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Sample records for familial creutzfeldt-jakob disease

  1. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a rare, degenerative brain disorder. Symptoms usually start around age 60. Memory problems, behavior changes, vision ... during a medical procedure Cattle can get a disease related to CJD called bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) ...

  2. Familial clustering of the ataxic form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with Hirano bodies.

    PubMed Central

    Cartier, L; Gálvez, S; Gajdusek, D C

    1985-01-01

    A family cluster of the ataxic form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with one probable and two autopsy proven cases that occurred in a single generation between 1974 and 1982 is reported. The clinical characteristics of the cases are closely similar to those of kuru patients, with a fair correlation between the prominent truncal ataxia and the intense devastation of the cerebellar cortex most marked in the vermis. Pathologically, the marked hippocampal involvement rarely seen in typical transmissible Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and the finding of Hirano bodies in the Ammon's horn without specific Alzheimer's senile changes are noteworthy features. Images PMID:2984334

  3. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    de Villemeur, Thierry Billette

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases are rare in children. Three types are known: kuru, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), and iatrogenic CJD. All three affect children and young adults, and are transmitted by infectious contamination. Kuru was the result of ritual funeral practices similar to cannibalism; variant CJD affects young people who have eaten meat from cows with mad cow disease (mostly in the UK); and iatrogenic CJD is secondary to graft of human tissues performed in the 1980s (dura mater, pituitary extracted growth hormone). The disease appears after 4-30 years of incubation. The initial symptomatology is frequently neurological (cerebellar ataxia, oculomotor disturbance, peripheral nerve pain, pyramidal syndrome) followed by dementia. There is no biological test available that can give a definite diagnosis of prion disease apart from neuropathology, although prion accumulation in vCJD can be demonstrated in pharyngeal tonsil by immunohistochemical techniques. This devastating disease results inevitably in death. No specific treatment is available. PMID:23622328

  4. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Gençer, Ali Görkem; Pelin, Zerrin; Küçükali, Cem İsmail; Topçuoğlu, Ozgür Bilgin; Yilmaz, Nuriye

    2011-06-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a progressive, degenerative, and fatal disease of the central nervous system. It is caused by abnormal accumulation of prion proteins and is characterized mainly by progressive dementia, myoclonus, and cerebellar, pyramidal, and extrapyramidal findings. Psychiatric symptoms may also accompany CJD and are often the first signs of the disease. The incidence of CJD is approximately 1 in 1 000 000. In certain cases, a diagnosis can be made by demonstrating the accumulation of pathological prion proteins. However, in many cultures brain biopsies or post-mortem evaluations are not welcomed by either the patients or their relatives. In these cases, the importance of additional diagnostic tools increases. Herein, we report on a CJD patient who first consulted a psychiatrist with early psychiatric symptoms. The patient developed neurological symptoms later and was subsequently diagnosed as sporadic CJD based on clinical and laboratory findings rather than brain biopsy. Repeated electroencephalograms (EEG) played a pivotal role in our evaluation of the patient. This case is an interesting presentation of CJD both because of the timing of the symptoms and because of the typical EEG findings that led to the diagnosis. PMID:21707861

  5. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... acquired CJD. CJD belongs to a family of human and animal diseases known as the transmissible spongiform ... CJD is the most common of the known human TSEs. Other human TSEs include kuru, fatal familial ...

  6. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... be the same one that causes vCJD in humans. Varient CJD causes less than 1% of all ... Scrapie (found in sheep) Other very rare inherited human diseases, such as Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease and ...

  7. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Narayan, S K; Dutta, J K

    2005-09-01

    Cruetzfeldt-Jakob disease is a prion protein disease causing a transmissible, subacute, fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by a spongiform encephalopathy. Though rare, ever since Pruisner described the pathogenesis in 1982, this disease kept the clinicians as well as biologists spellbound, because of its distinct clinical picture and the novel mechanism of transmission. There was a further quantum leap in the interest in the disease with the establishment of its new clinical variant, the so called 'mad cow disease' in the late 1990s and had led to more stringent measures to ensure the quality of cattle-feeds and cattle-derived food products. The sporadic genetic variants, the commonest form of the disease, continue to challenge the genetic scientists. Advances in neuroimaging, cerebrospinal fluid marker proteins and genetic linkage studies now offer excellent diagnostic methods, while advances in therapeutic medicine which use products from cadaveric extracts such as growth hormone for treatment of hypopituitarism, dural grafts for neurosurgical procedures and cornea for transplantation etc. have thrown new challenges in controlling this serious disease. PMID:16334625

  8. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the burden of neurological disease. The leading scientific theory at this time maintains that CJD is caused ... All NINDS-prepared information is in the public domain and may be freely copied. Credit to the ...

  9. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: implications for gastroenterology.

    PubMed

    Bramble, M G; Ironside, J W

    2002-06-01

    The current clinical views regarding variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and in particular transmission via endoscopy, of those representing both gastroenterology and the Spongiform Encephalopathy Advisory Committee are presented in an attempt to guide clinicians as to "best practice" given the current state of our knowledge. PMID:12010896

  10. Evidence for case-to-case transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    PubMed Central

    Will, RG; Matthews, WB

    1982-01-01

    Three cases of probable iatrogenic transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease by neurosurgery are detailed together with a cluster of three cases in Eastern England possibly connected by dental procedures, and the development of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a patient who had been in social contact with a familial case. PMID:7045290

  11. CJD: Understanding Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Vacca, Vincent M

    2016-03-01

    Rare, transmissible, and rapidly progressive, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is an ultimately fatal central nervous system infection caused by accumulation of abnormally shaped prion proteins in neurons (see Understanding prion proteins). Although categorized as an infection, CJD doesn't lead to the immune system or inflammatory response typical of most infectious diseases. This article discusses the pathophysiology and diagnosis of this terminal illness and nursing care for patients with suspected or confirmed CJD. PMID:26840797

  12. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in Austria.

    PubMed

    Hainfellner, J A; Jellinger, K; Diringer, H; Guentchev, M; Kleinert, R; Pilz, P; Maier, H; Budka, H

    1996-08-01

    Between 1969 and 30 September 1995, 79 Austrian patients had Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) diagnosed neuropathologically by necropsy or biopsy. The annual incidence has significantly increased in recent years (average 0.18 per million in 1969-85, and 0.67 per million in 1986-94; estimate for 1995: 1.5 per million). Also, the percentage of patients with CJD over 70 years at death increased significantly until 1989 but is since in decline. There is no regional clustering, familial occurrence, or recognised iatrogenic risk. One patient had a 10 year history of intramuscular injection of purified bovine RNA preparation (Regeneresen) from various organs including the brian. The ages at death are symmetrically distributed around the median of 64 years. The median duration of disease is four months. Most patients (76%) died within six months of onset. Retrospectively, 86% of patients fulfilled clinical criteria of probable or possible CJD. Neuropathology showed the classic triad of spongiform change, astrogliosis, and neuronal loss in most cases. Two cases did not show unequivocal tissue alterations, but anti-PrP immunocytochemistry detected PrP deposits also in these cases. It is concluded that the recent rise in incidence of CJD in Austria most likely reflects increased awareness and diagnosis of CJD rather than a real increase. As bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) has not been reported in Austria, the data do not support a link between a rise in incidence of sporadic CJD and BSE. PMID:8708680

  13. Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (vCJD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (vCJD) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) is a prion disease that was first ...

  14. [Mad cow disease and the new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease].

    PubMed

    Pastoret, P P

    2001-08-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy and the new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) belong to a family of similar diseases under the name of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE). It is demonstrated that the agent responsible for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is also responsible for the new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob in man. This contribution describes the main characteristics of the two diseases. PMID:11584442

  15. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease presenting as a stroke mimic590.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Claire L

    2011-10-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a rare neurodegenerative disease in which there is an abnormal accumulation of prion protein. It occurs with an incidence of approximately 1 per million per year. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease occurs in approximately 85% of cases, with familial, variant and iatrogenic forms less common. Typically sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease presents with a rapidly progressive dementia, but sub-variants include the Heidenhain and Oppenheimer-Brownell variants. The former presents with visual disturbance and the latter with ataxia. This article describes a 75-year-old man with a Heidenhain variant of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease who presented with a sudden onset of homonymous hemianopia mimicking a stroke. PMID:22041731

  16. Visual art therapy in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: a case study.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Rajeet; Trauger-Querry, Barbara; Loughrin, Athena; Appleby, Brian S

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the diagnostic and treatment utility of visual art therapy in a case of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Visual art therapy was compared longitudinally with clinical and neuroimaging data over five-month period in an autopsy-confirmed case of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease of MM2-cortical subtype. Art therapy sessions and content were useful in ascertaining neuropsychiatric symptoms during the course of her illness. Art therapy offered a unique emotional and cognitive outlet as illness progressed. Patients and families affected by sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease may benefit from art therapy despite the rapidly progressive nature of the illness. Art therapy can also be useful for assessment of patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease by healthcare professionals. PMID:26782687

  17. Biomarkers for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Soomro, Sanam; Mohan, Chandra

    2016-06-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is a rare but fatal type of spongiform encephalopathy with unknown cause. Unfortunately, definitive diagnosis of this disease can only be done by examination of postmortem brain tissue. Presumptive diagnosis is done through a combination of clinical manifestations, radiology results, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) testing for CSF 14-3-3. Even with these guidelines, premortem diagnosis of sCJD can be unreliable with high rates of misdiagnosis. This calls for more reliable biomarkers of the disease, allowing for better diagnosis as well as understanding the pathogenesis of sCJD. This review compiles potential genetic, protein, biomolecular, and imaging biomarker studies for sCJD since 2010, highlighting the promise of proteins, cytokines, and composite biomarkers for improving the diagnosis as well as understanding the pathogenesis of this mysterious ailment. PMID:27547775

  18. Ocular Dipping in Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    PubMed Central

    Llamas, Sara; Gonzalo, Juan Francisco; Sánchez Sánchez, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Background Ocular dipping (OD), or inverse ocular bobbing, consists of slow, spontaneous downward eye movements with rapid return to the primary position. It has been mainly reported following hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, but has also been described in association with other types of diffuse or multifocal encephalopathies and structural brainstem damage. Case Report We report the case of a previously asymptomatic 66-year-old woman who presented with confusion, recent memory disturbances, and abnormal involuntary movements, followed by a coma. Abnormal spontaneous vertical eye movements consistent with OD developed from the fourth day after admission, and the patient died 20 days later. The pathological examination of the brain confirmed the diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Conclusions The precise location of damage causing OD is unknown. In contrast to ocular bobbing, OD has no localizing value itself, but structural brainstem damage is likely when it appears combined with other spontaneous vertical eye movements. PMID:24829603

  19. Transmissible familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease associated with five, seven, and eight extra octapeptide coding repeats in the PRNP gene

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfarb, L.G.; Brown, P.; McCombie, W.R.; Gibbs, C.J. Jr.; Gajdusek, D.C. ); Goldgaber, D. ); Swergold, G.D. ); Wills, P.R. ); Cervenakova, L. ); Baron, H. )

    1991-12-01

    The PRNP gene, encoding the amyloid precursor protein that is centrally involved in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), has an unstable region of five variant tandem octapeptide coding repeats between codons 51 and 91. The authors screened a total of 535 individuals for the presence of extra repeats in this region, including patients with sporadic and familial forms of spongiform encephalopathy, members of their families, other neurological and non-neurological patients, and normal controls. They identified three CJD families (in each of which the proband's disease was neuropathologically confirmed and experimentally transmitted to primates) that were heterozygous for alleles with 10, 12, or 13 repeats, some of which had wobble nucleotide substitutions. They also found one individual with 9 repeats and no nucleotide substitutions who had no evidence of neurological disease. These observations, together with data on published British patients with 11 and 14 repeats, strongly suggest that the occurrence of 10 or more octapeptide repeats in the encoded amyloid precursor protein predisposes to CJD.

  20. Rapid cognitive and functional decline: Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Dameron, Matthew

    2013-09-01

    The emergence of "mad cow disease" has sparked interest in prion diseases, including Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, a spongiform encephalopathy that can mimic other rapidly progressive dementias. A systematic approach to evaluation and diagnostic testing can help rule out other causes. PMID:24317229

  1. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Presenting as Progressive Aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Shuttleworth, Edwin C.; Yates, Allan J.; Paltan-Ortiz, Jose D.

    1985-01-01

    The syndrome of slowly progressive aphasia usually has been associated with Pick's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or an isolated focal degenerative disorder of unknown etiology involving the left perisylvian cortex. This report is of a patient with progressive aphasia due to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:3900429

  2. Biological network inferences for a protection mechanism against familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with E200K pathogenic mutation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human prion diseases are caused by abnormal accumulation of misfolded prion protein in the brain tissue. Inherited prion diseases, including familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD), are associated with mutations of the prion protein gene (PRNP). The glutamate (E)-to-lysine (K) substitution at codon 200 (E200K) in PRNP is the most common pathogenic mutation causing fCJD, but the E200K pathogenic mutation alone is regarded insufficient to cause prion diseases; thus, additional unidentified factors are proposed to explain the penetrance of E200K-dependent fCJD. Here, exome differences and biological network analysis between fCJD patients with E200K and healthy individuals, including a non-CJD individual with E200K, were analysed to gain new insights into possible mechanisms for CJD in individuals carrying E200K. Methods Exome sequencing of the three CJD patients with E200K and 11 of the family of one patient (case1) were performed using the Illumina HiSeq 2000. The exome sequences of 24 Healthy Koreans were used as control. The bioinformatic analysis of the exome sequences was performed using the CLC Genomics Workbench v5.5. Sanger sequencing for variants validation was processed using a BigDye Terminator Cycle Sequencing Kit and an ABI 3730xl automated sequencer. Biological networks were created using Cytoscape (v2.8.3 and v3.0.2) and Pathway Studio 9.0 software. Results Nineteen sites were only observed in healthy individuals. Four proteins (NRXN2, KLKB1, KARS, and LAMA3) that harbour rarely observed single-nucleotide variants showed biological interactions that are associated with prion diseases and/or prion protein in our biological network analysis. Conclusion Through this study, we confirmed that individuals can have a CJD-free life, even if they carry a pathogenic E200K mutation. Our research provides a possible mechanism that involves a candidate protective factor; this could be exploited to prevent fCJD onset in individuals carrying E200K. PMID

  3. Deafness: an unusual onset of genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Cataldi, M L; Restivo, O; Reggio, E; Restivo, D A; Reggio, A

    2000-02-01

    We describe a case of genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) with deafness at the onset. We report clinical features, 14-3-3 protein positivity, electroencephalography and brain stem auditory evoked potential abnormalities, and high signal on magnetic resonance imaging in basal ganglia and temporal cortex. Similarities with CJD Heidenhain variant are discussed. PMID:10938203

  4. White matter involvement in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Caverzasi, Eduardo; Mandelli, Maria Luisa; DeArmond, Stephen J; Hess, Christopher P; Vitali, Paolo; Papinutto, Nico; Oehler, Abby; Miller, Bruce L; Lobach, Irina V; Bastianello, Stefano; Geschwind, Michael D; Henry, Roland G

    2014-12-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is considered primarily a disease of grey matter, although the extent of white matter involvement has not been well described. We used diffusion tensor imaging to study the white matter in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease compared to healthy control subjects and to correlated magnetic resonance imaging findings with histopathology. Twenty-six patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and nine age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects underwent volumetric T1-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging. Six patients had post-mortem brain analysis available for assessment of neuropathological findings associated with prion disease. Parcellation of the subcortical white matter was performed on 3D T1-weighted volumes using Freesurfer. Diffusion tensor imaging maps were calculated and transformed to the 3D-T1 space; the average value for each diffusion metric was calculated in the total white matter and in regional volumes of interest. Tract-based spatial statistics analysis was also performed to investigate the deeper white matter tracts. There was a significant reduction of mean (P=0.002), axial (P=0.0003) and radial (P=0.0134) diffusivities in the total white matter in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Mean diffusivity was significantly lower in most white matter volumes of interest (P<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons), with a generally symmetric pattern of involvement in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Mean diffusivity reduction reflected concomitant decrease of both axial and radial diffusivity, without appreciable changes in white matter anisotropy. Tract-based spatial statistics analysis showed significant reductions of mean diffusivity within the white matter of patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, mainly in the left hemisphere, with a strong trend (P=0.06) towards reduced mean diffusivity in most of the white matter bilaterally. In contrast, by visual assessment there was no white matter

  5. [Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and other human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Part I].

    PubMed

    Zaborowski, Adam

    2004-01-01

    In the first part of this work the main problems of prion diseases--also called transmissible cerebral amyloidoses (TCA) or subacute (transmissible) encephalopathies (SSE, TSE)--and clinical symptoms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease are presented. Some problems of neuropathology of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and basic informations about other human prion diseases will be presented in the second part. The growth of the interest in prion diseases during last years is caused by the problem of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or "mad cow disease") and its transmission into a human. The new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (nvCJD) has appeared. Prion diseases: Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS), kuru, fatal familial insomnia (FFI) and particularly the most frequent of them--Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)--have nonspecific, sometimes variable clinical (psychopathological and neurological) symptoms. The imaging, EEG, cerebrospinal fluid tests and other laboratory tests are not specific either and their diagnostic value is limited. Neuropathological studies are needed but their interpretation is often difficult. The only certain diagnostic marker for TSE is the presence of PrP(Sc), the prion protein, which is presently believed to be a direct cause for all transmissible cerebral amyloidoses (TCA). PMID:15307293

  6. Abnormal Eye Movements in Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Michael P.; Cohen, Mark; Petersen, Robert B.; Halmagyi, G. Michael; McDougall, Alan; Tusa, Ronald J.; Leigh, R. John

    1993-01-01

    We report 3 patients with autopsy-proven Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease who, early in their course, developed abnormal eye movements that included periodic alternating nystagmus and slow vertical saccades. These findings suggested involvement of the cerebellar nodulus and uvula, and the brainstem reticular formation, respectively. Cerebellar ataxia was also an early manifestation and, in one patient, a frontal lobe brain biopsy was normal at a time when ocular motor and cerebellar signs were conspicuous. As the disease progressed, all saccades and quick phases of nystagmus were lost, but periodic alternating gaze deviation persisted. At autopsy, 2 of the 3 patients had pronounced involvement of the cerebellum, especially of the midline structures. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease should be considered in patients with subacute progressive neurological disease when cognitive changes are overshadowed by ocular motor findings or ataxia.

  7. A Heidenhain variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: forensic implication.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, M; Bruni, A; Barberio, C; Magro, G; Foncin, J F

    2004-12-01

    To investigate whether typical clinical, diagnostic and neuropathological findings can be identified in a patient with a postmortem diagnosis of a Heidenhain variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). We report a new case of CJD in a rare variant. A man admitted to hospital with cefalea and vision disorder. Clinical and neurological examination showed headache, vision reduction, psychomotor anxiety and progressive torpor. The patient died 4 h after admission to hospital. The autopsy findings included marked encephalic vascular congestion. Hystoneurology examination showed no macroscopic anomaly. Microscopy findings included neuronal loss, gliosis in striate area with arachnoid cells and cerebellum microspongiosis. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a rare neurodegenerative human disorder. The prion hypothesis as an explanatory model is currently favoured by majority of researchers. A disease course described by Heidenhain including the leading symptoms of a visual disorder and rapid progression. This report emphasize the multidisciplinary role (forensic, neurogenetic and neurohistologic) for diagnosis and to standardize a protocol to investigate. PMID:15639587

  8. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: A Case Report and Differential Diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Tatsuno, Brent K; Inaba, Michiko; Velligas, Stephanie; Masaki, Kamal; Liow, Kore K

    2013-01-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a rare neurodegenerative disorder of unknown etiology that causes rapidly progressive dementia. This disease is uniformly fatal and most patients die within 12 months. Clinical findings include myoclonus, visual disturbances, and cerebellar and pyramidal/extrapyramidal signs in addition to rapidly progressive cognitive and functional impairment. These findings are all non-specific and it is often difficult and challenging to diagnose premortem because of low awareness and clinical suspicion. We present a 66-year-old woman with a 5-month history of rapidly progressive dementia. After a series of extensive diagnostic examinations and continuous follow-up, she was diagnosed with probable sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease based on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria, with key findings of rapidly progressive dementia, blurry vision, extrapyramidal signs (cogwheel rigidity), and abnormal hyperintensity signals on diffusion-weighted MRI. Her symptoms progressively worsened and she died 7 months after the onset. The postmortem brain autopsy demonstrated the presence of abnormal protease-resistant prion protein by Western Blot analysis. A literature review was performed on differential diagnoses that present with rapidly progressive dementia and thereby mimic sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. These include Alzheimer's disease, dementia with Lewy Bodies, frontotemporal dementia, meningoencephalitis, corticobasal degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy, CADASIL, and paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis. PMID:23795314

  9. Physical properties of the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease agent

    SciTech Connect

    Sklaviadis, T.K.; Manuelidis, L.; Manuelidis, E.E.

    1989-03-01

    In this report, the authors present the first physical characterization of the Creutzfeld-Jakob disease agent. Preparations with high yields of infectivity (assayed infectious units) were obtained by a novel, gentle procedure in which initially sedimenting Gp34 (prion protein) was disaggregated by a variety of criteria with no subsequent loss of infectivity. Studies with this preparation indicate that most of the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease agent has both a viruslike size and density. In velocity sedimentation and isopycnic sucrose gradients, infectivity comigrated with nucleic acid-protein complexes of appreciable size.

  10. From suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease to confirmed histoplasma meningitis.

    PubMed

    Batra, Vivek; Khararjian, Armen; Wheat, Joseph; Zhang, Sean X; Crain, Barbara; Baras, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    A 77-year-old man with chronic obstructive lung disease who was on steroids, presented to the hospital after a fall with subacute headaches and ataxia. During the patient's hospital course, his clinical condition deteriorated with myoclonic jerks, fevers and severe encephalopathy. An extensive workup, including EEG, brain MRI and lumbar puncture, revealed possible Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Unfortunately, the patient failed to improve and died 12 days after admission. A brain-only autopsy revealed he had acute histoplasma meningitis with patchy superficial cerebritis. PMID:27389723

  11. Cortical restricted diffusion as the predominant MRI finding in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Talbott, Sabrina D; Plato, Brian M; Sattenberg, Ronald J; Parker, John; Heidenreich, Jens O

    2011-04-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a rare and fatal neurodegenerative disorder with MR findings predominantly limited to the grey matter of the cortex and the basal ganglia. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease can produce a spectrum of MR imaging findings of the brain, most notably on DWI and FLAIR sequences. Involvement of the basal ganglia and neocortex is the most common finding, but isolated involvement of the cortex can also be seen. We describe the clinical history and MRI findings of three patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease confirmed by brain biopsy or autopsy and review the literature of imaging manifestations of this disease. PMID:21498372

  12. Co-Distribution of Aβ Plaques and Spongiform Degeneration in Familial Creutzfeldt - Jakob Disease with E200K-129M Haplotype

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Nupur; Cali, Ignazio; Perrin, Richard Justin; Josephson, Scott Andrew; Sun, Ning; Gambetti, Pierluigi; Morris, John Carl

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Dominantly inherited Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) comprises 5–15% of all CJD cases. The E200K mutation in the prion protein (PrP) gene (PRNP) is the most frequent cause of familial CJD. Co-existent amyloid-beta (Aβ) pathology has been reported in some transmissible spongiform encephalopathies but not in familial CJD with the E200K mutation. OBJECTIVE To characterize a CJD family in which Aβ pathology co-distributes with spongiform degeneration. DESIGN Clinicopathological and molecular study of a family with CJD with the E200K-129M haplotype. SETTING Alzheimer’s disease research center MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Clinical, biochemical, and neuropathological observations of 2 generations of a family. RESULTS In this kindred, three autopsied individuals showed pathological changes typical for this haplotype: spongiform degeneration, gliosis, neuronal loss, and PrP deposition. Moreover, two of these cases (ages 57 and 63) showed numerous Aβ plaques co-distributed with the spongiform degeneration. APOE genotyping in 2 cases revealed that Aβ plaques were present in the APOE4 carrier but not in the APOE4 noncarrier. Two additional individuals exhibited incomplete penetrance as they had no clinical evidence of CJD at death after age 80 and yet had affected siblings and children. CONCLUSION This is the first description of Aβ pathology in familial CJD with the E200K mutation. The co-distribution of plaques and CJD-associated changes suggests that PrP plays a central role in Aβ formation and that Aβ pathology and prion disease likely influence each other. The kindred described here provides support that PrPE200K may also result in increased Aβ deposition. PMID:19822779

  13. [Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Marcos; Gallardo, Andrés; Vidal, Aarón; Cornejo, Sebastián; Ramírez, Darío; Medinas, Danilo; Bustamante, Gonzalo; Pasquali, Renzo; Hetz, Claudio

    2016-06-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease has a higher incidence in Chile than in other countries. The post mortem pathological characterization of brain tissue is necessary to reach a definitive diagnosis. We report a 73 years old man with a history compatible with of a rapidly progressive dementia, in which the first electroencephalographic study showed a pattern consistent with non-convulsive status epilepticus. Besides discarding this diagnosis, it was necessary to rule out other causes of rapidly progressive dementia such as Hashimoto encephalopathy. Finally, the sustained clinical deterioration with no response to anticonvulsants and corticosteroids, the imaging studies, a serial electroencephalographic monitoring study and the detection of 14-3-3 protein in cerebrospinal fluid were the keys to achieve the diagnosis of the disease. PMID:27598501

  14. Lymphomatosis cerebri mimicking iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    PubMed Central

    Rivero Sanz, Elena; Torralba Cabeza, Miguel Ángel; Portugal, Francisco Sanjuán; García-Bragado, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Lymphomatosis cerebri (LC) is a rare variant of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) whereby individual lymphoma cells infiltrate the cerebral white matter without causing a mass effect. The disease characteristically presents as a rapidly progressive dementia, which opens an ample differential diagnosis of toxic, metabolic, neurodegenerative and infective causes. Other presentations also include changes in personality, myoclonus and psychotic symptoms. Here we report a patient who presented with a rapidly progressive dementia with a unique surgical history of a dural mater graft in the 1970s. The diagnosis of iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (iCJD) was initially considered. However, the patient’s clinical status deteriorated rapidly with no response to symptomatic treatment and she died 2 months after symptom onset. A diagnosis of T-type LC was reached at autopsy. PMID:25199185

  15. An unusual case of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD).

    PubMed

    Javed, Qaiser; Alam, Faouzi; Krishna, Sowmya; Jaganathan, Geetha

    2010-01-01

    A 49-year-old healthy white British female, not previously known to psychiatric services, presented with an acute onset of florid psychotic symptoms. Her symptoms included visual, auditory and tactile hallucinations as well as persecutory delusions. She was started on antipsychotic medication; however, her psychotic symptoms did not improve significantly in the first 3 months. Her blood tests were normal. Lumbar puncture was performed which was positive for protein 14-3-3. A computed tomography scan of the brain showed generalised atrophic changes. The history of early visual hallucinations, rapid cognitive decline and positive 14-3-3 result was in keeping with the Heidenhain variant of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). Despite a short life expectancy as reported in literature, our patient, who was diagnosed with sCJD more than two-and-a-half years ago, is still alive. We therefore believe this is an important finding to report. PMID:22753302

  16. Severe hypoxia and multiple infarctions resembling Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Mittelbronn, Michel; Capper, David; Bader, Benedikt; Schittenhelm, Jens; Haybaeck, Johannes; Weber, Petra; Meyermann, Richard; Kretzschmar, Hans A; Wietholter, Horst

    2008-01-01

    Although neuropathological examination is still required for the definite diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), specialised clinical assessment predicts probable CJD. Here we present a 73-year-old female patient presenting with rapid cognitive decline, visual, acoustic and cerebellar disturbances, ataxia and EEG changes compatible with early CJD stages. MRI revealed hyperintensities within the thalami, hypothalami, corpora mammillaria, the tectum and the cortex. Initial neuropathological examination showed severe cortical and subcortical spongiosis. However, both immunohistochemistry and Western blotting showed no pathological prion protein. Finally, small infarctions affecting the tectum, tegmentum, corpora mammillaria and global hypoxic-ischaemic changes could be identified as the probable reason for the changes interpreted as CJD-related pathology. Hypoxic-ischaemic CNS alterations mainly affecting the supply area of the basilar artery should be ruled out in case of probable CJD. In addition, severe spongiosis can be misleading in the histological examination, suggesting the diagnosis of a prion-induced spongiform encephalopathy. PMID:18587709

  17. Roles of methionine oxidation in E200K prion protein misfolding: Implications for the mechanism of pathogenesis in E200K linked familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zonglin; Feng, Boya; Xiao, Gengfu; Zhou, Zheng

    2016-04-01

    Prion diseases are a group of neurodegenerative diseases caused by prion protein (PrP) conformational changes. More than 30 PRNP gene mutations have been associated with familial prion diseases. E200K-associated familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD) is the most common inherited prion disease. One of the hallmarks of prion diseases is the accumulation of oxidative damage. The mechanism by which oxidative modification of methionine (Met) residues influence the E200K PrP misfolding remains unclear. Here, we examined the stability, structural change, oligomerization and proteinase K resistance of unoxidized/oxidized E200K PrP and Met-to-Leu mutants. We found that oxidation of surface-exposed Met109/112/129/134/154/166 residues significantly destabilized E200K PrP but had a limited impact on the protein's structure. The oxidation of Met213 was the initial step in the conformational conversion of E200K PrP and facilitated the further oxidation of Met205/206. The oxidation of Met213/205/206 led to the exposure of the inner hydrophobic core, disrupted the overall structure of E200K PrP and induced the formation of large soluble multimers at low pH. In addition, the aggregation behavior of oxidized E200K PrP at the cellular level was investigated using E200K PrP Met-to-Ser mutants. The results showed that M109/112/129/154S or M134/166S mutants were efficiently localized on the cell membrane, whereas the M213/205/206S mutant generated many of aggregated fluorescent dots in the cytoplasm. The present work provides important clues for understanding the special roles of methionine oxidation in E200K PrP misfolding and links oxidative stress and consequent misfolding of oxidative damaged E200K PrP with the pathogenic mechanism of E200K-associated fCJD. PMID:26779934

  18. Visual symptoms in the presentation of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Wong, Aaron; Matheos, Kaliopy; Danesh-Meyer, Helen V

    2015-10-01

    We describe a 68-year-old man with a previous history of neurosurgical repair of a skull fracture, who presented to the ophthalmology clinic with progressive visual decline. His initial visual acuity was 6/30 in the right eye and 6/48 in the left, and over 2 weeks this progressed to hand movements in both eyes. No ocular abnormalities were identified. He was noted to be increasingly confused and a subsequent MRI showed extensive bilateral posterior cortical changes consistent with cytotoxic oedema. An electroencephalogram was suggestive of encephalopathy, particularly involving the occipital lobe. He was diagnosed with the Heidenhain variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), confirmed by a positive cerebrospinal fluid 14-3-3 protein. Classically, patients with CJD present with rapidly progressive cognitive decline, ataxia and myoclonus. However, visual symptoms are a common and perhaps underrecognised manifestation of CJD. Patients can present with isolated visual symptoms which precede cognitive decline by weeks due to predominantly occipital lobe disease. This presentation is classified as the Heidenhain variant of CJD. PMID:26355534

  19. Standards for the assay of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease specimens.

    PubMed

    Minor, P; Newham, J; Jones, N; Bergeron, C; Gregori, L; Asher, D; van Engelenburg, F; Stroebel, T; Vey, M; Barnard, G; Head, M

    2004-06-01

    Assays for the agent of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) include measurement of infectivity in different animal systems, such as wild-type or transgenic mice, and detection of PrP(Sc) by different methods and formats. The various assays could be best calibrated against each other by use of uniform readily available materials, and samples of four human brains, two from sporadic CJD patients, one from a variant CJD patient and one from a non-CJD patient, have been prepared as 10% homogenates dispensed in 2000 vials each for this purpose. Results of in vitro methods, particularly immunoblot assays, were compared in the first collaborative study described here. While dilution end-points varied, the minimum detectable volume was surprisingly uniform for most assays and differences in technical procedure, other than the sample volume tested, had no detectable systematic effect. The two specimens from sporadic CJD cases contained both type 1 and type 2 prion proteins in approximately equal proportions. The materials have been given the status of reference reagents by the World Health Organization and are available for further study and assessment of other in vitro or in vivo assay procedures. PMID:15166463

  20. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease surveillance in Australia: update to December 2014.

    PubMed

    Klug, Genevieve M; Boyd, Alison; Sarros, Shannon; Stehmann, Christiane; Simpson, Marion; McLean, Catriona; Masters, Colin L; Collins, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Nation-wide surveillance of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (also known as prion diseases), the most common being Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, is performed by the Australian National Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Registry, based at the University of Melbourne. Prospective surveillance has been undertaken since 1993 and over this dynamic period in transmissible spongiform encephalopathy research and understanding, the unit has evolved and adapted to changes in surveillance practices and requirements concomitant with the emergence of new disease subtypes, improvements in diagnostic capabilities and the overall heightened awareness of prion diseases in the health care setting. In 2014, routine national surveillance continued and this brief report provides an update of the cumulative surveillance data collected by the Australian National Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Registry prospectively from 1993 to December 2014, and retrospectively to 1970. PMID:27522131

  1. Quinacrine treatment trial for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Amy L.; Wong, Katherine S.; Haman, Aissa; Devereux, Gillian; Raudabaugh, Benjamin J.; Johnson, David Y.; Torres-Chae, Charles C.; Finley, Ron; Garcia, Paul; Thai, Julie N.; Cheng, Hugo Q.; Neuhaus, John M.; Forner, Sven A.; Duncan, Jacque L.; Possin, Katherine L.; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.; Miller, Bruce L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether oral quinacrine increases survival in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). Methods: This NIH/National Institute on Aging–funded, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, stratified randomization treatment trial was conducted at the University of California, San Francisco from February 2005 through May 2009 (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00183092). Subjects were randomized (50:50) to quinacrine (300 mg daily) or placebo with inpatient evaluations at baseline, and planned for months 2, 6, and 12. Subjects returning for their month-2 visit were offered open-label quinacrine. The primary outcome was survival from randomization to month 2. Results: Of 425 patients referred, 69 subjects enrolled, 54 subjects were randomized to active drug or placebo, and 51 subjects with sCJD were included in survival analyses. Survival for the randomized portion of the trial (first 2 months) showed no significant difference between the 2 groups (log-rank statistic, p = 0.43; Cox proportional relative hazard = 1.43, quinacrine compared with placebo, 95% confidence interval = 0.58, 3.53). The quinacrine-treated group, however, declined less on 2 of 3 functional scales, the modified Rankin and Clinical Dementia Rating, than the placebo group during the first 2 months. Conclusion: This interventional study provides Class I evidence that oral quinacrine at 300 mg per day does not improve 2-month survival of patients with sCJD, compared with placebo. Importantly, this study shows that double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized treatment trials are possible in prion disease. Furthermore, the quantitative data collected on the course of sCJD will be useful for future trials. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that quinacrine does not improve survival for people with sCJD when given orally at a dose of 300 mg per day for 2 months. PMID:24122181

  2. Pathologically confirmed autoimmune encephalitis in suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    PubMed Central

    Maat, Peter; de Beukelaar, Janet W.; Jansen, Casper; Schuur, Maaike; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; van Coevorden, Marleen H.; de Graaff, Esther; Titulaer, Maarten; Rozemuller, Annemieke J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical features and presence in CSF of antineuronal antibodies in patients with pathologically proven autoimmune encephalitis derived from a cohort of patients with suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Methods: The Dutch Surveillance Centre for Prion Diseases performed 384 autopsies on patients with suspected CJD over a 14-year period (1998–2011). Clinical information was collected from treating physicians. Antineuronal antibodies were tested in CSF obtained postmortem by immunohistochemistry on fresh frozen rat brain sections, by Luminex assay for the presence of well-characterized onconeural antibodies, and by cell-based assays for antibodies against NMDAR, GABABR1/2, GABAAR GLUR1/2, LGI1, Caspr2, and DPPX. Results: In 203 patients, a diagnosis of definite CJD was made, while in 181 a variety of other conditions were diagnosed, mainly neurodegenerative. In 22 of these 181, the neuropathologist diagnosed autoimmune encephalitis. One patient was excluded because of lack of clinical information. Inflammatory infiltrates were predominantly perivascular and consisted mainly of T cells. The predominant locations were basal ganglia and thalamus (90%) and temporal lobes and hippocampus (81%). In 6 patients (29%), antineuronal antibodies were detected in postmortem CSF, directed against Hu, NMDAR, GABABR1/2, Caspr2, and an unidentified synaptic antigen in 2. The most frequent symptoms were dementia (90%), gait disturbance (86%), cerebellar signs (67%), and neuropsychiatric symptoms (67%). Immunopathologic and clinical findings did not differ between autoantibody-negative patients and patients with antineuronal antibodies. Conclusions: It is important to consider immune-mediated disorders in the differential diagnosis of rapidly progressive neurologic deficits. PMID:26601117

  3. Diagnosing Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: Accuracy of CSF 14-3-3 Protein Test of the Spinal Fluid

    MedlinePlus

    ... JAKOB DISEASE: ACCURACY OF THE 14-3-3 PROTEIN TEST OF THE SPINAL FLUID This information sheet ... help you understand how the 14-3-3 protein test helps in diagnosing sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease ( ...

  4. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: how safe is eating beef?

    PubMed

    Roma, Andres A; Prayson, Richard A

    2005-03-01

    Cases of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, mad cow disease) have been found in North American cattle. Its human counterpart, called variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (variant CJD), is rare but seems to be linked to eating diseased beef. Many questions remain about these diseases, such as why young people seem at greater risk of variant CJD. Also, are some people more genetically at risk for acquiring variant CJD than others? PMID:15825799

  5. The MM2-cortical form of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease presenting with visual disturbance.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, I; Hamaguchi, T; Noguchi-Shinohara, M; Ono, K; Shirasaki, H; Komai, K; Kitamoto, T; Yamada, M

    2006-08-01

    A subclass of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) characterized by onset with visual symptoms (Heidenhain variant) has been reported to belong to the MM1 or MV1 type according to Parchi's classification. The authors report a 65-year-old woman with MM2-cortical sCJD with slowly progressive visual disturbance as the initial symptom. Diffusion-weighted MRIs revealed hyperintensity in both occipital cortices at an early stage. PMID:16894125

  6. Codon 219 polymorphism of PRNP in healthy caucasians and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients

    SciTech Connect

    Petraroli, R.; Pocchiari, M.

    1996-04-01

    A number of point and insert mutations of the PrP gene (PRNP) have been linked to familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease (GSS). Moreover, the methionine/valine homozygosity at the polymorphic codon 129 of PRNP may cause a predisposition to sporadic and iatrogenic CJD or may control the age at onset of familial cases carrying either the 144-bp insertion or codon 178, codon 198, and codon 210 pathogenic mutations in PRNP. In addition, the association of methionine or valine at codon 129 and the point mutation at codon 178 on the same allele seem to play an important role in determining either fatal familial insomnia or CJD. However, it is noteworthy that a relationship between codon 129 polymorphism and accelerated pathogenesis (early age at onset or shorter duration of the disease) has not been seen in familial CJD patients with codon 200 mutation or in GSS patients with codon 102 mutation, arguing that other, as yet unidentified, gene products or environmental factors, or both, may influence the clinical expression of these diseases. 17 refs.

  7. A transmissible Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease-like agent is prevalent in the human population.

    PubMed Central

    Manuelidis, E E; Manuelidis, L

    1993-01-01

    The etiology of most human dementias is unknown. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), a relatively uncommon human dementia, is caused by a transmissible virus-like agent. Molecular markers that are specific for the agent have not yet been defined. However, the infectious disease can be transmitted to rodents from both brain and infected buffy coat (blood) samples. To determine whether human CJD infections are more widespread than is apparent from the low incidence of neurological disease, we attempted to transmit CJD from buffy coat samples of 30 healthy volunteers who had no family history of dementing illness. Primary transmissions from 26 of 30 individuals produced CJD-like spongiform changes in the brains of recipient hamsters at 200-500 days postinoculation. This positive evidence of viremia was found for individuals in all age groups (20-30, 40-50, and 61-71 years old), whereas 12 negatively scored brain samples failed to produce similar changes in hamsters observed for > 900 days in the same setting. We suggest that a CJD agent endemically infects humans but only infrequently produces an infectious dementia. Disease expression is likely to be influenced by several host factors in combination with viral variants that have altered neurovirulence. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8356076

  8. Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: need for mental health and palliative care team collaboration.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Kay; Sque, Margaret; Bryan, Karen; Abu-Saad, Huda

    2003-12-01

    People with a dementia syndrome and a superimposed terminal illness are increasingly being referred to palliative care services. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a dementia syndrome in the early stages of which people experience a variety of psychological symptoms that may lead to them being admitted to psychiatric services. People with CJD have died in psychiatric units. There is clearly a need for collaboration between mental health and palliative care services in providing care for people with CJD and other dementia syndromes. An inductive qualitative study of one case of variant CJD (vCJD) was carried out to explore issues that were raised in providing care for a young person with the disease who had died in a hospice unit. The study, which was a pilot for a larger study, highlights some of the complexities of providing care for people with an end-stage dementia and identifies the need for the development of education initiatives to increase knowledge and understanding of the end-of-life needs of people with CJD and other dementia syndromes, and their families. PMID:14765007

  9. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: an emergency department presentation of a rare disease.

    PubMed

    Prince, Louise A; Mann, Deborah; Reilly, Tracey

    2006-07-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) is one of a group of neurodegenerative disorders causing spongiform encephalopathies. CJD is the most common human transmissible spongiform encephalopathy, or prion disease, but has an annual incidence of only 0.4-1.8 cases per million population worldwide. The prognosis for this disease is very poor and there is currently no cure. Patients typically present with non-specific neurological or psychiatric complaints and often have multiple physician visits before diagnosis, which requires histological examination of brain tissue. This patient had serial presentations to our Emergency Department, with progressive symptoms and multiple laboratory and radiological tests as well as consults, but her diagnosis remained unclear until her disease rapidly progressed and a brain biopsy was performed. With increasing concerns about prion diseases such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)-or mad cow disease-and CJD, awareness of the symptoms and diagnostic challenges associated with these diseases will be helpful to emergency physicians. PMID:16798153

  10. Heidenhain variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: An autopsy study from India.

    PubMed

    Kher, Monica; Rao, Medha Y; Acharya, P T; Mahadevan, Anita; Shankar, S K

    2009-01-01

    Prion diseases are rare, progressive and fatal neurodegenerative diseases characterized by long incubation period and short clinical course. We present a rare case of Heidenhain variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, occurring in a 55-year-old lady presenting with dementia, cortical blindness, and myoclonic jerks. She succumbed to the disease within 8 weeks of onset of symptoms. MRI revealed hyperintense signals on T2WI and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images in basal ganglia and fronto-temporal and parietal cortex, sparing thalamus, striate cortex and globus pallidum. Abundant abnormal prion protein deposits (PrP(sc)) were detected in caudate, putamen, thalamus, cingulate and striate cortex, in comparison to frontal and parietal cortex while no deposits were found in globus pallidum. MRI changes did not correlate with degree of spongy change, gliosis or prion protein deposition. The cause for abnormal signal changes in MRI and FLAIR images remains unclear. PMID:20151011

  11. Unique inflammatory RNA profiles of microglia in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Christopher A.; Manuelidis, Laura

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) have shown that myeloid cells in the periphery as well as derivative microglial cells in the brain are infectious. Microglia can show an activated phenotype before prion protein (PrP) pathology is detectable in brain, and isolated infectious microglia contain very little PrP. To find whether a set of inflammatory genes are significantly induced or suppressed with infection, we analyzed RNA from isolated microglia with relevant cDNA arrays, and identified 30 transcripts not previously examined in any transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. This CJD expression profile contrasted with that of uninfected microglia exposed to prototypic inflammatory stimuli such as lipopolysaccharide and IFN-, as well as PrP amyloid. These findings underscore inflammatory pathways evoked by the infectious agent in brain. Transcript profiles unique for CJD microglia and other myeloid cells provide opportunities for more sensitive preclinical diagnoses of infectious and noninfectious neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease not related to a common venue--New Jersey, 1995-2004.

    PubMed

    2004-05-14

    Beginning in June 2003, the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services (NJDHSS) and CDC were notified of a suspected cluster of deaths caused by Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in persons reportedly linked to Garden State Racetrack in Cherry Hill, New Jersey. Concerns were raised that these deaths might have resulted from consumption of meat contaminated with the agent causing bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, commonly called "mad cow disease") served at racetrack restaurants during 1988-1992. Consumption of BSE-contaminated cattle products has been linked to a new variant form of CJD (vCJD) in humans. This report summarizes the results of an investigation that determined the deaths were not linked causally to a common source of infection. The findings underscore the need for physicians to arrange for brain autopsies of all patients with clinically suspected or diagnosed CJD. PMID:15138401

  13. [Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: the most frequent spongiform encephalopathy in humans].

    PubMed

    Kulczycki, J

    2001-01-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) which for many years was interpreted as one of degenerative brain processes is the most frequent spongiform encephalopathy caused by prions--molecules of erroneously conformed protein. In only few percent ill people occurrence of this pathogenic factor occurs as a result of mutation in gene PrP. Because transmissibility of prions was proved it should be supposed that in other cases CJD is a result of "infection" Susceptibility to prions depends in large part on specificity of host proteins. It creates certain individual and species specific barriers. At the present time we witness, fortunately only in single cases, occurrence in people variant CJD caused by prions originated from animals affected by "mad cow disease". Prognosis for human population is dependent on the effectiveness of between species barrier for prions. PMID:11556078

  14. Recent US Case of Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease-Global Implications.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Atul; Fischer, Michael; Gambetti, Pierluigi; Parker, Alicia; Ram, Aarthi; Soto, Claudio; Concha-Marambio, Luis; Cohen, Yvonne; Belay, Ermias D; Maddox, Ryan A; Mead, Simon; Goodman, Clay; Kass, Joseph S; Schonberger, Lawrence B; Hussein, Haitham M

    2015-05-01

    Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) is a rare, fatal prion disease resulting from transmission to humans of the infectious agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy. We describe the clinical presentation of a recent case of vCJD in the United States and provide an update on diagnostic testing. The location of this patient's exposure is less clear than those in the 3 previously reported US cases, but strong evidence indicates that exposure to contaminated beef occurred outside the United States more than a decade before illness onset. This case exemplifies the persistent risk for vCJD acquired in unsuspected geographic locations and highlights the need for continued global surveillance and awareness to prevent further dissemination of vCJD. PMID:25897712

  15. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: background, evolution, and current concerns.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, P.; Will, R. G.; Bradley, R.; Asher, D. M.; Detwiler, L.

    2001-01-01

    The epidemic of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in the United Kingdom, which began in 1986 and has affected nearly 200,000 cattle, is waning to a conclusion, but leaves in its wake an outbreak of human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, most probably resulting from the consumption of beef products contaminated by central nervous system tissue. Although averaging only 10-15 cases a year since its first appearance in 1994, its future magnitude and geographic distribution (in countries that have imported infected British cattle or cattle products, or have endogenous BSE) cannot yet be predicted. The possibility that large numbers of apparently healthy persons might be incubating the disease raises concerns about iatrogenic transmissions through instrumentation (surgery and medical diagnostic procedures) and blood and organ donations. Government agencies in many countries continue to implement new measures to minimize this risk. PMID:11266289

  16. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease presenting with visual symptoms: a case of the ‘Heidenhain variant’

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Junewar, Vivek; Sahu, Ritesh

    2013-01-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) belongs to a group of prion diseases that may be caused by the abnormal folding of proteins called prion proteins. The ‘Heidenhain variant’ is a subclass of patients with CJD, who present with isolated visual symptoms at the onset without any cognitive decline. Here we report such a case of an elderly man presenting with progressive diminution of vision, forgetfulness, abnormal behaviour, myoclonic jerks and akinetic mutism since the last 5 months. On clinical examination, lead pipe rigidity was present in all four limbs, and plantars were bilateral extensors. In view of rapidly progressive dementia associated with myoclonus, a possibility of CJD was entertained. As visual symptoms preceded dementia, hence the Heidenhain variant was strongly suspected. MRI of the brain revealed cortical ribboning, and EEG showed periodic triphasic waveforms with background slowing. The patient succumbed to the illness within 1 month of hospitalisation. PMID:23365167

  17. Photo essay. MRI and positron emission tomography findings in Heidenhain variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sashank; Lee, Edward B; Woo, John H; Alavi, Abass; Galetta, Steven L

    2010-09-01

    The typical presentation of Heidenhain variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a rapidly progressive visual loss in the setting of a relatively normal ophthalmologic examination. At presentation, patients with this uniformly fatal illness frequently demonstrate only minor cortical abnormalities on MRI. Here, we document the clinical presentation and imaging results of a patient with Heidenhain variant CJD in whom abnormalities on positron emission tomographic imaging were more evident than changes on MRI. These changes were present in striate cortex and visual association areas, providing clinical-anatomical correlation with our patient's visual deficits. Nuclear imaging provides a considerably more sensitive measure of neural dysfunction early in the course of this disease. PMID:20581692

  18. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease presenting with visual symptoms: a case of the 'Heidenhain variant'.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh; Junewar, Vivek; Sahu, Ritesh

    2013-01-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) belongs to a group of prion diseases that may be caused by the abnormal folding of proteins called prion proteins. The 'Heidenhain variant' is a subclass of patients with CJD, who present with isolated visual symptoms at the onset without any cognitive decline. Here we report such a case of an elderly man presenting with progressive diminution of vision, forgetfulness, abnormal behaviour, myoclonic jerks and akinetic mutism since the last 5 months. On clinical examination, lead pipe rigidity was present in all four limbs, and plantars were bilateral extensors. In view of rapidly progressive dementia associated with myoclonus, a possibility of CJD was entertained. As visual symptoms preceded dementia, hence the Heidenhain variant was strongly suspected. MRI of the brain revealed cortical ribboning, and EEG showed periodic triphasic waveforms with background slowing. The patient succumbed to the illness within 1 month of hospitalisation. PMID:23365167

  19. Autoimmune encephalitis mimicking sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Xing, Xiao-Wei; Zhang, Jia-Tang; Wang, Ruo-Xi; Zhao, Wei; Tan, Qing-Che; Liu, Ruo-Zhuo; Wang, Xiang-Qing; Huang, Xu-Sheng; Yu, Sheng-Yuan

    2016-06-15

    Autoimmune encephalitis associated with anti-voltage-gated potassium channel antibodies are most likely to be misdiagnosed as sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). Our goal was to delineate patients who were initially suspected to have CJD but were later found to have AE. We performed a retrospective clinical review of cases of individuals and made a comparison between groups of patients diagnosed with sCJD and AE. Patients who had rapidly progressing dementia and focal neurological impairment, such as aphasia, gait disturbance, visual disturbance, and depression, at onset were diagnosed with sCJD, whereas epilepsy, hyponatremia and dysautonomia were strong hints for AE. Fluoroscope-positron emission tomography (PET) of patients with AE revealed variable metabolism and normative and long-term immunosuppression were less likely to relapse. PMID:27235341

  20. Heidenhain variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: diffusion-weighted MRI and PET characteristics.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Yoshihisa; Kanamori, Hiroshi; Murakami, Gaku; Yokode, Masayuki; Mezaki, Takahiro; Doh-ura, Katsumi; Taniguchi, Ken; Matsubayashi, Kozo; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Kita, Toru; Tanaka, Makoto

    2004-01-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is characterized by rapidly progressive dementia with a variety of neurological disorders and a fatal outcome. The authors present a case with visual disturbance as a leading symptom and rapid deterioration in global cognitive functions. The cerebrospinal fluid was positive for 14-3-3 protein, and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed marked hyperintensity in the parieto-occipital cortices, where hypometabolism was clearly detected on positron emission tomography (PET). Pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials showed prolonged P100 latencies and increased N/5/P100 amplitudes. All these findings supported a diagnosis of the Heidenhain variant of CJD, whereas a long clinical course, a lack of myoclonus, and an absence of periodic synchronous discharges on electroencephalography were atypical. Diffusion-weighted MRI and PE1 in combination with visual evoked potential recording and 14-3-3 protein detection may be useful for the early diagnosis of CJD. PMID:14748211

  1. A Genome Wide Association Study Links Glutamate Receptor Pathway to Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Juan, Pascual; Bishop, Matthew T.; Kovacs, Gabor G.; Calero, Miguel; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Ladogana, Anna; Boyd, Alison; Lewis, Victoria; Ponto, Claudia; Calero, Olga; Poleggi, Anna; Carracedo, Ángel; van der Lee, Sven J.; Ströbel, Thomas; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Haïk, Stéphane; Combarros, Onofre; Berciano, José; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Collins, Steven J.; Budka, Herbert; Brandel, Jean-Philippe; Laplanche, Jean Louis; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Zerr, Inga; Knight, Richard S. G.; Will, Robert G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.

    2015-01-01

    We performed a genome-wide association (GWA) study in 434 sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) patients and 1939 controls from the United Kingdom, Germany and The Netherlands. The findings were replicated in an independent sample of 1109 sCJD and 2264 controls provided by a multinational consortium. From the initial GWA analysis we selected 23 SNPs for further genotyping in 1109 sCJD cases from seven different countries. Five SNPs were significantly associated with sCJD after correction for multiple testing. Subsequently these five SNPs were genotyped in 2264 controls. The pooled analysis, including 1543 sCJD cases and 4203 controls, yielded two genome wide significant results: rs6107516 (p-value=7.62x10-9) a variant tagging the prion protein gene (PRNP); and rs6951643 (p-value=1.66x10-8) tagging the Glutamate Receptor Metabotropic 8 gene (GRM8). Next we analysed the data stratifying by country of origin combining samples from the pooled analysis with genotypes from the 1000 Genomes Project and imputed genotypes from the Rotterdam Study (Total n=12967). The meta-analysis of the results showed that rs6107516 (p-value=3.00x10-8) and rs6951643 (p-value=3.91x10-5) remained as the two most significantly associated SNPs. Rs6951643 is located in an intronic region of GRM8, a gene that was additionally tagged by a cluster of 12 SNPs within our top100 ranked results. GRM8 encodes for mGluR8, a protein which belongs to the metabotropic glutamate receptor family, recently shown to be involved in the transduction of cellular signals triggered by the prion protein. Pathway enrichment analyses performed with both Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and ALIGATOR postulates glutamate receptor signalling as one of the main pathways associated with sCJD. In summary, we have detected GRM8 as a novel, non-PRNP, genome-wide significant marker associated with heightened disease risk, providing additional evidence supporting a role of glutamate receptors in sCJD pathogenesis. PMID:25918841

  2. A genome wide association study links glutamate receptor pathway to sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease risk.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Juan, Pascual; Bishop, Matthew T; Kovacs, Gabor G; Calero, Miguel; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Ladogana, Anna; Boyd, Alison; Lewis, Victoria; Ponto, Claudia; Calero, Olga; Poleggi, Anna; Carracedo, Ángel; van der Lee, Sven J; Ströbel, Thomas; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Haïk, Stéphane; Combarros, Onofre; Berciano, José; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Collins, Steven J; Budka, Herbert; Brandel, Jean-Philippe; Laplanche, Jean Louis; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Zerr, Inga; Knight, Richard S G; Will, Robert G; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2014-01-01

    We performed a genome-wide association (GWA) study in 434 sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) patients and 1939 controls from the United Kingdom, Germany and The Netherlands. The findings were replicated in an independent sample of 1109 sCJD and 2264 controls provided by a multinational consortium. From the initial GWA analysis we selected 23 SNPs for further genotyping in 1109 sCJD cases from seven different countries. Five SNPs were significantly associated with sCJD after correction for multiple testing. Subsequently these five SNPs were genotyped in 2264 controls. The pooled analysis, including 1543 sCJD cases and 4203 controls, yielded two genome wide significant results: rs6107516 (p-value=7.62x10-9) a variant tagging the prion protein gene (PRNP); and rs6951643 (p-value=1.66x10-8) tagging the Glutamate Receptor Metabotropic 8 gene (GRM8). Next we analysed the data stratifying by country of origin combining samples from the pooled analysis with genotypes from the 1000 Genomes Project and imputed genotypes from the Rotterdam Study (Total n=12967). The meta-analysis of the results showed that rs6107516 (p-value=3.00x10-8) and rs6951643 (p-value=3.91x10-5) remained as the two most significantly associated SNPs. Rs6951643 is located in an intronic region of GRM8, a gene that was additionally tagged by a cluster of 12 SNPs within our top100 ranked results. GRM8 encodes for mGluR8, a protein which belongs to the metabotropic glutamate receptor family, recently shown to be involved in the transduction of cellular signals triggered by the prion protein. Pathway enrichment analyses performed with both Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and ALIGATOR postulates glutamate receptor signalling as one of the main pathways associated with sCJD. In summary, we have detected GRM8 as a novel, non-PRNP, genome-wide significant marker associated with heightened disease risk, providing additional evidence supporting a role of glutamate receptors in sCJD pathogenesis. PMID:25918841

  3. Transmission Properties of Atypical Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: a Clue to Disease Etiology?

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Parchi, Piero; Yamada, Masahito; Brown, Paul; Saverioni, Daniela; Matsuura, Yuichi; Takeuchi, Atsuko; Mohri, Shirou

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genotype at polymorphic codon 129 of the PRNP gene has a profound influence on both phenotypic expression and prion strain susceptibility in humans. For example, while the most common sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) subtype, sporadic CJD-MM1 (M1 strain), induces a single phenotype after experimental transmission regardless of the codon 129 genotype of the recipient animal, the phenotype elicited by sporadic CJD-VV2 (V2 strain), the second most common subtype, varies according to the host codon 129 genotype. In particular, the propagation of the V2 strain in codon 129 methionine homozygotes has been linked only to acquired forms of CJD such as plaque-type dura mater graft-associated CJD (dCJD), a subgroup of iatrogenic CJD with distinctive phenotypic features, but has never been observed in sporadic CJD cases. In the present report, we describe atypical CJD cases carrying codon 129 methionine homozygosity, in a neurosurgeon and in a patient with a medical history of neurosurgery without dural grafting, showing the distinctive phenotypic features and transmission properties of plaque-type dCJD. These findings raise the possibility that the two cases, previously thought to represent sporadic CJD, might actually represent acquired CJD caused by infection with the V2 strain. Thus, careful analyses of phenotypic features and transmission properties in atypical cases may be useful to distinguish acquired from sporadic cases of CJD. IMPORTANCE Susceptibility to and phenotypic expression of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) depend on both the prion strain and genotype at polymorphic codon 129 of the PRNP gene. For example, propagation of the second most common sporadic CJD strain (V2 strain) into codon 129 methionine homozygotes has been linked to plaque-type dura mater graft-associated CJD (dCJD), a subgroup of iatrogenic CJD with distinctive phenotypic features, but has never been observed in sporadic CJD. In the present report, we describe atypical

  4. Multitracer study in Heidenhain variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: mismatch pattern of cerebral hypometabolism and perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Robert; Ciovica, Ioana; Rachinger, Johanna; Weiss, Serge; Aichner, Franz T

    2008-02-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a subacute spongiform encephalopathy. This fatal prion disease is characterized by rapidly progressive dementia with a variety of neurological disorders. Diagnostic methods provided by nuclear medicine might be helpful for evaluation of patients with probable CJD as additional diagnostic tools to MRI and cerebro-spinal fluid evaluation. The experience with FDG-PET and brain perfusion SPECT is presented. PMID:18283251

  5. An alarming presentation of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease following a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head.

    PubMed

    Harnish, Carissa; Gross, Brian; Rittenhouse, Katelyn; Bupp, Katherine; Vellucci, Ashley; Anderson, Jeffrey; Riley, Deborah; Rogers, Frederick B

    2015-05-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE), also known as prion diseases, are characterized by rapid and fatal neurological decline. They not only detrimentally affect the patient, but also present additional challenges to healthcare systems due to the infectivity of the tissues and the difficulty of inactivating the prion. The most common TSE is Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), which can occur after familial, spontaneous or acquired transmission. TSEs received more attention after the development of variant CJD (vCJD), also known as Mad Cow Disease, in the UK during the mid-1990s. Unlike familial or spontaneous CJD, this variant was connected to consumption of cattle contaminated with the prion disease, bovine spongiform encephalopathy.This development increased interest in the etiology of CJD and other TSEs and the risk it presents as an infectious disease. The following details the case of a 59-year-old male infected with CJD presented to our level II trauma center for treatment following a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head. PMID:25530409

  6. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: updated diagnostic criteria, treatment algorithm, and the utility of brain biopsy.

    PubMed

    Manix, Marc; Kalakoti, Piyush; Henry, Miriam; Thakur, Jai; Menger, Richard; Guthikonda, Bharat; Nanda, Anil

    2015-11-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a rare neurodegenerative condition with a rapid disease course and a mortality rate of 100%. Several forms of the disease have been described, and the most common is the sporadic type. The most challenging aspect of this disease is its diagnosis-the gold standard for definitive diagnosis is considered to be histopathological confirmation-but newer tests are providing means for an antemortem diagnosis in ways less invasive than brain biopsy. Imaging studies, electroencephalography, and biomarkers are used in conjunction with the clinical picture to try to make the diagnosis of CJD without brain tissue samples, and all of these are reviewed in this article. The current diagnostic criteria are limited; test sensitivity and specificity varies with the genetics of the disease as well as the clinical stage. Physicians may be unsure of all diagnostic testing available, and may order outdated tests or prematurely request a brain biopsy when the diagnostic workup is incomplete. The authors review CJD, discuss the role of brain biopsy in this patient population, provide a diagnostic pathway for the patient presenting with rapidly progressive dementia, and propose newer diagnostic criteria. PMID:26646926

  7. Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) and gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Axon, A T; Beilenhoff, U; Bramble, M G; Ghosh, S; Kruse, A; McDonnell, G E; Neumann, C; Rey, J F; Spencer, K

    2001-12-01

    Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) is a transmissible form of spongiform encephalopathy believed to be contracted from the consumption of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) infected beef products. To date over 100 individuals have developed this incurable disease. There have been no documented cases of iatrogenic infection, but there is a theoretical risk that surgical procedures could transmit the disease. This review describes the background of the disease and assesses the possible risks of transmission through endoscopic procedures. The risk of transmission by endoscopy is small and probably negligible if suitable procedures are followed. The greatest potential danger arises from healthy individuals who are incubating the disease. Pathological prions (PrP(sc)) may be found in lymphatic tissue of these individuals (particularly tonsils), but smaller amounts have been identified in the appendix and Peyer's patches. These prions are resistant to all forms of conventional sterilization. There is a theoretical risk that biopsy forceps and the operating channel of endoscopes could become contaminated. This review gives recommendations as to how these small risks can be minimized. They include the employment of single-use forceps for biopsies taken from the terminal ileum, greater attention to the maintenance of endoscopic equipment and accessories, more rigorous manual cleaning of endoscopic equipment and the use of well designed, disposable cleaning brushes for the operating channel of the endoscope. PMID:11740649

  8. Diffusion-weighted MRI findings and clinical correlations in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ting; Lyu, Jin-Hao; Zhang, Jia-Tang; Lou, Xin; Zhao, Wei; Xing, Xiao-Wei; Yang, Ming; Yao, Yan; Tan, Qing-Che; Tian, Cheng-Lin; Huang, Xu-Sheng; Ma, Lin; Yu, Sheng-Yuan

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the hyperintense lesions on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) and its clinical correlation in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). Patients who suffered from sCJD and followed up at the Department of Neurology at the General Hospital of the People's Liberation Army during the period of June 1, 2007 to July 1, 2014 were reviewed. The location of the hyperintense lesions on DWI, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the hyperintense lesions were correlated with symptoms and clinical course. A total of 58 sCJD patients and ten healthy controls were included. Hyperintense lesions on DWI were observed in all the patients. The patients with basal ganglia (BG) hyperintense lesions on DWI had shorter disease duration and higher incidence of myoclonus (92 versus 44 %) than those without BG hyperintense lesions. The patients with occipital cortex hyperintense lesions on DWI had shorter disease duration between symptom onset and akinetic mutism than those without these lesions. The lower of the BG ADC value the faster presence of akinetic mutism and the shorter disease duration the patients will have. The presence of BG and occipital cortex hyperintense lesions on DWI and BG ADC values is correlated with the clinical course and clinical symptoms. PMID:25860342

  9. Mutation and polymorphism of the prion protein gene in Libyan Jews with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)

    SciTech Connect

    Gabizon, R.; Rosenmann, H.; Meiner, Z.; Kahana, I. ); Kahana, E. ); Shugart, Y.; Ott, J. ); Prusiner, S.B. )

    1993-10-01

    The inherited prion diseases are neurodegenerative disorders which are not only genetic but also transmissible. More than a dozen mutations in the prion protein gene that result in nonconservative amino acid substitutions segregate with the inherited prion diseases including familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). In Israel, the incidence of CJD is about 1 case/10[sup 4] Libyan Jews. A Lys[sub 200] substitution segregates with CJD and is reported here to be genetically linked to CJD with a lod score of >4.8. Some healthy elderly Lys[sub 200] carriers > age 65 years were identified, suggesting the possibility of incomplete penetrance. In contrast, no linkage was found between the development of familial CJD and a polymorphism encoding either Met[sub 129] or Val[sub 129]. All Libyan Jewish CJD patients with the Lys[sub 200] mutation encode a Met[sub 129] on the mutant allele. Homozygosity for Met[sub 129] did not correlate with age at disease onset or the duration of illness. The frequency of the Met[sub 129] allele was higher in the affected pedigrees than in a control population of Libyan Jews. The frequency of the Met[sub 129] and Val[sub 129] alleles in the control Libyan population was similar to that found in the general Caucasian population. The identification of three Libyan Jews homozygous for the Lys[sub 200] mutation suggests frequent intrafamilial marriages, a custom documented by genealogical investigations. 26 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. LGI1 antibody encephalopathy overlapping with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Boaz; Yoo, Patrick; Sutherland, Tom; Boyd, Alison; Stehmann, Christiane; McLean, Catriona

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To report a rare case of leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1) antibody–mediated autoimmune encephalopathy clinically overlapping with pathologically confirmed sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Methods: The patient was investigated with repeated brain MRI, EEG, CSF examination, whole-body fluorodeoxy-glucose positron emission tomography, genetic analysis of the prion protein gene (PRNP), and extensive serologic screening for paraneoplastic and autoimmune encephalopathy markers. Written informed consent was obtained from the patient's next of kin for access to clinical files for research purposes and for publication. Results: The patient was a 77-year-old man who presented with faciobrachial dystonic seizures (FBDS) secondary to LGI1 antibody–mediated autoimmune encephalopathy, with suggestive MRI findings and a complete response to treatment with combinatorial immunosuppression. Stereotactic biopsy of a nonenhancing T1 hyperintense basal ganglia lesion during the initial FBDS phase, albeit following immunosuppression, did not disclose evidence of lymphocytic inflammation. Following full remission of the FBDS, the patient manifested a rapidly progressive dementia associated with gross motor decline confirmed to be CJD at autopsy (molecular subtype VV3), with no evidence of a pathogenic PRNP mutation. Conclusions: Our patient highlights that these rare diseases are not invariably mutually exclusive and underscores the benefits of comprehensive neuropathologic examination of the brain to achieve an accurate diagnosis, especially in complex cases when the clinical trajectory dramatically deviates and a concomitant disease may need to be conscientiously considered to best explain the new clinical course. PMID:27354985

  11. Advanced tests for early and accurate diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Zanusso, Gianluigi; Monaco, Salvatore; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Caughey, Byron

    2016-06-01

    Early and accurate diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a necessary to distinguish this untreatable disease from treatable rapidly progressive dementias, and to prevent iatrogenic transmission. Currently, definitive diagnosis of CJD requires detection of the abnormally folded, CJD-specific form of protease-resistant prion protein (PrP(CJD)) in brain tissue obtained postmortem or via biopsy; therefore, diagnosis of sporadic CJD in clinical practice is often challenging. Supporting investigations, including MRI, EEG and conventional analyses of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, are helpful in the diagnostic work-up, but do not allow definitive diagnosis. Recently, novel ultrasensitive seeding assays, based on the amplified detection of PrP(CJD), have improved the diagnostic process; for example, real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) is a sensitive method to detect prion-seeding activity in brain homogenate from humans with any subtype of sporadic CJD. RT-QuIC can also be used for in vivo diagnosis of CJD: its diagnostic sensitivity in detecting PrP(CJD) in CSF samples is 96%, and its specificity is 100%. Recently, we provided evidence that RT-QuIC of olfactory mucosa brushings is a 97% sensitive and 100% specific for sporadic CJD. These assays provide a basis for definitive antemortem diagnosis of prion diseases and, in doing so, improve prospects for reducing the risk of prion transmission. Moreover, they can be used to evaluate outcome measures in therapeutic trials for these as yet untreatable infections. PMID:27174240

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid tau levels are a marker for molecular subtype in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Karch, André; Hermann, Peter; Ponto, Claudia; Schmitz, Matthias; Arora, Amandeep; Zafar, Saima; Llorens, Franc; Müller-Heine, Annika; Zerr, Inga

    2015-05-01

    The molecular subtype of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is an important prognostic marker for patient survival. However, subtype determination is not possible during lifetime. Because the rate of disease progression is associated with the molecular subtype, this study aimed at investigating if total tau, a marker of neuronal death, allows premortem diagnosis of molecular subtype when codon 129 genotype is known. Two hundred ninety-six sCJD patients were tested for their cerebrospinal fluid total tau level at the time of diagnosis and were investigated for their sCJD subtype postmortem. There was a significant association between tau levels and the prion protein type in patients with codon 129 MM (p < 0.001), MV (p = 0.004), and VV (p = 0.001) genotype. Receiver operating characteristic analyses showed values of area under the curve of 0.76-0.80 for the different genotypes indicating a good diagnostic validity of the test. Total tau can be used as a diagnostic test for the assessment of prion protein type when codon 129 genotype is known. It provides valuable information for physicians and next of kin about the further course of disease. PMID:25749129

  13. Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease With Extremely Low Lymphoreticular Deposition of Prion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Simon; Wadsworth, Jonathan D. F.; Porter, Marie-Claire; Linehan, Jacqueline M.; Pietkiewicz, Wojciech; Jackson, Graham S.; Brandner, Sebastian; Collinge, John

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Human transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy causes the fatal neurodegenerative condition variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) and, based on recent human prevalence studies, significant subclinical prion infection of the UK population. To date, all clinical cases have been fatal, totaling 228 mostly young adults residing in the United Kingdom. OBSERVATIONS Here we describe the investigation and case history of a patient recently diagnosed as having vCJD in the United Kingdom. Although his presentation, imaging findings, cerebrospinal fluid investigation results, and clinical progression were typical of other cases, tonsillar biopsy and subsequent examination of multiple tissues at autopsy showed minimal deposition of disease-associated prion protein in peripheral lymphoreticular tissue. The result of a blood test for vCJD, the Direct Detection Assay for vCJD, was negative. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE These findings suggest that some patients with vCJD have very low peripheral prion colonization and therefore may not have detectable prion deposition in diagnostic tonsillar biopsy or markers of prion infection in blood. These results have implications for accurate interpretation of diagnostic tests and prevalence studies based on lymphoreticular tissue or blood. PMID:24445428

  14. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Presenting With Dizziness and Gaze-Evoked Nystagmus: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Ju; Kang, Kyung-Wook; Lee, Sae-Young; Kang, Seung-Ho; Lee, Seung-Han; Kim, Byeong C

    2016-02-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is clinically characterized by rapidly progressive dementia combined with other cardinal symptoms, such as myoclonus, visual or cerebellar disturbances, extrapyramidal or pyramidal disturbance, and akinetic mutism. However, as an initial manifestation, focal neurologic deficits other than the aforementioned or nonspecific generalized symptoms may lead to a misdiagnosis or a delayed diagnosis. The authors report a case of 66-year-old male patient with sporadic CJD who had dizziness, gaze-evoked nystagmus (GEN), and other central eye signs (impaired smooth pursuit, saccadic dysmetria) as an initial manifestation without dementia. The central eye signs led us to perform brain magnetic resonance images, which showed abnormal cortical high-signal intensity in both the cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres including the vestibulocerebellum. We reached a presumptive diagnosis of CJD, but the findings did not meet diagnostic criteria for probable CJD at that time. Three weeks after the initial work-ups, the patient presented with typical neurological findings of CJD: rapidly progressive dementia, akinetic mutism, and myoclonus of the left arm. Cerebrospinal fluid was positive for 14-3-3 protein, and electroencephalography showed periodic sharp wave complexes. In this patient, GEN and other central eye signs provided diagnostic clues for CJD. These unusual neurological manifestations may help physicians have a thorough knowledge of early deficits of CJD. PMID:26886621

  15. [A case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease presenting with arm levitation as an initial symptom].

