joseree Ann; Block, Nikolas R.; Miller, Bruce L.; Rankin, Katherine P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Accurate diagnosis of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is important as patients’ behavioral symptoms have profound implications for their families and communities. Since the diagnosis of bvFTD derives from behavioral features, accurate identification of patients can be difficult for non-specialists. Concrete rates of diagnostic accuracy among non-specialists are unavailable. Methods To examine the accuracy of community clinicians’ diagnoses of bvFTD and to identify patient characteristics leading to misdiagnosis, we reviewed the charts and referral letters of 3,578 patients who were seen at our specialized center. Referral diagnosis and reasons, manifesting symptoms, demographic data, Mini-Mental State Examination score, Clinical Dementia Rating score and Neuropsychiatric Inventory score were extracted. Results 60% of patients assigned a single diagnosis of bvFTD by community clinicians did not have bvFTD according to specialists. Compared to specialist-confirmed bvFTD patients, false bvFTD patients were more likely to be depressed and to be non-Caucasian, showed less euphoria, apathy, disinhibition and abnormal eating behaviors, had milder disease severity and better overall cognition. bvFTD was mentioned by referring clinicians in 86% of specialist-confirmed bvFTD cases, but missed cases were called Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s or Huntington’s disease, or progressive aphasia. Conclusion These results revealed a widespread lack of familiarity with core diagnostic symptoms among non-specialists and suggest that community clinicians require specialized diagnostic support before providing a definitive diagnosis of bvFTD. PMID:26741499

  2. Detecting cocaine use? The autobiographical implicit association test (aIAT) produces false positives in a real-world setting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The autobiographical Implicit Association Test (aIAT) is a novel application of the implicit association concept for detecting life events. It has been used to reveal concealed knowledge in clinical and forensic settings, including detecting drug use. In this study, we aimed to explore the functionality of the aIAT to identify drug use in real-world settings. Methods The study used mixed methodology with known groups of drug users and nonusers. Recreational cocaine users (n = 23) and non-users (n = 23) were recruited through ethnographic methodology and assessed using a bespoke brief aIAT for cocaine use. An identical aIAT test for heroin detection was also administered to a sub-sample of 10 cocaine users and 13 nonusers. The accuracy of the cocaine aIAT was measured through ROC analysis. Paradoxical aIAT results were explored by integrating craving, consumption measures and life-story interviews into the analysis. Results Whilst the two brief aIATs showed good concurrent validity for cocaine users by accurately detecting drug using status for 18 of the 23 users (78.3%), the test falsely reported 61% cocaine users in the non-user comparison group. The average D-scores were 0.257±0.246 for the cocaine users and 0.134±0.367 for the non-users, showing no discriminatory power (t(44) = 1.339, p = 0.187; AUC = 0.605, p = 0.223). Results were independent from craving and recent cocaine use. The comparison group’s cocaine and heroin aIAT scores correlated significantly (r(13) = 0.776, p = 0.002) whilst an accurate absence of such relationship was evidenced in the cocaine using sample (r(10) = 0.061, p = 0.866). Triangulation with life-story interviews suggests that in the absence of an autobiographical event, this test may measure an alternative cognitive construct linked to the Self-concept. Conclusion The aIAT is a variant of an attitude measure and can be better rationalized if propositional thinking is implied to explain outcomes. The Relational Frame

  3. False-Positive Transcription-Mediated Amplification Assay Detection of West Nile Virus in Blood from a Patient with Viremia Caused by an Usutu Virus Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Gaibani, Paolo; Pierro, Anna Maria; Cavrini, Francesca; Rossini, Giada; Landini, Maria Paola; Sambri, Vittorio

    2010-01-01

    Detection of West Nile virus (WNV) by nucleic acid amplification technology (NAAT) is used widely to screen blood and organ donations in areas where WNV is endemic. We report a false-positive result of a WNV transcription-mediated amplification assay (TMA) in a patient with viremia that was caused by Usutu virus, a mosquito-borne flavivirus. PMID:20592138

  4. Screening Outcomes in Older US Women Undergoing Multiple Mammograms in Community Practice: Does Interval, Age, or Comorbidity Score Affect Tumor Characteristics or False Positive Rates?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Uncertainty exists about the appropriate use of screening mammography among older women because comorbid illnesses may diminish the benefit of screening. We examined the risk of adverse tumor characteristics and false positive rates according to screening interval, age, and comorbidity. Methods From January 1999 to December 2006, data were collected prospectively on 2993 older women with breast cancer and 137 949 older women without breast cancer who underwent mammography at facilities that participated in a data linkage between the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium and Medicare claims. Women were aged 66 to 89 years at study entry to allow for measurement of 1 year of preexisting illnesses. We used logistic regression analyses to calculate the odds of advanced (IIb, III, IV) stage, large (>20 millimeters) tumors, and 10-year cumulative probability of false-positive mammography by screening frequency (1 vs 2 years), age, and comorbidity score. The comorbidity score was derived using the Klabunde approximation of the Charlson score. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Adverse tumor characteristics did not differ statistically significantly by comorbidity, age, or interval. Cumulative probability of a false-positive mammography result was higher among annual screeners than biennial screeners irrespective of comorbidity: 48.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 46.1% to 49.9%) of annual screeners aged 66 to 74 years had a false-positive result compared with 29.0% (95% CI = 28.1% to 29.9%) of biennial screeners. Conclusion Women aged 66 to 89 years who undergo biennial screening mammography have similar risk of advanced-stage disease and lower cumulative risk of a false-positive recommendation than annual screeners, regardless of comorbidity. PMID:23385442

