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Sample records for family genome-wide chip

  1. Genome-Wide Family-Based Linkage Analysis of Exome Chip Variants and Cardiometabolic Risk

    PubMed Central

    Hellwege, Jacklyn N.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Raffield, Laura M.; Ng, Maggie C.Y.; Hawkins, Gregory A.; Long, Jirong; Lorenzo, Carlos; Norris, Jill M.; da Chen, Y-D. I; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Bowden, Donald W.

    2014-01-01

    Linkage analysis of complex traits has had limited success in identifying trait-influencing loci. Recently, coding variants have been implicated as the basis for some biomedical associations. We tested whether coding variants are the basis for linkage peaks of complex traits in 42 African-American (n = 596) and 90 Hispanic (n = 1,414) families in the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study (IRASFS) using Illumina HumanExome Beadchips. A total of 92,157 variants in African Americans (34%) and 81,559 (31%) in Hispanics were polymorphic and tested using two-point linkage and association analyses with 37 cardiometabolic phenotypes. In African Americans 77 LOD scores greater than 3 were observed. The highest LOD score was 4.91 with the APOE SNP rs7412 (MAF = 0.13) with plasma apolipoprotein B (ApoB). This SNP was associated with ApoB (P-value = 4 × 10−19) and accounted for 16.2% of the variance in African Americans. In Hispanic families, 104 LOD scores were greater than 3. The strongest evidence of linkage (LOD = 4.29) was with rs5882 (MAF = 0.46) in CETP with HDL. CETP variants were strongly associated with HDL (0.00049 < P-value <4.6 × 10−12), accounting for up to 4.5% of the variance. These loci have previously been shown to have effects on the biomedical traits evaluated here. Thus, evidence of strong linkage in this genome wide survey of primarily coding variants was uncommon. Loci with strong evidence of linkage was characterized by large contributions to the variance, and, in these cases, are common variants. Less compelling evidence of linkage and association was observed with additional loci that may require larger family sets to confirm. PMID:24719370

  2. Family-Based Genome-Wide Association Scan of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mick, Eric; Todorov, Alexandre; Smalley, Susan; Hu, Xiaolan; Loo, Sandra; Todd, Richard D.; Biederman, Joseph; Byrne, Deirdre; Dechairo, Bryan; Guiney, Allan; McCracken, James; McGough, James; Nelson, Stanley F.; Reiersen, Angela M.; Wilens, Timothy E.; Wozniak, Janet; Neale, Benjamin M.; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2013-01-01

    Objective . Genes likely play a substantial role in the etiology of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic architecture of the disorder is unknown, and prior genome-wide association studies have not identified a genome-wide significant association. We have conducted a third, independent multi-site GWAS of DSM-IV-TR ADHD. Method . Families were ascertained at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH, N=309 trios), Washington University at St Louis (WASH-U, N=272 trios), and University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA, N=156 trios). Genotyping was conducted with the Illumina Human1M or Human1M-Duo BeadChip platforms. After applying quality control filters, association with ADHD was tested with 835,136 SNPs in 735 DSM-IV ADHD trios from 732 families. Results . Our smallest p-value (6.7E-07) did not reach the threshold for genome-wide statistical significance (5.0E-08) but one of the 20 most significant associations was located in a candidate gene of interest for ADHD, (SLC9A9, rs9810857, p=6.4E-6). We also conducted gene-based tests of candidate genes identified in the literature and found additional evidence of association with SLC9A9. Conclusion . We and our colleagues in the Psychiatric GWAS Consortium are working to pool together GWAS samples to establish the large data sets needed to follow-up on these results and to identify genes for ADHD and other disorders. PMID:20732626

  3. Genome-wide analysis of TCP family in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Chen, Y Q; Ding, A M; Chen, H; Xia, F; Wang, W F; Sun, Y H

    2016-01-01

    The TCP family is a transcription factor family, members of which are extensively involved in plant growth and development as well as in signal transduction in the response against many physiological and biochemical stimuli. In the present study, 61 TCP genes were identified in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) genome. Bioinformatic methods were employed for predicting and analyzing the gene structure, gene expression, phylogenetic analysis, and conserved domains of TCP proteins in tobacco. The 61 NtTCP genes were divided into three diverse groups, based on the division of TCP genes in tomato and Arabidopsis, and the results of the conserved domain and sequence analyses further confirmed the classification of the NtTCP genes. The expression pattern of NtTCP also demonstrated that majority of these genes play important roles in all the tissues, while some special genes exercise their functions only in specific tissues. In brief, the comprehensive and thorough study of the TCP family in other plants provides sufficient resources for studying the structure and functions of TCPs in tobacco. PMID:27323069

  4. Spotting and validation of a genome wide oligonucleotide chip with duplicate measurement of each gene

    SciTech Connect

    Thomassen, Mads . E-mail: mads.thomassen@ouh.fyns-amt.dk; Skov, Vibe; Eiriksdottir, Freyja; Tan, Qihua; Jochumsen, Kirsten; Fritzner, Niels; Brusgaard, Klaus; Dahlgaard, Jesper; Kruse, Torben A.

    2006-06-16

    The quality of DNA microarray based gene expression data relies on the reproducibility of several steps in a microarray experiment. We have developed a spotted genome wide microarray chip with oligonucleotides printed in duplicate in order to minimise undesirable biases, thereby optimising detection of true differential expression. The validation study design consisted of an assessment of the microarray chip performance using the MessageAmp and FairPlay labelling kits. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to demonstrate that MessageAmp was significantly more reproducible than FairPlay. Further examinations with MessageAmp revealed the applicability of the system. The linear range of the chips was three orders of magnitude, the precision was high, as 95% of measurements deviated less than 1.24-fold from the expected value, and the coefficient of variation for relative expression was 13.6%. Relative quantitation was more reproducible than absolute quantitation and substantial reduction of variance was attained with duplicate spotting. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated no significant day-to-day variation.

  5. Genome-wide linkage scan of quantitative traits representing symptom dimensions in multiplex schizophrenia families.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seunghyong; Won, Hong-Hee; Oh, Sohee; Kim, Jong-Won; Park, Taesung; Cho, Eun-Young; Cho, Youngah; Park, Dong Yeon; Lee, Yu-Sang; Kwon, Jun Soo; Hong, Kyung Sue

    2013-12-30

    Symptom dimensions of schizophrenia are likely to be the intermediate phenotypes under the control of disease-susceptibility genes, or separate traits related to disease-modifier genes. This study aimed to identify chromosomal loci linked to symptom dimensions of schizophrenia through genome-wide quantitative trait locus (QTL) linkage analysis. The study subjects consisted of 56 families with 183 members including 123 affected individuals. Symptom evaluations were performed on lifetime basis. Through principal component factor analysis, eight quantitative phenotypes representing symptom dimensions were identified. Genotyping was done for 6008 SNP markers, and genome-wide QTL linkage analysis was performed. No symptom dimension showed a significant linkage attaining genome-wide empirical thresholds. We observed seven regions yielding linkage signals attaining genome-wide empirical thresholds for suggestive linkage (NPL Z score = 2.78-3.49); chromosome 15q26.1 for 'non-paranoid delusion factor', 2p24.3 and 7q31.1 for 'prodromal impairment factor', 1q32.1, 9p21.3, and 9q31.2 for 'negative symptom factor', and 10p13 for 'disorganization factor'. Among these loci, chromosome 2p24.3 and 1q32.1 overlap with susceptibility loci of schizophrenia identified in our previous linkage studies. This study suggests the existence of genetic loci related to various clinical features of schizophrenia. Further genetic analyses for these dimensional phenotypes are warranted. PMID:24035701

  6. Genome-wide linkage analysis in a Dutch multigenerational family with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Vegt, Rinus; Bertoli-Avella, Aida M; Tulen, Joke H M; de Graaf, Bianca; Verkerk, Annemieke J M H; Vervoort, Jeroen; Twigt, Carla M; Maat-Kievit, Anneke; van Tuijl, Ruud; van der Lijn, Marieke; Hengeveld, Michiel W; Oostra, Ben A

    2010-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neuropsychiatric disorder. Genetics has an important role in the aetiology of this disease. In this study, we describe the clinical findings in a Dutch family with eight patients suffering from ADHD, in whom five had at least one other psychiatric disorder. We performed a genome-wide (parametric and nonparametric) affected-only linkage analysis. Two genomic regions on chromosomes 7 and 14 showed an excess of allele sharing among the definitely affected members of the family with suggestive LOD scores (2.1 and 2.08). Nonparametric linkage analyses (NPL) yielded a maxNPL of 2.92 (P=0.001) for marker D7S502 and a maxNPL score of 2.56 (P=0.003) for marker D14S275. We confirmed that all patients share the same haplotype in each region of 7p15.1–q31.33 and 14q11.2–q22.3. Interestingly, both loci have been reported before in Dutch (affected sib pairs) and German (extended families) ADHD linkage studies. Hopefully, the genome-wide association studies in ADHD will help to highlight specific polymorphisms and genes within the broad areas detected by our, as well as other, linkage studies. PMID:19707245

  7. Genome-wide sequencing to identify the cause of hereditary cancer syndromes: with examples from familial pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Nicholas J.; Klein, Alison P.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the human genome and next-generation technologies have facilitated the use of genome-wide sequencing to decipher the genetic basis of Mendelian disease and hereditary cancer syndromes. The application of genome-wide sequencing in hereditary cancer syndromes has had mixed success, in part, due to complex nature of the underlying genetic architecture. In this review we discuss the use of genome-wide sequencing in both Mendelian diseases and hereditary cancer syndromes, highlighting the potential and challenges of this approach using familial pancreatic cancer as an example. PMID:23196058

  8. Assessing Disease Risk in Genome-wide Association Studies Using Family History

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arpita; Hartge, Patricia; Purdue, Mark P.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Amundadottir, Laufey; Wang, Zhaoming; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Wacholder, Sholom

    2012-01-01

    We show how to use reports of cancer in family members to discover additional genetic associations or confirm previous findings in genome-wide association (GWA) studies conducted in case-control, cohort, or cross-sectional studies. Our novel family-history-based approach allows economical association studies for multiple cancers, without genotyping of relatives (as required in family studies), follow-up of participants (as required in cohort studies), or oversampling of specific cancer cases, (as required in case-control studies). We empirically evaluate the performance of the proposed family-history-based approach in studying associations with prostate and ovarian cancers, using data from GWA studies previously conducted within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. The family-history-based method may be particularly useful for investigating genetic susceptibility to rare diseases, for which accruing cases may be very difficult, by using disease information from non-genotyped relatives of participants in multiple case-control and cohort studies designed primarily for other purposes. PMID:22575968

  9. Genome-wide identification and comparison of legume MLO gene family

    PubMed Central

    Rispail, Nicolas; Rubiales, Diego

    2016-01-01

    MLO proteins are highly conserved proteins with seven trans-membrane domains. Specific MLO genes have been linked to plant disease susceptibility. Others are involved in plant reproduction and in root thigmomorphogenesis. Functions of the remaining MLOs are still unknown. Here we performed a genome-wide survey of the MLO family in eight legume species from different clades of the Papillionoideae sub-family. A total of 118 MLO sequences were identified and characterized. Their deduced protein sequences shared the characteristics of MLO proteins. The total number of MLO genes per legume species varied from 13 to 20 depending on the species. Legume MLOs were evenly distributed over their genomes and tended to localize within syntenic blocks conserved across legume genomes. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that these sequences clustered in seven well-defined clades. Comparison of MLO protein sequences revealed 34 clade-specific motifs in the variable regions of the proteins. Comparative analyses of the MLO family between legume species also uncovered several evolutionary differences between the tropical legume species from the Phaseoloid clades and the other legume species. Altogether, this study provides interesting new features on the evolution of the MLO family. It also provides valuable clues to identify additional MLO genes from non-sequenced species. PMID:27596925

  10. Genome-wide characterization of the ankyrin repeats gene family under salt stress in soybean.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dayong; Wan, Qun; He, Xiaolan; Ning, Lihua; Huang, Yihong; Xu, Zhaolong; Liu, Jia; Shao, Hongbo

    2016-10-15

    Ankyrin repeats (ANK) gene family are common in diverse organisms and play important roles in cell growth, development and response to environmental stresses. Recently, genome-wide identification and evolutionary analyses of the ANK gene family have been carried out in Arabidopsis, rice and maize. However, little is known about the ANK genes in the whole soybean genome. In this study, we described the identification and structural characterization of 162ANK genes in soybean (GmANK). Then, comprehensive bioinformatics analyses of GmANK genes family were performed including gene locus, phylogenetic, domain composition analysis, chromosomal localization and expression profiling. Domain composition analyses showed that GmANK proteins formed eleven subfamilies in soybean. In sicilo expression analysis of these GmANK genes demonstrated that GmANK genes show a diverse/various expression pattern, suggesting that functional diversification of GmANK genes family. Based on digital gene expression profile (DGEP) data between cultivated soybean and wild type under salt treatment, some GmANKs related to salt/drought response were investigated. Moreover, the expression pattern and subcellular localization of GmANK6 were performed. The results will provide important clues to explore ANK genes expression and function in future studies in soybean. PMID:27335162

  11. Genome-wide identification and comparison of legume MLO gene family.

    PubMed

    Rispail, Nicolas; Rubiales, Diego

    2016-01-01

    MLO proteins are highly conserved proteins with seven trans-membrane domains. Specific MLO genes have been linked to plant disease susceptibility. Others are involved in plant reproduction and in root thigmomorphogenesis. Functions of the remaining MLOs are still unknown. Here we performed a genome-wide survey of the MLO family in eight legume species from different clades of the Papillionoideae sub-family. A total of 118 MLO sequences were identified and characterized. Their deduced protein sequences shared the characteristics of MLO proteins. The total number of MLO genes per legume species varied from 13 to 20 depending on the species. Legume MLOs were evenly distributed over their genomes and tended to localize within syntenic blocks conserved across legume genomes. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that these sequences clustered in seven well-defined clades. Comparison of MLO protein sequences revealed 34 clade-specific motifs in the variable regions of the proteins. Comparative analyses of the MLO family between legume species also uncovered several evolutionary differences between the tropical legume species from the Phaseoloid clades and the other legume species. Altogether, this study provides interesting new features on the evolution of the MLO family. It also provides valuable clues to identify additional MLO genes from non-sequenced species. PMID:27596925

  12. Genome-wide gene-environment interactions on quantitative traits using family data.

    PubMed

    Sitlani, Colleen M; Dupuis, Josée; Rice, Kenneth M; Sun, Fangui; Pitsillides, Achilleas N; Cupples, L Adrienne; Psaty, Bruce M

    2016-07-01

    Gene-environment interactions may provide a mechanism for targeting interventions to those individuals who would gain the most benefit from them. Searching for interactions agnostically on a genome-wide scale requires large sample sizes, often achieved through collaboration among multiple studies in a consortium. Family studies can contribute to consortia, but to do so they must account for correlation within families by using specialized analytic methods. In this paper, we investigate the performance of methods that account for within-family correlation, in the context of gene-environment interactions with binary exposures and quantitative outcomes. We simulate both cross-sectional and longitudinal measurements, and analyze the simulated data taking family structure into account, via generalized estimating equations (GEE) and linear mixed-effects models. With sufficient exposure prevalence and correct model specification, all methods perform well. However, when models are misspecified, mixed modeling approaches have seriously inflated type I error rates. GEE methods with robust variance estimates are less sensitive to model misspecification; however, when exposures are infrequent, GEE methods require modifications to preserve type I error rate. We illustrate the practical use of these methods by evaluating gene-drug interactions on fasting glucose levels in data from the Framingham Heart Study, a cohort that includes related individuals. PMID:26626313

  13. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression of Xenopus F-Box Family of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Saritas-Yildirim, Banu; Pliner, Hannah A.; Ochoa, Angelica; Silva, Elena M.

    2015-01-01

    Protein degradation via the multistep ubiquitin/26S proteasome pathway is a rapid way to alter the protein profile and drive cell processes and developmental changes. Many key regulators of embryonic development are targeted for degradation by E3 ubiquitin ligases. The most studied family of E3 ubiquitin ligases is the SCF ubiquitin ligases, which use F-box adaptor proteins to recognize and recruit target proteins. Here, we used a bioinformatics screen and phylogenetic analysis to identify and annotate the family of F-box proteins in the Xenopus tropicalis genome. To shed light on the function of the F-box proteins, we analyzed expression of F-box genes during early stages of Xenopus development. Many F-box genes are broadly expressed with expression domains localized to diverse tissues including brain, spinal cord, eye, neural crest derivatives, somites, kidneys, and heart. All together, our genome-wide identification and expression profiling of the Xenopus F-box family of proteins provide a foundation for future research aimed to identify the precise role of F-box dependent E3 ubiquitin ligases and their targets in the regulatory circuits of development. PMID:26327321

  14. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of WRKY Gene Family in Capsicum annuum L.

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Wei-Ping; Snyder, John C.; Wang, Shu-Bin; Liu, Jin-Bing; Pan, Bao-Gui; Guo, Guang-Jun; Wei, Ge

    2016-01-01

    The WRKY family of transcription factors is one of the most important families of plant transcriptional regulators with members regulating multiple biological processes, especially in regulating defense against biotic and abiotic stresses. However, little information is available about WRKYs in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.). The recent release of completely assembled genome sequences of pepper allowed us to perform a genome-wide investigation for pepper WRKY proteins. In the present study, a total of 71 WRKY genes were identified in the pepper genome. According to structural features of their encoded proteins, the pepper WRKY genes (CaWRKY) were classified into three main groups, with the second group further divided into five subgroups. Genome mapping analysis revealed that CaWRKY were enriched on four chromosomes, especially on chromosome 1, and 15.5% of the family members were tandemly duplicated genes. A phylogenetic tree was constructed depending on WRKY domain' sequences derived from pepper and Arabidopsis. The expression of 21 selected CaWRKY genes in response to seven different biotic and abiotic stresses (salt, heat shock, drought, Phytophtora capsici, SA, MeJA, and ABA) was evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR; Some CaWRKYs were highly expressed and up-regulated by stress treatment. Our results will provide a platform for functional identification and molecular breeding studies of WRKY genes in pepper. PMID:26941768

  15. Genome-wide analysis and expression profiling of the phospholipase D gene family in Gossypium arboreum.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kai; Dong, Chunjuan; Liu, Jinyuan

    2016-02-01

    The plant phospholipase D (PLD) plays versatile functions in multiple aspects of plant growth, development, and stress responses. However, until now, our knowledge concerning the PLD gene family members and their expression patterns in cotton has been limited. In this study, we performed for the first time the genome-wide analysis and expression profiling of PLD gene family in Gossypium arboretum, and finally, a total of 19 non-redundant PLD genes (GaPLDs) were identified. Based on the phylogenetic analysis, they were divided into six well-supported clades (α, β/γ, δ, ε, ζ and φ). Most of the GaPLD genes within the same clade showed the similar exon-intron organization and highly conserved motif structures. Additionally, the chromosomal distribution pattern revealed that GaPLD genes were unevenly distributed across 10 of the 13 cotton chromosomes. Segmental duplication is the major contributor to the expansion of GaPLD gene family and estimated to have occurred from 19.61 to 20.44 million years ago when a recent large-scale genome duplication occurred in cotton. Moreover, the expression profiling provides the functional divergence of GaPLD genes in cotton and provides some new light on the molecular mechanisms of GaPLDα1 and GaPLDδ2 in fiber development. PMID:26718354

  16. Family-Based Genome-Wide Association Scan of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mick, Eric; Todorov, Alexandre; Smalley, Susan; Hu, Xiaolan; Loo, Sandra; Todd, Richard D.; Biederman, Joseph; Byrne, Deirdre; Dechairo, Bryan; Guiney, Allan; McCracken, James; McGough, James; Nelson, Stanley F.; Reiersen, Angela M.; Wilens, Timothy E.; Wozniak, Janet; Neale, Benjamin M.; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Genes likely play a substantial role in the etiology of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic architecture of the disorder is unknown, and prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not identified a genome-wide significant association. We have conducted a third, independent, multisite GWAS of…

  17. Genome-wide identification of the expansin gene family in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Ding, Anming; Marowa, Prince; Kong, Yingzhen

    2016-10-01

    Expansins are pH-dependent cell wall loosening proteins which form a large family in plants. They have been shown to be involved in various developmental processes and been implicated in enabling plants' ability to absorb nutrients from the soil as well as conferring biotic and abiotic stress resistances. It is therefore clear that they can be potential targets in genetic engineering for crop improvement. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) is a major crop species as well as a model organism. Considering that only a few tobacco expansins have been studied, a genome-wide analysis of the tobacco expansin gene family is necessary. In this study, we identified 52 expansins in tobacco, which were classified into four subfamilies: 36 NtEXPAs, 6 NtEXPBs, 3 NtEXLAs and 7 NtEXLBs. Compared to other species, the NtEXLB subfamily size was relatively larger. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the 52 tobacco expansins were divided into 13 subgroups. Gene structure analysis revealed that genes within subfamilies/subgroups exhibited similar characteristics such as gene structure and protein motif arrangement. Whole-genome duplication and tandem duplication events may have played important roles in the expanding of tobacco expansins. Cis-Acting element analysis revealed that each expansin gene was regulated or several expansin genes were co-regulated by both internal and environmental factors. 35 of these genes were identified as being expressed according to a microarray analysis. In contrast to most NtEXPAs which had higher expression levels in young organs, NtEXLAs and NtEXLBs were preferentially expressed in mature or senescent tissues, suggesting that they might play different roles in different organs or at different developmental stages. As the first step towards genome-wide analysis of the tobacco expansin gene family, our work provides solid background information related to structure, evolution and expression as well as regulatory cis-acting elements of the tobacco expansins. This

  18. Genome-wide identification and characterization of the Dof gene family in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Shu, Y J; Song, L L; Zhang, J; Liu, Y; Guo, C H

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-binding one zinc finger (Dof) family is a classic plant-specific zinc-finger transcription factor family, which is involved in many important processes, including seed maturation and germination, plant growth and development, and light responses. Investigation of the Medicago truncatula genome revealed 42 putative Dof genes, each of which holds one Dof domain. These genes were classified into four groups based on phylogenetic analysis, which are similar to the groups reported for Arabidopsis and rice. Based on genome duplication analysis, it was found that the MtDof genes were distributed on all chromosomes and had expanded through tandem gene duplication and segmental duplication events. Two main duplication regions were identified, one from tandem duplication and another from segmental duplication. By analyzing high-throughput sequencing data from M. truncatula, we found that most of the MtDof genes showed specific expression patterns in different tissues. According to cis-regulatory element analysis, these MtDof genes are regulated by different cis-acting motifs, which are important for the functional divergence of the MtDof genes in different processes. Thus, using genome-wide identification, evolution, and expression pattern analysis of the Dof genes in M. truncatula, our study provides valuable information for understanding the potential function of the Dof genes in regulating the growth and development of M. truncatula. PMID:26400295

  19. A genome-wide linkage scan for iron phenotype quantitative trait loci: the HEIRS Family Study.

    PubMed

    Acton, R T; Snively, B M; Barton, J C; McLaren, C E; Adams, P C; Rich, S S; Eckfeldt, J H; Press, R D; Sholinsky, P; Leiendecker-Foster, C; McLaren, G D; Speechley, M R; Harris, E L; Dawkins, F W; Gordeuk, V R

    2007-06-01

    Iron overload phenotypes in persons with and without hemochromatosis are variable. To investigate this further, probands with hemochromatosis or evidence of elevated iron stores and their family members were recruited for a genome-wide linkage scan to identify potential quantitative trait loci (QTL) that contribute to variation in transferrin saturation (TS), unsaturated iron-binding capacity (UIBC), and serum ferritin (SF). Genotyping utilized 402 microsatellite markers with average spacing of 9 cM. A total of 943 individuals, 64% Caucasian, were evaluated from 174 families. After adjusting for age, gender, and race/ethnicity, there was evidence for linkage of UIBC to chromosome 4q logarithm of the odds (LOD) = 2.08, p = 0.001) and of UIBC (LOD = 9.52), TS (LOD = 4.78), and SF (LOD = 2.75) to the chromosome 6p region containing HFE (each p < 0.0001). After adjustments for HFE genotype and other covariates, there was evidence of linkage of SF to chromosome 16p (LOD = 2.63, p = 0.0007) and of UIBC to chromosome 5q (LOD = 2.12, p = 0.002) and to chromosome 17q (LOD = 2.19, p = 0.002). We conclude that these regions should be considered for fine mapping studies to identify QTL that contribute to variation in SF and UIBC. PMID:17539901

  20. Genome-Wide Profiling of Yeast DNA:RNA Hybrid Prone Sites with DRIP-Chip

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Phoebe Y. T.; Luo, Zongli; Hamza, Akil; Kobor, Michael S.; Stirling, Peter C.; Hieter, Philip

    2014-01-01

    DNA:RNA hybrid formation is emerging as a significant cause of genome instability in biological systems ranging from bacteria to mammals. Here we describe the genome-wide distribution of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by DNA:RNA immunoprecipitation (DRIP) followed by hybridization on tiling microarray. These profiles show that DNA:RNA hybrids preferentially accumulated at rDNA, Ty1 and Ty2 transposons, telomeric repeat regions and a subset of open reading frames (ORFs). The latter are generally highly transcribed and have high GC content. Interestingly, significant DNA:RNA hybrid enrichment was also detected at genes associated with antisense transcripts. The expression of antisense-associated genes was also significantly altered upon overexpression of RNase H, which degrades the RNA in hybrids. Finally, we uncover mutant-specific differences in the DRIP profiles of a Sen1 helicase mutant, RNase H deletion mutant and Hpr1 THO complex mutant compared to wild type, suggesting different roles for these proteins in DNA:RNA hybrid biology. Our profiles of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci provide a resource for understanding the properties of hybrid-forming regions in vivo, extend our knowledge of hybrid-mitigating enzymes, and contribute to models of antisense-mediated gene regulation. A summary of this paper was presented at the 26th International Conference on Yeast Genetics and Molecular Biology, August 2013. PMID:24743342

  1. Genome-wide profiling of yeast DNA:RNA hybrid prone sites with DRIP-chip.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yujia A; Aristizabal, Maria J; Lu, Phoebe Y T; Luo, Zongli; Hamza, Akil; Kobor, Michael S; Stirling, Peter C; Hieter, Philip

    2014-04-01

    DNA:RNA hybrid formation is emerging as a significant cause of genome instability in biological systems ranging from bacteria to mammals. Here we describe the genome-wide distribution of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by DNA:RNA immunoprecipitation (DRIP) followed by hybridization on tiling microarray. These profiles show that DNA:RNA hybrids preferentially accumulated at rDNA, Ty1 and Ty2 transposons, telomeric repeat regions and a subset of open reading frames (ORFs). The latter are generally highly transcribed and have high GC content. Interestingly, significant DNA:RNA hybrid enrichment was also detected at genes associated with antisense transcripts. The expression of antisense-associated genes was also significantly altered upon overexpression of RNase H, which degrades the RNA in hybrids. Finally, we uncover mutant-specific differences in the DRIP profiles of a Sen1 helicase mutant, RNase H deletion mutant and Hpr1 THO complex mutant compared to wild type, suggesting different roles for these proteins in DNA:RNA hybrid biology. Our profiles of DNA:RNA hybrid prone loci provide a resource for understanding the properties of hybrid-forming regions in vivo, extend our knowledge of hybrid-mitigating enzymes, and contribute to models of antisense-mediated gene regulation. A summary of this paper was presented at the 26th International Conference on Yeast Genetics and Molecular Biology, August 2013. PMID:24743342

  2. Genome-wide identification and characterization of aquaporin gene family in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Ariani, Andrea; Gepts, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Plant aquaporins are a large and diverse family of water channel proteins that are essential for several physiological processes in living organisms. Numerous studies have linked plant aquaporins with a plethora of processes, such as nutrient acquisition, CO2 transport, plant growth and development, and response to abiotic stresses. However, little is known about this protein family in common bean. Here, we present a genome-wide identification of the aquaporin gene family in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), a legume crop essential for human nutrition. We identified 41 full-length coding aquaporin sequences in the common bean genome, divided by phylogenetic analysis into five sub-families (PIPs, TIPs, NIPs, SIPs and XIPs). Residues determining substrate specificity of aquaporins (i.e., NPA motifs and ar/R selectivity filter) seem conserved between common bean and other plant species, allowing inference of substrate specificity for these proteins. Thanks to the availability of RNA-sequencing datasets, expression levels in different organs and in leaves of wild and domesticated bean accessions were evaluated. Three aquaporins (PvTIP1;1, PvPIP2;4 and PvPIP1;2) have the overall highest mean expressions, with PvTIP1;1 having the highest expression among all aquaporins. We performed an EST database mining to identify drought-responsive aquaporins in common bean. This analysis showed a significant increase in expression for PvTIP1;1 in drought stress conditions compared to well-watered environments. The pivotal role suggested for PvTIP1;1 in regulating water homeostasis and drought stress response in the common bean should be verified by further field experimentation under drought stress. PMID:25846963

  3. Genome-Wide Identification and Characterization of WRKY Gene Family in Peanut

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hui; Wang, Pengfei; Lin, Jer-Young; Zhao, Chuanzhi; Bi, Yuping; Wang, Xingjun

    2016-01-01

    WRKY, an important transcription factor family, is widely distributed in the plant kingdom. Many reports focused on analysis of phylogenetic relationship and biological function of WRKY protein at the whole genome level in different plant species. However, little is known about WRKY proteins in the genome of Arachis species and their response to salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) treatment. In this study, we identified 77 and 75 WRKY proteins from the two wild ancestral diploid genomes of cultivated tetraploid peanut, Arachis duranensis and Arachis ipaënsis, using bioinformatics approaches. Most peanut WRKY coding genes were located on A. duranensis chromosome A6 and A. ipaënsis chromosome B3, while the least number of WRKY genes was found in chromosome 9. The WRKY orthologous gene pairs in A. duranensis and A. ipaënsis chromosomes were highly syntenic. Our analysis indicated that segmental duplication events played a major role in AdWRKY and AiWRKY genes, and strong purifying selection was observed in gene duplication pairs. Furthermore, we translate the knowledge gained from the genome-wide analysis result of wild ancestral peanut to cultivated peanut to reveal that gene activities of specific cultivated peanut WRKY gene were changed due to SA and JA treatment. Peanut WRKY7, 8 and 13 genes were down-regulated, whereas WRKY1 and 12 genes were up-regulated with SA and JA treatment. These results could provide valuable information for peanut improvement. PMID:27200012

  4. Genome-wide characterization and comparative analysis of the MLO gene family in cotton.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Ma, Qifeng; Dou, Lingling; Liu, Zhen; Peng, Renhai; Yu, Shuxun

    2016-06-01

    In plants, MLO (Mildew Locus O) gene encodes a plant-specific seven transmembrane (TM) domain protein involved in several cellular processes, including susceptibility to powdery mildew (PM). In this study, a genome-wide characterization of the MLO gene family in G. raimondii L., G. arboreum L. and G. hirsutum L. was performed. In total, 22, 17 and 38 homologous sequences were identified for each species, respectively. Gene organization, including chromosomal location, gene clustering and gene duplication, was investigated. Homologues related to PM susceptibility in upland cotton were inferred by phylogenetic relationships with functionally characterized MLO proteins. To conduct a comparative analysis between MLO candidate genes from G. raimondii L., G. arboreum L. and G. hirsutum L., orthologous relationships and conserved synteny blocks were constructed. The transcriptional variation of 38 GhMLO genes in response to exogenous application of salt, mannitol (Man), abscisic acid (ABA), ethylene (ETH), jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) was monitored. Further studies should be conducted to elucidate the functions of MLO genes in PM susceptibility and phytohormone signalling pathways. PMID:26986931

  5. Genome-wide analysis of the omega-3 fatty acid desaturase gene family in Gossypium

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yurchenko, Olga P.; Park, Sunjung; Ilut, Daniel C.; Inmon, Jay J.; Millhollon, Jon C.; Liechty, Zach; Page, Justin T.; Jenks, Matthew A.; Chapman, Kent D.; Udall, Joshua A.; et al

    2014-11-18

    The majority of commercial cotton varieties planted worldwide are derived from Gossypium hirsutum, which is a naturally occurring allotetraploid produced by interspecific hybridization of A- and D-genome diploid progenitor species. While most cotton species are adapted to warm, semi-arid tropical and subtropical regions, and thus perform well in these geographical areas, cotton seedlings are sensitive to cold temperature, which can significantly reduce crop yields. One of the common biochemical responses of plants to cold temperatures is an increase in omega-3 fatty acids, which protects cellular function by maintaining membrane integrity. The purpose of our study was to identify and characterizemore » the omega-3 fatty acid desaturase (FAD) gene family in G. hirsutum, with an emphasis on identifying omega-3 FADs involved in cold temperature adaptation. Results: Eleven omega-3 FAD genes were identified in G. hirsutum, and characterization of the gene family in extant A and D diploid species (G. herbaceum and G. raimondii, respectively) allowed for unambiguous genome assignment of all homoeologs in tetraploid G. hirsutum. The omega-3 FAD family of cotton includes five distinct genes, two of which encode endoplasmic reticulum-type enzymes (FAD3-1 and FAD3-2) and three that encode chloroplast-type enzymes (FAD7/8-1, FAD7/8-2, and FAD7/8-3). The FAD3-2 gene was duplicated in the A genome progenitor species after the evolutionary split from the D progenitor, but before the interspecific hybridization event that gave rise to modern tetraploid cotton. RNA-seq analysis revealed conserved, gene-specific expression patterns in various organs and cell types and semi-quantitative RT-PCR further revealed that FAD7/8-1 was specifically induced during cold temperature treatment of G. hirsutum seedlings. Conclusions: The omega-3 FAD gene family in cotton was characterized at the genome-wide level in three species, showing relatively ancient establishment of the gene family prior

  6. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of the expansin gene family in tomato.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongen; Liu, Lifeng; Wang, Xin; Han, Zhihui; Ouyang, Bo; Zhang, Junhong; Li, Hanxia

    2016-04-01

    Plant expansins are capable of inducing pH-dependent cell wall extension and stress relaxation. They may be useful as targets for crop improvement to enhance fruit development and stress resistance. Tomato is a major agricultural crop and a model plant for studying fruit development. Because only some tomato expansins have been studied, a genome-wide analysis of the tomato expansin family is necessary. In this study, we identified 25 SlEXPAs, eight SlEXPBs, one SlEXLA, four SlEXLBs, and five short homologs in the tomato genome. 25 of these genes were identified as being expressed. Bioinformatic analysis showed that although tomato expansins share similarities with those from other plants, they also exhibit specific features regarding genetic structure and amino acid sequences, which indicates a unique evolutionary process. Segmental and tandem duplication events have played important roles in expanding the tomato expansin family. Additionally, the 3-exon/2-intron structure may form the basic organization of expansin genes. We identified new expansin genes preferentially expressed in fruits (SlEXPA8, SlEXPB8, and SlEXLB1), roots (SlEXPA9, SlEXLB2, and SlEXLB4), and floral organs. Among the analyzed genes those that were inducible by hormone or stress treatments, including SlEXPA3, SlEXPA7, SlEXPB1-B2, SlEXPB8, SlEXLB1-LB2, and SlEXLB4. Our findings may further clarify the biological activities of tomato expansins, especially those related to fruit development and stress resistance, and contribute to the genetic modification of tomato plants to improve crop quality and yield. PMID:26499956

  7. Genome-wide characterization of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase gene family in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus).

    PubMed

    Dong, Chun-Juan; Shang, Qing-Mao

    2013-07-01

    Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), the first enzyme in the phenylpropanoid pathway, plays a critical role in plant growth, development, and adaptation. PAL enzymes are encoded by a gene family in plants. Here, we report a genome-wide search for PAL genes in watermelon. A total of 12 PAL genes, designated ClPAL1-12, are identified . Nine are arranged in tandem in two duplication blocks located on chromosomes 4 and 7, and the other three ClPAL genes are distributed as single copies on chromosomes 2, 3, and 8. Both the cDNA and protein sequences of ClPALs share an overall high identity with each other. A phylogenetic analysis places 11 of the ClPALs into a separate cucurbit subclade, whereas ClPAL2, which belongs to neither monocots nor dicots, may serve as an ancestral PAL in plants. In the cucurbit subclade, seven ClPALs form homologous pairs with their counterparts from cucumber. Expression profiling reveals that 11 of the ClPAL genes are expressed and show preferential expression in the stems and male and female flowers. Six of the 12 ClPALs are moderately or strongly expressed in the fruits, particularly in the pulp, suggesting the potential roles of PAL in the development of fruit color and flavor. A promoter motif analysis of the ClPAL genes implies redundant but distinctive cis-regulatory structures for stress responsiveness. Finally, duplication events during the evolution and expansion of the ClPAL gene family are discussed, and the relationships between the ClPAL genes and their cucumber orthologs are estimated. PMID:23546528

  8. Genome-Wide Identification, Characterization and Expression Analysis of the TCP Gene Family in Prunus mume

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuzhen; Xu, Zongda; Zhao, Kai; Yang, Weiru; Cheng, Tangren; Wang, Jia; Zhang, Qixiang

    2016-01-01

    TCP proteins, belonging to a plant-specific transcription factors family, are known to have great functions in plant development, especially flower and leaf development. However, there is little information about this gene family in Prunus mume, which is widely cultivated in China as an ornamental and fruit tree. Here a genome-wide analysis of TCP genes was performed to explore their evolution in P. mume. Nineteen PmTCPs were identified and three of them contained putative miR319 target sites. Phylogenetic and comprehensive bioinformatics analyses of these genes revealed that different types of TCP genes had undergone different evolutionary processes and the genes in the same clade had similar chromosomal location, gene structure, and conserved domains. Expression analysis of these PmTCPs indicated that there were diverse expression patterns among different clades. Most TCP genes were predominantly expressed in flower, leaf, and stem, and showed high expression levels in the different stages of flower bud differentiation, especially in petal formation stage and gametophyte development. Genes in TCP-P subfamily had main roles in both flower development and gametophyte development. The CIN genes in double petal cultivars might have key roles in the formation of petal, while they were correlated with gametophyte development in the single petal cultivar. The CYC/TB1 type genes were highly detected in the formation of petal and pistil. The less-complex flower types of P. mume might result from the fact that there were only two CYC type genes present in P. mume and a lack of CYC2 genes to control the identity of flower types. These results lay the foundation for further study on the functions of TCP genes during flower development.

  9. Genome-Wide Identification and Characterization of R2R3MYB Family in Cucumis sativus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Zhang, Cunjia; Li, Jing; Wang, Lina; Ren, Zhonghai

    2012-01-01

    Background The R2R3MYB proteins comprise one of the largest families of transcription factors in plants. Although genome-wide analysis of this family has been carried out in some species, little is known about R2R3MYB genes in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.). Principal Findings This study has identified 55 R2R3MYB genes in the latest cucumber genome and the CsR2R3MYB family contained the smallest number of identified genes compared to other species that have been studied due to the absence of recent gene duplication events. These results were also supported by genome distribution and gene duplication analysis. Phylogenetic analysis showed that they could be classified into 11 subgroups. The evolutionary relationships and the intron - exon organizations that showed similarities with Arabidopsis, Vitis and Glycine R2R3MYB proteins were also analyzed and suggested strong gene conservation but also the expansions of particular functional genes during the evolution of the plant species. In addition, we found that 8 out of 55 (∼14.54%) cucumber R2R3MYB genes underwent alternative splicing events, producing a variety of transcripts from a single gene, which illustrated the extremely high complexity of transcriptome regulation. Tissue-specific expression profiles showed that 50 cucumber R2R3MYB genes were expressed in at least one of the tissues and the other 5 genes showed very low expression in all tissues tested, which suggested that cucumber R2R3MYB genes took part in many cellular processes. The transcript abundance level analysis during abiotic conditions (NaCl, ABA and low temperature treatments) identified a group of R2R3MYB genes that responded to one or more treatments. Conclusions This study has produced a comparative genomics analysis of the cucumber R2R3MYB gene family and has provided the first steps towards the selection of CsR2R3MYB genes for cloning and functional dissection that can be used in further studies to uncover their roles in cucumber growth and

  10. Genome-wide variant analysis of simplex autism families with an integrative clinical-bioinformatics pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Barrón, Laura T.; O'Rawe, Jason A.; Wu, Yiyang; Yoon, Margaret; Fang, Han; Iossifov, Ivan; Lyon, Gholson J.

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of developmental disabilities that affect social interaction and communication and are characterized by repetitive behaviors. There is now a large body of evidence that suggests a complex role of genetics in ASDs, in which many different loci are involved. Although many current population-scale genomic studies have been demonstrably fruitful, these studies generally focus on analyzing a limited part of the genome or use a limited set of bioinformatics tools. These limitations preclude the analysis of genome-wide perturbations that may contribute to the development and severity of ASD-related phenotypes. To overcome these limitations, we have developed and utilized an integrative clinical and bioinformatics pipeline for generating a more complete and reliable set of genomic variants for downstream analyses. Our study focuses on the analysis of three simplex autism families consisting of one affected child, unaffected parents, and one unaffected sibling. All members were clinically evaluated and widely phenotyped. Genotyping arrays and whole-genome sequencing were performed on each member, and the resulting sequencing data were analyzed using a variety of available bioinformatics tools. We searched for rare variants of putative functional impact that were found to be segregating according to de novo, autosomal recessive, X-linked, mitochondrial, and compound heterozygote transmission models. The resulting candidate variants included three small heterozygous copy-number variations (CNVs), a rare heterozygous de novo nonsense mutation in MYBBP1A located within exon 1, and a novel de novo missense variant in LAMB3. Our work demonstrates how more comprehensive analyses that include rich clinical data and whole-genome sequencing data can generate reliable results for use in downstream investigations. PMID:27148569

  11. Genome-wide identification and analysis of the MADS-box gene family in sesame.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xin; Wang, Linhai; Yu, Jingyin; Zhang, Yanxin; Li, Donghua; Zhang, Xiurong

    2015-09-10

    MADS-box genes encode transcription factors that play crucial roles in plant growth and development. Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is an oil crop that contributes to the daily oil and protein requirements of almost half of the world's population; therefore, a genome-wide analysis of the MADS-box gene family is needed. Fifty-seven MADS-box genes were identified from 14 linkage groups of the sesame genome. Analysis of phylogenetic relationships with Arabidopsis thaliana, Utricularia gibba and Solanum lycopersicum MADS-box genes was performed. Sesame MADS-box genes were clustered into four groups: 28 MIKC(c)-type, 5 MIKC(⁎)-type, 14 Mα-type and 10 Mγ-type. Gene structure analysis revealed from 1 to 22 exons of sesame MADS-box genes. The number of exons in type II MADS-box genes greatly exceeded the number in type I genes. Motif distribution analysis of sesame MADS-box genes also indicated that type II MADS-box genes contained more motifs than type I genes. These results suggested that type II sesame MADS-box genes had more complex structures. By analyzing expression profiles of MADS-box genes in seven sesame transcriptomes, we determined that MIKC(C)-type MADS-box genes played significant roles in sesame flower and seed development. Although most MADS-box genes in the same clade showed similar expression features, some gene functions were diversified from the orthologous Arabidopsis genes. This research will contribute to uncovering the role of MADS-box genes in sesame development. PMID:25967387

  12. Genome-Wide Analysis and Characterization of Aux/IAA Family Genes in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Rameneni, Jana Jeevan; Li, Xiaonan; Sivanandhan, Ganesan; Choi, Su Ryun; Pang, Wenxing; Im, Subin; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2016-01-01

    Auxins are the key players in plant growth development involving leaf formation, phototropism, root, fruit and embryo development. Auxin/Indole-3-Acetic Acid (Aux/IAA) are early auxin response genes noted as transcriptional repressors in plant auxin signaling. However, many studies focus on Aux/ARF gene families and much less is known about the Aux/IAA gene family in Brassica rapa (B. rapa). Here we performed a comprehensive genome-wide analysis and identified 55 Aux/IAA genes in B. rapa using four conserved motifs of Aux/IAA family (PF02309). Chromosomal mapping of the B. rapa Aux/IAA (BrIAA) genes facilitated understanding cluster rearrangement of the crucifer building blocks in the genome. Phylogenetic analysis of BrIAA with Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa and Zea mays identified 51 sister pairs including 15 same species (BrIAA—BrIAA) and 36 cross species (BrIAA—AtIAA) IAA genes. Among the 55 BrIAA genes, expression of 43 and 45 genes were verified using Genebank B. rapa ESTs and in home developed microarray data from mature leaves of Chiifu and RcBr lines. Despite their huge morphological difference, tissue specific expression analysis of BrIAA genes between the parental lines Chiifu and RcBr showed that the genes followed a similar pattern of expression during leaf development and a different pattern during bud, flower and siliqua development stages. The response of the BrIAA genes to abiotic and auxin stress at different time intervals revealed their involvement in stress response. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms between IAA genes of reference genome Chiifu and RcBr were focused and identified. Our study examines the scope of conservation and divergence of Aux/IAA genes and their structures in B. rapa. Analyzing the expression and structural variation between two parental lines will significantly contribute to functional genomics of Brassica crops and we belive our study would provide a foundation in understanding the Aux/IAA genes in B. rapa. PMID

  13. Genome-Wide Analysis and Characterization of Aux/IAA Family Genes in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Paul, Parameswari; Dhandapani, Vignesh; Rameneni, Jana Jeevan; Li, Xiaonan; Sivanandhan, Ganesan; Choi, Su Ryun; Pang, Wenxing; Im, Subin; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2016-01-01

    Auxins are the key players in plant growth development involving leaf formation, phototropism, root, fruit and embryo development. Auxin/Indole-3-Acetic Acid (Aux/IAA) are early auxin response genes noted as transcriptional repressors in plant auxin signaling. However, many studies focus on Aux/ARF gene families and much less is known about the Aux/IAA gene family in Brassica rapa (B. rapa). Here we performed a comprehensive genome-wide analysis and identified 55 Aux/IAA genes in B. rapa using four conserved motifs of Aux/IAA family (PF02309). Chromosomal mapping of the B. rapa Aux/IAA (BrIAA) genes facilitated understanding cluster rearrangement of the crucifer building blocks in the genome. Phylogenetic analysis of BrIAA with Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa and Zea mays identified 51 sister pairs including 15 same species (BrIAA-BrIAA) and 36 cross species (BrIAA-AtIAA) IAA genes. Among the 55 BrIAA genes, expression of 43 and 45 genes were verified using Genebank B. rapa ESTs and in home developed microarray data from mature leaves of Chiifu and RcBr lines. Despite their huge morphological difference, tissue specific expression analysis of BrIAA genes between the parental lines Chiifu and RcBr showed that the genes followed a similar pattern of expression during leaf development and a different pattern during bud, flower and siliqua development stages. The response of the BrIAA genes to abiotic and auxin stress at different time intervals revealed their involvement in stress response. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms between IAA genes of reference genome Chiifu and RcBr were focused and identified. Our study examines the scope of conservation and divergence of Aux/IAA genes and their structures in B. rapa. Analyzing the expression and structural variation between two parental lines will significantly contribute to functional genomics of Brassica crops and we belive our study would provide a foundation in understanding the Aux/IAA genes in B. rapa. PMID

  14. Genome-wide linkage analyses of type 2 diabetes in Mexican Americans: the San Antonio Family Diabetes/Gallbladder Study.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Kelly J; Lehman, Donna M; Arya, Rector; Fowler, Sharon; Leach, Robin J; Göring, Harald H H; Almasy, Laura; Blangero, John; Dyer, Tom D; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Stern, Michael P

    2005-09-01

    The San Antonio Family Diabetes/Gallbladder Study was initiated to identify susceptibility genes for type 2 diabetes. Evidence was previously reported of linkage to diabetes on 10q with suggestive evidence on 3p and 9p in a genome-wide scan of 440 individuals from 27 pedigrees ascertained through a single diabetic proband. Subsequently, the study was expanded to include 906 individuals from 39 extended Mexican-American pedigrees, two additional examination cycles approximately 5.3 and 7.6 years after baseline, and genotypes for a new set of genome-wide markers. Therefore, we completed a second genome-wide linkage scan. Using information from a participant's most recent exam, the prevalence of diabetes in nonprobands was 21.8%. We performed genome-wide variance components-based genetic analysis on the discrete trait diabetes using a liability model and on the quantitative Martingale residual obtained from modeling age of diabetes diagnosis using Cox proportional hazard models. Controlling for age and age(2), our strongest evidence for linkage to the trait diabetes and the quantitative Martingale residual was on chromosome 3p at marker D3S2406 with multipoint empirical logarithm of odds scores of 1.87 and 3.76, respectively. In summary, we report evidence for linkage to diabetes on chromosome 3p in a region previously identified in at least three independent populations. PMID:16123354

  15. Genome-wide association study reveals greater polygenic loading for schizophrenia in cases with a family history of illness.

    PubMed

    Bigdeli, Tim B; Ripke, Stephan; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin; Lee, Sang Hong; Wray, Naomi R; Gejman, Pablo V; Rietschel, Marcella; Cichon, Sven; St Clair, David; Corvin, Aiden; Kirov, George; McQuillin, Andrew; Gurling, Hugh; Rujescu, Dan; Andreassen, Ole A; Werge, Thomas; Blackwood, Douglas H R; Pato, Carlos N; Pato, Michele T; Malhotra, Anil K; O'Donovan, Michael C; Kendler, Kenneth S; Fanous, Ayman H

    2016-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of schizophrenia have yielded more than 100 common susceptibility variants, and strongly support a substantial polygenic contribution of a large number of small allelic effects. It has been hypothesized that familial schizophrenia is largely a consequence of inherited rather than environmental factors. We investigated the extent to which familiality of schizophrenia is associated with enrichment for common risk variants detectable in a large GWAS. We analyzed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data for cases reporting a family history of psychotic illness (N = 978), cases reporting no such family history (N = 4,503), and unscreened controls (N = 8,285) from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC1) study of schizophrenia. We used a multinomial logistic regression approach with model-fitting to detect allelic effects specific to either family history subgroup. We also considered a polygenic model, in which we tested whether family history positive subjects carried more schizophrenia risk alleles than family history negative subjects, on average. Several individual SNPs attained suggestive but not genome-wide significant association with either family history subgroup. Comparison of genome-wide polygenic risk scores based on GWAS summary statistics indicated a significant enrichment for SNP effects among family history positive compared to family history negative cases (Nagelkerke's R(2 ) = 0.0021; P = 0.00331; P-value threshold <0.4). Estimates of variability in disease liability attributable to the aggregate effect of genome-wide SNPs were significantly greater for family history positive compared to family history negative cases (0.32 and 0.22, respectively; P = 0.031). We found suggestive evidence of allelic effects detectable in large GWAS of schizophrenia that might be specific to particular family history subgroups. However, consideration of a polygenic risk score indicated a significant

  16. The Phytocyanin Gene Family in Rice (Oryza sativa L.): Genome-Wide Identification, Classification and Transcriptional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Haoli; Zhao, Heming; Liu, Zhi; Zhao, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Background Phytocyanins (PCs) are plant-specific blue copper proteins involved in electron transport, and a large number of known PCs are considered to be chimeric arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs). To date there has not been a genome-wide overview of the OsPC gene family. Therefore, as the first step and a useful strategy to elucidate the functions of OsPCs, there is an urgent need for a thorough genome-wide analysis of this gene family. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, a total of 62 OsPC genes were identified through a comprehensive bioinformatics analysis of the rice (Oryza sativa L.) genome. Based on phylogeny and motif constitution, the family of OsPCs was classified into three subclasses: uclacyanin-like proteins (OsUCLs), stellacyanin-like proteins (OsSCLs) and early nodulin-like proteins (OsENODLs). Structure and glycosylation prediction indicated that 46 OsPCs were glycosylphosphatigylinositol-anchored proteins and 38 OsPCs were chimeric AGPs. Gene duplication analysis revealed that chromosomal segment and tandem duplications contributed almost equally to the expansion of this gene family, and duplication events were mostly happened in the OsUCL subfamily. The expression profiles of OsPC genes were analyzed at different stages of vegetative and reproductive development and under abiotic stresses. It revealed that a large number of OsPC genes were abundantly expressed in the various stages of development. Moreover, 17 genes were regulated under the treatments of abiotic stresses. Conclusions/Significance The genome-wide identification and expression analysis of OsPC genes should facilitate research in this gene family and give new insights toward elucidating their functions in higher plants. PMID:21984902

  17. A high-density SNP genome-wide linkage search of 206 families identifies susceptibility loci for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sellick, Gabrielle S; Goldin, Lynn R; Wild, Ruth W; Slager, Susan L; Ressenti, Laura; Strom, Sara S; Dyer, Martin J S; Mauro, Francesca R; Marti, Gerald E; Fuller, Stephen; Lyttelton, Matthew; Kipps, Thomas J; Keating, Michael J; Call, Timothy G; Catovsky, Daniel; Caporaso, Neil; Houlston, Richard S

    2007-11-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders display familial aggregation. To identify a susceptibility gene for CLL, we assembled families from the major European (ICLLC) and American (GEC) consortia to conduct a genome-wide linkage analysis of 101 new CLL pedigrees using a high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array and combined the results with data from our previously reported analysis of 105 families. Here, we report on the combined analysis of the 206 families. Multipoint linkage analyses were undertaken using both nonparametric (model-free) and parametric (model-based) methods. After the removal of high linkage disequilibrium SNPs, we obtained a maximum nonparametric linkage (NPL) score of 3.02 (P = .001) on chromosome 2q21.2. The same genomic position also yielded the highest multipoint heterogeneity LOD (HLOD) score under a common recessive model of disease susceptibility (HLOD = 3.11; P = 7.7 x 10(-5)), which was significant at the genome-wide level. In addition, 2 other chromosomal positions, 6p22.1 (corresponding to the major histocompatibility locus) and 18q21.1, displayed HLOD scores higher than 2.1 (P < .002). None of the regions coincided with areas of common chromosomal abnormalities frequently observed in CLL. These findings provide direct evidence for Mendelian predisposition to CLL and evidence for the location of disease loci. PMID:17687107

  18. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Musa WRKY Gene Family: Evolution and Differential Expression during Development and Stress.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ridhi; Pandey, Ashutosh; Trivedi, Prabodh K; Asif, Mehar H

    2016-01-01

    The WRKY gene family plays an important role in the development and stress responses in plants. As information is not available on the WRKY gene family in Musa species, genome-wide analysis has been carried out in this study using available genomic information from two species, Musa acuminata and Musa balbisiana. Analysis identified 147 and 132 members of the WRKY gene family in M. acuminata and M. balbisiana, respectively. Evolutionary analysis suggests that the WRKY gene family expanded much before the speciation in both the species. Most of the orthologs retained in two species were from the γ duplication event which occurred prior to α and β genome-wide duplication (GWD) events. Analysis also suggests that subtle changes in nucleotide sequences during the course of evolution have led to the development of new motifs which might be involved in neo-functionalization of different WRKY members in two species. Expression and cis-regulatory motif analysis suggest possible involvement of Group II and Group III WRKY members during various stresses and growth/development including fruit ripening process respectively. PMID:27014321

  19. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Musa WRKY Gene Family: Evolution and Differential Expression during Development and Stress

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Ridhi; Pandey, Ashutosh; Trivedi, Prabodh K.; Asif, Mehar H.

    2016-01-01

    The WRKY gene family plays an important role in the development and stress responses in plants. As information is not available on the WRKY gene family in Musa species, genome-wide analysis has been carried out in this study using available genomic information from two species, Musa acuminata and Musa balbisiana. Analysis identified 147 and 132 members of the WRKY gene family in M. acuminata and M. balbisiana, respectively. Evolutionary analysis suggests that the WRKY gene family expanded much before the speciation in both the species. Most of the orthologs retained in two species were from the γ duplication event which occurred prior to α and β genome-wide duplication (GWD) events. Analysis also suggests that subtle changes in nucleotide sequences during the course of evolution have led to the development of new motifs which might be involved in neo-functionalization of different WRKY members in two species. Expression and cis-regulatory motif analysis suggest possible involvement of Group II and Group III WRKY members during various stresses and growth/development including fruit ripening process respectively. PMID:27014321

  20. Genome-wide identification, isolation and expression analysis of auxin response factor (ARF) gene family in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Si-Bei; OuYang, Wei-Zhi; Hou, Xiao-Jin; Xie, Liang-Liang; Hu, Chun-Gen; Zhang, Jin-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Auxin response factors (ARFs) are an important family of proteins in auxin-mediated response, with key roles in various physiological and biochemical processes. To date, a genome-wide overview of the ARF gene family in citrus was not available. A systematic analysis of this gene family in citrus was begun by carrying out a genome-wide search for the homologs of ARFs. A total of 19 nonredundant ARF genes (CiARF) were found and validated from the sweet orange. A comprehensive overview of the CiARFs was undertaken, including the gene structures, phylogenetic analysis, chromosome locations, conserved motifs of proteins, and cis-elements in promoters of CiARF. Furthermore, expression profiling using real-time PCR revealed many CiARF genes, albeit with different patterns depending on types of tissues and/or developmental stages. Comprehensive expression analysis of these genes was also performed under two hormone treatments using real-time PCR. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and N-1-napthylphthalamic acid (NPA) treatment experiments revealed differential up-regulation and down-regulation, respectively, of the 19 citrus ARF genes in the callus of sweet orange. Our comprehensive analysis of ARF genes further elucidates the roles of CiARF family members during citrus growth and development process. PMID:25870601

  1. Genome-Wide Analysis of Basic/Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor Family in Rice and Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoxing; Duan, Xuepeng; Jiang, Haixiong; Sun, Yujin; Tang, Yuanping; Yuan, Zheng; Guo, Jingkang; Liang, Wanqi; Chen, Liang; Yin, Jingyuan; Ma, Hong; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Dabing

    2006-01-01

    The basic/helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors and their homologs form a large family in plant and animal genomes. They are known to play important roles in the specification of tissue types in animals. On the other hand, few plant bHLH proteins have been studied functionally. Recent completion of whole genome sequences of model plants Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa) allows genome-wide analysis and comparison of the bHLH family in flowering plants. We have identified 167 bHLH genes in the rice genome, and their phylogenetic analysis indicates that they form well-supported clades, which are defined as subfamilies. In addition, sequence analysis of potential DNA-binding activity, the sequence motifs outside the bHLH domain, and the conservation of intron/exon structural patterns further support the evolutionary relationships among these proteins. The genome distribution of rice bHLH genes strongly supports the hypothesis that genome-wide and tandem duplication contributed to the expansion of the bHLH gene family, consistent with the birth-and-death theory of gene family evolution. Bioinformatics analysis suggests that rice bHLH proteins can potentially participate in a variety of combinatorial interactions, endowing them with the capacity to regulate a multitude of transcriptional programs. In addition, similar expression patterns suggest functional conservation between some rice bHLH genes and their close Arabidopsis homologs. PMID:16896230

  2. Family-based genome-wide association study of frontal θ oscillations identifies potassium channel gene KCNJ6.

    PubMed

    Kang, S J; Rangaswamy, M; Manz, N; Wang, J-C; Wetherill, L; Hinrichs, T; Almasy, L; Brooks, A; Chorlian, D B; Dick, D; Hesselbrock, V; Kramer, J; Kuperman, S; Nurnberger, J; Rice, J; Schuckit, M; Tischfield, J; Bierut, L J; Edenberg, H J; Goate, A; Foroud, T; Porjesz, B

    2012-08-01

    Event-related oscillations (EROs) represent highly heritable neuroelectric correlates of cognitive processes that manifest deficits in alcoholics and in offspring at high risk to develop alcoholism. Theta ERO to targets in the visual oddball task has been shown to be an endophenotype for alcoholism. A family-based genome-wide association study was performed for the frontal theta ERO phenotype using 634 583 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 1560 family members from 117 families densely affected by alcohol use disorders, recruited in the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism. Genome-wide significant association was found with several SNPs on chromosome 21 in KCNJ6 (a potassium inward rectifier channel; KIR3.2/GIRK2), with the most significant SNP at P = 4.7 × 10(-10)). The same SNPs were also associated with EROs from central and parietal electrodes, but with less significance, suggesting that the association is frontally focused. One imputed synonymous SNP in exon four, highly correlated with our top three SNPs, was significantly associated with the frontal theta ERO phenotype. These results suggest KCNJ6 or its product GIRK2 account for some of the variations in frontal theta band oscillations. GIRK2 receptor activation contributes to slow inhibitory postsynaptic potentials that modulate neuronal excitability, and therefore influence neuronal networks. PMID:22554406

  3. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Cyclin Gene Family in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tingyan; Wang, Xin; Lu, Yongen; Cai, Xiaofeng; Ye, Zhibiao; Zhang, Junhong

    2014-01-01

    Cyclins play important roles in cell division and cell expansion. They also interact with cyclin-dependent kinases to control cell cycle progression in plants. Our genome-wide analysis identified 52 expressed cyclin genes in tomato. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino sequences of tomato and Arabidopsis cyclin genes divided them into 10 types, A-, B-, C-, D-, H-, L-, T-, U-, SDS- and J18. Pfam analysis indicated that most tomato cyclins contain a cyclin-N domain. C-, H- and J18 types only contain a cyclin-C domain, and U-type cyclins contain another potential cyclin domain. All of the cyclin genes are distributed throughout the tomato genome except for chromosome 8, and 30 of them were found to be segmentally duplicated; they are found on the duplicate segments of chromosome 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 11 and 12, suggesting that tomato cyclin genes experienced a mass of segmental duplication. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis indicates that the expression patterns of tomato cyclin genes were significantly different in vegetative and reproductive stages. Transcription of most cyclin genes can be enhanced or repressed by exogenous application of gibberellin, which implies that gibberellin maybe a direct regulator of cyclin genes. The study presented here may be useful as a guide for further functional research on tomato cyclins. PMID:24366066

  4. Genome-wide identification and characterization of aquaporin gene family in moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis).

    PubMed

    Sun, Huayu; Li, Lichao; Lou, Yongfeng; Zhao, Hansheng; Gao, Zhimin

    2016-05-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are known to play a major role in maintaining water and hydraulic conductivity balance in the plant system. Numerous studies have showed AQPs execute multi-function throughout plant growth and development, including water transport, nitrogen, carbon, and micronutrient acquisition etc. However, little information on AQPs is known in bamboo. In this study, we present the first genome-wide identification and characterization of AQP genes in moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) using bioinformatics. In total, 26 AQP genes were identified by homologous analysis, which were divided into four groups (PIPs, TIPs, NIPs, and SIPs) based on the phylogenetic analysis. All the genes were located on 26 different scaffolds respectively on basis of the gene mapped to bamboo genome. Evolutionary analysis indicated that Ph. edulis was more close to Oryza sativa than Zea mays in the genetic relationship. Besides, qRT-PCR was used to analyze gene expression profiles, which revealed that AQP genes were expressed constitutively in all the detected tissues, and were all responsive to the environmental cues such as drought, water, and NaCl stresses. This data suggested that AQPs may play fundamental roles in maintaining normal growth and development of bamboo, which would contribute to better understanding for the complex regulation mechanism involved in the fast-growing process of bamboo. Furthermore, the result could provide valuable information for further research on bamboo functional genomics. PMID:26993482

  5. Family based genome-wide copy number scan identifies complex rearrangements at 17q21.31 in dyslexics.

    PubMed

    Veerappa, Avinash M; Saldanha, Marita; Padakannaya, Prakash; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2014-10-01

    Developmental dyslexia (DD) is a complex heritable disorder with unexpected difficulty in learning to read and spell despite adequate intelligence, education, environment, and normal senses. We performed genome-wide screening for copy number variations (CNVs) in 10 large Indian dyslexic families using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0. Results revealed the complex genomic rearrangements due to one non-contiguous deletion and five contiguous micro duplications and micro deletions at 17q21.31 region in three dyslexic families. CNVs in this region harbor the genes KIAA1267, LRRC37A, ARL17A/B, NSFP1, and NSF. The CNVs in case 1 and case 2 at this locus were found to be in homozygous state and case 3 was a de novo CNV. These CNVs were found with at least one CNV having a common break and end points in the parents. This cluster of genes containing NSF is implicated in learning, cognition, and memory, though not formally associated with dyslexia. Molecular network analysis of these and other dyslexia related module genes suggests NSF and other genes to be associated with cellular/vesicular membrane fusion and synaptic transmission. Thus, we suggest that NSF in this cluster would be the nearest gene responsible for the learning disability phenotype. PMID:25139666

  6. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Profile of Dof Transcription Factor Gene Family in Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiming; Cheng, Jiaowen; Cui, Junjie; Xu, Xiaowan; Liang, Guansheng; Luo, Xirong; Chen, Xiaocui; Tang, Xiangqun; Hu, Kailin; Qin, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Dof (DNA-binding One Zinc Finger) transcription factor family is unique to plants and has diverse roles associated with plant-specific phenomena, such as light, phytohormone and defense responses as well as seed development and germination. Although, genome-wide analysis of this family has been performed in many species, information regarding Dof genes in the pepper, Capsicum annuum L., is extremely limited. In this study, exhaustive searches of pepper genome revealed 33 potential CaDofs that were phylogenetically clustered into four subgroups. Twenty-nine of the 33 Dof genes could be mapped on 11 chromosomes, except for chromosome 7. The intron/exon organizations and conserved motif compositions of these genes were also analyzed. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis and classification of the Dof transcription factor family in eight plant species revealed that S. lycopersicum and C. annuum as well as O. sativa and S. bicolor Dof proteins may have evolved conservatively. Moreover, comprehensive expression analysis of CaDofs using a RNA-seq atlas and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) revealed that these genes exhibit a variety of expression patterns. Most of the CaDofs were expressed in at least one of the tissues tested, whereas several genes were identified as being highly responsive to heat and salt stresses. Overall, this study describes the first genome-wide analysis of the pepper Dof family, whose genes exhibited different expression patterns in all primary fruit developmental stages and tissue types, as in response to abiotic stress. In particular, some Dof genes might be used as biomarkers for heat and salt stress. The results could expand our understanding of the roles of Dof genes in pepper. PMID:27200047

  7. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Profile of Dof Transcription Factor Gene Family in Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhiming; Cheng, Jiaowen; Cui, Junjie; Xu, Xiaowan; Liang, Guansheng; Luo, Xirong; Chen, Xiaocui; Tang, Xiangqun; Hu, Kailin; Qin, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Dof (DNA-binding One Zinc Finger) transcription factor family is unique to plants and has diverse roles associated with plant-specific phenomena, such as light, phytohormone and defense responses as well as seed development and germination. Although, genome-wide analysis of this family has been performed in many species, information regarding Dof genes in the pepper, Capsicum annuum L., is extremely limited. In this study, exhaustive searches of pepper genome revealed 33 potential CaDofs that were phylogenetically clustered into four subgroups. Twenty-nine of the 33 Dof genes could be mapped on 11 chromosomes, except for chromosome 7. The intron/exon organizations and conserved motif compositions of these genes were also analyzed. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis and classification of the Dof transcription factor family in eight plant species revealed that S. lycopersicum and C. annuum as well as O. sativa and S. bicolor Dof proteins may have evolved conservatively. Moreover, comprehensive expression analysis of CaDofs using a RNA-seq atlas and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) revealed that these genes exhibit a variety of expression patterns. Most of the CaDofs were expressed in at least one of the tissues tested, whereas several genes were identified as being highly responsive to heat and salt stresses. Overall, this study describes the first genome-wide analysis of the pepper Dof family, whose genes exhibited different expression patterns in all primary fruit developmental stages and tissue types, as in response to abiotic stress. In particular, some Dof genes might be used as biomarkers for heat and salt stress. The results could expand our understanding of the roles of Dof genes in pepper. PMID:27200047

  8. The Use of Multiplicity Corrections, Order Statistics and Generalized Family-Wise Statistics with Application to Genome-Wide Studies

    PubMed Central

    Schrodi, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    The most important decision faced by large-scale studies, such as those presently encountered in human genetics, is to distinguish between those tests that are true positives from those that are not. In the context of genetics, this entails the determination of genetic markers that actually underlie medically-relevant phenotypes from a vast number of makers typically interrogated in genome-wide studies. A critical part of these decisions relies on the appropriate statistical assessment of data obtained from tests across numerous markers. Several methods have been developed to aid with such analyses, with family-wise approaches, such as the Bonferroni and Dunn-Šidàk corrections, being popular. Conditions that motivate the use of family-wise corrections are explored. Although simple to implement, one major limitation of these approaches is that they assume that p-values are i.i.d. uniformly distributed under the null hypothesis. However, several factors may violate this assumption in genome-wide studies including effects from confounding by population stratification, the presence of related individuals, the correlational structure among genetic markers, and the use of limiting distributions for test statistics. Even after adjustment for such effects, the distribution of p-values can substantially depart from a uniform distribution under the null hypothesis. In this work, I present a decision theory for the use of family-wise corrections for multiplicity and a generalization of the Dunn-Šidàk correction that relaxes the assumption of uniformly-distributed null p-values. The independence assumption is also relaxed and handled through calculating the effective number of independent tests. I also explicitly show the relationship between order statistics and family-wise correction procedures. This generalization may be applicable to multiplicity problems outside of genomics. PMID:27128491

  9. Efficient generalized least squares method for mixed population and family-based samples in genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Yang, James; Levin, Albert M; Montgomery, Courtney G; Datta, Indrani; Trudeau, Sheri; Adrianto, Indra; McKeigue, Paul; Iannuzzi, Michael C; Rybicki, Benjamin A

    2014-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) that draw samples from multiple studies with a mixture of relationship structures are becoming more common. Analytical methods exist for using mixed-sample data, but few methods have been proposed for the analysis of genotype-by-environment (G×E) interactions. Using GWAS data from a study of sarcoidosis susceptibility genes in related and unrelated African Americans, we explored the current analytic options for genotype association testing in studies using both unrelated and family-based designs. We propose a novel method-generalized least squares (GLX)-to estimate both SNP and G×E interaction effects for categorical environmental covariates and compared this method to generalized estimating equations (GEE), logistic regression, the Cochran-Armitage trend test, and the WQLS and MQLS methods. We used simulation to demonstrate that the GLX method reduces type I error under a variety of pedigree structures. We also demonstrate its superior power to detect SNP effects while offering computational advantages and comparable power to detect G×E interactions versus GEE. Using this method, we found two novel SNPs that demonstrate a significant genome-wide interaction with insecticide exposure-rs10499003 and rs7745248, located in the intronic and 3' UTR regions of the FUT9 gene on chromosome 6q16.1. PMID:24845555

  10. Genome-wide identification and characterization of R2R3MYB family in Rosaceae.

    PubMed

    González, Máximo; Carrasco, Basilio; Salazar, Erika

    2016-09-01

    Transcription factors R2R3MYB family have been associated with the control of secondary metabolites, development of structures, cold tolerance and response to biotic and abiotic stress, among others. In recent years, genomes of Rosaceae botanical family are available. Although this information has been used to study the karyotype evolution of these species from an ancestral genome, there are no studies that treat the evolution and diversity of gene families present in these species or in the botanical family. Here we present the first comparative study of the R2R3MYB subfamily of transcription factors in three species of Rosaceae family (Malus domestica, Prunus persica and Fragaria vesca). We described 186, 98 and 86 non-redundant gene models for apple, peach and strawberry, respectively. In this research, we analyzed the intron-exon structure and genomic distribution of R2R3MYB families mentioned above. The phylogenetic comparisons revealed putative functions of some R2R3MYB transcription factors. This analysis found 44 functional subgroups, seven of which were unique for Rosaceae. In addition, our results showed a highly collinearity among some genes revealing the existence of conserved gene models between the three species studied. Although some gene models in these species have been validated under several approaches, more research in the Rosaceae family is necessary to determine gene expression patterns in specific tissues and development stages to facilitate understanding of the regulatory and biochemical mechanism in this botanical family. PMID:27408811

  11. Genome-wide prediction and annotation of Burkholderia pseudomallei AraC/XylS family transcription regulator.

    PubMed

    Lim, Boon-San; Chong, Chan-Eng; Zamrod, Zulkeflie; Nathan, Sheila; Mohamed, Rahmah

    2007-01-01

    Many members of the AraC/XylS family transcription regulator have been proven to play a critical role in regulating bacterial virulence factors in response to environmental stress. By using the Hidden Markov Model (HMM) profile built from the alignment of a 99 amino acid conserved domain sequence of 273 AraC/XylS family transcription regulators, we detected a total of 45 AraC/XylS family transcription regulators in the genome of the Gram-negative pathogen, Burkholderia pseudomallei. Further in silico analysis of each detected AraC/XylS family transcription regulatory protein and its neighboring genes allowed us to make a first-order guess on the role of some of these transcription regulators in regulating important virulence factors such as those involved in three type III secretion systems and biosynthesis of pyochelin, exopolysaccharide (EPS) and phospholipase C. This paper has demonstrated an efficient and systematic genome-wide scale prediction of the AraC/XylS family that can be applied to other protein families. PMID:18391231

  12. Genome-Wide Identification, Characterization and Expression Analysis of the Chalcone Synthase Family in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yahui; Ding, Ting; Su, Bo; Jiang, Haiyang

    2016-01-01

    Members of the chalcone synthase (CHS) family participate in the synthesis of a series of secondary metabolites in plants, fungi and bacteria. The metabolites play important roles in protecting land plants against various environmental stresses during the evolutionary process. Our research was conducted on comprehensive investigation of CHS genes in maize (Zea mays L.), including their phylogenetic relationships, gene structures, chromosomal locations and expression analysis. Fourteen CHS genes (ZmCHS01–14) were identified in the genome of maize, representing one of the largest numbers of CHS family members identified in one organism to date. The gene family was classified into four major classes (classes I–IV) based on their phylogenetic relationships. Most of them contained two exons and one intron. The 14 genes were unevenly located on six chromosomes. Two segmental duplication events were identified, which might contribute to the expansion of the maize CHS gene family to some extent. In addition, quantitative real-time PCR and microarray data analyses suggested that ZmCHS genes exhibited various expression patterns, indicating functional diversification of the ZmCHS genes. Our results will contribute to future studies of the complexity of the CHS gene family in maize and provide valuable information for the systematic analysis of the functions of the CHS gene family. PMID:26828478

  13. Genome-Wide Identification, Characterization and Expression Analysis of the Chalcone Synthase Family in Maize.

    PubMed

    Han, Yahui; Ding, Ting; Su, Bo; Jiang, Haiyang

    2016-01-01

    Members of the chalcone synthase (CHS) family participate in the synthesis of a series of secondary metabolites in plants, fungi and bacteria. The metabolites play important roles in protecting land plants against various environmental stresses during the evolutionary process. Our research was conducted on comprehensive investigation of CHS genes in maize (Zea mays L.), including their phylogenetic relationships, gene structures, chromosomal locations and expression analysis. Fourteen CHS genes (ZmCHS01-14) were identified in the genome of maize, representing one of the largest numbers of CHS family members identified in one organism to date. The gene family was classified into four major classes (classes I-IV) based on their phylogenetic relationships. Most of them contained two exons and one intron. The 14 genes were unevenly located on six chromosomes. Two segmental duplication events were identified, which might contribute to the expansion of the maize CHS gene family to some extent. In addition, quantitative real-time PCR and microarray data analyses suggested that ZmCHS genes exhibited various expression patterns, indicating functional diversification of the ZmCHS genes. Our results will contribute to future studies of the complexity of the CHS gene family in maize and provide valuable information for the systematic analysis of the functions of the CHS gene family. PMID:26828478

  14. On family-based genome-wide association studies with large pedigrees: observations and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Fardo, David W; Zhang, Xue; Ding, Lili; He, Hua; Kurowski, Brad; Alexander, Eileen S; Mersha, Tesfaye B; Pilipenko, Valentina; Kottyan, Leah; Nandakumar, Kannabiran; Martin, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Family based association studies are employed less often than case-control designs in the search for disease-predisposing genes. The optimal statistical genetic approach for complex pedigrees is unclear when evaluating both common and rare variants. We examined the empirical power and type I error rates of 2 common approaches, the measured genotype approach and family-based association testing, through simulations from a set of multigenerational pedigrees. Overall, these results suggest that much larger sample sizes will be required for family-based studies and that power was better using MGA compared to FBAT. Taking into account computational time and potential bias, a 2-step strategy is recommended with FBAT followed by MGA. PMID:25519377

  15. Genome-wide analysis of Aux/IAA and ARF gene families in Populus trichocarpa

    SciTech Connect

    Kalluri, Udaya C; DiFazio, Stephen P; Brunner, A.; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2007-01-01

    Auxin/Indole-3-Acetic Acid (Aux/IAA) and Auxin Response Factor (ARF) transcription factors are key regulators of auxin responses in plants. A total of 35 Aux/IAA and 39 ARF genes were identified in the Populus genome. Comparative phylogenetic analysis revealed that the subgroups PoptrARF2, 6, 9 and 16 and PoptrIAA3, 16, 27 and 29 have differentially expanded in Populus relative to Arabidopsis. Activator ARFs were found to be two fold-overrepresented in the Populus genome. PoptrIAA and PoptrARF gene families appear to have expanded due to high segmental and low tandem duplication events. Furthermore, expression studies showed that genes in the expanded PoptrIAA3 subgroup display differential expression. The gene-family analysis reported here will be useful in conducting future functional genomics studies to understand how the molecular roles of these large gene families translate into a diversity of biologically meaningful auxin effects.