    PubMed

    Kamogawa, Kenji; Ninomiya, Satoko; Okuda, Shinya; Matsumoto, Yushi; Tomita, Hitomi; Okamoto, Kensho; Okuda, Bungo

    2014-01-01

    A 74-year-old, right handed man, developed insidiously with levitation and clumsiness of the right upper limb. His right arm tended to levitate spontaneously, when he was examined. He could put the elevated arm down on command, while the arm resumed to antigravity posture when his attention was diverted. His right arm also exhibited unwilled elevation when performing complex finger movements on the right side. He had a feeling of strangeness of the elevated limb, especially with the eyes closed. In addition to asymmetric limb-kinetic apraxia, combined sensations such as stereognosis were disturbed on the right side. Brain MRI showed high signal lesions predominantly in the left cerebral cortices and basal ganglia. SPECT with (123)I-IMP revealed asymmetric hypoperfusion, predominantly in the left medial frontal and parietal regions. Two months after the onset, levitation of the arm gradually disappeared, with the development of rapidly progressive dementia, frontal signs, dystonia and generalized myoclonus. The diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) was made based on the clinical features and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. The early manifestation of the patient mimicked corticobasal degeneration which presents with arm levitation or alien hand syndrome. It is suggested that CJD can represent involuntary movements with higher brain dysfunction resembling corticobasal degeneration at the early stage of the illness. Although the underlying mechanism of arm levitation is still unknown, frontal disinhibition and parietal cortical sensory disturbance may contribute to the development of involuntary arm levitation in our patient. PMID:25342014

  16. Quantitative analysis of MRI signal intensity in new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Coulthard, A; Hall, K; English, P T; Ince, P G; Burn, D J; Bates, D

    1999-08-01

    High signal intensity within the posterior thalamus (pulvinar nucleus) has been noted on MRI in patients with new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (nvCJD). In this study MRI examinations from three patients with proven nvCJD were compared with MRI examinations from a control group of 14 age-matched subjects with no neurological abnormalities. Mean signal intensity from seven target areas (periaqueductal tissue, posterior thalamus, dorsomedial thalamus, anterior thalamus, putamen, caudate head and frontal white matter) was calculated in each case. Absolute signal intensity measurements were not significantly different between the groups. Patients with nvCJD showed significantly higher signal intensity within dorsomedial thalamus, posterior thalamus and periaqueductal region than control patients when these measurements were normalized to the signal intensity of normal appearing white matter. Highly significant differences in posterior thalamus/putamen signal intensity ratio (PPR) and posterior thalamus/caudate ratio (PCR) were observed between the groups. For proton density images, PPR and PCR were greater than 1 for all nvCJD patients and less than 1 for all control patients. Both PPR and PCR are simple to calculate and offer a simple, non-invasive indicator of nvCJD. PMID:10624339

  17. Metabolic disorders with clinical and radiologic features of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbloom, Michael H.; Tartaglia, M. Carmela; Forner, Sven A.; Wong, Katherine K.; Kuo, Amy; Johnson, David Y.; Colacurcio, Valerie; Andrews, Bret D.; Miller, Bruce L.; DeArmond, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Two patients with metabolic disorders presented with clinical and radiologic features suggestive of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). Case 1 was a 50-year-old man with rapid decline in cognitive, behavioral, and motor function following new-onset seizures. MRI was read as consistent with CJD, and he was referred for a treatment trial, but it was determined that he recently experienced rapid correction of hyponatremia resulting in extrapontine myelinolysis. Case 2 was a 66-year-old woman with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus who was found unconscious after a suspected insulin overdose. Examination showed altered mental status and neuroimaging was remarkable for cortical/striatal hyperintensities suggestive of sCJD. On autopsy, she had hypoglycemic/hypoxic nerve cell loss. Although characteristic MRI findings have high sensitivity and specificity for sCJD, potentially reversible metabolic disorders sometimes present rapidly and can resemble sCJD both clinically and radiologically. These cases highlight the importance of establishing a broad differential diagnosis when evaluating a patient with suspected sCJD. PMID:26137419

  18. Comparing CSF biomarkers and brain MRI in the diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    PubMed Central

    Forner, Sven A.; Takada, Leonel T.; Bettcher, Brianne M.; Lobach, Iryna V.; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; Torres-Chae, Charles; Haman, Aissatou; Thai, Julie; Vitali, Paolo; Neuhaus, John; Bostrom, Alan; Miller, Bruce L.; Rosen, Howard J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary We assessed the diagnostic utility of 3 CSF biomarkers—14-3-3 protein, total tau (T-tau), and neuron-specific enolase (NSE)—from the same lumbar puncture to distinguish between participants with neuropathologically confirmed sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD, n = 57) and controls with nonprion rapidly progressive dementia (npRPD, n = 41). Measures of diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value, as well as logistic regression and area under the receiver operator curve (AUC), were used to assess the ability of these CSF biomarkers, alone or concomitantly, to predict diagnosis. In a subcohort with available MRI (sCJD n = 57, npRPD = 32), we compared visual assessment of diffusion-weighted imaging MRI sequences to these CSF biomarkers. MRI was the best predictor, with an AUC of 0.97 (confidence interval [CI] 0.92–1.00) and a diagnostic accuracy of 97% (CI 90%–100%). Of the CSF biomarkers, T-tau had a higher diagnostic accuracy (79.6%) than 14-3-3 (70.4%, CI for difference 8.7%, 9.7%; p = 0.048) or NSE (71.4%, CI for difference 7.6%, 8.7%; p = 0.03). PMID:26137420

  19. Positive 14-3-3 and tau proteins in a sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease case and a brief perspective of prion diseases in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Escandón-Vargas, Kevin; Zorrilla-Vaca, Andrés; Corral-Prado, Raúl Heli

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases are rare neurodegenerative disorders occurring worldwide and affecting both humans and animals. Herein, we present the case of a patient diagnosed with definite sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in Cali, Colombia. Besides neurological examination, 14-3-3 and tau proteins were valuable tools supporting the diagnosis. We also present a brief perspective of the prion diseases reported in Colombia to date. Although the incidence of prion diseases is unknown in Colombia, our literature review revealed that one case of scrapie in 1981 and 29 human sporadic cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease have been documented and published in our country. PMID:27622622

  20. Genetic and Transcriptomic Profiles of Inflammation in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Alzheimer, Parkinson, Creutzfeldt-Jakob and Tauopathies

    PubMed Central

    López González, Irene; Garcia-Esparcia, Paula; Llorens, Franc; Ferrer, Isidre

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphisms in certain inflammatory-related genes have been identified as putative differential risk factors of neurodegenerative diseases with abnormal protein aggregates, such as sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and sporadic Parkinson’s disease (sPD). Gene expression studies of cytokines and mediators of the immune response have been made in post-mortem human brain samples in AD, sPD, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) subtypes MM1 and VV2, Pick’s disease (PiD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration linked to mutation P301L in MAPT Frontotemporal lobar degeneration-tau (FTLD-tau). The studies have disclosed variable gene regulation which is: (1) disease-dependent in the frontal cortex area 8 in AD, sPD, sCJD MM1 and VV2, PiD, PSP and FTLD-tau; (2) region-dependent as seen when comparing the entorhinal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and frontal cortex area 8 (FC) in AD; the substantia nigra, putamen, FC, and angular gyrus in PD, as well as the FC and cerebellum in sCJD; (3) genotype-dependent as seen considering sCJD MM1 and VV2; and (4) stage-dependent as seen in AD at different stages of disease progression. These observations show that regulation of inflammation is much more complicated and diverse than currently understood, and that new therapeutic approaches must be designed in order to selectively act on specific targets in particular diseases and at different time points of disease progression. PMID:26861289

  1. Genetic and Transcriptomic Profiles of Inflammation in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Alzheimer, Parkinson, Creutzfeldt-Jakob and Tauopathies.

    PubMed

    López González, Irene; Garcia-Esparcia, Paula; Llorens, Franc; Ferrer, Isidre

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphisms in certain inflammatory-related genes have been identified as putative differential risk factors of neurodegenerative diseases with abnormal protein aggregates, such as sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) and sporadic Parkinson's disease (sPD). Gene expression studies of cytokines and mediators of the immune response have been made in post-mortem human brain samples in AD, sPD, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) subtypes MM1 and VV2, Pick's disease (PiD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration linked to mutation P301L in MAPT Frontotemporal lobar degeneration-tau (FTLD-tau). The studies have disclosed variable gene regulation which is: (1) disease-dependent in the frontal cortex area 8 in AD, sPD, sCJD MM1 and VV2, PiD, PSP and FTLD-tau; (2) region-dependent as seen when comparing the entorhinal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and frontal cortex area 8 (FC) in AD; the substantia nigra, putamen, FC, and angular gyrus in PD, as well as the FC and cerebellum in sCJD; (3) genotype-dependent as seen considering sCJD MM1 and VV2; and (4) stage-dependent as seen in AD at different stages of disease progression. These observations show that regulation of inflammation is much more complicated and diverse than currently understood, and that new therapeutic approaches must be designed in order to selectively act on specific targets in particular diseases and at different time points of disease progression. PMID:26861289

  2. Update: Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease associated with cadaveric dura mater grafts--Japan, 1978-2008.

    PubMed

    2008-10-24

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is the most common of the human prion diseases (also known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies), which, according to the leading hypothesis, are caused by an abnormal protein (i.e., prion) that is able to induce abnormal folding of normal cellular prion proteins. Annual worldwide incidence of these always fatal neurodegenerative diseases is estimated at 0.5-2.0 cases per million population. CJD can occur sporadically, or as a genetic disease, or can be transmitted iatrogenically. In 1996, a new human prion disease, variant CJD (vCJD), was first described in the United Kingdom. This disease was believed to have resulted from human consumption of cattle products contaminated with the prions responsible for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, commonly known as mad cow disease). That year, in part to check for possible vCJD cases, a national survey was conducted in Japan; 821 CJD cases were identified, including 43 cases associated with receipt of cadaveric dura mater grafts. A single brand of dural graft (Lyodura) produced by a German manufacturer before May 1987 was identified as the most likely vehicle of transmission in all but one case. By 2003, continued surveillance in Japan had identified a total of 97 such cases. Since then, an additional 35 cases have been identified. This report updates previous reports and summarizes the investigation of all 132 cases to date linked to dural grafts. The results suggest that, because of the long incubation period between graft receipt and symptom onset (possibly >24.8 years), continued surveillance in Japan might identify additional CJD cases associated with dural grafts. PMID:18946463

  3. Role of the biomarkers for the diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    PubMed Central

    Dulamea, A; Solomon, E

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a human prion disease, rapidly progressive and fatal, characterized by spongiform encephalopathy. The characteristic triad of signs - rapidly progressive dementia, myoclonus and periodic sharp wave complexes (PSWC) on electroencephalography (EEG) - usually appear in the late stages of the disease. The clinical diagnosis of CJD ante-mortem involves the exclusion of the rapidly progressive non-prionic dementias, the definitive diagnosis requiring brain tissue confirmation. Authors evaluated the methods of clinical diagnosis for sporadic CJD. Methods: This study retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients diagnosed with probable sporadic CJD, based on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), EEG, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis and extensive laboratory work-up. Results: Four patients with a mean age of 67 years were included in our study. The mean duration from diagnosis until death was of 3.2 weeks. The clinical features of the disease at onset were atypical. In the final stage of the disease, all patients presented rapidly progressive dementia and myoclonus. High levels of 14-3-3 protein and tau protein and normal levels of amyloid β1-42 were found at CSF analysis, in all patients. PSWC on EEG were present in 3 out of 4 patients at different moments of the disease. MRI showed hyperintense lesions in brain cortex, caudate nucleus, and putamen on T2, FLAIR, and DWI. Conclusion: CJD may present various clinical features and, since brain biopsy is usually difficult to perform, a combination of biomarkers is useful in order to establish the diagnosis in the early phase of the disease. PMID:27453757

  4. The Distribution of Prion Protein Allotypes Differs Between Sporadic and Iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Roger A.; Head, Mark W.; Ironside, James W.; Ritchie, Diane L.; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Pyo Choi, Young; Priola, Suzette A.

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is the most prevalent of the human prion diseases, which are fatal and transmissible neurodegenerative diseases caused by the infectious prion protein (PrPSc). The origin of sCJD is unknown, although the initiating event is thought to be the stochastic misfolding of endogenous prion protein (PrPC) into infectious PrPSc. By contrast, human growth hormone-associated cases of iatrogenic CJD (iCJD) in the United Kingdom (UK) are associated with exposure to an exogenous source of PrPSc. In both forms of CJD, heterozygosity at residue 129 for methionine (M) or valine (V) in the prion protein gene may affect disease phenotype, onset and progression. However, the relative contribution of each PrPC allotype to PrPSc in heterozygous cases of CJD is unknown. Using mass spectrometry, we determined that the relative abundance of PrPSc with M or V at residue 129 in brain specimens from MV cases of sCJD was highly variable. This result is consistent with PrPC containing an M or V at residue 129 having a similar propensity to misfold into PrPSc thus causing sCJD. By contrast, PrPSc with V at residue 129 predominated in the majority of the UK human growth hormone associated iCJD cases, consistent with exposure to infectious PrPSc containing V at residue 129. In both types of CJD, the PrPSc allotype ratio had no correlation with CJD type, age at clinical onset, or disease duration. Therefore, factors other than PrPSc allotype abundance must influence the clinical progression and phenotype of heterozygous cases of CJD. PMID:26840342

  5. The Distribution of Prion Protein Allotypes Differs Between Sporadic and Iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Moore, Roger A; Head, Mark W; Ironside, James W; Ritchie, Diane L; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Choi, Young Pyo; Pyo Choi, Young; Priola, Suzette A

    2016-02-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is the most prevalent of the human prion diseases, which are fatal and transmissible neurodegenerative diseases caused by the infectious prion protein (PrP(Sc)). The origin of sCJD is unknown, although the initiating event is thought to be the stochastic misfolding of endogenous prion protein (PrP(C)) into infectious PrP(Sc). By contrast, human growth hormone-associated cases of iatrogenic CJD (iCJD) in the United Kingdom (UK) are associated with exposure to an exogenous source of PrP(Sc). In both forms of CJD, heterozygosity at residue 129 for methionine (M) or valine (V) in the prion protein gene may affect disease phenotype, onset and progression. However, the relative contribution of each PrP(C) allotype to PrP(Sc) in heterozygous cases of CJD is unknown. Using mass spectrometry, we determined that the relative abundance of PrP(Sc) with M or V at residue 129 in brain specimens from MV cases of sCJD was highly variable. This result is consistent with PrP(C) containing an M or V at residue 129 having a similar propensity to misfold into PrP(Sc) thus causing sCJD. By contrast, PrP(Sc) with V at residue 129 predominated in the majority of the UK human growth hormone associated iCJD cases, consistent with exposure to infectious PrP(Sc) containing V at residue 129. In both types of CJD, the PrP(Sc) allotype ratio had no correlation with CJD type, age at clinical onset, or disease duration. Therefore, factors other than PrP(Sc) allotype abundance must influence the clinical progression and phenotype of heterozygous cases of CJD. PMID:26840342

  6. Social cognitive predictors of intention to test for variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in those affected by haemophilia and other clotting disorders.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Gemma; Robinson, Georgina; Chilcot, Joseph; Troop, Nicholas A

    2014-06-01

    Individuals with bleeding disorders are at increased risk of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. This study explored social cognitive predictors of screening intentions. Ninety men and women with bleeding disorders, recruited through the Haemophilia Society, completed an extended Theory of Planned Behaviour questionnaire to predict intention to screen for variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Extended Theory of Planned Behaviour variables accounted for 57 per cent of the variance in intention. Self-efficacy and anticipated affect predicted intention directly, while attitudes were mediated by anticipated affect. Simple interventions that already exist address relevant predictive components of intention to screen for variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and could be used to aid decision-making. PMID:23520351

  7. Bioassay Studies Support the Potential for Iatrogenic Transmission of Variant Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease through Dental Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Vassey, Matthew; Dennis, Mike; Cornwall, Mark; McLeod, Neil; Smith, Andrew; Marsh, Philip D.; Walker, James T.; Sutton, J. Mark; Raven, Neil D. H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Evidence is required to quantify the potential risks of transmission of variant Creutzfeldt Jakob (vCJD) through dental procedures. Studies, using animal models relevant to vCJD, were performed to address two questions. Firstly, whether oral tissues could become infectious following dietary exposure to BSE? Secondly, would a vCJD-contaminated dental instrument be able to transmit disease to another patient? Methods BSE-301V was used as a clinically relevant model for vCJD. VM-mice were challenged by injection of infected brain homogenate into the small intestine (Q1) or by five minute contact between a deliberately-contaminated dental file and the gingival margin (Q2). Ten tissues were collected from groups of challenged mice at three or four weekly intervals, respectively. Each tissue was pooled, homogenised and bioassayed in indicator mice. Findings Challenge via the small intestine gave a transmission rate of 100% (mean incubation 157±17 days). Infectivity was found in both dental pulp and the gingival margin within 3 weeks of challenge and was observed in all tissues tested within the oral cavity before the appearance of clinical symptoms. Following exposure to deliberately contaminated dental files, 97% of mice developed clinical disease (mean incubation 234±33 days). Interpretation Infectivity was higher than expected, in a wider range of oral tissues, than was allowed for in previous risk assessments. Disease was transmitted following transient exposure of the gingiva to a contaminated dental file. These observations provide evidence that dental procedures could be a route of cross-infection for vCJD and support the enforcement of single-use for certain dental instruments. PMID:23226225

  8. Analyses of the mitochondrial mutations in the Chinese patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Zhi-Xia; Du, Peng-Chen; Zhou, Wei; Wu, Su-Dong; Wang, Qi-Ling; Chen, Cao; Shi, Qi; Chen, Chen; Gao, Chen; Tian, Chan; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations leading to mitochondrial dysfunction can cause a variety of chronic diseases in central nervous system (CNS). However, the role of mtDNA mutations in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) has still been unknown. In this study, we comparatively analyzed complete mtDNA sequences of 31 Chinese sCJD patients and 32 controls. Using MITOMASTER and PhyloTree, we characterized 520 variants in sCJD patients and 507 variants in control by haplogroup and allele frequencies. We classified the mtDNAs into 40 sub-haplogroups of 5 haplogroups, most of them being Asian-specific haplogroups. Haplogroup U, an European-specific haplogroups mtDNA, was found only in sCJD. The analysis to control region (CR) revealed a 31% increase in the frequency of mtDNA CR mutations in sCJD versus controls. In functional elements of the mtDNA CR, six CR mutations were in conserved sequence blocks I (CSBI) in sCJD, while only one in control (P<0.05). More mutants in transfer ribonucleic acid-Leu (tRNA-Leu) were detected in sCJD. The frequencies of two synonymous amino-acid changes, m.11467A>G, p.(=) in NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4) and m.12372G>A, p.(=) in NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 (ND5), in sCJD patients were higher than that of controls. Our study, for the first time, screened the variations of mtDNA of Chinese sCJD patients and identified some potential disease-related mutations for further investigations. PMID:24667788

  9. MRI and FDG PET/CT findings in a case of probable Heidenhain variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Clarençon, F; Gutman, F; Giannesini, C; Pénicaud, A; Galanaud, D; Kerrou, K; Marro, B; Talbot, J-N

    2008-10-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by the accumulation of a pathogenic isoform of a prion protein in neurons that is responsible for subacute dementia. The Heidenhain variant is an atypical form of CJD in which visual signs are predominant. This is a report of the case of a 65-year-old man with probable CJD of the Heidenhain variant, with topographical concordance between findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) photopenic areas on positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) for cortical parietooccipital lesions. PMID:18466976

  10. Vision loss due to coincident ocular and central causes in a patient with Heidenhain variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Foundas, Maria; Donaldson, Mark D; McAllister, Ian L; Bridges, Leslie R

    2008-03-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a degenerative disease of the brain associated with a rapidly progressive spongiform encephalopathy. Visual symptoms and neuro-ophthalmological signs are not infrequent, and presentation to an ophthalmologist may result. A case is reported of an 89-years-old gentleman who presented with a short history of isolated deterioration in vision. He underwent ocular intervention but subsequently developed progressive dementia, asterixis, myoclonus, cerebellar and extrapyramidal signs, and cortical blindness. An electroencephalogram was consistent with CJD. The patient progressively deteriorated and died 9 weeks after symptom onset. Limited post-mortem examination confirmed CJD. PMID:18065777

  11. Neuropathological and biochemical criteria to identify acquired Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease among presumed sporadic cases.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Parchi, Piero; Yamada, Masahito; Mohri, Shirou; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki

    2016-06-01

    As an experimental model of acquired Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), we performed transmission studies of sporadic CJD using knock-in mice expressing human prion protein (PrP). In this model, the inoculation of the sporadic CJD strain V2 into animals homozygous for methionine at polymorphic codon 129 (129 M/M) of the PRNP gene produced quite distinctive neuropathological and biochemical features, that is, widespread kuru plaques and intermediate type abnormal PrP (PrP(Sc) ). Interestingly, this distinctive combination of molecular and pathological features has been, to date, observed in acquired CJD but not in sporadic CJD. Assuming that these distinctive phenotypic traits are specific for acquired CJD, we revisited the literature and found two cases showing widespread kuru plaques despite the 129 M/M genotype, in a neurosurgeon and in a patient with a medical history of neurosurgery without dura mater grafting. By Western blot analysis of brain homogenates, we revealed the intermediate type of PrP(Sc) in both cases. Furthermore, transmission properties of brain extracts from these two cases were indistinguishable from those of a subgroup of dura mater graft-associated iatrogenic CJD caused by infection with the sporadic CJD strain V2. These data strongly suggest that the two atypical CJD cases, previously thought to represent sporadic CJD, very likely acquired the disease through exposure to prion-contaminated brain tissues. Thus, we propose that the distinctive combination of 129 M/M genotype, kuru plaques, and intermediate type PrP(Sc) , represents a reliable criterion for the identification of acquired CJD cases among presumed sporadic cases. PMID:26669818

  12. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with focal findings: caveats to current diagnostic criteria

    PubMed Central

    Mader, Edward C.; El-Abassi, Rima; Villemarette-Pittman, Nicole R.; Santana-Gould, Lenay; Olejniczak, Piotr W.; England, John D.

    2013-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is largely based on the 1998 World Health Organization diagnostic criteria. Unfortunately, rigid compliance with these criteria may result in failure to recognize sporadic CJD (sCJD), especially early in its course when focal findings predominate and traditional red flags are not yet present. A 61-year-old man presented with a 3-week history of epilepsia partialis continua (jerking of the left upper extremity) and a 2-week history of forgetfulness and left hemiparesis; left hemisensory neglect was also detected on admission. Repeated brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed areas of restricted diffusion in the cerebral cortex, initially on the right but later spreading to the left. Electroence-phalography (EEG) on hospital days 7, 10, and 14 showed right-sided periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges. On day 20, the EEG showed periodic sharp wave complexes leading to a diagnosis of probable sCJD and subsequently to definite sCJD with brain biopsy. Neurological decline was relatively fast with generalized myoclonus and akinetic mutism developing within 7 weeks from the onset of illness. CJD was not immediately recognized because of the patient's focal/lateralized manifestations. Focal/lateralized clinical, EEG, and MRI findings are not uncommon in sCJD and EEG/MRI results may not be diagnostic in the early stages of sCJD. Familiarity with these caveats and with the most current criteria for diagnosing probable sCJD (University of California San Francisco 2007, MRI-CJD Consortium 2009) will enhance the ability to recognize sCJD and implement early safety measures. PMID:23717780

  13. [Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Heidenhain variant: case report with MRI (DWI) findings].

    PubMed

    Arruda, Walter Oleschko; Bordignon, Kelly C; Milano, Jerônimo B; Ramina, Ricardo

    2004-06-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a presenile dementia characterized by rapidly progressive mental deterioration, myoclonic jerking, and other less common neurological signs. Few autoctonous cases have been described in Brazil. A 54-year-old white woman, was admitted in our service with a month history of progressive, bilateral cortical blindness. After admission, she developed right partial motor seizures( right facial, upper and lower limbs), she became progressively aphasic( mixed aphasia). Seizures were controlled with phenytoin, but she developed choreoathetotic movements on her right dimidium, with partial control after introduction of chlorpromazine 25 mg q/d. She could no longer stand up or walk due to severe ataxia. The first EEG (October, 2001) showed left hemisphere severe seizure activity (status epilepticus partialis). She was delivered home with enteral nutrition, phenytoin, chlorpromazine and mepacrine 100 mg qd. The following laboratorial tests were negative or normal: blood series, platelets, ESR, kidney and liver function, copper, ceruloplasmin, VDRL, HIV, HTLV-1, lactate, and cerebral DSA (performed in other service).A spinal tap with normal opening pressure was perform and CSF examination was normal. CSF 14-3-3 protein was positive, CSF specific neuronal enolase 7.5 ng/ml(normal). Genetic study of PRNP gene did not disclosed any known mutation. A MRI (October, 2001) showed areas of hyperintense signal (T2 and FLAIR) without Gd-enhancement on T1, in the left temporal lobe and in both occipital lobes; basal ganglia have a normal appearance. DWI imaging showed bright areas at the same sites. An EEG (March, 2002) disclosed a periodical sharp triphasic waves pattern, suggestive of CJD. A second MRI (April, 2002) showed mild generalized atrophy, no ventricular dilatation, and the hyperintense sites disappeared. She remained clinically stable and under use of chlorpromazine and mepacrine until she died due to pulmonary complications on April, 2003

  14. Towards an Age-Dependent Transmission Model of Acquired and Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Pedro-Cuesta, Jesús; Mahillo-Fernandez, Ignacio; Calero, Miguel; Rábano, Alberto; Cruz, Mabel; Siden, Åke; Martínez-Martín, Pablo; Laursen, Henning; Ruiz-Tovar, María; Mølbak, Kåre

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) might be transmitted by surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate potential susceptibility to sCJD from surgery at juvenile age and in early adulthood. Methods From Danish and Swedish national registries we identified 167 definite and probable sCJD cases with onset from 1987 through 2003, and 835 age-, sex- and residence-matched controls along with their surgical histories. Main, anatomically or etiologically classified surgical procedures followed by a ≥20-year lag were analyzed using logistic regression, and stratified by age at first-registered surgical discharge. Results The risk of having a diagnosis of CJD depended strongly on age at first surgery with odds ratio (OR) of 12.80 (95% CI 2.56–64.0) in patients <30 years, 3.04 (95% 1.26–7.33) in 30–39 years, and 1.75 (95% CI 0.89–3.45) in ≥40 years, for anatomically classified surgical procedures. Similar figures were obtained for etiologically classified surgical procedures. Conclusions Risk of surgical-acquired sCJD depends on age at exposure; this pattern is similar to age-specific profiles reported for CJD accidentally transmitted by human pituitary-derived growth hormone and susceptibility curves for variant CJD estimated after adjustment for dietary exposure to bovine spongiform encephalopathy. There might be an age-at-exposure-related susceptibility to acquire all CJD forms, including sCJD from routine surgery. PMID:25279832

  15. [Prion, from crazy cows to iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Which risk in laboratory or in hospital?].

    PubMed

    Paul, J

    1995-02-01

    The long latency time, without any characteristic clinical sign, of transmissible degenerative encephalopathies, the transmissibility of the called "prion" infectious agent, associated with its exceptional resistance to normal inactivation methods, are resulting in accidental transmissions, both human (Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease), and animal (bovine spongiform encephalopathy). Among data about physical and chemical inactivation methods tested, we retain, to avoid professional or iatrogenic transmissions in the laboratory or in hospital, steam autoclaving and sodium hypochlorite or hydroxide treatment. But inactivation shall not be performed using the current processes as regarding parameters such as temperature, concentration and duration of exposure. PMID:7777380

  16. Population Screening for Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Using a Novel Blood Test

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Graham S.; Burk-Rafel, Jesse; Edgeworth, Julie Ann; Sicilia, Anita; Abdilahi, Sabah; Korteweg, Justine; Mackey, Jonathan; Thomas, Claire; Wang, Guosu; Schott, Jonathan M.; Mummery, Catherine; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Mead, Simon; Collinge, John

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Our study indicates a prototype blood-based variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) assay has sufficient sensitivity and specificity to justify a large study comparing vCJD prevalence in the United Kingdom with a bovine spongiform encephalopathy–unexposed population. In a clinical diagnostic capacity, the assay’s likelihood ratios dramatically change an individual’s pretest disease odds to posttest probabilities and can confirm vCJD infection. OBJECTIVES To determine the diagnostic accuracy of a prototype blood test for vCJD and hence its suitability for clinical use and for screening prion-exposed populations. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective, cross-sectional diagnostic study of blood samples from national blood collection and prion disease centers in the United States and United Kingdom. Anonymized samples were representative of the US blood donor population (n = 5000), healthy UK donors (n = 200), patients with nonprion neurodegenerative diseases (n = 352), patients in whom a prion disease diagnosis was likely (n = 105), and patients with confirmed vCJD (n = 10). MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURE Presence of vCJD infection determined by a prototype test (now in clinical diagnostic use) that captures, enriches, and detects disease-associated prion protein from whole blood using stainless steel powder. RESULTS The assay’s specificity among the presumed negative American donor samples was 100% (95% CI, 99.93%-100%) and was confirmed in a healthy UK cohort (100% specificity; 95% CI, 98.2%-100%). Of potentially cross-reactive blood samples from patients with nonprion neurodegenerative diseases, no samples tested positive (100% specificity; 95% CI, 98.9%-100%). Among National Prion Clinic referrals in whom a prion disease diagnosis was likely, 2 patients with sporadic CJD tested positive (98.1% specificity; 95% CI, 93.3%-99.8%). Finally, we reconfirmed but could not refine our previous sensitivity estimate in a small blind panel of samples

  17. Dietary Risk Factors for Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: A Confirmatory Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Davanipour, Zoreh; Sobel, Eugene; Ziogas, Argyrios; Smoak, Carey; Bohr, Thomas; Doram, Keith; Liwnicz, Boleslaw

    2014-01-01

    Aims This study’s primary purpose was to determine whether earlier findings suggesting an association between sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of humans and specific dietary components could be replicated. The a priori hypotheses were that consumption of (i) foods likely to contain organ tissue and (ii) raw/rare meat are associated with increased sCJD risk. Study Design Population-based case-control study. Place and Duration of Study Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA, USA; 4 years. Methodology An 11-state case-control study of pathologically confirmed, definite sCJD cases, matched controls, and a sample of control-surrogates was conducted. Ninety-six percent (106/110) of the case data was obtained in 1991-1993, prior to variant CJD publicity. Results Using control self-responses, consumption of hot dogs, sausage, pepperoni, kielbasa, “other” canned meat, poultry liver, any stomach/intestine, beef stomach/intestine, any organ tissue, and beef organ tissue was individually associated with increased sCJD risk; odds ratios (OR) ranged from 2.4 to 7.2 (0.003

  18. No reactivation of JCV and CMV infections in the temporal cortex and cerebellum of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Löffler, Judith; Krasemann, Susanne; Zerr, Inga; Matschke, Jakob; Glatzel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is characterized by great phenotypic variability regarding clinical course and neuropathology. The most prominent disease modifiers are a polymorphism in Codon 129 of the prion protein gene and conformational variations of the misfolded prion protein. The cellular form of the prion protein restricts replication of viruses and may be involved in viral host defense, and viral infections influence the presentation and neuropathology in prion diseased mice. We investigated the occurrence of reactivated persistent viral infections of the brain in brain tissue samples of 25 sCJD patients. No evidence of reactivated JCV and CMV infections could be detected. This suggests that JCV and CMV infections are not reactivated as consequence of prion disease and do not act as disease modifiers in sCJD. PMID:25628966

  19. The variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: Risk, uncertainty or safety in the use of blood and blood derivatives?

    PubMed

    Liras, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    It has been long since French physician Jean-Baptiste Denys carried out the first successful blood transfusion to a human being. Using bird feathers as canules, sheep blood was transfused to a young man. The patient died soon after Denys' treatment and Denys was accused of murder. In the XXI century, known as the biotechnology century, we face new challenges in Medicine. New emerging and reemerging diseases, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) or "mad cow disease" and its human variant (vCJD), challenge the biosafety aspects of a widely extended and extremely useful technique, that is, the perfusion of blood, of its derived components and of other pharmacological products obtained from plasma. To face these new challenges we need innovative prevention strategies. PMID:18573217

  20. Bitemporal hypometabolism in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease measured by positron emission tomography with (/sup 18/F)-2-fluorodeoxyglucose

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, R.P.; Prusiner, S.B.; Jagust, W.J.; Budinger, T.F.; Davis, R.L.

    1984-10-01

    It is well established that Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is caused by a slow infectious agent similar to the scrapie prion. However, the pathogenesis of this infection is poorly understood. Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed on a 54-year-old man with autopsy confirmed CJD using (18F)-2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and the Donner 280-crystal tomograph. Temporal lobe hypometabolism with hemispheric asymmetry was observed. These findings are similar to those previously obtained in PET-FDG studies of patients with clinically defined Alzheimer disease (AD). The similarities in the regional metabolic alterations between CJD and AD provide additional evidence for the possibility that AD may be caused by a slow infectious prion.

  1. [Perioperative considerations for performing a brain biopsy on a patient with subtype VV2 sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease].

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Domínguez, R; Rubio-Romero, R; González-González, G; Jiménez, I

    2015-04-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is the most common transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. It is an infectious, progressive, degenerative neurological disorder, with a presumably long incubation period, but a rapid fatal course. CJD is transmitted by a proteinaceous infectious agent, or «prion». Because the prions are difficult to eradicate and are resistant to the currently used sterilization methods, special precautions must be taken with all surgical instruments. It is recommended the single-use equipment, destruction of contaminated equipment, decontamination of reusable instruments, use of protective clothing, and storing and quarantining surgical instruments. The single-use equipment and some tissues and body fluids from the patient with CJD are highly infectious and must be incinerated. We report a case of a patient who had undergone brain biopsy for suspected of CJD, being confirmed to have sporadic CJD. Specific preventive measures were taken to reduce the risk of transmission to healthcare workers. PMID:25146772

  2. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Thailand: A Case Series and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lolekha, Praween; Rasheed, Ahmed; Yotsarawat, Chutanat

    2015-01-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) is an incurable and inevitably fatal neurodegenerative disorder. Although CJD has a worldwide distribution, there are no official statistics on CJD in Thailand. A diagnosis of CJD is suspected when a patient develops rapidly progressive dementia with myoclonus. However, CJD may be mistaken for a variety of illnesses because its initial presentation frequently consists of non-specific symptoms. Here, we examined cases of sporadic CJD (sCJD) from Thammasat University Hospital (a tertiary care hospital in Thailand) between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2014. Three cases of probable and possible sCJD were collected. All cases presented with rapidly progressive cognitive dysfunction accompanied by spontaneous myoclonus. Classical electroencehalography changes and typical abnormal MRI features were observed. All of the cases died within a period of 8 months. None of the patients underwent brain biopsy. Our findings raise questions about the prevalence of CJD in Thailand, which needs further study. PMID:26413241

  3. Mortality, neoplasia, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in patients treated with human pituitary growth hormone in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, C R; Preece, M A; Milner, R D

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the cause of death and incidence of neoplasia in patients treated with human pituitary growth hormone. DESIGN--A long term cohort study established to receive details of death certification and tumour registrations through the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys and NHS central register. PATIENTS--All patients (1246 male, 662 female) treated for short stature with pituitary growth hormone under the Medical Research Council working party and health services human growth hormone committee. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Death or development of neoplasia. RESULTS--110 patients died (68 male, 42 female; aged 0.9-57 years) from 1972 to 1990. Fifty three death were from neoplasia responsible for growth hormone deficiency (27 craniopharyngioma, 24 other intracranial tumour, two leukaemia); two from histiocytosis X; and 13 from pituitary insufficiency. Six patients died of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, six of other neurological disorders, and eight of acute infection. Other deaths were apparently unrelated to growth hormone deficiency or its treatment. Seventeen tumours (in 16 patients) were identified during or after growth hormone treatment. Four were in patients with previous intracranial neoplasia and two were after cranial irradiation. Thirteen were intracranial, the others being Hodgkin's lymphoma, osteosarcoma, carcinoma of colon, and basal cell carcinoma. CONCLUSIONS--Recurrence or progression of intracranial tumours and potentially avoidable metabolic consequences of hypopituitarism were the main causes of death. Growth hormone treatment probably did not contribute to new tumour development. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease after pituitary growth hormone treatment continues to occur in the United Kingdom. This cohort must remain under long term review. PMID:2025705

  4. Characteristics of Korean patients with suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with 14-3-3 protein in cerebrospinal fluid: Preliminary study of the Korean Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease active surveillance program

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jae-Sung; Kwon, Hyung-Min; Jang, Jae-Won; Ju, Young-Ran; Kim, SuYeon; Park, Young Ho; Park, So Young; Kim, SangYun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although Korea had a national surveillance system for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), it was mainly dependent on attending physician's reports. Thus, little prospective data about the epidemiology, characteristics, and final diagnoses of suspected patients were available. We have established a nationwide network for the active surveillance of patients with suspected CJD. When the requested cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples tested positive for 14-3-3 protein, we investigated the clinical characteristics of the corresponding patients and followed them until their final diagnoses were confirmed. A total of 218 samples were requested for CSF assays from May 2010 to August 2012, and 106 (48.6%) were positive for 14-3-3 protein. In 89 patients with complete clinical data, 38 (42.7%) were diagnosed with probable CJD and the estimated annual occurrence of CJD was 16.3 persons-per-year. The most common diagnoses of the remainder were central nervous system infection and any-cause encephalopathy. Non-CJD subjects showed worse initial consciousness levels than CJD patients. This preliminary study showed that the number of reported cases of CJD and the true positivity rates of CSF 14-3-3 protein assays were both low in Korea. An active surveillance system is urgently needed to provide the latest nationwide epidemiological data of CJD. PMID:25996401

  5. MM2-thalamic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: neuropathological, biochemical and transmission studies identify a distinctive prion strain.

    PubMed

    Moda, Fabio; Suardi, Silvia; Di Fede, Giuseppe; Indaco, Antonio; Limido, Lucia; Vimercati, Chiara; Ruggerone, Margherita; Campagnani, Ilaria; Langeveld, Jan; Terruzzi, Alessandro; Brambilla, Antonio; Zerbi, Pietro; Fociani, Paolo; Bishop, Matthew T; Will, Robert G; Manson, Jean C; Giaccone, Giorgio; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2012-09-01

    In Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), molecular typing based on the size of the protease resistant core of the disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc) ) and the M/V polymorphism at codon 129 of the PRNP gene correlates with the clinico-pathologic subtypes. Approximately 95% of the sporadic 129MM CJD patients are characterized by cerebral deposition of type 1 PrP(Sc) and correspond to the classic clinical CJD phenotype. The rare 129MM CJD patients with type 2 PrP(Sc) are further subdivided in a cortical and a thalamic form also indicated as sporadic fatal insomnia. We observed two young patients with MM2-thalamic CJD. Main neuropathological features were diffuse, synaptic PrP immunoreactivity in the cerebral cortex and severe neuronal loss and gliosis in the thalamus and olivary nucleus. Western blot analysis showed the presence of type 2A PrP(Sc) . Challenge of transgenic mice expressing 129MM human PrP showed that MM2-thalamic sporadic CJD (sCJD) was able to transmit the disease, at variance with MM2-cortical sCJD. The affected mice showed deposition of type 2A PrP(Sc) , a scenario that is unprecedented in this mouse line. These data indicate that MM2-thalamic sCJD is caused by a prion strain distinct from the other sCJD subtypes including the MM2-cortical form. PMID:22288561

  6. Bitemporal hypometabolism in Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease measured by positron emission tomography with (F-18)2-fluorodeoxyglucose

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, R.P.; Budinger, T.F.; Prusiner, S.B.; Jagust, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    It is well established that Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) is caused by a slow infectious agent similar to the scrapie prion. However, the pathogenesis of this infection is poorly understood. Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed on a 54 year old male subject with autopsy confirmed CJD using (F-18)2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and the Donner 280-crystal tomograph. An x-ray computed tomographic study of the brain performed 4 days prior to PET was normal. In the PET study the frontal to temporal cortex difference of activity densities was 30% on the left and 12% on the right, reflecting temporal hypometabolism. The left-right temporal cortex difference of activity density was 25%, documenting marked hemispheric asymmetry. These findings are similar to those previously obtained in PET-FDG studies of patients with clinically defined Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and are distinctly different from PET-FDG finding in patients with other dementing illnesses or in healthy aged subjects. Recent work has demonstrated extensive biological similarities between CJD, scrapie and AD. The similarities in the regional metabolic alterations between CJD and AD provide additional evidence for the hypothesis that AD is caused by a slow infectious (prion-like) pathogen.

  7. Clinical and MRI evaluation of anxiety as the first symptom of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LIU, WEIBO; LU, YUNRONG; ZHONG, GUODONG; JIANG, BIAO; PAN, ZHIJIE

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is a rare, transmissible prion disease of the brain, characterized by prominent neurological symptoms and progressive dementia. Early psychiatric manifestations as an initial or sole symptom of sCJD are relatively rare. The current report describes an elderly female patient with sCJD demonstrating anxiety as an initial symptom. The present patient was initially diagnosed with adjustment disorder and anxiety; however, the rapid deterioration of the patient's cognitive and neurological functioning led to a diagnosis of sCJD. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images of the brain supported a diagnosis of sCJD, and it was posited that the abnormalities of gray matter that were observed within the bilateral cingulate cortex may be the pathophysiological basis of the anxiety associated with this case of sCJD. The patient eventually succumbed to inhalational bronchopneumonia 5 months after anxiety onset. The present case report emphasizes the importance of secondary causes of anxiety symptoms in elderly patients, and indicates that brain DWI is a non-invasive and useful examination in the early diagnosis of sCJD. PMID:27073474

  8. Complete penetrance of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in Libyan Jews carrying the E200K mutation in the prion protein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, S.; Mastrianni, J. A.; Wrensch, M.; Gabizon, R.; Meiner, Z.; Kahana, I.; Rosenmann, H.; Kahana, E.; Prusiner, S. B.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a prion disease which is manifest as a sporadic, inherited, and transmissible neurodegenerative disorder. The mean age at onset of CJD is approximately 60 years, and as such, many people destined to succumb undoubtedly die of other illnesses first. The delayed onset of CJD has complicated the analysis of inherited forms of the illness and led to the suggestion that mutations in the prion protein (PrP) gene are necessary but not sufficient for prion disease despite genetic linkage; indeed, an environmental factor such as a ubiquitous virus has been proposed as a second necessary factor. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To examine what appeared to be incomplete penetrance, we applied a life-table analysis to clinical and pedigree data from a cluster population of Libyan Jews in which the E200K mutation is prevalent. The study population included 42 affected and 44 unaffected members of 13 Libyan Jewish families, all of whom possessed the E200K mutation. RESULTS: The calculated value using life table analysis is 0.77 at age 70 which increases to 0.89 if a mutation carrier survives to age 80 and 0.96 if age 80 is surpassed. CONCLUSIONS: These data argue that the E200K mutation alone is sufficient to cause prion disease and does so in an age-dependent manner. PMID:8529127

  9. Surgery and Risk of Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease in Denmark and Sweden: Registry-Based Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mahillo-Fernandez, Ignacio; de Pedro-Cuesta, Jesús; Bleda, Maria José; Cruz, Mabel; Mølbak, Kåre; Laursen, Henning; Falkenhorst, Gerhard; Martínez-Martín, Pablo; Siden, Åke

    2008-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic evidence of surgical transmission of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) remains controversial. Methods From Danish and Swedish registries we selected 167 definite and probable sCJD cases (with onset between 1987 and 2003) and 3,059 controls (835 age-, sex-, and residence-matched, and 2,224 unmatched). Independent of case/control status, surgical histories were obtained from National Hospital Discharge Registries. Surgical procedures were categorized by body system group and lag time to onset of sCJD. Exposure frequencies were compared using logistic regression. Results A history of any major surgery, conducted ≥20 years before sCJD onset, was more common in cases than both matched (OR = 2.44, 95% CI = 1.46–4.07) and unmatched controls (OR = 2.25, 95% CI = 1.48–3.44). This observation was corroborated by a linear increase in risk per surgical discharge (OR = 1.57, 95% CI = 1.13–2.18; OR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.18–1.91). Surgery of various body systems, including peripheral vessels, digestive system and spleen, and female genital organs, was significantly associated with increased sCJD risk. Conclusions A variety of major surgical procedures constitute a risk factor for sCJD following an incubation period of many years. A considerable number of sCJD cases may originate from health care-related accidental transmission. PMID:18843192

  10. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease MM1+2C and MM1 are Identical in Transmission Properties.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Matsuura, Yuichi; Iwaki, Toru; Iwasaki, Yasushi; Yoshida, Mari; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Murayama, Shigeo; Takao, Masaki; Kato, Shinsuke; Yamada, Masahito; Mohri, Shirou; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The genotype (methionine, M or valine, V) at polymorphic codon 129 of the PRNP gene and the type (1 or 2) of abnormal prion protein in the brain are the major determinants of the clinicopathological features of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), thus providing molecular basis for classification of sporadic CJD, that is, MM1, MM2, MV1, MV2, VV1 or VV2. In addition to these "pure" cases, "mixed" cases presenting mixed neuropathological and biochemical features have also been recognized. The most frequently observed mixed form is the co-occurrence of MM1 and MM2, namely MM1+2. However, it has remained elusive whether MM1+2 could be a causative origin of dura mater graft-associated CJD (dCJD), one of the largest subgroups of iatrogenic CJD. To test this possibility, we performed transmission experiments of MM1+2 prions and a systematic neuropathological examination of dCJD patients in the present study. The transmission properties of the MM1+2 prions were identical to those of MM1 prions because MM2 prions lacked transmissibility. In addition, the neuropathological characteristics of MM2 were totally absent in dCJD patients examined. These results suggest that MM1+2 can be a causative origin of dCJD and causes neuropathological phenotype similar to that of MM1. PMID:25851836

  11. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: Prion Pathology in Medulla Oblongata—Possible Routes of Infection and Host Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Iacono, Diego; Ferrari, Sergio; Gelati, Matteo; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Mariotto, Sara; Monaco, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), the most frequent human prion disorder, is characterized by remarkable phenotypic variability, which is influenced by the conformation of the pathologic prion protein and the methionine/valine polymorphic codon 129 of the prion protein gene. While the etiology of sCJD remains unknown, it has been hypothesized that environmental exposure to prions might occur through conjunctival/mucosal contact, oral ingestion, inhalation, or simultaneous involvement of the olfactory and enteric systems. We studied 21 subjects with definite sCJD to assess neuropathological involvement of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and other medullary nuclei and to evaluate possible associations with codon 129 genotype and prion protein conformation. The present data show that prion protein deposition was detected in medullary nuclei of distinct sCJD subtypes, either valine homozygous or heterozygous at codon 129. These findings suggest that an “environmental exposure” might occur, supporting the hypothesis that external sources of contamination could contribute to sCJD in susceptible hosts. Furthermore, these novel data could shed the light on possible causes of sCJD through a “triple match” hypothesis that identify environmental exposure, host genotype, and direct exposure of specific anatomical regions as possible pathogenetic factors. PMID:26457299

  12. The epidemics of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Peter G.

    2003-01-01

    The large epidemic of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in the United Kingdom has been in decline since 1992, but has spread to other countries. The extensive control measures that have been put in place across the European Union and also in Switzerland should have brought the transmission of BSE under control in these countries, provided that the measures were properly enforced. Postmortem tests on brain tissue enable infected animals to be detected during the late stages of the incubation period, but tests that can be performed on live animals (including humans) and that will detect infections early are urgently needed. The number of infected animals currently entering the food chain is probably small, and the controls placed on bovine tissues in the European Union and Switzerland should ensure that any risks to human health are small and diminishing. Vigilance is required in all countries, especially in those in which there has been within-species recycling of ruminant feed. Fewer than 150 people, globally, have been diagnosed with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), but there are many uncertainties about the future course of the epidemic because of the long and variable incubation period. Better control measures are necessary to guard against the possibility of iatrogenic transmission through blood transfusion or contaminated surgical instruments. These measures will required sensitive and specific, diagnostic tests and improved decontamination methods. PMID:12751420

  13. Genomic Characteristics of Genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Patients with V180I Mutation and Associations with Other Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sol Moe; Chung, Myungguen; Hyeon, Jae Wook; Jeong, Seok Won; Ju, Young Ran; Kim, Heebal; Lee, Jeongmin; Kim, SangYun; An, Seong Soo A; Cho, Sung Beom; Lee, Yeong Seon; Kim, Su Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Inherited prion diseases (IPDs), including genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (gCJD), account for 10-15% of cases of prion diseases and are associated with several pathogenic mutations, including P102L, V180I, and E200K, in the prion protein gene (PRNP). The valine to isoleucine substitution at codon 180 (V180I) of PRNP is the most common pathogenic mutation causing gCJD in East Asian patients. In this study, we conducted follow-up analyses to identify candidate factors and their associations with disease onset. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data of five gCJD patients with V180I mutation and 145 healthy individuals were used to identify genomic differences. A total of 18,648,850 candidate variants were observed in only the patient group, 29 of them were validated as variants. Four of these validated variants were nonsense mutations, six were observed in genes directly or indirectly related to neurodegenerative disorders (NDs), such as LPA, LRRK2, and FGF20. More than half of validated variants were categorized in Gene Ontology (GO) terms of binding and/or catalytic activity. Moreover, we found differential genome variants in gCJD patients with V180I mutation, including one uniquely surviving 10 years after diagnosis of the disease. Elucidation of the relationships between gCJD and Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease at the genomic level will facilitate further advances in our understanding of the specific mechanisms mediating the pathogenesis of NDs and gold standard therapies for NDs. PMID:27341347

  14. Genomic Characteristics of Genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Patients with V180I Mutation and Associations with Other Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sol Moe; Chung, Myungguen; Hyeon, Jae Wook; Jeong, Seok Won; Ju, Young Ran; Kim, Heebal; Lee, Jeongmin; Kim, SangYun; An, Seong Soo A.; Cho, Sung Beom; Lee, Yeong Seon; Kim, Su Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Inherited prion diseases (IPDs), including genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (gCJD), account for 10–15% of cases of prion diseases and are associated with several pathogenic mutations, including P102L, V180I, and E200K, in the prion protein gene (PRNP). The valine to isoleucine substitution at codon 180 (V180I) of PRNP is the most common pathogenic mutation causing gCJD in East Asian patients. In this study, we conducted follow-up analyses to identify candidate factors and their associations with disease onset. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data of five gCJD patients with V180I mutation and 145 healthy individuals were used to identify genomic differences. A total of 18,648,850 candidate variants were observed in only the patient group, 29 of them were validated as variants. Four of these validated variants were nonsense mutations, six were observed in genes directly or indirectly related to neurodegenerative disorders (NDs), such as LPA, LRRK2, and FGF20. More than half of validated variants were categorized in Gene Ontology (GO) terms of binding and/or catalytic activity. Moreover, we found differential genome variants in gCJD patients with V180I mutation, including one uniquely surviving 10 years after diagnosis of the disease. Elucidation of the relationships between gCJD and Alzheimer’s disease or Parkinson’s disease at the genomic level will facilitate further advances in our understanding of the specific mechanisms mediating the pathogenesis of NDs and gold standard therapies for NDs. PMID:27341347

  15. Prion Protein-Hemin Interaction Upregulates Hemoglobin Synthesis: Implications for Cerebral Hemorrhage and Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Ajai K; Singh, Neena

    2016-01-01

    Hemin is known to induce endocytosis of prion-protein (PrP(C)) from the neuronal plasma membrane, potentially limiting propagation of the disease causing PrP-scrapie (PrP(Sc)) isoform. Hemin is therefore an attractive disease-modifying option for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), a human prion disorder with no effective treatment. The hemin-PrP(C) interaction is also of interest in cerebral-hemorrhage (CH), a condition where potentially toxic hemin molecules come in contact with neuronal PrP(C). Interestingly, PrP(C) is upregulated in penumbric neurons surrounding CH and is known to confer neuroprotection in a dose-dependent manner. The underlying mechanism, however, is not clear. Here, we report that hemin binds PrP(C) on diverse cell lines, resulting in its aggregation or degradation in a cell-type specific manner. Surprisingly, the hemin-PrP(C) interaction upregulates Hb synthesis in hematopoietic cells, a response reversed by deleting the hemin-binding octa-peptide repeat region of PrP(C). A similar response is noted in brain organotypic cultures where exposure to hemin induces significantly more α-globin in wild-type (PrP(+/+)) relative to PrP-knock-out (PrP(-/-)) samples. Furthermore, red blood cells and brain tissue from PrP(-/-) mice show significantly less α-globin relative to PrP(+/+) controls, indicating a positive effect of PrP(C) on Hb synthesis under physiological conditions as well. Surprisingly, levels of α-globin are significantly higher in sCJD brain tissue relative to controls, suggesting compensatory upregulation of Hb synthesis by surviving neurons or misregulation in diseased brains. These observations reveal a unique function of PrP(C) that is likely to impact the therapeutic management of CH and sCJD. PMID:26836195

  16. Revisiting the Heidenhain Variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: Evidence for Prion Type Variability Influencing Clinical Course and Laboratory Findings.

    PubMed

    Baiardi, Simone; Capellari, Sabina; Ladogana, Anna; Strumia, Silvia; Santangelo, Mario; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Parchi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    The Heidenhain variant defines a peculiar clinical presentation of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) characterized by isolated visual disturbances at disease onset and reflecting the early targeting of prions to the occipital cortex. Molecular and histopathological typing, thus far performed in 23 cases, has linked the Heidenhain variant to the MM1 sCJD type. To contribute a comprehensive characterization of cases with the Heidenhain variant, we reviewed a series of 370 definite sCJD cases. Eighteen patients (4.9%) fulfilled the selection criteria. Fourteen of them belonging to sCJD types MM1 or MM1+2C had a short duration of isolated visual symptoms and overall clinical disease, a high prevalence of periodic sharp-wave complexes in EEG, and a marked increase of cerebrospinal fluid proteins t-tau and 14-3-3 levels. In contrast, three cases of the MM 2C or MM 2+1C types showed a longer duration of isolated visual symptoms and overall clinical disease, non-specific EEG findings, and cerebrospinal fluid concentration below threshold for the diagnosis of "probable" CJD of both 14-3-3 and t-tau. However, a brain DWI-MRI disclosed an occipital cortical hyperintensity in the majority of examined cases of both groups. While confirming the strong linkage with the methionine genotype at the polymorphic codon 129 of the prion protein gene, our results definitely establish that the Heidenhain variant can also be associated with the MM 2C sCJD type in addition to the more common MM1 type. Likewise, our results highlight the significant differences in clinical evolution and laboratory findings between cases according to the dominant PrPSc type (type 1 versus type 2). PMID:26682685

  17. Revisiting the Heidenhain Variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: Evidence for Prion Type Variability Influencing Clinical Course and Laboratory Findings

    PubMed Central

    Baiardi, Simone; Capellari, Sabina; Ladogana, Anna; Strumia, Silvia; Santangelo, Mario; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Parchi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    The Heidenhain variant defines a peculiar clinical presentation of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) characterized by isolated visual disturbances at disease onset and reflecting the early targeting of prions to the occipital cortex. Molecular and histopathological typing, thus far performed in 23 cases, has linked the Heidenhain variant to the MM1 sCJD type. To contribute a comprehensive characterization of cases with the Heidenhain variant, we reviewed a series of 370 definite sCJD cases. Eighteen patients (4.9%) fulfilled the selection criteria. Fourteen of them belonging to sCJD types MM1 or MM1+2C had a short duration of isolated visual symptoms and overall clinical disease, a high prevalence of periodic sharp-wave complexes in EEG, and a marked increase of cerebrospinal fluid proteins t-tau and 14-3-3 levels. In contrast, three cases of the MM 2C or MM 2+1C types showed a longer duration of isolated visual symptoms and overall clinical disease, non-specific EEG findings, and cerebrospinal fluid concentration below threshold for the diagnosis of “probable” CJD of both 14-3-3 and t-tau. However, a brain DWI-MRI disclosed an occipital cortical hyperintensity in the majority of examined cases of both groups. While confirming the strong linkage with the methionine genotype at the polymorphic codon 129 of the prion protein gene, our results definitely establish that the Heidenhain variant can also be associated with the MM 2C sCJD type in addition to the more common MM1 type. Likewise, our results highlight the significant differences in clinical evolution and laboratory findings between cases according to the dominant PrPSc type (type 1 versus type 2). PMID:26682685

  18. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease diagnostic accuracy is improved by a new CSF ELISA 14-3-3γ assay.

    PubMed

    Leitão, M J; Baldeiras, I; Almeida, M R; Ribeiro, M H; Santos, A C; Ribeiro, M; Tomás, J; Rocha, S; Santana, I; Oliveira, C R

    2016-05-13

    Protein 14-3-3 is a reliable marker of rapid neuronal damage, specifically increased in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) patients. Its detection is usually performed by Western Blot (WB), prone to methodological issues. Our aim was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of a recently developed quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) assay for 14-3-3γ, in comparison with WB and other neurodegeneration markers. CSF samples from 145 patients with suspicion of prion disease, later classified as definite sCJD (n=72) or Non-prion diseases (Non-CJD; n=73) comprised our population. 14-3-3 protein was determined by WB and ELISA. Total Tau (t-Tau) and phosphorylated Tau (p-Tau) were also evaluated. Apolipoprotein E gene (ApoE) and prionic protein gene (PRNP) genotyping was assessed. ELISA 14-3-3γ levels were significantly increased in sCJD compared to Non-CJD patients (p<0.001), showing very good accuracy (AUC=0.982; sensitivity=97%; specificity=94%), and matching WB results in 81% of all cases. It strongly correlated with t-Tau and p-Tau (p<0.0001), showing slightly higher specificity (14-3-3 WB - 63%; Tau - 90%; p-Tau/t-Tau ratio - 88%). From WB inconclusive results (n=44), ELISA 14-3-3γ correctly classified 41 patients. Additionally, logistic regression analysis selected ELISA 14-3-3γ as the best single predictive marker for sCJD (overall accuracy=93%). ApoE and PRNP genotypes did not influence ELISA 14-3-3γ levels. Despite specificity for 14-3-3γ isoform, ELISA results not only match WB evaluation but also help discrimination of inconclusive results. Our results therefore reinforce this assay as a single screening test, allowing higher sample throughput and unequivocal results. PMID:26940479

  19. Validation of 14-3-3 Protein as a Marker in Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Diagnostic.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Matthias; Ebert, Elisabeth; Stoeck, Katharina; Karch, André; Collins, Steven; Calero, Miguel; Sklaviadis, Theodor; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Golanska, Ewa; Baldeiras, Ines; Satoh, Katsuya; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Ladogana, Anna; Skinningsrud, Anders; Hammarin, Anna-Lena; Mitrova, Eva; Llorens, Franc; Kim, Yong Sun; Green, Alison; Zerr, Inga

    2016-05-01

    At present, the testing of 14-3-3 protein in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a standard biomarker test in suspected sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) diagnosis. Increasing 14-3-3 test referrals in CJD reference laboratories in the last years have led to an urgent need to improve established 14-3-3 test methods. The main result of our study was the validation of a commercially available 14-3-3 ELISA next to the commonly used Western blot method as a high-throughput screening test. Hereby, 14-3-3 protein expression was quantitatively analyzed in CSF of 231 sCJD and 2035 control patients. We obtained excellent sensitivity/specificity values of 88 and 96% that are comparable to the established Western blot method. Since standard protocols and preanalytical sample handling have become more important in routine diagnostic, we investigated in a further step the reproducibility and stability of 14-3-3 as a biomarker for human prion diseases. Ring trial data from 2009 to 2013 revealed an increase of Fleiss' kappa from 0.51 to 0.68 indicating an improving reliability of 14-3-3 protein detection. The stability of 14-3-3 protein under short-term and long-term storage conditions at various temperatures and after repeated freezing/thawing cycles was confirmed. Contamination of CSF samples with blood appears likely to be an important factor at a concentration of more than 2500 erythrocytes/μL. Hemolysis of erythrocytes with significant release of 14-3-3 protein started after 2 days at room temperature. We first define clear standards for the sample handling, short- and long-term storage of CSF samples as well as the handling of blood- contaminated samples which may result in artificially elevated CSF levels of 14-3-3. PMID:25947081

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid real-time quaking-induced conversion is a robust and reliable test for sporadic creutzfeldt-jakob disease: An international study.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Lynne I; Poleggi, Anna; Poggiolini, Ilaria; Suardi, Silvia; Grznarova, Katarina; Shi, Song; de Vil, Bart; Sarros, Shannon; Satoh, Katsuya; Cheng, Keding; Cramm, Maria; Fairfoul, Graham; Schmitz, Matthias; Zerr, Inga; Cras, Patrick; Equestre, Michele; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Knox, David; Collins, Steven; Haïk, Stéphane; Parchi, Piero; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Green, Alison

    2016-07-01

    Real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) has been proposed as a sensitive diagnostic test for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease; however, before this assay can be introduced into clinical practice, its reliability and reproducibility need to be demonstrated. Two international ring trials were undertaken in which a set of 25 cerebrospinal fluid samples were analyzed by a total of 11 different centers using a range of recombinant prion protein substrates and instrumentation. The results show almost complete concordance between the centers and demonstrate that RT-QuIC is a suitably reliable and robust technique for clinical practice. Ann Neurol 2016;80:160-165. PMID:27130376

  1. Analysis of the compliance and the related influence factors in the follow-up process of surveillance for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Xiao, Kang; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Cao; Lv, Yan; Chen, Li-Na; Shi, Qi; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a kind of rare, rapidly progressive fatal central nervous system disorders. In China, the surveillance for CJD has started since 2006. As one of the major issues in CJD surveillance, the follow-up process via telephone plays important role in CJD diagnosis and surveillance. Although the follow-up process was conducted by the experiential staffs from CJD surveillance center in China CDC, it is frequently encountered that some interviewed family members do not cooperate well during follow-up. To screen the possible factors influence on the compliances of the interviewees during CJD follow-up, 11 independent variables from patient aspect and 4 variables from interviewee aspect were selected and a questionnaire was prepared. Based on 199 suspected sporadic CJD cases reported to CJD surveillance center in 2013, a telephone-inquiring was conducted and the degree of compliances of the interviewees were given as good, fair or poor. After screened with univariate analysis and evaluated ordinal logistic regression analysis, several indictors, such as the patient gender, CJD diagnosis, numbers of clinical symptoms, continual medical treatment after diagnosis, medical treatment mode, as well as the relationship with the patient and CJD knowledge of the interviewees, showed influence on the compliance in CJD follow-up process significantly. The data here provide for the first time the factors related with the compliances of the interviewed family members of the suspected CJD patients during follow-up process, which supplies useful clue for us to improve CJD follow-up process and increase the capacity of CJD surveillance. PMID:25482599

  2. An experiential learning model applied to nurses working with patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    D'Amour, Rolande; Guimond, Pierrette

    2010-01-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease (C/D) is a rare neurological disease, transmissible, incurable and always fatal affecting humans, as well as animals. In the 1980s, the "mad cow disease" (MCD) epidemic in the United Kingdom popularized prion diseases worldwide. However, this contributed to the proliferation of disinformation, causing confusion between C/D and MCD in the public, as well as in some health care providers. The purpose of this article is to describe the process utilized to develop, implement, and evaluate a workshop on CJD for nurses and other health care providers. Kolb's experiential teaching/learning model was used as a framework for this workshop. A workbook was developed to complement the participants' learning. Fifteen health care providers from the Alzheimer Society of Canada's Dementia Network agreed to participate in this educational project. The results indicated that the participants had limited knowledge about C/D. They felt ill prepared and uncomfortable in providing quality care to this patient population. The workshop generated new insights and knowledge about the disease and the needs of the patients and their families. Participants exchanged ideas for tailored interventions. An experiential teaching/learning model is a highly effective approach to increase knowledge and skills, as well as fostering reflective practice. PMID:20533643

  3. Late-in-life surgery associated with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: a methodological outline for evidence-based guidance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is increasing epidemiological evidence of etiological links between general surgery and sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) with long incubation periods. The purpose of this study was to identify specific surgical procedures potentially associated with sCJD to be targeted for preventive presurgical-intervention guidance. Results We propose a three-step clinical guidance outline where surgical procedures associated with sCJD clinical onset – potentially more contaminant - are taken into account. Data on hospital discharges and surgical procedures were obtained from Danish and Swedish national in-patient hospital registries for 167 sCJD cases, onset 1987–2003, and for 835 matched and 2,224 unmatched population controls. Surgery was allocated to different life-time periods as previously reported, and frequencies were compared using logistic regression analysis. In the year preceding clinical onset, persons with sCJD underwent a statistically significant higher number of minor surgical interventions (OR (95% CI): 17.50 (3.64-84.24)), transluminal endoscopies (OR: 2.73 (1.01–7.37)) and gastrointestinal operations (OR: 3.51 (1.21–10.19)) compared to matched controls. Surgical discharges clustered towards clinical onset. These differences increased during the clinical period, with statistically significant higher frequencies for both endoscopies and minor surgery (OR: 13.91 (5.87-32.95), and for main surgical procedures (OR: 2.10 (1.00-4.39)), particularly gastrointestinal surgery (OR: 6.00 (1.83-19.66)), and surgery contacting skeletal muscle. Comparisons with unmatched controls yielded similar results for neurosurgery in the clinical period (OR: 19.40 (2.22-168.34)). Conclusions These results suggest that some types of surgical procedures are associated with sCJD, after clinical onset or particularly just before onset. Selective planning of such surgery to minimize instrument/device contamination or quarantining might be feasible

  4. CSF Tau proteins reduce misdiagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease suspected cases with inconclusive 14-3-3 result.