  5. Efficient detection of human circulating tumor cells without significant production of false-positive cells by a novel conditionally replicating adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Fuminori; Narii, Nobuhiro; Tomita, Kyoko; Togo, Shinsaku; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Machitani, Mitsuhiro; Tachibana, Masashi; Ouchi, Masaaki; Katagiri, Nobuyoshi; Urata, Yasuo; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are promising biomarkers in several cancers, and thus methods and apparatuses for their detection and quantification in the blood have been actively pursued. A novel CTC detection system using a green fluorescence protein (GFP)–expressing conditionally replicating adenovirus (Ad) (rAd-GFP) was recently developed; however, there is concern about the production of false-positive cells (GFP-positive normal blood cells) when using rAd-GFP, particularly at high titers. In addition, CTCs lacking or expressing low levels of coxsackievirus–adenovirus receptor (CAR) cannot be detected by rAd-GFP, because rAd-GFP is constructed based on Ad serotype 5, which recognizes CAR. In order to suppress the production of false-positive cells, sequences perfectly complementary to blood cell–specific microRNA, miR-142-3p, were incorporated into the 3′-untranslated region of the E1B and GFP genes. In addition, the fiber protein was replaced with that of Ad serotype 35, which recognizes human CD46, creating rAdF35-142T-GFP. rAdF35-142T-GFP efficiently labeled not only CAR-positive tumor cells but also CAR-negative tumor cells with GFP. The numbers of false-positive cells were dramatically lower for rAdF35-142T-GFP than for rAd-GFP. CTCs in the blood of cancer patients were detected by rAdF35-142T-GFP with a large reduction in false-positive cells. PMID:26966699

  6. Efficient detection of human circulating tumor cells without significant production of false-positive cells by a novel conditionally replicating adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Fuminori; Narii, Nobuhiro; Tomita, Kyoko; Togo, Shinsaku; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Machitani, Mitsuhiro; Tachibana, Masashi; Ouchi, Masaaki; Katagiri, Nobuyoshi; Urata, Yasuo; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are promising biomarkers in several cancers, and thus methods and apparatuses for their detection and quantification in the blood have been actively pursued. A novel CTC detection system using a green fluorescence protein (GFP)-expressing conditionally replicating adenovirus (Ad) (rAd-GFP) was recently developed; however, there is concern about the production of false-positive cells (GFP-positive normal blood cells) when using rAd-GFP, particularly at high titers. In addition, CTCs lacking or expressing low levels of coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) cannot be detected by rAd-GFP, because rAd-GFP is constructed based on Ad serotype 5, which recognizes CAR. In order to suppress the production of false-positive cells, sequences perfectly complementary to blood cell-specific microRNA, miR-142-3p, were incorporated into the 3'-untranslated region of the E1B and GFP genes. In addition, the fiber protein was replaced with that of Ad serotype 35, which recognizes human CD46, creating rAdF35-142T-GFP. rAdF35-142T-GFP efficiently labeled not only CAR-positive tumor cells but also CAR-negative tumor cells with GFP. The numbers of false-positive cells were dramatically lower for rAdF35-142T-GFP than for rAd-GFP. CTCs in the blood of cancer patients were detected by rAdF35-142T-GFP with a large reduction in false-positive cells. PMID:26966699

  7. Reduction of misleading ("false") positive results in mammalian cell genotoxicity assays. III: sensitivity of human cell types to known genotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Paul; Smith, Robert; Smith, Katie; Young, Jamie; Jeffrey, Laura; Carmichael, Paul; Kirkland, David; Pfuhler, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    We have demonstrated previously that the seemingly high rate of "false" or "misleading" positive results from in vitro micronucleus assays (MNvit) was greater when rodent derived cell lines and certain toxicity measures, such as relative cell count or replication index, were used. These studies suggested that the use of a human cell type with functional p53 and a toxicity measure that included a function of cell proliferation could dramatically reduce the detection of misleading positive results. A reduced "false positive rate" should not be at the expense of a loss of sensitivity of the assay. Therefore, we have investigated the sensitivity of the MNvit assay to known genotoxic agents using three cell types shown previously to be less prone to misleading positives, namely human lymphocytes (HuLy), TK6 and HepG2 cells. The 17 chemicals are well characterised and are from a list of chemicals known to produce positive results in in vitro mammalian cell assays. These data demonstrated a high sensitivity of the assay in which TK6 and HuLy cells were employed, such that 15 out of the 17 chemicals were correctly identified. By contrast, the use of HepG2 cells resulted in far fewer than expected positive responses. In conclusion, using TK6 and HuLy cells in preference to long established rodent cell lines in order to improve specificity does not compromise the sensitivity of the MNvit to detect known genotoxic agents. PMID:24632063