  16. Variation in genome-wide mutation rates within and between human families.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Donald F; Keebler, Jonathan E M; DePristo, Mark A; Lindsay, Sarah J; Zhang, Yujun; Casals, Ferran; Idaghdour, Youssef; Hartl, Chris L; Torroja, Carlos; Garimella, Kiran V; Zilversmit, Martine; Cartwright, Reed; Rouleau, Guy A; Daly, Mark; Stone, Eric A; Hurles, Matthew E; Awadalla, Philip

    2011-07-01

    J.B.S. Haldane proposed in 1947 that the male germline may be more mutagenic than the female germline. Diverse studies have supported Haldane's contention of a higher average mutation rate in the male germline in a variety of mammals, including humans. Here we present, to our knowledge, the first direct comparative analysis of male and female germline mutation rates from the complete genome sequences of two parent-offspring trios. Through extensive validation, we identified 49 and 35 germline de novo mutations (DNMs) in two trio offspring, as well as 1,586 non-germline DNMs arising either somatically or in the cell lines from which the DNA was derived. Most strikingly, in one family, we observed that 92% of germline DNMs were from the paternal germline, whereas, in contrast, in the other family, 64% of DNMs were from the maternal germline. These observations suggest considerable variation in mutation rates within and between families. PMID:21666693

  17. Genome-Wide Identification of the Invertase Gene Family in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaoxing; Rao, Pian; An, Xinmin

    2015-01-01

    Invertase plays a crucial role in carbohydrate partitioning and plant development as it catalyses the irreversible hydrolysis of sucrose into glucose and fructose. The invertase family in plants is composed of two sub-families: acid invertases, which are targeted to the cell wall and vacuole; and neutral/alkaline invertases, which function in the cytosol. In this study, 5 cell wall invertase genes (PtCWINV1-5), 3 vacuolar invertase genes (PtVINV1-3) and 16 neutral/alkaline invertase genes (PtNINV1-16) were identified in the Populus genome and found to be distributed on 14 chromosomes. A comprehensive analysis of poplar invertase genes was performed, including structures, chromosome location, phylogeny, evolutionary pattern and expression profiles. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the two sub-families were both divided into two clades. Segmental duplication is contributed to neutral/alkaline sub-family expansion. Furthermore, the Populus invertase genes displayed differential expression in roots, stems, leaves, leaf buds and in response to salt/cold stress and pathogen infection. In addition, the analysis of enzyme activity and sugar content revealed that invertase genes play key roles in the sucrose metabolism of various tissues and organs in poplar. This work lays the foundation for future functional analysis of the invertase genes in Populus and other woody perennials. PMID:26393355

  18. Genome-Wide Identification of the Invertase Gene Family in Populus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Gao, Kai; Su, Xiaoxing; Rao, Pian; An, Xinmin

    2015-01-01

    Invertase plays a crucial role in carbohydrate partitioning and plant development as it catalyses the irreversible hydrolysis of sucrose into glucose and fructose. The invertase family in plants is composed of two sub-families: acid invertases, which are targeted to the cell wall and vacuole; and neutral/alkaline invertases, which function in the cytosol. In this study, 5 cell wall invertase genes (PtCWINV1-5), 3 vacuolar invertase genes (PtVINV1-3) and 16 neutral/alkaline invertase genes (PtNINV1-16) were identified in the Populus genome and found to be distributed on 14 chromosomes. A comprehensive analysis of poplar invertase genes was performed, including structures, chromosome location, phylogeny, evolutionary pattern and expression profiles. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the two sub-families were both divided into two clades. Segmental duplication is contributed to neutral/alkaline sub-family expansion. Furthermore, the Populus invertase genes displayed differential expression in roots, stems, leaves, leaf buds and in response to salt/cold stress and pathogen infection. In addition, the analysis of enzyme activity and sugar content revealed that invertase genes play key roles in the sucrose metabolism of various tissues and organs in poplar. This work lays the foundation for future functional analysis of the invertase genes in Populus and other woody perennials. PMID:26393355

  19. Genome-wide analysis of the MADS-box gene family in Brassica rapa (Chinese cabbage).

    PubMed

    Duan, Weike; Song, Xiaoming; Liu, Tongkun; Huang, Zhinan; Ren, Jun; Hou, Xilin; Li, Ying

    2015-02-01

    The MADS-box gene family is an ancient and well-studied transcription factor family that functions in almost every developmental process in plants. There are a number of reports about the MADS-box family in different plant species, but systematic analysis of the MADS-box transcription factor family in Brassica rapa (Chinese cabbage) is still lacking. In this study, 160 MADS-box transcription factors were identified from the entire Chinese cabbage genome and compared with the MADS-box factors from 21 other representative plant species. A detailed list of MADS proteins from these 22 species was sorted. Phylogenetic analysis of the BrMADS genes, together with their Arabidopsis and rice counterparts, showed that the BrMADS genes were categorised into type I (Mα, Mβ, Mγ) and type II (MIKC(C), MIKC*) groups, and the MIKC(C) proteins were further divided into 13 subfamilies. The Chinese cabbage type II group has 95 members, which is twice as much as the Arabidopsis type II group, indicating that the Chinese cabbage type II genes have been retained more frequently than the type I genes. Finally, RNA-seq transcriptome data and quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that BrMADS genes are expressed in a tissue-specific manner similar to Arabidopsis. Interestingly, a number of BrMIKC genes showed responses to different abiotic stress treatments, suggesting a function for some of the genes in these processes as well. Taken together, the characterization of the B. rapa MADS-box family presented here, will certainly help in the selection of appropriate candidate genes and further facilitate functional studies in Chinese cabbage. PMID:25216934

  20. Genome-Wide Analysis of the NADK Gene Family in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-Yan; Wang, Xiang; Li, Ri; Li, Wen-Qiang; Chen, Kun-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background NAD(H) kinase (NADK) is the key enzyme that catalyzes de novo synthesis of NADP(H) from NAD(H) for NADP(H)-based metabolic pathways. In plants, NADKs form functional subfamilies. Studies of these families in Arabidopsis thaliana indicate that they have undergone considerable evolutionary selection; however, the detailed evolutionary history and functions of the various NADKs in plants are not clearly understood. Principal Findings We performed a comparative genomic analysis that identified 74 NADK gene homologs from 24 species representing the eight major plant lineages within the supergroup Plantae: glaucophytes, rhodophytes, chlorophytes, bryophytes, lycophytes, gymnosperms, monocots and eudicots. Phylogenetic and structural analysis classified these NADK genes into four well-conserved subfamilies with considerable variety in the domain organization and gene structure among subfamily members. In addition to the typical NAD_kinase domain, additional domains, such as adenylate kinase, dual-specificity phosphatase, and protein tyrosine phosphatase catalytic domains, were found in subfamily II. Interestingly, NADKs in subfamily III exhibited low sequence similarity (∼30%) in the kinase domain within the subfamily and with the other subfamilies. These observations suggest that gene fusion and exon shuffling may have occurred after gene duplication, leading to specific domain organization seen in subfamilies II and III, respectively. Further analysis of the exon/intron structures showed that single intron loss and gain had occurred, yielding the diversified gene structures, during the process of structural evolution of NADK family genes. Finally, both available global microarray data analysis and qRT-RCR experiments revealed that the NADK genes in Arabidopsis and Oryza sativa show different expression patterns in different developmental stages and under several different abiotic/biotic stresses and hormone treatments, underscoring the functional diversity

  1. Genome-Wide Comparative Analysis of 20 Miniature Inverted-Repeat Transposable Element Families in Brassica rapa and B. oleracea

    PubMed Central

    Sampath, Perumal; Murukarthick, Jayakodi; Izzah, Nur Kholilatul; Lee, Jonghoon; Choi, Hong-Il; Shirasawa, Kenta; Choi, Beom-Soon; Liu, Shengyi; Nou, Ill-Sup; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) are ubiquitous, non-autonomous class II transposable elements. Here, we conducted genome-wide comparative analysis of 20 MITE families in B. rapa, B. oleracea, and Arabidopsis thaliana. A total of 5894 and 6026 MITE members belonging to the 20 families were found in the whole genome pseudo-chromosome sequences of B. rapa and B. oleracea, respectively. Meanwhile, only four of the 20 families, comprising 573 members, were identified in the Arabidopsis genome, indicating that most of the families were activated in the Brassica genus after divergence from Arabidopsis. Copy numbers varied from 4 to 1459 for each MITE family, and there was up to 6-fold variation between B. rapa and B. oleracea. In particular, analysis of intact members showed that whereas eleven families were present in similar copy numbers in B. rapa and B. oleracea, nine families showed copy number variation ranging from 2- to 16-fold. Four of those families (BraSto-3, BraTo-3, 4, 5) were more abundant in B. rapa, and the other five (BraSto-1, BraSto-4, BraTo-1, 7 and BraHAT-1) were more abundant in B. oleracea. Overall, 54% and 51% of the MITEs resided in or within 2 kb of a gene in the B. rapa and B. oleracea genomes, respectively. Notably, 92 MITEs were found within the CDS of annotated genes, suggesting that MITEs might play roles in diversification of genes in the recently triplicated Brassica genome. MITE insertion polymorphism (MIP) analysis of 289 MITE members showed that 52% and 23% were polymorphic at the inter- and intra-species levels, respectively, indicating that there has been recent MITE activity in the Brassica genome. These recently activated MITE families with abundant MIP will provide useful resources for molecular breeding and identification of novel functional genes arising from MITE insertion. PMID:24747717

  2. Genome-wide comparative analysis of 20 miniature inverted-repeat transposable element families in Brassica rapa and B. oleracea.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Perumal; Murukarthick, Jayakodi; Izzah, Nur Kholilatul; Lee, Jonghoon; Choi, Hong-Il; Shirasawa, Kenta; Choi, Beom-Soon; Liu, Shengyi; Nou, Ill-Sup; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) are ubiquitous, non-autonomous class II transposable elements. Here, we conducted genome-wide comparative analysis of 20 MITE families in B. rapa, B. oleracea, and Arabidopsis thaliana. A total of 5894 and 6026 MITE members belonging to the 20 families were found in the whole genome pseudo-chromosome sequences of B. rapa and B. oleracea, respectively. Meanwhile, only four of the 20 families, comprising 573 members, were identified in the Arabidopsis genome, indicating that most of the families were activated in the Brassica genus after divergence from Arabidopsis. Copy numbers varied from 4 to 1459 for each MITE family, and there was up to 6-fold variation between B. rapa and B. oleracea. In particular, analysis of intact members showed that whereas eleven families were present in similar copy numbers in B. rapa and B. oleracea, nine families showed copy number variation ranging from 2- to 16-fold. Four of those families (BraSto-3, BraTo-3, 4, 5) were more abundant in B. rapa, and the other five (BraSto-1, BraSto-4, BraTo-1, 7 and BraHAT-1) were more abundant in B. oleracea. Overall, 54% and 51% of the MITEs resided in or within 2 kb of a gene in the B. rapa and B. oleracea genomes, respectively. Notably, 92 MITEs were found within the CDS of annotated genes, suggesting that MITEs might play roles in diversification of genes in the recently triplicated Brassica genome. MITE insertion polymorphism (MIP) analysis of 289 MITE members showed that 52% and 23% were polymorphic at the inter- and intra-species levels, respectively, indicating that there has been recent MITE activity in the Brassica genome. These recently activated MITE families with abundant MIP will provide useful resources for molecular breeding and identification of novel functional genes arising from MITE insertion. PMID:24747717

  3. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of WNK kinase gene family in rice.

    PubMed

    Manuka, Rakesh; Saddhe, Ankush Ashok; Kumar, Kundan

    2015-12-01

    Eukaryotic protein kinases represent one of the largest gene families involved in diverse regulatory functions. WNK (With No Lysine) kinases are members of ser/thr protein kinase family, which lack conserved catalytic lysine (K) residue at protein kinase subdomain II and is replaced by either asparagine, serine or glycine residues. They are involved in regulation of flowering time, circadian rhythms and abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis thaliana. In the present study, we have identified 9 members of WNK in rice, showed resemblance to Arabidopsis and human WNK and clustered into five main clades phylogenetically. The predicted genes structure, bonafide conserved signature motif and domains strongly support their identity, as members of WNK kinase family. We have analyzed their chromosomal distribution, physio-chemical properties, subcellular localizations and cis-elements in the promoter regions in silico. Further, transcript analysis of OsWNK by qRT-PCR revealed their differential regulation in tissue specific and abiotic stresses libraries. In conclusion, the identification of nine OsWNK and transcript level expression pattern under abiotic stress using qRT-PCR in rice will significantly contribute towards the understanding of WNK genes in monocots and thus provide a set up for functional genomics studies of WNK protein kinases. PMID:26414948

  4. Genome-Wide Evolutionary Characterization and Expression Analyses of WRKY Family Genes in Brachypodium distachyon

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Feng; Zhu, Hong; Li, Peng; Jiang, Min; Mao, Wenqing; Ong, Chermaine; Chu, Zhaoqing

    2014-01-01

    Members of plant WRKY gene family are ancient transcription factors that function in plant growth and development and respond to biotic and abiotic stresses. In our present study, we have investigated WRKY family genes in Brachypodium distachyon, a new model plant of family Poaceae. We identified a total of 86 WRKY genes from B. distachyon and explored their chromosomal distribution and evolution, domain alignment, promoter cis-elements, and expression profiles. Combining the analysis of phylogenetic tree of BdWRKY genes and the result of expression profiling, results showed that most of clustered gene pairs had higher similarities in the WRKY domain, suggesting that they might be functionally redundant. Neighbour-joining analysis of 301 WRKY domains from Oryza sativa, Arabidopsis thaliana, and B. distachyon suggested that BdWRKY domains are evolutionarily more closely related to O. sativa WRKY domains than those of A. thaliana. Moreover, tissue-specific expression profile of BdWRKY genes and their responses to phytohormones and several biotic or abiotic stresses were analysed by quantitative real-time PCR. The results showed that the expression of BdWRKY genes was rapidly regulated by stresses and phytohormones, and there was a strong correlation between promoter cis-elements and the phytohormones-induced BdWRKY gene expression. PMID:24453041

  5. Genome-wide analysis of the AP2/ERF family in Musa species reveals divergence and neofunctionalisation during evolution

    PubMed Central

    Lakhwani, Deepika; Pandey, Ashutosh; Dhar, Yogeshwar Vikram; Bag, Sumit Kumar; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Asif, Mehar Hasan

    2016-01-01

    AP2/ERF domain containing transcription factor super family is one of the important regulators in the plant kingdom. The involvement of AP2/ERF family members has been elucidated in various processes associated with plant growth, development as well as in response to hormones, biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, we carried out genome-wide analysis to identify members of AP2/ERF family in Musa acuminata (A genome) and Musa balbisiana (B genome) and changes leading to neofunctionalisation of genes. Analysis identified 265 and 318 AP2/ERF encoding genes in M. acuminata and M. balbisiana respectively which were further classified into ERF, DREB, AP2, RAV and Soloist groups. Comparative analysis indicated that AP2/ERF family has undergone duplication, loss and divergence during evolution and speciation of the Musa A and B genomes. We identified nine genes which are up-regulated during fruit ripening and might be components of the regulatory machinery operating during ethylene-dependent ripening in banana. Tissue-specific expression analysis of the genes suggests that different regulatory mechanisms might be involved in peel and pulp ripening process through recruiting specific ERFs in these tissues. Analysis also suggests that MaRAV-6 and MaERF026 have structurally diverged from their M. balbisiana counterparts and have attained new functions during ripening. PMID:26733055

  6. Genome-wide analysis of the AP2/ERF family in Musa species reveals divergence and neofunctionalisation during evolution.

    PubMed

    Lakhwani, Deepika; Pandey, Ashutosh; Dhar, Yogeshwar Vikram; Bag, Sumit Kumar; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Asif, Mehar Hasan

    2016-01-01

    AP2/ERF domain containing transcription factor super family is one of the important regulators in the plant kingdom. The involvement of AP2/ERF family members has been elucidated in various processes associated with plant growth, development as well as in response to hormones, biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, we carried out genome-wide analysis to identify members of AP2/ERF family in Musa acuminata (A genome) and Musa balbisiana (B genome) and changes leading to neofunctionalisation of genes. Analysis identified 265 and 318 AP2/ERF encoding genes in M. acuminata and M. balbisiana respectively which were further classified into ERF, DREB, AP2, RAV and Soloist groups. Comparative analysis indicated that AP2/ERF family has undergone duplication, loss and divergence during evolution and speciation of the Musa A and B genomes. We identified nine genes which are up-regulated during fruit ripening and might be components of the regulatory machinery operating during ethylene-dependent ripening in banana. Tissue-specific expression analysis of the genes suggests that different regulatory mechanisms might be involved in peel and pulp ripening process through recruiting specific ERFs in these tissues. Analysis also suggests that MaRAV-6 and MaERF026 have structurally diverged from their M. balbisiana counterparts and have attained new functions during ripening. PMID:26733055

  7. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of the WRKY Gene Family in Cassava.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yunxie; Shi, Haitao; Xia, Zhiqiang; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Zehong; Yan, Yan; Wang, Wenquan; Hu, Wei; Li, Kaimian

    2016-01-01

    The WRKY family, a large family of transcription factors (TFs) found in higher plants, plays central roles in many aspects of physiological processes and adaption to environment. However, little information is available regarding the WRKY family in cassava (Manihot esculenta). In the present study, 85 WRKY genes were identified from the cassava genome and classified into three groups according to conserved WRKY domains and zinc-finger structure. Conserved motif analysis showed that all of the identified MeWRKYs had the conserved WRKY domain. Gene structure analysis suggested that the number of introns in MeWRKY genes varied from 1 to 5, with the majority of MeWRKY genes containing three exons. Expression profiles of MeWRKY genes in different tissues and in response to drought stress were analyzed using the RNA-seq technique. The results showed that 72 MeWRKY genes had differential expression in their transcript abundance and 78 MeWRKY genes were differentially expressed in response to drought stresses in different accessions, indicating their contribution to plant developmental processes and drought stress resistance in cassava. Finally, the expression of 9 WRKY genes was analyzed by qRT-PCR under osmotic, salt, ABA, H2O2, and cold treatments, indicating that MeWRKYs may be involved in different signaling pathways. Taken together, this systematic analysis identifies some tissue-specific and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MeWRKY genes for further functional assays in planta, and provides a solid foundation for understanding of abiotic stress responses and signal transduction mediated by WRKYs in cassava. PMID:26904033

  8. [Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of the WRKY gene family in peach].

    PubMed

    Yanbing, Gu; Zhirui, Ji; Fumei, Chi; Zhuang, Qiao; Chengnan, Xu; Junxiang, Zhang; Zongshan, Zhou; Qinglong, Dong

    2016-03-01

    The WRKY transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators and play diverse regulatory roles in biotic and abiotic stresses, plant growth and development processes. In this study, the WRKY DNA-binding domain (Pfam Database number: PF03106) downloaded from Pfam protein families database was exploited to identify WRKY genes from the peach (Prunus persica 'Lovell') genome using HMMER 3.0. The obtained amino acid sequences were analyzed with DNAMAN 5.0, WebLogo 3, MEGA 5.1, MapInspect and MEME bioinformatics softwares. Totally 61 peach WRKY genes were found in the peach genome. Our phylogenetic analysis revealed that peach WRKY genes were classified into three Groups: Ⅰ, Ⅱ and Ⅲ. The WRKY N-terminal and C-terminal domains of Group Ⅰ (group I-N and group I-C) were monophyletic. The Group Ⅱ was sub-divided into five distinct clades (groupⅡ-a, Ⅱ-b, Ⅱ-c, Ⅱ-d and Ⅱ-e). Our domain analysis indicated that the WRKY regions contained a highly conserved heptapeptide stretch WRKYGQK at its N-terminus followed by a zinc-finger motif. The chromosome mapping analysis showed that peach WRKY genes were distributed with different densities over 8 chromosomes. The intron-exon structure analysis revealed that structures of the WRKY gene were highly conserved in the peach. The conserved motif analysis showed that the conserved motifs 1, 2 and 3, which specify the WRKY domain, were observed in all peach WRKY proteins, motif 5 as the unknown domain was observed in group Ⅱ-d, two WRKY domains were assigned to GroupⅠ. SqRT-PCR and qRT-PCR results indicated that 16 PpWRKY genes were expressed in roots, stems, leaves, flowers and fruits at various expression levels. Our analysis thus identified the PpWRKY gene families, and future functional studies are needed to reveal its specific roles. PMID:27001479

  9. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of the WRKY Gene Family in Cassava

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yunxie; Shi, Haitao; Xia, Zhiqiang; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Zehong; Yan, Yan; Wang, Wenquan; Hu, Wei; Li, Kaimian

    2016-01-01

    The WRKY family, a large family of transcription factors (TFs) found in higher plants, plays central roles in many aspects of physiological processes and adaption to environment. However, little information is available regarding the WRKY family in cassava (Manihot esculenta). In the present study, 85 WRKY genes were identified from the cassava genome and classified into three groups according to conserved WRKY domains and zinc-finger structure. Conserved motif analysis showed that all of the identified MeWRKYs had the conserved WRKY domain. Gene structure analysis suggested that the number of introns in MeWRKY genes varied from 1 to 5, with the majority of MeWRKY genes containing three exons. Expression profiles of MeWRKY genes in different tissues and in response to drought stress were analyzed using the RNA-seq technique. The results showed that 72 MeWRKY genes had differential expression in their transcript abundance and 78 MeWRKY genes were differentially expressed in response to drought stresses in different accessions, indicating their contribution to plant developmental processes and drought stress resistance in cassava. Finally, the expression of 9 WRKY genes was analyzed by qRT-PCR under osmotic, salt, ABA, H2O2, and cold treatments, indicating that MeWRKYs may be involved in different signaling pathways. Taken together, this systematic analysis identifies some tissue-specific and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MeWRKY genes for further functional assays in planta, and provides a solid foundation for understanding of abiotic stress responses and signal transduction mediated by WRKYs in cassava. PMID:26904033

  10. Genome-wide analysis of the AP2/ERF gene family in Salix arbutifolia

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Guodong; Sui, Jinkai; Zeng, Yanfei; He, Caiyun; Zhang, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    AP2/ERF genes encode transcriptional regulators with a variety of functions in plant growth and development and in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. To date, there are no detailed classification and expression profiles for AP2/ERF genes in Salix. In this study, a comprehensive computational analysis identified 173 AP2/ERF superfamily genes in willow (Salix arbutifolia), by using in silico cloning methods with the use of the AP2/ERF conserved domain amino acid sequence of Arabidopsis thaliana as a probe. Based on the results of phylogenetic analyses and the number of AP2/ERF domains, the AP2/ERF genes were classified into four groups: AP2, RAV, ERF and Soloist. The expression profile was analyzed using transcriptome data from different tissues. A comparative analysis of AP2/ERF superfamily genes among Salix, Populus and Arabidopsis was performed. The Salix DREB, AP2 and RAV groups had a similar number to those in Arabidopsis, and the size of the ERF subfamily in Salix was about 1.4-fold that of Arabidopsis. The Salix DREB subfamily was smaller compared to Populus, while the other families were similar in size to those in Populus. These results will be useful for future functional analyses of the ERF family genes. PMID:25830086

  11. Genome-wide analysis of the SET DOMAIN GROUP family in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Aquea, Felipe; Vega, Andrea; Timmermann, Tania; Poupin, María Josefina; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2011-06-01

    The SET DOMAIN GROUP (SDG) proteins represent an evolutionarily-conserved family of epigenetic regulators present in eukaryotes and are putative candidates for the catalysis of lysine methylation in histones. Plant genomes analyses of this family have been performed in arabidopsis, maize, and rice and functional studies have shown that SDG genes are involved in the control of plant development. In this work, we describe the identification and structural characterization of SDG genes in the Vitis vinifera genome. This analysis revealed the presence of 33 putative SDG genes that can be grouped into different classes, as it has been previously described for plants. In addition to the SET domain, the proteins identified possessed other domains in the different classes. As part of our study regarding the growth and development of grapevine, we selected eight genes and their expression levels were analyzed in representative vegetative and reproductive organs of this species. The selected genes showed different patterns of expression during inflorescence and fruit development, suggesting that they participate in these processes. Furthermore, we showed that the expression of selected SDGs changes during viral infection, using as a model Grapevine Leafroll Associated Virus 3-infected symptomatic grapevine leaves and fruits. Our results suggest that developmental changes caused by this virus could be the result of alterations in SDG expression. PMID:21293861

  12. Genome-wide analysis of the GRAS gene family in physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.).

    PubMed

    Wu, Z Y; Wu, P Z; Chen, Y P; Li, M R; Wu, G J; Jiang, H W

    2015-01-01

    GRAS proteins play vital roles in plant growth and development. Physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) was found to have a total of 48 GRAS family members (JcGRAS), 15 more than those found in Arabidopsis. The JcGRAS genes were divided into 12 subfamilies or 15 ancient monophyletic lineages based on the phylogenetic analysis of GRAS proteins from both flowering and lower plants. The functions of GRAS genes in 9 subfamilies have been reported previously for several plants, while the genes in the remaining 3 subfamilies were of unknown function; we named the latter families U1 to U3. No member of U3 subfamily is present in Arabidopsis and Poaceae species according to public genome sequence data. In comparison with the number of GRAS genes in Arabidopsis, more were detected in physic nut, resulting from the retention of many ancient GRAS subfamilies and the formation of tandem repeats during evolution. No evidence of recent duplication among JcGRAS genes was observed in physic nut. Based on digital gene expression data, 21 of the 48 genes exhibited differential expression in four tissues analyzed. Two members of subfamily U3 were expressed only in buds and flowers, implying that they may play specific roles. Our results provide valuable resources for future studies on the functions of GRAS proteins in physic nut. PMID:26782574

  13. Genome-Wide Identification, Evolution and Expression Analysis of mTERF Gene Family in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanxin; Cai, Manjun; Zhang, Xiaobo; Li, Yurong; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhao, Hailiang; Kong, Fei; Zheng, Yonglian; Qiu, Fazhan

    2014-01-01

    Plant mitochondrial transcription termination factor (mTERF) genes comprise a large family with important roles in regulating organelle gene expression. In this study, a comprehensive database search yielded 31 potential mTERF genes in maize (Zea mays L.) and most of them were targeted to mitochondria or chloroplasts. Maize mTERF were divided into nine main groups based on phylogenetic analysis, and group IX represented the mitochondria and species-specific clade that diverged from other groups. Tandem and segmental duplication both contributed to the expansion of the mTERF gene family in the maize genome. Comprehensive expression analysis of these genes, using microarray data and RNA-seq data, revealed that these genes exhibit a variety of expression patterns. Environmental stimulus experiments revealed differential up or down-regulation expression of maize mTERF genes in seedlings exposed to light/dark, salts and plant hormones, respectively, suggesting various important roles of maize mTERF genes in light acclimation and stress-related responses. These results will be useful for elucidating the roles of mTERF genes in the growth, development and stress response of maize. PMID:24718683

  14. Genome-wide identification and expression profiling analysis of trihelix gene family in tomato.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuying; Cai, Xiaofeng; Ye, Zhibiao; Li, Hanxia

    2015-12-25

    The trihelix family, classified as GT factors due to their binding specificity for GT elements, constitutes a plant-specific transcription factor family with a conserved trihelix DNA binding domain. In the present study, the comprehensive analysis of 36 putative GT factors was performed in tomato. SlGT members can be classified into six subgroups (GT-1, GT-2, SH4, SIP1, GT-γ and GT-δ). Expression analysis of SlGT gene transcripts showed the distinct expression patterns of SlGT genes in various tomato organs. All the SlGT genes were regulated in response to various abiotic stresses and hormone treatments by the quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis. Several SlGT genes, including SlGT-27 and SlGT-34, were highly regulated by multiple abiotic stresses and phytohormone treatments. Taken together, our results presented here would be providing a useful platform for molecular clone and functional identification of SlGT genes in tomato. PMID:26612258

  15. Comparison of genome-wide association methods in analyses of admixed populations with complex familial relationships.

    PubMed

    Kadri, Naveen K; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Sørensen, Peter; Sahana, Goutam

    2014-01-01

    Population structure is known to cause false-positive detection in association studies. We compared the power, precision, and type-I error rates of various association models in analyses of a simulated dataset with structure at the population (admixture from two populations; P) and family (K) levels. We also compared type-I error rates among models in analyses of publicly available human and dog datasets. The models corrected for none, one, or both structure levels. Correction for K was performed with linear mixed models incorporating familial relationships estimated from pedigrees or genetic markers. Linear models that ignored K were also tested. Correction for P was performed using principal component or structured association analysis. In analyses of simulated and real data, linear mixed models that corrected for K were able to control for type-I error, regardless of whether they also corrected for P. In contrast, correction for P alone in linear models was insufficient. The power and precision of linear mixed models with and without correction for P were similar. Furthermore, power, precision, and type-I error rate were comparable in linear mixed models incorporating pedigree and genomic relationships. In summary, in association studies using samples with both P and K, ancestries estimated using principal components or structured assignment were not sufficient to correct type-I errors. In such cases type-I errors may be controlled by use of linear mixed models with relationships derived from either pedigree or from genetic markers. PMID:24662750

  16. Comparison of Genome-Wide Association Methods in Analyses of Admixed Populations with Complex Familial Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Kadri, Naveen K.; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Sørensen, Peter; Sahana, Goutam

    2014-01-01

    Population structure is known to cause false-positive detection in association studies. We compared the power, precision, and type-I error rates of various association models in analyses of a simulated dataset with structure at the population (admixture from two populations; P) and family (K) levels. We also compared type-I error rates among models in analyses of publicly available human and dog datasets. The models corrected for none, one, or both structure levels. Correction for K was performed with linear mixed models incorporating familial relationships estimated from pedigrees or genetic markers. Linear models that ignored K were also tested. Correction for P was performed using principal component or structured association analysis. In analyses of simulated and real data, linear mixed models that corrected for K were able to control for type-I error, regardless of whether they also corrected for P. In contrast, correction for P alone in linear models was insufficient. The power and precision of linear mixed models with and without correction for P were similar. Furthermore, power, precision, and type-I error rate were comparable in linear mixed models incorporating pedigree and genomic relationships. In summary, in association studies using samples with both P and K, ancestries estimated using principal components or structured assignment were not sufficient to correct type-I errors. In such cases type-I errors may be controlled by use of linear mixed models with relationships derived from either pedigree or from genetic markers. PMID:24662750

  17. Genome-wide identification, classification, and analysis of NADP-ME family members from 12 crucifer species.

    PubMed

    Tao, Peng; Guo, Weiling; Li, Biyuan; Wang, Wuhong; Yue, Zhichen; Lei, Juanli; Zhao, Yanting; Zhong, Xinmin

    2016-06-01

    NADP-dependent malic enzymes (NADP-MEs) play essential roles in both normal development and stress responses in plants. Here, genome-wide analysis was performed to identify 65 putative NADP-ME genes from 12 crucifer species. These NADP-ME genes were grouped into five categories of syntenic orthologous genes and were divided into three clades of a phylogenic tree. Promoter motif analysis showed that NADP-ME1 genes in Group IV were more conserved with each other than the other NADP-ME genes in Groups I and II. A nucleotide motif involved in ABA responses, desiccation and seed development was found in the promoters of most NADP-ME1 genes. Generally, the NADP-ME genes of Brassica rapa, B. oleracea and B. napus had less introns than their corresponding Arabidopsis orthologs. In these three Brassica species, the NADP-ME genes derived from the least fractionated subgenome have lost less introns than those from the medium fractionated and most fractionated subgenomes. BrNADP-ME1 showed the highest expression in petals and mature embryos. Two paralogous NADP-ME2 genes (BrNADP-ME2a and BrNADP-ME2b) shared similar expression profiles and differential expression levels. BrNADP-ME3 showed down-regulation during embryogenesis and reached its lowest expression in early cotyledonary embryos. BrNADP-ME4 was expressed widely in multiple organs and showed high expression during the whole embryogenesis process. Different NADP-ME genes of B. rapa showed differential gene expression profiles in young leaves after ABA treatment or cold stress. Our genome-wide identification and characterization of NADP-ME genes extend our understanding of the evolution or function of this family in Brassicaceae. PMID:26839002

  18. Genome-wide identification, classification and expression profiling of nicotianamine synthase (NAS) gene family in maize

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nicotianamine (NA), a ubiquitous molecule in plants, is an important metal ion chelator and the main precursor for phytosiderophores biosynthesis. Considerable progress has been achieved in cloning and characterizing the functions of nicotianamine synthase (NAS) in plants including barley, Arabidopsis and rice. Maize is not only an important cereal crop, but also a model plant for genetics and evolutionary study. The genome sequencing of maize was completed, and many gene families were identified. Although three NAS genes have been characterized in maize, there is still no systematic identification of maize NAS family by genomic mining. Results In this study, nine NAS genes in maize were identified and their expression patterns in different organs including developing seeds were determined. According to the evolutionary relationship and tissue specific expression profiles of ZmNAS genes, they can be subgrouped into two classes. Moreover, the expression patterns of ZmNAS genes in response to fluctuating metal status were analysed. The class I ZmNAS genes were induced under Fe deficiency and were suppressed under Fe excessive conditions, while the expression pattern of class II genes were opposite to class I. The complementary expression patterns of class I and class II ZmNAS genes confirmed the classification of this family. Furthermore, the histochemical localization of ZmNAS1;1/1;2 and ZmNAS3 were determined using in situ hybridization. It was revealed that ZmNAS1;1/1;2, representing the class I genes, mainly expressed in cortex and stele of roots with sufficient Fe, and its expression can expanded in epidermis, as well as shoot apices under Fe deficient conditions. On the contrary, ZmNAS3, one of the class II genes, was accumulated in axillary meristems, leaf primordia and mesophyll cells. These results suggest that the two classes of ZmNAS genes may be regulated on transcriptional level when responds to various demands for iron uptake, translocation

  19. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of the metacaspase gene family in Hevea brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Deng, Zhi; Chen, Jiangshu; Wang, Sen; Hao, Lili; Li, Dejun

    2016-08-01

    Metacaspases, a family of cysteine proteases, have been suggested to play important roles in programmed cell death (PCD) during plant development and stress responses. To date, no systematic characterization of this gene family has been reported in rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis). In the present study, nine metacaspase genes, designated as HbMC1 to HbMC9, were identified from whole-genome sequence of rubber tree. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses suggested that these genes were divided into two types: type I (HbMC1-HBMC7) and type II (HbMC8 and HbMC9). Gene structure analysis demonstrated that type I and type II HbMCs separately contained four and two introns, indicating the conserved exon-intron organization of HbMCs. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that HbMCs showed distinct expression patterns in different tissues, suggesting the functional diversity of HbMCs in various tissues during development. Most of the HbMCs were regulated by drought, cold, and salt stress, implying their possible functions in regulating abiotic stress-induced cell death. Of the nine HbMCs, HbMC1, HbMC2, HbMC5, and HbMC8 displayed a significantly higher relative transcript accumulation in barks of tapping panel dryness (TPD) trees compared with healthy trees. In addition, the four genes were up-regulated by ethephon (ET) and methyl jasmonate (MeJA), indicating their potential involvement in TPD resulting from ET- or JA-induced PCD. In summary, this work provides valuable information for further functional characterization of HbMC genes in rubber tree. PMID:27085600

  20. Comparative analysis of genome-wide Mlo gene family in Cajanus cajan and Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Reena; Singh, V K; Singh, B D

    2016-04-01

    The Mlo gene was discovered in barley because the mutant 'mlo' allele conferred broad-spectrum, non-race-specific resistance to powdery mildew caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei. The Mlo genes also play important roles in growth and development of plants, and in responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The Mlo gene family has been characterized in several crop species, but only a single legume species, soybean (Glycine max L.), has been investigated so far. The present report describes in silico identification of 18 CcMlo and 20 PvMlo genes in the important legume crops Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp. and Phaseolus vulgaris L., respectively. In silico analysis of gene organization, protein properties and conserved domains revealed that the C. cajan and P. vulgaris Mlo gene paralogs are more divergent from each other than from their orthologous pairs. The comparative phylogenetic analysis classified CcMlo and PvMlo genes into three major clades. A comparative analysis of CcMlo and PvMlo proteins with the G. max Mlo proteins indicated close association of one CcMlo, one PvMlo with two GmMlo genes, indicating that there was no further expansion of the Mlo gene family after the separation of these species. Thus, most of the diploid species of eudicots might be expected to contain 15-20 Mlo genes. The genes CcMlo12 and 14, and PvMlo11 and 12 are predicted to participate in powdery mildew resistance. If this prediction were verified, these genes could be targeted by TILLING or CRISPR to isolate powdery mildew resistant mutants. PMID:26961357

  1. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of the IQD gene family in moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis)

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Li, Yuan; Chen, Danmei; Liu, Huanlong; Zhu, Dongyue; Xiang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Members of the plant-specific IQ67-domain (IQD) protein family are involved in various aspects of normal plant growth and developmental processes as well as basal defence response. Although hundreds of IQD proteins have been identified, only a small number of IQDs have been functionally characterized. Moreover, no systematic study has been performed on moso bamboo. In this study, we performed for the first time a genome-wide identification and expression analysis of the IQD gene family in moso bamboo. We identified 29 non-redundant PeIQD encoding genes. Analysis of the evolutionary patterns and divergence revealed that the IQD genes underwent a large-scale event around 12 million years ago and the division times of IQD family genes between moso bamboo and rice, and, between moso bamboo and Brachypodium, were found to be 20–35 MYA and 25–40 MYA, respectively. We surveyed the putative promoter regions of the PeIQD genes, which showed that largely stress-related cis-elements existed in these genes. The expression profiles of the IQD genes shed light on their functional divergence. Additionally, a yeast two-hybrid assay proved that PeIQD8 can interact with PeCaM2 and that IQ or I in the IQ motif is required for PeIQD8 to combine with CaM2. PMID:27094318

  2. Genome-Wide Identification of the Target Genes of AP2-O, a Plasmodium AP2-Family Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Izumi; Iwanaga, Shiroh; Kato, Tomomi; Kobayashi, Issei; Yuda, Masao

    2015-05-01

    Stage-specific transcription is a fundamental biological process in the life cycle of the Plasmodium parasite. Proteins containing the AP2 DNA-binding domain are responsible for stage-specific transcriptional regulation and belong to the only known family of transcription factors in Plasmodium parasites. Comprehensive identification of their target genes will advance our understanding of the molecular basis of stage-specific transcriptional regulation and stage-specific parasite development. AP2-O is an AP2 family transcription factor that is expressed in the mosquito midgut-invading stage, called the ookinete, and is essential for normal morphogenesis of this stage. In this study, we identified the genome-wide target genes of AP2-O by chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing and elucidate how this AP2 family transcription factor contributes to the formation of this motile stage. The analysis revealed that AP2-O binds specifically to the upstream genomic regions of more than 500 genes, suggesting that approximately 10% of the parasite genome is directly regulated by AP2-O. These genes are involved in distinct biological processes such as morphogenesis, locomotion, midgut penetration, protection against mosquito immunity and preparation for subsequent oocyst development. This direct and global regulation by AP2-O provides a model for gene regulation in Plasmodium parasites and may explain how these parasites manage to control their complex life cycle using a small number of sequence-specific AP2 transcription factors. PMID:26018192

  3. Genome-Wide Identification of the Target Genes of AP2-O, a Plasmodium AP2-Family Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Izumi; Iwanaga, Shiroh; Kato, Tomomi; Kobayashi, Issei; Yuda, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Stage-specific transcription is a fundamental biological process in the life cycle of the Plasmodium parasite. Proteins containing the AP2 DNA-binding domain are responsible for stage-specific transcriptional regulation and belong to the only known family of transcription factors in Plasmodium parasites. Comprehensive identification of their target genes will advance our understanding of the molecular basis of stage-specific transcriptional regulation and stage-specific parasite development. AP2-O is an AP2 family transcription factor that is expressed in the mosquito midgut-invading stage, called the ookinete, and is essential for normal morphogenesis of this stage. In this study, we identified the genome-wide target genes of AP2-O by chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing and elucidate how this AP2 family transcription factor contributes to the formation of this motile stage. The analysis revealed that AP2-O binds specifically to the upstream genomic regions of more than 500 genes, suggesting that approximately 10% of the parasite genome is directly regulated by AP2-O. These genes are involved in distinct biological processes such as morphogenesis, locomotion, midgut penetration, protection against mosquito immunity and preparation for subsequent oocyst development. This direct and global regulation by AP2-O provides a model for gene regulation in Plasmodium parasites and may explain how these parasites manage to control their complex life cycle using a small number of sequence-specific AP2 transcription factors. PMID:26018192

  4. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of the IQD gene family in moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis).

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Li, Yuan; Chen, Danmei; Liu, Huanlong; Zhu, Dongyue; Xiang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Members of the plant-specific IQ67-domain (IQD) protein family are involved in various aspects of normal plant growth and developmental processes as well as basal defence response. Although hundreds of IQD proteins have been identified, only a small number of IQDs have been functionally characterized. Moreover, no systematic study has been performed on moso bamboo. In this study, we performed for the first time a genome-wide identification and expression analysis of the IQD gene family in moso bamboo. We identified 29 non-redundant PeIQD encoding genes. Analysis of the evolutionary patterns and divergence revealed that the IQD genes underwent a large-scale event around 12 million years ago and the division times of IQD family genes between moso bamboo and rice, and, between moso bamboo and Brachypodium, were found to be 20-35 MYA and 25-40 MYA, respectively. We surveyed the putative promoter regions of the PeIQD genes, which showed that largely stress-related cis-elements existed in these genes. The expression profiles of the IQD genes shed light on their functional divergence. Additionally, a yeast two-hybrid assay proved that PeIQD8 can interact with PeCaM2 and that IQ or I in the IQ motif is required for PeIQD8 to combine with CaM2. PMID:27094318

  5. Genome-wide analysis of the SBP-box gene family in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis).

    PubMed

    Tan, Hua-Wei; Song, Xiao-Ming; Duan, Wei-Ke; Wang, Yan; Hou, Xi-Lin

    2015-11-01

    The SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN (SBP)-box gene family contains highly conserved plant-specific transcription factors that play an important role in plant development, especially in flowering. Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis) is a leafy vegetable grown worldwide and is used as a model crop for research in genome duplication. The present study aimed to characterize the SBP-box transcription factor genes in Chinese cabbage. Twenty-nine SBP-box genes were identified in the Chinese cabbage genome and classified into six groups. We identified 23 orthologous and 5 co-orthologous SBP-box gene pairs between Chinese cabbage and Arabidopsis. An interaction network among these genes was constructed. Sixteen SBP-box genes were expressed more abundantly in flowers than in other tissues, suggesting their involvement in flowering. We show that the MiR156/157 family members may regulate the coding regions or 3'-UTR regions of Chinese cabbage SBP-box genes. As SBP-box genes were found to potentially participate in some plant development pathways, quantitative real-time PCR analysis was performed and showed that Chinese cabbage SBP-box genes were also sensitive to the exogenous hormones methyl jasmonic acid and salicylic acid. The SBP-box genes have undergone gene duplication and loss, evolving a more refined regulation for diverse stimulation in plant tissues. Our comprehensive genome-wide analysis provides insights into the SBP-box gene family of Chinese cabbage. PMID:26599708

  6. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of the NAC Transcription Factor Family in Cassava

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Hou, Xiaowan; Zou, Meiling; Lu, Cheng; Wang, Wenquan; Peng, Ming

    2015-01-01

    NAC [no apical meristem (NAM), Arabidopsis transcription activation factor [ATAF1/2] and cup-shaped cotyledon (CUC2)] proteins is one of the largest groups of plant specific transcription factors and plays a crucial role in plant growth, development, and adaption to the environment. Currently, no information is known about the NAC family in cassava. In this study, 96 NAC genes (MeNACs) were identified from the cassava genome. Phylogenetic analysis of the NACs from cassava and Arabidopsis showed that MeNAC proteins can be clustered into 16 subgroups. Gene structure analysis found that the number of introns of MeNAC genes varied from 0 to 5, with the majority of MeNAC genes containing two introns, indicating a small gene structure diversity of cassava NAC genes. Conserved motif analysis revealed that all of the identified MeNACs had the conserved NAC domain and/or NAM domain. Global expression analysis suggested that MeNAC genes exhibited different expression profiles in different tissues between wild subspecies and cultivated varieties, indicating their involvement in the functional diversity of different accessions. Transcriptome analysis demonstrated that MeNACs had a widely transcriptional response to drought stress and that they had differential expression profiles in different accessions, implying their contribution to drought stress resistance in cassava. Finally, the expression of twelve MeNAC genes was analyzed under osmotic, salt, cold, ABA, and H2O2 treatments, indicating that cassava NACs may represent convergence points of different signaling pathways. Taken together, this work found some excellent tissue-specific and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MeNAC genes, which would provide a solid foundation for functional investigation of the NAC family, crop improvement and improved understanding of signal transduction in plants. These data bring new insight on the complexity of the transcriptional control of MeNAC genes and support the hypothesis that

  7. Exploring Genome-wide DNA Methylation Profiles Altered in Kashin-Beck Disease Using Infinium Human Methylation 450 Bead Chips.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao Wei; Shi, Bo Hui; Lyu, Ai Li; Zhang, Feng; Zhou, Tian Tian; Guo, Xiong

    2016-07-01

    To understand how differentially methylated genes (DMGs) might affect the pathogenesis of Kashin-Beck disease (KBD). Genome-wide methylation profiling of whole blood from 12 matched KBD and controls pairs was performed using a high-resolution Infinium 450 K methylation array. In total, 97 CpG sites were differentially methylated in KBD compared to the normal controls; of these sites, 36 sites were significantly hypermethylated (covering 22 genes) and 61 sites were significantly hypomethylated (covering 34 genes). Of these genes, 14 significant pathways were identified, the most significant P value pathway was type I diabetes mellitus pathway and pathways associated with autoimmune diseases and inflammatory diseases were included in this study. Subsequently, 4 CpG sites in HLA-DRB1 were validated using bisulfite sequencing polymerase chain reaction (BSP) in articular cartilage, and the results showed significant differences in the methylation status between KBD and controls, consistent with the results of the high-resolution array. These results suggested that differences in genome-wide DNA methylation exist between KBD and the controls, and the biological pathways support the autoimmune disease and inflammatory disease hypothesis of KBD. PMID:27554126

  8. Genome-wide identification and characterization of WRKY gene family in Hevea brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-Liang; Guo, Dong; Yang, Zi-Ping; Tang, Xiao; Peng, Shi-Qing

    2014-07-01

    WRKY proteins constitute a large family of transcription factors. In this study, we identified 81 WRKY genes (named HbWRKY1 to HbWRKY81) in the latest rubber tree genome. Tissue-specific expression profiles showed that 74 HbWRKYs were expressed in at least one of the tissues and the other 7 genes showed very low expression in all tissues tested, which suggested that HbWRKYs took part in many cellular processes. The responses of 20 selected HbWRKYs to jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) were analyzed in the latex. 17 HbWRKYs responded to at least one treatment, which included 15 HbWRKYs responding to JA treatment, 15 HbWRKYs to ET, which suggested that these HbWRKYs were regulated by JA and ET. We also observed that HbWRKY3, 14, and 55 bind HbSRPP promoter and activate the transcription in yeast. This study suggests that HbWRKY proteins maybe involved in the transcriptional regulation of nature rubber biosynthesis. PMID:24793160

  9. Genome-wide characterization of the CBF/DREB1 gene family in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Choon; Lim, Myung-Ho; Yu, Jae-Gyeong; Park, Beom-Seok; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2012-12-01

    The C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element binding transcription factors (CBF/DREBs) are important proteins in involved in responses to abiotic stress in plants. We identified ten BrDREB1 genes belonging to the CBF/DREB1 gene family in the Brassica rapa whole genome sequence, whereas six genes are found in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. The deduced amino acid sequences of the B. rapa genes showed conserved motifs shared with other known plant CBF/DREB1s. Comparative analysis revealed that nine of the BrDREB1 genes were derived from the recent genome triplication in the tribe Brassiceae and the other one was translocated. The nine genes were located in seven of the 12 macrosyntenic blocks that are triplicated counterparts of four Arabidopsis macrosyntenic blocks harboring six CBF/DREB1 genes: one gene on each of three blocks and three tandemly arrayed genes on another block. We inspected the expression patterns of eight BrDREB1 genes by RT-PCR and microarray database searches. All eight genes were highly up-regulated during cold (4 °C) treatment, and some of them were also responsive to salt (250 mM NaCl), drought (air drying), and ABA (100 μM) treatment. Microarray data for plant developmental stages revealed that BrDREB1C2 was highly expressed during a period of cold treatment for vernalization, similar to abiotic stress-inducible genes homologous to Bn28a, Bn47, Bn115, and BoRS1, but almost opposite of BrFLC genes. Taken together, the number of BrDREB1 genes increased to 10 by genome triplication and reorganization, providing additional functions in B. rapa abiotic stress responses and development, as distinct from their Arabidopsis homologs. PMID:23148914

  10. Genome-wide analysis of the MYB gene family in physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changpin; Chen, Yanbo; Wu, Zhenying; Lu, Wenjia; Han, Jinli; Wu, Pingzhi; Chen, Yaping; Li, Meiru; Jiang, Huawu; Wu, Guojiang

    2015-11-01

    The MYB proteins comprise one of the largest transcription factor families in plants, and play key roles in regulatory networks controlling development, metabolism, and stress responses. A total of 125 MYB genes (JcMYB) have been identified in the physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) genome, including 120 2R-type MYB, 4 3R-MYB, and 1 4R-MYB genes. Based on exon-intron arrangement of MYBs from both lower (Physcomitrella patens) and higher (physic nut, Arabidopsis, and rice) plants, we can classify plant MYB genes into ten groups (MI-X), except for MIX genes which are nonexistent in higher plants. We also observed that MVIII genes may be one of the most ancient MYB types which consist of both R2R3- and 3R-MYB genes. Most MYB genes (76.8% in physic nut) belong to the MI group which can be divided into 34 subgroups. The JcMYB genes were nonrandomly distributed on its 11 linkage groups (LGs). The expansion of MYB genes across several subgroups was observed and resulted from genome triplication of ancient dicotyledons and from both ancient and recent tandem duplication events in the physic nut genome. The expression patterns of several MYB duplicates in the physic nut showed differences in four tissues (root, stem, leaf, and seed), and 34 MYB genes responded to at least one abiotic stressor (drought, salinity, phosphate starvation, and nitrogen starvation) in leaves and/or roots based on the data analysis of digital gene expression tags. Overexpression of the JcMYB001 gene in Arabidopsis increased its sensitivity to drought and salinity stresses. PMID:26142104

  11. Genome-Wide Comparative Analysis of Chemosensory Gene Families in Five Tsetse Fly Species

    PubMed Central

    Macharia, Rosaline; Mireji, Paul; Murungi, Edwin; Murilla, Grace; Christoffels, Alan; Aksoy, Serap; Masiga, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    For decades, odour-baited traps have been used for control of tsetse flies (Diptera; Glossinidae), vectors of African trypanosomes. However, differential responses to known attractants have been reported in different Glossina species, hindering establishment of a universal vector control tool. Availability of full genome sequences of five Glossina species offers an opportunity to compare their chemosensory repertoire and enhance our understanding of their biology in relation to chemosensation. Here, we identified and annotated the major chemosensory gene families in Glossina. We identified a total of 118, 115, 124, and 123 chemosensory genes in Glossina austeni, G. brevipalpis, G. f. fuscipes, G. pallidipes, respectively, relative to 127 reported in G. m. morsitans. Our results show that tsetse fly genomes have fewer chemosensory genes when compared to other dipterans such as Musca domestica (n>393), Drosophila melanogaster (n = 246) and Anopheles gambiae (n>247). We also found that Glossina chemosensory genes are dispersed across distantly located scaffolds in their respective genomes, in contrast to other insects like D. melanogaster whose genes occur in clusters. Further, Glossina appears to be devoid of sugar receptors and to have expanded CO2 associated receptors, potentially reflecting Glossina's obligate hematophagy and the need to detect hosts that may be out of sight. We also identified, in all species, homologs of Ir84a; a Drosophila-specific ionotropic receptor that promotes male courtship suggesting that this is a conserved trait in tsetse flies. Notably, our selection analysis revealed that a total of four gene loci (Gr21a, GluRIIA, Gr28b, and Obp83a) were under positive selection, which confers fitness advantage to species. These findings provide a platform for studies to further define the language of communication of tsetse with their environment, and influence development of novel approaches for control. PMID:26886411

  12. Genome-wide Identification of TCP Family Transcription Factors from Populus euphratica and Their Involvement in Leaf Shape Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaodong; Ma, Jianchao; Fan, Di; Li, Chaofeng; Jiang, Yuanzhong; Luo, Keming

    2016-01-01

    Higher plants have been shown to experience a juvenile vegetative phase, an adult vegetative phase, and a reproductive phase during its postembryonic development and distinct lateral organ morphologies have been observed at the different development stages. Populus euphratica, commonly known as a desert poplar, has developed heteromorphic leaves during its development. The TCP family genes encode a group of plant-specific transcription factors involved in several aspects of plant development. In particular, TCPs have been shown to influence leaf size and shape in many herbaceous plants. However, whether these functions are conserved in woody plants remains unknown. In the present study, we carried out genome-wide identification of TCP genes in P. euphratica and P. trichocarpa, and 33 and 36 genes encoding putative TCP proteins were found, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the poplar TCPs together with Arabidopsis TCPs indicated a biased expansion of the TCP gene family via segmental duplications. In addition, our results have also shown a correlation between different expression patterns of several P. euphratica TCP genes and leaf shape variations, indicating their involvement in the regulation of leaf shape development. PMID:27605130

  13. Genome-wide identification, classification, and expression analysis of the arabinogalactan protein gene family in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) comprise a family of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins that are implicated in plant growth and development. In this study, 69 AGPs are identified from the rice genome, including 13 classical AGPs, 15 arabinogalactan (AG) peptides, three non-classical AGPs, three early nodulin-like AGPs (eNod-like AGPs), eight non-specific lipid transfer protein-like AGPs (nsLTP-like AGPs), and 27 fasciclin-like AGPs (FLAs). The results from expressed sequence tags, microarrays, and massively parallel signature sequencing tags are used to analyse the expression of AGP-encoding genes, which is confirmed by real-time PCR. The results reveal that several rice AGP-encoding genes are predominantly expressed in anthers and display differential expression patterns in response to abscisic acid, gibberellic acid, and abiotic stresses. Based on the results obtained from this analysis, an attempt has been made to link the protein structures and expression patterns of rice AGP-encoding genes to their functions. Taken together, the genome-wide identification and expression analysis of the rice AGP gene family might facilitate further functional studies of rice AGPs. PMID:20423940

  14. Genome-wide Identification of TCP Family Transcription Factors from Populus euphratica and Their Involvement in Leaf Shape Regulation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaodong; Ma, Jianchao; Fan, Di; Li, Chaofeng; Jiang, Yuanzhong; Luo, Keming

    2016-01-01

    Higher plants have been shown to experience a juvenile vegetative phase, an adult vegetative phase, and a reproductive phase during its postembryonic development and distinct lateral organ morphologies have been observed at the different development stages. Populus euphratica, commonly known as a desert poplar, has developed heteromorphic leaves during its development. The TCP family genes encode a group of plant-specific transcription factors involved in several aspects of plant development. In particular, TCPs have been shown to influence leaf size and shape in many herbaceous plants. However, whether these functions are conserved in woody plants remains unknown. In the present study, we carried out genome-wide identification of TCP genes in P. euphratica and P. trichocarpa, and 33 and 36 genes encoding putative TCP proteins were found, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the poplar TCPs together with Arabidopsis TCPs indicated a biased expansion of the TCP gene family via segmental duplications. In addition, our results have also shown a correlation between different expression patterns of several P. euphratica TCP genes and leaf shape variations, indicating their involvement in the regulation of leaf shape development. PMID:27605130

  15. Genome-wide analysis of auxin response factor gene family members in medicinal model plant Salvia miltiorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhichao; Ji, Aijia; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Auxin response factors (ARFs) can function as transcriptional activators or repressors to regulate the expression of auxin response genes by specifically binding to auxin response elements (AuxREs) during plant development. Based on a genome-wide strategy using the medicinal model plant Salvia miltiorrhiza, 25 S. miltiorrhiza ARF (SmARF) gene family members in four classes (class Ia, IIa, IIb and III) were comprehensively analyzed to identify characteristics including gene structures, conserved domains, phylogenetic relationships and expression patterns. In a hybrid analysis of the phylogenetic tree, microRNA targets, and expression patterns of SmARFs in different organs, root tissues, and methyl jasmonate or indole-3-acetic acid treatment conditions, we screened for candidate SmARFs involved in various developmental processes of S. miltiorrhiza. Based on this analysis, we predicted that SmARF25, SmARF7, SmARF16 and SmARF20 are involved in flower, leaf, stem and root development, respectively. With the further insight into the targets of miR160 and miR167, specific SmARF genes in S. miltiorrhiza might encode products that participate in biological processes as described for ARF genes in Arabidopsis. Our results provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis and regulatory mechanisms of SmARFs in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:27230647

  16. The first genome-wide scan in a tunisian family with generalized epilepsy with febrile seizure plus (GEFS+).

    PubMed

    Fendri-Kriaa, Nourhene; Louhichi, Nacim; Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna; Chabchoub, Ghazi; Kammoun, Fatma; Salem, Ikhlass Hadj; Rebai, Ahmed; Triki, Chahnez; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2010-11-01

    Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizure plus (GEFS+) is an autosomal dominant disorder. In the literature, 5 responsible genes were identified and 2 novel susceptibility loci for GEFS+ at 2p24 and 8p23-p21 were reported, indicating the genetic heterogeneity of this disorder. The aim of this report is to identify the responsible loci in a large affected Tunisian family by performing a 10cM density genome-wide scan. The highest multipoint logarithm of odds (LOD) score (1.04) was found for D5S407 in the absence of recombination. Two other interesting regions were found around marker D19S210 (LOD=0.799) and D7S484 (LOD=0.61) markers. To fine map these loci, additional markers in 2 regions on 5q13.3 and 7p14.2 were analyzed and positive LOD scores for both loci were obtained. Sequencing of the Sodium channel subunit beta-1 gene (SCN1B) (19q13.1) showed the absence of any causal mutation. Our findings emphasized the genetic heterogeneity of febrile seizures. PMID:20382841

  17. Genome-wide analysis of auxin response factor gene family members in medicinal model plant Salvia miltiorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhichao; Ji, Aijia; Song, Jingyuan; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    Auxin response factors (ARFs) can function as transcriptional activators or repressors to regulate the expression of auxin response genes by specifically binding to auxin response elements (AuxREs) during plant development. Based on a genome-wide strategy using the medicinal model plant Salvia miltiorrhiza, 25 S. miltiorrhiza ARF (SmARF) gene family members in four classes (class Ia, IIa, IIb and III) were comprehensively analyzed to identify characteristics including gene structures, conserved domains, phylogenetic relationships and expression patterns. In a hybrid analysis of the phylogenetic tree, microRNA targets, and expression patterns of SmARFs in different organs, root tissues, and methyl jasmonate or indole-3-acetic acid treatment conditions, we screened for candidate SmARFs involved in various developmental processes of S. miltiorrhiza Based on this analysis, we predicted that SmARF25, SmARF7, SmARF16 and SmARF20 are involved in flower, leaf, stem and root development, respectively. With the further insight into the targets of miR160 and miR167, specific SmARF genes in S. miltiorrhiza might encode products that participate in biological processes as described for ARF genes in Arabidopsis Our results provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis and regulatory mechanisms of SmARFs in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:27230647

  18. Genome-wide DNA methylation detection by MethylCap-seq and Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips: an independent large-scale comparison

    PubMed Central

    De Meyer, Tim; Bady, Pierre; Trooskens, Geert; Kurscheid, Sebastian; Bloch, Jocelyne; Kros, Johan M.; Hainfellner, Johannes A.; Stupp, Roger; Delorenzi, Mauro; Hegi, Monika E.; Van Criekinge, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Two cost-efficient genome-scale methodologies to assess DNA-methylation are MethylCap-seq and Illumina’s Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips (HM450). Objective information regarding the best-suited methodology for a specific research question is scant. Therefore, we performed a large-scale evaluation on a set of 70 brain tissue samples, i.e. 65 glioblastoma and 5 non-tumoral tissues. As MethylCap-seq coverages were limited, we focused on the inherent capacity of the methodology to detect methylated loci rather than a quantitative analysis. MethylCap-seq and HM450 data were dichotomized and performances were compared using a gold standard free Bayesian modelling procedure. While conditional specificity was adequate for both approaches, conditional sensitivity was systematically higher for HM450. In addition, genome-wide characteristics were compared, revealing that HM450 probes identified substantially fewer regions compared to MethylCap-seq. Although results indicated that the latter method can detect more potentially relevant DNA-methylation, this did not translate into the discovery of more differentially methylated loci between tumours and controls compared to HM450. Our results therefore indicate that both methodologies are complementary, with a higher sensitivity for HM450 and a far larger genome-wide coverage for MethylCap-seq, but also that a more comprehensive character does not automatically imply more significant results in biomarker studies. PMID:26482909

  19. Genome-wide study on intramuscular fat in Italian Large White pig breed using the PorcineSNP60 BeadChip.

    PubMed

    Davoli, R; Luise, D; Mingazzini, V; Zambonelli, P; Braglia, S; Serra, A; Russo, V

    2016-08-01

    Genome-wide association study results are presented for intramuscular fat in Italian Large White pig breed. A total of 886 individuals were genotyped with PorcineSNP60 BeadChip. After quality control performed with plink software and in R environment, 49 208 markers remained for the association analysis. The genome-wide association studies was conducted using linear mixed model implemented in GenABEL. We detected seven new SNPs of genes till now not found associated to intramuscular fat (IMF). Three markers map in a wide intergenic region rich of QTL linked to fat traits, one map 388 kb upstream the gene SDK1, one map inside PPP3CA gene, one inside SCPEP1 gene and the last is not mapped in the porcine genome yet. Associations here presented indicate a moderate effect of these genes on IMF. In particular, PPP3CA, that is involved in the oxidative metabolism of skeletal muscle, could be considerated as an interesting candidate gene for IMF content in pigs. However, further studies are needed to clarify the role of these genes on the physiological processes involved in IMF regulation. These results may be useful to control this trait that is important in terms of nutritional, technological and organoleptic characteristics of fresh meat and processed products. PMID:26578072

  20. Genome-wide analysis of the omega-3 fatty acid desaturase gene family in Gossypium

    SciTech Connect

    Yurchenko, Olga P.; Park, Sunjung; Ilut, Daniel C.; Inmon, Jay J.; Millhollon, Jon C.; Liechty, Zach; Page, Justin T.; Jenks, Matthew A.; Chapman, Kent D.; Udall, Joshua A.; Gore, Michael A.; Dyer, John M.

    2014-11-18

    The majority of commercial cotton varieties planted worldwide are derived from Gossypium hirsutum, which is a naturally occurring allotetraploid produced by interspecific hybridization of A- and D-genome diploid progenitor species. While most cotton species are adapted to warm, semi-arid tropical and subtropical regions, and thus perform well in these geographical areas, cotton seedlings are sensitive to cold temperature, which can significantly reduce crop yields. One of the common biochemical responses of plants to cold temperatures is an increase in omega-3 fatty acids, which protects cellular function by maintaining membrane integrity. The purpose of our study was to identify and characterize the omega-3 fatty acid desaturase (FAD) gene family in G. hirsutum, with an emphasis on identifying omega-3 FADs involved in cold temperature adaptation. Results: Eleven omega-3 FAD genes were identified in G. hirsutum, and characterization of the gene family in extant A and D diploid species (G. herbaceum and G. raimondii, respectively) allowed for unambiguous genome assignment of all homoeologs in tetraploid G. hirsutum. The omega-3 FAD family of cotton includes five distinct genes, two of which encode endoplasmic reticulum-type enzymes (FAD3-1 and FAD3-2) and three that encode chloroplast-type enzymes (FAD7/8-1, FAD7/8-2, and FAD7/8-3). The FAD3-2 gene was duplicated in the A genome progenitor species after the evolutionary split from the D progenitor, but before the interspecific hybridization event that gave rise to modern tetraploid cotton. RNA-seq analysis revealed conserved, gene-specific expression patterns in various organs and cell types and semi-quantitative RT-PCR further revealed that FAD7/8-1 was specifically induced during cold temperature treatment of G. hirsutum seedlings. Conclusions: The omega-3 FAD gene family in cotton was characterized at the genome-wide level

  1. First all-in-one diagnostic tool for DNA intelligence: genome-wide inference of biogeographic ancestry, appearance, relatedness, and sex with the Identitas v1 Forensic Chip.

    PubMed

    Keating, Brendan; Bansal, Aruna T; Walsh, Susan; Millman, Jonathan; Newman, Jonathan; Kidd, Kenneth; Budowle, Bruce; Eisenberg, Arthur; Donfack, Joseph; Gasparini, Paolo; Budimlija, Zoran; Henders, Anjali K; Chandrupatla, Hareesh; Duffy, David L; Gordon, Scott D; Hysi, Pirro; Liu, Fan; Medland, Sarah E; Rubin, Laurence; Martin, Nicholas G; Spector, Timothy D; Kayser, Manfred

    2013-05-01

    When a forensic DNA sample cannot be associated directly with a previously genotyped reference sample by standard short tandem repeat profiling, the investigation required for identifying perpetrators, victims, or missing persons can be both costly and time consuming. Here, we describe the outcome of a collaborative study using the Identitas Version 1 (v1) Forensic Chip, the first commercially available all-in-one tool dedicated to the concept of developing intelligence leads based on DNA. The chip allows parallel interrogation of 201,173 genome-wide autosomal, X-chromosomal, Y-chromosomal, and mitochondrial single nucleotide polymorphisms for inference of biogeographic ancestry, appearance, relatedness, and sex. The first assessment of the chip's performance was carried out on 3,196 blinded DNA samples of varying quantities and qualities, covering a wide range of biogeographic origin and eye/hair coloration as well as variation in relatedness and sex. Overall, 95 % of the samples (N = 3,034) passed quality checks with an overall genotype call rate >90 % on variable numbers of available recorded trait information. Predictions of sex, direct match, and first to third degree relatedness were highly accurate. Chip-based predictions of biparental continental ancestry were on average ~94 % correct (further support provided by separately inferred patrilineal and matrilineal ancestry). Predictions of eye color were 85 % correct for brown and 70 % correct for blue eyes, and predictions of hair color were 72 % for brown, 63 % for blond, 58 % for black, and 48 % for red hair. From the 5 % of samples (N = 162) with <90 % call rate, 56 % yielded correct continental ancestry predictions while 7 % yielded sufficient genotypes to allow hair and eye color prediction. Our results demonstrate that the Identitas v1 Forensic Chip holds great promise for a wide range of applications including criminal investigations, missing person investigations, and for national security

  2. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Profiling of Tomato Hsp20 Gene Family in Response to Biotic and Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jiahong; Cheng, Yuan; Feng, Kun; Ruan, Meiying; Ye, Qingjing; Wang, Rongqing; Li, Zhimiao; Zhou, Guozhi; Yao, Zhuping; Yang, Yuejian; Wan, Hongjian

    2016-01-01

    The Hsp20 genes are involved in the response of plants to environment stresses including heat shock and also play a vital role in plant growth and development. They represent the most abundant small heat shock proteins (sHsps) in plants, but little is known about this family in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), an important vegetable crop in the world. Here, we characterized heat shock protein 20 (SlHsp20) gene family in tomato through integration of gene structure, chromosome location, phylogenetic relationship, and expression profile. Using bioinformatics-based methods, we identified at least 42 putative SlHsp20 genes in tomato. Sequence analysis revealed that most of SlHsp20 genes possessed no intron or a relatively short intron in length. Chromosome mapping indicated that inter-arm and intra-chromosome duplication events contributed remarkably to the expansion of SlHsp20 genes. Phylogentic tree of Hsp20 genes from tomato and other plant species revealed that SlHsp20 genes were grouped into 13 subfamilies, indicating that these genes may have a common ancestor that generated diverse subfamilies prior to the mono-dicot split. In addition, expression analysis using RNA-seq in various tissues and developmental stages of cultivated tomato and the wild relative Solanum pimpinellifolium revealed that most of these genes (83%) were expressed in at least one stage from at least one genotype. Out of 42 genes, 4 genes were expressed constitutively in almost all the tissues analyzed, implying that these genes might have specific housekeeping function in tomato cell under normal growth conditions. Two SlHsp20 genes displayed differential expression levels between cultivated tomato and S. pimpinellifolium in vegetative (leaf and root) and reproductive organs (floral bud and flower), suggesting inter-species diversification for functional specialization during the process of domestication. Based on genome-wide microarray analysis, we showed that the transcript levels of SlHsp20

  3. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Profiling of Tomato Hsp20 Gene Family in Response to Biotic and Abiotic Stresses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiahong; Cheng, Yuan; Feng, Kun; Ruan, Meiying; Ye, Qingjing; Wang, Rongqing; Li, Zhimiao; Zhou, Guozhi; Yao, Zhuping; Yang, Yuejian; Wan, Hongjian

    2016-01-01

    The Hsp20 genes are involved in the response of plants to environment stresses including heat shock and also play a vital role in plant growth and development. They represent the most abundant small heat shock proteins (sHsps) in plants, but little is known about this family in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), an important vegetable crop in the world. Here, we characterized heat shock protein 20 (SlHsp20) gene family in tomato through integration of gene structure, chromosome location, phylogenetic relationship, and expression profile. Using bioinformatics-based methods, we identified at least 42 putative SlHsp20 genes in tomato. Sequence analysis revealed that most of SlHsp20 genes possessed no intron or a relatively short intron in length. Chromosome mapping indicated that inter-arm and intra-chromosome duplication events contributed remarkably to the expansion of SlHsp20 genes. Phylogentic tree of Hsp20 genes from tomato and other plant species revealed that SlHsp20 genes were grouped into 13 subfamilies, indicating that these genes may have a common ancestor that generated diverse subfamilies prior to the mono-dicot split. In addition, expression analysis using RNA-seq in various tissues and developmental stages of cultivated tomato and the wild relative Solanum pimpinellifolium revealed that most of these genes (83%) were expressed in at least one stage from at least one genotype. Out of 42 genes, 4 genes were expressed constitutively in almost all the tissues analyzed, implying that these genes might have specific housekeeping function in tomato cell under normal growth conditions. Two SlHsp20 genes displayed differential expression levels between cultivated tomato and S. pimpinellifolium in vegetative (leaf and root) and reproductive organs (floral bud and flower), suggesting inter-species diversification for functional specialization during the process of domestication. Based on genome-wide microarray analysis, we showed that the transcript levels of SlHsp20

  4. Genome-Wide Analysis and Evolution of the Pto-Like Protein Kinase (PLPK) Gene Family in Pepper.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Jelli; Jahn, Molly; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2016-01-01

    The tomato Pto gene, which encodes a serine/threonine kinase (STK) domain-containing protein, confers resistance to bacterial speck disease caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst). In this study, in vivo recognition assays using PVX constructs showed that AvrPto was specifically recognized in the pepper genotypes. This AvrPto recognition caused a nonhost hypersensitive response (HR) and localization of the PVX::AvrPto fusion protein to inoculated pepper leaf tissues, which indicates the presence of a similar Pto recognition mechanism in pepper as in tomato. However, genome-wide analysis in pepper revealed no Pto clade corresponding to that in tomato, suggesting an alternative system for Pto recognition in pepper. Nevertheless, 25 Pto-like protein kinases (PLPKs) with a highly conserved STK domain have been identified in the pepper genome. For the majority of the amino acid sites in the STK domain of Ptos and PLPKs, nonsynonymous (dN) to synonymous (dS) nucleotide substitution ratios (ω) were less than one, suggesting that purifying selection played a predominant role in the evolutionary process. However, some amino acid sites were found to be subjected to episodic positive selection in the course of evolution of Pto homologs, and, thus, different evolutionary processes might have shaped the Pto gene family in plants. Based on RNA-seq data, PLPK genes and other Pto pathway genes, such as Prf, Pti1, Pti5, and Pti6 were expressed in all tested pepper genotypes. Therefore, the nonhost HR against Pst in pepper may be due to the recognition of the AvrPto effector by a PLPK homolog, and subsequent action of downstream components of the Pto signaling pathway. However, the possibility remains that the recognition of AvrPto in pepper plants may involve activities of other receptor like kinases (RLKs). The identification of the PLPKs in this study will serve as a foundation for further efforts to understand the roles of PLPKs in nonhost resistance. PMID:27536870

  5. Genome-Wide Analysis and Evolution of the Pto-Like Protein Kinase (PLPK) Gene Family in Pepper

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Jelli; Jahn, Molly; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2016-01-01

    The tomato Pto gene, which encodes a serine/threonine kinase (STK) domain-containing protein, confers resistance to bacterial speck disease caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst). In this study, in vivo recognition assays using PVX constructs showed that AvrPto was specifically recognized in the pepper genotypes. This AvrPto recognition caused a nonhost hypersensitive response (HR) and localization of the PVX::AvrPto fusion protein to inoculated pepper leaf tissues, which indicates the presence of a similar Pto recognition mechanism in pepper as in tomato. However, genome-wide analysis in pepper revealed no Pto clade corresponding to that in tomato, suggesting an alternative system for Pto recognition in pepper. Nevertheless, 25 Pto-like protein kinases (PLPKs) with a highly conserved STK domain have been identified in the pepper genome. For the majority of the amino acid sites in the STK domain of Ptos and PLPKs, nonsynonymous (dN) to synonymous (dS) nucleotide substitution ratios (ω) were less than one, suggesting that purifying selection played a predominant role in the evolutionary process. However, some amino acid sites were found to be subjected to episodic positive selection in the course of evolution of Pto homologs, and, thus, different evolutionary processes might have shaped the Pto gene family in plants. Based on RNA-seq data, PLPK genes and other Pto pathway genes, such as Prf, Pti1, Pti5, and Pti6 were expressed in all tested pepper genotypes. Therefore, the nonhost HR against Pst in pepper may be due to the recognition of the AvrPto effector by a PLPK homolog, and subsequent action of downstream components of the Pto signaling pathway. However, the possibility remains that the recognition of AvrPto in pepper plants may involve activities of other receptor like kinases (RLKs). The identification of the PLPKs in this study will serve as a foundation for further efforts to understand the roles of PLPKs in nonhost resistance. PMID:27536870

  6. Heritability and Genome-Wide Association Studies for Hair Color in a Dutch Twin Family Based Sample.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bochao Danae; Mbarek, Hamdi; Willemsen, Gonneke; Dolan, Conor V; Fedko, Iryna O; Abdellaoui, Abdel; de Geus, Eco J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Hair color is one of the most visible and heritable traits in humans. Here, we estimated heritability by structural equation modeling (N = 20,142), and performed a genome wide association (GWA) analysis (N = 7091) and a GCTA study (N = 3340) on hair color within a large cohort of twins, their parents and siblings from the Netherlands Twin Register (NTR). Self-reported hair color was analyzed as five binary phenotypes, namely "blond versus non-blond", "red versus non-red", "brown versus non-brown", "black versus non-black", and "light versus dark". The broad-sense heritability of hair color was estimated between 73% and 99% and the genetic component included non-additive genetic variance. Assortative mating for hair color was significant, except for red and black hair color. From GCTA analyses, at most 24.6% of the additive genetic variance in hair color was explained by 1000G well-imputed SNPs. Genome-wide association analysis for each hair color showed that SNPs in the MC1R region were significantly associated with red, brown and black hair, and also with light versus dark hair color. Five other known genes (HERC2, TPCN2, SLC24A4, IRF4, and KITLG) gave genome-wide significant hits for blond, brown and light versus dark hair color. We did not find and replicate any new loci for hair color. PMID:26184321

  7. Heritability and Genome-Wide Association Studies for Hair Color in a Dutch Twin Family Based Sample

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bochao Danae; Mbarek, Hamdi; Willemsen, Gonneke; Dolan, Conor V.; Fedko, Iryna O.; Abdellaoui, Abdel; de Geus, Eco J.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Hair color is one of the most visible and heritable traits in humans. Here, we estimated heritability by structural equation modeling (N = 20,142), and performed a genome wide association (GWA) analysis (N = 7091) and a GCTA study (N = 3340) on hair color within a large cohort of twins, their parents and siblings from the Netherlands Twin Register (NTR). Self-reported hair color was analyzed as five binary phenotypes, namely “blond versus non-blond”, “red versus non-red”, “brown versus non-brown”, “black versus non-black”, and “light versus dark”. The broad-sense heritability of hair color was estimated between 73% and 99% and the genetic component included non-additive genetic variance. Assortative mating for hair color was significant, except for red and black hair color. From GCTA analyses, at most 24.6% of the additive genetic variance in hair color was explained by 1000G well-imputed SNPs. Genome-wide association analysis for each hair color showed that SNPs in the MC1R region were significantly associated with red, brown and black hair, and also with light versus dark hair color. Five other known genes (HERC2, TPCN2, SLC24A4, IRF4, and KITLG) gave genome-wide significant hits for blond, brown and light versus dark hair color. We did not find and replicate any new loci for hair color. PMID:26184321

  8. A Genome Wide Association Study on Age at First Calving Using High Density Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Chips in Hanwoo (Bos taurus coreanae)

    PubMed Central

    Hyeong, K.-E.; Iqbal, A.; Kim, J.-J.

    2014-01-01

    Age at first calving is an important trait for achieving earlier reproductive performance. To detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for reproductive traits, a genome wide association study was conducted on the 96 Hanwoo cows that were born between 2008 and 2010 from 13 sires in a local farm (Juk-Am Hanwoo farm, Suncheon, Korea) and genotyped with the Illumina 50K bovine single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips. Phenotypes were regressed on additive and dominance effects for each SNP using a simple linear regression model after the effects of birth-year-month and polygenes were considered. A forward regression procedure was applied to determine the best set of SNPs for age at first calving. A total of 15 QTL were detected at the comparison-wise 0.001 level. Two QTL with strong statistical evidence were found at 128.9 Mb and 111.1 Mb on bovine chromosomes (BTA) 2 and 7, respectively, each of which accounted for 22% of the phenotypic variance. Also, five significant SNPs were detected on BTAs 10, 16, 20, 26, and 29. Multiple QTL were found on BTAs 1, 2, 7, and 14. The significant QTLs may be applied via marker assisted selection to increase rate of genetic gain for the trait, after validation tests in other Hanwoo cow populations. PMID:25178291

  9. Integration of Genome-Wide Computation DRE Search, AhR ChIP-chip and Gene Expression Analyses of TCDD-Elicited Responses in the Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor (TF) that mediates responses to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Integration of TCDD-induced genome-wide AhR enrichment, differential gene expression and computational dioxin response element (DRE) analyses further elucidate the hepatic AhR regulatory network. Results Global ChIP-chip and gene expression analyses were performed on hepatic tissue from immature ovariectomized mice orally gavaged with 30 μg/kg TCDD. ChIP-chip analysis identified 14,446 and 974 AhR enriched regions (1% false discovery rate) at 2 and 24 hrs, respectively. Enrichment density was greatest in the proximal promoter, and more specifically, within ± 1.5 kb of a transcriptional start site (TSS). AhR enrichment also occurred distal to a TSS (e.g. intergenic DNA and 3' UTR), extending the potential gene expression regulatory roles of the AhR. Although TF binding site analyses identified over-represented DRE sequences within enriched regions, approximately 50% of all AhR enriched regions lacked a DRE core (5'-GCGTG-3'). Microarray analysis identified 1,896 number of TCDD-responsive genes (|fold change| ≥ 1.5, P1(t) > 0.999). Integrating this gene expression data with our ChIP-chip and DRE analyses only identified 625 differentially expressed genes that involved an AhR interaction at a DRE. Functional annotation analysis of differentially regulated genes associated with AhR enrichment identified overrepresented processes related to fatty acid and lipid metabolism and transport, and xenobiotic metabolism, which are consistent with TCDD-elicited steatosis in the mouse liver. Conclusions Details of the AhR regulatory network have been expanded to include AhR-DNA interactions within intragenic and intergenic genomic regions. Moreover, the AhR can interact with DNA independent of a DRE core suggesting there are alternative mechanisms of AhR-mediated gene regulation. PMID:21762485

  10. Genome-wide analysis of tandem repeats in Tribolium castaneum genome reveals abundant and highly dynamic tandem repeat families with satellite DNA features in euchromatic chromosomal arms

    PubMed Central

    Pavlek, Martina; Gelfand, Yevgeniy; Plohl, Miroslav; Meštrović, Nevenka

    2015-01-01

    Although satellite DNAs are well-explored components of heterochromatin and centromeres, little is known about emergence, dispersal and possible impact of comparably structured tandem repeats (TRs) on the genome-wide scale. Our bioinformatics analysis of assembled Tribolium castaneum genome disclosed significant contribution of TRs in euchromatic chromosomal arms and clear predominance of satellite DNA-typical 170 bp monomers in arrays of ≥5 repeats. By applying different experimental approaches, we revealed that the nine most prominent TR families Cast1–Cast9 extracted from the assembly comprise ∼4.3% of the entire genome and reside almost exclusively in euchromatic regions. Among them, seven families that build ∼3.9% of the genome are based on ∼170 and ∼340 bp long monomers. Results of phylogenetic analyses of 2500 monomers originating from these families show high-sequence dynamics, evident by extensive exchanges between arrays on non-homologous chromosomes. In addition, our analysis shows that concerted evolution acts more efficiently on longer than on shorter arrays. Efficient genome-wide distribution of nine TR families implies the role of transposition only in expansion of the most dispersed family, and involvement of other mechanisms is anticipated. Despite similarities in sequence features, FISH experiments indicate high-level compartmentalization of centromeric and euchromatic tandem repeats. PMID:26428853

  11. Genome-wide analysis of CrRLK1L gene family in Gossypium and identification of candidate CrRLK1L genes related to fiber development.