    PubMed

    Leitão, M J; Baldeiras, I; Almeida, M R; Ribeiro, M H; Santos, A C; Ribeiro, M; Tomás, J; Rocha, S; Santana, I; Oliveira, C R

    2016-09-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 14-3-3 protein supports sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob (sCJD) diagnosis, but often leads to weak-positive results and lacks standardization. In this study, we explored the added diagnostic value of Total Tau (t-Tau) and phosphorylated Tau (p-Tau) in sCJD diagnosis, particularly in the cases with inconclusive 14-3-3 result. 95 definite sCJD and 287 patients without prion disease (non-CJD) were included in this study. CSF samples were collected in routine clinical diagnosis and analysed for 14-3-3 detection by Western blot (WB). CSF t-Tau and p-Tau were quantified by commercial ELISA kits and PRNP and APOE genotyping assessed by PCR-RFLP. In a regression analysis of the whole cohort, 14-3-3 protein revealed an overall accuracy of 82 % (sensitivity = 96.7 %; specificity = 75.6 %) for sCJD. Regarding 14-3-3 clear positive results, we observed no added value either of t-Tau alone or p-Tau/t-Tau ratio in the model. On the other hand, considering 14-3-3 weak-positive cases, t-Tau protein increased the overall accuracy of 14-3-3 alone from 91 to 94 % and specificity from 74 to 93 % (p < 0.05), with no sensitivity improvement. However, inclusion of p-Tau/t-Tau ratio did not significantly improve the first model (p = 0.0595). Globally, t-Tau protein allowed a further discrimination of 65 % within 14-3-3 inconclusive results. Furthermore, PRNP MV genotype showed a trend to decrease 14-3-3 sensitivity (p = 0.051), but such effect was not seen on t-Tau protein. In light of these results, we suggest that t-Tau protein assay is of significant importance as a second marker in identifying 14-3-3 false-positive results among sCJD probable cases. PMID:27357003

  5. Creutzfeldt-Jakob-Like Syndrome due to Hypercalcemic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Rösche, Johannes; Sieveking, Catharina; Kampf, Christina; Benecke, Reiner

    2015-10-01

    Hypercalcemia can cause a subacute syndrome of progressive dementia and marked changes in the electroencephalogram (EEG). We report a case of iatrogenic hypercalcemia with a close correlation between the clinical course and the EEG changes. A 73-year-old woman presented with a subacute syndrome of progressive dementia and bursts of 1.5 to 2 Hz intermittent rhythmic delta activity superimposed on a low-voltage background activity in the EEG. Clinical and EEG abnormalities rapidly resolved after normalization of serum calcium levels. As part of the diagnostic workup of a subacute progressive dementia, a serum calcium level and an EEG should be obtained to detect a Creutzfeldt-Jakob like syndrome in hypercalcemia. Unlike in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob-like syndrome induced by lithium intoxication, there are rarely myoclonic jerks and periodic discharges in hypercalcemic encephalopathy. PMID:24973231

  6. Alien hand and leg as the presenting feature of probable sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: A rare presentation of a rare disease.

    PubMed

    Kumawat, Banshi Lal; Sharma, Chandra Mohan; Nath, Kunal; Acharya, Mihir; Khandelwal, Dinesh; Jain, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) can have varied clinical presentation depending upon the genotype at codon 129. The common presenting clinical features of sCJD are rapid onset cognitive impairment, ataxia, psychosis and visual signs (field defects, distortion, cortical blindness). Alien limb sign was first described in patients with corpus callosal tumors and later with other neurodegenerative conditions like corticobasal degeneration. Alien hand complaints as the presenting feature of sCJD has been described in literature, but simultaneous alien hand and leg has been rarely described as presenting feature of sCJD. We describe here a case of a 55-year-old man who presented with progressive left alien hand and leg as the sole clinical manifestation of probable sCJD. PMID:25745324

  7. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and mad cows: lessons learnt from yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, J; Wolf, H; Grassmann, A; Arndt, V; Graham, J; Vorberg, I

    2012-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are fatal neurodegenerative diseases that affect mammals including humans. The proteinaceous nature of the infectious agent, the prion, and its propagation, challenge established dogmas in biology. It is now widely accepted that prion diseases are caused by unconventional agents principally composed of a misfolded host-encoded protein, PrP. Surprisingly, major break-throughs in prion research came from studies on functionally unrelated proteins in yeast and filamentous fungi. Aggregates composed of these proteins act as epigenetic elements of inheritance that can propagate their alternative states by a conformational switch into an ordered ß-sheet rich polymer just like mammalian prions. Since their discovery prions of lower eukaryotes have provided invaluable insights into all aspects of prion biogenesis. Importantly, yeast prions provide proof-of-principle that distinct protein conformers can be infectious and can serve as genetic elements that have the capacity to encipher strain specific information. As a powerful and tractable model system, yeast prions will continue to increase our understanding of prion-host cell interaction and potential mechanisms of protein-based epigenetic inheritance. PMID:22270552

  8. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... advice early in the course of the disorder. Advance directive , power of attorney, and other legal actions ... easier to control, give patients time to make advance directives and prepare for the end of life, ...

  9. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... damage leads to rapid decline in thinking and reasoning as well as involuntary muscle movements, confusion, difficulty ... been tested but have not shown any benefit. Clinical studies of potential CJD treatments are complicated by ...

  10. Sporadic MM2-thalamic + cortical Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Utility of diffusion tensor imaging in the detection of cortical involvement in vivo.

    PubMed

    Grau-Rivera, Oriol; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Bargalló, Nuria; Lladó, Albert; Gaig, Carles; Nos, Carlos; Ferrer, Isidre; Graus, Francesc; Gelpi, Ellen

    2016-04-01

    In sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), high signal intensity in fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) sequences in striatum and/or cortical regions of the brain are present in about 83% of cases, reflecting tissue damage, such as spongiform change and abnormal prion protein deposits. Novel diffusion sequences of MRI might improve the detection of CJD characteristic changes in the subset of patients in whom these alterations are absent or less evident. We report a neuropathologically confirmed case of the rare MM2 T + C subtype of sCJD, with mixed clinical and neuropathological features of MM2 thalamic and MM2 cortical subtypes, in whom the use of diffusion tensor imaging helped to identify cortical hyperintensities that could be easily overlooked with conventional DWI. PMID:26542448

  11. [Epidemics of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. Most recent findings on prion disease].

    PubMed

    Calza, L; Manfredi, R; Chiodo, F

    2001-02-01

    Prion diseases have been popularized by extensive media coverage of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) or "mad cow disease" epidemic, observed in Great Britain since 1986, and new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (nvCJD), reported for the first time in 1996. In contrast to the classical form of the disease, nvCJD affects younger patients, presents a relatively longer duration of illness and is caused by the same agent as BSE. Evidence from laboratory studies now strongly supports the hypothesis that new variant represents human form of animal disease, linked to exposure, probably through food, to bovine prions. Number of BSE reports in the United Kingdom began to decline in 1993, and has continuously decreased year by year since then, but a great worry spread in European countries in association with new BSE reported cases outside of the Great Britain, and increasing incidence of nvCJD. New epidemiological, clinical, histopathological and experimental data on prion diseases are reviewed, focusing our attention on the possible transmission of prion proteins from animals to humans. PMID:11294108

  12. Thinking the unthinkable: Alzheimer's, Creutzfeldt-Jakob and Mad Cow disease: the age-related reemergence of virulent, foodborne, bovine tuberculosis or losing your mind for the sake of a shake or burger.

    PubMed

    Broxmeyer, Lawrence

    2005-01-01

    The possibility of the age-related reemergence of foodborne Mycobacterium bovis (bovine tuberculosis) as a vector for Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD or human Mad Cow Disease) and Mad Cow disease itself is real. The CDC reported last May of an outbreak of CJD linked to the consumption of meat contaminated "with the agent causing" bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in a New Jersey racetrack between the time frame 1995-2004. In the opinion of experts, ample justification exists for considering a similar pathogenesis for Alzheimer's, Creutzfeldt-Jakob and the other spongiform encephalopathies such as Mad Cow disease. In fact, Creutzfeldt-Jakob and Alzheimer's often coexist and at this point are thought to differ merely by time-dependent physical changes. A recent study links up to 13% of all "Alzheimer's" victims as really having Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Bovine tuberculosis, which includes Mycobacterium bovis and M. avium-intracellulare or paratuberculosis, is and has always been the most prevalent threat to the cattle industry, and the USDA reports that between 20% and 40% of US dairy herds are infected with paratuberculosis alone. The health risk for milk tainted with M. bovis has been known for decades and there was a time not so long ago when "tuberculin-tested" was printed on every milk container. Schliesser stated that meat from tuberculous animals may also constitute a significant risk of infection. At the turn of the 20th century 25% of the many US deaths from TB in adults were caused by M. bovis. Dairy products aside, when past and present meat consumption are factored in, there is three times the risk of developing Alzheimer's in meat eaters as opposed to vegetarians. The investigation into the causal trail for Creutzfeldt-Jakob, indistinguishable from Alzheimer's except for its shorter, lethal course might have grown cold where it not for Roel's and others who linked mad cow in cattle with M. bovis and related paratuberculosis on clinical, pathologic

  13. Failure to detect the presence of prions in the uterine and gestational tissues from a Gravida with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiangzhu; Miravalle, Leticia; Yuan, Jue; McGeehan, John; Dong, Zhiqian; Wyza, Robert; MacLennan, Gregory T; Golichowski, Alan M; Kneale, Geoff; King, Nicholas; Kong, Qingzhong; Spina, Salvatore; Vidal, Ruben; Ghetti, Bernardino; Roos, Karen; Gambetti, Pierluigi; Zou, Wen-Quan

    2009-05-01

    The vertical transmission of a prion disease from infected mothers to their offspring is believed to be one of the routes for the natural spread of animal prion diseases. Supporting this notion is the observation that prion infectivity occurs in the placenta of infected ewes. Furthermore, the prion protein (PrP), both in its cellular form (PrP(C)) and its pathological isoform (PrP(Sc)), has been observed at the fetal-maternal interface of scrapie-infected sheep. However, whether these features of prion infectivity also hold true for human prion diseases is currently unknown. To begin to address such an important question, we examined PrP in the uterus as well as gestational tissues, including the placenta and amniotic fluid, in a pregnant woman with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Although the proteinase K (PK)-resistant prion protein, PrP27-30, was present in the brain tissues of the mother, the PrP detected in the uterus, placenta, and amniotic fluid was sensitive to PK digestion. Unlike PrP(C) in the brain and adjacent cerebrospinal fluid, the predominant PrP species in the reproductive and gestational tissues were N-terminally truncated, similar to urine PrP. Our study did not detect abnormal PrP in the reproductive and gestational tissues in this case of CJD. Nevertheless, examination by a highly sensitive bioassay is ongoing to ascertain possible prion infectivity from CJD in the amniotic fluid. PMID:19349373

  14. Prion Diseases: Update on Mad Cow Disease, Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, and the Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Janka, Jacqueline; Maldarelli, Frank

    2004-08-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of progressive, fatal neurodegenerative disorders that share a common spongiform histopathology. TSEs may be transmitted in a sporadic, familial, iatrogenic, or zoonotic fashion. The putative infectious agent of TSE, the prion, represents a novel paradigm of infectious disease with disease transmission in the absence of nucleic acid. Several small but spectacular epidemics of TSEs in man have prompted widespread public health and food safety concerns. Although TSEs affect a comparatively small number of individuals, prion research has revealed fascinating insights of direct relevance to common illnesses. This paper reviews recent advances that have shed new light on the nature of prions and TSEs. PMID:15265460

  15. A study of clinical profile, radiological and electroencephalographic characteristics of suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a tertiary care centre in South India

    PubMed Central

    Mahale, Rohan R.; Javali, Mahendra; Mehta, Anish; Sharma, Suryanarayana; Acharya, Purushottam; Srinivasa, Rangasetty

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a progressive, fatal, neurodegenerative disease classified under transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) or prion diseases. It is characterized by long asymptomatic period followed by rapid clinical deterioration leading to the death within months. The disease is still under-reported in India. Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the clinical, radiological and electroencephalographic characteristics of eight cases of CJD encountered in MS Ramaiah Medical college and Hospital, Bangalore over the past 3 years (2010-2013). This was retrospective, observational, hospital-based study. Results: The mean age of patients was 66.6 years (range: 54-82) and there was female predominance (five patients). The main clinical manifestations were cognitive disturbance (8/8) and myoclonus (8/8), followed by behavioral disturbance (5/8), ataxia (5/8) and extra-pyramidal symptoms/signs (4/8). Time interval (mean) between onset of disease to death was 6.6 months (range: 3-14). Brain MRI abnormalities were noted in 6 patients: Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery hyperintensities with restriction on diffusion-weighted image/apparent diffusion coefficient (DWI/ADC) in caudate and putamen, and diffusion hyperintensities without restriction on ADC in parieto-occipital, frontal and temporal regions. Classical electroencephalogram (EEG) changes of periodic triphasic waves were seen in 87% of patients. The CSF 14-3-3 protein assay was positive in two patients (out of four). Seven cases were probable CJD and one was possible CJD. Conclusion: A strong clinical suspicion aided by characteristic brain MRI and EEG abnormalities is essential for timely diagnosis of this fatal disease. PMID:25552850

  16. The Levels of Tau Isoforms Containing Exon-2 and Exon-10 Segments Increased in the Cerebrospinal Fluids of the Patients with Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cao; Zhou, Wei; Lv, Yan; Shi, Qi; Wang, Jing; Xiao, Kang; Chen, Li-Na; Zhang, Bao-Yun; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-08-01

    The alteration of protein tau in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) has been widely evaluated, possessing a significant diagnostic value for CJD. With the biotin-labeled tau-exon-specific mAbs, direct ELISA methods were established and the levels of tau isoforms containing exon-2 and exon-10 segments in CSF of the patients with various human prion diseases and in brain tissues of scrapie-infected animals were evaluated. The results showed that the levels of tau, especially containing four repeats in microtubule binding domain, were increased in the CSF samples of the patients with sporadic CJD (sCJD). Using the unlabeled (cold) mixed exon-specific mAbs, a competitive tau ELISA was conducted based on a commercial tau kit. It revealed that the majority of the increased tau in the CSF of sCJD cases was derived from the tau isoforms with exon-2 and exon-10 segments. Increases of CSF tau isoforms with exon-2 and exon-10 segments were also observed in the patients of E200K and T188K genetic CJD (gCJD), but not in the cases of fatal familiar insomnia (FFI). The increasing levels of tau isoforms with exon-2 and exon-10 segments in the group of sCJD correlated well with the positive 14-3-3 in CSF. Additionally, the similar alterative profiles of tau isoforms with exon-2 and exon-10 segments were also observed in the brain tissues of scrapie-infected rodents and a sCJD patient. Our data here propose the tau isoforms with exon-2 and exon-10 segments increase in CSF of sCJD and some types of gCJD, which may help to understand the physiological metabolism and pathological significance of various tau isoforms in the pathogenesis of prion diseases. PMID:26188647

  17. Is brain copper deficiency in Alzheimer's, Lewy body, and Creutzfeldt Jakob diseases the common key for a free radical mechanism and oxidative stress-induced damage?

    PubMed

    Deloncle, Roger; Guillard, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer's (AD), Lewy body (LBD), and Creutzfeldt Jakob (CJD) diseases, similar pathological hallmarks have been described, one of which is brain deposition of abnormal protease-resistant proteins. For these pathologies, copper bound to proteins is able to protect against free radicals by reduction from cupric Cu++ to cupreous Cu+. We have previously demonstrated in bovine brain homogenate that free radicals produce proteinase K-resistant prion after manganese is substituted for copper. Since low brain copper levels have been described in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, in substantia nigra in Parkinson's disease, and in various brain regions in AD, LBD, and CJD, a mechanism has been proposed that may underlie the neurodegenerative processes that occur when copper protection against free radicals is impaired. In peptide sequences, the alpha acid proton near the peptide bond is highly mobile and can be pulled out by free radicals. It will produce a trivalent α-carbon radical and induce a free radical chain process that will generate a D-amino acid configuration in the peptide sequence. Since only L-amino acids are physiologically present in mammalian (human) proteins, it may be supposed that only physiological L-peptides can be recycled by physiological enzymes such as proteases. If a D-amino acid is found in the peptide sequence subsequent to deficient copper protection against free radicals, it will not be recognized and might alter the proteasome L-amino acid recycling from brain peptides. In the brain, there will result an accumulation of abnormal protease-resistant proteins such as those observed in AD, LBD, and CJD. PMID:25125459

  18. [Still a small problem with the mad cow disease? Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and other prion diseases: current status].

    PubMed

    Lundberg, P O

    2001-01-10

    This review is based on recent published research on the BSE/CJD/vCJD problem mainly from UK, Germany and France. The situation in Sweden seems to be fortunate for several reasons. The use of meat and bonemeal as animal fodder was forbidden in this country 13 years ago. Sweden has not had any sheep with scrapie for many years. No animals with BSE have so far been found in our country. The incidence of sporadic CJD in this country followed retrospectively from 1985 to 1996 and prospectively from 1997 to 1999 has been around 1.2 per million per year with no significant increase. Only few cases of familial CJD are known. No patient with iatrogenic CJD has ever been found. The use of growth hormone derived from human pituitary glands was abandoned in 1985 when recombinant human growth hormone became available. So far there is no indication that any of the CJD cases diagnosed in Sweden has been of the vCJD type, the one linked to BSE. However, as the incubation period for prion diseases is very long and the Swedes are frequent travellers there is a risk that people from our country could have contracted vCJD through consuming meat products in countries with BSE. As a precaution the consumption of brain, spinal cord, lymphatic tissue, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract should be avoided. Human pituitary derived growth hormone is still available in some countries and might be illegally imported into Sweden. PMID:11213704

  19. Distinctive properties of plaque-type dura mater graft-associated Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in cell-protein misfolding cyclic amplification.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Atsuko; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Parchi, Piero; Yamada, Masahito; Morita, Masanori; Uno, Shusei; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki

    2016-05-01

    There are two distinct subtypes of dura mater graft-associated Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (dCJD) with methionine homozygosity at codon 129 of the PRNP gene. The majority of cases is represented by a non-plaque-type (np-dCJD) resembling sporadic CJD (sCJD)-MM1 or -MV1, while the minority by a plaque-type (p-dCJD). p-dCJD shows distinctive phenotypic features, namely numerous kuru plaques and an abnormal isoform of prion protein (PrP(Sc)) intermediate in size between types 1 and 2. Transmission studies have shown that the unusual phenotypic features of p-dCJD are linked to the V2 prion strain that is associated with sCJD subtypes VV2 or -MV2. In this study, we applied protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) using recombinant human prion protein as a substrate and demonstrated that p-dCJD prions show amplification features that are distinct from those of np-dCJD. Although no amplification of np-dCJD prions was observed with either 129 M or 129 V substrate, p-dCJD prions were drastically amplified with the 129 V substrates, despite the PRNP codon 129 incompatibility between seed and substrate. Moreover, by using a type 2 PrP(Sc)-specific antibody not recognizing PrP(Sc) in p-dCJD, we found that type 2 products are generated de novo from p-dCJD prions during PMCA with the 129 V substrates. These findings suggest that our cell-PMCA is a useful tool for easily and rapidly identifying acquired CJD associated with the transmission of the V2 CJD strain to codon 129 methionine homozygotes, based on the preference for the 129 V substrate and the type of the amplified products. PMID:26878132

  20. Rapid and Highly Sensitive Detection of Variant Creutzfeldt - Jakob Disease Abnormal Prion Protein on Steel Surfaces by Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification: Application to Prion Decontamination Studies

    PubMed Central

    Belondrade, Maxime; Nicot, Simon; Béringue, Vincent; Coste, Joliette; Lehmann, Sylvain; Bougard, Daisy

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in the population remains uncertain, although it has been estimated that 1 in 2000 people in the United Kingdom are positive for abnormal prion protein (PrPTSE) by a recent survey of archived appendix tissues. The prominent lymphotropism of vCJD prions raises the possibility that some surgical procedures may be at risk of iatrogenic vCJD transmission in healthcare facilities. It is therefore vital that decontamination procedures applied to medical devices before their reprocessing are thoroughly validated. A current limitation is the lack of a rapid model permissive to human prions. Here, we developed a prion detection assay based on protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) technology combined with stainless-steel wire surfaces as carriers of prions (Surf-PMCA). This assay allowed the specific detection of minute quantities (10−8 brain dilution) of either human vCJD or ovine scrapie PrPTSE adsorbed onto a single steel wire, within a two week timeframe. Using Surf-PMCA we evaluated the performance of several reference and commercially available prion-specific decontamination procedures. Surprisingly, we found the efficiency of several marketed reagents to remove human vCJD PrPTSE was lower than expected. Overall, our results demonstrate that Surf-PMCA can be used as a rapid and ultrasensitive assay for the detection of human vCJD PrPTSE adsorbed onto a metallic surface, therefore facilitating the development and validation of decontamination procedures against human prions. PMID:26800081

  1. The reporting of theoretical health risks by the media: Canadian newspaper reporting of potential blood transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kumanan; Code, Catherine; Dornan, Christopher; Ahmad, Nadya; Hébert, Paul; Graham, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Background The media play an important role at the interface of science and policy by communicating scientific information to the public and policy makers. In issues of theoretical risk, in which there is scientific uncertainty, the media's role as disseminators of information is particularly important due to the potential to influence public perception of the severity of the risk. In this article we describe how the Canadian print media reported the theoretical risk of blood transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Methods We searched 3 newspaper databases for articles published by 6 major Canadian daily newspapers between January 1990 and December 1999. We identified all articles relating to blood transmission of CJD. In duplicate we extracted information from the articles and entered the information into a qualitative software program. We compared the observations obtained from this content analysis with information obtained from a previous policy analysis examining the Canadian blood system's decision-making concerning the potential transfusion transmission of CJD. Results Our search identified 245 relevant articles. We observed that newspapers in one instance accelerated a policy decision, which had important resource and health implication, by communicating information on risk to the public. We also observed that newspapers primarily relied upon expert opinion (47 articles) as opposed to published medical evidence (28 articles) when communicating risk information. Journalists we interviewed described the challenges of balancing their responsibility to raise awareness of potential health threats with not unnecessarily arousing fear amongst the public. Conclusions Based on our findings we recommend that journalists report information from both expert opinion sources and from published studies when communicating information on risk. We also recommend researchers work more closely with journalists to assist them in identifying and appraising relevant

  2. Rapid and Highly Sensitive Detection of Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Abnormal Prion Protein on Steel Surfaces by Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification: Application to Prion Decontamination Studies.

    PubMed

    Belondrade, Maxime; Nicot, Simon; Béringue, Vincent; Coste, Joliette; Lehmann, Sylvain; Bougard, Daisy

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in the population remains uncertain, although it has been estimated that 1 in 2000 people in the United Kingdom are positive for abnormal prion protein (PrPTSE) by a recent survey of archived appendix tissues. The prominent lymphotropism of vCJD prions raises the possibility that some surgical procedures may be at risk of iatrogenic vCJD transmission in healthcare facilities. It is therefore vital that decontamination procedures applied to medical devices before their reprocessing are thoroughly validated. A current limitation is the lack of a rapid model permissive to human prions. Here, we developed a prion detection assay based on protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) technology combined with stainless-steel wire surfaces as carriers of prions (Surf-PMCA). This assay allowed the specific detection of minute quantities (10-8 brain dilution) of either human vCJD or ovine scrapie PrPTSE adsorbed onto a single steel wire, within a two week timeframe. Using Surf-PMCA we evaluated the performance of several reference and commercially available prion-specific decontamination procedures. Surprisingly, we found the efficiency of several marketed reagents to remove human vCJD PrPTSE was lower than expected. Overall, our results demonstrate that Surf-PMCA can be used as a rapid and ultrasensitive assay for the detection of human vCJD PrPTSE adsorbed onto a metallic surface, therefore facilitating the development and validation of decontamination procedures against human prions. PMID:26800081

  3. Batch recall of French plasma-derived products due to variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease risk: the psychological impact on haemophilic patients, changes in their therapeutic demands and behaviour and ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Aouba, A; Harroche, A; Frenzel, L; Torchet, M-F; Rothschild, C; François, I; Mamzer-Bruneel, M-F

    2015-01-01

    The choice of plasma-derived products (PdP) vs. recombinant products (RP) for treating haemophilia is influenced by the infectious and perceived safety of the products. Batch recall of PdP due to the risk of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) may have unfavourable psychological impacts on haemophilia patients and influence their product preferences. This study aimed to assess the psychological impact of batch recalls of PdP in six haemophilia patients and their therapeutic demands, and to discuss the ethical problems in physicians' management of this event. A survey was conducted using a new interview form and an existing anxiety and depression questionnaire. Batch recalls produce recurrent negative emotional outcomes in haemophiliacs and their families. The quality, understanding and efficiency of the batch recall announcements were unsatisfactory in some respects. Only one patient still had some of the vials in question, and only three patients understood the real reason for the batch recall. Four patients asked to change their PdP for RP; a fifth patient was considering doing so. Here, topics for discussion include the delivery of an unclear message to patients about a very uncertain risk of a frightening disease, the reasons to maintain PdP when RP are largely available, except in specific cases, and the related discomfort for caregivers. The ethical questions revealed by batch recalls and the high psychological impact of vCJD risk on patients can no longer be ignored, and require surveys assessing the rationales and choices of the healthcare authorities, manufacturers, prescribers and users. PMID:25545300

  4. Accelerated, Spleen-Based Titration of Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Infectivity in Transgenic Mice Expressing Human Prion Protein with Sensitivity Comparable to That of Survival Time Bioassay

    PubMed Central

    Halliez, Sophie; Reine, Fabienne; Herzog, Laetitia; Jaumain, Emilie; Haïk, Stéphane; Rezaei, Human; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Laude, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The dietary exposure of the human population to the prions responsible for the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) epizooty has led to the emergence of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). This fatal, untreatable neurodegenerative disorder is a growing public health concern because the prevalence of the infection seems much greater than the disease incidence and because secondary transmission of vCJD by blood transfusion or use of blood products has occurred. A current limitation in variant CJD risk assessment is the lack of quantitative information on the infectivity of contaminated tissues. To address this limitation, we tested the potential of a transgenic mouse line overexpressing human prion protein (PrP), which was previously reported to propagate vCJD prions. Endpoint titration of vCJD infectivity in different tissues was evaluated by two different methods: (i) the “classical” bioassay, based on the appearance of clinical symptoms and the detection of pathological prion protein in tissues of the inoculated mouse, and (ii) a shortened bioassay based on the detection of the protein in the mouse spleen at defined time points. The two methods proved equally sensitive in quantifying infectivity, even after very-low-dose inoculation of infected material, but the time schedule was shortened from ∼2.5 years to ∼1 year with the spleen bioassay. Compared to the “gold-standard” RIII model routinely used for endpoint titration of vCJD/BSE prions, either method improved the sensitivity by >2 orders of magnitude and allowed reevaluating the infectious titer of spleen from a vCJD individual at disease end stage to >1,000-fold-higher values. IMPORTANCE Here, we provide key reevaluation of the infectious titer of variant CJD brain and spleen tissues. The highly sensitive, accelerated spleen-based assay should thus constitute a key advance for variant CJD epidemiological and risk assessment purposes and should greatly facilitate future titration

  5. Glucose metabolism in nine patients with probable sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: FDG-PET study using SPM and individual patient analysis.

    PubMed

    Renard, Dimitri; Vandenberghe, Rik; Collombier, Laurent; Kotzki, Pierre-Olivier; Pouget, Jean-Pierre; Boudousq, Vincent

    2013-12-01

    Only one large series using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) reports on FDG-PET in sporadic (Heidenhain and non-Heidenhain variant) Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), describing hypometabolism in bilateral parietal, frontal, and occipital cortices. Our aim was to study FDG-PET in non-Heidenhain probable sCJD patients in order to assess the most pertinent FDG-PET pattern, and to compare FDG-PET and MRI data. We used both SPM and NeuroGam(®) software analysis, compared with healthy controls, to describe the FDG-PET abnormalities. Individual FDG-PET and MRI-DWI data were compared. SPM group analysis showed lateralized hypometabolism in the medial parietal cortex, the lateral and medial frontal (sparing Brodmann's area 4 and 6 and the anterior cingulate cortex), and lateral parietal cortex, in the absence of basal ganglia or cerebellar hypometabolism. The most severe hypometabolism was seen in Brodmann's area 31, and to a lesser degree area 23 (both areas correspond to the posterior cingulate cortex) and the precuneus. On individual analysis using NeuroGam(®) software, additional variable temporal cortex and frequent basal ganglia (with caudate nucleus as the most frequently involved structure) hypometabolism was seen, in the absence of cerebellar hypometabolism. The cerebral lobe cortex was more frequently and more severely hypometabolic than basal ganglia structures. Concordance between FDG-PET and MRI abnormalities was most often present for both the cerebral lobe cortex and the basal ganglia. In the case of discordance, FDG-PET was more sensitive than MRI for the cortex, whereas MRI was more sensitive than FDG-PET for the basal ganglia. When pathological, both cortical lobe cortex and basal ganglia involvement were slightly more often lateralized on FDG-PET than on MRI. Despite the presence of overlapping features with other diseases presenting with rapidly progressive dementia, the FDG-PET pattern we found in our non-Heidenhain sCJD patients may help in the

  6. Red-Backed Vole Brain Promotes Highly Efficient In Vitro Amplification of Abnormal Prion Protein from Macaque and Human Brains Infected with Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Agent

    PubMed Central

    Nemecek, Julie; Nag, Nabanita; Carlson, Christina M.; Schneider, Jay R.; Heisey, Dennis M.; Johnson, Christopher J.; Asher, David M.; Gregori, Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Rapid antemortem tests to detect individuals with transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) would contribute to public health. We investigated a technique known as protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) to amplify abnormal prion protein (PrPTSE) from highly diluted variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD)-infected human and macaque brain homogenates, seeking to improve the rapid detection of PrPTSE in tissues and blood. Macaque vCJD PrPTSE did not amplify using normal macaque brain homogenate as substrate (intraspecies PMCA). Next, we tested interspecies PMCA with normal brain homogenate of the southern red-backed vole (RBV), a close relative of the bank vole, seeded with macaque vCJD PrPTSE. The RBV has a natural polymorphism at residue 170 of the PrP-encoding gene (N/N, S/S, and S/N). We investigated the effect of this polymorphism on amplification of human and macaque vCJD PrPTSE. Meadow vole brain (170N/N PrP genotype) was also included in the panel of substrates tested. Both humans and macaques have the same 170S/S PrP genotype. Macaque PrPTSE was best amplified with RBV 170S/S brain, although 170N/N and 170S/N were also competent substrates, while meadow vole brain was a poor substrate. In contrast, human PrPTSE demonstrated a striking narrow selectivity for PMCA substrate and was successfully amplified only with RBV 170S/S brain. These observations suggest that macaque PrPTSE was more permissive than human PrPTSE in selecting the competent RBV substrate. RBV 170S/S brain was used to assess the sensitivity of PMCA with PrPTSE from brains of humans and macaques with vCJD. PrPTSE signals were reproducibly detected by Western blot in dilutions through 10-12 of vCJD-infected 10% brain homogenates. This is the first report showing PrPTSE from vCJD-infected human and macaque brains efficiently amplified with RBV brain as the substrate. Based on our estimates, PMCA showed a sensitivity that might be sufficient to detect PrPTSE in vCJD-infected human

  7. Red-backed vole brain promotes highly efficient in vitro amplification of abnormal prion protein from macaque and human brains infected with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease agent.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nemecek, Julie; Nag, Nabanita; Carlson, Christina M.; Schneider, Jay R.; Heisey, Dennis M.; Johnson, Christopher J.; Asher, David M.; Gregori, Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Rapid antemortem tests to detect individuals with transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) would contribute to public health. We investigated a technique known as protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) to amplify abnormal prion protein (PrPTSE) from highly diluted variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD)-infected human and macaque brain homogenates, seeking to improve the rapid detection of PrPTSE in tissues and blood. Macaque vCJD PrPTSE did not amplify using normal macaque brain homogenate as substrate (intraspecies PMCA). Next, we tested interspecies PMCA with normal brain homogenate of the southern red-backed vole (RBV), a close relative of the bank vole, seeded with macaque vCJD PrPTSE. The RBV has a natural polymorphism at residue 170 of the PrP-encoding gene (N/N, S/S, and S/N). We investigated the effect of this polymorphism on amplification of human and macaque vCJD PrPTSE. Meadow vole brain (170N/N PrP genotype) was also included in the panel of substrates tested. Both humans and macaques have the same 170S/S PrP genotype. Macaque PrPTSE was best amplified with RBV 170S/S brain, although 170N/N and 170S/N were also competent substrates, while meadow vole brain was a poor substrate. In contrast, human PrPTSE demonstrated a striking narrow selectivity for PMCA substrate and was successfully amplified only with RBV 170S/S brain. These observations suggest that macaque PrPTSE was more permissive than human PrPTSE in selecting the competent RBV substrate. RBV 170S/S brain was used to assess the sensitivity of PMCA with PrPTSE from brains of humans and macaques with vCJD. PrPTSE signals were reproducibly detected by Western blot in dilutions through 10-12 of vCJD-infected 10% brain homogenates. This is the first report showing PrPTSE from vCJD-infected human and macaque brains efficiently amplified with RBV brain as the substrate. Based on our estimates, PMCA showed a sensitivity that might be sufficient to detect PrPTSE in v

  8. R3-R4 deletion in the PRNP gene is associated with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)

    SciTech Connect

    Cervenakova, L.; Brown, P.; Nagle, J.

    1994-09-01

    There are conflicting reports on the association of deletions in the PRNP gene on chromosome 20 with CJD, a rapidly progressive fatal spongiform encephalopathy. We accumulated data suggesting that a deletion of R3-R4 type (parts of the third and fourth repeats are deleted from the area of four repeating 24 bp sequences in the 5{prime} region of the gene) is causing CJD. Screening of 129 unaffected control individuals demonstrated presence of a deletion of R2 type in four (1.55% of the studied chromosomes), but none of them had the R3-R4 type. Of 181 screened patients with spongiform encephalopathies, two had a deletion of R3-R4 type with no other mutations in the coding sequence. Both patients had a classical rapidly progressive dementing disease and diffuse spongiform degeneration, and both cases were apparently sporadic. The same R3-R4 type of deletion was detected in three additional neuropathologically confirmed spongiform encephalopathy patients, of which two had other known pathogenic mutations in the PRNP gene: at codon 178 on the methionine allele exhibiting the phenotype of fatal familial insomnia, and codon 200 causing CJD with severe dementia; the third was a patient with iatrogenic CJD who developed the disease after treatment with growth hormone extracted from cadaveric human pituitary glands. In all cases the deletion coincided with a variant sequence at position 129 coding for methionine.

  9. Description and analysis of 12 years of surveillance for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in Denmark, 1997 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Gubbels, S; Bacci, S; Laursen, H; Hogenhaven, H; Cowan, S; Molbak, K; Christiansen, M

    2012-04-12

    Prospective surveillance of Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD) was initiated in Denmark in 1997, following the observation of variant CJD in the United Kingdom. Demographic, clinical and diagnostic information was collected for each patient with clinical suspicion of CJD. Here we describe the methods for surveillance and the observed outcomes between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2008. A total of 83 patients were classified as sporadic CJD, 47 were definite diagnoses, 34 probable and two possible. This resulted in a mean incidence of 1.26 patients with probable and definite sporadic CJD per million inhabitants. Two sporadic CJD patients were found to have a genetic variant of unknown significance: Thr201Ser and Glu200Asp. One patient was diagnosed with Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome. No patients were classified as having variant, iatrogenic or familial CJD. The Danish surveillance system, like those in other countries, has a multidisciplinary approach, which is labour-intensive and time-consuming but ensures the most complete set of information possible. With this approach we think that patients with variant CJD would have been detected had they occurred in Denmark. Certain aspects of CJD surveillance need further discussion at European level and beyond, in order to find a balance between efficiency of the systems and accuracy of surveillance data. PMID:22516048

  10. Insights into the Management of Emerging Infections: Regulating Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Transfusion Risk in the UK and the US

    PubMed Central

    Ponte, Maya L

    2006-01-01

    Background Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) is a human prion disease caused by infection with the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy. After the recognition of vCJD in the UK in 1996, many nations implemented policies intended to reduce the hypothetical risk of transfusion transmission of vCJD. This was despite the fact that no cases of transfusion transmission had yet been identified. In December 2003, however, the first case of vCJD in a recipient of blood from a vCJD-infected donor was announced. The aim of this study is to ascertain and compare the factors that influenced the motivation for and the design of regulations to prevent transfusion transmission of vCJD in the UK and US prior to the recognition of this case. Methods and Findings A document search was conducted to identify US and UK governmental policy statements and guidance, transcripts (or minutes when transcripts were not available) of scientific advisory committee meetings, research articles, and editorials published in medical and scientific journals on the topic of vCJD and blood transfusion transmission between March 1996 and December 2003. In addition, 40 interviews were conducted with individuals familiar with the decision-making process and/or the science involved. All documents and transcripts were coded and analyzed according to the methods and principles of grounded theory. Data showed that while resulting policies were based on the available science, social and historical factors played a major role in the motivation for and the design of regulations to protect against transfusion transmission of vCJD. First, recent experience with and collective guilt resulting from the transfusion-transmitted epidemics of HIV/AIDS in both countries served as a major, historically specific impetus for such policies. This history was brought to bear both by hemophilia activists and those charged with regulating blood products in the US and UK. Second, local specificities, such as the recall

  11. Stability and Reproducibility Underscore Utility of RT-QuIC for Diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease.

    PubMed

    Cramm, Maria; Schmitz, Matthias; Karch, André; Mitrova, Eva; Kuhn, Franziska; Schroeder, Bjoern; Raeber, Alex; Varges, Daniela; Kim, Yong-Sun; Satoh, Katsuya; Collins, Steven; Zerr, Inga

    2016-04-01

    Real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) allows the amplification of miniscule amounts of scrapie prion protein (PrP(Sc)). Recent studies applied the RT-QuIC methodology to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for diagnosing human prion diseases. However, to date, there has not been a formal multi-centre assessment of the reproducibility, validity and stability of RT-QuIC in this context, an indispensable step for establishment as a diagnostic test in clinical practice. In the present study, we analysed CSF from 110 prion disease patients and 400 control patients using the RT-QuIC method under various conditions. In addition, "blinded" ring trials between different participating sites were performed to estimate reproducibility. Using the previously established cut-off of 10,000 relative fluorescence units (rfu), we obtained a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 99%. The multi-centre inter-laboratory reproducibility of RT-QuIC revealed a Fleiss' kappa value of 0.83 (95% CI: 0.40-1.00) indicating an almost perfect agreement. Moreover, we investigated the impact of short-term CSF storage at different temperatures, long-term storage, repeated freezing and thawing cycles and the contamination of CSF with blood on the RT-QuIC seeding response. Our data indicated that the PrP(Sc) seed in CSF is stable to any type of storage condition but sensitive to contaminations with blood (>1250 erythrocytes/μL), which results in a false negative RT-QuIC response. Fresh blood-contaminated samples (3 days) can be rescued by removal of erythrocytes. The present study underlines the reproducibility and high stability of RT-QuIC across various CSF storage conditions with a remarkable sensitivity and specificity, suggesting RT-QuIC as an innovative and robust diagnostic method. PMID:25823511

  12. First Demonstration of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy-associated Prion Protein (PrPTSE) in Extracellular Vesicles from Plasma of Mice Infected with Mouse-adapted Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease by in Vitro Amplification*

    PubMed Central

    Saá, Paula; Yakovleva, Oksana; de Castro, Jorge; Vasilyeva, Irina; De Paoli, Silvia H.; Simak, Jan; Cervenakova, Larisa

    2014-01-01

    The development of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in three recipients of non-leukoreduced red blood cells from asymptomatic donors who subsequently developed the disease has confirmed existing concerns about the possible spread of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) via blood products. In addition, the presence of disease-associated misfolded prion protein (PrPTSE), generally associated with infectivity, has been demonstrated in the blood of vCJD patients. However, its origin and distribution in this biological fluid are still unknown. Various studies have identified cellular prion protein (PrPC) among the protein cargo in human blood-circulating extracellular vesicles released from endothelial cells and platelets, and exosomes isolated from the conditioned media of TSE-infected cells have caused the disease when injected into experimental mice. In this study, we demonstrate the detection of PrPTSE in extracellular vesicles isolated from plasma samples collected during the preclinical and clinical phases of the disease from mice infected with mouse-adapted vCJD and confirm the presence of the exosomal marker Hsp70 in these preparations. PMID:25157106

  13. Decreased regional cerebral blood flow in the bilateral thalami and medulla oblongata determined by an easy Z-score (eZIS) analysis of (99m)Tc-ECD-SPECT images in a case of MM2-thalamic-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yuichi; Iwasaki, Yasushi; Yoshikura, Nobuaki; Asano, Takahiko; Hatano, Taku; Tatsumi, Shinsui; Satoh, Katsuya; Kimura, Akio; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Yoshida, Mari; Inuzuka, Takashi

    2015-11-15

    We report a case of autopsy-verified MM2-thalamic-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) in a 46-year-old patient with a 16-month history of abnormal behavior, progressive dementia, insomnia, and speech disturbances without family history. Neurological examination revealed progressive dementia, frontal signs, insomnia, speech disturbance, gait disturbance and bilaterally exaggerated tendon reflexes. Both brain MRI and cerebrospinal fluid examinations, including 14-3-3 protein, yielded normal results. An easy Z-score (eZIS) analysis for (99m)Tc-ethyl cysteinate dimer-single photon emission computed tomography ((99m)Tc-ECD-SPECT) revealed decreased regional cerebral blood flow in the bilateral thalami and medulla oblongata. PRNP gene analysis revealed methionine homozygosity at codon 129 without mutation. Neuropathological examinations revealed severe neuronal loss, gliosis, and hypertrophic astrocytosis in the medial thalamus and inferior olivary nucleus. A slight depletion of Purkinje cells was observed. PrP immunostaining showed no obvious PrP deposits in the basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum, or brainstem; however, mild synaptic-type PrP deposits with some smaller plaque-like structures were only partially observed in the localized region of the frontal lobe with the spongiform change. Western blot analyses of protease-resistant PrP showed a type 2 pattern. In conclusion, eZIS analysis of (99m)Tc-ECD-SPECT images is useful for detecting both thalamic and medullary lesions. This is the first case of medullary lesions detected in a live patient with MM2-thalamic-type sCJD using SPECT. PMID:26421831

  14. Human growth hormone-related latrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Search for a genetic susceptibility by analysis of the PRNP coding region

    SciTech Connect

    Jaegly, A.; Boussin, F.; Deslys, J.P.

    1995-05-20

    The human PRNP gene encoding PrP is located on chromosome 20 and consists of two exons and a single intron. The open reading frame is entirely fitted into the second exon. Genetic studies indicate that all of the familial and several sporadic forms of TSSEs are associated with mutations in the PRNP 759-bp coding region. Moreover, homozygosity at codon 129, a locus harboring a polymorphism among the general population, was proposed as a genetic susceptibility marker for both sporadic and iatrogenic CJD. To assess whether additional genetic predisposition markers exist in the PRNP gene, the authors sequenced the PRNP coding region of 17 of the 32 French patients who developed a hGH-related CJD.

  15. Recent US Case of Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease—Global Implications

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Michael; Gambetti, Pierluigi; Parker, Alicia; Ram, Aarthi; Soto, Claudio; Concha-Marambio, Luis; Cohen, Yvonne; Belay, Ermias D.; Maddox, Ryan A.; Mead, Simon; Goodman, Clay; Kass, Joseph S.; Schonberger, Lawrence B.; Hussein, Haitham M.

    2015-01-01

    Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) is a rare, fatal prion disease resulting from transmission to humans of the infectious agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy. We describe the clinical presentation of a recent case of vCJD in the United States and provide an update on diagnostic testing. The location of this patient’s exposure is less clear than those in the 3 previously reported US cases, but strong evidence indicates that exposure to contaminated beef occurred outside the United States more than a decade before illness onset. This case exemplifies the persistent risk for vCJD acquired in unsuspected geographic locations and highlights the need for continued global surveillance and awareness to prevent further dissemination of vCJD. PMID:25897712

  16. Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (Prion Diseases)

    MedlinePlus

    ... when brain tissue is viewed under a microscope. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is the most well-known of the ... and Worldwide NINDS Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) Foundation Inc. 341 W. 38th Street, Suite ...

  17. Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Dementia Types of Dementia Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Dementia with Lewy Bodies Down ... Research Traumatic Brain Injury and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Awardees Year Researcher Study Name 2015 Jesse Mez ...

  18. Proteomics analyses for the global proteins in the brain tissues of different human prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qi; Chen, Li-Na; Zhang, Bao-Yun; Xiao, Kang; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Cao; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Tian, Chan; Gao, Chen; Wang, Jing; Han, Jun; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Proteomics changes of brain tissues have been described in different neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. However, the brain proteomics of human prion disease remains less understood. In the study, the proteomics patterns of cortex and cerebellum of brain tissues of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, fatal familial insomnia, and G114V genetic CJD were analyzed with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation combined with multidimensional liquid chromatography and MS analysis, with the brains from three normal individuals as controls. Global protein profiling, significant pathway, and functional categories were analyzed. In total, 2287 proteins were identified with quantitative information both in cortex and cerebellum regions. Cerebellum tissues appeared to contain more up- and down-regulated proteins (727 proteins) than cortex regions (312 proteins) of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, fatal familial insomnia, and G114V genetic CJD. Viral myocarditis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, lysosome, oxidative phosphorylation, protein export, and drug metabolism-cytochrome P450 were the most commonly affected pathways of the three kinds of diseases. Almost coincident biological functions were identified in the brain tissues of the three diseases. In all, data here demonstrate that the brain tissues of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, fatal familial insomnia, and G114V genetic CJD have obvious proteomics changes at their terminal stages, which show the similarities not only among human prion diseases but also with other neurodegeneration diseases. This is the first study to provide a reference proteome map for human prion diseases and will be helpful for future studies focused on potential biomarkers for the diagnosis and therapy of human prion diseases. PMID:25616867

  19. Inherited prion disease with 4-octapeptide repeat insertion: disease requires the interaction of multiple genetic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Kaski, Diego N; Pennington, Catherine; Beck, Jon; Poulter, Mark; Uphill, James; Bishop, Matthew T; Linehan, Jaqueline M; O'Malley, Catherine; Wadsworth, Jonathan D F; Joiner, Susan; Knight, Richard S G; Ironside, James W; Brandner, Sebastian; Collinge, John; Mead, Simon

    2011-06-01

    Genetic factors are implicated in the aetiology of sporadic late-onset neurodegenerative diseases. Whether these genetic variants are predominantly common or rare, and how multiple genetic factors interact with each other to cause disease is poorly understood. Inherited prion diseases are highly heterogeneous and may be clinically mistaken for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease because of a negative family history. Here we report our investigation of patients from the UK with four extra octapeptide repeats, which suggest that the risk of clinical disease is increased by a combination of the mutation and a susceptibility haplotype on the wild-type chromosome. The predominant clinical syndrome is a progressive cortical dementia with pyramidal signs, myoclonus and cerebellar abnormalities that closely resemble sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Autopsy shows perpendicular deposits of prion protein in the molecular layer of the cerebellum. Identity testing, PRNP microsatellite haplotyping and genealogical work confirm no cryptic close family relationships and suggests multiple progenitor disease haplotypes. All patients were homozygous for methionine at polymorphic codon 129. In addition, at a single nucleotide polymorphism upstream of PRNP thought to confer susceptibility to sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (rs1029273), all patients were homozygous for the risk allele (combined P=5.9×10(-5)). The haplotype identified may also be a risk factor in other partially penetrant inherited prion diseases although it does not modify age of onset. Blood expression of PRNP in healthy individuals was modestly higher in carriers of the risk haplotype. These findings may provide a precedent for understanding apparently sporadic neurodegenerative diseases caused by rare high-risk mutations. PMID:21616973

  20. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Fact Sheet for Healthcare Workers and Morticians

    MedlinePlus

    ... incidence of CJD indicates that person-to-person transmission probably does not occur through normal contact. Spouses ... is still no definitive evidence for how this transmission took place, it is believed that transmission occurred ...

  1. Genetic prion disease with codon 196 PRNP mutation: clinical and pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Schelzke, Gabi; Eigenbrod, Sabina; Romero, Carlos; Varges, Daniela; Breithaupt, Maren; Taratuto, Ana L; Kretzschmar, Hans A; Zerr, Inga

    2011-04-01

    Ten percent to 15% of all human transmissible spongiform encephalopathy are characterized by a mutation in prion protein gene (PRNP). They are distinct with respect to clinical signs, disease onset, disease duration, and diagnostic findings. During our surveillance activities in Germany, we identified 7 patients with the rare mutation E196K in PRNP gene, thereof 4 patients belonging to 2 families. The clinical syndromes were characterized by nonspecific and psychiatric symptoms at disease onset and progressed to predominant motor signs. These patients showed a late median disease onset of 71 years and short disease duration of 6.5 months. In absence of family history, they mimicked sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). In clinical tests they were 100% positive for 14-3-3 protein detection in cerebrospinal fluid and less sensitive for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalogram (EEG) abnormalities. As a secondary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormality, we have seen conspicuous common involvement of the subcortical white matter in 57%. Four patients underwent autopsy-pathological lesions revealed striking similarity to sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease but also involvement of the white matter. PMID:21232818

  2. Prion diseases: immunotargets and therapy.

    PubMed

    Burchell, Jennifer T; Panegyres, Peter K

    2016-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephathalopathies or prion diseases are a group of neurological disorders characterized by neuronal loss, spongiform degeneration, and activation of astrocytes or microglia. These diseases affect humans and animals with an extremely high prevalence in some species such as deer and elk in North America. Although rare in humans, they result in a devastatingly swift neurological progression with dementia and ataxia. Patients usually die within a year of diagnosis. Prion diseases are familial, sporadic, iatrogenic, or transmissible. Human prion diseases include Kuru, sporadic, iatrogenic, and familial forms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease, and fatal familial insomnia. The causative agent is a misfolded version of the physiological prion protein called PrP(Sc) in the brain. There are a number of therapeutic options currently under investigation. A number of small molecules have had some success in delaying disease progression in animal models and mixed results in clinical trials, including pentosan polysulfate, quinacrine, and amphotericin B. More promisingly, immunotherapy has reported success in vitro and in vivo in animal studies and clinical trials. The three main branches of immunotherapy research are focus on antibody vaccines, dendritic cell vaccines, and adoptive transfer of physiological prion protein-specific CD4(+) T-lymphocytes. Vaccines utilizing antibodies generally target disease-specific epitopes that are only exposed in the misfolded PrP(Sc) conformation. Vaccines utilizing antigen-loaded dendritic cell have the ability to bypass immune tolerance and prime CD4(+) cells to initiate an immune response. Adoptive transfer of CD4(+) T-cells is another promising target as this cell type can orchestrate the adaptive immune response. Although more research into mechanisms and safety is required, these immunotherapies offer novel therapeutic targets for prion

  3. Neuroimaging Biomarkers of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Risacher, Shannon L.; Saykin, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders leading to dementia are common diseases that affect many older and some young adults. Neuroimaging methods are important tools for assessing and monitoring pathological brain changes associated with progressive neurodegenerative conditions. In this review, the authors describe key findings from neuroimaging studies (magnetic resonance imaging and radionucleotide imaging) in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and prodromal stages, familial and atypical AD syndromes, frontotemporal dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with and without dementia, Parkinson’s disease with and without dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, Huntington’s disease, multiple sclerosis, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder, and prion protein associated diseases (i.e., Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease). The authors focus on neuroimaging findings of in vivo pathology in these disorders, as well as the potential for neuroimaging to provide useful information for differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24234359

  4. Transgenic Fatal Familial Insomnia Mice Indicate Prion Infectivity-Independent Mechanisms of Pathogenesis and Phenotypic Expression of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bouybayoune, Ihssane; Mantovani, Susanna; Del Gallo, Federico; Bertani, Ilaria; Restelli, Elena; Comerio, Liliana; Tapella, Laura; Baracchi, Francesca; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Mangieri, Michela; Bisighini, Cinzia; Beznoussenko, Galina V.; Paladini, Alessandra; Balducci, Claudia; Micotti, Edoardo; Forloni, Gianluigi; Castilla, Joaquín; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Imeri, Luca; Chiesa, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) and a genetic form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD178) are clinically different prion disorders linked to the D178N prion protein (PrP) mutation. The disease phenotype is determined by the 129 M/V polymorphism on the mutant allele, which is thought to influence D178N PrP misfolding, leading to the formation of distinctive prion strains with specific neurotoxic properties. However, the mechanism by which misfolded variants of mutant PrP cause different diseases is not known. We generated transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the mouse PrP homolog of the FFI mutation. These mice synthesize a misfolded form of mutant PrP in their brains and develop a neurological illness with severe sleep disruption, highly reminiscent of FFI and different from that of analogously generated Tg(CJD) mice modeling CJD178. No prion infectivity was detectable in Tg(FFI) and Tg(CJD) brains by bioassay or protein misfolding cyclic amplification, indicating that mutant PrP has disease-encoding properties that do not depend on its ability to propagate its misfolded conformation. Tg(FFI) and Tg(CJD) neurons have different patterns of intracellular PrP accumulation associated with distinct morphological abnormalities of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi, suggesting that mutation-specific alterations of secretory transport may contribute to the disease phenotype. PMID:25880443

  5. Kuru

    MedlinePlus

    ... type to also change shape. Other TSEs include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and fatal familial insomnia in humans, bovine spongiform ... and Worldwide NINDS Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) Foundation Inc. 341 W. 38th Street, Suite ...

  6. New variant CJD-BSE (mad cow disease). The need for disposable ENT instruments.

    PubMed

    Bingham, Brian

    2002-02-25

    This paper outlines the development of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) in the United Kingdom. The relationship between BSE and new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) is considered and the risks of iatrogenic spread reviewed. The rationale for disposable surgical instruments in adenotonsillectomy to prevent iatrogenic spread is discussed. PMID:11852121

  7. Human tonsil-derived follicular dendritic-like cells are refractory to human prion infection in vitro and traffic disease-associated prion protein to lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Krejciova, Zuzana; De Sousa, Paul; Manson, Jean; Ironside, James W; Head, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in human cellular susceptibility to prion infection remain poorly defined. This is due, in part, to the absence of any well characterized and relevant cultured human cells susceptible to infection with human prions, such as those involved in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. In variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, prion replication is thought to occur first in the lymphoreticular system and then spread into the brain. We have, therefore, examined the susceptibility of a human tonsil-derived follicular dendritic cell-like cell line (HK) to prion infection. HK cells were found to display a readily detectable, time-dependent increase in cell-associated abnormal prion protein (PrP(TSE)) when exposed to medium spiked with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease brain homogenate, resulting in a coarse granular perinuclear PrP(TSE) staining pattern. Despite their high level of cellular prion protein expression, HK cells failed to support infection, as judged by longer term maintenance of PrP(TSE) accumulation. Colocalization studies revealed that exposure of HK cells to brain homogenate resulted in increased numbers of detectable lysosomes and that these structures immunostained intensely for PrP(TSE) after exposure to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease brain homogenate. Our data suggest that human follicular dendritic-like cells and perhaps other human cell types are able to avoid prion infection by efficient lysosomal degradation of PrP(TSE). PMID:24183781

  8. Chronic wasting disease and atypical forms of BSE and scrapie are not transmissible to mice expressing wild-type levels of human PrP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The association between bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) has demonstrated that cattle TSEs can pose a risk to human health and raises the possibility that other ruminant TSEs may be transmissible to humans. In recent years, several new TSEs in shee...

  9. MAD COW DISEASE: New Recruits for French Prion Research.

    PubMed

    Casassus, B

    2000-12-01

    As panic over "mad cow disease" engulfs France and threatens to spread to other countries in Western Europe, French research minister Roger-Gérard Schwartzenberg last week unveiled detailed plans for spending $27 million the government has earmarked for prion disease research in 2001. Next year's budget for studying prions--infectious, abnormal proteins linked to bovine spongiform encephalopathy and its human form, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease--will triple France's current prion research spending. PMID:17798203

  10. [From the Scrapie syndrome of sheep and goat to the mad cow disease - the history of the discovery of prion].

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Weng, Yi

    2009-05-01

    Since the discovery of Scrapie Syndrome in sheep and goats in 1730, there emerged a series of diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, kuru disease and mad cow disease etc. In the research of kuru disease, the American scientist D. Carlteton Gajdusek found a new virus without the characteristic of DNA and RNA, which was awarded the Nobel Prize in physiology in 1976. Since then another American scientist, Stanley B. Prusiner, found a new virus-prion, taking protein as the genetic medium, which was awarded the Nobel prize in physiology and medicine in 1997. The discovery of prion is a great landmark in the research of life science, which laid a theoretical foundation for people to conquer a series of diseases such as Scrapie syndrome in sheep and goats, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, kuru disease and mad cow disease etc. PMID:19930927

  11. Epidemiological characteristics of human prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cao; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Human prion diseases are a group of transmissible, progressive, and invariably fatal neurodegenerative disorders, which include Kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, and fatal familial insomnia. Human prion diseases affect approximately 1-2 persons per million worldwide annually, occurring in sporadic, inherited, and acquired forms. These diseases have attracted both scientific and public attention not only because of their mysterious pathogen, but also due to their considerable threat to public health since the emergence of the variant CJD.There are still no specific therapeutic and prophylactic interventions available for prion diseases, thus active surveillance of human prion diseases is critical for disease control and prevention. Since 1993, CJD surveillance systems have been established in many countries and regions, and several long-term multinational cooperative projects have been conducted.In this paper, the epidemiological characteristics of various human prion diseases and the active surveillance systems pertaining to them in different countries and regions are summarized and reviewed. PMID:27251305

  12. [Human prion diseases in the Czech Republic].

    PubMed

    Rohan, Z; Rusina, R; Marešová, M; Matěj, R

    2015-09-01

    Human prion diseases are a group of very rare diseases with a unique pathogenesis and, due to an inauspicious prognosis and unavailability of therapy, with fatal consequences. The etiopathogenetic background is the presence of pathologically misfolded prion protein, highly resistant to denaturation, the aggregation and presence of which in the brain tissue causes irreversible neuronal damage. The most frequent prion disease in humans is Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) which occurs in sporadic, hereditary/familial, or acquired/infectious/iatrogenic forms. A new form of CJD, variant CJD, is considered to be linked to dietary exposure to beef products from cattle infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and to infection via blood transfusion. The clinical picture of these diseases is characterized by a rapidly progressing dementia, cerebellar and extrapyramidal symptoms, and rather specific MRI, EEG, and CSF findings. Clinically, the diagnosis is described as possible or probable prion disease and needs to be confirmed by neuropathological or immunological investigation of the brain tissue. Epidemiological data from the Czech Republic spanning the last decade are presented. PMID:26448298

  13. Prion protein gene analysis in three kindreds with fatal familial insomnia (FFI): Codon 178 mutation and codon 129 polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Medori, R.; Tritschler, H.J. )

    1993-10-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) is a disease linked to a GAC(Asp) [yields] AAC(Asn) mutation in codon 178 of the prion protein (PrP) gene. FFI is characterized clinically by untreatable progressive insomnia, dysautonomia, and motor dysfunctions and is characterized pathologically by selective thalamic atrophy. The authors confirmed the 178[sup Asn] mutation in the PrP gene of a third FFI family of French ancestry. Three family members who are under 40 years of age and who inherited the mutation showed only reduced perfusion in the basal ganglia on single photon emission computerized tomography. Some FFI features differ from the clinical and neuropathologic findings associated with 178[sup Asn] reported elsewhere. However, additional intragenic mutations accounting for the phenotypic differences were not observed in two affected individuals. In other sporadic and familial forms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Gerstmann-Straeussler syndrome, Met or Val homozygosity at polymorphic codon 129 is associated with a more severe phenotype, younger age at onset, and faster progression. In FFI, young and old individuals at disease onset had 129[sup Met/Val]. Moreover, of five 178[sup Asn] individuals who are above age-at-onset range and who are well, two have 129[sup Met] and three have 129[sup Met/Val], suggesting that polymorphic site 129 does not modulate FFI phenotypic expression. Genetic heterogeneity and environment may play an important role in inter- and intrafamilial variability of the 178[sup Asn] mutation. 32 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Prion protein gene analysis in three kindreds with fatal familial insomnia (FFI): codon 178 mutation and codon 129 polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Medori, R; Tritschler, H J

    1993-01-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) is a disease linked to a GAC(Asp)-->AAC(Asn) mutation in codon 178 of the prion protein (PrP) gene. FFI is characterized clinically by untreatable progressive insomnia, dysautonomia, and motor dysfunctions and is characterized pathologically by selective thalamic atrophy. We confirmed the 178Asn mutation in the PrP gene of a third FFI family of French ancestry. Three family members who are under 40 years of age and who inherited the mutation showed only reduced perfusion in the basal ganglia on single photon emission computerized tomography. Some FFI features differ from the clinical and neuropathologic findings associated with 178Asn reported elsewhere. However, additional intragenic mutations accounting for the phenotypic differences were not observed in two affected individuals. In other sporadic and familial forms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Gerstmann-Sträussler syndrome, Met or Val homozygosity at polymorphic codon 129 is associated with a more severe phenotype, younger age at onset, and faster progression. In FFI, young and old individuals at disease onset had 129Met/Val. Moreover, of five 178Asn individuals who are above age-at-onset range and who are well, two have 129Met and three have 129Met/Val, suggesting that polymorphic site 129 does not modulate FFI phenotypic expression. Genetic heterogeneity and environment may play an important role in inter- and intrafamilial variability of the 178Asn mutation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8105681

  15. Historical overview of prion diseases: a view from afar.

    PubMed

    Liberski, Pawel P

    2012-01-01

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), or prion diseases, are a group of neurodegenerative disorders which include kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) syndrome, and fatal familial insomnia in men, natural scrapie in sheep, goats and mufflons, transmissible mink encephalopathy in ranch-reared mink, chronic wasting disease of mule deer and elk, bovine spongiform encephalopathy or "mad cow disease" and its analogues in several exotic species of antelopes and wild felids in zoological gardens, and feline spongiform encephalopathy in domestic cats. This short review summarizes the history of the research to find the nature of the scrapie agent, especially as I have witnessed it unfolding before my eyes. I review the historical background of TSEs starting from the first description of scrapie in 1732. In 1957, the first prion disease in humans, kuru was described and its transmissibility was demonstrated in 1965 by seminal work of Gajdusek, Gibbs and colleagues, followed by transmission of CJD and then, GSS. In 1982, Stanley B. Prusiner formulated "prion hypothesis" which has dominated the field for the last 30 years. This theory had been recently extended to cover other neurodegenerations which are caused by misfolded proteins; these disease are called prionoids. PMID:22505359

  16. Identifying Unstable Regions of Proteins Involved in Misfolding Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guest, Will; Cashman, Neil; Plotkin, Steven

    2009-05-01

    Protein misfolding is a necessary step in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS). Identifying unstable structural elements in their causative proteins elucidates the early events of misfolding and presents targets for inhibition of the disease process. An algorithm was developed to calculate the Gibbs free energy of unfolding for all sequence-contiguous regions of a protein using three methods to parameterize energy changes: a modified G=o model, changes in solvent-accessible surface area, and all-atoms molecular dynamics. The entropic effects of disulfide bonds and post-translational modifications are treated analytically. It incorporates a novel method for finding local dielectric constants inside a protein to accurately handle charge effects. We have predicted the unstable parts of prion protein and superoxide dismutase 1, the proteins involved in CJD and fALS respectively, and have used these regions as epitopes to prepare antibodies that are specific to the misfolded conformation and show promise as therapeutic agents.

  17. Phosphatidylinositol-Glycan-Phospholipase D Is Involved in Neurodegeneration in Prion Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jae-Kwang; Jang, Byungki; Jin, Hyoung Tae; Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Jung, Cha-Gyun; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Kim, Jae-Il; Carp, Richard I.; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2015-01-01

    PrPSc is formed from a normal glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored prion protein (PrPC) by a posttranslational modification. Most GPI-anchored proteins have been shown to be cleaved by GPI phospholipases. Recently, GPI-phospholipase D (GPI-PLD) was shown to be a strictly specific enzyme for GPI anchors. To investigate the involvement of GPI-PLD in the processes of neurodegeneration in prion diseases, we examined the mRNA and protein expression levels of GPI-PLD in the brains of a prion animal model (scrapie), and in both the brains and cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) of sporadic and familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) patients. We found that compared with controls, the expression of GPI-PLD was dramatically down-regulated in the brains of scrapie-infected mice, especially in the caveolin-enriched membrane fractions. Interestingly, the observed decrease in GPI-PLD expression levels began at the same time that PrPSc began to accumulate in the infected brains and this decrease was also observed in both the brain and CSF of CJD patients; however, no differences in expression were observed in either the brains or CSF specimens from Alzheimer’s disease patients. Taken together, these results suggest that the down-regulation of GPI-PLD protein may be involved in prion propagation in the brains of prion diseases. PMID:25867459

  18. Structure-Based Prediction of Unstable Regions in Proteins: Applications to Protein Misfolding Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guest, Will; Cashman, Neil; Plotkin, Steven

    2009-03-01

    Protein misfolding is a necessary step in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS). Identifying unstable structural elements in their causative proteins elucidates the early events of misfolding and presents targets for inhibition of the disease process. An algorithm was developed to calculate the Gibbs free energy of unfolding for all sequence-contiguous regions of a protein using three methods to parameterize energy changes: a modified G=o model, changes in solvent-accessible surface area, and solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The entropic effects of disulfide bonds and post-translational modifications are treated analytically. It incorporates a novel method for finding local dielectric constants inside a protein to accurately handle charge effects. We have predicted the unstable parts of prion protein and superoxide dismutase 1, the proteins involved in CJD and fALS respectively, and have used these regions as epitopes to prepare antibodies that are specific to the misfolded conformation and show promise as therapeutic agents.

  19. Transgenic mice recapitulate the phenotypic heterogeneity of genetic prion diseases without developing prion infectivity: Role of intracellular PrP retention in neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, Roberto; Restelli, Elena; Comerio, Liliana; Del Gallo, Federico; Imeri, Luca

    2016-03-01

    Genetic prion diseases are degenerative brain disorders caused by mutations in the gene encoding the prion protein (PrP). Different PrP mutations cause different diseases, including Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) syndrome and fatal familial insomnia (FFI). The reason for this variability is not known. It has been suggested that prion strains with unique self-replicating and neurotoxic properties emerge spontaneously in individuals carrying PrP mutations, dictating the phenotypic expression of disease. We generated transgenic mice expressing the FFI mutation, and found that they developed a fatal neurological illness highly reminiscent of FFI, and different from those of similarly generated mice modeling genetic CJD and GSS. Thus transgenic mice recapitulate the phenotypic differences seen in humans. The mutant PrPs expressed in these mice are misfolded but unable to self-replicate. They accumulate in different compartments of the neuronal secretory pathway, impairing the membrane delivery of ion channels essential for neuronal function. Our results indicate that conversion of mutant PrP into an infectious isoform is not required for pathogenesis, and suggest that the phenotypic variability may be due to different effects of mutant PrP on intracellular transport. PMID:26864450

  20. Transgenic mice recapitulate the phenotypic heterogeneity of genetic prion diseases without developing prion infectivity: Role of intracellular PrP retention in neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Chiesa, Roberto; Restelli, Elena; Comerio, Liliana; Del Gallo, Federico; Imeri, Luca

    2016-01-01

    abstract Genetic prion diseases are degenerative brain disorders caused by mutations in the gene encoding the prion protein (PrP). Different PrP mutations cause different diseases, including Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) syndrome and fatal familial insomnia (FFI). The reason for this variability is not known. It has been suggested that prion strains with unique self-replicating and neurotoxic properties emerge spontaneously in individuals carrying PrP mutations, dictating the phenotypic expression of disease. We generated transgenic mice expressing the FFI mutation, and found that they developed a fatal neurological illness highly reminiscent of FFI, and different from those of similarly generated mice modeling genetic CJD and GSS. Thus transgenic mice recapitulate the phenotypic differences seen in humans. The mutant PrPs expressed in these mice are misfolded but unable to self-replicate. They accumulate in different compartments of the neuronal secretory pathway, impairing the membrane delivery of ion channels essential for neuronal function. Our results indicate that conversion of mutant PrP into an infectious isoform is not required for pathogenesis, and suggest that the phenotypic variability may be due to different effects of mutant PrP on intracellular transport. PMID:26864450

  1. SPONGIFORM DISEASE: Experts Downplay New vCJD Fears.

    PubMed

    Balter, M

    2000-09-01

    The chilling scenario of getting "mad cow disease" from eating products of other animals besides just cows was splashed across the mainstream British press last week based on a report from a leading U.K. lab that prions--abnormal proteins linked to bovine spongiform encephalopathy and its human form, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease--can jump from one species to another more easily than previously believed. Although some experts say the findings raise concern about a threat to human health, others decry the media frenzy and contend that the new research adds little to what is known about the mysterious, fatal diseases. PMID:17811144

  2. The Structure of Intrinsically Disordered Peptides Implicated in Amyloid Diseases: Insights from Fully Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chun; Shea, Joan-Emma

    Protein aggregation involves the self-assembly of proteins into large β-sheet-rich complexes. This process can be the result of aberrant protein folding and lead to "amyloidosis," a condition characterized by deposits of protein aggregates known as amyloids on various organs of the body [1]. Amyloid-related diseases include, among others, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and type II diabetes [2, 3, 4]. In other instances, however, protein aggregation is not a pathological process, but rather a functional one, with aggregates serving as structural scaffolds in a number of organisms [5].

  3. Food Safety: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (Mad Cow Disease).

    PubMed

    Acheson, David W. K.