  8. Comparative analyses across cattle genders and breeds reveal the pitfalls caused by false positive and lineage-differential copy number variations.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Utsunomiya, Yuri T; Xu, Lingyang; Hay, El Hamidi Abdel; Bickhart, Derek M; Sonstegard, Tad S; Van Tassell, Curtis P; Garcia, Jose Fernando; Liu, George E

    2016-01-01

    We compared CNV region (CNVR) results derived from 1,682 Nellore cattle with equivalent results derived from our previous analysis of Bovine HapMap samples. By comparing CNV segment frequencies between different genders and groups, we identified 9 frequent, false positive CNVRs with a total length of 0.8 Mbp that were likely caused by assembly errors. Although there was a paucity of lineage specific events, we did find one 54 kb deletion on chr5 significantly enriched in Nellore cattle. A few highly frequent CNVRs present in both datasets were detected within genomic regions containing olfactory receptor, ATP-binding cassette, and major histocompatibility complex genes. We further evaluated their impacts on downstream bioinformatics and CNV association analyses. Our results revealed pitfalls caused by false positive and lineage-differential copy number variations and will increase the accuracy of future CNV studies in both taurine and indicine cattle. PMID:27381368

  9. Comparative analyses across cattle genders and breeds reveal the pitfalls caused by false positive and lineage-differential copy number variations

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yang; Utsunomiya, Yuri T.; Xu, Lingyang; Hay, El Hamidi abdel; Bickhart, Derek M.; Sonstegard, Tad S.; Van Tassell, Curtis P.; Garcia, Jose Fernando; Liu, George E.

    2016-01-01

    We compared CNV region (CNVR) results derived from 1,682 Nellore cattle with equivalent results derived from our previous analysis of Bovine HapMap samples. By comparing CNV segment frequencies between different genders and groups, we identified 9 frequent, false positive CNVRs with a total length of 0.8 Mbp that were likely caused by assembly errors. Although there was a paucity of lineage specific events, we did find one 54 kb deletion on chr5 significantly enriched in Nellore cattle. A few highly frequent CNVRs present in both datasets were detected within genomic regions containing olfactory receptor, ATP-binding cassette, and major histocompatibility complex genes. We further evaluated their impacts on downstream bioinformatics and CNV association analyses. Our results revealed pitfalls caused by false positive and lineage-differential copy number variations and will increase the accuracy of future CNV studies in both taurine and indicine cattle. PMID:27381368

  10. Selecting At-Risk First-Grade Readers for Early Intervention: Eliminating False Positives and Exploring the Promise of a Two-Stage Gated Screening Process

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Donald L.; Fuchs, Douglas; Fuchs, Lynn S.; Bouton, Bobette; Gilbert, Jennifer K.; Barquero, Laura A.; Cho, Eunsoo; Crouch, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (a) to identify measures that when added to a base 1st-grade screening battery help eliminate false positives and (b) to investigate gains in efficiency associated with a 2-stage gated screening procedure. We tested 355 children in the fall of 1st grade, and assessed for reading difficulty at the end of 2nd grade. The base screening model, included measures of phonemic awareness, rapid naming skill, oral vocabulary, and initial word identification fluency (WIF). Short-term WIF progress monitoring (intercept and slope), dynamic assessment, running records, and oral reading fluency were each considered as an additional screening measure in contrasting models. Results indicated that the addition of WIF progress monitoring and dynamic assessment, but not running records or oral reading fluency, significantly decreased false positives. The 2-stage gated screening process using phonemic decoding efficiency in the first stage significantly reduced the number of children requiring the full screening battery. PMID:20689725

  11. Short-term Follow-up US Leads to Higher False-positive Results Without Detection of Structural Recurrences in PTMC.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung Hyun; Lee, Hye Sun; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Youk, Ji Hyun; Kim, Hyun Gi; Moon, Hee Jung; Kwak, Jin Young

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the value of the annual follow-up neck ultrasonography (US) for postoperative surveillance in patients with papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC). This retrospective study has been approved by our institutional review board (IRB) with waiver for informed consent. A total of 375 patients diagnosed as PTMCs, who underwent total thyroidectomy with radioiodine remnant ablation were included, to identify the recurrence rate and the false-positive rate of annual ultrasound. The number, interval, and the results of follow-up US or fine needle aspiration were obtained from electronic medical records. Four (1.1%, 4/375) recurrences were found 3 years after the initial treatment, and only 1 patient (0.3%, 1/375) had a metastatic lymph node larger than 8 mm in the shortest diameter on US found 7.6 years after initial treatment with biochemical abnormalities. Cumulative risk of having at least 1 false-positive exam was 8.3% by the 8th US, and 8.1% by the 8-9 year follow-up. Cox multivariate regression showed shorter interval of follow-up US and presence of lymph node metastasis at initial surgery are independent predictors affecting the cumulative false-positive results (hazard ratio [HR], 0.60; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.49-0.73; P < 0.001 and HR, 2.19; 95% CI: 1.01-4.75; P = 0.048, respectively). Short-term follow-up US can result in higher cumulative false-positive results without detection of meaningful recurrences in patients with PTMCs who do not have biochemical abnormalities. PMID:26735548