    PubMed

    Niu, Erli; Cai, Caiping; Zheng, Yongjie; Shang, Xiaoguang; Fang, Lei; Guo, Wangzhen

    2016-06-01

    Members of the CrRLK1L family, a subgroup of the receptor-like kinase (RLK) gene family, are thought to act as sensors for the integrity of the cell wall and regulators of polar elongation. To better understand the various functions in fiber development, we conducted genome-wide identification and characterization analyses of CrRLK1L family in cotton. Here 44, 40, and 79 CrRLK1L genes were identified from three cotton species: diploid G. raimondii (D5), diploid G. arboreum (A2), and tetraploid G. hirsutum TM-1 (AD1), respectively. The 44 CrRLK1Ls in G. raimondii were anchored to the 12 chromosomes unevenly and were classified into six groups (I-VI), with group II and group IV being further divided into two subgroups (groups IIa and IIb, and IVa and IVb, respectively). These CrRLK1Ls displayed a highly regular pattern of developmental and spatial regulation in cotton. Using the transcriptome data of five chromosomal segment introgression lines (CSILs) and the physical integration of CrRLK1Ls with the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) related to fiber quality traits, we revealed that six CrRLK1L genes were highly associated with fiber development. This study brings new insights into the integrated genome-wide identification of CrRLK1Ls in cotton and provides references for the genetic improvement of cotton fiber. PMID:26833484

  12. Genome-wide identification of WRKY family genes in peach and analysis of WRKY expression during bud dormancy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Tan, Qiuping; Sun, Mingyue; Li, Dongmei; Fu, Xiling; Chen, Xiude; Xiao, Wei; Li, Ling; Gao, Dongsheng

    2016-06-01

    Bud dormancy in deciduous fruit trees is an important adaptive mechanism for their survival in cold climates. The WRKY genes participate in several developmental and physiological processes, including dormancy. However, the dormancy mechanisms of WRKY genes have not been studied in detail. We conducted a genome-wide analysis and identified 58 WRKY genes in peach. These putative genes were located on all eight chromosomes. In bioinformatics analyses, we compared the sequences of WRKY genes from peach, rice, and Arabidopsis. In a cluster analysis, the gene sequences formed three groups, of which group II was further divided into five subgroups. Gene structure was highly conserved within each group, especially in groups IId and III. Gene expression analyses by qRT-PCR showed that WRKY genes showed different expression patterns in peach buds during dormancy. The mean expression levels of six WRKY genes (Prupe.6G286000, Prupe.1G393000, Prupe.1G114800, Prupe.1G071400, Prupe.2G185100, and Prupe.2G307400) increased during endodormancy and decreased during ecodormancy, indicating that these six WRKY genes may play a role in dormancy in a perennial fruit tree. This information will be useful for selecting fruit trees with desirable dormancy characteristics or for manipulating dormancy in genetic engineering programs. PMID:26951048

  13. Genome-Wide Comparative Analyses Reveal the Dynamic Evolution of Nucleotide-Binding Leucine-Rich Repeat Gene Family among Solanaceae Plants

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Eunyoung; Kim, Seungill; Yeom, Seon-In; Choi, Doil

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved an elaborate innate immune system against invading pathogens. Within this system, intracellular nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) immune receptors are known play critical roles in effector-triggered immunity (ETI) plant defense. We performed genome-wide identification and classification of NLR-coding sequences from the genomes of pepper, tomato, and potato using fixed criteria. We then compared genomic duplication and evolution features. We identified intact 267, 443, and 755 NLR-encoding genes in tomato, potato, and pepper genomes, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis and classification of Solanaceae NLRs revealed that the majority of NLR super family members fell into 14 subgroups, including a TIR-NLR (TNL) subgroup and 13 non-TNL subgroups. Specific subgroups have expanded in each genome, with the expansion in pepper showing subgroup-specific physical clusters. Comparative analysis of duplications showed distinct duplication patterns within pepper and among Solanaceae plants suggesting subgroup- or species-specific gene duplication events after speciation, resulting in divergent evolution. Taken together, genome-wide analysis of NLR family members provide insights into their evolutionary history in Solanaceae. These findings also provide important foundational knowledge for understanding NLR evolution and will empower broader characterization of disease resistance genes to be used for crop breeding. PMID:27559340

  14. Genome-Wide Comparative Analyses Reveal the Dynamic Evolution of Nucleotide-Binding Leucine-Rich Repeat Gene Family among Solanaceae Plants.

    PubMed

    Seo, Eunyoung; Kim, Seungill; Yeom, Seon-In; Choi, Doil

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved an elaborate innate immune system against invading pathogens. Within this system, intracellular nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) immune receptors are known play critical roles in effector-triggered immunity (ETI) plant defense. We performed genome-wide identification and classification of NLR-coding sequences from the genomes of pepper, tomato, and potato using fixed criteria. We then compared genomic duplication and evolution features. We identified intact 267, 443, and 755 NLR-encoding genes in tomato, potato, and pepper genomes, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis and classification of Solanaceae NLRs revealed that the majority of NLR super family members fell into 14 subgroups, including a TIR-NLR (TNL) subgroup and 13 non-TNL subgroups. Specific subgroups have expanded in each genome, with the expansion in pepper showing subgroup-specific physical clusters. Comparative analysis of duplications showed distinct duplication patterns within pepper and among Solanaceae plants suggesting subgroup- or species-specific gene duplication events after speciation, resulting in divergent evolution. Taken together, genome-wide analysis of NLR family members provide insights into their evolutionary history in Solanaceae. These findings also provide important foundational knowledge for understanding NLR evolution and will empower broader characterization of disease resistance genes to be used for crop breeding. PMID:27559340

  15. Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Diverged Patterns of Codon Bias, Gene Expression, and Rates of Sequence Evolution in Picea Gene Families

    PubMed Central

    De La Torre, Amanda R.; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Van de Peer, Yves; Ingvarsson, Pär K.

    2015-01-01

    The recent sequencing of several gymnosperm genomes has greatly facilitated studying the evolution of their genes and gene families. In this study, we examine the evidence for expression-mediated selection in the first two fully sequenced representatives of the gymnosperm plant clade (Picea abies and Picea glauca). We use genome-wide estimates of gene expression (>50,000 expressed genes) to study the relationship between gene expression, codon bias, rates of sequence divergence, protein length, and gene duplication. We found that gene expression is correlated with rates of sequence divergence and codon bias, suggesting that natural selection is acting on Picea protein-coding genes for translational efficiency. Gene expression, rates of sequence divergence, and codon bias are correlated with the size of gene families, with large multicopy gene families having, on average, a lower expression level and breadth, lower codon bias, and higher rates of sequence divergence than single-copy gene families. Tissue-specific patterns of gene expression were more common in large gene families with large gene expression divergence than in single-copy families. Recent family expansions combined with large gene expression variation in paralogs and increased rates of sequence evolution suggest that some Picea gene families are rapidly evolving to cope with biotic and abiotic stress. Our study highlights the importance of gene expression and natural selection in shaping the evolution of protein-coding genes in Picea species, and sets the ground for further studies investigating the evolution of individual gene families in gymnosperms. PMID:25747252

  16. A genome-wide linkage scan of bipolar disorder in Latino families identifies susceptibility loci at 8q24 and 14q32.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Suzanne; Camarillo, Cynthia; Rodriguez, Marco; Ramirez, Mercedes; Zavala, Juan; Armas, Regina; Contreras, Salvador A; Contreras, Javier; Dassori, Albana; Almasy, Laura; Flores, Deborah; Jerez, Alvaro; Raventós, Henriette; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Escamilla, Michael

    2014-09-01

    A genome-wide nonparametric linkage screen was performed to localize Bipolar Disorder (BP) susceptibility loci in a sample of 3757 individuals of Latino ancestry. The sample included 963 individuals with BP phenotype (704 relative pairs) from 686 families recruited from the US, Mexico, Costa Rica, and Guatemala. Non-parametric analyses were performed over a 5 cM grid with an average genetic coverage of 0.67 cM. Multipoint analyses were conducted across the genome using non-parametric Kong & Cox LOD scores along with Sall statistics for all relative pairs. Suggestive and significant genome-wide thresholds were calculated based on 1000 simulations. Single-marker association tests in the presence of linkage were performed assuming a multiplicative model with a population prevalence of 2%. We identified two genome-wide significant susceptibly loci for BP at 8q24 and 14q32, and a third suggestive locus at 2q13-q14. Within these three linkage regions, the top associated single marker (rs1847694, P = 2.40 × 10(-5)) is located 195 Kb upstream of DPP10 in Chromosome 2. DPP10 is prominently expressed in brain neuronal populations, where it has been shown to bind and regulate Kv4-mediated A-type potassium channels. Taken together, these results provide additional evidence that 8q24, 14q32, and 2q13-q14 are susceptibly loci for BP and these regions may be involved in the pathogenesis of BP in the Latino population. PMID:25044503

  17. Genome-wide investigation and expression analysis of AP2-ERF gene family in salt tolerant common bean

    PubMed Central

    Kavas, Musa; Kizildogan, Aslihan; Gökdemir, Gökhan; Baloglu, Mehmet Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    Apetala2-ethylene-responsive element binding factor (AP2-ERF) superfamily with common AP2-DNA binding domain have developmentally and physiologically important roles in plants. Since common bean genome project has been completed recently, it is possible to identify all of the AP2-ERF genes in the common bean genome. In this study, a comprehensive genome-wide in silico analysis identified 180 AP2-ERF superfamily genes in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Based on the amino acid alignment and phylogenetic analyses, superfamily members were classified into four subfamilies: DREB (54), ERF (95), AP2 (27) and RAV (3), as well as one soloist. The physical and chemical characteristics of amino acids, interaction between AP2-ERF proteins, cis elements of promoter region of AP2-ERF genes and phylogenetic trees were predicted and analyzed. Additionally, expression levels of AP2-ERF genes were evaluated by in silico and qRT-PCR analyses. In silico micro-RNA target transcript analyses identified nearly all PvAP2-ERF genes as targets of by 44 different plant species' miRNAs were identified in this study. The most abundant target genes were PvAP2/ERF-20-25-62-78-113-173. miR156, miR172 and miR838 were the most important miRNAs found in targeting and BLAST analyses. Interactome analysis revealed that the transcription factor PvAP2-ERF78, an ortholog of Arabidopsis At2G28550, was potentially interacted with at least 15 proteins, indicating that it was very important in transcriptional regulation. Here we present the first study to identify and characterize the AP2-ERF transcription factors in common bean using whole-genome analysis, and the findings may serve as a references for future functional research on the transcription factors in common bean. PMID:27152109

  18. Genome-wide identification and analysis of the SBP-box family genes in apple (Malus x domestica Borkh)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SQUAMOSA promoter binding protein (SBP)-box genes encode a family of plant-specific transcription factors and play many crucial roles in plant development. In this study, 27 SBP-box gene family members were identified in the apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) genome, 15 of which were suggested to be ...

  19. [Genome-wide identification, phylogenetic analysis and expression profiling of the WOX family genes in Solanum lycopersicum].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxu; Liu, Cheng; Li, Wei; Zhang, Zenglin; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhou, Hui; Guo, Yongfeng

    2016-05-01

    Members of the plant-specific WOX transcription factor family have been reported to play important roles in cell to cell communication as well as other physiological and developmental processes. In this study, ten members of the WOX transcription factor family were identified in Solanum lycopersicum with HMMER. Neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree, maximum-likelihood tree and Bayesian-inference tree were constructed and similar topologies were shown using the protein sequences of the homeodomain. Phylogenetic study revealed that the 25 WOX family members from Arabidopsis and tomato fall into three clades and nine subfamilies. The patterns of exon-intron structures and organization of conserved domains in Arabidopsis and tomato were consistent based on the phylogenetic results. Transcriptome analysis showed that the expression patterns of SlWOXs were different in different tissue types. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis suggested that, as transcription factors, the SlWOX family members could be involved in a number of biological processes including cell to cell communication and tissue development. Our results are useful for future studies on WOX family members in tomato and other plant species. PMID:27232493

  20. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of Homeodomain Leucine Zipper Subfamily IV (HDZ IV) Gene Family from Musa accuminata.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ashutosh; Misra, Prashant; Alok, Anshu; Kaur, Navneet; Sharma, Shivani; Lakhwani, Deepika; Asif, Mehar H; Tiwari, Siddharth; Trivedi, Prabodh K

    2016-01-01

    The homeodomain zipper family (HD-ZIP) of transcription factors is present only in plants and plays important role in the regulation of plant-specific processes. The subfamily IV of HDZ transcription factors (HD-ZIP IV) has primarily been implicated in the regulation of epidermal structure development. Though this gene family is present in all lineages of land plants, members of this gene family have not been identified in banana, which is one of the major staple fruit crops. In the present work, we identified 21 HDZIV encoding genes in banana by the computational analysis of banana genome resource. Our analysis suggested that these genes putatively encode proteins having all the characteristic domains of HDZIV transcription factors. The phylogenetic analysis of the banana HDZIV family genes further confirmed that after separation from a common ancestor, the banana, and poales lineages might have followed distinct evolutionary paths. Further, we conclude that segmental duplication played a major role in the evolution of banana HDZIV encoding genes. All the identified banana HDZIV genes expresses in different banana tissue, however at varying levels. The transcript levels of some of the banana HDZIV genes were also detected in banana fruit pulp, suggesting their putative role in fruit attributes. A large number of genes of this family showed modulated expression under drought and salinity stress. Taken together, the present work lays a foundation for elucidation of functional aspects of the banana HDZIV encoding genes and for their possible use in the banana improvement programs. PMID:26870050

  1. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of Homeodomain Leucine Zipper Subfamily IV (HDZ IV) Gene Family from Musa accuminata

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Ashutosh; Misra, Prashant; Alok, Anshu; Kaur, Navneet; Sharma, Shivani; Lakhwani, Deepika; Asif, Mehar H.; Tiwari, Siddharth; Trivedi, Prabodh K.

    2016-01-01

    The homeodomain zipper family (HD-ZIP) of transcription factors is present only in plants and plays important role in the regulation of plant-specific processes. The subfamily IV of HDZ transcription factors (HD-ZIP IV) has primarily been implicated in the regulation of epidermal structure development. Though this gene family is present in all lineages of land plants, members of this gene family have not been identified in banana, which is one of the major staple fruit crops. In the present work, we identified 21 HDZIV encoding genes in banana by the computational analysis of banana genome resource. Our analysis suggested that these genes putatively encode proteins having all the characteristic domains of HDZIV transcription factors. The phylogenetic analysis of the banana HDZIV family genes further confirmed that after separation from a common ancestor, the banana, and poales lineages might have followed distinct evolutionary paths. Further, we conclude that segmental duplication played a major role in the evolution of banana HDZIV encoding genes. All the identified banana HDZIV genes expresses in different banana tissue, however at varying levels. The transcript levels of some of the banana HDZIV genes were also detected in banana fruit pulp, suggesting their putative role in fruit attributes. A large number of genes of this family showed modulated expression under drought and salinity stress. Taken together, the present work lays a foundation for elucidation of functional aspects of the banana HDZIV encoding genes and for their possible use in the banana improvement programs. PMID:26870050

  2. Genome-Wide Analysis of APETALA2/Ethylene-Responsive Factor (AP2/ERF) Gene Family in Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.).

    PubMed

    Guo, Baojian; Wei, Yafeng; Xu, Ruibin; Lin, Shen; Luan, Haiye; Lv, Chao; Zhang, Xinzhong; Song, Xiyun; Xu, Rugen

    2016-01-01

    APETALA2/Ethylene-Responsive Factor (AP2/ERF) gene family is plant specific transcription factor. It plays critical roles in development process, tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses, and responses to plant hormones. However, limited data are available on the contributions of AP2/ERF gene family in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). In the present study, 121 HvAP2/ERF genes in barley were identified by using bioinformatics methods. A total of 118 HvAP2/ERF (97.5%) genes were located on seven chromosomes. According to phylogenetic classification of AP2/ERF family in Arabidopsis, HvAP2/ERF proteins were divided into AP2 (APETALA2), RAV (Related to ABI3/VP), DREB (dehydration responsive element binding), ERF (ethylene responsive factors) and soloist sub families. The analysis of duplication events indicated that tandem repeat and segmental duplication contributed to the expansion of the AP2/ERF family in barley. HvDREB1s/2s genes displayed various expression patterns under abiotic stress and phytohormone. Taken together, the data generated in this study will be useful for genome-wide analysis to determine the precise role of the HvAP2/ERF gene during barley development, abiotic stress and phytohormone responses with the ultimate goal of improving crop production. PMID:27598245

  3. Genome-Wide Comparative In Silico Analysis of the RNA Helicase Gene Family in Zea mays and Glycine max: A Comparison with Arabidopsis and Oryza sativa

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinguang; Zheng, Chengchao

    2013-01-01

    RNA helicases are enzymes that are thought to unwind double-stranded RNA molecules in an energy-dependent fashion through the hydrolysis of NTP. RNA helicases are associated with all processes involving RNA molecules, including nuclear transcription, editing, splicing, ribosome biogenesis, RNA export, and organelle gene expression. The involvement of RNA helicase in response to stress and in plant growth and development has been reported previously. While their importance in Arabidopsis and Oryza sativa has been partially studied, the function of RNA helicase proteins is poorly understood in Zea mays and Glycine max. In this study, we identified a total of RNA helicase genes in Arabidopsis and other crop species genome by genome-wide comparative in silico analysis. We classified the RNA helicase genes into three subfamilies according to the structural features of the motif II region, such as DEAD-box, DEAH-box and DExD/H-box, and different species showed different patterns of alternative splicing. Secondly, chromosome location analysis showed that the RNA helicase protein genes were distributed across all chromosomes with different densities in the four species. Thirdly, phylogenetic tree analyses identified the relevant homologs of DEAD-box, DEAH-box and DExD/H-box RNA helicase proteins in each of the four species. Fourthly, microarray expression data showed that many of these predicted RNA helicase genes were expressed in different developmental stages and different tissues under normal growth conditions. Finally, real-time quantitative PCR analysis showed that the expression levels of 10 genes in Arabidopsis and 13 genes in Zea mays were in close agreement with the microarray expression data. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a comparative genome-wide analysis of the RNA helicase gene family in Arabidopsis, Oryza sativa, Zea mays and Glycine max. This study provides valuable information for understanding the classification and putative functions of

  4. Genome-Wide Association and Trans-ethnic Meta-Analysis for Advanced Diabetic Kidney Disease: Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND).

    PubMed

    Iyengar, Sudha K; Sedor, John R; Freedman, Barry I; Kao, W H Linda; Kretzler, Matthias; Keller, Benjamin J; Abboud, Hanna E; Adler, Sharon G; Best, Lyle G; Bowden, Donald W; Burlock, Allison; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Cole, Shelley A; Comeau, Mary E; Curtis, Jeffrey M; Divers, Jasmin; Drechsler, Christiane; Duggirala, Ravi; Elston, Robert C; Guo, Xiuqing; Huang, Huateng; Hoffmann, Michael Marcus; Howard, Barbara V; Ipp, Eli; Kimmel, Paul L; Klag, Michael J; Knowler, William C; Kohn, Orly F; Leak, Tennille S; Leehey, David J; Li, Man; Malhotra, Alka; März, Winfried; Nair, Viji; Nelson, Robert G; Nicholas, Susanne B; O'Brien, Stephen J; Pahl, Madeleine V; Parekh, Rulan S; Pezzolesi, Marcus G; Rasooly, Rebekah S; Rotimi, Charles N; Rotter, Jerome I; Schelling, Jeffrey R; Seldin, Michael F; Shah, Vallabh O; Smiles, Adam M; Smith, Michael W; Taylor, Kent D; Thameem, Farook; Thornley-Brown, Denyse P; Truitt, Barbara J; Wanner, Christoph; Weil, E Jennifer; Winkler, Cheryl A; Zager, Philip G; Igo, Robert P; Hanson, Robert L; Langefeld, Carl D

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is the most common etiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the industrialized world and accounts for much of the excess mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus. Approximately 45% of U.S. patients with incident end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) have DKD. Independent of glycemic control, DKD aggregates in families and has higher incidence rates in African, Mexican, and American Indian ancestral groups relative to European populations. The Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND) performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) contrasting 6,197 unrelated individuals with advanced DKD with healthy and diabetic individuals lacking nephropathy of European American, African American, Mexican American, or American Indian ancestry. A large-scale replication and trans-ethnic meta-analysis included 7,539 additional European American, African American and American Indian DKD cases and non-nephropathy controls. Within ethnic group meta-analysis of discovery GWAS and replication set results identified genome-wide significant evidence for association between DKD and rs12523822 on chromosome 6q25.2 in American Indians (P = 5.74x10-9). The strongest signal of association in the trans-ethnic meta-analysis was with a SNP in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs12523822 (rs955333; P = 1.31x10-8), with directionally consistent results across ethnic groups. These 6q25.2 SNPs are located between the SCAF8 and CNKSR3 genes, a region with DKD relevant changes in gene expression and an eQTL with IPCEF1, a gene co-translated with CNKSR3. Several other SNPs demonstrated suggestive evidence of association with DKD, within and across populations. These data identify a novel DKD susceptibility locus with consistent directions of effect across diverse ancestral groups and provide insight into the genetic architecture of DKD. PMID:26305897

  5. Genome-Wide Association and Trans-ethnic Meta-Analysis for Advanced Diabetic Kidney Disease: Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND)

    PubMed Central

    Kretzler, Matthias; Keller, Benjamin J.; Adler, Sharon G.; Best, Lyle G.; Bowden, Donald W.; Burlock, Allison; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Cole, Shelley A.; Comeau, Mary E.; Curtis, Jeffrey M.; Divers, Jasmin; Drechsler, Christiane; Duggirala, Ravi; Elston, Robert C.; Guo, Xiuqing; Huang, Huateng; Hoffmann, Michael Marcus; Howard, Barbara V.; Ipp, Eli; Kimmel, Paul L.; Klag, Michael J.; Knowler, William C.; Kohn, Orly F.; Leak, Tennille S.; Leehey, David J.; Li, Man; Malhotra, Alka; März, Winfried; Nair, Viji; Nelson, Robert G.; Nicholas, Susanne B.; O’Brien, Stephen J.; Pahl, Madeleine V.; Parekh, Rulan S.; Pezzolesi, Marcus G.; Rasooly, Rebekah S.; Rotimi, Charles N.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Schelling, Jeffrey R.; Seldin, Michael F.; Shah, Vallabh O.; Smiles, Adam M.; Smith, Michael W.; Taylor, Kent D.; Thameem, Farook; Thornley-Brown, Denyse P.; Truitt, Barbara J.; Wanner, Christoph; Weil, E. Jennifer; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Zager, Philip G.; Igo, Robert P.; Hanson, Robert L.; Langefeld, Carl D.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is the most common etiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the industrialized world and accounts for much of the excess mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus. Approximately 45% of U.S. patients with incident end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) have DKD. Independent of glycemic control, DKD aggregates in families and has higher incidence rates in African, Mexican, and American Indian ancestral groups relative to European populations. The Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND) performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) contrasting 6,197 unrelated individuals with advanced DKD with healthy and diabetic individuals lacking nephropathy of European American, African American, Mexican American, or American Indian ancestry. A large-scale replication and trans-ethnic meta-analysis included 7,539 additional European American, African American and American Indian DKD cases and non-nephropathy controls. Within ethnic group meta-analysis of discovery GWAS and replication set results identified genome-wide significant evidence for association between DKD and rs12523822 on chromosome 6q25.2 in American Indians (P = 5.74x10-9). The strongest signal of association in the trans-ethnic meta-analysis was with a SNP in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs12523822 (rs955333; P = 1.31x10-8), with directionally consistent results across ethnic groups. These 6q25.2 SNPs are located between the SCAF8 and CNKSR3 genes, a region with DKD relevant changes in gene expression and an eQTL with IPCEF1, a gene co-translated with CNKSR3. Several other SNPs demonstrated suggestive evidence of association with DKD, within and across populations. These data identify a novel DKD susceptibility locus with consistent directions of effect across diverse ancestral groups and provide insight into the genetic architecture of DKD. PMID:26305897

  6. Genome-wide identification of WRKY family genes and their response to cold stress in Vitis vinifera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    WRKY transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators in plants. WRKY genes are not only found to play significant roles in biotic and abiotic stress response, but also regulate growth and development. Grapevine (Vitis vinifera) production is largely limited by str...

  7. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of the 14-3-3 Family Genes in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Cheng; Cheng, Linming; Shen, Jingqin; Zhang, Yunhong; Cao, Huimin; Lu, Dan; Shen, Chenjia

    2016-01-01

    The 14-3-3 gene family, which is conserved in eukaryotes, is involved in protein-protein interactions and mediates signal transduction. However, detailed investigations of the 14-3-3 gene family in Medicago truncatula are largely unknown. In this study, the identification and study of M. truncatula 14-3-3-family genes were performed based on the latest M. truncatula genome. In the M. truncatula genome, 10 14-3-3 family genes were identified, and they can be grouped into ε and non-ε groups. An exon-intron analysis showed that the gene structures are conserved in the same group. The protein structure analysis showed that 14-3-3 proteins in M. truncatula are composed of nine typical antiparallel α-helices. The expression patterns of Mt14-3-3 genes indicated that they are expressed in all tissues. Furthermore, the gene expression levels of Mt14-3-3 under hormone treatment and Sinorhizobium meliloti infection showed that the Mt14-3-3 genes were involve in nodule formation. Our findings lay a solid foundation for further functional studies of 14-3-3 in M. truncatula. PMID:27047505

  8. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Glutathione S-Transferase Gene Family in Capsella rubella: Identification, Expression, and Biochemical Functions

    PubMed Central

    He, Gang; Guan, Chao-Nan; Chen, Qiang-Xin; Gou, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Wei; Zeng, Qing-Yin; Lan, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Extensive subfunctionalization might explain why so many genes have been maintained after gene duplication, which provides the engine for gene family expansion. However, it is still a particular challenge to trace the evolutionary dynamics and features of functional divergences in a supergene family over the course of evolution. In this study, we identified 49 Glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes from the Capsella rubella, a close relative of Arabidopsis thaliana and a member of the mustard family. Capsella GSTs can be categorized into eight classes, with tau and phi GSTs being the most numerous. The expansion of the two classes mainly occurs through tandem gene duplication, which results in tandem-arrayed gene clusters on chromosomes. By integrating phylogenetic analysis, expression patterns, and biochemical functions of Capsella and Arabidopsis GSTs, functional divergence, both in gene expression and enzymatic properties, were clearly observed in paralogous gene pairs in Capsella (even the most recent duplicates), and orthologous GSTs in Arabidopsis/Capsella. This study provides functional evidence for the expansion and organization of a large gene family in closely related species.

  9. Genome-wide identification, classification and expression analysis of the heat shock transcription factor family in Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaoming; Liu, Gaofeng; Duan, Weike; Liu, Tongkun; Huang, Zhinan; Ren, Jun; Li, Ying; Hou, Xilin

    2014-08-01

    The Hsf gene family, one of the most important transcription factor families, plays crucial roles in regulating heat resistance. However, a systematic and comprehensive analysis of this gene family has not been reported in Chinese cabbage. Therefore, systematic analysis of the Hsf gene family in Chinese cabbage has profound significance. In this study, 35 BrHsf genes were identified from Chinese cabbage, which could be classified into three groups according to their structural characteristics and phylogenetic comparisons with Arabidopsis and rice. Thirty-three BrHsf genes mapped on chromosomes were further assigned to three subgenomes and eight ancestral karyotypes. Distribution mapping showed that BrHsf genes were non-randomly localized on chromosomes. Chinese cabbage and Arabidopsis shared 22 orthologous gene pairs. The expansion of BrHsf genes mainly resulted from genome triplication. Comparative analysis showed that the most Hsf genes were in Chinese cabbage among the five species analyzed. Interestingly, the number of Hsf genes of heat-resistant plants (Theobroma cacao and Musa acuminata) was fewer than that in Chinese cabbage. The expression patterns of BrHsf genes were different in six tissues, based on RNA-seq. Quantitative real-time-PCR analysis showed that the expression level of BrHsf genes varied under various abiotic stresses. In conclusion, this comprehensive analysis of BrHsf genes will provide rich resources, aiding the determination of Hsfs functions in plant heat resistance. Furthermore, the comparative genomics analysis deepened our understanding of Hsf genes' evolution accompanied by the polyploidy event of Chinese cabbage. PMID:24609322

  10. Genome-Wide Analysis and Heavy Metal-Induced Expression Profiling of the HMA Gene Family in Populus trichocarpa

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dandan; Xu, Xuemei; Hu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Quangang; Wang, Zhanchao; Zhang, Haizhen; Wang, Han; Wei, Ming; Wang, Hanzeng; Liu, Haimei; Li, Chenghao

    2015-01-01

    The heavy metal ATPase (HMA) family plays an important role in transition metal transport in plants. However, this gene family has not been extensively studied in Populus trichocarpa. We identified 17 HMA genes in P. trichocarpa (PtHMAs), of which PtHMA1–PtHMA4 belonged to the zinc (Zn)/cobalt (Co)/cadmium (Cd)/lead (Pb) subgroup, and PtHMA5–PtHMA8 were members of the copper (Cu)/silver (Ag) subgroup. Most of the genes were localized to chromosomes I and III. Gene structure, gene chromosomal location, and synteny analyses of PtHMAs indicated that tandem and segmental duplications likely contributed to the expansion and evolution of the PtHMAs. Most of the HMA genes contained abiotic stress-related cis-elements. Tissue-specific expression of PtHMA genes showed that PtHMA1 and PtHMA4 had relatively high expression levels in the leaves, whereas Cu/Ag subgroup (PtHMA5.1- PtHMA8) genes were upregulated in the roots. High concentrations of Cu, Ag, Zn, Cd, Co, Pb, and Mn differentially regulated the expression of PtHMAs in various tissues. The preliminary results of the present study generated basic information on the HMA family of Populus that may serve as foundation for future functional studies. PMID:26779188

  11. Genome-Wide Analysis and Expression Profiling of the Phospholipase C Gene Family in Soybean (Glycine max)

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yonggang; Dong, Jinye; Chen, Huan; Dong, Yuanyuan; Wang, Nan; Li, Xiaowei; Li, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) hydrolyses phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate to produce diacylglycerol and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. It plays an important role in plant development and abiotic stress responses. However, systematic analysis and expression profiling of the phospholipase C (PLC) gene family in soybean have not been reported. In this study, 12 putative PLC genes were identified in the soybean genome. Soybean PLCs were found on chromosomes 2, 11, 14 and 18 and encoded 58.8–70.06 kD proteins. Expression pattern analysis by RT-PCR demonstrated that expression of the GmPLCs was induced by PEG, NaCl and saline-alkali treatments in roots and leaves. GmPLC transcripts accumulated specifically in roots after ABA treatment. Furthermore, GmPLC transcripts were analyzed in various tissues. The results showed that GmPLC7 was highly expressed in most tissues, whereas GmPLC12 was expressed in early pods specifically. In addition, subcellular localization analysis was carried out and confirmed that GmPLC10 was localized in the plasma membrane in Nicotiana benthamiana. Our genomic analysis of the soybean PLC family provides an insight into the regulation of abiotic stress responses and development. It also provides a solid foundation for the functional characterization of the soybean PLC gene family. PMID:26421918

  12. Genome-Wide Analysis and Heavy Metal-Induced Expression Profiling of the HMA Gene Family in Populus trichocarpa.

    PubMed

    Li, Dandan; Xu, Xuemei; Hu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Quangang; Wang, Zhanchao; Zhang, Haizhen; Wang, Han; Wei, Ming; Wang, Hanzeng; Liu, Haimei; Li, Chenghao

    2015-01-01

    The heavy metal ATPase (HMA) family plays an important role in transition metal transport in plants. However, this gene family has not been extensively studied in Populus trichocarpa. We identified 17 HMA genes in P. trichocarpa (PtHMAs), of which PtHMA1-PtHMA4 belonged to the zinc (Zn)/cobalt (Co)/cadmium (Cd)/lead (Pb) subgroup, and PtHMA5-PtHMA8 were members of the copper (Cu)/silver (Ag) subgroup. Most of the genes were localized to chromosomes I and III. Gene structure, gene chromosomal location, and synteny analyses of PtHMAs indicated that tandem and segmental duplications likely contributed to the expansion and evolution of the PtHMAs. Most of the HMA genes contained abiotic stress-related cis-elements. Tissue-specific expression of PtHMA genes showed that PtHMA1 and PtHMA4 had relatively high expression levels in the leaves, whereas Cu/Ag subgroup (PtHMA5.1- PtHMA8) genes were upregulated in the roots. High concentrations of Cu, Ag, Zn, Cd, Co, Pb, and Mn differentially regulated the expression of PtHMAs in various tissues. The preliminary results of the present study generated basic information on the HMA family of Populus that may serve as foundation for future functional studies. PMID:26779188

  13. Genome-Wide Analysis and Expression Profiling of the Phospholipase C Gene Family in Soybean (Glycine max).

    PubMed

    Wang, Fawei; Deng, Yu; Zhou, Yonggang; Dong, Jinye; Chen, Huan; Dong, Yuanyuan; Wang, Nan; Li, Xiaowei; Li, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) hydrolyses phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate to produce diacylglycerol and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. It plays an important role in plant development and abiotic stress responses. However, systematic analysis and expression profiling of the phospholipase C (PLC) gene family in soybean have not been reported. In this study, 12 putative PLC genes were identified in the soybean genome. Soybean PLCs were found on chromosomes 2, 11, 14 and 18 and encoded 58.8-70.06 kD proteins. Expression pattern analysis by RT-PCR demonstrated that expression of the GmPLCs was induced by PEG, NaCl and saline-alkali treatments in roots and leaves. GmPLC transcripts accumulated specifically in roots after ABA treatment. Furthermore, GmPLC transcripts were analyzed in various tissues. The results showed that GmPLC7 was highly expressed in most tissues, whereas GmPLC12 was expressed in early pods specifically. In addition, subcellular localization analysis was carried out and confirmed that GmPLC10 was localized in the plasma membrane in Nicotiana benthamiana. Our genomic analysis of the soybean PLC family provides an insight into the regulation of abiotic stress responses and development. It also provides a solid foundation for the functional characterization of the soybean PLC gene family. PMID:26421918

  14. Genome-wide gene phylogeny of CIPK family in cassava and expression analysis of partial drought-induced genes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Xia, Zhiqiang; Yan, Yan; Ding, Zehong; Tie, Weiwei; Wang, Lianzhe; Zou, Meiling; Wei, Yunxie; Lu, Cheng; Hou, Xiaowan; Wang, Wenquan; Peng, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Cassava is an important food and potential biofuel crop that is tolerant to multiple abiotic stressors. The mechanisms underlying these tolerances are currently less known. CBL-interacting protein kinases (CIPKs) have been shown to play crucial roles in plant developmental processes, hormone signaling transduction, and in the response to abiotic stress. However, no data is currently available about the CPK family in cassava. In this study, a total of 25 CIPK genes were identified from cassava genome based on our previous genome sequencing data. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that 25 MeCIPKs could be classified into four subfamilies, which was supported by exon-intron organizations and the architectures of conserved protein motifs. Transcriptomic analysis of a wild subspecies and two cultivated varieties showed that most MeCIPKs had different expression patterns between wild subspecies and cultivatars in different tissues or in response to drought stress. Some orthologous genes involved in CIPK interaction networks were identified between Arabidopsis and cassava. The interaction networks and co-expression patterns of these orthologous genes revealed that the crucial pathways controlled by CIPK networks may be involved in the differential response to drought stress in different accessions of cassava. Nine MeCIPK genes were selected to investigate their transcriptional response to various stimuli and the results showed the comprehensive response of the tested MeCIPK genes to osmotic, salt, cold, oxidative stressors, and ABA signaling. The identification and expression analysis of CIPK family suggested that CIPK genes are important components of development and multiple signal transduction pathways in cassava. The findings of this study will help lay a foundation for the functional characterization of the CIPK gene family and provide an improved understanding of abiotic stress responses and signaling transduction in cassava. PMID:26579161

  15. Genome-wide analysis, expression dynamics and varietal comparison of NAC gene family at various developmental stages in Morus notabilis.

    PubMed

    Baranwal, Vinay Kumar; Khurana, Paramjit

    2016-06-01

    NAC genes are important transcription factors and forms a large family in plants. They have shown to play an important role in growth and development and have also been shown to involve in regulation of stress-responsive genes. In the present study, a repertoire of NAC genes in recently published mulberry genome has been identified which consists of a total of 79 members. Structural analysis revealed that most of the NAC genes in mulberry contain two introns. The proteins encoded by them show a wide range of isoelectric points suggestive of their varied roles in varying microcellular environment. Phylogenetic and conserved motif analysis elucidate the presence of 15 sub-groups of these genes along with two novel sub-groups having distinct conserved motifs which are not present in Arabidopsis. Gene ontology term enrichment analysis and cis-element identification from their putative 1 K upstream regulatory region indicates their possible role in important biological processes like organ formation, meristem establishment, senescence, and various biotic and abiotic stresses. Expression analysis across various developmental stages led to identification of their preferential expression in diverse tissues. Taken together, this work provides a solid background information related to structure, function, expression and evolution of NAC gene family in mulberry. PMID:26942603

  16. Genome-wide comparison of ferritin family from Archaea, Bacteria, Eukarya, and Viruses: its distribution, characteristic motif, and phylogenetic relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Lina; Xie, Ting; Hu, Qingqing; Deng, Changyan; Zheng, Rong; Chen, Wanping

    2015-10-01

    Ferritins are highly conserved proteins that are widely distributed in various species from archaea to humans. The ubiquitous characteristic of these proteins reflects the pivotal contribution of ferritins to the safe storage and timely delivery of iron to achieve iron homeostasis. This study investigated the ferritin genes in 248 genomes from various species, including viruses, archaea, bacteria, and eukarya. The distribution comparison suggests that mammals and eudicots possess abundant ferritin genes, whereas fungi contain very few ferritin genes. Archaea and bacteria show considerable numbers of ferritin genes. Generally, prokaryotes possess three types of ferritin (the typical ferritin, bacterioferritin, and DNA-binding protein from starved cell), whereas eukaryotes have various subunit types of ferritin, thereby indicating the individuation of the ferritin family during evolution. The characteristic motif analysis of ferritins suggested that all key residues specifying the unique structural motifs of ferritin are highly conserved across three domains of life. Meanwhile, the characteristic motifs were also distinguishable between ferritin groups, especially phytoferritins, which show a plant-specific motif. The phylogenetic analyses show that ferritins within the same subfamily or subunits are generally clustered together. The phylogenetic relationships among ferritin members suggest that both gene duplication and horizontal transfer contribute to the wide variety of ferritins, and their possible evolutionary scenario was also proposed. The results contribute to a better understanding of the distribution, characteristic motif, and evolutionary relationship of the ferritin family.

  17. Comprehensive analysis of multi-tissue transcriptome data and the genome-wide investigation of GRAS family in Phyllostachys edulis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hansheng; Dong, Lili; Sun, Huayu; Li, Lichao; Lou, Yongfeng; Wang, Lili; Li, Zuyao; Gao, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    GRAS family is one of plant specific transcription factors and plays diverse roles in the regulation of plant growth and development as well as in the plant disease resistance and abiotic stress responses. However, the investigation of GRAS family and multi-tissue gene expression profiles still remains unavailable in bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis). Here, we applied RNA-Seq analysis to monitor global transcriptional changes and investigate expression patterns in the five tissues of Ph. edulis, and analyzed a large-scale transcriptional events and patterns. Moreover, the tissue-specific genes and DEGs in different tissues were detected. For example, DEGs in panicle and leaf tissues were abundant in photosynthesis, glutathione, porphyrin and chlorophyll metabolism, whereas those in shoot and rhizome were majority in glycerophospholipid metabolism. In the portion of Ph. edulis GRAS (PeGRAS) analyses, we performed the analysis of phylogenetic, gene structure, conserved motifs, and analyzed the expression profiles of PeGRASs in response to high light and made a co-expression analysis. Additionally, the expression profiles of PeGRASs were validated using quantitative real-time PCR. Thus, PeGRASs based on dynamics profiles of gene expression is helpful in uncovering the specific biological functions which might be of critical values for bioengineering to improve bamboo breeding in future. PMID:27325361

  18. Xq27 FRAXA locus is a strong candidate for dyslexia: evidence from a genome-wide scan in French families.

    PubMed

    Huc-Chabrolle, M; Charon, C; Guilmatre, A; Vourc'h, P; Tripi, G; Barthez, M A; Sizaret, E; Thepault, R A; Le Gallic, S; Hager, J; Toutain, A; Raynaud, M; Andres, C; Campion, D; Laumonnier, F; Bonnet-Brilhault, F

    2013-03-01

    Dyslexia is a frequent neurodevelopmental learning disorder. To date, nine susceptibility loci have been identified, one of them being DYX9, located in Xq27. We performed the first French SNP linkage study followed by candidate gene investigation in dyslexia by studying 12 multiplex families (58 subjects) with at least two children affected, according to categorical restrictive criteria for phenotype definition. Significant results emerged on Xq27.3 within DYX9. The maximum multipoint LOD score reached 3,884 between rs12558359 and rs454992. Within this region, seven candidate genes were investigated for mutations in exonic sequences (CXORF1, CXORF51, SLITRK2, FMR1, FMR2, ASFMR1, FMR1NB), all having a role during brain development. We further looked for 5'UTR trinucleotide repeats in FMR1 and FMR2 genes. No mutation or polymorphism co-segregating with dyslexia was found. This finding in French families with Dyslexia showed significant linkage on Xq27.3 enclosing FRAXA, and consequently confirmed the DYX9 region as a robust susceptibility locus. We reduced the previously described interval from 6.8 (DXS1227-DXS8091) to 4 Mb also disclosing a higher LOD score. PMID:23307483

  19. Comprehensive analysis of multi-tissue transcriptome data and the genome-wide investigation of GRAS family in Phyllostachys edulis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hansheng; Dong, Lili; Sun, Huayu; Li, Lichao; Lou, Yongfeng; Wang, Lili; Li, Zuyao; Gao, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    GRAS family is one of plant specific transcription factors and plays diverse roles in the regulation of plant growth and development as well as in the plant disease resistance and abiotic stress responses. However, the investigation of GRAS family and multi-tissue gene expression profiles still remains unavailable in bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis). Here, we applied RNA-Seq analysis to monitor global transcriptional changes and investigate expression patterns in the five tissues of Ph. edulis, and analyzed a large-scale transcriptional events and patterns. Moreover, the tissue-specific genes and DEGs in different tissues were detected. For example, DEGs in panicle and leaf tissues were abundant in photosynthesis, glutathione, porphyrin and chlorophyll metabolism, whereas those in shoot and rhizome were majority in glycerophospholipid metabolism. In the portion of Ph. edulis GRAS (PeGRAS) analyses, we performed the analysis of phylogenetic, gene structure, conserved motifs, and analyzed the expression profiles of PeGRASs in response to high light and made a co-expression analysis. Additionally, the expression profiles of PeGRASs were validated using quantitative real-time PCR. Thus, PeGRASs based on dynamics profiles of gene expression is helpful in uncovering the specific biological functions which might be of critical values for bioengineering to improve bamboo breeding in future. PMID:27325361

  20. Genome-wide characterization and analysis of bZIP transcription factor gene family related to abiotic stress in cassava.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Yang, Hubiao; Yan, Yan; Wei, Yunxie; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Zehong; Zuo, Jiao; Peng, Ming; Li, Kaimian

    2016-01-01

    The basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor family plays crucial roles in various aspects of biological processes. Currently, no information is available regarding the bZIP family in the important tropical crop cassava. Herein, 77 bZIP genes were identified from cassava. Evolutionary analysis indicated that MebZIPs could be divided into 10 subfamilies, which was further supported by conserved motif and gene structure analyses. Global expression analysis suggested that MebZIPs showed similar or distinct expression patterns in different tissues between cultivated variety and wild subspecies. Transcriptome analysis of three cassava genotypes revealed that many MebZIP genes were activated by drought in the root of W14 subspecies, indicating the involvement of these genes in the strong resistance of cassava to drought. Expression analysis of selected MebZIP genes in response to osmotic, salt, cold, ABA, and H2O2 suggested that they might participate in distinct signaling pathways. Our systematic analysis of MebZIPs reveals constitutive, tissue-specific and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MebZIP genes for further functional characterization in planta, yields new insights into transcriptional regulation of MebZIP genes, and lays a foundation for understanding of bZIP-mediated abiotic stress response. PMID:26947924

  1. Genome-wide characterization and analysis of bZIP transcription factor gene family related to abiotic stress in cassava

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Yang, Hubiao; Yan, Yan; Wei, Yunxie; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Zehong; Zuo, Jiao; Peng, Ming; Li, Kaimian

    2016-01-01

    The basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor family plays crucial roles in various aspects of biological processes. Currently, no information is available regarding the bZIP family in the important tropical crop cassava. Herein, 77 bZIP genes were identified from cassava. Evolutionary analysis indicated that MebZIPs could be divided into 10 subfamilies, which was further supported by conserved motif and gene structure analyses. Global expression analysis suggested that MebZIPs showed similar or distinct expression patterns in different tissues between cultivated variety and wild subspecies. Transcriptome analysis of three cassava genotypes revealed that many MebZIP genes were activated by drought in the root of W14 subspecies, indicating the involvement of these genes in the strong resistance of cassava to drought. Expression analysis of selected MebZIP genes in response to osmotic, salt, cold, ABA, and H2O2 suggested that they might participate in distinct signaling pathways. Our systematic analysis of MebZIPs reveals constitutive, tissue-specific and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MebZIP genes for further functional characterization in planta, yields new insights into transcriptional regulation of MebZIP genes, and lays a foundation for understanding of bZIP-mediated abiotic stress response. PMID:26947924

  2. Genome-wide identification and comparative analysis of the cation proton antiporters family in pear and four other Rosaceae species.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongsheng; Qi, Kaijie; Liu, Xing; Yin, Hao; Wang, Peng; Chen, Jianqing; Wu, Juyou; Zhang, Shaoling

    2016-08-01

    The monovalent cation proton antiporters (CPAs) play essential roles in plant nutrition, development, and signal transduction by regulating ion and pH homeostasis of the cell. The CPAs of plants include the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, K(+) efflux antiporter, and cation/H(+) exchanger families. However, currently, little is known about the CPA genes in Rosaceae species. In this study, 220 CPA genes were identified from five Rosaceae species (Pyrus bretschneideri, Malus domestica, Prunus persica, Fragaria vesca, and Prunus mume), and 53 of which came from P. bretschneideri. Phylogenetic, structure, collinearity, and gene expression analyses were conducted on the entire CPA genes of pear. Gene expression data showed that 35 and 37 CPA genes were expressed in pear fruit and pollen tubes, respectively. The transcript analysis of some CPA genes under abiotic stress conditions revealed that CPAs may play an important role in pollen tubes growth. The results presented here will be useful in improving understanding of the complexity of the CPA gene family and will promote functional characterization in future studies. PMID:27193473

  3. A Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Stress and Hormone Responsive Patterns of TIFY Family Genes in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Gopal; Park, Jong-In; Kayum, Md. Abdul; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    The TIFY family is a plant-specific group of proteins with a diversity of functions and includes four subfamilies, viz. ZML, TIFY, PPD, and JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins. TIFY family members, particularly JAZ subfamily proteins, play roles in biological processes such as development and stress and hormone responses in Arabidopsis, rice, chickpea, and grape. However, there is no information about this family in any Brassica crop. This study identifies 36 TIFY genes in Brassica rapa, an economically important crop species in the Brassicaceae. An extensive in silico analysis of phylogenetic grouping, protein motif organization and intron-exon distribution confirmed that there are four subfamilies of BrTIFY proteins. Out of 36 BrTIFY genes, we identified 21 in the JAZ subfamily, seven in the TIFY subfamily, six in ZML and two in PPD. Extensive expression profiling of 21 BrTIFY JAZs in various tissues, especially in floral organs and at different flower growth stages revealed constitutive expression patterns, which suggest that BrTIFY JAZ genes are important during growth and development of B. rapa flowers. A protein interaction network analysis also pointed to association of these proteins with fertility and defense processes of B. rapa. Using a low temperature-treated whole-genome microarray data set, most of the JAZ genes were found to have variable transcript abundance between the contrasting inbred lines Chiifu and Kenshin of B. rapa. Subsequently, the expression of all 21 BrTIFY JAZs in response to cold stress was characterized in the same two lines via qPCR, demonstrating that nine genes were up-regulated. Importantly, the BrTIFY JAZs showed strong and differential expression upon JA treatment, pointing to their probable involvement in JA-mediated growth regulatory functions, especially during flower development and stress responses. Additionally, BrTIFY JAZs were induced in response to salt, drought, Fusarium, ABA, and SA treatments, and six genes (BrTIFY3

  4. A Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Stress and Hormone Responsive Patterns of TIFY Family Genes in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Saha, Gopal; Park, Jong-In; Kayum, Md Abdul; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    The TIFY family is a plant-specific group of proteins with a diversity of functions and includes four subfamilies, viz. ZML, TIFY, PPD, and JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins. TIFY family members, particularly JAZ subfamily proteins, play roles in biological processes such as development and stress and hormone responses in Arabidopsis, rice, chickpea, and grape. However, there is no information about this family in any Brassica crop. This study identifies 36 TIFY genes in Brassica rapa, an economically important crop species in the Brassicaceae. An extensive in silico analysis of phylogenetic grouping, protein motif organization and intron-exon distribution confirmed that there are four subfamilies of BrTIFY proteins. Out of 36 BrTIFY genes, we identified 21 in the JAZ subfamily, seven in the TIFY subfamily, six in ZML and two in PPD. Extensive expression profiling of 21 BrTIFY JAZs in various tissues, especially in floral organs and at different flower growth stages revealed constitutive expression patterns, which suggest that BrTIFY JAZ genes are important during growth and development of B. rapa flowers. A protein interaction network analysis also pointed to association of these proteins with fertility and defense processes of B. rapa. Using a low temperature-treated whole-genome microarray data set, most of the JAZ genes were found to have variable transcript abundance between the contrasting inbred lines Chiifu and Kenshin of B. rapa. Subsequently, the expression of all 21 BrTIFY JAZs in response to cold stress was characterized in the same two lines via qPCR, demonstrating that nine genes were up-regulated. Importantly, the BrTIFY JAZs showed strong and differential expression upon JA treatment, pointing to their probable involvement in JA-mediated growth regulatory functions, especially during flower development and stress responses. Additionally, BrTIFY JAZs were induced in response to salt, drought, Fusarium, ABA, and SA treatments, and six genes (BrTIFY3

  5. Genome-Wide Comparative Analysis of the Phospholipase D Gene Families among Allotetraploid Cotton and Its Diploid Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kai; Dong, Chun-Juan; Liu, Jin-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, 40 phospholipase D (PLD) genes were identified from allotetraploid cotton Gossypium hirsutum, and 20 PLD genes were examined in diploid cotton Gossypium raimondii. Combining with 19 previously identified Gossypium arboreum PLD genes, a comparative analysis was performed among the PLD gene families among allotetraploid and two diploid cottons. Based on the orthologous relationships, we found that almost each G. hirsutum PLD had a corresponding homolog in the G. arboreum and G. raimondii genomes, except for GhPLDβ3A, whose homolog GaPLDβ3 may have been lost during the evolution of G. arboreum after the interspecific hybridization. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all of the cotton PLDs were unevenly classified into six numbered subgroups: α, β/γ, δ, ε, ζ and φ. An N-terminal C2 domain was found in the α, β/γ, δ and ε subgroups, while phox homology (PX) and pleckstrin homology (PH) domains were identified in the ζ subgroup. The subgroup φ possessed a single peptide instead of a functional domain. In each phylogenetic subgroup, the PLDs showed high conservation in gene structure and amino acid sequences in functional domains. The expansion of GhPLD and GrPLD gene families were mainly attributed to segmental duplication and partly attributed to tandem duplication. Furthermore, purifying selection played a critical role in the evolution of PLD genes in cotton. Quantitative RT-PCR documented that allotetraploid cotton PLD genes were broadly expressed and each had a unique spatial and developmental expression pattern, indicating their functional diversification in cotton growth and development. Further analysis of cis-regulatory elements elucidated transcriptional regulations and potential functions. Our comparative analysis provided valuable information for understanding the putative functions of the PLD genes in cotton fiber. PMID:27213891

  6. Genome-Wide Identification and Comparative Analysis of Cytosine-5 DNA Methyltransferase and Demethylase Families in Wild and Cultivated Peanut.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengfei; Gao, Chao; Bian, Xiaotong; Zhao, Shuzhen; Zhao, Chuanzhi; Xia, Han; Song, Hui; Hou, Lei; Wan, Shubo; Wang, Xingjun

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation plays important roles in genome protection, regulation of gene expression and is associated with plants development. Plant DNA methylation pattern was mediated by cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferase and demethylase. Although the genomes of AA and BB wild peanuts have been fully sequenced, these two gene families have not been studied. In this study we report the identification and analysis of putative cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferases (C5-MTases) and demethylases in AA and BB wild peanuts. Cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferases in AA and BB wild peanuts could be classified in MET, CMT, and DRM2 groups based on their domain organization. This result was supported by the gene and protein structural characteristics and phylogenetic analysis. We found that some wild peanut DRM2 members didn't contain UBA domain which was different from other plants such as Arabidopsis, maize and soybean. Five DNA demethylase encoding genes were found in AA genome and five in BB genome. The selective pressure analysis showed that wild peanut C5-MTase genes mainly underwent purifying selection but many positive selection sites can be detected. Conversely, DNA demethylase genes mainly underwent positive selection during evolution. Additionally, the expression dynamic of cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferase and demethylase genes in different cultivated peanut tissues were analyzed. Expression result showed that cold, heat or PEG stress could influence the expression level of C5-MTase and DNA demethylase genes in cultivated peanut. These results are useful for better understanding the complexity of these two gene families, and will facilitate epigenetic studies in peanut in the future. PMID:26870046

  7. Genome-wide analysis of the Zn(II)₂Cys₆ zinc cluster-encoding gene family in Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Perng-Kuang; Ehrlich, Kenneth C

    2013-05-01

    Proteins with a Zn(II)₂Cys₆ domain, Cys-X₂-Cys-X₆-Cys-X₅₋₁₂-Cys-X₂-Cys-X₆₋₉-Cys (hereafter, referred to as the C6 domain), form a subclass of zinc finger proteins found exclusively in fungi and yeast. Genome sequence databases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans have provided an overview of this family of genes. Annotation of this gene family in most fungal genomes is still far from perfect and refined bioinformatic algorithms are urgently needed. Aspergillus flavus is a saprophytic soil fungus that can produce the carcinogenic aflatoxin. It is the second leading causative agent of invasive aspergillosis. The 37-Mb genome of A. flavus is predicted to encode 12,000 proteins. Two and a half percent of the total proteins are estimated to contain the C6 domain, more than twofold greater than those estimated for yeast, which is about 1 %. The variability in the spacing between cysteines, C₃-C₄ and C₅-C₆, in the zinc cluster enables classification of the domains into distinct subgroups, which are also well conserved in Aspergillus nidulans. Sixty-six percent (202/306) of the A. flavus C6 proteins contain a specific transcription factor domain, and 7 % contain a domain of unknown function, DUF3468. Two A. nidulans C6 proteins containing the DUF3468 are involved in asexual conidiation and another two in sexual differentiation. In the anamorphic A. flavus, a homolog of the latter lacks the C6 domain. A. flavus being heterothallic and reproducing mainly through conidiation appears to have lost some components involved in homothallic sexual development. Of the 55 predicted gene clusters thought to be involved in production of secondary metabolites, only about half have a C6-encoding gene in or near the gene clusters. The features revealed by the A. flavus C6 proteins likely are common for other ascomycete fungi. PMID:23563886

  8. Genome-Wide Identification and Comparative Analysis of Cytosine-5 DNA Methyltransferase and Demethylase Families in Wild and Cultivated Peanut

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengfei; Gao, Chao; Bian, Xiaotong; Zhao, Shuzhen; Zhao, Chuanzhi; Xia, Han; Song, Hui; Hou, Lei; Wan, Shubo; Wang, Xingjun

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation plays important roles in genome protection, regulation of gene expression and is associated with plants development. Plant DNA methylation pattern was mediated by cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferase and demethylase. Although the genomes of AA and BB wild peanuts have been fully sequenced, these two gene families have not been studied. In this study we report the identification and analysis of putative cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferases (C5-MTases) and demethylases in AA and BB wild peanuts. Cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferases in AA and BB wild peanuts could be classified in MET, CMT, and DRM2 groups based on their domain organization. This result was supported by the gene and protein structural characteristics and phylogenetic analysis. We found that some wild peanut DRM2 members didn't contain UBA domain which was different from other plants such as Arabidopsis, maize and soybean. Five DNA demethylase encoding genes were found in AA genome and five in BB genome. The selective pressure analysis showed that wild peanut C5-MTase genes mainly underwent purifying selection but many positive selection sites can be detected. Conversely, DNA demethylase genes mainly underwent positive selection during evolution. Additionally, the expression dynamic of cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferase and demethylase genes in different cultivated peanut tissues were analyzed. Expression result showed that cold, heat or PEG stress could influence the expression level of C5-MTase and DNA demethylase genes in cultivated peanut. These results are useful for better understanding the complexity of these two gene families, and will facilitate epigenetic studies in peanut in the future. PMID:26870046

  9. Genome-Wide Comparative Analysis of the Phospholipase D Gene Families among Allotetraploid Cotton and Its Diploid Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kai; Dong, Chun-Juan; Liu, Jin-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, 40 phospholipase D (PLD) genes were identified from allotetraploid cotton Gossypium hirsutum, and 20 PLD genes were examined in diploid cotton Gossypium raimondii. Combining with 19 previously identified Gossypium arboreum PLD genes, a comparative analysis was performed among the PLD gene families among allotetraploid and two diploid cottons. Based on the orthologous relationships, we found that almost each G. hirsutum PLD had a corresponding homolog in the G. arboreum and G. raimondii genomes, except for GhPLDβ3A, whose homolog GaPLDβ3 may have been lost during the evolution of G. arboreum after the interspecific hybridization. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all of the cotton PLDs were unevenly classified into six numbered subgroups: α, β/γ, δ, ε, ζ and φ. An N-terminal C2 domain was found in the α, β/γ, δ and ε subgroups, while phox homology (PX) and pleckstrin homology (PH) domains were identified in the ζ subgroup. The subgroup φ possessed a single peptide instead of a functional domain. In each phylogenetic subgroup, the PLDs showed high conservation in gene structure and amino acid sequences in functional domains. The expansion of GhPLD and GrPLD gene families were mainly attributed to segmental duplication and partly attributed to tandem duplication. Furthermore, purifying selection played a critical role in the evolution of PLD genes in cotton. Quantitative RT-PCR documented that allotetraploid cotton PLD genes were broadly expressed and each had a unique spatial and developmental expression pattern, indicating their functional diversification in cotton growth and development. Further analysis of cis-regulatory elements elucidated transcriptional regulations and potential functions. Our comparative analysis provided valuable information for understanding the putative functions of the PLD genes in cotton fiber. PMID:27213891

  10. Genome Wide Analysis of the Apple MYB Transcription Factor Family Allows the Identification of MdoMYB121 Gene Confering Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rong-Kai; Zhang, Rui-Fen; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The MYB proteins comprise one of the largest families of transcription factors (TFs) in plants. Although several MYB genes have been characterized to play roles in secondary metabolism, the MYB family has not yet been identified in apple. In this study, 229 apple MYB genes were identified through a genome-wide analysis and divided into 45 subgroups. A computational analysis was conducted using the apple genomic database to yield a complete overview of the MYB family, including the intron-exon organizations, the sequence features of the MYB DNA-binding domains, the carboxy-terminal motifs, and the chromosomal locations. Subsequently, the expression of 18 MYB genes, including 12 were chosen from stress-related subgroups, while another 6 ones from other subgroups, in response to various abiotic stresses was examined. It was found that several of these MYB genes, particularly MdoMYB121, were induced by multiple stresses. The MdoMYB121 was then further functionally characterized. Its predicted protein was found to be localized in the nucleus. A transgenic analysis indicated that the overexpression of the MdoMYB121 gene remarkably enhanced the tolerance to high salinity, drought, and cold stresses in transgenic tomato and apple plants. Our results indicate that the MYB genes are highly conserved in plant species and that MdoMYB121 can be used as a target gene in genetic engineering approaches to improve the tolerance of plants to multiple abiotic stresses. PMID:23950843

  11. SCPS: a fast implementation of a spectral method for detecting protein families on a genome-wide scale

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An important problem in genomics is the automatic inference of groups of homologous proteins from pairwise sequence similarities. Several approaches have been proposed for this task which are "local" in the sense that they assign a protein to a cluster based only on the distances between that protein and the other proteins in the set. It was shown recently that global methods such as spectral clustering have better performance on a wide variety of datasets. However, currently available implementations of spectral clustering methods mostly consist of a few loosely coupled Matlab scripts that assume a fair amount of familiarity with Matlab programming and hence they are inaccessible for large parts of the research community. Results SCPS (Spectral Clustering of Protein Sequences) is an efficient and user-friendly implementation of a spectral method for inferring protein families. The method uses only pairwise sequence similarities, and is therefore practical when only sequence information is available. SCPS was tested on difficult sets of proteins whose relationships were extracted from the SCOP database, and its results were extensively compared with those obtained using other popular protein clustering algorithms such as TribeMCL, hierarchical clustering and connected component analysis. We show that SCPS is able to identify many of the family/superfamily relationships correctly and that the quality of the obtained clusters as indicated by their F-scores is consistently better than all the other methods we compared it with. We also demonstrate the scalability of SCPS by clustering the entire SCOP database (14,183 sequences) and the complete genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (6,690 sequences). Conclusions Besides the spectral method, SCPS also implements connected component analysis and hierarchical clustering, it integrates TribeMCL, it provides different cluster quality tools, it can extract human-readable protein descriptions using GI

  12. Genome-wide analysis of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene family in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaodong; Cheng, Tingcai; Wang, Genhong; Duan, Jun; Niu, Weihuan; Xia, Qingyou

    2012-07-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily is a larger protein family with diverse physiological functions in all kingdoms of life. We identified 53 ABC transporters in the silkworm genome, and classified them into eight subfamilies (A-H). Comparative genome analysis revealed that the silkworm has an expanded ABCC subfamily with more members than Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, or Homo sapiens. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the ABCE and ABCF genes were highly conserved in the silkworm, indicating possible involvement in fundamental biological processes. Five multidrug resistance-related genes in the ABCB subfamily and two multidrug resistance-associated-related genes in the ABCC subfamily indicated involvement in biochemical defense. Genetic variation analysis revealed four ABC genes that might be evolving under positive selection. Moreover, the silkworm ABCC4 gene might be important for silkworm domestication. Microarray analysis showed that the silkworm ABC genes had distinct expression patterns in different tissues on day 3 of the fifth instar. These results might provide new insights for further functional studies on the ABC genes in the silkworm genome. PMID:22311044

  13. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Gene Family in Cassava

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Wang, Lianzhe; Ding, Zehong; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Xupo; Zeng, Changying; Wei, Yunxie; Zhao, Hongliang; Peng, Ming; Hu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play central roles in plant developmental processes, hormone signaling transduction, and responses to abiotic stress. However, no data are currently available about the MAPK family in cassava, an important tropical crop. Herein, 21 MeMAPK genes were identified from cassava. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that MeMAPKs could be classified into four subfamilies. Gene structure analysis demonstrated that the number of introns in MeMAPK genes ranged from 1 to 10, suggesting large variation among cassava MAPK genes. Conserved motif analysis indicated that all MeMAPKs had typical protein kinase domains. Transcriptomic analysis suggested that MeMAPK genes showed differential expression patterns in distinct tissues and in response to drought stress between wild subspecies and cultivated varieties. Interaction networks and co-expression analyses revealed that crucial pathways controlled by MeMAPK networks may be involved in the differential response to drought stress in different accessions of cassava. Expression of nine selected MAPK genes showed that these genes could comprehensively respond to osmotic, salt, cold, oxidative stressors, and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling. These findings yield new insights into the transcriptional control of MAPK gene expression, provide an improved understanding of abiotic stress responses and signaling transduction in cassava, and lead to potential applications in the genetic improvement of cassava cultivars. PMID:27625666

  14. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analyses of Aquaporin Gene Family during Development and Abiotic Stress in Banana

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Hou, Xiaowan; Huang, Chao; Yan, Yan; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Zehong; Wei, Yunxie; Liu, Juhua; Miao, Hongxia; Lu, Zhiwei; Li, Meiying; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) function to selectively control the flow of water and other small molecules through biological membranes, playing crucial roles in various biological processes. However, little information is available on the AQP gene family in bananas. In this study, we identified 47 banana AQP genes based on the banana genome sequence. Evolutionary analysis of AQPs from banana, Arabidopsis, poplar, and rice indicated that banana AQPs (MaAQPs) were clustered into four subfamilies. Conserved motif analysis showed that all banana AQPs contained the typical AQP-like or major intrinsic protein (MIP) domain. Gene structure analysis suggested the majority of MaAQPs had two to four introns with a highly specific number and length for each subfamily. Expression analysis of MaAQP genes during fruit development and postharvest ripening showed that some MaAQP genes exhibited high expression levels during these stages, indicating the involvement of MaAQP genes in banana fruit development and ripening. Additionally, some MaAQP genes showed strong induction after stress treatment and therefore, may represent potential candidates for improving banana resistance to abiotic stress. Taken together, this study identified some excellent tissue-specific, fruit development- and ripening-dependent, and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MaAQP genes, which could lay a solid foundation for genetic improvement of banana cultivars. PMID:26307965

  15. Genome-wide copy number scan identifies IRF6 involvement in Van der Woude syndrome in an Indian family.

    PubMed

    Manjegowda, Dinesh S; Prasad, Manu; Veerappa, Avinash M; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2014-01-01

    Summary Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) is an autosomal dominant developmental malformation presenting with bilateral lower lip pits related to cleft lip, cleft palate and other malformations. We performed a whole-genome copy number variations (CNVs) scan in an Indian family with members suffering from VWS using 2·6 million combined SNP and CNV markers. We found CNVs affecting IRF6, a known candidate gene for VWS, in all three cases, while none of the non-VWS members showed any CNVs in the IRF6 region. The duplications and deletions of the chromosomal critical region in 1q32-q41 confirm the involvement of CNVs in IRF6 in South Indian VWS patients. Molecular network analysis of these and other cleft lip/palate related module genes suggests that they are associated with cytokine-mediated signalling pathways and response to interferon-gamma mediated signalling pathways. This is a maiden study indicating the involvement of CNVs in IRF6 in causing VWS in the Indian population. PMID:25579819

  16. Genome-Wide Identification, Classification, and Expression Analysis of Amino Acid Transporter Gene Family in Glycine Max

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lin; Yuan, Hong-Yu; Ren, Ren; Zhao, Shi-Qi; Han, Ya-Peng; Zhou, Qi-Ying; Ke, Dan-Xia; Wang, Ying-Xiang; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid transporters (AATs) play important roles in transporting amino acid across cellular membranes and are essential for plant growth and development. To date, the AAT gene family in soybean (Glycine max L.) has not been characterized. In this study, we identified 189 AAT genes from the entire soybean genomic sequence, and classified them into 12 distinct subfamilies based upon their sequence composition and phylogenetic positions. To further investigate the functions of these genes, we analyzed the chromosome distributions, gene structures, duplication patterns, phylogenetic tree, tissue expression patterns of the 189 AAT genes in soybean. We found that a large number of AAT genes in soybean were expanded via gene duplication, 46 and 36 GmAAT genes were WGD/segmental and tandemly duplicated, respectively. Further comprehensive analyses of the expression profiles of GmAAT genes in various stages of vegetative and reproductive development showed that soybean AAT genes exhibited preferential or distinct expression patterns among different tissues. Overall, our study provides a framework for further analysis of the biological functions of AAT genes in either soybean or other crops. PMID:27148336

  17. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analyses of Aquaporin Gene Family during Development and Abiotic Stress in Banana.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Hou, Xiaowan; Huang, Chao; Yan, Yan; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Zehong; Wei, Yunxie; Liu, Juhua; Miao, Hongxia; Lu, Zhiwei; Li, Meiying; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) function to selectively control the flow of water and other small molecules through biological membranes, playing crucial roles in various biological processes. However, little information is available on the AQP gene family in bananas. In this study, we identified 47 banana AQP genes based on the banana genome sequence. Evolutionary analysis of AQPs from banana, Arabidopsis, poplar, and rice indicated that banana AQPs (MaAQPs) were clustered into four subfamilies. Conserved motif analysis showed that all banana AQPs contained the typical AQP-like or major intrinsic protein (MIP) domain. Gene structure analysis suggested the majority of MaAQPs had two to four introns with a highly specific number and length for each subfamily. Expression analysis of MaAQP genes during fruit development and postharvest ripening showed that some MaAQP genes exhibited high expression levels during these stages, indicating the involvement of MaAQP genes in banana fruit development and ripening. Additionally, some MaAQP genes showed strong induction after stress treatment and therefore, may represent potential candidates for improving banana resistance to abiotic stress. Taken together, this study identified some excellent tissue-specific, fruit development- and ripening-dependent, and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MaAQP genes, which could lay a solid foundation for genetic improvement of banana cultivars. PMID:26307965

  18. Genome-wide survey and expression analysis of the calcium-dependent protein kinase gene family in cassava.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Hou, Xiaowan; Xia, Zhiqiang; Yan, Yan; Wei, Yunxie; Wang, Lianzhe; Zou, Meiling; Lu, Cheng; Wang, Wenquan; Peng, Ming

    2016-02-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CPKs) play important roles in regulating plant tolerance to abiotic stress and signal transduction; however, no data are currently available regarding the CPK family in cassava. Herein, we identified 27 CPK genes from cassava based on our previous genome sequencing data. Phylogenetic analysis showed that cassava CPKs could be clustered into three groups, which was further supported by gene structure and conserved protein motif analyses. Global expression analysis suggested that MeCPK genes showed distinct expression patterns in different tissues between wild subspecies and cultivated varieties, indicating their involvement in the functional diversity of different varieties. Transcriptomics, interaction networks, and co-expression assays revealed a broad transcriptional response of cassava CPKs and CPK-mediated networks to drought stress and their differential expression profiles in different varieties, implying their contribution to drought stress tolerance in cassava. Expression analysis of eight MeCPK genes suggested a comprehensive response to osmotic stress, salt, cold, abscisic acid, and H2O2, which indicated that cassava CPKs might be convergence points for different signaling pathways. This study provides a basis for crop improvements and understanding of abiotic stress responses and signal transduction mediated by CPKs in cassava. PMID:26272723

  19. Genome-wide characterization of the β-1,3-glucanase gene family in Gossypium by comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoyang; Feng, Yue; Fang, Shuai; Xu, Jun; Wang, Xinyu; Guo, Wangzhen

    2016-01-01

    The β-1,3-glucanase gene family is involved in a wide range of plant developmental processes as well as pathogen defense mechanisms. Comprehensive analyses of β-1,3-glucanase genes (GLUs) have not been reported in cotton. Here, we identified 67, 68, 130 and 158 GLUs in four sequenced cotton species, G. raimondii (D5), G. arboreum (A2), G. hirsutum acc. TM-1 (AD1), and G. barbadense acc. 3-79 (AD2), respectively. Cotton GLUs can be classified into the eight subfamilies (A-H), and their protein domain architecture and intron/exon structure are relatively conserved within each subfamily. Sixty-seven GLUs in G. raimondii were anchored onto 13 chromosomes, with 27 genes involved in segmental duplications, and 13 in tandem duplications. Expression patterns showed highly developmental and spatial regulation of GLUs in TM-1. In particular, the expression of individual member of GLUs in subfamily E was limited to roots, leaves, floral organs or fibers. Members of subfamily E also showed more protein evolution and subgenome expression bias compared with members of other subfamilies. We clarified that GLU42 and GLU43 in subfamily E were preferentially expressed in root and leaf tissues and significantly upregulated after Verticillium dahliae inoculation. Silencing of GLU42 and GLU43 significantly increased the susceptibility of cotton to V. dahliae. PMID:27353015

  20. Genome-Wide Identification, Classification, and Expression Analysis of Amino Acid Transporter Gene Family in Glycine Max.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lin; Yuan, Hong-Yu; Ren, Ren; Zhao, Shi-Qi; Han, Ya-Peng; Zhou, Qi-Ying; Ke, Dan-Xia; Wang, Ying-Xiang; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid transporters (AATs) play important roles in transporting amino acid across cellular membranes and are essential for plant growth and development. To date, the AAT gene family in soybean (Glycine max L.) has not been characterized. In this study, we identified 189 AAT genes from the entire soybean genomic sequence, and classified them into 12 distinct subfamilies based upon their sequence composition and phylogenetic positions. To further investigate the functions of these genes, we analyzed the chromosome distributions, gene structures, duplication patterns, phylogenetic tree, tissue expression patterns of the 189 AAT genes in soybean. We found that a large number of AAT genes in soybean were expanded via gene duplication, 46 and 36 GmAAT genes were WGD/segmental and tandemly duplicated, respectively. Further comprehensive analyses of the expression profiles of GmAAT genes in various stages of vegetative and reproductive development showed that soybean AAT genes exhibited preferential or distinct expression patterns among different tissues. Overall, our study provides a framework for further analysis of the biological functions of AAT genes in either soybean or other crops. PMID:27148336

  1. Genome-wide survey and expression analysis of the PUB family in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinesis).

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Duan, Weike; Riquicho, Ali RamuliMaquina; Jing, Zange; Liu, Tongkun; Hou, Xilin; Li, Ying

    2015-12-01

    U-box proteins are widely distributed among eukaryotic organisms and show a higher prevalence in plants than in other organisms. Plant U-box (PUB) proteins play crucial regulatory roles in various developmental and physiological processes. Previously, 64 and 77 PUB genes have been identified in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa), respectively. In this study, 101 putative PUB genes were identified in the Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis line Chiifu-401-42) genome and compared with other 15 representative plants. By specific protein domains and a phylogenetic analysis, the B. rapa PUB (BrPUB) gene family was subdivided into 10 groups. Localization of BrPUB genes showed an uneven distribution on the ten chromosomes of B. rapa. The orthologous and co-orthologous PUB gene pairs were identified between B. rapa and A. thaliana. RNA-seq transcriptome data of different tissues revealed tissue-specific and differential expression profiles of the BrPUBs, and quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed inverse gene expression patterns of the BrPUB-ARMs in response to cold and heat stresses. Altogether, the identification, classification, phylogenetic analysis, chromosome distribution, conserved motifs, and expression patterns of BrPUBs were predicted and analysed. Importantly, this study of BrPUBs provides a rich resource that will aid in the determination of PUB functions in plant development. PMID:26054324

  2. Genome-wide identification, classification, and analysis of heat shock transcription factor family in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa pekinensis).

    PubMed

    Huang, X Y; Tao, P; Li, B Y; Wang, W H; Yue, Z C; Lei, J L; Zhong, X M

    2015-01-01

    Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis) is one of the most important vegetable crops grown worldwide, and various methods exist for selection, propagation, and cultivation. The entire Chinese cabbage genome has been sequenced, and the heat shock transcription factor family (Hsfs) has been found to play a central role in plant growth and development and in the response to biotic and abiotic stress conditions, particularly in acquired thermotolerance. We analyzed heat tolerance mechanisms in Chinese cabbage. In this study, 30 Hsfs were identified from the Chinese cabbage genome database. The classification, phylogenetic reconstruction, chromosome distribution, conserved motifs, expression analysis, and interaction networks of the Hsfs were predicted and analyzed. Thirty BrHsfs were classified into 3 major classes (class A, B, and C) according to their structural characteristics and phylogenetic comparisons, and class A was further subdivided into 8 subclasses. Distribution mapping results showed that Hsf genes were located on 10 Chinese cabbage chromosomes. The expression profile indicated that Hsfs play differential roles in 5 organs in Chinese cabbage, and likely participate in the development of underground parts and regulation of reproductive growth. An orthologous gene interaction network was constructed, and included MBF1C, ROF1, TBP2, CDC2, and HSP70 5 genes, which are closely related to heat stress. Our results contribute to the understanding of the complexity of Hsfs in Chinese cabbage and provide a basis for further functional gene research. PMID:25867366

  3. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Gene Family in Cassava.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Wang, Lianzhe; Ding, Zehong; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Xupo; Zeng, Changying; Wei, Yunxie; Zhao, Hongliang; Peng, Ming; Hu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play central roles in plant developmental processes, hormone signaling transduction, and responses to abiotic stress. However, no data are currently available about the MAPK family in cassava, an important tropical crop. Herein, 21 MeMAPK genes were identified from cassava. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that MeMAPKs could be classified into four subfamilies. Gene structure analysis demonstrated that the number of introns in MeMAPK genes ranged from 1 to 10, suggesting large variation among cassava MAPK genes. Conserved motif analysis indicated that all MeMAPKs had typical protein kinase domains. Transcriptomic analysis suggested that MeMAPK genes showed differential expression patterns in distinct tissues and in response to drought stress between wild subspecies and cultivated varieties. Interaction networks and co-expression analyses revealed that crucial pathways controlled by MeMAPK networks may be involved in the differential response to drought stress in different accessions of cassava. Expression of nine selected MAPK genes showed that these genes could comprehensively respond to osmotic, salt, cold, oxidative stressors, and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling. These findings yield new insights into the transcriptional control of MAPK gene expression, provide an improved understanding of abiotic stress responses and signaling transduction in cassava, and lead to potential applications in the genetic improvement of cassava cultivars. PMID:27625666

  4. Genome-wide characterization of the β-1,3-glucanase gene family in Gossypium by comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoyang; Feng, Yue; Fang, Shuai; Xu, Jun; Wang, Xinyu; Guo, Wangzhen

    2016-01-01

    The β-1,3-glucanase gene family is involved in a wide range of plant developmental processes as well as pathogen defense mechanisms. Comprehensive analyses of β-1,3-glucanase genes (GLUs) have not been reported in cotton. Here, we identified 67, 68, 130 and 158 GLUs in four sequenced cotton species, G. raimondii (D5), G. arboreum (A2), G. hirsutum acc. TM-1 (AD1), and G. barbadense acc. 3–79 (AD2), respectively. Cotton GLUs can be classified into the eight subfamilies (A–H), and their protein domain architecture and intron/exon structure are relatively conserved within each subfamily. Sixty-seven GLUs in G. raimondii were anchored onto 13 chromosomes, with 27 genes involved in segmental duplications, and 13 in tandem duplications. Expression patterns showed highly developmental and spatial regulation of GLUs in TM-1. In particular, the expression of individual member of GLUs in subfamily E was limited to roots, leaves, floral organs or fibers. Members of subfamily E also showed more protein evolution and subgenome expression bias compared with members of other subfamilies. We clarified that GLU42 and GLU43 in subfamily E were preferentially expressed in root and leaf tissues and significantly upregulated after Verticillium dahliae inoculation. Silencing of GLU42 and GLU43 significantly increased the susceptibility of cotton to V. dahliae. PMID:27353015

  5. Genome-wide identification of WRKY family genes and their response to cold stress in Vitis vinifera

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background WRKY transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators in plants. WRKY genes are not only found to play significant roles in biotic and abiotic stress response, but also regulate growth and development. Grapevine (Vitis vinifera) production is largely limited by stressful climate conditions such as cold stress and the role of WRKY genes in the survival of grapevine under these conditions remains unknown. Results We identified a total of 59 VvWRKYs from the V. vinifera genome, belonging to four subgroups according to conserved WRKY domains and zinc-finger structure. The majority of VvWRKYs were expressed in more than one tissue among the 7 tissues examined which included young leaves, mature leaves, tendril, stem apex, root, young fruits and ripe fruits. Publicly available microarray data suggested that a subset of VvWRKYs was activated in response to diverse stresses. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) results demonstrated that the expression levels of 36 VvWRKYs are changed following cold exposure. Comparative analysis was performed on data from publicly available microarray experiments, previous global transcriptome analysis studies, and qRT-PCR. We identified 15 VvWRKYs in at least two of these databases which may relate to cold stress. Among them, the transcription of three genes can be induced by exogenous ABA application, suggesting that they can be involved in an ABA-dependent signaling pathway in response to cold stress. Conclusions We identified 59 VvWRKYs from the V. vinifera genome and 15 of them showed cold stress-induced expression patterns. These genes represented candidate genes for future functional analysis of VvWRKYs involved in the low temperature-related signal pathways in grape. PMID:24755338

  6. Genome-Wide Function, Evolutionary Characterization and Expression Analysis of Sugar Transporter Family Genes in Pear (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd).