    2002-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy is just one of a group of diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Only recently has it become recognized that transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are likely due to proteins known as prions. Although it has been recognized that transmissible spongiform encephalopathies may readily spread within species, the recent observations that bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle may have originated from another transmissible spongiform encephalopathy in sheep, known as scrapie, is cause for concern. Further, bovine spongiform encephalopathy has now been strongly linked with a universally fatal human neurologic disease known as new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Currently the only approach to preventing bovine spongiform encephalopathy, and subsequent new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, from ingestion of bovine spongiform encephalopathy-infected material is to avoid consumption of contaminated food. Little can be done to treat food that will destroy prions and leave a palatable product. At this stage we are continuing to learn about transmissible spongiform encephalopathies and their implications on human health. This is an ever-changing situation and has an unpredictable element in terms of the extent of the current outbreaks in England and other parts of Europe. PMID:11984426

  4. Olfactory Receptors in Non-Chemosensory Organs: The Nervous System in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Isidro; Garcia-Esparcia, Paula; Carmona, Margarita; Carro, Eva; Aronica, Eleonora; Kovacs, Gabor G.; Grison, Alice; Gustincich, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) and down-stream functional signaling molecules adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3), olfactory G protein α subunit (Gαolf), OR transporters receptor transporter proteins 1 and 2 (RTP1 and RTP2), receptor expression enhancing protein 1 (REEP1), and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are expressed in neurons of the human and murine central nervous system (CNS). In vitro studies have shown that these receptors react to external stimuli and therefore are equipped to be functional. However, ORs are not directly related to the detection of odors. Several molecules delivered from the blood, cerebrospinal fluid, neighboring local neurons and glial cells, distant cells through the extracellular space, and the cells’ own self-regulating internal homeostasis can be postulated as possible ligands. Moreover, a single neuron outside the olfactory epithelium expresses more than one receptor, and the mechanism of transcriptional regulation may be different in olfactory epithelia and brain neurons. OR gene expression is altered in several neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s disease (PD), Alzheimer’s disease (AD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) subtypes MM1 and VV2 with disease-, region- and subtype-specific patterns. Altered gene expression is also observed in the prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia with a major but not total influence of chlorpromazine treatment. Preliminary parallel observations have also shown the presence of taste receptors (TASRs), mainly of the bitter taste family, in the mammalian brain, whose function is not related to taste. TASRs in brain are also abnormally regulated in neurodegenerative diseases. These seminal observations point to the need for further studies on ORs and TASRs chemoreceptors in the mammalian brain. PMID:27458372

  5. Olfactory Receptors in Non-Chemosensory Organs: The Nervous System in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Isidro; Garcia-Esparcia, Paula; Carmona, Margarita; Carro, Eva; Aronica, Eleonora; Kovacs, Gabor G; Grison, Alice; Gustincich, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) and down-stream functional signaling molecules adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3), olfactory G protein α subunit (Gαolf), OR transporters receptor transporter proteins 1 and 2 (RTP1 and RTP2), receptor expression enhancing protein 1 (REEP1), and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are expressed in neurons of the human and murine central nervous system (CNS). In vitro studies have shown that these receptors react to external stimuli and therefore are equipped to be functional. However, ORs are not directly related to the detection of odors. Several molecules delivered from the blood, cerebrospinal fluid, neighboring local neurons and glial cells, distant cells through the extracellular space, and the cells' own self-regulating internal homeostasis can be postulated as possible ligands. Moreover, a single neuron outside the olfactory epithelium expresses more than one receptor, and the mechanism of transcriptional regulation may be different in olfactory epithelia and brain neurons. OR gene expression is altered in several neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) subtypes MM1 and VV2 with disease-, region- and subtype-specific patterns. Altered gene expression is also observed in the prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia with a major but not total influence of chlorpromazine treatment. Preliminary parallel observations have also shown the presence of taste receptors (TASRs), mainly of the bitter taste family, in the mammalian brain, whose function is not related to taste. TASRs in brain are also abnormally regulated in neurodegenerative diseases. These seminal observations point to the need for further studies on ORs and TASRs chemoreceptors in the mammalian brain. PMID:27458372

  6. [Doctor Francoise Cathala and history of prions diseases].

    PubMed

    Court, L; Hauw, J-J

    2015-12-01

    Doctor Françoise Cathala Pagesy, MD, MS, born on July 7, 1921 in Paris, passed away peacefully at home on November 5, 2012. Unconventional, passionate and enthusiastic neurologist and virologist, she devoted her life to research on latent and slow viral infections, specializing mainly on unconventional transmissible agents or prions. As a research member of Inserm (French Institute for Medical Research), she soon joined the team of Carlton Gajdusek (the NINCDS - National Institute of Nervous Central System and Stroke - of NIH), who first demonstrated the transmissibility of kuru and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease to monkeys. When she came back to Paris, where she was followed by one of NIH members, Paul Brown, she joined the Centre de Recherches du Service de Santé des Armées (Army Health Research Center), in Percy-Clamart, where she found the experimental design and the attentive help needed for her research, which appeared heretical to many French virologists, including some authorities. A large number of research programs were set up with numerous collaborations involving CEA (Center for Atomic Energy) and other institutions in Paris and Marseilles on epidemiology, results of tissue inoculation, electrophysiology and neuropathology of human and animal prions diseases, and resistance of the infectious agent. International symposia were set up, where met, in the Val-de-Grâce hospital in Paris, the research community on "slow viral diseases". Stanley Prusiner introduced the concept - then badly accepted and still in evolution - of prion, a protein only infectious agent. Before retiring from Inserm, Françoise Cathala predicted and was involved in some of the huge sanitary crises in France. These were, first, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease from contaminated growth hormone extracted from cadavers, which led parents to instigate legal procedure - a quite unusual practice in France. The second was Mad cow disease in the United Kingdom then in France, followed by new variant

  7. The immunobiology of prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Aguzzi, Adriano; Nuvolone, Mario; Zhu, Caihong

    2013-12-01

    Individuals infected with prions succumb to brain damage, and prion infections continue to be inexorably lethal. However, many crucial steps in prion pathogenesis occur in lymphatic organs and precede invasion of the central nervous system. In the past two decades, a great deal has been learnt concerning the cellular and molecular mechanisms of prion lymphoinvasion. These properties are diagnostically useful and have, for example, facilitated preclinical diagnosis of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the tonsils. Moreover, the early colonization of lymphoid organs can be exploited for post-exposure prophylaxis of prion infections. As stromal cells of lymphoid organs are crucial for peripheral prion infection, the dedifferentiation of these cells offers a powerful means of hindering prion spread in infected individuals. In this Review, we discuss the current knowledge of the immunobiology of prions with an emphasis on how basic discoveries might enable translational strategies. PMID:24189576

  8. Canadian media representations of mad cow disease.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Amanda D; Jardine, Cynthia G; Driedger, S Michelle

    2009-01-01

    A Canadian case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) or "mad cow disease" was confirmed in May, 2003. An in-depth content analysis of newspaper articles was conducted to understand the portrayal of BSE and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in the Canadian media. Articles in the "first 10 days" following the initial discovery of a cow with BSE in Canada on May 20, 2003, were examined based on the premise that these initial stories provide the major frames that dominate news media reporting of the same issue over time and multiple occurrences. Subsequent confirmed Canadian cases were similarly analyzed to determine if coverage changed in these later media articles. The results include a prominence of economic articles, de-emphasis of health aspects, and anchoring the Canadian outbreak to that of Britain's crisis. The variation in media representations between those in Canada and those documented in Britain are explored in this study. PMID:19697246

  9. Prionet Canada: a network of centres of excellence for research into prions and prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michelle; Toth, Janie; Haney, Sandra; Tyshenko, Michael G; Darshan, Shalu; Krewski, Daniel; Leighton, Frederick A; Westaway, David; Moore, Stephen S; Ricketts, Maura; Cashman, Neil

    2009-01-01

    PrioNet Canada's strength in basic, applied, and social research is helping to solve the food, health safety, and socioeconomic problems associated with prion diseases. Prion diseases are transmissible, fatal neurodegenerative diseases of humans and animals. Examples of prion diseases include bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, commonly known as "mad cow" disease), Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, and chronic wasting disease (CWD) in deer and elk. As of March 31, 2008, PrioNet's interdisciplinary network included 62 scientific members, 5 international collaborators, and more than 150 students and young professionals working in partnership with 25 different government, nongovernment, and industry partners. PrioNet's activities are developing strategies based on a sustained, rational approach that will mitigate, and ultimately control, prion diseases in Canada. PMID:19697232

  10. Copper and the Prion Protein: Methods, Structures, Function, and Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millhauser, Glenn L.

    2007-05-01

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) arise from conversion of the membrane-bound prion protein from PrPC to PrPSc. Examples of the TSEs include mad cow disease, chronic wasting disease in deer and elk, scrapie in goats and sheep, and kuru and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. Although the precise function of PrPC in healthy tissues is not known, recent research demonstrates that it binds Cu(II) in an unusual and highly conserved region of the protein termed the octarepeat domain. This review describes recent connections between copper and PrPC, with an emphasis on the electron paramagnetic resonance elucidation of the specific copper-binding sites, insights into PrPC function, and emerging connections between copper and prion disease.

  11. Copper and the prion protein: methods, structures, function, and disease.

    PubMed

    Millhauser, Glenn L

    2007-01-01

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) arise from conversion of the membrane-bound prion protein from PrP(C) to PrP(Sc). Examples of the TSEs include mad cow disease, chronic wasting disease in deer and elk, scrapie in goats and sheep, and kuru and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. Although the precise function of PrP(C) in healthy tissues is not known, recent research demonstrates that it binds Cu(II) in an unusual and highly conserved region of the protein termed the octarepeat domain. This review describes recent connections between copper and PrP(C), with an emphasis on the electron paramagnetic resonance elucidation of the specific copper-binding sites, insights into PrP(C) function, and emerging connections between copper and prion disease. PMID:17076634

  12. [The truth and present uncertainty about mad cow disease].

    PubMed

    Suárez Fernández, G

    2001-01-01

    A historical review is made about Spongiform Encephalopathies which affect both animals and man. This is the base for an epidemiological and predictive analysis of these type of diseases, especially Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) as a present health problem. The scientific certainties or truths, such as the prion theory (PrPc-PrPsc), the low natural infectivity of these group of diseases, the high dose of prions necessary to produce the experimental disease, the species barrier or specificity, the individual susceptibility due to genetic traits, and the low transmission efficiency by the oral route, compared to the parenteral route, agree with the epidemiological observations of human cases of the variant of the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), which is 0.1 cases per million inhabitants and year. The present and future prediction of BSE should not be alarmist, taking into account the certainties that we know. PMID:11455757

  13. Prospects for safe and effective vaccines against prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Mabbott, Neil Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases are subacute neurodegenerative diseases that affect humans and animals. An abnormally folded isoform (PrP(Sc)) of the host cellular prion protein is considered to constitute the major, if not sole, component of the infectious prion. The occurrence of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans most likely arose due to consumption of food contaminated with bovine spongiform encephalopathy prions. The demonstration that some prion infections may have the capacity to transmit to other species, especially humans, has focused attention on the development of safe and effective vaccines against these invariably fatal and currently incurable diseases. Although much effort has been invested in the development of safe and effective anti-PrP vaccines, many important issues remain to be resolved. PMID:25266267

  14. Presence of voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibody in a case of genetic prion disease.

    PubMed

    Jammoul, Adham; Lederman, Richard J; Tavee, Jinny; Li, Yuebing

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibody-mediated encephalitis is a recently recognised entity which has been reported to mimic the clinical presentation of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Testing for the presence of this neuronal surface autoantibody in patients presenting with subacute encephalopathy is therefore crucial as it may both revoke the bleak diagnosis of prion disease and allow institution of potentially life-saving immunotherapy. Tempering this optimistic view is the rare instance when a positive VGKC complex antibody titre occurs in a definite case of prion disease. We present a pathologically and genetically confirmed case of CJD with elevated serum VGKC complex antibody titres. This case highlights the importance of interpreting the result of a positive VGKC complex antibody with caution and in the context of the overall clinical manifestation. PMID:24903967

  15. 77 FR 34390 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Amendment to “Guidance for Industry: Revised Preventive Measures To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft document entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Amendment (revisions to labeling recommendations for potential risk of vCJD) to `Guidance for Industry: Revised Preventive Measures to Reduce the Possible Risk of Transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) and Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (vCJD) by Blood and......

  16. Chronic wasting disease and atypical forms of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and scrapie are not transmissible to mice expressing wild-type levels of human prion protein.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rona; Plinston, Chris; Hunter, Nora; Casalone, Cristina; Corona, Cristiano; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Suardi, Silvia; Ruggerone, Margherita; Moda, Fabio; Graziano, Silvia; Sbriccoli, Marco; Cardone, Franco; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Ingrosso, Loredana; Baron, Thierry; Richt, Juergen; Andreoletti, Olivier; Simmons, Marion; Lockey, Richard; Manson, Jean C; Barron, Rona M

    2012-07-01

    The association between bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) has demonstrated that cattle transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) can pose a risk to human health and raises the possibility that other ruminant TSEs may be transmissible to humans. In recent years, several novel TSEs in sheep, cattle and deer have been described and the risk posed to humans by these agents is currently unknown. In this study, we inoculated two forms of atypical BSE (BASE and H-type BSE), a chronic wasting disease (CWD) isolate and seven isolates of atypical scrapie into gene-targeted transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the human prion protein (PrP). Upon challenge with these ruminant TSEs, gene-targeted Tg mice expressing human PrP did not show any signs of disease pathology. These data strongly suggest the presence of a substantial transmission barrier between these recently identified ruminant TSEs and humans. PMID:22495232

  17. Prion diseases as transmissible zoonotic diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeongmin; Kim, Su Yeon; Hwang, Kyu Jam; Ju, Young Ran; Woo, Hee-Jong

    2013-02-01

    Prion diseases, also called transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), lead to neurological dysfunction in animals and are fatal. Infectious prion proteins are causative agents of many mammalian TSEs, including scrapie (in sheep), chronic wasting disease (in deer and elk), bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE; in cattle), and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD; in humans). BSE, better known as mad cow disease, is among the many recently discovered zoonotic diseases. BSE cases were first reported in the United Kingdom in 1986. Variant CJD (vCJD) is a disease that was first detected in 1996, which affects humans and is linked to the BSE epidemic in cattle. vCJD is presumed to be caused by consumption of contaminated meat and other food products derived from affected cattle. The BSE epidemic peaked in 1992 and decreased thereafter; this decline is continuing sharply owing to intensive surveillance and screening programs in the Western world. However, there are still new outbreaks and/or progression of prion diseases, including atypical BSE, and iatrogenic CJD and vCJD via organ transplantation and blood transfusion. This paper summarizes studies on prions, particularly on prion molecular mechanisms, BSE, vCJD, and diagnostic procedures. Risk perception and communication policies of the European Union for the prevention of prion diseases are also addressed to provide recommendations for appropriate government policies in Korea. PMID:24159531

  18. Disease Burden of 32 Infectious Diseases in the Netherlands, 2007-2011

    PubMed Central

    Bouwknegt, Martijn; Kretzschmar, Mirjam E.; Mangen, Marie-Josée J.; Wallinga, Jacco; de Melker, Hester E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Infectious disease burden estimates provided by a composite health measure give a balanced view of the true impact of a disease on a population, allowing the relative impact of diseases that differ in severity and mortality to be monitored over time. This article presents the first national disease burden estimates for a comprehensive set of 32 infectious diseases in the Netherlands. Methods and Findings The average annual disease burden was computed for the period 2007–2011 for selected infectious diseases in the Netherlands using the disability-adjusted life years (DALY) measure. The pathogen- and incidence-based approach was adopted to quantify the burden due to both morbidity and premature mortality associated with all short and long-term consequences of infection. Natural history models, disease progression probabilities, disability weights, and other parameters were adapted from previous research. Annual incidence was obtained from statutory notification and other surveillance systems, which was corrected for under-ascertainment and under-reporting. The highest average annual disease burden was estimated for invasive pneumococcal disease (9444 DALYs/year; 95% uncertainty interval [UI]: 8911–9961) and influenza (8670 DALYs/year; 95% UI: 8468–8874), which represents 16% and 15% of the total burden of all 32 diseases, respectively. The remaining 30 diseases ranked by number of DALYs/year from high to low were: HIV infection, legionellosis, toxoplasmosis, chlamydia, campylobacteriosis, pertussis, tuberculosis, hepatitis C infection, Q fever, norovirus infection, salmonellosis, gonorrhoea, invasive meningococcal disease, hepatitis B infection, invasive Haemophilus influenzae infection, shigellosis, listeriosis, giardiasis, hepatitis A infection, infection with STEC O157, measles, cryptosporidiosis, syphilis, rabies, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, tetanus, mumps, rubella, diphtheria, and poliomyelitis. The very low burden for the latter five

  19. 21 CFR 1271.75 - How do I screen a donor?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... method that ensures freedom from contamination of the cells or tissue by infectious disease organisms...) Risk factors for, and clinical evidence of, relevant communicable disease agents and diseases... transmissible spongiform encephalopathy, including Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease; (v) Treponema pallidum; and...

  20. The expanding universe of prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Watts, Joel C; Balachandran, Aru; Westaway, David

    2006-03-01

    Prions cause fatal and transmissible neurodegenerative disease. These etiological infectious agents are formed in greater part from a misfolded cell-surface protein called PrP(C). Several mammalian species are affected by the diseases, and in the case of "mad cow disease" (BSE) the agent has a tropism for humans, with negative consequences for agribusiness and public health. Unfortunately, the known universe of prion diseases is expanding. At least four novel prion diseases--including human diseases variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) and sporadic fatal insomnia (sFI), bovine amyloidotic spongiform encephalopathy (BASE), and Nor98 of sheep--have been identified in the last ten years, and chronic wasting disease (CWD) of North American deer (Odocoileus Specis) and Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) is undergoing a dramatic spread across North America. While amplification (BSE) and dissemination (CWD, commercial sourcing of cervids from the wild and movement of farmed elk) can be attributed to human activity, the origins of emergent prion diseases cannot always be laid at the door of humankind. Instead, the continued appearance of new outbreaks in the form of "sporadic" disease may be an inevitable outcome in a situation where the replicating pathogen is host-encoded. PMID:16609731

  1. 75 FR 55803 - Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... agents from blood components and chronic wasting disease. FDA intends to make background material... the variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) agent in U.S.-licensed plasma-derived Factor VIII and...

  2. The Expanding Universe of Prion Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Joel C; Balachandran, Aru; Westaway, David

    2006-01-01

    Prions cause fatal and transmissible neurodegenerative disease. These etiological infectious agents are formed in greater part from a misfolded cell-surface protein called PrPC. Several mammalian species are affected by the diseases, and in the case of “mad cow disease” (BSE) the agent has a tropism for humans, with negative consequences for agribusiness and public health. Unfortunately, the known universe of prion diseases is expanding. At least four novel prion diseases—including human diseases variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) and sporadic fatal insomnia (sFI), bovine amyloidotic spongiform encephalopathy (BASE), and Nor98 of sheep—have been identified in the last ten years, and chronic wasting disease (CWD) of North American deer (Odocoileus Specis) and Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) is undergoing a dramatic spread across North America. While amplification (BSE) and dissemination (CWD, commercial sourcing of cervids from the wild and movement of farmed elk) can be attributed to human activity, the origins of emergent prion diseases cannot always be laid at the door of humankind. Instead, the continued appearance of new outbreaks in the form of “sporadic” disease may be an inevitable outcome in a situation where the replicating pathogen is host-encoded. PMID:16609731

  3. Family recognition of celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Bąk-Romaniszyn, Leokadia

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease is a permanent intolerance to gluten that leads to small-bowel mucosal villous atrophy during autoimmune processes in genetically predisposed individuals. At present the diagnosis of celiac disease is based on characteristic clinical symptoms, the results of serological investigations (tissue transglutaminase ten times the upper limit of normal, presence of antiendomysial antibodies – EMA) and positive results of genetic examinations. The aim of this study is to present a medical history of a family in which the mother and younger son were diagnosed with celiac disease (confirmed by genotype examination). Before the genetic examination, the father and the elder son were also suspected of suffering from this disease (they were on gluten-free diets). The authors emphasize the usefulness of HLA-DQ2/DQ8 determination in first-degree relatives of celiac patients. PMID:24868289

  4. 78 FR 11207 - Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... to discuss FDA's draft risk assessment model for potential exposure to the variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) agent in Red Blood Cells for transfusion in the United States. FDA intends to...

  5. Mild Cognitive Impairment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Dementia Types of Dementia Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Dementia with Lewy Bodies Down ... Research Traumatic Brain Injury and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Awardees Year Researcher Study Name 2015 Jesse Mez ...

  6. Types of Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Dementia Types of Dementia Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Dementia with Lewy Bodies Down ... Research Traumatic Brain Injury and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Awardees Year Researcher Study Name 2015 Jesse Mez ...

  7. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Dementia Types of Dementia Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Dementia with Lewy Bodies Down ... Research Traumatic Brain Injury and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) Awardees Year Researcher Study Name 2015 Jesse Mez ...

  8. Information for People Treated with Human Growth Hormone (Comprehensive Report)

    MedlinePlus

    ... I help with the follow-up study? How did Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) occur in people treated ... help to clarify individual level of risk. [ Top ] Did the hormone I took cause CJD? We have ...

  9. Human prion disease and relative risk associated with chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Mawhinney, Samantha; Pape, W John; Forster, Jeri E; Anderson, C Alan; Bosque, Patrick; Miller, Michael W

    2006-10-01

    The transmission of the prion disease bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) to humans raises concern about chronic wasting disease (CWD), a prion disease of deer and elk. In 7 Colorado counties with high CWD prevalence, 75% of state hunting licenses are issued locally, which suggests that residents consume most regionally harvested game. We used Colorado death certificate data from 1979 through 2001 to evaluate rates of death from the human prion disease Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). The relative risk (RR) of CJD for CWD-endemic county residents was not significantly increased (RR 0.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.40-1.63), and the rate of CJD did not increase over time (5-year RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.73-1.16). In Colorado, human prion disease resulting from CWD exposure is rare or nonexistent. However, given uncertainties about the incubation period, exposure, and clinical presentation, the possibility that the CWD agent might cause human disease cannot be eliminated. PMID:17176567

  10. Prion diseases and the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Davies, G A; Bryant, Adam R; Reynolds, John D; Jirik, Frank R; Sharkey, Keith A

    2006-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract plays a central role in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. These are human and animal diseases that include bovine spongiform encephalopathy, scrapie and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. They are uniformly fatal neurological diseases, which are characterized by ataxia and vacuolation in the central nervous system. Although they are known to be caused by the conversion of normal cellular prion protein to its infectious conformational isoform (PrPsc) the process by which this isoform is propagated and transported to the brain remains poorly understood. M cells, dendritic cells and possibly enteroendocrine cells are important in the movement of infectious prions across the GI epithelium. From there, PrPsc propagation requires B lymphocytes, dendritic cells and follicular dendritic cells of Peyer's patches. The early accumulation of the disease-causing agent in the plexuses of the enteric nervous system supports the contention that the autonomic nervous system is important in disease transmission. This is further supported by the presence of PrPsc in the ganglia of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves that innervate the GI tract. Additionally, the lymphoreticular system has been implicated as the route of transmission from the gut to the brain. Although normal cellular prion protein is found in the enteric nervous system, its role has not been characterized. Further research is required to understand how the cellular components of the gut wall interact to propagate and transmit infectious prions to develop potential therapies that may prevent the progression of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. PMID:16432555

  11. Prions and prion diseases: fundamentals and mechanistic details.

    PubMed

    Ryou, Chongsuk

    2007-07-01

    Prion diseases, often called transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), are infectious diseases that accompany neurological dysfunctions in many mammalian hosts. Prion diseases include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, "mad cow disease") in cattle, scrapie in sheep, and chronic wasting disease (CWD) in deer and elks. The cause of these fatal diseases is a proteinaceous pathogen termed prion that lacks functional nucleic acids. As demonstrated in the BSE outbreak and its transmission to humans, the onset of disease is not limited to a certain species but can be transmissible from one host species to another. Such a striking nature ofprions has generated huge concerns in public health and attracted serious attention in the scientific communities. To date, the potential transmission ofprions to humans via foodbome infectiorn and iatrogenic routes has not been alleviated. Rather, the possible transmission of human to human or cervids to human aggravates the terrifying situation across the globe. In this review, basic features about prion diseases including clinical and pathological characteristics, etiology, and transmission of diseases are described. Based on recently accumulated evidences, the molecular and biochemical aspects of prions, with an emphasis on the molecular interactions involved in prion conversion that is critical during prion replication and pathogenesis, are also addressed. PMID:18051314

  12. Slow virus disease: deciphering conflicting data on the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) also called prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Frank O; Fermin, Cesar D

    2005-11-01

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) that manifest as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, as scrapie in sheep and goats, mad cow disease in cattle, or chronic wasting disease in cervids (deer) represent a serious human health crisis and a significant economical problem. Despite much research, the nature of the elusive pathogen directly involved with TSE is currently unresolved. This article reviews current pathogen-cell plasma membrane properties, showing that the primary biochemical marker of the prion disease is used as a receptor by the intracellular bacterium Brucella abortus. Such observation makes plausible the role for the prion in the pathogenesis of TSE, and supports the concept that Spiroplasma, a wall-less bacterium, may be a transmissible agent of TSE. Over the past three decades, we have published convincing evidence that Spiroplasma infection is associated with TSE. The bacterial-prion-receptor concept by other laboratories support a model for TSE wherein a Spiroplasma bacterium can bind to prion receptors (alone or with anchors) on the cell surface lipid raft, allowing entry of the microbe into the cell to initiate infection. The relevance of this new concept is that it offers a new window for future research involving a bacterium in the pathogenesis of TSE. Data from the bacterial-prion-receptor model will aid in the development diagnostic tests and/or treatment protocols for TSE. PMID:16276518

  13. Epigenetic Treatment of Neurodegenerative Disorders: Alzheimer and Parkinson Diseases.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Michael H; Moos, Walter H; Faller, Douglas V; Steliou, Kosta; Pinkert, Carl A

    2016-05-01

    Preclinical Research In this review, we discuss epigenetic-driven methods for treating neurodegenerative disorders associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, focusing on carnitinoid antioxidant-histone deacetylase inhibitors that show an ability to reinvigorate synaptic plasticity and protect against neuromotor decline in vivo. Aging remains a major risk factor in patients who progress to dementia, a clinical syndrome typified by decreased mental capacity, including impairments in memory, language skills, and executive function. Energy metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction are viewed as determinants in the aging process that may afford therapeutic targets for a host of disease conditions, the brain being primary in such thinking. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a core feature in the pathophysiology of both Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases and rare mitochondrial diseases. The potential of new therapies in this area extends to glaucoma and other ophthalmic disorders, migraine, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, post-traumatic stress disorder, systemic exertion intolerance disease, and chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment. An emerging and hopefully more promising approach to addressing these hard-to-treat diseases leverages their sensitivity to activation of master regulators of antioxidant and cytoprotective genes, antioxidant response elements, and mitophagy. Drug Dev Res 77 : 109-123, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26899010

  14. Helping Family and Friends Understand Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alzheimer’s. You can: • Tell friends and family about Alzheimer’s disease and its effects. • Share articles, websites, and other information about the disease. • Tell them what they can do to help. Let them know you need ... has Alzheimer’s disease, it affects everyone in the family, including children ...

  15. Could ectoparasites act as vectors for prion diseases?

    PubMed

    Lupi, Omar

    2003-06-01

    Prion diseases are rare neurodegenerative diseases of humans and animals with a lethal evolution. Several cell types found on the human skin, including keratinocytes, fibroblasts and lymphocytes, are susceptible to the abnormal infective isoform of the prion protein, which transforms the skin to produce a potential target for prion infection. Iatrogenic transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease was also recognized after corneal transplants in humans, and scrapie was successfully transmitted to mice after ocular instillation of infected brain tissue, confirming that these new routes, as well as cerebral inoculation and oral ingestion, could be important in prion infections. Animal prion infections, such as scrapie (sheep) and "mad cow disease" (cattle), have shown a pattern of horizontal transmission in farm conditions and several ectoparasites have been shown to harbor prion rods in laboratory experiments. Fly larvae and mites were exposed to brain-infected material and were readily able to transmit scrapie to hamsters. New lines of evidence have confirmed that adult flies are also able to express prion proteins. Because ocular and cerebral myiases and mite infestation are not rare worldwide, and most cases are caused by fly larvae or hay mites that usually affect sheep and cattle, it is important to discuss the possibility that these ectoparasites could eventually act as reservoirs and/or vectors for prion diseases. PMID:12786866

  16. Prion disease tempo determined by host-dependent substrate reduction

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Charles E.; Kim, Chae; Haldiman, Tracy; van der Merwe, Jacques; Lau, Agnes; Yang, Jing; Grams, Jennifer; Di Bari, Michele A.; Nonno, Romolo; Telling, Glenn C.; Kong, Qingzhong; Langeveld, Jan; McKenzie, Debbie; Westaway, David; Safar, Jiri G.

    2014-01-01

    The symptoms of prion infection can take years or decades to manifest following the initial exposure. Molecular markers of prion disease include accumulation of the misfolded prion protein (PrPSc), which is derived from its cellular precursor (PrPC), as well as downregulation of the PrP-like Shadoo (Sho) glycoprotein. Given the overlapping cellular environments for PrPC and Sho, we inferred that PrPC levels might also be altered as part of a host response during prion infection. Using rodent models, we found that, in addition to changes in PrPC glycosylation and proteolytic processing, net reductions in PrPC occur in a wide range of prion diseases, including sheep scrapie, human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and cervid chronic wasting disease. The reduction in PrPC results in decreased prion replication, as measured by the protein misfolding cyclic amplification technique for generating PrPSc in vitro. While PrPC downregulation is not discernible in animals with unusually short incubation periods and high PrPC expression, slowly evolving prion infections exhibit downregulation of the PrPC substrate required for new PrPSc synthesis and as a receptor for pathogenic signaling. Our data reveal PrPC downregulation as a previously unappreciated element of disease pathogenesis that defines the extensive, presymptomatic period for many prion strains. PMID:24430187

  17. Progress and problems in the biology, diagnostics, and therapeutics of prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Aguzzi, Adriano; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Miele, Gino

    2004-07-01

    The term "prion" was introduced by Stanley Prusiner in 1982 to describe the atypical infectious agent that causes transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, a group of infectious neurodegenerative diseases that include scrapie in sheep, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, chronic wasting disease in cervids, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle. Over the past twenty years, the word "prion" has been taken to signify various subtly different concepts. In this article, we refer to the prion as the transmissible principle underlying prion diseases, without necessarily implying any specific biochemical or structural identity. When Prusiner started his seminal work, the study of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies was undertaken by only a handful of scientists. Since that time, the "mad cow" crisis has put prion diseases on the agenda of both politicians and the media. Significant progress has been made in prion disease research, and many aspects of prion pathogenesis are now understood. And yet the diagnostic procedures available for prion diseases are not nearly as sensitive as they ought to be, and no therapeutic intervention has been shown to reliably affect the course of the diseases. This article reviews recent progress in the areas of pathogenesis of, diagnostics of, and therapy for prion diseases and highlights some conspicuous problems that remain to be addressed in each of these fields. PMID:15254579

  18. Progress and problems in the biology, diagnostics, and therapeutics of prion diseases

    PubMed Central

    Aguzzi, Adriano; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Miele, Gino

    2004-01-01

    The term “prion” was introduced by Stanley Prusiner in 1982 to describe the atypical infectious agent that causes transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, a group of infectious neurodegenerative diseases that include scrapie in sheep, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, chronic wasting disease in cervids, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle. Over the past twenty years, the word “prion” has been taken to signify various subtly different concepts. In this article, we refer to the prion as the transmissible principle underlying prion diseases, without necessarily implying any specific biochemical or structural identity. When Prusiner started his seminal work, the study of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies was undertaken by only a handful of scientists. Since that time, the “mad cow” crisis has put prion diseases on the agenda of both politicians and the media. Significant progress has been made in prion disease research, and many aspects of prion pathogenesis are now understood. And yet the diagnostic procedures available for prion diseases are not nearly as sensitive as they ought to be, and no therapeutic intervention has been shown to reliably affect the course of the diseases. This article reviews recent progress in the areas of pathogenesis of, diagnostics of, and therapy for prion diseases and highlights some conspicuous problems that remain to be addressed in each of these fields. PMID:15254579

  19. Potential for transmission of prion disease by contact lenses: an assessment of risk.

    PubMed

    Hogan, R Nick

    2003-01-01

    Prions are small proteinaceous infectious agents known to cause central nervous system infections in both animals and humans. Interest in the pathogenesis of these diseases has grown since the emergence of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or "mad cow disease") in the United Kingdom and several other countries in Europe. Ingestion of meat products from animals infected with BSE has resulted in transmission of the disease to humans as a variant form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (vCJD). CJD has a long asymptomatic incubation period, is untreatable, and universally fatal. Hence concern has arisen over other possible routes of disease transmission. Because it is known that prions are found in low levels in the corneas of animals with experimentally induced prion disease, and that a case of human CJD transmission by corneal transplantation has occurred, the question of possible prion transmission through the reuse of diagnostic fitting of contact lenses has surfaced. This article reviews prion diseases of animals and humans, and the data regarding the presence and location of prions in the eye. Issues inherent in the question of corneal and contact lens transmission are discussed. Although some key information has yet to be derived, it appears that the chance of obtaining prion disease through contact lens use is negligible. PMID:12772730

  20. Small-Molecule Theranostic Probes: A Promising Future in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Aulić, Suzana

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative illnesses, which include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans and scrapie, chronic wasting disease, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy in animals. They are caused by unconventional infectious agents consisting primarily of misfolded, aggregated, β-sheet-rich isoforms, denoted prions, of the physiological cellular prion protein (PrPC). Many lines of evidence suggest that prions (PrPSc) act both as a template for this conversion and as a neurotoxic agent causing neuronal dysfunction and cell death. As such, PrPSc may be considered as both a neuropathological hallmark of the disease and a therapeutic target. Several diagnostic imaging probes have been developed to monitor cerebral amyloid lesions in patients with neurodegenerative disorders (such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and prion disease). Examples of these probes are Congo red, thioflavin T, and their derivatives. We synthesized a series of styryl derivatives, denoted theranostics, and studied their therapeutic and/or diagnostic potentials. Here we review the salient traits of these small molecules that are able to detect and modulate aggregated forms of several proteins involved in protein misfolding diseases. We then highlight the importance of further studies for their practical implications in therapy and diagnostics. PMID:24324497

  1. Octarepeat region flexibility impacts prion function, endoproteolysis and disease manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Agnes; McDonald, Alex; Daude, Nathalie; Mays, Charles E; Walter, Eric D; Aglietti, Robin; Mercer, Robert CC; Wohlgemuth, Serene; van der Merwe, Jacques; Yang, Jing; Gapeshina, Hristina; Kim, Chae; Grams, Jennifer; Shi, Beipei; Wille, Holger; Balachandran, Aru; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold; Safar, Jiri G; Millhauser, Glenn L; Westaway, David

    2015-01-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPC) comprises a natively unstructured N-terminal domain, including a metal-binding octarepeat region (OR) and a linker, followed by a C-terminal domain that misfolds to form PrPSc in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. PrPC β-endoproteolysis to the C2 fragment allows PrPSc formation, while α-endoproteolysis blocks production. To examine the OR, we used structure-directed design to make novel alleles, ‘S1’ and ‘S3’, locking this region in extended or compact conformations, respectively. S1 and S3 PrP resembled WT PrP in supporting peripheral nerve myelination. Prion-infected S1 and S3 transgenic mice both accumulated similar low levels of PrPSc and infectious prion particles, but differed in their clinical presentation. Unexpectedly, S3 PrP overproduced C2 fragment in the brain by a mechanism distinct from metal-catalysed hydrolysis reported previously. OR flexibility is concluded to impact diverse biological endpoints; it is a salient variable in infectious disease paradigms and modulates how the levels of PrPSc and infectivity can either uncouple or engage to drive the onset of clinical disease. PMID:25661904

  2. Octarepeat region flexibility impacts prion function, endoproteolysis and disease manifestation.

    PubMed

    Lau, Agnes; McDonald, Alex; Daude, Nathalie; Mays, Charles E; Walter, Eric D; Aglietti, Robin; Mercer, Robert C C; Wohlgemuth, Serene; van der Merwe, Jacques; Yang, Jing; Gapeshina, Hristina; Kim, Chae; Grams, Jennifer; Shi, Beipei; Wille, Holger; Balachandran, Aru; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold; Safar, Jiri G; Millhauser, Glenn L; Westaway, David

    2015-03-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) comprises a natively unstructured N-terminal domain, including a metal-binding octarepeat region (OR) and a linker, followed by a C-terminal domain that misfolds to form PrP(S) (c) in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. PrP(C) β-endoproteolysis to the C2 fragment allows PrP(S) (c) formation, while α-endoproteolysis blocks production. To examine the OR, we used structure-directed design to make novel alleles, 'S1' and 'S3', locking this region in extended or compact conformations, respectively. S1 and S3 PrP resembled WT PrP in supporting peripheral nerve myelination. Prion-infected S1 and S3 transgenic mice both accumulated similar low levels of PrP(S) (c) and infectious prion particles, but differed in their clinical presentation. Unexpectedly, S3 PrP overproduced C2 fragment in the brain by a mechanism distinct from metal-catalysed hydrolysis reported previously. OR flexibility is concluded to impact diverse biological endpoints; it is a salient variable in infectious disease paradigms and modulates how the levels of PrP(S) (c) and infectivity can either uncouple or engage to drive the onset of clinical disease. PMID:25661904

  3. The role of macropinocytosis in the propagation of protein aggregation associated with neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zeineddine, Rafaa; Yerbury, Justin J.

    2015-01-01

    With the onset of the rapidly aging population, the impact of age related neurodegenerative diseases is becoming a predominant health and economic concern. Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) result from the loss of a specific subsets of neurons, which is closely associated with accumulation and deposition of specific protein aggregates. Protein aggregation, or fibril formation, is a well-studied phenomenon that occurs in a nucleation-dependent growth reaction. Recently, there has been a swell of literature implicating protein aggregation and its ability to propagate cell-to-cell in the rapid progression of these diseases. In order for protein aggregation to be kindled in recipient cells it is a requisite that aggregates must be able to be released from one cell and then taken up by others. In this article we will explore the relationship between protein aggregates, their propagation and the role of macropinocytosis in their uptake. We highlight the ability of neurons to undergo stimulated macropinocytosis and identify potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26528186

  4. [The other dementias: the neuropathology of the non-Alzheimer's disease dementias].

    PubMed

    Hamilton, R L

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common causes of dementia, but requires neuropathological verification for a definitive diagnosis because there are a number of other neurodegenerative diseases that may present with dementia. Some of these disorders have considerable overlap both clinically and pathologically with AD, while others have distinct clinical and pathological profiles. Vascular dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) have the greatest overlap with AD and considerable controversy still surrounds the exact contribution of the non AD pathology to the dementia syndrome. The frontotemporal dementias are loosely united by clinical presentation, but are pathologically heterogeneous and include Pick's disease, dementia lacking distinctive histopathology, motor neuron disease inclusion dementia and corticobasal degeneration (CBD). CBD can be difficult to distinguish from progressive supranuclear palsy, especially when the latter lacks the distinctive gaze palsy. Finally, Creutzfeldt Jakob disease (CJD) may be difficult to distinguish from AD when the symptoms progress at an atypically slow pace. Recently, a new variant of CJD (vCJD) that has been linked to bovine spongiform encephalopathy ('mad cow' disease) has heightened awareness of these prion protein disorders. The neuropathological criteria for the diagnosis of these non AD dementia disorders will be reviewed. PMID:12938072

  5. Identification of misfolded proteins in body fluids for the diagnosis of prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Properzi, Francesca; Pocchiari, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) or prion diseases are fatal rare neurodegenerative disorders affecting man and animals and caused by a transmissible infectious agent. TSE diseases are characterized by spongiform brain lesions with neuronal loss and the abnormal deposition in the CNS, and to less extent in other tissues, of an insoluble and protease resistant form of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)), named PrP(TSE). In man, TSE diseases affect usually people over 60 years of age with no evident disease-associated risk factors. In some cases, however, TSE diseases are unequivocally linked to infectious episodes related to the use of prion-contaminated medicines, medical devices, or meat products as in the variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Clinical signs occur months or years after infection, and during this silent period PrP(TSE), the only reliable marker of infection, is not easily measurable in blood or other accessible tissues or body fluids causing public health concerns. To overcome the limit of PrP(TSE) detection, several highly sensitive assays have been developed, but attempts to apply these techniques to blood of infected hosts have been unsuccessful or not yet validated. An update on the latest advances for the detection of misfolded prion protein in body fluids is provided. PMID:24027585

  6. Identification of Misfolded Proteins in Body Fluids for the Diagnosis of Prion Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pocchiari, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) or prion diseases are fatal rare neurodegenerative disorders affecting man and animals and caused by a transmissible infectious agent. TSE diseases are characterized by spongiform brain lesions with neuronal loss and the abnormal deposition in the CNS, and to less extent in other tissues, of an insoluble and protease resistant form of the cellular prion protein (PrPC), named PrPTSE. In man, TSE diseases affect usually people over 60 years of age with no evident disease-associated risk factors. In some cases, however, TSE diseases are unequivocally linked to infectious episodes related to the use of prion-contaminated medicines, medical devices, or meat products as in the variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Clinical signs occur months or years after infection, and during this silent period PrPTSE, the only reliable marker of infection, is not easily measurable in blood or other accessible tissues or body fluids causing public health concerns. To overcome the limit of PrPTSE detection, several highly sensitive assays have been developed, but attempts to apply these techniques to blood of infected hosts have been unsuccessful or not yet validated. An update on the latest advances for the detection of misfolded prion protein in body fluids is provided. PMID:24027585

  7. Preclinical detection of infectivity and disease-specific PrP in blood throughout the incubation period of prion disease.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Elizabeth B; Edgeworth, Julie Ann; Thomas, Claire; Collinge, John; Jackson, Graham S

    2015-01-01

    Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterised by accumulation of pathological isoforms of the prion protein, PrP. Although cases of clinical vCJD are rare, there is evidence there may be tens of thousands of infectious carriers in the United Kingdom alone. This raises concern about the potential for perpetuation of infection via medical procedures, in particular transfusion of contaminated blood products. Accurate biochemical detection of prion infection is crucial to mitigate risk and we have previously reported a blood assay for vCJD. This assay is sensitive for abnormal PrP conformers at the earliest stages of preclinical prion disease in mice and precedes the maximum infectious titre in blood. Not only does this support the possibility of screening asymptomatic individuals, it will also facilitate the elucidation of the complex relationship that exists between the ensemble of abnormal PrP conformers present in blood and the relationship to infectivity. PMID:26631638

  8. Transcriptional modulation in a leukocyte-depleted splenic cell population during prion disease.

    PubMed

    Huzarewich, Rhiannon L C H; Medina, Sarah; Robertson, Catherine; Parchaliuk, Debra; Booth, Stephanie A

    2011-01-01

    Prion replication in the periphery precedes neuroinvasion in many experimental rodent scrapie models, and in natural sheep scrapie and chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids. Prions propagate in the germinal centers of secondary lymphoid organs and are strongly associated with follicular dendritic cells (FDC) and possibly circulating dendritic cells and macrophages. Given the importance of lymphoid organs in prion disease transmission and pathogenesis, gene expression studies may reveal host factors or biological pathways related to prion replication and accumulation. A procedure was developed to enrich for FDC, dendritic cells, and macrophages prior to the investigation of transcriptional alterations in murine splenic cells during prion pathogenesis. In total, 1753 transcripts exhibited fold changes greater than three (false discovery rates less than 2%) in this population isolated from spleens of prion-infected versus uninfected mice. The gene for the small leucine-rich proteoglycan decorin (DCN) was one of the genes most overexpressed in infected mice, and the splenic protein levels mirrored this in mice infected with scrapie as well as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). A number of groups of functionally related genes were also significantly decreased in infected spleens. These included genes related to iron metabolism and homeostasis, pathways that have also been implicated in prion pathogenesis in the brain. These gene expression alterations provide insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying prion disease pathogenesis and may serve as a pool of potential surrogate markers for the early detection and diagnosis of some prion diseases. PMID:22043911

  9. Atypical transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in ruminants: a challenge for disease surveillance and control.

    PubMed

    Seuberlich, Torsten; Heim, Dagmar; Zurbriggen, Andreas

    2010-11-01

    Since 1987, when bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) emerged as a novel disease in cattle, enormous efforts were undertaken to monitor and control the disease in ruminants worldwide. The driving force was its high economic impact, which resulted from trade restrictions and the loss of consumer confidence in beef products, the latter because BSE turned out to be a fatal zoonosis, causing variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in human beings. The ban on meat and bone meal in livestock feed and the removal of specified risk materials from the food chain were the main measures to successfully prevent infection in cattle and to protect human beings from BSE exposure. However, although BSE is now under control, previously unknown, so-called atypical transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) in cattle and small ruminants have been identified by enhanced disease surveillance. This report briefly reviews and summarizes the current level of knowledge on the spectrum of TSEs in cattle and small ruminants and addresses the question of the extent to which such atypical TSEs have an effect on disease surveillance and control strategies. PMID:21088166

  10. Autism and Autoimmune Disease: A Family Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Money, John; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Described in a family in which the youngest boy has early infantile autism, Addison's disease, and moniliasis and two older boys have autoimmune disease with hypoparathyroidism, Addison's disease, moniliasis, and either alopecia totalis or diabetes mellitus, while the oldest boy and parents are symptom free. (KW)

  11. Spatial correlation between the prevalence of transmissible spongiform diseases and British soil geochemistry.

    PubMed

    Imrie, C E; Korre, A; Munoz-Melendez, G

    2009-02-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of fatal neurological conditions affecting a number of mammals, including sheep and goats (scrapie), cows (BSE), and humans (Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease). The diseases are widely believed to be caused by the misfolding of the normal prion protein to a pathological isoform, which is thought to act as an infectious agent. Outbreaks of the disease are commonly attributed to contaminated feed and genetic susceptibility. However, the implication of copper and manganese in the pathology of the disease, and its apparent geographical clustering, have prompted suggestions of a link with trace elements in the environment. Nevertheless, studies of soils at regional scales have failed to provide evidence of an environmental risk factor. This study uses geostatistical techniques to investigate the correlations between the distribution of TSE prevalence and soil geochemical variables across the UK according to different spatial scales. A similar spatial pattern in scrapie and BSE occurrence is identified, which may be linked with increasing pH and total organic carbon, and decreasing iodine concentration. However, the pattern also resembles that of the density of dairy farming. Nevertheless, despite the low spatial resolution of the TSE data available for this study, the fact that significant correlations are detected indicates there is a possibility of a link between soil geochemistry, scrapie, and BSE. It is suggested that further investigations of the prevalence of TSE and environmental exposure to trace metals should take into account the factors affecting their bioavailability. PMID:18427934

  12. The alternative role of 14-3-3 zeta as a sweeper of misfolded proteins in disease conditions.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kiyotoshi; Hachiya, Naomi S

    2006-01-01

    Here, we propose a novel hypothesis that 14-3-3 zeta might act as a sweeper of misfolded proteins by facilitating the formation of aggregates, which are referred to as inclusion bodies. Studies on the localization of the 14-3-3 proteins in different types of inclusion bodies in the brain including neurofibrillary tangle in Alzheimer's disease, pick bodies in Pick's disease, Lewy body-like hyaline inclusions in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, prion/florid plaques in sporadic/variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, nuclear inclusions in spinocerebellar ataxia-1, and possibly Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease suggest a close association of these diseases with 14-3-3 zeta. The highly conserved hydrophobic surface of the amphipathic groove in 14-3-3 zeta represents a general mechanism with diverse cellular proteins, and it may also allow for the molecular recognition of misfolded proteins by hydrophobic interaction in disease conditions. When the abnormal processing of misfolded proteins overwhelms the quality control systems of the cell, it is likely that 14-3-3 zeta is recruited to form deposits of protein aggregates with nonnative, misfolded proteins in order to protect the cell against toxicity. Hence, 14-3-3 zeta may be considered as an auxiliary therapeutic tool in the protein aggregation disorders. PMID:16516399

  13. Atypical sporadic CJD-MM phenotype with white matter kuru plaques associated with intranuclear inclusion body and argyrophilic grain disease.

    PubMed

    Berghoff, Anna S; Trummert, Anita; Unterberger, Ursula; Ströbel, Thomas; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Kovacs, Gabor G

    2015-08-01

    We describe an atypical neuropathological phenotype of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in a 76-year-old man. The clinical symptoms were characterized by progressive dementia, gait ataxia, rigidity and urinary incontinence. The disease duration was 6 weeks. MRI did not show prominent atrophy or hyperintensities in cortical areas, striatum or thalamus. Biomarker examination of the cerebrospinal fluid deviated from that seen in pure Alzheimer's disease. Triphasic waves in the EEG were detected only later in the disease course, while 14-3-3 assay was positive. PRNP genotyping revealed methionine homozygosity (MM) at codon 129. Neuropathology showed classical CJD changes corresponding to the MM type 1 cases. However, a striking feature was the presence of abundant kuru-type plaques in the white matter. This rare morphology was associated with neuropathological signs of intranuclear inclusion body disease and advanced stage of argyrophilic grain disease. These alterations did not show correlation with each other, thus seemed to develop independently. This case further highlights the complexity of neuropathological alterations in the ageing brain. PMID:25783686

  14. Human prion protein sequence elements impede cross-species chronic wasting disease transmission

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Timothy D.; Jiang, Lin; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Bett, Cyrus; Liu, Jun; Yang, Tom; Spraker, Terry R.; Castilla, Joaquín; Eisenberg, David; Kong, Qingzhong; Sigurdson, Christina J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal prion disease of North American deer and elk and poses an unclear risk for transmission to humans. Human exposure to CWD occurs through hunting activities and consumption of venison from prion-infected animals. Although the amino acid residues of the prion protein (PrP) that prevent or permit human CWD infection are unknown, NMR-based structural studies suggest that the β2-α2 loop (residues 165–175) may impact species barriers. Here we sought to define PrP sequence determinants that affect CWD transmission to humans. We engineered transgenic mice that express human PrP with four amino acid substitutions that result in expression of PrP with a β2-α2 loop (residues 165–175) that exactly matches that of elk PrP. Compared with transgenic mice expressing unaltered human PrP, mice expressing the human-elk chimeric PrP were highly susceptible to elk and deer CWD prions but were concurrently less susceptible to human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease prions. A systematic in vitro survey of amino acid differences between humans and cervids identified two additional residues that impacted CWD conversion of human PrP. This work identifies amino acids that constitute a substantial structural barrier for CWD transmission to humans and helps illuminate the molecular requirements for cross-species prion transmission. PMID:25705888

  15. Molecular dynamics studies on the structural stability of wild-type dog prion protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiapu; Liu, David D W

    2011-06-01

    Prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, Fatal Familial Insomnia, Kuru in humans, scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (or 'mad-cow' disease) and chronic wasting disease in cattle are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans and animals. However, by now there have not been some effective therapeutic approaches to treat all these prion diseases. In 2008, canine mammals including dogs (canis familials) were the first time academically reported to be resistant to prion diseases (Vaccine 26: 2601-2614 (2008)). Thus, it is very worth studying the molecular structures of dog prion protein to obtain insights into the immunity of dogs to prion diseases. This paper studies the molecular structural dynamics of wild-type dog prion protein. The comparison analyses with rabbit prion protein show that the dog prion protein has stable molecular structures whether under neutral or low pH environments. We also find that the salt bridges such as D177-R163 contribute to the structural stability of wild-type rabbit prion protein under neutral pH environment. PMID:21469747

  16. Extracellular vesicles--Their role in the packaging and spread of misfolded proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Bradley M; Hill, Andrew F

    2015-04-01

    Many cell types, including neurons, are known to release small membranous vesicles known as exosomes. In addition to their protein content these vesicles have recently been shown to contain messenger RNA (mRNA) and micro RNA (miRNA) species. Roles for these vesicles include cell-cell signalling, removal of unwanted proteins, and transfer of pathogens (including prion-like misfolded proteins) between cells, such as infectious prions. Prions are the infectious particles that are responsible for transmissible neurodegenerative diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) of humans or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) of cattle. Exosomes are also involved in processing the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). As exosomes can be isolated from circulating fluids such as serum, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), they provide a potential source of biomarkers for neurological conditions. Here, we review the roles these vesicles play in neurodegenerative disease and highlight their potential in diagnosing these disorders through analysis of their RNA content. PMID:25704308

  17. Anterior-posterior and lateral hemispheric alterations in cortical glucose utilization in Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, T.F.; Budinger, T.F.; Jaqust, W.J.; Yano, Y.; Huesman, R.H.; Knittel, B.; Koss, E.; Ober, B.A.

    1984-01-01

    The anatomical and chemical features of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are not distributed evenly throughout the brain. However, the nature of this focality has not been well established in vivo. Dynamic studies using the Donner 280-Crystal Positron Tomograph with (F-18)2-fluorodeoxyglucose were performed in 17 subjects meeting current research criteria for AD, and in 7 healthy age-matched control subjects. Glucose metabolic rates in the temporal-parietal cortex are 27% lower in AD than in controls. Ratios of activity density reveal consistently lower metabolic rates in temporal-parietal than frontal cortex in the AD group, while healthy aged subjects have equal metabolic rates in the two areas. Similar findings have been reported by other laboratories. A major finding is a striking lateral asymmetry of cortical metabolism in AD which does not favor either hemisphere. (The asymmetry is 13% in the AD group, 3% in controls, p<.005.) This has not been previously reported in AD. The consistency with which anterior-posterior metabolic differences are found in AD suggests that the focality of the metabolic changes may be used to develop a noninvasive diagnostic test for the disorder. The metabolic asymmetry in AD may be compared to the clinical and pathological asymmetry found in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and may represent an additional link between AD and the subacute spongiform encephalopathies.

  18. Atypical prion diseases in humans and animals.

    PubMed

    Tranulis, Michael A; Benestad, Sylvie L; Baron, Thierry; Kretzschmar, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Although prion diseases, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans and scrapie in sheep, have long been recognized, our understanding of their epidemiology and pathogenesis is still in its early stages. Progress is hampered by the lengthy incubation periods and the lack of effective ways of monitoring and characterizing these agents. Protease-resistant conformers of the prion protein (PrP), known as the "scrapie form" (PrP(Sc)), are used as disease markers, and for taxonomic purposes, in correlation with clinical, pathological, and genetic data. In humans, prion diseases can arise sporadically (sCJD) or genetically (gCJD and others), caused by mutations in the PrP-gene (PRNP), or as a foodborne infection, with the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) causing variant CJD (vCJD). Person-to-person spread of human prion disease has only been known to occur following cannibalism (kuru disease in Papua New Guinea) or through medical or surgical treatment (iatrogenic CJD, iCJD). In contrast, scrapie in small ruminants and chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids behave as infectious diseases within these species. Recently, however, so-called atypical forms of prion diseases have been discovered in sheep (atypical/Nor98 scrapie) and in cattle, BSE-H and BSE-L. These maladies resemble sporadic or genetic human prion diseases and might be their animal equivalents. This hypothesis also raises the significant public health question of possible epidemiological links between these diseases and their counterparts in humans. PMID:21598097

  19. A vital fluid: risk, controversy and the politics of blood donation in the era of "mad cow disease".

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Kate

    2003-10-01

    This article examines the reasons for, and likely impact of, the decision by the US and other countries to permanently defer blood donors who have spent time in Britain or Europe, for fear they may transmit new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), the human form of "mad cow disease". It begins by discussing how vCJD and blood transfusion are linked, and how these have been translated into policy. First, maintaining a safe and stable supply of blood entails not only maintaining the trust of recipients in the system, but also that of donors, who need to be assured that their blood will be welcomed and used. Often, the balance, once upset, is regained by sacrificing donors, but accompanying costs might also be high. Second, the article highlights the impact of various forms of globalization -of commerce, disease and travel, and immigration- on blood policies and public and policy attitudes. Third, it assesses the decision by the US to restrict blood donations from Europeans and travelers to combat such a pervasive risk. The conclusion discusses how donor deferral policies may be interpreted by the public in the light of earlier discussions, and raises issues for future research. PMID:14971395

  20. The impact of social amplification and attenuation of risk and the public reaction to mad cow disease in Canada.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Roxanne E; Tyshenko, Michael G

    2009-05-01

    Following the detection of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in Canada, and subsequently in the United States, confidence in the safety of beef products remained high. Consumers actually increased their consumption of beef slightly after the news of an increased risk from mad cow disease, which has been interpreted as public support for beef farmers and confidence in government regulators. The Canadian public showed a markedly different reaction to the news of domestic BSE than the furious and panicked responses observed in the United Kingdom, Germany, and Japan. Using the social amplification of risk framework, we show that, while other countries displayed social amplification of risk, Canada experienced a social attenuation of risk. The attenuated reaction in Canada toward mad cow disease and increased human health risks from variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) was due to the social context at the time when BSE was discovered domestically. Mortality, morbidity, and psychosocial impacts resulting from other major events such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), West Nile virus (WNV), and the U.S.-Iraq war made the theoretical risks of BSE and vCJD a lower priority, reducing its concern as a risk issue. PMID:19192234

  1. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies of livestock.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Justin J; Greenlee, M Heather West

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal protein-misfolding neurodegenerative diseases. TSEs have been described in several species, including bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle, scrapie in sheep and goats, chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids, transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) in mink, and Kuru and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans. These diseases are associated with the accumulation of a protease-resistant, disease-associated isoform of the prion protein (called PrP(Sc)) in the central nervous system and other tissues, depending on the host species. Typically, TSEs are acquired through exposure to infectious material, but inherited and spontaneous TSEs also occur. All TSEs share pathologic features and infectious mechanisms but have distinct differences in transmission and epidemiology due to host factors and strain differences encoded within the structure of the misfolded prion protein. The possibility that BSE can be transmitted to humans as the cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease has brought attention to this family of diseases. This review is focused on the TSEs of livestock: bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle and scrapie in sheep and goats. PMID:25991695

  2. Family Physician Perspectives on Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Orange, Jordan S.; Seeborg, Filiz O.; Boyle, Marcia; Scalchunes, Christopher; Hernandez-Trujillo, Vivian

    2016-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) include over 250 diverse disorders. The current study assessed management of PID by family practice physicians. The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Primary Immunodeficiency Committee and the Immune Deficiency Foundation conducted an incentivized mail survey of family practice physician members of the American Medical Association and the American Osteopathic Association in direct patient care. Responses were compared with subspecialist immunologist responses from a similar survey. Surveys were returned by 528 (of 4500 surveys mailed) family practice physicians, of whom 44% reported following ≥1 patient with PID. Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (21%) and chronic granulomatous disease (11%) were most common and were followed by significantly more subspecialist immunologists (P < 0.05). Use of intravenously administered immunoglobulin and live viral vaccinations across PID was significantly different (P < 0.05). Few family practice physicians were aware of professional guidelines for diagnosis and management of PID (4 vs. 79% of subspecialist immunologists, P < 0.05). Family practice physicians will likely encounter patients with PID diagnoses during their career. Differences in how family practice physicians and subspecialist immunologists manage patients with PID underscore areas where improved educational and training initiatives may benefit patient care. PMID:27066486

  3. Family Physician Perspectives on Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases.

    PubMed

    Orange, Jordan S; Seeborg, Filiz O; Boyle, Marcia; Scalchunes, Christopher; Hernandez-Trujillo, Vivian

    2016-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) include over 250 diverse disorders. The current study assessed management of PID by family practice physicians. The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Primary Immunodeficiency Committee and the Immune Deficiency Foundation conducted an incentivized mail survey of family practice physician members of the American Medical Association and the American Osteopathic Association in direct patient care. Responses were compared with subspecialist immunologist responses from a similar survey. Surveys were returned by 528 (of 4500 surveys mailed) family practice physicians, of whom 44% reported following ≥1 patient with PID. Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (21%) and chronic granulomatous disease (11%) were most common and were followed by significantly more subspecialist immunologists (P < 0.05). Use of intravenously administered immunoglobulin and live viral vaccinations across PID was significantly different (P < 0.05). Few family practice physicians were aware of professional guidelines for diagnosis and management of PID (4 vs. 79% of subspecialist immunologists, P < 0.05). Family practice physicians will likely encounter patients with PID diagnoses during their career. Differences in how family practice physicians and subspecialist immunologists manage patients with PID underscore areas where improved educational and training initiatives may benefit patient care. PMID:27066486

  4. Interleukin-1 Family Cytokines in Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Hiroko; Cai, Xianbin; Hayashi, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    The gene encoding IL-1 was sequenced more than 30 years ago, and many related cytokines, such as IL-18, IL-33, IL-36, IL-37, IL-38, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), and IL-36Ra, have since been identified. IL-1 is a potent proinflammatory cytokine and is involved in various inflammatory diseases. Other IL-1 family ligands are critical for the development of diverse diseases, including inflammatory and allergic diseases. Only IL-1Ra possesses the leader peptide required for secretion from cells, and many ligands require posttranslational processing for activation. Some require inflammasome-mediated processing for activation and release, whereas others serve as alarmins and are released following cell membrane rupture, for example, by pyroptosis or necroptosis. Thus, each ligand has the proper molecular process to exert its own biological functions. In this review, we will give a brief introduction to the IL-1 family cytokines and discuss their pivotal roles in the development of various liver diseases in association with immune responses. For example, an excess of IL-33 causes liver fibrosis in mice via activation and expansion of group 2 innate lymphoid cells to produce type 2 cytokines, resulting in cell conversion into pro-fibrotic M2 macrophages. Finally, we will discuss the importance of IL-1 family cytokine-mediated molecular and cellular networks in the development of acute and chronic liver diseases. PMID:26549942

  5. Human prion diseases: surgical lessons learned from iatrogenic prion transmission.

    PubMed

    Bonda, David J; Manjila, Sunil; Mehndiratta, Prachi; Khan, Fahd; Miller, Benjamin R; Onwuzulike, Kaine; Puoti, Gianfranco; Cohen, Mark L; Schonberger, Lawrence B; Cali, Ignazio

    2016-07-01

    The human prion diseases, or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, have captivated our imaginations since their discovery in the Fore linguistic group in Papua New Guinea in the 1950s. The mysterious and poorly understood "infectious protein" has become somewhat of a household name in many regions across the globe. From bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), commonly identified as mad cow disease, to endocannibalism, media outlets have capitalized on these devastatingly fatal neurological conditions. Interestingly, since their discovery, there have been more than 492 incidents of iatrogenic transmission of prion diseases, largely resulting from prion-contaminated growth hormone and dura mater grafts. Although fewer than 9 cases of probable iatrogenic neurosurgical cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) have been reported worldwide, the likelihood of some missed cases and the potential for prion transmission by neurosurgery create considerable concern. Laboratory studies indicate that standard decontamination and sterilization procedures may be insufficient to completely remove infectivity from prion-contaminated instruments. In this unfortunate event, the instruments may transmit the prion disease to others. Much caution therefore should be taken in the absence of strong evidence against the presence of a prion disease in a neurosurgical patient. While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and World Health Organization (WHO) have devised risk assessment and decontamination protocols for the prevention of iatrogenic transmission of the prion diseases, incidents of possible exposure to prions have unfortunately occurred in the United States. In this article, the authors outline the historical discoveries that led from kuru to the identification and isolation of the pathological prion proteins in addition to providing a brief description of human prion diseases and iatrogenic forms of CJD, a brief history of prion disease nosocomial transmission

  6. Infection and disease: cause and cure.

    PubMed

    Herrington, C Simon; Douek, Daniel C

    2006-01-01

    Much can be learnt about the mechanisms by which micro-organisms cause disease from the ways that they interact with cells and tissues. This issue of The Journal of Pathology contains articles that address the roles that cell and tissue biology and pathology are playing in the elucidation of these mechanisms. A review of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is followed by a discussion of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Two articles on human papillomavirus (HPV) infection address the association between viral infection and neoplasia, as do reviews on viruses and lymphoma/leukaemia, and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (human herpesvirus 8, HHV8). The section on viral disease concludes with an article on morbilliviruses. The intracellular effects of bacteria are addressed in a review of Listeria infection and a further review outlines recent advances in our knowledge of syphilis. Reviews on Helicobacter and gastric neoplasia, innate defences against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection, and the function of granulomas in tuberculosis also address aspects of tissue responses to bacterial infection. Following a review of the function of immunoglobulin A in defence against infection, a group of articles considers vaccination and gene therapy approaches, the latter involving consideration of both viral and bacterial strategies. The reviews assembled here bridge several gaps: between microbiology and cellular pathology; between host and infecting organism; and between disease and therapy. It is clear that cell and tissue pathology approaches are of value in all of these spheres, providing cell and tissue relevance to microbiological and immunological observations. PMID:16362991

  7. Family with intermittent maple syrup urine disease

    PubMed Central

    Valman, H. B.; Patrick, A. D.; Seakins, J. W. T.; Platt, J. W.; Gompertz, D.

    1973-01-01

    A family is described in which the 3 children presented with episodes of severe metabolic acidosis secondary to minor infections. 2 of them died, and 1 of these was severely retarded. The sole surviving child is 6 years old and is normal with respect to physical and mental development. Gas chromatography of the urine obtained during episodes of ketoacidosis showed the keto and hydroxy acids characteristic of maple syrup urine disease, and thin layer chromatography of the plasma and urine showed greatly increased concentrations of the branched chain amino acids. The urine and plasma of the surviving child was chromatographically normal between episodes. The leucocyte branched chain keto acid decarboxylase activity in this patient and her father was reduced. The range of features in this family with intermittent maple syrup urine disease illustrates the necessity for prompt and careful investigation of metabolic acidosis of unknown aetiology. PMID:4693464

  8. Treatment of Prion Disease with Heterologous Prion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Pamela J.; Kim, Hyeon O.; Bryant, Damani; Kinzel, Nikilyn J.; Reilly, Cavan; Priola, Suzette A.; Ward, Anne E.; Goodman, Patricia A.; Olson, Katherine; Seelig, Davis M.