  12. False-Positive Finding on 18F FDG PET/CT: Report of a Rare Case With Xanthogranulomatous Inflammation in the Spinal Epidural Space.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohammed Shah; Guan, Wei; Zhou, Wen-Lan; Wang, Quan-Shi; Wu, Hu-Bing

    2016-09-01

    Xanthogranulomatous inflammation in the spinal epidural space is extremely rare. We report a case of a 62-year-old man with a xanthogranulomatous inflammation in the spinal epidural space mistaken for lymphoma because of its avid F FDG uptake on PET/CT. This case emphasizes the need for caution when evaluating a spinal epidural mass using F FDG PET/CT as xanthogranulomatous inflammation can induce a false-positive reading on F-FDG PET/CT. PMID:27276211

  13. Prevalence and factors associated with false positive suspicion of acute aortic syndrome: experience in a patient population transferred to a specialized aortic treatment center

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Chad E.; Aggarwal, Bhuvnesh; Schoenhagen, Paul; Kralovic, Damon M.; Kormos, Kristopher; Holloway, David

    2013-01-01

    Study objective Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a medical emergency that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment at specialized centers. We sought to determine the frequency and etiology of false positive activation of a regional AAS network in a patient population emergently transferred for suspected AAS. Methods We evaluated 150 consecutive patients transferred from community emergency departments directly to our Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (CICU) with a diagnosis of suspected AAS between March, 2010 and August, 2011. A final diagnosis of confirmed acute Type A, acute Type B dissection, and false positive suspicion of dissection was made in 63 (42%), 70 (46.7%) and 17 (11.3%) patients respectively. Results Of the 17 false positive transfers, ten (58.8%) were suspected Type A dissection and seven (41.2%) were suspected Type B dissection. The initial hospital diagnosis in 15 (88.2%) patients was made by a computed tomography (CT) scan and 10 (66.6%) of these patients required repeat imaging with an ECG-synchronized CT to definitively rule out AAS. Five (29.4%) patients had prior history of open or endovascular aortic repair. Overall in-hospital mortality was 9.3%. Conclusions The diagnosis of AAS is confirmed in most patients emergently transferred for suspected AAS. False positive activation in this setting is driven primarily by uncertainty secondary to motion-artifact of the ascending aorta and the presence of complex anatomy following prior aortic intervention. Network-wide standardization of imaging strategies, and improved sharing of imaging may further improve triage of this complex patient population. PMID:24400203

  14. Short-term Follow-up US Leads to Higher False-positive Results Without Detection of Structural Recurrences in PTMC

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung Hyun; Lee, Hye Sun; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Youk, Ji Hyun; Kim, Hyun Gi; Moon, Hee Jung; Kwak, Jin Young

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the value of the annual follow-up neck ultrasonography (US) for postoperative surveillance in patients with papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC). This retrospective study has been approved by our institutional review board (IRB) with waiver for informed consent. A total of 375 patients diagnosed as PTMCs, who underwent total thyroidectomy with radioiodine remnant ablation were included, to identify the recurrence rate and the false-positive rate of annual ultrasound. The number, interval, and the results of follow-up US or fine needle aspiration were obtained from electronic medical records. Four (1.1%, 4/375) recurrences were found 3 years after the initial treatment, and only 1 patient (0.3%, 1/375) had a metastatic lymph node larger than 8 mm in the shortest diameter on US found 7.6 years after initial treatment with biochemical abnormalities. Cumulative risk of having at least 1 false-positive exam was 8.3% by the 8th US, and 8.1% by the 8–9 year follow-up. Cox multivariate regression showed shorter interval of follow-up US and presence of lymph node metastasis at initial surgery are independent predictors affecting the cumulative false-positive results (hazard ratio [HR], 0.60; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.49–0.73; P < 0.001 and HR, 2.19; 95% CI: 1.01–4.75; P = 0.048, respectively). Short-term follow-up US can result in higher cumulative false-positive results without detection of meaningful recurrences in patients with PTMCs who do not have biochemical abnormalities. PMID:26735548