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Ming; Zheng, Dan-man; Li, Lei-ting; Qiao, Xin; Wei, Shu-wei; Bai, Bin; Zhang, Shao-ling; Wu, Jun

    2015-09-01

    The sugar transporter (ST) plays an important role in plant growth, development and fruit quality. In this study, a total of 75 ST genes were identified in the pear (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd) genome based on systematic analysis. Furthermore, all ST genes identified were grouped into eight subfamilies according to conserved domains and phylogenetic analysis. Analysis of cis-regulatory element sequences of all ST genes identified the MYBCOREATCYCB1 promoter in sucrose transporter (SUT) and monosaccharide transporter (MST) genes of pear, while in grape it is exclusively found in SUT subfamily members, indicating divergent transcriptional regulation in different species. Gene duplication event analysis indicated that whole-genome duplication (WGD) and segmental duplication play key roles in ST gene amplification, followed by tandem duplication. Estimation of positive selection at codon sites of ST paralog pairs indicated that all plastidic glucose translocator (pGlcT) subfamily members have evolved under positive selection. In addition, the evolutionary history of ST gene duplications indicated that the ST genes have experienced significant expansion in the whole ST gene family after the second WGD, especially after apple and pear divergence. According to the global RNA sequencing results of pear fruit development, gene expression profiling showed the expression of 53 STs. Combined with quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis, two polyol/monosaccharide transporter (PLT) and three tonoplast monosaccharide transporter (tMT) members were identified as candidate genes, which may play important roles in sugar accumulation during pear fruit development and ripening. Identification of highly expressed STs in fruit is important for finding novel genes contributing to enhanced levels of sugar content in pear fruit. PMID:26079674

  7. Comprehensive Genome-Wide Survey, Genomic Constitution and Expression Profiling of the NAC Transcription Factor Family in Foxtail Millet (Setaria italica L.)

    PubMed Central

    Puranik, Swati; Sahu, Pranav Pankaj; Mandal, Sambhu Nath; B., Venkata Suresh; Parida, Swarup Kumar; Prasad, Manoj

    2013-01-01

    The NAC proteins represent a major plant-specific transcription factor family that has established enormously diverse roles in various plant processes. Aided by the availability of complete genomes, several members of this family have been identified in Arabidopsis, rice, soybean and poplar. However, no comprehensive investigation has been presented for the recently sequenced, naturally stress tolerant crop, Setaria italica (foxtail millet) that is famed as a model crop for bioenergy research. In this study, we identified 147 putative NAC domain-encoding genes from foxtail millet by systematic sequence analysis and physically mapped them onto nine chromosomes. Genomic organization suggested that inter-chromosomal duplications may have been responsible for expansion of this gene family in foxtail millet. Phylogenetically, they were arranged into 11 distinct sub-families (I-XI), with duplicated genes fitting into one cluster and possessing conserved motif compositions. Comparative mapping with other grass species revealed some orthologous relationships and chromosomal rearrangements including duplication, inversion and deletion of genes. The evolutionary significance as duplication and divergence of NAC genes based on their amino acid substitution rates was understood. Expression profiling against various stresses and phytohormones provides novel insights into specific and/or overlapping expression patterns of SiNAC genes, which may be responsible for functional divergence among individual members in this crop. Further, we performed structure modeling and molecular simulation of a stress-responsive protein, SiNAC128, proffering an initial framework for understanding its molecular function. Taken together, this genome-wide identification and expression profiling unlocks new avenues for systematic functional analysis of novel NAC gene family candidates which may be applied for improvising stress adaption in plants. PMID:23691254

  8. The ARF, AUX/IAA and GH3 gene families in citrus: genome-wide identification and expression analysis during fruitlet drop from abscission zone A.

    PubMed

    Xie, Rangjin; Pang, Shaoping; Ma, Yanyan; Deng, Lie; He, Shaolan; Yi, Shilai; Lv, Qiang; Zheng, Yongqiang

    2015-12-01

    Completion of the whole genome sequencing of citrus enabled us to perform genome-wide identification and functional analysis of the gene families involved in agronomic traits and morphological diversity of citrus. In this study, 22 CitARF, 11 CitGH3 and 26 CitAUX/IAA genes were identified in citrus, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all the genes of each gene family could be subdivided into three groups and showed strong evolutionary conservation. The GH3 and AUX/IAA gene families shrank and ARF gene family was highly conserved in the citrus genome after speciation from Arabidopsis thaliana. Tissue-specific expression profiles revealed that 54 genes were expressed in at least one tissue while just 5 genes including CitARF07, CitARF20, CitGH3.04, CitAUX/IAA25 and CitAUX/IAA26 with very low expression level in all tissues tested, suggesting that the CitARF, CitGH3 and CitAUX/IAA gene families played important roles in the development of citrus organs. In addition, our data found that the expression of 2 CitARF, 4 CitGH3 and 4 AUX/IAA genes was affected by IAA treatment, and 7 genes including, CitGH3.04, CitGH3.07, CitAUX/IAA03, CitAUX/IAA04, CitAUX/IAA18, CitAUX/IAA19 and CitAUX/IAA23 were related to fruitlet abscission. This study provides a foundation for future studies on elucidating the precise role of citrus ARF, GH3 and AUX/IAA genes in early steps of auxin signal transduction and open up a new opportunity to uncover the molecular mechanism underlying citrus fruitlet abscission. PMID:25982744

  9. CCCH-Type Zinc Finger Family in Maize: Genome-Wide Identification, Classification and Expression Profiling under Abscisic Acid and Drought Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jiangang; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Haiyang; Li, Xiaoyu; Ma, Qing; Zhu, Suwen; Cheng, Beijiu

    2012-01-01

    Background CCCH-type zinc finger proteins comprise a large protein family. Increasing evidence suggests that members of this family are RNA-binding proteins with regulatory functions in mRNA processing. Compared with those in animals, functions of CCCH-type zinc finger proteins involved in plant growth and development are poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we performed a genome-wide survey of CCCH-type zinc finger genes in maize (Zea mays L.) by describing the gene structure, phylogenetic relationships and chromosomal location of each family member. Promoter sequences and expression profiles of putative stress-responsive members were also investigated. A total of 68 CCCH genes (ZmC3H1-68) were identified in maize and divided into seven groups by phylogenetic analysis. These 68 genes were found to be unevenly distributed on 10 chromosomes with 15 segmental duplication events, suggesting that segmental duplication played a major role in expansion of the maize CCCH family. The Ka/Ks ratios suggested that the duplicated genes of the CCCH family mainly experienced purifying selection with limited functional divergence after duplication events. Twelve maize CCCH genes grouped with other known stress-responsive genes from Arabidopsis were found to contain putative stress-responsive cis-elements in their promoter regions. Seven of these genes chosen for further quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed differential expression patterns among five representative maize tissues and over time in response to abscisic acid and drought treatments. Conclusions The results presented in this study provide basic information on maize CCCH proteins and form the foundation for future functional studies of these proteins, especially for those members of which may play important roles in response to abiotic stresses. PMID:22792223

  10. RTN4 and FBXL17 Genes are Associated with Coronary Heart Disease in Genome-Wide Association Analysis of Lithuanian Families

    PubMed Central

    Domarkienė, I; Pranculis, A; Germanas, Š; Jakaitienė, A; Vitkus, D; Dženkevičiūtė, V; Kučinskienė, ZA; Kučinskas, V

    2013-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a complex and heterogeneous cardiovascular disease. There are many genome-wide association studies (GWAS) performed worldwide to extract the causative genetic factors. Moreover, each population may have some exceptional genetic characteristic. Thus, the background of our study is from the previous Lithuanian studies (the LiVicordia Project), which demonstrated the differences of the atherosclerosis process between Lithuanian and Swedish male individuals. In this study we performed GWAS of 32 families of Lithuanian origin in search of significant candidate genetic markers [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)] of CHD in this population. After careful clinical and biochemical phenotype evaluation, the ∼770K SNPs genotyping (Illumina HumanOmniExpress-12 v1.0 array) and familial GWAS analyses were performed. Twelve SNPs were found to be significantly associated with the CHD phenotype (p value <0.0001; the power >0.65). The odds ratio (OR) values were calculated. Two SNPs (rs17046570 in the RTN4 gene and rs11743737 in the FBXL17 gene) stood out and may prove to be important genetic factors for CHD risk. Our results correspond with the findings in other studies, and these two SNPs may be the susceptibility loci for CHD. PMID:24778558

  11. RTN4 and FBXL17 Genes are Associated with Coronary Heart Disease in Genome-Wide Association Analysis of Lithuanian Families.

    PubMed

    Domarkienė, I; Pranculis, A; Germanas, S; Jakaitienė, A; Vitkus, D; Dženkevičiūtė, V; Kučinskienė, Za; Kučinskas, V

    2013-12-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a complex and heterogeneous cardiovascular disease. There are many genome-wide association studies (GWAS) performed worldwide to extract the causative genetic factors. Moreover, each population may have some exceptional genetic characteristic. Thus, the background of our study is from the previous Lithuanian studies (the LiVicordia Project), which demonstrated the differences of the atherosclerosis process between Lithuanian and Swedish male individuals. In this study we performed GWAS of 32 families of Lithuanian origin in search of significant candidate genetic markers [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)] of CHD in this population. After careful clinical and biochemical phenotype evaluation, the ∼770K SNPs genotyping (Illumina HumanOmniExpress-12 v1.0 array) and familial GWAS analyses were performed. Twelve SNPs were found to be significantly associated with the CHD phenotype (p value <0.0001; the power >0.65). The odds ratio (OR) values were calculated. Two SNPs (rs17046570 in the RTN4 gene and rs11743737 in the FBXL17 gene) stood out and may prove to be important genetic factors for CHD risk. Our results correspond with the findings in other studies, and these two SNPs may be the susceptibility loci for CHD. PMID:24778558

  12. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Fasciclin-Like Arabinogalactan Protein Gene Family Reveals Differential Expression Patterns, Localization, and Salt Stress Response in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Lina; Zheng, Tangchun; Chu, Yanguang; Ding, Changjun; Zhang, Weixi; Huang, Qinjun; Su, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    Fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins (FLAs) are a subclass of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) involved in plant growth, development and response to abiotic stress. Although many studies have been performed to identify molecular functions of individual family members, little information is available on genome-wide identification and characterization of FLAs in the genus Populus. Based on genome-wide analysis, we have identified 35 Populus FLAs which were distributed on 16 chromosomes and phylogenetically clustered into four major groups. Gene structure and motif composition were relatively conserved in each group. All the members contained N-terminal signal peptide, 23 of which included predicted glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) modification sites and were anchored to plasma membranes. Subcellular localization analysis showed that PtrFLA2/20/26 were localized in cell membrane and cytoplasm of protoplasts from Populus stem-differentiating xylem. The Ka/Ks ratios showed that purifying selection has played a leading role in the long-term evolutionary period which greatly maintained the function of this family. The expression profiles showed that 32 PtrFLAs were differentially expressed in four tissues at four seasons based on publicly available microarray data. 18 FLAs were further verified with qRT-PCR in different tissues, which indicated that PtrFLA1/2/3/7/11/12/20/21/22/24/26/30 were significantly expressed in male and female flowers, suggesting close correlations with the reproductive development. In addition, PtrFLA1/9/10/11/17/21/23/24/26/28 were highly expressed in the stems and differentiating xylem, which may be involved in stem development. To determine salt response of FLAs, qRT-PCR was performed to analyze the expression of 18 genes under salinity stress across two time points. Results demonstrated that all the 18 FLAs were expressed in root tissues; especially, PtrFLA2/12/20/21/24/30 were significantly induced at different time points. In summary

  13. Genome-wide identification of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) histone modification gene families and their expression analysis during the fruit development and fruit-blue mold infection process.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jidi; Xu, Haidan; Liu, Yuanlong; Wang, Xia; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiuxin

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, histone acetylation and methylation have been known to be involved in regulating diverse developmental processes and plant defense. These histone modification events are controlled by a series of histone modification gene families. To date, there is no study regarding genome-wide characterization of histone modification related genes in citrus species. Based on the two recent sequenced sweet orange genome databases, a total of 136 CsHMs (Citrus sinensis histone modification genes), including 47 CsHMTs (histone methyltransferase genes), 23 CsHDMs (histone demethylase genes), 50 CsHATs (histone acetyltransferase genes), and 16 CsHDACs (histone deacetylase genes) were identified. These genes were categorized to 11 gene families. A comprehensive analysis of these 11 gene families was performed with chromosome locations, phylogenetic comparison, gene structures, and conserved domain compositions of proteins. In order to gain an insight into the potential roles of these genes in citrus fruit development, 42 CsHMs with high mRNA abundance in fruit tissues were selected to further analyze their expression profiles at six stages of fruit development. Interestingly, a numbers of genes were expressed highly in flesh of ripening fruit and some of them showed the increasing expression levels along with the fruit development. Furthermore, we analyzed the expression patterns of all 136 CsHMs response to the infection of blue mold (Penicillium digitatum), which is the most devastating pathogen in citrus post-harvest process. The results indicated that 20 of them showed the strong alterations of their expression levels during the fruit-pathogen infection. In conclusion, this study presents a comprehensive analysis of the histone modification gene families in sweet orange and further elucidates their behaviors during the fruit development and the blue mold infection responses. PMID:26300904

  14. Genome-Wide Study of the Tomato SlMLO Gene Family and Its Functional Characterization in Response to the Powdery Mildew Fungus Oidium neolycopersici.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zheng; Appiano, Michela; Pavan, Stefano; Bracuto, Valentina; Ricciardi, Luigi; Visser, Richard G F; Wolters, Anne-Marie A; Bai, Yuling

    2016-01-01

    The MLO (Mildew Locus O) gene family encodes plant-specific proteins containing seven transmembrane domains and likely acting in signal transduction in a calcium and calmodulin dependent manner. Some members of the MLO family are susceptibility factors toward fungi causing the powdery mildew disease. In tomato, for example, the loss-of-function of the MLO gene SlMLO1 leads to a particular form of powdery mildew resistance, called ol-2, which arrests almost completely fungal penetration. This type of penetration resistance is characterized by the apposition of papillae at the sites of plant-pathogen interaction. Other MLO homologs in Arabidopsis regulate root response to mechanical stimuli (AtMLO4 and AtMLO11) and pollen tube reception by the female gametophyte (AtMLO7). However, the role of most MLO genes remains unknown. In this work, we provide a genome-wide study of the tomato SlMLO gene family. Besides SlMLO1, other 15 SlMLO homologs were identified and characterized with respect to their structure, genomic organization, phylogenetic relationship, and expression profile. In addition, by analysis of transgenic plants, we demonstrated that simultaneous silencing of SlMLO1 and two of its closely related homologs, SlMLO5 and SlMLO8, confer higher level of resistance than the one associated with the ol-2 mutation. The outcome of this study provides evidence for functional redundancy among tomato homolog genes involved in powdery mildew susceptibility. Moreover, we developed a series of transgenic lines silenced for individual SlMLO homologs, which lay the foundation for further investigations aimed at assigning new biological functions to the MLO gene family. PMID:27579028

  15. Genome-wide identification of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) histone modification gene families and their expression analysis during the fruit development and fruit-blue mold infection process

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jidi; Xu, Haidan; Liu, Yuanlong; Wang, Xia; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiuxin

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, histone acetylation and methylation have been known to be involved in regulating diverse developmental processes and plant defense. These histone modification events are controlled by a series of histone modification gene families. To date, there is no study regarding genome-wide characterization of histone modification related genes in citrus species. Based on the two recent sequenced sweet orange genome databases, a total of 136 CsHMs (Citrus sinensis histone modification genes), including 47 CsHMTs (histone methyltransferase genes), 23 CsHDMs (histone demethylase genes), 50 CsHATs (histone acetyltransferase genes), and 16 CsHDACs (histone deacetylase genes) were identified. These genes were categorized to 11 gene families. A comprehensive analysis of these 11 gene families was performed with chromosome locations, phylogenetic comparison, gene structures, and conserved domain compositions of proteins. In order to gain an insight into the potential roles of these genes in citrus fruit development, 42 CsHMs with high mRNA abundance in fruit tissues were selected to further analyze their expression profiles at six stages of fruit development. Interestingly, a numbers of genes were expressed highly in flesh of ripening fruit and some of them showed the increasing expression levels along with the fruit development. Furthermore, we analyzed the expression patterns of all 136 CsHMs response to the infection of blue mold (Penicillium digitatum), which is the most devastating pathogen in citrus post-harvest process. The results indicated that 20 of them showed the strong alterations of their expression levels during the fruit-pathogen infection. In conclusion, this study presents a comprehensive analysis of the histone modification gene families in sweet orange and further elucidates their behaviors during the fruit development and the blue mold infection responses. PMID:26300904

  16. Genome-Wide Study of the Tomato SlMLO Gene Family and Its Functional Characterization in Response to the Powdery Mildew Fungus Oidium neolycopersici

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zheng; Appiano, Michela; Pavan, Stefano; Bracuto, Valentina; Ricciardi, Luigi; Visser, Richard G. F.; Wolters, Anne-Marie A.; Bai, Yuling

    2016-01-01

    The MLO (Mildew Locus O) gene family encodes plant-specific proteins containing seven transmembrane domains and likely acting in signal transduction in a calcium and calmodulin dependent manner. Some members of the MLO family are susceptibility factors toward fungi causing the powdery mildew disease. In tomato, for example, the loss-of-function of the MLO gene SlMLO1 leads to a particular form of powdery mildew resistance, called ol-2, which arrests almost completely fungal penetration. This type of penetration resistance is characterized by the apposition of papillae at the sites of plant-pathogen interaction. Other MLO homologs in Arabidopsis regulate root response to mechanical stimuli (AtMLO4 and AtMLO11) and pollen tube reception by the female gametophyte (AtMLO7). However, the role of most MLO genes remains unknown. In this work, we provide a genome-wide study of the tomato SlMLO gene family. Besides SlMLO1, other 15 SlMLO homologs were identified and characterized with respect to their structure, genomic organization, phylogenetic relationship, and expression profile. In addition, by analysis of transgenic plants, we demonstrated that simultaneous silencing of SlMLO1 and two of its closely related homologs, SlMLO5 and SlMLO8, confer higher level of resistance than the one associated with the ol-2 mutation. The outcome of this study provides evidence for functional redundancy among tomato homolog genes involved in powdery mildew susceptibility. Moreover, we developed a series of transgenic lines silenced for individual SlMLO homologs, which lay the foundation for further investigations aimed at assigning new biological functions to the MLO gene family. PMID:27579028

  17. Calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) and CDPK-related kinase (CRK) gene families in tomato: genome-wide identification and functional analyses in disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-Peng; Xu, You-Ping; Munyampundu, Jean-Pierre; Liu, Tian-Yu; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2016-04-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) and CDPK-related kinases (CRKs) play multiple roles in plant. Nevertheless, genome-wide identification of these two families is limited to several plant species, and role of CRKs in disease resistance remains unclear. In this study, we identified the CDPK and CRK gene families in genome of the economically important crop tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) and analyzed their function in resistance to various pathogens. Twenty-nine CDPK and six CRK genes were identified in tomato genome. Both SlCDPK and SlCRK proteins harbored an STKc_CAMK type protein kinase domain, while only SlCDPKs contained EF-hand type Ca(2+) binding domain(s). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that plant CRK family diverged early from CDPKs, and shared a common ancestor gene with subgroup IV CDPKs. Subgroup IV SlCDPK proteins were basic and their genes contained 11 introns, which were distinguished from other subgroups but similar to CRKs. Subgroup I SlCDPKs generally did not carry an N-terminal myristoylation motif while those of the remaining subgroups and SlCRKs universally did. SlCDPK and SlCRK genes were differently responsive to pathogenic stimuli. Furthermore, silencing analyses demonstrated that SlCDPK18 and SlCDPK10 positively regulated nonhost resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and host resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000, respectively, while SlCRK6 positively regulated resistance to both Pst DC3000 and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in tomato. In conclusion, CRKs apparently evolved from CDPK lineage, SlCDPK and SlCRK genes regulate a wide range of resistance and SlCRK6 is the first CRK gene proved to function in plant disease resistance. PMID:26520101

  18. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Expression of WRKY Family Genes in Different Developmental Stages of Wild Strawberry (Fragaria vesca) Fruit.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Heying; Li, Yuxuan; Zhang, Qing; Ren, Suyue; Shen, Yuanyue; Qin, Ling; Xing, Yu

    2016-01-01

    WRKY proteins play important regulatory roles in plant developmental processes such as senescence, trichome initiation and embryo morphogenesis. In strawberry, only FaWRKY1 (Fragaria × ananassa) has been characterized, leaving numerous WRKY genes to be identified and their function characterized. The publication of the draft genome sequence of the strawberry genome allowed us to conduct a genome-wide search for WRKY proteins in Fragaria vesca, and to compare the identified proteins with their homologs in model plants. Fifty-nine FvWRKY genes were identified and annotated from the F. vesca genome. Detailed analysis, including gene classification, annotation, phylogenetic evaluation, conserved motif determination and expression profiling, based on RNA-seq data, were performed on all members of the family. Additionally, the expression patterns of the WRKY genes in different fruit developmental stages were further investigated using qRT-PCR, to provide a foundation for further comparative genomics and functional studies of this important class of transcriptional regulators in strawberry. PMID:27138272

  19. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Expression of WRKY Family Genes in Different Developmental Stages of Wild Strawberry (Fragaria vesca) Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing; Ren, Suyue; Shen, Yuanyue; Qin, Ling; Xing, Yu

    2016-01-01

    WRKY proteins play important regulatory roles in plant developmental processes such as senescence, trichome initiation and embryo morphogenesis. In strawberry, only FaWRKY1 (Fragaria × ananassa) has been characterized, leaving numerous WRKY genes to be identified and their function characterized. The publication of the draft genome sequence of the strawberry genome allowed us to conduct a genome-wide search for WRKY proteins in Fragaria vesca, and to compare the identified proteins with their homologs in model plants. Fifty-nine FvWRKY genes were identified and annotated from the F. vesca genome. Detailed analysis, including gene classification, annotation, phylogenetic evaluation, conserved motif determination and expression profiling, based on RNA-seq data, were performed on all members of the family. Additionally, the expression patterns of the WRKY genes in different fruit developmental stages were further investigated using qRT-PCR, to provide a foundation for further comparative genomics and functional studies of this important class of transcriptional regulators in strawberry. PMID:27138272

  20. Genome-wide association of familial prostate cancer cases identifies evidence for a rare segregating haplotype at 8q24.21.

    PubMed

    Teerlink, Craig C; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Dadaev, Tokhir; Thomas, Alun; Farnham, James; Stephenson, Robert A; Riska, Shaun; McDonnell, Shannon K; Schaid, Daniel J; Catalona, William J; Zheng, S Lilly; Cooney, Kathleen A; Ray, Anna M; Zuhlke, Kimberly A; Lange, Ethan M; Giles, Graham G; Southey, Melissa C; Fitzgerald, Liesel M; Rinckleb, Antje; Luedeke, Manuel; Maier, Christiane; Stanford, Janet L; Ostrander, Elaine A; Kaikkonen, Elina M; Sipeky, Csilla; Tammela, Teuvo; Schleutker, Johanna; Wiley, Kathleen E; Isaacs, Sarah D; Walsh, Patrick C; Isaacs, William B; Xu, Jianfeng; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Cussenot, Olivier; Mandal, Diptasri; Laurie, Cecelia; Laurie, Cathy; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Eeles, Rosalind A; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Cannon-Albright, Lisa

    2016-08-01

    Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of prostate cancer risk focused on cases unselected for family history and have reported over 100 significant associations. The International Consortium for Prostate Cancer Genetics (ICPCG) has now performed a GWAS of 2511 (unrelated) familial prostate cancer cases and 1382 unaffected controls from 12 member sites. All samples were genotyped on the Illumina 5M+exome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) platform. The GWAS identified a significant evidence for association for SNPs in six regions previously associated with prostate cancer in population-based cohorts, including 3q26.2, 6q25.3, 8q24.21, 10q11.23, 11q13.3, and 17q12. Of note, SNP rs138042437 (p = 1.7e(-8)) at 8q24.21 achieved a large estimated effect size in this cohort (odds ratio = 13.3). 116 previously sampled affected relatives of 62 risk-allele carriers from the GWAS cohort were genotyped for this SNP, identifying 78 additional affected carriers in 62 pedigrees. A test for an excess number of affected carriers among relatives exhibited strong evidence for co-segregation of the variant with disease (p = 8.5e(-11)). The majority (92 %) of risk-allele carriers at rs138042437 had a consistent estimated haplotype spanning approximately 100 kb of 8q24.21 that contained the minor alleles of three rare SNPs (dosage minor allele frequencies <1.7 %), rs183373024 (PRNCR1), previously associated SNP rs188140481, and rs138042437 (CASC19). Strong evidence for co-segregation of a SNP on the haplotype further characterizes the haplotype as a prostate cancer predisposition locus. PMID:27262462

  1. Genome-Wide Identification of Jatropha curcas Aquaporin Genes and the Comparative Analysis Provides Insights into the Gene Family Expansion and Evolution in Hevea brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhi; Yang, Lifu; Gong, Jun; Mo, Yeyong; Wang, Jikun; Cao, Jianhua; An, Feng; Xie, Guishui

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are channel-forming integral membrane proteins that transport water and other small solutes across biological membranes. Despite the vital role of AQPs, to date, little is known in physic nut (Jatropha curcas L., Euphorbiaceae), an important non-edible oilseed crop with great potential for the production of biodiesel. In this study, 32 AQP genes were identified from the physic nut genome and the family number is relatively small in comparison to 51 in another Euphorbiaceae plant, rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.). Based on the phylogenetic analysis, the JcAQPs were assigned to five subfamilies, i.e., nine plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs), nine tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs), eight NOD26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs), two X intrinsic proteins (XIPs), and four small basic intrinsic proteins (SIPs). Like rubber tree and other plant species, functional prediction based on the aromatic/arginine selectivity filter, Froger's positions, and specificity-determining positions showed a remarkable difference in substrate specificity among subfamilies of JcAQPs. Genome-wide comparative analysis revealed the specific expansion of PIP and TIP subfamilies in rubber tree and the specific gene loss of the XIP subfamily in physic nut. Furthermore, by analyzing deep transcriptome sequencing data, the expression evolution especially the expression divergence of duplicated HbAQP genes was also investigated and discussed. Results obtained from this study not only provide valuable information for future functional analysis and utilization of Jc/HbAQP genes, but also provide a useful reference to survey the gene family expansion and evolution in Euphorbiaceae plants and other plant species. PMID:27066041

  2. Genome-Wide Identification and Analysis of the SBP-Box Family Genes under Phytophthora capsici Stress in Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huai-Xia; Jin, Jing-Hao; He, Yu-Mei; Lu, Bo-Ya; Li, Da-Wei; Chai, Wei-Guo; Khan, Abid; Gong, Zhen-Hui

    2016-01-01

    SQUAMOSA promoter binding protein (SBP)-box genes encode plant-specific transcription factors that are extensively involved in many physiological and biochemical processes, including growth, development, and signal transduction. However, pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) SBP-box family genes have not been well characterized. We investigated SBP-box family genes in the pepper genome and characterized these genes across both compatible and incompatible strain of Phytophthora capsici, and also under different hormone treatments. The results indicated that total 15 members were identified and distributed on seven chromosomes of pepper. Phylogenetic analysis showed that SBP-box genes of pepper can be classified into six groups. In addition, duplication analysis within pepper genome, as well as between pepper and Arabidopsis genomes demonstrated that there are four pairs of homology of SBP-box genes in the pepper genome and 10 pairs between pepper and Arabidopsis genomes. Tissue-specific expression analysis of the CaSBP genes demonstrated their diverse spatiotemporal expression patterns. The expression profiles were similarly analyzed following exposure to P. capsici inoculation and hormone treatments. It was shown that nine of the CaSBP genes (CaSBP01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 11, 12, and 13) exhibited a dramatic up-regulation after compatible HX-9 strain (P. capsici) inoculation, while CaSBP09 and CaSBP15 were down-regulated. In case of PC strain (P. capsici) infection six of the CaSBP genes (CaSBP02, 05, 06, 11, 12, and 13) were arose while CaSBP14 was down regulated. Furthermore, Salicylic acid, Methyl jasmonate and their biosynthesis inhibitors treatment indicated that some of the CaSBP genes are potentially involved in these hormone regulation pathways. This genome-wide identification, as well as characterization of evolutionary relationships and expression profiles of the pepper CaSBP genes, will help to improve pepper stress tolerance in the future. PMID:27148327

  3. Genome-Wide Identification of Jatropha curcas Aquaporin Genes and the Comparative Analysis Provides Insights into the Gene Family Expansion and Evolution in Hevea brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zhi; Yang, Lifu; Gong, Jun; Mo, Yeyong; Wang, Jikun; Cao, Jianhua; An, Feng; Xie, Guishui

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are channel-forming integral membrane proteins that transport water and other small solutes across biological membranes. Despite the vital role of AQPs, to date, little is known in physic nut (Jatropha curcas L., Euphorbiaceae), an important non-edible oilseed crop with great potential for the production of biodiesel. In this study, 32 AQP genes were identified from the physic nut genome and the family number is relatively small in comparison to 51 in another Euphorbiaceae plant, rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.). Based on the phylogenetic analysis, the JcAQPs were assigned to five subfamilies, i.e., nine plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs), nine tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs), eight NOD26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs), two X intrinsic proteins (XIPs), and four small basic intrinsic proteins (SIPs). Like rubber tree and other plant species, functional prediction based on the aromatic/arginine selectivity filter, Froger's positions, and specificity-determining positions showed a remarkable difference in substrate specificity among subfamilies of JcAQPs. Genome-wide comparative analysis revealed the specific expansion of PIP and TIP subfamilies in rubber tree and the specific gene loss of the XIP subfamily in physic nut. Furthermore, by analyzing deep transcriptome sequencing data, the expression evolution especially the expression divergence of duplicated HbAQP genes was also investigated and discussed. Results obtained from this study not only provide valuable information for future functional analysis and utilization of Jc/HbAQP genes, but also provide a useful reference to survey the gene family expansion and evolution in Euphorbiaceae plants and other plant species. PMID:27066041

  4. Genome-Wide Linkage and Admixture Mapping of Type 2 Diabetes in African American Families From the American Diabetes Association GENNID (Genetics of NIDDM) Study Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Elbein, Steven C.; Das, Swapan K.; Hallman, D. Michael; Hanis, Craig L.; Hasstedt, Sandra J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—We used a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) map in a large cohort of 580 African American families to identify regions linked to type 2 diabetes, age of type 2 diabetes diagnosis, and BMI. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—After removing outliers and problematic samples, we conducted linkage analysis using 5,914 SNPs in 1,344 individuals from 530 families. Linkage analysis was conducted using variance components for type 2 diabetes, age of type 2 diabetes diagnosis, and BMI and nonparametric linkage analyses. Ordered subset analyses were conducted ranking on age of type 2 diabetes diagnosis, BMI, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, and amount of European admixture. Admixture mapping was conducted using 4,486 markers not in linkage disequilibrium. RESULTS—The strongest signal for type 2 diabetes (logarithm of odds [LOD] 4.53) was a broad peak on chromosome 2, with weaker linkage to age of type 2 diabetes diagnosis (LOD 1.82). Type 2 diabetes and age of type 2 diabetes diagnosis were linked to chromosome 13p (3–22 cM; LOD 2.42 and 2.46, respectively). Age of type 2 diabetes diagnosis was linked to 18p (66 cM; LOD 2.96). We replicated previous reports on chromosome 7p (79 cM; LOD 2.93). Ordered subset analysis did not overlap with linkage of unselected families. The best admixture score was on chromosome 12 (90 cM; P = 0.0003). CONCLUSIONS—The linkage regions on chromosomes 7 (27–78 cM) and 18p overlap prior reports, whereas regions on 2p and 13p linkage are novel. Among potential candidate genes implicated are TCF7L1, VAMP5, VAMP8, CDK8, INSIG2, IPF1, PAX8, IL18R1, members of the IL1 and IL1 receptor families, and MAP4K4. These studies provide a complementary approach to genome-wide association scans to identify causative genes for African American diabetes. PMID:18840782

  5. Obsessive–compulsive symptoms in a large population-based twin-family sample are predicted by clinically based polygenic scores and by genome-wide SNPs

    PubMed Central

    den Braber, A; Zilhão, N R; Fedko, I O; Hottenga, J-J; Pool, R; Smit, D J A; Cath, D C; Boomsma, D I

    2016-01-01

    Variation in obsessive–compulsive symptoms (OCS) has a heritable basis, with genetic association studies starting to yield the first suggestive findings. We contribute to insights into the genetic basis of OCS by performing an extensive series of genetic analyses in a homogeneous, population-based sample from the Netherlands. First, phenotypic and genetic longitudinal correlations over a 6-year period were estimated by modeling OCS data from twins and siblings. Second, polygenic risk scores (PRS) for 6931 subjects with genotype and OCS data were calculated based on meta-analysis results from IOCDF-GC, to investigate their predictive value. Third, the contribution of measured single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to the heritability was estimated using random-effects modeling. Last, we performed an exploratory genome-wide association study (GWAS) of OCS, testing for SNP- and for gene-based associations. Stability in OCS (test–retest correlation 0.63) was mainly explained by genetic stability. The PRS based on clinical samples predicted OCS in our population-based twin-family sample. SNP-based heritability was estimated at 14%. GWAS revealed one SNP (rs8100480), located within the MEF2BNB gene, associated with OCS (P=2.56 × 10−8). Additional gene-based testing resulted in four significantly associated genes, which are located in the same chromosomal region on chromosome 19p13.11: MEF2BNB, RFXANK, MEF2BNB-MEF2B and MEF2B. Thus, common genetic variants explained a significant proportion of OCS trait variation. Genes significantly associated with OCS are expressed in the brain and involved in development and control of immune system functions (RFXANK) and regulation of gene expression of muscle-specific genes (MEF2BNB). MEF2BNB also showed a suggestive association with OCD in an independent case–control study, suggesting a role for this gene in the development of OCS. PMID:26859814

  6. Obsessive-compulsive symptoms in a large population-based twin-family sample are predicted by clinically based polygenic scores and by genome-wide SNPs.

    PubMed

    den Braber, A; Zilhão, N R; Fedko, I O; Hottenga, J-J; Pool, R; Smit, D J A; Cath, D C; Boomsma, D I

    2016-01-01

    Variation in obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) has a heritable basis, with genetic association studies starting to yield the first suggestive findings. We contribute to insights into the genetic basis of OCS by performing an extensive series of genetic analyses in a homogeneous, population-based sample from the Netherlands. First, phenotypic and genetic longitudinal correlations over a 6-year period were estimated by modeling OCS data from twins and siblings. Second, polygenic risk scores (PRS) for 6931 subjects with genotype and OCS data were calculated based on meta-analysis results from IOCDF-GC, to investigate their predictive value. Third, the contribution of measured single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to the heritability was estimated using random-effects modeling. Last, we performed an exploratory genome-wide association study (GWAS) of OCS, testing for SNP- and for gene-based associations. Stability in OCS (test-retest correlation 0.63) was mainly explained by genetic stability. The PRS based on clinical samples predicted OCS in our population-based twin-family sample. SNP-based heritability was estimated at 14%. GWAS revealed one SNP (rs8100480), located within the MEF2BNB gene, associated with OCS (P=2.56 × 10(-8)). Additional gene-based testing resulted in four significantly associated genes, which are located in the same chromosomal region on chromosome 19p13.11: MEF2BNB, RFXANK, MEF2BNB-MEF2B and MEF2B. Thus, common genetic variants explained a significant proportion of OCS trait variation. Genes significantly associated with OCS are expressed in the brain and involved in development and control of immune system functions (RFXANK) and regulation of gene expression of muscle-specific genes (MEF2BNB). MEF2BNB also showed a suggestive association with OCD in an independent case-control study, suggesting a role for this gene in the development of OCS. PMID:26859814

  7. Genome-Wide Transcriptome Analysis of Two Contrasting Brassica rapa Doubled Haploid Lines under Cold-Stresses Using Br135K Oligomeric Chip

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-In; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Lee, Sang Sook; Kim, Yeon-Ki; Lim, Yong-Pyo; Nou, Ill-Sup; Hur, Yoonkang

    2014-01-01

    Genome wide transcription analysis in response to stresses is important to provide a basis of effective engineering strategies to improve stress tolerance in crop plants. We assembled a Brassica rapa oligomeric microarray (Br135K microarray) using sequence information from 41,173 unigenes and analyzed the transcription profiles of two contrasting doubled haploid (DH) lines, Chiifu and Kenshin, under cold-treatments. The two DH lines showed great differences in electrolyte leakage below −4°C, but similar patterns from 4°C to −2°C. Cold-treatments induced 885 and 858 genes in Chiifu and Kenshin, respectively. Overall, 134, and 56 genes showed an intrinsic difference in expression in Chiifu and Kenshin, respectively. Among 5,349 genes that showed no hit found (NHF) in public databases, 61 and 24 were specifically expressed in Chiifu and Kenshin, respectively. Many transcription factor genes (TFs) also showed various characteristics of expression. BrMYB12, BrMYBL2, BrbHLHs, BrbHLH038, a C2H2, a WRKY, BrDREB19 and a integrase-type TF were induced in a Chiifu-specific fashion, while a bHLH (Bra001826/AT3G21330), bHLH, cycling Dof factor and two Dof type TFs were Kenshin specific. Similar to previous studies, a large number of genes were differently induced or regulated among the two genotypes, but many genes, including NHFs, were specifically or intrinsically expressed with genotype specificity. Expression patterns of known-cold responsive genes in plants resulted in discrepancy to membrane leakage in the two DH lines, indicating that timing of gene expression is more important to conferring freezing tolerance rather than expression levels. Otherwise, the tolerance will be related to the levels of transcripts before cold-treatment or regulated by other mechanisms. Overall, these results indicate common signaling pathways and various transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are working together during cold-treatment of B. rapa. Our newly developed Br135K oligomeric

  8. Genome-Wide Analysis of Oleosin Gene Family in 22 Tree Species: An Accelerator for Metabolic Engineering of BioFuel Crops and Agrigenomics Industrial Applications?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Trees contribute to enormous plant oil reserves because many trees contain 50%–80% of oil (triacylglycerols, TAGs) in the fruits and kernels. TAGs accumulate in subcellular structures called oil bodies/droplets, in which TAGs are covered by low-molecular-mass hydrophobic proteins called oleosins (OLEs). The OLEs/TAGs ratio determines the size and shape of intracellular oil bodies. There is a lack of comprehensive sequence analysis and structural information of OLEs among diverse trees. The objectives of this study were to identify OLEs from 22 tree species (e.g., tung tree, tea-oil tree, castor bean), perform genome-wide analysis of OLEs, classify OLEs, identify conserved sequence motifs and amino acid residues, and predict secondary and three-dimensional structures in tree OLEs and OLE subfamilies. Data mining identified 65 OLEs with perfect conservation of the “proline knot” motif (PX5SPX3P) from 19 trees. These OLEs contained >40% hydrophobic amino acid residues. They displayed similar properties and amino acid composition. Genome-wide phylogenetic analysis and multiple sequence alignment demonstrated that these proteins could be classified into five OLE subfamilies. There were distinct patterns of sequence conservation among the OLE subfamilies and within individual tree species. Computational modeling indicated that OLEs were composed of at least three α-helixes connected with short coils without any β-strand and that they exhibited distinct 3D structures and ligand binding sites. These analyses provide fundamental information in the similarity and specificity of diverse OLE isoforms within the same subfamily and among the different species, which should facilitate studying the structure-function relationship and identify critical amino acid residues in OLEs for metabolic engineering of tree TAGs. PMID:26258573

  9. Genome-Wide Analysis of Oleosin Gene Family in 22 Tree Species: An Accelerator for Metabolic Engineering of BioFuel Crops and Agrigenomics Industrial Applications?

    PubMed

    Cao, Heping

    2015-09-01

    Trees contribute to enormous plant oil reserves because many trees contain 50%-80% of oil (triacylglycerols, TAGs) in the fruits and kernels. TAGs accumulate in subcellular structures called oil bodies/droplets, in which TAGs are covered by low-molecular-mass hydrophobic proteins called oleosins (OLEs). The OLEs/TAGs ratio determines the size and shape of intracellular oil bodies. There is a lack of comprehensive sequence analysis and structural information of OLEs among diverse trees. The objectives of this study were to identify OLEs from 22 tree species (e.g., tung tree, tea-oil tree, castor bean), perform genome-wide analysis of OLEs, classify OLEs, identify conserved sequence motifs and amino acid residues, and predict secondary and three-dimensional structures in tree OLEs and OLE subfamilies. Data mining identified 65 OLEs with perfect conservation of the "proline knot" motif (PX5SPX3P) from 19 trees. These OLEs contained >40% hydrophobic amino acid residues. They displayed similar properties and amino acid composition. Genome-wide phylogenetic analysis and multiple sequence alignment demonstrated that these proteins could be classified into five OLE subfamilies. There were distinct patterns of sequence conservation among the OLE subfamilies and within individual tree species. Computational modeling indicated that OLEs were composed of at least three α-helixes connected with short coils without any β-strand and that they exhibited distinct 3D structures and ligand binding sites. These analyses provide fundamental information in the similarity and specificity of diverse OLE isoforms within the same subfamily and among the different species, which should facilitate studying the structure-function relationship and identify critical amino acid residues in OLEs for metabolic engineering of tree TAGs. PMID:26258573

  10. Genome-Wide Identification and Analysis of the VQ Motif-Containing Protein Family in Chinese Cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. Pekinensis)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gaoyuan; Wang, Fengde; Li, Jingjuan; Ding, Qian; Zhang, Yihui; Li, Huayin; Zhang, Jiannong; Gao, Jianwei

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have showed that the VQ motif–containing proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa play an important role in plant growth, development, and stress responses. However, little is known about the functions of the VQ genes in Brassica rapa (Chinese cabbage). In this study, we performed genome-wide identification, characterization, and expression analysis of the VQ genes in Chinese cabbage, especially under adverse environment. We identified 57 VQ genes and classified them into seven subgroups (I–VII), which were dispersedly distributed on chromosomes 1 to 10. The expansion of these genes mainly contributed to segmental and tandem duplication. Fifty-four VQ genes contained no introns and 50 VQ proteins were less than 300 amino acids in length. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that the VQ genes were differentially expressed in various tissues and during different abiotic stresses and plant hormone treatments. This study provides a comprehensive overview of Chinese cabbage VQ genes and will benefit the molecular breeding for resistance to stresses and disease, as well as further studies on the biological functions of the VQ proteins. PMID:26633387

  11. Genome-Wide Identification and Analysis of the VQ Motif-Containing Protein Family in Chinese Cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. Pekinensis).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gaoyuan; Wang, Fengde; Li, Jingjuan; Ding, Qian; Zhang, Yihui; Li, Huayin; Zhang, Jiannong; Gao, Jianwei

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have showed that the VQ motif-containing proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa play an important role in plant growth, development, and stress responses. However, little is known about the functions of the VQ genes in Brassica rapa (Chinese cabbage). In this study, we performed genome-wide identification, characterization, and expression analysis of the VQ genes in Chinese cabbage, especially under adverse environment. We identified 57 VQ genes and classified them into seven subgroups (I-VII), which were dispersedly distributed on chromosomes 1 to 10. The expansion of these genes mainly contributed to segmental and tandem duplication. Fifty-four VQ genes contained no introns and 50 VQ proteins were less than 300 amino acids in length. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that the VQ genes were differentially expressed in various tissues and during different abiotic stresses and plant hormone treatments. This study provides a comprehensive overview of Chinese cabbage VQ genes and will benefit the molecular breeding for resistance to stresses and disease, as well as further studies on the biological functions of the VQ proteins. PMID:26633387

  12. Genome-wide copy number variation analysis in extended families and unrelated individuals characterized for musical aptitude and creativity in music.

    PubMed

    Ukkola-Vuoti, Liisa; Kanduri, Chakravarthi; Oikkonen, Jaana; Buck, Gemma; Blancher, Christine; Raijas, Pirre; Karma, Kai; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Järvelä, Irma

    2013-01-01

    Music perception and practice represent complex cognitive functions of the human brain. Recently, evidence for the molecular genetic background of music related phenotypes has been obtained. In order to further elucidate the molecular background of musical phenotypes we analyzed genome wide copy number variations (CNVs) in five extended pedigrees and in 172 unrelated subjects characterized for musical aptitude and creative functions in music. Musical aptitude was defined by combination of the scores of three music tests (COMB scores): auditory structuring ability, Seashores test for pitch and for time. Data on creativity in music (herein composing, improvising and/or arranging music) was surveyed using a web-based questionnaire.Several CNVRs containing genes that affect neurodevelopment, learning and memory were detected. A deletion at 5q31.1 covering the protocadherin-α gene cluster (Pcdha 1-9) was found co-segregating with low music test scores (COMB) in both sample sets. Pcdha is involved in neural migration, differentiation and synaptogenesis. Creativity in music was found to co-segregate with a duplication covering glucose mutarotase gene (GALM) at 2p22. GALM has influence on serotonin release and membrane trafficking of the human serotonin transporter. Interestingly, genes related to serotonergic systems have been shown to associate not only with psychiatric disorders but also with creativity and music perception. Both, Pcdha and GALM, are related to the serotonergic systems influencing cognitive and motor functions, important for music perception and practice. Finally, a 1.3 Mb duplication was identified in a subject with low COMB scores in the region previously linked with absolute pitch (AP) at 8q24. No differences in the CNV burden was detected among the high/low music test scores or creative/non-creative groups. In summary, CNVs and genes found in this study are related to cognitive functions. Our result suggests new candidate genes for music perception

  13. Genome-wide identification and characterization of the apple (Malus domestica) HECT ubiquitin-protein ligase family and expression analysis of their responsiveness to abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianing; Xing, Shanshan; Cui, Haoran; Chen, Xuesen; Wang, Xiaoyun

    2016-04-01

    The ubiquitin-protein ligases (E3s) directly participate in ubiquitin (Ub) transferring to the target proteins in the ubiquitination pathway. The HECT ubiquitin-protein ligase (UPL), one type of E3s, is characterized as containing a conserved HECT domain of approximately 350 amino acids in the C terminus. Some UPLs were found to be involved in trichome development and leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. However, studies on plant UPLs, such as characteristics of the protein structure, predicted functional motifs of the HECT domain, and the regulatory expression of UPLs have all been limited. Here, we present genome-wide identification of the genes encoding UPLs (HECT gene) in apple. The 13 genes (named as MdUPL1-MdUPL13) from ten different chromosomes were divided into four groups by phylogenetic analysis. Among these groups, the encoding genes in the intron-exon structure and the included additional functional domains were quite different. Notably, the F-box domain was first found in MdUPL7 in plant UPLs. The HECT domain in different MdUPL groups also presented different spatial features and three types of conservative motifs were identified. The promoters of each MdUPL member carried multiple stress-response related elements by cis-acting element analysis. Experimental results demonstrated that the expressions of several MdUPLs were quite sensitive to cold-, drought-, and salt-stresses by qRT-PCR assay. The results of this study helped to elucidate the functions of HECT proteins, especially in Rosaceae plants. PMID:26510744

  14. Genome-wide Association Study of Chicken Plumage Pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi Na; Choi, Jin Ae; Lee, Kyung-Tai; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Choi, Bong-Hwan; Kim, Heebal; Kim, Tae-Hun; Cho, Seoae; Lee, Taeheon

    2013-11-01

    To increase plumage color uniformity and understand the genetic background of Korean chickens, we performed a genome-wide association study of different plumage color in Korean native chickens. We analyzed 60K SNP chips on 279 chickens with GEMMA methods for GWAS and estimated the genetic heritability for plumage color. The estimated heritability suggests that plumage coloration is a polygenic trait. We found new loci associated with feather pigmentation at the genome-wide level and from the results infer that there are additional genetic effect for plumage color. The results will be used for selecting and breeding chicken for plumage color uniformity. PMID:25049737

  15. A Genome-Wide Association Study for Culm Cellulose Content in Barley Reveals Candidate Genes Co-Expressed with Members of the CELLULOSE SYNTHASE A Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Kelly; Burton, Rachel A.; Sznajder, Beata; Rafalski, Antoni J.; Dhugga, Kanwarpal S.; Mather, Diane E.; Taylor, Jillian; Steffenson, Brian J.; Waugh, Robbie; Fincher, Geoffrey B.

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose is a fundamentally important component of cell walls of higher plants. It provides a scaffold that allows the development and growth of the plant to occur in an ordered fashion. Cellulose also provides mechanical strength, which is crucial for both normal development and to enable the plant to withstand both abiotic and biotic stresses. We quantified the cellulose concentration in the culm of 288 two – rowed and 288 six – rowed spring type barley accessions that were part of the USDA funded barley Coordinated Agricultural Project (CAP) program in the USA. When the population structure of these accessions was analysed we identified six distinct populations, four of which we considered to be comprised of a sufficient number of accessions to be suitable for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). These lines had been genotyped with 3072 SNPs so we combined the trait and genetic data to carry out GWAS. The analysis allowed us to identify regions of the genome containing significant associations between molecular markers and cellulose concentration data, including one region cross-validated in multiple populations. To identify candidate genes we assembled the gene content of these regions and used these to query a comprehensive RNA-seq based gene expression atlas. This provided us with gene annotations and associated expression data across multiple tissues, which allowed us to formulate a supported list of candidate genes that regulate cellulose biosynthesis. Several regions identified by our analysis contain genes that are co-expressed with CELLULOSE SYNTHASE A (HvCesA) across a range of tissues and developmental stages. These genes are involved in both primary and secondary cell wall development. In addition, genes that have been previously linked with cellulose synthesis by biochemical methods, such as HvCOBRA, a gene of unknown function, were also associated with cellulose levels in the association panel. Our analyses provide new insights into the

  16. Genome-wide identification and expression profiling of the C2H2-type zinc finger protein transcription factor family in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Minglei, Yang; Jiangtao, Chao; Dawei, Wang; Junhua, Hu; Hua, Wu; Daping, Gong; Guanshan, Liu

    2016-04-01

    C2H2 zinc finger protein transcription factor family members have important biological functions in eukaryotes. They not only bind DNA and RNA, but also interact with proteins. In this study, 118 members of the tobacco C2H2 zinc finger protein transcription factor family were identified from the N. tabacum genome database by using Pfam, SMART and Blastp. The analyses of phylogenetic tree, physical and chemical properties, chromosomal mapping, gene structures, protein three-dimensional structures and tissue expression patterns were performed. The results suggested that the peptide length of different subfamily members is significantly different. Phylogenetic and motif analysis revealed that the C2H2 zinc finger protein transcription factor family members can be divided into 5 subfamilies and each member has at least one C2H2 motif. Genes of the family members are distributed across the 22 chromosomes. C2H2 zinc finger protein transcription factor family members are expressed in different tissues although some have higher expression levels in leaves and roots. This study will be helpful for further analysis of the C2H2 zinc finger family proteins in other plants. PMID:27103457

  17. Genome-wide identification, structural analysis and new insights into late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) gene family formation pattern in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yu; Xiong, Ziyi; Zheng, Jianxiao; Xu, Dongyang; Zhu, Zeyang; Xiang, Jun; Gan, Jianping; Raboanatahiry, Nadia; Yin, Yongtai; Li, Maoteng

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a diverse and large group of polypeptides that play important roles in desiccation and freezing tolerance in plants. The LEA family has been systematically characterized in some plants but not Brassica napus. In this study, 108 BnLEA genes were identified in the B. napus genome and classified into eight families based on their conserved domains. Protein sequence alignments revealed an abundance of alanine, lysine and glutamic acid residues in BnLEA proteins. The BnLEA gene structure has few introns (<3), and they are distributed unevenly across all 19 chromosomes in B. napus, occurring as gene clusters in chromosomes A9, C2, C4 and C5. More than two-thirds of the BnLEA genes are associated with segmental duplication. Synteny analysis revealed that most LEA genes are conserved, although gene losses or gains were also identified. These results suggest that segmental duplication and whole-genome duplication played a major role in the expansion of the BnLEA gene family. Expression profiles analysis indicated that expression of most BnLEAs was increased in leaves and late stage seeds. This study presents a comprehensive overview of the LEA gene family in B. napus and provides new insights into the formation of this family. PMID:27072743

  18. Genome-wide analysis and expression profiling under heat and drought treatments of HSP70 gene family in soybean (Glycine max L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Zhao, Hong-Kun; Dong, Qian-Li; Zhang, Yuan-Yu; Wang, Yu-Min; Li, Hai-Yun; Xing, Guo-Jie; Li, Qi-Yun; Dong, Ying-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) perform a fundamental role in protecting plants against abiotic stresses. Previous studies have made great efforts in the functional analysis of individual family members, but there has not yet been an overall analysis or expression profiling of the HSP70 gene family in soybeans (Glycine max L.). In this study, an investigation of the soybean genome revealed 61 putative HSP70 genes, which were evaluated. These genes were classified into eight sub-families, denoted I–VIII, based on a phylogenetic analysis. In each sub-family, the constituent parts of the gene structure and motif were relatively conserved. These GmHSP70 genes were distributed unequally on 17 of the 20 chromosomes. The analysis of the expression profiles showed that 53 of the 61 GmHSP70 genes were differentially expressed across the 14 tissues. However, most of the GmHSP70s were differentially expressed in a tissue-specific expression pattern. Furthermore, the expression of some of the duplicate genes was partially redundant, while others showed functional diversity. The quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis of the 61 soybean HSP70 genes confirmed their stress-inducible expression patterns under both drought and heat stress. These findings provide a thorough overview of the evolution and modification of the GmHSP70 gene family, which will help to determine the functional characteristics of the HSP70 genes in soybean growth and development. PMID:26442082

  19. Genome-wide identification, structural analysis and new insights into late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) gene family formation pattern in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yu; Xiong, Ziyi; Zheng, Jianxiao; Xu, Dongyang; Zhu, Zeyang; Xiang, Jun; Gan, Jianping; Raboanatahiry, Nadia; Yin, Yongtai; Li, Maoteng

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a diverse and large group of polypeptides that play important roles in desiccation and freezing tolerance in plants. The LEA family has been systematically characterized in some plants but not Brassica napus. In this study, 108 BnLEA genes were identified in the B. napus genome and classified into eight families based on their conserved domains. Protein sequence alignments revealed an abundance of alanine, lysine and glutamic acid residues in BnLEA proteins. The BnLEA gene structure has few introns (<3), and they are distributed unevenly across all 19 chromosomes in B. napus, occurring as gene clusters in chromosomes A9, C2, C4 and C5. More than two-thirds of the BnLEA genes are associated with segmental duplication. Synteny analysis revealed that most LEA genes are conserved, although gene losses or gains were also identified. These results suggest that segmental duplication and whole-genome duplication played a major role in the expansion of the BnLEA gene family. Expression profiles analysis indicated that expression of most BnLEAs was increased in leaves and late stage seeds. This study presents a comprehensive overview of the LEA gene family in B. napus and provides new insights into the formation of this family. PMID:27072743

  20. A genome-wide analysis of the auxin/indole-3-acetic acid gene family in hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Linyi; Zhang, Xiaojun; Han, Xiao; Zhang, Lei; Li, Xin; Zhan, Haixian; Ma, Jian; Luo, Peigao; Zhang, Wenping; Cui, Lei; Li, Xiaoyan; Chang, Zhijian

    2015-01-01

    The Auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (Aux/IAA) gene family plays key roles in the primary auxin-response process and controls a number of important traits in plants. However, the characteristics of the Aux/IAA gene family in hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) have long been unknown. In this study, a comprehensive identification of the Aux/IAA gene family was performed using the latest draft genome sequence of the bread wheat “Chinese Spring.” Thirty-four Aux/IAA genes were identified, 30 of which have duplicated genes on the A, B or D sub-genome, with a total of 84 Aux/IAA sequences. These predicted Aux/IAA genes were non-randomly distributed in all the wheat chromosomes except for chromosome 2D. The information of wheat Aux/IAA proteins is also described. Based on an analysis of phylogeny, expression and adaptive evolution, we prove that the Aux/IAA family in wheat has been replicated twice in the two allopolyploidization events of bread wheat, when the tandem duplication also occurred. The duplicated genes have undergone an evolutionary process of purifying selection, resulting in the high conservation of copy genes among sub-genomes and functional redundancy among several members of the TaIAA family. However, functional divergence probably existed in most TaIAA members due to the diversity of the functional domain and expression pattern. Our research provides useful information for further research into the function of Aux/IAA genes in wheat. PMID:26483801

  1. Genome-wide identification of BURP domain-containing genes in rice reveals a gene family with diverse structures and responses to abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xipeng; Hou, Xin; Xie, Kabin; Xiong, Lizhong

    2009-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that a gene family encoding proteins containing BURP domains have diverse functions in plants, but systematic characterization of this gene family have not been reported. In this study, 17 BURP family genes (OsBURP01-17) were identified and analyzed in rice (Oryza sativa L.). These genes have diverse exon-intron structures and distinct organization of putative motifs. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of BURP protein sequences from rice and other plant species, the BURP family was classified into seven subfamilies, including two subfamilies (BURP V and BURP VI) with members from rice only and one subfamily (BURP VII) with members from monocotyledons only. Two BURP gene clusters, belonging to BURP V and BURP VI, were located in the duplicated region on chromosome 5 and 6 of rice, respectively. Transcript level analysis of BURP genes of rice in various tissues and organs revealed different tempo-spatial expression patterns, suggesting that these genes may function at different stages of plant growth and development. Interestingly, all the genes of the BURP VII subfamily were predominantly expressed in flower organs. We also investigated the expression patterns of BURP genes of rice under different stress conditions. The results suggested that, except for two genes (OsBURP01 and OsBURP13), all other members were induced by at least one of the stresses including drought, salt, cold, and abscisic acid treatment. Two genes (OsBURP05 and OsBURP16) were responsive to all the stress treatments and most of the OsBURP genes were responsive to salt stress. Promoter sequence analysis revealed an over-abundance of stress-related cis-elements in the stress-responsive genes. The data presented here provide important clues for elucidating the functions of genes of this family. PMID:19363683

  2. Genome-wide analysis of the grapevine stilbene synthase multigenic family: genomic organization and expression profiles upon biotic and abiotic stresses

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Plant stilbenes are a small group of phenylpropanoids, which have been detected in at least 72 unrelated plant species and accumulate in response to biotic and abiotic stresses such as infection, wounding, UV-C exposure and treatment with chemicals. Stilbenes are formed via the phenylalanine/polymalonate-route, the last step of which is catalyzed by the enzyme stilbene synthase (STS), a type III polyketide synthase (PKS). Stilbene synthases are closely related to chalcone synthases (CHS), the key enzymes of the flavonoid pathway, as illustrated by the fact that both enzymes share the same substrates. To date, STSs have been cloned from peanut, pine, sorghum and grapevine, the only stilbene-producing fruiting-plant for which the entire genome has been sequenced. Apart from sorghum, STS genes appear to exist as a family of closely related genes in these other plant species. Results In this study a complete characterization of the STS multigenic family in grapevine has been performed, commencing with the identification, annotation and phylogenetic analysis of all members and integration of this information with a comprehensive set of gene expression analyses including healthy tissues at differential developmental stages and in leaves exposed to both biotic (downy mildew infection) and abiotic (wounding and UV-C exposure) stresses. At least thirty-three full length sequences encoding VvSTS genes were identified, which, based on predicted amino acid sequences, cluster in 3 principal groups designated A, B and C. The majority of VvSTS genes cluster in groups B and C and are located on chr16 whereas the few gene family members in group A are found on chr10. Microarray and mRNA-seq expression analyses revealed different patterns of transcript accumulation between the different groups of VvSTS family members and between VvSTSs and VvCHSs. Indeed, under certain conditions the transcriptional response of VvSTS and VvCHS genes appears to be diametrically opposed

  3. Genome-wide analysis of the maize (Zea may L.) CPP-like gene family and expression profiling under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Song, X Y; Zhang, Y Y; Wu, F C; Zhang, L

    2016-01-01

    Cysteine-rich polycomb-like (CPP) proteins are members of a small family of transcription factors, which have been identified and characterized in Arabidopsis, rice, and soybean. In this study, we investigated CPP-like genes in the maize genome. The results revealed 13 putative CPP-like genes, which were found to encode 17 distinct transcripts and were distributed unequally on 7 of 10 maize chromosomes. Analysis of phylogenetic relationships showed that Arabidopsis, rice, and maize CPP-like transcription factors can be grouped into two subfamilies. We also used real-time RT-PCR to evaluate changes in the transcript levels of ZmCPP genes in response to abiotic stresses (heat, cold, salt, and drought stresses). These findings provide an overview of the evolution of the ZmCPP gene family, which will aid in the functional characterization of CPP-like genes in maize growth and development. PMID:27525875

  4. Genome-Wide Analysis of the AP2/ERF Family in Eucalyptus grandis: An Intriguing Over-Representation of Stress-Responsive DREB1/CBF Genes

    PubMed Central

    SanClemente, H.; Mounet, F.; Dunand, C.; Marque, G.; Marque, C.; Teulières, C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The AP2/ERF family includes a large number of developmentally and physiologically important transcription factors sharing an AP2 DNA-binding domain. Among them DREB1/CBF and DREB2 factors are known as master regulators respectively of cold and heat/osmotic stress responses. Experimental Approaches The manual annotation of AP2/ERF family from Eucalyptus grandis, Malus, Populus and Vitis genomes allowed a complete phylogenetic study for comparing the structure of this family in woody species and the model Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression profiles of the whole groups of EgrDREB1 and EgrDREB2 were investigated through RNAseq database survey and RT-qPCR analyses. Results The structure and the size of the AP2/ERF family show a global conservation for the plant species under comparison. In addition to an expansion of the ERF subfamily, the tree genomes mainly differ with respect to the group representation within the subfamilies. With regard to the E. grandis DREB subfamily, an obvious feature is the presence of 17 DREB1/CBF genes, the maximum reported to date for dicotyledons. In contrast, only six DREB2 have been identified, which is similar to the other plants species under study, except for Malus. All the DREB1/CBF and DREB2 genes from E. grandis are expressed in at least one condition and all are heat-responsive. Regulation by cold and drought depends on the genes but is not specific of one group; DREB1/CBF group is more cold-inducible than DREB2 which is mainly drought responsive. Conclusion These features suggest that the dramatic expansion of the DREB1/CBF group might be related to the adaptation of this evergreen tree to climate changes when it expanded in Australia. PMID:25849589

  5. Genome-wide identification and evolution of ATP-binding cassette transporters in the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila: A case of functional divergence in a multigene family

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In eukaryotes, ABC transporters that utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to expel cellular substrates into the environment are responsible for most of the efflux from cells. Many members of the superfamily of ABC transporters have been linked with resistance to multiple drugs or toxins. Owing to their medical and toxicological importance, members of the ABC superfamily have been studied in several model organisms and warrant examination in newly sequenced genomes. Results A total of 165 ABC transporter genes, constituting a highly expanded superfamily relative to its size in other eukaryotes, were identified in the macronuclear genome of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. Based on ortholog comparisons, phylogenetic topologies and intron characterizations, each highly expanded ABC transporter family of T. thermophila was classified into several distinct groups, and hypotheses about their evolutionary relationships are presented. A comprehensive microarray analysis revealed divergent expression patterns among the members of the ABC transporter superfamily during different states of physiology and development. Many of the relatively recently formed duplicate pairs within individual ABC transporter families exhibit significantly different expression patterns. Further analysis showed that multiple mechanisms have led to functional divergence that is responsible for the preservation of duplicated genes. Conclusion Gene duplications have resulted in an extensive expansion of the superfamily of ABC transporters in the Tetrahymena genome, making it the largest example of its kind reported in any organism to date. Multiple independent duplications and subsequent divergence contributed to the formation of different families of ABC transporter genes. Many of the members within a gene family exhibit different expression patterns. The combination of gene duplication followed by both sequence divergence and acquisition of new patterns of expression likely plays a

  6. A Genome-Wide Analysis of the LBD (LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES Domain) Gene Family in Malus domestica with a Functional Characterization of MdLBD11

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ling; Liu, Xin; Hao, Yujin

    2013-01-01

    The plant-specific LBD (LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES domain) genes belong to a major family of transcription factor that encode a zinc finger-like domain. It has been shown that LBD genes play crucial roles in the growth and development of Arabidopsis and other plant species. However, no detailed information concerning this family is available for apple. In the present study, we analyzed the apple (Malus domestica) genome and identified 58 LBD genes. This gene family was tested for its phylogenetic relationships with homologous genes in the Arabidopsis genome, as well as its location in the genome, structure and expression. We also transformed one MdLBD gene into Arabidopsis to evaluate its function. Like Arabidopsis, apple LBD genes also have a conserved CX2CX6CX3C zinc finger-like domain in the N terminus and can be divided into two classes. The expression profile indicated that apple LBD genes exhibited a variety of expression patterns, suggesting that they have diverse functions. At the same time, the expression analysis implied that members of this apple gene family were responsive to hormones and stress and that they may participate in hormone-mediated plant organogenesis, which was demonstrated with the overexpression of the apple LBD gene MdLBD11, resulting in an abnormal phenotype. This phenotype included upward curling leaves, delayed flowering, downward-pointing flowers, siliques and other abnormal traits. Based on these data, we concluded that the MdLBD genes may play an important role in apple growth and development as in Arabidopsis and other species. PMID:23468909

  7. Genome-wide identification, expression analysis of auxin-responsive GH3 family genes in maize (Zea mays L.) under abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shangguo; Yue, Runqing; Tao, Sun; Yang, Yanjun; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Mingfeng; Wang, Huizhong; Shen, Chenjia

    2015-09-01

    Auxin is involved in different aspects of plant growth and development by regulating the expression of auxin-responsive family genes. As one of the three major auxin-responsive families, GH3 (Gretchen Hagen3) genes participate in auxin homeostasis by catalyzing auxin conjugation and bounding free indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to amino acids. However, how GH3 genes function in responses to abiotic stresses and various hormones in maize is largely unknown. Here, the latest updated maize (Zea mays L.) reference genome sequence was used to characterize and analyze the ZmGH3 family genes from maize. The results showed that 13 ZmGH3 genes were mapped on five maize chromosomes (total 10 chromosomes). Highly diversified gene structures and tissue-specific expression patterns suggested the possibility of function diversification for these genes in response to environmental stresses and hormone stimuli. The expression patterns of ZmGH3 genes are responsive to several abiotic stresses (salt, drought and cadmium) and major stress-related hormones (abscisic acid, salicylic acid and jasmonic acid). Various environmental factors suppress auxin free IAA contents in maize roots suggesting that these abiotic stresses and hormones might alter GH3-mediated auxin levels. The responsiveness of ZmGH3 genes to a wide range of abiotic stresses and stress-related hormones suggested that ZmGH3s are involved in maize tolerance to environmental stresses. PMID:25557253

  8. Genome-Wide Identification and Transcriptome-Based Expression Profiling of the Sox Gene Family in the Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ling; Yang, Chao; Tao, Wenjing; Wang, Deshou

    2016-01-01

    The Sox transcription factor family is characterized with the presence of a Sry-related high-mobility group (HMG) box and plays important roles in various biological processes in animals, including sex determination and differentiation, and the development of multiple organs. In this study, 27 Sox genes were identified in the genome of the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), and were classified into seven groups. The members of each group of the tilapia Sox genes exhibited a relatively conserved exon-intron structure. Comparative analysis showed that the Sox gene family has undergone an expansion in tilapia and other teleost fishes following their whole genome duplication, and group K only exists in teleosts. Transcriptome-based analysis demonstrated that most of the tilapia Sox genes presented stage-specific and/or sex-dimorphic expressions during gonadal development, and six of the group B Sox genes were specifically expressed in the adult brain. Our results provide a better understanding of gene structure and spatio-temporal expression of the Sox gene family in tilapia, and will be useful for further deciphering the roles of the Sox genes during sex determination and gonadal development in teleosts. PMID:26907269

  9. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of NBS-Encoding Genes in Malus x domestica and Expansion of NBS Genes Family in Rosaceae

    PubMed Central

    Arya, Preeti; Kumar, Gulshan; Acharya, Vishal; Singh, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleotide binding site leucine-rich repeats (NBS-LRR) disease resistance proteins play an important role in plant defense against pathogen attack. A number of recent studies have been carried out to identify and characterize NBS-LRR gene families in many important plant species. In this study, we identified NBS-LRR gene family comprising of 1015 NBS-LRRs using highly stringent computational methods. These NBS-LRRs were characterized on the basis of conserved protein motifs, gene duplication events, chromosomal locations, phylogenetic relationships and digital gene expression analysis. Surprisingly, equal distribution of Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) and coiled coil (CC) (1∶1) was detected in apple while the unequal distribution was reported in majority of all other known plant genome studies. Prediction of gene duplication events intriguingly revealed that not only tandem duplication but also segmental duplication may equally be responsible for the expansion of the apple NBS-LRR gene family. Gene expression profiling using expressed sequence tags database of apple and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed the expression of these genes in wide range of tissues and disease conditions, respectively. Taken together, this study will provide a blueprint for future efforts towards improvement of disease resistance in apple. PMID:25232838

  10. Genome-Wide Identification and Transcriptome-Based Expression Profiling of the Sox Gene Family in the Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Wei, Ling; Yang, Chao; Tao, Wenjing; Wang, Deshou

    2016-01-01

    The Sox transcription factor family is characterized with the presence of a Sry-related high-mobility group (HMG) box and plays important roles in various biological processes in animals, including sex determination and differentiation, and the development of multiple organs. In this study, 27 Sox genes were identified in the genome of the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), and were classified into seven groups. The members of each group of the tilapia Sox genes exhibited a relatively conserved exon-intron structure. Comparative analysis showed that the Sox gene family has undergone an expansion in tilapia and other teleost fishes following their whole genome duplication, and group K only exists in teleosts. Transcriptome-based analysis demonstrated that most of the tilapia Sox genes presented stage-specific and/or sex-dimorphic expressions during gonadal development, and six of the group B Sox genes were specifically expressed in the adult brain. Our results provide a better understanding of gene structure and spatio-temporal expression of the Sox gene family in tilapia, and will be useful for further deciphering the roles of the Sox genes during sex determination and gonadal development in teleosts. PMID:26907269

  11. Genome-Wide Analysis of C2H2 Zinc-Finger Family Transcription Factors and Their Responses to Abiotic Stresses in Poplar (Populus trichocarpa)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Quangang; Wang, Zhanchao; Xu, Xuemei; Zhang, Haizhen; Li, Chenghao

    2015-01-01

    Background C2H2 zinc-finger (C2H2-ZF) proteins are a large gene family in plants that participate in various aspects of normal plant growth and development, as well as in biotic and abiotic stress responses. To date, no overall analysis incorporating evolutionary history and expression profiling of the C2H2-ZF gene family in model tree species poplar (Populus trichocarpa) has been reported. Principal Findings Here, we identified 109 full-length C2H2-ZF genes in P. trichocarpa, and classified them into four groups, based on phylogenetic analysis. The 109 C2H2-ZF genes were distributed unequally on 19 P. trichocarpa linkage groups (LGs), with 39 segmental duplication events, indicating that segmental duplication has been important in the expansion of the C2H2-ZF gene family. Promoter cis-element analysis indicated that most of the C2H2-ZF genes contain phytohormone or abiotic stress-related cis-elements. The expression patterns of C2H2-ZF genes, based on heatmap analysis, suggested that C2H2-ZF genes are involved in tissue and organ development, especially root and floral development. Expression analysis based on quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction indicated that C2H2-ZF genes are significantly involved in drought, heat and salt response, possibly via different mechanisms. Conclusions This study provides a thorough overview of the P. trichocarpa C2H2-ZF gene family and presents a new perspective on the evolution of this gene family. In particular, some C2H2-ZF genes may be involved in environmental stress tolerance regulation. PtrZFP2, 19 and 95 showed high expression levels in leaves and/or roots under environmental stresses. Additionally, this study provided a solid foundation for studying the biological roles of C2H2-ZF genes in Populus growth and development. These results form the basis for further investigation of the roles of these candidate genes and for future genetic engineering and gene functional studies in Populus. PMID

  12. Genome-wide analysis of the Hsp20 gene family in soybean: comprehensive sequence, genomic organization and expression profile analysis under abiotic and biotic stresses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Hsp20 genes are associated with stress caused by HS and other abiotic factors, but have recently been found to be associated with the response to biotic stresses. These genes represent the most abundant class among the HSPs in plants, but little is known about this gene family in soybean. Because of their apparent multifunctionality, these proteins are promising targets for developing crop varieties that are better adapted to biotic and abiotic stresses. Thus, in the present study an in silico identification of GmHsp20 gene family members was performed, and the genes were characterized and subjected to in vivo expression analysis under biotic and abiotic stresses. Results A search of the available soybean genome databases revealed 51 gene models as potential GmHsp20 candidates. The 51 GmHsp20 genes were distributed across a total of 15 subfamilies where a specific predicted secondary structure was identified. Based on in vivo analysis, only 47 soybean Hsp20 genes were responsive to heat shock stress. Among the GmHsp20 genes that were potentials HSR, five were also cold-induced, and another five, in addition to one GmAcd gene, were responsive to Meloidogyne javanica infection. Furthermore, one predicted GmHsp20 was shown to be responsive only to nematode infection; no expression change was detected under other stress conditions. Some of the biotic stress-responsive GmHsp20 genes exhibited a divergent expression pattern between resistant and susceptible soybean genotypes under M. javanica infection. The putative regulatory elements presenting some conservation level in the GmHsp20 promoters included HSE, W-box, CAAT box, and TA-rich elements. Some of these putative elements showed a unique occurrence pattern among genes responsive to nematode infection. Conclusions The evolution of Hsp20 family in soybean genome has most likely involved a total of 23 gene duplications. The obtained expression profiles revealed that the majority of the 51 GmHsp20

  13. Genome-Wide Analysis of the AP2/ERF Transcription Factors Family and the Expression Patterns of DREB Genes in Moso Bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis).