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle, and scrapie in sheep are fatal neurodegenerative diseases for which there is no effective treatment. The pathology of these diseases involves the conversion of a protease sensitive form of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) into a protease resistant infectious form (PrPsc or PrPres). Both in vitro (cell culture and cell free conversion assays) and in vivo (animal) studies have demonstrated the strong dependence of this conversion process on protein sequence homology between the initial prion inoculum and the host’s own cellular prion protein. The presence of non-homologous (heterologous) proteins is often inhibitory to this conversion process. We hypothesize that the presence of heterologous prion proteins from one species might therefore constitute an effective treatment for prion disease in another species. To test this hypothesis, we infected mice intracerebrally with murine adapted RML-Chandler scrapie and treated them with heterologous prion protein (purified bacterially expressed recombinant hamster prion protein) or vehicle alone. Treated animals demonstrated reduced disease associated pathology, decreased accumulation of protease-resistant disease-associated prion protein, with delayed onset of clinical symptoms and motor deficits. This was concomitant with significantly increased survival times relative to mock-treated animals. These results provide proof of principle that recombinant hamster prion proteins can effectively and safely inhibit prion disease in mice, and suggest that hamster or other non-human prion proteins may be a viable treatment for prion diseases in humans. PMID:26134409

  9. Lewy Body Pathology in Familial Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leverenz, James B.; Fishel, Mark A.; Peskind, Elaine R.; Montine, Thomas J.; Nochlin, David; Steinbart, Ellen; Raskind, Murray A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Bird, Thomas D.; Tsuang, Debby

    2006-01-01

    Background The origin and significance of Lewy bodies and neurites (Lewy body pathology [LBP]) in Alzheimer disease (AD) are poorly understood. Objective To examine LBP in the brainstem, limbic cortex, and neocortex of a large number of familial AD cases with mutations in 2 presenilin (PSEN) genes. Methods Twenty-five familial AD cases with 9 known PSEN 1 mutations and 14 familial AD cases with a single PSEN 2 mutation (N141I) were examined for LBP using α-synuclein immunohistochemistry and sampling of multiple brainstem and cortical regions. Results The amygdala was the most vulnerable site for LBP. In fact, virtually all (24 [96%] of 25 cases) of the PSEN 1 mutation cases had LBP in the amygdala. The PSEN 1 mutation cases also had more frequent LBP in the amygdala and neocortex than those with the PSEN 2 mutation. However, within families with a single mutation of either PSEN 1 or PSEN 2, there was frequent variability of the LBP. Conclusion These findings suggest that there are genetic influences on the presence of LBP in familial AD as demonstrated by the differences between PSEN 1 and PSEN 2 mutation cases. PMID:16533963

  10. Tay Sachs and Related Storage Diseases: Family Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneiderman, Gerald; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Based on interviews with 24 families, the article discusses family planning and the choices available to those families in which a child has previously died from Tay-Sachs or related lipid storage diseases. (IM)

  11. Myiasis as a risk factor for prion diseases in humans.

    PubMed

    Lupi, O

    2006-10-01

    Prion diseases are transmissible spongiform encephalopathies of humans and animals. The oral route is clearly associated with some prion diseases, according to the dissemination of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or mad cow disease) in cattle and kuru in humans. However, other prion diseases such as scrapie (in sheep) and chronic wasting disease (CWD) (in cervids) cannot be explained in this way and are probably more associated with a pattern of horizontal transmission in both domestic and wild animals. The skin and mucous membranes are a potential target for prion infections because keratinocytes and lymphocytes are susceptible to the abnormal infective isoform of the prion protein. Iatrogenic transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) was also recognized after corneal transplants in humans and scrapie was successfully transmitted to mice after ocular instillation of infected brain tissue, confirming that these new routes could also be important in prion infections. Some ectoparasites have been proven to harbour prion rods in laboratory experiments. Prion rods were identified in both fly larvae and pupae; adult flies are also able to express prion proteins. The most common causes of myiasis in cattle and sheep, closely related animals with previous prion infections, are Hypoderma bovis and Oestrus ovis, respectively. Both species of flies present a life cycle very different from human myiasis, as they have a long contact with neurological structures, such as spinal canal and epidural fat, which are potentially rich in prion rods. Ophthalmomyiases in humans is commonly caused by both species of fly larvae worldwide, providing almost direct contact with the central nervous system (CNS). The high expression of the prion protein on the skin and mucosa and the severity of the inflammatory response to the larvae could readily increase the efficiency of transmission of prions in both animals and humans. PMID:16987255

  12. Hybrid molecules synergistically acting against protein aggregation diseases.

    PubMed

    Korth, Carsten; Klingenstein, Ralf; Müller-Schiffmann, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    An emerging common feature of the age-associated neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is the ability of many disease-associated protein aggregates to induce conversion of a normal counterpart conformer leading to an acceleration of disease progression. Curative pharmacotherapy has not been achieved so far despite successes in elucidating pathomechanisms. Here, we review the pharmaceutical strategy of generating hybrid compounds, i.e. compounds consisting of several independently acting moieties with synergistic effects, on key molecular players in AD and CJD. For prion diseases, we review hybrid compounds consisting of two different heterocyclic compounds, their synergistic effects on prion replication in a cell culture model and their ability to prolong survival of experimentally prion-infected mice in vivo. While a combination therapy of several antiprion compounds including quinacrine, clomipramine, simvastatin and tocopherol prolonged survival time to 10-25%, administration of hybrid compound quinpramine alone, a chimera of acridine and iminodibenzyl scaffolds, led to 10% survival time extension. For AD, we review a hybrid compound consisting of an Aβ recognizing D-peptide fused to a small molecule β-sheet breaker, an aminopyrazole. This molecule was able to diminish Aβ oligomers in cell culture and significantly decrease synaptotoxicity as measured by miniature excitatory postsynaptic responses in vitro. Hybrid compounds can dramatically increase potency of their single moieties and lead to novel functions when they act in a simultaneous or sequential manner thereby revealing synergistic properties. Their systematic generation combining different classes of compounds from peptides to small molecules has the potential to significantly accelerate drug discovery. PMID:24059335

  13. LRP Receptor Family Member Associated Bone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lara-Castillo, N; Johnson, ML

    2015-01-01

    A dozen years ago the identification of causal mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene involved in two rare bone disorders propelled research in the bone field in totally new directions. Since then, there have been an explosion in the number of reports that highlight the role of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in the regulation of bone homeostasis. In this review we discuss some of the most recent reports (in the past 2 years) highlighting the involvement of the members of the LRP family (LRP5, LRP6, LRP4, and more recently LRP8) in the maintenance of bone and their implications in bone diseases. These reports include records of new single nucleotides polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes that suggest variants in these genes can contribute to subtle variation in bone traits to mutations that give rise to extreme bone phenotypes. All of these serve to further support and reinforce the importance of this tightly regulated pathway in bone. Furthermore, we discuss provocative reports suggesting novel approaches through inhibitors of this pathway to treat rarer diseases such as Osteoporosis-Pseudoglioma Syndrome (OPPG), Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI), and Sclerosteosis/Van Buchem disease. It is hoped that by understanding the role of each component of the pathway and their involvement in bone diseases that this knowledge will allow us to develop new, more effective therapeutic approaches for more common diseases such as post-menopausal osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis as well as these rarer bone diseases. PMID:26048454

  14. Bilateral familial Hirayama disease in a father and daughter

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Sanjay; Jain, Shruti

    2016-01-01

    We are reporting a case of bilateral familial Hirayama disease where a father and daughter are the affected members of the family with the similar distribution of their weakness and wasting. To the best of our knowledge, bilateral familial Hirayama disease has not been described in father and daughter. PMID:27293344

  15. Clinical Issues-May 2016.

    PubMed

    Van Wicklin, Sharon A

    2016-05-01

    Variations in documenting surgical wound classification Key words: surgical wound classification, clean, clean-contaminated, contaminated, dirty. Wearing long-sleeved jackets while preparing and packaging items for sterilization Key words: long-sleeved jackets, organic material, sterile processing. Endoscopic transmission of prions Key words: prions, high-risk tissue, low-risk tissue, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). Wearing gloves when handling flexible endoscopes Key words: gloves, low-protein, powder-free, natural rubber latex gloves, latex-free gloves. PMID:27129755

  16. The cognitive profile of prion disease: a prospective clinical and imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Caine, Diana; Tinelli, Renata J; Hyare, Harpreet; De Vita, Enrico; Lowe, Jessica; Lukic, Ana; Thompson, Andrew; Porter, Marie-Claire; Cipolotti, Lisa; Rudge, Peter; Collinge, John; Mead, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Prion diseases are dementing illnesses with poorly defined neuropsychological features. This is probably because the most common form, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, is often rapidly progressive with pervasive cognitive decline making detailed neuropsychological investigation difficult. This study, which includes patients with inherited, acquired (iatrogenic and variant) and sporadic forms of the disease, is the only large-scale neuropsychological investigation of this patient group ever undertaken and aimed to define a neuropsychological profile of human prion diseases. Methods A tailored short cognitive examination of all of the patients (n = 81), with detailed neuropsychological testing in a subset with mild disease (n = 30) and correlation with demographic, clinical, genetic (PRNP mutation and polymorphic codon 129 genotype), and other variables (MRI brain signal change in cortex, basal ganglia or thalamus; quantitative research imaging, cerebrospinal fluid 14-3-3 protein). Results Comparison with healthy controls showed patients to be impaired on all tasks. Principal components analysis showed a major axis of fronto-parietal dysfunction that accounted for approximately half of the variance observed. This correlated strongly with volume reduction in frontal and parietal gray matter on MRI. Examination of individual patients' performances confirmed early impairment on this axis, suggesting characteristic cognitive features in mild disease: prominent executive impairment, parietal dysfunction, a largely expressive dysphasia, with reduced motor speed. Interpretation Taken together with typical neurological features, these results complete a profile that should improve differential diagnosis in a clinical setting. We propose a tailored neuropsychological battery for early recognition of clinical onset of symptoms with potential for use in clinical trials involving at-risk individuals. PMID:26000326

  17. Familial aggregation of Parkinson disease in Utah

    PubMed Central

    Savica, Rodolfo; Pulst, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe clustering of death from Parkinson disease (PD) in relatives in a large US study. Methods: We analyzed the Utah Population Database resource, which includes genealogy data of more than 2.7 million individuals linked to 519,061 individuals with a Utah death certificate (DC). We identified individuals whose DC included PD as a cause of death using ICD coding. In those individuals whose Utah DC listed PD as a cause of death, the relative risk (RR) of death with PD was determined among close and distant relatives using sex-, birth year–, and birthplace-specific rates. Results: We identified 4,031 individuals whose DC indicated PD. Among 18,127 first-degree relatives of probands with a Utah DC, the RR of death with PD was significantly increased (RR = 1.82, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.61–2.04). The RR of death with PD was also significantly increased among 40,546 second-degree relatives with a Utah DC (RR = 1.44, 95% CI 1.29–1.60) and among 93,398 third-degree relatives with a Utah DC (RR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.03–1.18). Conclusions: Significant evidence for excess familial clustering was observed for PD deaths. The excess familial clustering and the significantly elevated RRs for PD among close and distant relatives strongly support a genetic contribution to PD mortality. These results confirm and expand the results of previous studies of PD by quantifying the risk of PD death among more distant relatives. PMID:27123483

  18. Retinal function and morphology are altered in cattle infected with the prion disease transmissible mink encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Smith, J D; Greenlee, J J; Hamir, A N; Richt, J A; Greenlee, M H West

    2009-09-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of diseases that result in progressive and invariably fatal neurologic disease in both animals and humans. TSEs are characterized by the accumulation of an abnormal protease-resistant form of the prion protein in the central nervous system. Transmission of infectious TSEs is believed to occur via ingestion of prion protein-contaminated material. This material is also involved in the transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy ("mad cow disease") to humans, which resulted in the variant form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Abnormal prion protein has been reported in the retina of TSE-affected cattle, but despite these observations, the specific effect of abnormal prion protein on retinal morphology and function has not been assessed. The objective of this study was to identify and characterize potential functional and morphologic abnormalities in the retinas of cattle infected with a bovine-adapted isolate of transmissible mink encephalopathy. We used electroretinography and immunohistochemistry to examine retinas from 10 noninoculated and 5 transmissible mink encephalopathy-inoculated adult Holstein steers. Here we show altered retinal function, as evidenced by prolonged implicit time of the electroretinogram b-wave, in transmissible mink encephalopathy-infected cattle before the onset of clinical illness. We also demonstrate disruption of rod bipolar cell synaptic terminals, indicated by decreased immunoreactivity for the alpha isoform of protein kinase C and vesicular glutamate transporter 1, and activation of Müller glia, as evidenced by increased glial fibrillary acidic protein and glutamine synthetase expression, in the retinas of these cattle at the time of euthanasia due to clinical deterioration. This is the first study to identify both functional and morphologic alterations in the retinas of TSE-infected cattle. Our results support future efforts to focus on the retina for the development of

  19. A naturally occurring variant of the human prion protein completely prevents prion disease.

    PubMed

    Asante, Emmanuel A; Smidak, Michelle; Grimshaw, Andrew; Houghton, Richard; Tomlinson, Andrew; Jeelani, Asif; Jakubcova, Tatiana; Hamdan, Shyma; Richard-Londt, Angela; Linehan, Jacqueline M; Brandner, Sebastian; Alpers, Michael; Whitfield, Jerome; Mead, Simon; Wadsworth, Jonathan D F; Collinge, John

    2015-06-25

    Mammalian prions, transmissible agents causing lethal neurodegenerative diseases, are composed of assemblies of misfolded cellular prion protein (PrP). A novel PrP variant, G127V, was under positive evolutionary selection during the epidemic of kuru--an acquired prion disease epidemic of the Fore population in Papua New Guinea--and appeared to provide strong protection against disease in the heterozygous state. Here we have investigated the protective role of this variant and its interaction with the common, worldwide M129V PrP polymorphism. V127 was seen exclusively on a M129 PRNP allele. We demonstrate that transgenic mice expressing both variant and wild-type human PrP are completely resistant to both kuru and classical Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) prions (which are closely similar) but can be infected with variant CJD prions, a human prion strain resulting from exposure to bovine spongiform encephalopathy prions to which the Fore were not exposed. Notably, mice expressing only PrP V127 were completely resistant to all prion strains, demonstrating a different molecular mechanism to M129V, which provides its relative protection against classical CJD and kuru in the heterozygous state. Indeed, this single amino acid substitution (G→V) at a residue invariant in vertebrate evolution is as protective as deletion of the protein. Further study in transgenic mice expressing different ratios of variant and wild-type PrP indicates that not only is PrP V127 completely refractory to prion conversion but acts as a potent dose-dependent inhibitor of wild-type prion propagation. PMID:26061765

  20. A low molecular-weight ferroxidase is increased in the CSF of sCJD cases: CSF ferroxidase and transferrin as diagnostic biomarkers for sCJD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Imbalance of brain iron homeostasis is a common feature of neurodegenerative conditions that include sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Huntington's disease, among others. However, the mechanisms underlying this change are unclear. In s...

  1. Detecting and quantifying prions: Mass spectrometry-based approaches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prions are novel pathogens that cause a set of rare fatal neurological diseases know as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Examples of these diseases include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, scrapie and chronic wasting disease. Prions are able to recruit a normal cellular prion protein and convert...

  2. Risk perception of the "mad cow disease" in France: determinants and consequences.

    PubMed

    Setbon, Michel; Raude, Jocelyn; Fischler, Claude; Flahault, Antoine

    2005-08-01

    Since 1996, when bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) was assessed as a possible human transmissible disease, a variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), French people have entered into a long period of fear and avoidance of beef and bovine byproducts, which produced an unprecedented collapse in the beef market. This article deals with the perceived risk of the "mad cow disease" (MCD) in the French general population. Two surveys were conducted on a representative sample of the adult population, the first one in 2000 during the peak of the crisis and the second one 13 months later in a quieter period. The main assumption we made was that changes in beef consumption are strongly related to the perceived risk of MCD, which we defined as people's cognitive and affective responses to hazard. Our objective was to identify the determinants and consequences of this perceived risk and to compare them in different sociopolitical contexts. The results issued from a bivariate and multivariate analysis show that: (i) the distribution of most of the variables significantly related to the perceived risk identified in the first survey had changed in the second survey, in relation with the reduction of worry and the resumption of national beef consumption; (ii) the propensity for self-protection through avoiding or ceasing beef eating was more related to feelings of worry than to subjective vCJD risk assessments; and (iii) the main determinant of less avoidance to beef products was the preference for beef, a feeling identified prior to emergence of the risk of MCD, remaining unchanged in various contexts. PMID:16268931

  3. Neurodegeneration in humans caused by prions.

    PubMed Central

    Prusiner, S B

    1994-01-01

    Prion diseases include kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease, and fatal familial insomnia of humans as well as scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy of animals. For many years, the prion diseases were thought to be caused by viruses despite evidence to the contrary. The unique characteristic common to all of these disorders, whether sporadic, dominantly inherited, or acquired by infection, is that they involve aberrant metabolism of the prion protein. In many cases, the cellular prion protein is converted into the scrapie variant by a process after translation that involves a conformational change. Often the human prion diseases are transmissible experimentally to animals, and all of the inherited prion diseases segregate with prion protein gene mutations. Images PMID:7975565

  4. Detection of PrP(Sc) in peripheral tissues of clinically affected cattle after oral challenge with bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a fatal neurodegenerative prion disease that affects cattle and can be transmitted to human beings as new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). A protease-resistant, disease-associated isoform of the prion protein (PrP**Sc) accumulates in the central ner...

  5. What Are the Risks of a Blood Transfusion?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the transfusion can safely be restarted. Viruses and Infectious Diseases Some infectious agents, such as HIV, can survive in blood and infect the person receiving the blood transfusion. To keep blood safe, blood ... Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). This disease is the human version of ...

  6. Phenotypic heterogeneity and genetic modification of P102L inherited prion disease in an international series

    PubMed Central

    Webb, T. E. F.; Poulter, M.; Beck, J.; Uphill, J.; Adamson, G.; Campbell, T.; Linehan, J.; Powell, C.; Brandner, S.; Pal, S.; Siddique, D.; Wadsworth, J. D.; Joiner, S.; Alner, K.; Petersen, C.; Hampson, S.; Rhymes, C.; Treacy, C.; Storey, E.; Geschwind, M. D.; Nemeth, A. H.; Wroe, S.; Mead, S.

    2008-01-01

    The largest kindred with inherited prion disease P102L, historically Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, originates from central England, with émigrés now resident in various parts of the English-speaking world. We have collected data from 84 patients in the large UK kindred and numerous small unrelated pedigrees to investigate phenotypic heterogeneity and modifying factors. This collection represents by far the largest series of P102L patients so far reported. Microsatellite and genealogical analyses of eight separate European kindreds support multiple distinct mutational events at a cytosine-phosphate diester-guanidine dinucleotide mutation hot spot. All of the smaller P102L kindreds were linked to polymorphic human prion protein gene codon 129M and were not connected by genealogy or microsatellite haplotype background to the large kindred or each other. While many present with classical Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, a slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia with later onset cognitive impairment, there is remarkable heterogeneity. A subset of patients present with prominent cognitive and psychiatric features and some have met diagnostic criteria for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. We show that polymorphic human prion protein gene codon 129 modifies age at onset: the earliest eight clinical onsets were all MM homozygotes and overall age at onset was 7 years earlier for MM compared with MV heterozygotes (P = 0.02). Unexpectedly, apolipoprotein E4 carriers have a delayed age of onset by 10 years (P = 0.02). We found a preponderance of female patients compared with males (54 females versus 30 males, P = 0.01), which probably relates to ascertainment bias. However, these modifiers had no impact on a semi-quantitative pathological phenotype in 10 autopsied patients. These data allow an appreciation of the range of clinical phenotype, modern imaging and molecular investigation and should inform genetic counselling of at-risk individuals, with the

  7. Genetic defect causing familial Alzheimer's disease maps on chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    St. George-Hyslop, P.H.; Tanzi, R.E.; Polinsky, R.J.; Haines, J.L.; Nee, L.; Watkins, P.C.; Myers, R.H.; Feldman, R.G.; Pollen, D.; Drachman, D.; Growdon, J.

    1987-02-20

    Alzheimer's disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among the elderly. Several families have been described in which Alzheimer's disease is caused by an autosomal dominant gene defect. The chromosomal location of this defective gene has been discovered by using genetic linkage to DNA markers on chromosome 21. The localization on chromosome 21 provides an explanation for the occurrence of Alzheimer's disease-like pathology in Down syndrome. Isolation and characterization of the gene at this locus may yield new insights into the nature of the defect causing familial Alzheimer's disease and possibly, into the etiology of all forms of Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Prions in dentistry: A need to be concerned and known.

    PubMed

    Sushma, B; Gugwad, Sachin; Pavaskar, Rajdeep; Malik, Shambhvi A

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases were first discovered by Stanley B. Prusiner who defined prions as infectious, transmissible proteinaceous particles that lack nucleic acid and are composed exclusively of a modified isoform of the noninfectious cellular prion protein (PrPC). These are incurable neurodegenerative conditions affecting both animals and humans. They may be sporadic, infectious or inherited in origin. Human prion diseases include Creutzfeldt-Jakob desease (CJD), Gerstmann- Straussler-Scheinker disease, Kuru and Fatal familial insomnia. Prions resist the conventional sterilization procedures and hence the dentists must be aware of such diseases so as to opt standard methods of infection control and decontamination for such infectious agents. This review article divulge the dentists with a brief overview of the characteristics of prions, the risk of transmission and the implications for infection control in dentist. PMID:27194872

  9. Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease amyloid protein polymerizes according to the "dock-and-lock" model.

    PubMed

    Gobbi, Marco; Colombo, Laura; Morbin, Michela; Mazzoleni, Giulia; Accardo, Elena; Vanoni, Marco; Del Favero, Elena; Cantù, Laura; Kirschner, Daniel A; Manzoni, Claudia; Beeg, Marten; Ceci, Paolo; Ubezio, Paolo; Forloni, Gianluigi; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Salmona, Mario

    2006-01-13

    Prion protein (PrP) amyloid formation is a central feature of genetic and acquired prion diseases such as Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease (GSS) and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The major component of GSS amyloid is a PrP fragment spanning residues approximately 82-146, which when synthesized as a peptide, readily forms fibrils featuring GSS amyloid. The present study employed surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to characterize the binding events underlying PrP82-146 oligomerization at the first stages of fibrillization, according to evidence suggesting a pathogenic role of prefibrillar oligomers rather than mature amyloid fibrils. We followed in real time the binding reactions occurring during short term (seconds) addition of PrP82-146 small oligomers (1-5-mers, flowing species) onto soluble prefibrillar PrP82-146 aggregates immobilized on the sensor surface. SPR data confirmed very efficient aggregation/elongation, consistent with the hypothesis of nucleation-dependent polymerization process. Much lower binding was observed when PrP82-146 flowed onto the scrambled sequence of PrP82-146 or onto prefibrillar Abeta42 aggregates. As previously found with Abeta40, SPR data could be adequately fitted by equations modeling the "dock-and-lock" mechanism, in which the "locking" step is due to sequential conformational changes, each increasing the affinity of the monomer for the fibril until a condition of irreversible binding is reached. However, these conformational changes (i.e. the locking steps) appear to be faster and easier with PrP82-146 than with Abeta40. Such differences suggest that PrP82-146 has a greater propensity to polymerize and greater stability of the aggregates. PMID:16286452

  10. Transmission of scrapie prions to primate after an extended silent incubation period

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (c-BSE) is an animal prion disease that also causes variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. Over the past decades, c-BSE's zoonotic potential has been the driving force in establishing extensive protective measures for animal and human health. In compl...

  11. Mass Spectrometry of Prions: Approaches to Conformational Distinction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prions are the agents that cause a set of fatal neurological diseases that include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Prions are composed solely of protein. Unlike viral, bacterial, or fungal pathogens, the information necessary to propagate the infection is contained in the conformation of the prion isofor...

  12. Families of children with congenital heart disease: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Wei, Holly; Roscigno, Cecelia I; Hanson, Cherissa C; Swanson, Kristen M

    2015-01-01

    In 2000 and 2002, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute launched two initiatives to encourage treatment innovations and research on children with heart disease and their families. Since then, no systematic reviews have examined the evidence regarding the impacts of having a child with congenital heart disease (CHD) on families. This review synthesized key findings regarding families of children with CHD, critiqued research methods, described what has been done, and provided recommendations for future inquiry. Databases searched included PubMed, CINAHL, Family & Society Studies Worldwide, Women's Studies International, and PsycINFO. The literature search followed the PRISMA guidelines. As a result, ninety-four articles were reviewed. Four major themes were derived: parents' psychological health, family life, parenting challenges, and family-focused interventions. In conclusion, while they found parents having psychological symptoms, researchers did not explore parents' appraisals of what led to their symptoms. Research is needed to explore parents' experiences and expectations. PMID:26404115

  13. Congenital heart disease in spondylothoracic dysostosis: two familial cases.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, J M; Cook, A; Fagg, N L; MacLachlan, N A; Sharland, G K

    1995-01-01

    Two familial cases of spondylothoracic dysostosis are reported. Both cases had severe congenital heart disease in addition to the skeletal malformations which are characteristic of the condition. Images PMID:7473656

  14. Assessing Impact on Family Caregivers to Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talkington-Boyer, Shannon; Snyder, Douglas K.

    1994-01-01

    Examined impact of caregiving among 110 caregivers to aging family member with Alzheimer's disease. Family caregivers' appraisals along dimensions of subjective burden, negative impact, caregiving satisfaction, and caregiver mastery were correlated with extent of memory and behavior problems of patient and caregivers' coping style, locus of…

  15. Familial multiple lipomas coexisting with celiac disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Gluten enteropathy (celiac disease) is a chronic disease and presents as diarrhea, weight loss and anemia. Case presentation A 35-year-old Caucasian man with gluten enteropathy, familial multiple lipomas and seborrheic keratosis was seen in our clinic. After confirmation of the diagnosis, he was advised to follow a gluten-free diet. His clinical improvement was evaluated and confirmed with biopsy. Conclusion Celiac disease is known to be associated with many systemic diseases and skin lesions but its association with familial multiple lipomas has not yet been reported. PMID:25227743

  16. A new estimate of family disease history providing improved prediction of disease risks

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Rui; McClure, Leslie A.; Tiwari, Hemant K.; Howard, George

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Complex diseases often aggregate within families and using the history of family members’ disease can potentially increase the accuracy of the risk assessment and allow clinicians to better target on high risk individuals. However, available family risk scores do not reflect the age of disease onset, gender and family structures simultaneously. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach for a family risk score, the stratified log-rank family score (SLFS), which incorporates the age of disease onset of family members, gender differences and the relationship among family members. Via simulation, we demonstrate that the new SLFS is more closely associated with the true family risk for the disease and more robust to family sizes than two existing methods. We apply our proposed method and the two existing methods to a study of stroke and heart disease. The results show that assessing family history can improve the prediction of disease risks and the SLFS has strongest positive associations with both myocardial infarction and stroke. PMID:19170247

  17. Movement-related cortical activation in familial Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Delval, A; Defebvre, L; Labyt, E; Douay, X; Bourriez, J-L; Waucquiez, N; Derambure, P; Destée, A

    2006-09-26

    We sought to determine whether or not first-degree relatives of patients with familial Parkinson disease (FDRs) present impaired movement-related cortical activity. We studied 10 familial Parkinson disease subjects, 10 FDRs, and 10 controls and analyzed event-related mu desynchronization (ERD) and beta synchronization. Forty percent FDRs presented reduced premovement mu ERD latency, suggesting that premovement cortical activation is impaired in FDRs. PMID:17000986

  18. Toward the molecular basis of inherited prion diseases: NMR structure of the human prion protein with V210I mutation.

    PubMed

    Biljan, Ivana; Ilc, Gregor; Giachin, Gabriele; Raspadori, Andrea; Zhukov, Igor; Plavec, Janez; Legname, Giuseppe

    2011-09-30

    The development of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) is associated with the conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into a misfolded, pathogenic isoform (PrP(Sc)). Spontaneous generation of PrP(Sc) in inherited forms of disease is caused by mutations in gene coding for PrP (PRNP). In this work, we describe the NMR solution-state structure of the truncated recombinant human PrP (HuPrP) carrying the pathological V210I mutation linked to genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The three-dimensional structure of V210I mutant consists of an unstructured N-terminal part (residues 90-124) and a well-defined C-terminal domain (residues 125-228). The C-terminal domain contains three α-helices (residues 144-156, 170-194 and 200-228) and a short antiparallel β-sheet (residues 129-130 and 162-163). Comparison with the structure of the wild-type HuPrP revealed that although two structures share similar global architecture, mutation introduces some local structural differences. The observed variations are mostly clustered in the α(2)-α(3) inter-helical interface and in the β(2)-α(2) loop region. Introduction of bulkier Ile at position 210 induces reorientations of several residues that are part of hydrophobic core, thus influencing α(2)-α(3) inter-helical interactions. Another important structural feature involves the alteration of conformation of the β(2)-α(2) loop region and the subsequent exposure of hydrophobic cluster to solvent, which facilitates intermolecular interactions involved in spontaneous generation of PrP(Sc). The NMR structure of V210I mutant offers new clues about the earliest events of the pathogenic conversion process that could be used for the development of antiprion drugs. PMID:21839748

  19. Acute inferior homonymous quandrantanopia in a 71-year-old woman.

    PubMed

    Vachalová, Ivana; Gindl, Viola; Heckmann, Josef G

    2014-04-01

    A 71-year-old woman presented with acute inferior homonymous quadrantanopia initially mimicking acute ischemic stroke. As clinical signs and symptoms progressed to akinetic mutism with myoclonus the diagnosis of the Heidenhain variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease was made. Brain MRI 4 days after symptom onset revealed ribbon-like high signal intensity in the medial occipital cortex. PMID:24210803

  20. Typical and atypical cases of bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of cattle, first detected in 1986 in the United Kingdom and subsequently in other countries. It is the most likely cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans, but the origin of BSE has not been eluci...

  1. Fluorescence of tissues fluororophores such as lipofuscin as a possible basis for the detection of CNS tissues on bovine carcasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a fatal neurodegenerative transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) which is thought to cause variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans. It is believed that humans contract vCJD by consumption of meat contaminated with bovine tissue containi...

  2. Familial clustering and genetic heterogeneity in Meniere's disease.

    PubMed

    Requena, T; Espinosa-Sanchez, J M; Cabrera, S; Trinidad, G; Soto-Varela, A; Santos-Perez, S; Teggi, R; Perez, P; Batuecas-Caletrio, A; Fraile, J; Aran, I; Martin, E; Benitez, J; Pérez-Fernández, N; Lopez-Escamez, J A

    2014-03-01

    The aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence of familial cases in patients with Meniere's disease (MD) and to identify clinical differences between sporadic and familial MD. We recruited 1375 patients with definite MD according to the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery criteria, obtaining the familial history of hearing loss or episodic vertigo by direct interview or a postal survey in 1245 cases in a multicenter study. Familial clustering was estimated by the recurrence risk ratio in siblings (λs ) and offspring (λo ) using intermediate and high prevalence values for MD in European population. A total of 431 patients (34%) reported a familial history of hearing loss or recurrent vertigo and 133 patients had a relative with possible MD. After clinical reevaluation, 93 relatives in 76 families were diagnosed of definite MD (8.4%), including three pairs of monozygotic twins. λs and λo were 16-48 and 4-12, respectively. We observed genetic heterogeneity, but most families had an autosomal dominant inheritance with anticipation. No clinical differences were found between sporadic and familial MD, except for an early onset in familial cases. We may conclude that MD has a strong familial aggregation and that sporadic and familial MDs are clinically identical. PMID:23521103

  3. Prions and protein-folding diseases.

    PubMed

    Norrby, E

    2011-07-01

    Prions represent a group of proteins with a unique capacity to fold into different conformations. One isoform is rich in beta-pleated sheets and can aggregate into amyloid that may be pathogenic. This abnormal form propagates itself by imposing its confirmation on the homologous normal host cell protein. Pathogenic prions have been shown to cause lethal neurodegenerative diseases in humans and animals. These diseases are sometimes infectious and hence referred to as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. In the present review, the remarkable evolution of the heterodox prion concept is summarized. The origin of this phenomenon is based on information transfer between homologous proteins, without the involvement of nucleic acid-encoded mechanisms. Historically, kuru and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) were the first infectious prion diseases to be identified in man. It was their relationship to scrapie in sheep and experimental rodents that allowed an unravelling of the particular molecular mechanism that underlie the disease process. Transmission between humans has been documented to have occurred in particular contexts, including ritual cannibalism, iatrogenic transmission because of pituitary gland-derived growth hormone or the use in neurosurgical procedures of dura mater from cadavers, and the temporary use of a prion-contaminated protein-rich feed for cows. The latter caused a major outbreak of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, which spread to man by human consumption of contaminated meat, causing approximately 200 cases of variant CJD. All these epidemics now appear to be over because of measures taken to curtail further spread of prions. Recent studies have shown that the mechanism of protein aggregation may apply to a wider range of diseases in and possibly also outside the brain, some of which are relatively common such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Furthermore, it has become apparent that the phenomenon of prion aggregation may have a wider

  4. Tec family kinases in inflammation and disease.

    PubMed

    Horwood, Nicole J; Urbaniak, Ania M; Danks, Lynett

    2012-04-01

    Over the last decade, the Tec family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (Btk, Tec, Bmx, Itk, and Rlk) have been shown to play a key role in inflammation and bone destruction. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) has been the most widely studied due to the critical role of this kinase in B-cell development and recent evidence showing that blocking Btk signaling is effective in ameliorating lymphoma progression and experimental arthritis. This review will examine the role of TFK in myeloid cell function and the potential of targeting these kinases as a therapeutic intervention in autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:22449071

  5. Benign familial pemphigus (Hailey-Hailey disease).

    PubMed

    White, Forrest; Shvartsbeyn, Marianna; Meehan, Shane A; Urbanek, Richard W

    2015-12-01

    A 56-year-old man presented with a 15-year history of scaly red plaques on the trunk and axillae. Skin biopsy was consistent with Hailey-Hailey disease. His condition was refractory to multiple therapies, which included topical and oral antibiotics and topical, intralesional, and oral glucocorticoids. Treatment with subcutaneous botulinum toxin type A at the axillae and on the back led to a nearly complete resolution of plaques in those areas. Botulinum toxin type A should be considered in patients with extensive Hailey-Hailey disease who are fail traditional therapies. PMID:26990332

  6. Maternal Family History is Associated with Alzheimer's Disease Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Honea, Robyn A.; Vidoni, Eric D.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Burns, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    A family history of Alzheimer's disease (AD) increases one's risk of developing late-onset AD (LOAD), and a maternal family history of LOAD influences risk more than a paternal family history. Accumulating evidence suggests that a family history of dementia associates with AD-typical biomarker changes. We analyzed cross-sectional data from non-demented, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and LOAD participants in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) with PET imaging using Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB, n = 99) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis (n = 403) for amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) and total tau. We assessed the relationship of CSF and PiB biomarkers and family history of dementia, as well as parent gender effects. In the larger analysis of CSF biomarkers, we assessed diagnosis groups individually. In the overall sample, CSF Aβ, tau/Aβ ratio, and global PiB uptake were significantly different between family history positive and negative groups, with markers of increased AD burden associated with a positive maternal family history of dementia. Moreover, a maternal family history of dementia was associated with significantly greater PiB Aβ load in the brain in the parietal cortex, precuneus, and sensorimotor cortex. Individuals with MCI positive for a maternal family history of dementia had significantly more markers of AD pathophysiology than individuals with no family history of dementia. A family history of dementia is associated with AD-typical biomarker changes. These biomarker associations are most robust in individuals with a maternal family history, suggesting that a maternally inherited factor influences AD risk. PMID:22669011

  7. Endpoint Quaking-Induced Conversion: a Sensitive, Specific, and High-Throughput Method for Antemortem Diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jacob Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vendramelli, Robert; Sloan, Angela; Waitt, Brooks; Podhorodecki, Lisa; Godal, Debra

    2016-01-01

    The Prion Laboratory Section of the Public Health Agency of Canada supports heath care professionals dealing with patients suspected to have Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) by testing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for protein markers of CJD. To better serve Canadian diagnostic requirements, a quaking-induced conversion (QuIC)-based assay has been added to the test panel. The QuIC tests exploit the ability of disease-associated prion protein, found in the CSF of a majority of CJD patients, to convert a recombinant prion protein (rPrP) into detectable amounts of a misfolded, aggregated form of rPrP. The rPrP aggregates interact with a specific dye, causing a measurable change in the dye's fluorescence emission spectrum. Optimal test and analysis parameters were empirically determined. Taking both practical and performance considerations into account, an endpoint QuIC (EP-QuIC) configuration was chosen. EP-QuIC uses a thermo-mixer to perform the shaking necessary to produce the quaking-induced conversions. Fluorescence readings are obtained from a microwell fluorescence reader only at the beginning and the end of EP-QuIC reactions. Samples for which the relative fluorescence unit ratio between the initial and final readings represent a ≥4 increase in signal intensity in at least two of the three replicates are classified as positive. A retrospective analysis of 91 CSF samples that included 45 confirmed cases of CJD and 46 non-CJD cases was used to estimate the performance characteristics of the EP-QuIC assay. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the EP-QuIC test of this set of samples were 98 and 91%, respectively. PMID:27076662

  8. Endpoint Quaking-Induced Conversion: a Sensitive, Specific, and High-Throughput Method for Antemortem Diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jacob Disease.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Keding; Vendramelli, Robert; Sloan, Angela; Waitt, Brooks; Podhorodecki, Lisa; Godal, Debra; Knox, J David

    2016-07-01

    The Prion Laboratory Section of the Public Health Agency of Canada supports heath care professionals dealing with patients suspected to have Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) by testing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for protein markers of CJD. To better serve Canadian diagnostic requirements, a quaking-induced conversion (QuIC)-based assay has been added to the test panel. The QuIC tests exploit the ability of disease-associated prion protein, found in the CSF of a majority of CJD patients, to convert a recombinant prion protein (rPrP) into detectable amounts of a misfolded, aggregated form of rPrP. The rPrP aggregates interact with a specific dye, causing a measurable change in the dye's fluorescence emission spectrum. Optimal test and analysis parameters were empirically determined. Taking both practical and performance considerations into account, an endpoint QuIC (EP-QuIC) configuration was chosen. EP-QuIC uses a thermo-mixer to perform the shaking necessary to produce the quaking-induced conversions. Fluorescence readings are obtained from a microwell fluorescence reader only at the beginning and the end of EP-QuIC reactions. Samples for which the relative fluorescence unit ratio between the initial and final readings represent a ≥4 increase in signal intensity in at least two of the three replicates are classified as positive. A retrospective analysis of 91 CSF samples that included 45 confirmed cases of CJD and 46 non-CJD cases was used to estimate the performance characteristics of the EP-QuIC assay. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the EP-QuIC test of this set of samples were 98 and 91%, respectively. PMID:27076662

  9. Identification of TMEM230 mutations in familial Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Deng, Han-Xiang; Shi, Yong; Yang, Yi; Ahmeti, Kreshnik B; Miller, Nimrod; Huang, Cao; Cheng, Lijun; Zhai, Hong; Deng, Sheng; Nuytemans, Karen; Corbett, Nicola J; Kim, Myung Jong; Deng, Hao; Tang, Beisha; Yang, Ziquang; Xu, Yanming; Chan, Piu; Huang, Bo; Gao, Xiao-Ping; Song, Zhi; Liu, Zhenhua; Fecto, Faisal; Siddique, Nailah; Foroud, Tatiana; Jankovic, Joseph; Ghetti, Bernardino; Nicholson, Daniel A; Krainc, Dimitri; Melen, Onur; Vance, Jeffery M; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Ma, Yong-Chao; Rajput, Ali H; Siddique, Teepu

    2016-07-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder without effective treatment. It is generally sporadic with unknown etiology. However, genetic studies of rare familial forms have led to the identification of mutations in several genes, which are linked to typical Parkinson's disease or parkinsonian disorders. The pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease remains largely elusive. Here we report a locus for autosomal dominant, clinically typical and Lewy body-confirmed Parkinson's disease on the short arm of chromosome 20 (20pter-p12) and identify TMEM230 as the disease-causing gene. We show that TMEM230 encodes a transmembrane protein of secretory/recycling vesicles, including synaptic vesicles in neurons. Disease-linked TMEM230 mutants impair synaptic vesicle trafficking. Our data provide genetic evidence that a mutant transmembrane protein of synaptic vesicles in neurons is etiologically linked to Parkinson's disease, with implications for understanding the pathogenic mechanism of Parkinson's disease and for developing rational therapies. PMID:27270108

  10. Examination of Huntington's disease in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mingxia; Li, Xiaogai; Wu, Sanyun; Shen, Ji; Tu, Jiancheng

    2014-01-01

    We report brain imaging and genetic diagnosis in a family from Wuhan, China, with a history of Huntington's disease. Among 17 family members across three generations, four patients (II2, II6, III5, and III9) show typical Huntington's disease, involuntary dance-like movements. Magnetic resonance imaging found lateral ventricular atrophy in three members (II2, II6, and III5). Moreover, genetic analysis identified abnormally amplified CAG sequence repeats (> 40) in two members (III5 and III9). Among borderline cases, with clinical symptoms and brain imaging features of Huntington's disease, two cases were identified (II2 and II6), but shown by mutation analysis for CAG expansions in the important transcript 15 gene, to be non-Huntington's disease. Our findings suggest that clinical diagnosis of Huntington's disease requires a combination of clinical symptoms, radiological changes, and genetic diagnosis. PMID:25206833

  11. Family Study of Platelet Membrane Fluidity in Alzheimer's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubenko, George S.; Wusylko, Michael; Cohen, Bruce M.; Boller, Francois; Teply, Ivana

    1987-10-01

    The fluorescence anisotropy of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene in labeled platelet membranes, an index of membrane fluidity, identifies a prominent subgroup of patients with Alzheimer's disease who manifest distinct clinical features. In a family study, the prevalence of this platelet membrane abnormality was 3.2 to 11.5 times higher in asymptomatic, first-degree relatives of probands with Alzheimer's disease than in neurologically healthy control subjects chosen without regard to family history of dementia. The pattern of the platelet membrane abnormality within families was consistent with that of a fully penetrant autosomal dominant trait. Thus, this abnormality of platelet membranes may be an inherited factor that is related to the development of Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Molecular aspects of disease pathogenesis in the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Priola, Suzette A; Vorberg, Ina

    2004-01-01

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) diseases are a group of rare, fatal, and transmissible neurodegenerative diseases that include kuru and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans, scrapie in sheep, transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME), and chronic wasting disease (CWD) in mule deer and elk. Over the last 20 yr, they have gone from a fascinating but relatively obscure group of diseases to one that is a major agricultural and economic problem as well as a threat to human health. The shift in the relative impact of the TSE diseases began in the late 1970s when the United Kingdom altered the process by which animal carcasses were rendered to provide a protein supplement (i.e., meat and bone meal) to sheep, cattle, and other livestock. Several years later a new disease was recognized in the British cattle population. The pathological and immunohistochemical characteristics of the disease clearly placed it among the TSEs. The new disease was named bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) by the scientific community and "mad cow disease" by the less-than-scientific press. At its peak in the UK, several thousand cattle a year were diagnosed with BSE, and millions of cattle were slaughtered. Introduction of the specified offals ban as well as banning the practice of feeding ruminants to other ruminants has led to a drastic decrease in the number of yearly BSE cases in the UK (less than 500 in 2003), and the epidemic is clearly on the wane. However, BSE has now spread throughout the rest of Europe, as well as to Japan, Russia, Canada, and Israel and thus remains a worldwide problem.A primary concern following the identification of BSE in 1985 was that it might cross species barriers to infect humans. Initially, it was thought that transmission of BSE to humans was unlikely, given that humans appeared to be resistant to scrapie, an animal TSE that had been endemic in British sheep for centuries. However, a few years after BSE was first recognized, a

  13. Memory binding and white matter integrity in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Parra, Mario A; Saarimäki, Heini; Bastin, Mark E; Londoño, Ana C; Pettit, Lewis; Lopera, Francisco; Della Sala, Sergio; Abrahams, Sharon

    2015-05-01

    Binding information in short-term and long-term memory are functions sensitive to Alzheimer's disease. They have been found to be affected in patients who meet criteria for familial Alzheimer's disease due to the mutation E280A of the PSEN1 gene. However, only short-term memory binding has been found to be affected in asymptomatic carriers of this mutation. The neural correlates of this dissociation are poorly understood. The present study used diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging to investigate whether the integrity of white matter structures could offer an account. A sample of 19 patients with familial Alzheimer's disease, 18 asymptomatic carriers and 21 non-carrier controls underwent diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging, neuropsychological and memory binding assessment. The short-term memory binding task required participants to detect changes across two consecutive screens displaying arrays of shapes, colours, or shape-colour bindings. The long-term memory binding task was a Paired Associates Learning Test. Performance on these tasks were entered into regression models. Relative to controls, patients with familial Alzheimer's disease performed poorly on both memory binding tasks. Asymptomatic carriers differed from controls only in the short-term memory binding task. White matter integrity explained poor memory binding performance only in patients with familial Alzheimer's disease. White matter water diffusion metrics from the frontal lobe accounted for poor performance on both memory binding tasks. Dissociations were found in the genu of corpus callosum which accounted for short-term memory binding impairments and in the hippocampal part of cingulum bundle which accounted for long-term memory binding deficits. The results indicate that white matter structures in the frontal and temporal lobes are vulnerable to the early stages of familial Alzheimer's disease and their damage is associated with impairments in two memory binding functions known to

  14. Fine scale association mapping of disease loci using simplex families.

    PubMed

    Morris, A P; Whittaker, J C

    2000-05-01

    We present a new method for the fine scale mapping of disease loci based on samples of simplex families, each containing an affected child. The method is based on a generalisation of a single locus allele transmission model to multiple marker loci. The model is developed under the assumption of a single ancestral mutation and allows for the calculation of posterior probabilities that each allele at a particular marker was present on the founder chromosome. We illustrate the method using simulated family data for cystic fibrosis and Huntingtons disease, for which the locations of mutations in the disease genes are now known. For both diseases, our new method provides good estimates of the location of the mutations. PMID:11246474

  15. Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr’s disease)

    PubMed Central

    Mufaddel, Amir A.; Al-Hassani, Ghanem A.

    2014-01-01

    Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr’s disease) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by symmetrical and bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia. Calcifications may also occur in other brain regions such as dentate nucleus, thalamus, and cerebral cortex. Both familial and non-familial cases of Fahr’s disease have been reported, predominantly with autosomal-dominant fashion. The disease has a wide range of clinical presentations, predominantly with neuropsychiatric features and movement disorders. Psychiatric features reported in the literature include: cognitive impairment, depression, hallucinations, delusions, manic symptoms, anxiety, schizophrenia-like psychosis, and personality change. Other clinical features include: Parkinsonism, ataxia, headache, seizures, vertigo, stroke-like events, orthostatic hypotension, tremor, dysarthria, and paresis. Fahr’s disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of psychiatric symptoms, particularly when associated with movement disorder. The disease should be differentiated from other conditions that can cause intracranial calcification. No specific treatment is currently available. Further research is needed to bridge the gap existing in our current knowledge of the prevalence, etiology, symptoms, and treatment of Fahr’s disease. PMID:24983277

  16. FYI: Services to Poor Families; Controlling Infectious Diseases; Parent Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children Today, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Discusses services and resources available for families, parents, and child care providers. Describes a National Resource Center for Children in Poverty; a guide for controlling infectious diseases among young children in day care; a directory of parent support groups; and reports of a link between household pesticides and childhood leukemia. (BB)

  17. Coronary heart disease in Asian Indians: perspectives of family members.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Shantala; Wilkes, Lesley M; Jackson, Debra

    Despite the high prevalence rate and significant mortality and morbidity from coronary heart disease in Asian Indians (irrespective of their religious background), very few studies have reported on family members' experiences of caring for a person with coronary heart disease. This paper reports on family members' experiences of coronary heart disease in Asian Indians residing in Australia, and is part of a larger study that explored the experiences and/or understanding of coronary heart disease in Asian Indians from the perspective of patients, family members and 'healthy' participants. Using a constructivist approach semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with five family members. Findings are represented under the following main categories: 1. A period of complexity for family members; 2. Indian Culture: Its influence on health/health behaviour & illness experience; 3. Impact of migration and societal discrimination; 4. Disappointment with health care services and the health system; and 5. Strategies to prevent cardiac illness and attain optimal health. Cultural factors had both positive and negative influences not only on the illness experience but also on health behaviour and attitude. The impact of Indian culture in relation to coronary heart disease needs to be understood not only at the cultural level by providing culturally sensitive health care, but also by educating Asian Indians to change their health attitude and behaviour and improve their lifestyle. Asian Indians need education and advice to become more resilient and adaptable to a Western society and also to become aware of the acculturative effects of a Western lifestyle. PMID:17343522

  18. Coronary artery disease and haemostatic variables in heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Sugrue, D D; Trayner, I; Thompson, G R; Vere, V J; Dimeson, J; Stirling, Y; Meade, T W

    1985-01-01

    Haemostatic variables were measured in 61 patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia, 32 of whom had evidence of coronary heart disease. Age adjusted mean concentrations of plasma fibrinogen and factor VIII were significantly higher in these patients than in the 29 patients without coronary heart disease, but there were no significant differences in serum lipid concentrations between the two groups. Comparisons in 30 patients taking and not taking lipid lowering drugs showed lower values for low density lipoprotein cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol and antithrombin III, and a higher high density lipoprotein ratio while receiving treatment. The results suggest that hypercoagulability may play a role in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease in patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia. PMID:3970784

  19. [A 73-year-old woman with familial Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Takanashi, M; Urabe, T; Ohta, S; Hamano, Y; Mori, H; Shirai, T; Kondo, T; Mizuno, Y

    1999-12-01

    We report a 73-year-old Japanese woman with familial Parkinson's disease. The patient was well until her 67 years of the age, when she noted rest tremor in her right hand. Soon after her gait became short stepped. She visited our clinic on October 6, 1992 when she was 68 years old. She was alert and well oriented without dementia. She showed masked face, small voice, small stepped gait, retropulsion, resting tremor in her right hand, rigidity in the neck, and bradykinesia. She was treated with 400 mg/day of levodopa-carbidopa, which improved her symptoms, however, she developed wearing off phenomenon 3 years after the initiation of levodopa treatment. On August 26, 1998, she developed abdominal pain, diarrhea, and vomiting. She was admitted to another hospital, where abdominal plain x-ray revealed an evidence of intestinal obstruction (ileus). She was treated with nasogastric suction and intravenous fluid. Her condition did not improve and she was transferred to our hospital on August 29, 1998. Her family history revealed no consanguineous marriage. She had two elder brothers and three elder sisters. One of her brothers had been diagnosed as Parkinson's disease. Her husband also suffered from Parkinson's disease, however, her parents apparently did not have Parkinson's disease. On admission, she appeared to be drowsy. Her blood pressure was 102/70 mmHg, body temperature 36.2 degrees C. The lungs were clear and no cardiac murmur was present. Abdomen was flat and bowel sound was audible. No abnormal mass was palpable. Neurologic examination revealed mild consciousness disturbance, masked face, and small voice. No motor paralysis was noted. Muscle tone was hypotonic. No abnormal involuntary movement was noted. Abnormal laboratory findings on admission were as follows; WBC 11,300/microliter, amylase 1,373 IU/l, CK 446 IU/l, BUN 50 mg/dl, creatinine 1.17 mg/dl, CRP 22.7 mg/ dl, Na 134 mEq/l, K 3.1 mEq/l, and Cl 81 mEq/l. A chest x-ray film revealed pneumonic shadows in

  20. Family coronary heart disease: a call to action.

    PubMed

    Superko, H Robert; Roberts, Robert; Garrett, Brenda; Pendyala, Lakshmana; King, Spencer

    2010-12-01

    A family history of coronary heart disease (CHD) is an accepted risk factor for cardiovascular events and is independent of common CHD risk factors. Advances in the understanding of genetic influences on CHD risk provide the opportunity to apply this knowledge and improve patient care. Utility of inherited cardiovascular risk testing exists by utilizing both phenotypes and genotypes and includes improved CHD risk prediction, selection of the most appropriate treatment, prediction of outcome, and family counseling. The major impediment to widespread clinical adoption of this concept involves un-reimbursed staff time, educational needs, access to a standardized and efficient assessment mechanism, and privacy issues. The link between CHD and inheritance is indisputable and the evidence strong and consistent. For clinicians, the question is how to utilize this information, in an efficient manner, in order to improve patient care and detection of high-risk family members. PMID:21184539

  1. Family Stress with Chronic Childhood Illness: Cystic Fibrosis, Neuromuscular Disease, and Renal Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Jean; Guthrie, Donald

    1986-01-01

    Parents of children with neuromuscular disease, cystic fibrosis, and renal disease were compared with parents of control subjects matched by age to the clinical cases. The three clinical groups exhibited different patterns of stressful response, consistent with the nature of their illnesses and the requirements for care imposed on the families.…

  2. Chromosome 14 and late-onset familial alzheimer disease (FAD)

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberg, G.D.; Anderson, L.; Nemens, E.; Bird, T.D.; Wijsman, E.M.; Martin, G.M.; Payami, H.; Orr, H.T.; White, J.A.; Alonso, M.E.

    1993-09-01

    Familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) is genetically heterogeneous. Two loci responsible for early-onset FAD have been identified: the amyloid precursor protein gene on chromosome 21 and the as-yet-unidentified locus on chromosome 14. The genetics of late-onset FAD is unresolved. Maximum-likelihood, affected-pedigree-member (APM), and sib-pair analysis were used, in 49 families with a mean age at onset [>=]60 years, to determine whether the chromosome 14 locus is responsible for late-onset FAD. The markers used were D14S53, D14S43, and D14S52. The LOD score method was used to test for linkage of late-onset FAD to the chromosome 14 markers, under three different models: age-dependent penetrance, an affected-only analysis, and age-dependent penetrance with allowance for possible age-dependent sporadic cases. No evidence for linkage was obtained under any of these conditions for the late-onset kindreds, and strong evidence against linkage (LOD score [>=]2.0) to this region was obtained. Heterogeneity tests of the LOD score results for the combined group of families (early onset, Volga Germans, and late onset) favored the hypothesis of linkage to chromosome 14 with genetic heterogeneity. The positive results are primarily from early-onset families. APM analysis gave significant evidence for linkage of D14S43 and D14S52 to FAD in early-onset kindreds (P<.02). No evidence for linkage was found for the entire late-onset family group. Significant evidence for linkage to D14S52, however, was found for a subgroup of families of intermediate age at onset (mean age at onset [>=]60 years and <70 years). These results indicate that the chromosome 14 locus is not responsible for Alzheimer disease in most late-onset FAD kindreds but could play a role in a subset of these kindreds. 37 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  3. The KCTD family of proteins: structure, function, disease relevance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The family of potassium channel tetramerizationdomain (KCTD) proteins consists of 26 members with mostly unknown functions. The name of the protein family is due to the sequence similarity between the conserved N-terminal region of KCTD proteins and the tetramerization domain in some voltage-gated potassium channels. Dozens of publications suggest that KCTD proteins have roles in various biological processes and diseases. In this review, we summarize the character of Bric-a-brack,Tram-track, Broad complex(BTB) of KCTD proteins, their roles in the ubiquitination pathway, and the roles of KCTD mutants in diseases. Furthermore, we review potential downstream signaling pathways and discuss future studies that should be performed. PMID:24268103

  4. Calcified Granulomatous Disease: Occupational Associations and Lack of Familial Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Robert M.; Amoroso, Anthony; Hashmi, Salman; Kligerman, Seth; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Netzer, Giora

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The acute host response to histoplasma capsulatum infection varies according to exposure and susceptibility. Late sequelae include calcifications in the lung, thoracic lymphatics, and spleen. Determinants of calcified granuloma formation are poorly studied and may differ from those affecting acute response. We examined the occupational associations and familial aggregation of radiographic calcified granulomatous disease to characterize the determinants of calcified granuloma formation. Methods We analyzed prospectively collected cross-sectional data including computed tomograms from 872 adult members of the Old Order Amish of Lancaster County. Results Granulomas were present in 71 % of participants. Granulomas were present in the lung of 57 % of participants, in the hilar or mediastinal lymph nodes of 55 % of participants, and in the spleen of 29 % of participants. No significant differences were observed in the presence of granulomas between men and women. Each year of age was associated with 4 % higher odds of splenic calcifications, and a primary occupation of farming was associated with an 84 % higher odds of splenic calcifications. A compelling pattern of familial aggregation was not observed. Conclusions Calcified granulomatous disease does not appear to aggregate in families. Determinants influencing patterns of granulomatous disease include occupation, age, and geographic location. PMID:25038755

  5. Families with familial combined hyperlipidemia and families enriched for coronary artery disease share genetic determinants for the atherogenic lipoprotein phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Allayee, H.; Aouizerat, B.E.; Lusis, A.J.; Cantor, R.M.; Lanning, C.D.; Rotter, J.I.; Dallinga-Thie, G.M.; Krauss, R.M.; Bruin, T.W.A. de

    1998-08-01

    Small, dense LDL particles consistently have been associated with hypertriglyceridemia, premature coronary artery disease (CAD), and familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCH). Previously, the authors have observed linkage of LDL particle size with four separate candidate-gene loci in a study of families enriched for CAD. These loci contain the genes for manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), on chromosome 6q; for apolipoprotein AI-CIII-AIV, on chromosome 11q; for cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and lecithin:cholesterol acyl-transferase (LCAT), on chromosome 16q; and for the LDL receptor (LDLR), on chromosome 19p. The authors have now tested whether these loci also contribute to LDL particle size in families ascertained for FCH. The members of 18 families (481 individuals) were typed for genetic markers at the four loci, and linkage to LDL particle size was assessed by nonparametric sib-pair linkage analysis. The presence of small, dense LDL (pattern B) was much more frequent in the FCH probands than in the spouse controls. Evidence for linkage was observed at the MnSOD (P = .02), CETP/LCAT (P = .03), and apolipoprotein AI0CIII0AIV loci (P = .005) but not at the LDLR locus. The authors conclude that there is a genetically based association between FCH and small, dense LDL and that the genetic determinants for LDL particle size are shared, at least in part, among FCH families and the more general population at risk for CAD.

  6. Mononucleated Blood Cell Populations Display Different Abilities To Transmit Prion Disease by the Transfusion Route

    PubMed Central

    Douet, Jean-Yves; Lacroux, Caroline; Litaise, Claire; Lugan, Séverine; Corbière, Fabien; Arnold, Mark; Simmons, Hugh; Aron, Naima; Costes, Pierrette; Tillier, Cécile; Cassard, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous experiments carried out in a sheep scrapie model demonstrated that the transfusion of 200 μl of prion-infected whole blood has an apparent 100% efficacy for disease transmission. These experiments also indicated that, despite the apparent low infectious titer, the intravenous administration of white blood cells (WBC) resulted in efficient disease transmission. In the study presented here, using the same transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) animal model, our aim was to determine the minimal number of white blood cells and the specific abilities of mononucleated cell populations to transmit scrapie by the transfusion route. Our results confirmed that the transfusion of 100 μl, but not 10 μl, of fresh whole blood collected in asymptomatic scrapie-infected donor sheep can transmit the disease. The data also show that the intravenous administration of 105 WBCs is sufficient to cause scrapie in recipient sheep. Cell-sorted CD45R+ (predominantly B lymphocytes), CD4+/CD8+ (T lymphocytes), and CD14+ (monocytes/macrophages) blood cell subpopulations all were shown to contain prion infectivity by bioassays in ovine PrP transgenic mice. However, while the intravenous administration of 106 CD45+ or CD4+/8+ living cells was able to transmit the disease, similar numbers of CD14+ cells failed to infect the recipients. These data support the contention that mononucleated blood cell populations display different abilities to transmit TSE by the transfusion route. They also represent an important input for the risk assessment of blood-borne prion disease transmission and for refining the target performance of leukoreduction processes that currently are applied to mitigate the transmission risk in transfusion medicine. IMPORTANCE Interindividual variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) transmission through blood and blood-derived products is considered a major public health issue in transfusion medicine. Over the last decade, TSE in sheep has emerged as a

  7. Familial perinatal liver disease and fetal thrombotic vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Linda M; Grossman, Andrew B; Ruchelli, Eduardo D

    2008-01-01

    The association between placental fetal thrombotic vasculopathy (FTV) and perinatal liver disease was not recognized until 2002, when Dahms and colleagues reported a series of 3 patients in whom severe liver disease developed in the first 2 days of life. All had abnormal liver histology and showed a variety of abnormalities, including Budd-Chiari syndrome, changes mimicking extrahepatic obstruction, lobular fibrosis, cholestasis, and hepatocyte giant cell transformation. We report recurrent significant perinatal liver disease in a family, associated with proven FTV in at least 1 pregnancy. A 30-year-old gravida 4 female with a history of heterozygous methylenetetrahydrofolate A1298C mutation had a normal 1st pregnancy and then experienced an intrauterine fetal demise at 38 weeks of gestation. Placental examination revealed extensive occlusive and mural thrombi of chorionic vessels associated with a large focus of avascular villi. Histologic examination of the liver showed extensive giant cell transformation and hepatocyte dropout. No excess hemosiderin pigment was present in the liver, pancreas, or heart. A 3rd pregnancy produced a live-born term infant with transient neonatal cholestasis. The 4th pregnancy also produced a term neonate who presented with acute hepatic failure of unknown cause, ultimately requiring liver transplantation. Fetal thrombotic vasculopathy is an underrecognized association with perinatal liver disease that may be associated with abnormal liver perfusion and that may recur in families, especially when a genetic thrombophilia is present. PMID:17990937

  8. Concordant dyslipidemia, hypertension and early coronary disease in Utah families.

    PubMed

    Williams, R R; Hunt, S C; Wu, L L; Hopkins, P N; Hasstedt, S J; Schumacher, M C; Stults, B M; Kuida, H

    1990-01-01

    A detailed family history questionnaire collected from families of 35,000 sixteen year old high school students in Utah was used to identify population-bases sibships with two or more living adults affected with hypertension under age 60 or coronary artery disease before age 55. Detailed clinical and biochemical evaluations performed during a four-hour visit to a research clinic provided data to test for concordant abnormalities in siblings with either early hypertension or early coronary heart disease. A new syndrome, familial dyslipidemic hypertension (FDH), was found in 48% of the hypertensive sibships. In these FDH subjects, 68% had HDL-cholesterol below the 10th percentile, 49% had triglyceride level above the 90th percentile, and 27% had LDL levels above the 90th percentile. When compared to normolipidemic hypertensive subjects, persons with FDH had significantly elevated fasting plasma insulin levels, increased subscapular skinfold thickness, increased knee width and wrist circumference, and increased levels of VLDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein B. In coronary sibships, concordant abnormalities for lipids were consistent with familial combined hyperlipidemia in 30-40% of sibships, FDH in 15-45% of sibships, and low HDL-C (with normal cholesterol) in 10%. Concordant normal lipids were found in only 15% of sibships. These data suggest that inherited metabolic abnormalities likely explain some co-aggregation of hyperinsulinemia, obesity, hypertension, and early coronary heart disease. Current knowledge also suggests these metabolic abnormalities could be treated or prevented with appropriate modification in lifestyle factors such as diet and exercise as well as through the use of prescription medications. PMID:2189041

  9. Familial Atypical Cold Urticaria: Description of a New Hereditary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Chhavi; Healy, Chris; Wanderer, Alan A.; Hoffman, Hal M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Acquired Cold Urticaria (ACU) is usually a self-limited, sporadic, cutaneous disease diagnosed by history and positive cold stimulation time tests (CSTT). We describe three unrelated families (A,B,C) with lifelong atypical cold urticaria, distinguished from ACU and Familial Cold Autoinflammatory Syndrome (FCAS). Objective To describe a new hereditary disease of cold urticaria and study its pathogenesis. Methods Questionnaires, interviews, physical exams, skin testing and biopsies were obtained. Absolute values, means and prevalence percentages of data are reported. Results 35 subjects are described with Familial Atypical Cold Urticaria (FACU) (A:17, B:8, C:10) displaying an autosomal dominant (AD) pattern of inheritance. All tested subjects had negative CSTT. Completed questionnaires from family A and B (35) revealed that all affected subjects had lifelong symptoms that began in early childhood with pruritis, erythema and urticaria after cold exposure. Angioedema (A:23%; B:42%), syncope and/or near-syncope (A:46%; B:86%) were also present. Triggers included cold atmosphere (100%), aquatic activities (A:92%, B:100%), handling cold objects (A:54%, B:71%) and ingestion of cold food or beverage (A:69%, B:100%). Skin biopsies demonstrated a mast cell infiltrate with the appearance of degranulation after cold challenge. Conclusions FACU is a new cold-induced inherited disease that is different than ACU in its natural history, atmospheric cold elicitation, severity of systemic reactions and CSTT results. FACU differs from FCAS in symptom-timing and the absence of fever, chills and joint pain. The etiology is suspected to be mast cell-related. Treatment of reactions is similar to ACU. Further evaluation of pathogenesis and genetics is warranted. PMID:19910034

  10. Implications of prion adaptation and evolution paradigm for human neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Kabir, M Enamul; Safar, Jiri G

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence indicating that number of human neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, fronto-temporal dementias, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, propagate in the brain via prion-like intercellular induction of protein misfolding. Prions cause lethal neurodegenerative diseases in humans, the most prevalent being sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD); they self-replicate and spread by converting the cellular form of prion protein (PrP(C)) to a misfolded pathogenic conformer (PrP(Sc)). The extensive phenotypic heterogeneity of human prion diseases is determined by polymorphisms in the prion protein gene, and by prion strain-specific conformation of PrP(Sc). Remarkably, even though informative nucleic acid is absent, prions may undergo rapid adaptation and evolution in cloned cells and upon crossing the species barrier. In the course of our investigation of this process, we isolated distinct populations of PrP(Sc) particles that frequently co-exist in sCJD. The human prion particles replicate independently and undergo competitive selection of those with lower initial conformational stability. Exposed to mutant substrate, the winning PrP(Sc) conformers are subject to further evolution by natural selection of the subpopulation with the highest replication rate due to the lowest stability. Thus, the evolution and adaptation of human prions is enabled by a dynamic collection of distinct populations of particles, whose evolution is governed by the selection of progressively less stable, faster replicating PrP(Sc) conformers. This fundamental biological mechanism may explain the drug resistance that some prions gained after exposure to compounds targeting PrP(Sc). Whether the phenotypic heterogeneity of other neurodegenerative diseases caused by protein misfolding is determined by the spectrum of misfolded conformers (strains) remains to be established. However, the prospect that these conformers may evolve and

  11. Ascertainment through family history of disease often decreases the power of family-based association studies.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Manuel A R; Sham, Pak; Daly, Mark J; Purcell, Shaun

    2007-07-01

    Selection of cases with additional affected relatives has been shown to increase the power of the case-control association design. We investigated whether this strategy can also improve the power of family-based association studies that use the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT), while accounting for the effects of residual polygenic and environmental factors on disease liability. Ascertainment of parent-offspring trios conditional on the proband having affected first-degree relatives almost always reduced the power of the TDT. For many disease models, this reduction was quite considerable. In contrast, for the same sample size, designs that analyzed more than one affected offspring per family often improved power when compared to the standard parent-offspring trio design. Together, our results suggest that (1) residual polygenic and environmental influences should be considered when estimating the power of the TDT for studies that ascertain families with multiple affected relatives; (2) if trios are selected conditional on having additional affected offspring, then it is important to genotype and include in the analysis the additional siblings; (3) the ascertainment strategy should be considered when interpreting results from TDT analyses. Our analytic approach to estimate the asymptotic power of the TDT is implemented online at http://pngu.mgh.harvard.edu/ ~purcell/gpc/. PMID:17372818

  12. Iatrogenic CJD due to pituitary-derived growth hormone with genetically determined incubation times of up to 40 years.

    PubMed

    Rudge, Peter; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Adlard, Peter; Bjurstrom, Nina; Caine, Diana; Lowe, Jessica; Norsworthy, Penny; Hummerich, Holger; Druyeh, Ron; Wadsworth, Jonathan D F; Brandner, Sebastian; Hyare, Harpreet; Mead, Simon; Collinge, John

    2015-11-01

    Patients with iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease due to administration of cadaver-sourced growth hormone during childhood are still being seen in the UK 30 years after cessation of this treatment. Of the 77 patients who have developed iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, 56 have been genotyped. There has been a marked change in genotype profile at polymorphic codon 129 of the prion protein gene (PRNP) from predominantly valine homozygous to a mixed picture of methionine homozygous and methionine-valine heterozygous over time. The incubation period of iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is significantly different between all three genotypes. This experience is a striking contrast with that in France and the USA, which may relate to contamination of different growth hormone batches with different strains of human prions. We describe the clinical, imaging, molecular and autopsy features in 22 of 24 patients who have developed iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the UK since 2003. Mean age at onset of symptoms was 42.7 years. Gait ataxia and lower limb dysaesthesiae were the most frequent presenting symptoms. All had cerebellar signs, and the majority had myoclonus and lower limb pyramidal signs, with relatively preserved cognitive function, when first seen. There was a progressive decline in neurological and cognitive function leading to death after 5-32 (mean 14) months. Despite incubation periods approaching 40 years, the clinical duration in methionine homozygote patients appeared to be shorter than that seen in heterozygote patients. MRI showed restricted diffusion in the basal ganglia, thalamus, hippocampus, frontal and the paracentral motor cortex and cerebellar vermis. The electroencephalogram was abnormal in 15 patients and cerebrospinal fluid 14-3-3 protein was positive in half the patients. Neuropathological examination was conducted in nine patients. All but one showed synaptic prion deposition with numerous kuru type plaques in the basal ganglia

  13. Iatrogenic CJD due to pituitary-derived growth hormone with genetically determined incubation times of up to 40 years

    PubMed Central

    Jaunmuktane, Zane; Adlard, Peter; Bjurstrom, Nina; Caine, Diana; Lowe, Jessica; Norsworthy, Penny; Hummerich, Holger; Druyeh, Ron; Wadsworth, Jonathan D. F.; Brandner, Sebastian; Hyare, Harpreet; Mead, Simon; Collinge, John

    2015-01-01

    Patients with iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease due to administration of cadaver-sourced growth hormone during childhood are still being seen in the UK 30 years after cessation of this treatment. Of the 77 patients who have developed iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, 56 have been genotyped. There has been a marked change in genotype profile at polymorphic codon 129 of the prion protein gene (PRNP) from predominantly valine homozygous to a mixed picture of methionine homozygous and methionine-valine heterozygous over time. The incubation period of iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is significantly different between all three genotypes. This experience is a striking contrast with that in France and the USA, which may relate to contamination of different growth hormone batches with different strains of human prions. We describe the clinical, imaging, molecular and autopsy features in 22 of 24 patients who have developed iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the UK since 2003. Mean age at onset of symptoms was 42.7 years. Gait ataxia and lower limb dysaesthesiae were the most frequent presenting symptoms. All had cerebellar signs, and the majority had myoclonus and lower limb pyramidal signs, with relatively preserved cognitive function, when first seen. There was a progressive decline in neurological and cognitive function leading to death after 5–32 (mean 14) months. Despite incubation periods approaching 40 years, the clinical duration in methionine homozygote patients appeared to be shorter than that seen in heterozygote patients. MRI showed restricted diffusion in the basal ganglia, thalamus, hippocampus, frontal and the paracentral motor cortex and cerebellar vermis. The electroencephalogram was abnormal in 15 patients and cerebrospinal fluid 14-3-3 protein was positive in half the patients. Neuropathological examination was conducted in nine patients. All but one showed synaptic prion deposition with numerous kuru type plaques in the basal ganglia

  14. A family living with Alzheimer's disease: The communicative challenges.

    PubMed

    Jones, Danielle

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease irrevocably challenges a person's capacity to communicate with others. Earlier research on these challenges focused on the language disorders associated with the condition and situated language deficit solely in the limitations of a person's cognitive and semantic impairments. This research falls short of gaining insight into the actual interactional experiences of a person with Alzheimer's and their family. Drawing on a UK data set of 70 telephone calls recorded over a two-and-a-half year period (2006-2008) between one elderly woman with Alzheimer's disease, and her daughter and son-in-law, this paper explores the role which communication (and its degeneration) plays in family relationships. Investigating these interactions, using a conversation analytic approach, reveals that there are clearly communicative difficulties, but closer inspection suggests that they arise due to the contingencies that are generated by the other's contributions in the interaction. That being so, this paper marks a departure from the traditional focus on language level analysis and the assumption that deficits are intrinsic to the individual with Alzheimer's, and instead focuses on the collaborative communicative challenges that arise in the interaction itself and which have a profound impact on people's lives and relationships. PMID:24339113

  15. PrP(CWD) lymphoid cell targets in early and advanced chronic wasting disease of mule deer.

    PubMed

    Sigurdson, Christina J; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Miller, Michael W; Oesch, Bruno; van Keulen, Lucien J M; Langeveld, Jan P M; Hoover, Edward A

    2002-10-01

    Up to 15% of free-ranging mule deer in northeastern Colorado and southeastern Wyoming, USA, are afflicted with a prion disease, or transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE), known as chronic wasting disease (CWD). CWD is similar to a subset of TSEs including scrapie and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in which the abnormal prion protein isoform, PrP(CWD), accumulates in lymphoid tissue. Experimental scrapie studies have indicated that this early lymphoid phase is an important constituent of prion replication interposed between mucosal entry and central nervous system accumulation. To identify the lymphoid target cells associated with PrP(CWD), we used triple-label immunofluorescence and high-resolution confocal microscopy on tonsils from naturally infected deer in advanced disease. We detected PrP(CWD) primarily extracellularly in association with follicular dendritic and B cell membranes as determined by frequent co-localization with antibodies against membrane bound immunoglobulin and CD21. There was minimal co-localization with cytoplasmic labels for follicular dendritic cells (FDC). This finding could indicate FDC capture of PrP(CWD), potentially in association with immunoglobulin or complement, or PrP(C) conversion on FDC. In addition, scattered tingible body macrophages in the germinal centre contained coarse intracytoplasmic aggregates of PrP(CWD), reflecting either phagocytosis of PrP(CWD) on FDC processes, apoptotic FDC or B cells, or actual PrP(CWD) replication within tingible body macrophages. To compare lymphoid cell targets in early and advanced disease, we also examined: (i) PrP(CWD) distribution in lymphoid cells of fawns within 3 months of oral CWD exposure and (ii) tonsil biopsies from preclinical deer with naturally acquired CWD. These studies revealed that the early lymphoid cellular distribution of PrP(CWD) was similar to that in advanced disease, i.e. in a pattern suggesting FDC association. We conclude that in deer, PrP(CWD) accumulates

  16. Familial nephropathy associated with hepatic type of glycogen storage disease.

    PubMed

    Sonobe, H; Ogawa, K; Takahashi, I

    1976-11-01

    The female patient was diagnosed as having Von Gierke's disease at 14 years of age, based on clinical manifestations, laboratory examination and liver biopsy. At 19 years of age she had uremia and died from its deterioration at 24 years of age. The parents were consanguineous, and a 27-year-old sister is presently hospitalized for renal insufficiency with hepatomegaly. On autopsy, the patient's kidneys were highly contracted and contained a number of small cysts, mainly in the medulla. Histological examination indicated periglomerular fibrosis, glomerular hyalinization, tubular atrophy or cystic dilatation and intersitial fibrosis with round cell infiltration. These findings correspond to Fanconi's familial juvenile nephronophthisis, except for age. The liver was markedly enlarged and indicated severe, glycogen deposits, but the kidney did not contain glycogen deposits. It can, therefore, be presumed that the renal lesions were not a secondary consequence of long-term glycogen deposits but that renal and hepatic lesions were associated with each other. PMID:1070908

  17. Caring for infants with congenital heart disease and their families.

    PubMed

    Saenz, R B; Beebe, D K; Triplett, L C

    1999-04-01

    Congenital heart defects are classified into two broad categories: acyanotic and cyanotic lesions. The most common acyanotic lesions are ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, atrioventricular canal, pulmonary stenosis, patent ductus arteriosus, aortic stenosis and coarctation of the aorta. Congestive heart failure is the primary concern in infants with acyanotic lesions. The most common cyanotic lesions are tetralogy of Fallot and transposition of the great arteries. In infants with cyanotic lesions, hypoxia is more of a problem than congestive heart failure. Suspicion of a congenital heart defect should be raised by the presence of feeding difficulties in association with tachypnea, sweating and subcostal recession, or severe growth impairment. Follow-up of infants with congenital heart disease should follow the schedule of routine care for healthy babies with some modifications, such as administration of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines. More frequent follow-up is required if congestive heart failure is present. Family psychosocial issues should also be addressed. One of the main roles for the family physician is to help the parents put the diagnosis in perspective by clarifying expectations and misconceptions, and answering specific questions. PMID:10208705

  18. Motor–Language Coupling in Huntington’s Disease Families

    PubMed Central

    Kargieman, Lucila; Herrera, Eduar; Baez, Sandra; García, Adolfo M.; Dottori, Martin; Gelormini, Carlos; Manes, Facundo; Gershanik, Oscar; Ibáñez, Agustín

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, Huntington’s disease (HD) has been known as a movement disorder, characterized by motor, psychiatric, and cognitive impairments. Recent studies have shown that motor and action–language processes are neurally associated. The cognitive mechanisms underlying this interaction have been investigated through the action compatibility effect (ACE) paradigm, which induces a contextual coupling of ongoing motor actions and verbal processing. The present study is the first to use the ACE paradigm to evaluate action–word processing in HD patients (HDP) and their families. Specifically, we tested three groups: HDP, healthy first-degree relatives (HDR), and non-relative healthy controls. The results showed that ACE was abolished in HDP as well as HDR, but not in controls. Furthermore, we found that the processing deficits were primarily linguistic, given that they did not correlate executive function measurements. Our overall results underscore the role of cortico-basal ganglia circuits in action–word processing and indicate that the ACE task is a sensitive and robust early biomarker of HD and familial vulnerability. PMID:24971062

  19. The interleukin-1 family gene polymorphisms and Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Khalilzadeh, O; Anvari, M; Esteghamati, A; Momen-Heravi, F; Mahmoudi, M; Rashidi, A; Amiri, H M; Ranjbar, M; Tabataba-Vakili, S; Amirzargar, A

    2010-09-01

    Genetic factors, including cytokine gene polymorphisms, are potential contributors to the pathogenesis of the Graves' disease (GD). We attempted in this study to determine the association between GD and the following polymorphisms in the interleukin-1 (IL-1) family genes: IL-1alpha (-889C/T), IL-1ss (-511C/T), IL-1ss (+3962C/T), IL-1R (Pst-1 1970C/T) and IL-1RA (Mspa-I 11100C/T). We studied 107 patients with an established diagnosis of GD and 140 healthy controls. Cytokine typing was performed by the polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers assay. Genotype distributions among patients were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for all polymorphisms. The frequency of the IL-1alpha -889T allele was significantly higher in patients than in controls (51.9% vs. 31.6%, OR=2.33, 95% CI=1.61-3.38; p<0.0001). The IL-1RA Msp-I 11100C allele was significantly more frequent in patients than in controls (50.0% vs. 22.9%, OR=3.38, 95% CI=2.29-4.97, p<0.0001). No significant associations were found for other polymorphisms. Although the IL-1 family has well-known roles in GD pathogenesis, the contributions of their genetic variations to the disease are unclear. In this study, we documented a highly significant association between GD and polymorphism in IL-1alpha and IL-1RA genes. Further studies in other populations are necessary to confirm our results. PMID:20400062

  20. Diagnosis and Evaluation of a Patient with Rapidly Progressive Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Bucelli, Robert C.; Ances, Beau M.