  15. Selecting At-Risk First-Grade Readers for Early Intervention: Eliminating False Positives and Exploring the Promise of a Two-Stage Gated Screening Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton, Donald L.; Fuchs, Douglas; Fuchs, Lynn S.; Bouton, Bobette; Gilbert, Jennifer K.; Barquero, Laura A.; Cho, Eunsoo; Crouch, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (a) to identify measures that when added to a base 1st-grade screening battery help eliminate false positives and (b) to investigate gains in efficiency associated with a 2-stage gated screening procedure. We tested 355 children in the fall of 1st grade and assessed for reading difficulty at the end of 2nd grade.…

  16. Unusual False Positive Radioiodine Uptake on 131I Whole Body Scintigraphy in Three Unrelated Organs with Different Pathologies in Patients of Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Rohit; Pawar, Shwetal; Mahajan, Abhishek; Basu, Sandip

    2016-01-01

    Three cases with unusual false positive radioiodine uptake in three different organs and pathologies (infective old fibrotic lesion in the lung, simple liver cyst, and benign breast lesion) on iodine-131 (131I) whole body scintigraphy. Clinicoradiological correlation was undertaken in all three cases and the pathologies were ascertained. In all the three cases, single-photon emission computerized tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) and ancillary imaging modalities were employed and were helpful in arriving at the final diagnosis. PMID:27134566

  17. Generic piperacillin/tazobactam is not associated with galactomannan false-positivity in adult patients with cancer: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ko, J-H; Peck, K R; Lee, W J; Lee, J Y; Cho, S Y; Ha, Y E; Kang, C-I; Chung, D R; Jung, C W; Kang, E-S; Song, J-H

    2015-07-01

    Recent products of piperacillin/tazobactam (PTZ) from the original manufacturer, previously considered a major cause of galactomannan (GM) false-positivity, are reported not to be related to it. However, data regarding generic PTZ are limited and controversial. To evaluate the effect of generic PTZ on GM false-positivity in Korea, we performed a case-control study in adult patients with cancer. A case-control study was designed. Electronic medical records of cancer patients who were admitted and tested for serum GM between March and June 2014 at a tertiary care university hospital were reviewed. During the study period, a single generic PTZ (C manufacturer, Korea) was used. Patients who received PTZ within 24 h prior to serum GM testing were enrolled. Age- and GM test date-matched non-PTZ patients were selected as controls. A total of 110 patients received PTZ within 24 h prior to serum GM testing during the study period. The GM optical density index (ODI) of the PTZ group did not vary significantly from that of the control group (p = 0.251). The percentage of false-positive patients in the PTZ group was also similar to that of the control group (p = 0.538). There was no statistical relationship between GM ODI titer and time interval from PTZ administration (p = 0.095) or cumulative PTZ dose (p = 0.416). In a case-control study that evaluated 220 patients, a generic PTZ in Korea was not related to GM false-positivity. PMID:25894983

  18. When the Single Matters more than the Group (II): Addressing the Problem of High False Positive Rates in Single Case Voxel Based Morphometry Using Non-parametric Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Scarpazza, Cristina; Nichols, Thomas E.; Seramondi, Donato; Maumet, Camille; Sartori, Giuseppe; Mechelli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of studies have used Voxel Based Morphometry (VBM) to compare a single patient with a psychiatric or neurological condition of interest against a group of healthy controls. However, the validity of this approach critically relies on the assumption that the single patient is drawn from a hypothetical population with a normal distribution and variance equal to that of the control group. In a previous investigation, we demonstrated that family-wise false positive error rate (i.e., the proportion of statistical comparisons yielding at least one false positive) in single case VBM are much higher than expected (Scarpazza et al., 2013). Here, we examine whether the use of non-parametric statistics, which does not rely on the assumptions of normal distribution and equal variance, would enable the investigation of single subjects with good control of false positive risk. We empirically estimated false positive rates (FPRs) in single case non-parametric VBM, by performing 400 statistical comparisons between a single disease-free individual and a group of 100 disease-free controls. The impact of smoothing (4, 8, and 12 mm) and type of pre-processing (Modulated, Unmodulated) was also examined, as these factors have been found to influence FPRs in previous investigations using parametric statistics. The 400 statistical comparisons were repeated using two independent, freely available data sets in order to maximize the generalizability of the results. We found that the family-wise error rate was 5% for increases and 3.6% for decreases in one data set; and 5.6% for increases and 6.3% for decreases in the other data set (5% nominal). Further, these results were not dependent on the level of smoothing and modulation. Therefore, the present study provides empirical evidence that single case VBM studies with non-parametric statistics are not susceptible to high false positive rates. The critical implication of this finding is that VBM can be used

  19. Chemical applicability domain of the Local Lymph Node Assay (LLNA) for skin sensitisation potency. Part 3. Apparent discrepancies between LLNA and GPMT sensitisation potential: False positives or differences in sensitivity?