    PubMed

    Wu, Huili; Lv, Hao; Li, Long; Liu, Jun; Mu, Shaohua; Li, Xueping; Gao, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The AP2/ERF transcription factor family, one of the largest families unique to plants, performs a significant role in terms of regulation of growth and development, and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) is a fast-growing non-timber forest species with the highest ecological, economic and social values of all bamboos in Asia. The draft genome of moso bamboo and the available genomes of other plants provide great opportunities to research global information on the AP2/ERF family in moso bamboo. In total, 116 AP2/ERF transcription factors were identified in moso bamboo. The phylogeny analyses indicated that the 116 AP2/ERF genes could be divided into three subfamilies: AP2, RAV and ERF; and the ERF subfamily genes were divided into 11 groups. The gene structures, exons/introns and conserved motifs of the PeAP2/ERF genes were analyzed. Analysis of the evolutionary patterns and divergence showed the PeAP2/ERF genes underwent a large-scale event around 15 million years ago (MYA) and the division time of AP2/ERF family genes between rice and moso bamboo was 15-23 MYA. We surveyed the putative promoter regions of the PeDREBs and showed that largely stress-related cis-elements existed in these genes. Further analysis of expression patterns of PeDREBs revealed that the most were strongly induced by drought, low-temperature and/or high salinity stresses in roots and, in contrast, most PeDREB genes had negative functions in leaves under the same respective stresses. In this study there were two main interesting points: there were fewer members of the PeDREB subfamily in moso bamboo than in other plants and there were differences in DREB gene expression profiles between leaves and roots triggered in response to abiotic stress. The information produced from this study may be valuable in overcoming challenges in cultivating moso bamboo. PMID:25985202

  14. Genome-Wide Analysis of the AP2/ERF Transcription Factors Family and the Expression Patterns of DREB Genes in Moso Bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Long; Liu, Jun; Mu, Shaohua; Li, Xueping; Gao, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The AP2/ERF transcription factor family, one of the largest families unique to plants, performs a significant role in terms of regulation of growth and development, and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) is a fast-growing non-timber forest species with the highest ecological, economic and social values of all bamboos in Asia. The draft genome of moso bamboo and the available genomes of other plants provide great opportunities to research global information on the AP2/ERF family in moso bamboo. In total, 116 AP2/ERF transcription factors were identified in moso bamboo. The phylogeny analyses indicated that the 116 AP2/ERF genes could be divided into three subfamilies: AP2, RAV and ERF; and the ERF subfamily genes were divided into 11 groups. The gene structures, exons/introns and conserved motifs of the PeAP2/ERF genes were analyzed. Analysis of the evolutionary patterns and divergence showed the PeAP2/ERF genes underwent a large-scale event around 15 million years ago (MYA) and the division time of AP2/ERF family genes between rice and moso bamboo was 15–23 MYA. We surveyed the putative promoter regions of the PeDREBs and showed that largely stress-related cis-elements existed in these genes. Further analysis of expression patterns of PeDREBs revealed that the most were strongly induced by drought, low-temperature and/or high salinity stresses in roots and, in contrast, most PeDREB genes had negative functions in leaves under the same respective stresses. In this study there were two main interesting points: there were fewer members of the PeDREB subfamily in moso bamboo than in other plants and there were differences in DREB gene expression profiles between leaves and roots triggered in response to abiotic stress. The information produced from this study may be valuable in overcoming challenges in cultivating moso bamboo. PMID:25985202

  15. Genome-Wide Identification, Evolutionary Analysis and Expression Profiles of LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN Gene Family in Lotus japonicus and Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tianquan; Fang, Genwang yue; He, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN (LBD) gene family has been well-studied in Arabidopsis and play crucial roles in the diverse growth and development processes including establishment and maintenance of boundary of developmental lateral organs. In this study we identified and characterized 38 LBD genes in Lotus japonicus (LjLBD) and 57 LBD genes in Medicago truncatula (MtLBD), both of which are model legume plants that have some specific development features absent in Arabidopsis. The phylogenetic relationships, their locations in the genome, genes structure and conserved motifs were examined. The results revealed that all LjLBD and MtLBD genes could be distinctly divided into two classes: Class I and II. The evolutionary analysis showed that Type I functional divergence with some significantly site-specific shifts may be the main force for the divergence between Class I and Class II. In addition, the expression patterns of LjLBD genes uncovered the diverse functions in plant development. Interestingly, we found that two LjLBD proteins that were highly expressed during compound leaf and pulvinus development, can interact via yeast two-hybrid assays. Taken together, our findings provide an evolutionary and genetic foundation in further understanding the molecular basis of LBD gene family in general, specifically in L. japonicus and M. truncatula. PMID:27560982

  16. Genome-Wide Identification of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Gene Family across Fungal Lineage Shows Presence of Novel and Diverse Activation Loop Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Mohanta, Tapan Kumar; Mohanta, Nibedita; Parida, Pratap; Panda, Sujogya Kumar; Ponpandian, Lakshmi Narayanan; Bae, Hanhong

    2016-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is characterized by the presence of the T-E-Y, T-D-Y, and T-G-Y motifs in its activation loop region and plays a significant role in regulating diverse cellular responses in eukaryotic organisms. Availability of large-scale genome data in the fungal kingdom encouraged us to identify and analyse the fungal MAPK gene family consisting of 173 fungal species. The analysis of the MAPK gene family resulted in the discovery of several novel activation loop motifs (T-T-Y, T-I-Y, T-N-Y, T-H-Y, T-S-Y, K-G-Y, T-Q-Y, S-E-Y and S-D-Y) in fungal MAPKs. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that fungal MAPKs are non-polymorphic, had evolved from their common ancestors around 1500 million years ago, and are distantly related to plant MAPKs. We are the first to report the presence of nine novel activation loop motifs in fungal MAPKs. The specificity of the activation loop motif plays a significant role in controlling different growth and stress related pathways in fungi. Hence, the presences of these nine novel activation loop motifs in fungi are of special interest. PMID:26918378

  17. Genome-wide identification and characterization of WRKY transcriptional factor family in apple and analysis of their responses to waterlogging and drought stress.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dong; Li, Yuanyuan; Bai, Yang; Li, Mingjun; Cheng, Lailiang

    2016-06-01

    As one of the largest transcriptional factor families in plants, WRKY genes play significant roles in various biotic and abiotic stress responses. Although the WRKY gene family has been characterized in a few plant species, the details remain largely unknown in the apple (Malus domestica Borkh.). In this study, we identified a total of 127 MdWRKYs from the apple genome, which were divided into four subgroups according to the WRKY domains and zinc finger motif. Most of them were mapped onto the apple's 17 chromosomes and were expressed in more than one tissue, including shoot tips, mature leaves, fruit and apple calli. We then contrasted WRKY expression patterns between calli grown in solid medium (control) and liquid medium (representing waterlogging stress) and found that 34 WRKY genes were differentially expressed between the two growing conditions. Finally, we determined the expression patterns of 10 selected WRKY genes in an apple rootstock, G41, in response to waterlogging and drought stress, which identified candidate genes involved in responses to water stress for functional analysis. Our data provide interesting candidate MdWRKYs for future functional analysis and demonstrate that apple callus is a useful system for characterizing gene expression and function in apple. PMID:26970718

  18. The EF-hand Ca(2+)-binding protein super-family: a genome-wide analysis of gene expression patterns in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Girard, F; Venail, J; Schwaller, B; Celio, M R

    2015-05-21

    In mice, 249 putative members of the superfamily of EF-hand domain Ca(2+)-binding proteins, manifesting great diversity in structure, cellular localization and functions have been identified. Three members in particular, namely, calbindin-D28K, calretinin and parvalbumin, are widely used as markers for specific neuronal subpopulations in different regions of the brain. The aim of the present study was to compile a comprehensive atlas of the gene-expression profiles of the entire EF-hand gene superfamily in the murine brain. This was achieved by a meticulous examination of the in-situ hybridization images in the Allen Brain Atlas database. Topographically, our analysis focused on the olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex (barrel cortex in the primary somatosensory area), basal ganglia, hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus, hypothalamus, cerebellum, midbrain, pons and medulla, and on clearly identifiable sub-structures within each of these areas. The expression profiles of four family-members, namely hippocalcin-like 4, neurocalcin-δ, plastin 3 and tescalcin, that have not been hitherto reported, at either the mRNA (in-situ-hybridization) or the protein (immunohistochemical) levels, are now presented for the first time. The fruit of our analysis is a document in which the gene-expression profiles of all members of the EF-hand family genes are compared, and in which future possible neuronal markers for specific cells/brain areas are identified. The assembled information could afford functional clues to investigators, conducive to further experimental pursuit. PMID:25770968

  19. The heat shock factor gene family in Salix suchowensis: a genome-wide survey and expression profiling during development and abiotic stresses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Li, Yu; Jia, Hui-Xia; Li, Jian-Bo; Huang, Juan; Lu, Meng-Zhu; Hu, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock transcription factors (Hsfs), which act as important transcriptional regulatory proteins, play crucial roles in plant developmental processes, and stress responses. Recently, the genome of the shrub willow Salix suchowensis was fully sequenced. In this study, a total of 27 non-redundant Hsf genes were identified from the S. suchowensis genome. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the members of the SsuHsf family can be divided into three groups (class A, B, and C) based on their structural characteristics. Promoter analysis indicated that the SsuHsfs promoters included various cis-acting elements related to hormone and/or stress responses. Furthermore, the expression profiles of 27 SsuHsfs were analyzed in different tissues and under various stresses (heat, drought, salt, and ABA treatment) using RT-PCR. The results demonstrated that the SsuHsfs were involved in abiotic stress responses. Our results contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of the SsuHsf gene family, and will facilitate functional characterization in future studies. PMID:26442061

  20. Genome-Wide Identification, Evolutionary Analysis and Expression Profiles of LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN Gene Family in Lotus japonicus and Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianquan; Fang, Genwang Yue; He, Hua; Chen, Jianghua

    2016-01-01

    The LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN (LBD) gene family has been well-studied in Arabidopsis and play crucial roles in the diverse growth and development processes including establishment and maintenance of boundary of developmental lateral organs. In this study we identified and characterized 38 LBD genes in Lotus japonicus (LjLBD) and 57 LBD genes in Medicago truncatula (MtLBD), both of which are model legume plants that have some specific development features absent in Arabidopsis. The phylogenetic relationships, their locations in the genome, genes structure and conserved motifs were examined. The results revealed that all LjLBD and MtLBD genes could be distinctly divided into two classes: Class I and II. The evolutionary analysis showed that Type I functional divergence with some significantly site-specific shifts may be the main force for the divergence between Class I and Class II. In addition, the expression patterns of LjLBD genes uncovered the diverse functions in plant development. Interestingly, we found that two LjLBD proteins that were highly expressed during compound leaf and pulvinus development, can interact via yeast two-hybrid assays. Taken together, our findings provide an evolutionary and genetic foundation in further understanding the molecular basis of LBD gene family in general, specifically in L. japonicus and M. truncatula. PMID:27560982

  1. Genome-wide analysis of SnRK gene family in Brachypodium distachyon and functional characterization of BdSnRK2.9.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lianzhe; Hu, Wei; Sun, Jiutong; Liang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Xiaoyue; Wei, Shuya; Wang, Xiatian; Zhou, Yi; Xiao, Qiang; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan

    2015-08-01

    The sucrose non-fermenting 1 (SNF1)-related protein kinases (SnRKs) play key roles in plant signaling pathways including responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Although SnRKs have been systematically studied in Arabidopsis and rice, there is no information concerning SnRKs in the new Poaceae model plant Brachypodium distachyon. In the present study, a total of 44 BdSnRKs were identified and classified into three subfamilies, including three members of BdSnRK1, 10 of BdSnRK2 and 31 of BdSnRK3 (CIPK) subfamilies. Phylogenetic reconstruction, chromosome distribution and synteny analyses suggested that BdSnRK family had been established before the dicot-monocot lineage parted, and had experienced rapid expansion during the process of plant evolution since then. Expression analysis of the BdSnRK2 subfamily showed that the majority of them could respond to abiotic stress and related signal molecules treatments. Protein-protein interaction and co-expression analyses of BdSnRK2s network showed that SnRK2s might be involved in biological pathway different from that of dicot model plant Arabidopsis. Expression of BdSnRK2.9 in tobacco resulted in increased tolerance to drought and salt stresses through activation of NtABF2. Taken together, comprehensive analyses of BdSnRKs would provide a basis for understanding of evolution and function of BdSnRK family. PMID:26089150

  2. Genome Wide Identification of the Immunophilin Gene Family in Leptosphaeria maculans: A Causal Agent of Blackleg Disease in Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus)

    PubMed Central

    Zouhar, Miloslav; Mazakova, Jana; Rysanek, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Phoma stem canker (blackleg) is a disease of world-wide importance on oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and can cause serious losses for crops globally. The disease is caused by dothideomycetous fungus, Leptosphaeria maculans, which is highly virulent/aggressive. Cyclophilins (CYPs) and FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs) are ubiquitous proteins belonging to the peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) family. They are collectively referred to as immunophilins (IMMs). In the present study, IMM genes, CYP and FKBP in haploid strain v23.1.3 of L. maculans genome, were identified and classified. Twelve CYPs and five FKBPs were determined in total. Domain architecture analysis revealed the presence of a conserved cyclophilin-like domain (CLD) in the case of CYPs and FKBP_C in the case of FKBPs. Interestingly, IMMs in L. maculans also subgrouped into single domain (SD) and multidomain (MD) proteins. They were primarily found to be localized in cytoplasm, nuclei, and mitochondria. Homologous and orthologous gene pairs were also determined by comparison with the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Remarkably, IMMs of L. maculans contain shorter introns in comparison to exons. Moreover, CYPs, in contrast with FKBPs, contain few exons. However, two CYPs were determined as being intronless. The expression profile of IMMs in both mycelium and infected primary leaves of B. napus demonstrated their potential role during infection. Secondary structure analysis revealed the presence of atypical eight β strands and two α helices fold architecture. Gene ontology analysis of IMMs predicted their significant role in protein folding and PPIase activity. Taken together, our findings for the first time present new prospects of this highly conserved gene family in phytopathogenic fungus. PMID:25259854

  3. Genome wide identification of the immunophilin gene family in Leptosphaeria maculans: a causal agent of Blackleg disease in Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus).

    PubMed

    Singh, Khushwant; Zouhar, Miloslav; Mazakova, Jana; Rysanek, Pavel

    2014-10-01

    Abstract Phoma stem canker (blackleg) is a disease of world-wide importance on oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and can cause serious losses for crops globally. The disease is caused by dothideomycetous fungus, Leptosphaeria maculans, which is highly virulent/aggressive. Cyclophilins (CYPs) and FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs) are ubiquitous proteins belonging to the peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) family. They are collectively referred to as immunophilins (IMMs). In the present study, IMM genes, CYP and FKBP in haploid strain v23.1.3 of L. maculans genome, were identified and classified. Twelve CYPs and five FKBPs were determined in total. Domain architecture analysis revealed the presence of a conserved cyclophilin-like domain (CLD) in the case of CYPs and FKBP_C in the case of FKBPs. Interestingly, IMMs in L. maculans also subgrouped into single domain (SD) and multidomain (MD) proteins. They were primarily found to be localized in cytoplasm, nuclei, and mitochondria. Homologous and orthologous gene pairs were also determined by comparison with the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Remarkably, IMMs of L. maculans contain shorter introns in comparison to exons. Moreover, CYPs, in contrast with FKBPs, contain few exons. However, two CYPs were determined as being intronless. The expression profile of IMMs in both mycelium and infected primary leaves of B. napus demonstrated their potential role during infection. Secondary structure analysis revealed the presence of atypical eight β strands and two α helices fold architecture. Gene ontology analysis of IMMs predicted their significant role in protein folding and PPIase activity. Taken together, our findings for the first time present new prospects of this highly conserved gene family in phytopathogenic fungus. PMID:25259854

  4. Genome-wide analyses of the bZIP family reveal their involvement in the development, ripening and abiotic stress response in banana.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Wang, Lianzhe; Tie, Weiwei; Yan, Yan; Ding, Zehong; Liu, Juhua; Li, Meiying; Peng, Ming; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    The leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors play important roles in multiple biological processes. However, less information is available regarding the bZIP family in the important fruit crop banana. In this study, 121 bZIP transcription factor genes were identified in the banana genome. Phylogenetic analysis showed that MabZIPs were classified into 11 subfamilies. The majority of MabZIP genes in the same subfamily shared similar gene structures and conserved motifs. The comprehensive transcriptome analysis of two banana genotypes revealed the differential expression patterns of MabZIP genes in different organs, in various stages of fruit development and ripening, and in responses to abiotic stresses, including drought, cold, and salt. Interaction networks and co-expression assays showed that group A MabZIP-mediated networks participated in various stress signaling, which was strongly activated in Musa ABB Pisang Awak. This study provided new insights into the complicated transcriptional control of MabZIP genes and provided robust tissue-specific, development-dependent, and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MabZIP genes for potential applications in the genetic improvement of banana cultivars. PMID:27445085

  5. Genome-wide survey of Aux/IAA gene family members in potato (Solanum tuberosum): Identification, expression analysis, and evaluation of their roles in tuber development.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junpeng; Cao, Xiaoli; Shi, Shandang; Ma, Yuling; Wang, Kai; Liu, Shengjie; Chen, Dan; Chen, Qin; Ma, Haoli

    2016-03-01

    The Auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (Aux/IAA) genes encode short-lived nuclear proteins that are known to be involved in the primary cellular responses to auxin. To date, systematic analysis of the Aux/IAA genes in potato (Solanum tuberosum) has not been conducted. In this study, a total of 26 potato Aux/IAA genes were identified (designated from StIAA1 to StIAA26), and the distribution of four conserved domains shared by the StIAAs were analyzed based on multiple sequence alignment and a motif-based sequence analysis. A phylogenetic analysis of the Aux/IAA gene families of potato and Arabidopsis was also conducted. In order to assess the roles of StIAA genes in tuber development, the results of RNA-seq studies were reformatted to analyze the expression patterns of StIAA genes, and then verified by quantitative real-time PCR. A large number of StIAA genes (12 genes) were highly expressed in stolon organs and in during the tuber initiation and expansion developmental stages, and most of these genes were responsive to indoleacetic acid treatment. Our results suggested that StIAA genes were involved in the process of tuber development and provided insights into functional roles of potato Aux/IAA genes. PMID:26869512

  6. The auxin response factor transcription factor family in soybean: genome-wide identification and expression analyses during development and water stress.

    PubMed

    Ha, Chien Van; Le, Dung Tien; Nishiyama, Rie; Watanabe, Yasuko; Sulieman, Saad; Tran, Uyen Thi; Mochida, Keiichi; Dong, Nguyen Van; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2013-10-01

    In plants, the auxin response factor (ARF) transcription factors play important roles in regulating diverse biological processes, including development, growth, cell division and responses to environmental stimuli. An exhaustive search of soybean genome revealed 51 GmARFs, many of which were formed by genome duplications. The typical GmARFs (43 members) contain a DNA-binding domain, an ARF domain and an auxin/indole acetic acid (AUX/IAA) dimerization domain, whereas the remaining eight members lack the dimerization domain. Phylogenetic analysis of the ARFs from soybean and Arabidopsis revealed both similarity and divergence between the two ARF families, as well as enabled us to predict the functions of the GmARFs. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and available soybean Affymetrix array and Illumina transcriptome sequence data, a comprehensive expression atlas of GmARF genes was obtained in various organs and tissues, providing useful information about their involvement in defining the precise nature of individual tissues. Furthermore, expression profiling using qRT-PCR and microarray data revealed many water stress-responsive GmARFs in soybean, albeit with different patterns depending on types of tissues and/or developmental stages. Our systematic analysis has identified excellent tissue-specific and/or stress-responsive candidate GmARF genes for in-depth in planta functional analyses, which would lead to potential applications in the development of genetically modified soybean cultivars with enhanced drought tolerance. PMID:23810914

  7. Genome-wide analyses of the bZIP family reveal their involvement in the development, ripening and abiotic stress response in banana

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Wang, Lianzhe; Tie, Weiwei; Yan, Yan; Ding, Zehong; Liu, Juhua; Li, Meiying; Peng, Ming; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    The leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors play important roles in multiple biological processes. However, less information is available regarding the bZIP family in the important fruit crop banana. In this study, 121 bZIP transcription factor genes were identified in the banana genome. Phylogenetic analysis showed that MabZIPs were classified into 11 subfamilies. The majority of MabZIP genes in the same subfamily shared similar gene structures and conserved motifs. The comprehensive transcriptome analysis of two banana genotypes revealed the differential expression patterns of MabZIP genes in different organs, in various stages of fruit development and ripening, and in responses to abiotic stresses, including drought, cold, and salt. Interaction networks and co-expression assays showed that group A MabZIP-mediated networks participated in various stress signaling, which was strongly activated in Musa ABB Pisang Awak. This study provided new insights into the complicated transcriptional control of MabZIP genes and provided robust tissue-specific, development-dependent, and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MabZIP genes for potential applications in the genetic improvement of banana cultivars. PMID:27445085

  8. The Auxin Response Factor Transcription Factor Family in Soybean: Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analyses During Development and Water Stress

    PubMed Central

    Van Ha, Chien; Le, Dung Tien; Nishiyama, Rie; Watanabe, Yasuko; Sulieman, Saad; Tran, Uyen Thi; Mochida, Keiichi; Van Dong, Nguyen; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2013-01-01

    In plants, the auxin response factor (ARF) transcription factors play important roles in regulating diverse biological processes, including development, growth, cell division and responses to environmental stimuli. An exhaustive search of soybean genome revealed 51 GmARFs, many of which were formed by genome duplications. The typical GmARFs (43 members) contain a DNA-binding domain, an ARF domain and an auxin/indole acetic acid (AUX/IAA) dimerization domain, whereas the remaining eight members lack the dimerization domain. Phylogenetic analysis of the ARFs from soybean and Arabidopsis revealed both similarity and divergence between the two ARF families, as well as enabled us to predict the functions of the GmARFs. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and available soybean Affymetrix array and Illumina transcriptome sequence data, a comprehensive expression atlas of GmARF genes was obtained in various organs and tissues, providing useful information about their involvement in defining the precise nature of individual tissues. Furthermore, expression profiling using qRT-PCR and microarray data revealed many water stress-responsive GmARFs in soybean, albeit with different patterns depending on types of tissues and/or developmental stages. Our systematic analysis has identified excellent tissue-specific and/or stress-responsive candidate GmARF genes for in-depth in planta functional analyses, which would lead to potential applications in the development of genetically modified soybean cultivars with enhanced drought tolerance. PMID:23810914

  9. Genome-wide Analyses of the Structural Gene Families Involved in the Legume-specific 5-Deoxyisoflavonoid Biosynthesis of Lotus japonicus

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Norimoto; Sato, Shusei; Akashi, Tomoyoshi; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Tabata, Satoshi; Ayabe, Shin-ichi; Aoki, Toshio

    2007-01-01

    Abstract A model legume Lotus japonicus (Regel) K. Larsen is one of the subjects of genome sequencing and functional genomics programs. In the course of targeted approaches to the legume genomics, we analyzed the genes encoding enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of the legume-specific 5-deoxyisoflavonoid of L. japonicus, which produces isoflavan phytoalexins on elicitor treatment. The paralogous biosynthetic genes were assigned as comprehensively as possible by biochemical experiments, similarity searches, comparison of the gene structures, and phylogenetic analyses. Among the 10 biosynthetic genes investigated, six comprise multigene families, and in many cases they form gene clusters in the chromosomes. Semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase–PCR analyses showed coordinate up-regulation of most of the genes during phytoalexin induction and complex accumulation patterns of the transcripts in different organs. Some paralogous genes exhibited similar expression specificities, suggesting their genetic redundancy. The molecular evolution of the biosynthetic genes is discussed. The results presented here provide reliable annotations of the genes and genetic markers for comparative and functional genomics of leguminous plants. PMID:17452423

  10. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of the CaNAC family members in chickpea during development, dehydration and ABA treatments.

    PubMed

    Ha, Chien Van; Esfahani, Maryam Nasr; Watanabe, Yasuko; Tran, Uyen Thi; Sulieman, Saad; Mochida, Keiichi; Nguyen, Dong Van; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2014-01-01

    The plant-specific NAC transcription factors (TFs) play important roles in regulation of diverse biological processes, including development, growth, cell division and responses to environmental stimuli. In this study, we identified the members of the NAC TF family of chickpea (Cicer arietinum) and assess their expression profiles during plant development and under dehydration and abscisic acid (ABA) treatments in a systematic manner. Seventy-one CaNAC genes were detected from the chickpea genome, including 8 membrane-bound members of which many might be involved in dehydration responses as judged from published literature. Phylogenetic analysis of the chickpea and well-known stress-related Arabidopsis and rice NACs enabled us to predict several putative stress-related CaNACs. By exploring available transcriptome data, we provided a comprehensive expression atlas of CaNACs in various tissues at different developmental stages. With the highest interest in dehydration responses, we examined the expression of the predicted stress-related and membrane-bound CaNACs in roots and leaves of chickpea seedlings, subjected to well-watered (control), dehydration and ABA treatments, using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Nine-teen of the 23 CaNACs examined were found to be dehydration-responsive in chickpea roots and/or leaves in either ABA-dependent or -independent pathway. Our results have provided a solid foundation for selection of promising tissue-specific and/or dehydration-responsive CaNAC candidates for detailed in planta functional analyses, leading to development of transgenic chickpea varieties with improved productivity under drought. PMID:25479253

  11. Genome-wide analysis of the CaHsp20 gene family in pepper: comprehensive sequence and expression profile analysis under heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Meng; Liu, Jin-Hong; Lu, Jin-Ping; Zhai, Yu-Fei; Wang, Hu; Gong, Zhen-Hui; Wang, Shu-Bin; Lu, Ming-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The Hsp20 genes are present in all plant species and play important roles in alleviating heat stress and enhancing plant thermotolerance by preventing the irreversible aggregation of denaturing proteins. However, very little is known about the CaHsp20 gene family in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.), an important vegetable crop with character of temperate but thermosensitive. In this study, a total of 35 putative pepper Hsp20 genes (CaHsp20s) were identified and renamed on the basis of their molecular weight, and then their gene structure, genome location, gene duplication, phylogenetic relationship, and interaction network were also analyzed. The expression patterns of CaHsp20 genes in four different tissues (root, stem, leaf, and flower) from the thermotolerant line R9 under heat stress condition were measured using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The transcripts of most CaHsp20 genes maintained a low level in all of the four tissues under normal temperature condition, but were highly induced by heat stress, while the expression of CaHsp16.6b, 16.7, and 23.8 were only detected in specific tissues and were not so sensitive to heat stress like other CaHsp20 genes. In addition, compared to those in thermotolerant line R9, the expression peak of most CaHsp20 genes in thermosensitive line B6 under heat stress was hysteretic, and several CaHsp20 genes (CaHsp16.4, 18.2a, 18.7, 21.2, 22.0, 25.8, and 25.9) showed higher expression levels in both line B6 and R9. These data suggest that the CaHsp20 genes may be involved in heat stress and defense responses in pepper, which provides the basis for further functional analyses of CaHsp20s in the formation of pepper acquired thermotoleance. PMID:26483820

  12. Genome-wide classification and evolutionary analysis of the bHLH family of transcription factors in Arabidopsis, poplar, rice, moss, and algae.

    PubMed

    Carretero-Paulet, Lorenzo; Galstyan, Anahit; Roig-Villanova, Irma; Martínez-García, Jaime F; Bilbao-Castro, Jose R; Robertson, David L

    2010-07-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix proteins (bHLHs) are found throughout the three eukaryotic kingdoms and constitute one of the largest families of transcription factors. A growing number of bHLH proteins have been functionally characterized in plants. However, some of these have not been previously classified. We present here an updated and comprehensive classification of the bHLHs encoded by the whole sequenced genomes of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), Populus trichocarpa, Oryza sativa, Physcomitrella patens, and five algae species. We define a plant bHLH consensus motif, which allowed the identification of novel highly diverged atypical bHLHs. Using yeast two-hybrid assays, we confirm that (1) a highly diverged bHLH has retained protein interaction activity and (2) the two most conserved positions in the consensus play an essential role in dimerization. Phylogenetic analysis permitted classification of the 638 bHLH genes identified into 32 subfamilies. Evolutionary and functional relationships within subfamilies are supported by intron patterns, predicted DNA-binding motifs, and the architecture of conserved protein motifs. Our analyses reveal the origin and evolutionary diversification of plant bHLHs through differential expansions, domain shuffling, and extensive sequence divergence. At the functional level, this would translate into different subfamilies evolving specific DNA-binding and protein interaction activities as well as differential transcriptional regulatory roles. Our results suggest a role for bHLH proteins in generating plant phenotypic diversity and provide a solid framework for further investigations into the role carried out in the transcriptional regulation of key growth and developmental processes. PMID:20472752

  13. Genome-wide identification, classification and analysis of HD-ZIP gene family in citrus, and its potential roles in somatic embryogenesis regulation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Zheng; Wu, Xiao-Meng; Chai, Li-Jun; Guo, Wen-Wu

    2015-12-10

    The homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) transcription factors, which belong to a class of Homeobox proteins, has been reported to be involved in different biological processes of plants, including growth and development, photomorphogenesis, flowering, fruit ripening and adaptation responses to environmental stresses. In this study, 27 HD-Zip genes (CsHBs) were identified in Citrus. Based on the phylogenetic analysis and characteristics of individual gene or protein, the HD-Zip gene family in Citrus can be classified into 4 subfamilies, i.e. HD-Zip I, HD-Zip II, HD-Zip III, and HD-Zip IV containing 16, 2, 4, and 5 members respectively. The digital expression patterns of 27 HD-Zip genes were analyzed in the callus, flower, leaf and fruit of Citrus sinensis. The qRT-PCR and RT-PCR analyses of six selected HD-Zip genes were performed in six citrus cultivars with different embryogenic competence and in the embryo induction stages, which revealed that these genes were differentially expressed and might be involved in citrus somatic embryogenesis (SE). The results exhibited that the expression of CsHB1 was up-regulated in somatic embryo induction process, and its expression was higher in citrus cultivars with high embryogenic capacity than in cultivars recalcitrant to form somatic embryos. Moreover, a microsatellite site of three nucleotide repeats was found in CsHB1 gene among eighteen citrus genotypes, indicating the possible association of CsHB1 gene to the capacity of callus induction. PMID:26232336

  14. Genome-wide analysis of AP2/ERF family genes from Lotus corniculatus shows LcERF054 enhances salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhan-Min; Zhou, Mei-Liang; Xiao, Xing-Guo; Tang, Yi-Xiong; Wu, Yan-Min

    2014-09-01

    Lotus corniculatus is used in agriculture as a main forage plant. Members of the Apetala2/ethylene response factor (AP2/ERF) family play important roles in regulating gene expression in response to many forms of stress, including drought and salt. Here, starting from database of the L. corniculatus var. japonicus genome, we identified 127 AP2/ERF genes by insilico cloning method. The phylogeny, gene structures, and putative conserved motifs in L. corniculatus var. japonicus ERF proteins were analyzed. Based on the number of AP2/ERF domains and the function of the genes, 127 AP2/ERF genes from L. corniculatus var. japonicus were classified into five subfamilies named the AP2, dehydration-responsive element binding factor (DREB), ERF, RAV, and a soloist. Outside the AP2/ERF domain, many L. corniculatus var. japonicus-specific conserved motifs were detected. Expression profile analysis of AP2/ERF genes by quantitative real-time PCR revealed that 19 LcERF genes, including LcERF054 (KJ004728), were significantly induced by salt stress. The results showed that the LcERF054 gene encodes a nuclear transcription activator. Overexpression of LcERF054 in Arabidopsis enhanced the tolerances to salt stress, showed higher germination ratio of seeds, and had elevated levels of relative moisture contents, soluble sugars, proline, and lower levels of malondialdehyde under stress conditions compared to wild-type plants. The expression of hyperosmotic salinity response genes COR15A, LEA4-5, P5CS1, and RD29A was found to be elevated in the LcERF054-overexpressing Arabidopsis plants compared to wild type. These results revealed that the LcERF genes play important roles in L. corniculatus cv Leo under salt stress and that LcERFs are attractive engineering targets in applied efforts to improve abiotic stress tolerances in L. corniculatus cv Leo or other crops. PMID:24777608

  15. The auxin response factor gene family in banana: genome-wide identification and expression analyses during development, ripening, and abiotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Zuo, Jiao; Hou, Xiaowan; Yan, Yan; Wei, Yunxie; Liu, Juhua; Li, Meiying; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Auxin signaling regulates various auxin-responsive genes via two types of transcriptional regulators, Auxin Response Factors (ARF) and Aux/IAA. ARF transcription factors act as critical components of auxin signaling that play important roles in modulating various biological processes. However, limited information about this gene family in fruit crops is currently available. Herein, 47 ARF genes were identified in banana based on its genome sequence. Phylogenetic analysis of the ARFs from banana, rice, and Arabidopsis suggested that the ARFs could be divided into four subgroups, among which most ARFs from the banana showed a closer relationship with those from rice than those from Arabidopsis. Conserved motif analysis showed that all identified MaARFs had typical DNA-binding and ARF domains, but 12 members lacked the dimerization domain. Gene structure analysis showed that the number of exons in MaARF genes ranged from 5 to 21, suggesting large variation amongst banana ARF genes. The comprehensive expression profiles of MaARF genes yielded useful information about their involvement in diverse tissues, different stages of fruit development and ripening, and responses to abiotic stresses in different varieties. Interaction networks and co-expression assays indicated the strong transcriptional response of banana ARFs and ARF-mediated networks in early fruit development for different varieties. Our systematic analysis of MaARFs revealed robust tissue-specific, development-dependent, and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MaARF genes for further functional assays in planta. These findings could lead to potential applications in the genetic improvement of banana cultivars, and yield new insights into the complexity of the control of MaARF gene expression at the transcriptional level. Finally, they support the hypothesis that ARFs are a crucial component of the auxin signaling pathway, which regulates a wide range of physiological processes. PMID:26442055

  16. The auxin response factor gene family in banana: genome-wide identification and expression analyses during development, ripening, and abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Zuo, Jiao; Hou, Xiaowan; Yan, Yan; Wei, Yunxie; Liu, Juhua; Li, Meiying; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Auxin signaling regulates various auxin-responsive genes via two types of transcriptional regulators, Auxin Response Factors (ARF) and Aux/IAA. ARF transcription factors act as critical components of auxin signaling that play important roles in modulating various biological processes. However, limited information about this gene family in fruit crops is currently available. Herein, 47 ARF genes were identified in banana based on its genome sequence. Phylogenetic analysis of the ARFs from banana, rice, and Arabidopsis suggested that the ARFs could be divided into four subgroups, among which most ARFs from the banana showed a closer relationship with those from rice than those from Arabidopsis. Conserved motif analysis showed that all identified MaARFs had typical DNA-binding and ARF domains, but 12 members lacked the dimerization domain. Gene structure analysis showed that the number of exons in MaARF genes ranged from 5 to 21, suggesting large variation amongst banana ARF genes. The comprehensive expression profiles of MaARF genes yielded useful information about their involvement in diverse tissues, different stages of fruit development and ripening, and responses to abiotic stresses in different varieties. Interaction networks and co-expression assays indicated the strong transcriptional response of banana ARFs and ARF-mediated networks in early fruit development for different varieties. Our systematic analysis of MaARFs revealed robust tissue-specific, development-dependent, and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MaARF genes for further functional assays in planta. These findings could lead to potential applications in the genetic improvement of banana cultivars, and yield new insights into the complexity of the control of MaARF gene expression at the transcriptional level. Finally, they support the hypothesis that ARFs are a crucial component of the auxin signaling pathway, which regulates a wide range of physiological processes. PMID:26442055

  17. Genome-wide analysis of the CaHsp20 gene family in pepper: comprehensive sequence and expression profile analysis under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meng; Liu, Jin-Hong; Lu, Jin-Ping; Zhai, Yu-Fei; Wang, Hu; Gong, Zhen-Hui; Wang, Shu-Bin; Lu, Ming-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The Hsp20 genes are present in all plant species and play important roles in alleviating heat stress and enhancing plant thermotolerance by preventing the irreversible aggregation of denaturing proteins. However, very little is known about the CaHsp20 gene family in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.), an important vegetable crop with character of temperate but thermosensitive. In this study, a total of 35 putative pepper Hsp20 genes (CaHsp20s) were identified and renamed on the basis of their molecular weight, and then their gene structure, genome location, gene duplication, phylogenetic relationship, and interaction network were also analyzed. The expression patterns of CaHsp20 genes in four different tissues (root, stem, leaf, and flower) from the thermotolerant line R9 under heat stress condition were measured using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The transcripts of most CaHsp20 genes maintained a low level in all of the four tissues under normal temperature condition, but were highly induced by heat stress, while the expression of CaHsp16.6b, 16.7, and 23.8 were only detected in specific tissues and were not so sensitive to heat stress like other CaHsp20 genes. In addition, compared to those in thermotolerant line R9, the expression peak of most CaHsp20 genes in thermosensitive line B6 under heat stress was hysteretic, and several CaHsp20 genes (CaHsp16.4, 18.2a, 18.7, 21.2, 22.0, 25.8, and 25.9) showed higher expression levels in both line B6 and R9. These data suggest that the CaHsp20 genes may be involved in heat stress and defense responses in pepper, which provides the basis for further functional analyses of CaHsp20s in the formation of pepper acquired thermotoleance. PMID:26483820

  18. Genome-Wide Survey and Expression Profile Analysis of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Gene Family in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hao; Qu, Cunmin; Tang, Zhanglin; Li, Jiana; Chai, Yourong; Liang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are fundamental signal transduction modules in plants, controlling cell division, development, hormone signaling, and biotic and abiotic stress responses. Although MAPKs have been investigated in several plant species, a comprehensive analysis of the MAPK gene family has hitherto not been performed in Brassica rapa. In this study, we identified 32 MAPKs in the B. rapa genome by conducting BLASTP and syntenic block analyses, and screening for the essential signature motif (TDY or TEY) of plant MAPK proteins. Of the 32 BraMAPK genes retrieved from the Brassica Database, 13 exhibited exon splicing errors, excessive splicing of the 5' sequence, excessive retention of the 5' sequence, and sequencing errors of the 3' end. Phylogenetic trees of the 32 corrected MAPKs from B. rapa and of MAPKs from other plants generated by the neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood methods suggested that BraMAPKs could be divided into four groups (groups A, B, C, and D). Gene number expansion was observed for BraMAPK genes in groups A and D, which may have been caused by the tandem duplication and genome triplication of the ancestral genome of the Brassica progenitor. Except for five members of the BraMAPK10 subfamily, the identified BraMAPKs were expressed in most of the tissues examined, including callus, root, stem, leaf, flower, and silique. Quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that at least six and five BraMAPKs were induced or repressed by various abiotic stresses and hormone treatments, respectively, suggesting their potential roles in the abiotic stress response and various hormone signal transduction pathways in B. rapa. This study provides valuable insight into the putative physiological and biochemical functions of MAPK genes in B. rapa. PMID:26173020

  19. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of the CaNAC Family Members in Chickpea during Development, Dehydration and ABA Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Chien Van; Nasr Esfahani, Maryam; Watanabe, Yasuko; Tran, Uyen Thi; Sulieman, Saad; Mochida, Keiichi; Van Nguyen, Dong; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2014-01-01

    The plant-specific NAC transcription factors (TFs) play important roles in regulation of diverse biological processes, including development, growth, cell division and responses to environmental stimuli. In this study, we identified the members of the NAC TF family of chickpea (Cicer arietinum) and assess their expression profiles during plant development and under dehydration and abscisic acid (ABA) treatments in a systematic manner. Seventy-one CaNAC genes were detected from the chickpea genome, including 8 membrane-bound members of which many might be involved in dehydration responses as judged from published literature. Phylogenetic analysis of the chickpea and well-known stress-related Arabidopsis and rice NACs enabled us to predict several putative stress-related CaNACs. By exploring available transcriptome data, we provided a comprehensive expression atlas of CaNACs in various tissues at different developmental stages. With the highest interest in dehydration responses, we examined the expression of the predicted stress-related and membrane-bound CaNACs in roots and leaves of chickpea seedlings, subjected to well-watered (control), dehydration and ABA treatments, using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Nine-teen of the 23 CaNACs examined were found to be dehydration-responsive in chickpea roots and/or leaves in either ABA-dependent or -independent pathway. Our results have provided a solid foundation for selection of promising tissue-specific and/or dehydration-responsive CaNAC candidates for detailed in planta functional analyses, leading to development of transgenic chickpea varieties with improved productivity under drought. PMID:25479253

  20. Genome-Wide Survey and Expression Profile Analysis of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Gene Family in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kun; Guo, Wenjin; Lu, Junxing; Yu, Hao; Qu, Cunmin; Tang, Zhanglin; Li, Jiana; Chai, Yourong; Liang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are fundamental signal transduction modules in plants, controlling cell division, development, hormone signaling, and biotic and abiotic stress responses. Although MAPKs have been investigated in several plant species, a comprehensive analysis of the MAPK gene family has hitherto not been performed in Brassica rapa. In this study, we identified 32 MAPKs in the B. rapa genome by conducting BLASTP and syntenic block analyses, and screening for the essential signature motif (TDY or TEY) of plant MAPK proteins. Of the 32 BraMAPK genes retrieved from the Brassica Database, 13 exhibited exon splicing errors, excessive splicing of the 5' sequence, excessive retention of the 5' sequence, and sequencing errors of the 3' end. Phylogenetic trees of the 32 corrected MAPKs from B. rapa and of MAPKs from other plants generated by the neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood methods suggested that BraMAPKs could be divided into four groups (groups A, B, C, and D). Gene number expansion was observed for BraMAPK genes in groups A and D, which may have been caused by the tandem duplication and genome triplication of the ancestral genome of the Brassica progenitor. Except for five members of the BraMAPK10 subfamily, the identified BraMAPKs were expressed in most of the tissues examined, including callus, root, stem, leaf, flower, and silique. Quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that at least six and five BraMAPKs were induced or repressed by various abiotic stresses and hormone treatments, respectively, suggesting their potential roles in the abiotic stress response and various hormone signal transduction pathways in B. rapa. This study provides valuable insight into the putative physiological and biochemical functions of MAPK genes in B. rapa. PMID:26173020

  1. Genome-Wide Classification and Evolutionary Analysis of the bHLH Family of Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis, Poplar, Rice, Moss, and Algae1[W

    PubMed Central

    Carretero-Paulet, Lorenzo; Galstyan, Anahit; Roig-Villanova, Irma; Martínez-García, Jaime F.; Bilbao-Castro, Jose R.; Robertson, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix proteins (bHLHs) are found throughout the three eukaryotic kingdoms and constitute one of the largest families of transcription factors. A growing number of bHLH proteins have been functionally characterized in plants. However, some of these have not been previously classified. We present here an updated and comprehensive classification of the bHLHs encoded by the whole sequenced genomes of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), Populus trichocarpa, Oryza sativa, Physcomitrella patens, and five algae species. We define a plant bHLH consensus motif, which allowed the identification of novel highly diverged atypical bHLHs. Using yeast two-hybrid assays, we confirm that (1) a highly diverged bHLH has retained protein interaction activity and (2) the two most conserved positions in the consensus play an essential role in dimerization. Phylogenetic analysis permitted classification of the 638 bHLH genes identified into 32 subfamilies. Evolutionary and functional relationships within subfamilies are supported by intron patterns, predicted DNA-binding motifs, and the architecture of conserved protein motifs. Our analyses reveal the origin and evolutionary diversification of plant bHLHs through differential expansions, domain shuffling, and extensive sequence divergence. At the functional level, this would translate into different subfamilies evolving specific DNA-binding and protein interaction activities as well as differential transcriptional regulatory roles. Our results suggest a role for bHLH proteins in generating plant phenotypic diversity and provide a solid framework for further investigations into the role carried out in the transcriptional regulation of key growth and developmental processes. PMID:20472752

  2. Foxtail Millet NF-Y Families: Genome-Wide Survey and Evolution Analyses Identified Two Functional Genes Important in Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhi-Juan; He, Guan-Hua; Zheng, Wei-Jun; Lu, Pan-Pan; Chen, Ming; Gong, Ya-Ming; Ma, You-Zhi; Xu, Zhao-Shi

    2015-01-01

    It was reported that Nuclear Factor Y (NF-Y) genes were involved in abiotic stress in plants. Foxtail millet (Setaria italica), an elite stress tolerant crop, provided an impetus for the investigation of the NF-Y families in abiotic responses. In the present study, a total of 39 NF-Y genes were identified in foxtail millet. Synteny analyses suggested that foxtail millet NF-Y genes had experienced rapid expansion and strong purifying selection during the process of plant evolution. De novo transcriptome assembly of foxtail millet revealed 11 drought up-regulated NF-Y genes. SiNF-YA1 and SiNF-YB8 were highly activated in leaves and/or roots by drought and salt stresses. Abscisic acid (ABA) and H2O2 played positive roles in the induction of SiNF-YA1 and SiNF-YB8 under stress treatments. Transient luciferase (LUC) expression assays revealed that SiNF-YA1 and SiNF-YB8 could activate the LUC gene driven by the tobacco (Nicotiana tobacam) NtERD10, NtLEA5, NtCAT, NtSOD, or NtPOD promoter under normal or stress conditions. Overexpression of SiNF-YA1 enhanced drought and salt tolerance by activating stress-related genes NtERD10 and NtCAT1 and by maintaining relatively stable relative water content (RWC) and contents of chlorophyll, superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in transgenic lines under stresses. SiNF-YB8 regulated expression of NtSOD, NtPOD, NtLEA5, and NtERD10 and conferred relatively high RWC and chlorophyll contents and low MDA content, resulting in drought and osmotic tolerance in transgenic lines under stresses. Therefore, SiNF-YA1 and SiNF-YB8 could activate stress-related genes and improve physiological traits, resulting in tolerance to abiotic stresses in plants. All these results will facilitate functional characterization of foxtail millet NF-Ys in future studies. PMID:26734043

  3. Foxtail Millet NF-Y Families: Genome-Wide Survey and Evolution Analyses Identified Two Functional Genes Important in Abiotic Stresses.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhi-Juan; He, Guan-Hua; Zheng, Wei-Jun; Lu, Pan-Pan; Chen, Ming; Gong, Ya-Ming; Ma, You-Zhi; Xu, Zhao-Shi

    2015-01-01

    It was reported that Nuclear Factor Y (NF-Y) genes were involved in abiotic stress in plants. Foxtail millet (Setaria italica), an elite stress tolerant crop, provided an impetus for the investigation of the NF-Y families in abiotic responses. In the present study, a total of 39 NF-Y genes were identified in foxtail millet. Synteny analyses suggested that foxtail millet NF-Y genes had experienced rapid expansion and strong purifying selection during the process of plant evolution. De novo transcriptome assembly of foxtail millet revealed 11 drought up-regulated NF-Y genes. SiNF-YA1 and SiNF-YB8 were highly activated in leaves and/or roots by drought and salt stresses. Abscisic acid (ABA) and H2O2 played positive roles in the induction of SiNF-YA1 and SiNF-YB8 under stress treatments. Transient luciferase (LUC) expression assays revealed that SiNF-YA1 and SiNF-YB8 could activate the LUC gene driven by the tobacco (Nicotiana tobacam) NtERD10, NtLEA5, NtCAT, NtSOD, or NtPOD promoter under normal or stress conditions. Overexpression of SiNF-YA1 enhanced drought and salt tolerance by activating stress-related genes NtERD10 and NtCAT1 and by maintaining relatively stable relative water content (RWC) and contents of chlorophyll, superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in transgenic lines under stresses. SiNF-YB8 regulated expression of NtSOD, NtPOD, NtLEA5, and NtERD10 and conferred relatively high RWC and chlorophyll contents and low MDA content, resulting in drought and osmotic tolerance in transgenic lines under stresses. Therefore, SiNF-YA1 and SiNF-YB8 could activate stress-related genes and improve physiological traits, resulting in tolerance to abiotic stresses in plants. All these results will facilitate functional characterization of foxtail millet NF-Ys in future studies. PMID:26734043

  4. A genome-wide scan for preeclampsia in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Lachmeijer, A M; Arngrímsson, R; Bastiaans, E J; Frigge, M L; Pals, G; Sigurdardóttir, S; Stéfansson, H; Pálsson, B; Nicolae, D; Kong, A; Aarnoudse, J G; Gulcher, J R; Dekker, G A; ten Kate, L P; Stéfansson, K

    2001-10-01

    Preeclampsia, hallmarked by de novo hypertension and proteinuria in pregnancy, has a familial tendency. Recently, a large Icelandic genome-wide scan provided evidence for a maternal susceptibility locus for preeclampsia on chromosome 2p13 which was confirmed by a genome scan from Australia and New Zealand (NZ). The current study reports on a genome-wide scan of Dutch affected sib-pair families. In total 67 Dutch affected sib-pair families, comprising at least two siblings with proteinuric preeclampsia, eclampsia or HELLP-syndrome, were typed for 293 polymorphic markers throughout the genome and linkage analysis was performed. The highest allele sharing lod score of 1.99 was seen on chromosome 12q at 109.5 cM. Two peaks overlapped in the same regions between the Dutch and Icelandic genome-wide scan at chromosome 3p and chromosome 15q. No overlap was seen on 2p. Re-analysis in 38 families without HELLP-syndrome (preeclampsia families) and 34 families with at least one sibling with HELLP syndrome (HELLP families), revealed two peaks with suggestive evidence for linkage in the non-HELLP families on chromosome 10q (lod score 2.38, D10S1432, 93.9 cM) and 22q (lod score 2.41, D22S685, 32.4 cM). The peak on 12q appeared to be associated with HELLP syndrome; it increased to a lod score of 2.1 in the HELLP families and almost disappeared in the preeclampsia families. A nominal peak on chromosome 11 in the preeclampsia families showed overlap with the second highest peak in the Australian/NZ study. Results from our Dutch genome-wide scan indicate that HELLP syndrome might have a different genetic background than preeclampsia. PMID:11781687

  5. Case-Control Genome-Wide Association Study of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah; Ripke, Stephan; Anney, Richard J. L.; Asherson, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara; Gill, Michael; Kent, Lindsey; Holmans, Peter; Middleton, Frank; Thapar, Anita; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Daly, Mark; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schafer, Helmut; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Warnke, Andreas; Walitza, Susanne; Freitag, Christine; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Rothenberger, Aribert; Hawi, Ziarih; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. Thus additional genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are needed. Method: We used case-control analyses of 896 cases…

  6. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah E.; Ripke, Stephan; Asherson, Philip; Franke, Barbara; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schafer, Helmut; Holmans, Peter; Daly, Mark; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Freitag, Christine; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Walitza, Susanne; Warnke, Andreas; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Buitelaar, Jan; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Lambregts-Rommelse, Nanda; Gill, Michael; Anney, Richard J. L.; Langely, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael; Williams, Nigel; Owen, Michael; Thapar, Anita; Kent, Lindsey; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph; Doyle, Alysa; Smalley, Susan; Loo, Sandra; Hakonarson, Hakon; Elia, Josephine; Todorov, Alexandre; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Ebstein, Richard P.; Rothenberger, Aribert; Banaschewski, Tobias; Oades, Robert D.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; McGough, James; Nisenbaum, Laura; Middleton, Frank; Hu, Xiaolan; Nelson, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. As prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not yielded significant results, we conducted a meta-analysis of…

  7. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of Haloferax volcanii H26 and identification of DNA methyltransferase related PD-(D/E)XK nuclease family protein HVO_A0006

    PubMed Central

    Ouellette, Matthew; Jackson, Laura; Chimileski, Scott; Papke, R. Thane

    2015-01-01

    Restriction-modification (RM) systems have evolved to protect the cell from invading DNAs and are composed of two enzymes: a DNA methyltransferase and a restriction endonuclease. Although RM systems are present in both archaeal and bacterial genomes, DNA methylation in archaea has not been well defined. In order to characterize the function of RM systems in archaeal species, we have made use of the model haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii. A genomic DNA methylation analysis of H. volcanii strain H26 was performed using PacBio single molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing. This analysis was also performed on a strain of H. volcanii in which an annotated DNA methyltransferase gene HVO_A0006 was deleted from the genome. Sequence analysis of H26 revealed two motifs which are modified in the genome: Cm4TAG and GCAm6BN6VTGC. Analysis of the ΔHVO_A0006 strain indicated that it exhibited reduced adenine methylation compared to the parental strain and altered the detected adenine motif. However, protein domain architecture analysis and amino acid alignments revealed that HVO_A0006 is homologous only to the N-terminal endonuclease region of Type IIG RM proteins and contains a PD-(D/E)XK nuclease motif, suggesting that HVO_A0006 is a PD-(D/E)XK nuclease family protein. Further bioinformatic analysis of the HVO_A0006 gene demonstrated that the gene is rare among the Halobacteria. It is surrounded by two transposition genes suggesting that HVO_A0006 is a fragment of a Type IIG RM gene, which has likely been acquired through gene transfer, and affects restriction-modification activity by interacting with another RM system component(s). Here, we present the first genome-wide characterization of DNA methylation in an archaeal species and examine the function of a DNA methyltransferase related gene HVO_A0006. PMID:25904898

  8. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in hepatoblastoma tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ximao; Liu, Baihui; Zheng, Shan; Dong, Kuiran; Dong, Rui

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation has a crucial role in cancer biology. In the present study, a genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in hepatoblastoma (HB) tissues was performed to verify differential methylation levels between HB and normal tissues. As alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) has a critical role in HB, AFP methylation levels were also detected using pyrosequencing. Normal and HB liver tissue samples (frozen tissue) were obtained from patients with HB. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in these tissues was performed using an Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip, and the results were confirmed with reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip demonstrated distinctively less methylation in HB tissues than in non-tumor tissues. In addition, methylation enrichment was observed in positions near the transcription start site of AFP, which exhibited lower methylation levels in HB tissues than in non-tumor liver tissues. Lastly, a significant negative correlation was observed between AFP messenger RNA expression and DNA methylation percentage, using linear Pearson's R correlation coefficients. The present results demonstrate differential methylation levels between HB and normal tissues, and imply that aberrant methylation of AFP in HB could reflect HB development. Expansion of these findings could provide useful insight into HB biology. PMID:27446465

  9. Establishing an analytic pipeline for genome-wide DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Michelle L; Dozmorov, Mikhail G; Wolen, Aaron R; Jackson-Cook, Colleen; Starkweather, Angela R; Lyon, Debra E; York, Timothy P

    2016-01-01

    The need for research investigating DNA methylation (DNAm) in clinical studies has increased, leading to the evolution of new analytic methods to improve accuracy and reproducibility of the interpretation of results from these studies. The purpose of this article is to provide clinical researchers with a summary of the major data processing steps routinely applied in clinical studies investigating genome-wide DNAm using the Illumina HumanMethylation 450K BeadChip. In most studies, the primary goal of employing DNAm analysis is to identify differential methylation at CpG sites among phenotypic groups. Experimental design considerations are crucial at the onset to minimize bias from factors related to sample processing and avoid confounding experimental variables with non-biological batch effects. Although there are currently no de facto standard methods for analyzing these data, we review the major steps in processing DNAm data recommended by several research studies. We describe several variations available for clinical researchers to process, analyze, and interpret DNAm data. These insights are applicable to most types of genome-wide DNAm array platforms and will be applicable for the next generation of DNAm array technologies (e.g., the 850K array). Selection of the DNAm analytic pipeline followed by investigators should be guided by the research question and supported by recently published methods. PMID:27127542

  10. A Pooled Genome-Wide Association Study of Asperger Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Warrier, Varun; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Murphy, Laura; Chan, Allen; Craig, Ian; Mallya, Uma; Lakatošová, Silvia; Rehnstrom, Karola; Wheelwright, Sally; Allison, Carrie; Fisher, Simon E.; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Asperger Syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by impairments in social interaction and communication, alongside the presence of unusually repetitive, restricted interests and stereotyped behaviour. Individuals with AS have no delay in cognitive and language development. It is a subset of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC), which are highly heritable and has a population prevalence of approximately 1%. Few studies have investigated the genetic basis of AS. To address this gap in the literature, we performed a genome-wide pooled DNA association study to identify candidate loci in 612 individuals (294 cases and 318 controls) of Caucasian ancestry, using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping version 6.0 array. We identified 11 SNPs that had a p-value below 1x10-5. These SNPs were independently genotyped in the same sample. Three of the SNPs (rs1268055, rs7785891 and rs2782448) were nominally significant, though none remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Two of our top three SNPs (rs7785891 and rs2782448) lie in loci previously implicated in ASC. However, investigation of the three SNPs in the ASC genome-wide association dataset from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium indicated that these three SNPs were not significantly associated with ASC. The effect sizes of the variants were modest, indicating that our study was not sufficiently powered to identify causal variants with precision. PMID:26176695

  11. Genome-Wide Scan for Methylation Profiles in Keloids

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Lamont R.; Young, William; Divine, George; Datta, Indrani; Chen, Kang Mei; Ozog, David; Worsham, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    Keloids are benign fibroproliferative tumors of the skin which commonly occur after injury mainly in darker skinned patients. Medical treatment is fraught with high recurrence rates mainly because of an incomplete understanding of the biological mechanisms that lead to keloids. The purpose of this project was to examine keloid pathogenesis from the epigenome perspective of DNA methylation. Genome-wide profiling used the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip to interrogate DNA from 6 fresh keloid and 6 normal skin samples from 12 anonymous donors. A 3-tiered approach was used to call out genes most differentially methylated between keloid and normal. When compared to normal, of the 685 differentially methylated CpGs at Tier 3, 510 were hypomethylated and 175 were hypermethylated with 190 CpGs in promoter and 495 in nonpromoter regions. The 190 promoter region CpGs corresponded to 152 genes: 96 (63%) were hypomethylated and 56 (37%) hypermethylated. This exploratory genome-wide scan of the keloid methylome highlights a predominance of hypomethylated genomic landscapes, favoring nonpromoter regions. DNA methylation, as an additional mechanism for gene regulation in keloid pathogenesis, holds potential for novel treatments that reverse deleterious epigenetic changes. As an alternative mechanism for regulating genes, epigenetics may explain why gene mutations alone do not provide definitive mechanisms for keloid formation. PMID:26074660

  12. Genome-wide association study for jumping performances in French sport horses.

    PubMed

    Brard, S; Ricard, A

    2015-02-01

    A genome-wide association study was performed to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with jumping performances of warmbloods in France. The 999 horses included in the study for jumping performances were sport horses [mostly Selle Français (68%), Anglo-Arabians (13%) and horses from the other European studbooks]. Horses were genotyped using the Illumina EquineSNP50 BeadChip. Of the 54,602 SNPs available on this chip, 44,424 were retained after quality testing. Phenotypes were obtained by deregressing official breeding values for jumping competitions to use all available information, that is, the performances of each horse as well as those of its relatives. Two models were used to test the effects of the genotypes on deregressed phenotypes: a single-marker mixed model and a haplotype-based mixed model (significant: P < 1E-05; suggestive: P < 1E-04). Both models included a polygenic effect to take into account familial structures. For jumping performances, one suggestive quantitative trait locus (QTL) located on chromosome 1 (BIEC2_31196 and BIEC2_31198) was detected with both models. This QTL explains 0.7% of the phenotypic variance. RYR2, a gene encoding a major calcium channel in cardiac muscle in humans and mice, is located 0.55 Mb from this potential QTL. PMID:25515185

  13. Genome-wide association studies in pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ann K

    2010-04-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies for pharmacogenomics-related traits are increasingly being performed to identify loci that affect either drug response or susceptibility to adverse drug reactions. Until now, only the largest effects have been detected, partly because of the challenges of obtaining large numbers of cases for pharmacogenomic studies. Since 2007, a range of pharmacogenomics GWA studies have been published that have identified several interesting and novel associations between drug responses or reactions and clinically relevant loci, showing the value of this approach. PMID:20300088

  14. Genome-wide association studies in neurology

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Meng-Shan; Jiang, Teng

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are a powerful tool for understanding the genetic underpinnings of human disease. In this article, we briefly review the role and findings of GWAS in common neurological diseases, including Stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, migraine, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, restless legs syndrome, intracranial aneurysm, human prion diseases and moyamoya disease. We then discuss the present and future implications of these findings with regards to disease prediction, uncovering basic biology, and the development of potential therapeutic agents. PMID:25568877

  15. Genome-Wide Association Studies: A Primer

    PubMed Central

    Corvin, Aiden; Craddock, Nick; Sullivan, Patrick F.

    2014-01-01

    There have been nearly 400genome-wide association studies published since 2005. The GWAS approach has been exceptionally successful in identifying common genetic variants that predispose to a variety of complex human diseases and biochemical and anthropometric traits. Although this approach is relatively new, there are many excellent reviews of different aspects of the GWAS method. Here, we provide a primer, an annotated overview of the GWAS method with particular reference to psychiatric genetics. We dissect the GWAS methodology into its components and provide a brief description with citations and links to reviews that cover the topic in detail. PMID:19895722

  16. Genome-wide identification of enhancer elements.

    PubMed

    Tulin, Sarah; Barsi, Julius C; Bocconcelli, Carlo; Smith, Joel

    2016-01-01

    We present a prospective genome-wide regulatory element database for the sea urchin embryo and the modified chromosome capture-related methodology used to create it. The method we developed is termed GRIP-seq for genome-wide regulatory element immunoprecipitation and combines features of chromosome conformation capture, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and paired-end next-generation sequencing with molecular steps that enrich for active cis-regulatory elements associated with basal transcriptional machinery. The first GRIP-seq database, available to the community, comes from S. purpuratus 24 hpf embryos and takes advantage of the extremely well-characterized cis-regulatory elements in this system for validation. In addition, using the GRIP-seq database, we identify and experimentally validate a novel, intronic cis-regulatory element at the onecut locus. We find GRIP-seq signal sensitively identifies active cis-regulatory elements with a high signal-to-noise ratio for both distal and intronic elements. This promising GRIP-seq protocol has the potential to address a rate-limiting step in resolving comprehensive, predictive network models in all systems. PMID:27389984

  17. Genome-wide association study identifies loci affecting blood copper, selenium and zinc

    PubMed Central

    Evans, David M.; Zhu, Gu; Dy, Veronica; Heath, Andrew C.; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Kemp, John P.; McMahon, George; St Pourcain, Beate; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Golding, Jean; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Steer, Colin; Montgomery, Grant W.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Smith, George Davey; Whitfield, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation affecting absorption, distribution or excretion of essential trace elements may lead to health effects related to sub-clinical deficiency. We have tested for allelic effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on blood copper, selenium and zinc in a genome-wide association study using two adult cohorts from Australia and the UK. Participants were recruited in Australia from twins and their families and in the UK from pregnant women. We measured erythrocyte Cu, Se and Zn (Australian samples) or whole blood Se (UK samples) using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Genotyping was performed with Illumina chips and >2.5 m SNPs were imputed from HapMap data. Genome-wide significant associations were found for each element. For Cu, there were two loci on chromosome 1 (most significant SNPs rs1175550, P = 5.03 × 10−10, and rs2769264, P = 2.63 × 10−20); for Se, a locus on chromosome 5 was significant in both cohorts (combined P = 9.40 × 10−28 at rs921943); and for Zn three loci on chromosomes 8, 15 and X showed significant results (rs1532423, P = 6.40 × 10−12; rs2120019, P = 1.55 × 10−18; and rs4826508, P = 1.40 × 10−12, respectively). The Se locus covers three genes involved in metabolism of sulphur-containing amino acids and potentially of the analogous Se compounds; the chromosome 8 locus for Zn contains multiple genes for the Zn-containing enzyme carbonic anhydrase. Where potentially relevant genes were identified, they relate to metabolism of the element (Se) or to the presence at high concentration of a metal-containing protein (Cu). PMID:23720494

  18. Genome-wide linkage in Utah autism pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Allen-Brady, K; Robison, R; Cannon, D; Varvil, T; Villalobos, M; Pingree, C; Leppert, M F; Miller, J; McMahon, W M; Coon, H

    2010-10-01

    Genetic studies of autism over the past decade suggest a complex landscape of multiple genes. In the face of this heterogeneity, studies that include large extended pedigrees may offer valuable insights, as the relatively few susceptibility genes within single large families may be more easily discerned. This genome-wide screen of 70 families includes 20 large extended pedigrees of 6-9 generations, 6 moderate-sized families of 4-5 generations and 44 smaller families of 2-3 generations. The Center for Inherited Disease Research (CIDR) provided genotyping using the Illumina Linkage Panel 12, a 6K single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) platform. Results from 192 subjects with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and 461 of their relatives revealed genome-wide significance on chromosome 15q, with three possibly distinct peaks: 15q13.1-q14 (heterogeneity LOD (HLOD)=4.09 at 29 459 872 bp); 15q14-q21.1 (HLOD=3.59 at 36 837 208 bp); and 15q21.1-q22.2 (HLOD=5.31 at 55 629 733 bp). Two of these peaks replicate earlier findings. There were additional suggestive results on chromosomes 2p25.3-p24.1 (HLOD=1.87), 7q31.31-q32.3 (HLOD=1.97) and 13q12.11-q12.3 (HLOD=1.93). Affected subjects in families supporting the linkage peaks found in this study did not reveal strong evidence for distinct phenotypic subgroups. PMID:19455147

  19. SUSCEPTIBILITY LOCI FOR UMBILICAL HERNIA IN SWINE DETECTED BY GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION.

    PubMed

    Liao, X J; Lia, L; Zhang, Z Y; Long, Y; Yang, B; Ruan, G R; Su, Y; Ai, H S; Zhang, W C; Deng, W Y; Xiao, S J; Ren, J; Ding, N S; Huang, L S

    2015-10-01

    Umbilical hernia (UH) is a complex disorder caused by both genetic and environmental factors. UH brings animal welfare problems and severe economic loss to the pig industry. Until now, the genetic basis of UH is poorly understood. The high-density 60K porcine SNP array enables the rapid application of genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify genetic loci for phenotypic traits at genome wide scale in pigs. The objective of this research was to identify susceptibility loci for swine umbilical hernia using the GWAS approach. We genotyped 478 piglets from 142 families representing three Western commercial breeds with the Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip. Then significant SNPs were detected by GWAS using ROADTRIPS (Robust Association-Detection Test for Related Individuals with Population Substructure) software base on a Bonferroni corrected threshold (P = 1.67E-06) or suggestive threshold (P = 3.34E-05) and false discovery rate (FDR = 0.05). After quality control, 29,924 qualified SNPs and 472 piglets were used for GWAS. Two suggestive loci predisposing to pig UH were identified at 44.25MB on SSC2 (rs81358018, P = 3.34E-06, FDR = 0.049933) and at 45.90MB on SSC17 (rs81479278, P = 3.30E-06, FDR = 0.049933) in Duroc population, respectively. And no SNP was detected to be associated with pig UH at significant level in neither Landrace nor Large White population. Furthermore, we carried out a meta-analysis in the combined pure-breed population containing all the 472 piglets. rs81479278 (P = 1.16E-06, FDR = 0.022475) was identified to associate with pig UH at genome-wide significant level. SRC was characterized as plausible candidate gene for susceptibility to pig UH according to its genomic position and biological functions. To our knowledge, this study gives the first description of GWAS identifying susceptibility loci for umbilical hernia in pigs. Our findings provide deeper insights to the genetic architecture of umbilical hernia in pigs. PMID:27169231

  20. GWIDD: Genome-wide protein docking database

    PubMed Central

    Kundrotas, Petras J.; Zhu, Zhengwei; Vakser, Ilya A.

    2010-01-01

    Structural information on interacting proteins is important for understanding life processes at the molecular level. Genome-wide docking database is an integrated resource for structural studies of protein–protein interactions on the genome scale, which combines the available experimental data with models obtained by docking techniques. Current database version (August 2009) contains 25 559 experimental and modeled 3D structures for 771 organisms spanned over the entire universe of life from viruses to humans. Data are organized in a relational database with user-friendly search interface allowing exploration of the database content by a number of parameters. Search results can be interactively previewed and downloaded as PDB-formatted files, along with the information relevant to the specified interactions. The resource is freely available at http://gwidd.bioinformatics.ku.edu. PMID:19900970

  1. Genome-wide Membrane Protein Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Piccoli, Stefano; Suku, Eda; Garonzi, Marianna; Giorgetti, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Transmembrane proteins allow cells to extensively communicate with the external world in a very accurate and specific way. They form principal nodes in several signaling pathways and attract large interest in therapeutic intervention, as the majority pharmaceutical compounds target membrane proteins. Thus, according to the current genome annotation methods, a detailed structural/functional characterization at the protein level of each of the elements codified in the genome is also required. The extreme difficulty in obtaining high-resolution three-dimensional structures, calls for computational approaches. Here we review to which extent the efforts made in the last few years, combining the structural characterization of membrane proteins with protein bioinformatics techniques, could help describing membrane proteins at a genome-wide scale. In particular we analyze the use of comparative modeling techniques as a way of overcoming the lack of high-resolution three-dimensional structures in the human membrane proteome. PMID:24403851

  2. Genome-Wide Association Studies of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Zsofia K.; Thom, Peter; Robson, Mark E.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Kauff, Noah D.; Hurley, Karen E.; Devlin, Vincent; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J.; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the inherited risk for cancer is an important component of preventive oncology. In addition to well-established syndromes of cancer predisposition, much remains to be discovered about the genetic variation underlying susceptibility to common malignancies. Increased knowledge about the human genome and advances in genotyping technology have made possible genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of human diseases. These studies have identified many important regions of genetic variation associated with an increased risk for human traits and diseases including cancer. Understanding the principles, major findings, and limitations of GWAS is becoming increasingly important for oncologists as dissemination of genomic risk tests directly to consumers is already occurring through commercial companies. GWAS have contributed to our understanding of the genetic basis of cancer and will shed light on biologic pathways and possible new strategies for targeted prevention. To date, however, the clinical utility of GWAS-derived risk markers remains limited. PMID:20585100

  3. Genome-wide association study of Tourette's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scharf, J M; Yu, D; Mathews, C A; Neale, B M; Stewart, S E; Fagerness, J A; Evans, P; Gamazon, E; Edlund, C K; Service, S K; Tikhomirov, A; Osiecki, L; Illmann, C; Pluzhnikov, A; Konkashbaev, A; Davis, L K; Han, B; Crane, J; Moorjani, P; Crenshaw, A T; Parkin, M A; Reus, V I; Lowe, T L; Rangel-Lugo, M; Chouinard, S; Dion, Y; Girard, S; Cath, D C; Smit, J H; King, R A; Fernandez, T V; Leckman, J F; Kidd, K K; Kidd, J R; Pakstis, A J; State, M W; Herrera, L D; Romero, R; Fournier, E; Sandor, P; Barr, C L; Phan, N; Gross-Tsur, V; Benarroch, F; Pollak, Y; Budman, C L; Bruun, R D; Erenberg, G; Naarden, A L; Lee, P C; Weiss, N; Kremeyer, B; Berrío, G B; Campbell, D D; Cardona Silgado, J C; Ochoa, W C; Mesa Restrepo, S C; Muller, H; Valencia Duarte, A V; Lyon, G J; Leppert, M; Morgan, J; Weiss, R; Grados, M A; Anderson, K; Davarya, S; Singer, H; Walkup, J; Jankovic, J; Tischfield, J A; Heiman, G A; Gilbert, D L; Hoekstra, P J; Robertson, M M; Kurlan, R; Liu, C; Gibbs, J R; Singleton, A; Hardy, J; Strengman, E; Ophoff, R A; Wagner, M; Moessner, R; Mirel, D B; Posthuma, D; Sabatti, C; Eskin, E; Conti, D V; Knowles, J A; Ruiz-Linares, A; Rouleau, G A; Purcell, S; Heutink, P; Oostra, B A; McMahon, W M; Freimer, N B; Cox, N J; Pauls, D L

    2013-06-01

    Tourette's syndrome (TS) is a developmental disorder that has one of the highest familial recurrence rates among neuropsychiatric diseases with complex inheritance. However, the identification of definitive TS susceptibility genes remains elusive. Here, we report the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of TS in 1285 cases and 4964 ancestry-matched controls of European ancestry, including two European-derived population isolates, Ashkenazi Jews from North America and Israel and French Canadians from Quebec, Canada. In a primary meta-analysis of GWAS data from these European ancestry samples, no markers achieved a genome-wide threshold of significance (P<5 × 10(-8)); the top signal was found in rs7868992 on chromosome 9q32 within COL27A1 (P=1.85 × 10(-6)). A secondary analysis including an additional 211 cases and 285 controls from two closely related Latin American population isolates from the Central Valley of Costa Rica and Antioquia, Colombia also identified rs7868992 as the top signal (P=3.6 × 10(-7) for the combined sample of 1496 cases and 5249 controls following imputation with 1000 Genomes data). This study lays the groundwork for the eventual identification of common TS susceptibility variants in larger cohorts and helps to provide a more complete understanding of the full genetic architecture of this disorder. PMID:22889924

  4. Genome-wide association study of Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, Jeremiah M.; Yu, Dongmei; Mathews, Carol A.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Stewart, S. Evelyn; Fagerness, Jesen A; Evans, Patrick; Gamazon, Eric; Edlund, Christopher K.; Service, Susan; Tikhomirov, Anna; Osiecki, Lisa; Illmann, Cornelia; Pluzhnikov, Anna; Konkashbaev, Anuar; Davis, Lea K; Han, Buhm; Crane, Jacquelyn; Moorjani, Priya; Crenshaw, Andrew T.; Parkin, Melissa A.; Reus, Victor I.; Lowe, Thomas L.; Rangel-Lugo, Martha; Chouinard, Sylvain; Dion, Yves; Girard, Simon; Cath, Danielle C; Smit, Jan H; King, Robert A.; Fernandez, Thomas; Leckman, James F.; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Kidd, Judith R.; Pakstis, Andrew J.; State, Matthew; Herrera, Luis Diego; Romero, Roxana; Fournier, Eduardo; Sandor, Paul; Barr, Cathy L; Phan, Nam; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Benarroch, Fortu; Pollak, Yehuda; Budman, Cathy L.; Bruun, Ruth D.; Erenberg, Gerald; Naarden, Allan L; Lee, Paul C; Weiss, Nicholas; Kremeyer, Barbara; Berrío, Gabriel Bedoya; Campbell, Desmond; Silgado, Julio C. Cardona; Ochoa, William Cornejo; Restrepo, Sandra C. Mesa; Muller, Heike; Duarte, Ana V. Valencia; Lyon, Gholson J; Leppert, Mark; Morgan, Jubel; Weiss, Robert; Grados, Marco A.; Anderson, Kelley; Davarya, Sarah; Singer, Harvey; Walkup, John; Jankovic, Joseph; Tischfield, Jay A.; Heiman, Gary A.; Gilbert, Donald L.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Robertson, Mary M.; Kurlan, Roger; Liu, Chunyu; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John; Strengman, Eric; Ophoff, Roel; Wagner, Michael; Moessner, Rainald; Mirel, Daniel B.; Posthuma, Danielle; Sabatti, Chiara; Eskin, Eleazar; Conti, David V.; Knowles, James A.; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Rouleau, Guy A.; Purcell, Shaun; Heutink, Peter; Oostra, Ben A.; McMahon, William; Freimer, Nelson; Cox, Nancy J.; Pauls, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a developmental disorder that has one of the highest familial recurrence rates among neuropsychiatric diseases with complex inheritance. However, the identification of definitive TS susceptibility genes remains elusive. Here, we report the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of TS in 1285 cases and 4964 ancestry-matched controls of European ancestry, including two European-derived population isolates, Ashkenazi Jews from North America and Israel, and French Canadians from Quebec, Canada. In a primary meta-analysis of GWAS data from these European ancestry samples, no markers achieved a genome-wide threshold of significance (p<5 × 10−8); the top signal was found in rs7868992 on chromosome 9q32 within COL27A1 (p=1.85 × 10−6). A secondary analysis including an additional 211 cases and 285 controls from two closely-related Latin-American population isolates from the Central Valley of Costa Rica and Antioquia, Colombia also identified rs7868992 as the top signal (p=3.6 × 10−7 for the combined sample of 1496 cases and 5249 controls following imputation with 1000 Genomes data). This study lays the groundwork for the eventual identification of common TS susceptibility variants in larger cohorts and helps to provide a more complete understanding of the full genetic architecture of this disorder. PMID:22889924

  5. Genome-wide analysis correlates Ayurveda Prakriti

    PubMed Central

    Govindaraj, Periyasamy; Nizamuddin, Sheikh; Sharath, Anugula; Jyothi, Vuskamalla; Rotti, Harish; Raval, Ritu; Nayak, Jayakrishna; Bhat, Balakrishna K.; Prasanna, B. V.; Shintre, Pooja; Sule, Mayura; Joshi, Kalpana S.; Dedge, Amrish P.; Bharadwaj, Ramachandra; Gangadharan, G. G.; Nair, Sreekumaran; Gopinath, Puthiya M.; Patwardhan, Bhushan; Kondaiah, Paturu; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Valiathan, Marthanda Varma Sankaran; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2015-01-01

    The practice of Ayurveda, the traditional medicine of India, is based on the concept of three major constitutional types (Vata, Pitta and Kapha) defined as “Prakriti”. To the best of our knowledge, no study has convincingly correlated genomic variations with the classification of Prakriti. In the present study, we performed genome-wide SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) analysis (Affymetrix, 6.0) of 262 well-classified male individuals (after screening 3416 subjects) belonging to three Prakritis. We found 52 SNPs (p ≤ 1 × 10−5) were significantly different between Prakritis, without any confounding effect of stratification, after 106 permutations. Principal component analysis (PCA) of these SNPs classified 262 individuals into their respective groups (Vata, Pitta and Kapha) irrespective of their ancestry, which represent its power in categorization. We further validated our finding with 297 Indian population samples with known ancestry. Subsequently, we found that PGM1 correlates with phenotype of Pitta as described in the ancient text of Caraka Samhita, suggesting that the phenotypic classification of India’s traditional medicine has a genetic basis; and its Prakriti-based practice in vogue for many centuries resonates with personalized medicine. PMID:26511157

  6. Genome-wide association mapping of heritable temperament variation in the Tennessee Walking Horse.

    PubMed

    Staiger, E A; Albright, J D; Brooks, S A

    2016-06-01

    Temperament is a key criterion in the selection of horses for both leisure and competitive riding to ensure optimal performance and safety. The Tennessee Walking Horse (TWH) is described as a calm, docile breed and is often used as a trail, show and pleasure horse. However, among horse owners and caretakers, there are anecdotes supporting familial and disciplinal typical behaviors and personalities. To investigate the contribution of genetics to temperament, we collected a behavior questionnaire, brief training history and identifying information for 276 TWH, as well as blood or hair samples for DNA. Factor analysis was conducted on the 20-item questionnaire for the set of 216 horses that met inclusion thresholds. Factor analysis identified four temperament factors in TWH: 'anxious', 'tractable', 'agonistic' and 'gregarious'. These four factors account for 64% of the total trait variance. DNA from 113 TWHs were selected and genotyped using the Equine SNP70 bead chip for three separate genome-wide association studies (GWAs) using the factor 1-anxious, factor 2-tractable and factor 3-agonistic scores as the phenotype. Quantitative association analysis identified significant candidate loci for each factor that warrant further investigation. PMID:26991152

  7. Genome-wide methylation profiling of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rukova, B; Staneva, R; Hadjidekova, S; Stamenov, G; Milanova; Toncheva, D

    2014-12-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the major psychiatric disorders. It is a disorder of complex inheritance, involving both heritable and environmental factors. DNA methylation is an inheritable epigenetic modification that stably alters gene expression. We reasoned that genetic modifications that are a result of environmental stimuli could also make a contribution. We have performed 26 high-resolution genome-wide methylation array analyses to determine the methylation status of 27,627 CpG islands and compared the data between patients and healthy controls. Methylation profiles of DNAs were analyzed in six pools: 220 schizophrenia patients; 220 age-matched healthy controls; 110 female schizophrenia patients; 110 age-matched healthy females; 110 male schizophrenia patients; 110 age-matched healthy males. We also investigated the methylation status of 20 individual patient DNA samples (eight females and 12 males. We found significant differences in the methylation profile between schizophrenia and control DNA pools. We found new candidate genes that principally participate in apoptosis, synaptic transmission and nervous system development (GABRA2, LIN7B, CASP3). Methylation profiles differed between the genders. In females, the most important genes participate in apoptosis and synaptic transmission (XIAP, GABRD, OXT, KRT7), whereas in the males, the implicated genes in the molecular pathology of the disease were DHX37, MAP2K2, FNDC4 and GIPC1. Data from the individual methylation analyses confirmed, the gender-specific pools results. Our data revealed major differences in methylation profiles between schizophrenia patients and controls and between male and female patients. The dysregulated activity of the candidate genes could play a role in schizophrenia pathogenesis. PMID:25937794

  8. Genome-Wide Methylation Profiling of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Rukova, B; Staneva, R; Hadjidekova, S; Stamenov, G; Milanova; Toncheva, D

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the major psychiatric disorders. It is a disorder of complex inheritance, involving both heritable and environmental factors. DNA methylation is an inheritable epigenetic modification that stably alters gene expression. We reasoned that genetic modifications that are a result of environmental stimuli could also make a contribution. We have performed 26 high-resolution genome-wide methylation array analyses to determine the methylation status of 27,627 CpG islands and compared the data between patients and healthy controls. Methylation profiles of DNAs were analyzed in six pools: 220 schizophrenia patients; 220 age-matched healthy controls; 110 female schizophrenia patients; 110 age-matched healthy females; 110 male schizophrenia patients; 110 age-matched healthy males. We also investigated the methylation status of 20 individual patient DNA samples (eight females and 12 males. We found significant differences in the methylation profile between schizophrenia and control DNA pools. We found new candidate genes that principally participate in apoptosis, synaptic transmission and nervous system development (GABRA2, LIN7B, CASP3). Methylation profiles differed between the genders. In females, the most important genes participate in apoptosis and synaptic transmission (XIAP, GABRD, OXT, KRT7), whereas in the males, the implicated genes in the molecular pathology of the disease were DHX37, MAP2K2, FNDC4 and GIPC1. Data from the individual methylation analyses confirmed, the gender-specific pools results. Our data revealed major differences in methylation profiles between schizophrenia patients and controls and between male and female patients. The dysregulated activity of the candidate genes could play a role in schizophrenia pathogenesis. PMID:25937794

  9. Genome Wide Methylome Alterations in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mullapudi, Nandita; Ye, Bin; Suzuki, Masako; Fazzari, Melissa; Han, Weiguo; Shi, Miao K; Marquardt, Gaby; Lin, Juan; Wang, Tao; Keller, Steven; Zhu, Changcheng; Locker, Joseph D; Spivack, Simon D

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant cytosine 5-methylation underlies many deregulated elements of cancer. Among paired non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), we sought to profile DNA 5-methyl-cytosine features which may underlie genome-wide deregulation. In one of the more dense interrogations of the methylome, we sampled 1.2 million CpG sites from twenty-four NSCLC tumor (T)-non-tumor (NT) pairs using a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme- based HELP-microarray assay. We found 225,350 differentially methylated (DM) sites in adenocarcinomas versus adjacent non-tumor tissue that vary in frequency across genomic compartment, particularly notable in gene bodies (GB; p<2.2E-16). Further, when DM was coupled to differential transcriptome (DE) in the same samples, 37,056 differential loci in adenocarcinoma emerged. Approximately 90% of the DM-DE relationships were non-canonical; for example, promoter DM associated with DE in the same direction. Of the canonical changes noted, promoter (PR) DM loci with reciprocal changes in expression in adenocarcinomas included HBEGF, AGER, PTPRM, DPT, CST1, MELK; DM GB loci with concordant changes in expression included FOXM1, FERMT1, SLC7A5, and FAP genes. IPA analyses showed adenocarcinoma-specific promoter DMxDE overlay identified familiar lung cancer nodes [tP53, Akt] as well as less familiar nodes [HBEGF, NQO1, GRK5, VWF, HPGD, CDH5, CTNNAL1, PTPN13, DACH1, SMAD6, LAMA3, AR]. The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate methylation sites in both PR and GB regions not previously identified in NSCLC, and many non-canonical relationships to gene expression. These DNA methylation features could potentially be developed as risk or diagnostic biomarkers, or as candidate targets for newer methylation locus-targeted preventive or therapeutic agents. PMID:26683690

  10. Genome Wide Methylome Alterations in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masako; Fazzari, Melissa; Han, Weiguo; Shi, Miao K.; Marquardt, Gaby; Lin, Juan; Wang, Tao; Keller, Steven; Zhu, Changcheng; Locker, Joseph D.; Spivack, Simon D.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant cytosine 5-methylation underlies many deregulated elements of cancer. Among paired non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), we sought to profile DNA 5-methyl-cytosine features which may underlie genome-wide deregulation. In one of the more dense interrogations of the methylome, we sampled 1.2 million CpG sites from twenty-four NSCLC tumor (T)–non-tumor (NT) pairs using a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme- based HELP-microarray assay. We found 225,350 differentially methylated (DM) sites in adenocarcinomas versus adjacent non-tumor tissue that vary in frequency across genomic compartment, particularly notable in gene bodies (GB; p<2.2E-16). Further, when DM was coupled to differential transcriptome (DE) in the same samples, 37,056 differential loci in adenocarcinoma emerged. Approximately 90% of the DM-DE relationships were non-canonical; for example, promoter DM associated with DE in the same direction. Of the canonical changes noted, promoter (PR) DM loci with reciprocal changes in expression in adenocarcinomas included HBEGF, AGER, PTPRM, DPT, CST1, MELK; DM GB loci with concordant changes in expression included FOXM1, FERMT1, SLC7A5, and FAP genes. IPA analyses showed adenocarcinoma-specific promoter DMxDE overlay identified familiar lung cancer nodes [tP53, Akt] as well as less familiar nodes [HBEGF, NQO1, GRK5, VWF, HPGD, CDH5, CTNNAL1, PTPN13, DACH1, SMAD6, LAMA3, AR]. The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate methylation sites in both PR and GB regions not previously identified in NSCLC, and many non-canonical relationships to gene expression. These DNA methylation features could potentially be developed as risk or diagnostic biomarkers, or as candidate targets for newer methylation locus-targeted preventive or therapeutic agents. PMID:26683690

  11. Genome wide association study on early puberty in Bos indicus.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, A V; Matos, M C; Seno, L O; Romero, A R S; Garcia, J F; Grisolia, A B

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a genome wide association study (GWAS) approach to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with fertility traits (early puberty) in Nellore cattle (Bos indicus). Fifty-five Nellore cows were selected from a herd monitored for early puberty onset (positive pregnancy at 18 months of age). Extremes of this phenotype were selected; 30 and 25 individuals were pregnant and non-pregnant, respectively, at that age. DNA samples were genotyped using a high-density SNP chip (>777.000 SNP). GWAS using a case-control strategy highlighted a number of significant markers based on their proximity with the Bonferroni correction line. Results indicated that chromosomes 5, 6, 9, 10, and 22 were associated with the traits of interest. The most significant SNPs on these chromosomes were rs133039577, rs110013280, rs134702839, rs109551605, and rs41639155. Candidate genes, as well as quantitative trait loci (QTL) previously reported in the Ensembl and Cattle QTLdb databases, were further investigated. Analysis of the regions close to the SNP on chromosomes 9 and 10 revealed that four QTL had been previously classified under the reproduction category. In conclusion, we have identified SNPs in close proximity to genes associated with reproductive traits. Moreover, U6 spliceosomal RNA was present on three different chromosomes, which is possibly associated with age at first calving, suggesting that it might be a strong candidate for future studies. PMID:26909970

  12. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Optic Disc Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Jansonius, Nomdo M.; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.; Isaacs, Aaron; Amin, Najaf; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Wolfs, Roger C. W.; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Oostra, Ben A.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hysi, Pirro; Hammond, Christopher J.; Lemij, Hans G.; Vingerling, Johannes R.