    2014-01-01

    While the most common dementia is Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a detailed history is needed to rule out rapidly progressive dementias (RPDs). RPDs are less than two years in duration and have a rate of progression faster typical neurodegenerative diseases. Identification of RPDs is important as some are treatable. This review focuses on the spectrum of RPDs, with special emphasis on paraneoplastic disorders and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). PMID:24279195

  1. Prevalence of disease related prion protein in anonymous tonsil specimens in Britain: cross sectional opportunistic survey

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Carole M; Andrews, Nick; Vogliqi, Kelly; Mallinson, Gary; Kaisar, Maria; Hilton, David A; Ironside, James W; Edwards, Philip; McCardle, Linda M; Ritchie, Diane L; Dabaghian, Reza; Ambrose, Helen E; Gill, O Noel

    2009-01-01

    Objective To establish with improved accuracy the prevalence of disease related prion protein (PrPCJD) in the population of Britain and thereby guide a proportionate public health response to limit the threat of healthcare associated transmission of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). Design Cross sectional opportunistic survey. Study samples Anonymised tonsil pairs removed at elective tonsillectomy throughout England and Scotland. Setting National anonymous tissue archive for England and Scotland. Main outcome measure Presence of PrPCJD determined by using two enzyme immunoassays based on different analytical principles, with further investigation by immunohistochemistry or immunoblotting of any samples reactive in either assay. Results Testing of 63 007 samples was completed by the end of September 2008. Of these, 12 753 were from the birth cohort in which most vCJD cases have arisen (1961-85) and 19 908 were from the 1986-95 cohort that would have been also exposed to bovine spongiform encephalopathy through infected meat or meat products. None of the samples tested was unequivocally reactive in both enzyme immunoassays. Only two samples were reactive in one or other enzyme immunoassay and equivocal in the other, and nine samples were equivocally reactive in both enzyme immunoassays. Two hundred and seventy six samples were initially reactive in one or other enzyme immunoassay; the repeat reactivity rate was 15% or less, depending on the enzyme immunoassay and cut-off definition. None of the samples (including all the 276 initially reactive in enzyme immunoassay) that were investigated by immunohistochemistry or immunoblotting was positive for the presence of PrPCJD. Conclusions The observed prevalence of PrPCJD in tonsils from the 1961-95 combined birth cohort was 0/32 661 with a 95% confidence interval of 0 to 113 per million. In the 1961-85 cohort, the prevalence of zero with a 95% confidence interval of 0 to 289 per million was lower than, but

  2. Isolation of Prion with BSE Properties from Farmed Goat

    PubMed Central

    Lockey, Richard; Sallis, Rosemary E.; Terry, Linda A.; Thorne, Leigh; Holder, Thomas M.; Beck, Katy E.; Simmons, Marion M.

    2011-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are fatal neurodegenerative diseases that include variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in small ruminants, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle. Scrapie is not considered a public health risk, but BSE has been linked to variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Small ruminants are susceptible to BSE, and in 2005 BSE was identified in a farmed goat in France. We confirm another BSE case in a goat in which scrapie was originally diagnosed and retrospectively identified as suspected BSE. The prion strain in this case was further characterized by mouse bioassay after extraction from formaldehyde-fixed brain tissue embedded in paraffin blocks. Our data show that BSE can infect small ruminants under natural conditions and could be misdiagnosed as scrapie. Surveillance should continue so that another outbreak of this zoonotic transmissible spongiform encephalopathy can be prevented and public health safeguarded. PMID:22172149

  3. Autoimmune BSEP disease: disease recurrence after liver transplantation for progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Kubitz, Ralf; Dröge, Carola; Kluge, Stefanie; Stross, Claudia; Walter, Nathalie; Keitel, Verena; Häussinger, Dieter; Stindt, Jan

    2015-06-01

    Severe cholestasis may result in end-stage liver disease with the need of liver transplantation (LTX). In children, about 10 % of LTX are necessary because of cholestatic liver diseases. Apart from bile duct atresia, three types of progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) are common causes of severe cholestasis in children. The three subtypes of PFIC are defined by the involved genes: PFIC-1, PFIC-2, and PFIC-3 are due to mutations of P-type ATPase ATP8B1 (familial intrahepatic cholestasis 1, FIC1), the ATP binding cassette transporter ABCB11 (bile salt export pump, BSEP), or ABCB4 (multidrug resistance protein 3, MDR3), respectively. All transporters are localized in the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes and together mediate bile salt and phospholipid transport. In some patients with PFIC-2 disease, recurrence has been observed after LTX, which mimics a PFIC phenotype. It could be shown by several groups that inhibitory anti-BSEP antibodies emerge, which most likely cause disease recurrence. The prevalence of severe BSEP mutations (e.g., splice site and premature stop codon mutations) is very high in this group of patients. These mutations often result in the complete absence of BSEP, which likely accounts for an insufficient auto-tolerance against BSEP. Although many aspects of this "new" disease are not fully elucidated, the possibility of anti-BSEP antibody formation has implications for the pre- and posttransplant management of PFIC-2 patients. This review will summarize the current knowledge including diagnosis, pathomechanisms, and management of "autoimmune BSEP disease." PMID:25342496

  4. Genetic Variations of NLR family genes in Behcet's Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Yu, Hongsong; Jiang, Yanni; Deng, Bolin; Bai, Lin; Kijlstra, Aize; Yang, Peizeng

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of five NLR family genes (NOD1, NOD2, NLRP1, NLRP3 and CIITA) are associated with Behcet's disease (BD) in a Chinese Han population. The study was carried out in 950 BD patients and 1440 controls for 19 SNPs in the selected NLR genes. In the first-stage study, significantly decreased frequencies of the CIITA//rs12932187 C allele (Pc = 1.668E-02) and NOD1//rs2075818 G allele (Pc = 4.694E-02) were found in BD patients as compared to controls . After performing a second stage validation study and combination of data we confirmed the association of CIITA//rs12932187 and NOD1//rs2075818 with BD. In CIITA//rs12932187, the frequencies of the CC genotype and C allele were significantly lower in BD than in controls (Pc = 3.331E-06; Pc = 6.004E-07, respectively). In NOD1//rs2075818, the GG genotype and G allele showed significantly decreased frequencies in BD patients when compared to controls (Pc = 1.022E-02; Pc = 6.811E-05, respectively). Functional experiments showed that carriers with the CC genotype in CIITA//rs12932187 had a lower CIITA mRNA expression level and an enhanced IL-10 secretion as compared to GG and CG carriers. This study provides evidence that the CIITA and NOD1 gene are involved in the susceptibility to Behcet's disease. PMID:26833430

  5. Cell signaling abnormalities may drive neurodegeneration in familial Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Robakis, Nikolaos K

    2014-01-01

    Presenilins (PSs) are catalytic components of the γ-secretase complex that produces Aβ peptides. Substrates of γ-secretase are membrane-bound protein fragments deriving from the cleavage of extracellular sequence of cell surface proteins. APP-derived γ-secretase substrates are cleaved at gamma (γ) sites to produce Aβ while cleavage at the epsilon (ε) site produces AICD proposed to function in transcription. In addition to APP, γ-secretase promotes the ε-cleavage of a large number of cell surface proteins producing cytosolic peptides shown to function in cell signaling. A common hypothesis suggests that Alzheimer's disease (AD) is caused by Aβ peptides or their products. Treatment of patients with inhibitors of Aβ production however, showed no therapeutic benefits while inducing cytotoxicity. Similarly, treatments with anti-Aβ antibodies yielded disappointing results. Importantly, recent evidence shows that PS familial AD (FAD) mutations cause a loss of γ-secretase cleavage activity at ε site of substrates thus inhibiting production of biologically important cell signaling peptides while promoting accumulation of membrane-bound cytotoxic substrates. These data support a hypothesis that FAD mutations may increase neurotoxicity by inhibiting the γ-secretase-catalyzed ε cleavage of substrates thus interfering with cell signaling while also promoting accumulation of cytotoxic peptides. Similar mechanisms may explain γ-secretase inhibitor-associated toxicities observed in clinical trials. Here we discuss evidence that FAD neurodegeneration may be caused by loss of γ-secretase cleavage function at ε sites of substrates. PMID:23436150

  6. CHCHD2 gene mutations in familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chang-He; Mao, Cheng-Yuan; Zhang, Shu-Yu; Yang, Jing; Song, Bo; Wu, Ping; Zuo, Chuan-Tao; Liu, Yu-Tao; Ji, Yan; Yang, Zhi-Hua; Wu, Jun; Zhuang, Zheng-Ping; Xu, Yu-Ming

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in CHCHD2 gene have been reported in autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (ADPD). However, there is still lack of evidence supported CHCHD2 mutations lead to ADPD in other populations. We performed whole exome sequencing, positron emission tomography (PET), and haplotype analyses in an ADPD pedigree and then comprehensively screened for CHCHD2 gene mutations in additional 18 familial parkinsonism pedigrees, 364 sporadic PD patients, and 384 healthy controls to assess the frequencies of known and novel rare nonsynonymous CHCHD2 mutations. We identified a heterozygous variant (c.182C>T; p.Thr61Ile) in the CHCHD2 gene in the ADPD pedigree. PET revealed a significant reduction in dopamine transporter binding in the putamen and caudate nucleus of the proband, similar to idiopathic PD. The single nucleotide variant 5C>T (Pro2Leu) in CHCHD2 was confirmed to have a significantly higher frequency among sporadic PD patients than controls. Our results confirm that ADPD can be caused by CHCHD2 mutations and show that the Pro2Leu variant in CHCHD2 may be a risk factor for sporadic PD in Chinese populations. PMID:26705026

  7. Family Responsibility and Caregiving in the Qualitative Analysis of the Alzheimer's Disease Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gubrium, Jaber F.

    1988-01-01

    Presents field data to examine family responsibility in caring for Alzheimer's disease patients. Addresses features of social comparison, issue contingency, family history, and kinship priority. Argues that qualitative analysis offers empirical lessons about family responsibility and caregiver functioning untaught by other methods. (Author)

  8. Family Health History Communication Networks of Older Adults: Importance of Social Relationships and Disease Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashida, Sato; Kaphingst, Kimberly A.; Goodman, Melody; Schafer, Ellen J.

    2013-01-01

    Older individuals play a critical role in disseminating family health history (FHH) information that can facilitate disease prevention among younger family members. This study evaluated the characteristics of older adults and their familial networks associated with two types of communication ("have shared" and "intend to share…

  9. Uptake and Degradation of Protease-Sensitive and -Resistant Forms of Abnormal Human Prion Protein Aggregates by Human Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Pyo; Head, Mark W.; Ironside, James W.; Priola, Suzette A.

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is the most common of the human prion diseases, a group of rare, transmissible, and fatal neurologic diseases associated with the accumulation of an abnormal form (PrPSc) of the host prion protein. In sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, disease-associated PrPSc is present not only as an aggregated, protease-resistant form but also as an aggregated protease-sensitive form (sPrPSc). Although evidence suggests that sPrPSc may play a role in prion pathogenesis, little is known about how it interacts with cells during prion infection. Here, we show that protease-sensitive abnormal PrP aggregates derived from patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease are taken up and degraded by immortalized human astrocytes similarly to abnormal PrP aggregates that are resistant to proteases. Our data suggest that relative proteinase K resistance does not significantly influence the astrocyte's ability to degrade PrPSc. Furthermore, the cell does not appear to distinguish between sPrPSc and protease-resistant PrPSc, suggesting that sPrPSc could contribute to prion infection. PMID:25280631

  10. The Impact of Experience with a Family Member with Alzheimer's Disease on Views about the Disease across Five Countries

    PubMed Central

    Blendon, Robert J.; Benson, John M.; Wikler, Elizabeth M.; Weldon, Kathleen J.; Georges, Jean; Baumgart, Matthew; Kallmyer, Beth A.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to understand how the public's beliefs in five countries may change as more families have direct experience with Alzheimer's disease. The data are derived from a questionnaire survey conducted by telephone (landline and cell) with 2678 randomly selected adults in France, Germany, Poland, Spain, and the United States. The paper analyzes the beliefs and anticipated behavior of those in each country who report having had a family member with Alzheimer's disease versus those who do not. In one or more countries, differences were found between the two groups in their concern about getting Alzheimer's disease, knowledge that the disease is fatal, awareness of certain symptoms, and support for increased public spending. The results suggest that as more people have experience with a family member who has Alzheimer's disease, the public will generally become more concerned about Alzheimer's disease and more likely to recognize that Alzheimer's disease is a fatal disease. The findings suggest that other beliefs may only be affected if there are future major educational campaigns about the disease. The publics in individual countries, with differing cultures and health systems, are likely to respond in different ways as more families have experience with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22997601

  11. Mutational analysis of PKD1 gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingyan; Li, Lanrong; Liu, Qingmin

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a hereditary disease and common renal disease. Mutations of PKD genes are responsible for this disease. We analyzed a large Chinese family with ADPKD using Sanger sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for this disease. The family comprised 27 individuals including 10 ADPKD patients. These ADPKD patients had severe renal disease and most of them died very young. We analyzed 6 survival patients gene and found they all had C10529T mutation in exon 35 of PKD1 gene. We did not found gene mutation in any unaffected relatives or 300 unrelated controls. These findings suggested that the C10529T mutation in PKD1 gene might be the pathogenic mutation responsible for the disease in this family. PMID:26722532

  12. Mutational analysis of PKD1 gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingyan; Li, Lanrong; Liu, Qingmin

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a hereditary disease and common renal disease. Mutations of PKD genes are responsible for this disease. We analyzed a large Chinese family with ADPKD using Sanger sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for this disease. The family comprised 27 individuals including 10 ADPKD patients. These ADPKD patients had severe renal disease and most of them died very young. We analyzed 6 survival patients gene and found they all had C10529T mutation in exon 35 of PKD1 gene. We did not found gene mutation in any unaffected relatives or 300 unrelated controls. These findings suggested that the C10529T mutation in PKD1 gene might be the pathogenic mutation responsible for the disease in this family. PMID:26722532

  13. A survey and a molecular dynamics study on the (central) hydrophobic region of prion proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiapu; Wang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Prion diseases which are serious neurodegenerative diseases that affect humans and animals occur in various of species. Unlike many other neurodegenerative diseases affected by amyloid, prion diseases can be highly infectious. Prion diseases occur in many species. In humans, prion diseases include the fatal human neurodegenerative diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), Fatal Familial Insomnia (FFI), Gerstmann-Strussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS) and Kuru etc. In animals, prion diseases are related to the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or 'mad-cow' disease) in cattle, the chronic wasting disease (CWD) found in deer and elk, and scrapie seen in sheep and goats, etc. More seriously, the fact that transmission of the prion diseases across the species barrier to other species such as humans has caused a major public health concern worldwide. For example, the BSE in Europe, the CWD in North America, and variant CJDs (vCJDs) in young people of UK. Fortunately, it is discovered that the hydrophobic region of prion proteins (PrP) controls the formation of diseased prions (PrP(Sc)), which provide some clues in control of such diseases. This article provides a detailed survey of recent studies with respect to the PrP hydrophobic region of human PrP(110-136) using molecular dynamics studies. PMID:25373387

  14. Family History of Alzheimer's Disease and Cortical Thickness in Patients With Dementia.

    PubMed

    Ganske, Steffi; Haussmann, Robert; Gruschwitz, Antonia; Werner, Annett; Osterrath, Antje; Baumgaertel, Johanna; Lange, Jan; Donix, Katharina L; Linn, Jennifer; Donix, Markus

    2016-08-01

    A first-degree family history of Alzheimer's disease reflects genetic risks for the neurodegenerative disorder. Recent imaging data suggest localized effects of genetic risks on brain structure in healthy people. It is unknown whether this association can also be found in patients who already have dementia. Our aim was to investigate whether family history risk modulates regional medial temporal lobe cortical thickness in patients with Alzheimer's disease. We performed high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and cortical unfolding data analysis on 54 patients and 53 nondemented individuals. A first-degree family history of Alzheimer's disease was associated with left hemispheric cortical thinning in the subiculum among patients and controls. The contribution of Alzheimer's disease family history to regional brain anatomy changes independent of cognitive impairment may reflect genetic risks that modulate onset and clinical course of the disease. PMID:27303063

  15. Family history of Alzheimer’s disease limits improvement in cognitive function after bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Strain, Gladys; Devlin, Michael; Crosby, Ross D; Mitchell, James E

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objective: Bariatric surgery can reverse cognitive impairments associated with obesity. However, such benefits may be attenuated in individuals with a predisposing risk for cognitive impairment such as family history of Alzheimer’s disease. Methods: In all, 94 bariatric surgery participants completed a computerized cognitive test battery before and 12 weeks after surgery. Family history of Alzheimer’s disease was obtained through self-report. Results: In the overall sample, cognitive function improved in memory and attention/executive function 12 weeks post-surgery. Repeated measures showed similar rates of improvements in attention/executive function between patients with and without a family history of Alzheimer’s disease. In contrast, only individuals without a family history of Alzheimer’s disease exhibited post-operative improvements in memory. A family history of Alzheimer’s disease was associated with greater post-surgery rates of cognitive impairment. Conclusions: Family history of Alzheimer’s disease may limit post-surgery cognitive benefits. Future studies should examine whether weight loss can modify the course of cognitive decline in patients at-risk for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26770731

  16. Converging approaches to understanding early onset familial Alzheimer disease: A First Nation study

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Laura Y; Beattie, B Lynn; Dwosh, Emily; Illes, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In 2007, a novel pathogenic genetic mutation associated with early onset familial Alzheimer disease was identified in a large First Nation family living in communities across British Columbia, Canada. Building on a community-based participatory study with members of the Nation, we sought to explore the impact and interplay of medicalization with the Nation’s knowledge and approaches to wellness in relation to early onset familial Alzheimer disease. Methods: We performed a secondary content analysis of focus group discussions and interviews with 48 members of the Nation between 2012 and 2013. The analysis focused specifically on geneticization, medicalization, and traditional knowledge of early onset familial Alzheimer disease, as these themes were prominent in the primary analysis. Results: We found that while biomedical explanations of disease permeate the knowledge and understanding of early onset familial Alzheimer disease, traditional concepts about wellness are upheld simultaneously. Conclusion: The analysis brings the theoretical framework of “two-eyed seeing” to the case of early onset familial Alzheimer disease for which the contributions of different ways of knowing are embraced, and in which traditional and western ways complement each other on the path of maintaining wellness in the face of progressive neurologic disease. PMID:27092264

  17. Clinical Decision Support for Vascular Disease in Community Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Keshavjee, K; Holbrook, AM; Lau, E; Esporlas-Jewer, I; Troyan, S

    2006-01-01

    The COMPETE III Vascular Disease Tracker (C3VT) is a personalized, Web-based, clinical decision support tool that provides patients and physicians access to a patient’s 16 individual vascular risk markers, specific advice for each marker and links to best practices in vascular disease management. It utilizes the chronic care model1 so that physicians can better manage patients with chronic diseases. Over 1100 patients have been enrolled into the COMPETE III study to date.

  18. [Familial incidence of affective diseases in patients with anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Herpertz-Dahlmann, B

    1988-03-01

    Analysis of family history information about first-, second- and third-degree relatives of 45 anorectic patients and 38 control subjects with different types of neurosis showed significantly more depression and eating disorders in the families of the anorectic group. Our data revealed the same prevalence of psychiatric disorders in general for both groups; the alcoholism rate was higher in the anorectic group without a statistic significance. These findings might provide further evidence of a possible genetic relationship between anorexia nervosa and affective illness. PMID:3388987

  19. Using Picture Books to Help Children Cope with a Family Member's Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Marna

    2005-01-01

    A diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the resulting behavioral changes in a loved one can cause intense emotional reactions from all family members, including children. Sharing and discussing relevant picture books can be an effective strategy to help the children in such families understand and deal with their emotions. Picture books can…

  20. Experiences of Supporting People with Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease in Aged Care and Family Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carling-Jenkins, Rachel; Torr, Jennifer; Iacono, Teresa; Bigby, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Background: Research addressing the experiences of families of adults with Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease in seeking diagnosis and gaining support is limited. The aim of this study was to gain a greater understanding of these processes by exploring the experiences of families and carers in supporting people with Down syndrome and…

  1. EXPLORING PARENT-SIBLING COMMUNICATION IN FAMILIES OF CHILDREN WITH SICKLE CELL DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Graff, J. Carolyn; Hankins, Jane S.; Hardy, Belinda T.; Hall, Heather R.; Roberts, Ruth J.; Neely-Barnes, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    Focus group interviews were conducted with parents of children with sickle cell disease to explore parent-sibling communication about sickle cell disease. Communication was influenced by attributes and behaviors of the parent, the child with sickle cell disease, and the sibling; extended family, neighbors, friends, and church members or social networks; and available, accessible resources related to the child’s health, child’s school, and parent employment. Outcomes that influenced and were influenced by factors within and outside the parent-sibling dyad and nuclear family included parent satisfaction, parent roles, family intactness, and status attainment. These findings support previous research with African American families and expand our views of the importance of educating parents, family members, and others about sickle cell disease. The findings suggest a need to explore sibling perception of this communication, parent and sibling perception of the impact of frequent hospitalizations and clinic visits on the sibling and family, and variations within families of children with sickle cell disease. PMID:20384476

  2. Family Stigma and Caregiver Burden in Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Perla; Mittelman, Mary S.; Goldstein, Dovrat; Heinik, Jeremia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The stigma experienced by the family members of an individual with a stigmatized illness is defined by 3 dimensions: caregiver stigma, lay public stigma, and structural stigma. Research in the area of mental illness suggests that caregivers' perception of stigma is associated with increased burden. However, the effect of stigma on…

  3. Tristetraprolin family proteins may prevent and treat cardiovascular diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most deadly disease in the U. S., according to the American Heart Association statistics. CVD have been consistently ranked the No. 1 killer since 1900 (except 1918), accounted for 38.5% of all deaths in 2001, and was estimated to cost $368.4 billion in 2004 in t...

  4. Comparison of family history and SNPs for predicting risk of complex disease.

    PubMed

    Do, Chuong B; Hinds, David A; Francke, Uta; Eriksson, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    The clinical utility of family history and genetic tests is generally well understood for simple Mendelian disorders and rare subforms of complex diseases that are directly attributable to highly penetrant genetic variants. However, little is presently known regarding the performance of these methods in situations where disease susceptibility depends on the cumulative contribution of multiple genetic factors of moderate or low penetrance. Using quantitative genetic theory, we develop a model for studying the predictive ability of family history and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based methods for assessing risk of polygenic disorders. We show that family history is most useful for highly common, heritable conditions (e.g., coronary artery disease), where it explains roughly 20%-30% of disease heritability, on par with the most successful SNP models based on associations discovered to date. In contrast, we find that for diseases of moderate or low frequency (e.g., Crohn disease) family history accounts for less than 4% of disease heritability, substantially lagging behind SNPs in almost all cases. These results indicate that, for a broad range of diseases, already identified SNP associations may be better predictors of risk than their family history-based counterparts, despite the large fraction of missing heritability that remains to be explained. Our model illustrates the difficulty of using either family history or SNPs for standalone disease prediction. On the other hand, we show that, unlike family history, SNP-based tests can reveal extreme likelihood ratios for a relatively large percentage of individuals, thus providing potentially valuable adjunctive evidence in a differential diagnosis. PMID:23071447

  5. [Systemic family therapy in the context of Alzheimer's disease: a theoretical and practical approach].

    PubMed

    Cantegreil-Kallen, Inge; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2009-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease has a negative impact on family relationships and may trigger conflicts between the main caregiver and other family members. The systemic approach evidences the impact of dementia on structural and functional characteristics of the family system. Systemic family therapy is especially indicated in crisis situations such as emergency hospitalization or institutionalization of the patient, and when the family members do not agree on when and how to introduce care and support services at the patient's home. In this case, the aim of the intervention is to restore the communication between all the family members in order to find an agreement for the best management of the patients. Since September 2006, systemic family therapy has been offered in the memory clinic of the Broca Hospital to families having a member suffering from Alzheimer's disease. The involvement of the families was accomplished by the direct participation of the patient, main caregiver (spouse), grown-up children and grandchildren. The aim was to obtain an agreement for the access of support and care services at home from all the family members. The intervention was based on a step-by-step procedure and comprehended five sessions. The primary results of a pilot study are presented. PMID:20031507

  6. Is mad cow disease caused by a bacteria?

    PubMed

    Broxmeyer, L

    2004-01-01

    Transmissible spongioform enchephalopathies (TSE's), include bovine spongiform encephalopathy (also called BSE or "mad cow disease"), Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans, and scrapie in sheep. They remain a mystery, their cause hotly debated. But between 1994 and 1996, 12 people in England came down with CJD, the human form of mad cow, and all had eaten beef from suspect cows. Current mad cow diagnosis lies solely in the detection of late appearing "prions", an acronym for hypothesized, gene-less, misfolded proteins, somehow claimed to cause the disease. Yet laboratory preparations of prions contain other things, which could include unidentified bacteria or viruses. Furthermore, the rigors of prion purification alone, might, in and of themselves, have killed the causative virus or bacteria. Therefore, even if samples appear to infect animals, it is impossible to prove that prions are causative. Manuelidis found viral-like particles, which even when separated from prions, were responsible for spongiform STE's. Subsequently, Lasmezas's study showed that 55% of mice injected with cattle BSE, and who came down with disease, had no detectable prions. Still, incredibly, prions, are held as existing TSE dogma and Heino Dringer, who did pioneer work on their nature, candidly predicts "it will turn out that the prion concept is wrong." Many animals that die of spongiform TSE's never show evidence of misfolded proteins, and Dr. Frank Bastian, of Tulane, an authority, thinks the disorder is caused by the bacterial DNA he found in this group of diseases. Recently, Roels and Walravens isolated Mycobacterium bovis it from the brain of a cow with the clinical and histopathological signs of mad cow. Moreover, epidemiologic maps of the origins and peak incidence of BSE in the UK, suggestively match those of England's areas of highest bovine tuberculosis, the Southwest, where Britain's mad cow epidemic began. The neurotoxic potential for cow tuberculosis was shown in pre-1960

  7. The RNase II/RNB family of exoribonucleases: putting the 'Dis' in disease.

    PubMed

    Reis, Filipa P; Pobre, Vânia; Silva, Inês J; Malecki, Michal; Arraiano, Cecília M

    2013-01-01

    Important findings over the last years have shed new light onto the mechanistic details of RNA degradation by members of the RNase II/RNB family of exoribonucleases. Members of this family have been shown to be involved in growth, normal chloroplast biogenesis, mitotic control and cancer. Recently, different publications have linked human orthologs (Dis3 and Dis3L2) to important human diseases. This article describes the structural and biochemical characteristics of members of this family of enzymes, and the physiological implications that relate them with disease. PMID:23776156

  8. Co-existence of classic familial lecithin-cholesterol acyl transferase deficiency and fish eye disease in the same family.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, H S; Ramanarayanan, S; Gupta, A; Bhardwaj, M

    2015-01-01

    We report a family with a rare genetic disorder arising out of mutation in the gene that encodes for the enzyme lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). The proband presented with nephrotic syndrome, hemolytic anemia, cloudy cornea, and dyslipidemia. Kidney biopsy showed certain characteristic features to suggest LCAT deficiency, and the enzyme activity in the serum was undetectable. Mother and younger sister showed corneal opacity and dyslipidemia but no renal or hematological involvement. These two members had a milder manifestation of the disease called fish eye disease. This case is presented to emphasize the importance of taking family history and doing a good clinical examination in patients with nephrotic syndrome and carefully analyze the lipid fractions in these subset of patients. PMID:26664212

  9. Co-existence of classic familial lecithin-cholesterol acyl transferase deficiency and fish eye disease in the same family

    PubMed Central

    Mahapatra, H. S.; Ramanarayanan, S.; Gupta, A.; Bhardwaj, M.

    2015-01-01

    We report a family with a rare genetic disorder arising out of mutation in the gene that encodes for the enzyme lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). The proband presented with nephrotic syndrome, hemolytic anemia, cloudy cornea, and dyslipidemia. Kidney biopsy showed certain characteristic features to suggest LCAT deficiency, and the enzyme activity in the serum was undetectable. Mother and younger sister showed corneal opacity and dyslipidemia but no renal or hematological involvement. These two members had a milder manifestation of the disease called fish eye disease. This case is presented to emphasize the importance of taking family history and doing a good clinical examination in patients with nephrotic syndrome and carefully analyze the lipid fractions in these subset of patients. PMID:26664212

  10. [Perception of mental disease by users of family health strategy].

    PubMed

    Câmara, Mariana Cristina; Pereira, Maria Alice Ornellas

    2010-12-01

    This research aims to identify perceptions of mental disorder by subjects who receive mental health assistance from the Family Health Strategy program. A qualitative method was used in this research, in which 12 subjects participated. Semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis were used to understand perceptions on mental disorder related to the topics: history of life suffering and family conflicts. Mental disorder was related to experiences of poverty, lack of affect and relationships, which increase vulnerability and reveal the scope of the health/illness process. In the reports, the possibility of suicide was often mentioned. The study calls attention to the importance of hearing and taking into consideration concepts elaborated by the subjects who are receiving mental health care. It also indicates the need for organizational guidelines of care that answer to the plurality of demand. PMID:21805884

  11. Familial aggregation in inflammatory bowel disease: Is it genes or environment?

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Tiago; Fiorino, Gionata; Danese, Silvio; Sans, Miquel

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) develops in genetically susceptible individuals due to the influence of environmental factors, leading to an abnormal recognition of microbiota antigens by the innate immune system which triggers an exaggerated immune response and subsequent bowel tissue damage. IBD has been more frequently found in families, an observation that could be due to either genetic, environmental or both types of factors present in these families. In addition to expanding our knowledge on IBD pathogenesis, defining the specific contribution to familial IBD of each one of these factors might have also clinical usefulness. We review the available evidence on familial IBD pathogenesis. PMID:21734779

  12. FamPipe: An Automatic Analysis Pipeline for Analyzing Sequencing Data in Families for Disease Studies.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ren-Hua; Tsai, Wei-Yun; Kang, Chen-Yu; Yao, Po-Ju; Tsai, Hui-Ju; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2016-06-01

    In disease studies, family-based designs have become an attractive approach to analyzing next-generation sequencing (NGS) data for the identification of rare mutations enriched in families. Substantial research effort has been devoted to developing pipelines for automating sequence alignment, variant calling, and annotation. However, fewer pipelines have been designed specifically for disease studies. Most of the current analysis pipelines for family-based disease studies using NGS data focus on a specific function, such as identifying variants with Mendelian inheritance or identifying shared chromosomal regions among affected family members. Consequently, some other useful family-based analysis tools, such as imputation, linkage, and association tools, have yet to be integrated and automated. We developed FamPipe, a comprehensive analysis pipeline, which includes several family-specific analysis modules, including the identification of shared chromosomal regions among affected family members, prioritizing variants assuming a disease model, imputation of untyped variants, and linkage and association tests. We used simulation studies to compare properties of some modules implemented in FamPipe, and based on the results, we provided suggestions for the selection of modules to achieve an optimal analysis strategy. The pipeline is under the GNU GPL License and can be downloaded for free at http://fampipe.sourceforge.net. PMID:27272119

  13. FamPipe: An Automatic Analysis Pipeline for Analyzing Sequencing Data in Families for Disease Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ren-Hua; Tsai, Wei-Yun; Kang, Chen-Yu; Yao, Po-Ju; Tsai, Hui-Ju; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    In disease studies, family-based designs have become an attractive approach to analyzing next-generation sequencing (NGS) data for the identification of rare mutations enriched in families. Substantial research effort has been devoted to developing pipelines for automating sequence alignment, variant calling, and annotation. However, fewer pipelines have been designed specifically for disease studies. Most of the current analysis pipelines for family-based disease studies using NGS data focus on a specific function, such as identifying variants with Mendelian inheritance or identifying shared chromosomal regions among affected family members. Consequently, some other useful family-based analysis tools, such as imputation, linkage, and association tools, have yet to be integrated and automated. We developed FamPipe, a comprehensive analysis pipeline, which includes several family-specific analysis modules, including the identification of shared chromosomal regions among affected family members, prioritizing variants assuming a disease model, imputation of untyped variants, and linkage and association tests. We used simulation studies to compare properties of some modules implemented in FamPipe, and based on the results, we provided suggestions for the selection of modules to achieve an optimal analysis strategy. The pipeline is under the GNU GPL License and can be downloaded for free at http://fampipe.sourceforge.net. PMID:27272119

  14. Polygenic risk score is associated with increased disease risk in 52 Finnish breast cancer families.

    PubMed

    Muranen, Taru A; Mavaddat, Nasim; Khan, Sofia; Fagerholm, Rainer; Pelttari, Liisa; Lee, Andrew; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Easton, Douglas F; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2016-08-01

    The risk of developing breast cancer is increased in women with family history of breast cancer and particularly in families with multiple cases of breast or ovarian cancer. Nevertheless, many women with a positive family history never develop the disease. Polygenic risk scores (PRSs) based on the risk effects of multiple common genetic variants have been proposed for individual risk assessment on a population level. We investigate the applicability of the PRS for risk prediction within breast cancer families. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and a PRS based on 75 common genetic variants in 52 Finnish breast cancer families including 427 genotyped women and pedigree information on ~4000 additional individuals by comparing the affected to healthy family members, as well as in a case-control dataset comprising 1272 healthy population controls and 1681 breast cancer cases with information on family history. Family structure was summarized using the BOADICEA risk prediction model. The PRS was associated with increased disease risk in women with family history of breast cancer as well as in women within the breast cancer families. The odds ratio (OR) for breast cancer within the family dataset was 1.55 [95 % CI 1.26-1.91] per unit increase in the PRS, similar to OR in unselected breast cancer cases of the case-control dataset (1.49 [1.38-1.62]). High PRS-values were informative for risk prediction in breast cancer families, whereas for the low PRS-categories the results were inconclusive. The PRS is informative in women with family history of breast cancer and should be incorporated within pedigree-based clinical risk assessment. PMID:27438779

  15. Genomic architecture of inflammatory bowel disease in five families with multiple affected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Stittrich, Anna B; Ashworth, Justin; Shi, Mude; Robinson, Max; Mauldin, Denise; Brunkow, Mary E; Biswas, Shameek; Kim, Jin-Man; Kwon, Ki-Sun; Jung, Jae U; Galas, David; Serikawa, Kyle; Duerr, Richard H; Guthery, Stephen L; Peschon, Jacques; Hood, Leroy; Roach, Jared C; Glusman, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the best clinical predictor for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is family history. Over 163 sequence variants have been associated with IBD in genome-wide association studies, but they have weak effects and explain only a fraction of the observed heritability. It is expected that additional variants contribute to the genomic architecture of IBD, possibly including rare variants with effect sizes larger than the identified common variants. Here we applied a family study design and sequenced 38 individuals from five families, under the hypothesis that families with multiple IBD-affected individuals harbor one or more risk variants that (i) are shared among affected family members, (ii) are rare and (iii) have substantial effect on disease development. Our analysis revealed not only novel candidate risk variants but also high polygenic risk scores for common known risk variants in four out of the five families. Functional analysis of our top novel variant in the remaining family, a rare missense mutation in the ubiquitin ligase TRIM11, suggests that it leads to increased nuclear factor of kappa light chain enhancer in B-cells (NF-κB) signaling. We conclude that an accumulation of common weak-effect variants accounts for the high incidence of IBD in most, but not all families we analyzed and that a family study design can identify novel rare variants conferring risk for IBD with potentially large effect size, such as the TRIM11 p.H414Y mutation. PMID:27081563

  16. 76 FR 13621 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Family...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Family History and Diamond Blackfan Anemia, DD11- 010,...

  17. Heart-Healthy Families. Helping Your Kids Stay Fit Could Prevent Heart Disease in Their Futures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vagnini, Frederic J.; Malone, Mary Jo

    1994-01-01

    The conditions and habits that lead to heart disease begin early in life. Obesity is the predecessor of a host of cardiovascular-related diseases; childhood obesity poses serious physical and psychological roadblocks for youngsters as they mature. The article suggests how families can adopt fitter lifestyles and instill good eating and exercise…

  18. Familial Prion Disease with Alzheimer Disease-Like Tau Pathology and Clinical Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Jayadev, Suman; Nochlin, David; Poorkaj, Parvoneh; Steinbart, Ellen J.; Mastrianni, James A.; Montine, Thomas J.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Bird, Thomas D.; Leverenz, James B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the Alzheimer disease (AD)-like clinical and pathological features, including marked neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) pathology, of a familial prion disease due to a rare nonsense mutation of the prion gene (PRNP). Methods Longitudinal clinical assessments were available for the proband and her mother. After death, both underwent neuropathological evaluation. PRNP was sequenced after failure to find immunopositive Aβ deposits in the proband and the documentation of prion protein (PrP) immunopositive pathology. Results The proband presented at age 42 years with a 3-year history of progressive short-term memory impairment and depression. Neuropsychological testing found impaired memory performance, with relatively preserved attention and construction. She was diagnosed with AD and died at age 47 years. Neuropathologic evaluation revealed extensive limbic and neocortical NFT formation and neuritic plaques consistent with a Braak stage of VI. The NFTs were immunopositive, with multiple tau antibodies, and electron microscopy revealed paired helical filaments. However, the neuritic plaques were immunonegative for Aβ, whereas immunostaining for PrP was positive. The mother of the proband had a similar presentation, including depression, and had been diagnosed clinically and pathologically as AD. Reevaluation of her brain tissue confirmed similar tau and PrP immunostaining findings. Genetic analysis revealed that both the proband and her mother had a rare PRNP mutation (Q160X) that resulted in the production of truncated PrP. Interpretation We suggest that PRNP mutations that result in a truncation of PrP lead to a prolonged clinical course consistent with a clinical diagnosis of AD and severe AD-like NFTs. PMID:21416485

  19. A distinct pattern of disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms in IBD risk genes in a family with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Barthel, Christiane; Spalinger, Marianne R; Brunner, Jakob; Lang, Silvia; Fried, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard; Scharl, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies have identified more than 160 inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility loci and provided evidence for genetic heritability in disease pathogenesis. Here we describe a case of a 47-year-old White woman suffering from Crohn's disease (CD), who had four children, two with CD and two with a factor V Leiden variation. We analysed the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms in several CD susceptibility genes. SNP analysis was carried out using commercially available assays. The female CD patient had a positive inflammatory bowel disease family history. All of the patients had a mild disease course, without fistulae or symptomatic stenosis. The patient was heterozygous for risk variants of the genes encoding nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) and Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) and a homozygous carrier of both of the identified protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 2 (PTPN2) risk alleles. The CD-affected daughter carried heterozygous risk alleles of the genes encoding TLR5, NOD2 and PTPN2. The son, with the earliest onset of disease in the family at the age of 12 years, was heterozygous for risk alleles of autophagy 16 like 1 (ATG16L1), TLR5, NOD2 and PTPN2. This study reports an interesting pattern of CD-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms in a family with CD. This report clearly supports the observation that genetic variations, especially in genes associated with the innate immune system, contribute to disease onset. PMID:24901824

  20. Optimal management of Alzheimer’s disease patients: Clinical guidelines and family advice

    PubMed Central

    Haberstroh, Julia; Hampel, Harald; Pantel, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Family members provide most of the patient care and administer most of the treatments to patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Family caregivers have an important impact on clinical outcomes, such as quality of life (QoL). As a consequence of this service, family caregivers suffer high rates of psychological and physical illness as well as social and financial burdens. Hence, it is important to involve family caregivers in multimodal treatment settings and provide interventions that are both suitable and specifically tailored to their needs. In recent years, several clinical guidelines have been presented worldwide for evidence-based treatment of AD and other forms of dementia. Most of these guidelines have considered family advice as integral to the optimal clinical management of AD. This article reviews current and internationally relevant guidelines with emphasis on recommendations concerning family advice. PMID:20520788

  1. Family influences on coping processes in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Kliewer, W; Lewis, H

    1995-08-01

    Examined the contribution of parenting and family variables to the general coping processes of 39 children and adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD). In home interviews, parents reported on their child's health history, the coping suggestions they make to their children, their own coping strategies, and family cohesion. Children rated their general coping strategies and level of hope. Partial support was obtained for each of the three models of family influences tested in this study. After accounting for the effects of age, gender, family structure, and type of SCD, children's hope was positively associated with active coping suggestions by parents. Children's active coping was associated with a cohesive family environment, and avoidance coping was predicted by less parental use of restructuring coping, and greater parental use of active coping strategies. Taken together, this study provides evidence for the influence of parental coaching and modeling and the family environment on coping processes in children with SCD. PMID:7666291

  2. Multi-Family Psychoeducational Support Group Therapy for Families with a Member Afflicted with Irreversible Brain Syndrome (Alzheimer's Disease): Report of a Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paley, Evelyn S.; And Others

    Alzheimers Disease (AD), an incurable disability which afflicts older adults, can have devastating emotional consequences for the victim and the family. In an attempt to determine the effectiveness of multifamily psychoeducational support, group therapy (MFPSGT), 22 persons (13 families) from the Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders…

  3. The structural stability of wild-type horse prion protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2011-10-01

    Prion diseases (e.g. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), variant CJD (vCJD), Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS), Fatal Familial Insomnia (FFI) and Kuru in humans, scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or 'mad-cow' disease) and chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cattles) are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans and animals. However, by now there have not been some effective therapeutic approaches or medications to treat all these prion diseases. Rabbits, dogs, and horses are the only mammalian species reported to be resistant to infection from prion diseases isolated from other species. Recently, the β2-α2 loop has been reported to contribute to their protein structural stabilities. The author has found that rabbit prion protein has a strong salt bridge ASP177-ARG163 (like a taut bow string) keeping this loop linked. This paper confirms that this salt bridge also contributes to the structural stability of horse prion protein. Thus, the region of β2-α2 loop might be a potential drug target region. Besides this very important salt bridge, other four important salt bridges GLU196-ARG156-HIS187, ARG156-ASP202 and GLU211-HIS177 are also found to greatly contribute to the structural stability of horse prion protein. Rich databases of salt bridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts for horse prion protein can be found in this paper. PMID:21875155

  4. Molecular dynamics studies on 3D structures of the hydrophobic region PrP(109-136).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiapu; Zhang, Yuanli

    2013-06-01

    Prion diseases, traditionally referred to as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases that affect a wide variety of mammalian species, manifesting as scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (or 'mad-cow' disease) in cattle, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Gerstmann-Strussler-Scheinker syndrome, fatal familial insomnia (FFI), and Kulu in humans, etc. These neurodegenerative diseases are caused by the conversion from a soluble normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into insoluble abnormally folded infectious prions (PrP(Sc)). The hydrophobic region PrP(109-136) controls the formation of diseased prions: the normal PrP(113-120) AGAAAAGA palindrome is an inhibitor/blocker of prion diseases and the highly conserved glycine-xxx-glycine motif PrP(119-131) can inhibit the formation of infectious prion proteins in cells. This article gives detailed reviews on the PrP(109-136) region and presents the studies of its three-dimensional structures and structural dynamics. PMID:23563221

  5. Stress in Families of Children With Neuromuscular Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Jean; Guthrie, Donald

    1979-01-01

    This study compared parents of children with neuromuscular diseases to parents of children with psychiatric diagnoses, using the Questionnaire on Resources and Stress. The groups showed different patterns of stress relating to child care. Within the neuromuscular group, parental stress increased with the severity of the child's illness.…

  6. Relevance of chronic lyme disease to family medicine as a complex multidimensional chronic disease construct: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Borgermans, Liesbeth; Goderis, Geert; Vandevoorde, Jan; Devroey, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease has become a global public health problem and a prototype of an emerging infection. Both treatment-refractory infection and symptoms that are related to Borrelia burgdorferi infection remain subject to controversy. Because of the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, diagnostic criteria, tools and treatment options, the role of autoimmunity to residual or persisting antigens, and the role of a toxin or other bacterial-associated products that are responsible for the symptoms and signs, chronic Lyme disease (CLD) remains a relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role and performance of family medicine in the detection, integrative treatment, and follow-up of CLD are not well studied either. The purpose of this paper is to describe insights into the complexity of CLD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine by means of a systematic literature review. PMID:25506429

  7. Relevance of Chronic Lyme Disease to Family Medicine as a Complex Multidimensional Chronic Disease Construct: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Goderis, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease has become a global public health problem and a prototype of an emerging infection. Both treatment-refractory infection and symptoms that are related to Borrelia burgdorferi infection remain subject to controversy. Because of the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, diagnostic criteria, tools and treatment options, the role of autoimmunity to residual or persisting antigens, and the role of a toxin or other bacterial-associated products that are responsible for the symptoms and signs, chronic Lyme disease (CLD) remains a relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role and performance of family medicine in the detection, integrative treatment, and follow-up of CLD are not well studied either. The purpose of this paper is to describe insights into the complexity of CLD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine by means of a systematic literature review. PMID:25506429

  8. A family with spondyloepimetaphyseal dwarfism: a 'new' dysplasia or Kniest disease with autosomal recessive inheritance?

    PubMed Central

    Farag, T I; Al-Awadi, S A; Hunt, M C; Satyanath, S; Zahran, M; Usha, R; Uma, R

    1987-01-01

    We present an Arab family with some features of Kniest disease. The proband was a six year old boy with rhizomelic short limbed dwarfism, 'dish-like' facies, cleft palate, deafness, and camptodactyly. Most radiological changes were compatible with Kniest disease. Two younger sibs, similarly affected, had died at a few months old, and the pedigree shows strong evidence of autosomal recessive inheritance, unlike previously reported cases of Kniest disease which have shown autosomal dominant inheritance. Images PMID:3681904

  9. Identification of Sandhoff disease in a Thai family: clinical and biochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Sakpichaisakul, Kullasate; Taeranawich, Pairat; Nitiapinyasakul, Achara; Sirisopikun, Todsaporn

    2010-09-01

    Sandhoff disease is a GM2 gangliosidosis that is rare in Thailand. The authors report a Thai family with two children known to have infantile form of Sandhoff disease. The index case exhibited mitral valve prolapse with mitral regurgitation as an early sign, which is a rare presentation in Sandhoff disease. Thereafter the patient had developmental regression, startle reaction, and cherry red spots. The diagnosis was confirmed by biochemical analysis. PMID:20873083

  10. Anterior Urethral Stricture Disease Negatively Impacts the Quality of Life of Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Weese, Jonathan R.; Eswara, Jairam R.; Marshall, Stephen D.; Chang, Andrew J.; Vetter, Joel; Brandes, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To quantify the quality of life (QoL) distress experienced by immediate family members of patients with urethral stricture via a questionnaire given prior to definitive urethroplasty. The emotional, social, and physical effects of urethral stricture disease on the QoL of family members have not been previously described. Materials and Methods. A questionnaire was administered prospectively to an immediate family member of 51 patients undergoing anterior urethroplasty by a single surgeon (SBB). The survey was comprised of twelve questions that addressed the emotional, social, and physical consequences experienced as a result of their loved one. Results. Of the 51 surveyed family members, most were female (92.2%), lived in the same household (86.3%), and slept in the same room as the patient (70.6%). Respondents experienced sleep disturbances (56.9%) and diminished social lives (43.1%). 82.4% felt stressed by the patient's surgical treatment, and 83.9% (26/31) felt that their intimacy was negatively impacted. Conclusions. Urethral stricture disease has a significant impact on the family members of those affected. These effects may last decades and include sleep disturbance, decreased social interactions, emotional stress, and impaired sexual intimacy. Treatment of urethral stricture disease should attempt to mitigate the impact of the disease on family members as well as the patient. PMID:27034658

  11. Characteristics of familial aggregation in early-onset Alzheimer`s disease: Evidence of subgroups

    SciTech Connect

    Campion, D.; Martinez, M.; Babron, M.C.

    1995-06-19

    Characteristics of familial aggregation of Alzheimer`s Disease were studied in 92 families ascertained through a clinically diagnosed proband with an onset below age 60 years. In each family data were systematically collected on the sibships of the proband, of his father, and of his mother. A total of 926 relatives were included and 81% of the living relatives (i.e., 251 individuals) were directly examined. The estimated cumulative risk among first degree relatives was equal to 35% by age 89 years (95% confidence interval 22 to 47%). This result does not support the hypothesis that an autosomal dominant gene, fully penetrant by age 90 years, is segregating within all these pedigrees. Despite the fact that all probands were selected for an onset before age 60 years it was shown that two types of families could be delineated with respect to age at onset among affected relatives: all secondary cases with an onset below age 60 years were contributed by a particular group of families (type 1 families), whereas all secondary cases with an onset after age 60 years were contributed by another group of families (type 2 families). Although genetic interpretation of these findings is not straightforward, they support the hypothesis of etiologic heterogeneity in the determinism of early-onset Alzheimer`s disease. 58 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. A population-based study of familial Alzheimer disease: Linkage to chromosomes 14, 19, and 21

    SciTech Connect

    Duijn, C.M. van; Hofman, A.; Hendriks, L.; Cruts, M.; Van Broeckhoven, C.; Backhovens, H.; Wehnert, A. |; Farrer, L.A.

    1994-10-01

    Linkage of Alzheimer disease (AD) to DNA markers on chromosomes 14, 19, and 21 was studied in 10 families in which the disease was apparently inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Families were derived from a Dutch population-based epidemiologic study of early-onset AD. Although in all probands the onset of AD was at or before age 65 years, the mean age at onset was after age 65 years in four families (referred to as {open_quotes}LOAD{close_quotes}). Among the six families with early-onset AD (referred to as {open_quotes}EOAD,{close_quotes} i.e., mean age of onset of AD of relatives was at or before age 65 years), conclusive linkage to 14q24.3 was found in one family with a very early onset (around 47 years), while linkage to the same region was excluded in two other families. For the LOAD families, predominantly negative lod scores were obtained, and the overall lod score excluded linkage to chromosome 14. The results with markers on chromosome 19 and chromosome 21 were not conclusive for EOAD and LOAD. The findings of our study confirm genetic heterogeneity within familial EOAD. 50 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) family proteins: New therapeutic targets in major diseases.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Mathur, Shruti; Manjula, Ramu; Tripathi, Shailesh

    2016-06-01

    The bromodomains and extra-terminal domain (BET) family proteins recognize acetylated chromatin through their bromodomains (BDs) and help in regulating gene expression. BDs are chromatin 'readers': by interacting with acetylated lysines on the histone tails, they recruit chromatin-regulating proteins on the promoter region to regulate gene expression and repression. Extensive efforts have been employed by scientific communities worldwide to identify and develop potential inhibitors of BET family BDs to regulate protein expression by inhibiting acetylated histone (H3/H4) interactions. Several small molecule inhibitors have been reported, which not only have high affinity but also have high specificity to BET BDs. These developments make BET family proteins an important therapeutic targets for major diseases such as cancer, neurological disorders, obesity and inflammation. Here, we review and discuss the structural biology of BET family BDs and their applications in major diseases. PMID:27240990

  14. Inpatient detection of cardiac-inherited disease: the impact of improving family history taking

    PubMed Central

    Waddell-Smith, Kathryn E; Donoghue, Tom; Oates, Stephanie; Graham, Amanda; Crawford, Jackie; Stiles, Martin K; Aitken, Andrew; Skinner, Jonathan R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives ‘Idiopathic’ cardiac conditions such as dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and resuscitated sudden cardiac death (RSCD) may be familial. We suspected that inpatient cardiology services fail to recognise this. Our objective was to compare diagnostic value of family histories recorded by inpatient cardiology teams with a multigenerational family tree obtained by specially trained allied professionals. Methods 2 experienced cardiology nurses working in 2 tertiary adult cardiac units were trained in cardiac-inherited diseases and family history (FHx) taking, and established as regional coordinators for a National Cardiac Inherited Disease Registry. Over 6 months they sought ‘idiopathic’ cardiology inpatients with conditions with a possible familial basis, reviewed the FHx in the clinical records and pursued a minimum 3-generation family tree for syncope, young sudden death and cardiac disease (full FHx). Results 37 patients (22 males) were selected: mean age 51 years (range 15–79). Admission presentations included (idiopathic) RSCD (14), dyspnoea or heart failure (11), ventricular tachycardia (2), other (10). 3 patients had already volunteered their familial diagnosis to the admitting team. FHx was incompletely elicited in 17 (46%) and absent in 20 (54%). 29 patients (78%) provided a full FHx to the coordinator; 12 of which (41%) were strongly consistent with a diagnosis of a cardiac-inherited disease (DCM 7, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 3, long QT 1, left ventricular non-compaction 1). Overall, a familial diagnostic rate rose from 3/37(8%) to 12/37 (32%). Conclusions Adult cardiology inpatient teams are poor at recording FHx and need to be reminded of its powerful diagnostic value. PMID:26925241

  15. Clinical features of early onset, familial Alzheimer`s disease linked to chromosome 14

    SciTech Connect

    Mullan, M.; Bennett, C.; Figueredo, C.; Crawford, F.

    1995-02-27

    Early onset familial Alzheimer`s disease (AD) has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Two genes are responsible for the majority of cases of this subtype of AD. Mutations in the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein ({beta}APP) gene on chromosome 21 have been shown to completely cosegregate with the disease. We and others have previously described the clinical features of families with {beta}APP mutations at the codon 717 locus in an attempt to define the phenotype associated with a valine to isoleucine (Val {r_arrow} Ile) or a valine to glycine (Val {r_arrow} Gly) change. More recently, a second locus for very early onset disease has been localized to chromosome 14. The results of linkage studies in some families suggesting linkage to both chromosomes have been explained by the suggestion of a second (centromeric) locus on chromosome 21. Here we report the clinical features and genetic analysis of a British pedigree (F74) with early onset AD in which neither the {beta}APP locus nor any other chromosome 21 locus segregates with the disease, but in which good evidence is seen for linkage on the long arm of chromosome 14. In particular we report marker data suggesting that the chromosome 14 disease locus is close to D14S43 and D14S77. Given the likelihood that F74 represents a chromosome 14 linked family, we describe the clinical features and make a limited clinical comparison with the {beta}APP717 Val {r_arrow} Ile and {beta}APP717 Val {r_arrow} Gly encoded families that have been previously described. We conclude that although several previously reported clinical features occur to excess in early onset familial AD, no single clinical feature demarcates either the chromosome 14 or {beta}APP codon 717 mutated families except mean age of onset. 52 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Exploring the service and support needs of families with early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Allison K; Anderson, Keith A; Acocks, Sara

    2014-11-01

    Although often cast as a disease of later life, a growing number of people are being diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in their 50s and 60s. Early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) poses special challenges and needs for individuals and their caregivers, such as employment and access to services. In this cross-sectional study, the researchers surveyed 81 (N = 81) family caregivers to individuals with EOAD to identify service and support usage and need. Descriptive analyses revealed that families utilized a range of formal services (eg, adult day) and informal support from family and friends. In terms of challenges and needs, participants indicated that they struggled most with employment, benefits, and financial issues. Although most caregivers felt that they were coping well, they also indicated that their needs were not well understood by service providers and the public. These findings highlight the need to better understand and respond to the specific issues surrounding EOAD. PMID:25392308

  17. Papular acantholytic dyskeratosis of the vulva associated with familial Hailey-Hailey disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, W Y; Ng, E; Hale, C; Hu, S; Pomeranz, M K

    2016-08-01

    Papular acantholytic dyskeratosis (PAD) of the vulva is a rare, chronic disorder first described in 1984. It presents in young women as white to skin-coloured smooth papules over the vulva, which are persistent but asymptomatic. Histologically, there is hyperkeratosis and focal parakeratosis with acantholytic and dyskeratotic cells forming corps ronds and grains, placing PAD within Ackerman's spectrum of focal acantholytic dyskeratoses with Hailey-Hailey disease (HHD) and Darier disease. There have been 17 previous reports of PAD of the vulva, to our knowledge. Only one demonstrated a familial pattern, and none of the cases was associated with a family history of HHD. This is the first report of PAD and HHD in a single family, suggesting that PAD and HHD lie on a spectrum of disease and are genetically linked. PMID:27028372

  18. Polyphenols as Modulators of Aquaporin Family in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentini, Diana; Zambonin, Laura; Vieceli Dalla Sega, Francesco; Hrelia, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Polyphenols are bioactive molecules widely distributed in fruits, vegetables, cereals, and beverages. Polyphenols in food sources are extensively studied for their role in the maintenance of human health and in the protection against development of chronic/degenerative diseases. Polyphenols act mainly as antioxidant molecules, protecting cell constituents against oxidative damage. The enormous number of polyphenolic compounds leads to huge different mechanisms of action not fully understood. Recently, some evidence is emerging about the role of polyphenols, such as curcumin, pinocembrin, resveratrol, and quercetin, in modulating the activity of some aquaporin (AQP) isoforms. AQPs are integral, small hydrophobic water channel proteins, extensively expressed in many organs and tissues, whose major function is to facilitate the transport of water or glycerol over cell plasma membranes. Here we summarize AQP physiological functions and report emerging evidence on the implication of these proteins in a number of pathophysiological processes. In particular, this review offers an overview about the role of AQPs in brain, eye, skin diseases, and metabolic syndrome, focusing on the ability of polyphenols to modulate AQP expression. This original analysis can contribute to elucidating some peculiar effects exerted by polyphenols and can lead to the development of an innovative potential preventive/therapeutic strategy. PMID:26346093

  19. Mutations of von Willebrand factor gene in families with von Willebrand disease in the Aland Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.P.; Blombaeck, M.; Anvret, M. ); Nyman, D. )

    1993-09-01

    Patients with von Willebrand disease in four families in the Aland Islands, including the original family that was described in 1926 by the Finnish physician von Willebrand, were screened for mutations in the Swedish hot-spot' regions (exons 18, 28, 32, 43, and 45) of the von Willebrand factor gene. One cytosine deletion in exon 18 was detected in each of these families. Linkage analysis and genealogical studies suggest that the deletion present in these four families probably has an origin in common with the mutations in the Swedish patients. Apart from the deletion in exon 18, two close transitions (G [yields] A at S1263 and C [yields] T at P1266) in exon 28 on the same chromosome were identified in one individual who married into the original family and in his two children. The transitions could be due to a recombination between the von Willebrand factor gene and its pseudogene. 24 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. The APOE locus advances disease progression in late onset familial Alzheimer`s disease but is not causative

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, F.; Bennett, C.; Osborne, A.

    1994-09-01

    An association has been observed in several independent data sets between late onset Alzheimer`s disease (AD) and the APOE locus on chromosomes 19. We have examined the genotype in family history positive (FHP) and family history negative (FHN) cases and find a distortion of the APOE allele frequencies in accord with previous studies. However, when we examined the allele distribution of the at-risk siblings of the FHP group we found an excess of the {epsilon}4 allele which also differs significantly from historic controls but not from the affected siblings. The age distribution of the affected and unaffected siblings was similar, suggesting that the allelic frequency distortion in the unaffected siblings was not due to their being below the mean age of onset. Lod score linkage analysis, with age dependent onset and nonstringent specification of the genetic parameters, did not suggest linkage to the APOE locus. Furthermore, an analysis of variance of the age of disease-free survival suggested that APOE genotype contributes a small fraction of the total variance, indicating that the APOE locus is a poor predictor of disease-free survival time within late onset families. We suggest that the APOE locus enhances the rate of progression of the disease in otherwise predisposed individuals and that variation at this locus is not able in and of itself to cause this disease.

  1. The prion-ZIP connection: From cousins to partners in iron uptake.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neena; Asthana, Abhishek; Baksi, Shounak; Desai, Vilok; Haldar, Swati; Hari, Sahi; Tripathi, Ajai K

    2015-01-01

    Converging observations from disparate lines of inquiry are beginning to clarify the cause of brain iron dyshomeostasis in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), a neurodegenerative condition associated with the conversion of prion protein (PrP(C)), a plasma membrane glycoprotein, from α-helical to a β-sheet rich PrP-scrapie (PrP(Sc)) isoform. Biochemical evidence indicates that PrP(C) facilitates cellular iron uptake by functioning as a membrane-bound ferrireductase (FR), an activity necessary for the transport of iron across biological membranes through metal transporters. An entirely different experimental approach reveals an evolutionary link between PrP(C) and the Zrt, Irt-like protein (ZIP) family, a group of proteins involved in the transport of zinc, iron, and manganese across the plasma membrane. Close physical proximity of PrP(C) with certain members of the ZIP family on the plasma membrane and increased uptake of extracellular iron by cells that co-express PrP(C) and ZIP14 suggest that PrP(C) functions as a FR partner for certain members of this family. The connection between PrP(C) and ZIP proteins therefore extends beyond common ancestry to that of functional cooperation. Here, we summarize evidence supporting the facilitative role of PrP(C) in cellular iron uptake, and implications of this activity on iron metabolism in sCJD brains. PMID:26689487

  2. The prion-ZIP connection: From cousins to partners in iron uptake

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Neena; Asthana, Abhishek; Baksi, Shounak; Desai, Vilok; Haldar, Swati; Hari, Sahi; Tripathi, Ajai K

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Converging observations from disparate lines of inquiry are beginning to clarify the cause of brain iron dyshomeostasis in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), a neurodegenerative condition associated with the conversion of prion protein (PrPC), a plasma membrane glycoprotein, from α-helical to a β-sheet rich PrP-scrapie (PrPSc) isoform. Biochemical evidence indicates that PrPC facilitates cellular iron uptake by functioning as a membrane-bound ferrireductase (FR), an activity necessary for the transport of iron across biological membranes through metal transporters. An entirely different experimental approach reveals an evolutionary link between PrPC and the Zrt, Irt-like protein (ZIP) family, a group of proteins involved in the transport of zinc, iron, and manganese across the plasma membrane. Close physical proximity of PrPC with certain members of the ZIP family on the plasma membrane and increased uptake of extracellular iron by cells that co-express PrPC and ZIP14 suggest that PrPC functions as a FR partner for certain members of this family. The connection between PrPC and ZIP proteins therefore extends beyond common ancestry to that of functional cooperation. Here, we summarize evidence supporting the facilitative role of PrPC in cellular iron uptake, and implications of this activity on iron metabolism in sCJD brains. PMID:26689487

  3. Alcoholic patients' response to their disease: perspective of patients and family

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Rodríguez, Joaquín Salvador; Guerra-Martín, María Dolores; Domínguez-Sánchez, Isabel; Lima-Serrano, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to know the perspective of alcoholic patients and their families about the behavioral characteristics of the disease, identifying the issues to modify the addictive behavior and seek rehabilitation. Method: ethnographic research using interpretative anthropology, via participant observation and a detailed interview with alcoholic patients and their families, members of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Alanon in Spain. Results: development of disease behavior in alcoholism is complex due to the issues of interpreting the consumption model as a disease sign. Patients often remain long periods in the pre-contemplation stage, delaying the search for assistance, which often arrives without them accepting the role of patient. This constrains the recovery and is related to the social thought on alcoholism and self-stigma on alcoholics and their families, leading them to deny the disease, condition of the patient, and help. The efforts of self-help groups and the involvement of health professionals is essential for recovery. Conclusion: understanding how disease behavior develops, and the change process of addictive behavior, it may be useful for patients, families and health professionals, enabling them to act in a specific way at each stage. PMID:26626009

  4. Analysis of familial aggregation of atopic eczema and other atopic diseases by ODDS RATIO regression models.

    PubMed

    Diepgen, T L; Blettner, M

    1996-05-01

    In order to determine the relative importance of genetics and the environment on the occurrence of atopic diseases, we investigated the familial aggregation of atopic eczema, allergic rhinitis, and allergic asthma in the relatives of 426 patients with atopic eczema and 628 subjects with no history of eczema (5,136 family members in total). Analyses were performed by regression models for odds ratios (OR) allowing us to estimate OR for the familial aggregation and simultaneously to adjust for other covariates. Three models were analyzed assuming that the OR i) is the same among any two members of a family, ii) depends on different familial constellations, i.e., whether the pairs are siblings, parents, or parent/sibling pairs, and iii) is not the same between the father and the children and between the mother and the children. The OR of familial aggregation for atopic eczema was 2.16 (95% confidence interval (95%-CI) 1.58-2.96) if no distinction was made between the degree of relationship. Further analyses within the members of the family showed a high OR among siblings (OR = 3.86; 95%-CI 2.10-7.09), while the OR between parents and siblings was only 1.90 (95%-CI 1.31-2.97). Only for atopic eczema was the familial aggregation between fathers and siblings (ms: OR = 2.66; fs: OR = 1.29). This can be explained by stronger maternal heritability, shared physical environment of mother and child, or environmental events that affect the fetus in utero. Since for all atopic diseases a stronger correlation was found between siblings than between siblings and parents, our study indicates that environmental factors, especially during childhood, seem to explain the recently observed increased frequencies of atopic diseases. PMID:8618061

  5. Familial pheochromocytoma, hypercalcemia, and von Hippel-Lindau disease. A ten year study of a large family.

    PubMed

    Atuk, N O; McDonald, T; Wood, T; Carpenter, J T; Walzak, M P; Donaldson, M; Gillenwater, J Y

    1979-05-01

    Long-term epidemiological and laboratory studies were carried out in a kindred with familial pheochromocytoma associated with von Hippel-Lindau disease. Thirteen members were affected by the syndrome and the trait appears to be transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion. Of 13 patients, 7 had pheochromocytoma alone. Of the remaining six patients, one had pheochromocytoma combined with von Hippel-Lindau disease, four had pheochromocytoma with retinal disease only, and a single patient had a retinal lesion without pheochromocytoma. In four patients, pheochromocytoma antedated the development of retinal lesions. Ten members also had mild hypercalcemia without accompanying elevations of PTH in the 4 patients in whom this was determined. In all, hypercalcemia was corrected with removal of tumors, and no patient had a return of hypercalcemia in the absence of recurrent increases in urinary catecholamines. The clinical presentations in 12 patients varied markedly, as did their urinary excretion rates of norepinephrine, epinephrine and their metabolites. However, an analysis of the data revealed significant correlations not previously described between the urinary excretion of free catecholamines (norepinephrine plus epinephrine), blood pressure, the free catecholamine content of the tumor and the age of the patient. Urinary excretion of free norepinephrine plus epinephrine appear to be decreased with advancing age (p less than 0.001). Both systolic and diastolic blood pressures and the age of the patient were inversely correlated (p less than 0.01). A significant inverse relationship between the tumor content of free catecholamines and the age of the patients was, although to a lesser degree, also present (p less than 0.05). As a whole, the size of the tumors and their norepinephrine content were not correlated. We present a concept that, in familial pheochromocytoma, the metabolism of catecholamines is altered by the process of aging, and that this change modifies the

  6. The Impact of Familial Predisposition to Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease on Childhood Obesity.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Louise Aas; Nielsen, Tenna Ruest Haarmark; Holm, Jens-Christian

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity has reached alarming rates world-wide. The aetiology seems to be an interplay between genetic and environmental factors, and a surrogate measure of this complex interaction is suggested as familial predisposition. Familial predisposition to obesity and related cardiovascular disease (CVD) complications constitute the presence of obesity and/or obesity-related complications in primarily blood-related family members. The approaches of its measurement and applicability vary, and the evidence especially of its influence on obesity and obesity treatment in childhood is limited. Studies have linked a familial predisposition of obesity, CVD (hypertension, dyslipidaemia and thromboembolic events), and type 2 diabetes mellitus to BMI as well as other adiposity measures in children, suggesting degrees of familial aggregation of metabolic derangements. A pattern of predispositions arising from mothers, parents or grandparents as being most influential have been found, but further comprehensive studies are needed in order to specify the exact implications of familial predisposition. In the scope of childhood obesity this article reviews the current literature regarding familial predisposition to obesity and obesity-related complications, and how these familial predispositions may impact obesity in the offspring. PMID:26465142

  7. Familial impact and coping with child heart disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alun C; Frydenberg, Erica; Liang, Rachel P-T; Higgins, Rosemary O; Murphy, Barbara M

    2015-04-01

    Families of children with congenital heart disease (CHD) cope differently depending on individual and familial factors beyond the severity of the child's condition. Recent research has shifted from an emphasis on the psychopathology of family functioning to a focus on the resilience of families in coping with the challenges presented by a young child's condition. The increasing number of studies on the relationship between psychological adaptation, parental coping and parenting practices and quality of life in families of children with CHD necessitates an in-depth re-exploration. The present study reviews published literature in this area over the past 25 years to generate evidence to inform clinical practice, particularly to better target parent and family interventions designed to enhance family coping. Twenty-five studies were selected for inclusion, using the PRISMA guidelines. Thematic analysis identified a number of themes including psychological distress and well-being, gender differences in parental coping, and variable parenting practices and a number of subthemes. There is general agreement in the literature that families who have fewer psychosocial resources and lower levels of support may be at risk of higher psychological distress and lower well-being over time, for both parent and the child. Moreover, familial factors such as cohesiveness and adaptive parental coping strategies are necessary for successful parental adaptation to CHD in their child. The experiences, needs and ways of coping in families of children with CHD are diverse and multi-faceted. A holistic approach to early psychosocial intervention should target improved adaptive coping and enhanced productive parenting practices in this population. This should lay a strong foundation for these families to successfully cope with future uncertainties and challenges at various phases in the trajectory of the child's condition. PMID:25618163

  8. Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies: a family of etiologically complex diseases--a review.