    PubMed

    Roberts, David W; Schultz, Terry W; Api, Anne Marie

    2016-10-01

    The Local Lymph Node Assay (LLNA) is the gold standard regulatory toxicology test for skin sensitisation along with the guinea pig maximisation test (GPMT). Compared with the GPMT, LLNA uses fewer animals, it is quantitative, and it gives a numerical prediction of potency. However several concerns have been raised with this assay, mainly related to false positives and false negatives. Over the years, many authors, including the developers of the assay, have presented cases where there have been discrepancies between the GMPT and LLNA results. Several theories have been put forward for these discrepancies, the main one being the "over-sensitivity" of the GPMT. This paper analyses the data from a systematic study, published in three papers from 2008 to 2011, covering several classes of chemicals, in particular unsaturated fatty acids, sugar surfactants and ethoxylated alcohols, with many cases of chemicals testing positive in the LLNA being negative in the GPMT. Based on consideration of reaction chemistry and structural alerts, it is concluded that these discrepancies are not LLNA false positives, but can be rationalised in terms of the different protocols of the assays. PMID:27477089

  20. Does ampicillin-sulbactam cause false positivity of (1,3)-beta-D-glucan assay? A prospective evaluation of 15 patients without invasive fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Metan, Gokhan; Agkus, Cigdem; Nedret Koc, A; Elmali, Ferhan; Finkelman, Malcolm A

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction between intravenous ampicillin-sulbactam treatment and (1,3)-beta-D-glucan (BDG) assay. Fifteen patients with a median age of 60 (16-81) without known risk factors for invasive fungal infections who received a daily dose of 3×2g ampicillin-sulbactam monotherapy from different batches were included in the study. Thirteen patients had soft tissue infections. The 5 of 13 patients who went under surgery had surgical dressings. Serum samples were obtained both before and after antibiotic infusion on the first, third, seventh and tenth days of an ampicillin-sulbactam treatment course. BDG was assayed using the Fungitell kit (Associates of Cape Cod, East Falmouth, MA, USA) according to manufacturers' specifications. All serum samples were also tested for galactomannan (GM) antigenemia by Platelia Aspergillus ELISA (Bio-Rad Laboratories, Marnes-la-Coquette, France). A total of 37 of 117 serum samples were positive for BDG at a threshold of 80pg ml(-1) . Seven of 37 BDG positive serum samples had a GM index ≥0.5. When a cutoff value of ≥0.5 was used for GM positivity, 16 (13.3%) serum samples were positive. For a cutoff value of ≥0.7, eight (6.6%) serum samples were positive. There were no statistically significant differences in the median BDG levels (P=0.47) or median GM indices (P =0.28) of the various sampling times. None of the SAM vials tested positive for BDG or GM. After ruling out fungal infections and all known potential causes of false BDG positivity, environmental contamination remained possible cause of BDG reactivity. We did not observe any significant association of ampicillin-sulbactam administration and positive assays for BDG or GM. PMID:22040530

  1. A Discovery of a Candidate Companion to a Transiting System KOI-94: A Direct Imaging Study for a Possibility of a False Positive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Narita, Norio; Hirano, Teruyuki; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Tamura, Motohide; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hashimoto, Jun; Sato, Bun'ei; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph C.; Currie, Thayne; Egner, Sebastian; Feldt, Markus; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol A.; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; McElwain, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    We report a discovery of a companion candidate around one of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), KOI-94, and results of our quantitative investigation of the possibility that planetary candidates around KOI-94 are false positives. KOI-94 has a planetary system in which four planetary detections have been reported by Kepler, suggesting that this system is intriguing to study the dynamical evolutions of planets. However, while two of those detections (KOI-94.01 and 03) have been made robust by previous observations, the others (KOI-94.02 and 04) are marginal detections, for which future confirmations with various techniques are required. We have conducted high-contrast direct imaging observations with Subaru/HiCIAO in H band and detected a faint object located at a separation of approximately 0.6 sec from KOI-94. The object has a contrast of approximately 1 × 10(exp -3) in H band, and corresponds to an M type star on the assumption that the object is at the same distance of KOI-94. Based on our analysis, KOI-94.02 is likely to be a real planet because of its transit depth, while KOI-94.04 can be a false positive due to the companion candidate. The success in detecting the companion candidate suggests that high-contrast direct imaging observations are important keys to examine false positives of KOIs. On the other hand, our transit light curve reanalyses lead to a better period estimate of KOI-94.04 than that on the KOI catalogue and show that the planetary candidate has the same limb darkening parameter value as the other planetary candidates in the KOI-94 system, suggesting that KOI-94.04 is also a real planet in the system.