    2010-01-01

    The optic nerve head is involved in many ophthalmic disorders, including common diseases such as myopia and open-angle glaucoma. Two of the most important parameters are the size of the optic disc area and the vertical cup-disc ratio (VCDR). Both are highly heritable but genetically largely undetermined. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) data to identify genetic variants associated with optic disc area and VCDR. The gene discovery included 7,360 unrelated individuals from the population-based Rotterdam Study I and Rotterdam Study II cohorts. These cohorts revealed two genome-wide significant loci for optic disc area, rs1192415 on chromosome 1p22 (p = 6.72×10−19) within 117 kb of the CDC7 gene and rs1900004 on chromosome 10q21.3-q22.1 (p = 2.67×10−33) within 10 kb of the ATOH7 gene. They revealed two genome-wide significant loci for VCDR, rs1063192 on chromosome 9p21 (p = 6.15×10−11) in the CDKN2B gene and rs10483727 on chromosome 14q22.3-q23 (p = 2.93×10−10) within 40 kbp of the SIX1 gene. Findings were replicated in two independent Dutch cohorts (Rotterdam Study III and Erasmus Rucphen Family study; N = 3,612), and the TwinsUK cohort (N = 843). Meta-analysis with the replication cohorts confirmed the four loci and revealed a third locus at 16q12.1 associated with optic disc area, and four other loci at 11q13, 13q13, 17q23 (borderline significant), and 22q12.1 for VCDR. ATOH7 was also associated with VCDR independent of optic disc area. Three of the loci were marginally associated with open-angle glaucoma. The protein pathways in which the loci of optic disc area are involved overlap with those identified for VCDR, suggesting a common genetic origin. PMID:20548946

  13. Genome-wide association study of antisocial personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Rautiainen, M-R; Paunio, T; Repo-Tiihonen, E; Virkkunen, M; Ollila, H M; Sulkava, S; Jolanki, O; Palotie, A; Tiihonen, J

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) remains unclear. Although the most consistent biological finding is reduced grey matter volume in the frontal cortex, about 50% of the total liability to developing ASPD has been attributed to genetic factors. The contributing genes remain largely unknown. Therefore, we sought to study the genetic background of ASPD. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and a replication analysis of Finnish criminal offenders fulfilling DSM-IV criteria for ASPD (N=370, N=5850 for controls, GWAS; N=173, N=3766 for controls and replication sample). The GWAS resulted in suggestive associations of two clusters of single-nucleotide polymorphisms at 6p21.2 and at 6p21.32 at the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region. Imputation of HLA alleles revealed an independent association with DRB1*01:01 (odds ratio (OR)=2.19 (1.53-3.14), P=1.9 × 10(-5)). Two polymorphisms at 6p21.2 LINC00951-LRFN2 gene region were replicated in a separate data set, and rs4714329 reached genome-wide significance (OR=1.59 (1.37-1.85), P=1.6 × 10(-9)) in the meta-analysis. The risk allele also associated with antisocial features in the general population conditioned for severe problems in childhood family (β=0.68, P=0.012). Functional analysis in brain tissue in open access GTEx and Braineac databases revealed eQTL associations of rs4714329 with LINC00951 and LRFN2 in cerebellum. In humans, LINC00951 and LRFN2 are both expressed in the brain, especially in the frontal cortex, which is intriguing considering the role of the frontal cortex in behavior and the neuroanatomical findings of reduced gray matter volume in ASPD. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing genome-wide significant and replicable findings on genetic variants associated with any personality disorder. PMID:27598967

  14. Genotype-Environment Interactions in Microsatellite Stable/Microsatellite Instability-Low Colorectal Cancer: Results from a Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Jane C.; Lewinger, Juan Pablo; Song, Chi; Campbell, Peter T.; Conti, David V.; Edlund, Christopher K.; Duggan, Dave J.; Rangrej, Jagadish; Lemire, Mathieu; Hudson, Thomas; Zanke, Brent; Cotterchio, Michelle; Gallinger, Steven; Jenkins, Mark; Hopper, John; Haile, Robert; Newcomb, Polly; Potter, John; Baron, John A.; Marchand, Loic Le; Casey, Graham

    2011-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have led to the identification of a number of common susceptibility loci for colorectal cancer (CRC); however, none of these GWAS have considered gene-environment (GxE) interactions. Therefore, it is unclear whether current hits are modified by environmental exposures or whether there are additional hits whose effects are dependent on environmental exposures. Methods We conducted a systematic search for GxE interactions using genome wide data from the Colon Cancer Family Registry that included 1,191 cases of microsatellite stable (MSS) or microsatellite instability (MSI)-low CRC and 999 controls genotyped using either the Illumina Human1M or Human1M-Duo BeadChip. We tested for interactions between genotypes and 14 environmental factors using three methods: a traditional case-control test, a case-only test, and the recently proposed two-step method by Murcray et al. All potentially significant findings were replicated in the ARCTIC Study. Results No GxE interactions were identified that reached genome-wide significance by any of the three methods. When analyzing previously reported susceptibility loci, seven significant GxE interactions were found at a 5% significance level. We investigated these seven interactions in an independent sample and none of the interactions were replicated. Conclusions Identifying GxE interactions will present challenges in a GWAS setting. Our power calculations illustrate the need for larger sample sizes; however, since CRC is a heterogeneous disease, a tradeoff between increasing sample size and heterogeneity needs to be considered. Impact The results from this first genome-wide analysis of GxE in CRC identify several challenges, which may be addressed by large consortium efforts. PMID:21357381

  15. Genome-Wide Linkage, Exome Sequencing and Functional Analyses Identify ABCB6 as the Pathogenic Gene of Dyschromatosis Universalis Hereditaria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Na; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Xuechao; Sheng, Donglai; Fu, Xi’an; See, Kelvin; Foo, Jia Nee; Low, Huiqi; Liany, Herty; Irwan, Ishak Darryl; Liu, Jian; Yang, Baoqi; Chen, Mingfei; Yu, Yongxiang; Yu, Gongqi; Niu, Guiye; You, Jiabao; Zhou, Yan; Ma, Shanshan; Wang, Ting; Yan, Xiaoxiao; Goh, Boon Kee; Common, John E. A.; Lane, Birgitte E.; Sun, Yonghu; Zhou, Guizhi; Lu, Xianmei; Wang, Zhenhua; Tian, Hongqing; Cao, Yuanhua; Chen, Shumin; Liu, Qiji; Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Furen

    2014-01-01

    Background As a genetic disorder of abnormal pigmentation, the molecular basis of dyschromatosis universalis hereditaria (DUH) had remained unclear until recently when ABCB6 was reported as a causative gene of DUH. Methodology We performed genome-wide linkage scan using Illumina Human 660W-Quad BeadChip and exome sequencing analyses using Agilent SureSelect Human All Exon Kits in a multiplex Chinese DUH family to identify the pathogenic mutations and verified the candidate mutations using Sanger sequencing. Quantitative RT-PCR and Immunohistochemistry was performed to verify the expression of the pathogenic gene, Zebrafish was also used to confirm the functional role of ABCB6 in melanocytes and pigmentation. Results Genome-wide linkage (assuming autosomal dominant inheritance mode) and exome sequencing analyses identified ABCB6 as the disease candidate gene by discovering a coding mutation (c.1358C>T; p.Ala453Val) that co-segregates with the disease phenotype. Further mutation analysis of ABCB6 in four other DUH families and two sporadic cases by Sanger sequencing confirmed the mutation (c.1358C>T; p.Ala453Val) and discovered a second, co-segregating coding mutation (c.964A>C; p.Ser322Lys) in one of the four families. Both mutations were heterozygous in DUH patients and not present in the 1000 Genome Project and dbSNP database as well as 1,516 unrelated Chinese healthy controls. Expression analysis in human skin and mutagenesis interrogation in zebrafish confirmed the functional role of ABCB6 in melanocytes and pigmentation. Given the involvement of ABCB6 mutations in coloboma, we performed ophthalmological examination of the DUH carriers of ABCB6 mutations and found ocular abnormalities in them. Conclusion Our study has advanced our understanding of DUH pathogenesis and revealed the shared pathological mechanism between pigmentary DUH and ocular coloboma. PMID:24498303

  16. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of the mitogen-activated protein kinase gene family from banana suggest involvement of specific members in different stages of fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Asif, Mehar Hasan; Lakhwani, Deepika; Pathak, Sumya; Bhambhani, Sweta; Bag, Sumit K; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are important components of the tripartite mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascade and play an important role in plant growth and development. Although members of the MAPK gene family have been identified in model plants, little information is available regarding this gene family in fruit crops. In this study, we carried out a computational analysis using the Musa Genome database to identify members of the MAPK gene family in banana, an economically important crop and the most popular fruit worldwide. Our analysis identified 25 members of the MAP kinase (MAPK or MPK) gene family. Phylogenetic analyses of MPKs in Arabidopsis, Oryza, and Populus have classified these MPKs into four subgroups. The presence of conserved domains in the deduced amino acid sequences, phylogeny, and genomic organization strongly support their identity as members of the MPK gene family. Expression analysis during ethylene-induced banana fruit ripening suggests the involvement of several MPKs in the ethylene signal transduction pathway that are necessary for banana fruit ripening. Analysis of the cis-regulatory elements in the promoter regions and the involvement of the identified MPKs in various cellular processes, as analyzed using Pathway Studio, suggest a role for the banana MPK gene family in diverse functions related to growth, development, and the stress response. This report is the first concerning the identification of members of a gene family and the elucidation of their role in various processes using the Musa Genome database. PMID:24275941

  17. Chronic Periodontitis Genome-wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Rhodin, K.; Divaris, K.; North, K.E.; Barros, S.P.; Moss, K.; Beck, J.D.; Offenbacher, S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of chronic periodontitis (CP) offer rich data sources for the investigation of candidate genes, functional elements, and pathways. We used GWAS data of CP (n = 4,504) and periodontal pathogen colonization (n = 1,020) from a cohort of adult Americans of European descent participating in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study and employed a MAGENTA approach (i.e., meta-analysis gene set enrichment of variant associations) to obtain gene-centric and gene set association results corrected for gene size, number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and local linkage disequilibrium characteristics based on the human genome build 18 (National Center for Biotechnology Information build 36). We used the Gene Ontology, Ingenuity, KEGG, Panther, Reactome, and Biocarta databases for gene set enrichment analyses. Six genes showed evidence of statistically significant association: 4 with severe CP (NIN, p = 1.6 × 10−7; ABHD12B, p = 3.6 × 10−7; WHAMM, p = 1.7 × 10−6; AP3B2, p = 2.2 × 10−6) and 2 with high periodontal pathogen colonization (red complex–KCNK1, p = 3.4 × 10−7; Porphyromonas gingivalis–DAB2IP, p = 1.0 × 10−6). Top-ranked genes for moderate CP were HGD (p = 1.4 × 10−5), ZNF675 (p = 1.5 × 10−5), TNFRSF10C (p = 2.0 × 10−5), and EMR1 (p = 2.0 × 10−5). Loci containing NIN, EMR1, KCNK1, and DAB2IP had showed suggestive evidence of association in the earlier single-nucleotide polymorphism–based analyses, whereas WHAMM and AP2B2 emerged as novel candidates. The top gene sets included severe CP (“endoplasmic reticulum membrane,” “cytochrome P450,” “microsome,” and “oxidation reduction”) and moderate CP (“regulation of gene expression,” “zinc ion binding,” “BMP signaling pathway,” and “ruffle”). Gene-centric analyses offer a promising avenue for efficient interrogation of large-scale GWAS data. These results highlight genes in previously identified loci and

  18. Genome-Wide Architecture of Disease Resistance Genes in Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Christopoulou, Marilena; Wo, Sebastian Reyes-Chin; Kozik, Alex; McHale, Leah K; Truco, Maria-Jose; Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Michelmore, Richard W

    2015-12-01

    Genome-wide motif searches identified 1134 genes in the lettuce reference genome of cv. Salinas that are potentially involved in pathogen recognition, of which 385 were predicted to encode nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat receptor (NLR) proteins. Using a maximum-likelihood approach, we grouped the NLRs into 25 multigene families and 17 singletons. Forty-one percent of these NLR-encoding genes belong to three families, the largest being RGC16 with 62 genes in cv. Salinas. The majority of NLR-encoding genes are located in five major resistance clusters (MRCs) on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8 and cosegregate with multiple disease resistance phenotypes. Most MRCs contain primarily members of a single NLR gene family but a few are more complex. MRC2 spans 73 Mb and contains 61 NLRs of six different gene families that cosegregate with nine disease resistance phenotypes. MRC3, which is 25 Mb, contains 22 RGC21 genes and colocates with Dm13. A library of 33 transgenic RNA interference tester stocks was generated for functional analysis of NLR-encoding genes that cosegregated with disease resistance phenotypes in each of the MRCs. Members of four NLR-encoding families, RGC1, RGC2, RGC21, and RGC12 were shown to be required for 16 disease resistance phenotypes in lettuce. The general composition of MRCs is conserved across different genotypes; however, the specific repertoire of NLR-encoding genes varied particularly of the rapidly evolving Type I genes. These tester stocks are valuable resources for future analyses of additional resistance phenotypes. PMID:26449254

  19. Genome-Wide Architecture of Disease Resistance Genes in Lettuce

    PubMed Central

    Christopoulou, Marilena; Wo, Sebastian Reyes-Chin; Kozik, Alex; McHale, Leah K.; Truco, Maria-Jose; Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Michelmore, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide motif searches identified 1134 genes in the lettuce reference genome of cv. Salinas that are potentially involved in pathogen recognition, of which 385 were predicted to encode nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat receptor (NLR) proteins. Using a maximum-likelihood approach, we grouped the NLRs into 25 multigene families and 17 singletons. Forty-one percent of these NLR-encoding genes belong to three families, the largest being RGC16 with 62 genes in cv. Salinas. The majority of NLR-encoding genes are located in five major resistance clusters (MRCs) on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8 and cosegregate with multiple disease resistance phenotypes. Most MRCs contain primarily members of a single NLR gene family but a few are more complex. MRC2 spans 73 Mb and contains 61 NLRs of six different gene families that cosegregate with nine disease resistance phenotypes. MRC3, which is 25 Mb, contains 22 RGC21 genes and colocates with Dm13. A library of 33 transgenic RNA interference tester stocks was generated for functional analysis of NLR-encoding genes that cosegregated with disease resistance phenotypes in each of the MRCs. Members of four NLR-encoding families, RGC1, RGC2, RGC21, and RGC12 were shown to be required for 16 disease resistance phenotypes in lettuce. The general composition of MRCs is conserved across different genotypes; however, the specific repertoire of NLR-encoding genes varied particularly of the rapidly evolving Type I genes. These tester stocks are valuable resources for future analyses of additional resistance phenotypes. PMID:26449254

  20. Genome-wide identification and comparative expression analysis reveal a rapid expansion and functional divergence of duplicated genes in the WRKY gene family of cabbage, Brassica oleracea var. capitata.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qiu-Yang; Xia, En-Hua; Liu, Fei-Hu; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2015-02-15

    WRKY transcription factors (TFs), one of the ten largest TF families in higher plants, play important roles in regulating plant development and resistance. To date, little is known about the WRKY TF family in Brassica oleracea. Recently, the completed genome sequence of cabbage (B. oleracea var. capitata) allows us to systematically analyze WRKY genes in this species. A total of 148 WRKY genes were characterized and classified into seven subgroups that belong to three major groups. Phylogenetic and synteny analyses revealed that the repertoire of cabbage WRKY genes was derived from a common ancestor shared with Arabidopsis thaliana. The B. oleracea WRKY genes were found to be preferentially retained after the whole-genome triplication (WGT) event in its recent ancestor, suggesting that the WGT event had largely contributed to a rapid expansion of the WRKY gene family in B. oleracea. The analysis of RNA-Seq data from various tissues (i.e., roots, stems, leaves, buds, flowers and siliques) revealed that most of the identified WRKY genes were positively expressed in cabbage, and a large portion of them exhibited patterns of differential and tissue-specific expression, demonstrating that these gene members might play essential roles in plant developmental processes. Comparative analysis of the expression level among duplicated genes showed that gene expression divergence was evidently presented among cabbage WRKY paralogs, indicating functional divergence of these duplicated WRKY genes. PMID:25481634

  1. ReplicationDomain: a visualization tool and comparative database for genome-wide replication timing data

    PubMed Central

    Weddington, Nodin; Stuy, Alexander; Hiratani, Ichiro; Ryba, Tyrone; Yokochi, Tomoki; Gilbert, David M

    2008-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic DNA replication is regulated at the level of large chromosomal domains (0.5–5 megabases in mammals) within which replicons are activated relatively synchronously. These domains replicate in a specific temporal order during S-phase and our genome-wide analyses of replication timing have demonstrated that this temporal order of domain replication is a stable property of specific cell types. Results We have developed ReplicationDomain as a web-based database for analysis of genome-wide replication timing maps (replication profiles) from various cell lines and species. This database also provides comparative information of transcriptional expression and is configured to display any genome-wide property (for instance, ChIP-Chip or ChIP-Seq data) via an interactive web interface. Our published microarray data sets are publicly available. Users may graphically display these data sets for a selected genomic region and download the data displayed as text files, or alternatively, download complete genome-wide data sets. Furthermore, we have implemented a user registration system that allows registered users to upload their own data sets. Upon uploading, registered users may choose to: (1) view their data sets privately without sharing; (2) share with other registered users; or (3) make their published or "in press" data sets publicly available, which can fulfill journal and funding agencies' requirements for data sharing. Conclusion ReplicationDomain is a novel and powerful tool to facilitate the comparative visualization of replication timing in various cell types as well as other genome-wide chromatin features and is considerably faster and more convenient than existing browsers when viewing multi-megabase segments of chromosomes. Furthermore, the data upload function with the option of private viewing or sharing of data sets between registered users should be a valuable resource for the scientific community. PMID:19077204

  2. Genome-wide linkage analysis of a Parkinsonian-pyramidal syndrome pedigree by 500 K SNP arrays.

    PubMed

    Shojaee, Seyedmehdi; Sina, Farzad; Banihosseini, Setareh Sadat; Kazemi, Mohammad Hossein; Kalhor, Reza; Shahidi, Gholam-Ali; Fakhrai-Rad, Hossein; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Elahi, Elahe

    2008-06-01

    Robust SNP genotyping technologies and data analysis programs have encouraged researchers in recent years to use SNPs for linkage studies. Platforms used to date have been 10 K chip arrays, but the possible value of interrogating SNPs at higher densities has been considered. Here, we present a genome-wide linkage analysis by means of a 500 K SNP platform. The analysis was done on a large pedigree affected with Parkinsonian-pyramidal syndrome (PPS), and the results showed linkage to chromosome 22. Sequencing of candidate genes revealed a disease-associated homozygous variation (R378G) in FBXO7. FBXO7 codes for a member of the F-box family of proteins, all of which may have a role in the ubiquitin-proteosome protein-degradation pathway. This pathway has been implicated in various neurodegenerative diseases, and identification of FBXO7 as the causative gene of PPS is expected to shed new light on its role. The performance of the array was assessed and systematic analysis of effects of SNP density reduction was performed with the real experimental data. Our results suggest that linkage in our pedigree may have been missed had we used chips containing less than 100,000 SNPs across the genome. PMID:18513678

  3. Genome-Wide Identification of Calcium Dependent Protein Kinase Gene Family in Plant Lineage Shows Presence of Novel D-x-D and D-E-L Motifs in EF-Hand Domain

    PubMed Central

    Mohanta, Tapan K.; Mohanta, Nibedita; Mohanta, Yugal K.; Bae, Hanhong

    2015-01-01

    Calcium ions are considered ubiquitous second messengers in eukaryotic signal transduction pathways. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration are modulated by various signals such as hormones and biotic and abiotic stresses. Modulation of Ca2+ ion leads to stimulation of calcium dependent protein kinase genes (CPKs), which results in regulation of gene expression and therefore mediates plant growth and development as well as biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we reported the CPK gene family of 40 different plant species (950 CPK genes) and provided a unified nomenclature system for all of them. In addition, we analyzed their genomic, biochemical and structural conserved features. Multiple sequence alignment revealed that the kinase domain, auto-inhibitory domain and EF-hands regions of regulatory domains are highly conserved in nature. Additionally, the EF-hand domains of higher plants were found to contain four D-x-D and two D-E-L motifs, while lower eukaryotic plants had two D-x-D and one D-x-E motifs in their EF-hands. Phylogenetic analysis showed that CPK genes are clustered into four different groups. By studying the CPK gene family across the plant lineage, we provide the first evidence of the presence of D-x-D motif in the calcium binding EF-hand domain of CPK proteins. PMID:26734045

  4. Genome-wide identification, classification and expression analysis in fungal-plant interactions of cutinase gene family and functional analysis of a putative ClCUT7 in Curvularia lunata.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Hou, Jumei; Wang, Yuying; Jin, Yazhong; Borth, Wayne; Zhao, Fengzhou; Liu, Zheng; Hu, John; Zuo, Yuhu

    2016-06-01

    Cutinase is described as playing various roles in fungal-plant pathogen interactions, such as eliciting host-derived signals, fungal spore attachment and carbon acquisition during saprophytic growth. However, the characteristics of the cutinase genes, their expression in compatible interactions and their roles in pathogenesis have not been reported in Curvularia lunata, an important leaf spot pathogen of maize in China. Therefore, a cutinase gene family analysis could have profound significance. In this study, we identified 13 cutinase genes (ClCUT1 to ClCUT13) in the C. lunata genome. Multiple sequence alignment showed that most fungal cutinase proteins had one highly conserved GYSQG motif and a similar DxVCxG[ST]-[LIVMF](3)-x(3)H motif. Gene structure analyses of the cutinases revealed a complex intron-exon pattern with differences in the position and number of introns and exons. Based on phylogenetic relationship analysis, C. lunata cutinases and 78 known cutinase proteins from other fungi were classified into four groups with subgroups, but the C. lunata cutinases clustered in only three of the four groups. Motif analyses showed that each group of cutinases from C. lunata had a common motif. Real-time PCR indicated that transcript levels of the cutinase genes in a compatible interaction between pathogen and host had varied expression patterns. Interestingly, the transcript levels of ClCUT7 gradually increased during early pathogenesis with the most significant up-regulation at 3 h post-inoculation. When ClCUT7 was deleted, pathogenicity of the mutant decreased on unwounded maize (Zea mays) leaves. On wounded maize leaves, however, the mutant caused symptoms similar to the wild-type strain. Moreover, the ClCUT7 mutant had an approximately 10 % reduction in growth rate when cutin was the sole carbon source. In conclusion, we identified and characterized the cutinase family genes of C. lunata, analyzed their expression patterns in a compatible host

  5. Genome-wide identification of Dicer-like, Argonaute and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene families and their expression analyses in response to viral infection and abiotic stresses in Solanum lycopersicum.

    PubMed

    Bai, Miao; Yang, Guo-Shun; Chen, Wen-Ting; Mao, Zhen-Chuan; Kang, Hou-Xiang; Chen, Guo-Hua; Yang, Yu-Hong; Xie, Bing-Yan

    2012-06-10

    Dicer, Argonaute and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase form the core components to trigger RNA silencing. Although tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is a dicotyledon model plant, no systematic analysis and expression profiling of these genes in tomato has been undertaken previously. In this study, seven Dicer-like (SlDCLs), 15 Argonaute (SlAGOs) and six RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (SlRDRs) genes were identified in tomato. These genes were categorized into four subgroups based on phylogenetic analyses. Comprehensive analyses of gene structure, genomic localization and similarity among these genes were performed. Their expression patterns were investigated by means of expression models in different tissues and organs using online data and semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Many of the candidate genes were up-regulated in response to Tomato yellow leaf curl virus infection and abiotic stresses. The expression models of tandem gene duplications among SlDCL2s indicated the DCL2 family plays an important role in the evolution of tomato. PMID:22406496

  6. Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1999 Spotlight on Research 2012 July 2012 (historical) Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma A ... out to see if a technology called whole genome sequencing would help them find other genetic risk ...

  7. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human epidermal melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Haltaufderhyde, Kirk D.; Oancea, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Because human epidermal melanocytes (HEMs) provide critical protection against skin cancer, sunburn, and photoaging, a genome-wide perspective of gene expression in these cells is vital to understanding human skin physiology. In this study we performed high throughput sequencing of HEMs to obtain a complete data set of transcript sizes, abundances, and splicing. As expected, we found that melanocyte specific genes that function in pigmentation were among the highest expressed genes. We analyzed receptor, ion channel and transcription factor gene families to get a better understanding of the cell signalling pathways used by melanocytes. We also performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of lightly versus darkly pigmented HEMs and found 16 genes differentially expressed in the two pigmentation phenotypes; of those, only one putative melanosomal transporter (SLC45A2) has known function in pigmentation. In addition, we found 166 genes with splice isoforms expressed exclusively in one pigmentation phenotype, 17 of which are genes involved in signal transduction. Our melanocyte transcriptome study provides a comprehensive view and may help identify novel pigmentation genes and potential pharmacological targets. PMID:25451175

  8. Genome-Wide Association Study for Endothelial Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lieb, Wolfgang; Chen, Ming-Huei; Larson, Martin G.; Safa, Radwan; Teumer, Alexander; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Lin, Honghuang; Smith, Holly M.; Koch, Manja; Lorbeer, Roberto; Völker, Uwe; Nauck, Matthias; Völzke, Henry; Wallaschofski, Henri; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Endothelial growth factors including angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), its soluble receptor Tie-2 (sTie-2) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) play important roles in angiogenesis, vascular remodeling, local tumor growth and metastatic potential of various cancers. Circulating levels of these biomarkers have a heritable component (between 13% and 56%), but the underlying genetic variation influencing these biomarker levels is largely unknown. Methods and Results We performed a genome-wide association study for circulating Ang-2, sTie-2, and HGF in 3571 Framingham Heart Study (FHS) participants and assessed replication of the top hits for Ang-2 and sTie-2 in 3184 participants of the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP). In multivariable-adjusted models, sTie-2 and HGF concentrations were associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes encoding the respective biomarkers (top p=2.40×10−65 [rs2273720] and 3.64×10−19 [rs5745687], respectively). Likewise, rs2442517 in the MCPH1 gene (in which the Ang-2 gene is embedded) was associated with Ang-2 levels (p=5.05×10−8 in FHS and 8.39×10−5 in SHIP). Furthermore, SNPs in the AB0 gene were associated with sTie-2 (top SNP rs8176693 with p=1.84×10−33 in FHS; p=2.53×10−30 in SHIP) and Ang-2 (rs8176746 with p=2.07×10−8 in FHS; p=0.001 in SHIP) levels on a genome-wide significant level. The top genetic loci explained between 1.7% (Ang-2) and 11.2% (sTie-2) of the inter-individual variation in biomarker levels. Conclusions Genetic variation contributes to the inter-individual variation in growth factor levels and explains a modest proportion of circulating HGF, Ang-2, and Tie-2. This may potentially contribute to the familial susceptibility to cancer, a premise that warrants further studies. PMID:25552591

  9. A genome-wide association study to detect genetic variation for postpartum dysgalactia syndrome in five commercial pig breeding lines.

    PubMed

    Preissler, Regine; Tetens, Jens; Reiners, Kerstin; Looft, Holger; Kemper, Nicole

    2013-08-01

    Postpartum dysgalactia syndrome (PDS) in sows is an important disease after parturition with a relevant economic impact, affecting the health and welfare of both sows and piglets. The genetic background of this disease has been discussed and its heritability estimated, but further genetic analyses are lacking in detail. The aim of the current study was to detect loci affecting the susceptibility to PDS through a genome-wide association approach. The study was designed as a family-based association study with matched sampling of affected sows and healthy half- or full-sib control sows on six farms. For the study, 597 sows (322 affected vs. 275 healthy control sows) were genotyped on 62 163 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using the Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip. After quality control, 585 sows (314 affected vs. 271 healthy control sows) and 49 740 SNPs remained for further analysis. Statistics were performed mainly with the r package genabel and included a principal component analysis. A statistically significant genome-wide associated SNP was identified on porcine chromosome (SSC) 17. Further promising results with moderate significance were detected on SSC 13 and on an unplaced scaffold with an older annotation on SSC 15. The PRICKLE2 and NRP2 genes were identified as candidate genes near associated SNPs. Several quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been previously described in these genomic regions, including QTL for mammary gland condition, as teat number and non-functional nipples QTL, as well as QTL for body temperature and gestation length. PMID:23742276

  10. Genome-Wide Association for Growth Traits in Canchim Beef Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Buzanskas, Marcos E.; Grossi, Daniela A.; Ventura, Ricardo V.; Schenkel, Flávio S.; Sargolzaei, Mehdi; Meirelles, Sarah L. C.; Mokry, Fabiana B.; Higa, Roberto H.; Mudadu, Maurício A.; da Silva, Marcos V. G. Barbosa.; Niciura, Simone C. M.; Júnior, Roberto A. A. Torres.; Alencar, Maurício M.; Regitano, Luciana C. A.; Munari, Danísio P.

    2014-01-01

    Studies are being conducted on the applicability of genomic data to improve the accuracy of the selection process in livestock, and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) provide valuable information to enhance the understanding on the genetics of complex traits. The aim of this study was to identify genomic regions and genes that play roles in birth weight (BW), weaning weight adjusted for 210 days of age (WW), and long-yearling weight adjusted for 420 days of age (LYW) in Canchim cattle. GWAS were performed by means of the Generalized Quasi-Likelihood Score (GQLS) method using genotypes from the BovineHD BeadChip and estimated breeding values for BW, WW, and LYW. Data consisted of 285 animals from the Canchim breed and 114 from the MA genetic group (derived from crossings between Charolais sires and ½ Canchim + ½ Zebu dams). After applying a false discovery rate correction at a 10% significance level, a total of 4, 12, and 10 SNPs were significantly associated with BW, WW, and LYW, respectively. These SNPs were surveyed to their corresponding genes or to surrounding genes within a distance of 250 kb. The genes DPP6 (dipeptidyl-peptidase 6) and CLEC3B (C-type lectin domain family 3 member B) were highlighted, considering its functions on the development of the brain and skeletal system, respectively. The GQLS method identified regions on chromosome associated with birth weight, weaning weight, and long-yearling weight in Canchim and MA animals. New candidate regions for body weight traits were detected and some of them have interesting biological functions, of which most have not been previously reported. The observation of QTL reports for body weight traits, covering areas surrounding the genes (SNPs) herein identified provides more evidence for these associations. Future studies targeting these areas could provide further knowledge to uncover the genetic architecture underlying growth traits in Canchim cattle. PMID:24733441

  11. Genome-wide signatures of male-mediated migration shaping the Indian gene pool.

    PubMed

    ArunKumar, GaneshPrasad; Tatarinova, Tatiana V; Duty, Jeff; Rollo, Debra; Syama, Adhikarla; Arun, Varatharajan Santhakumari; Kavitha, Valampuri John; Triska, Petr; Greenspan, Bennett; Wells, R Spencer; Pitchappan, Ramasamy

    2015-09-01

    Multiple questions relating to contributions of cultural and demographical factors in the process of human geographical dispersal remain largely unanswered. India, a land of early human settlement and the resulting diversity is a good place to look for some of the answers. In this study, we explored the genetic structure of India using a diverse panel of 78 males genotyped using the GenoChip. Their genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) diversity was examined in the context of various covariates that influence Indian gene pool. Admixture analysis of genome-wide SNP data showed high proportion of the Southwest Asian component in all of the Indian samples. Hierarchical clustering based on admixture proportions revealed seven distinct clusters correlating to geographical and linguistic affiliations. Convex hull overlay of Y-chromosomal haplogroups on the genome-wide SNP principal component analysis brought out distinct non-overlapping polygons of F*-M89, H*-M69, L1-M27, O2a-M95 and O3a3c1-M117, suggesting a male-mediated migration and expansion of the Indian gene pool. Lack of similar correlation with mitochondrial DNA clades indicated a shared genetic ancestry of females. We suggest that ancient male-mediated migratory events and settlement in various regional niches led to the present day scenario and peopling of India. PMID:25994871

  12. Genome-wide association analysis to predict optimal antipsychotic dosage in schizophrenia: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Koga, Arthur T; Strauss, John; Zai, Clement; Remington, Gary; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, several studies have investigated genetic polymorphisms of antipsychotic drug-metabolizing enzymes and receptors. However, most studies focused on drug response and very few have investigated the genetic influence on antipsychotic dosage. The aim of the present study is to test the association between antipsychotic dosages at genome-wide level. The current dosage of antipsychotic medications was collected from 79 schizophrenia patients. The dosage was standardized using three different methods: chlorpromazine equivalent (CPZe), defined daily dose (DDD), and percentage of maximum dose (PM %). The patients were then genotyped using the Illumina HumanOmni2.5-8 BeadChip Kit. All markers were screened for significance using linear regression, and the p values were visualized using a Manhattan plot. The genome-wide analysis showed that the top Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with dosage variation were rs981975 on chromosome 14 for CPZe, rs4470690 on chromosome 4 for PM %, and rs79323383 on chromosome 8 for DDD. However, no genome-wide significantly associated SNPs were identified. In this pilot sample, we found promising trends for pharmacodynamic targets associated with antipsychotic dosage. Therefore, studies combining large prescription databases may identify genetic predictors to adjust the dose of antipsychotic medication. PMID:26821981

  13. Acetaminophen-NAPQI Hepatotoxicity: A Cell Line Model System Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Ann M.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Jenkins, Gregory D.; Batzler, Anthony J.; Pelleymounter, Linda L.; Kalari, Krishna R.; Ji, Yuan; Chai, Yubo; Nordgren, Kendra K. S.; Weinshilboum, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Acetaminophen is the leading cause of acute hepatic failure in many developed nations. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity is mediated by the reactive metabolite N-acetyl-p-benzoquinonimine (NAPQI). We performed a “discovery” genome-wide association study using a cell line–based model system to study the possible contribution of genomics to NAPQI-induced cytotoxicity. A total of 176 lymphoblastoid cell lines from healthy subjects were treated with increasing concentrations of NAPQI. Inhibiting concentration 50 values were determined and were associated with “glutathione pathway” gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genome-wide basal messenger RNA expression, as well as with 1.3 million genome-wide SNPs. A group of SNPs in linkage disequilibrium on chromosome 3 was highly associated with NAPQI toxicity. The p value for rs2880961, the SNP with the lowest p value, was 1.88 × 10−7. This group of SNPs mapped to a “gene desert,” but chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated binding of several transcription factor proteins including heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) and HSF2, at or near rs2880961. These chromosome 3 SNPs were not significantly associated with variation in basal expression for any of the genome-wide genes represented on the Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 GeneChip. We have used a cell line–based model system to identify a SNP signal associated with NAPQI cytotoxicity. If these observations are validated in future clinical studies, this SNP signal might represent a potential biomarker for risk of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. The mechanisms responsible for this association remain unclear. PMID:21177773

  14. Methodological Issues in Multistage Genome-wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Duncan C.; Casey, Graham; Conti, David V.; Haile, Robert W.; Lewinger, Juan Pablo; Stram, Daniel O.

    2010-01-01

    Because of the high cost of commercial genotyping chip technologies, many investigations have used a two-stage design for genome-wide association studies, using part of the sample for an initial discovery of “promising” SNPs at a less stringent significance level and the remainder in a joint analysis of just these SNPs using custom genotyping. Typical cost savings of about 50% are possible with this design to obtain comparable levels of overall type I error and power by using about half the sample for stage I and carrying about 0.1% of SNPs forward to the second stage, the optimal design depending primarily upon the ratio of costs per genotype for stages I and II. However, with the rapidly declining costs of the commercial panels, the generally low observed ORs of current studies, and many studies aiming to test multiple hypotheses and multiple endpoints, many investigators are abandoning the two-stage design in favor of simply genotyping all available subjects using a standard high-density panel. Concern is sometimes raised about the absence of a “replication” panel in this approach, as required by some high-profile journals, but it must be appreciated that the two-stage design is not a discovery/replication design but simply a more efficient design for discovery using a joint analysis of the data from both stages. Once a subset of highly-significant associations has been discovered, a truly independent “exact replication” study is needed in a similar population of the same promising SNPs using similar methods. This can then be followed by (1) “generalizability” studies to assess the full scope of replicated associations across different races, different endpoints, different interactions, etc.; (2) fine-mapping or re-sequencing to try to identify the causal variant; and (3) experimental studies of the biological function of these genes. Multistage sampling designs may be more useful at this stage, say for selecting subsets of subjects for deep re

  15. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Two Novel Promising Candidate Genes Affecting Escherichia coli F4ab/F4ac Susceptibility in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xin; Niu, Xiao-Yan; Ding, Xiang-Dong; Liu, Jian-Feng; Zhang, Qin

    2012-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) expressing F4 fimbria is the major pathogenic bacteria causing diarrhoea in neonatal and post-weaning piglets. Previous studies have revealed that the susceptibility to ETEC F4ab/F4ac is an autosomal Mendelian dominant trait and the loci controlling the F4ab/F4ac receptor are located on SSC13q41, between markers SW207 and S0283. To pinpoint these loci and further validate previous findings, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using a two generation family-based population, consisting of 301 piglets with phenotypes of susceptibility to ETEC F4ab/F4ac by the vitro adhesion test. The DNA of all piglets and their parents was genotyped using the Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip, and 50,972 and 50,483 SNPs were available for F4ab and F4ac susceptibility, respectively, in the association analysis after quality control. In summary, 28 and 18 significant SNPs (p<0.05) were detected associated with F4ab and F4ac susceptibility respectively at genome-wide significance level. From these significant findings, two novel candidate genes, HEG1 and ITGB5, were firstly identified as the most promising genes underlying F4ab/F4ac susceptibility in swine according to their functions and positions. Our findings herein provide a novel evidence for unravelling genetic mechanism of diarrhoea risk in piglets. PMID:22457712

  16. Assessing statistical significance in multivariable genome wide association analysis

    PubMed Central

    Buzdugan, Laura; Kalisch, Markus; Navarro, Arcadi; Schunk, Daniel; Fehr, Ernst; Bühlmann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Although Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) genotype a very large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), the data are often analyzed one SNP at a time. The low predictive power of single SNPs, coupled with the high significance threshold needed to correct for multiple testing, greatly decreases the power of GWAS. Results: We propose a procedure in which all the SNPs are analyzed in a multiple generalized linear model, and we show its use for extremely high-dimensional datasets. Our method yields P-values for assessing significance of single SNPs or groups of SNPs while controlling for all other SNPs and the family wise error rate (FWER). Thus, our method tests whether or not a SNP carries any additional information about the phenotype beyond that available by all the other SNPs. This rules out spurious correlations between phenotypes and SNPs that can arise from marginal methods because the ‘spuriously correlated’ SNP merely happens to be correlated with the ‘truly causal’ SNP. In addition, the method offers a data driven approach to identifying and refining groups of SNPs that jointly contain informative signals about the phenotype. We demonstrate the value of our method by applying it to the seven diseases analyzed by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC). We show, in particular, that our method is also capable of finding significant SNPs that were not identified in the original WTCCC study, but were replicated in other independent studies. Availability and implementation: Reproducibility of our research is supported by the open-source Bioconductor package hierGWAS. Contact: peter.buehlmann@stat.math.ethz.ch Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153677

  17. Quantitative trait loci on chromosome 8q24 for pancreatic beta-cell function and 7q11 for insulin sensitivity in obese nondiabetic white and black families: evidence from genome-wide linkage scans in the NHLBI Hypertension Genetic Epidemiology Network (HyperGEN) study.

    PubMed

    An, Ping; Freedman, Barry I; Rich, Stephen S; Mandel, Stephen A; Arnett, Donna K; Myers, Richard H; Chen, Yii-Der I; Hunt, Steven C; Rao, D C

    2006-02-01

    Genome-wide linkage scans were carried out using a multipoint variance components method in white and black families of the NHLBI Hypertension Genetic Epidemiology Network (HyperGEN) study to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for pancreatic beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity estimated through the newly released nonlinear computer version of homeostasis model assessment 2. Participants fasting <8 h, with diagnosed type 2 diabetes, or taking blood glucose or blood lipid-lowering medications were excluded. Both phenotypes were adjusted separately by race and sex for the effects of age, BMI, and field center before linkage scans using 370 microsatellite markers were performed. A total of 685 white families (1,180 sibpairs) and 773 black families (775 sibpairs) were evaluated as well as subsets including 267 obese white families (757 sibpairs) and 427 obese black families (599 sibpairs) identified through tree-linkage analyses using interacting covariates of age, sex, and BMI. For beta-cell function in the obese white families, significant (logarithm of odds [LOD] score >3.6) evidence supporting linkages was detected on chromosome 8q24 at D8S1179 (135 cM, LOD score 4.2, empirical P = 0.002) and at D8S1128 (140 cM, LOD score 3.7, empirical P = 0.003). In addition, two regions supported linkage for insulin sensitivity index in the obese black families on chromosome 7q11 at D7S3046 (79 cM, LOD score 3.0, empirical P = 0.018) and on chromosome 6q26 at D6S1277 (173 cM, LOD score 3.0, empirical P = 0.018). Reducing clinical heterogeneity using obesity data and improved estimates of beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity may have permitted identification of a QTL on chromosome 8q24 for beta-cell function in the presence of estimated insulin resistance and a QTL on chromosome 7q11 for insulin sensitivity. These regions replicate previous reports for type 2 diabetes-associated traits. PMID:16443794

  18. A GENOME-WIDE LINKAGE AND ASSOCIATION SCAN REVEALS NOVEL LOCI FOR AUTISM

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Lauren A.; Arking, Dan E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Although autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, attempts to identify specific susceptibility genes have thus far met with limited success 1. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) using half a million or more markers, particularly those with very large sample sizes achieved through meta-analysis, have shown great success in mapping genes for other complex genetic traits (http://www.genome.gov/26525384). Consequently, we initiated a linkage and association mapping study using half a million genome-wide SNPs in a common set of 1,031 multiplex autism families (1,553 affected offspring). We identified regions of suggestive and significant linkage on chromosomes 6q27 and 20p13, respectively. Initial analysis did not yield genome-wide significant associations; however, genotyping of top hits in additional families revealed a SNP on chromosome 5p15 (between SEMA5A and TAS2R1) that was significantly associated with autism (P = 2 × 10−7). We also demonstrated that expression of SEMA5A is reduced in brains from autistic patients, further implicating SEMA5A as an autism susceptibility gene. The linkage regions reported here provide targets for rare variation screening while the discovery of a single novel association demonstrates the action of common variants. PMID:19812673

  19. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis yielded genome-wide significant associations with schizophrenia for seven loci, five of which are new (1p21.3, 2q32.3, 8p23.2, 8q21.3 and 10q24.32-q24.33) and two of which have been previously implicated (6p21.32-p22.1 and 18q21.2). The strongest new finding (P = 1.6 × 10−11) was with rs1625579 within an intron of a putative primary transcript for MIR137 (microRNA 137), a known regulator of neuronal development. Four other schizophrenia loci achieving genome-wide significance contain predicted targets of MIR137, suggesting MIR137-mediated dysregulation as a previously unknown etiologic mechanism in schizophrenia. In a joint analysis with a bipolar disorder sample (16,374 affected individuals and 14,044 controls), three loci reached genome-wide significance: CACNA1C (rs4765905, P = 7.0 × 10−9), ANK3 (rs10994359, P = 2.5 × 10−8) and the ITIH3-ITIH4 region (rs2239547, P = 7.8 × 10−9). PMID:21926974

  20. A super powerful method for genome wide association study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome-Wide Association Studies shed light on the identification of genes underlying human diseases and agriculturally important traits. This potential has been shadowed by false positive findings. The Mixed Linear Model (MLM) method is flexible enough to simultaneously incorporate population struct...

  1. Design and bioinformatics analysis of genome-wide CLIP experiments

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Xiao, Guanghua; Chu, Yongjun; Zhang, Michael Q.; Corey, David R.; Xie, Yang

    2015-01-01

    The past decades have witnessed a surge of discoveries revealing RNA regulation as a central player in cellular processes. RNAs are regulated by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) at all post-transcriptional stages, including splicing, transportation, stabilization and translation. Defects in the functions of these RBPs underlie a broad spectrum of human pathologies. Systematic identification of RBP functional targets is among the key biomedical research questions and provides a new direction for drug discovery. The advent of cross-linking immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (genome-wide CLIP) technology has recently enabled the investigation of genome-wide RBP–RNA binding at single base-pair resolution. This technology has evolved through the development of three distinct versions: HITS-CLIP, PAR-CLIP and iCLIP. Meanwhile, numerous bioinformatics pipelines for handling the genome-wide CLIP data have also been developed. In this review, we discuss the genome-wide CLIP technology and focus on bioinformatics analysis. Specifically, we compare the strengths and weaknesses, as well as the scopes, of various bioinformatics tools. To assist readers in choosing optimal procedures for their analysis, we also review experimental design and procedures that affect bioinformatics analyses. PMID:25958398

  2. Genome-wide association mapping of soybean aphid resistance traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean aphid is the most damaging insect pest of soybean in the Upper Midwest and is primarily controlled by insecticides. Soybean aphid resistance (i.e., Rag genes) has been documented in some soybean lines at chromosomes 6, 7, 13, and 16, but more sources of resistance are needed. Genome-wide ass...

  3. Genome-wide characterization of maize miRNA genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that play essential roles in plant growth and development. We conducted a genome-wide survey of maize miRNA genes, characterizing their structure, expression, and evolution. Computational approaches based on homology and secondary structure modeling ident...

  4. Massively expedited genome-wide heritability analysis (MEGHA)

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Tian; Nichols, Thomas E.; Lee, Phil H.; Holmes, Avram J.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Buckner, Randy L.; Sabuncu, Mert R.; Smoller, Jordan W.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery and prioritization of heritable phenotypes is a computational challenge in a variety of settings, including neuroimaging genetics and analyses of the vast phenotypic repositories in electronic health record systems and population-based biobanks. Classical estimates of heritability require twin or pedigree data, which can be costly and difficult to acquire. Genome-wide complex trait analysis is an alternative tool to compute heritability estimates from unrelated individuals, using genome-wide data that are increasingly ubiquitous, but is computationally demanding and becomes difficult to apply in evaluating very large numbers of phenotypes. Here we present a fast and accurate statistical method for high-dimensional heritability analysis using genome-wide SNP data from unrelated individuals, termed massively expedited genome-wide heritability analysis (MEGHA) and accompanying nonparametric sampling techniques that enable flexible inferences for arbitrary statistics of interest. MEGHA produces estimates and significance measures of heritability with several orders of magnitude less computational time than existing methods, making heritability-based prioritization of millions of phenotypes based on data from unrelated individuals tractable for the first time to our knowledge. As a demonstration of application, we conducted heritability analyses on global and local morphometric measurements derived from brain structural MRI scans, using genome-wide SNP data from 1,320 unrelated young healthy adults of non-Hispanic European ancestry. We also computed surface maps of heritability for cortical thickness measures and empirically localized cortical regions where thickness measures were significantly heritable. Our analyses demonstrate the unique capability of MEGHA for large-scale heritability-based screening and high-dimensional heritability profile construction. PMID:25675487

  5. Massively expedited genome-wide heritability analysis (MEGHA).

    PubMed

    Ge, Tian; Nichols, Thomas E; Lee, Phil H; Holmes, Avram J; Roffman, Joshua L; Buckner, Randy L; Sabuncu, Mert R; Smoller, Jordan W

    2015-02-24

    The discovery and prioritization of heritable phenotypes is a computational challenge in a variety of settings, including neuroimaging genetics and analyses of the vast phenotypic repositories in electronic health record systems and population-based biobanks. Classical estimates of heritability require twin or pedigree data, which can be costly and difficult to acquire. Genome-wide complex trait analysis is an alternative tool to compute heritability estimates from unrelated individuals, using genome-wide data that are increasingly ubiquitous, but is computationally demanding and becomes difficult to apply in evaluating very large numbers of phenotypes. Here we present a fast and accurate statistical method for high-dimensional heritability analysis using genome-wide SNP data from unrelated individuals, termed massively expedited genome-wide heritability analysis (MEGHA) and accompanying nonparametric sampling techniques that enable flexible inferences for arbitrary statistics of interest. MEGHA produces estimates and significance measures of heritability with several orders of magnitude less computational time than existing methods, making heritability-based prioritization of millions of phenotypes based on data from unrelated individuals tractable for the first time to our knowledge. As a demonstration of application, we conducted heritability analyses on global and local morphometric measurements derived from brain structural MRI scans, using genome-wide SNP data from 1,320 unrelated young healthy adults of non-Hispanic European ancestry. We also computed surface maps of heritability for cortical thickness measures and empirically localized cortical regions where thickness measures were significantly heritable. Our analyses demonstrate the unique capability of MEGHA for large-scale heritability-based screening and high-dimensional heritability profile construction. PMID:25675487

  6. A Proposal of a Single Chip Surface Detector Trigger Based on Altera CycloneTM Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szadkowski, Z.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2003-07-01

    In May 2003 the new Altera r PLD family CycloneT M appears on the market. The new chip allows significantly simplifying the construction of the surface detector trigger as well as decreasing the total costs and improving parameters. In comparison with currently approved ACEX r chips, Cyclone chips contain much bigger internal memory (a possibility of implementation of slow memory inside the PLD chip or extension of fast buffers). 1.5 V supplies the core (reduction of power consumption). The single chip allows implementing interleaving DMA mode and avoiding problems with chips synchronization. The register performance indicated by compiler is on the level 130 MHz. Such a high internal speed allows increasing the sampling frequency, which could improve a time resolution of the trigger. More resources allow implementing new kind of triggers based up on Power Spectrum Density. MegaCore r library offers DSP routies as FFT, which may be useful to recognize type of events.

  7. Revisiting the classification of curtoviruses based on genome-wide pairwise identity.

    PubMed

    Varsani, Arvind; Martin, Darren P; Navas-Castillo, Jesús; Moriones, Enrique; Hernández-Zepeda, Cecilia; Idris, Ali; Murilo Zerbini, F; Brown, Judith K

    2014-07-01

    Members of the genus Curtovirus (family Geminiviridae) are important pathogens of many wild and cultivated plant species. Until recently, relatively few full curtovirus genomes have been characterised. However, with the 19 full genome sequences now available in public databases, we revisit the proposed curtovirus species and strain classification criteria. Using pairwise identities coupled with phylogenetic evidence, revised species and strain demarcation guidelines have been instituted. Specifically, we have established 77 % genome-wide pairwise identity as a species demarcation threshold and 94 % genome-wide pairwise identity as a strain demarcation threshold. Hence, whereas curtovirus sequences with >77 % genome-wide pairwise identity would be classified as belonging to the same species, those sharing >94 % identity would be classified as belonging to the same strain. We provide step-by-step guidelines to facilitate the classification of newly discovered curtovirus full genome sequences and a set of defined criteria for naming new species and strains. The revision yields three curtovirus species: Beet curly top virus (BCTV), Spinach severe surly top virus (SpSCTV) and Horseradish curly top virus (HrCTV). PMID:24463952

  8. Genome-wide patterns of identity-by-descent sharing in the French Canadian founder population

    PubMed Central

    Gauvin, Héloïse; Moreau, Claudia; Lefebvre, Jean-François; Laprise, Catherine; Vézina, Hélène; Labuda, Damian; Roy-Gagnon, Marie-Hélène

    2014-01-01

    In genetics the ability to accurately describe the familial relationships among a group of individuals can be very useful. Recent statistical tools succeeded in assessing the degree of relatedness up to 6–7 generations with good power using dense genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism data to estimate the extent of identity-by-descent (IBD) sharing. It is therefore important to describe genome-wide patterns of IBD sharing for more remote and complex relatedness between individuals, such as that observed in a founder population like Quebec, Canada. Taking advantage of the extended genealogical records of the French Canadian founder population, we first compared different tools to identify regions of IBD in order to best describe genome-wide IBD sharing and its correlation with genealogical characteristics. Results showed that the extent of IBD sharing identified with FastIBD correlates best with relatedness measured using genealogical data. Total length of IBD sharing explained 85% of the genealogical kinship's variance. In addition, we observed significantly higher sharing in pairs of individuals with at least one inbred ancestor compared with those without any. Furthermore, patterns of IBD sharing and average sharing were different across regional populations, consistent with the settlement history of Quebec. Our results suggest that, as expected, the complex relatedness present in founder populations is reflected in patterns of IBD sharing. Using these patterns, it is thus possible to gain insight on the types of distant relationships in a sample from a founder population like Quebec. PMID:24129432

  9. Genome-Wide Meta-Analysis of Longitudinal Alcohol Consumption Across Youth and Early Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Adkins, Daniel E; Clark, Shaunna L; Copeland, William E; Kennedy, Martin; Conway, Kevin; Angold, Adrian; Maes, Hermine; Liu, Youfang; Kumar, Gaurav; Erkanli, Alaattin; Patkar, Ashwin A; Silberg, Judy; Brown, Tyson H; Fergusson, David M; Horwood, L John; Eaves, Lindon; van den Oord, Edwin J C G; Sullivan, Patrick F; Costello, E J

    2015-08-01

    The public health burden of alcohol is unevenly distributed across the life course, with levels of use, abuse, and dependence increasing across adolescence and peaking in early adulthood. Here, we leverage this temporal patterning to search for common genetic variants predicting developmental trajectories of alcohol consumption. Comparable psychiatric evaluations measuring alcohol consumption were collected in three longitudinal community samples (N=2,126, obs=12,166). Consumption-repeated measurements spanning adolescence and early adulthood were analyzed using linear mixed models, estimating individual consumption trajectories, which were then tested for association with Illumina 660W-Quad genotype data (866,099 SNPs after imputation and QC). Association results were combined across samples using standard meta-analysis methods. Four meta-analysis associations satisfied our pre-determined genome-wide significance criterion (FDR<0.1) and six others met our 'suggestive' criterion (FDR<0.2). Genome-wide significant associations were highly biological plausible, including associations within GABA transporter 1, SLC6A1 (solute carrier family 6, member 1), and exonic hits in LOC100129340 (mitofusin-1-like). Pathway analyses elaborated single marker results, indicating significant enriched associations to intuitive biological mechanisms, including neurotransmission, xenobiotic pharmacodynamics, and nuclear hormone receptors (NHR). These findings underscore the value of combining longitudinal behavioral data and genome-wide genotype information in order to study developmental patterns and improve statistical power in genomic studies. PMID:26081443

  10. Genome-wide meta-analysis of longitudinal alcohol consumption across youth and early adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Adkins, Daniel E.; Clark, Shaunna L.; Copeland, William E.; Kennedy, Martin; Conway, Kevin; Angold, Adrian; Maes, Hermine; Liu, Youfang; Kumar, Gaurav; Erkanli, Alaattin; Patkar, Ashwin A.; Silberg, Judy; Brown, Tyson H.; Fergusson, David M.; Horwood, L. John; Eaves, Lindon; van den Oord, Edwin J.C.G.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Costello, E. J.

    2016-01-01

    The public health burden of alcohol is unevenly distributed across the life course, with levels of use, abuse and dependence increasing across adolescence and peaking in early adulthood. Here we leverage this temporal patterning to search for common genetic variants predicting developmental trajectories of alcohol consumption. Comparable psychiatric evaluations measuring alcohol consumption were collected in three, longitudinal community samples (N=2,126, obs=12,166). Consumption repeated measurements spanning adolescence and early adulthood were analyzed using linear mixed models, estimating individual consumption trajectories, which were then tested for association with Illumina 660W-Quad genotype data (866,099 SNPs after imputation and QC). Association results were combined across samples using standard meta-analysis methods. Four meta-analysis associations satisfied our pre-determined genome-wide significance criterion (FDR<0.1) and 6 others met our “suggestive” criterion (FDR<0.2). Genome-wide significant associations were highly biological plausible, including associations within GABA transporter 1, SLC6A1 (solute carrier family 6, member 1), and exonic hits in LOC100129340 (mitofusin-1-like). Pathway analyses elaborated single marker results, indicating significant enriched associations to intuitive biological mechanisms including neurotransmission, xenobiotic pharmacodynamics and nuclear hormone receptors. These findings underscore the value of combining longitudinal behavioral data and genome-wide genotype information in order to study developmental patterns and improve statistical power in genomic studies. PMID:26081443

  11. Genome-wide association studies for hematological traits in Chinese Sutai pigs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been shown that hematological traits are strongly associated with the metabolism and the immune system in domestic pig. However, little is known about the genetic architecture of hematological traits. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling hematological traits, we performed single marker Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and haplotype analysis for 15 hematological traits in 495 Chinese Sutai pigs. Results We identified 161 significant SNPs including 44 genome-wide significant SNPs associated with 11 hematological traits by single marker GWAS. Most of them were located on SSC2. Meanwhile, we detected 499 significant SNPs containing 154 genome-wide significant SNPs associated with 9 hematological traits by haplotype analysis. Most of the identified loci were located on SSC7 and SSC9. Conclusions We detected 4 SNPs with pleiotropic effects on SSC2 by single marker GWAS and (or) on SSC7 by haplotype analysis. Furthermore, through checking the gene functional annotations, positions and their expression variation, we finally selected 7 genes as potential candidates. Specially, we found that three genes (TRIM58, TRIM26 and TRIM21) of them originated from the same gene family and executed similar function of innate and adaptive immune. The findings will contribute to dissection the immune gene network, further identification of causative mutations underlying the identified QTLs and providing insights into the molecular basis of hematological trait in domestic pig. PMID:24674592

  12. Identifying Human Genome-Wide CNV, LOH and UPD by Targeted Sequencing of Selected Regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Li, Wei; Xia, Yingying; Wang, Chongzhi; Tang, Y Tom; Guo, Wenying; Li, Jinliang; Zhao, Xia; Sun, Yepeng; Hu, Juan; Zhen, Hefu; Zhang, Xiandong; Chen, Chao; Shi, Yujian; Li, Lin; Cao, Hongzhi; Du, Hongli; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Copy-number variations (CNV), loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and uniparental disomy (UPD) are large genomic aberrations leading to many common inherited diseases, cancers, and other complex diseases. An integrated tool to identify these aberrations is essential in understanding diseases and in designing clinical interventions. Previous discovery methods based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS) require very high depth of coverage on the whole genome scale, and are cost-wise inefficient. Another approach, whole exome genome sequencing (WEGS), is limited to discovering variations within exons. Thus, we are lacking efficient methods to detect genomic aberrations on the whole genome scale using next-generation sequencing technology. Here we present a method to identify genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD for the human genome via selectively sequencing a small portion of genome termed Selected Target Regions (SeTRs). In our experiments, the SeTRs are covered by 99.73%~99.95% with sufficient depth. Our developed bioinformatics pipeline calls genome-wide CNVs with high confidence, revealing 8 credible events of LOH and 3 UPD events larger than 5M from 15 individual samples. We demonstrate that genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD can be detected using a cost-effective SeTRs sequencing approach, and that LOH and UPD can be identified using just a sample grouping technique, without using a matched sample or familial information. PMID:25919136

  13. Identifying Human Genome-Wide CNV, LOH and UPD by Targeted Sequencing of Selected Regions

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wenying; Li, Jinliang; Zhao, Xia; Sun, Yepeng; Hu, Juan; Zhen, Hefu; Zhang, Xiandong; Chen, Chao; Shi, Yujian; Li, Lin; Cao, Hongzhi; Du, Hongli; Li, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Copy-number variations (CNV), loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and uniparental disomy (UPD) are large genomic aberrations leading to many common inherited diseases, cancers, and other complex diseases. An integrated tool to identify these aberrations is essential in understanding diseases and in designing clinical interventions. Previous discovery methods based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS) require very high depth of coverage on the whole genome scale, and are cost-wise inefficient. Another approach, whole exome genome sequencing (WEGS), is limited to discovering variations within exons. Thus, we are lacking efficient methods to detect genomic aberrations on the whole genome scale using next-generation sequencing technology. Here we present a method to identify genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD for the human genome via selectively sequencing a small portion of genome termed Selected Target Regions (SeTRs). In our experiments, the SeTRs are covered by 99.73%~99.95% with sufficient depth. Our developed bioinformatics pipeline calls genome-wide CNVs with high confidence, revealing 8 credible events of LOH and 3 UPD events larger than 5M from 15 individual samples. We demonstrate that genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD can be detected using a cost-effective SeTRs sequencing approach, and that LOH and UPD can be identified using just a sample grouping technique, without using a matched sample or familial information. PMID:25919136

  14. Genome-wide association analysis of age at onset and psychotic symptoms in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Pamela Belmonte; Pirooznia, Mehdi; Goes, Fernando S.; Seifuddin, Fayaz; Steele, Jo; Lee, Phil Hyoun; Huang, Jie; Hamshere, Marian; DePaulo, J. Raymond; Kelsoe, John R.; Rietschel, Marcella; Nöthen, Markus; Cichon, Sven; Gurling, Hugh; Purcell, Shaun; Smoller, Jordan W.; Craddock, Nick; Schulze, ThomasG.; McMahon, Francis J.; Potash, James B.; Zandi, Peter P.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several susceptibility loci for bipolar disorder (BP), most notably ANK3. However, most of the inherited risk for BP remains unexplained. One reason for the limited success may be the genetic heterogeneity of BP. Clinical sub-phenotypes of BP may identify more etiologically homogeneous subsets of patients, which can be studied with increased power to detect genetic variation. Here, we report on a mega-analysis of two widely studied sub-phenotypes of BP, age at onset and psychotic symptoms, which are familial and clinically significant. We combined data from three GWAS: NIMH Bipolar Disorder Genetic Association Information Network (GAIN-BP), NIMH Bipolar Disorder Genome Study(BiGS), and a German sample. The combined sample consisted of 2836 BP cases with information on sub-phenotypes and 2744 controls. Imputation was performed, resulting in 2.3 million SNPs available for analysis. No SNP reached genome-wide significance for either sub-phenotype. In addition, no SNP reached genome-wide significance in a meta-analysis with an independent replication sample. We had 80% power to detect associations with a common SNP at an OR of 1.6 for psychotic symptoms and a mean difference of 1.8 years in age at onset. Age at onset and psychotic symptoms in BP may be influenced by many genes of smaller effect sizes or other variants not measured well by SNP arrays, such as rare alleles. PMID:21305692

  15. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Benjamin M; Medland, Sarah E.; Ripke, Stephan; Asherson, Philip; Franke, Barbara; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schäfer, Helmut; Holmans, Peter; Daly, Mark; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Freitag, Christine; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Walitza, Susanne; Warnke, Andreas; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Buitelaar, Jan; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Lambregts-Rommelse, Nanda; Gill, Michael; Anney, Richard J.L.; Langely, Kate; O’Donovan, Michael; Williams, Nigel; Owen, Michael; Thapar, Anita; Kent, Lindsey; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph; Doyle, Alysa; Smalley, Susan; Loo, Sandra; Hakonarson, Hakon; Elia, Josephine; Todorov, Alexandre; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Ebstein, Richard P.; Rothenberger, Aribert; Banaschewski, Tobias; Oades, Robert D.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; McGough, James; Nisenbaum, Laura; Middleton, Frank; Hu, Xiaolan; Nelson, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Objective Although twin and family studies have shown Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. As prior genome-wide association scans (GWAS) have not yielded significant results, we conducted a meta-analysis of existing studies to boost statistical power. Method We used data from four projects: a) the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), b) phase I of the International Multicenter ADHD Genetics project (IMAGE), c) phase II of IMAGE (IMAGE II), and d) the Pfizer funded study from the University of California, Los Angeles, Washington University and the Massachusetts General Hospital (PUWMa). The final sample size consisted of 2,064 trios, 896 cases and 2,455 controls. For each study, we imputed HapMap SNPs, computed association test statistics and transformed them to Z-scores, and then combined weighted Z-scores in a meta-analysis. Results No genome-wide significant associations were found, although an analysis of candidate genes suggests they may be involved in the disorder. Conclusions Given that ADHD is a highly heritable disorder, our negative results suggest that the effects of common ADHD risk variants must, individually, be very small or that other types of variants, e.g. rare ones, account for much of the disorder’s heritability. PMID:20732625

  16. The genetic architecture of seed composition in soybean is refined by genome-wide association scans across multiple populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean oil and meal are major contributors to world-wide food production. Consequently, the genetic basis for soybean seed composition has been intensely studied using family-based mapping. Population-based mapping approaches, in the form of genome-wide association (GWA) scans, have been able to re...

  17. Genome-wide association with select biomarker traits in the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Emelia J; Dupuis, Josée; Larson, Martin G; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Booth, Sarah L; Govindaraju, Diddahally R; Kathiresan, Sekar; Keaney, John F; Keyes, Michelle J; Lin, Jing-Ping; Meigs, James B; Robins, Sander J; Rong, Jian; Schnabel, Renate; Vita, Joseph A; Wang, Thomas J; Wilson, Peter WF; Wolf, Philip A; Vasan, Ramachandran S

    2007-01-01

    Background Systemic biomarkers provide insights into disease pathogenesis, diagnosis, and risk stratification. Many systemic biomarker concentrations are heritable phenotypes. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) provide mechanisms to investigate the genetic contributions to biomarker variability unconstrained by current knowledge of physiological relations. Methods We examined the association of Affymetrix 100K GeneChip single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to 22 systemic biomarker concentrations in 4 biological domains: inflammation/oxidative stress; natriuretic peptides; liver function; and vitamins. Related members of the Framingham Offspring cohort (n = 1012; mean age 59 ± 10 years, 51% women) had both phenotype and genotype data (minimum-maximum per phenotype n = 507–1008). We used Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE), Family Based Association Tests (FBAT) and variance components linkage to relate SNPs to multivariable-adjusted biomarker residuals. Autosomal SNPs (n = 70,987) meeting the following criteria were studied: minor allele frequency ≥ 10%, call rate ≥ 80% and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium p ≥ 0.001. Results With GEE, 58 SNPs had p < 10-6: the top SNPs were rs2494250 (p = 1.00*10-14) and rs4128725 (p = 3.68*10-12) for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP1), and rs2794520 (p = 2.83*10-8) and rs2808629 (p = 3.19*10-8) for C-reactive protein (CRP) averaged from 3 examinations (over about 20 years). With FBAT, 11 SNPs had p < 10-6: the top SNPs were the same for MCP1 (rs4128725, p = 3.28*10-8, and rs2494250, p = 3.55*10-8), and also included B-type natriuretic peptide (rs437021, p = 1.01*10-6) and Vitamin K percent undercarboxylated osteocalcin (rs2052028, p = 1.07*10-6). The peak LOD (logarithm of the odds) scores were for MCP1 (4.38, chromosome 1) and CRP (3.28, chromosome 1; previously described) concentrations; of note the 1.5 support interval included the MCP1 and CRP SNPs reported above (GEE model). Previous candidate SNP associations

  18. Ion Torrent sequencing for conducting genome-wide scans for mutation mapping analysis.

    PubMed

    Damerla, Rama Rao; Chatterjee, Bishwanath; Li, You; Francis, Richard J B; Fatakia, Sarosh N; Lo, Cecilia W

    2014-04-01

    Mutation mapping in mice can be readily accomplished by genome wide segregation analysis of polymorphic DNA markers. In this study, we showed the efficacy of Ion Torrent next generation sequencing for conducting genome-wide scans to map and identify a mutation causing congenital heart disease in a mouse mutant, Bishu, recovered from a mouse mutagenesis screen. The Bishu mutant line generated in a C57BL/6J (B6) background was intercrossed with another inbred strain, C57BL/10J (B10), and the resulting B6/B10 hybrid offspring were intercrossed to generate mutants used for the mapping analysis. For each mutant sample, a panel of 123 B6/B10 polymorphic SNPs distributed throughout the mouse genome was PCR amplified, bar coded, and then pooled to generate a single library used for Ion Torrent sequencing. Sequencing carried out using the 314 chip yielded >600,000 usable reads. These were aligned and mapped using a custom bioinformatics pipeline. Each SNP was sequenced to a depth >500×, allowing accurate automated calling of the B6/B10 genotypes. This analysis mapped the mutation in Bishu to an interval on the proximal region of mouse chromosome 4. This was confirmed by parallel capillary sequencing of the 123 polymorphic SNPs. Further analysis of genes in the map interval identified a splicing mutation in Dnaic1(c.204+1G>A), an intermediate chain dynein, as the disease causing mutation in Bishu. Overall, our experience shows Ion Torrent amplicon sequencing is high throughput and cost effective for conducting genome-wide mapping analysis and is easily scalable for other high volume genotyping analyses. PMID:24306492

  19. Genome-wide patterns of selection in 230 ancient Eurasians.

    PubMed

    Mathieson, Iain; Lazaridis, Iosif; Rohland, Nadin; Mallick, Swapan; Patterson, Nick; Roodenberg, Songül Alpaslan; Harney, Eadaoin; Stewardson, Kristin; Fernandes, Daniel; Novak, Mario; Sirak, Kendra; Gamba, Cristina; Jones, Eppie R; Llamas, Bastien; Dryomov, Stanislav; Pickrell, Joseph; Arsuaga, Juan Luís; de Castro, José María Bermúdez; Carbonell, Eudald; Gerritsen, Fokke; Khokhlov, Aleksandr; Kuznetsov, Pavel; Lozano, Marina; Meller, Harald; Mochalov, Oleg; Moiseyev, Vyacheslav; Guerra, Manuel A Rojo; Roodenberg, Jacob; Vergès, Josep Maria; Krause, Johannes; Cooper, Alan; Alt, Kurt W; Brown, Dorcas; Anthony, David; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Haak, Wolfgang; Pinhasi, Ron; Reich, David

    2015-12-24

    Ancient DNA makes it possible to observe natural selection directly by analysing samples from populations before, during and after adaptation events. Here we report a genome-wide scan for selection using ancient DNA, capitalizing on the largest ancient DNA data set yet assembled: 230 West Eurasians who lived between 6500 and 300 bc, including 163 with newly reported data. The new samples include, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide ancient DNA from Anatolian Neolithic farmers, whose genetic material we obtained by extracting from petrous bones, and who we show were members of the population that was the source of Europe's first farmers. We also report a transect of the steppe region in Samara between 5600 and 300 bc, which allows us to identify admixture into the steppe from at least two external sources. We detect selection at loci associated with diet, pigmentation and immunity, and two independent episodes of selection on height. PMID:26595274

  20. Genome-wide patterns of selection in 230 ancient Eurasians

    PubMed Central

    Mathieson, Iain; Lazaridis, Iosif; Rohland, Nadin; Mallick, Swapan; Patterson, Nick; Roodenberg, Songül Alpaslan; Harney, Eadaoin; Stewardson, Kristin; Fernandes, Daniel; Novak, Mario; Sirak, Kendra; Gamba, Cristina; Jones, Eppie R.; Llamas, Bastien; Dryomov, Stanislav; Pickrel, Joseph; Arsuaga, Juan Luís; de Castro, José María Bermúdez; Carbonell, Eudald; Gerritsen, Fokke; Khokhlov, Aleksandr; Kuznetsov, Pavel; Lozano, Marina; Meller, Harald; Mochalov, Oleg; Moiseyev, Vayacheslav; Rojo Guerra, Manuel A.; Roodenberg, Jacob; Vergès, Josep Maria; Krause, Johannes; Cooper, Alan; Alt, Kurt W.; Brown, Dorcas; Anthony, David; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Haak, Wolfgang; Pinhasi, Ron; Reich, David

    2016-01-01

    Ancient DNA makes it possible to directly witness natural selection by analyzing samples from populations before, during and after adaptation events. Here we report the first scan for selection using ancient DNA, capitalizing on the largest genome-wide dataset yet assembled: 230 West Eurasians dating to between 6500 and 1000 BCE, including 163 with newly reported data. The new samples include the first genome-wide data from the Anatolian Neolithic culture whose genetic material we extracted from the DNA-rich petrous bone and who we show were members of the population that was the source of Europe’s first farmers. We also report a complete transect of the steppe region in Samara between 5500 and 1200 BCE that allows us to recognize admixture from at least two external sources into steppe populations during this period. We detect selection at loci associated with diet, pigmentation and immunity, and two independent episodes of selection on height. PMID:26595274

  1. Genome-Wide Significant Loci: How Important Are They?

    PubMed Central

    Björkegren, Johan L.M.; Kovacic, Jason C.; Dudley, Joel T.; Schadt, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been extensively used to study common complex diseases such as coronary artery disease (CAD), revealing 153 suggestive CAD loci, of which at least 46 have been validated as having genome-wide significance. However, these loci collectively explain <10% of the genetic variance in CAD. Thus, we must address the key question of what factors constitute the remaining 90% of CAD heritability. We review possible limitations of GWAS, and contextually consider some candidate CAD loci identified by this method. Looking ahead, we propose systems genetics as a complementary approach to unlocking the CAD heritability and etiology. Systems genetics builds network models of relevant molecular processes by combining genetic and genomic datasets to ultimately identify key “drivers” of disease. By leveraging systems-based genetic approaches, we can help reveal the full genetic basis of common complex disorders, enabling novel diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities. PMID:25720628

  2. Genome-wide association study of schizophrenia in Ashkenazi Jews.

    PubMed

    Goes, Fernando S; McGrath, John; Avramopoulos, Dimitrios; Wolyniec, Paula; Pirooznia, Mehdi; Ruczinski, Ingo; Nestadt, Gerald; Kenny, Eimear E; Vacic, Vladimir; Peters, Inga; Lencz, Todd; Darvasi, Ariel; Mulle, Jennifer G; Warren, Stephen T; Pulver, Ann E

    2015-12-01

    Schizophrenia is a common, clinically heterogeneous disorder associated with lifelong morbidity and early mortality. Several genetic variants associated with schizophrenia have been identified, but the majority of the heritability remains unknown. In this study, we report on a case-control sample of Ashkenazi Jews (AJ), a founder population that may provide additional insights into genetic etiology of schizophrenia. We performed a genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) of 592 cases and 505 controls of AJ ancestry ascertained in the US. Subsequently, we performed a meta-analysis with an Israeli AJ sample of 913 cases and 1640 controls, followed by a meta-analysis and polygenic risk scoring using summary results from Psychiatric GWAS Consortium 2 schizophrenia study. The U.S. AJ sample showed strong evidence of polygenic inheritance (pseudo-R(2) ∼9.7%) and a SNP-heritability estimate of 0.39 (P = 0.00046). We found no genome-wide significant associations in the U.S. sample or in the combined US/Israeli AJ meta-analysis of 1505 cases and 2145 controls. The strongest AJ specific associations (P-values in 10(-6) -10(-7) range) were in the 22q 11.2 deletion region and included the genes TBX1, GLN1, and COMT. Supportive evidence (meta P < 1 × 10(-4) ) was also found for several previously identified genome-wide significant findings, including the HLA region, CNTN4, IMMP2L, and GRIN2A. The meta-analysis of the U.S. sample with the PGC2 results provided initial genome-wide significant evidence for six new loci. Among the novel potential susceptibility genes is PEPD, a gene involved in proline metabolism, which is associated with a Mendelian disorder characterized by developmental delay and cognitive deficits. PMID:26198764

  3. Genome-Wide Detection and Analysis of Multifunctional Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pritykin, Yuri; Ghersi, Dario; Singh, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Many genes can play a role in multiple biological processes or molecular functions. Identifying multifunctional genes at the genome-wide level and studying their properties can shed light upon the complexity of molecular events that underpin cellular functioning, thereby leading to a better understanding of the functional landscape of the cell. However, to date, genome-wide analysis of multifunctional genes (and the proteins they encode) has been limited. Here we introduce a computational approach that uses known functional annotations to extract genes playing a role in at least two distinct biological processes. We leverage functional genomics data sets for three organisms—H. sapiens, D. melanogaster, and S. cerevisiae—and show that, as compared to other annotated genes, genes involved in multiple biological processes possess distinct physicochemical properties, are more broadly expressed, tend to be more central in protein interaction networks, tend to be more evolutionarily conserved, and are more likely to be essential. We also find that multifunctional genes are significantly more likely to be involved in human disorders. These same features also hold when multifunctionality is defined with respect to molecular functions instead of biological processes. Our analysis uncovers key features about multifunctional genes, and is a step towards a better genome-wide understanding of gene multifunctionality. PMID:26436655

  4. Genome-Wide Detection and Analysis of Multifunctional Genes.

    PubMed

    Pritykin, Yuri; Ghersi, Dario; Singh, Mona

    2015-10-01

    Many genes can play a role in multiple biological processes or molecular functions. Identifying multifunctional genes at the genome-wide level and studying their properties can shed light upon the complexity of molecular events that underpin cellular functioning, thereby leading to a better understanding of the functional landscape of the cell. However, to date, genome-wide analysis of multifunctional genes (and the proteins they encode) has been limited. Here we introduce a computational approach that uses known functional annotations to extract genes playing a role in at least two distinct biological processes. We leverage functional genomics data sets for three organisms--H. sapiens, D. melanogaster, and S. cerevisiae--and show that, as compared to other annotated genes, genes involved in multiple biological processes possess distinct physicochemical properties, are more broadly expressed, tend to be more central in protein interaction networks, tend to be more evolutionarily conserved, and are more likely to be essential. We also find that multifunctional genes are significantly more likely to be involved in human disorders. These same features also hold when multifunctionality is defined with respect to molecular functions instead of biological processes. Our analysis uncovers key features about multifunctional genes, and is a step towards a better genome-wide understanding of gene multifunctionality. PMID:26436655

  5. Genome-wide association study of periodontal pathogen colonization.

    PubMed

    Divaris, K; Monda, K L; North, K E; Olshan, A F; Lange, E M; Moss, K; Barros, S P; Beck, J D; Offenbacher, S

    2012-07-01

    Pathological shifts of the human microbiome are characteristic of many diseases, including chronic periodontitis. To date, there is limited evidence on host genetic risk loci associated with periodontal pathogen colonization. We conducted a genome-wide association (GWA) study among 1,020 white participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, whose periodontal diagnosis ranged from healthy to severe chronic periodontitis, and for whom "checkerboard" DNA-DNA hybridization quantification of 8 periodontal pathogens was performed. We examined 3 traits: "high red" and "high orange" bacterial complexes, and "high" Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) colonization. Genotyping was performed on the Affymetrix 6.0 platform. Imputation to 2.5 million markers was based on HapMap II-CEU, and a multiple-test correction was applied (genome-wide threshold of p < 5 × 10(-8)). We detected no genome-wide significant signals. However, 13 loci, including KCNK1, FBXO38, UHRF2, IL33, RUNX2, TRPS1, CAMTA1, and VAMP3, provided suggestive evidence (p < 5 × 10(-6)) of association. All associations reported for "red" and "orange" complex microbiota, but not for Aa, had the same effect direction in a second sample of 123 African-American participants. None of these polymorphisms was associated with periodontitis diagnosis. Investigations replicating these findings may lead to an improved understanding of the complex nature of host-microbiome interactions that characterizes states of health and disease. PMID:22699663

  6. Genome-wide polymorphisms show unexpected targets of natural selection.

    PubMed

    Pespeni, Melissa H; Garfield, David A; Manier, Mollie K; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2012-04-01

    Natural selection can act on all the expressed genes of an individual, leaving signatures of genetic differentiation or diversity at many loci across the genome. New power to assay these genome-wide effects of selection comes from associating multi-locus patterns of polymorphism with gene expression and function. Here, we performed one of the first genome-wide surveys in a marine species, comparing purple sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, from two distant locations along the species' wide latitudinal range. We examined 9112 polymorphic loci from upstream non-coding and coding regions of genes for signatures of selection with respect to gene function and tissue- and ontogenetic gene expression. We found that genetic differentiation (F(ST)) varied significantly across functional gene classes. The strongest enrichment occurred in the upstream regions of E3 ligase genes, enzymes known to regulate protein abundance during development and environmental stress. We found enrichment for high heterozygosity in genes directly involved in immune response, particularly NALP genes, which mediate pro-inflammatory signals during bacterial infection. We also found higher heterozygosity in immune genes in the southern population, where disease incidence and pathogen diversity are greater. Similar to the major histocompatibility complex in mammals, balancing selection may enhance genetic diversity in the innate immune system genes of this invertebrate. Overall, our results show that how genome-wide polymorphism data coupled with growing databases on gene function and expression can combine to detect otherwise hidden signals of selection in natural populations. PMID:21993504

  7. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Amin, Najaf; Bakshis, Erin; Baumert, Jens; Ding, Jingzhong; Liu, Yongmei; Marciante, Kristin; Meirelles, Osorio; Nalls, Michael A.; Sun, Yan V.; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Yu, Lei; Bandinelli, Stefania; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Bennett, David A.; Boomsma, Dorret; Cannas, Alessandra; Coker, Laura H.; de Geus, Eco; De Jager, Philip L.; Diez-Roux, Ana V.; Purcell, Shaun; Hu, Frank B.; Rimma, Eric B.; Hunter, David J.; Jensen, Majken K.; Curhan, Gary; Rice, Kenneth; Penman, Alan D.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Emeny, Rebecca; Eriksson, Johan G.; Evans, Denis A.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fornage, Myriam; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hofman, Albert; Illig, Thomas; Kardia, Sharon; Kelly-Hayes, Margaret; Koenen, Karestan; Kraft, Peter; Kuningas, Maris; Massaro, Joseph M.; Melzer, David; Mulas, Antonella; Mulder, Cornelis L.; Murray, Anna; Oostra, Ben A.; Palotie, Aarno; Penninx, Brenda; Petersmann, Astrid; Pilling, Luke C.; Psaty, Bruce; Rawal, Rajesh; Reiman, Eric M.; Schulz, Andrea; Shulman, Joshua M.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Smith, Albert V.; Sutin, Angelina R.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Völzke, Henry; Widen, Elisabeth; Yaffe, Kristine; Zonderman, Alan B.; Cucca, Francesco; Harris, Tamara; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; Llewellyn, David J.; Räikkönen, Katri; Tanaka, Toshiko

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression is a heritable trait that exists on a continuum of varying severity and duration. Yet, the search for genetic variants associated with depression has had few successes. We exploit the entire continuum of depression to find common variants for depressive symptoms. Methods In this genome-wide association study, we combined the results of 17 population-based studies assessing depressive symptoms with the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Replication of the independent top hits (p < 1 × 10−5) was performed in five studies assessing depressive symptoms with other instruments. In addition, we performed a combined meta-analysis of all 22 discovery and replication studies. Results The discovery sample comprised 34,549 individuals (mean age of 66.5) and no loci reached genome-wide significance (lowest p = 1.05 × 10−7). Seven independent single nucleotide polymorphisms were considered for replication. In the replication set (n = 16,709), we found suggestive association of one single nucleotide polymorphism with depressive symptoms (rs161645, 5q21, p = 9.19 × 10−3). This 5q21 region reached genome-wide significance (p = 4.78 × 10−8) in the overall meta-analysis combining discovery and replication studies (n = 51,258). Conclusions The results suggest that only a large sample comprising more than 50,000 subjects may be sufficiently powered to detect genes for depressive symptoms. PMID:23290196

  8. Genome-wide association and genomic prediction identifies associated loci and predicts the sensitivity of Tobacco ringspot virus in soybean plant introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genome-wide association study (GWAS) is a useful tool for detecting and characterizing traits of interest including those associated with disease resistance in soybean. The availability of 50,000 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers (SoySNP50K iSelect BeadChip; www.soybase.org) on 19,652...