    PubMed

    Bounias, Michel; Purdey, Mark

    2002-10-01

    The upsurge of 'mad cow disease' with its human implications has raised the problem of the etiological mechanisms and the similarities or differences underlying the family of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Structural properties of prions are reviewed in connection with their natural distribution and functions, factors of transmissibility and mechanisms of pathogenicity. Polymorphism is examined in relation to disease phenotype variants. The role of oxidative factors is emphasized, while raising complexity about the role of copper ions. Further investigation directions are suggested. PMID:12389776

  9. Linkage analyses of chromosome 6 loci, including HLA, in familial aggregations of Crohn disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hugot, J.P.; Laurent-Puig, P.; Gower-Rousseau, C.; Caillat-Zueman, S.; Beaugerie, L.; Dupas, J.L.; Van Gossum, A.; Bonaiti-Pellie, C.; Cortot, A.

    1994-08-15

    Segregation analyses of familial aggregations of Crohn disease have provided consistent results pointing to the involvement of a predisposing gene with a recessive mode of inheritance. Although extensively investigated, the role played by human leucocyte antigen (HLA) genes in this inflammatory bowel disease remains elusive and the major histocompatibility complex is a candidate region for the mapping of the Crohn disease susceptibility gene. A total of 25 families with multiple cases of Crohn disease was genotyped for HLA DRB1 and for 16 highly polymorphic loci evenly distributed on chromosome 6. The data were subjected to linkage analysis using the lod score method. Neither individual nor combined lod scores for any family and for any locus tested reached values suggesting linkage or genetic heterogeneity. The Crohn disease predisposing locus was excluded from the whole chromosome 6 with lod scores less than -2. It was excluded from the major histocompatibility complex and from 91% of the chromosome 6 genetic map with lod scores less than -4. The major recessive gene involved in genetic predisposition to Crohn disease does not reside on the major histocompatibility complex nor on any locus mapping to chromosome 6. 37 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Theoretical model of prion propagation: a misfolded protein induces misfolding.

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Edyta; Boniecki, Michal; Kolinski, Andrzej; Piela, Lucjan

    2005-05-31

    There is a hypothesis that dangerous diseases such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy, Creutzfeldt-Jakob, Alzheimer's, fatal familial insomnia, and several others are induced by propagation of wrong or misfolded conformations of some vital proteins. If for some reason the misfolded conformations were acquired by many such protein molecules it might lead to a "conformational" disease of the organism. Here, a theoretical model of the molecular mechanism of such a conformational disease is proposed, in which a metastable (or misfolded) form of a protein induces a similar misfolding of another protein molecule (conformational autocatalysis). First, a number of amino acid sequences composed of 32 aa have been designed that fold rapidly into a well defined native-like alpha-helical conformation. From a large number of such sequences a subset of 14 had a specific feature of their energy landscape, a well defined local energy minimum (higher than the global minimum for the alpha-helical fold) corresponding to beta-type structure. Only one of these 14 sequences exhibited a strong autocatalytic tendency to form a beta-sheet dimer capable of further propagation of protofibril-like structure. Simulations were done by using a reduced, although of high resolution, protein model and the replica exchange Monte Carlo sampling procedure. PMID:15911770

  11. Theoretical model of prion propagation: A misfolded protein induces misfolding

    PubMed Central

    Małolepsza, Edyta; Boniecki, Michał; Kolinski, Andrzej; Piela, Lucjan

    2005-01-01

    There is a hypothesis that dangerous diseases such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy, Creutzfeldt-Jakob, Alzheimer's, fatal familial insomnia, and several others are induced by propagation of wrong or misfolded conformations of some vital proteins. If for some reason the misfolded conformations were acquired by many such protein molecules it might lead to a “conformational” disease of the organism. Here, a theoretical model of the molecular mechanism of such a conformational disease is proposed, in which a metastable (or misfolded) form of a protein induces a similar misfolding of another protein molecule (conformational autocatalysis). First, a number of amino acid sequences composed of 32 aa have been designed that fold rapidly into a well defined native-like α-helical conformation. From a large number of such sequences a subset of 14 had a specific feature of their energy landscape, a well defined local energy minimum (higher than the global minimum for the α-helical fold) corresponding to β-type structure. Only one of these 14 sequences exhibited a strong autocatalytic tendency to form a β-sheet dimer capable of further propagation of protofibril-like structure. Simulations were done by using a reduced, although of high resolution, protein model and the replica exchange Monte Carlo sampling procedure. PMID:15911770

  12. Interleukin 12 (IL-12) family cytokines: Role in immune pathogenesis and treatment of CNS autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lin; He, Chang; Nair, Lekha; Yeung, Justine; Egwuagu, Charles E

    2015-10-01

    Cytokines play crucial roles in coordinating the activities of innate and adaptive immune systems. In response to pathogen recognition, innate immune cells secrete cytokines that inform the adaptive immune system about the nature of the pathogen and instruct naïve T cells to differentiate into the appropriate T cell subtypes required to clear the infection. These include Interleukins, Interferons and other immune-regulatory cytokines that exhibit remarkable functional redundancy and pleiotropic effects. The focus of this review, however, is on the enigmatic Interleukin 12 (IL-12) family of cytokines. This family of cytokines plays crucial roles in shaping immune responses during antigen presentation and influence cell-fate decisions of differentiating naïve T cells. They also play essential roles in regulating functions of a variety of effector cells, making IL-12 family cytokines important therapeutic targets or agents in a number of inflammatory diseases, such as the CNS autoimmune diseases, uveitis and multiple sclerosis. PMID:25796985

  13. Feasibility of recruiting families into a heart disease prevention program based on dietary patterns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Offspring of parents with a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) inherit a similar genetic profile and share diet and lifestyle behaviors. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of recruiting families at risk of CVD to a dietary prevention program, determine the changes in diet achieved, an...

  14. Supported or stigmatised? The impact of sickle cell disease on families.

    PubMed

    Keane, Brigid; Defoe, Lindy

    2016-06-01

    Caring for a child with a chronic medical condition can be stressful for parents and likely to have an impact on family dynamics. In a low-prevalence region, services to support parents of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are limited and consequently parents can feel isolated. We explored this issue in a service evaluation, using semi-structured questionnaires to interview twelve families who had a child with SCD. Our analysis outlines the impact that this condition has on family life and the importance that cultural values and perspectives have in learning to deal with the issues involved. We conclude that families would benefit from greater multidisciplinary support on a regular basis. PMID:27443031

  15. Relationship of lipoprotein(a) levels to physical activity and family history of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Martín, S; Elosua, R; Covas, M I; Pavesi, M; Vila, J; Marrugat, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the association of physical activity with serum lipoprotein(a) [La(a)] levels in individuals according to whether they had a family history of coronary heart disease (CHD). METHODS: Lp(a) levels in 332 healthy Spanish men aged 20 to 60 years were measured. Physical activity and family history of CHD were assessed. RESULTS: For men with a family history of CHD, the odds ratio for Lp(a) levels above the median value was 0.13 (95% confidence interval = 0.03, 0.50) in very active men (energy expended in physical activity > 300 kcal/day) compared with active men (energy expended in physical activity < 300 kcal/day). CONCLUSIONS: Regular daily physical activity in individuals with a family history of CHD could be useful for controlling Lp(a) levels. PMID:10076490

  16. [Announcing the diagnosis of a genetic disease and psychological care of the patient and family].

    PubMed

    Lacombe, Didier; Toussaint, Eva

    2007-03-01

    Announcing a diagnostic of genetic disease to a child is for parents such a pain, also brutal and destructive. Even if the physician chooses the best moment, the right words, it's a sign of a rupture, a real disaster combined with physical feeling of bascule and temporo-spacial confusion. It's a beach in their flesh, a lost of identity, a profound norcissic failure. In addition this feature is associated with a high feeling of guilt failure with sometimes non logical imaginary structures. All those testimonies confirm that the identification of a genetic disease is a key in the family history. Announcing a diagnostic almost stay in mind as a bad new enduring a period of life when disease was absent or undiagnosed. Even if previews complementary investigations were done, the revelation still stays a mess. Also the diagnosis could be a relief the beginning of a new life with possibility of rebuilding. Regarding genetic diseases, it's the whole family that is concerned. The patients will deal with the diseases daily sometimes invisible by the circle. After the announcement of the diagnosis, the parents will have to structure that life according to the changes that the diseases rags in the family Brothers and sisters will have to find their place compared to this affetted brother or sister. In the some time as finding answers too many questions. The grand parents may feel guilty and wonder how to help the parents. The main part to this psychological approach in genetic diseases is to give each member of the family his role. PMID:17546763

  17. Family Caregiving for Immigrant Seniors Living With Heart Disease and Stroke: Chinese Canadian Perspective.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lichun Willa; McDaniel, Susan A

    2015-01-01

    Heart disease and stroke are two leading causes of death and disability among older Canadians. Family support and caregiving are crucial to the positive functional recovery and psychological well-being of heart disease and stroke survivors. Based on focus groups and individual interviews with Chinese family caregivers in the Canadian province of Ontario, we explored the caregiver's experience, including the challenges, needs, and service gaps in providing care for immigrant seniors with heart disease and stroke. We found that caregiving practices and the strategies used to cope with caregiving challenges varied by gender, ethnicity, age, and length of migration. We provide recommendations for narrowing the gaps in caregiving at the end of the article. PMID:25985230

  18. Analysis of POFUT1 Gene Mutation in a Chinese Family with Dowling-Degos Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingfei; Li, Yi; Liu, Hong; Fu, Xi'an; Yu, Yiongxiang; Yu, Gongqi; Wang, Chuan; Bao, Fangfang; Liany, Herty; Wang, Zhenzhen; Shi, Zhongxiang; Zhang, Dizhan; Zhou, Guizhi; Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Furen

    2014-01-01

    Dowling-Degos disease (DDD) is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by reticular pigmented anomaly mainly affecting flexures. Though KRT5 has been identified to be the causal gene of DDD, the heterogeneity of this disease was displayed: for example, POFUT1 and POGLUT1 were recently identified and confirmed to be additional pathogenic genes of DDD. To identify other DDD causative genes, we performed genome-wide linkage and exome sequencing analyses in a multiplex Chinese DDD family, in which the KRT5 mutation was absent. Only a novel 1-bp deletion (c.246+5delG) in POFUT1 was found. No other novel mutation or this deletion was detected in POFUT1 in a second DDD family and a sporadic DDD case by Sanger Sequencing. The result shows the genetic-heterogeneity and complexity of DDD and will contribute to the further understanding of DDD genotype/phenotype correlations and to the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:25157627

  19. A Novel Approach for Identifying Causal Models of Complex Diseases from Family Data

    PubMed Central

    Park, Leeyoung; Kim, Ju H.

    2015-01-01

    Causal models including genetic factors are important for understanding the presentation mechanisms of complex diseases. Familial aggregation and segregation analyses based on polygenic threshold models have been the primary approach to fitting genetic models to the family data of complex diseases. In the current study, an advanced approach to obtaining appropriate causal models for complex diseases based on the sufficient component cause (SCC) model involving combinations of traditional genetics principles was proposed. The probabilities for the entire population, i.e., normal–normal, normal–disease, and disease–disease, were considered for each model for the appropriate handling of common complex diseases. The causal model in the current study included the genetic effects from single genes involving epistasis, complementary gene interactions, gene–environment interactions, and environmental effects. Bayesian inference using a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm (MCMC) was used to assess of the proportions of each component for a given population lifetime incidence. This approach is flexible, allowing both common and rare variants within a gene and across multiple genes. An application to schizophrenia data confirmed the complexity of the causal factors. An analysis of diabetes data demonstrated that environmental factors and gene–environment interactions are the main causal factors for type II diabetes. The proposed method is effective and useful for identifying causal models, which can accelerate the development of efficient strategies for identifying causal factors of complex diseases. PMID:25701286

  20. Family History

    MedlinePlus

    Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, ... as heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but ...

  1. Dynamics of vitamin D in patients with mild or inactive inflammatory bowel disease and their families

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background 25(OH) vitamin D levels may be low in patients with moderately or severely active inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD: Crohn’s disease and Idiopathic Ulcerative Colitis) but this is less clear in patients with mild or inactive IBD. Furthermore there is limited information of any family influence on 25(OH) vitamin D levels in IBD. As a possible risk factor we hypothesize that vitamin D levels may also be low in families of IBD patients. Objectives To evaluate 25[OH] vitamin D levels in patients with IBD in remission or with mild activity. A second objective is to evaluate whether there are relationships within IBD family units of 25[OH] vitamin D and what are the influences associated with these levels. Methods Participants underwent medical history, physical examination and a 114 item diet questionnaire. Serum 25[OH] vitamin D was measured, using a radioimmunoassay kit, (replete ≥ 75, insufficient 50–74, deficient < 25–50, or severely deficient < 25 nmol/L). Associations between 25[OH] vitamin D and twenty variables were evaluated using univariate regression. Multivariable analysis was also applied and intrafamilial dynamics were assessed. Results 55 patients and 48 controls with their respective families participated (N206). 25[OH] vitamin D levels between patients and controls were similar (71.2 ± 32.8 vs. 68.3 ±26.2 nmol/L). Vitamin D supplements significantly increased intake but correlation with serum 25[OH] vitamin D was significant only during non sunny months among patients. Within family units, patients’ families had mean replete levels (82.3 ± 34.2 nmol/L) and a modest correlation emerged during sunny months between patients and family (r2 =0.209 p = 0.032). These relationships were less robust and non significant in controls and their families. Conclusions In patients with mild or inactive IBD 25[OH] vitamin D levels are less than ideal but are similar to controls. Taken together collectively, the results

  2. Exome sequencing reveals a high genetic heterogeneity on familial Hirschsprung disease.

    PubMed

    Luzón-Toro, Berta; Gui, Hongsheng; Ruiz-Ferrer, Macarena; Sze-Man Tang, Clara; Fernández, Raquel M; Sham, Pak-Chung; Torroglosa, Ana; Kwong-Hang Tam, Paul; Espino-Paisán, Laura; Cherny, Stacey S; Bleda, Marta; Enguix-Riego, María Del Valle; Dopazo, Joaquín; Antiñolo, Guillermo; García-Barceló, María-Mercé; Borrego, Salud

    2015-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR; OMIM 142623) is a developmental disorder characterized by aganglionosis along variable lengths of the distal gastrointestinal tract, which results in intestinal obstruction. Interactions among known HSCR genes and/or unknown disease susceptibility loci lead to variable severity of phenotype. Neither linkage nor genome-wide association studies have efficiently contributed to completely dissect the genetic pathways underlying this complex genetic disorder. We have performed whole exome sequencing of 16 HSCR patients from 8 unrelated families with SOLID platform. Variants shared by affected relatives were validated by Sanger sequencing. We searched for genes recurrently mutated across families. Only variations in the FAT3 gene were significantly enriched in five families. Within-family analysis identified compound heterozygotes for AHNAK and several genes (N = 23) with heterozygous variants that co-segregated with the phenotype. Network and pathway analyses facilitated the discovery of polygenic inheritance involving FAT3, HSCR known genes and their gene partners. Altogether, our approach has facilitated the detection of more than one damaging variant in biologically plausible genes that could jointly contribute to the phenotype. Our data may contribute to the understanding of the complex interactions that occur during enteric nervous system development and the etiopathology of familial HSCR. PMID:26559152

  3. Exome sequencing reveals a high genetic heterogeneity on familial Hirschsprung disease

    PubMed Central

    Luzón-Toro, Berta; Gui, Hongsheng; Ruiz-Ferrer, Macarena; Sze-Man Tang, Clara; Fernández, Raquel M.; Sham, Pak-Chung; Torroglosa, Ana; Kwong-Hang Tam, Paul; Espino-Paisán, Laura; Cherny, Stacey S.; Bleda, Marta; Enguix-Riego, María del Valle; Dopazo, Joaquín; Antiñolo, Guillermo; García-Barceló, María-Mercé; Borrego, Salud

    2015-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR; OMIM 142623) is a developmental disorder characterized by aganglionosis along variable lengths of the distal gastrointestinal tract, which results in intestinal obstruction. Interactions among known HSCR genes and/or unknown disease susceptibility loci lead to variable severity of phenotype. Neither linkage nor genome-wide association studies have efficiently contributed to completely dissect the genetic pathways underlying this complex genetic disorder. We have performed whole exome sequencing of 16 HSCR patients from 8 unrelated families with SOLID platform. Variants shared by affected relatives were validated by Sanger sequencing. We searched for genes recurrently mutated across families. Only variations in the FAT3 gene were significantly enriched in five families. Within-family analysis identified compound heterozygotes for AHNAK and several genes (N = 23) with heterozygous variants that co-segregated with the phenotype. Network and pathway analyses facilitated the discovery of polygenic inheritance involving FAT3, HSCR known genes and their gene partners. Altogether, our approach has facilitated the detection of more than one damaging variant in biologically plausible genes that could jointly contribute to the phenotype. Our data may contribute to the understanding of the complex interactions that occur during enteric nervous system development and the etiopathology of familial HSCR. PMID:26559152

  4. Burden and associated pathologies in family caregivers of Alzheimer’s disease patients in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Cotelo, Natalia Vérez; Rodríguez, N. Floro Andrés; PÉREZ, José A. Fornos; Iglesias, J. Carlos Andrés; Lago, Marcos Ríos

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the profile of family caregivers of Alzheimer’s disease patients, identify any signs of psychopathology, quantify the level of perceived burden on the caregiver, and determine the caregiver’s relationship with their pharmacist. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at a community pharmacy in Pontevedra, Spain. Demographic variables were collected, and the following questionnaires were administered: the Beck Depression Inventory-II, STAI-Anxiety Questionnaire, Zarit Burden Scale, family APGAR scale, and the Duke-UNC questionnaire. Results: The typical caregiver profile consists of a 55-year old first degree relative (mostly daughters) with a primary education who belongs to a functional or mildly dysfunctional family. Nearly one quarter (24%) of caregivers had a high perception of burden, with anxiety in 20% of caregivers and symptoms of depression in 20%. Family caregivers usually went to the same pharmacy as the patients (96%), were treated with psychotropic drugs (68%), and interacted with the pharmacist (92%). Conclusion: This study confirmed that psychological distress and burden is present among family caregivers. Care for caregivers should be integrated into patient care as part of a national plan, including grants and subsidies, which will result in better care of Alzheimer’s patients. Pharmacists are the most accessible health care professionals and can provide information about Alzheimer’s disease management to caregivers to ease the burden of care. PMID:26131040

  5. Assessing Disease Risk in Genome-wide Association Studies Using Family History

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arpita; Hartge, Patricia; Purdue, Mark P.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Amundadottir, Laufey; Wang, Zhaoming; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Wacholder, Sholom

    2012-01-01

    We show how to use reports of cancer in family members to discover additional genetic associations or confirm previous findings in genome-wide association (GWA) studies conducted in case-control, cohort, or cross-sectional studies. Our novel family-history-based approach allows economical association studies for multiple cancers, without genotyping of relatives (as required in family studies), follow-up of participants (as required in cohort studies), or oversampling of specific cancer cases, (as required in case-control studies). We empirically evaluate the performance of the proposed family-history-based approach in studying associations with prostate and ovarian cancers, using data from GWA studies previously conducted within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. The family-history-based method may be particularly useful for investigating genetic susceptibility to rare diseases, for which accruing cases may be very difficult, by using disease information from non-genotyped relatives of participants in multiple case-control and cohort studies designed primarily for other purposes. PMID:22575968

  6. Pheochromocytoma associated with von Hippel-lindau disease in a Pakistani family

    PubMed Central

    Jalbani, Imran K.; Nazim, Syed Muhammad; Abbas, Farhat

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim was to study the presentation, disease characteristics, operative outcome, and prognosis in patients with familial Pheochromocytoma associated with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease. Materials and Methods: There were six patients belonging to two generations of a single family who developed features of VHL over a period of 13 years and were treated at our institute. Patients’ characteristics, that is, age, gender, presenting complaints and clinical signs, laboratory and biochemical evaluation, and the presence of associated conditions was gathered from medical records. The preoperative and postoperative radiological imaging and histopathological results were also collected. Results: Out of six cases, five were male, and one was female. The mean age at first presentation was 25 years (16-40). All patients presented with uncontrolled hypertension and were found to have Pheochromocytoma on workup. Three patients had unilateral adrenal tumor, and three had bilateral disease. None of the patients had extra-adrenal Pheochromocytoma. All patients were managed with adrenalectomy and had benign pathology. Two patients subsequently had craniotomy for excision of cerebellar hemangioma, and one patient had bilateral partial nephrectomy at the time of adrenalectomy. There was no peri- post-operative mortality and all patients are being followed by the surgeon(s) and endocrinologist. Conclusion: Pheochromocytoma can be a part of familial conditions including VHL. Other associated features should be suspected, investigated, and treated in these patients that can influence patients’ clinical course and prognosis. Family members should also be screened to achieve early diagnosis. PMID:25657563

  7. De novo PMP2 mutations in families with type 1 Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Motley, William W; Palaima, Paulius; Yum, Sabrina W; Gonzalez, Michael A; Tao, Feifei; Wanschitz, Julia V; Strickland, Alleene V; Löscher, Wolfgang N; De Vriendt, Els; Koppi, Stefan; Medne, Livija; Janecke, Andreas R; Jordanova, Albena; Zuchner, Stephan; Scherer, Steven S

    2016-06-01

    We performed whole exome sequencing on a patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 and identified a de novo mutation in PMP2, the gene that encodes the myelin P2 protein. This mutation (p.Ile52Thr) was passed from the proband to his one affected son, and segregates with clinical and electrophysiological evidence of demyelinating neuropathy. We then screened a cohort of 136 European probands with uncharacterized genetic cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and identified another family with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 that has a mutation affecting an adjacent amino acid (p.Thr51Pro), which segregates with disease. Our genetic and clinical findings in these kindred demonstrate that dominant PMP2 mutations cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1. PMID:27009151

  8. Insights from late-onset familial parkinsonism on the pathogenesis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Volta, Mattia; Milnerwood, Austen J; Farrer, Matthew J

    2015-10-01

    Disease-modifying therapies that slow or halt the progression of Parkinson's disease are an unmet clinical need. Many hypotheses have been put forward to explain the pathogenesis of the disease, but none has led to the development of disease-modifying drugs. Here we focus on familial forms of late-onset parkinsonism that most closely resemble idiopathic Parkinson's disease and present a synthesis of emerging molecular advances. Genetic discoveries and mechanistic investigations have highlighted early alterations to synaptic function, endosomal maturation, and protein sorting that might lead to an intracellular proteinopathy. We propose that these cellular processes constitute one pathway to pathogenesis and suggest that neuroprotection, as an adjunct to current symptomatic treatments, need not remain an elusive goal. PMID:26376970

  9. Familial expression of anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae mannan antibodies in affected and unaffected relatives of patients with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, C; Yang, H; Li, Z; Rotter, J; Targan, S; Braun, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Crohn's disease is a familial disorder, and antiglycan antibodies to the cell wall mannan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA) are highly correlated with Crohn's disease.
AIMS—To determine whether there is a familial pattern for expression of serum levels of anti-mannan Ig, and whether this trait is expressed in clinically unaffected Crohn's disease family members.
METHODS—349 patients with Crohn's disease, 87 Crohn's disease affected relatives, 333 inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) free relatives, 58 spouses, and 190 healthy control patients were studied. Serum IgG and IgA binding activity to S cerevisiae cell wall mannan was quantitated by ELISA.
RESULTS—A high percentage of patients with Crohn's disease (51.9%) and affected family members (56.3%) were seropositive for anti-mannan Ig, compared with the normal control population (3.7%). Seropositive and seronegative phenotypes of Crohn's disease probands were correlated among all affected relatives, and this association was stronger in affected first degree relatives. Statistical intraclass correlations of quantitative anti-mannan Ig levels revealed significantly less variation within, rather than between families. A significant familial aggregation was observed for affected relatives; this was even stronger for unaffected relatives. While a significant familial aggregation was observed among unaffected siblings pairs, there was no significant correlation among marital pairs.
CONCLUSION—Results show that anti-mannan Ig in family members affected and unaffected with Crohn's disease is a familial trait for both affected and unaffected relatives. The lack of concordance in marital pairs indicates that familiality is due in part to a genetic factor or childhood environmental exposure.


Keywords: Crohn's disease; inflammatory bowel disease; ulcerative colitis; anti-mannan antibodies; intraclass correlation; statistical genetics PMID:10601056

  10. Strategies used by teens growing up in families with Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, Janet K; Driessnack, Martha; Barnette, J Jackson; Sparbel, Kathleen J H; Leserman, Anne; Thompson, Sean; Paulsen, Jane S

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify helpfulness of strategies used by teens growing up in families with Huntington disease (HD). Forty-four participants responded to a mailed HD Family Survey-Teens Strategies. Strategies were those with strong positive correlation between use and perceived helpfulness, and those with negative or inverse relationships. Obtaining information, thinking about or doing something else, and actions on behalf of the parent with HD were rated as highest use and perceived helpfulness. Emotional suppression had high use but low helpfulness. Participants reported using numerous helpful strategies. Social support was often unavailable to help manage teen concerns. PMID:23531469

  11. The hnRNP family: insights into their role in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Geuens, Thomas; Bouhy, Delphine; Timmerman, Vincent

    2016-08-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) represent a large family of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that contribute to multiple aspects of nucleic acid metabolism including alternative splicing, mRNA stabilization, and transcriptional and translational regulation. Many hnRNPs share general features, but differ in domain composition and functional properties. This review will discuss the current knowledge about the different hnRNP family members, focusing on their structural and functional divergence. Additionally, we will highlight their involvement in neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, and the potential to develop RNA-based therapies. PMID:27215579

  12. Feasibility of Recruiting Families into a Heart Disease Prevention Program Based on Dietary Patterns.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Tracy L; Burrows, Tracy L; Thompson, Deborah I; Spratt, Neil J; Callister, Robin; Collins, Clare E

    2015-08-01

    Offspring of parents with a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) inherit a similar genetic profile and share diet and lifestyle behaviors. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of recruiting families at risk of CVD to a dietary prevention program, determine the changes in diet achieved, and program acceptability. Families were recruited into a pilot parallel group randomized controlled trial consisting of a three month evidence-based dietary intervention, based on the Mediterranean and Portfolio diets. Feasibility was assessed by recruitment and retention rates, change in diet by food frequency questionnaire, and program acceptability by qualitative interviews and program evaluation. Twenty one families were enrolled over 16 months, with fourteen families (n = 42 individuals) completing the study. Post-program dietary changes in the intervention group included small daily increases in vegetable serves (0.8 ± 1.3) and reduced usage of full-fat milk (-21%), cheese (-12%) and meat products (-17%). Qualitative interviews highlighted beneficial changes in food purchasing habits. Future studies need more effective methods of recruitment to engage families in the intervention. Once engaged, families made small incremental improvements in their diets. Evaluation indicated that feedback on diet and CVD risk factors, dietetic counselling and the resources provided were appropriate for a program of this type. PMID:26308048

  13. Feasibility of Recruiting Families into a Heart Disease Prevention Program Based on Dietary Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Tracy L.; Burrows, Tracy L.; Thompson, Deborah I.; Spratt, Neil J.; Callister, Robin; Collins, Clare E.

    2015-01-01

    Offspring of parents with a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) inherit a similar genetic profile and share diet and lifestyle behaviors. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of recruiting families at risk of CVD to a dietary prevention program, determine the changes in diet achieved, and program acceptability. Families were recruited into a pilot parallel group randomized controlled trial consisting of a three month evidence-based dietary intervention, based on the Mediterranean and Portfolio diets. Feasibility was assessed by recruitment and retention rates, change in diet by food frequency questionnaire, and program acceptability by qualitative interviews and program evaluation. Twenty one families were enrolled over 16 months, with fourteen families (n = 42 individuals) completing the study. Post-program dietary changes in the intervention group included small daily increases in vegetable serves (0.8 ± 1.3) and reduced usage of full-fat milk (−21%), cheese (−12%) and meat products (−17%). Qualitative interviews highlighted beneficial changes in food purchasing habits. Future studies need more effective methods of recruitment to engage families in the intervention. Once engaged, families made small incremental improvements in their diets. Evaluation indicated that feedback on diet and CVD risk factors, dietetic counselling and the resources provided were appropriate for a program of this type. PMID:26308048

  14. A Preliminary Study of Psychiatric, Familial, and Medical Characteristics of High Utilizing Sickle Cell Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, C. Patrick; Haywood, Carlton; Hoot, Michelle R.; Lanzkron, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To identify demographic, medical, and psychosocial characteristics that distinguished sickle cell disease patients who were frequent utilizers of urgent or emergent care resources from low-utilizing patients. Methods Patients at a large urban comprehensive sickle cell disease treatment center were recruited from clinic or during urgent care visits. Participants who were high utilizers, defined as having more than 4 acute or emergency care visits in the prior 12 months, were compared to patients with more typical utilization patterns on lifetime complications of SCD, family background, psychiatric history, occupational function, coping, depressive symptoms, and personality. Results High utilizers were nearly a decade younger on average; despite this they had a similar lifetime history of SCD complications. High utilizing patients' parents appeared to have greater educational achievement overall. High utilizers reported a nearly three-fold greater prevalence of psychiatric illness in family members than low utilizers. On other measures; including coping strategies, social support, and personality; the two groups were comparable. Discussion The study strengthens emerging evidence that disease severity, familial factors related to greater parental education, and psychiatric illness are important factors in high care utilization in patients with sickle cell disease. PMID:23246997

  15. Whole exome sequencing unravels disease-causing genes in consanguineous families in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Fahiminiya, S; Almuriekhi, M; Nawaz, Z; Staffa, A; Lepage, P; Ali, R; Hashim, L; Schwartzentruber, J; Abu Khadija, K; Zaineddin, S; Gamal, H; Majewski, J; Ben-Omran, T

    2014-08-01

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) has greatly facilitated the identification of causal mutations for diverse human genetic disorders. We applied WES as a molecular diagnostic tool to identify disease-causing genes in consanguineous families in Qatar. Seventeen consanguineous families with diverse disorders were recruited. Initial mutation screening of known genes related to the clinical diagnoses did not reveal the causative mutations. Using WES approach, we identified the definitive disease-causing mutations in four families: (i) a novel nonsense homozygous (c.1034C>G) in PHKG2 causing glycogen storage disease type 9C (GSD9C) in a male with initial diagnosis of GSD3; (ii) a novel homozygous 1-bp deletion (c.915del) in NSUN2 in a male proband with Noonan-like syndrome; (iii) a homozygous SNV (c.1598C>G) in exon 11 of IDUA causing Hurler syndrome in a female proband with unknown clinical diagnosis; (iv) a de novo known splicing mutation (c.1645+1G>A) in PHEX in a female proband with initial diagnosis of autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets. Applying WES as a diagnostic tool led to the unambiguous identification of disease-causing mutations in phenotypically complex disorders or correction of the initial clinical diagnosis in ˜25% of our cases. PMID:24102521

  16. Icelandic families with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: families unlinked to chromosome 16p13.3 revealed by linkage analysis.

    PubMed

    Fossdal, R; Böthvarsson, M; Asmundsson, P; Ragnarsson, J; Peters, D; Breuning, M H; Jensson, O

    1993-07-01

    We have mainly used 3 highly polymorphic DNA markers, 3'HVR (D16S85), 16AC2.5 (D16S291) and SM7 (D16S283), flanking the PKD1 region on chromosome 16p13.3 to establish linkage status in seven Icelandic families with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). In four families, the disease locus is in the PKD1 region, and three families are "unlinked" to chromosome 16p13.3. In one of the "unlinked" families, the disease locus is excluded from a part of the long arm of chromosome 2, and we support a theory of more than 2 loci being responsible for ADPKD. Our data confirm the location of the locus YNH24 (D2S44) to chromosome 2q13-q24. PMID:8340115

  17. Screening strategies for colorectal cancer among patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and family history.

    PubMed

    Wong, Martin C S; Ching, Jessica Y L; Chan, Victor C W; Lam, Thomas Y T; Luk, Arthur K C; Wong, Sunny H; Ng, Siew C; Wong, Vincent W S; Ng, Simon S M; Wu, Justin C Y; Chan, Francis K L; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2016-02-01

    Patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and family history of colorectal cancer (CRC) are at higher risks but how they should be screened remains uncertain. Hence, we evaluated the cost-effectiveness of CRC screening among patients with NAFLD and family history by different strategies. A hypothetical population of 100,000 subjects aged 40-75 years receive: (i) yearly fecal immunochemical test (FIT) at 50 years; (ii) flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) every 5 years at 50 years; (iii) colonoscopy 10 yearly at 50 years; (iv) colonoscopy 10 yearly at 50 years among those with family history/NAFLD and yearly FIT at 50 years among those without; (v) colonoscopy 10 yearly at 40 years among those with family history/NAFLD and yearly FIT at 50 years among those without and (vi) colonoscopy 10 yearly at 40 years among those with family history/NAFLD and colonoscopy 10 yearly at 50 years among those without. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was studied by Markov modeling. It was found that colonoscopy, FS and FIT reduced incidence of CRC by 49.5, 26.3 and 23.6%, respectively. Using strategies 4, 5 and 6, the corresponding reduction in CRC incidence was 29.9, 30.9 and 69.3% for family history, and 33.2, 34.7 and 69.8% for NAFLD. Compared with no screening, strategies 4 (US$1,018/life-year saved) and 5 (US$7,485) for family history offered the lowest ICER, whilst strategy 4 (US$5,877) for NAFLD was the most cost-effective. These findings were robust when assessed with a wide range of deterministic sensitivity analyses around the base case. These indicated that screening patients with family history or NAFLD by colonoscopy at 50 years was economically favorable. PMID:26289421

  18. Subjective experience of family stigma as reported by children of Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Werner, Perla; Goldstein, Dovrat; Buchbinder, Eli

    2010-02-01

    In this study we explored the subjective experience of family stigma as reported by children of persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our data indicated that family stigma in the area of AD was primarily experienced in three dimensions: caregivers' stigma, lay public's stigma, and structural stigma. We found that in all these dimensions family stigma follows a process characterized by three core elements: cognitive attributions, emotional reactions, and behavioral responses. Findings of this study highlight the profound stigma confronting caregivers of persons with AD. What emerges is a poignant picture of adult children living with stigmatic beliefs while providing care for their parents with AD. We suggest that swift steps be taken to deal with these stigmatic beliefs. Mainly, structural discrimination must end if all citizens are to receive truly fair and equitable health care services and benefits. PMID:20065304

  19. HLA is unlikely to be a major component of risk in familial inflammatory bowl disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, C.G.; Naom, I.S.; Hodgson, S.V.

    1994-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammation of the bowel which is confined to the colon in ulcerative colitis (UC) or may affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract in Crohn`s disease (CD). The cause of IBD is unknown, but a genetic component is suggested by a 10-fold increase in risk to first degree relatives, and a higher concordance of disease in MZ versus DZ twins. Distinct associations of HLA DR2 with UC and DR1/DQw5 with CD have been reported. We are searching for susceptibility genes in IBD by linkage analysis in a panel of 43 families with 3 or more living affected members, which includes 12 families with CD, 17 with UC and 14 {open_quotes}mixed{close_quotes} families with UC and CD. In view of the reported HLA associations in IBD, we have analyzed 5 microsatellite markers from the major histocompatibility complex for linkage to IBD using both parametric and nonparametric methods. LOD scores were calculated for 4 different genetic models, including both dominant and recessive inheritance, and haplotype sharing was analyzed in affected siblings. LOD scores for the MHC locus were negative in the full data set, and in the 3 classes of family (UC,CD,mixed). Haplotype sharing in affected sibs was very close to that expected if no linkage was present. We conclude that genes from the HLA region are unlikely to be a major component of risk in familial IBD. Linkage analysis of genes which cause chronic colitis when disrupted in transgenic mice is in progress.

  20. Linkage and mutational analysis of familial Alzheimer disease kindreds for the APP gene region

    SciTech Connect

    Kamino, K.; Anderson, L.; O'dahl, S.; Nemens, E.; Bird, T.D.; Schellenberg, G.D.; Wijsman, E.M.; Kukall, W.; Larson, E. ); Heston, L.L.

    1992-11-01

    A large number of familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) kindreds were examined to determine whether mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene could be responsible for the disease. Previous studies have identified three mutations at APP codon 717 which are pathogenic for Alzheimer disease (AD). Samples from affected subjects were examined for mutations in exons 16 and 17 of the APP gene. A combination of direct sequencing and single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis was used. Sporadic AD and normal controls were also examined by the same methods. Five sequence variants were identified. One variant at APP codon 693 resulted in a Glu[yields]Gly change. This is the same codon as the hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type Glu[yields]Gln mutation. Another single-base change at APP codon 708 did not alter the amino acid encoded at this site. Two point mutations and a 6-bp deletion were identified in the intronic sequences surrounding exon 17. None of the variants could be unambigously determined to be responsible for FAD. The larger families were also analyzed by testing for linkage of FAD to a highly polymorphic short tandem repeat marker (D21S210) that is tightly linked to APP. Highly negative LOD scores were obtained for the family groups tested, and linkage was formally excluded beyond [theta] = .10 for the Volga German kindreds, [theta] = .20 for early-onset non-Volga Germans, and [theta] = .10 for late-onset families. LOD scores for linkage of FAD to markers centromeric to APP (D21S1/S11, D21S13, and D21S215) were also negative in the three family groups. These studies show that APP mutations account for AD in only a small fraction of FAD kindreds. 49 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Host-microbiome interaction in Crohn’s disease: A familiar or familial issue?

    PubMed Central

    Michielan, Andrea; D’Incà, Renata

    2015-01-01

    An impaired interaction between the gut and the intestinal microbiome is likely to be the key element in the pathogenesis of Crohn’s disease (CD). Family studies have provided invaluable information on CD pathogenesis and on its etiology. Relatives share the same genetic risk of developing the disease as affected subjects. Relatives also exhibit similar features relating to their host-microbiome interaction, namely genetic variants in loci involved in detecting bacteria, a greater sero-reactivity to microbial components, and an impaired intestinal permeability. The burden of environmental factors such as cigarette smoking and dysbiosis also seems to be particularly relevant in these genetically predisposed subjects. Diet is emerging as an important factor and could account for the changing epidemiology of CD in recent years. Despite the pivotal role of genetics in the disease’s pathogenesis (especially in familial CD), screening tests in healthy relatives cannot be recommended. PMID:26600974

  2. Preventive study in subjects at risk of fatal familial insomnia: Innovative approach to rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Forloni, Gianluigi; Tettamanti, Mauro; Lucca, Ugo; Albanese, Yasmin; Quaglio, Elena; Chiesa, Roberto; Erbetta, Alessandra; Villani, Flavio; Redaelli, Veronica; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Artuso, Vladimiro; Roiter, Ignazio

    2015-01-01

    The text describes a preventive clinical trial with drug treatment in a very rare neurodegenerative disease (Fatal familial Insomnia, FFI) designed with the help of individuals at genetic risk of developing the disease, asymptomatic carriers, who have agreed to be exposed over a 10-year period to doxycycline, an antibiotic with anti-prion activity. At least 10 carriers of the FFI mutation over 42 y old will be treated with doxycycline (100 mg/die) and the incidence of the disease will be compared to that of an historical dataset. For ethical reasons a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was not feasible, however the study design and the statistical analysis ensure the scientific value of the results. This approach might represent an important breakthrough in terms of potential therapy and knowledge of rare diseases that could give some hopes to these neglected patients. PMID:25996399

  3. Social representation of Alzheimer's disease for family caregivers: stressful and rewarding.

    PubMed

    Folle, Aline Duarte; Shimizu, Helena Eri; Naves, Janeth de Oliveira Silva

    2016-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To understand the content of Social Representation (SR) of family caregivers of Alzheimer's disease patients. METHOD Interviews were conducted with 26 caregivers and analyzed by the ALCESTE software. RESULTS The SR content was structured in two thematic axes called Daily Life and Care and Medical and Emotional Concepts and Outcomes. The first axis creates images related to the routine of interaction with the sick person, and contains a description of care procedures, experiences, and practices applied every day. The second is composed of subjective and conceptual aspects that make up the social representation of Alzheimer's disease, with meanings related to the emotional, medical, and biological contexts. CONCLUSION Due to the importance of topics related to patients' dependence and the personal and emotional consequences of the disease, overload is the main content of the SR of Alzheimer's disease for caregivers, and the understanding of these SR by health professionals should support the planning of interventions addressing this group of individuals. PMID:27007424

  4. Familial Cushing's disease with severe weight loss occurring in late childhood.

    PubMed

    Cameron, F J; Warne, G L

    1997-02-01

    We describe a rare case of familial Cushing's disease occurring in a 7-year-old boy, and 19 years of follow up. Our patient first presented soon after his maternal aunt had been treated for Cushing's disease. The clinical presentation was made complicated by the development of an intercurrent eating disorder resembling anorexia nervosa. This resulted in marked weight loss, and even though serum and urinary cortisol levels were elevated, many of the clinical stigmata of Cushing's disease were absent. Eating disorders are relatively uncommon in boys, and in this case there was an organic cause for the abnormal behaviour. This case shows, furthermore, that even the obesity of Cushing's disease can be overcome by the combination of diet and exercise. PMID:9069050

  5. Preventive study in subjects at risk of fatal familial insomnia: Innovative approach to rare diseases

    PubMed Central

    Forloni, Gianluigi; Tettamanti, Mauro; Lucca, Ugo; Albanese, Yasmin; Quaglio, Elena; Chiesa, Roberto; Erbetta, Alessandra; Villani, Flavio; Redaelli, Veronica; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Artuso, Vladimiro; Roiter, Ignazio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The text describes a preventive clinical trial with drug treatment in a very rare neurodegenerative disease (Fatal familial Insomnia, FFI) designed with the help of individuals at genetic risk of developing the disease, asymptomatic carriers, who have agreed to be exposed over a 10-year period to doxycycline, an antibiotic with anti-prion activity. At least 10 carriers of the FFI mutation over 42 y old will be treated with doxycycline (100 mg/die) and the incidence of the disease will be compared to that of an historical dataset. For ethical reasons a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was not feasible, however the study design and the statistical analysis ensure the scientific value of the results. This approach might represent an important breakthrough in terms of potential therapy and knowledge of rare diseases that could give some hopes to these neglected patients. PMID:25996399

  6. Hospitalizations for cardiovascular diseases and the coverage by the family health strategy 1

    PubMed Central

    Lentsck, Maicon Henrique; Mathias, Thais Aidar de Freitas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to verify the correlation between the rates of hospitalization for primary care-sensitive cardiovascular diseases and the coverage by the Family Health Strategy of residents of the State of Paraná, by regional health divisions, from 2000 to 2011. Method: ecological study developed from data of the Hospital Information System of the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) and the Department of Primary Care of the Ministry of Health. The rates of hospitalization for cardiovascular diseases were correlated with the annual coverage by the Family Health Strategy using Pearson's and Spearman's correlation coefficients. Result: there was a strong and negative correlation in the State of Paraná (r=-0.91; p <0.001) and in most regional health divisions, with the highest correlations observed in the Metropolitan and Toledo (r =-0.93; p<0.001) and Paranaguá (r=-0.92, p<0.001) regional health divisions. Conclusion: the results suggest that the increase in the coverage by the Family Health Strategy was an important factor for decrease in the hospitalizations for cardiovascular conditions among residents of the State of Paraná and in most regional health divisions. Other studies should be performed to analyze the factors and causes in regional health divisions where there was no correlation with increase in the Family Health Strategy. PMID:26444162

  7. Mutant LRP6 Impairs Endothelial Cell Functions Associated with Familial Normolipidemic Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jian; Li, Yang; Ren, Yi-Hong; Sun, Zhijun; Dong, Jie; Yan, Han; Xu, Yujun; Wang, Dao Wen; Zheng, Gu-Yan; Du, Jie; Tian, Xiao-Li

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the genes low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein-6 (LRP6) and myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A) were reported in families with coronary artery disease (CAD). We intend to determine the mutational spectrum of these genes among hyperlipidemic and normolipidemic CAD families. Forty probands with early-onset CAD were recruited from 19 hyperlipidemic and 21 normolipidemic Chinese families. We sequenced all exons and intron-exon boundaries of LRP6 and MEF2A, and found a novel heterozygous variant in LRP6 from a proband with normolipidemic CAD. This variant led to a substitution of histidine to tyrosine (Y418H) in an evolutionarily conserved domain YWTD in exon 6 and was not found in 1025 unrelated healthy individuals. Co-segregated with CAD in the affected family, LRP6Y418H significantly debilitated the Wnt3a-associated signaling pathway, suppressed endothelial cell proliferation and migration, and decreased anti-apoptotic ability. However, it exhibited no influences on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol uptake. Thus, mutation Y418H in LRP6 likely contributes to normolipidemic familial CAD via impairing endothelial cell functions and weakening the Wnt3a signaling pathway. PMID:27455246

  8. Family Caregiver's Perception of Alzheimer's disease and caregiving in Chinese culture.

    PubMed

    Dai, Baozhen; Mao, Zongfu; Wu, Bei; Mei, Y John; Levkoff, Sue; Wang, Huali

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the perception of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and caregiving among family caregivers of individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD in China. In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted with 46 family caregivers of individuals with cognitive impairment in 2009 in Wuhan and Beijing, China. Participants included 38 spouses, 7 adult children, and 1 sibling, aged between 41 and 85 years old. The findings showed that all family caregivers thought the Chinese terminology of AD laonian chidai, brought discrimination to individuals with cognitive impairment. Caregivers of individuals with AD experienced burden and desired an increase of formal services. Traditional beliefs of respecting elders and caring for extended family members were held among family caregivers of individuals with cognitive impairment, and there was nearly no difference found between caregivers of AD and those of MCI. It implied that traditional culture provided positive influences on caring for elders with cognitive impairment. An alternative term for MCI may contribute to further reducing the discrimination brought by the old Chinese terminology of AD laonian chidai. Development of formal services for elders with cognitive impairment may contribute to reducing caregivers' worries about future caregiving. PMID:25602761

  9. Mutant LRP6 Impairs Endothelial Cell Functions Associated with Familial Normolipidemic Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jian; Li, Yang; Ren, Yi-Hong; Sun, Zhijun; Dong, Jie; Yan, Han; Xu, Yujun; Wang, Dao Wen; Zheng, Gu-Yan; Du, Jie; Tian, Xiao-Li

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the genes low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein-6 (LRP6) and myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A) were reported in families with coronary artery disease (CAD). We intend to determine the mutational spectrum of these genes among hyperlipidemic and normolipidemic CAD families. Forty probands with early-onset CAD were recruited from 19 hyperlipidemic and 21 normolipidemic Chinese families. We sequenced all exons and intron-exon boundaries of LRP6 and MEF2A, and found a novel heterozygous variant in LRP6 from a proband with normolipidemic CAD. This variant led to a substitution of histidine to tyrosine (Y418H) in an evolutionarily conserved domain YWTD in exon 6 and was not found in 1025 unrelated healthy individuals. Co-segregated with CAD in the affected family, LRP6Y418H significantly debilitated the Wnt3a-associated signaling pathway, suppressed endothelial cell proliferation and migration, and decreased anti-apoptotic ability. However, it exhibited no influences on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol uptake. Thus, mutation Y418H in LRP6 likely contributes to normolipidemic familial CAD via impairing endothelial cell functions and weakening the Wnt3a signaling pathway. PMID:27455246

  10. Homozygous carriers of APP A713T mutation in an autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease family

    PubMed Central

    Conidi, Maria E.; Bernardi, Livia; Puccio, Gianfranco; Smirne, Nicoletta; Muraca, Maria G.; Curcio, Sabrina A.M.; Colao, Rosanna; Piscopo, Paola; Gallo, Maura; Anfossi, Maria; Frangipane, Francesca; Clodomiro, Alessandra; Mirabelli, Maria; Vasso, Franca; Cupidi, Chiara; Torchia, Giusi; Di Lorenzo, Raffaele; Mandich, Paola; Confaloni, Annamaria; Maletta, Raffaele G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report, for the first time, a large autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (AD) family in which the APP A713T mutation is present in the homozygous and heterozygous state. To date, the mutation has been reported as dominant, and in the heterozygous state associated with familial AD and cerebrovascular lesions. Methods: The family described here has been genealogically reconstructed over 6 generations dating back to the 19th century. Plasma β-amyloid peptide was measured. Sequencing of causative AD genes was performed. Results: Twenty-one individuals, all but 1 born from 2 consanguineous unions, were studied: 8 were described as affected through history, 5 were studied clinically and genetically, and 8 were asymptomatic at-risk subjects. The A713T mutation was detected in the homozygous state in 3 patients and in the heterozygous state in 8 subjects (6 asymptomatic and 2 affected). Conclusions: Our findings, also supported by the β-amyloid plasma assay, confirm (1) the pathogenic role of the APP A713T mutation, (2) the specific phenotype (AD with cerebrovascular lesions) associated with this mutation, and (3) the large span of age at onset, not influenced by APOE, TOMM40, and TREM2 genes. No substantial differences concerning clinical phenotype were evidenced between heterozygous and homozygous patients, in line with the classic definition of dominance. Therefore, in this study, AD followed the classic definition of a dominant disease, contrary to that reported in a previously described AD family with recessive APP mutation. This confirms that genetic AD may be considered a disease with dominant and recessive traits of inheritance. PMID:25948718

  11. Profile of Diseases Prevalent in a Tribal Locality in Jharkhand, India: A Family Medicine Practitioner's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    Background: Majority of Indian population is dependent on general practitioners (GPs) for medical services at primary care level in India. They are most preferred and considered to be first contact person for medical services at primary care level. But advances in medical science has put more emphasis on specialist culture and average Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) graduates who are working as general physician are gradually feeling themselves less competent because they are less exposed to latest advances in treatment of diseases. Amidst such scenario, Christian Medical College (CMC) has come up with an idea: “The refer less and resolve more initiative”. It has started a decentralized 2-year family medicine distance diploma course (Postgraduate Diploma in Family Medicine (PGDFM)) now accredited by Dr. MGR Medical University, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, that trains the GPs to become family medicine specialist. Materials and Methods: As component of PGDFM course, this study was conducted to provide better understanding of prevalent ailments and common treatment provided by the GPs in the community at present giving key insight of current practice in rural area by a registered family medicine practitioner. Results: As part of study, among 500 patients evaluated, three most common diagnosis were upper respiratory infections (URIs; 18%), acute gastroenteritis including water-borne diseases (15.8%), and anemia (10.4%). Treatment given to these patients comprised of mostly of antipyretic, analgesic, and antimicrobial agents. Most common drug prescribed was paracetamol for fever. Other common drugs prescribed were amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, chloroquine, artemisin derivative, doxycycline, co-trimoxazole, miltefosine, cephalexin, ceftriaxone sodium, cefixime, oral rehydration salts, ranitidine, omeprazole, pantoprazole, metronidazole, albendazole, ondansetron, diclofenac sodium, piroxicam, ibuprofen, diphenhydramine, codeine-sulfate, amlodipine, ramipril

  12. The TNF-family cytokine TL1A: from lymphocyte costimulator to disease co-conspirator.

    PubMed

    Richard, Arianne C; Ferdinand, John R; Meylan, Françoise; Hayes, Erika T; Gabay, Odile; Siegel, Richard M

    2015-09-01

    Originally described in 2002 as a T cell-costimulatory cytokine, the tumor necrosis factor family member TNF-like factor 1A (TL1A), encoded by the TNFSF15 gene, has since been found to affect multiple cell lineages through its receptor, death receptor 3 (DR3, encoded by TNFRSF25) with distinct cell-type effects. Genetic deficiency or blockade of TL1A-DR3 has defined a number of disease states that depend on this cytokine-receptor pair, whereas excess TL1A leads to allergic gastrointestinal inflammation through stimulation of group 2 innate lymphoid cells. Noncoding variants in the TL1A locus are associated with susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease and leprosy, predicting that the level of TL1A expression may influence host defense and the development of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:26188076

  13. The TNF-family cytokine TL1A: from lymphocyte costimulator to disease co-conspirator

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Arianne C.; Ferdinand, John R.; Meylan, Françoise; Hayes, Erika T.; Gabay, Odile; Siegel, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Originally described in 2002 as a T cell-costimulatory cytokine, the tumor necrosis factor family member TNF-like factor 1A (TL1A), encoded by the TNFSF15 gene, has since been found to affect multiple cell lineages through its receptor, death receptor 3 (DR3, encoded by TNFRSF25) with distinct cell-type effects. Genetic deficiency or blockade of TL1A-DR3 has defined a number of disease states that depend on this cytokine-receptor pair, whereas excess TL1A leads to allergic gastrointestinal inflammation through stimulation of group 2 innate lymphoid cells. Noncoding variants in the TL1A locus are associated with susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease and leprosy, predicting that the level of TL1A expression may influence host defense and the development of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:26188076

  14. Familial expansile osteolysis: An Australian case report of a Paget's Disease Mimic.

    PubMed

    Topham, Dean Grant; Sampson, Matthew John

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of familial expansile osteolysis (FEO) with multimodality imaging findings and histopathological correlation in a 42-year-old man presenting to a South Australian Emergency Department. FEO is a unique metabolic bone condition that is similar in some respects to Paget's disease but distinct enough in its clinical, radiological and histological findings to be classified as a separate disease process. It is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and typified by increased osteoclast activity, medullary expansion, and hearing and dental problems. These changes can lead to significant morbidity with individuals affected suffering from bone pain and pathological fractures. To the best of the authors' knowledge, there are no reported cases in the literature documenting this disease in Australia. PMID:27258166

  15. Growth Hormone and Cerebral Amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Benvenga, S; Guarneri, F

    2016-08-01

    Great interest has recently been focused on a paper reporting characteristic deposits of amyloid-β protein associated with Alzheimer's disease in brains of adults who died of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. As they had contracted such disease after treatment with prion-contaminated human growth hormone extracted from cadaver-derived pituitaries, the authors have suggested that interhuman transmission of Alzheimer's disease had occurred. Our previous research led us to find that amyloid-forming peptides share amino acid sequence homology, summarized by a motif. Here, we probed the amino acid sequence of human growth hormone for such a motif, and found that 2 segments fit the motif and are potentially amyloid-forming. This finding was confirmed by Aggrescan, another well-known software for the prediction of amyloidogenic peptides. Our results, taken together with data from the literature that are missing in the aforementioned paper and associated commentaries, minimize the contagious nature of the iatrogenically-acquired coexistence of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Alzheimer's disease. In particular, the above mentioned paper misses literature data on intratumoral amyloidosis in growth hormone- and prolactin-secreting adenomas, tumors relatively frequent in adults, which are often silent. It cannot be excluded that some pituitaries used to extract growth hormone contained clinically silent microadenomas, a fraction of which containing amyloid deposits, and patients might had received a fraction of growth hormone (with or without prolactin) that already was an amyloid seed. The intrinsic amyloidogenicity of growth hormone, in the presence of contaminating prion protein (and perhaps prolactin as well) and amyloid-β contained in some cadavers' pituitaries, may have led to the observed co-occurring of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27214308

  16. A familial form of parkinsonism, dementia, and motor neuron disease: a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Boeve, Bradley F.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Tacik, Pawel; Aoki, Naoya; Strongosky, Audrey J.; Baker, Matt; Ross, Owen A.; Rademakers, Rosa; Sossi, Vesna; Dickson, Dennis W.; Stoessl, A. Jon; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe clinical, positron emission tomography (PET), pathological, and genetic findings of a large kindred with progressive neurodegenerative phenotypes in which the proband had autopsy-confirmed corticobasal degeneration (CBD). Methods Five family members, including the proband, were examined neurologically. Clinical information from the other family members was collected by questionnaires. Three individuals underwent PET with 11C-dihydrotetrabenazine and 18F-fludeoxyglucose. The proband was examined post-mortem. Genetic studies were performed. Results The pedigree contains 64 individuals, including 8 affected patients. The inheritance is likely autosomal dominant with reduced penetrance. The proband developed progressive speech and language difficulties at the age of 64 years. Upon examination at the age of 68 years, she showed non-fluent aphasia, word-finding difficulties, circumlocution, frontal release signs, and right-sided bradykinesia, rigidity, and pyramidal signs. She died 5 years after disease onset. The neuropathology was consistent with CBD, including many cortical and subcortical astrocytic plaques. Other family members had progressive neurodegenerative phenotypes – two were diagnosed with parkinsonism and behavioral problems, two with parkinsonism alone, one with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis alone, one with dementia, and one with progressive gait and speech problems. PET on three potentially affected individuals showed no significant pathology. Genetic sequencing of DNA from the proband excluded mutations in known neurodegenerative-related genes including MAPT, PGRN, LRRK2, and C9ORF72. Conclusions Families with such complex phenotypes rarely occur. They are usually associated with MAPT mutations; however, in this family, MAPT mutations have been excluded, implicating another causative gene or genes. Further genetic studies on this family may eventually disclose the etiology. PMID:25175602

  17. Preventing a Mass Disease: The Case of Gallstones Disease: Role and Competence for Family Physicians.

    PubMed

    Portincasa, Piero; Di Ciaula, Agostino; Grattagliano, Ignazio

    2016-07-01

    Gallstone formation is the result of a complex interaction between genetic and nongenetic factors. We searched and reviewed the available literature to define how the primary prevention of gallstones (cholesterol gallstones in particular) could be applied in general practice. Electronic bibliographical databases were searched. Prospective and retrospective cohort studies and case-controlled studies were analyzed and graded for evidence quality. The epidemiological data confirmed that genetic factors are estimated to account for only approximately 25% of the overall risk of gallstones, while metabolic/environmental factors are at least partially modifiable in stone-free risk groups, and are thus modifiable by primary prevention measures related to diet, lifestyle, and environmental factors (i.e., rapid weight loss, bariatric surgery, somatostatin or analogues therapy, transient gallbladder stasis, and hormone therapy). There is no specific recommendation for the secondary prevention of recurrent gallstones. Family physicians can contribute to preventing gallstones due to their capability to identify and effectively manage several risk factors discussed in this study. Although further studies are needed to better elucidate the involvement of epigenetic factors that may regulate the effect of environment and lifestyle on gene expression in the primary prevention of gallstone formation, preventive interventions are feasible and advisable in the general practice setting. PMID:27468338

  18. Preventing a Mass Disease: The Case of Gallstones Disease: Role and Competence for Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Di Ciaula, Agostino; Grattagliano, Ignazio

    2016-01-01

    Gallstone formation is the result of a complex interaction between genetic and nongenetic factors. We searched and reviewed the available literature to define how the primary prevention of gallstones (cholesterol gallstones in particular) could be applied in general practice. Electronic bibliographical databases were searched. Prospective and retrospective cohort studies and case–controlled studies were analyzed and graded for evidence quality. The epidemiological data confirmed that genetic factors are estimated to account for only approximately 25% of the overall risk of gallstones, while metabolic/environmental factors are at least partially modifiable in stone-free risk groups, and are thus modifiable by primary prevention measures related to diet, lifestyle, and environmental factors (i.e., rapid weight loss, bariatric surgery, somatostatin or analogues therapy, transient gallbladder stasis, and hormone therapy). There is no specific recommendation for the secondary prevention of recurrent gallstones. Family physicians can contribute to preventing gallstones due to their capability to identify and effectively manage several risk factors discussed in this study. Although further studies are needed to better elucidate the involvement of epigenetic factors that may regulate the effect of environment and lifestyle on gene expression in the primary prevention of gallstone formation, preventive interventions are feasible and advisable in the general practice setting. PMID:27468338

  19. New novel mutation of the ATP7B gene in a family with Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Young; Kim, Young-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Woo; Oh, Sun-Young; Kim, Dal-Sik; Shin, Byoung-Soo

    2012-02-15

    Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism. The WD gene codes for a copper transporting P-type ATPase (ATP7B) are located on chromosome 13q14.3. Mutation of this gene disrupts copper homeostasis, resulting in the accumulation of copper in the liver, brain, kidneys and corneas and copper toxication at these sites. Since the detection of the WD gene in 1993, approximately 300 disease-specific muations have been identified. We recently evaluated a Korean family with WD. The proband, a 17-year-old boy, visited our hospital due to abnormal behaviors including generalized slow movement, dysphagia, drooling and ataxia. Laboratory results revealed decreases in serum copper and ceruloplasmin and an increase in urinary excretion of copper. He had liver cirrhosis, brain lesions and Kayser-Fleischer corenal rings. Molecular genetic analysis of the ATP7B gene demonstrated that he was heterozygous for deletion mutation c.2697_2723del27 in exon 11. Further study of family members revealed that his father and younger brother had the same mutation. The c.2697_2723del27 deletion mutation in exon 11 has not yet been reported as a causative muation of WD and is an in-frame deletion not expected to lead to a frame shift. Therefore, we report a novel mutation of the ATP7B gene in a family with WD. PMID:22075048

  20. An emerging role for the miR-26 family in cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Icli, Basak; Dorbala, Pranav; Feinberg, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    In response to acute myocardial infarction (MI), a complex series of cellular and molecular signaling events orchestrate the myocardial remodeling that ensues weeks to months after injury. Clinical, epidemiological, and pathological studies demonstrate that inadequate or impaired angiogenesis after myocardial injury is often associated with decreased left ventricular (LV) function and clinical outcomes. The microRNA family, miR-26, plays diverse roles in regulating key aspects of cellular growth, development, and activation. Recent evidence supports a central role for the miR-26 family in cardiovascular disease by controlling critical signaling pathways, such as BMP/SMAD1 signaling, and targets relevant to endothelial cell growth, angiogenesis, and LV function post-MI. Emerging studies of the miR-26 family in other cell types including vascular smooth muscle cells, cardiac fibroblasts, and cardiomyocytes suggest that miR-26 may bear important implications for a range of cardiovascular repair mechanisms. This review examines the current knowledge of the miR-26 family’s role in key cell types that critically control cardiovascular disease under pathological and physiological stimuli PMID:25066487

  1. Identification of a novel mutation in the presenilin 1 gene in a Chinese Alzheimer's disease family.

    PubMed

    Deng, Bo; Lian, Yan; Wang, Xin; Zeng, Fan; Jiao, Bin; Wang, Ye-Ran; Liang, Chun-Rong; Liu, Yu-Hui; Bu, Xian-Le; Yao, Xiu-Qing; Zhu, Chi; Shen, Lu; Zhou, Hua-Dong; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Yan-Jiang

    2014-10-01

    This study has identified a gene mutation in a Chinese family with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Family members were screened by a set of medical examinations and neuropsychological tests. Their DNA was extracted from blood cells and sequenced for gene mutation in the amyloid precursor protein (APP), the presenilin 1 (PS1) and the presenilin 2 (PS2) genes. Genetic analysis showed that the AD patients in the family harbored a T to G missense mutation at the position 314 in exon 4 of the PS1 gene, resulting in a change of F105C in amino acid sequence. Clinical manifestation of these patients included memory loss, counting difficulty, personality change, disorientation, dyscalculia, agnosia, aphasia, and apraxia, which was similar to that of the familial AD (FAD) patients harboring other PS1 mutations. We intend to add a novel mutation F105C of the PS1 gene to the pool of FAD mutations. With the current available genetic data, mutations of the PS1 gene account for the majority of gene mutations in Chinese FAD. PMID:24737487

  2. Assessing family caregiver skill in managing behavioral symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Farran, Carol J.; Fogg, Louis G.; McCann, Judith J.; Etkin, Caryn; Dong, Xinqi; Barnes, Lisa L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This measurement study operationalized family caregiver skill in managing behavioral symptoms associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) by testing a Caregiver Assessment of Behavioral Skill-Self Report measure (CAB-SR). Method A cross-sectional design was used. Caregivers had a family member with possible/probable AD, resided at home with the care recipient and provided the majority of care (N=82). The mail-administered assessment included the CAB-SR and other care recipient and caregiver measures. Results Preliminary CAB-SR reliability and validity were determined, using reliability, factor analytic and correlational procedures. Conclusion This measure provides a preliminary assessment of caregiver skill in managing behavioral symptoms of AD and shows promise for use in research and clinical intervention settings. PMID:21500018

  3. Using Family Health History for Chronic Disease Prevention in the Age of Genomics: Translation to Health Education Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Carl; Novilla, Lelinneth; Barnes, Michael; De La Cruz, Natalie; Meacham, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    Advances in the field of human genomics have important implications for the prevention of chronic disease. In response to these advancements, public health professionals--including health educators--must become competent in the principles underlying the interface between genomics and the use of family health history. Family health history captures…

  4. Family-based association analysis implicates IL-4 in susceptibility to Kawasaki disease

    PubMed Central

    Burns, JC; Shimizu, C; Shike, H; Newburger, JW; Sundel, RP; Baker, AL; Matsubara, T; Ishikawa, Y; Brophy, VA; Cheng, S; Grow, MA; Steiner, LL; Kono, N; Cantor, RM