  2. A false positive case due to matrix interference in the analysis of ronidazole residues in muscle tissue using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen; Rúbies, Antoni; Centrich, Francesc; Companyó, Ramon

    2014-06-01

    In contrast with the information of the inspection body concerning the use of ronidazole, several non compliant muscle samples were detected using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method in accordance with confirmation criteria of Decision 2002/657/EC. This led to the suspicion that non compliance could be due to false positive results. In this context, a liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) method was developed and sample extracts were re-analyzed, resolving the co eluting isobaric interfering peak, which also has an interfering product ion with the transition product (m/z 201>140). PMID:24583330

  3. False-Positive Radioactive Iodine Uptake Mimicking Miliary Lung Metastases in a Patient Affected by Papillary Thyroid Cancer and IgA Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Demidowich, Andrew Paul; Kundu, Amartya; Reynolds, James C; Celi, Francesco S

    2016-09-01

    A 42-year-old female with immunoglobulin A deficiency and recurrent sinopulmonary infections underwent thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Follow-up (123)I scintigraphy demonstrated diffuse pulmonary uptake, suggesting metastatic disease. However, subsequent pathologic, biochemical and radiographic testing proved that she was in fact disease free, and the initial (123)I pulmonary uptake was identified as a false positive. Inflammatory conditions may rarely cause iodine uptake in non-thyroidal tissues due to local retention, organification, and/or immunologic utilization. To avoid exposing patients to unnecessary treatments, it is critical for clinicians to recognize that comorbid pulmonary conditions may mimic metastatic PTC on radioiodine scintigraphy. PMID:27540434

  4. Avian metapneumovirus RT-nested-PCR: a novel false positive reducing inactivated control virus with potential applications to other RNA viruses and real time methods.

    PubMed

    Falchieri, Marco; Brown, Paul A; Catelli, Elena; Naylor, Clive J

    2012-12-01

    Using reverse genetics, an avian metapneumovirus (AMPV) was modified for use as a positive control for validating all stages of a popular established RT-nested PCR, used in the detection of the two major AMPV subtypes (A and B). Resultant amplicons were of increased size and clearly distinguishable from those arising from unmodified virus, thus allowing false positive bands, due to control virus contamination of test samples, to be identified readily. Absorption of the control virus onto filter paper and subsequent microwave irradiation removed all infectivity while its function as an efficient RT-nested-PCR template was unaffected. Identical amplicons were produced after storage for one year. The modified virus is likely to have application as an internal standard as well as in real time methods. Additions to AMPV of RNA from other RNA viruses, including hazardous examples such HIV and influenza, are likely to yield similar safe RT-PCR controls. PMID:22824554

  5. Using linked birth, notification, hospital and mortality data to examine false-positive meningococcal disease reporting and adjust disease incidence estimates for children in New South Wales, Australia.

    PubMed

    Gibson, A; Jorm, L; McIntyre, P

    2015-09-01

    Meningococcal disease is a rare, rapidly progressing condition which may be difficult to diagnose, disproportionally affects children, and has high morbidity and mortality. Accurate incidence estimates are needed to monitor the effectiveness of vaccination and treatment. We used linked notification, hospital, mortality and birth data for all children of an Australian state (2000-2007) to estimate the incidence of meningococcal disease. A total of 595 cases were notified, 684 cases had a hospital diagnosis, and 26 cases died from meningococcal disease. All deaths were notified, but only 68% (466/684) of hospitalized cases. Of non-notified hospitalized cases with more than one clinical admission, most (90%, 103/114) did not have meningococcal disease recorded as their final diagnosis, consistent with initial 'false-positive' hospital meningococcal disease diagnosis. After adjusting for false-positive rates in hospital data, capture-recapture estimation suggested that up to four cases of meningococcal disease may not have been captured in either notification or hospital records. The estimated incidence of meningococcal disease in NSW-born and -resident children aged 0-14 years was 5·1-5·4 cases/100 000 child-years at risk, comparable to international estimates using similar methods, but lower than estimates based on hospital data. PMID:25573266

  6. Investigation of false positives associated with loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays for detection of Toxoplasma gondii in archived tissue samples of captive felids.

    PubMed

    Suleman, Essa; Mtshali, Moses Sibusiso; Lane, Emily

    2016-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a ubiquitous protozoan parasite that infects humans and many different animals, including felids. Many molecular and serologic tests have been developed for detection of T. gondii in a wide range of hosts. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a field-friendly technique that lacks the practical drawbacks of other molecular and serologic tests, and LAMP assays have been successfully developed for detection of T. gondii in fresh tissue samples. In the current study, both a previously published and a de-novo designed LAMP assay were compared to a quantitative real-time (q)PCR assay, for the detection of T. gondii in archived formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples from captive wildlife. The LAMP assays produced conflicting results, generating both false positives and false negatives. Furthermore, the LAMP assays were unable to positively identify samples with low levels of parasites as determined by qPCR and histopathology. Therefore, these LAMP assays may not be the most suitable assays for detection of T. gondii in archived FFPE and frozen tissue samples. PMID:27449130

  7. The Application of Voltammetric Analysis of Δ(9) -THC for the Reduction of False Positive Results in the Analysis of Suspected Marijuana Plant Matter.