  9. A genome-wide analysis of putative functional and exonic variation associated with extremely high intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Kadeva, Neli; Miller, Mike B.; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt; Stergiakouli, Evie; Davey Smith, George; Putallaz, Martha; Lubinski, David; Meaburn, Emma L.; Plomin, Robert; Simpson, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Although individual differences in intelligence (general cognitive ability) are highly heritable, molecular genetic analyses to date have had limited success in identifying specific loci responsible for its heritability. The present study is the first to investigate exome variation in individuals of extremely high intelligence. Under the quantitative genetic model, sampling from the high extreme of the distribution should provide increased power to detect associations. We therefore performed a case-control association analysis with 1 409 individuals drawn from the top 0.0003 (IQ > 170) of the population distribution of intelligence and 3 253 unselected population-based controls. Our analysis focused on putative functional exonic variants assayed on the Illumina Human Exome BeadChip. We did not observe any individual protein-altering variants that are reproducibly associated with extremely high intelligence and within the entire distribution of intelligence. Moreover, no significant associations were found for multiple rare alleles within individual genes. However, analyses using genome-wide similarity between unrelated individuals (Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis) indicate that the genotyped functional protein-altering variation yields a heritability estimate of 17.4% (SE 1.7%) based on a liability model. In addition, investigation of nominally significant associations revealed fewer rare alleles associated with extremely high intelligence than would be expected under the null hypothesis. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that rare functional alleles are more frequently detrimental than beneficial to intelligence. PMID:26239293

  10. Genome-wide association scan suggests basis for microtia in Awassi sheep.

    PubMed

    Jawasreh, K; Boettcher, P J; Stella, A

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary underdevelopment of the ear, a condition also known as microtia, has been observed in several sheep breeds as well as in humans and other species. Its genetic basis in sheep is unknown. The Awassi sheep, a breed native to southwest Asia, carries this phenotype and was targeted for molecular characterization via a genome-wide association study. DNA samples were collected from sheep in Jordan. Eight affected and 12 normal individuals were genotyped with the Illumina OvineSNP50(®) chip. Multilocus analyses failed to identify any genotypic association. In contrast, a single-locus analysis revealed a statistically significant association (P = 0.012, genome-wide) with a SNP at basepair 34 647 499 on OAR23. This marker is adjacent to the gene encoding transcription factor GATA-6, which has been shown to play a role in many developmental processes, including chondrogenesis. The lack of extended homozygosity in this region suggests a fairly ancient mutation, and the time of occurrence was estimated to be approximately 3000 years ago. Many of the earless sheep breeds may thus share the causative mutation, especially within the subgroup of fat-tailed, wool sheep. PMID:26990958

  11. A genome-wide analysis of putative functional and exonic variation associated with extremely high intelligence.

    PubMed

    Spain, S L; Pedroso, I; Kadeva, N; Miller, M B; Iacono, W G; McGue, M; Stergiakouli, E; Smith, G D; Putallaz, M; Lubinski, D; Meaburn, E L; Plomin, R; Simpson, M A

    2016-08-01

    Although individual differences in intelligence (general cognitive ability) are highly heritable, molecular genetic analyses to date have had limited success in identifying specific loci responsible for its heritability. This study is the first to investigate exome variation in individuals of extremely high intelligence. Under the quantitative genetic model, sampling from the high extreme of the distribution should provide increased power to detect associations. We therefore performed a case-control association analysis with 1409 individuals drawn from the top 0.0003 (IQ >170) of the population distribution of intelligence and 3253 unselected population-based controls. Our analysis focused on putative functional exonic variants assayed on the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip. We did not observe any individual protein-altering variants that are reproducibly associated with extremely high intelligence and within the entire distribution of intelligence. Moreover, no significant associations were found for multiple rare alleles within individual genes. However, analyses using genome-wide similarity between unrelated individuals (genome-wide complex trait analysis) indicate that the genotyped functional protein-altering variation yields a heritability estimate of 17.4% (s.e. 1.7%) based on a liability model. In addition, investigation of nominally significant associations revealed fewer rare alleles associated with extremely high intelligence than would be expected under the null hypothesis. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that rare functional alleles are more frequently detrimental than beneficial to intelligence. PMID:26239293

  12. Semiconductor-based sequencing of genome-wide DNA methylation states.

    PubMed

    Corley, Michael J; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Xin; Lum-Jones, Annette; Maunakea, Alika K

    2015-01-01

    Methylated DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing (MeDIP-Seq) is a widely used approach to study DNA methylation genome-wide. Here, we developed a MeDIP-Seq protocol compatible with the Ion Torrent semiconductor-based sequencing platform that is low cost, rapid, and scalable. We applied this protocol to demonstrate MeDIP-Seq on the Ion Torrent platform provides adequate coverage of CpG cytosines, the methylation states of which we validated at single-base resolution on the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array, and accurately identifies sites of differential DNA methylation. Furthermore, we applied an integrative approach to further investigate and confirm the role of DNA methylation in alternative splicing and to profile 5mC and 5hmC variants of DNA methylation in normal human brain tissue that is localized over distinct genomic regions. These applications of MeDIP-Seq on the Ion Torrent platform have broad utility and add to the current methodologies for profiling genome-wide DNA methylation states in normal and disease conditions. PMID:25602802

  13. Genome-wide Comparative Analysis of Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis Gives Insight into Opposing Genetic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Baurecht, Hansjörg; Hotze, Melanie; Brand, Stephan; Büning, Carsten; Cormican, Paul; Corvin, Aiden; Ellinghaus, David; Ellinghaus, Eva; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Hubner, Norbert; Illig, Thomas; Irvine, Alan D.; Kabesch, Michael; Lee, Young A.E.; Lieb, Wolfgang; Marenholz, Ingo; McLean, W.H. Irwin; Morris, Derek W.; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Nair, Rajan; Nöthen, Markus M.; Novak, Natalija; O’Regan, Grainne M.; Schreiber, Stefan; Smith, Catherine; Strauch, Konstantin; Stuart, Philip E.; Trembath, Richard; Tsoi, Lam C.; Weichenthal, Michael; Barker, Jonathan; Elder, James T.; Weidinger, Stephan; Cordell, Heather J.; Brown, Sara J.

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis and psoriasis are the two most common immune-mediated inflammatory disorders affecting the skin. Genome-wide studies demonstrate a high degree of genetic overlap, but these diseases have mutually exclusive clinical phenotypes and opposing immune mechanisms. Despite their prevalence, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis very rarely co-occur within one individual. By utilizing genome-wide association study and ImmunoChip data from >19,000 individuals and methodologies developed from meta-analysis, we have identified opposing risk alleles at shared loci as well as independent disease-specific loci within the epidermal differentiation complex (chromosome 1q21.3), the Th2 locus control region (chromosome 5q31.1), and the major histocompatibility complex (chromosome 6p21–22). We further identified previously unreported pleiotropic alleles with opposing effects on atopic dermatitis and psoriasis risk in PRKRA and ANXA6/TNIP1. In contrast, there was no evidence for shared loci with effects operating in the same direction on both diseases. Our results show that atopic dermatitis and psoriasis have distinct genetic mechanisms with opposing effects in shared pathways influencing epidermal differentiation and immune response. The statistical analysis methods developed in the conduct of this study have produced additional insight from previously published data sets. The approach is likely to be applicable to the investigation of the genetic basis of other complex traits with overlapping and distinct clinical features. PMID:25574825

  14. Genome-wide association discoveries of alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Lingjun; Lu, Lingeng; Tan, Yunlong; Pan, Xinghua; Cai, Yiqiang; Wang, Xiaoping; Hong, Jiang; Zhong, Chunlong; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Xiang-yang; Vanderlinden, Lauren A.; Tabakoff, Boris; Luo, Xingguang

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report the genome-wide significant and/or replicable risk variants for alcohol dependence and explore their potential biological functions. Methods We searched in PubMed for all genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of alcohol dependence. The following three types of the results were extracted: (1) genome-wide significant associations in an individual sample, the combined samples, or the meta-analysis (p<5×10−8); (2) top-ranked associations in an individual sample (p<10−5) that were nominally replicated in other samples (p<0.05); and (3) nominally replicable associations across at least three independent GWAS samples (p<0.05). These results were meta-analyzed. cis-eQTLs in human, RNA expression in rat and mouse brain and bioinformatics properties of all of these risk variants were analyzed. Results The variants located within ADH cluster were significantly associated with alcohol dependence at genome-wide level (p<5×10−8) in at least one sample. Some associations with the ADH cluster were replicable across six independent GWAS samples. The variants located within or near SERINC2, KIAA0040, MREG-PECR or PKNOX2 were significantly associated with alcohol dependence at genome-wide level (p<5×10−8) in meta-analysis or combined samples, and these associations were replicable across at least one sample. The associations with the variants within NRD1, GPD1L-CMTM8 or MAP3K9-PCNX were suggestive (5×10−8

  15. Genome Wide Screening of Candidate Genes for Improving Piglet Birth Weight Using High and Low Estimated Breeding Value Populations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lifan; Zhou, Xiang; Michal, Jennifer J.; Ding, Bo; Li, Rui; Jiang, Zhihua

    2014-01-01

    Birth weight is an economically important trait in pig production because it directly impacts piglet growth and survival rate. In the present study, we performed a genome wide survey of candidate genes and pathways associated with individual birth weight (IBW) using the Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip on 24 high (HEBV) and 24 low estimated breeding value (LEBV) animals. These animals were selected from a reference population of 522 individuals produced by three sires and six dam lines, which were crossbreds with multiple breeds. After quality-control, 43,257 SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms), including 42,243 autosomal SNPs and 1,014 SNPs on chromosome X, were used in the data analysis. A total of 27 differentially selected regions (DSRs), including 1 on Sus scrofa chromosome 1 (SSC1), 1 on SSC4, 2 on SSC5, 4 on SSC6, 2 on SSC7, 5 on SSC8, 3 on SSC9, 1 on SSC14, 3 on SSC18, and 5 on SSCX, were identified to show the genome wide separations between the HEBV and LEBV groups for IBW in piglets. A DSR with the most number of significant SNPs (including 7 top 0.1% and 31 top 5% SNPs) was located on SSC6, while another DSR with the largest genetic differences in FST was found on SSC18. These regions harbor known functionally important genes involved in growth and development, such as TNFRSF9 (tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 9), CA6 (carbonic anhydrase VI) and MDFIC (MyoD family inhibitor domain containing). A DSR rich in imprinting genes appeared on SSC9, which included PEG10 (paternally expressed 10), SGCE (sarcoglycan, epsilon), PPP1R9A (protein phosphatase 1, regulatory subunit 9A) and ASB4 (ankyrin repeat and SOCS box containing 4). More importantly, our present study provided evidence to support six quantitative trait loci (QTL) regions for pig birth weight, six QTL regions for average birth weight (ABW) and three QTL regions for litter birth weight (LBW) reported previously by other groups. Furthermore, gene ontology analysis with 183 genes

  16. Siblings with Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS): Results of a Genome-wide Scan for Stroke Loci

    PubMed Central

    Meschia, James F.; Nalls, Michael; Matarin, Mar; Brott, Thomas G.; Brown, Robert D.; Hardy, John; Kissela, Brett; Rich, Stephen S.; Singleton, Andrew; Hernandez, Dena; Ferrucci, Luigi; Pearce, Kerra; Keller, Margaret; Worrall, Bradford B.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Ischemic stroke has a strong familial component to risk. The Siblings with Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS) is a genome-wide family-based analysis that included use of imputed genotypes. SWISS was conducted to examine associations between SNPs and risk of stroke and stroke subtypes within pairs. Methods SWISS enrolled 312 probands with ischemic stroke across 70 US and Canadian centers. Affected siblings were ascertained by centers and confirmed by central record review; unaffected siblings were ascertained by telephone contact. Ischemic stroke was subtyped using TOAST criteria. Genotyping was performed using an Illumina 610 quad array (probands) and an Illumina linkage V array (affected siblings). SNPs were imputed using 1000 Genomes Project data and MACH software. Family-based association analyses were conducted using the sibling-transmission disequilibrium test. Results For all pairs, the correlation of age at stroke within pairs of affected siblings was r = 0.83 (95%CI, 0.78 to 0.86; P < 2.2×10−16). The correlation did not differ substantially by subtype. The concordance of stroke subtypes among affected pairs was 33.8% (kappa = 0.13; P = 5.06×10−4) and did not differ by age at stroke in the proband. Although no SNP achieved genome-wide significance for risk of ischemic stroke, there was clustering of the most associated SNPs on chromosomes 3p (NOS1) and 6p. Conclusions Stroke subtype and age at stroke in affected sibling pairs exhibit significant clustering. No individual SNP reached genome-wide significance. However, two promising candidate loci were identified, including one that contains NOS1, though these risk loci warrant further examination in larger sample collections. PMID:21940970

  17. Genome-wide Mapping Reveals Conservation of Promoter DNA Methylation Following Chicken Domestication

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qinghe; Wang, Yuanyuan; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Zhao, Yaofeng; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that environment influences DNA methylation, however, the extent of heritable DNA methylation variation following animal domestication remains largely unknown. Using meDIP-chip we mapped the promoter methylomes for 23,316 genes in muscle tissues of ancestral and domestic chickens. We systematically examined the variation of promoter DNA methylation in terms of different breeds, differentially expressed genes, SNPs and genes undergo genetic selection sweeps. While considerable changes in DNA sequence and gene expression programs were prevalent, we found that the inter-strain DNA methylation patterns were highly conserved in promoter region between the wild and domestic chicken breeds. Our data suggests a global preservation of DNA methylation between the wild and domestic chicken breeds in either a genome-wide or locus-specific scale in chick muscle tissues. PMID:25735894

  18. Stories and Challenges of Genome Wide Association Studies in Livestock — A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Aditi; Lee, Jun Seop; Dang, Chang Gwon; Sudrajad, Pita; Kim, Hyeong Cheol; Yeon, Seong Heum; Kang, Hee Seol; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Undoubtedly livestock is one of the major contributors to the economy of any country. The economic value of livestock includes meat, dairy products, fiber, fertilizer etc. Understanding and identifying the associations of quantitative trait loci (QTL) with the economically important traits is believed to substantially benefit the livestock industry. The past two decades have seen a flurry of interest in mapping the QTL associated with traits of economic importance on the genome. With the availability of single nucleotide polymorphism chip of various densities it is possible to identify regions, QTL and genes on the genome that explain the association and its effect on the phenotype under consideration. Remarkable advancement has been seen in genome wide association studies (GWAS) since its inception till the present day. In this review we describe the progress and challenges of GWAS in various livestock species. PMID:26194229

  19. Association weight matrix: a network-based approach towards functional genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Reverter, Antonio; Fortes, Marina R S

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we describe the Association Weight Matrix (AWM), a novel procedure to exploit the results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and, in combination with network inference algorithms, generate gene networks with regulatory and functional significance. In simple terms, the AWM is a matrix with rows represented by genes and columns represented by phenotypes. Individual {i, j}th elements in the AWM correspond to the association of the SNP in the ith gene to the jth phenotype. While our main objective is to provide a recipe-like tutorial on how to build and use AWM, we also take the opportunity to briefly reason the logic behind each step in the process. To conclude, we discuss the impact on AWM of issues like the number of phenotypes under scrutiny, the density of the SNP chip and the choice of contrast upon which to infer the cause-effect regulatory interactions. PMID:23756904

  20. Stories and Challenges of Genome Wide Association Studies in Livestock - A Review.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aditi; Lee, Jun Seop; Dang, Chang Gwon; Sudrajad, Pita; Kim, Hyeong Cheol; Yeon, Seong Heum; Kang, Hee Seol; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2015-10-01

    Undoubtedly livestock is one of the major contributors to the economy of any country. The economic value of livestock includes meat, dairy products, fiber, fertilizer etc. Understanding and identifying the associations of quantitative trait loci (QTL) with the economically important traits is believed to substantially benefit the livestock industry. The past two decades have seen a flurry of interest in mapping the QTL associated with traits of economic importance on the genome. With the availability of single nucleotide polymorphism chip of various densities it is possible to identify regions, QTL and genes on the genome that explain the association and its effect on the phenotype under consideration. Remarkable advancement has been seen in genome wide association studies (GWAS) since its inception till the present day. In this review we describe the progress and challenges of GWAS in various livestock species. PMID:26194229

  1. A genome-wide DNA methylation study in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We performed a genome-wide scan of 27,578 CpG loci covering 14,475 genes to identify differentially methylated loci (DML) in colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Methods We used Illumina's Infinium methylation assay in paired DNA samples extracted from 24 fresh frozen CRC tissues and their corresponding normal colon tissues from 24 consecutive diagnosed patients at a tertiary medical center. Results We found a total of 627 DML in CRC covering 513 genes, of which 535 are novel DML covering 465 genes. We also validated the Illumina Infinium methylation data for top-ranking genes by non-bisulfite conversion q-PCR-based methyl profiler assay in a subset of the same samples. We also carried out integration of genome-wide copy number and expression microarray along with methylation profiling to see the functional effect of methylation. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) showed that among the major "gene sets" that are hypermethylated in CRC are the sets: "inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by G-protein signaling", "Rac guanyl-nucleotide exchange factor activity", "regulation of retinoic acid receptor signaling pathway" and "estrogen receptor activity". Two-level nested cross validation showed that DML-based predictive models may offer reasonable sensitivity (around 89%), specificity (around 95%), positive predictive value (around 95%) and negative predictive value (around 89%), suggesting that these markers may have potential clinical application. Conclusion Our genome-wide methylation study in CRC clearly supports most of the previous findings; additionally we found a large number of novel DML in CRC tissue. If confirmed in future studies, these findings may lead to identification of genomic markers for potential clinical application. PMID:21699707

  2. Voxelwise genome-wide association study (vGWAS)

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jason L.; Hua, Xue; Lee, Suh; Ho, April J.; Leow, Alex D.; Toga, Arthur W.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Shen, Li; Foroud, Tatiana; Pankratz, Nathan; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Craig, David W.; Gerber, Jill D.; Allen, April N.; Corneveaux, Jason J.; DeChairo, Bryan M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Weiner, Michael W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    The structure of the human brain is highly heritable, and is thought to be influenced by many common genetic variants, many of which are currently unknown. Recent advances in neuroimaging and genetics have allowed collection of both highly detailed structural brain scans and genome-wide genotype information. This wealth of information presents a new opportunity to find the genes influencing brain structure. Here we explore the relation between 448,293 single nucleotide polymorphisms in each of 31,622 voxels of the entire brain across 740 elderly subjects (mean age±s.d.: 75.52±6.82 years; 438 male) including subjects with Alzheimer's disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and healthy elderly controls from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). We used tensor-based morphometry to measure individual differences in brain structure at the voxel level relative to a study-specific template based on healthy elderly subjects. We then conducted a genome-wide association at each voxel to identify genetic variants of interest. By studying only the most associated variant at each voxel, we developed a novel method to address the multiple comparisons problem and computational burden associated with the unprecedented amount of data. No variant survived the strict significance criterion, but several genes worthy of further exploration were identified, including CSMD2 and CADPS2. These genes have high relevance to brain structure. This is the first voxelwise genome wide association study to our knowledge, and offers a novel method to discover genetic influences on brain structure. PMID:20171287

  3. Genome-Wide Association Study of Metabolic Syndrome in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seok Won; Chung, Myungguen; Park, Soo-Jung; Cho, Seong Beom

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (METS) is a disorder of energy utilization and storage and increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes. To identify the genetic risk factors of METS, we carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for 2,657 cases and 5,917 controls in Korean populations. As a result, we could identify 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with genome-wide significance level p-values (<5 × 10-8), 8 SNPs with genome-wide suggestive p-values (5 × 10-8 ≤ p < 1 × 10-5), and 2 SNPs of more functional variants with borderline p-values (5 × 10-5 ≤ p < 1 × 10-4). On the other hand, the multiple correction criteria of conventional GWASs exclude false-positive loci, but simultaneously, they discard many true-positive loci. To reconsider the discarded true-positive loci, we attempted to include the functional variants (nonsynonymous SNPs [nsSNPs] and expression quantitative trait loci [eQTL]) among the top 5,000 SNPs based on the proportion of phenotypic variance explained by genotypic variance. In total, 159 eQTLs and 18 nsSNPs were presented in the top 5,000 SNPs. Although they should be replicated in other independent populations, 6 eQTLs and 2 nsSNP loci were located in the molecular pathways of LPL, APOA5, and CHRM2, which were the significant or suggestive loci in the METS GWAS. Conclusively, our approach using the conventional GWAS, reconsidering functional variants and pathway-based interpretation, suggests a useful method to understand the GWAS results of complex traits and can be expanded in other genomewide association studies. PMID:25705157

  4. Genome-Wide Association Study of Parity in Bangladeshi Women

    PubMed Central

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Argos, Maria; Pierce, Brandon L.; Tong, Lin; Jasmine, Farzana; Roy, Shantanu; Parvez, Faruque; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Ahsan, Habibul

    2015-01-01

    Human fertility is a complex trait determined by gene-environment interactions in which genetic factors represent a significant component. To better understand inter-individual variability in fertility, we performed one of the first genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of common fertility phenotypes, lifetime number of pregnancies and number of children in a developing country population. The fertility phenotype data and DNA samples were obtained at baseline recruitment from individuals participating in a large prospective cohort study in Bangladesh. GWAS analyses of fertility phenotypes were conducted among 1,686 married women. One SNP on chromosome 4 was non-significantly associated with number of children at P <10-7 and number of pregnancies at P <10-6. This SNP is located in a region without a gene within 1 Mb. One SNP on chromosome 6 was non-significantly associated with extreme number of children at P <10-6. The closest gene to this SNP is HDGFL1, a hepatoma-derived growth factor. When we excluded hormonal contraceptive users, a SNP on chromosome 5 was non-significantly associated at P <10-5 for number of children and number of pregnancies. This SNP is located near C5orf64, an open reading frame, and ZSWIM6, a zinc ion binding gene. We also estimated the heritability of these phenotypes from our genotype data using GCTA (Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis) for number of children (hg2 = 0.149, SE = 0.24, p-value = 0.265) and number of pregnancies (hg2 = 0.007, SE = 0.22, p-value = 0.487). Our genome-wide association study and heritability estimates of number of pregnancies and number of children in Bangladesh did not confer strong evidence of common variants for parity variation. However, our results suggest that future studies may want to consider the role of 3 notable SNPs in their analysis. PMID:25742292

  5. Genome-wide association study of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Stewart, S E; Yu, D; Scharf, J M; Neale, B M; Fagerness, J A; Mathews, C A; Arnold, P D; Evans, P D; Gamazon, E R; Davis, L K; Osiecki, L; McGrath, L; Haddad, S; Crane, J; Hezel, D; Illman, C; Mayerfeld, C; Konkashbaev, A; Liu, C; Pluzhnikov, A; Tikhomirov, A; Edlund, C K; Rauch, S L; Moessner, R; Falkai, P; Maier, W; Ruhrmann, S; Grabe, H-J; Lennertz, L; Wagner, M; Bellodi, L; Cavallini, M C; Richter, M A; Cook, E H; Kennedy, J L; Rosenberg, D; Stein, D J; Hemmings, S M J; Lochner, C; Azzam, A; Chavira, D A; Fournier, E; Garrido, H; Sheppard, B; Umaña, P; Murphy, D L; Wendland, J R; Veenstra-VanderWeele, J; Denys, D; Blom, R; Deforce, D; Van Nieuwerburgh, F; Westenberg, H G M; Walitza, S; Egberts, K; Renner, T; Miguel, E C; Cappi, C; Hounie, A G; Conceição do Rosário, M; Sampaio, A S; Vallada, H; Nicolini, H; Lanzagorta, N; Camarena, B; Delorme, R; Leboyer, M; Pato, C N; Pato, M T; Voyiaziakis, E; Heutink, P; Cath, D C; Posthuma, D; Smit, J H; Samuels, J; Bienvenu, O J; Cullen, B; Fyer, A J; Grados, M A; Greenberg, B D; McCracken, J T; Riddle, M A; Wang, Y; Coric, V; Leckman, J F; Bloch, M; Pittenger, C; Eapen, V; Black, D W; Ophoff, R A; Strengman, E; Cusi, D; Turiel, M; Frau, F; Macciardi, F; Gibbs, J R; Cookson, M R; Singleton, A; Hardy, J; Crenshaw, A T; Parkin, M A; Mirel, D B; Conti, D V; Purcell, S; Nestadt, G; Hanna, G L; Jenike, M A; Knowles, J A; Cox, N; Pauls, D L

    2013-07-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common, debilitating neuropsychiatric illness with complex genetic etiology. The International OCD Foundation Genetics Collaborative (IOCDF-GC) is a multi-national collaboration established to discover the genetic variation predisposing to OCD. A set of individuals affected with DSM-IV OCD, a subset of their parents, and unselected controls, were genotyped with several different Illumina SNP microarrays. After extensive data cleaning, 1465 cases, 5557 ancestry-matched controls and 400 complete trios remained, with a common set of 469,410 autosomal and 9657 X-chromosome single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Ancestry-stratified case-control association analyses were conducted for three genetically-defined subpopulations and combined in two meta-analyses, with and without the trio-based analysis. In the case-control analysis, the lowest two P-values were located within DLGAP1 (P=2.49 × 10(-6) and P=3.44 × 10(-6)), a member of the neuronal postsynaptic density complex. In the trio analysis, rs6131295, near BTBD3, exceeded the genome-wide significance threshold with a P-value=3.84 × 10(-8). However, when trios were meta-analyzed with the case-control samples, the P-value for this variant was 3.62 × 10(-5), losing genome-wide significance. Although no SNPs were identified to be associated with OCD at a genome-wide significant level in the combined trio-case-control sample, a significant enrichment of methylation QTLs (P<0.001) and frontal lobe expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) (P=0.001) was observed within the top-ranked SNPs (P<0.01) from the trio-case-control analysis, suggesting these top signals may have a broad role in gene expression in the brain, and possibly in the etiology of OCD. PMID:22889921

  6. Genome-Wide Approaches to Drosophila Heart Development

    PubMed Central

    Frasch, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The development of the dorsal vessel in Drosophila is one of the first systems in which key mechanisms regulating cardiogenesis have been defined in great detail at the genetic and molecular level. Due to evolutionary conservation, these findings have also provided major inputs into studies of cardiogenesis in vertebrates. Many of the major components that control Drosophila cardiogenesis were discovered based on candidate gene approaches and their functions were defined by employing the outstanding genetic tools and molecular techniques available in this system. More recently, approaches have been taken that aim to interrogate the entire genome in order to identify novel components and describe genomic features that are pertinent to the regulation of heart development. Apart from classical forward genetic screens, the availability of the thoroughly annotated Drosophila genome sequence made new genome-wide approaches possible, which include the generation of massive numbers of RNA interference (RNAi) reagents that were used in forward genetic screens, as well as studies of the transcriptomes and proteomes of the developing heart under normal and experimentally manipulated conditions. Moreover, genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments have been performed with the aim to define the full set of genomic binding sites of the major cardiogenic transcription factors, their relevant target genes, and a more complete picture of the regulatory network that drives cardiogenesis. This review will give an overview on these genome-wide approaches to Drosophila heart development and on computational analyses of the obtained information that ultimately aim to provide a description of this process at the systems level. PMID:27294102

  7. Genome-wide mapping of DNA hydroxymethylation in osteoarthritic chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Sarah E. B.; Li, Ye Henry; Wong, Wing H.; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine genome-wide 5hmC distribution in osteoarthritic (OA) and normal chondrocytes to investigate the effect on OA-specific gene expression. Methods Cartilage was obtained from OA patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty or control patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Genome-wide sequencing of 5hmC-enriched DNA (5hmC-seq) was performed for a small cohort of normal and OA chondrocytes to identify differentially hydroxymethylated regions (DhMRs) in OA chondrocytes. 5hmC-seq data was intersected with global OA gene expression data to define subsets of genes and pathways potentially affected by increased 5hmC levels in OA chondrocytes. Results 70591 DhMRs were identified in OA chondrocytes compared to normal chondrocytes, 44288 (63%) of which were increased in OA chondrocytes. The majority of DhMRs (66%) were gained in gene bodies. Increased DhMRs were observed in ~50% of genes previously implicated in OA pathology including MMP3, LRP5, GDF5 and COL11A1. Furthermore, analyses of gene expression data revealed gene body gain of 5hmC appears to be preferentially associated with activated but not repressed genes in OA chondrocytes. Conclusion This study provides the first genome-wide profiling of 5hmC distribution in OA chondrocytes. We had previously reported a global increase in 5hmC levels in OA chondrocytes. Gain of 5hmC in the gene body is found to be characteristic of activated genes in OA chondrocytes, highlighting the influence of 5hmC as an epigenetic mark in OA. In addition, this study identifies multiple OA-associated genes that are potentially regulated either singularly by gain of DNA hydroxymethylation or in combination with loss of DNA methylation. PMID:25940674

  8. Genome-wide association study of parity in Bangladeshi women.

    PubMed

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Argos, Maria; Pierce, Brandon L; Tong, Lin; Jasmine, Farzana; Roy, Shantanu; Parvez, Faruque; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Ahsan, Habibul

    2015-01-01

    Human fertility is a complex trait determined by gene-environment interactions in which genetic factors represent a significant component. To better understand inter-individual variability in fertility, we performed one of the first genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of common fertility phenotypes, lifetime number of pregnancies and number of children in a developing country population. The fertility phenotype data and DNA samples were obtained at baseline recruitment from individuals participating in a large prospective cohort study in Bangladesh. GWAS analyses of fertility phenotypes were conducted among 1,686 married women. One SNP on chromosome 4 was non-significantly associated with number of children at P <10(-7) and number of pregnancies at P <10(-6). This SNP is located in a region without a gene within 1 Mb. One SNP on chromosome 6 was non-significantly associated with extreme number of children at P <10(-6). The closest gene to this SNP is HDGFL1, a hepatoma-derived growth factor. When we excluded hormonal contraceptive users, a SNP on chromosome 5 was non-significantly associated at P <10(-5) for number of children and number of pregnancies. This SNP is located near C5orf64, an open reading frame, and ZSWIM6, a zinc ion binding gene. We also estimated the heritability of these phenotypes from our genotype data using GCTA (Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis) for number of children (hg2 = 0.149, SE = 0.24, p-value = 0.265) and number of pregnancies (hg2 = 0.007, SE = 0.22, p-value = 0.487). Our genome-wide association study and heritability estimates of number of pregnancies and number of children in Bangladesh did not confer strong evidence of common variants for parity variation. However, our results suggest that future studies may want to consider the role of 3 notable SNPs in their analysis. PMID:25742292

  9. [Genome-wide association study for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis].

    PubMed

    Ogura, Yoji; Kou, Ikuyo; Scoliosis, Japan; Matsumoto, Morio; Watanabe, Kota; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2016-04-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis(AIS)is a polygenic disease. Genome-wide association studies(GWASs)have been performed for a lot of polygenic diseases. For AIS, we conducted GWAS and identified the first AIS locus near LBX1. After the discovery, we have extended our study by increasing the numbers of subjects and SNPs. In total, our Japanese GWAS has identified four susceptibility genes. GWASs for AIS have also been performed in the USA and China, which identified one and three susceptibility genes, respectively. Here we review GWASs in Japan and abroad and functional analysis to clarify the pathomechanism of AIS. PMID:27013625

  10. Genome-wide profiling of alternative splicing in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Mitchell K.P.; Esiri, Margaret M.; Tan, Michelle G.K.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a highly regulated process which generates transcriptome and proteome diversity through the skipping or inclusion of exons within gene loci. Identification of aberrant alternative splicing associated with human diseases has become feasible with the development of new genomic technologies and powerful bioinformatics. We have previously reported genome-wide gene alterations in the neocortex of a well-characterized cohort of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and matched elderly controls using a commercial exon microarray platform [1]. Here, we provide detailed description of analyses aimed at identifying differential alternative splicing events associated with AD. PMID:26484111

  11. Genome-wide association studies in diverse populations

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Noah A; Huang, Lucy; Jewett, Ethan M; Szpiech, Zachary A; Jankovic, Ivana; Boehnke, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified a large number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with disease phenotypes. As most GWA studies have been performed primarily in populations of European descent, this review examines the issues involved in extending consideration of GWA studies to diverse worldwide populations. Although challenges exist with such issues as imputation, admixture, and replication, investigation of diverse populations in GWA studies has significant potential to advance the project of mapping the genetic determinants of complex diseases for the human population as a whole. PMID:20395969

  12. [New insight of genome-wide association study (GWAS)].

    PubMed

    Hotta, Kikuko

    2013-02-01

    The number of obese patients is increasing in Japan, due to the westernization of lifestyle. Obesity, especially visceral fat obesity, is important for the development of metabolic syndrome. Genetic factors are important for the development of obesity as well as environmental factors. Importance of genetic factors of fat distribution is also reported. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revealed the obesity and fat distribution-related polymorphisms. GWAS will highlight a better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms in the regulation of obesity and distribution of body fat. PMID:23631198

  13. Genome-Wide Association Studies for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbin; Zhao, Han; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2016-07-01

    Over the past several years, the field of reproductive medicine has witnessed great advances in genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), leading to identification of several promising genes involved in hormone action, type 2 diabetes, and cell proliferation. This review summarizes the key findings and discusses their potential implications with regard to genetic mechanisms of PCOS. Limitations of GWAS are evaluated, emphasizing the understanding of the reasons for variability in results between individual studies. Root causes of misinterpretations of GWASs are also addressed. Finally, the impact of GWAS on future directions of multi- and interdisciplinary studies is discussed. PMID:27513023

  14. Genome-Wide Patterns of Nucleotide Polymorphism in Domesticated Rice

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Ryan D; Boyko, Adam; Fledel-Alon, Adi; York, Thomas L; Polato, Nicholas R; Olsen, Kenneth M; Nielsen, Rasmus; McCouch, Susan R; Bustamante, Carlos D; Purugganan, Michael D

    2007-01-01

    Domesticated Asian rice (Oryza sativa) is one of the oldest domesticated crop species in the world, having fed more people than any other plant in human history. We report the patterns of DNA sequence variation in rice and its wild ancestor, O. rufipogon, across 111 randomly chosen gene fragments, and use these to infer the evolutionary dynamics that led to the origins of rice. There is a genome-wide excess of high-frequency derived single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in O. sativa varieties, a pattern that has not been reported for other crop species. We developed several alternative models to explain contemporary patterns of polymorphisms in rice, including a (i) selectively neutral population bottleneck model, (ii) bottleneck plus migration model, (iii) multiple selective sweeps model, and (iv) bottleneck plus selective sweeps model. We find that a simple bottleneck model, which has been the dominant demographic model for domesticated species, cannot explain the derived nucleotide polymorphism site frequency spectrum in rice. Instead, a bottleneck model that incorporates selective sweeps, or a more complex demographic model that includes subdivision and gene flow, are more plausible explanations for patterns of variation in domesticated rice varieties. If selective sweeps are indeed the explanation for the observed nucleotide data of domesticated rice, it suggests that strong selection can leave its imprint on genome-wide polymorphism patterns, contrary to expectations that selection results only in a local signature of variation. PMID:17907810

  15. Genome-wide signals of positive selection in human evolution

    PubMed Central

    Enard, David; Messer, Philipp W.; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2014-01-01

    The role of positive selection in human evolution remains controversial. On the one hand, scans for positive selection have identified hundreds of candidate loci, and the genome-wide patterns of polymorphism show signatures consistent with frequent positive selection. On the other hand, recent studies have argued that many of the candidate loci are false positives and that most genome-wide signatures of adaptation are in fact due to reduction of neutral diversity by linked deleterious mutations, known as background selection. Here we analyze human polymorphism data from the 1000 Genomes Project and detect signatures of positive selection once we correct for the effects of background selection. We show that levels of neutral polymorphism are lower near amino acid substitutions, with the strongest reduction observed specifically near functionally consequential amino acid substitutions. Furthermore, amino acid substitutions are associated with signatures of recent adaptation that should not be generated by background selection, such as unusually long and frequent haplotypes and specific distortions in the site frequency spectrum. We use forward simulations to argue that the observed signatures require a high rate of strongly adaptive substitutions near amino acid changes. We further demonstrate that the observed signatures of positive selection correlate better with the presence of regulatory sequences, as predicted by the ENCODE Project Consortium, than with the positions of amino acid substitutions. Our results suggest that adaptation was frequent in human evolution and provide support for the hypothesis of King and Wilson that adaptive divergence is primarily driven by regulatory changes. PMID:24619126

  16. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three psoriasis susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Philip E.; Nair, Rajan P.; Ellinghaus, Eva; Ding, Jun; Tejasvi, Trilokraj; Gudjonsson, Johann E.; Li, Yun; Weidinger, Stephan; Eberlein, Bernadette; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, H. Erich; Kunz, Manfred; Ike, Robert; Krueger, Gerald G.; Bowcock, Anne M.; Mroweitz, Ulrich; Lim, Henry W.; Voorhees, John J.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Weichenthal, Michael; Franke, Andre; Rahman, Proton; Gladman, Dafna D.; Elder, James T.

    2010-01-01

    To identify novel psoriasis susceptibility loci, we carried out a meta-analysis of two recent genome-wide association studies 1,2, yielding a discovery sample of 1,831 cases and 2,546 controls. 102 of the most promising loci in the discovery analysis were followed up in a three-stage replication study using 4,064 cases and 4,685 controls from Michigan, Toronto, Newfoundland, and Germany. Association at a genome-wide level of significance for the combined discovery and replication samples was found for three genomic regions. One contains NOS2 (rs4795067, p = 4 × 10−11), another contains FBXL19 (rs10782001, p = 9 × 10−10), and a third contains PSMA6 and NFKBIA (rs12586317, p = 2 × 10−8). All three loci were also strongly associated with the subphenotypes of psoriatic arthritis and purely cutaneous psoriasis. Finally, we confirmed a recently identified3 association signal near RNF114. PMID:20953189

  17. Genome-wide gene-based association study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hsin-Chou; Liang, Yu-Jen; Chung, Chia-Min; Chen, Jia-Wei; Pan, Wen-Harn

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies, which analyzes hundreds of thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms to identify disease susceptibility genes, are challenging because the work involves intensive computation and complex modeling. We propose a two-stage genome-wide association scanning procedure, consisting of a single-locus association scan for the first stage and a gene-based association scan for the second stage. Marginal effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms are examined by using the exact Armitage trend test or logistic regression, and gene effects are examined by using a p-value combination method. Compared with some existing single-locus and multilocus methods, the proposed method has the following merits: 1) convenient for definition of biologically meaningful regions, 2) powerful for detection of minor-effect genes, 3) helpful for alleviation of a multiple-testing problem, and 4) convenient for result interpretation. The method was applied to study Genetic Analysis Workshop 16 Problem 1 rheumatoid arthritis data, and strong association signals were found. The results show that the human major histocompatibility complex region is the most important genomic region associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Moreover, previously reported genes including PTPN22, C5, and IL2RB were confirmed; novel genes including HLA-DRA, BTNL2, C6orf10, NOTCH4, TAP2, and TNXB were identified by our analysis. PMID:20018002

  18. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Stefan; Atzmon, Gil; Demerath, Ellen W.; Garcia, Melissa E.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Kumari, Meena; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Milaneschi, Yuri; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tranah, Gregory J.; Völker, Uwe; Yu, Lei; Arnold, Alice; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Biffar, Reiner; Buchman, Aron S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Couper, David; De Jager, Philip L.; Evans, Denis A.; Harris, Tamara B.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P.; Kocher, Thomas; Kuningas, Maris; Launer, Lenore J.; Lohman, Kurt K.; Lutsey, Pamela L.; Mackenbach, Johan; Marciante, Kristin; Psaty, Bruce M.; Reiman, Eric M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Seshadri, Sudha; Shardell, Michelle D.; Smith, Albert V.; van Duijn, Cornelia; Walston, Jeremy; Zillikens, M. Carola; Bandinelli, Stefania; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Bennett, David A.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Liu, Yongmei; Murabito, Joanne M.; Newman, Anne B.; Tiemeier, Henning; Franceschini, Nora

    2011-01-01

    Human longevity and healthy aging show moderate heritability (20–50%). We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies from nine studies from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium for two outcomes: a) all-cause mortality and b) survival free of major disease or death. No single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was a genome-wide significant predictor of either outcome (p < 5 × 10−8). We found fourteen independent SNPs that predicted risk of death, and eight SNPs that predicted event-free survival (p < 10−5). These SNPs are in or near genes that are highly expressed in the brain (HECW2, HIP1, BIN2, GRIA1), genes involved in neural development and function (KCNQ4, LMO4, GRIA1, NETO1) and autophagy (ATG4C), and genes that are associated with risk of various diseases including cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. In addition to considerable overlap between the traits, pathway and network analysis corroborated these findings. These findings indicate that variation in genes involved in neurological processes may be an important factor in regulating aging free of major disease and achieving longevity. PMID:21782286

  19. Consistency of genome-wide associations across major ancestral groups.

    PubMed

    Ntzani, Evangelia E; Liberopoulos, George; Manolio, Teri A; Ioannidis, John P A

    2012-07-01

    It is not well known whether genetic markers identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) confer similar or different risks across people of different ancestry. We screened a regularly updated catalog of all published GWAS curated at the NHGRI website for GWAS-identified associations that had reached genome-wide significance (p ≤ 5 × 10(-8)) in at least one major ancestry group (European, Asian, African) and for which replication data were available for comparison in at least two different major ancestry groups. These groups were compared for the correlation between and differences in risk allele frequencies and genetic effects' estimates. Data on 108 eligible GWAS-identified associations with a total of 900 datasets (European, n = 624; Asian, n = 217; African, n = 60) were analyzed. Risk-allele frequencies were modestly correlated between ancestry groups, with >10% absolute differences in 75-89% of the three pairwise comparisons of ancestry groups. Genetic effect (odds ratio) point estimates between ancestry groups correlated modestly (pairwise comparisons' correlation coefficients: 0.20-0.33) and point estimates of risks were opposite in direction or differed more than twofold in 57%, 79%, and 89% of the European versus Asian, European versus African, and Asian versus African comparisons, respectively. The modest correlations, differing risk estimates, and considerable between-association heterogeneity suggest that differential ancestral effects can be anticipated and genomic risk markers may need separate further evaluation in different ancestry groups. PMID:22183176

  20. Phenome-wide analysis of genome-wide polygenic scores.

    PubMed

    Krapohl, E; Euesden, J; Zabaneh, D; Pingault, J-B; Rimfeld, K; von Stumm, S; Dale, P S; Breen, G; O'Reilly, P F; Plomin, R

    2016-09-01

    Genome-wide polygenic scores (GPS), which aggregate the effects of thousands of DNA variants from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), have the potential to make genetic predictions for individuals. We conducted a systematic investigation of associations between GPS and many behavioral traits, the behavioral phenome. For 3152 unrelated 16-year-old individuals representative of the United Kingdom, we created 13 GPS from the largest GWAS for psychiatric disorders (for example, schizophrenia, depression and dementia) and cognitive traits (for example, intelligence, educational attainment and intracranial volume). The behavioral phenome included 50 traits from the domains of psychopathology, personality, cognitive abilities and educational achievement. We examined phenome-wide profiles of associations for the entire distribution of each GPS and for the extremes of the GPS distributions. The cognitive GPS yielded stronger predictive power than the psychiatric GPS in our UK-representative sample of adolescents. For example, education GPS explained variation in adolescents' behavior problems (~0.6%) and in educational achievement (~2%) but psychiatric GPS were associated with neither. Despite the modest effect sizes of current GPS, quantile analyses illustrate the ability to stratify individuals by GPS and opportunities for research. For example, the highest and lowest septiles for the education GPS yielded a 0.5 s.d. difference in mean math grade and a 0.25 s.d. difference in mean behavior problems. We discuss the usefulness and limitations of GPS based on adult GWAS to predict genetic propensities earlier in development. PMID:26303664

  1. Genome-wide identification of hypoxia-induced enhancer regions

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Jessica L.; Randel, Melissa A.; Johnson, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a genome-wide method for de novo identification of enhancer regions. This approach enables massively parallel empirical investigation of DNA sequences that mediate transcriptional activation and provides a platform for discovery of regulatory modules capable of driving context-specific gene expression. The method links fragmented genomic DNA to the transcription of randomer molecule identifiers and measures the functional enhancer activity of the library by massively parallel sequencing. We transfected a Drosophila melanogaster library into S2 cells in normoxia and hypoxia, and assayed 4,599,881 genomic DNA fragments in parallel. The locations of the enhancer regions strongly correlate with genes up-regulated after hypoxia and previously described enhancers. Novel enhancer regions were identified and integrated with RNAseq data and transcription factor motifs to describe the hypoxic response on a genome-wide basis as a complex regulatory network involving multiple stress-response pathways. This work provides a novel method for high-throughput assay of enhancer activity and the genome-scale identification of 31 hypoxia-activated enhancers in Drosophila. PMID:26713262

  2. Advances in genome-wide DNA methylation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Romi; Nagarajan, Arvindhan; Wajapeyee, Narendra

    2013-01-01

    The covalent DNA modification of cytosine at position 5 (5-methylcytosine; 5mC) has emerged as an important epigenetic mark most commonly present in the context of CpG dinucleotides in mammalian cells. In pluripotent stem cells and plants, it is also found in non-CpG and CpNpG contexts, respectively. 5mC has important implications in a diverse set of biological processes, including transcriptional regulation. Aberrant DNA methylation has been shown to be associated with a wide variety of human ailments and thus is the focus of active investigation. Methods used for detecting DNA methylation have revolutionized our understanding of this epigenetic mark and provided new insights into its role in diverse biological functions. Here we describe recent technological advances in genome-wide DNA methylation analysis and discuss their relative utility and drawbacks, providing specific examples from studies that have used these technologies for genome-wide DNA methylation analysis to address important biological questions. Finally, we discuss a newly identified covalent DNA modification, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), and speculate on its possible biological function, as well as describe a new methodology that can distinguish 5hmC from 5mC. PMID:20964631

  3. Measuring genome-wide nucleosome turnover using CATCH-IT.

    PubMed

    Teves, Sheila S; Deal, Roger B; Henikoff, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic interplay between DNA-binding proteins and nucleosomes underlies essential nuclear processes such as transcription, replication, and DNA repair. Manifestations of this interplay include the assembly, eviction, and replacement of nucleosomes. Hence, measurements of nucleosome turnover kinetics can lead to insights into the regulation of dynamic chromatin processes. In this chapter, we describe a genome-wide method for measuring nucleosome turnover that uses metabolic labeling followed by capture of newly synthesized histones, which we have termed Covalent Attachment of Tagged Histones to Capture and Identify Turnover (CATCH-IT). Although CATCH-IT can be used with any genome-wide mapping procedure, high-resolution profiling is attainable using paired-end sequencing of native chromatin. Our protocol also includes an efficient Solexa DNA sequencing library preparation protocol that can be used for single base-pair resolution mapping of both nucleosome and subnucleosomal particles. We not only describe the use of these protocols in the context of a Drosophila cell line but also provide the necessary changes for adaptation to other model systems. PMID:22929769

  4. Genome-wide association interaction analysis for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gusareva, Elena S.; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Bellenguez, Céline; Cuyvers, Elise; Colon, Samuel; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Mahachie Johna, Jestinah M.; Bessonov, Kyrylo; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Williams, Julie; Amouyel, Philippe; Sleegers, Kristel; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Van Steen, Kristel

    2015-01-01

    We propose a minimal protocol for exhaustive genome-wide association interaction analysis that involves screening for epistasis over large-scale genomic data combining strengths of different methods and statistical tools. The different steps of this protocol are illustrated on a real-life data application for Alzheimer's disease (AD) (2259 patients and 6017 controls from France). Particularly, in the exhaustive genome-wide epistasis screening we identified AD-associated interacting SNPs-pair from chromosome 6q11.1 (rs6455128, the KHDRBS2 gene) and 13q12.11 (rs7989332, the CRYL1 gene) (p = 0.006, corrected for multiple testing). A replication analysis in the independent AD cohort from Germany (555 patients and 824 controls) confirmed the discovered epistasis signal (p = 0.036). This signal was also supported by a meta-analysis approach in 5 independent AD cohorts that was applied in the context of epistasis for the first time. Transcriptome analysis revealed negative correlation between expression levels of KHDRBS2 and CRYL1 in both the temporal cortex (β = −0.19, p = 0.0006) and cerebellum (β = −0.23, p < 0.0001) brain regions. This is the first time a replicable epistasis associated with AD was identified using a hypothesis free screening approach. PMID:24958192

  5. Genome-Wide Mapping of DNA Strand Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Frédéric; Faucher, David; Bikond Nkoma, Geneviève; Grégoire, Marie-Chantal; Arguin, Mélina; Wellinger, Raymund J.; Boissonneault, Guylain

    2011-01-01

    Determination of cellular DNA damage has so far been limited to global assessment of genome integrity whereas nucleotide-level mapping has been restricted to specific loci by the use of specific primers. Therefore, only limited DNA sequences can be studied and novel regions of genomic instability can hardly be discovered. Using a well-characterized yeast model, we describe a straightforward strategy to map genome-wide DNA strand breaks without compromising nucleotide-level resolution. This technique, termed “damaged DNA immunoprecipitation” (dDIP), uses immunoprecipitation and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin end-labeling (TUNEL) to capture DNA at break sites. When used in combination with microarray or next-generation sequencing technologies, dDIP will allow researchers to map genome-wide DNA strand breaks as well as other types of DNA damage and to establish a clear profiling of altered genes and/or intergenic sequences in various experimental conditions. This mapping technique could find several applications for instance in the study of aging, genotoxic drug screening, cancer, meiosis, radiation and oxidative DNA damage. PMID:21364894

  6. Genome-wide detection of gene extinction in early mammalian evolution.

    PubMed

    Kuraku, Shigehiro; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    Detecting gene losses is a novel aspect of evolutionary genomics that has been made feasible by whole-genome sequencing. However, research to date has concentrated on elucidating evolutionary patterns of genomic components shared between species, rather than identifying disparities between genomes. In this study, we searched for gene losses in the lineage leading to eutherian mammals. First, as a pilot analysis, we selected five gene families (Wnt, Fgf, Tbx, TGFβ, and Frizzled) for molecular phylogenetic analyses, and identified mammalian lineage-specific losses of Wnt11b, Tbx6L/VegT/tbx16, Nodal-related, ADMP1, ADMP2, Sizzled, and Crescent. Second, automated genome-wide phylogenetic screening was implemented based on this pilot analysis. As a result, we detected 147 chicken genes without eutherian orthologs, which resulted from 141 gene loss events. Our inventory contained a group of regulatory genes governing early embryonic axis formation, such as Noggins, and multiple members of the opsin and prolactin-releasing hormone receptor ("PRLHR") gene families. Our findings highlight the potential of genome-wide gene phylogeny ("phylome") analysis in detecting possible rearrangement of gene networks and the importance of identifying losses of ancestral genomic components in analyzing the molecular basis underlying phenotypic evolution. PMID:22094861

  7. Genome-wide scans of genetic variants for psychophysiological endophenotypes: a methodological overview.

    PubMed

    Iacono, William G; Malone, Stephen M; Vaidyanathan, Uma; Vrieze, Scott I

    2014-12-01

    This article provides an introductory overview of the investigative strategy employed to evaluate the genetic basis of 17 endophenotypes examined as part of a 20-year data collection effort from the Minnesota Center for Twin and Family Research. Included are characterization of the study samples, descriptive statistics for key properties of the psychophysiological measures, and rationale behind the steps taken in the molecular genetic study design. The statistical approach included (a) biometric analysis of twin and family data, (b) heritability analysis using 527,829 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), (c) genome-wide association analysis of these SNPs and 17,601 autosomal genes, (d) follow-up analyses of candidate SNPs and genes hypothesized to have an association with each endophenotype, (e) rare variant analysis of nonsynonymous SNPs in the exome, and (f) whole genome sequencing association analysis using 27 million genetic variants. These methods were used in the accompanying empirical articles comprising this special issue, Genome-Wide Scans of Genetic Variants for Psychophysiological Endophenotypes. PMID:25387703

  8. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity

    PubMed Central

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P.; Nir, Talia M.; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Green, Robert C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hansell, Narelle K.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Liu, Enchi; Green, Robert C.; Montine, Tom; Petersen, Ronald; Aisen, Paul; Gamst, Anthony; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Beckett, Laurel; Harvey, Danielle; Gamst, Anthony; Donohue, Michael; Kornak, John; Jack, Clifford R.; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Jagust, William; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Morris, John; Cairns, Nigel J.; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Trojanowki, J.Q.; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Khachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Petersen, Ronald; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Romirowsky, Aliza; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; Kielb, Stephanie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Coleman, R. Edward; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristina; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan; Belden, Christine; Jacobson, Sandra; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Bwayo, Salome K.; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T.-Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Longmire, Crystal Flynn; Spicer, Kenneth; Finger, Elizabeth; Rachinsky, Irina; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Drost, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain’s connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain’s wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases. PMID:23471985

  9. Genome-Wide Association Study in Immunocompetent Patients with Delayed Hypersensitivity to Sulfonamide Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Dickey, Allison; Yale, Steven; Trepanier, Lauren A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypersensitivity (HS) reactions to sulfonamide antibiotics occur uncommonly, but with potentially severe clinical manifestations. A familial predisposition to sulfonamide HS is suspected, but robust predictive genetic risk factors have yet to be identified. Strongly linked genetic polymorphisms have been used clinically as screening tests for other HS reactions prior to administration of high-risk drugs. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate for genetic risk of sulfonamide HS in the immunocompetent population using genome-wide association. Methods Ninety-one patients with symptoms after trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) attributable to “probable” drug HS based on medical record review and the Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale, and 184 age- and sex-matched patients who tolerated a therapeutic course of TMP-SMX, were included in a genome-wide association study using both common and rare variant techniques. Additionally, two subgroups of HS patients with a more refined clinical phenotype (fever and rash; or fever, rash and eosinophilia) were evaluated separately. Results For the full dataset, no single nucleotide polymorphisms were suggestive of or reached genome-wide significance in the common variant analysis, nor was any genetic locus significant in the rare variant analysis. A single, possible gene locus association (COL12A1) was identified in the rare variant analysis for patients with both fever and rash, but the sample size was very small in this subgroup (n = 16), and this may be a false positive finding. No other significant associations were found for the subgroups. Conclusions No convincing genetic risk factors for sulfonamide HS were identified in this population. These negative findings may be due to challenges in accurately confirming the phenotype in exanthematous drug eruptions, or to unidentified gene-environment interactions influencing sulfonamide HS. PMID:27272151

  10. FVGWAS: Fast voxelwise genome wide association analysis of large-scale imaging genetic data.

    PubMed

    Huang, Meiyan; Nichols, Thomas; Huang, Chao; Yu, Yang; Lu, Zhaohua; Knickmeyer, Rebecca C; Feng, Qianjin; Zhu, Hongtu

    2015-09-01

    More and more large-scale imaging genetic studies are being widely conducted to collect a rich set of imaging, genetic, and clinical data to detect putative genes for complexly inherited neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Several major big-data challenges arise from testing genome-wide (NC>12 million known variants) associations with signals at millions of locations (NV~10(6)) in the brain from thousands of subjects (n~10(3)). The aim of this paper is to develop a Fast Voxelwise Genome Wide Association analysiS (FVGWAS) framework to efficiently carry out whole-genome analyses of whole-brain data. FVGWAS consists of three components including a heteroscedastic linear model, a global sure independence screening (GSIS) procedure, and a detection procedure based on wild bootstrap methods. Specifically, for standard linear association, the computational complexity is O (nNVNC) for voxelwise genome wide association analysis (VGWAS) method compared with O ((NC+NV)n(2)) for FVGWAS. Simulation studies show that FVGWAS is an efficient method of searching sparse signals in an extremely large search space, while controlling for the family-wise error rate. Finally, we have successfully applied FVGWAS to a large-scale imaging genetic data analysis of ADNI data with 708 subjects, 193,275voxels in RAVENS maps, and 501,584 SNPs, and the total processing time was 203,645s for a single CPU. Our FVGWAS may be a valuable statistical toolbox for large-scale imaging genetic analysis as the field is rapidly advancing with ultra-high-resolution imaging and whole-genome sequencing. PMID:26025292

  11. A Genome Wide Linkage Scan for Cleft Lip and Palate and Dental Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; McHenry, Toby G.; Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Marazita, Mary L.

    2008-01-01

    We revisited 46 families with two or more siblings affected with an orofacial cleft that participated in previous genome wide studies and collected complete dental information. Genotypes from 392 microsatellite markers at 10 cM intervals were reanalyzed. We carried out four sets of genome wide analyses. First, we ran the analysis solely on the cleft status. Second, we assigned to any dental anomaly (tooth agenesis, supernumerary teeth, and microdontia) an affection status, and repeated the analysis. Third, we ran only the 19 families where the proband had a cleft with no dental anomalies. Finally, we ran only the 27 families that had a proband with cleft and additional dental anomalies outside the cleft area. Chromosomes (1, 2, 6, 8, 16, and 19) presented regions with LOD scores >2.0. Chromosome 19 has the most compelling results in our study. The LOD scores increased from 3.11 (in the scan of all 46 families with clefts as the only assigned affection status) to 3.91 when the 19 families whose probands present with no additional dental anomalies were studied, suggesting the interval 19p13.12-19q12 may contain a gene that contributes to clefts but not to dental anomalies. On the other hand, we found a LOD score of 3.00 in the 2q22.3 region when dental anomalies data were added to the analysis to define affection status. Our preliminary results support the hypothesis that some loci may contribute to both clefts and congenital dental anomalies. Also, adding dental anomalies information will provide new opportunities to map susceptibility loci for clefts. PMID:18442096

  12. Maternal gestational diabetes is associated with genome-wide DNA methylation variation in placenta and cord blood of exposed offspring.

    PubMed

    Finer, Sarah; Mathews, Chris; Lowe, Rob; Smart, Melissa; Hillman, Sara; Foo, Lin; Sinha, Ajay; Williams, David; Rakyan, Vardhman K; Hitman, Graham A

    2015-06-01

    Exposure of a developing foetus to maternal gestational diabetes (GDM) has been shown to programme future risk of diabetes and obesity. Epigenetic variation in foetal tissue may have a mechanistic role in metabolic disease programming through interaction of the pregnancy environment with gene function. We aimed to identify genome-wide DNA methylation variation in cord blood and placenta from offspring born to mothers with and without GDM. Pregnant women of South Asian origin were studied and foetal tissues sampled at term delivery. The Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip was used to assay genome-wide DNA methylation in placenta and cord blood from 27 GDM exposed and 21 unexposed offspring. We identified 1485 cord blood and 1708 placenta methylation variable positions (MVPs) achieving genome-wide significance (adjusted P-value <0.05) with methylation differences of >5%. MVPs were disproportionately located within first exons. A bioinformatic co-methylation algorithm was used to detect consistent directionality of methylation in 1000 bp window around each MVP was observed at 74% of placenta and 59% of cord blood MVPs. KEGG pathway analysis showed enrichment of pathways involved in endocytosis, MAPK signalling and extracellular triggers to intracellular metabolic processes. Replication studies should integrate genomics and transcriptomics with longitudinal sampling to elucidate stability, determine causality for translation into biomarker and prevention studies. PMID:25634562

  13. Genome-wide association analysis identifies loci for left-sided displacement of the abomasum in German Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Mömke, S; Sickinger, M; Lichtner, P; Doll, K; Rehage, J; Distl, O

    2013-06-01

    Left-sided displacement of the abomasum (LDA) is one of the most common disorders of the digestive system in many dairy breeds and particularly in Holstein dairy cows. We performed a genome-wide association study for 854 German Holstein cows, including 225 cases and 629 controls. All cows were genotyped using the Illumina Bovine SNP50 BeadChip (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA). After quality control of genotypes, a total of 36,226 informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were left for analysis. We used a mixed linear model approach for a genome-wide association study of LDA. In total, 36 SNP located on 17 bovine (Bos taurus) chromosomes (BTA) showed associations with LDA at nominal -log10P-values >3.0. Two of these SNP, located on BTA11 at 46.70 Mb and BTA20 at 16.67 Mb, showed genome-wide significant associations with LDA at -log10P-values >4.6. Pathway analyses indicated genes involved in calcium metabolism and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus to be factors in the pathogenesis of LDA in German Holstein cows. PMID:23548285

  14. Genome-wide association studies in pediatric chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Jayanta; Kanetsky, Peter A; Wuttke, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna; Schaefer, Franz; Wong, Craig S

    2016-08-01

    The genome-wide association study (GWAS) has become an established scientific method that provides an unbiased screen for genetic loci potentially associated with phenotypes of clinical interest, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD). Thus, GWAS provides opportunities to gain new perspectives regarding the genetic architecture of CKD progression by identifying new candidate genes and targets for intervention. As such, it has become an important arm of translational science providing a complementary line of investigation to identify novel therapeutics to treat CKD. In this review, we describe the method and the challenges of performing GWAS in the pediatric CKD population. We also provide an overview of successful GWAS for kidney disease, and we discuss the established pediatric CKD cohorts in North America and Europe that are poised to identify genetic risk variants associated with CKD progression. PMID:26490952

  15. Ultrafast laser nanosurgery in microfluidics for genome-wide screenings

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Yakar, Adela; Bourgeois, Frederic

    2009-01-01

    Summary The use of ultrafast laser pulses in surgery has allowed for unprecedented precision with minimal collateral damage to surrounding tissues. For these reasons, ultrafast laser nanosurgery, as an injury model, has gained tremendous momentum in experimental biology ranging from in-vitro manipulations of subcellular structures to in-vivo studies in whole living organisms. For example, femtosecond laser nanosurgery on such model organism as the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) has opened new opportunities for in-vivo nerve regeneration studies. Meanwhile, the development of novel microfluidic devices has brought the control in experimental environment to the level required for precise nanosurgery in various animal models. Merging microfluidics and laser nanosurgery has recently improved the specificities and increased the speed of laser surgeries enabling fast genome-wide screenings that can more readily decode the genetic map of various biological processes. PMID:19278850

  16. Genome-wide nucleosome positioning during embryonic stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Teif, Vladimir B; Vainshtein, Yevhen; Caudron-Herger, Maïwen; Mallm, Jan-Philipp; Marth, Caroline; Höfer, Thomas; Rippe, Karsten

    2012-11-01

    We determined genome-wide nucleosome occupancies in mouse embryonic stem cells and their neural progenitor and embryonic fibroblast counterparts to assess features associated with nucleosome positioning during lineage commitment. Cell-type- and protein-specific binding preferences of transcription factors to sites with either low (Myc, Klf4 and Zfx) or high (Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2) nucleosome occupancy as well as complex patterns for CTCF were identified. Nucleosome-depleted regions around transcription start and transcription termination sites were broad and more pronounced for active genes, with distinct patterns for promoters classified according to CpG content or histone methylation marks. Throughout the genome, nucleosome occupancy was correlated with certain histone methylation or acetylation modifications. In addition, the average nucleosome repeat length increased during differentiation by 5-7 base pairs, with local variations for specific regions. Our results reveal regulatory mechanisms of cell differentiation that involve nucleosome repositioning. PMID:23085715

  17. Quantitative prediction of genome-wide resource allocation in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Goelzer, Anne; Muntel, Jan; Chubukov, Victor; Jules, Matthieu; Prestel, Eric; Nölker, Rolf; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Aymerich, Stéphane; Hecker, Michael; Noirot, Philippe; Becher, Dörte; Fromion, Vincent

    2015-11-01

    Predicting resource allocation between cell processes is the primary step towards decoding the evolutionary constraints governing bacterial growth under various conditions. Quantitative prediction at genome-scale remains a computational challenge as current methods are limited by the tractability of the problem or by simplifying hypotheses. Here, we show that the constraint-based modeling method Resource Balance Analysis (RBA), calibrated using genome-wide absolute protein quantification data, accurately predicts resource allocation in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis for a wide range of growth conditions. The regulation of most cellular processes is consistent with the objective of growth rate maximization except for a few suboptimal processes which likely integrate more complex objectives such as coping with stressful conditions and survival. As a proof of principle by using simulations, we illustrated how calibrated RBA could aid rational design of strains for maximizing protein production, offering new opportunities to investigate design principles in prokaryotes and to exploit them for biotechnological applications. PMID:26498510

  18. Progress of genome wide association study in domestic animals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Domestic animals are invaluable resources for study of the molecular architecture of complex traits. Although the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) responsible for economically important traits in domestic animals has achieved remarkable results in recent decades, not all of the genetic variation in the complex traits has been captured because of the low density of markers used in QTL mapping studies. The genome wide association study (GWAS), which utilizes high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), provides a new way to tackle this issue. Encouraging achievements in dissection of the genetic mechanisms of complex diseases in humans have resulted from the use of GWAS. At present, GWAS has been applied to the field of domestic animal breeding and genetics, and some advances have been made. Many genes or markers that affect economic traits of interest in domestic animals have been identified. In this review, advances in the use of GWAS in domestic animals are described. PMID:22958308

  19. Metabolite-based genome-wide association studies in plants.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie

    2015-04-01

    The plant metabolome is the readout of plant physiological status and is regarded as the bridge between the genome and the phenome of plants. Unraveling the natural variation and the underlying genetic basis of plant metabolism has received increasing interest from plant biologists. Enabled by the recent advances in high-throughput profiling and genotyping technologies, metabolite-based genome-wide association study (mGWAS) has emerged as a powerful alternative forward genetics strategy to dissect the genetic and biochemical bases of metabolism in model and crop plants. In this review, recent progress and applications of mGWAS in understanding the genetic control of plant metabolism and in interactive functional genomics and metabolomics are presented. Further directions and perspectives of mGWAS in plants are also discussed. PMID:25637954

  20. Genome-wide genetic changes during modern breeding of maize.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yinping; Zhao, Hainan; Ren, Longhui; Song, Weibin; Zeng, Biao; Guo, Jinjie; Wang, Baobao; Liu, Zhipeng; Chen, Jing; Li, Wei; Zhang, Mei; Xie, Shaojun; Lai, Jinsheng

    2012-07-01

    The success of modern maize breeding has been demonstrated by remarkable increases in productivity over the last four decades. However, the underlying genetic changes correlated with these gains remain largely unknown. We report here the sequencing of 278 temperate maize inbred lines from different stages of breeding history, including deep resequencing of 4 lines with known pedigree information. The results show that modern breeding has introduced highly dynamic genetic changes into the maize genome. Artificial selection has affected thousands of targets, including genes and non-genic regions, leading to a reduction in nucleotide diversity and an increase in the proportion of rare alleles. Genetic changes during breeding happen rapidly, with extensive variation (SNPs, indels and copy-number variants (CNVs)) occurring, even within identity-by-descent regions. Our genome-wide assessment of genetic changes during modern maize breeding provides new strategies as well as practical targets for future crop breeding and biotechnology. PMID:22660547

  1. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Murphy, P J; Cairns, B R

    2016-01-01

    Genomic DNA methylation functions to repress gene expression by interfering with transcription factor binding and/or recruiting repressive chromatin machinery. Recent data support contribution of regulated DNA methylation to embryonic pluripotency, development, and tissue differentiation; this important epigenetic mark is chemically stable yet enzymatically reversible-and heritable through the germline. Importantly, all the major components involved in dynamic DNA methylation are conserved in zebrafish, including the factors that "write, read, and erase" this mark. Therefore, the zebrafish has become an excellent model for studying most biological processes associated with DNA methylation in mammals. Here we briefly review the zebrafish model for studying DNA methylation and describe a series of methods for performing genome-wide DNA methylation analysis. We address and provide methods for methylated DNA immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (MeDIP-Seq), bisulfite sequencing (BS-Seq), and reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS-Seq). PMID:27443935

  2. Quality control procedures for genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Turner, Stephen; Armstrong, Loren L; Bradford, Yuki; Carlson, Christopher S; Crawford, Dana C; Crenshaw, Andrew T; de Andrade, Mariza; Doheny, Kimberly F; Haines, Jonathan L; Hayes, Geoffrey; Jarvik, Gail; Jiang, Lan; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Li, Rongling; Ling, Hua; Manolio, Teri A; Matsumoto, Martha; McCarty, Catherine A; McDavid, Andrew N; Mirel, Daniel B; Paschall, Justin E; Pugh, Elizabeth W; Rasmussen, Luke V; Wilke, Russell A; Zuvich, Rebecca L; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are being conducted at an unprecedented rate in population-based cohorts and have increased our understanding of the pathophysiology of complex disease. Regardless of context, the practical utility of this information will ultimately depend upon the quality of the original data. Quality control (QC) procedures for GWAS are computationally intensive, operationally challenging, and constantly evolving. Here we enumerate some of the challenges in QC of GWAS data and describe the approaches that the electronic MEdical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) network is using for quality assurance in GWAS data, thereby minimizing potential bias and error in GWAS results. We discuss common issues associated with QC of GWAS data, including data file formats, software packages for data manipulation and analysis, sex chromosome anomalies, sample identity, sample relatedness, population substructure, batch effects, and marker quality. We propose best practices and discuss areas of ongoing and future research. PMID:21234875

  3. Genome Wide Association Identifies Novel Loci Involved in Fungal Communication

    PubMed Central

    Kowbel, David; Welch, Juliet; Taylor, John W.; Brem, Rachel B.; Glass, N. Louise

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how genomes encode complex cellular and organismal behaviors has become the outstanding challenge of modern genetics. Unlike classical screening methods, analysis of genetic variation that occurs naturally in wild populations can enable rapid, genome-scale mapping of genotype to phenotype with a medium-throughput experimental design. Here we describe the results of the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) used to identify novel loci underlying trait variation in a microbial eukaryote, harnessing wild isolates of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We genotyped each of a population of wild Louisiana strains at 1 million genetic loci genome-wide, and we used these genotypes to map genetic determinants of microbial communication. In N. crassa, germinated asexual spores (germlings) sense the presence of other germlings, grow toward them in a coordinated fashion, and fuse. We evaluated germlings of each strain for their ability to chemically sense, chemotropically seek, and undergo cell fusion, and we subjected these trait measurements to GWAS. This analysis identified one gene, NCU04379 (cse-1, encoding a homolog of a neuronal calcium sensor), at which inheritance was strongly associated with the efficiency of germling communication. Deletion of cse-1 significantly impaired germling communication and fusion, and two genes encoding predicted interaction partners of CSE1 were also required for the communication trait. Additionally, mining our association results for signaling and secretion genes with a potential role in germling communication, we validated six more previously unknown molecular players, including a secreted protease and two other genes whose deletion conferred a novel phenotype of increased communication and multi-germling fusion. Our results establish protein secretion as a linchpin of germling communication in N. crassa and shed light on the regulation of communication molecules in this fungus. Our study demonstrates the power