    2010-01-01

    Several compelling lines of evidence suggest an important influence of genetic variation in susceptibility to Kawasaki disease (KD), an acute vasculitis that causes coronary artery aneurysms in children. We performed a family-based genotyping study to test for association between KD and 58 genes involved in cardiovascular disease and inflammation. By analysis of a cohort of 209 KD trios using the transmission disequilibrium test, we documented the asymmetric transmission of five alleles including the interleukin-4 (IL-4) C(−589)T allele (P = 0.03). Asymmetric transmission of the IL-4 C(−589)T was replicated in a second, independent cohort of 60 trios (P = 0.05, combined P = 0.002). Haplotypes of alleles in IL-4, colony-stimulating factor 2 (CSF2), IL-13, and transcription factor 7 (TCF7), all located in the interleukin gene cluster on 5q31, were also asymmetrically transmitted. The reported associations of KD with atopic dermatitis and allergy, elevated serum IgE levels, eosinophilia, and increased circulating numbers of monocyte/macrophages expressing the low-affinity IgE receptor (FCεR2) may be related to effects of IL-4. Thus, the largest family-based genotyping study of KD patients to date suggests that genetic variation in the IL-4 gene, or regions linked to IL-4, plays an important role in KD pathogenesis and disease susceptibility. PMID:15889128

  5. Neuropsychiatric symptoms of the elderly with Alzheimer's disease and the family caregivers' distress 1

    PubMed Central

    Storti, Luana Baldin; Quintino, Débora Teles; Silva, Natália Michelato; Kusumota, Luciana; Marques, Sueli

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to analyze the relationship between the distress of the family caregiver and the presence of neuropsychiatric symptoms in elderly patients with Alzheimer's disease or mixed dementia. Method: a descriptive, cross-sectional study conducted in the Geriatric and Dementias Clinic of a general tertiary hospital, with 96 elderly people with Alzheimer's disease or mixed dementia and their family caregivers. Questionnaires to characterize the elderly and caregivers, and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory were used. Descriptive statistics and Pearson correlation test were performed. Results: 68.7% of the elderly were women, average age 80.8 years, 56.2% had Alzheimer's disease and 43.7%, mixed dementia. Among caregivers, 90.6% were women, average age 56, 70.8% took care of parents and 64.6% lived with the elderly. There was a strong (r = 0.82) and significant (p <0.01) correlation between the total score on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory and the total score on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Distress and strong (r = 0.80) and significant (p <0 01) correlation between the total score on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Distress and the number of neuropsychiatric symptoms, i.e., the higher the number, frequency and severity of these symptoms in the elderly, the more intense is the caregiver distress. Conclusion: the presence of neuropsychiatric symptoms in the elderly was related to increased distress in caregivers. PMID:27533264

  6. Exploring Spirituality in Family Caregivers of Patients With Primary Malignant Brain Tumors Across the Disease Trajectory

    PubMed Central

    Newberry, Alyssa G.; Jean Choi, Chien-Wen; Donovan, Heidi S.; Schulz, Richard; Bender, Catherine; Given, Barbara; Sherwood, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To determine whether the perceived level of spirituality in family caregivers of patients with primary malignant brain tumors (PMBTs) changes across the disease trajectory. Design Ongoing descriptive, longitudinal study. Setting Southwestern Pennsylvania. Sample 50 family caregivers of patients with PMBT. Methods Caregivers and care recipients were recruited at time of diagnosis. Participants were interviewed at two subse-quent time points, four and eight months following diagnosis. Main Research Variables Care recipients’ symptoms, neuro-psychologic status, and physical function, as well as caregiver social support. Findings Results showed no significant difference in spirituality scores reported at baseline and eight months (p = 0.8), suggesting that spirituality may be a stable trait across the disease trajectory. Conclusions Spirituality remains relatively stable along the course of the disease trajectory. Reports of caregiver depressive symptoms and anxiety were lower when paired with higher reports of spirituality. Implications for Nursing Clinicians can better identify caregivers at risk for negative outcomes by identifying those who report lower levels of spirituality. Future interventions should focus on the development and implementation of interventions that provide protective buffers such as increased social support. Knowledge Translation Spirituality is a relatively stable trait. High levels of spirituality can serve as a protective buffer from negative mental health outcomes. Caregivers with low levels of spirituality may be at risk for greater levels of burden, anxiety, and stress. PMID:23615145

  7. A Novel Missense Mutation of GATA4 in a Chinese Family with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Sun; Fu, Qihua; Sun, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most prevalent type of birth defect in human, with high morbidity in infant. Several genes essential for heart development have been identified. GATA4 is a pivotal transcription factor that can regulate the cardiac development. Many GATA4 mutations have been identified in patients with different types of CHD. Aims In this study, the NKX2-5, HAND1 and GATA4 coding regions were sequenced in a family spanning three generations in which seven patients had CHD. Disease-causing potential variation in this family was evaluated by bioinformatics programs and the transcriptional activity of mutant protein was analyzed by the dual luciferase reporter assay. Results A novel GATA4 mutation, c.C931T (p.R311W), was identified and co-segregated with the affected patients in this family. The bioinformatics programs predicted this heterozygous mutation to be deleterious and the cross-species alignment of GATA4 sequences showed that the mutation occurred within a highly conserved amino acid. Even though it resided in the nuclear localization signal domain, the mutant protein didn’t alter its intracellular distribution. Nevertheless, further luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that the p.R311W mutation reduced the ability of GATA4 to activate its downstream target gene. Conclusions Our study identified a novel mutation in GATA4 that likely contributed to the CHD in this family. This finding expanded the spectrum of GATA4 mutations and underscored the pathogenic correlation between GATA4 mutations and CHD. PMID:27391137

  8. Late-onset disease is associated with a mild phenotype in children with familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Özdel, Semanur; Özçakar, Z Birsin; Kunt, Seda Şahin; Elhan, Atilla H; Yalçınkaya, Fatoş

    2016-07-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease, characterised by recurrent, self-limited attacks of fever with serositis. Recently, it was shown that patients with early disease onset during childhood period had more severe disease. The aim of this study was to describe the demographic, clinical and genetic features of FMF patients who had late-onset disease during childhood period and to compare them to those with earlier onset patients. Files of patients who had been seen in our department between January 2013 and January 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups according to age of disease onset (group I, ≤8 years; group II, >8 years), and clinical findings were compared between the two groups. The study group comprised 317 FMF patients. There were 267 patients in group I and 50 patients in Group II. Median attack frequency was 24/year in group I and 12/year in group II (p < 0.05). Fever and M694V homozygosity were less frequently detected in group II (p = 0.003 and p = 0.022). Median delay in diagnosis was 24 months in group I and 12 months in group II (p = 0.002). Disease severity scores and final colchicine dosages were lower in group II (p < 0.001 and p = 0.003). Only a small number of FMF patients had disease onset at older ages in childhood period. It seems that FMF patients with late-onset disease have milder illness. However, more readily expression of their clinical findings in older ages yields earlier diagnosis in this group. PMID:26842301

  9. Genetic polymorphism of MMP family and coronary disease susceptibility: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Shi, Jingpu; Fu, Lingyu; Wang, Hailong; Zhou, Bo; Wu, Xiaomei

    2012-03-01

    The issue that genetic polymorphism of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family is in association with coronary disease is controversial. So we did a meta-analysis to clarify it clearly. We made a literature search of PubMed, the Web of Science, and Cochrane Collaboration's database to identify eligible reports. The methodological quality of each included studies was assessed. We calculated the pooled ORs with their 95%CI for each genetic polymorphism in STATA 11 software. Separate analysis was performed to address the consistency of results across the subgroup with different continents. A total of 39 studies were included, with a sample of 42269 individuals. This meta-analysis provided evidence that genetic polymorphism of MMP1-1607 1G/2G, MMP3-Gly45lys, MMP3-376 G/C, MMP3-1171 5A/6A, MMP9-1562 C/T and MMP9-R279Q have a small to medium effect on incidence of coronary disease. There was no evidence that MMP1-519 A/G, MMP1-340 T/C and MMP2-1306 C/T polymorphism could increase risk of coronary disease. Results from subgroup analysis supported a relation between MMP3-1711 5A allele, MMP9-1562 C allele and coronary disease especially in Asian population. The results provide moderate association between the six common genetic polymorphism of matrix metalloproteinase family and coronary disease. However, the challenge for researcher is identifying separate effect on different races. PMID:22226810

  10. The health-disease process and the family health strategy: the user's perspective1

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Débora de Souza; Tenório, Elainey de Albuquerque; Brêda, Mércia Zeviane; Mishima, Silvana Martins

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze the meanings Primary Health Care users attribute to their health-disease process and the services used. METHODS: this qualitative research uses the focus group technique to interview two groups of users the service monitors. The first is a group of elderly people and the second of pregnant women. To analyze the meanings, the discourse analysis technique and the reference framework of health promotion are used. RESULTS: the group of elderly, being mostly female arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus patients, visualizes the health-disease process as the evolution of human existence controlled by divine power, signifying the health service as a blessing in the control of the disease. The Group of young pregnant women signified health as the ability for self-care and disease as the disability for that purposes, considering the Primary Health Care service as responsible for the recovery of individual and family health. FINAL CONSIDERATIONS: the users demonstrated dissatisfaction with bureaucratic and vertical relations present at the health services. In each group, it was observed that the meanings for health and disease and meanings of the health service the users elaborated can be related. PMID:25591086

  11. The expressivist objection to prenatal testing: the experiences of families living with genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Boardman, Felicity Kate

    2014-04-01

    The expressivist objection to prenatal testing is acknowledged as a significant critique of prenatal testing practices most commonly advanced by disability rights supporters. Such writers argue that prenatal testing and selective termination practices are objectionable as they express disvalue not only of the foetus being tested, but also of disabled people as a whole, by focusing exclusively on the disabling trait. While the objection has been widely critiqued on the basis of its theoretical incoherence, this paper highlights the way in which it, nevertheless, is a significant mediator in decisions around the use of reproductive genetic technologies. By drawing on 41 in-depth qualitative interviews (drawn from a sample of 61) conducted in the UK between 2007 and 2009 with families and individuals living with a genetic disease, Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA), this paper highlights the ways in which expressivist objections feature prominently in the reproductive decisions of families living with SMA and the significant emotional burden they represent. While the literature on the expressivist objection has focused on the reproductive decisions of those undergoing prenatal testing for a condition of which they have little (or no) prior knowledge, the context of intimate familial relationships and extensive experience with the tested-for condition fundamentally alters the nature and impact of expressivist objections within families living with an inheritable condition. By focussing on the reproductive decisions of families living with SMA and their strategic management of the expressivist objection, this paper will address the call, made primarily by disability rights supporters, for 'experientially based' (as opposed to medical) information about the tested-for disability to be made available to would-be parents considering selective termination. It will be argued that parents' experiential knowledge of the tested-for disability can, in fact, amplify expressivist

  12. Qualitative Evaluation of Cardiovascular Diseases Management in Family Medicine Team in One Year Level

    PubMed Central

    Beganlic, Azijada; Pavljasevic, Suzana; Kreitmayer, Sanda; Zildzic, Muharem; Softic, Albina; Selmanovic, Senada; Becarevic, Munevera

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the leading death cause in modern world and are the most public health problem. WHO program for CVD contains: prevention, command and follow up of CVD in global level. Aim: Investigate CVD frequency in family medicine team in 2012.year (one year period of time) and qualitative management prevention and clinical services management quality of CVD together with recommended standards. Patients and methods: clinical revision of clinical standard practice patients with CVD was provided in Family medicine team in Public Health Centre Tuzla for the period of time from January 01 2012 - December 31 2012. For quality of realized services, AKAZ standards were based for: chapter 2. Health promotion and diseases prevention 2.5. preventive clinical services; chapter 3. Clinical services, standard 3.1. Coronary diseases and standard 3.2. TIA and Stroke. From CVD register next parameters had been used: age, gender, disease diagnose, therapy, blood pressure values, total cholesterol values, ß blockers therapy, anticoagulant therapy prescription, smoker status, stop smoking recommendation and influenza vaccination recommendation. Statistical approach: All results were taken in Excel program and statistically analyzed. Descriptive standard tests were taken with measurement of central tendency and dispersion. For significant differentials achieved with χ² chances relation was taken (Odds Ratio-OR) with 95% relevant security. All tests were leveled in statistical significant from 95% (p<0,05). Results: Considering total registered habitants number 1448 (males 624 females 824) total diseases of usually CVD in Team 1 family medicine 531 (36,67%). The most frequent disease was hypertension which was presented in 30,31% of registered patients but in total CVD illness was present in 82,67%. In relation with total patients number (531), female prevalence from CVD 345:186 males vs. 65%:35%; P=0,001 and was statistically significantly higher

  13. BDNF genetic variants are associated with onset age of familial Parkinson disease: GenePD Study.

    PubMed

    Karamohamed, S; Latourelle, J C; Racette, B A; Perlmutter, J S; Wooten, G F; Lew, M; Klein, C; Shill, H; Golbe, L I; Mark, M H; Guttman, M; Nicholson, G; Wilk, J B; Saint-Hilaire, M; DeStefano, A L; Prakash, R; Tobin, S; Williamson, J; Suchowersky, O; Labell, N; Growdon, B N J; Singer, C; Watts, R; Goldwurm, S; Pezzoli, G; Baker, K B; Giroux, M L; Pramstaller, P P; Burn, D J; Chinnery, P; Sherman, S; Vieregge, P; Litvan, I; Gusella, J F; Myers, R H; Parsian, A

    2005-12-13

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) stimulates neuronal growth and protects nigral dopamine neurons in animal models of Parkinson disease (PD). Therefore, BDNF is a candidate gene for PD. The authors investigated five single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 597 cases of familial PD. Homozygosity for the rare allele of the functional BDNF G196A (Val66Met) variant was associated with a 5.3-year older onset age (p = 0.0001). These findings suggest that BDNF may influence PD onset age. PMID:16344533

  14. Statewide implementation of "reducing disability in Alzheimer's disease": impact on family caregiver outcomes.

    PubMed

    Menne, Heather L; Bass, David M; Johnson, Justin D; Primetica, Branka; Kearney, Keith R; Bollin, Salli; Molea, Marcus J; Teri, Linda

    2014-01-01

    There have been few replications of efficacious evidence-based programs for dementia caregivers offered in community settings. This study highlights the replication of the evidence-based Reducing Disability in Alzheimer's Disease program and explores the changes in outcomes for participating caregivers and whether those changes are related to level of program utilization. With data from 219 caregivers, regression results indicate that more exercise sessions are associated with a decrease in caregiver strain and more behavior management sessions are associated with a decrease in unmet needs after 3 months. Findings demonstrate how a multicomponent program can have positive benefits for family caregivers. PMID:24329593

  15. Severe heart disease in an unusual case of familial amyloid polyneuropathy type I.

    PubMed

    Oliveira Santos, Miguel; Brito, Dulce

    2013-09-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy type I (FAP type I) is a rare hereditary systemic amyloidosis caused by the Val30Met mutation in the transthyretin (TTR) gene. The clinical onset and spectrum are variable and depend on phenotypic heterogeneity. Cardiac complications (dysrhythmias and conduction disturbances, cardiomyopathy and dysautonomia) indicate a poor prognosis, even after liver transplantation. We report an atypical case of FAP type I, highlighting the severe cardiac involvement and its complications. Early diagnosis of amyloid heart disease is increasingly important in the context of several clinical trials of promising new and experimental drugs. PMID:23993291

  16. Family History

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Family Health History Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... visit this page: About CDC.gov . Family Health History The Basics Family Health History & Chronic Disease Planning ...

  17. Case Studies Illustrating Focal Alzheimer's, Fluent Aphasia, Late-Onset Memory Loss, and Rapid Dementia.

    PubMed

    Camsari, Gamze Balci; Murray, Melissa E; Graff-Radford, Neill R

    2016-08-01

    Many dementia subtypes have more shared signs and symptoms than defining ones. We review 8 cases with 4 overlapping syndromes and demonstrate how to distinguish the cases. These include focal cortical presentations of Alzheimer's disease (AD; posterior cortical atrophy and corticobasal syndrome [CBS]), fluent aphasia (semantic dementia and logopenic aphasia), late-onset slowly progressive dementia (hippocampal sclerosis and limbic predominant AD) and rapidly progressive dementia (Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and limbic encephalitis). Recognizing the different syndromes can help the clinician to improve their diagnostic skills, leading to improved patient outcomes by early and accurate diagnosis, prompt treatment, and appropriate counseling and guidance. PMID:27445249

  18. Hiding in plain sight: a closer look at posterior cortical atrophy.

    PubMed

    Beh, Shin C; Muthusamy, Brinda; Calabresi, Peter; Hart, John; Zee, David; Patel, Vivek; Frohman, Elliot

    2015-02-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome dominated by deterioration of higher visual function (particularly visuospatial and visuoperceptual abilities). It is most commonly due to Alzheimer's disease pathology, but may also be caused by dementia with Lewy bodies, corticobasal degeneration or Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Patients often present to optometrists, ophthalmologists and/or neurologists with non-specific visual complaints, and unless clinicians seek the specific symptoms and signs of PCA (beyond that of the 'standard' neurological examination), this infrequent disorder is easily missed, delaying its diagnosis and treatment. We review the clinical features of PCA, focusing on its visual manifestations, to help neurologists recognise this important syndrome. PMID:25216669

  19. Kuru: the old epidemic in a new mirror.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, Lev G

    2002-07-01

    The kuru epidemic lasted almost a century; it started in 1901-1902, reached epidemic proportions in the mid-1950s, and disappeared in the 1990s. Kuru is the prototype member of a group of disorders known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases. Recent data on the genetics and pathogenesis of TSEs contribute to a better understanding of the documented kuru phenomena, and vice versa, observations made during the kuru epidemic are immensely helpful in understanding the epidemic of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease that is currently developing in Europe. The major goal of this review is to identify and illustrate these points. PMID:12270735

  20. [Kuru].

    PubMed

    Mori, S

    1997-04-01

    Kuru, the progressive and fatal neurologic disorder which occurred exclusively among natives of the New Guinea Highlands, were reviewed. Early history of kuru investigation, epidemiology, clinical findings, pathological findings, successful transmission with chimpanzees, from unconventional virus to prion hypothesis and the similarities to "variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease" were discussed in the literature. Although the incidence of kuru has markedly declined with the suppression of cannibalism, it is important from a historical perspective because it was the first human transmissible prion disease to be recognized. PMID:9103906

  1. Kuru: A Journey Back in Time from Papua New Guinea to the Neanderthals’ Extinction

    PubMed Central

    Liberski, Pawel P.

    2013-01-01

    Kuru, the first human transmissible spongiform encephalopathy was transmitted to chimpanzees by D. Carleton Gajdusek (1923–2008). In this review, I briefly summarize the history of this seminal discovery along its epidemiology, clinical picture, neuropathology and molecular genetics. The discovery of kuru opened new windows into the realms of human medicine and was instrumental in the later transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease as well as the relevance that bovine spongiform encephalopathy had for transmission to humans. The transmission of kuru was one of the greatest contributions to biomedical sciences of the 20th century. PMID:25437203

  2. Analysis on the susceptibility genes in two chinese pedigrees with familial Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changshui; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Yanmin; Ma, Jianjun; Kawakami, Hideshi; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Kamada, Masaki

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To screen the susceptibility genes in Chinese pedigrees with early-onset familial Parkinson's disease (FPD). Methods. Fifty-one genomic DNA samples extracted from two Chinese pedigrees with FPD, the alpha-synuclein genes (SNCA), the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2(LRRK2), PINK1(PTEN-induced putative kinase 1), PARK7(Protein DJ1), PARK2(Parkinson juvenile disease protein 2), the glucocerebrosidase (GBA), and ATP(Ezrin-binding protein PACE-1), were sequenced by the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The gene dose of SNCA was checked. Results. There were only two missense mutations observed, respectively, at exon 5 of LRRK2 and exon 10 of PARK2, and both were enrolled in SNPs. Conclusion. No meaningful mutations could be detected, and other susceptibility genes should be detected in FDP patients in China. PMID:21188226

  3. Complex inheritance of ABCA4 disease: four mutations in a family with multiple macular phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Winston; Xie, Yajing; Zernant, Jana; Yuan, Bo; Bearelly, Srilaxmi; Tsang, Stephen H; Lupski, James R; Allikmets, Rando

    2016-01-01

    Over 800 mutations in the ABCA4 gene cause autosomal recessive Stargardt disease. Due to extensive genetic heterogeneity, observed variant-associated phenotypes can manifest tremendous variability of expression. Furthermore, the high carrier frequency of pathogenic ABCA4 alleles in the general population (~1:20) often results in pseudo-dominant inheritance patterns further complicating the diagnosis and characterization of affected individuals. This study describes a genotype/phenotype analysis of an unusual family with multiple macular disease phenotypes spanning across two generations and segregating four distinct ABCA4 mutant alleles. Complete sequencing of ABCA4 discovered two known missense mutations, p.C54Y and p.G1961E. Array comparative genomic hybridization revealed a large novel deletion combined with a small insertion, c.6148-698_c.6670del/insTGTGCACCTCCCTAG, and complete sequencing of the entire ABCA4 genomic locus uncovered a new deep intronic variant, c.302+68C>T. Patients with the p.G1961E mutation had the mildest, confined maculopathy phenotype with peripheral flecks while those with all other mutant allele combinations exhibited a more advanced stage of generalized retinal and choriocapillaris atrophy. This family epitomizes the clinical and genetic complexity of ABCA4-associated diseases. It contained variants from all classes of mutations, in the coding region, deep intronic, both single nucleotide variants and copy number variants that accounted for varying phenotypes segregating in an apparent dominant fashion. Unequivocally defining disease-associated alleles in the ABCA4 locus requires a multifaceted approach that includes advanced mutation detection methods and a thorough analysis of clinical phenotypes. PMID:26527198

  4. Role of Trisomy 21 Mosaicism in Sporadic and Familial Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Potter, Huntington; Granic, Antoneta; Caneus, Julbert

    2016-01-01

    Trisomy 21 and the consequent extra copy of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene and increased beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptide production underlie the universal development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology and high risk of AD dementia in people with Down syndrome (DS). Trisomy 21 and other forms of aneuploidy also arise among neurons and peripheral cells in both sporadic and familial AD and in mouse and cell models thereof, reinforcing the conclusion that AD and DS are two sides of the same coin. The demonstration that 90% of the neurodegeneration in AD can be attributed to the selective loss of aneuploid neurons generated over the course of the disease indicates that aneuploidy is an essential feature of the pathogenic pathway leading to the depletion of neuronal cell populations. Trisomy 21 mosaicism also occurs in neurons and other cells from patients with Niemann-Pick C1 disease and from patients with familial or sporadic frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), as well as in their corresponding mouse and cell models. Biochemical studies have shown that Aβ induces mitotic spindle defects, chromosome mis-segregation, and aneuploidy in cultured cells by inhibiting specific microtubule motors required for mitosis. These data indicate that neuronal trisomy 21 and other types of aneuploidy characterize and likely contribute to multiple neurodegenerative diseases and are a valid target for therapeutic intervention. For example, reducing extracellular calcium or treating cells with lithium chloride (LiCl) blocks the induction of trisomy 21 by Aβ. The latter finding is relevant in light of recent reports of a lowered risk of dementia in bipolar patients treated with LiCl and in the stabilization of cognition in AD patients treated with LiCl. PMID:26651340

  5. Relation Between Family History of Premature Coronary Artery Disease and the Risk of Death in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Abdi-Ali, Ahmed; Shaheen, AbdelAziz; Southern, Danielle; Zhang, Mei; Knudtson, Merril; White, James; Graham, Michelle; James, Mathew T; Wilton, Stephen B

    2016-02-01

    Family history (FHx) of premature coronary artery disease (CAD) is a risk factor for development of incident cardiovascular disease. However the association between FHx and outcomes in patients with established CAD is unclear. We followed 84,373 patients with angiographic CAD enrolled in the inclusive Alberta Provincial Project for Outcomes Assessment in Coronary Heart Disease registry between April 2002 and March 2013. Overall, 25,566 (30%) self-reported an FHx of CAD, defined as a first-degree relative with premature CAD (men, age <55 years; women, age <65 years). We tested the association between FHx and all-cause mortality using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. After adjusting for baseline differences in clinical characteristics, indication, and extent of CAD, FHx was associated with reduced all-cause mortality over a median 5.6 years in follow-up (hazard ratio [HR] 0.77 [95% CI 0.73 to 0.80]). The magnitude of this protective association was weaker in those with versus without a previous myocardial infarction (HR 0.87 [95% CI 0.81 to 0.93] versus 0.72 [0.69 to 0.76], interaction p <0.0001) and slightly stronger in those presenting with versus without an acute coronary syndrome (HR 0.74 [0.70 to 0.79] versus 0.80 [0.75 to 0.85], interaction p = 0.08). There was attenuation of association with increasing age, but FHx remained protective even in those aged older than 80 years (HR 0.86 [0.77 to 0.95]). In conclusion, in patients with angiographic CAD, self-reported FHx of premature CAD is associated with improved long-term survival rate, independent of clinical characteristics, mode of presentation, and extent of disease. Further investigation of potential patient- and system-level mediators of this seemingly paradoxical relation is required. PMID:26723106

  6. Homozygosity Mapping and Targeted Sanger Sequencing Reveal Genetic Defects Underlying Inherited Retinal Disease in Families from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, Nadia Khalida; Siddiqui, Sorath Noorani; Mustafa, Bilal; Ayub, Humaira; Ali, Liaqat; Ahmad, Shakeel; Micheal, Shazia; Hussain, Alamdar; Shah, Syed Tahir Abbas; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Ahmed, Waqas; Khan, Yar Muhammad; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Haer-Wigman, Lonneke; Collin, Rob W. J.; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Qamar, Raheel; Cremers, Frans P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Homozygosity mapping has facilitated the identification of the genetic causes underlying inherited diseases, particularly in consanguineous families with multiple affected individuals. This knowledge has also resulted in a mutation dataset that can be used in a cost and time effective manner to screen frequent population-specific genetic variations associated with diseases such as inherited retinal disease (IRD). Methods We genetically screened 13 families from a cohort of 81 Pakistani IRD families diagnosed with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), retinitis pigmentosa (RP), congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB), or cone dystrophy (CD). We employed genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array analysis to identify homozygous regions shared by affected individuals and performed Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes located in the sizeable homozygous regions. In addition, based on population specific mutation data we performed targeted Sanger sequencing (TSS) of frequent variants in AIPL1, CEP290, CRB1, GUCY2D, LCA5, RPGRIP1 and TULP1, in probands from 28 LCA families. Results Homozygosity mapping and Sanger sequencing of IRD-associated genes revealed the underlying mutations in 10 families. TSS revealed causative variants in three families. In these 13 families four novel mutations were identified in CNGA1, CNGB1, GUCY2D, and RPGRIP1. Conclusions Homozygosity mapping and TSS revealed the underlying genetic cause in 13 IRD families, which is useful for genetic counseling as well as therapeutic interventions that are likely to become available in the near future. PMID:25775262

  7. A Yoga and Compassion Meditation Program Reduces Stress in Familial Caregivers of Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Danucalov, M. A. D.; Kozasa, E. H.; Ribas, K. T.; Galduróz, J. C. F.; Garcia, M. C.; Verreschi, I. T. N.; Oliveira, K. C.; Romani de Oliveira, L.; Leite, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    Familial caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease exhibit reduced quality of life and increased stress levels. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of an 8-week yoga and compassion meditation program on the perceived stress, anxiety, depression, and salivary cortisol levels in familial caregivers. A total of 46 volunteers were randomly assigned to participate in a stress-reduction program for a 2-month period (yoga and compassion meditation program—YCMP group) (n = 25) or an untreated group for the same period of time (control group) (n = 21). The levels of stress, anxiety, depression, and morning salivary cortisol of the participants were measured before and after intervention. The groups were initially homogeneous; however, after intervention, the groups diverged significantly. The YCMP group exhibited a reduction of the stress (P < 0.05), anxiety (P < 0.000001), and depression (P < 0.00001) levels, as well as a reduction in the concentration of salivary cortisol (P < 0.05). Our study suggests that an 8-week yoga and compassion meditation program may offer an effective intervention for reducing perceived stress, anxiety, depression, and salivary cortisol in familial caregivers. PMID:23690846

  8. Machado–Joseph disease in a Nigerian family: mutational origin and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Ogun, Shamsideen Abayomi; Martins, Sandra; Adebayo, Philip B; Dawodu, Clara O; Sequeiros, Jorge; Finkel, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Machado–Joseph disease (MJD) has been described in Africans, but no cases have been reported from Nigeria. Current MJD global distribution results from both the ancestral populations-of-origin and the founder effects of mutations, some as a consequence of the Portuguese sea travels in the 15th to 16th century. Two main ancestral haplotypes have been identified: the Machado lineage, which is more recent, predominant in families of Portuguese extraction, and the Joseph lineage, which is much older and worldwide spread, postulated to have an Asian origin. We report a Nigerian family with MJD from Calabar, once settled by Portuguese slave traders, and assessed its mutational origin. The proband was a 33-year-old man with progressive unsteady gait, weakness of all limbs, dysphagia, dysarthria, urinary frequency and diaphoresis. He had end-of-gaze nystagmus, spastic quadriparesis and atrophic small muscles of the hand. He showed fibrillation potentials on EMG, and nerve conduction studies suggested a central axonopathy without demyelination. This family bears the Joseph haplotype, which has a founder effect in the island of Flores, in the Azores (and their descendants in North-America), but is also the most common in non-Portuguese populations worldwide, with an estimated mutation age of around 7000 years. PMID:24781759

  9. A yoga and compassion meditation program reduces stress in familial caregivers of Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Danucalov, M A D; Kozasa, E H; Ribas, K T; Galduróz, J C F; Garcia, M C; Verreschi, I T N; Oliveira, K C; Romani de Oliveira, L; Leite, J R

    2013-01-01

    Familial caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease exhibit reduced quality of life and increased stress levels. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of an 8-week yoga and compassion meditation program on the perceived stress, anxiety, depression, and salivary cortisol levels in familial caregivers. A total of 46 volunteers were randomly assigned to participate in a stress-reduction program for a 2-month period (yoga and compassion meditation program-YCMP group) (n = 25) or an untreated group for the same period of time (control group) (n = 21). The levels of stress, anxiety, depression, and morning salivary cortisol of the participants were measured before and after intervention. The groups were initially homogeneous; however, after intervention, the groups diverged significantly. The YCMP group exhibited a reduction of the stress (P < 0.05), anxiety (P < 0.000001), and depression (P < 0.00001) levels, as well as a reduction in the concentration of salivary cortisol (P < 0.05). Our study suggests that an 8-week yoga and compassion meditation program may offer an effective intervention for reducing perceived stress, anxiety, depression, and salivary cortisol in familial caregivers. PMID:23690846

  10. Deadly Outbreak of Iron Storage Disease (ISD) in Italian Birds of the Family Turdidae

    PubMed Central

    PAVONE, Silvia; SALAMIDA, Sonia; PECORELLI, Ivan; ROSSI, Elisabetta; MANUALI, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A widespread deadly outbreak occurred in captive birds belonging to the family Turdidae in Italy. The present study was performed on 46 dead birds coming from 3 small decoy-bird breeders in central Italy. Only Turdus pilaris, Turdus iliacus, Turdus philomelos and Turdus merula were affected. No other species of bird held by these breeders died. A change of diet before the hunting season was reported from all breeders. Full necropsy of the animals and histological investigations of representative tissue samples were performed. Microscopical examination showed marked iron deposits in liver samples. Bacteriological investigations and molecular analysis to exclude bacterial and viral diseases were carried out. Contamination of food pellet samples by mycotoxins and analysis to detect heavy metal contaminants in food pellet samples were considered. An interesting result was the high iron content found in food pellets. It was higher than that considered suitable for birds, especially for species susceptible to development iron storage disease (ISD). Taken together, the results suggested an outbreak of ISD caused by the high iron content of food given to the birds before the hunting season. The high mortality recorded only in species belonging to the family Turdidae suggests a genetic predisposition in the affected birds. PMID:24920545

  11. Variable expressivity familial cherubism: woman transmitting cherubism without suffering the disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cherubism is classified within the group of benign osteo-fibrous lesions. Aside from facial deformities, it may account for major complications. It has been observed that the disease is caused by a mutation in the gene SH3BP2 (SH3-domain binding protein 2), which is located at chromosome 4pl6.3. Here we present two cases of familial cherubism, uncle and nephew, with variable clinical involvement (“Expressivity”), and one case of a woman (sister and mother, respectively), who transmitted cherubism without suffering the disease. In this article we have shown that, in familial cherubism cases, the mutation is inherited through an autosomal dominant transmission. Mutations affecting gene SH3BP2 cause variable clinical involvement (variable expressivity), involvement can be moderate, severe or may result merely in asymptomatic carriers. Since the possibility of transmission reaches 50% of chances, we believe that it is important to develop genetic counseling for both patients and carriers, in order to prevent or minimize new affected offspring. PMID:24382142

  12. SORL1 rare variants: a major risk factor for familial early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, G; Charbonnier, C; Wallon, D; Quenez, O; Bellenguez, C; Grenier-Boley, B; Rousseau, S; Richard, A-C; Rovelet-Lecrux, A; Le Guennec, K; Bacq, D; Garnier, J-G; Olaso, R; Boland, A; Meyer, V; Deleuze, J-F; Amouyel, P; Munter, H M; Bourque, G; Lathrop, M; Frebourg, T; Redon, R; Letenneur, L; Dartigues, J-F; Génin, E; Lambert, J-C; Hannequin, D; Campion, D

    2016-06-01

    The SORL1 protein plays a protective role against the secretion of the amyloid β peptide, a key event in the pathogeny of Alzheimer's disease. We assessed the impact of SORL1 rare variants in early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) in a case-control setting. We conducted a whole exome analysis among 484 French EOAD patients and 498 ethnically matched controls. After collapsing rare variants (minor allele frequency ≤1%), we detected an enrichment of disruptive and predicted damaging missense SORL1 variants in cases (odds radio (OR)=5.03, 95% confidence interval (CI)=(2.02-14.99), P=7.49.10(-5)). This enrichment was even stronger when restricting the analysis to the 205 cases with a positive family history (OR=8.86, 95% CI=(3.35-27.31), P=3.82.10(-7)). We conclude that predicted damaging rare SORL1 variants are a strong risk factor for EOAD and that the association signal is mainly driven by cases with positive family history. PMID:26303663

  13. Reproductive options for prospective parents in families with Huntington's disease: clinical, psychological and ethical reflections.

    PubMed

    de Die-Smulders, C E M; de Wert, G M W R; Liebaers, I; Tibben, A; Evers-Kiebooms, G

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative late onset disorder. This review of reproductive options aims to increase reproductive confidence and to prevent suffering in relation to family planning around HD and possibly other late onset neurodegenerative disorders. METHODS Selected relevant literature and own views and experiences as clinical geneticists, psychologists and ethicists have been used. RESULTS Possible options, with emphasis on prenatal diagnosis (PD) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to prevent the transmission of HD to the next generation, are described and discussed. They are formally presented in a decision tree, taking into account the presence or absence of a fully penetrant allele (FPA), a reduced penetrant allele (RPA) or an intermediate allele (IA). A table compares invasive and non-invasive PD and PGD. From a psychological perspective, the complex process of counselling and decision-making regarding reproductive options is discussed. Special attention is paid to the decision to avoid the transmission of the mutation and to the confrontation and coping of a mutation-free child growing up with a parent developing disease symptoms. From an ethical point of view, reflections on both PD and PGD are brought forward taking into account the difference between FPA, RPA and IA, direct testing or exclusion testing and taking into account the welfare of the child in the context of medically assisted reproduction. CONCLUSION Recommendations and suggestions for good clinical practice in the reproductive care for HD families are formulated. PMID:23377865

  14. Systematic review and meta-analysis of Japanese familial Alzheimer's disease and FTDP-17.

    PubMed

    Kasuga, Kensaku; Kikuchi, Masataka; Tokutake, Takayoshi; Nakaya, Akihiro; Tezuka, Toshiyuki; Tsukie, Tamao; Hara, Norikazu; Miyashita, Akinori; Kuwano, Ryozo; Ikeuchi, Takeshi

    2015-05-01

    Mutations in APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2 as the genetic causes of familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) have been found in various ethnic populations. A substantial number of FAD pedigrees with mutations have been reported in the Japanese population; however, it remains unclear whether the genetic and clinical features of FAD in the Japanese population differ from those in other populations. To address this issue, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of Japanese FAD and frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) by literature search. Using this analysis, we identified 39 different PSEN1 mutations in 140 patients, 5 APP mutations in 35 patients and 16 MAPT mutations in 84 patients. There was no PSEN2 mutation among Japanese patients. The age at onset in Japanese FAD patients with PSEN1 mutations was significantly younger than that in patients with APP mutations. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with MAPT mutations showed a shorter survival than patients with PSEN1 or APP mutations. Patients with mutations in different genes exhibit characteristic clinical presentations, suggesting that mutations in causative genes may modify the clinical presentations. By collecting and cataloging genetic and clinical information on Japanese FAD and FTDP-17, we developed an original database designated as Japanese Familial Alzheimer's Disease Database, which is accessible at http://alzdb.bri.niigata-u.ac.jp/. PMID:25694106

  15. High prevalence of LRRK2 mutations in familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Joaquim J; Guedes, Leonor Correia; Rosa, Mário Miguel; Coelho, Miguel; van Doeselaar, Marina; Schweiger, Dorothea; Di Fonzo, Alessio; Oostra, Ben A; Sampaio, Cristina; Bonifati, Vincenzo

    2007-06-15

    Mutations in the Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene are the most frequent known cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), but their prevalence varies markedly between populations. Here we studied the frequency and associated phenotype of four recurrent LRRK2 mutations (R1441C, R1441G, R1441H, and G2019S) in familial and sporadic PD from a single referral center in Lisbon, Portugal. Among 138 unrelated PD probands, we identified 9 heterozygous G2019S carriers (6.52%) and 1 heterozygous R1441H carrier (0.72%). The G2019S mutation was present in 4 of the 107 sporadic (3.74%) and in 5 of the 31 familial probands (16.1%). Mutations were not found among 101 Portuguese controls. The G2019S mutation was present on a single haplotype and displayed reduced penetrance. Heterozygous parkin gene mutations were also found in 2 G2019S-positive probands, but their pathogenic role is unclear. The clinical phenotype in patients with LRRK2 mutations was indistinguishable from that of typical PD, including impaired sense of smell. The G2019S mutation is a very common genetic determinant among the Portuguese patients with PD, and the R1441H mutation is also present in this population. These data have important implications for the diagnostic work-up and genetic counseling of patients with this disease in Portugal. PMID:17469194

  16. Familial Currarino syndrome associated with Hirschsprung disease: two cases of a mother and daughter.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Koichi; Nakamura, Tetsuro; Azuma, Takashi; Nakaoka, Tatsuo; Takama, Yuichi; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Horiike, Masaki; Zenitani, Masahiro; Higashio, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Currarino syndrome with Hirschsprung disease (CS-HD) is extremely rare. We present the first family with CS-HD. Case 1: A 28-year-old woman was admitted with severe abdominal distension and dyspnea. She was diagnosed with anal stenosis, hemisacrum, anterior sacral meningocele (ASM), tethered cord (TC), and short-segment aganglionosis. She underwent the modified Duhamel operation after meningocele repair and cord detethering. A bicornuate uterus, bilateral ovarian dermoid cysts, and small rectal duplication were also noted intraoperatively. Case 2: The daughter of case 1 was admitted for abdominal distension and anal stenosis at the age of 17 days. Studies revealed a hemisacrum, ASM, TC, presacral mass, atrial septal defect, polyp in the right nasal cavity, right vesicoureteral reflux, and short-segment aganglionosis. She underwent the modified Soave operation at the age of 1 year and 4 months after meningocele repair, cord detethering, and resection of the presacral mass (epidermoid cyst). In both cases, the aganglionic segments were confirmed by preoperative rectal suction biopsy and postoperative pathological examination on full-thickness rectal specimens. Some causal genes for Currarino syndrome (CS) and Hirschsprung disease (HD) are currently investigated. Thus far, 10 CS-HD cases have been reported, including 6 cases of familial CS. However, all the patients had sporadic HD. Recent reports suggest that anomalies of the enteric nerve system contribute to postoperative constipation in CS cases. PMID:23331821

  17. Exploratory Data from Complete Genomes of Familial Alzheimer Disease Age-at-Onset Outliers

    PubMed Central

    Lalli, Matthew A.; Garcia, Gloria; Madrigal, Lucia; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Arcila, Mary Luz; Kosik, Kenneth S.; Lopera, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Identifying genes that modify the age-at-onset (AAO) of Alzheimer disease and targeting them pharmacologically represent a potential treatment strategy. In this exploratory study, we sequenced the complete genomes of six individuals with familial Alzheimer disease due to the autosomal dominant mutation p.Glu280Ala in PSEN1 (MIM# 104311; NM_000021.3:c.839A>C). The disease and its age-at-onset are highly heritable, motivating our search for genetic variants that modulate AAO. The median AAO of dementia in carriers of the mutant allele is 49 years. Extreme phenotypic outliers for AAO in this genetically isolated population with limited environmental variance are likely to harbor onset-modifying genetic variants. A narrow distribution of AAO in this kindred suggests large effect sizes of genetic determinants of AAO in these outliers. Identity by Descent (IBD) analysis and a combination of bioinformatics filters have suggested several candidate variants for AAO modifiers. Future work and replication studies on these variants may provide mechanistic insights into the etiopathology of Alzheimer disease. PMID:22829467

  18. Cowden's Disease: Familial Goiter and Skin Hamartomas—A Report of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Sogol, Paul B.; Sugawara, Masahiro; Gordon, H. Earl; Shellow, William V. R.; Hernandez, Felix; Hershman, Jerome M.

    1983-01-01

    Multiple hamartoma syndrome (Cowden's disease) consists of characteristic skin lesions of the face, mucous membranes and distal extremities in association with a variety of benign and malignant internal tumors, especially of the thyroid and breast. We describe a family in which the father, daughter and son were found to have goiter associated with the skin lesions of Cowden's disease. Review of the 40 reported cases of this syndrome indicates that thyroid disease occurs in two thirds of patients with Cowden's disease and most often presents as goiter at an early age. Thyroid cancer has occurred in only three (7.5%) of the patients. Surgical removal of the large goiter of the son showed that it was composed of multiple encapsulated follicular adenomas and a few areas of lymphocytic thyroiditis. Studies of the thyroid tissue showed that peroxidase activity was decreased, the thyroglobulin had a reduced content of thyroxine and triiodothyronine (perhaps due to the therapeutic suppression of thyroid-stimulating hormone) and thyroxine 5'-monodeiodinase was greatly increased; increased outer ring monodeiodinase activity may be a characteristic of human follicular adenomas. Images PMID:6636746

  19. Misdiagnosis as steatohepatitis in a family with mild glycogen storage disease type 1a.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Jeng-Jer; Lu, Yung-Hsiu; Huang, Shi-Wei; Huang, Yu-Hsiu; Sun, Chih-Hao; Chiou, Hong-Jen; Liu, Chinsu; Lo, Ming-Yu; Lin, Ching-Yuang; Niu, Dau-Ming

    2012-11-01

    The manifestations of glycogen storage disease type 1a (GSD 1a) are usually so prominent in childhood that it is readily diagnosed by pediatricians. However, a mild form of the disease may only become apparent during adolescence or adulthood. We observed a brother and sister with subtle manifestations of the disease, which was discovered after the brother's son was diagnosed with typical GSD 1a. The adult siblings never suffered from hypoglycemia, had normal fasting blood glucose and liver transaminases at the time of diagnosis, and were taller than average for Chinese. Their only notable disease manifestations were recurrent gouty arthritis associated with hyperuricemia and hyperlipidemia during adolescence. When diagnosed, the brother had multiple benign and malignant hepatic tumors, and died of fulminant metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma 6 months after liver transplantation. p.M121V/p.R83H and p.M121V/p.M121V genotypic constellations of the G6PC gene were identified in this family. Both siblings were homozygous for the newly identified p.M121V mutation. The infant had compound heterozygous mutations, p.R83H and p.M121V. We recommend that mild GSD should be considered in the adolescents with unexplained hyperuricemia and hyperlipidemia, despite the presence of normal blood glucose levels. This report also reminds us that hepatocellular carcinoma could develop even in very mild GSD 1a patients. PMID:22909800

  20. Factors associated with chronic diseases among the elderly receiving treatment under the Family Health Strategy.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Fernanda Batista; Pinho, Lucinéia; Silveira, Marise Fagundes; Botelho, Ana Cristina de Carvalho

    2015-08-01

    The profile of a sample population of elderly receiving treatment under the Family Health Strategy in the municipality of Teófilo Otoni, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil, is described, and the factors associated with diseases prevalence examined. Using simple random sampling, 385 elderly were interviewed using Form A and Elderly Form from the Primary Health Care Information System. The majority of the sample (83.1%) self-reported at least one disease, 69.9% had hypertension, and 17.7% had diabetes. Poisson regression analysis showed that the main factors associated with hypertension and other diseases were being non-white, having a low level of education, medication use, dental prosthesis use, and lack of a private health plan. The prevalence of diabetes was greater among women and individuals who depended on other people to live. It can be concluded that this sample population of elderly has a generally low socioeconomic status and are more susceptible to developing diseases, particularly hypertension. Diabetes should be controlled although had relatively low prevalence. It is suggested investments in structuring the health system network to provide adequate care for the elderly and in training health professionals to play an effective role in improving the quality of life of the elderly in Brazil. PMID:26221814

  1. The performance of oyster families exposed to Dermo disease is contingent on the source of pathogen exposure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we report preliminary results from a course of research integrating pathology, feeding ecology, genetics and genomics to address resistance to Dermo disease in eastern oysters. We challenged six oyster families with Perkinsus marinus, the etiological agent of Dermo disease, through either direc...

  2. Lifestyle, Family History, and Risk of Idiopathic Parkinson Disease: A Large Danish Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kenborg, Line; Lassen, Christina F.; Ritz, Beate; Andersen, Klaus K.; Christensen, Jane; Schernhammer, Eva S.; Hansen, Johnni; Wermuth, Lene; Rod, Naja H.; Olsen, Jørgen H.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between Parkinson disease (PD) and smoking has been examined in several studies, but little is known about smoking in conjunction with other behaviors and a family history of PD. Using unconditional logistic regression analysis, we studied individual and joint associations of these factors with idiopathic PD among 1,808 Danish patients who were diagnosed in 1996–2009 and matched to 1,876 randomly selected population controls. Although there was a downward trend in duration of smoking, this was not observed for daily tobacco consumption. A moderate intake of caffeine (3.1–5 cups/day) was associated with a lower odds ratio for PD (0.45, 95% confidence interval: 0.34, 0.62), as was a moderate intake of alcohol (3.1–7 units/week) (odds ratio = 0.60, 95% confidence interval: 0.58, 0.84); a higher daily intake did not reduce the odds further. When these behaviors were studied in combination with smoking, the odds ratios were lower than those for each one alone. Compared with never smokers with no family history of PD, never smokers who did have a family history had an odds ratio of 2.81 (95% confidence interval: 1.91, 4.13); for smokers with a family history, the odds ratio was 1.60 (95% confidence interval: 1.15, 2.23). In conclusion, duration of smoking seems to be more important than intensity in the relationship between smoking and idiopathic PD. The finding of lower risk estimates for smoking in combination with caffeine or alcohol requires further confirmation. PMID:25925389

  3. Pesticide exposure and risk of Parkinson's disease: A family-based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Dana B; Martin, Eden R; Mayhew, Gregory M; Stajich, Jeffrey M; Jewett, Rita; Stacy, Mark A; Scott, Burton L; Vance, Jeffery M; Scott, William K

    2008-01-01

    Background Pesticides and correlated lifestyle factors (e.g., exposure to well-water and farming) are repeatedly reported risk factors for Parkinson's disease (PD), but few family-based studies have examined these relationships. Methods Using 319 cases and 296 relative and other controls, associations of direct pesticide application, well-water consumption, and farming residences/occupations with PD were examined using generalized estimating equations while controlling for age-at-examination, sex, cigarette smoking, and caffeine consumption. Results Overall, individuals with PD were significantly more likely to report direct pesticide application than their unaffected relatives (odds ratio = 1.61; 95% confidence interval, 1.13–2.29). Frequency, duration, and cumulative exposure were also significantly associated with PD in a dose-response pattern (p ≤ 0.013). Associations of direct pesticide application did not vary by sex but were modified by family history of PD, as significant associations were restricted to individuals with no family history. When classifying pesticides by functional type, both insecticides and herbicides were found to significantly increase risk of PD. Two specific insecticide classes, organochlorines and organophosphorus compounds, were significantly associated with PD. Consuming well-water and living/working on a farm were not associated with PD. Conclusion These data corroborate positive associations of broadly defined pesticide exposure with PD in families, particularly for sporadic PD. These data also implicate a few specific classes of pesticides in PD and thus emphasize the need to consider a more narrow definition of pesticides in future studies. PMID:18373838

  4. Impact of familial risk and mammography screening on prognostic indicators of breast disease among women from the Ontario site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry.

    PubMed

    Walker, Meghan J; Mirea, Lucia; Cooper, Kristine; Nabavi, Mitra; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; O'Malley, Frances P; Chiarelli, Anna M

    2014-06-01

    Although several studies have found screen-detected cancers in women with familial breast cancer risk have favorable prognostic features compared with symptomatic cancers, the impact of level of familial risk is unknown. A cohort of 899 first-degree female relatives of cases of breast cancer from the Ontario site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry was followed for 2 years. Logistic regression analyses compared diagnoses of breast cancer or benign breast disease (BBD) between women at high (n = 258, 28.7 %) versus low/moderate (n = 641, 71.3 %) familial risk. Similar analyses compared prognostic features of invasive cancers and BBD by level of familial risk and mammography screening status. Among 899 women, 44 (4.9 %) were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer and/or ductal carcinoma in situ, and 56 (6.2 %) with BBD. Women with high familial risk were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer [odds ratio (OR) = 2.84, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.50-5.38] than low/moderate risk women, particularly if diagnosed at age ≥50 (OR = 2.99, 95 % CI 1.37-6.56) or screened with mammography (OR = 3.33, 95 % CI 1.54-7.18). High risk women were more likely to be diagnosed with BBD (OR = 1.94, 95 % CI 1.03-3.66). Level of familial risk was not associated with prognostic features. Cancers among unscreened women were larger (OR = 9.72, 95 % CI 1.01-93.61) and diagnosed at stage II or above (OR = 7.80, 95 % CI 1.18-51.50) compared with screen-detected cancers. Screening mammography may be effective for women with a first-degree family history of breast cancer, irrespective of level of familial risk. PMID:24097051

  5. Neuronal ubiquitinated intranuclear inclusions in familial and non-familial frontotemporal dementia of the motor neuron disease type associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bigio, Eileen H; Johnson, Nancy A; Rademaker, Alfred W; Fung, Bing B; Mesulam, M-Marsel; Siddique, Nailah; Dellefave, Lisa; Caliendo, Janice; Freeman, Stefanie; Siddique, Teepu

    2004-08-01

    Ubiquitinated cytoplasmic inclusions (Ub-CIs) in superficial frontal cortex and dentate gyrus neurons are the hallmark of frontotemporal degeneration of the motor neuron disease-type (FTD-MND-type). To date, 2 reports have described intranuclear ubiquitinated inclusions (Ub-INIs) in 9 cases of familial FTD-MND-type (without clinical or pathologic motor neuron disease, MND). In the current study we found an additional 11 cases with Ub-INIs. We have identified for the first time among these cases 2 with a negative family history and 3 that have concomitant amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The results of the present study i) confirm a previous report of significantly lower average brain weight and longer duration in cases with Ub-INIs, ii) reveal significantly greater striatal neuronal loss and gliosis in cases with intranuclear inclusions, and iii) demonstrate that intranuclear inclusions correlate with cytoplasmic inclusions and dystrophic neurites in frontal cortex and striatum but not in dentate gyrus. In addition, the current study confirms that Ub-INIs are found in familial FTD-MND-type, but also extends the presence of Ub-INIs to familial FTD-MND (with concomitant ALS), and probably also to non-familial FTD-MND-type. PMID:15330335

  6. Highly sensitive rapid fluorescence detection of protein residues on surgical instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Valeri I.; Bartona, James S.; Richardson, Patricia R.; Jones, Anita C.

    2006-07-01

    There is a risk of contamination of surgical instruments by infectious protein residues, in particular, prions which are the agents for Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease in humans. They are exceptionally resistant to conventional sterilization, therefore it is important to detect their presence as contaminants so that alternative cleaning procedures can be applied. We describe the development of an optimized detection system for fluorescently labelled protein, suitable for in-hospital use. We show that under optimum conditions the technique can detect ~10 attomole/cm2 with a scan speed of ~3-10 cm2/s of the test instrument's surface. A theoretical analysis and experimental measurements will be discussed.

  7. Toward fluorescence detection of protein residues on surgical instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Patricia R.; Jones, Anita C.; Baxter, Robert L.; Baxter, Helen C.; Whittaker, A. Gavin; Campbell, Gaynor A.

    2004-06-01

    Prion proteins are the infectious agents that cause Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) in humans. These proteins are particularly resistant to normal sterilization procedures, and the theoretical risk of prion transmission via surgical instruments is of current public and professional concern. We are currently investigating fluorescence methods for the detection of proteins on surfaces, with a view to developing an optical-fiber-based system for routine, online monitoring of residual protein contamination on surgical instruments, in hospital sterilization departments. This paper presents preliminary results on the detection of femtomole amounts of fluorescently labelled protein on surgical steel and discusses some of the problems involved in the detection of fluorescence from metal samples.

  8. Medicinal and other products and human and animal transmissible spongiform encephalopathies: memorandum from a WHO meeting.

    PubMed Central

    1997-01-01

    The report in March 1996 of 10 human cases of a novel from of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the United Kingdom, and its possible link to the agent that causes bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), raises many questions about the safety of animal-derived products and by-products entering the food chain or being used in medicine. This Memorandum updates the preventive measures put forward in 1991 to minimize the risks associated with the use of bovine-derived materials in medicinal products and medical devices. PMID:9509622

  9. Is Autism a Member of a Family of Diseases Resulting from Genetic/Cultural Mismatches? Implications for Treatment and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Bilbo, Staci D.; Jones, John P.; Parker, William

    2012-01-01

    Several lines of evidence support the view that autism is a typical member of a large family of immune-related, noninfectious, chronic diseases associated with postindustrial society. This family of diseases includes a wide range of inflammatory, allergic, and autoimmune diseases and results from consequences of genetic/culture mismatches which profoundly destabilize the immune system. Principle among these consequences is depletion of important components, particularly helminths, from the ecosystem of the human body, the human biome. Autism shares a wide range of features in common with this family of diseases, including the contribution of genetics/epigenetics, the identification of disease-inducing triggers, the apparent role of immunity in pathogenesis, high prevalence, complex etiologies and manifestations, and potentially some aspects of epidemiology. Fortunately, using available resources and technology, modern medicine has the potential to effectively reconstitute the human biome, thus treating or even avoiding altogether the consequences of genetic/cultural mismatches which underpin this entire family of disease. Thus, if indeed autism is an epidemic of postindustrial society associated with immune hypersensitivity, we can expect that the disease is readily preventable. PMID:22928103

  10. Clinicopathological concordance and discordance in three monozygotic twin pairs with familial Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Brickell, Kiri L; Leverenz, James B; Steinbart, Ellen J; Rumbaugh, Malia; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Nochlin, David; Lampe, Thomas H; Holm, Ida E; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Yuan, Wuxing; Bird, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    Aim Neuropathological examination of both individuals in a monozygotic (MZ) twin pair with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is rare, especially in the molecular genetic era. We had the opportunity to assess the concordance and discordance of clinical presentation and neuropathology in three MZ twin pairs with AD. Methods The MZ twins were identified and characterised by the University of Washington Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. We reviewed the available clinical and neuropathological records for all six cases looking specifically for concordance and discordance of clinical phenotype, neuritic amyloid plaques (NP), neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and Lewy related pathology (LRP). Results Discordance in age of onset for developing AD in the MZ twins varied from 4 to 18 years. Clinical presentations also differed between twins. One twin presented with a dementia with Lewy Body clinical syndrome while the other presented with typical clinical AD. Neuropathology within the MZ twin pairs was concordant for NP and NFT, regardless of duration of disease, and was discordant for LRP. This difference was most marked in the late onset AD twin pair. One pair was found to have a mutation in presenilin‐1 (PS1) (A79V) with remarkably late onset in a family member. Conclusions MZ twins with AD can vary considerably in age of onset, presentation and disease duration. The concordance of NP and NFT pathological change and the discordance of LRP support the concept that, in AD, the former are primarily under genetic control whereas the latter (LRP) is more influenced by disease duration and environmental factors. The A79V mutation in PS1 can be associated with very late onset of dementia. PMID:17615170

  11. An Uncommon Association of Familial Partial Lipodystrophy, Dilated Cardiomyopathy, and Conduction System Disease

    PubMed Central

    Panikkath, Ragesh; Panikkath, Deepa; Sanchez-Iglesias, S.; Araujo-Vilar, D; Lado-Abeal, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    A 46-year-old African American woman presented with severe respiratory distress requiring intubation and was diagnosed with nonischemic cardiomyopathy. She had the typical phenotype of familial partial lipodystrophy 2 (FPLD2). Sequence analysis of LMNA gene showed a heterozygous missense mutation at exon 8 (c.1444C>T) causing amino acid change, p.R482W. She later developed severe coronary artery disease requiring multiple percutaneous coronary interventions and coronary artery bypass surgery. She was later diagnosed with diabetes, primary hyperparathyroidism, and euthyroid multinodular goiter. She had sinus nodal and atrioventricular nodal disease and had an implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation due to persistent left ventricular dysfunction. The device eroded through the skin few months after implantation and needed a re-implant on the contralateral side. She had atrial flutter requiring ablation. This patient with FPLD2 had most of the reported cardiac complications of FPLD2. This case is presented to improve the awareness of the presentation of this disease among cardiologists and internists. PMID:27504462

  12. An Uncommon Association of Familial Partial Lipodystrophy, Dilated Cardiomyopathy, and Conduction System Disease.

    PubMed

    Panikkath, Ragesh; Panikkath, Deepa; Sanchez-Iglesias, S; Araujo-Vilar, D; Lado-Abeal, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    A 46-year-old African American woman presented with severe respiratory distress requiring intubation and was diagnosed with nonischemic cardiomyopathy. She had the typical phenotype of familial partial lipodystrophy 2 (FPLD2). Sequence analysis of LMNA gene showed a heterozygous missense mutation at exon 8 (c.1444C>T) causing amino acid change, p.R482W. She later developed severe coronary artery disease requiring multiple percutaneous coronary interventions and coronary artery bypass surgery. She was later diagnosed with diabetes, primary hyperparathyroidism, and euthyroid multinodular goiter. She had sinus nodal and atrioventricular nodal disease and had an implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation due to persistent left ventricular dysfunction. The device eroded through the skin few months after implantation and needed a re-implant on the contralateral side. She had atrial flutter requiring ablation. This patient with FPLD2 had most of the reported cardiac complications of FPLD2. This case is presented to improve the awareness of the presentation of this disease among cardiologists and internists. PMID:27504462

  13. Asbestos diseases and pulmonary symptoms and signs in shipyard workers and their families in Los Angeles

    SciTech Connect

    Kilburn, K.H.; Warshaw, R.; Thornton, J.C.

    1986-11-01

    Families of 338 male and 81 female shipyard workers (SYW), including 280 wives, 144 daughters, and 81 sons, were examined for diseases resulting from asbestos. The workers were initially exposed to asbestos at least 20 years prior to the study date. Radiographic signs of asbestosis (using standard criteria international Labor Office 1980) were found in 64% of 288 male SYW and 21% of 71 female SYW. After excluding those with any occupational exposure to asbestos, asbestosis prevalence was 11% in wives, 8% in sons, and 2% in daughters. Asbestos disease prevalence in workers and in wives increased with the number of years from initial exposure. Male SYW who had smoked had airway obstruction without volume loss. Nonsmokers had normal pulmonary functions. In SYW households prevalences of respiratory diseases, wheezing on physical examination, and symptoms of asthma and chronic bronchitis, exceeded those in the comparison (Michigan) population, even for the younger daughters and sons. These differences, and airway obstruction and distribution defects reported earlier were not explained by cigarette smoking or by asbestos exposure. Instead, they are tentatively ascribed to long-term exposure to ambient air pollution in Los Angeles.

  14. Mutation in ST6GALNAC5 identified in family with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    InanlooRahatloo, Kolsoum; Parsa, Amir Farhang Zand; Huse, Klaus; Rasooli, Paniz; Davaran, Saeid; Platzer, Matthias; Kramer, Marcel; Fan, Jian-Bing; Turk, Casey; Amini, Sasan; Steemers, Frank; Gunderson, Kevin; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Elahi, Elahe

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to identify the genetic cause of coronary artery disease (CAD) in an Iranian pedigree. Genetic linkage analysis identified three loci with an LOD score of 2.2. Twelve sequence variations identified by exome sequencing were tested for segregation with disease. A p.Val99Met causing mutation in ST6GALNAC5 was considered the likely cause of CAD. ST6GALNAC5 encodes sialyltransferase 7e. The variation affects a highly conserved amino acid, was absent in 800 controls, and was predicted to damage protein function. ST6GALNAC5 is positioned within loci previously linked to CAD-associated parameters. While hypercholesterolemia was a prominent feature in the family, clinical and genetic data suggest that this condition is not caused by the mutation in ST6GALNAC5. Sequencing of ST6GALNAC5 in 160 Iranian patients revealed a candidate causative stop-loss mutation in two other patients. The p.Val99Met and stop-loss mutations both caused increased sialyltransferase activity. Sequence data from combined Iranian and US controls and CAD affected individuals provided evidence consistent with potential role of ST6GALNAC5 in CAD. We conclude that ST6GALNAC5 mutations can cause CAD. There is substantial literature suggesting a relation between sialyltransferase and sialic acid levels and coronary disease. Our findings provide strong evidence for the existence of this relation. PMID:24399302

  15. Mutation in ST6GALNAC5 identified in family with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    InanlooRahatloo, Kolsoum; Parsa, Amir Farhang Zand; Huse, Klaus; Rasooli, Paniz; Davaran, Saeid; Platzer, Matthias; Kramer, Marcel; Fan, Jian-Bing; Turk, Casey; Amini, Sasan; Steemers, Frank; Gunderson, Kevin; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Elahi, Elahe

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to identify the genetic cause of coronary artery disease (CAD) in an Iranian pedigree. Genetic linkage analysis identified three loci with an LOD score of 2.2. Twelve sequence variations identified by exome sequencing were tested for segregation with disease. A p.Val99Met causing mutation in ST6GALNAC5 was considered the likely cause of CAD. ST6GALNAC5 encodes sialyltransferase 7e. The variation affects a highly conserved amino acid, was absent in 800 controls, and was predicted to damage protein function. ST6GALNAC5 is positioned within loci previously linked to CAD-associated parameters. While hypercholesterolemia was a prominent feature in the family, clinical and genetic data suggest that this condition is not caused by the mutation in ST6GALNAC5. Sequencing of ST6GALNAC5 in 160 Iranian patients revealed a candidate causative stop-loss mutation in two other patients. The p.Val99Met and stop-loss mutations both caused increased sialyltransferase activity. Sequence data from combined Iranian and US controls and CAD affected individuals provided evidence consistent with potential role of ST6GALNAC5 in CAD. We conclude that ST6GALNAC5 mutations can cause CAD. There is substantial literature suggesting a relation between sialyltransferase and sialic acid levels and coronary disease. Our findings provide strong evidence for the existence of this relation. PMID:24399302

  16. Qualitative changes in human γ-secretase underlie familial Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Szaruga, Maria; Veugelen, Sarah; Benurwar, Manasi; Lismont, Sam; Sepulveda-Falla, Diego; Lleo, Alberto; Ryan, Natalie S; Lashley, Tammaryn; Fox, Nick C; Murayama, Shigeo; Gijsen, Harrie; De Strooper, Bart; Chávez-Gutiérrez, Lucía

    2015-11-16

    Presenilin (PSEN) pathogenic mutations cause familial Alzheimer's disease (AD [FAD]) in an autosomal-dominant manner. The extent to which the healthy and diseased alleles influence each other to cause neurodegeneration remains unclear. In this study, we assessed γ-secretase activity in brain samples from 15 nondemented subjects, 22 FAD patients harboring nine different mutations in PSEN1, and 11 sporadic AD (SAD) patients. FAD and control brain samples had similar overall γ-secretase activity levels, and therefore, loss of overall (endopeptidase) γ-secretase function cannot be an essential part of the pathogenic mechanism. In contrast, impaired carboxypeptidase-like activity (γ-secretase dysfunction) is a constant feature in all FAD brains. Significantly, we demonstrate that pharmacological activation of the carboxypeptidase-like γ-secretase activity with γ-secretase modulators alleviates the mutant PSEN pathogenic effects. Most SAD cases display normal endo- and carboxypeptidase-like γ-secretase activities. However and interestingly, a few SAD patient samples display γ-secretase dysfunction, suggesting that γ-secretase may play a role in some SAD cases. In conclusion, our study highlights qualitative shifts in amyloid-β (Aβ) profiles as the common denominator in FAD and supports a model in which the healthy allele contributes with normal Aβ products and the diseased allele generates longer aggregation-prone peptides that act as seeds inducing toxic amyloid conformations. PMID:26481686

  17. Qualitative changes in human γ-secretase underlie familial Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Szaruga, Maria; Veugelen, Sarah; Benurwar, Manasi; Lismont, Sam; Sepulveda-Falla, Diego; Lleo, Alberto; Ryan, Natalie S.; Lashley, Tammaryn; Fox, Nick C.; Murayama, Shigeo; Gijsen, Harrie

    2015-01-01

    Presenilin (PSEN) pathogenic mutations cause familial Alzheimer’s disease (AD [FAD]) in an autosomal-dominant manner. The extent to which the healthy and diseased alleles influence each other to cause neurodegeneration remains unclear. In this study, we assessed γ-secretase activity in brain samples from 15 nondemented subjects, 22 FAD patients harboring nine different mutations in PSEN1, and 11 sporadic AD (SAD) patients. FAD and control brain samples had similar overall γ-secretase activity levels, and therefore, loss of overall (endopeptidase) γ-secretase function cannot be an essential part of the pathogenic mechanism. In contrast, impaired carboxypeptidase-like activity (γ-secretase dysfunction) is a constant feature in all FAD brains. Significantly, we demonstrate that pharmacological activation of the carboxypeptidase-like γ-secretase activity with γ-secretase modulators alleviates the mutant PSEN pathogenic effects. Most SAD cases display normal endo- and carboxypeptidase-like γ-secretase activities. However and interestingly, a few SAD patient samples display γ-secretase dysfunction, suggesting that γ-secretase may play a role in some SAD cases. In conclusion, our study highlights qualitative shifts in amyloid-β (Aβ) profiles as the common denominator in FAD and supports a model in which the healthy allele contributes with normal Aβ products and the diseased allele generates longer aggregation-prone peptides that act as seeds inducing toxic amyloid conformations. PMID:26481686

  18. Interdisciplinary teamwork for the treatment of people with Parkinson's disease and their families.

    PubMed

    Giladi, Nir; Manor, Yael; Hilel, Ariela; Gurevich, Tanya

    2014-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic progressive neurodegenerative and multidimensional disease that involves a range of disabling motor and nonmotor symptoms. These symptoms can have a major impact on the quality of life of PD patients. The focus of this article is to stress the importance of the interdisciplinary team intervention approach in the treatment of patients with PD. The team approach uses experts in PD from different health care professions, including a neurologist, a nurse, a speech and language therapist, a physiotherapist, a social worker, a psychiatrist, an occupational therapist, a sexologist, and a dietician. The major aim of the team and of teamwork is to provide professional care in all motor and nonmotor aspects of PD throughout the course of the disease. There are different models of multidisciplinary teams: inpatient facility, community rehabilitation facility, and synchronized multiprofessional treatment in the community. The Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center model of interdisciplinary care was designed to create a coordinated multidisciplinary team in the Movement Disorders Unit. The role of each team member and their professional objective are described. Their collaboration is by design a promotion of a team goal for maintaining and enhancing the quality of life of PD patients and their families. PMID:25245121

  19. The relationship between religion, illness and death in life histories of family members of children with life-threatening diseases.

    PubMed

    Bousso, Regina Szylit; Serafim, Taís de Souza; Misko, Maira Deguer

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to get to know the relationship between the experiences of families of children with a life-threatening disease and their religion, illness and life histories. The methodological framework was based on Oral History. The data were collected through interviews and the participants were nine families from six different religions who had lived the experience of having a child with a life-threatening disease. The interviews, held with one or two family members, were transcribed, textualized and, through their analysis, the Vital Tone was elaborated, representing the moral synthesis of each narrative. Three dimensions of spirituality were related to illness and death in their life histories: a Higher Being with a healing power; Development and Maintenance of a Connection with God and Faith Encouraging Optimism. The narratives demonstrated the family's search to attribute meanings to their experiences, based on their religious beliefs. PMID:20549112

  20. Family, Community, and Health System Considerations for Reducing the Burden of Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease in Uganda Through Newborn Screening

    PubMed Central

    Green, Nancy S.; Mathur, Sanyukta; Kiguli, Sarah; Makani, Julie; Fashakin, Victoria; LaRussa, Philip; Lyimo, Magdalena; Abrams, Elaine J.; Mulumba, Lukia; Mupere, Ezekiel

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with high mortality for children under 5 years of age in sub-Saharan Africa. Newborn sickle screening program and enhanced capacity for SCD treatment are under development to reduce disease burden in Uganda and elsewhere in the region. Based on an international stakeholder meeting and a family-directed conference on SCD in Kampala in 2015, and interviews with parents, multinational experts, and other key informants, we describe health care, community, and family perspectives in support of these initiatives. Key stakeholder meetings, discussions, and interviews were held to understand perspectives of public health and multinational leadership, patients and families, as well as national progress, resource needs, medical and social barriers to program success, and resources leveraged from HIV/AIDS. Partnering with program leadership, professionals, patients and families, multinational stakeholders, and leveraging resources from existing programs are needed for building successful programs in Uganda and elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:27336011