    PubMed

    Balbino, Marco A; de Oliveira, Laura S; Eleotério, Izabel C; Oiye, Erica N; Ribeiro, Maria F M; McCord, Bruce R; Ipolito, Antonio J; de Oliveira, Marcelo F

    2016-07-01

    The development of methodologies using inexpensive, fast, and reliable instrumention is desirable in illicit drug analysis. The purpose of this study was based on cyclic voltammetry technique to differentiate the electrochemical behavior of ∆(9) -THC, the psychoactive substance in marijuana, and five different extract plants to yield false positive results after analysis protocol for cannabinoids using thin-layer chromatography and Fast Blue B salt. After applying a deposition potential of -0.5 V in a glassy carbon working electrode, the results indicated an anodic peak current at 0.0 V versus Ag/AgCl after addition of ∆(9) -THC solution in the electrochemical cell, and limits of detection and quantification were 1.0 ng mL(-1) and 3.5 ng mL(-1) , respectively. Other interfering plants showed distinct amperometric responses. This methodology was useful to detect ∆(9) -THC even in the presence of the Fast Blue B salt, which avoided false positive results for all the studied extract plants. PMID:27364289

  8. The background rate of false positives: Combining simulations of gravitational wave events with an unsupervised algorithm for transient identification in crowded image-subtracted data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackley, Kendall; Eikenberry, Stephen; Klimenko, Sergey; LIGO Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We are now entering the era of multimessenger gravitational wave (GW) astronomy with the completion of the first observing run of Advanced LIGO. Multiwavelength electromagnetic (EM) emission is expected to accompany gravitational radiation from compact object binary mergers, such as those between neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes, where Advanced LIGO is most sensitive to their detection. Attempting to perform EM follow-up over the 10-100s deg2 error regions will be faced with many challenges, including the identification and removal of O (105) false positive transients that appear as a commotion of background events and as image artifacts in crowded image-subtracted fields. We present an update to our automated unsupervised algorithm including how our pipeline uses the existing coherent WaveBurst pipeline in an attempt to develop optimized EM follow-up schema. Our end-to-end pipeline combines simulated GW events with actual observational data from a number of ground-based optical observatories, including PTF, ROTSE, and DECam. Our performance is reported both in terms of the number of coincident false positives as well as the efficiency of recovery.

  9. Strikingly high false positivity of surveillance FDG-PET/CT scanning among patients with diffuse large cell lymphoma in the rituximab era.

    PubMed

    Avivi, Irit; Zilberlicht, Ariel; Dann, Eldad J; Leiba, Ronit; Faibish, Tal; Rowe, Jacob M; Bar-Shalom, Rachel

    2013-05-01

    Predictive value (PV) of surveillance fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) treated with chemotherapy-rituximab (R) versus chemotherapy only, remains unclear. The aim of the current study was to compare the performance of surveillance PET in DLBCL patients receiving CHOP (cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine, and prednisone) alone versus CHOP-R. Institutional database was retrospectively searched for adults with newly diagnosed DLBCL, receiving CHOP or CHOP-R, who achieved complete remission and underwent surveillance PETs. Follow-up (FU) PET was considered positive for recurrence in case of an uptake unrelated to physiological or known benign process. Results were confirmed by biopsy, imaging and clinical FU. One hundred nineteen patients, 35 receiving CHOP and 84 CHOP-R, who underwent 422 FU-PETs, were analyzed. At a median PET-FU of 3.4 years, 31 patients relapsed (17 vs. 14, respectively; P = 0.02). PET detected all relapses, with no false-negative studies. Specificity and positive PV (PPV) were significantly lower for patients receiving CHOP-R vs. CHOP (84% vs. 87%, P = 0.023; 23% vs. 74%, P < 0.0001), reflecting a higher false-positive (FP) rate in subjects receiving CHOP-R (77% vs. 26%, P < 0.001). In the latter group, FP-rate remained persistently high up to 3 years post-therapy. Multivariate analysis confirmed rituximab to be the most significant predictor for FP-PET. In conclusion, routine surveillance FDG-PET is not recommended in DLBCL treated with rituximab; strict criteria identifying patients in whom FU-PET is beneficial are required. PMID:23423884

  10. False assumptions.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, M

    1997-01-01

    Indian women do not have to be told the benefits of breast feeding or "rescued from the clutches of wicked multinational companies" by international agencies. There is no proof that breast feeding has declined in India; in fact, a 1987 survey revealed that 98% of Indian women breast feed. Efforts to promote breast feeding among the middle classes rely on such initiatives as the "baby friendly" hospital where breast feeding is promoted immediately after birth. This ignores the 76% of Indian women who give birth at home. Blaming this unproved decline in breast feeding on multinational companies distracts attention from more far-reaching and intractable effects of social change. While the Infant Milk Substitutes Act is helpful, it also deflects attention from more pressing issues. Another false assumption is that Indian women are abandoning breast feeding to comply with the demands of employment, but research indicates that most women give up employment for breast feeding, despite the economic cost to their families. Women also seek work in the informal sector to secure the flexibility to meet their child care responsibilities. Instead of being concerned about "teaching" women what they already know about the benefits of breast feeding, efforts should be made to remove the constraints women face as a result of their multiple roles and to empower them with the support of families, governmental policies and legislation, employers, health professionals, and the media. PMID:12321627