  4. Genome-Wide Association Studies for Comb Traits in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Meng; Dou, Taocun; Lu, Jian; Guo, Jun; Hu, Yuping; Yi, Guoqiang; Yuan, Jingwei; Sun, Congjiao; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The comb, as a secondary sexual character, is an important trait in chicken. Indicators of comb length (CL), comb height (CH), and comb weight (CW) are often selected in production. DNA-based marker-assisted selection could help chicken breeders to accelerate genetic improvement for comb or related economic characters by early selection. Although a number of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and candidate genes have been identified with advances in molecular genetics, candidate genes underlying comb traits are limited. The aim of the study was to use genome-wide association (GWA) studies by 600 K Affymetrix chicken SNP arrays to detect genes that are related to comb, using an F2 resource population. For all comb characters, comb exhibited high SNP-based heritability estimates (0.61–0.69). Chromosome 1 explained 20.80% genetic variance, while chromosome 4 explained 6.89%. Independent univariate genome-wide screens for each character identified 127, 197, and 268 novel significant SNPs with CL, CH, and CW, respectively. Three candidate genes, VPS36, AR, and WNT11B, were determined to have a plausible function in all comb characters. These genes are important to the initiation of follicle development, gonadal growth, and dermal development, respectively. The current study provides the first GWA analysis for comb traits. Identification of the genetic basis as well as promising candidate genes will help us understand the underlying genetic architecture of comb development and has practical significance in breeding programs for the selection of comb as an index for sexual maturity or reproduction. PMID:27427764

  5. Systems-Level Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Data

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have emerged as the method of choice for identifying common variants affecting complex disease. In a GWAS, particular attention is placed, for obvious reasons, on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that exceed stringent genome-wide significance thresholds. However, it is expected that many SNPs with only nominal evidence of association (e.g., P < 0.05) truly influence disease. Efforts to extract additional biological information from entire GWAS datasets have primarily focused on pathway-enrichment analyses. However, these methods suffer from a number of limitations and typically fail to lead to testable hypotheses. To evaluate alternative approaches, we performed a systems-level analysis of GWAS data using weighted gene coexpression network analysis. A weighted gene coexpression network was generated for 1918 genes harboring SNPs that displayed nominal evidence of association (P ≤ 0.05) from a GWAS of bone mineral density (BMD) using microarray data on circulating monocytes isolated from individuals with extremely low or high BMD. Thirteen distinct gene modules were identified, each comprising coexpressed and highly interconnected GWAS genes. Through the characterization of module content and topology, we illustrate how network analysis can be used to discover disease-associated subnetworks and characterize novel interactions for genes with a known role in the regulation of BMD. In addition, we provide evidence that network metrics can be used as a prioritizing tool when selecting genes and SNPs for replication studies. Our results highlight the advantages of using systems-level strategies to add value to and inform GWAS. PMID:23316444

  6. The genome-wide structure of the Jewish people.

    PubMed

    Behar, Doron M; Yunusbayev, Bayazit; Metspalu, Mait; Metspalu, Ene; Rosset, Saharon; Parik, Jüri; Rootsi, Siiri; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Kutuev, Ildus; Yudkovsky, Guennady; Khusnutdinova, Elza K; Balanovsky, Oleg; Semino, Ornella; Pereira, Luisa; Comas, David; Gurwitz, David; Bonne-Tamir, Batsheva; Parfitt, Tudor; Hammer, Michael F; Skorecki, Karl; Villems, Richard

    2010-07-01

    Contemporary Jews comprise an aggregate of ethno-religious communities whose worldwide members identify with each other through various shared religious, historical and cultural traditions. Historical evidence suggests common origins in the Middle East, followed by migrations leading to the establishment of communities of Jews in Europe, Africa and Asia, in what is termed the Jewish Diaspora. This complex demographic history imposes special challenges in attempting to address the genetic structure of the Jewish people. Although many genetic studies have shed light on Jewish origins and on diseases prevalent among Jewish communities, including studies focusing on uniparentally and biparentally inherited markers, genome-wide patterns of variation across the vast geographic span of Jewish Diaspora communities and their respective neighbours have yet to be addressed. Here we use high-density bead arrays to genotype individuals from 14 Jewish Diaspora communities and compare these patterns of genome-wide diversity with those from 69 Old World non-Jewish populations, of which 25 have not previously been reported. These samples were carefully chosen to provide comprehensive comparisons between Jewish and non-Jewish populations in the Diaspora, as well as with non-Jewish populations from the Middle East and north Africa. Principal component and structure-like analyses identify previously unrecognized genetic substructure within the Middle East. Most Jewish samples form a remarkably tight subcluster that overlies Druze and Cypriot samples but not samples from other Levantine populations or paired Diaspora host populations. In contrast, Ethiopian Jews (Beta Israel) and Indian Jews (Bene Israel and Cochini) cluster with neighbouring autochthonous populations in Ethiopia and western India, respectively, despite a clear paternal link between the Bene Israel and the Levant. These results cast light on the variegated genetic architecture of the Middle East, and trace the origins

  7. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Boraska, V; Franklin, C S; Floyd, J A B; Thornton, L M; Huckins, L M; Southam, L; Rayner, N W; Tachmazidou, I; Klump, K L; Treasure, J; Lewis, C M; Schmidt, U; Tozzi, F; Kiezebrink, K; Hebebrand, J; Gorwood, P; Adan, R A H; Kas, M J H; Favaro, A; Santonastaso, P; Fernández-Aranda, F; Gratacos, M; Rybakowski, F; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, M; Kaprio, J; Keski-Rahkonen, A; Raevuori, A; Van Furth, E F; Slof-Op 't Landt, M C T; Hudson, J I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, T; Knudsen, G P S; Monteleone, P; Kaplan, A S; Karwautz, A; Hakonarson, H; Berrettini, W H; Guo, Y; Li, D; Schork, N J; Komaki, G; Ando, T; Inoko, H; Esko, T; Fischer, K; Männik, K; Metspalu, A; Baker, J H; Cone, R D; Dackor, J; DeSocio, J E; Hilliard, C E; O'Toole, J K; Pantel, J; Szatkiewicz, J P; Taico, C; Zerwas, S; Trace, S E; Davis, O S P; Helder, S; Bühren, K; Burghardt, R; de Zwaan, M; Egberts, K; Ehrlich, S; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B; Herzog, W; Imgart, H; Scherag, A; Scherag, S; Zipfel, S; Boni, C; Ramoz, N; Versini, A; Brandys, M K; Danner, U N; de Kovel, C; Hendriks, J; Koeleman, B P C; Ophoff, R A; Strengman, E; van Elburg, A A; Bruson, A; Clementi, M; Degortes, D; Forzan, M; Tenconi, E; Docampo, E; Escaramís, G; Jiménez-Murcia, S; Lissowska, J; Rajewski, A; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N; Slopien, A; Hauser, J; Karhunen, L; Meulenbelt, I; Slagboom, P E; Tortorella, A; Maj, M; Dedoussis, G; Dikeos, D; Gonidakis, F; Tziouvas, K; Tsitsika, A; Papezova, H; Slachtova, L; Martaskova, D; Kennedy, J L; Levitan, R D; Yilmaz, Z; Huemer, J; Koubek, D; Merl, E; Wagner, G; Lichtenstein, P; Breen, G; Cohen-Woods, S; Farmer, A; McGuffin, P; Cichon, S; Giegling, I; Herms, S; Rujescu, D; Schreiber, S; Wichmann, H-E; Dina, C; Sladek, R; Gambaro, G; Soranzo, N; Julia, A; Marsal, S; Rabionet, R; Gaborieau, V; Dick, D M; Palotie, A; Ripatti, S; Widén, E; Andreassen, O A; Espeseth, T; Lundervold, A; Reinvang, I; Steen, V M; Le Hellard, S; Mattingsdal, M; Ntalla, I; Bencko, V; Foretova, L; Janout, V; Navratilova, M; Gallinger, S; Pinto, D; Scherer, S W; Aschauer, H; Carlberg, L; Schosser, A; Alfredsson, L; Ding, B; Klareskog, L; Padyukov, L; Courtet, P; Guillaume, S; Jaussent, I; Finan, C; Kalsi, G; Roberts, M; Logan, D W; Peltonen, L; Ritchie, G R S; Barrett, J C; Estivill, X; Hinney, A; Sullivan, P F; Collier, D A; Zeggini, E; Bulik, C M

    2014-10-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome-wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14 860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery data sets. Seventy-six (72 independent) single nucleotide polymorphisms were taken forward for in silico (two data sets) or de novo (13 data sets) replication genotyping in 2677 independent AN cases and 8629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication data sets comprised 5551 AN cases and 21 080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1606 AN restricting; 1445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01 × 10(-7)) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84 × 10(-6)) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76 × 10(-)(6)) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05 × 10(-)(6)) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery with replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P=4 × 10(-6)), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field. PMID:24514567

  8. Genome-Wide Association Studies for Comb Traits in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Shen, Manman; Qu, Liang; Ma, Meng; Dou, Taocun; Lu, Jian; Guo, Jun; Hu, Yuping; Yi, Guoqiang; Yuan, Jingwei; Sun, Congjiao; Wang, Kehua; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The comb, as a secondary sexual character, is an important trait in chicken. Indicators of comb length (CL), comb height (CH), and comb weight (CW) are often selected in production. DNA-based marker-assisted selection could help chicken breeders to accelerate genetic improvement for comb or related economic characters by early selection. Although a number of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and candidate genes have been identified with advances in molecular genetics, candidate genes underlying comb traits are limited. The aim of the study was to use genome-wide association (GWA) studies by 600 K Affymetrix chicken SNP arrays to detect genes that are related to comb, using an F2 resource population. For all comb characters, comb exhibited high SNP-based heritability estimates (0.61-0.69). Chromosome 1 explained 20.80% genetic variance, while chromosome 4 explained 6.89%. Independent univariate genome-wide screens for each character identified 127, 197, and 268 novel significant SNPs with CL, CH, and CW, respectively. Three candidate genes, VPS36, AR, and WNT11B, were determined to have a plausible function in all comb characters. These genes are important to the initiation of follicle development, gonadal growth, and dermal development, respectively. The current study provides the first GWA analysis for comb traits. Identification of the genetic basis as well as promising candidate genes will help us understand the underlying genetic architecture of comb development and has practical significance in breeding programs for the selection of comb as an index for sexual maturity or reproduction. PMID:27427764

  9. Genome wide association identifies novel loci involved in fungal communication.

    PubMed

    Palma-Guerrero, Javier; Hall, Charles R; Kowbel, David; Welch, Juliet; Taylor, John W; Brem, Rachel B; Glass, N Louise

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how genomes encode complex cellular and organismal behaviors has become the outstanding challenge of modern genetics. Unlike classical screening methods, analysis of genetic variation that occurs naturally in wild populations can enable rapid, genome-scale mapping of genotype to phenotype with a medium-throughput experimental design. Here we describe the results of the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) used to identify novel loci underlying trait variation in a microbial eukaryote, harnessing wild isolates of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We genotyped each of a population of wild Louisiana strains at 1 million genetic loci genome-wide, and we used these genotypes to map genetic determinants of microbial communication. In N. crassa, germinated asexual spores (germlings) sense the presence of other germlings, grow toward them in a coordinated fashion, and fuse. We evaluated germlings of each strain for their ability to chemically sense, chemotropically seek, and undergo cell fusion, and we subjected these trait measurements to GWAS. This analysis identified one gene, NCU04379 (cse-1, encoding a homolog of a neuronal calcium sensor), at which inheritance was strongly associated with the efficiency of germling communication. Deletion of cse-1 significantly impaired germling communication and fusion, and two genes encoding predicted interaction partners of CSE1 were also required for the communication trait. Additionally, mining our association results for signaling and secretion genes with a potential role in germling communication, we validated six more previously unknown molecular players, including a secreted protease and two other genes whose deletion conferred a novel phenotype of increased communication and multi-germling fusion. Our results establish protein secretion as a linchpin of germling communication in N. crassa and shed light on the regulation of communication molecules in this fungus. Our study demonstrates the power

  10. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Boraska, Vesna; Franklin, Christopher S; Floyd, James AB; Thornton, Laura M; Huckins, Laura M; Southam, Lorraine; Rayner, N William; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Klump, Kelly L; Treasure, Janet; Lewis, Cathryn M; Schmidt, Ulrike; Tozzi, Federica; Kiezebrink, Kirsty; Hebebrand, Johannes; Gorwood, Philip; Adan, Roger AH; Kas, Martien JH; Favaro, Angela; Santonastaso, Paolo; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Gratacos, Monica; Rybakowski, Filip; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Raevuori, Anu; Van Furth, Eric F; Landt, Margarita CT Slof-Op t; Hudson, James I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Knudsen, Gun Peggy S; Monteleone, Palmiero; Kaplan, Allan S; Karwautz, Andreas; Hakonarson, Hakon; Berrettini, Wade H; Guo, Yiran; Li, Dong; Schork, Nicholas J.; Komaki, Gen; Ando, Tetsuya; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Esko, Tõnu; Fischer, Krista; Männik, Katrin; Metspalu, Andres; Baker, Jessica H; Cone, Roger D; Dackor, Jennifer; DeSocio, Janiece E; Hilliard, Christopher E; O'Toole, Julie K; Pantel, Jacques; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Taico, Chrysecolla; Zerwas, Stephanie; Trace, Sara E; Davis, Oliver SP; Helder, Sietske; Bühren, Katharina; Burghardt, Roland; de Zwaan, Martina; Egberts, Karin; Ehrlich, Stefan; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Herzog, Wolfgang; Imgart, Hartmut; Scherag, André; Scherag, Susann; Zipfel, Stephan; Boni, Claudette; Ramoz, Nicolas; Versini, Audrey; Brandys, Marek K; Danner, Unna N; de Kovel, Carolien; Hendriks, Judith; Koeleman, Bobby PC; Ophoff, Roel A; Strengman, Eric; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Bruson, Alice; Clementi, Maurizio; Degortes, Daniela; Forzan, Monica; Tenconi, Elena; Docampo, Elisa; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rajewski, Andrzej; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Slopien, Agnieszka; Hauser, Joanna; Karhunen, Leila; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Slagboom, P Eline; Tortorella, Alfonso; Maj, Mario; Dedoussis, George; Dikeos, Dimitris; Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Tziouvas, Konstantinos; Tsitsika, Artemis; Papezova, Hana; Slachtova, Lenka; Martaskova, Debora; Kennedy, James L.; Levitan, Robert D.; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Huemer, Julia; Koubek, Doris; Merl, Elisabeth; Wagner, Gudrun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Breen, Gerome; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Farmer, Anne; McGuffin, Peter; Cichon, Sven; Giegling, Ina; Herms, Stefan; Rujescu, Dan; Schreiber, Stefan; Wichmann, H-Erich; Dina, Christian; Sladek, Rob; Gambaro, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Julia, Antonio; Marsal, Sara; Rabionet, Raquel; Gaborieau, Valerie; Dick, Danielle M; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Widén, Elisabeth; Andreassen, Ole A; Espeseth, Thomas; Lundervold, Astri; Reinvang, Ivar; Steen, Vidar M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Mattingsdal, Morten; Ntalla, Ioanna; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Navratilova, Marie; Gallinger, Steven; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen; Aschauer, Harald; Carlberg, Laura; Schosser, Alexandra; Alfredsson, Lars; Ding, Bo; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Finan, Chris; Kalsi, Gursharan; Roberts, Marion; Logan, Darren W; Peltonen, Leena; Ritchie, Graham RS; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Estivill, Xavier; Hinney, Anke; Sullivan, Patrick F; Collier, David A; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2,907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14,860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery datasets. Seventy-six (72 independent) SNPs were taken forward for in silico (two datasets) or de novo (13 datasets) replication genotyping in 2,677 independent AN cases and 8,629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication datasets comprised 5,551 AN cases and 21,080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1,606 AN restricting; 1,445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01×10-7) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84×10-6) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76×10-6) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05×10-6) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery to replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P=4×10-6), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but that our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field. PMID:24514567

  11. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Boraska, Vesna; Franklin, Christopher S; Floyd, James AB; Thornton, Laura M; Huckins, Laura M; Southam, Lorraine; Rayner, N William; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Klump, Kelly L; Treasure, Janet; Lewis, Cathryn M; Schmidt, Ulrike; Tozzi, Federica; Kiezebrink, Kirsty; Hebebrand, Johannes; Gorwood, Philip; Adan, Roger AH; Kas, Martien JH; Favaro, Angela; Santonastaso, Paolo; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Gratacos, Monica; Rybakowski, Filip; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Raevuori, Anu; Van Furth, Eric F; Slof-Op t Landt, Margarita CT; Hudson, James I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Knudsen, Gun Peggy S; Monteleone, Palmiero; Kaplan, Allan S; Karwautz, Andreas; Hakonarson, Hakon; Berrettini, Wade H; Guo, Yiran; Li, Dong; Schork, Nicholas J.; Komaki, Gen; Ando, Tetsuya; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Esko, Tõnu; Fischer, Krista; Männik, Katrin; Metspalu, Andres; Baker, Jessica H; Cone, Roger D; Dackor, Jennifer; DeSocio, Janiece E; Hilliard, Christopher E; O’Toole, Julie K; Pantel, Jacques; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Taico, Chrysecolla; Zerwas, Stephanie; Trace, Sara E; Davis, Oliver SP; Helder, Sietske; Bühren, Katharina; Burghardt, Roland; de Zwaan, Martina; Egberts, Karin; Ehrlich, Stefan; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Herzog, Wolfgang; Imgart, Hartmut; Scherag, André; Scherag, Susann; Zipfel, Stephan; Boni, Claudette; Ramoz, Nicolas; Versini, Audrey; Brandys, Marek K; Danner, Unna N; de Kovel, Carolien; Hendriks, Judith; Koeleman, Bobby PC; Ophoff, Roel A; Strengman, Eric; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Bruson, Alice; Clementi, Maurizio; Degortes, Daniela; Forzan, Monica; Tenconi, Elena; Docampo, Elisa; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rajewski, Andrzej; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Slopien, Agnieszka; Hauser, Joanna; Karhunen, Leila; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Slagboom, P Eline; Tortorella, Alfonso; Maj, Mario; Dedoussis, George; Dikeos, Dimitris; Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Tziouvas, Konstantinos; Tsitsika, Artemis; Papezova, Hana; Slachtova, Lenka; Martaskova, Debora; Kennedy, James L.; Levitan, Robert D.; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Huemer, Julia; Koubek, Doris; Merl, Elisabeth; Wagner, Gudrun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Breen, Gerome; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Farmer, Anne; McGuffin, Peter; Cichon, Sven; Giegling, Ina; Herms, Stefan; Rujescu, Dan; Schreiber, Stefan; Wichmann, H-Erich; Dina, Christian; Sladek, Rob; Gambaro, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Julia, Antonio; Marsal, Sara; Rabionet, Raquel; Gaborieau, Valerie; Dick, Danielle M; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Widén, Elisabeth; Andreassen, Ole A; Espeseth, Thomas; Lundervold, Astri; Reinvang, Ivar; Steen, Vidar M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Mattingsdal, Morten; Ntalla, Ioanna; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Navratilova, Marie; Gallinger, Steven; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen; Aschauer, Harald; Carlberg, Laura; Schosser, Alexandra; Alfredsson, Lars; Ding, Bo; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Finan, Chris; Kalsi, Gursharan; Roberts, Marion; Logan, Darren W; Peltonen, Leena; Ritchie, Graham RS; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Estivill, Xavier; Hinney, Anke; Sullivan, Patrick F; Collier, David A; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2,907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14,860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery datasets. Seventy-six (72 independent) SNPs were taken forward for in silico (two datasets) or de novo (13 datasets) replication genotyping in 2,677 independent AN cases and 8,629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication datasets comprised 5,551 AN cases and 21,080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1,606 AN restricting; 1,445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01×10−7) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84×10−6) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76×10−6) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05×10−6) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery to replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P= 4×10−6), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but that our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field. PMID:21079607

  12. Comparative analysis of genome-wide divergence, domestication footprints and genome-wide association study of root traits for Gossypium hirsutum and Gossypium barbadense

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of 10,129 singleton SNPs of known genomic location in tetraploid cotton provided unique opportunities to characterize genome-wide diversity among 440 Gossypium hirsutum and 219 G. barbadense cultivars and landrace accessions of widespread origin. Using genome-wide distributed SNPs, we examined ...

  13. HLA has strongest association with IgA nephropathy in genome-wide analysis.

    PubMed

    Feehally, John; Farrall, Martin; Boland, Anne; Gale, Daniel P; Gut, Ivo; Heath, Simon; Kumar, Ashish; Peden, John F; Maxwell, Patrick H; Morris, David L; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Vyse, Timothy J; Zawadzka, Anna; Rees, Andrew J; Lathrop, Mark; Ratcliffe, Peter J

    2010-10-01

    Demographic and family studies support the existence of a genetic contribution to the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy, but results from genetic association studies of candidate genes are inconsistent. To systematically survey common genetic variation in this disease, we performed a genome-wide analysis in a cohort of patients with IgA nephropathy selected from the UK Glomerulonephritis DNA Bank. We used two groups of controls: parents of affected individuals and previously genotyped, unaffected, ancestry-matched individuals from the 1958 British Birth Cohort and the UK Blood Service. We genotyped 914 affected or family controls for 318,127 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Filtering for low genotype call rates and inferred non-European ancestry left 533 genotyped individuals (187 affected children) for the family-based association analysis and 244 cases and 4980 controls for the case-control analysis. A total of 286,200 SNPs with call rates >95% were available for analysis. Genome-wide analysis showed a strong signal of association on chromosome 6p in the region of the MHC (P = 1 × 10(-9)). The two most strongly associated SNPs showed consistent association in both family-based and case-control analyses. HLA imputation analysis showed that the strongest association signal arose from a combination of DQ loci with some support for an independent HLA-B signal. These results suggest that the HLA region contains the strongest common susceptibility alleles that predispose to IgA nephropathy in the European population. PMID:20595679

  14. Genome-wide analysis of the MYB transcription factor superfamily in soybean

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The MYB superfamily constitutes one of the most abundant groups of transcription factors described in plants. Nevertheless, their functions appear to be highly diverse and remain rather unclear. To date, no genome-wide characterization of this gene family has been conducted in a legume species. Here we report the first genome-wide analysis of the whole MYB superfamily in a legume species, soybean (Glycine max), including the gene structures, phylogeny, chromosome locations, conserved motifs, and expression patterns, as well as a comparative genomic analysis with Arabidopsis. Results A total of 244 R2R3-MYB genes were identified and further classified into 48 subfamilies based on a phylogenetic comparative analysis with their putative orthologs, showed both gene loss and duplication events. The phylogenetic analysis showed that most characterized MYB genes with similar functions are clustered in the same subfamily, together with the identification of orthologs by synteny analysis, functional conservation among subgroups of MYB genes was strongly indicated. The phylogenetic relationships of each subgroup of MYB genes were well supported by the highly conserved intron/exon structures and motifs outside the MYB domain. Synonymous nucleotide substitution (dN/dS) analysis showed that the soybean MYB DNA-binding domain is under strong negative selection. The chromosome distribution pattern strongly indicated that genome-wide segmental and tandem duplication contribute to the expansion of soybean MYB genes. In addition, we found that ~ 4% of soybean R2R3-MYB genes had undergone alternative splicing events, producing a variety of transcripts from a single gene, which illustrated the extremely high complexity of transcriptome regulation. Comparative expression profile analysis of R2R3-MYB genes in soybean and Arabidopsis revealed that MYB genes play conserved and various roles in plants, which is indicative of a divergence in function. Conclusions In this

  15. Genome-wide association study identifies novel loci associated with resistance to bovine tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bermingham, M L; Bishop, S C; Woolliams, J A; Pong-Wong, R; Allen, A R; McBride, S H; Ryder, J J; Wright, D M; Skuce, R A; McDowell, S WJ; Glass, E J

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium bovis is a re-emerging disease of livestock that is of major economic importance worldwide, as well as being a zoonotic risk. There is significant heritability for host resistance to bovine TB (bTB) in dairy cattle. To identify resistance loci for bTB, we undertook a genome-wide association study in female Holstein–Friesian cattle with 592 cases and 559 age-matched controls from case herds. Cases and controls were categorised into distinct phenotypes: skin test and lesion positive vs skin test negative on multiple occasions, respectively. These animals were genotyped with the Illumina BovineHD 700K BeadChip. Genome-wide rapid association using linear and logistic mixed models and regression (GRAMMAR), regional heritability mapping (RHM) and haplotype-sharing analysis identified two novel resistance loci that attained chromosome-wise significance, protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor T (PTPRT; P=4.8 × 10−7) and myosin IIIB (MYO3B; P=5.4 × 10−6). We estimated that 21% of the phenotypic variance in TB resistance could be explained by all of the informative single-nucleotide polymorphisms, of which the region encompassing the PTPRT gene accounted for 6.2% of the variance and a further 3.6% was associated with a putative copy number variant in MYO3B. The results from this study add to our understanding of variation in host control of infection and suggest that genetic marker-based selection for resistance to bTB has the potential to make a significant contribution to bTB control. PMID:24496092

  16. Genome-Wide Detection of CNVs and Their Association with Meat Tenderness in Nelore Cattle

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Vinicius Henrique; Regitano, Luciana Correia de Almeida; Geistlinger, Ludwig; Pértille, Fábio; Morosini, Natália Silva; Zimmer, Ralf; Coutinho, Luiz Lehmann

    2016-01-01

    Brazil is one of the largest beef producers and exporters in the world with the Nelore breed representing the vast majority of Brazilian cattle (Bos taurus indicus). Despite the great adaptability of the Nelore breed to tropical climate, meat tenderness (MT) remains to be improved. Several factors including genetic composition can influence MT. In this article, we report a genome-wide analysis of copy number variation (CNV) inferred from Illumina® High Density SNP-chip data for a Nelore population of 723 males. We detected >2,600 CNV regions (CNVRs) representing ≈6.5% of the genome. Comparing our results with previous studies revealed an overlap in ≈1400 CNVRs (>50%). A total of 1,155 CNVRs (43.6%) overlapped 2,750 genes. They were enriched for processes involving guanosine triphosphate (GTP), previously reported to influence skeletal muscle physiology and morphology. Nelore CNVRs also overlapped QTLs for MT reported in other breeds (8.9%, 236 CNVRs) and from a previous study with this population (4.1%, 109 CNVRs). Two CNVRs were also proximal to glutathione metabolism genes that were previously associated with MT. Genome-wide association study of CN state with estimated breeding values derived from meat shear force identified 6 regions, including a region on BTA3 that contains genes of the cAMP and cGMP pathway. Ten CNVRs that overlapped regions associated with MT were successfully validated by qPCR. Our results represent the first comprehensive CNV study in Bos taurus indicus cattle and identify regions in which copy number changes are potentially of importance for the MT phenotype. PMID:27348523

  17. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Profiles Indicate CD8+ T Cell Hypermethylation in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Steffan D.; Page, Christian M.; Andreassen, Bettina K.; Elboudwarej, Emon; Gustavsen, Marte W.; Briggs, Farren; Quach, Hong; Leikfoss, Ingvild S.; Bjølgerud, Anja; Berge, Tone; Harbo, Hanne F.; Barcellos, Lisa F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Determine whether MS-specific DNA methylation profiles can be identified in whole blood or purified immune cells from untreated MS patients. Methods Whole blood, CD4+ and CD8+ T cell DNA from 16 female, treatment naïve MS patients and 14 matched controls was profiled using the HumanMethylation450K BeadChip. Genotype data were used to assess genetic homogeneity of our sample and to exclude potential SNP-induced DNA methylation measurement errors. Results As expected, significant differences between CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells and whole blood DNA methylation profiles were observed, regardless of disease status. Strong evidence for hypermethylation of CD8+ T cell, but not CD4+ T cell or whole blood DNA in MS patients compared to controls was observed. Genome-wide significant individual CpG-site DNA methylation differences were not identified. Furthermore, significant differences in gene DNA methylation of 148 established MS-associated risk genes were not observed. Conclusion While genome-wide significant DNA methylation differences were not detected for individual CpG-sites, strong evidence for DNA hypermethylation of CD8+ T cells for MS patients was observed, indicating a role for DNA methylation in MS. Further, our results suggest that large DNA methylation differences for CpG-sites tested here do not contribute to MS susceptibility. In particular, large DNA methylation differences for CpG-sites within 148 established MS candidate genes tested in our study cannot explain missing heritability. Larger studies of homogenous MS patients and matched controls are warranted to further elucidate the impact of CD8+ T cell and more subtle DNA methylation changes in MS development and pathogenesis. PMID:25734800

  18. Genome-wide association study of comorbid depressive syndrome and alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Alexis C.; Aliev, Fazil; Bierut, Laura J.; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Edenberg, Howard; Hesselbrock, Victor; Kramer, John; Kuperman, Samuel; Nurnberger, John I.; Schuckit, Marc A.; Porjesz, Bernice; Dick, Danielle M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Depression and alcohol dependence are common psychiatric disorders that often co-occur. Both disorders are genetically influenced, with heritability estimates in the range of 35–60%. In addition, evidence from twin studies suggests that alcohol dependence and depression are genetically correlated. Here we report results from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of a comorbid phenotype in which cases meet the DSM-IV symptom threshold for major depressive symptomatology and DSM-IV criteria for alcohol dependence. Methods Samples (N=467 cases and N=407 controls) were of European-American descent, and were genotyped using the Illumina Human 1M BeadChip array. Results Although no SNP meets genome-wide significance criteria, we identify ten markers with p-values < 1 × 10−5, seven of which are located in known genes, which have not been previously implicated in either disorder. Genes harboring SNPs yielding p<1 × 10−3 are functionally enriched for a number of gene ontology categories, notably several related to glutamatergic function. Investigation of expression localization using online resources suggests that these genes are expressed across a variety of tissues, including behaviorally relevant brain regions. Genes that have been previously associated with depression, alcohol dependence, or other addiction-related phenotypes – such as CDH13, CSMD2, GRID1, and HTR1B – were implicated by nominally significant SNPs. Finally, the degree of overlap of significant SNPs between a comorbid phenotype and an alcohol dependence-only phenotype is modest. Conclusions These results underscore the complex genomic influences on psychiatric phenotypes, and suggest that a comorbid phenotype is partially influenced by genetic variants that do not affect alcohol dependence alone. PMID:22064162

  19. Genome-wide DNA methylation variability in adolescent monozygotic twins followed since birth.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Mélissa L; Casey, Kevin F; Szyf, Moshe; Ismaylova, Elmira; Ly, Victoria; Verner, Marie-Pier; Suderman, Matthew; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Dionne, Ginette; Boivin, Michel; Tremblay, Richard E; Booij, Linda

    2014-10-01

    DNA methylation patterns are characterized by highly conserved developmental programs, but allow for divergent gene expression resulting from stochastic epigenetic drift or divergent environments. Genome-wide methylation studies in monozygotic (MZ) twins are providing insight into the extent of epigenetic variation that occurs, irrespective of genotype. However, little is known about the variability of DNA methylation patterns in adolescence, a period involving significant and rapid physical, emotional, social, and neurodevelopmental change. Here, we assessed genome-wide DNA methylation using the 450 K Illumina BeadChip in a sample of 37 MZ twin pairs followed longitudinally since birth to investigate: 1) the extent of variation in DNA methylation in identical genetic backgrounds in adolescence and; 2) whether these variations are randomly distributed or enriched in particular functional pathways. We also assessed stability of DNA methylation over 3-6 months to distinguish stable trait-like and variable state-like genes. A pathway analysis found high within-pair variability in genes associated with development, cellular mechanisms, tissue and cell morphology, and various disorders. Test-retest analyses performed in a sub-sample of 8 twin pairs demonstrated enrichment in gene pathways involved in organismal development, cellular growth and proliferation, cell signaling, and particular disorders. The variability found in functional gene pathways may plausibly underlie phenotypic differences in this adolescent MZ twin sample. Furthermore, we assessed stability of methylation over 3-6 months and found that some genes were stable while others were unstable, suggesting that the methylome remains dynamic in adolescence and that dynamic sites tend to be organized in certain gene pathways. PMID:25437055

  20. Genome-Wide Estimates of Coancestry, Inbreeding and Effective Population Size in the Spanish Holstein Population

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Ramilo, Silvia Teresa; Fernández, Jesús; Toro, Miguel Angel; Hernández, Delfino; Villanueva, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Estimates of effective population size in the Holstein cattle breed have usually been low despite the large number of animals that constitute this breed. Effective population size is inversely related to the rates at which coancestry and inbreeding increase and these rates have been high as a consequence of intense and accurate selection. Traditionally, coancestry and inbreeding coefficients have been calculated from pedigree data. However, the development of genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms has increased the interest of calculating these coefficients from molecular data in order to improve their accuracy. In this study, genomic estimates of coancestry, inbreeding and effective population size were obtained in the Spanish Holstein population and then compared with pedigree-based estimates. A total of 11,135 animals genotyped with the Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip were available for the study. After applying filtering criteria, the final genomic dataset included 36,693 autosomal SNPs and 10,569 animals. Pedigree data from those genotyped animals included 31,203 animals. These individuals represented only the last five generations in order to homogenise the amount of pedigree information across animals. Genomic estimates of coancestry and inbreeding were obtained from identity by descent segments (coancestry) or runs of homozygosity (inbreeding). The results indicate that the percentage of variance of pedigree-based coancestry estimates explained by genomic coancestry estimates was higher than that for inbreeding. Estimates of effective population size obtained from genome-wide and pedigree information were consistent and ranged from about 66 to 79. These low values emphasize the need of controlling the rate of increase of coancestry and inbreeding in Holstein selection programmes. PMID:25880228

  1. Genome-wide DNA methylation variability in adolescent monozygotic twins followed since birth

    PubMed Central

    Lévesque, Mélissa L; Casey, Kevin F; Szyf, Moshe; Ismaylova, Elmira; Ly, Victoria; Verner, Marie-Pier; Suderman, Matthew; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Dionne, Ginette; Boivin, Michel; Tremblay, Richard E; Booij, Linda

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation patterns are characterized by highly conserved developmental programs, but allow for divergent gene expression resulting from stochastic epigenetic drift or divergent environments. Genome-wide methylation studies in monozygotic (MZ) twins are providing insight into the extent of epigenetic variation that occurs, irrespective of genotype. However, little is known about the variability of DNA methylation patterns in adolescence, a period involving significant and rapid physical, emotional, social, and neurodevelopmental change. Here, we assessed genome-wide DNA methylation using the 450 K Illumina BeadChip in a sample of 37 MZ twin pairs followed longitudinally since birth to investigate: 1) the extent of variation in DNA methylation in identical genetic backgrounds in adolescence and; 2) whether these variations are randomly distributed or enriched in particular functional pathways. We also assessed stability of DNA methylation over 3–6 months to distinguish stable trait-like and variable state-like genes. A pathway analysis found high within-pair variability in genes associated with development, cellular mechanisms, tissue and cell morphology, and various disorders. Test-retest analyses performed in a sub-sample of 8 twin pairs demonstrated enrichment in gene pathways involved in organismal development, cellular growth and proliferation, cell signaling, and particular disorders. The variability found in functional gene pathways may plausibly underlie phenotypic differences in this adolescent MZ twin sample. Furthermore, we assessed stability of methylation over 3–6 months and found that some genes were stable while others were unstable, suggesting that the methylome remains dynamic in adolescence and that dynamic sites tend to be organized in certain gene pathways. PMID:25437055

  2. Genome-Wide Detection of CNVs and Their Association with Meat Tenderness in Nelore Cattle.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vinicius Henrique da; Regitano, Luciana Correia de Almeida; Geistlinger, Ludwig; Pértille, Fábio; Giachetto, Poliana Fernanda; Brassaloti, Ricardo Augusto; Morosini, Natália Silva; Zimmer, Ralf; Coutinho, Luiz Lehmann

    2016-01-01

    Brazil is one of the largest beef producers and exporters in the world with the Nelore breed representing the vast majority of Brazilian cattle (Bos taurus indicus). Despite the great adaptability of the Nelore breed to tropical climate, meat tenderness (MT) remains to be improved. Several factors including genetic composition can influence MT. In this article, we report a genome-wide analysis of copy number variation (CNV) inferred from Illumina® High Density SNP-chip data for a Nelore population of 723 males. We detected >2,600 CNV regions (CNVRs) representing ≈6.5% of the genome. Comparing our results with previous studies revealed an overlap in ≈1400 CNVRs (>50%). A total of 1,155 CNVRs (43.6%) overlapped 2,750 genes. They were enriched for processes involving guanosine triphosphate (GTP), previously reported to influence skeletal muscle physiology and morphology. Nelore CNVRs also overlapped QTLs for MT reported in other breeds (8.9%, 236 CNVRs) and from a previous study with this population (4.1%, 109 CNVRs). Two CNVRs were also proximal to glutathione metabolism genes that were previously associated with MT. Genome-wide association study of CN state with estimated breeding values derived from meat shear force identified 6 regions, including a region on BTA3 that contains genes of the cAMP and cGMP pathway. Ten CNVRs that overlapped regions associated with MT were successfully validated by qPCR. Our results represent the first comprehensive CNV study in Bos taurus indicus cattle and identify regions in which copy number changes are potentially of importance for the MT phenotype. PMID:27348523

  3. Genome-wide association analyses for growth and feed efficiency traits in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Lu, D; Miller, S; Sargolzaei, M; Kelly, M; Vander Voort, G; Caldwell, T; Wang, Z; Plastow, G; Moore, S

    2013-08-01

    A genome-wide association study using the Illumina 50K BeadChip included 38,745 SNP on 29 BTA analyzed on 751 animals, including 33 purebreds and 718 crossbred cattle. Genotypes and 6 production traits: birth weight (BWT), weaning weight (WWT), ADG, DMI, midtest metabolic BW (MMWT), and residual feed intake (RFI), were used to estimate effects of individual SNP on the traits. At the genome-wide level false discovery rate (FDR < 10%), 41 and 5 SNP were found significantly associated with BWT and WWT, respectively. Thirty-three of them were located on BTA6. At a less stringent significance level (P < 0.001), 277 and 27 SNP were in association with single traits and multiple traits, respectively. Seventy-three SNP on BTA6 and were mostly associated with BW-related traits, and heavily located around 30 to 50Mb. Markers that significantly affected multiple traits appeared to impact them in same direction. In terms of the size of SNP effect, the significant SNP (P < 0.001) explained between 0.26 and 8.06% of the phenotypic variation in the traits. Pairs of traits with low genetic correlation, such as ADG vs. RFI or DMI vs. BWT, appeared to be controlled by 2 groups of SNP; 1 of them affected the traits in same direction, the other worked in opposite direction. This study provides useful information to further assist the identification of chromosome regions and subsequently genes affecting growth and feed efficiency traits in beef cattle. PMID:23851991

  4. Genome-wide Association Study of Biochemical Traits in Korčula Island, Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Lauc, Gordan; Janković, Stipan; Rotim, Krešimir; Vatavuk, Zoran; Benčić, Goran; Đogaš, Zoran; Boraska, Vesna; Torlak, Vesela; Sušac, Jelena; Zobić, Ivana; Rudan, Diana; Pulanić, Dražen; Modun, Darko; Mudnić, Ivana; Gunjača, Grgo; Budimir, Danijela; Hayward, Caroline; Vitart, Veronique; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor

    2009-01-01

    Aim To identify genetic variants underlying biochemical traits – total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, albumin, and fibrinogen, in a genome-wide association study in an isolated population where rare variants of larger effect may be more easily identified. Methods The study included 944 adult inhabitants of the island of Korčula, as a part of a larger DNA-based genetic epidemiological study in 2007. Biochemical measurements were performed in a single laboratory with stringent internal and external quality control procedures. Examinees were genotyped using Human Hap370CNV chip by Illumina, with a genome-wide scan containing 346 027 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). Results A total of 31 SNPs were associated with 7 investigated traits at the level of P < 1.00 × 10−5. Nine of SNPs implicated the role of SLC2A9 in uric acid regulation (P = 4.10 × 10−6-2.58 × 10−12), as previously found in other populations. All 22 remaining associations fell into the P = 1.00 × 10−5-1.00 × 10−6 significance range. One of them replicated the association between cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and HDL, and 7 associations were more than 100 kilobases away from the closest known gene. Nearby SNPs, rs4767631 and rs10444502, in gene kinase suppressor of ras 2 (KSR2) on chromosome 12 were associated with LDL cholesterol levels, and rs10444502 in the same gene with total cholesterol levels. Similarly, rs2839619 in gene PBX/knotted 1 homeobox 1 (PKNOX1) on chromosome 21 was associated with total and LDL cholesterol levels. The remaining 9 findings implied possible associations between phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT) gene and total cholesterol; USP46, RAP1GDS1, and ZCCHC16 genes and triglycerides; BCAT1 and SLC14A2 genes and albumin; and NR3C2, GRIK2, and PCSK2 genes and fibrinogen. Conclusion Although this study was

  5. Case-Control Genome-Wide Association of Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah; Ripke, Stephan; Anney, Richard J.L.; Asherson, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara; Gill, Michael; Kent, Lindsey; Holmans, Peter; Middleton, Frank; Thapar, Anita; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Daly, Mark; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schäfer, Helmut; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Warnke, Andreas; Walitza, Susanne; Freitag, Christine; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Rothenberger, Aribert; Hawi, Ziarih; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Biederman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Objective Although twin and family studies have shown attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. Thus, additional genomewide association studies (GWAS) are needed. Method We used case-control analyses of 896 cases with DSM-IV ADHD genotyped using the Affymetrix 5.0 array and 2,455 repository controls screened for psychotic and bipolar symptoms genotyped using Affymetrix 6.0 arrays. A consensus SNP set was imputed using BEAGLE 3.0, resulting in an analysis dataset of 1,033,244 SNPs. The data were analyzed using a generalized linear model. Results No genome-wide significant associations were found. The most significant results implicated the following genes: PRKG1, FLNC, TCERG1L, PPM1H, NXPH1, PPM1H, CDH13, HK1 and HKDC1. Conclusions The current analyses are a useful addition to the present literature and will make a valuable contribution to future meta-analyses. The candidate gene findings are consistent with a prior meta-analysis in suggesting that the effects of ADHD risk variants must, individually, be very small and/or include multiple rare alleles. PMID:20732627

  6. A powerful test of independent assortment that determines genome-wide significance quickly and accurately

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, W C L; Hager, V R

    2016-01-01

    In the analysis of DNA sequences on related individuals, most methods strive to incorporate as much information as possible, with little or no attention paid to the issue of statistical significance. For example, a modern workstation can easily handle the computations needed to perform a large-scale genome-wide inheritance-by-descent (IBD) scan, but accurate assessment of the significance of that scan is often hindered by inaccurate approximations and computationally intensive simulation. To address these issues, we developed gLOD—a test of co-segregation that, for large samples, models chromosome-specific IBD statistics as a collection of stationary Gaussian processes. With this simple model, the parametric bootstrap yields an accurate and rapid assessment of significance—the genome-wide corrected P-value. Furthermore, we show that (i) under the null hypothesis, the limiting distribution of the gLOD is the standard Gumbel distribution; (ii) our parametric bootstrap simulator is approximately 40 000 times faster than gene-dropping methods, and it is more powerful than methods that approximate the adjusted P-value; and, (iii) the gLOD has the same statistical power as the widely used maximum Kong and Cox LOD. Thus, our approach gives researchers the ability to determine quickly and accurately the significance of most large-scale IBD scans, which may contain multiple traits, thousands of families and tens of thousands of DNA sequences. PMID:27245422

  7. A powerful test of independent assortment that determines genome-wide significance quickly and accurately.

    PubMed

    Stewart, W C L; Hager, V R

    2016-08-01

    In the analysis of DNA sequences on related individuals, most methods strive to incorporate as much information as possible, with little or no attention paid to the issue of statistical significance. For example, a modern workstation can easily handle the computations needed to perform a large-scale genome-wide inheritance-by-descent (IBD) scan, but accurate assessment of the significance of that scan is often hindered by inaccurate approximations and computationally intensive simulation. To address these issues, we developed gLOD-a test of co-segregation that, for large samples, models chromosome-specific IBD statistics as a collection of stationary Gaussian processes. With this simple model, the parametric bootstrap yields an accurate and rapid assessment of significance-the genome-wide corrected P-value. Furthermore, we show that (i) under the null hypothesis, the limiting distribution of the gLOD is the standard Gumbel distribution; (ii) our parametric bootstrap simulator is approximately 40 000 times faster than gene-dropping methods, and it is more powerful than methods that approximate the adjusted P-value; and, (iii) the gLOD has the same statistical power as the widely used maximum Kong and Cox LOD. Thus, our approach gives researchers the ability to determine quickly and accurately the significance of most large-scale IBD scans, which may contain multiple traits, thousands of families and tens of thousands of DNA sequences. PMID:27245422

  8. Epigenetic Variation in Monozygotic Twins: A Genome-Wide Analysis of DNA Methylation in Buccal Cells

    PubMed Central

    van Dongen, Jenny; Ehli, Erik A.; Slieker, Roderick C.; Bartels, Meike; Weber, Zachary M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Heijmans, Bastiaan T.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is one of the most extensively studied epigenetic marks in humans. Yet, it is largely unknown what causes variation in DNA methylation between individuals. The comparison of DNA methylation profiles of monozygotic (MZ) twins offers a unique experimental design to examine the extent to which such variation is related to individual-specific environmental influences and stochastic events or to familial factors (DNA sequence and shared environment). We measured genome-wide DNA methylation in buccal samples from ten MZ pairs (age 8–19) using the Illumina 450k array and examined twin correlations for methylation level at 420,921 CpGs after QC. After selecting CpGs showing the most variation in the methylation level between subjects, the mean genome-wide correlation (rho) was 0.54. The correlation was higher, on average, for CpGs within CpG islands (CGIs), compared to CGI shores, shelves and non-CGI regions, particularly at hypomethylated CpGs. This finding suggests that individual-specific environmental and stochastic influences account for more variation in DNA methylation in CpG-poor regions. Our findings also indicate that it is worthwhile to examine heritable and shared environmental influences on buccal DNA methylation in larger studies that also include dizygotic twins. PMID:24802513

  9. Epigenetic variation in monozygotic twins: a genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in buccal cells.

    PubMed

    van Dongen, Jenny; Ehli, Erik A; Slieker, Roderick C; Bartels, Meike; Weber, Zachary M; Davies, Gareth E; Slagboom, P Eline; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is one of the most extensively studied epigenetic marks in humans. Yet, it is largely unknown what causes variation in DNA methylation between individuals. The comparison of DNA methylation profiles of monozygotic (MZ) twins offers a unique experimental design to examine the extent to which such variation is related to individual-specific environmental influences and stochastic events or to familial factors (DNA sequence and shared environment). We measured genome-wide DNA methylation in buccal samples from ten MZ pairs (age 8-19) using the Illumina 450k array and examined twin correlations for methylation level at 420,921 CpGs after QC. After selecting CpGs showing the most variation in the methylation level between subjects, the mean genome-wide correlation (rho) was 0.54. The correlation was higher, on average, for CpGs within CpG islands (CGIs), compared to CGI shores, shelves and non-CGI regions, particularly at hypomethylated CpGs. This finding suggests that individual-specific environmental and stochastic influences account for more variation in DNA methylation in CpG-poor regions. Our findings also indicate that it is worthwhile to examine heritable and shared environmental influences on buccal DNA methylation in larger studies that also include dizygotic twins. PMID:24802513

  10. Efficiently identifying genome-wide changes with next-generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weichun; Umbach, David M; Vincent Jordan, Nicole; Abell, Amy N; Johnson, Gary L; Li, Leping

    2011-10-01

    We propose a new and effective statistical framework for identifying genome-wide differential changes in epigenetic marks with ChIP-seq data or gene expression with mRNA-seq data, and we develop a new software tool EpiCenter that can efficiently perform data analysis. The key features of our framework are: (i) providing multiple normalization methods to achieve appropriate normalization under different scenarios, (ii) using a sequence of three statistical tests to eliminate background regions and to account for different sources of variation and (iii) allowing adjustment for multiple testing to control false discovery rate (FDR) or family-wise type I error. Our software EpiCenter can perform multiple analytic tasks including: (i) identifying genome-wide epigenetic changes or differentially expressed genes, (ii) finding transcription factor binding sites and (iii) converting multiple-sample sequencing data into a single read-count data matrix. By simulation, we show that our framework achieves a low FDR consistently over a broad range of read coverage and biological variation. Through two real examples, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our framework and the usages of our tool. In particular, we show that our novel and robust 'parsimony' normalization method is superior to the widely-used 'tagRatio' method. Our software EpiCenter is freely available to the public. PMID:21803788

  11. Forward-time simulation of realistic samples for genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Forward-time simulations have unique advantages in power and flexibility for the simulation of genetic samples of complex human diseases because they can closely mimic the evolution of human populations carrying these diseases. However, a number of methodological and computational constraints have prevented the power of this simulation method from being fully explored in existing forward-time simulation methods. Results Using a general-purpose forward-time population genetics simulation environment, we developed a forward-time simulation method that can be used to simulate realistic samples for genome-wide association studies. We examined the properties of this simulation method by comparing simulated samples with real data and demonstrated its wide applicability using four examples, including a simulation of case-control samples with a disease caused by multiple interacting genetic and environmental factors, a simulation of trio families affected by a disease-predisposing allele that had been subjected to either slow or rapid selective sweep, and a simulation of a structured population resulting from recent population admixture. Conclusions Our algorithm simulates populations that closely resemble the complex structure of the human genome, while allows the introduction of signals of natural selection. Because of its flexibility to generate different types of samples with arbitrary disease or quantitative trait models, this simulation method can simulate realistic samples to evaluate the performance of a wide variety of statistical gene mapping methods for genome-wide association studies. PMID:20809983

  12. Meta-analysis of genome-wide linkage scans for renal function traits

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Madhumathi; Mottl, Amy K.; Cole, Shelley A.; Umans, Jason G.; Freedman, Barry I.; Bowden, Donald W.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Fox, Caroline S.; Yang, Qiong; Cupples, Adrienne; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Hunt, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Several genome scans have explored the linkage of chronic kidney disease phenotypes to chromosomic regions with disparate results. Genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA) is a quantitative method to synthesize linkage results from independent studies and assess their concordance. Methods. We searched PubMed to identify genome linkage analyses of renal function traits in humans, such as estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR), albuminuria, serum creatinine concentration and creatinine clearance. We contacted authors for numerical data and extracted information from individual studies. We applied the GSMA nonparametric approach to combine results across 14 linkage studies for GFR, 11 linkage studies for albumin creatinine ratio, 11 linkage studies for serum creatinine and 4 linkage studies for creatinine clearance. Results. No chromosomal region reached genome-wide statistical significance in the main analysis which included all scans under each phenotype; however, regions on Chromosomes 7, 10 and 16 reached suggestive significance for linkage to two or more phenotypes. Subgroup analyses by disease status or ethnicity did not yield additional information. Conclusions. While heterogeneity across populations, methodologies and study designs likely explain this lack of agreement, it is possible that linkage scan methodologies lack the resolution for investigating complex traits. Combining family-based linkage studies with genome-wide association studies may be a powerful approach to detect private mutations contributing to complex renal phenotypes. PMID:21622988

  13. Genome-wide pathway analysis of genome-wide association studies on systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ho; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Choi, Sung Jae; Ji, Jong Dae; Song, Gwan Gyu

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and candidate mechanisms of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Two SLE genome-wide association studies (GWASs) datasets were included in this study. Meta-analysis was conducted using 737,984 SNPs in 1,527 SLE cases and 3,421 controls of European ancestry, and 4,429 SNPs that met a threshold of p < 0.01 in a Korean RA GWAS dataset was used. ICSNPathway (identify candidate causal SNPs and pathways) analysis was applied to the meta-analysis results of the SLE GWAS datasets, and a RA GWAS dataset. The most significant result of SLE GWAS meta-analysis concerned rs2051549 in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region (p = 3.36E-22). In the non-HLA region, meta-analysis identified 6 SNPs associated with SLE with genome-wide significance (STAT4, TNPO3, BLK, FAM167A, and IRF5). ICSNPathway identified five candidate causal SNPs and 13 candidate causal pathways. This pathway-based analysis provides three hypotheses of the biological mechanism involved. First, rs8084 and rs7192 → HLA-DRA → bystander B cell activation. Second, rs1800629 → TNF → cytokine network. Third, rs1150752 and rs185819 → TNXB → collagen metabolic process. ICSNPathway analysis identified three candidate causal non-HLA SNPs and four candidate causal pathways involving the PADI4, MTR, PADI2, and TPH2 genes of RA. We identified five candidate SNPs and thirteen pathways, involving bystander B cell activation, cytokine network, and collagen metabolic processing, which may contribute to SLE susceptibility, and we revealed candidate causal non-HLA SNPs, genes, and pathways of RA. PMID:23053960

  14. Minimalist ensemble algorithms for genome-wide protein localization prediction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Computational prediction of protein subcellular localization can greatly help to elucidate its functions. Despite the existence of dozens of protein localization prediction algorithms, the prediction accuracy and coverage are still low. Several ensemble algorithms have been proposed to improve the prediction performance, which usually include as many as 10 or more individual localization algorithms. However, their performance is still limited by the running complexity and redundancy among individual prediction algorithms. Results This paper proposed a novel method for rational design of minimalist ensemble algorithms for practical genome-wide protein subcellular localization prediction. The algorithm is based on combining a feature selection based filter and a logistic regression classifier. Using a novel concept of contribution scores, we analyzed issues of algorithm redundancy, consensus mistakes, and algorithm complementarity in designing ensemble algorithms. We applied the proposed minimalist logistic regression (LR) ensemble algorithm to two genome-wide datasets of Yeast and Human and compared its performance with current ensemble algorithms. Experimental results showed that the minimalist ensemble algorithm can achieve high prediction accuracy with only 1/3 to 1/2 of individual predictors of current ensemble algorithms, which greatly reduces computational complexity and running time. It was found that the high performance ensemble algorithms are usually composed of the predictors that together cover most of available features. Compared to the best individual predictor, our ensemble algorithm improved the prediction accuracy from AUC score of 0.558 to 0.707 for the Yeast dataset and from 0.628 to 0.646 for the Human dataset. Compared with popular weighted voting based ensemble algorithms, our classifier-based ensemble algorithms achieved much better performance without suffering from inclusion of too many individual predictors. Conclusions We

  15. Genome wide identification of regulatory motifs in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Mwangi, Michael M; Siggia, Eric D

    2003-01-01

    Background To explain the vastly different phenotypes exhibited by the same organism under different conditions, it is essential that we understand how the organism's genes are coordinately regulated. While there are many excellent tools for predicting sequences encoding proteins or RNA genes, few algorithms exist to predict regulatory sequences on a genome wide scale with no prior information. Results To identify motifs involved in the control of transcription, an algorithm was developed that searches upstream of operons for improbably frequent dimers. The algorithm was applied to the B. subtilis genome, which is predicted to encode for approximately 200 DNA binding proteins. The dimers found to be over-represented could be clustered into 317 distinct groups, each thought to represent a class of motifs uniquely recognized by some transcription factor. For each cluster of dimers, a representative weight matrix was derived and scored over the regions upstream of the operons to predict the sites recognized by the cluster's factor, and a putative regulon of the operons immediately downstream of the sites was inferred. The distribution in number of operons per predicted regulon is comparable to that for well characterized transcription factors. The most highly over-represented dimers matched σA, the T-box, and σW sites. We have evidence to suggest that at least 52 of our clusters of dimers represent actual regulatory motifs, based on the groups' weight matrix matches to experimentally characterized sites, the functional similarity of the component operons of the groups' regulons, and the positional biases of the weight matrix matches. All predictions are assigned a significance value, and thresholds are set to avoid false positives. Where possible, we examine our false negatives, drawing examples from known regulatory motifs and regulons inferred from RNA expression data. Conclusions We have demonstrated that in the case of B. subtilis our algorithm allows for the

  16. Comparative analysis of methods for genome-wide nucleosome cartography.

    PubMed

    Quintales, Luis; Vázquez, Enrique; Antequera, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Nucleosomes contribute to compacting the genome into the nucleus and regulate the physical access of regulatory proteins to DNA either directly or through the epigenetic modifications of the histone tails. Precise mapping of nucleosome positioning across the genome is, therefore, essential to understanding the genome regulation. In recent years, several experimental protocols have been developed for this purpose that include the enzymatic digestion, chemical cleavage or immunoprecipitation of chromatin followed by next-generation sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments. Here, we compare the performance and resolution of these methods from the initial biochemical steps through the alignment of the millions of short-sequence reads to a reference genome to the final computational analysis to generate genome-wide maps of nucleosome occupancy. Because of the lack of a unified protocol to process data sets obtained through the different approaches, we have developed a new computational tool (NUCwave), which facilitates their analysis, comparison and assessment and will enable researchers to choose the most suitable method for any particular purpose. NUCwave is freely available at http://nucleosome.usal.es/nucwave along with a step-by-step protocol for its use. PMID:25296770

  17. Genome-Wide Association Studies of the Human Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Emily R; Cusanovich, Darren A; Michelini, Katelyn; Barreiro, Luis B; Ober, Carole; Gilad, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial composition of the human fecal microbiome is influenced by many lifestyle factors, notably diet. It is less clear, however, what role host genetics plays in dictating the composition of bacteria living in the gut. In this study, we examined the association of ~200K host genotypes with the relative abundance of fecal bacterial taxa in a founder population, the Hutterites, during two seasons (n = 91 summer, n = 93 winter, n = 57 individuals collected in both). These individuals live and eat communally, minimizing variation due to environmental exposures, including diet, which could potentially mask small genetic effects. Using a GWAS approach that takes into account the relatedness between subjects, we identified at least 8 bacterial taxa whose abundances were associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the host genome in each season (at genome-wide FDR of 20%). For example, we identified an association between a taxon known to affect obesity (genus Akkermansia) and a variant near PLD1, a gene previously associated with body mass index. Moreover, we replicate a previously reported association from a quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping study of fecal microbiome abundance in mice (genus Lactococcus, rs3747113, P = 3.13 x 10-7). Finally, based on the significance distribution of the associated microbiome QTLs in our study with respect to chromatin accessibility profiles, we identified tissues in which host genetic variation may be acting to influence bacterial abundance in the gut. PMID:26528553

  18. Assessing Predictive Properties of Genome-Wide Selection in Soybeans.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Alencar; Muir, William M; Rainey, Katy Martin

    2016-01-01

    Many economically important traits in plant breeding have low heritability or are difficult to measure. For these traits, genomic selection has attractive features and may boost genetic gains. Our goal was to evaluate alternative scenarios to implement genomic selection for yield components in soybean (Glycine max L. merr). We used a nested association panel with cross validation to evaluate the impacts of training population size, genotyping density, and prediction model on the accuracy of genomic prediction. Our results indicate that training population size was the factor most relevant to improvement in genome-wide prediction, with greatest improvement observed in training sets up to 2000 individuals. We discuss assumptions that influence the choice of the prediction model. Although alternative models had minor impacts on prediction accuracy, the most robust prediction model was the combination of reproducing kernel Hilbert space regression and BayesB. Higher genotyping density marginally improved accuracy. Our study finds that breeding programs seeking efficient genomic selection in soybeans would best allocate resources by investing in a representative training set. PMID:27317786

  19. Genome wide association scan for chronic periodontitis implicates novel locus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is evidence for a genetic contribution to chronic periodontitis. In this study, we conducted a genome wide association study among 866 participants of the University of Pittsburgh Dental Registry and DNA Repository, whose periodontal diagnosis ranged from healthy (N = 767) to severe chronic periodontitis (N = 99). Methods Genotypingi of over half-million single nucleotide polymorphisms was determined. Analyses were done twice, first in the complete dataset of all ethnicities, and second including only samples defined as self-reported Whites. From the top 100 results, twenty single nucleotide polymorphisms had consistent results in both analyses (borderline p-values ranging from 1E-05 to 1E-6) and were selected to be tested in two independent datasets derived from 1,460 individuals from Porto Alegre, and 359 from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Meta-analyses of the Single nucleotide polymorphisms showing a trend for association in the independent dataset were performed. Results The rs1477403 marker located on 16q22.3 showed suggestive association in the discovery phase and in the Porto Alegre dataset (p = 0.05). The meta-analysis suggested the less common allele decreases the risk of chronic periodontitis. Conclusions Our data offer a clear hypothesis to be independently tested regarding the contribution of the 16q22.3 locus to chronic periodontitis. PMID:25008200

  20. Genome-wide association study of aggressive behaviour in chicken.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhui; Zheng, Ming; Abdalla, Bahareldin Ali; Zhang, Zhe; Xu, Zhenqiang; Ye, Qiao; Xu, Haiping; Luo, Wei; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-01-01

    In the poultry industry, aggressive behaviour is a large animal welfare issue all over the world. To date, little is known about the underlying genetics of the aggressive behaviour. Here, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to explore the genetic mechanism associated with aggressive behaviour in chickens. The GWAS results showed that a total of 33 SNPs were associated with aggressive behaviour traits (P < 4.6E-6). rs312463697 on chromosome 4 was significantly associated with aggression (P = 2.10905E-07), and it was in the intron region of the sortilin-related VPS10 domain containing receptor 2 (SORCS2) gene. In addition, biological function analysis of the nearest 26 genes around the significant SNPs was performed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. An interaction network contained 17 genes was obtained and SORCS2 was involved in this network, interacted with nerve growth factor (NGF), nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR), dopa decarboxylase (L-dopa) and dopamine. After knockdown of SORCS2, the mRNA levels of NGF, L-dopa and dopamine receptor genes DRD1, DRD2, DRD3 and DRD4 were significantly decreased (P < 0.05). In summary, our data indicated that SORCS2 might play an important role in chicken aggressive behaviour through the regulation of dopaminergic pathways and NGF. PMID:27485826

  1. Genome-Wide Discriminatory Information Patterns of Cytosine DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Robersy; Mackenzie, Sally A

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine DNA methylation (CDM) is a highly abundant, heritable but reversible chemical modification to the genome. Herein, a machine learning approach was applied to analyze the accumulation of epigenetic marks in methylomes of 152 ecotypes and 85 silencing mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. In an information-thermodynamics framework, two measurements were used: (1) the amount of information gained/lost with the CDM changes I R and (2) the uncertainty of not observing a SNP L C R . We hypothesize that epigenetic marks are chromosomal footprints accounting for different ontogenetic and phylogenetic histories of individual populations. A machine learning approach is proposed to verify this hypothesis. Results support the hypothesis by the existence of discriminatory information (DI) patterns of CDM able to discriminate between individuals and between individual subpopulations. The statistical analyses revealed a strong association between the topologies of the structured population of Arabidopsis ecotypes based on I R and on LCR, respectively. A statistical-physical relationship between I R and L C R was also found. Results to date imply that the genome-wide distribution of CDM changes is not only part of the biological signal created by the methylation regulatory machinery, but ensures the stability of the DNA molecule, preserving the integrity of the genetic message under continuous stress from thermal fluctuations in the cell environment. PMID:27322251

  2. Imputing Phenotypes for Genome-wide Association Studies.

    PubMed

    Hormozdiari, Farhad; Kang, Eun Yong; Bilow, Michael; Ben-David, Eyal; Vulpe, Chris; McLachlan, Stela; Lusis, Aldons J; Han, Buhm; Eskin, Eleazar

    2016-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have been successful in detecting variants correlated with phenotypes of clinical interest. However, the power to detect these variants depends on the number of individuals whose phenotypes are collected, and for phenotypes that are difficult to collect, the sample size might be insufficient to achieve the desired statistical power. The phenotype of interest is often difficult to collect, whereas surrogate phenotypes or related phenotypes are easier to collect and have already been collected in very large samples. This paper demonstrates how we take advantage of these additional related phenotypes to impute the phenotype of interest or target phenotype and then perform association analysis. Our approach leverages the correlation structure between phenotypes to perform the imputation. The correlation structure can be estimated from a smaller complete dataset for which both the target and related phenotypes have been collected. Under some assumptions, the statistical power can be computed analytically given the correlation structure of the phenotypes used in imputation. In addition, our method can impute the summary statistic of the target phenotype as a weighted linear combination of the summary statistics of related phenotypes. Thus, our method is applicable to datasets for which we have access only to summary statistics and not to the raw genotypes. We illustrate our approach by analyzing associated loci to triglycerides (TGs), body mass index (BMI), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort dataset. PMID:27292110

  3. Genome-Wide Association Studies of the Human Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Emily R.; Cusanovich, Darren A.; Michelini, Katelyn; Barreiro, Luis B.; Ober, Carole; Gilad, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial composition of the human fecal microbiome is influenced by many lifestyle factors, notably diet. It is less clear, however, what role host genetics plays in dictating the composition of bacteria living in the gut. In this study, we examined the association of ~200K host genotypes with the relative abundance of fecal bacterial taxa in a founder population, the Hutterites, during two seasons (n = 91 summer, n = 93 winter, n = 57 individuals collected in both). These individuals live and eat communally, minimizing variation due to environmental exposures, including diet, which could potentially mask small genetic effects. Using a GWAS approach that takes into account the relatedness between subjects, we identified at least 8 bacterial taxa whose abundances were associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the host genome in each season (at genome-wide FDR of 20%). For example, we identified an association between a taxon known to affect obesity (genus Akkermansia) and a variant near PLD1, a gene previously associated with body mass index. Moreover, we replicate a previously reported association from a quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping study of fecal microbiome abundance in mice (genus Lactococcus, rs3747113, P = 3.13 x 10−7). Finally, based on the significance distribution of the associated microbiome QTLs in our study with respect to chromatin accessibility profiles, we identified tissues in which host genetic variation may be acting to influence bacterial abundance in the gut. PMID:26528553

  4. Quality Control Procedures for Genome Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Stephen; Armstrong, Loren L.; Bradford, Yuki; Carlson, Christopher S.; Crawford, Dana C.; Crenshaw, Andrew T.; de Andrade, Mariza; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Hayes, Geoffrey; Jarvik, Gail; Jiang, Lan; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Li, Rongling; Ling, Hua; Manolio, Teri A.; Matsumoto, Martha; McCarty, Catherine A.; McDavid, Andrew N.; Mirel, Daniel B.; Paschall, Justin E.; Pugh, Elizabeth W.; Rasmussen, Luke V.; Wilke, Russell A.; Zuvich, Rebecca L.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are being conducted at an unprecedented rate in population-based cohorts and have increased our understanding of the pathophysiology of complex disease. The recent application of GWAS to clinic-based cohorts has also yielded genetic predictors of clinical outcomes. Regardless of context, the practical utility of this information will ultimately depend upon the quality of the original data. Quality control (QC) procedures for GWAS are computationally intensive, operationally challenging, and constantly evolving. With each new dataset, new realities are discovered about GWAS data and best practices continue to be developed. The Genomics Workgroup of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) funded electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) network has invested considerable effort in developing strategies for QC of these data. The lessons learned by this group will be valuable for other investigators dealing with large scale genomic datasets. Here we enumerate some of the challenges in QC of GWAS data and describe the approaches that the eMERGE network is using for quality assurance in GWAS data, thereby minimizing potential bias and error in GWAS results. In this protocol we discuss common issues associated with QC of GWAS data, including data file formats, software packages for data manipulation and analysis, sex chromosome anomalies, sample identity, sample relatedness, population substructure, batch effects, and marker quality. We propose best practices and discuss areas of ongoing and future research. PMID:21234875

  5. Insights into kidney diseases from genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Over the past decade, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have considerably improved our understanding of the genetic basis of kidney function and disease. Population-based studies, used to investigate traits that define chronic kidney disease (CKD), have identified >50 genomic regions in which common genetic variants associate with estimated glomerular filtration rate or urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Case-control studies, used to study specific CKD aetiologies, have yielded risk loci for specific kidney diseases such as IgA nephropathy and membranous nephropathy. In this Review, we summarize important findings from GWAS and clinical and experimental follow-up studies. We also compare risk allele frequency, effect sizes, and specificity in GWAS of CKD-defining traits and GWAS of specific CKD aetiologies and the implications for study design. Genomic regions identified in GWAS of CKD-defining traits can contain causal genes for monogenic kidney diseases. Population-based research on kidney function traits can therefore generate insights into more severe forms of kidney diseases. Experimental follow-up studies have begun to identify causal genes and variants, which are potential therapeutic targets, and suggest mechanisms underlying the high allele frequency of causal variants. GWAS are thus a useful approach to advance knowledge in nephrology. PMID:27477491

  6. Reconstructing Roma History from Genome-Wide Data

    PubMed Central

    Moorjani, Priya; Patterson, Nick; Loh, Po-Ru; Lipson, Mark; Kisfali, Péter; Melegh, Bela I.; Bonin, Michael; Kádaši, Ľudevít; Rieß, Olaf; Berger, Bonnie; Reich, David; Melegh, Béla

    2013-01-01

    The Roma people, living throughout Europe and West Asia, are a diverse population linked by the Romani language and culture. Previous linguistic and genetic studies have suggested that the Roma migrated into Europe from South Asia about 1,000–1,500 years ago. Genetic inferences about Roma history have mostly focused on the Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA. To explore what additional information can be learned from genome-wide data, we analyzed data from six Roma groups that we genotyped at hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We estimate that the Roma harbor about 80% West Eurasian ancestry–derived from a combination of European and South Asian sources–and that the date of admixture of South Asian and European ancestry was about 850 years before present. We provide evidence for Eastern Europe being a major source of European ancestry, and North-west India being a major source of the South Asian ancestry in the Roma. By computing allele sharing as a measure of linkage disequilibrium, we estimate that the migration of Roma out of the Indian subcontinent was accompanied by a severe founder event, which appears to have been followed by a major demographic expansion after the arrival in Europe. PMID:23516520

  7. Assessing Predictive Properties of Genome-Wide Selection in Soybeans

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Alencar; Muir, William M.; Rainey, Katy Martin

    2016-01-01

    Many economically important traits in plant breeding have low heritability or are difficult to measure. For these traits, genomic selection has attractive features and may boost genetic gains. Our goal was to evaluate alternative scenarios to implement genomic selection for yield components in soybean (Glycine max L. merr). We used a nested association panel with cross validation to evaluate the impacts of training population size, genotyping density, and prediction model on the accuracy of genomic prediction. Our results indicate that training population size was the factor most relevant to improvement in genome-wide prediction, with greatest improvement observed in training sets up to 2000 individuals. We discuss assumptions that influence the choice of the prediction model. Although alternative models had minor impacts on prediction accuracy, the most robust prediction model was the combination of reproducing kernel Hilbert space regression and BayesB. Higher genotyping density marginally improved accuracy. Our study finds that breeding programs seeking efficient genomic selection in soybeans would best allocate resources by investing in a representative training set. PMID:27317786

  8. Optical mapping discerns genome wide DNA methylation profiles

    PubMed Central

    Ananiev, Gene E; Goldstein, Steve; Runnheim, Rod; Forrest, Dan K; Zhou, Shiguo; Potamousis, Konstantinos; Churas, Chris P; Bergendahl, Veit; Thomson, James A; Schwartz, David C

    2008-01-01

    Background Methylation of CpG dinucleotides is a fundamental mechanism of epigenetic regulation in eukaryotic genomes. Development of methods for rapid genome wide methylation profiling will greatly facilitate both hypothesis and discovery driven research in the field of epigenetics. In this regard, a single molecule approach to methylation profiling offers several unique advantages that include elimination of chemical DNA modification steps and PCR amplification. Results A single molecule approach is presented for the discernment of methylation profiles, based on optical mapping. We report results from a series of pilot studies demonstrating the capabilities of optical mapping as a platform for methylation profiling of whole genomes. Optical mapping was used to discern the methylation profile from both an engineered and wild type Escherichia coli. Furthermore, the methylation status of selected loci within the genome of human embryonic stem cells was profiled using optical mapping. Conclusion The optical mapping platform effectively detects DNA methylation patterns. Due to single molecule detection, optical mapping offers significant advantages over other technologies. This advantage stems from obviation of DNA modification steps, such as bisulfite treatment, and the ability of the platform to assay repeat dense regions within mammalian genomes inaccessible to techniques using array-hybridization technologies. PMID:18667073

  9. Genome-wide significant risk associations for mucinous ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kelemen, Linda E.; Lawrenson, Kate; Tyrer, Jonathan; Li, Qiyuan; M. Lee, Janet; Seo, Ji-Heui; Phelan, Catherine M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqin; Spindler, Tassja J.; Aben, Katja K.H.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Baker, Helen; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Y. Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Dürst, Matthias; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T.; Edwards, Robert P.; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B.; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Grownwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Narod, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Wlodzimierz, Sawicki; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H.; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Sellers, Thomas A.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D.; Gayther, Simon A.; Berchuck, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several risk associations for ovarian carcinomas (OC) but not for mucinous ovarian carcinomas (MOC). Genotypes from OC cases and controls were imputed into the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel. Analysis of 1,644 MOC cases and 21,693 controls identified three novel risk associations: rs752590 at 2q13 (P = 3.3 × 10−8), rs711830 at 2q31.1 (P = 7.5 × 10−12) and rs688187 at 19q13.2 (P = 6.8 × 10−13). Expression Quantitative Trait Locus (eQTL) analysis in ovarian and colorectal tumors (which are histologically similar to MOC) identified significant eQTL associations for HOXD9 at 2q31.1 in ovarian (P = 4.95 × 10−4, FDR = 0.003) and colorectal (P = 0.01, FDR = 0.09) tumors, and for PAX8 at 2q13 in colorectal tumors (P = 0.03, FDR = 0.09). Chromosome conformation capture analysis identified interactions between the HOXD9 promoter and risk SNPs at 2q31.1. Overexpressing HOXD9 in MOC cells augmented the neoplastic phenotype. These findings provide the first evidence for MOC susceptibility variants and insights into the underlying biology of the disease. PMID:26075790

  10. Genome-Wide Mapping of Yeast RNA Polymerase II Termination

    PubMed Central

    Schaughency, Paul; Merran, Jonathan; Corden, Jeffry L.

    2014-01-01

    Yeast RNA polymerase II (Pol II) terminates transcription of coding transcripts through the polyadenylation (pA) pathway and non-coding transcripts through the non-polyadenylation (non-pA) pathway. We have used PAR-CLIP to map the position of Pol II genome-wide in living yeast cells after depletion of components of either the pA or non-pA termination complexes. We show here that Ysh1, responsible for cleavage at the pA site, is required for efficient removal of Pol II from the template. Depletion of Ysh1 from the nucleus does not, however, lead to readthrough transcription. In contrast, depletion of the termination factor Nrd1 leads to widespread runaway elongation of non-pA transcripts. Depletion of Sen1 also leads to readthrough at non-pA terminators, but in contrast to Nrd1, this readthrough is less processive, or more susceptible to pausing. The data presented here provide delineation of in vivo Pol II termination regions and highlight differences in the sequences that signal termination of different classes of non-pA transcripts. PMID:25299594

  11. Reconstructing Roma history from genome-wide data.

    PubMed

    Moorjani, Priya; Patterson, Nick; Loh, Po-Ru; Lipson, Mark; Kisfali, Péter; Melegh, Bela I; Bonin, Michael; Kádaši, Ludevít; Rieß, Olaf; Berger, Bonnie; Reich, David; Melegh, Béla

    2013-01-01

    The Roma people, living throughout Europe and West Asia, are a diverse population linked by the Romani language and culture. Previous linguistic and genetic studies have suggested that the Roma migrated into Europe from South Asia about 1,000-1,500 years ago. Genetic inferences about Roma history have mostly focused on the Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA. To explore what additional information can be learned from genome-wide data, we analyzed data from six Roma groups that we genotyped at hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We estimate that the Roma harbor about 80% West Eurasian ancestry-derived from a combination of European and South Asian sources-and that the date of admixture of South Asian and European ancestry was about 850 years before present. We provide evidence for Eastern Europe being a major source of European ancestry, and North-west India being a major source of the South Asian ancestry in the Roma. By computing allele sharing as a measure of linkage disequilibrium, we estimate that the migration of Roma out of the Indian subcontinent was accompanied by a severe founder event, which appears to have been followed by a major demographic expansion after the arrival in Europe. PMID:23516520

  12. Genome-Wide Specific Selection in Three Domestic Sheep Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jiaxve; Wu, Mingming; Ma, Xiaomeng; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Ruizao; Zhao, Fuping; Wei, Caihong; Du, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Background Commercial sheep raised for mutton grow faster than traditional Chinese sheep breeds. Here, we aimed to evaluate genetic selection among three different types of sheep breed: two well-known commercial mutton breeds and one indigenous Chinese breed. Results We first combined locus-specific branch lengths and di statistical methods to detect candidate regions targeted by selection in the three different populations. The results showed that the genetic distances reached at least medium divergence for each pairwise combination. We found these two methods were highly correlated, and identified many growth-related candidate genes undergoing artificial selection. For production traits, APOBR and FTO are associated with body mass index. For meat traits, ALDOA, STK32B and FAM190A are related to marbling. For reproduction traits, CCNB2 and SLC8A3 affect oocyte development. We also found two well-known genes, GHR (which affects meat production and quality) and EDAR (associated with hair thickness) were associated with German mutton merino sheep. Furthermore, four genes (POL, RPL7, MSL1 and SHISA9) were associated with pre-weaning gain in our previous genome-wide association study. Conclusions Our results indicated that combine locus-specific branch lengths and di statistical approaches can reduce the searching ranges for specific selection. And we got many credible candidate genes which not only confirm the results of previous reports, but also provide a suite of novel candidate genes in defined breeds to guide hybridization breeding. PMID:26083354

  13. Genome-wide association study of aggressive behaviour in chicken

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenhui; Zheng, Ming; Abdalla, Bahareldin Ali; Zhang, Zhe; Xu, Zhenqiang; Ye, Qiao; Xu, Haiping; Luo, Wei; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-01-01

    In the poultry industry, aggressive behaviour is a large animal welfare issue all over the world. To date, little is known about the underlying genetics of the aggressive behaviour. Here, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to explore the genetic mechanism associated with aggressive behaviour in chickens. The GWAS results showed that a total of 33 SNPs were associated with aggressive behaviour traits (P < 4.6E-6). rs312463697 on chromosome 4 was significantly associated with aggression (P = 2.10905E-07), and it was in the intron region of the sortilin-related VPS10 domain containing receptor 2 (SORCS2) gene. In addition, biological function analysis of the nearest 26 genes around the significant SNPs was performed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. An interaction network contained 17 genes was obtained and SORCS2 was involved in this network, interacted with nerve growth factor (NGF), nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR), dopa decarboxylase (L-dopa) and dopamine. After knockdown of SORCS2, the mRNA levels of NGF, L-dopa and dopamine receptor genes DRD1, DRD2, DRD3 and DRD4 were significantly decreased (P < 0.05). In summary, our data indicated that SORCS2 might play an important role in chicken aggressive behaviour through the regulation of dopaminergic pathways and NGF. PMID:27485826

  14. A SUPER Powerful Method for Genome Wide Association Study

    PubMed C